WorldWideScience

Sample records for fire management assistance

  1. 78 FR 14740 - Disaster Assistance; Fire Management Assistance Grant (FMAG) Program-Deadline Extensions and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Parts 204 and 206 RIN 1660-AA78 Disaster Assistance; Fire Management Assistance Grant (FMAG) Program--Deadline Extensions and Administrative Corrections... longer necessary. The Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 established the Fire Management Assistance Grant...

  2. 44 CFR 204.23 - Processing a request for a fire management assistance declaration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ASSISTANCE GRANT PROGRAM Declaration Process § 204.23 Processing a request for a fire management assistance... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Processing a request for a fire management assistance declaration. 204.23 Section 204.23 Emergency Management and...

  3. 75 FR 50713 - Procedural Changes to the Fire Management Assistance Declaration Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 204 RIN-1660-AA72 Procedural Changes to the Fire... Management Assistance Grant Program regulations to reflect a change in the internal delegation of authority for fire management assistance declarations, and resulting internal procedural changes that are...

  4. 75 FR 55341 - Recovery Policy, RP 9523.6, Mutual Aid Agreements for Public Assistance and Fire Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Recovery Policy, RP 9523.6, Mutual Aid Agreements for Public... comments on Recovery Policy, RP 9523.6, Mutual Aid Agreements for Public Assistance and Fire Management Assistance. This is an existing policy that is scheduled for review to ensure that Recovery...

  5. Fire Management Species Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of the Fire Management Species Profile project is to identify habitat management objectives that are specific, measurable, achievable, clearly...

  6. Fire Management Plan 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan considers fire on Erie as a tool for management and as a potential problem to be dealt with. This document discusses environmental impacts and alternatives...

  7. A national cohesive wildland fire management strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest Service U.S. Department of Agriculture; Office of Wildland Fire Coordination. Department of the Interior

    2011-01-01

    Addressing wildfire is not simply a fire management, fire operations, or wildland-urban interface problem - it is a larger, more complex land management and societal issue. The vision for the next century is to: Safely and effectively extinguish fire, when needed; use fire where allowable; manage our natural resources; and as a Nation, live with wildland fire. Three...

  8. Fire management and invasive plants- A handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Matthew L.; Lusk, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Fire management can help maintain natural habitats, increase forage for wildlife, reduce fuel loads that might otherwise lead to catastrophic wildfire, and maintain natural succession. Today, there is an emerging challenge that fire managers need to be aware of: invasive plants. Fire management activities can create ideal opportunities for invasions by nonnative plants, potentially undermining the benefits of fire management actions. This manual provides practical guidelines that fire managers should consider with respect to invasive plants.

  9. Fire Management Plan and Environmental Assessment 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Fire Management Plan outlines and details all of the refuge objectives for prescribed burns for the 1991 calendar year. It includes new fire management...

  10. Systems thinking and wildland fire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew P. Thompson; Christopher J. Dunn; David E. Calkin

    2017-01-01

    A changing climate, changing development and land use patterns, and increasing pressures on ecosystem services raise global concerns over growing losses associated with wildland fires. New management paradigms acknowledge that fire is inevitable and often uncontrollable, and focus on living with fire rather than attempting to eliminate it from the landscape. A notable...

  11. Fire management of California shrubland landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E.

    2002-01-01

    Fire management of California shrublands has been heavily influenced by policies designed for coniferous forests, however, fire suppression has not effectively excluded fire from chaparral and coastal sage scrub landscapes and catastrophic wildfires are not the result of unnatural fuel accumulation. There is no evidence that prescribed burning in these shrublands provides any resource benefit and in some areas may negatively impact shrublands by increasing fire frequency. Therefore, fire hazard reduction is the primary justification for prescription burning, but it is doubtful that rotational burning to create landscape age mosaics is a cost effective method of controlling catastrophic wildfires. There are problems with prescription burning in this crown-fire ecosystem that are not shared by forests with a natural surface-fire regime. Prescription weather conditions preclude burning at rotation intervals sufficient to effect the control of fires ignited under severe weather conditions. Fire management should focus on strategic placement of prescription burns to both insure the most efficient fire hazard reduction and to minimize the amount of landscape exposed to unnaturally high fire frequency. A major contributor to increased fire suppression costs and increased loss of property and lives is the continued urban sprawl into wildlands naturally subjected to high intensity crown fires. Differences in shrubland fire history suggest there may be a need for different fire management tactics between central coastal and southern California. Much less is known about shrubland fire history in the Sierra Nevada foothills and interior North Coast Ranges, and thus it would be prudent to not transfer these ideas too broadly across the range of chaparral until we have a clearer understanding of the extent of regional variation in shrubland fire regimes.

  12. Fire management of California shrubland landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E

    2002-03-01

    Fire management of California shrublands has been heavily influenced by policies designed for coniferous forests, however, fire suppression has not effectively excluded fire from chaparral and coastal sage scrub landscapes and catastrophic wildfires are not the result of unnatural fuel accumulation. There is no evidence that prescribed burning in these shrublands provides any resource benefit and in some areas may negatively impact shrublands by increasing fire frequency. Therefore, fire hazard reduction is the primary justification for prescription burning, but it is doubtful that rotational burning to create landscape age mosaics is a cost effective method of controlling catastrophic wildfires. There are problems with prescription burning in this crown-fire ecosystem that are not shared by forests with a natural surface-fire regime. Prescription weather conditions preclude burning at rotation intervals sufficient to effect the control of fires ignited under severe weather conditions. Fire management should focus on strategic placement of prescription burns to both insure the most efficient fire hazard reduction and to minimize the amount of landscape exposed to unnaturally high fire frequency. A major contributor to increased fire suppression costs and increased loss of property and lives is the continued urban sprawl into wildlands naturally subjected to high intensity crown fires. Differences in shrubland fire history suggest there may be a need for different fire management tactics between central coastal and southern California. Much less is known about shrubland fire history in the Sierra Nevada foothills and interior North Coast Ranges, and thus it would be prudent to not transfer these ideas too broadly across the range of chaparral until we have a clearer understanding of the extent of regional variation in shrubland fire regimes.

  13. Fire management plan Modoc National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this plan is to initiate the integrated program of fire management. Component management actions will include suppression (including the appropriate...

  14. Fault Management Assistant (FMA) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — S&K Aerospace (SKA) proposes to develop the Fault Management Assistant (FMA) to aid project managers and fault management engineers in developing better and more...

  15. Artificial Intelligence Applications to Fire Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don J. Latham

    1987-01-01

    Artificial intelligence could be used in Forest Service fire management and land-use planning to a larger degree than is now done. Robots, for example, could be programmed to monitor for fire and insect activity, to keep track of wildlife, and to do elementary thinking about the environment. Catching up with the fast-changing technology is imperative.

  16. Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge Fire Management Plan 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Department of the Interior fire management policy requires that all national wildlife refuges with vegetation that can sustain fire have a Fire Management Plan...

  17. Fire Management Plan : Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and the Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Ottawa NWR Fire Management Plan. A description of...

  18. Interagency Agreement for Wildland Fire Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objectives of this Master Cooperative Wildland Fire Management Agreement are to provide a basis for cooperation among the agencies on all aspects of wildland...

  19. Santee National Wildlife Refuge Fire Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this Fire Management Plan is to provide objectives and guidelines for managingthe 15,095 acres of the Santee National Wildlife Refuge. This plan will...

  20. A decision support system for managing forest fire casualties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonazountas, Marc; Kallidromitou, Despina; Kassomenos, Pavlos; Passas, Nikos

    2007-09-01

    Southern Europe is exposed to anthropogenic and natural forest fires. These result in loss of lives, goods and infrastructure, but also deteriorate the natural environment and degrade ecosystems. The early detection and combating of such catastrophes requires the use of a decision support system (DSS) for emergency management. The current literature reports on a series of efforts aimed to deliver DSSs for the management of the forest fires by utilising technologies like remote sensing and geographical information systems (GIS), yet no integrated system exists. This manuscript presents the results of scientific research aiming to the development of a DSS for managing forest fires. The system provides a series of software tools for the assessment of the propagation and combating of forest fires based on Arc/Info, ArcView, Arc Spatial Analyst, Arc Avenue, and Visual C++ technologies. The system integrates GIS technologies under the same data environment and utilises a common user interface to produce an integrated computer system based on semi-automatic satellite image processing (fuel maps), socio-economic risk modelling and probabilistic models that would serve as a useful tool for forest fire prevention, planning and management. Its performance has been demonstrated via real time up-to-date accurate information on the position and evolution of the fire. The system can assist emergency assessment, management and combating of the incident. A site demonstration and validation has been accomplished for the island of Evoia, Greece, an area particularly vulnerable to forest fires due to its ecological characteristics and prevailing wind patterns.

  1. Comparison of crown fire modeling systems used in three fire management applications

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, J. H.

    2006-01-01

    The relative behavior of surface-crown fire spread rate modeling systems used in three fire management applications—CFIS (Crown Fire Initiation and Spread), FlamMap and NEXUS— is compared using fire environment characteristics derived from a dataset of destructively measured canopy fuel and associated stand characteristics. Although the surface-crown modeling systems predict the same basic fire behavior characteristics (type of fire, spread rate) using the same basic fire environment characte...

  2. Managing the risks of risk management on large fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald G. MacGregor; Armando. González-Cabán

    2013-01-01

    Large fires pose risks to a number of important values, including the ecology, property and the lives of incident responders. A relatively unstudied aspect of fire management is the risks to which incident managers are exposed due to organizational and sociopolitical factors that put them in a position of, for example, potential liability or degradation of their image...

  3. South Carolina Low Country Complex Fire Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Fire Management Plan (FMP) is to provide objectives and guidelines formanaging wildland fire (wildfire or prescribed fire) on approximately 99,000...

  4. Decision Support System for Blockage Management in Fire Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasuski Adam

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article we present the foundations of a decision support system for blockage management in Fire Service. Blockage refers to the situation when all fire units are out and a new incident occurs. The approach is based on two phases: off-line data preparation and online blockage estimation. The off-line phase consists of methods from data mining and natural language processing and results in semantically coherent information granules. The online phase is about building the probabilistic models that estimate the block-age probability based on these granules. Finally, the selected classifier judges whether a blockage can occur and whether the resources from neighbour fire stations should be asked for assistance.

  5. Fire Service Emergency Management Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Department 2525 S. Carson Street, 2525 S. Carson Street, Capitol Complex Capital Complex Carson City, NV 89710 Carson City, NV 89710 (702) 887-7302 (702...Training - Twenty-First Floor Capital Plaza Tower Mero Street Frankfurt, KY 40601 (502) 564-2326 Department of Housing, Fire Prevention and Buildings...out cops and their families. Psycology Stisy inhololsesnlictl an reicsit. Nmewrk Meohna Series, .-d loday, 1979, May, 59-62. Pelletier, K.R. Mind as

  6. A fire management simulation model using stochastic arrival times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric L. Smith

    1987-01-01

    Fire management simulation models are used to predict the impact of changes in the fire management program on fire outcomes. As with all models, the goal is to abstract reality without seriously distorting relationships between variables of interest. One important variable of fire organization performance is the length of time it takes to get suppression units to the...

  7. Introduction-2nd Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference: The fire environment-innovations, management, and policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne Cook; Bret W. Butler

    2007-01-01

    The 2nd Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference: Fire Environment -- Innovations, Management and Policy was held in Destin, FL, March 26-30, 2007. Following on the success of the 1st Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference, this conference was initiated in response to the needs of the National Wildfire Coordinating Group -- Fire Environment Working Team.

  8. Support Assistants for Fire Emergencies; Student Manual, Part A. Firefighting for Civil Defense Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Association of Fire Chiefs, New York, NY.

    A manual intended to help fire departments and Civil Defense organizations train people to support regular fire forces during a national emergency is presented. It contains 11 chapters: Introduction, Modern Weapons and Radioactive Fallout, Role of Fire Service in Civil Defense, Local Fire Department Organization, Role of Support Assistants in…

  9. Developing standardized strategic response categories for fire management units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew P. Thompson; Crystal S. Stonesifer; Robert C. Seli; Marlena Hovorka

    2013-01-01

    Federal wildland fire policy requires that publicly owned lands with burnable vegetation have a fire management plan (FMP); this applies to the five primary Federal fire agencies (Bureau of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Forest Service). FMPs are based on land and resource management plans and are...

  10. Principles of effective USA federal fire management plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marc D.; Roberts, Susan L.; Wills, Robin; Brooks, Matthew L.; Winford, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Federal fire management plans are essential implementation guides for the management of wildland fire on federal lands. Recent changes in federal fire policy implementation guidance and fire science information suggest the need for substantial changes in federal fire management plans of the United States. Federal land management agencies are also undergoing land management planning efforts that will initiate revision of fire management plans across the country. Using the southern Sierra Nevada as a case study, we briefly describe the underlying framework of fire management plans, assess their consistency with guiding principles based on current science information and federal policy guidance, and provide recommendations for the development of future fire management plans. Based on our review, we recommend that future fire management plans be: (1) consistent and compatible, (2) collaborative, (3) clear and comprehensive, (4) spatially and temporally scalable, (5) informed by the best available science, and (6) flexible and adaptive. In addition, we identify and describe several strategic guides or “tools” that can enhance these core principles and benefit future fire management plans in the following areas: planning and prioritization, science integration, climate change adaptation, partnerships, monitoring, education and communication, and applied fire management. These principles and tools are essential to successfully realize fire management goals and objectives in a rapidly changing world.

  11. Wildland Fire Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwager, K.; Green, T. M.

    2014-10-01

    The DOE policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas managed by DOE and/or Its various contractors which can sustain fire must have a FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures associated with wildland fire, operational, and prescribed fires. FMPs provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled ''prescribed'' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered, threatened, and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL. The plan will be reviewed periodically to ensure fire program advances and will evolve with the missions of DOE and BNL.

  12. Risk management :A probe and study on forest fires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Jinzhu; FENG Zhongke; JIANG Wei; YANG Xiaoqin

    2007-01-01

    The subject of risk management is attracting more and more attention around the world.The risk of forest fire disasters should be faced and dealt with for forest fires cannot be avoided.Treating forest fire disasters as a risk management issue promotes important measures and methods for fire fighters to prevent,reduce and control the risks of forest fires.In this paper,the risk concept andrisk connotation as well as the management risks for forest fire suppression are discussed clearly.Issues such as risk judgments,risk analysis,risk control and the assessment of risk,including their contents and corresponding methods are clarified.

  13. 25 CFR 163.28 - Fire management measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... as a management tool on Indian land to achieve land and/or resource management objectives. ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fire management measures. 163.28 Section 163.28 Indians... Management and Operations § 163.28 Fire management measures. (a) The Secretary is authorized to...

  14. Wildfire Prediction to Inform Fire Management: Statistical Science Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, S W; Dean, C B; Martell, David L

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire is an important system process of the earth that occurs across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. A variety of methods have been used to predict wildfire phenomena during the past century to better our understanding of fire processes and to inform fire and land management decision-making. Statistical methods have an important role in wildfire prediction due to the inherent stochastic nature of fire phenomena at all scales. Predictive models have exploited several sources of data describing fire phenomena. Experimental data are scarce; observational data are dominated by statistics compiled by government fire management agencies, primarily for administrative purposes and increasingly from remote sensing observations. Fires are rare events at many scales. The data describing fire phenomena can be zero-heavy and nonstationary over both space and time. Users of fire modeling methodologies are mainly fire management agencies often working under great time constraints, thus, complex models have t...

  15. Fire Management Plan Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Fire Management Plan for Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge was developed to provide direction and continuity in operational procedures to guide all fire...

  16. Smokey comes of age: Unmanned aerial systems for fire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twidwell, Dirac; Allen, Craig R.; Detweiler , Carrick; Higgins, James; Laney, Christian; Elbaum, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    During the past century, fire management has focused on techniques both to protect human communities from catastrophic wildfire and to maintain fire-dependent ecological systems. However, despite a large and increasing allocation of resources and personnel to achieve these goals, fire management objectives at regional to global scales are not being met. Current fire management techniques are clearly inadequate for the challenges faced by fire managers, and technological innovations are needed. Advances in unmanned aerial systems (UAS) technology provide opportunities for innovation in fire management and science. In many countries, fire management organizations are beginning to explore the potential of UAS for monitoring fires. We have taken the next step and developed a prototype that can precisely ignite fires as part of wildfire suppression tactics or prescribed fires (fire intentionally ignited within predetermined conditions to reduce hazardous fuels, improve habitat, or mitigate for large wildfires). We discuss the potential for these technologies to benefit fire management activities, while acknowledging the sizeable sociopolitical barriers that prevent their immediate broad application.

  17. The Fire Effects Information System - serving managers since before the Yellowstone fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane Kapler Smith; Janet L. Fryer; Kristin Zouhar

    2009-01-01

    This presentation will describe the current status of the Fire Effects Information System (FEIS) and explore lessons learned from this 23-yearold project about the application of science to fire management issues. FEIS contains literature reviews covering biology and fire ecology for approximately 1,100 species in North America: plants and animals, native and nonnative...

  18. Wildland Fire Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green,T.

    2009-10-23

    This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) updates the 2003 plan incorporating changes necessary to comply with DOE Order 450.1 and DOE P 450.4, Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy and Program Review; Wildland and Prescribed Fire Management Policy and implementation Procedures Reference Guide. This current plan incorporates changes since the original draft of the FMP that result from new policies on the national level. This update also removes references and dependence on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and Department of the Interior, fully transitioning Wildland Fire Management responsibilities to BNL. The Department of Energy policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas, managed by the DOE and/or its various contractors, that can sustain fire must have a FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures associated with wild fire, operational, and prescribed fires. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, 'prescribed' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered, threatened, and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of the DOE and BNL. This Fire Management Plan is presented in a format that coverers all aspects specified by DOE guidance documents which are based on the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. This FMP is to be used and implemented for the

  19. Managing the human component of fire regimes: lessons from Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Sally

    2016-06-05

    Human impacts on fire regimes accumulated slowly with the evolution of modern humans able to ignite fires and manipulate landscapes. Today, myriad voices aim to influence fire in grassy ecosystems to different ends, and this is complicated by a colonial past focused on suppressing fire and preventing human ignitions. Here, I review available evidence on the impacts of people on various fire characteristics such as the number and size of fires, fire intensity, fire frequency and seasonality of fire in African grassy ecosystems, with the intention of focusing the debate and identifying areas of uncertainty. Humans alter seasonal patterns of fire in grassy systems but tend to decrease total fire emissions: livestock have replaced fire as the dominant consumer in many parts of Africa, and fragmented landscapes reduce area burned. Humans alter the season and time of day when fires occur, with important implications for fire intensity, tree-grass dynamics and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Late season fires are more common when fire is banned or illegal: these later fires are far more intense but emit fewer GHGs. The types of fires which preserve human livelihoods and biodiversity are not always aligned with the goal of reducing GHG concentrations. Current fire management challenges therefore involve balancing the needs of a large rural population against national and global perspectives on the desirability of different types of fire, but this cannot happen unless the interests of all parties are equally represented. In the future, Africa is expected to urbanize and land use to intensify, which will imply different trajectories for the continent's fire regimes.This article is part of the themed issue 'The interaction of fire and mankind.

  20. Integrating fire behavior models and geospatial analysis for wildland fire risk assessment and fuel management planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan A. Ager; Nicole M. Vaillant; Mark A. Finney

    2011-01-01

    Wildland fire risk assessment and fuel management planning on federal lands in the US are complex problems that require state-of-the-art fire behavior modeling and intensive geospatial analyses. Fuel management is a particularly complicated process where the benefits and potential impacts of fuel treatments must be demonstrated in the context of land management goals...

  1. Studying fire mitigation strategies in multi-ownership landscapes: balancing the management of fire-dependent ecosystems and fire risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian R. Sturtevant; Brian R. Miranda; Jian Yang; Hong S. He; Eric J. Gustafson; Robert M. Scheller

    2009-01-01

    Public forests are surrounded by land over which agency managers have no control, and whose owners expect the public forest to be a "good neighbor." Fire risk abatement on multi-owner landscapes containing flammable but fire-dependent ecosystems epitomizes the complexities of managing public lands. We report a case study that applies a landscape disturbance...

  2. An empirical machine learning method for predicting potential fire control locations for pre-fire planning and operational fire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher D. O' Connor; David E. Calkin; Matthew P. Thompson

    2017-01-01

    During active fire incidents, decisions regarding where and how to safely and effectively deploy resources to meet management objectives are often made under rapidly evolving conditions, with limited time to assess management strategies or for development of backup plans if initial efforts prove unsuccessful. Under all but the most extreme fire weather conditions,...

  3. FEMME- post-Fire Emergency ManageMEnt tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Diana; Serpa, Dalila; Rocha, João; Nunes, João; Keizer, Jacob

    2017-04-01

    Wildfires can have important impacts on hydrological and soil erosion processes in forest catchments, due to the destruction of vegetation cover and changes to soil properties. The involved processes however, are non-linear and not fully understood. This has severely limited the understanding on the impacts of wildfires, and, as a consequence, current runoff-erosion models are poorly adapted to recently burned forest conditions. Furthermore, while post-fire forestry operations and, to a lesser extent, post-fire soil conservation measures are commonly applied, their hydrological and erosion impacts continue poorly known, hampering decision-making by land owners and managers. Past post-wildfire research in Portugal has involved simple adaptations of plot-scale runoff-erosion models to post-fire conditions. This follow-up study focusses on model adaptation to selected post-fire soil conservation measures. To this end, full stock is taken of various datasets collected by several (past and ongoing research projects. The selected model is the Morgan-Morgan-Finney model (MMF, Morgan,2001), which already proved its suitability for post-fire conditions in Portugal (Vieira et al, 2010, 2014) as well as NW-Spain ( Fernández et al., 2010). The present results concerned runoff and erosion different burn severities and various post-fire mitigation treatments (mulch, hydromulch, needle cast, barriers), focussing on the plot and field scale. The results for both the first and the second year following the wildfire revealed good model efficiency, not only for burned and untreated conditions but also for burned and treated conditions. These results thus reinforced earlier findings that MMF is a suitable model for the envisaged post-fire soil erosion assessment tool, coined "FEMME". The data used for post-fire soil erosion calibration with the MMF already allows the delineation of the post-fire management FEMME tool. Nevertheless, further model assessment will address additional

  4. Satellite remote-sensing technologies used in forest fire management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Xiao-rui; Douglas J. Mcrae; SHU Li-fu; WANG Ming-yu; LI Hong

    2005-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing has become a primary data source for fire danger rating prediction, fuel and fire mapping, fire monitoring, and fire ecology research. This paper summarizes the research achievements in these research fields, and discusses the future trend in the use of satellite remote-sensing techniques in wildfire management. Fuel-type maps from remote-sensing data can now be produced at spatial and temporal scales quite adequate for operational fire management applications. US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellites are being used for fire detection worldwide due to their high temporal resolution and ability to detect fires in remote regions. Results can be quickly presented on many Websites providing a valuable service readily available to fire agency. As cost-effective tools, satellite remote-sensing techniques play an important role in fire mapping. Improved remote-sensing techniques have the potential to date older fire scars and provide estimates of burn severity. Satellite remote sensing is well suited to assessing the extent of biomass burning, a prerequisite for estimating emissions at regional and global scales, which are needed for better understanding the effects of fire on climate change. The types of satellites used in fire research are also discussed in the paper. Suggestions on what remote-sensing efforts should be completed in China to modernize fire management technology in this country are given.

  5. Integrating Fire Behavior Models and Geospatial Analysis for Wildland Fire Risk Assessment and Fuel Management Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan A. Ager

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wildland fire risk assessment and fuel management planning on federal lands in the US are complex problems that require state-of-the-art fire behavior modeling and intensive geospatial analyses. Fuel management is a particularly complicated process where the benefits and potential impacts of fuel treatments must be demonstrated in the context of land management goals and public expectations. A number of fire behavior metrics, including fire spread, intensity, likelihood, and ecological risk must be analyzed for multiple treatment alternatives. The effect of treatments on wildfire impacts must be considered at multiple scales. The process is complicated by the lack of data integration among fire behavior models, and weak linkages to geographic information systems, corporate data, and desktop office software. This paper describes our efforts to build a streamlined fuel management planning and risk assessment framework, and an integrated system of tools for designing and testing fuel treatment programs on fire-prone wildlands.

  6. Evaluating spatially explicit burn probabilities for strategic fire management planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Miller; M.-A. Parisien; A. A. Ager; M. A. Finney

    2008-01-01

    Spatially explicit information on the probability of burning is necessary for virtually all strategic fire and fuels management planning activities, including conducting wildland fire risk assessments, optimizing fuel treatments, and prevention planning. Predictive models providing a reliable estimate of the annual likelihood of fire at each point on the landscape have...

  7. Understanding heterogeneity of social preferences for fire prevention management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varela, Elsa; Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl; Soliño, Mario

    2014-01-01

    studies look at public preferences for fire suppression, this study analyses the heterogeneity of social preferences for fire prevention. The visual characteristics of fire prevention structures are very familiar to respondents, but their management is unfamiliar, which raises specific attention in terms...

  8. 75 FR 40845 - Preventing Deaths and Injuries of Fire Fighters Using Risk Management Principles at Structure Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... Fighters Using Risk Management Principles at Structure Fires AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational... Fire Fighters Using Risk Management Principles at Structure Fires.'' The final document can be found at.... Established fire service risk management principles suggest that caution should be exercised in abandoned...

  9. Avian community responses to post-fire forest structure: implications for fire management in mixed conifer forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angela White; Patricia Manley; Gina Tarbill; T. W. Richardson; R. E. Russell; H. D. Safford; S. Z. Dobrowski

    2016-01-01

    Fire is a natural process and the dominant disturbance shaping plant and animal communities in many coniferous forests of the western US. Given that fire size and severity are predicted to increase in the future, it has become increasingly important to understand how wildlife responds to fire and post-fire management. The Angora Fire...

  10. WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION

    2003-09-01

    This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) and the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve) is based on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) fire management planning procedures and was developed in cooperation with the Department of Energy (DOE) by Brookhaven Science Associates. As the Upton Reserve is contained within the BNL 5,265-acre site, it is logical that the plan applies to both the Upton Reserve and BNL. The Department of the Interior policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas managed by FWS that can sustain fire must have an FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures and specifies values to be protected or enhanced. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, ''prescribed'' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL/Upton Reserve Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered and threatened species and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL and the Upton Reserve. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of FWS, BNL, and the Upton Reserve. This Fire Management Plan is a modified version of the Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex Fire plan (updated in 2000), which contains all FWS fire plan requirements and is presented in the format specified by the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. FWS shall be, through an Interagency Agreement dated November 2000 (Appendix C), responsible for coordinating and

  11. An investigation into the fire safety management of historic buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Kincaid, Simon

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a research project which considered the issues surrounding fire safety management in historic buildings. The main aim was to establish to what extent having a robust fire safety management regime might stand as an alternative to physical measures in achieving a satisfactory level of fire safety. In order to do this, a research method focusing on qualitative methods and aiming to gain an in-depth understanding of the issues was adopted. Secondary data was ga...

  12. Investigation of Fire Safety Awareness and Management in Mall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rahim N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In spite of having sufficient fire safety system installed in buildings, the incidence of fire hazard becomes the furthermost and supreme threat to health and safety, as well as property to any community. In order to make sure that the safety of the building and its users, the fundamental features depends on the fire precaution system and equipment which should be according to the standard requirements. Nevertheless, the awareness on fire safety could necessarily alleviate the damages or rate of fatality during the event of fire. This paper presents the results on the investigation of fire safety awareness and management, concentrating on shopping mall. The endeavour of this study is to explore the level of fire safety knowledge of the users in the mall, and to study the effectiveness level of fire safety management in a mall. From the study, public awareness is highly related to understanding human behaviour and their personal background. The respondents’ levels of awareness are rather low, which reflects on their poor action when facing emergency situation during fire. The most effective methods identified to improve the awareness and effectiveness of fire safety level is through involvement in related fire safety programmes, distribution of pamphlets or brochures on fire safety and appointing specific personnel for Emergency Response Team in the mall.

  13. Seasonal Forecasts of Extreme Conditions for Wildland Fire Management in Alaska using NMME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, U. S.; Bieniek, P.; Thoman, R.; York, A.; Ziel, R.

    2016-12-01

    The summer of 2015 was the second largest Alaska fire season since 1950 where approximately the land area of Massachusetts burned. The record fire year of 2004 resulted in 6.5 million acres burned and was costly from property loss (> 35M) and emergency personnel (> 17M). In addition to requiring significant resources, wildfire smoke impacts air quality in Alaska and downstream into North America. Fires in Alaska result from lightning strikes coupled with persistent (extreme) dry warm conditions in remote areas with limited fire management and the seasonal climate/weather determine the extent of the fire season in Alaska. Fire managers rely on weather/climate outlooks for allocating staff and resources from days to a season in advance. Though currently few tested products are available at the seasonal scale. Probabilistic forecasts of the expected seasonal climate/weather would aid tremendously in the planning process. Advanced knowledge of both lightning and fuel conditions would assist managers in planning resource allocation for the upcoming season. For fuel conditions, the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index System (CFFWIS) has been used since 1992 because it better suits the Alaska fire regime than the standard US National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS). This CFFWIS is based on early afternoon values of 2-m air temperature, relative humidity, and 10-m winds and daily total precipitation. Extremes of these indices and the variables are used to calculate these indices will be defined in reference to fire weather for the boreal forest. The CFFWIS will be applied and evaluated for the NMME hindcasts. This study will evaluate the quality of the forecasts comparing the hindcast NMME CFFWIS to acres burned in Alaska. Spatial synoptic patterns in the NMME related to fire weather extremes will be constructed using self-organized maps and probabilities of occurrence will be evaluated against acres burned.

  14. The Howling Prescribed Natural Fire - long-term effects on the modernization of planning and implementation of wildland fire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom Zimmerman; Laurie Kurth; Mitchell Burgard

    2011-01-01

    Wildland fire management policy and practices have long been driven by the occurrence of significant events. The Howling Prescribed Natural Fire in Glacier National Park in 1994 is a prime example of a significant historical fire event that provided the impetus for program changes and modifications that modernized wildland fire management at the local, regional, and...

  15. A comparison of geospatially modeled fire behavior and fire management utility of three data sources in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaWen T. Hollingsworth; Laurie L. Kurth; Bernard R. Parresol; Roger D. Ottmar; Susan J. Prichard

    2012-01-01

    Landscape-scale fire behavior analyses are important to inform decisions on resource management projects that meet land management objectives and protect values from adverse consequences of fire. Deterministic and probabilistic geospatial fire behavior analyses are conducted with various modeling systems including FARSITE, FlamMap, FSPro, and Large Fire Simulation...

  16. Fire Managment Plan Presquile National Wildlife Refuge 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document establishes a Fire Management Plan for Presquile National Wildlife Refuge. It relates to existing land management policy, however, comprehensive...

  17. Fire Management Review of St. Vincent Island NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Fire Management Review for St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge covers habitat management including: open sand ridges, marshes, pine flatwoods, scrub, and oak...

  18. Human Factors in Fire Safety Management and Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Othuman Mydin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fire protection is the study and practice of mitigating the unwanted effects of potentially destructive fires. It involves the study of the behavior, compartmentalization, and investigation of fire and its related emergencies, as well as the research and development, production, testing and application of mitigating systems. Problems still occurred despite of the adequate fire safety systems installed. For most people in high-risk buildings, not all accidents were caused by them. They were more likely to be the victims of a fire that occurred. Besides damaging their properties and belongings, some people were burned to death for not knowing what to do if fire happens in their place. This paper will present the human factors in fire safety management and prevention system.

  19. Inter-agency collaboration for fire disaster management in Nairobi City

    OpenAIRE

    Alice A. Menya; O.A. K’Akumu

    2016-01-01

    The County Government of Nairobi faces a myriad of capacity challenges that have impeded fire disaster management in the City. This is further compounded by the lack of a comprehensive legal and institutional framework for disaster management in Kenya. Whereas the County Government enlists assistance from other public, private and civil society organizations, the approach employed is skewed towards interagency coordination rather than a collaborative approach. This paper looks at the concept ...

  20. Tending for Cattle: Traditional Fire Management in Ethiopian Montane Heathlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria U. Johansson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Fire has long been a principal tool for manipulating ecosystems, notably for pastoralist cultures, but in modern times, fire use has often been a source of conflicts with state bureaucracies. Despite this, traditional fire management practices have rarely been examined from a perspective of fire behavior and fire effects, which hampers dialogue on management options. In order to analyze the rationale for fire use, its practical handling, and ecological effects in high-elevation ericaceous heathlands in Ethiopia, we used three different information sources: interviews with pastoralists, field observations of fires, and analysis of vegetation age structure at the landscape level. The interviews revealed three primary reasons for burning: increasing the grazing value, controlling a toxic caterpillar, and reducing predator attacks. Informants were well aware of critical factors governing fire behavior, such as slope, wind, vertical and horizontal fuel structure, and fuel moisture. Recent burns (1-4 years since fire were used as firebreaks to control the size of individual burns, which resulted in a mosaic of vegetation of different ages. The age structure indicated an average fire return interval of ~10 years. At these elevations (> 3500 m, the dry period is unreliable, with occasional rains. Of all observed fires, 83% were ignited during very high Fire Weather Index levels, reached during only 11% of all days of the year. Burning is illegal, but if this ban was respected, our data suggest that the Erica shrubs would grow out of reach of cattle within a few years only, creating a dense and continuous canopy. This would also create a risk of large high-intensity wildfires since the landscape is virtually devoid of natural fuel breaks. Under the present management regime, this heathland ecosystem should be quite resilient to degradation by fire due to a relatively slow fuel buildup (limiting fire intervals and an effective regrowth of Erica shoots

  1. Evidence of fuels management and fire weather influencing fire severity in an extreme fire event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydersen, Jamie M; Collins, Brandon M.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Matchett, John R.; Shive, Kristen L.; Povak, Nicholas A.; Kane, Van R.; Smith, Douglas F.

    2017-01-01

    Following changes in vegetation structure and pattern, along with a changing climate, large wildfire incidence has increased in forests throughout the western U.S. Given this increase there is great interest in whether fuels treatments and previous wildfire can alter fire severity patterns in large wildfires. We assessed the relative influence of previous fuels treatments (including wildfire), fire weather, vegetation and water balance on fire severity in the Rim Fire of 2013. We did this at three different spatial scales to investigate whether the influences on fire severity changed across scales. Both fuels treatments and previous low to moderate severity wildfire reduced the prevalence of high severity fire. In general, areas without recent fuels treatments and areas that previously burned at high severity tended to have a greater proportion of high severity fire in the Rim Fire. Areas treated with prescribed fire, especially when combined with thinning, had the lowest proportions of high severity. Proportion of the landscape burned at high severity was most strongly influenced by fire weather and proportional area previously treated for fuels or burned by low to moderate severity wildfire. The proportion treated needed to effectively reduce the amount of high fire severity fire varied by spatial scale of analysis, with smaller spatial scales requiring a greater proportion treated to see an effect on fire severity. When moderate and high severity fire encountered a previously treated area, fire severity was significantly reduced in the treated area relative to the adjacent untreated area. Our results show that fuels treatments and low to moderate severity wildfire can reduce fire severity in a subsequent wildfire, even when burning under fire growth conditions. These results serve as further evidence that both fuels treatments and lower severity wildfire can increase forest resilience.

  2. Fire in Protected Areas - the Effect of Protection and Importance of Fire Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Pereira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Fires are important but socially and economically unwanted disturbances of the ecosystems. They cannot be considered as a problem, they are global phenomena. Protected areas are created to protect biodiversity, and strict protection is often applied, forgetting that fire had shaped that that we aim to protect. This harsh protection is producing important changes in the protected habitats and is increasing their vulnerability to destructive wildfires. Thus, it is of major interest to incorporate fire management in the protected areas plan, including the (reuse of prescribed fire and traditional burning in order to reintroduce fire regimens, fundamental to the landscape sustainability. This incorporation represents an enormous step in the habitats sustainability. Policies should be more focused on fire prevention than on its suppression.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.59.1.856

  3. Wildfire Prediction to Inform Fire Management: Statistical Science Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, S. W.; Douglas G. Woolford; Dean, C. B.; Martell, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire is an important system process of the earth that occurs across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. A variety of methods have been used to predict wildfire phenomena during the past century to better our understanding of fire processes and to inform fire and land management decision-making. Statistical methods have an important role in wildfire prediction due to the inherent stochastic nature of fire phenomena at all scales. ¶ Predictive models have exploited several so...

  4. 7 CFR 1944.547 - Management assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Management assistance. 1944.547 Section 1944.547 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Technical and Supervisory Assistance Grants § 1944.547 Management...

  5. Landscape development, forest fires, and wilderness management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, H E

    1974-11-08

    fire. Major fires occur so often that the vegetation pattern is a record of fire history. All elements in the forest mosaic are in various stages of postfire succession, with only a few approaching climax. Fire interrupts the successful sequence toward climax. Geomorphic and edaphic factors in vegetational distribution are largely submerged by the fire regime, except for bog and other lowland vegetation. Fire recycles nutrients and renews succession. Nevertheless, despite the fire regime, the resulting long-term equilibrium of the forest mosaic, characterized by severe and irregular fluctuations of individual elements, reflects regional climate. In the BWCA and the western mountains, large virgin forests can be preserved for study and wilderness recreation. These wilderness areas must be managed to return them to the natural equilibrium which has been disturbed by 50 to 70 years of fire suppression. The goal should be to maintain virgin forests as primeval wilderness. This can be done by management that permits fire and other natural processes to determine the forest mosaic. Mechanized tree-felling and other human disturbances should be kept to an absolute minimum. Natural landforms also should be preserved for study and for certain nondestructive recreational activities. It is somewhat late for the Colorado River and other rivers of the West, because natural balances are upset by drainagebasin disturbances. Modification of plant cover on hillslopes changes infiltration and erosion rates and thus the stream discharge and sediment load, so the stream balance is altered from primeval conditions. Scenic Rivers legislation should thus be used to restore certain river systems and their drainage basins. Mountain meadows, badlands, desert plains, and patterned permafrost terrain are extremely fragile and sensitive. Intricate stream and weathering processes leave patterns easily obliterated by mechanized vehicles. Tire tracks can last for decades or centuries. The mineral

  6. Crisis management with applicability on fire fighting plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaitescu, M.; Panaitescu, F. V.; Voicu, I.; Dumitrescu, L. G.

    2017-08-01

    The paper presents a case study for a crisis management analysis which address to fire fighting plants. The procedures include the steps of FTA (Failure tree analysis). The purpose of the present paper is to describe this crisis management plan with tools of FTA. The crisis management procedures have applicability on anticipated and emergency situations and help to describe and planning a worst-case scenario plan. For this issue must calculate the probabilities in different situations for fire fighting plants. In the conclusions of paper is analised the block diagram with components of fire fighting plant and are presented the solutions for each possible risk situations.

  7. Landscape-scale fire history studies support fire management action at Bandelier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Craig D.; Touchan, Ramzi; Swetnam, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Fire has long been recognized as a key process determining the ecological structure and function of many southwestern forests (Weaver 1951). Major changes in southwestern fire regimes over the past century (Swetnam 1990) are having correspondingly large ecological effects on southwestern forests, including those of Bandelier National Monument in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico (Allen 1989). Ecologists and managers who seek to understand current landscapes require accurate information on the spatial and temporal variability in past fire regimes. This kind of information provides essential historical context that is needed to properly manage our modern park landscapes.

  8. Variation in fire regimes of the rocky mountains: Implications for avian communities and fire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, V.A.; Powell, H.D.W.; Kotliar, N.B.; Newlon, K.R.

    2005-01-01

    Information about avian responses to fire in the U.S. Rocky Mountains is based solely on studies of crown fires. However, fire management in this region is based primarily on studies of low-elevation ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests maintained largely by frequent understory fires. In contrast to both of these trends, most Rocky Mountain forests are subject to mixed severity fire regimes. As a result, our knowledge of bird responses to fire in the region is incomplete and skewed toward ponderosa pine forests. Research in recent large wildfires across the Rocky Mountains indicates that large burns support diverse avifauna. In the absence of controlled studies of bird responses to fire, we compared reproductive success for six cavity-nesting species using results from studies in burned and unburned habitats. Birds in ponderosa pine forests burned by stand-replacement fire tended to have higher nest success than individuals of the same species in unburned habitats, but unburned areas are needed to serve species dependent upon live woody vegetation, especially foliage gleaners. Over the last century, fire suppression, livestock grazing, and logging altered the structure and composition of many low-elevation forests, leading to larger and more severe burns. In higher elevation forests, changes have been less marked. Traditional low-severity prescribed fire is not likely to replicate historical conditions in these mixed or high-severity fire regimes, which include many mixed coniferous forests and all lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and spruce-fir (Picea-Abies) forests. We suggest four research priorities: (1) the effects of fire severity and patch size on species' responses to fire, (2) the possibility that postfire forests are ephemeral sources for some bird species, (3) the effect of salvage logging prescriptions on bird communities, and (4) experiments that illustrate bird responses to prescribed fire and other forest restoration methods. This research is

  9. Fire Management Plan for Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan considers fire on Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge as a tool for management and as a potential problem to be dealt with. This document discusses...

  10. Fire Management Plan Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan for the Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge will provide guidance on a wide range of fire management activities including preparedness,...

  11. Wildland Fire Management Plan: Great River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document establishes a Fire Management Plan (FMP) for the Great River National Wildlife Refuge and for purposes of this plan includes Clarence Cannon National...

  12. USFWS R1 Fire Management Hazardous Fuels Treatment Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The shapefile was created by Molly Cox, a contract worker with ApTech, Inc. in the fall and winter of 2010 and 2011. National Wildlife Refuge Fire Management staff...

  13. Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge Fire Management Plan 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan considers fire on Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge as a tool for management and as a potential problem to be dealt with. This document discusses...

  14. Fire Management Plan : Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan considers fire on Minnesota Valley NWR as a tool for management and as a potential problem to be dealt with. This document discusses environmental impacts...

  15. Fire Management Plan: Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan considers fire on Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge as a tool for management and as a potential problem to be dealt with. This document discusses...

  16. Wildland fire management plan : Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan considers fire on Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge as a tool for management and as a potential problem to be dealt with. This document discusses...

  17. Fire Management Plan Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan for Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge will provide guidance on a wide range of fire management activities including preparedness,...

  18. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Fire Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan considers fire on Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge as a tool for management and as a potential problem to be dealt with. This document discusses...

  19. Management of fire affected areas. Beyond the environmental question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo

    2016-04-01

    Fire is considered a natural element of the ecosystems. With exception of the polar areas, fire visited with more or less frequency all the earth biomes, determining the ecosystems characteristics, to the point that several species are fire-dependent to survive and are very resilient to their impact. Fire was a fundamental element for human evolution, which allowed us to cook, manipulation of metals, hunt, protect from predators and clear fields for agriculture. In some extension, we are only humans because of fire. In the last millennium fire was used to shape the landscape as we know today. One good example of this is the Mediterranean environment, a landscape where the ecology is not understood without the presence of fire. Until the end of the first half of the last century, fire was used frequently by farmers to landscape management. However, due to rural abandonment, change of life styles, disconnection with rural environment and lack of understanding of fire role in the ecosystems. The perception of fire changed and nowadays is understood by the population as a threat to the ecosystems, rather than a tool that helped to manage the landscape and help us in our evolution. This change of vision promoted the idea that fire has negative impacts in the ecosystems and should be banned from the nature. Something that is impossible. All these perceptions facilitated the implementation of fire-suppression policies, which today are recognized by science as one of the causes of the occurrence of frequent high-severity wildfires, with important impacts on the ecosystems, economy and society. However, most of the ecosystems can regenerate sooner or later, depending of the fire severity and the ecosystem affected. Thus, fire is not an ecological, but social and economic problem, due to lives loss and the temporary destruction of ecosystems, which local communities depend on. In this context, when we are managing fire affected areas, it goes much beyond environmental

  20. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Wildland Fire Management Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irving, John S

    2003-04-01

    DOE prepared an environmental assessment (EA)for wildland fire management activities on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (DOE/EA-1372). The EA was developed to evaluate wildland fire management options for pre-fire, fire suppression, and post fire activities. Those activities have an important role in minimizing the conversion of the native sagebrush steppe ecosystem found on the INEEL to non-native weeds. Four alternative management approaches were analyzed: Alternative 1 - maximum fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 3 - protect infrastructure and personnel; and Alternative 4 - no action/traditional fire protection.

  1. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Wildland Fire Management Environmental Assessment - April 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irving, J.S.

    2003-04-30

    DOE prepared an environmental assessment (EA)for wildland fire management activities on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (DOE/EA-1372). The EA was developed to evaluate wildland fire management options for pre-fire, fire suppression, and post fire activities. Those activities have an important role in minimizing the conversion of the native sagebrush steppe ecosystem found on the INEEL to non-native weeds. Four alternative management approaches were analyzed: Alternative 1 - maximum fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 3 - protect infrastructure and personnel; and Alternative 4 - no action/traditional fire protection.

  2. Ecological fire use for ecological fire management: Managing large wildfires by design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy Ingalsbee

    2015-01-01

    Past fire exclusion policies and fire suppression actions have led to a historic "fire deficit" on public wildlands. These sociocultural actions have led to unprecedented environmental changes that have created conditions conducive to more frequent large-scale wildfires. Politicians, the newsmedia, and agency officials portray large wildland fires as...

  3. Fire regime in a Mexican forest under indigenous resource management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulé, Peter Z; Ramos-Gómez, Mauro; Cortés-Montaño, Citlali; Miller, Andrew M

    2011-04-01

    The Rarámuri (Tarahumara) people live in the mountains and canyons of the Sierra Madre Occidental of Chihuahua, Mexico. They base their subsistence on multiple-use strategies of their natural resources, including agriculture, pastoralism, and harvesting of native plants and wildlife. Pino Gordo is a Rarámuri settlement in a remote location where the forest has not been commercially logged. We reconstructed the forest fire regime from fire-scarred trees, measured the structure of the never-logged forest, and interviewed community members about fire use. Fire occurrence was consistent throughout the 19th and 20th centuries up to our fire scar collection in 2004. This is the least interrupted surface-fire regime reported to date in North America. Studies from other relict sites such as nature reserves in Mexico or the USA have all shown some recent alterations associated with industrialized society. At Pino Gordo, fires recurred frequently at the three study sites, with a composite mean fire interval of 1.9 years (all fires) to 7.6 years (fires scarring 25% or more of samples). Per-sample fire intervals averaged 10-14 years at the three sites. Approximately two-thirds of fires burned in the season of cambial dormancy, probably during the pre-monsoonal drought. Forests were dominated by pines and contained many large living trees and snags, in contrast to two nearby similar forests that have been logged. Community residents reported using fire for many purposes, consistent with previous literature on fire use by indigenous people. Pino Gordo is a valuable example of a continuing frequent-fire regime in a never-harvested forest. The Rarámuri people have actively conserved this forest through their traditional livelihood and management techniques, as opposed to logging the forest, and have also facilitated the fire regime by burning. The data contribute to a better understanding of the interactions of humans who live in pine forests and the fire regimes of these

  4. Uncertainty and risk in wildland fire management: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matthew P; Calkin, Dave E

    2011-08-01

    Wildland fire management is subject to manifold sources of uncertainty. Beyond the unpredictability of wildfire behavior, uncertainty stems from inaccurate/missing data, limited resource value measures to guide prioritization across fires and resources at risk, and an incomplete scientific understanding of ecological response to fire, of fire behavior response to treatments, and of spatiotemporal dynamics involving disturbance regimes and climate change. This work attempts to systematically align sources of uncertainty with the most appropriate decision support methodologies, in order to facilitate cost-effective, risk-based wildfire planning efforts. We review the state of wildfire risk assessment and management, with a specific focus on uncertainties challenging implementation of integrated risk assessments that consider a suite of human and ecological values. Recent advances in wildfire simulation and geospatial mapping of highly valued resources have enabled robust risk-based analyses to inform planning across a variety of scales, although improvements are needed in fire behavior and ignition occurrence models. A key remaining challenge is a better characterization of non-market resources at risk, both in terms of their response to fire and how society values those resources. Our findings echo earlier literature identifying wildfire effects analysis and value uncertainty as the primary challenges to integrated wildfire risk assessment and wildfire management. We stress the importance of identifying and characterizing uncertainties in order to better quantify and manage them. Leveraging the most appropriate decision support tools can facilitate wildfire risk assessment and ideally improve decision-making.

  5. Managing for Old Growth in Frequent-fire Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl E. Fiedler

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available There is no one-size-fits-all approach to managing frequent-fire, old-growth forests. However, there are general guidelines to follow: 1 set objectives for both structure (tree density, diameter distribution, tree species composition, spatial arrangement, amount of coarse woody debris and function (nutrient cycling, desired tree species regeneration; 2 prioritize treatments according to ecological, economic, and social needs and risks; 3 identify the potential treatments (natural fire, prescribed fire, silvicultural cutting that best meet the objectives and scale of the project; and 4 implement the treatment(s. We discuss each of these guidelines in this article.

  6. Adding fuel to the fire: the impacts of non-native grass invasion on fire management at a regional scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha A Setterfield

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Widespread invasion by non-native plants has resulted in substantial change in fire-fuel characteristics and fire-behaviour in many of the world's ecosystems, with a subsequent increase in the risk of fire damage to human life, property and the environment. Models used by fire management agencies to assess fire risk are dependent on accurate assessments of fuel characteristics but there is little evidence that they have been modified to reflect landscape-scale invasions. There is also a paucity of information documenting other changes in fire management activities that have occurred to mitigate changed fire regimes. This represents an important limitation in information for both fire and weed risk management. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We undertook an aerial survey to estimate changes to landscape fuel loads in northern Australia resulting from invasion by Andropogon gayanus (gamba grass. Fuel load within the most densely invaded area had increased from 6 to 10 t ha(-1 in the past two decades. Assessment of the effect of calculating the Grassland Fire Danger Index (GFDI for the 2008 and 2009 fire seasons demonstrated that an increase from 6 to 10 t ha(-1 resulted in an increase from five to 38 days with fire risk in the 'severe' category in 2008 and from 11 to 67 days in 2009. The season of severe fire weather increased by six weeks. Our assessment of the effect of increased fuel load on fire management practices showed that fire management costs in the region have increased markedly (∼9 times in the past decade due primarily to A. gayanus invasion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrated the high economic cost of mitigating fire impacts of an invasive grass. This study demonstrates the need to quantify direct and indirect invasion costs to assess the risk of further invasion and to appropriately fund fire and weed management strategies.

  7. Modeling Fire Emissions across Central and Southern Italy: Implications for Land and Fire Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacciu, V. M.; Salis, M.; Spano, D.

    2015-12-01

    Fires play a relevant role in the global and regional carbon cycle, representing a remarkable source of CO2 and other greenhouse gases (GHG) that influence atmosphere budgets and climate. In addition, the wildfire increase projected in Southern Europe due to climate change (CC) and concurrent exacerbation of extreme weather conditions could also lead to a significant rise in GHG. Recently, in the context of the Italian National Adaptation Strategy to Climate Change (SNAC), several approaches were identified as valuable tools to adapt and mitigate the impacts of CC on wildfires, in order to reduce landscape susceptibility and to contribute to the efforts of carbon emission mitigation proposed within the Kyoto protocol. Active forest and fuel management (such as prescribed burning, fuel reduction and removal, weed and flammable shrub control, creation of fuel discontinuity) is recognised to be a key element to adapt and mitigate the impacts of CC on wildfires. Despite this, overall there is a lack of studies about the effectiveness of fire emission mitigation strategies. The current work aims to analyse the potential of a combination of fuel management practices in mitigating emissions from forest fires and evaluate valuable and viable options across Central and Southern Italy. These objectives were achieved throughout a retrospective application of an integrated approach combining a fire emission model (FOFEM - First Order Fire Effect Model) with spatially explicit, comprehensive, and accurate fire, vegetation and weather data for the period 2004-2012. Furthermore, a number of silvicultural techniques were combined to develop several fuel management scenarios and then tested to evaluate their potential in mitigating fire emissions.The preliminary results showed the crucial role of appropriate fuel, fire behavior, and weather data to reduce bias in quantifying the source and the composition of fire emissions and to attain reasonable estimations. Also, the current

  8. Villaflores: Municipal forest fire management model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro Martínez Muñoz; Carlos Alberto Velázquez Sanabria

    2013-01-01

    As provided for in the General Law on Sustainable Forestry Development, the Municipality of Villaflores has worked on a continuous basis since 2002 to reduce the damage caused by forest fires as part of its working agenda, in conjunction with Federal and State agencies and NGOs. The work plan has the following phases: a) Inter-agency coordination:...

  9. When to fire bad managers: The role of collusion between managment and board of directors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beetsma, R.M.W.J.; Peters, H.; Rebers, E.

    2000-01-01

    We develop a model in which a shareholder hires a director to monitor a manager who faces stochastic firing costs. We study the optimal incentive scheme for the director, allowing for the possibility that the manager bribes the director in order to change his firing intentions. Such collusion may be

  10. When to fire bad managers: The role of collusion between managment and board of directors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beetsma, R.M.W.J.; Peters, H.; Rebers, E.

    2000-01-01

    We develop a model in which a shareholder hires a director to monitor a manager who faces stochastic firing costs. We study the optimal incentive scheme for the director, allowing for the possibility that the manager bribes the director in order to change his firing intentions. Such collusion may be

  11. Resolving future fire management conflicts using multicriteria decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Don A; Bode, Michael; Bradstock, Ross A; Keith, David A; Penman, Trent D; Price, Owen F

    2016-02-01

    Management strategies to reduce the risks to human life and property from wildfire commonly involve burning native vegetation. However, planned burning can conflict with other societal objectives such as human health and biodiversity conservation. These conflicts are likely to intensify as fire regimes change under future climates and as growing human populations encroach farther into fire-prone ecosystems. Decisions about managing fire risks are therefore complex and warrant more sophisticated approaches than are typically used. We applied a multicriteria decision making approach (MCDA) with the potential to improve fire management outcomes to the case of a highly populated, biodiverse, and flammable wildland-urban interface. We considered the effects of 22 planned burning options on 8 objectives: house protection, maximizing water quality, minimizing carbon emissions and impacts on human health, and minimizing declines of 5 distinct species types. The MCDA identified a small number of management options (burning forest adjacent to houses) that performed well for most objectives, but not for one species type (arboreal mammal) or for water quality. Although MCDA made the conflict between objectives explicit, resolution of the problem depended on the weighting assigned to each objective. Additive weighting of criteria traded off the arboreal mammal and water quality objectives for other objectives. Multiplicative weighting identified scenarios that avoided poor outcomes for any objective, which is important for avoiding potentially irreversible biodiversity losses. To distinguish reliably among management options, future work should focus on reducing uncertainty in outcomes across a range of objectives. Considering management actions that have more predictable outcomes than landscape fuel management will be important. We found that, where data were adequate, an MCDA can support decision making in the complex and often conflicted area of fire management.

  12. Management and Climate Controls on Fire Trends in the Continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H.; McCarty, J. L.; Wang, D.; Rogers, B. M.; Morton, D. C.; Collatz, G. J.; Randerson, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    Fires in croplands, plantations, and rangelands contribute significantly to fire emissions in the United States, yet are often overshadowed by forest fires in both scale and in the resources invested for management. Here we quantified decadal trends, interannual variability, and seasonality of satellite observations of active fires as a function of management type in the continental U.S. during 2001-2010. We used the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity Database (MTBS) to identify the location of large wildland fires and the MODIS Land Cover Type Product (MCD12Q1) to identify agricultural burning in croplands. A third class of fires, defined as prescribed or other fires included all residual fires not attributed to wildland or cropland fire types. Wildland fires dominated the interannual variation for U.S. active fires; however, there were no significant trends by region over the last decade. Agricultural and other/prescribed fires were responsible for 70% of total active fires, 50% of which were in the south and southeastern United States where contributions from wildland fires was relatively small. In the west, agricultural fires had a decreasing trend at a rate of 6% per year, mainly during the harvest season of October. Except for the west, prescribed fires were in-phase with agricultural fires on both seasonal and interannual timescales, possibly reflecting the similar management strategies. We also performed correlation analysis between fires and potential evapotranspiration (PE) to examine how climate controls varied by fire type. While climate is the dominant factor for wildland fires, agricultural and other non-wildland fires show no direct relationship to PE. Our result suggests that by targeting agricultural and prescribed fire management, there is potential to significantly reduce landscape fire emissions within the U.S., despite expected changes in climate over the next several decades. The trends (p < 0.01) in annual active fire detections across the

  13. COMPUTER-ASSISTED INSTRUCTION FOR FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Babb, Emerson M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes computer-assisted instruction for financial management which can be used to supplement an undergraduate course or to update training of persons in agribusiness. It is used to review principles of financial management, to illustrate analytical techniques, and to provide practice in the use of financial concepts and techniques. The material covered is similar to that found in traditional textbooks. Student evaluations of the software were fairly positive, but teaching effec...

  14. FACTORS INFLUENCING FIRE DISASTER MANAGEMENT PREPAREDNESS: A CASE OF PRIMARY SCHOOLS IN MAKUENI COUNTY, KENYA

    OpenAIRE

    David K. Ndetu; Veronica Kaluyu

    2016-01-01

    The study sought to establish the factors influencing fire disaster preparedness in primary schools in Makueni County in Kenya. Using multiple regression analysis, the findings showed that fire safety policy knowledge had a beta (), fire safety guidelines implementation practices  and fire safety resources provision. This infers that fire safety support resources provision affects fire disaster management preparedness in primary schools to a great extent followed by safety policy knowledge wh...

  15. Fire Risk Analysis and Optimization of Fire Prevention Management for Green Building Design and High Rise Buildings: Hong Kong Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yau Albert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There are many iconic high rise buildings in Hong Kong, for example, International Commercial Centre, International Financial Centre, etc. Fire safety issue in high rise buildings has been raised by local fire professionals in terms of occupant evacuation, means of fire-fighting by fire fighters, sprinkler systems to automatically put off fires in buildings, etc. Fire risk becomes an important issue in building fire safety because it relates to life safety of building occupants where they live and work in high rise buildings in Hong Kong. The aim of this research is to identify the fire risk for different types of high rise buildings in Hong Kong and to optimise the fire prevention management for those high rise buildings with higher level of fire risk and to validate the model and also to carry out the study of the conflict between the current fire safety building code and the current trend of green building design. Survey via the 7-point scale questionnaire was conducted through 50 participants and their responses were received and analysed via the statistical tool SPSS software computer program. A number of statistical methods of testing for significantly difference in samples were adopted to carry out the analysis of the data received. When the statistical analysis was completed, the results of the data analysis were validated by two Fire Safety Experts in this area of specialisation and also by quantitative fire risk analysis.

  16. Wildland fire and fuel management: principles for effective communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Toman; Bruce Shindler

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we discuss four principles identified through recent research for effective citizen-agency communication and examine their use in accomplishing fire management objectives. Principles include the following: (1) effective communication is a product of effective planning; (2) both unidirectional (one-way) and interactive approaches are part of successful...

  17. Communication and implementation of GIS data in fire management: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth G. Boykin; Douglas I. Boykin; Rusty Stovall; Ryan. Whitaker

    2008-01-01

    Remotely sensed data and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) can be an effective tool in fire management. For the inclusion of these tools, fire management and research personnel must be effective in communication regarding needs and limitations of the data and implementing that data at various scales. A number of personnel can be involved within fire management...

  18. 75 FR 10308 - Fire Management Plan, Final Environmental Impact Statement, Record of Decision, Grand Canyon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... Doc No: 2010-4414] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Fire Management Plan, Final... Impact Statement for the Fire Management Plan, Grand Canyon National Park. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the... availability of the Record of Decision for the Fire Management Plan, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. On...

  19. Land cover, more than monthly fire weather, drives fire-size distribution in Southern Québec forests: Implications for fire risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Jean; Cumming, Steve G; McIntire, Eliot J B

    2017-01-01

    Fire activity in North American forests is expected to increase substantially with climate change. This would represent a growing risk to human settlements and industrial infrastructure proximal to forests, and to the forest products industry. We modelled fire size distributions in southern Québec as functions of fire weather and land cover, thus explicitly integrating some of the biotic interactions and feedbacks in a forest-wildfire system. We found that, contrary to expectations, land-cover and not fire weather was the primary driver of fire size in our study region. Fires were highly selective on fuel-type under a wide range of fire weather conditions: specifically, deciduous forest, lakes and to a lesser extent recently burned areas decreased the expected fire size in their vicinity compared to conifer forest. This has large implications for fire risk management in that fuels management could reduce fire risk over the long term. Our results imply, for example, that if 30% of a conifer-dominated landscape were converted to hardwoods, the probability of a given fire, occurring in that landscape under mean fire weather conditions, exceeding 100,000 ha would be reduced by a factor of 21. A similarly marked but slightly smaller effect size would be expected under extreme fire weather conditions. We attribute the decrease in expected fire size that occurs in recently burned areas to fuel availability limitations on fires spread. Because regenerating burned conifer stands often pass through a deciduous stage, this would also act as a negative biotic feedback whereby the occurrence of fires limits the size of nearby future for some period of time. Our parameter estimates imply that changes in vegetation flammability or fuel availability after fires would tend to counteract shifts in the fire size distribution favoring larger fires that are expected under climate warming. Ecological forecasts from models neglecting these feedbacks may markedly overestimate the

  20. A GIS-based framework for evaluating investments in fire management: Spatial allocation of recreation values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth A. Baerenklau; Armando González-Cabán; Catrina I. Páez; Edgard. Chávez

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Forest Service is responsible for developing tools to facilitate effective and efficient fire management on wildlands and urban-wildland interfaces. Existing GIS-based fire modeling software only permits estimation of the costs of fire prevention and mitigation efforts as well as the effects of those efforts on fire behavior. This research demonstrates how the...

  1. A review of challenges to determining and demonstrating efficiency of large fire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew P. Thompson; Francisco Rodriguez y Silva; David E. Calkin; Michael S. Hand

    2017-01-01

    Characterising the impacts of wildland fire and fire suppression is critical information for fire management decision-making. Here, we focus on decisions related to the rare larger and longer-duration fire events, where the scope and scale of decision-making can be far broader than initial response efforts, and where determining and demonstrating efficiency of...

  2. Fire in Ghana's dry forest: Causes, frequency, effects and management interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandra Opoku Agyemang; Michael Muller; Victor Rex Barnes

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the number of fires, area burned, causes and seasonality of fires over a ten year period from 2002-2012 and investigates different fire management strategies and their effectiveness in the Afram headwaters forest reserve in Ghana. Data were collected from interviews of stakeholders in two communities adjacent to the reserve, and from 2002-2012 fire...

  3. Fire Management in the Inter Galatic Interface or 30 Years of Fire Management at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge/Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederic W. Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Prescribed burning is essential on Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Not only is it needed to manage the volatile fuels, but also to manage the complex system of fire maintained habitats found here. Fire management on the Refuge presents unique challenges. In addition to the restraints to prescribed burning that are common to many prescribed burning programs,...

  4. Impacts of fire exclusion and recent managed fire on forest structure in old growth Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon M. Collins; Richard G. Everett; Scott L. Stephens

    2011-01-01

    We re-sampled areas included in an unbiased 1911 timber inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service over a 4000 ha study area. Over half of the re-sampled area burned in relatively recent management- and lightning-ignited fires. This allowed for comparisons of both areas that have experienced recent fire and areas with no recent fire, to the same areas historically...

  5. 25 CFR 286.11 - Management and technical assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Management and technical assistance. 286.11 Section 286... DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM § 286.11 Management and technical assistance. (a) Prior to and concurrent with the making... insure that competent management and technical assistance is available to the grantee in the preparation...

  6. 25 CFR 101.7 - Management and technical assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Management and technical assistance. 101.7 Section 101.7... THE REVOLVING LOAN FUND § 101.7 Management and technical assistance. Prior to and concurrent with the... under title V of the Indian Financing Act of 1974 that competent management and technical assistance is...

  7. How well does the Post-fire Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) really work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaud, Peter; Elliot, William; Lewis, Sarah; Miller, Mary Ellen

    2016-04-01

    The decision of where, when, and how to apply the most effective postfire erosion mitigation treatments requires land managers to assess the risk of damaging runoff and erosion events occurring after a fire. The Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) was developed to assist post fire assessment teams identify high erosion risk areas and effectiveness of various mitigation treatments to reduce that risk. ERMiT is a web-based application that uses the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) technology to estimate erosion, in probabilistic terms, on burned and recovering forest, range, and chaparral lands with and without the application of mitigation treatments. User inputs are processed by ERMiT to combine rain event variability with spatial and temporal variabilities of hillslope burn severity and soil properties which are then used as WEPP inputs. Since 2007, the model has been used in making hundreds of land management decisions in the US and elsewhere. We use eight published field study sites in the Western US to compare ERMiT predictions to observed hillslope erosion rates. Most sites experience only a few rainfall events that produced runoff and sediment except for a California site with a Mediterranean climate. When hillslope erosion occurred, significant correlations occurred between the observed hillslope erosion and those predicted by ERMiT. Significant correlation occurred for most mitigation treatments as well as the five recovery years. These model validation results suggest reasonable estimates of probabilistic post-fire hillslope sediment delivery when compared to observation.

  8. Utilizing NASA EOS Data for Fire Management in el Departmento del Valle del Cauco, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenton, J. C.; Bledsoe, N.; Alabdouli, K.

    2012-12-01

    In the last few years, fire incidence in Colombian wild areas has increased, damaging pristine forests into savannas and sterile lands. Fire poses a significant threat to biodiversity, rural communities and established infrastructure. These events issue an urgent need to address this problem. NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) can play a significant role in the monitoring fires and natural disasters. SERVIR, the Regional Visualization and Monitoring Network, constitutes a platform for the observation, forecasting and modeling of environmental processes in Central America. A project called "The GIS for fire management in Guatemala (SIGMA-I)" has been already conducted to address the same problem in another Latin American country, Guatemala. SIGMA-I was developed by the Inter-agency work among the National protected areas council (CONAP), National Forestry Institution (INAB), the National Coordinator for Disaster Reduction / National Forest Fire Prevention and Control System (CONRED/SIPECIF), and the Ministry of the Environment and National Resources (MARN) in Guatemala under the guidance and assistance of SERVIR. With SIGMA-I as an example, we proposed to conduct a similar project for the country of Colombia. First, a pilot study in the area of the watershed of the Cali River, Colombia was conducted to ensure that the data was available and that the maps and models were accurate. The proposed study will investigate the technical resources required: 1.) A fire map with a compilation of ignition data (hot spots) utilizing Fire Information for Resource Management System (FIRMS) derived from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) products MOD14 and MYD14 2.) A map of fire scars derived from medium resolution satellite data (ASTER) during the period 2003-2011 for the entire country, and a map of fire scar recurrence and statistics derived from the datasets produced. 3.) A pattern analysis and ignition cause model derived from a matrix of variables

  9. Multi-Level Wild Land Fire Fighting Management Support System for an Optimized Guidance of Ground and Air Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almer, Alexander; Schnabel, Thomas; Perko, Roland; Raggam, Johann; Köfler, Armin; Feischl, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Climate change will lead to a dramatic increase in damage from forest fires in Europe by the end of this century. In the Mediterranean region, the average annual area affected by forest fires has quadrupled since the 1960s (WWF, 2012). The number of forest fires is also on the increase in Central and Northern Europe. The Austrian forest fire database shows a total of 584 fires for the period 2012 to 2014, while even large areas of Sweden were hit by forest fires in August 2014, which were brought under control only after two weeks of intense fire-fighting efforts supported by European civil protection modules. Based on these facts, the improvements in forest fire control are a major international issue in the quest to protect human lives and resources as well as to reduce the negative environmental impact of these fires to a minimum. Within this paper the development of a multi-functional airborne management support system within the frame of the Austrian national safety and security research programme (KIRAS) is described. The main goal of the developments is to assist crisis management tasks of civil emergency teams and armed forces in disaster management by providing multi spectral, near real-time airborne image data products. As time, flexibility and reliability as well as objective information are crucial aspects in emergency management, the used components are tailored to meet these requirements. An airborne multi-functional management support system was developed as part of the national funded project AIRWATCH, which enables real-time monitoring of natural disasters based on optical and thermal images. Airborne image acquisition, a broadband line of sight downlink and near real-time processing solutions allow the generation of an up-to-date geo-referenced situation map. Furthermore, this paper presents ongoing developments for innovative extensions and research activities designed to optimize command operations in national and international fire

  10. Research Summary: Projecting Vegetation and Wildfire Response to Changing Climate and Fire Management in Interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-21

    permafrost, vulnerability, fire management , modeling , soil. 12 UU UU UU UU Unclassified Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. N/A Page... management sce- nario using the ALFRESCO computer model ? How did we alter the current fire management planning designations? To provide meaningful...within a managed area. The groups discussed relevant fire management scenarios that could be used to alter current wildfire trends on DoD training

  11. Assessing the effects of fire disturbance on ecosystems: a scientific agenda for research and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Schmoldt; David L. Peterson; Robert E. Keane; James M. Lenihan; Donald McKenzie; David R. Weise; David V. Sandberg

    1999-01-01

    A team of fire scientists and resource managers convened 17-19 April 1996 in Seattle, Washington, to assess the effects of fire disturbance on ecosystems. Objectives of this workshop were to develop scientific recommendations for future fire research and management activities. These recommendations included a series of numerically ranked scientific and managerial...

  12. Climate change, fire management, and ecological services in the southwestern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurteau, Matthew D.; Bradford, John B.; Fulé, Peter Z.; Taylor, Alan H.; Martin, Katherine L.

    2013-01-01

    The diverse forest types of the southwestern US are inseparable from fire. Across climate zones in California, Nevada, Arizona, and New Mexico, fire suppression has left many forest types out of sync with their historic fire regimes. As a result, high fuel loads place them at risk of severe fire, particularly as fire activity increases due to climate change. A legacy of fire exclusion coupled with a warming climate has led to increasingly large and severe wildfires in many southwest forest types. Climate change projections include an extended fire season length due to earlier snowmelt and a general drying trend due to rising temperatures. This suggests the future will be warmer and drier regardless of changes in precipitation. Hotter, drier conditions are likely to increase forest flammability, at least initially. Changes in climate alone have the potential to alter the distribution of vegetation types within the region, and climate-driven shifts in vegetation distribution are likely to be accelerated when coupled with stand-replacing fire. Regardless of the rate of change, the interaction of climate and fire and their effects on Southwest ecosystems will alter the provisioning of ecosystem services, including carbon storage and biodiversity. Interactions between climate, fire, and vegetation growth provide a source of great uncertainty in projecting future fire activity in the region, as post-fire forest recovery is strongly influenced by climate and subsequent fire frequency. Severe fire can be mitigated with fuels management including prescribed fire, thinning, and wildfire management, but new strategies are needed to ensure the effectiveness of treatments across landscapes. We review the current understanding of the relationship between fire and climate in the Southwest, both historical and projected. We then discuss the potential implications of climate change for fire management and examine the potential effects of climate change and fire on ecosystem

  13. Climate change, fire management, and ecological services in the southwestern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurteau, Matthew D.; Bradford, John B.; Fulé, Peter Z.; Taylor, Alan H.; Martin, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    The diverse forest types of the southwestern US are inseparable from fire. Across climate zones in California, Nevada, Arizona, and New Mexico, fire suppression has left many forest types out of sync with their historic fire regimes. As a result, high fuel loads place them at risk of severe fire, particularly as fire activity increases due to climate change. A legacy of fire exclusion coupled with a warming climate has led to increasingly large and severe wildfires in many southwest forest types. Climate change projections include an extended fire season length due to earlier snowmelt and a general drying trend due to rising temperatures. This suggests the future will be warmer and drier regardless of changes in precipitation. Hotter, drier conditions are likely to increase forest flammability, at least initially. Changes in climate alone have the potential to alter the distribution of vegetation types within the region, and climate-driven shifts in vegetation distribution are likely to be accelerated when coupled with stand-replacing fire. Regardless of the rate of change, the interaction of climate and fire and their effects on Southwest ecosystems will alter the provisioning of ecosystem services, including carbon storage and biodiversity. Interactions between climate, fire, and vegetation growth provide a source of great uncertainty in projecting future fire activity in the region, as post-fire forest recovery is strongly influenced by climate and subsequent fire frequency. Severe fire can be mitigated with fuels management including prescribed fire, thinning, and wildfire management, but new strategies are needed to ensure the effectiveness of treatments across landscapes. We review the current understanding of the relationship between fire and climate in the Southwest, both historical and projected. We then discuss the potential implications of climate change for fire management and examine the potential effects of climate change and fire on ecosystem

  14. 78 FR 70076 - Aging Management of Internal Surfaces, Fire Water Systems, Atmospheric Storage Tanks, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... COMMISSION Aging Management of Internal Surfaces, Fire Water Systems, Atmospheric Storage Tanks, and... Guidance (LR-ISG), LR-ISG-2012-02, ``Aging Management of Internal Surfaces, Fire Water Systems, Atmospheric... aging management programs (AMPs), aging management review (AMR) items, and definitions in NUREG-...

  15. Intelligent Assistants in Crisis Management: From PDA to TDA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diggelen, J. van; Beun, R.J.; Werkhoven, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses a variety of potential applications of intelligent assistants, from personal digital assistant (PDA) to team digital assistant (TDA). We identify two challenges that arise when developing intelligent assistants in crisis management and give an overview of the different technolog

  16. Using ecological forecasting of future vegetation transition and fire frequency change in the Sierra Nevada to assess fire management strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, J. H.; Schwartz, M. W.; Holguin, A. J.; Moritz, M.; Batllori, E.; Folger, K.; Nydick, K.

    2013-12-01

    Ecological systems may respond in complex manners as climate change progresses. Among the responses, site-level climate conditions may cause a shift in vegetation due to the physiological tolerances of plant species, and the fire return interval may change. Natural resource managers challenged with maintaining ecosystem health need a way to forecast how these processes may affect every location, in order to determine appropriate management actions and prioritize locations for interventions. We integrated climate change-driven vegetation type transitions with projected change in fire frequency for 45,203 km2 of the southern Sierra Nevada, California, containing over 10 land management agencies as well as private lands. This Magnitude of Change (MOC) approach involves classing vegetation types in current time according to their climate envelopes, and identifying which sites will in the future have climates beyond what that vegetation currently occurs in. Independently, fire models are used to determine the change in fire frequency for each site. We examined 82 vegetation types with >50 grid cell occurrences. We found iconic resources such as the giant sequoia, lower slope oak woodlands, and high elevation conifer forests are projected as highly vulnerable by models that project a warmer drier future, but not as much by models that project a warmer future that is not drier than current conditions. Further, there were strongly divergent vulnerabilities of these forest types across land ownership (National Parks versus US Forest Service lands), and by GCM. For example, of 50 giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) groves and complexes, all but 3 (on Sierra National Forest) were in the 2 highest levels of risk of climate and fire under the GFDL A2 projection, while 15 groves with low-to-moderate risk were found on both the National Parks and National Forests 18 in the 2 under PCM A2. Landscape projections of potential MOC suggest that the region is likely to experience

  17. Assessing the Role and Impact of Geospatial Data for Wildland Fire Management Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, E. A.; Lev, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    The 2015 Wildland and Fire Science and Technology Task Force Final Report, produced by the National Science and Technology Council, Committee on Environment, Natural Resources, and Sustainability, Subcommittee on Disaster Reduction, highlighted the increasing frequency of large wildfires and the growing demand for science to inform critical resource decisions to manage, mitigate, respond to, and recover from wildland fires. Federal spending on fire suppression from 2005-2015 has more than doubled despite policy changes that prioritize the mitigation of fire risks through the use of fuel treatments, prescribed fire, and management of naturally occurring wildfires to protect life and property. Fire suppression policies over the last century have created forests primed for severe fire, and in the face of a changing climate, the benefits of re-introducing fire into once fire-resilient ecosystems are clear. There are a range of complex factors and regional variation associated with wildland fire risk that complicate our understanding and effective management of this hazard. Data derived from Earth-observing (EO) systems and networks are a crucial input for managers when making decisions about fire suppression and fuel management. EO data can also be used to develop pre- and post-fire metrics that can aid in the evaluating the effectiveness of wildland fire management decisions. A value-tree method for mapping the role of EO systems and networks in delivering societal benefit through key Federal objectives related to wildland fire management will be presented. The value-tree methodology utilizes input from subject matter experts to assess the availability and usability of data and data products and to evaluate the impact of individual EO data inputs for achieving wildland fire management objectives. The results provide a qualitative assessment of the value of the data for the objectives described and identify critical gaps and continuity issues associated with

  18. Affected parents' and other stakeholders' perception of a fire disaster management in India: a situational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satapathy, Sujata; Walia, Ajinder

    2007-01-01

    Fires that result in a large number of deaths and injuries are quite common in India, presenting many complex emergency management challenges. While significant improvement in disaster management has been noted in recent years, full integration of government emergency management initiatives at the provincial level is still in its infancy. This article presents the findings of a study of a school fire in India that resulted in the deaths of 93 children. The effective provincial level management of this fire, in the absence of a well-defined disaster management plan, was quite encouraging and provides guidance for other disaster managers in the country. The purpose of the study was to analyze the factors leading to the tragedy, the response of the stakeholders, the relief and rehabilitation support provided to the affected families, and the perceptions of the affected parents regarding their level of satisfaction with the management of this disaster. Extensive visits were made to the damaged school, schools where the rescued and evacuated children were relocated, affected households, injured children, various stakeholders and institutions playing a significant role in managing the incident, and nongovernment organizations working in the field. The study methodology included structured interviews to determine the parents' level of satisfaction with the different elements of the response, participant observations, intensive interaction with the members of the affected families, and focused group discussion with different relevant government officials. The findings indicate a high level of parent and stakeholder satisfaction in the majority of response and relief efforts associated with the disaster. Also reinforced were the importance of adherence to school safety regulations; the role of effective relief and rehabilitation; public-private partnership in disaster management; and the importance of media management, humanitarian assistance during crisis management and

  19. Barriers to implementation of risk management for federal wildland fire management agencies in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave Calkin; Matthew P. Thompson; Alan A. Ager; Mark Finney

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation we review progress towards the implementation of a risk-based management framework for U.S. Federal wildland fire policy and operations. We first describe new developments in wildfire simulation technology that catalyzed the development of risk-based decision support systems for strategic wildfire management. These systems include new analytical...

  20. Management and climate contributions to satellite-derived active fire trends in the contiguous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiao-Wen; McCarty, Jessica L.; Wang, Dongdong; Rogers, Brendan M.; Morton, Douglas C.; Collatz, G. James; Jin, Yufang; Randerson, James T.

    2014-04-01

    Fires in croplands, plantations, and rangelands contribute significantly to fire emissions in the United States, yet are often overshadowed by wildland fires in efforts to develop inventories or estimate responses to climate change. Here we quantified decadal trends, interannual variability, and seasonality of Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations of active fires (thermal anomalies) as a function of management type in the contiguous U.S. during 2001-2010. We used the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity database to identify active fires within the perimeter of large wildland fires and land cover maps to identify active fires in croplands. A third class of fires defined as prescribed/other included all residual satellite active fire detections. Large wildland fires were the most variable of all three fire types and had no significant annual trend in the contiguous U.S. during 2001-2010. Active fires in croplands, in contrast, increased at a rate of 3.4% per year. Cropland and prescribed/other fire types combined were responsible for 77% of the total active fire detections within the U.S and were most abundant in the south and southeast. In the west, cropland active fires decreased at a rate of 5.9% per year, likely in response to intensive air quality policies. Potential evaporation was a dominant regulator of the interannual variability of large wildland fires, but had a weaker influence on the other two fire types. Our analysis suggests it may be possible to modify landscape fire emissions within the U.S. by influencing the way fires are used in managed ecosystems.

  1. Wildland fire management plan Modoc National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan is written to provide guidelines for appropriate wildland fire suppression and prescribed fire programs. Prescribed fires may be used to reduce hazard...

  2. Practitioner Perceptions of Wildland Fire Management across South Europe and Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo M. Molina-Terrén

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Wildfire presents a challenge to natural resource managers the world over, and the intentional setting of fires can be used to alleviate some of the challenges associated with wildfire management. Prescribed burning can be used prior to wildfires to reduce fuel loads and promote ecological integrity in fire-adapted systems, while suppression burning can help firefighters control the direction, extent, and intensity of wildfire behavior under extreme conditions. In both cases, the success of intentional fire use depends on training, knowledge, experience, and institutional and social support. The influence of these factors can significantly impact whether fire use is perceived as positive or negative, increasing or decreasing, and whether managers are supportive of its incorporation into their management planning and decision-making. Perceived impediments to fire use are likely to differ based on location, level of training and experience, and even the social context of fire management specific to different job positions in natural resource management. In order to explore how managers and stakeholders across the world perceive fire use, we surveyed over 700 respondents from 12 countries and three continents. This study represents the largest survey of perceptions on managed fire use ever conducted. Perceptions differed across age categories, job positions, and regions. Countries or regions with larger amounts of wildfire area burned tended to be more supportive of fire use for suppression, while countries with less wildfire had less positive perceptions of fire use for either prescribed or suppression burning. Bureaucracy and social perceptions were identified as impediments to using prescribed fire prior to wildfire occurrence, but neither were identified as impediments to fire use during suppression procedures. Across the countries, fire use in suppression was viewed more positively than prescribed fire use prior to wildfire occurrence.

  3. First-order fire effects models for land Management: Overview and issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizabeth D. Reinhardt; Matthew B. Dickinson

    2010-01-01

    We give an overview of the science application process at work in supporting fire management. First-order fire effects models, such as those discussed in accompanying papers, are the building blocks of software systems designed for application to landscapes over time scales from days to centuries. Fire effects may be modeled using empirical, rule based, or process...

  4. Wildland fire management. Volume 2: Wildland fire control 1985-1995. [satellite information system for California fire problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveker, D. R. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The preliminary design of a satellite plus computer earth resources information system is proposed for potential uses in fire prevention and control in the wildland fire community. Suggested are satellite characteristics, sensor characteristics, discrimination algorithms, data communication techniques, data processing requirements, display characteristics, and costs in achieving the integrated wildland fire information system.

  5. Forest fire management to avoid unintended consequences: a case study of Portugal using system dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Ross D; de Neufville, Richard; Claro, João; Oliveira, Tiago; Pacheco, Abílio P

    2013-11-30

    Forest fires are a serious management challenge in many regions, complicating the appropriate allocation to suppression and prevention efforts. Using a System Dynamics (SD) model, this paper explores how interactions between physical and political systems in forest fire management impact the effectiveness of different allocations. A core issue is that apparently sound management can have unintended consequences. An instinctive management response to periods of worsening fire severity is to increase fire suppression capacity, an approach with immediate appeal as it directly treats the symptom of devastating fires and appeases the public. However, the SD analysis indicates that a policy emphasizing suppression can degrade the long-run effectiveness of forest fire management. By crowding out efforts to preventative fuel removal, it exacerbates fuel loads and leads to greater fires, which further balloon suppression budgets. The business management literature refers to this problem as the firefighting trap, wherein focus on fixing problems diverts attention from preventing them, and thus leads to inferior outcomes. The paper illustrates these phenomena through a case study of Portugal, showing that a balanced approach to suppression and prevention efforts can mitigate the self-reinforcing consequences of this trap, and better manage long-term fire damages. These insights can help policymakers and fire managers better appreciate the interconnected systems in which their authorities reside and the dynamics that may undermine seemingly rational management decisions.

  6. Distribution and Management of the Red Imported Fire Ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren, in Virginia

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Hamilton Ross

    2010-01-01

    Red imported fire ant specimens were first collected in Virginia in 1989 from colonies located in Hampton, Va. Now colonies are established throughout the Hampton Roads area of Virginia. Because the fire ant is a new pest information regarding the distribution, biology, and management of the ant in Virgnia are absent. Therefore studies were conducted to compare the efficacies of four broadcast fire ant control products and an individual mound treatment to control fire ants and to determine...

  7. Management of expatriate medical assistance in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vio Ferruccio

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper discusses how Mozambique coped with the health system needs in terms of specialized doctors since independence, in a troubled context of war, lack of financial resources and modifying settings of foreign aid. The Ministry of Health (MOH managed to make up for its severe scarcity of specialist MDs especially through contracting expatriate technical assistance. Different scenarios, partnerships and contract schemes that have evolved since independence are briefly described, as well as self-reliance option possibility and implications. Lessons learned about donor initiatives aimed at contracting specialists from other developing countries are singled out. The issue of obtaining expertise and knowledge in the global market as cheap as possible is stressed, and realistic figures of cost planning are highlighted, as determined by the overall health system necessities and budget limitations.

  8. Does the Establishment of Sustainable Use Reserves Affect Fire Management in the Humid Tropics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Carmenta

    Full Text Available Tropical forests are experiencing a growing fire problem driven by climatic change, agricultural expansion and forest degradation. Protected areas are an important feature of forest protection strategies, and sustainable use reserves (SURs may be reducing fire prevalence since they promote sustainable livelihoods and resource management. However, the use of fire in swidden agriculture, and other forms of land management, may be undermining the effectiveness of SURs in meeting their conservation and sustainable development goals. We analyse MODIS derived hot pixels, TRMM rainfall data, Terra-Class land cover data, socio-ecological data from the Brazilian agro-census and the spatial extent of rivers and roads to evaluate whether the designation of SURs reduces fire occurrence in the Brazilian Amazon. Specifically, we ask (1 a. Is SUR location (i.e., de facto or (1 b. designation (i.e. de jure the driving factor affecting performance in terms of the spatial density of fires?, and (2, Does SUR creation affect fire management (i.e., the timing of fires in relation to previous rainfall? We demonstrate that pre-protection baselines are crucial for understanding reserve performance. We show that reserve creation had no discernible impact on fire density, and that fires were less prevalent in SURs due to their characteristics of sparser human settlement and remoteness, rather than their status de jure. In addition, the timing of fires in relation to rainfall, indicative of local fire management and adherence to environmental law, did not improve following SUR creation. These results challenge the notion that SURs promote environmentally sensitive fire-management, and suggest that SURs in Amazonia will require special attention if they are to curtail future accidental wildfires, particularly as plans to expand the road infrastructure throughout the region are realised. Greater investment to support improved fire management by farmers living in reserves

  9. OCULUS fire: a command and control system for fire management with crowd sourcing and social media interconnectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomopoulos, Stelios C. A.; Kyriazanos, Dimitris M.; Astyakopoulos, Alkiviadis; Dimitros, Kostantinos; Margonis, Christos; Thanos, Giorgos Konstantinos; Skroumpelou, Katerina

    2016-05-01

    AF3 (Advanced Forest Fire Fighting2) is a European FP7 research project that intends to improve the efficiency of current fire-fighting operations and the protection of human lives, the environment and property by developing innovative technologies to ensure the integration between existing and new systems. To reach this objective, the AF3 project focuses on innovative active and passive countermeasures, early detection and monitoring, integrated crisis management and advanced public information channels. OCULUS Fire is the innovative control and command system developed within AF3 as a monitoring, GIS and Knowledge Extraction System and Visualization Tool. OCULUS Fire includes (a) an interface for real-time updating and reconstructing of maps to enable rerouting based on estimated hazards and risks, (b) processing of GIS dynamic re-construction and mission re-routing, based on the fusion of airborne, satellite, ground and ancillary geolocation data, (c) visualization components for the C2 monitoring system, displaying and managing information arriving from a variety of sources and (d) mission and situational awareness module for OCULUS Fire ground monitoring system being part of an Integrated Crisis Management Information System for ground and ancillary sensors. OCULUS Fire will also process and visualise information from public information channels, social media and also mobile applications by helpful citizens and volunteers. Social networking, community building and crowdsourcing features will enable a higher reliability and less false alarm rates when using such data in the context of safety and security applications.

  10. Vegetation management with fire modifies peatland soil thermal regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lee E; Palmer, Sheila M; Johnston, Kerrylyn; Holden, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    Vegetation removal with fire can alter the thermal regime of the land surface, leading to significant changes in biogeochemistry (e.g. carbon cycling) and soil hydrology. In the UK, large expanses of carbon-rich upland environments are managed to encourage increased abundance of red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scotica) by rotational burning of shrub vegetation. To date, though, there has not been any consideration of whether prescribed vegetation burning on peatlands modifies the thermal regime of the soil mass in the years after fire. In this study thermal regime was monitored across 12 burned peatland soil plots over an 18-month period, with the aim of (i) quantifying thermal dynamics between burned plots of different ages (from management. Compared to plots burned 15 + years previously, plots recently burned (soil temperatures, and lower minima. Statistical models (generalised least square regression) were developed to predict daily mean and maximum soil temperature in plots burned 15 + years prior to the study. These models were then applied to predict temperatures of plots burned 2, 4 and 7 years previously, with significant deviations from predicted temperatures illustrating the magnitude of burn management effects. Temperatures measured in soil plots burned Soil temperatures in plots burnt 7 years previously were most similar to plots burned 15 + years ago indicating the potential for soil temperatures to recover as vegetation regrows. Our findings that prescribed peatland vegetation burning alters soil thermal regime should provide an impetus for further research to understand the consequences of thermal regime change for carbon processing and release, and hydrological processes, in these peatlands.

  11. Evolution of fire and invasive alien plant management practices in fynbos

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wilgen, BW

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The history and development of fire and invasive alien plant management policies in fynbos during the 20th century are reviewed. Fire was initially condemned outright as a destructive force, but as its vital role became better understood, management...

  12. Perils in the adaptation of fire management to a changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armando González-Cabán; M.M. Fernández-Ramiro; Claudio Conese; Francesco Bosello; Jorge Núñez; Victor Otrachshenko; B.J. Orr

    2014-01-01

    Increased fire load and costs are anticipated under future scenarios of climate and other global changes. This requires increased efficiency in investments in wildfire management operations, and resolving the disconnect problem between science, policy and management.

  13. Effect of fire season, fire frequency, rainfall and management on fire intensity in savanna vegetation in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, N

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available in the Kruger National Park, South Africa, by documenting fuel loads, fuel moisture contents, rates of fire spread and the heat yields of fuel in 956 experimental plot burns over 21 years. 3. Individual fires were conducted in five different months (February...

  14. Human Factors in Fire Safety Management and Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    M.A. Othuman Mydin

    2014-01-01

    Fire protection is the study and practice of mitigating the unwanted effects of potentially destructive fires. It involves the study of the behavior, compartmentalization, and investigation of fire and its related emergencies, as well as the research and development, production, testing and application of mitigating systems. Problems still occurred despite of the adequate fire safety systems installed. For most people in high-risk buildings, not all accidents were caused by ...

  15. Forest-fire models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiganoush Preisler; Alan Ager

    2013-01-01

    For applied mathematicians forest fire models refer mainly to a non-linear dynamic system often used to simulate spread of fire. For forest managers forest fire models may pertain to any of the three phases of fire management: prefire planning (fire risk models), fire suppression (fire behavior models), and postfire evaluation (fire effects and economic models). In...

  16. Recent fire history of the Table Mountain National Park and implications for fire management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forsyth, GG

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available weather data from a recording weather station at Cape Town International Airport (33º58’S, 18º36’E) for the period 1970 to 2007 and used the McArthur Forest Fire Danger Index (Noble et al. 1980) to calculate daily indices of fire danger. The data used... this in January 2001. These fires destroyed 14 houses and necessitated the temporary evacuation of many residents, both reducing the immediate need for further burning and hardening public attitudes towards fire. As a result, almost no large prescribed burns...

  17. Climate Change and Long-Term Fire Management Impacts on Australian Savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiter, S.; Higgins, S. I.; Beringer, J.; Hutley, L. B.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical savannas cover a large proportion of the Earth's land surface and many people are dependent on the ecosystem services that savannas supply. Their sustainable management is therefore crucial. Due to the complexity of vegetation dynamics, the impacts of climate change and land use on savannas are highly uncertain. Here, we use a dynamic vegetation model, the aDGVM, to project how climate change and fire management influence vegetation in northern Australian savannas in 2100. We show that under future climate conditions, vegetation can store more carbon than under ambient conditions, despite substantial changes in fire regimes. Changes in rainfall seasonality influence future carbon storage but do not turn vegetation into a carbon source, suggesting that CO2 fertilization is the main driver of vegetation change. The application of prescribed fires with varying return intervals and burning season, influences vegetation dynamics and fire induced carbon and greenhouse gas emissions. Carbon sequestration is maximized with early dry season fires and long fire return intervals, grass productivity is maximized with late dry season fires at an intermediate fire return intervals. The study has implications for management policy across Australian savannas because it can contribute to identifying fire management strategies that optimize grazing yield, carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions. This knowledge is crucial to maintain important ecosystem services of Australian savannas.

  18. Landowners' perceptions of risk in grassland management: woody plant encroachment and prescribed fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan N. Harr

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ecologists recognize that fire and herbivory are essential to maintaining habitat quality in grassland ecosystems. Prescribed fire and grazing are typically used on public reserves to increase biodiversity, improve grassland productivity, and control encroachment of woody plants. However, these tools, particularly prescribed fire, have not been widely adopted by private landowners. Fire suppression and prescribed fire are strategies that present competing risks to owners who make management decisions. We explore landowner perceptions of risk associated with (1 eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana encroachment, and (2 the use of prescribed fire to control woody species in the Grand River Grasslands of Iowa and Missouri, USA. We found that although mapping data of eastern redcedar in this region showed substantial encroachment over the past three decades, concept mapping of landowner beliefs and in-person interviews of local community leaders revealed that perceived risks associated with prescribed fire often outweighed those associated with loss of forage and grassland habitats.

  19. First Approximations of Prescribed Fire Risks Relative to Other Management Techniques Used on Private Lands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirac Twidwell

    Full Text Available Fire is widely recognized as a critical ecological and evolutionary driver that needs to be at the forefront of land management actions if conservation targets are to be met. However, the prevailing view is that prescribed fire is riskier than other land management techniques. Perceived risks associated with the application of fire limits its use and reduces agency support for prescribed burning in the private sector. As a result, considerably less cost-share support is given for prescribed fire compared to mechanical techniques. This study tests the general perception that fire is a riskier technique relative to other land management options. Due to the lack of data available to directly test this notion, we use a combination of approaches including 1 a comparison of fatalities resulting from different occupations that are proxies for techniques employed in land management, 2 a comparison of fatalities resulting from wildland fire versus prescribed fire, and 3 an exploration of causal factors responsible for wildland fire-related fatalities. This approach establishes a first approximation of the relative risk of fatality to private citizens using prescribed fire compared to other management techniques that are readily used in ecosystem management. Our data do not support using risks of landowner fatalities as justification for the use of alternative land management techniques, such as mechanical (machine-related equipment, over prescribed fire. Vehicles and heavy machinery are consistently leading reasons for fatalities within occupations selected as proxies for management techniques employed by ranchers and agricultural producers, and also constitute a large proportion of fatalities among firefighters. Our study provides the foundation for agencies to establish data-driven decisions regarding the degree of support they provide for prescribed burning on private lands.

  20. Perceptions of forest experts on climate change and fire management in European Mediterranean forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raftoyannis Y

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Climate change has already increased fire risk in Mediterranean forests. Adaptation options related to forest fires and climate change include measures related to fuel management, fire fighting and infrastructure, as well as public awareness. The importance of each of these measures was evaluated in six Mediterranean countries in a study initiated within the COST Action FP0703 “Expected Climate Change and Options for European Silviculture”. A questionnaire survey was used to document the views of foresters and forest scientists. Country differences were observed and adaptation measures related to fire fighting efficiency and public awareness were valued as more important than fuel management. Results were discussed in the light of a critical review of adaptive fire management measures with special reference to European Mediterranean countries.

  1. Restoring and managing low-severity fire in dry-forest landscapes of the western USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, William L

    2017-01-01

    Low-severity fires that killed few canopy trees played a significant historical role in dry forests of the western USA and warrant restoration and management, but historical rates of burning remain uncertain. Past reconstructions focused on on dating fire years, not measuring historical rates of burning. Past statistics, including mean composite fire interval (mean CFI) and individual-tree fire interval (mean ITFI) have biases and inaccuracies if used as estimators of rates. In this study, I used regression, with a calibration dataset of 96 cases, to test whether these statistics could accurately predict two equivalent historical rates, population mean fire interval (PMFI) and fire rotation (FR). The best model, using Weibull mean ITFI, had low prediction error and R2adj = 0.972. I used this model to predict historical PMFI/FR at 252 sites spanning dry forests. Historical PMFI/FR for a pool of 342 calibration and predicted sites had a mean of 39 years and median of 30 years. Short ( 55 years) mean PMFI/FRs were mainly from northern New Mexico to South Dakota. Mountain sites often had a large range in PMFI/FR. Nearly all 342 estimates are for old forests with a history of primarily low-severity fire, found across only about 34% of historical dry-forest area. Frequent fire (PMFI/FR fire. Historical fuels (e.g., understory shrubs and small trees) could fully recover between multidecadal fires, allowing some denser forests and some ecosystem processes and wildlife habitat to be less limited by fire. Lower historical rates mean less restoration treatment is needed before beginning managed fire for resource benefits, where feasible. Mimicking patterns of variability in historical low-severity fire regimes would likely benefit biological diversity and ecosystem functioning.

  2. 'SINAMI': a tool for the economic evaluation of forest fire management programs in Mediterranean ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco Rodriguez y Silva; Armando Gonzalez-Caban

    2010-01-01

    Historically, in Spain and most European countries, forest fire budgets have never been subjected to an objective and rigorous economic analysis indicative of the returns on investments in fire management protection programs. Thus far we have witnessed expansive growth of costs without any investment planning. New economic realities and more focussed oversight by...

  3. Change as a factor in advancing fire-management decisionmaking and program effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas. Zimmerman

    2011-01-01

    Wildland fire management—as evidenced by its nature, historical growth, and development—can be characterized as a program of constant change. To become better able to meet changing conditions and complexity, fire management must be agile, flexible, and able to embrace change. But many challenges and limitations to acceptance continue to hamper...

  4. Focus on...The right tools: Managing for fire using FIA inventory data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    USDA Forest Service

    2003-01-01

    The relative severity of recent fire seasons has led to numerous debates about the health, associated fire hazards, and effectiveness of fuel reduction treatments in forests across the United States. Scientific analyses of forest inventories offer policy makers and other interested parties objective information with which to make crucial forest management decisions....

  5. Anaesthetic management of laparoscopic assisted bilateral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-13

    Apr 13, 2011 ... assisted bilateral adrenalectomy in a five-year-old child with Cushing's ... and her vocal cords visualised and sprayed with 2 ml 2% lignocaine. .... crossmatched. Medical therapy of Cushing's disease includes the drugs,.

  6. The Assistant Manager - a Key Factor of the Managerial Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lecturer Ph. D. Niculina Vargolici

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The new economic context, marked by the crisis and by radical transformations of the labor market, generates the need for more and more sophisticated skills for the assistant manager. That is because the efficiency of the secretarial activity implies both strategic skills and complex abilities, starting from knowledge about the specific activity of the company/institution where the person works as assistant manager, to connected areas such as: management, marketing, human resources, brand communication, company’s culture etc. Whether the manager changes his job together with the “boss”, or the boss is changed and he is bond to adapt to new conditions, a strong team spirit between the manager and his assistant is one of the most important elements that contribute to the productivity and efficiency of the both. The loyalty to the boss and to the company where he works, his adaptation capacity, his competence and his professionalism make the today’s assistant manager a key factor of the managerial team. The essence of the assistant manager job consists in making more efficient the managerial activities, namely, to make it respond to the expectations expressed or not of the manager, or even to anticipate them.

  7. Towards adaptive fire management for biodiversity conservation: Experience in South African National Parks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W. van Wilgen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the experience gained in three South African national parks (Kruger, Table Mountain and Bontebok with regard to the adaptive management of fire for the conservation of biodiversity. In the Kruger National Park, adaptive approaches have evolved over the past 15 years, beginning initially as a form of ‘informed trial and error’, but progressing towards active adaptive management in which landscape-scale, experimental burning treatments are being applied in order to learn. In the process, significant advances in understanding regarding the role and management of fire have been made. Attempts have been made to transfer the approaches developed in Kruger National Park to the other two national parks. However, little progress has been made to date, both because of a failure to provide an agreed context for the introduction of adaptive approaches, and because (in the case of Bontebok National Park too little time has passed to be able to make an assessment. Fire management interventions, ultimately, will manifest themselves in terms of biodiversity outcomes, but definite links between fire interventions and biodiversity outcomes have yet to be made.Conservation implications: Significant challenges face the managers of fire-prone and fire adapted ecosystems, where the attainment of ecosystem goals may require approaches (like encouraging high-intensity fires at hot and dry times of the year that threaten societal goals related to safety. In addition, approaches to fire management have focused on encouraging particular fire patterns in the absence of a sound understanding of their ecological outcomes. Adaptive management offers a framework for addressing these issues, but will require higher levels of agreement, monitoring and assessment than have been the case to date.

  8. Ecological legacies of Indigenous fire management in high-latitude coastal temperate rainforests, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, K.; Lertzman, K. P.; Starzomski, B. M.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropogenic burning is considered to have little impact on coastal temperate rainforest fire regimes in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of North America, yet few long-term fire histories have been reconstructed in these forests. We use a multidisciplinary approach to reconstruct the ecological impact, scale, and legacies of historic fire regime variability in high-latitude coastal temperate rainforests located in British Columbia, Canada. We map seven centuries of fire activity with fire scars and records of stand establishment, and examine patterns in the distribution and composition of vegetation to assess whether fire was historically used as a tool for resource management. We conduct a paired study of 20 former Indigenous habitation and control sites across a 100 km2 island group to relate historic fire activity with long-term patterns of human land use and contemporary lightning strike densities. Fires were significantly associated with the locations of former Indigenous habitation sites, low and mixed in severity, and likely intentionally used to influence the composition and structure of vegetation, thus increasing the productivity of culturally important plants such as western redcedar, berry-producing shrubs, and bracken fern. Centuries of repeated anthropogenic burning have resulted in a mosaic of vegetation types in different stages of succession. These data are directly relevant to the management of contemporary forests as they do not support the widespread contention that old growth coastal temperate rainforests in this region are pristine landscapes where fire is rare, but more likely the result of long-term human land use practices.

  9. Deriving Multiple Benefits from Carbon Market-Based Savanna Fire Management: An Australian Example.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Russell-Smith

    Full Text Available Carbon markets afford potentially useful opportunities for supporting socially and environmentally sustainable land management programs but, to date, have been little applied in globally significant fire-prone savanna settings. While fire is intrinsic to regulating the composition, structure and dynamics of savanna systems, in north Australian savannas frequent and extensive late dry season wildfires incur significant environmental, production and social impacts. Here we assess the potential of market-based savanna burning greenhouse gas emissions abatement and allied carbon biosequestration projects to deliver compatible environmental and broader socio-economic benefits in a highly biodiverse north Australian setting. Drawing on extensive regional ecological knowledge of fire regime effects on fire-vulnerable taxa and communities, we compare three fire regime metrics (seasonal fire frequency, proportion of long-unburnt vegetation, fire patch-size distribution over a 15-year period for three national parks with an indigenously (Aboriginal owned and managed market-based emissions abatement enterprise. Our assessment indicates improved fire management outcomes under the emissions abatement program, and mostly little change or declining outcomes on the parks. We attribute improved outcomes and putative biodiversity benefits under the abatement program to enhanced strategic management made possible by the market-based mitigation arrangement. For these same sites we estimate quanta of carbon credits that could be delivered under realistic enhanced fire management practice, using currently available and developing accredited Australian savanna burning accounting methods. We conclude that, in appropriate situations, market-based savanna burning activities can provide transformative climate change mitigation, ecosystem health, and community benefits in northern Australia, and, despite significant challenges, potentially in other fire-prone savanna

  10. A systematic conservation planning approach to fire risk management in Natura 2000 sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresta, Massimiliano; Carranza, Maria Laura; Garfì, Vittorio; Di Febbraro, Mirko; Marchetti, Marco; Loy, Anna

    2016-10-01

    A primary challenge in conservation biology is to preserve the most representative biodiversity while simultaneously optimizing the efforts associated with conservation. In Europe, the implementation of the Natura 2000 network requires protocols to recognize and map threats to biodiversity and to identify specific mitigation actions. We propose a systematic conservation planning approach to optimize management actions against specific threats based on two fundamental parameters: biodiversity values and threat pressure. We used the conservation planning software Marxan to optimize a fire management plan in a Natura 2000 coastal network in southern Italy. We address three primary questions: i) Which areas are at high fire risk? ii) Which areas are the most valuable for threatened biodiversity? iii) Which areas should receive priority risk-mitigation actions for the optimal effect?, iv) which fire-prevention actions are feasible in the management areas?. The biodiversity values for the Natura 2000 spatial units were derived from the distribution maps of 18 habitats and 89 vertebrate species of concern in Europe (Habitat Directive 92/43/EEC). The threat pressure map, defined as fire probability, was obtained from digital layers of fire risk and of fire frequency. Marxan settings were defined as follows: a) planning units of 40 × 40 m, b) conservation features defined as all habitats and vertebrate species of European concern occurring in the study area, c) conservation targets defined according with fire sensitivity and extinction risk of conservation features, and d) costs determined as the complement of fire probabilities. We identified 23 management areas in which to concentrate efforts for the optimal reduction of fire-induced effects. Because traditional fire prevention is not feasible for most of policy habitats included in the management areas, alternative prevention practices were identified that allows the conservation of the vegetation structure. The

  11. Silvicultural considerations for managing fire-dependent oak woodland ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    John M. Kabrick; Daniel C. Dey; Carter O. Kinkead; Benjamin O. Knapp; Michael Leahy; Matthew G. Olson; Michael C. Stambaugh; Aaron P. Stevenson

    2014-01-01

    Oak woodlands are characterized by open understories and dense ground flora composed of forbs, grasses, and sedges. They once were common in the western Central Hardwood Forest region and the prairie-forest transition zone where low-intensity fires occurred frequently. In the absence of fire, many of the woodland ecosystems throughout much of this region have succeeded...

  12. Restoring and managing low-severity fire in dry-forest landscapes of the western USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Low-severity fires that killed few canopy trees played a significant historical role in dry forests of the western USA and warrant restoration and management, but historical rates of burning remain uncertain. Past reconstructions focused on on dating fire years, not measuring historical rates of burning. Past statistics, including mean composite fire interval (mean CFI) and individual-tree fire interval (mean ITFI) have biases and inaccuracies if used as estimators of rates. In this study, I used regression, with a calibration dataset of 96 cases, to test whether these statistics could accurately predict two equivalent historical rates, population mean fire interval (PMFI) and fire rotation (FR). The best model, using Weibull mean ITFI, had low prediction error and R2adj = 0.972. I used this model to predict historical PMFI/FR at 252 sites spanning dry forests. Historical PMFI/FR for a pool of 342 calibration and predicted sites had a mean of 39 years and median of 30 years. Short ( 55 years) mean PMFI/FRs were mainly from northern New Mexico to South Dakota. Mountain sites often had a large range in PMFI/FR. Nearly all 342 estimates are for old forests with a history of primarily low-severity fire, found across only about 34% of historical dry-forest area. Frequent fire (PMFI/FR shrubs and small trees) could fully recover between multidecadal fires, allowing some denser forests and some ecosystem processes and wildlife habitat to be less limited by fire. Lower historical rates mean less restoration treatment is needed before beginning managed fire for resource benefits, where feasible. Mimicking patterns of variability in historical low-severity fire regimes would likely benefit biological diversity and ecosystem functioning. PMID:28199416

  13. Burning, fire prevention and landscape productions among the Pemon, Gran Sabana, Venezuela: toward an intercultural approach to wildland fire management in Neotropical Savannas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sletto, Bjørn; Rodriguez, Iokiñe

    2013-01-30

    Wildland fire management in savanna landscapes increasingly incorporates indigenous knowledge to pursue strategies of controlled, prescriptive burning to control fuel loads. However, such participatory approaches are fraught with challenges because of contrasting views on the role of fire and the practices of prescribed burning between indigenous and state fire managers. Also, indigenous and state systems of knowledge and meanings associated with fire are not monolithic but instead characterized by conflicts and inconsistencies, which require new, communicative strategies in order to develop successful, intercultural approaches to fire management. This paper is based on long-term research on indigenous Pemon social constructs, rules and regulations regarding fire use, and traditional system of prescribed burning in the Gran Sabana, Venezuela. The authors review factors that act as constraints against successful intercultural fire management in the Gran Sabana, including conflicting perspectives on fire use within state agencies and in indigenous communities, and propose strategies for research and communicative planning to guide future efforts for more participatory and effective fire management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. White-tailed deer ecology and management on Fire Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, H.B.

    2005-01-01

    Deer populations have grown dramatically on Fire Island National Seashore (FIlS) since 1983. Trend data reveal a dichotomy in deer dynamics. In the eastern half of the island, deer density appears to have stabilized between 25-35 deer/km2. In the western half of the island, deer densities are 3-4 times as high in residential communities. Concomitant with that increase has been a general decline in physical stature of some animals, visible impacts on island vegetation, especially in the Sunken Forest, and a perceived increase in the frequency of human and deer interactions. Intensive research on FIlS has shown that deer occupy relatively predictable home ranges throughout the year, but can and do move up and down the island. Impacts of deer on vegetation are most dramatic in the Sunken Forest. Most obvious are the effects of browsing on the herb layer of the Sunken Forest. The least obvious, but perhaps more significant impact is the stark lack of regeneration of canopy tree species since about 1970, which coincides with the initiation of the deer population irruption. A number of herbs and shrubs have been greatly reduced in the understory, and their propagules from the soil. Deer do not readily transmit the bacterium that causes Lyme disease to other organisms, but deer are important hosts for adult ticks which underscores their importance in the transmission pathway of the disease to humans. Deer on FIlS, while occasionally docile, are still wild animals and should be treated as such. Some animals are relatively unafraid of humans due to the absence of predation and a lack of harassment. This in turn has contributed to a longstanding tradition of feeding deer by many residents and visitors, particularly in western portions of the island. Feeding affects both the behavior and population dynamics of deer inhabiting Fire Island. Recent efforts to reduce deer feeding by visitors and residents have been very effective. Ongoing experiments with Porcine Zona Pellucida

  15. Wildland fire management and air quality in the southern Sierra Nevada: using the Lion Fire as a case study with a multi-year perspective on PM(2.5) impacts and fire policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Don; Cisneros, Ricardo

    2014-11-01

    Management of fire is an important and controversial policy issue. Active fire suppression has led to a backlog of fuels, limited the ecological benefits of fire, and reduced short-term smoke impacts likely delaying these emissions to future generations over a larger spatial extent. Smoke impacts can be expected to increase as fire size and intensity increase and the fuel backlog is consumed; whether through reintroduction of fire under desirable conditions or through stand replacing fire. Land Management Agencies would like to increase the use of naturally ignited fires to burn during favorable conditions as a way to reduce catastrophic fires. This study provides information about the levels of air quality impacts expected from these types of fires and discusses some of the policy controversies of managed fire that propagate inconsistencies between agencies and enter the public discourse. The Lion Fire, a primarily low intensity 8,370 ha fire that was extensively monitored for Particulate Matter less than 2.5 microns (PM2.5), is used to quantify impacts to air quality. PM2.5 monitoring sites are used to assess exposure, public health impacts, and subsequently quantify annual air quality during a year with a fire that is within the historic normal fire size and intensity for this area. Ground level PM2.5 impacts were found to be localized with 99% of the hourly Air Quality Index readings in the moderate or good category for the sites impacted by the fire. PM2.5 concentrations at sites nearest the fire were below annual federal air quality standards for PM2.5 with annual 98th percentile at the most impacted sites (Johnsondale, Kernville, and Camp Nelson) of 35.0, 34.0, and 28.0 μg m(-3) respectively. Smoke impacts to PM2.5 concentrations were not found to reach the populated Central Valley. The findings suggest that this type of fire can be implemented with minimal public health impacts thus allowing an opportunity for air and fire managers to alter policy to

  16. Bounded ranges of variation as a framework for future conservation and fire management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Max A; Hurteau, Matthew D; Suding, Katharine N; D'Antonio, Carla M

    2013-05-01

    Alterations in natural fire patterns have negatively affected fire-prone ecosystems in many ways. The historical range of variability (HRV) concept evolved as a management target for natural vegetation composition and fire regimes in fire-prone ecosystems. HRV-based management inherently assumes that ecosystem resilience is reflected in observed ranges of past vegetation and fire dynamics, typically without knowledge of where thresholds exist beyond these dynamics. Given uncertainty in future conditions, some have argued that HRV may not adequately reflect ecosystem resilience to future fire activity. We suggest a refinement that includes concepts from the thresholds of potential concern (TPC) framework, which emphasizes tipping points at the extremes of ecosystem dynamics and other socially unacceptable outcomes. We propose bounded ranges of variation (BRV), an approach focused on building resilience by using historical information, but also by identifying socio-ecological thresholds to avoid and associated management action triggers. Here, we examine nonnative species and carbon sequestration as examples of how the BRV framework could be used in the context of conservation and fire management.

  17. A multi-disciplinary approach to fire management strategy, suppression costs, community interaction, and organizational performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne E. Black; Krista Gebert; Sarah McCaffrey; Toddi Steelman; Janie Canton-Thompson

    2009-01-01

    Wildland fire management must balance the multiple objectives of protecting life, property, and resources; reducing hazardous fuels; and restoring ecosystems. These Federal policy imperatives, varied yet connected, must be met under an increasingly constrained budget. A key to management success is effectively exercising the full range of management flexibility in...

  18. An Examination of Assistant Professors' Project Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Shannon Atkinson; Hartshorne, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to identify factors that influence the use of project management in higher education research projects by investigating the project management practices of assistant professors. Design/methodology/approach: Using a grounded theory approach that included in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 22…

  19. An Examination of Assistant Professors' Project Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Shannon Atkinson; Hartshorne, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to identify factors that influence the use of project management in higher education research projects by investigating the project management practices of assistant professors. Design/methodology/approach: Using a grounded theory approach that included in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 22…

  20. Relative importance of fuel management, ignition management and weather for area burned: Evidence from five landscape-fire-succession models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey J. Cary; Mike D. Flannigan; Robert E. Keane; Ross A. Bradstock; Ian D. Davies; James M. Lenihan; Chao Li; Kimberley A. Logan; Russell A. Parsons

    2009-01-01

    The behaviour of five landscape fire models (CAFE, FIRESCAPE, LAMOS(HS), LANDSUM and SEMLAND) was compared in a standardised modelling experiment. The importance of fuel management approach, fuel management effort, ignition management effort and weather in determining variation in area burned and number of edge pixels burned (a measure of potential impact on assets...

  1. Evaluation of Fire Hazard and Safety Management of Heritage Buildings in Georgetown, Penang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othuman Mydin M.A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fire is a subject that is always neglected and ignored as far as heritage buildings are concerned. Unlike newly-built buildings, which are required under UBBL to undergo certain fire protection system tests, people are less likely to carry out such tests and detailed assessments for heritage buildings. Thus, this research is significant as it is aimed at accomplishing several objectives including studying the current fire emergency plan, besides identifying and assessing the possible fire hazards in heritage buildings in Penang. Several case studies were carried out at a few premises such as the Khoo Kongsi, Cheah Kongsi, Hock Teik Chen Shin Temple and the Teochew Temple with the aid of the Fire Rescue Department Malaysia (FRDM. The results obtained from this study will be discussed according to several aspects focusing on general health and safety management at the site, the fire-fighting system, fire exit routes and signage at the temples, fire hazards, and fire detection and alarm.

  2. Fire patterns in the range of the greater sage-grouse, 1984-2013 — Implications for conservation and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Matthew L.; Matchett, John R.; Shinneman, Douglas J.; Coates, Peter S.

    2015-09-10

    Fire ranks among the top three threats to the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) throughout its range, and among the top two threats in the western part of its range. The national research strategy for this species and the recent U.S. Department of the Interior Secretarial Order 3336 call for science-based threats assessment of fire to inform conservation planning and fire management efforts. The cornerstone of such assessments is a clear understanding of where fires are occurring and what aspects of fire regimes may be shifting outside of their historical range of variation. This report fulfills this need by describing patterns of fire area, fire size, fire rotation, and fire season length and timing from 1984 to 2013 across the range of the greater sage-grouse. This information need is further addressed by evaluating the ecological and management implications of these fire patterns. Analyses are stratified by major vegetation types and the seven greater sage-grouse management zones, delineated regionally as four western and three eastern management zones. Soil temperature and moisture indicators of resilience to fire and resistance to cheatgrass invasion, and the potential for establishment of a grass/fire cycle, are used as unifying concepts in developing fire threat assessments for each analysis strata.

  3. Legal barriers to effective ecosystem management: exploring linkages between liability, regulations, and prescribed fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonkka, Carissa L; Rogers, William E; Kreuter, Urs P

    2015-12-01

    Resistance to the use of prescribed fire is strong among many private land managers despite the advantages it offers for maintaining fire-adapted ecosystems. Even managers who are aware of the benefits of using prescribed fire as a management tool avoid using it, citing potential liability as a major reason for their aversion. Recognizing the importance of prescribed fire for ecosystem management and the constraints current statutory schemes impose on its use, several states in the United States have undertaken prescribed burn statutory reform. The stated purpose of these statutory reforms, often called "right to burn" or "prescribed burning" acts, is to encourage prescribed burning for resource protection, public safety, and land management. Our research assessed the consequences of prescribed burn statutory reform by identifying legal incentives and impediments to prescribed fire application for ecosystem restoration and management, as well as fuel reduction. Specifically, we explored the relationship between prescribed burning laws and decisions made by land managers by exploiting a geographic-based natural experiment to compare landowner-prescribed fire use in contiguous counties with different regulations and legal liability standards. Controlling for potentially confounding variables, we found that private landowners in counties with gross negligence liability standards burn significantly more hectares than those in counties with simple negligence standards (F6,72 = 4.16, P = 0.046). There was no difference in hectares burned on private land between counties with additional statutorily mandated regulatory requirements and those requiring only a permit to complete a prescribed burn (F6,72 = 1.42, P = 0.24) or between counties with burn ban exemptions for certified prescribed burn managers and those with no exemptions during burn bans (F6,72 = 1.39, P = 0.24). Lawmakers attempting to develop prescribed burning statutes to promote the safe use of prescribed fire

  4. The challenge of applying governance and sustainable development to wildland fire management in Southern Europe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susana Aguilar; Cristina Montiel

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses participatory processes in wildland fire management (WFM).Participation is an essential element of both the European Sustainable Development (SD) Strategy and the White Paper on Governance.Governance and SD have thus become an interconnected challenge to be applied to WFM (as a sub-area in forest policy),amongst other policies.An overspread weakness in WFM is lack of real participatinn of stakeholders.Absence of (or deficient) participation can seriously impair contribution of this group to WFM in high-risk areas and runs counter governance and the SDS.Further,this weakness might prevent an efficient.use of fire as a land management tool (prescribed burning,PB) and as a technique for fighting wildfire (suppression fire,SF).Even though these rue practices have been well known in many different places,they have been increasingly neglected or prohibited over time in Southern Europe.At present,forest and fire fighting administrations are turning their eyes back on them and analyzing the benefits of using fire in relation to preventive and suppressive actions.Therefore,participatory and diffusion mechanisms (the latter adopting the shape of national and international experts' networks) are required in order to solve the socalled fire paradox:that is,the need to move from a one-dimensional perception of the negative impacts of fire to a more sophisticated one that also stresses its positive effects.Governance,based on broad social participation,and diffusion,through fire networks,are of utmost importance in order,first,to diminish long-standing suspicion amongst different interests as to the use of fire and,secondly,to diffuse best practices associated with PB and SF.Most importantly,the EU should exercise its environmental leadership so that these new fire practices and sustainable WFM are diffused across the international arena.

  5. The evolution of fire management practices in savanna protected areas in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.W. van Wilgen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The history and development of ecologically-based fire management policies in savanna protected areas during the 20th century are reviewed. Research on fire in savannas began in the 1950s, and from the 1980s onwards, managers of savanna protected areas experimented on large scales with different management approaches. New ecological paradigms that embraced variability in space and time, and management goals that broadened from single-species to biodiversity conservation, precipitated significant changes to management approaches in the 1990s. Many lessons have been learnt in the process, allowing for the derivation of general principles regarding both the effects of fire and managerial ability to influence fire regimes on a large scale. Significant challenges remain; these include dealing with increasing CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere, and with interactions between fire and increasing elephant numbers in protected areas. The ability of savanna managers to deal with these challenges in the context of an imperfect understanding will be determined by how well, and how fast, they can learn from experience.

  6. Dog-assisted therapy to treat emotional management in teenagers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xóchitl Ortiz Jiménez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The emotional changes in adolescence are related to the difficulty to perceive, understand and regulate emotions, which negatively impacts on self-esteem and the management of emotions. Dog-assisted therapy can help improve self-esteem and help in the management of emotions. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of dog-assisted therapy on self-esteem and components of emotions in a group of adolescents with emotional problems. The results showed significant changes in the attentional emotion component of emotions, which means, in the ability to perceive their emotions.

  7. Integrating Fire, Climate, and Societal Factors into Decision Support for Strategic Planning in Wildland Fire Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara J. Morehouse; Gregg Garfin; Timothy Brown; Thomas W. Swetnam

    2006-01-01

    An El Niño winter in 1998-99, followed by a strong La Niña winter in 1999- 2000, set the stage for potentially large wildfires in the southwestern, southeastern, and northwestern forests of the United States. Researchers at the University of Arizona organized a three-day workshop to discuss the relationship between synoptic scale climate conditions and wildland fire...

  8. Fire Management/Suppression Systems/Concepts Relating to Aircraft Cabin Fire Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    windows melted, reticulated , combusted, and burned through within about 1 min. This is much less time than is needed for the fire to penetrate the...generate more smoke in flaming combustion.3 6 3 The reverse is true with cellulosic materials, which reduce 31 ................................. the amount...sometimes by a factor of 100, than that produced by cellulosic materials.3 0 * Higher heating levels of polymeric materials also increase their production of

  9. Improving disaster risk reduction capacity of District Civil Protection Units in managing veld fires: A case of Mangwe District in Matabeleland South Province, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Dube

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article analysed disaster risk reduction capacity of District Civil Protection Units (DCPUs in managing veld fires in Mangwe District of Matabeleland South Province, Zimbabwe. Veld fires have resulted in unnecessary material, environmental and economic losses. Communities’ livelihoods and property have been destroyed, and the natural environment depleted. The research sought to improve disaster risk reduction capacity of DCPUs in managing veld fires, through new intervention strategies and a new model. The objectives of the study were to investigate the main causes of veld fires; to analyse their impacts; to examine the effectiveness of the current intervention strategies; and to identify challenges in implementing these interventions. Furthermore, the study sought to recommend new possible intervention strategies. This mainly qualitative study employed self-administered questionnaires, interviews and focus-group discussions. Questionnaires were used to investigate members of the DCPU’s ideas, views and experiences, interviews solicited perceptions of community leaders and their subjects, whilst focus-group discussions assisted with information from members of the District Civil Protection Planning Committee. Veld fires in the district are mainly caused by human activities, and they are prevalent during the months of September and October. They affect livelihoods and the natural environment the most. This study found that DCPUs are not prepared to manage veld fires and therefore recommended new strategies and adoption of the community-based disaster risk reduction model. The new strategies include involving community leaders and members of the communities in DCPUs; regular training and workshops to members of DCPUs on veld fire management; creation of fire protection associations; regular campaigns and rehearsal of emergency drills by the DCPU personnel; the introduction of competitions and incentives in veld fire management; vigorous

  10. An evaluation of the impact of Melaleuca quinquenervia invasion and managment on plant community structure after fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The successful management of invasive species can be particularly difficult in natural areas that depend on disturbances such as fire to maintain community structure and function. In these systems, fire-adapted invasive species may disproportionally benefit from post-fire resource availability, inc...

  11. The management of fire-adapted ecosystems in an urban setting: the case of Table Mountain National Park, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wilgen, BW

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available and invasive alien plant control. National legislation emphasizes the need to protect communities from dangerous wildfires, and this compels fire managers to adopt a cautious approach to the application of fire. Ecological outcomes are optimized under a fire...

  12. The development of solar-assisted gas-fired appliances: phase ii. Final report dec 80-nov 81

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, K.G.; Levine, A.; Colarusso, J.M.; Zakak, A.I.

    1981-12-01

    An evaluation of applying solar assistance to commercial laundry drying and supermarket dehumidification was accomplished. The laundry drying project included experimental evaluation of the transient and steady-state characteristics of the hot air produced by an air-heating solar collector; experimental evaluation of the performance characteristics of a gas-fired laundry dryer as affected by varying the inlet air temperature and humidity; and an assessment of the characteristics of commercial laundries in relation to the potential commercialization of the solar-assisted dryer concept. The supermarket dehumidification project included an assessment of the relative latent and sensible cooling requirements as a function of geographic location; typical design studies of the performance and cost effectiveness of desiccant dehumidification systems in this application; and the incremental effectiveness of solar assistance to desiccant regeneration. In both projects, the solar-assist feature is, at best, marginally cost effective, including incentives, in the near term; however, the gas-fired only desiccant dehumidification concept is shown to be a potentially attractive alternative to vapor compression dehumidification with a potential for widespread application.

  13. Business Schools under Fire: Humanistic Management Education as the Way Forward. Humanism in Business Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Wolfgang, Ed.; Pirson, Michael, Ed.; Dierksmeier, Claus, Ed.; Von Kimakowitz, Ernst, Ed.; Spitzeck, Heiko, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    In a time of instability trust in managers is low. Management education is being scrutinized for its impact on society and business schools have been considered as "silent partners in corporate crime." This book outlines how business schools can get out of the line of fire by presenting the cornerstones of a humanistic business education. This…

  14. Factors affecting fire suppression costs as identified by incident management teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janie Canton-Thompson; Brooke Thompson; Krista Gebert; David Calkin; Geoff Donovan; Greg Jones

    2006-01-01

    This study uses qualitative sociological methodology to discover information and insights about the role of Incident Management Teams in wildland fire suppression costs. We interviewed 48 command and general staff members of Incident Management Teams throughout the United States. Interviewees were asked about team structure, functioning, and decision making as a...

  15. Estimating US federal wildland fire managers' preferences toward competing strategic suppression objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    David E. Calkin; Tyron Venn; Matthew Wibbenmeyer; Matthew P. Thompson

    2012-01-01

    Wildfire management involves significant complexity and uncertainty, requiring simultaneous consideration of multiple, non-commensurate objectives. This paper investigates the tradeoffs fire managers are willing to make among these objectives using a choice experiment methodology that provides three key advancements relative to previous stated-preference studies...

  16. Risk management: Core principles and practices, and their relevance to wildland fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew P. Thompson; Donald G. MacGregor; Dave Calkin

    2016-01-01

    The Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture faces a future of increasing complexity and risk, pressing financial issues, and the inescapable possibility of loss of human life. These issues are perhaps most acute for wildland fire management, the highest risk activity in which the Forest Service engages. Risk management (RM) has long been put forth as an...

  17. Risk terminology primer: Basic principles and a glossary for the wildland fire management community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew P. Thompson; Tom Zimmerman; Dan Mindar; Mary Taber

    2016-01-01

    Risk management is being increasingly promoted as an appropriate method for addressing wildland fire management challenges. However, a lack of a common understanding of risk concepts and terminology is hindering effective application. In response, this General Technical Report provides a set of clear, consistent, understandable, and usable definitions for terms...

  18. Impacts of Land Management on the Resilience of Mediterranean Dry Forests to Fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Jucker Riva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Wildfires have always been a part of the history of Mediterranean forests. However, forests are not always certain to regenerate after a wildfire. Whether they do depends on many factors, some of which may be influenced by land management activities. Failure to regenerate will cause a regime shift in the ecosystem, reducing the provision of ecosystem services and ultimately leading to desertification. How can we increase the resilience of Mediterranean forests to fire? Our approach to answering this question was twofold: first, we reviewed the literature to investigate chains of processes that allowed forests to regenerate (which we label Regeneration Mechanisms, or RMs; and second, we assessed the impact of selected management practices documented in the WOCAT database on these RMs. For the assessment, we evaluated the relation between the benefits and disadvantages of the land management practices on the one hand, and the hindering and supporting factors of the RMs on the other. We identified three distinct RMs that enable Mediterranean forests to recover, as well as the time frame before and after a fire in which they are at work, and factors that can hinder or support resilience. The three RMs enabling a forest to regenerate after a fire consist of regeneration (1 from a seed bank; (2 from resprouting individuals; and (3 from unburned plants that escaped the fire. Management practices were grouped into four categories: (1 fuel breaks; (2 fuel management; (3 afforestation; and (4 mulching. We assessed how and under what conditions land management modifies the ecosystem’s resilience. The results show that land management influences resilience by interacting with resilience mechanisms before and after the fire, and not just by modifying the fire regime. Our analysis demonstrates a need for adaptive—i.e., context- and time-specific—management strategies.

  19. Combining fire and erosion modeling to target forest management activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Elliot; Mary Ellen Miller; Nic Enstice

    2015-01-01

    Forests deliver a number of important ecosystem services including clean water. When forests are disturbed by wildfire, the timing, quantity and quality of runoff are altered. A modeling study was carried out in a forested watershed in California to determine the risk of wildfire, and the potential post-fire sediment delivery from approximately 6-ha hillslope polygons...

  20. A Case for Developing Place-Based Fire Management Strategies from Traditional Ecological Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily A. Ray

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability science promotes place-based resource management because natural processes vary among ecosystems. When local science is limited, land managers may be forced to generalize from other ecosystems that function differently. One proposed solution is to draw upon the traditional ecological knowledge that indigenous groups have accumulated through resource use. Integrating traditional ecological knowledge with conventional resource management is difficult, especially when the two offer competing explanations of local environments. Although resource managers may discount traditional ecological knowledge that contradicts conventional resource management, we investigate the possibility that these disagreements can arise when nonlocal resource management generalizations displace place-based science. Specifically, we compare claims about wildfires made by Athabascan forest users residing in or near the Koyukuk National Wildlife Refuge and in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service fire management plan for that refuge. We focus on two aspects of fire ecology and management: the drivers of landscape flammability and the feasibility of using wildfires and prescribed burns to achieve resource management objectives. The results indicated that some disagreements came from reliance of the federal fire management plan on generalized national narratives at the expense of place-based science. We propose that in some cases, conflicts between traditional ecological knowledge and conventional resource management, rather than indicating a dead end, can identify topics requiring in-depth, place-based research.

  1. Fire management and research in the Kruger National Park, with suggestions on the detection of thresholds of potential concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.W. Van Wilgen

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the options for management of the savanna ecosystems of the Kruger National Park using fire. The major goals of management have shifted from attempts to use fire to achieve a stable vegetation composition, to one of recognising that savanna ecosystems are in constant flux. Fire is a major form of disturbance that helps to maintain a state of flux, and thus to conserve biodiversity. Three candidate approaches for fire management have been put forward@the lightning fire approach, the patch mosaic burning approach, and an approach based on the assessment of ecological criteria. These approaches differ in their underlying philosophies, but not necessarily in their outcomes, although this cannot be predicted with confidence. We propose, therefore, that patterns of fire frequency, season, intensity and spatial distribution be recorded and monitored, and that these patterns should serve as surrogate measures of biodiversity. Guidelines for the definition of thresholds of potential concern with regard to these patterns are discussed. The monitoring of both fire patterns and trends in plant and animal populations can be used to identify interactions between fire and the components of the ecosystem, and these in turn can be used to define a relevant research agenda. The role of management in monitoring and assessing fire patterns (previously regarded as a research responsibility is emphasised. Convergence in the patterns of fire that result from the different management approaches could also serve as a basis for merging some or all of these approaches in order to simplify management.

  2. Irrigation system management assisted by thermal imagery and spatial statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermal imaging has the potential to assist with many aspects of irrigation management including scheduling water application, detecting leaky irrigation canals, and gauging the overall effectiveness of water distribution networks used in furrow irrigation. Many challenges exist for the use of therm...

  3. Patch-mosaic burning: a new paradigm for savanna fire management in protected areas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.L. Parr

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The shift in ecological thinking, from equilibrium to non-equilibrium processes has been accompanied by a move to encourage heterogeneity rather than homogeneity in landscapes. Spatial and temporal heterogeneity is thought to be a major source of biotic diversity, and disturbances such as fire, producing heterogeneity are now recognised as being important. A patch-mosaic system of burning is based on the premise that fire pattern is a surrogate for diversity, and produces a range of patches in the landscape with unique patch characteristics and fire histories. A patch-mosaic system of burning is supported historically and empirically through field studies. However, there is a need for more research into the effects of various aspects of patch and fire variables on biotic diversity, especially in savannas where our understanding is particularly poor. Landscape-scale experiments, like those to be established in the Kruger National Park, South Africa are necessary to test different burning regimes. Challenges to patch- mosaic burning include determining the 'natural' range of variation for fire parameters, implementing random ignitions, and cost-effective fire scar mapping at the appropriate resolution. An adaptive management approach should be adopted to deal with the ignorance and uncertainties that characterise the management of savanna ecosystems. This should be applied with both modelling and monitoring as key elements in this process.

  4. San Diego Declaration on Climate Change and Fire Management: Ramifications for fuels management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian P. Oswald

    2007-01-01

    Climate plays a central role in shaping fire regimes over long time scales and in generating short-term weather that drives fire events. Recent research suggests that the increasing numbers of large and severe wildfires, lengthened wildfire seasons, and increased area burned are, in part, related to shifts in climate. The historical fire regimes in many ecosystems have...

  5. Assistant Teachers in Prekindergarten Programs: What Roles Do Lead Teachers Feel Assistants Play in Classroom Management and Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosinsky, Laura Stout; Gilliam, Walter S.

    2011-01-01

    Assistant teachers are a ubiquitous yet virtually overlooked part of the early education workforce. Assistant teacher education level and its relationship to various classroom characteristics and the roles lead teachers feel assistants play in classroom management and teaching were examined in a nationally representative sample of 3,191…

  6. Integrated pest management concepts for red imported fire ants Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drees, Bastiaan M; Calixto, Alejandro A; Nester, Paul R

    2013-08-01

    Management of imported fire ant species has evolved since their accidental introduction into the United States and currently uses integrated pest management concepts to design, implement, and evaluate suppression programs. Although eradication is the management goal in certain isolated infestation sites, localized goals vary dramatically in larger infestations where reinvasion of treated areas is likely. These goals are influenced by regulatory policies, medical liabilities, ecological impact, and/or economic considerations. Tactics employed in fire ant management programs presented here include cultural and biological control options along with judicious use of site-specific insecticide products. In addition, program design considerations that include management goal(s), action level(s), ant form (monogyne or polygyne), presence of nontarget ant species, size of treatment area, seasonality, implementation cost, and environmental impact are also presented. Optimally, elegant IPM programs are target specific, threshold driven, environmentally friendly and cost-effective.

  7. Multifunctional Rangeland in Southern Africa: Managing for Production, Conservation, and Resilience with Fire and Grazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devan Allen McGranahan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Residents of Southern Africa depend on rangeland for food, livelihoods, and ecosystem services. Sustainable management of rangeland ecosystems requires attention to interactive effects of fire and grazing in a changing climate. It is essential to compare rangeland responses to fire and grazing across space and through time to understand the effects of rangeland management practices on biodiversity and ecosystem services in an era of global climate change. We propose a paradigm of ecologically-analogous rangeland management within the context of multifunctional landscapes to guide design and application of ecosystem-based rangeland research in Southern Africa. We synthesize range science from the North American Great Plains and Southern African savannas into a proposal for fire and grazing research on rangeland in Southern Africa. We discuss how management for the fire-grazing interaction might advance multiple goals including agricultural productivity, biodiversity conservation, and resilience to increased variability under global change. Finally, we discuss several ecological and social issues important to the effective development of sustainable rangeland practices especially within the context of global climate change. The associated literature review serves as a comprehensive bibliography for sustainable rangeland management and development across the savanna biomes of Southern Africa.

  8. Impact of the post fire management in some soil chemical properties. First results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francos, Marcos; Pereira, Paulo; Alcañiz, Meritxell; Úbeda, Xavi

    2016-04-01

    Post-fire management after severe wildfires has impact on soil properties. In Mediterranean environments management of fire affected areas is a common practice. This intervention may change soil chemical properties of the soil such as major cations. The aim of this work is to study the impact of different types of forest management in soil extractable calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium after a severe wildfire. The study area is located in Ódena (Catalonia, Spain). The wildfire occurred at July 27th of 2015 and burned 1235 ha. After the fire an experimental plot was designed 9 plots with 2x2 meters (4 square meters). The different managements were: a) clear-cuted area and wood removed, b) no treatment); and c) clear-cutted. The results of the first sampling showed significant differences among all treatments in extractable calcium, sodium and potassium. The amount of these extractable elements was high in clear-cutted treatment in comparison to the others. No differences were identified in extractable magnesium. Overall, in the immediate period after the fire, burned area management, changed the studied soil properties. We are currently studying the evolution of this soil properties in these plots with the time

  9. A performance overview about fire risk management in the Brazilian hydroelectric generating plants and transmission network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Dayse [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Dept. de Engenharia de Producao, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2004-01-01

    Power plants and substations have been around for quite some time, so ample engineering experience exists and the public is familiar with their equipment and structures (i.e. transformer, circuit break, transmission lines, etc). They also have a substantial economic incentive to prevent accidents. In spite of mature technology, good management, and incentives to keep the plant or substation from blowing up, uncontrollable fire rages within them on occasion, killing operators and causing substantial losses. Fire in substations range from those which have a relatively minor impact, in which there is little or no interruption of the operation to the interconnect network to major catastrophe: the blackout in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 1995 being synonymous. While the engineers who design the substation have the knowledge and understanding to recognise the fire hazard throughout the system interactions and take measures, which will reduce the risk of a fire occurring, it is the substation operators who are responsible for its safe operation on a day-to-day basis. They must be aware, not only of the inherent hazard of the process of which they are in charge, but also of what can go wrong and, perhaps more importantly, how it can go wrong. However, professional fire safety practice today is dominated by traditional regulatory codes, standards and insurance considerations that are based on our past experience, i.e. failures. These methods should be suffice in a simple workplace producing simple and unchanging products or services. However, today's power plant or substation are rarely simple and unchanging. Their complexities require a more effective approach to fire safety. A new way of thinking is essential. It should enable us to use the wisdom of past experience and state-of-the-art knowledge in foreseeing fire hazard interactions. The approach to fire and explosion espoused in this paper is based on performance. The performance analysis involves two steps

  10. 77 FR 55505 - Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management; Agency Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management; Agency Information Collection.... Agency: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management. Type of Review: Extension...

  11. 78 FR 71665 - Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management; Agency Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management; Agency Information Collection... the General Services Administration set forth terms and conditions delegating FPB operation to the DOL, Office of the Assistant Secretary for ] Administration and Management (OASAM). The delegation sets...

  12. Long-term changes in nutrient availability after prescribed fire management in a Mediterranean soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcañiz, Meritxell; Outeiro, Luis; Francos, Marcos; Farguell, Joaquim; Úbeda, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The study area is located in the Tivissa Ranges (NE Iberian Peninsula) and the slope is ~35%, at 615 m.a.s.l. The natural vegetation before prescribed fire was composed of the three stratums in which trees (1% of the plot) were Pinus halepensis, shrubs were Ulex parviflorus, Cistus albidus, Rosmarinus officinallis, Erica multiflora and Quercus coccifera (75% of the plot), and herbs (24%) manly composed of Brachypodium retusum. The firemen had two main forest management objectives with the prescribed fire that was carried out on April 2002: (1) to change the dominance from Ulex to Cistus which is less flammable specie, and which would (2) permit the livestock into this area. Nine years after the prescribed fire our study plot was burned again with a low severity fire to manage the accumulation of vegetation. The aim of this study is a) to see the evolution of nutrient availability in the soil during 13 years since the first prescribed fire, and b) to evaluate the use of prescribed fire as a forest management tool. We have five sampling moments: (1) before the first prescribed fire; (2) after; (3) one year after; (4) three years after and (5) thirteen years after. Within the study area was placed a sampling plot with a rectangular 4×18 m structure. The study was carried out with 30 unstructured soil samples which were air-dried and passed through a 2 mm sieve. After that, fine material was prepared to measure different chemicals parameters of soil studied: soil pH [1:2.5], electrical conductivity [1:2.5], potassium, calcium and magnesium. The results show that, while pH is stable during the period studied, electrical conductivity increased after the prescribed fire as it was expected. However, thirteen years after the first prescribed fire the value (167 μS/cm) was markedly lower than before the prescribed fire (326 μS/cm). Changes in nutrient availability depend on the cation valence. Divalent cations (calcium and magnesium) decreased just after the prescribed

  13. Managing fire for woodland caribou in Jasper and Banff National Parks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landon Shepherd

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou populations in Jasper (JNP and Banff National Parks (BNP have declined since the 1970s, coincident with reduced fire activity in both parks, relative to historic levels. Some researchers have suggested that long periods without fire may cause habitat deterioration for woodland caribou, primarily by reducing available lichen forage. We examined winter habitat selection by woodland caribou at coarse and fine scales based on GPS-derived telemetry data and used models that included stand origin (decade, topography, and several stand structure variables that are related to time since fire, to explore relationships among caribou, lichen, and fire history. Based on the relationships illustrated by the models, we assessed how fire management could be applied to caribou conservation in JNP and BNP. At a coarse scale, caribou selected old forest (> 75 years in landscapes that have likely experienced less frequent wildfire. While the abundance of Cladonia spp. influenced caribou use at fine scales, a preference for areas with older trees within stands was also significant. We conclude that short-term habitat protection for woodland caribou in JNP and BNP likely requires fire exclusion from caribou range.

  14. The ongoing development of a pragmatic and adaptive fire management policy in a large African savanna protected area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wilgen, Brian W; Govender, Navashni; Smit, Izak P J; MacFadyen, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes recent changes to the fire management policy of the 1.9 million ha Kruger National Park in South Africa. It provides a real-life example of adaptive learning in an environment where understanding is incomplete, but where management nonetheless has to proceed. The previous policy called for the application of fire to meet burnt area targets that were set for administrative subdivisions, and that were assessed at the scale of the entire park. This was problematic because the park is large and heterogeneous, and because sound ecological motivations that could link burning prescriptions to ecological objectives were missing. The new policy divides the park into five fire management zones on the basis of differences in mean annual rainfall, historic fire return periods, and geology. In addition, it proposes fire management actions designed to achieve specified ecological objectives in each zone, and includes fire-regime related thresholds and associated ecological outcomes against which to assess the effectiveness of management. The new policy is an improvement over previous iterations, but several challenges remain. Most important among these would be to continually improve the understanding of the effects of fire, and to develop frameworks for assessing the impacts of fire together with other ecosystem drivers that interact strongly with fire to influence the attainment of ecological objectives.

  15. Community owned solutions for fire management in tropical ecosystems: case studies from Indigenous communities of South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Jayalaxshmi; Bilbao, Bibiana A; Berardi, Andrea

    2016-06-05

    Fire plays an increasingly significant role in tropical forest and savanna ecosystems, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions and impacting on biodiversity. Emerging research shows the potential role of Indigenous land-use practices for controlling deforestation and reducing CO2 emissions. Analysis of satellite imagery suggests that Indigenous lands have the lowest incidence of wildfires, significantly contributing to maintaining carbon stocks and enhancing biodiversity. Yet acknowledgement of Indigenous peoples' role in fire management and control is limited, and in many cases dismissed, especially in policy-making circles. In this paper, we review existing data on Indigenous fire management and impact, focusing on examples from tropical forest and savanna ecosystems in Venezuela, Brazil and Guyana. We highlight how the complexities of community owned solutions for fire management are being lost as well as undermined by continued efforts on fire suppression and firefighting, and emerging approaches to incorporate Indigenous fire management into market- and incentive-based mechanisms for climate change mitigation. Our aim is to build a case for supporting Indigenous fire practices within all scales of decision-making by strengthening Indigenous knowledge systems to ensure more effective and sustainable fire management.This article is part of the themed issue 'The interaction of fire and mankind'.

  16. Fire occurrence zoning from local to global scale in the European Mediterranean basin: implications for multi-scale fire management and policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koutsias N

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes and evaluates a relatively new concept for fire occurrence zoning based on documented historical fire records. The proposed method creates continuous kernel density surfaces based on wildland fire ignition observations. Kernels have the advantage of directly producing density estimates that are not influenced by grid size or localization effects. Within this scheme, kernel density surfaces have been created and reclassified to construct fire occurrence zones at local to global scales in the Mediterranean Basin. Specifically, fire occurrence zones were created for the European scale (European Mediterranean Basin, national scale (Greece, regional scale (Peloponnese, Greece and local scale (Chalkidiki, Greece. To evaluate fire occurrence zones, we compared the observed with the expected distribution of the number of fires within these zones using a Monte Carlo randomization test, finding that these numbers were statistically different in all cases. The deviations observed from the expected distributions towards the high occurrence zone indicated their successful assessment and value. In this paper, we further discuss their potential role and use for multi-scale fire management and policy in a European context.

  17. Social and environmental issues in developing vegetation and fire management plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard Charles

    1995-01-01

    To reduce the risk of wildfire in the California urban interface often requires actions that will be viewed by members of the public as having adverse effects on such resources as wildlife, vegetation, views, air quality, and recreational opportunities. These citizens can substantially delay and even thwart development of fire management plans. In developing such a...

  18. Assessing high reliability practices in wildland fire management: an exploration and benchmarking of organizational culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne E. Black; Brooke Baldauf. McBride

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to improve organizational outcomes, including safety, in wildland fire management, researchers and practitioners have turned to a domain of research on organizational performance known as High Reliability Organizing (HRO). The HRO paradigm emerged in the late 1980s in an effort to identify commonalities among organizations that function under hazardous...

  19. A spatial stochastic programming model for timber and core area management under risk of fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu Wei; Michael Bevers; Dung Nguyen; Erin Belval

    2014-01-01

    Previous stochastic models in harvest scheduling seldom address explicit spatial management concerns under the influence of natural disturbances. We employ multistage stochastic programming models to explore the challenges and advantages of building spatial optimization models that account for the influences of random stand-replacing fires. Our exploratory test models...

  20. Challenges and needs in fire management: A landscape simulation modeling perspective [chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane; Geoffrey J. Cary; Mike D. Flannigan

    2011-01-01

    Fire management will face many challenges in the future from global climate change to protecting people, communities, and values at risk. Simulation modeling will be a vital tool for addressing these challenges but the next generation of simulation models must be spatially explicit to address critical landscape ecology relationships and they must use mechanistic...

  1. 城市建筑消防检查和消防管理研究%On Fire Inspection and Fire Management for Urban Building

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵衍宁

    2014-01-01

    Starting from fire inspection and management for urban building, this paper analyzes the deficiency of urban building fire safety at present, and puts forward some suggestions.%院本文从城市建筑消防检查与管理说起,分析了当前城市建筑在消防安全这方面的不足,并提出了建议。

  2. 32 CFR 700.323 - The Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Financial Management).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Assistants § 700.323 The Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Financial Management). The Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Financial Management) is the Comptroller of the Navy, and is responsible for all matters related to the financial management of the Department of the Navy, including: (a) Budgeting; (b...

  3. Wildland Arson as Clandestine Resource Management: A Space-Time Permutation Analysis and Classification of Informal Fire Management Regimes in Georgia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    Forest managers are increasingly recognizing the value of disturbance-based land management techniques such as prescribed burning. Unauthorized, "arson" fires are common in the southeastern United States where a legacy of agrarian cultural heritage persists amidst an increasingly forest-dominated landscape. This paper reexamines unauthorized fire-setting in the state of Georgia, USA from a historical ecology perspective that aims to contribute to historically informed, disturbance-based land management. A space-time permutation analysis is employed to discriminate systematic, management-oriented unauthorized fires from more arbitrary or socially deviant fire-setting behaviors. This paper argues that statistically significant space-time clusters of unauthorized fire occurrence represent informal management regimes linked to the legacy of traditional land management practices. Recent scholarship has pointed out that traditional management has actively promoted sustainable resource use and, in some cases, enhanced biodiversity often through the use of fire. Despite broad-scale displacement of traditional management during the 20th century, informal management practices may locally circumvent more formal and regionally dominant management regimes. Space-time permutation analysis identified 29 statistically significant fire regimes for the state of Georgia. The identified regimes are classified by region and land cover type and their implications for historically informed disturbance-based resource management are discussed.

  4. Wildland Arson as Clandestine Resource Management: A Space-Time Permutation Analysis and Classification of Informal Fire Management Regimes in Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Michael R.

    2016-05-01

    Forest managers are increasingly recognizing the value of disturbance-based land management techniques such as prescribed burning. Unauthorized, "arson" fires are common in the southeastern United States where a legacy of agrarian cultural heritage persists amidst an increasingly forest-dominated landscape. This paper reexamines unauthorized fire-setting in the state of Georgia, USA from a historical ecology perspective that aims to contribute to historically informed, disturbance-based land management. A space-time permutation analysis is employed to discriminate systematic, management-oriented unauthorized fires from more arbitrary or socially deviant fire-setting behaviors. This paper argues that statistically significant space-time clusters of unauthorized fire occurrence represent informal management regimes linked to the legacy of traditional land management practices. Recent scholarship has pointed out that traditional management has actively promoted sustainable resource use and, in some cases, enhanced biodiversity often through the use of fire. Despite broad-scale displacement of traditional management during the 20th century, informal management practices may locally circumvent more formal and regionally dominant management regimes. Space-time permutation analysis identified 29 statistically significant fire regimes for the state of Georgia. The identified regimes are classified by region and land cover type and their implications for historically informed disturbance-based resource management are discussed.

  5. Earth, Wind, and Fire: Managing Risk in Today's Schools Part 1--Fire!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Richard

    2010-01-01

    If one word can characterize what may be troubling about risk management in today's schools, it is "complacency." Complacency is a negative behavior that could entrap people into letting their guard down. In "The School Business Administrator," authors Kenneth Stevenson and Don Tharpe write: "A successful school business administrator has a…

  6. Towards adaptive fire management for biodiversity conservation: experience in South African national parks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wilgen, BW

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available % and < 33%. Lack of fuel available for burning in subsequent years (if too large an area burns), leading to a shortage of forage for bontebok, and absence of a seed source for dispersal. Large areas will burn when the vegetation is immature. Failure... informed by long-term and ongoing fire research (Brynard 1971; Van der Schijff 1958; Van Wilgen, Govender & Biggs 2007). Considerable changes in fire management came about, following the adoption of a heterogeneity paradigm in the Page 3 of 9 TABLE 1...

  7. Monitoring Fires from Space and Getting Data in to the hands of Users: An Example from NASA's Fire Information for Resource Management System (FIRMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, D.; Wong, M.; Ilavajhala, S.; Molinario, G.; Justice, C. O.

    2012-12-01

    This paper discusses the broad uptake of MODIS near-real-time (NRT) active fire data for applications. Prior to the launch of MODIS most real-time satellite-derived fire information was obtained from NOAA AVHRR via direct broadcast (DB) systems. Whilst there were efforts to make direct broadcast stations affordable in developing countries, such as through the Local Applications of Satellite Remote Technologies (LARST), these systems were relatively few and far between and required expertise to manage and operate. One such system was in Etosha National Park (ENP) in Namibia. Prior to the installation of the AVHRR DB system in ENP, fires were reported by rangers and the quality, accuracy and timing of reports was variable. With the introduction of the DB station, early warning of fires improved and fire maps could be produced for park managers within 2-3 hours by staff trained to process data, interpret images and produce maps. Up keep and maintenance of such systems was relatively costly for parks with limited resources therefore when global fire data from MODIS became available uptake was widespread. NRT data from MODIS became availalbe through a collaboration between the MODIS Fire Team and the US Forest Service (USFS) Remote Sensing Applications Center to provide rapid access to imagery to help fight the Montana wildfires of 2001. This prompted the development of a Rapid Response System for fire data that eventually led to the operational use of MODIS data by the USFS for fire monitoring. Building on this success, the Fire Information for Resource Management System (FIRMS) project was funded by NASA Applications, and developed under the umbrella of the GOFC-GOLD Fire program, to further improve products and services for the global fire information community. FIRMS was developed as a web-based geospatial tool, offering a range of geospatial data services, including a fire email alert service which is widely used around the world. FIRMS was initially developed to

  8. Impacts of fire management on aboveground tree carbon stocks in Yosemite and Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchett, John R.; Lutz, James A.; Tarnay, Leland W.; Smith, Douglas G.; Becker, Kendall M.L.; Brooks, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Forest biomass on Sierra Nevada landscapes constitutes one of the largest carbon stocks in California, and its stability is tightly linked to the factors driving fire regimes. Research suggests that fire suppression, logging, climate change, and present management practices in Sierra Nevada forests have altered historic patterns of landscape carbon storage, and over a century of fire suppression and the resulting accumulation in surface fuels have been implicated in contributing to recent increases in high severity, stand-replacing fires. For over 30 years, fire management at Yosemite (YOSE) and Sequoia & Kings Canyon (SEKI) national parks has led the nation in restoring fire to park landscapes; however, the impacts on the stability and magnitude of carbon stocks have not been thoroughly examined.

  9. Communicating About Smoke from Wildland Fire: Challenges and Opportunities for Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Christine S.; Mazzotta, Danielle K.; Toman, Eric; Fischer, A. Paige

    2014-09-01

    Wildland fire and associated management efforts are dominant topics in natural resource fields. Smoke from fires can be a nuisance and pose serious health risks and aggravate pre-existing health conditions. When it results in reduced visibility near roadways, smoke can also pose hazardous driving conditions and reduce the scenic value of vistas. Communicating about smoke, whether in the preparation phases before a planned burn or during a wildfire event, can enable those at risk to make informed decisions to minimize their exposure to smoke or choose alternate activities that mitigate smoke completely. To date, very little research has been completed on the social aspects of smoke, such as communication or public perceptions. Here, we present findings from an exploratory study that examined challenges and opportunities related to communication (within agencies or to the public) for management of smoke from wildland fires. Interviews were conducted in California, Oregon, Montana, and South Carolina among a purposive sample of individuals, who are involved in fire or smoke management. Findings indicate that smoke poses several challenges to management agencies. Findings also provide insight into potential strategies to address such challenges by improving communication in both inter- and intra-agency situations as well as with members of the public. In particular, prioritizing fire and smoke-related communication within agencies, allocating agency resources specifically for training in communication and outreach endeavors, taking advantage of existing resources including informal social networks among the public, and building long-term relationships both between agencies and with the public were viewed as effective.

  10. Perspectives on disconnects between scientific information and management decisions on post-fire recovery in Western US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoli; Emery, Nathan; Garcia, Elizabeth S; Hanan, Erin J; Hodges, Heather E; Martin, Tyronne; Meyers, Matthew A; Peavey, Lindsey E; Peng, Hui; Santamaria, Jaime Sainz; Uyeda, Kellie A; Anderson, Sarah E; Tague, Christina

    2013-12-01

    Environmental regulations frequently mandate the use of "best available" science, but ensuring that it is used in decisions around the use and protection of natural resources is often challenging. In the Western US, this relationship between science and management is at the forefront of post-fire land management decisions. Recent fires, post-fire threats (e.g. flooding, erosion), and the role of fire in ecosystem health combine to make post-fire management highly visible and often controversial. This paper uses post-fire management to present a framework for understanding why disconnects between science and management decisions may occur. We argue that attributes of agencies, such as their political or financial incentives, can limit how effectively science is incorporated into decision-making. At the other end of the spectrum, the lack of synthesis or limited data in science can result in disconnects between science-based analysis of post-fire effects and agency policy and decisions. Disconnects also occur because of the interaction between the attributes of agencies and the attributes of science, such as their different spatial and temporal scales of interest. After offering examples of these disconnects in post-fire treatment, the paper concludes with recommendations to reduce disconnects by improving monitoring, increasing synthesis of scientific findings, and directing social-science research toward identifying and deepening understanding of these disconnects.

  11. Towards An Integrated Fire Management Framework Using Space-Based Application In Asia-Pacific Region

    OpenAIRE

    Hendri; Loh, Timothy; Tiwaree, Ram S.; Lee, Khiam Jin; Lee, Han Soo; Yamashita, Takao

    2011-01-01

    The integrated fire management framework using space-based application has been developed to reduce the consequences of fire disaster, particularly in developing countries, least developed countries (LDCs), small island developing states (SIDs) and land-locked developing countries (LLDCs) in Asia and the Pacific. Since 1982/1983 and 1997/1998, the two recorded forest fires in the world created much suffering in Asia and the Pacific region, while the resulting transboundary atmospheric polluta...

  12. Annual Fire Management Program 1987 Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — When environmental and weather conditions are right Prescribed burning will be used for hazardous fuel reduction, wildlife habitat management and habitat improvement...

  13. In the line of fire: managing expatriates in hostile environments

    OpenAIRE

    Gannon, Judie; Paraskevas, Alexandros

    2017-01-01

    This study explores best practice in the preparation and protection of strategic human resources deployed by MNCs in hostile environments. By building on the literature from the areas of strategic and international human resource management (SIHRM), expatriation, as well as risk and crisis management, the limitations and gaps of the extant research are highlighted. This provides a foundation for our investigation through a series of in-depth interviews with corporate executives, and insurers ...

  14. Integrating land cover modeling and adaptive management to conserve endangered species and reduce catastrophic fire risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breininger, David; Duncan, Brean; Eaton, Mitchell J.; Johnson, Fred; Nichols, James

    2014-01-01

    Land cover modeling is used to inform land management, but most often via a two-step process, where science informs how management alternatives can influence resources, and then, decision makers can use this information to make decisions. A more efficient process is to directly integrate science and decision-making, where science allows us to learn in order to better accomplish management objectives and is developed to address specific decisions. Co-development of management and science is especially productive when decisions are complicated by multiple objectives and impeded by uncertainty. Multiple objectives can be met by the specification of tradeoffs, and relevant uncertainty can be addressed through targeted science (i.e., models and monitoring). We describe how to integrate habitat and fuel monitoring with decision-making focused on the dual objectives of managing for endangered species and minimizing catastrophic fire risk. Under certain conditions, both objectives might be achieved by a similar management policy; other conditions require tradeoffs between objectives. Knowledge about system responses to actions can be informed by developing hypotheses based on ideas about fire behavior and then applying competing management actions to different land units in the same system state. Monitoring and management integration is important to optimize state-specific management decisions and to increase knowledge about system responses. We believe this approach has broad utility and identifies a clear role for land cover modeling programs intended to inform decision-making.

  15. Integrating Land Cover Modeling and Adaptive Management to Conserve Endangered Species and Reduce Catastrophic Fire Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breininger, David; Duncan, Brean; Eaton, Mitchell; Johnson, Fred; Nichols, James

    2014-01-01

    Land cover modeling is used to inform land management, but most often via a two-step process where science informs how management alternatives can influence resources and then decision makers can use this to make decisions. A more efficient process is to directly integrate science and decision making, where science allows us to learn to better accomplish management objectives and is developed to address specific decisions. Co-development of management and science is especially productive when decisions are complicated by multiple objectives and impeded by uncertainty. Multiple objectives can be met by specification of tradeoffs, and relevant uncertainty can be addressed through targeted science (i.e., models and monitoring). We describe how to integrate habitat and fuels monitoring with decision making focused on dual objectives of managing for endangered species and minimizing catastrophic fire risk. Under certain conditions, both objectives might be achieved by a similar management policy, but habitat trajectories suggest tradeoffs. Knowledge about system responses to actions can be informed by applying competing management actions to different land units in the same system state and by ideas about fire behavior. Monitoring and management integration is important to optimize state-specific management decisions and increase knowledge about system responses. We believe this approach has broad utility for and cover modeling programs intended to inform decision making.

  16. The influence of fire history, plant species and post-fire management on soil water repellency in a Mediterranean catchment: the Mount Carmel range, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesstra, Saskia; Wittenberg, Lea; Maroulis, Jerry; Malkinson, Dan; Cerdà, Artemi; Pereira, Paulo

    2016-04-01

    Fire is a key factor impacting soil hydrology in many Mediterranean catchments. Soil water repellency (SWR) can stimulate land degradation processes by reducing the affinity of soil and water thereby triggering a reduction in soil fertility and increasing soil and water losses (. The effects of two consequent fires (1989 and 2005) on SWR were assessed in the Carmel Mountains, Israel. Fire history, plant recovery and post-fire management were investigated as determining factors in a time dependent system. SWR was highest in the >50 years unburnt plots, where soil under Pinus halepensis is most hydrophobic. In the most disturbed soils (twice burnt), many sites have a low to absent SWR even if the soil is very dry. The dynamics and fluctuations in SWR differ in magnitude under different plant species. The areas treated with CC (chipping of charred trees) showed a much higher SWR than areas left untreated. From these insights, a conceptual model of the reaction of SWR on multiple fires was developed. KEYWORDS: Soil water repellency, WDPT, Wildfires, Vegetation recovery, post-fire management, Mediterranean.

  17. Fire Management Problem Analysis of Key Unit of Fire Safety%消防安全重点单位消防管理问题分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧萍

    2013-01-01

    消防安全重点单位一般都是对单位当地或者是国民经济发展有着较大的促进作用,它们也是消防部门的工作需要予以较多关注的对象。本文主要从这些重点单位的消防安全着手,简要的分析这些单位在消防安全方面所做的工作,并指出其存在的缺陷和不足,及时的为其安全管理部门提供相应的解决对策,帮助这些消防安全重点单位综合有效的做好消防的管理和监督工作。%Key unit of fire safety is usually important for the promotion of the local national economic development, so more attention from the fire department should be paid to them. This article mainly starts from the fire safety of these key units, briefly analyzes the fire safety work of these units and points out the defects and deficiencies, offering countermeasures for the safety management department to help these key units of fire safety to go a good job in fire safety management and monitoring comprehensively and effectively.

  18. Assistance of inhalation injury victims caused by fire in confined spaces: what we learned from the tragedy at Santa Maria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Estevão; Miranda, Leandro Costa; Tierno, Paulo Fernando Guimarães Morando Marzocchi; Ferreira, César Biselli; Cadamuro, Filipe Matheus; Figueiredo, Viviane Rossi; Damasceno, Maria Cecilia de Toledo; Malbouisson, Luiz Marcelo Sá

    2014-01-01

    On January 2013, a disaster at Santa Maria (RS) due to a fire in a confined space caused 242 deaths, most of them by inhalation injury. On November 2013, four individuals required intensive care following smoke inhalation from a fire at the Memorial da América Latina in São Paulo (SP). The present article reports the clinical progression and management of disaster victims presenting with inhalation injury. Patients ERL and OC exhibited early respiratory failure, bronchial aspiration of carbonaceous material, and carbon monoxide poisoning. Ventilation support was performed with 100% oxygen, the aspirated material was removed by bronchoscopy, and cyanide poisoning was empirically treated with sodium nitrite and sodium thiosulfate. Patient RP initially exhibited cough and retrosternal burning and subsequently progressed to respiratory failure due to upper airway swelling and early-onset pulmonary infection, which were treated with protective ventilation and antimicrobial agents. This patient was extubated following improvement of edema on bronchoscopy. Patient MA, an asthmatic, exhibited carbon monoxide poisoning and bronchospasm and was treated with normobaric hyperoxia,bronchodilators, and corticosteroids. The length of stay in the intensive care unit varied from four to 10 days, and all four patients exhibited satisfactory functional recovery. To conclude, inhalation injury has a preponderant role in fires in confined spaces. Invasive ventilation should not be delayed in cases with significant airway swelling. Hyperoxia should be induced early asa therapeutic means against carbon monoxide poisoning, in addition to empiric pharmacological treatment in suspected cases of cyanide poisoning.

  19. An Integrated Model for Identifying Linkages Between the Management of Fuel Treatments, Fire and Ecosystem Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, R. R.; Anderson, S.; Moritz, M.; Plantinga, A.; Tague, C.

    2015-12-01

    Vegetation fuel treatments (e.g. thinning, prescribed burning) are a frequent tool for managing fire-prone landscapes. However, predicting how fuel treatments may affect future wildfire risk and associated ecosystem services, such as forest water availability and streamflow, remains a challenge. This challenge is in part due to the large range of conditions under which fuel treatments may be implemented, as response is likely to vary with species type, rates of vegetation regrowth, meteorological conditions and physiographic properties of the treated site. It is also due to insufficient understanding of how social factors such as political pressure, public demands and economic constraints affect fuel management decisions. To examine the feedbacks between ecological and social dimensions of fuel treatments, we present an integrated model that links a biophysical model that simulates vegetation and hydrology (RHESSys), a fire spread model (WMFire) and an empirical fuel treatment model that accounts for agency decision-making. We use this model to investigate how management decisions affect landscape fuel loads, which in turn affect fire severity and ecosystem services, which feedback to management decisions on fuel treatments. We hypothesize that this latter effect will be driven by salience theory, which predicts that fuel treatments are more likely to occur following major wildfire events. The integrated model provides a flexible framework for answering novel questions about fuel treatments that span social and ecological domains, areas that have previously been treated separately.

  20. Overview of the fire management policy of the Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.C. Biggs

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available New developments in fire management policy in the Kruger National Park are sketched against the background of changing attitudes towards ecosystem management. The experimental burning plots established in the mid-1950s are discussed briefly, as is the almost forty-year era of rotational block- burning. The lightning-driven fire policy initiated in 1992 and currently aimed at by park management is discussed, with comments on its early performance. More recent revision of the management plan stressed maximisation of appropriate research benefits from the experimental burning plots, con- doned the lightning approach for the present, but stressed the absolute necessity of the park not finding itself in the 1992 position again, where a major change in policy has to be made with no comparative evidence from other systems. To this end, a major landscape-scale fire management trial has been planned for implementation starting in April 2000. It is sheduled to run over a twenty-year period, and will be placed at four localities representing different major landscapes in the park. It will compare the effects of three different fire systems (lightning, patch mosaic, and range condition burning systems on biodiversity elements crucial to the park's mission. The rationale for, layout of, and criteria for deciding on the outcome of the trial are discussed, as well as the trade-offs that were made to enable the trial to be of such a large scale and still fit into overall park planning. The impact of the trial on the park's monitoring programme is discussed.

  1. Fighting Fire with Fire: Modeling the Datacenter-Scale Effects of Targeted Superlattice Thermal Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, S; Tiwari, M; Theogarajan, L; Sherwood, T P; Chong, F T

    2010-11-11

    Local thermal hot-spots in microprocessors lead to worst case provisioning of global cooling resources, especially in large-scale systems. However, efficiency of cooling solutions degrade non-linearly with supply temperature, resulting in high power consumption and cost in cooling - 50 {approx} 100% of IT power. Recent advances in active cooling techniques have shown on-chip thermoelectric coolers (TECs) to be very efficient at selectively eliminating small hot-spots, where applying current to a superlattice film deposited between silicon and the heat spreader results in a Peltier effect that spreads the heat and lowers the temperature of the hot-spot significantly to improve chip reliability. In this paper, we propose that hot-spot mitigation using thermoelectric coolers can be used as a power management mechanism to allow global coolers to be provisioned for a better worst case temperature leading to substantial savings in cooling power. In order to quantify the potential power savings from using TECs in data center servers, we present a detailed power model that integrates on-chip dynamic and leakage power sources, heat diffusion through the entire chip, TEC and global cooler efficiencies, and all their mutual interactions. Our multiscale analysis shows that, for a typical data center, TECs allow global coolers to operate at higher temperatures without degrading chip lifetime, and thus save {approx}27% cooling power on average while providing the same processor reliability as a data center running at 288K.

  2. Tips on hiring the good, firing the not-so-good, and becoming a better manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    The success or failure of any department depends on the people who work for you and with you. Following is a list of valuable ideas on how to best navigate the tricky, important business of hiring the right person for the job. These tips will assist you in determining real staff needs and motivating employees to produce more and better. They will also help you deal with the unpleasant, although sometimes necessary, task of firing someone, as well as help you handle the inevitable loss of good people.

  3. The Lost Creek Fire: managing social relations under disaster conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Bill; Kulig, Judith; Edge, Dana; Lightfoot, Nancy; Townshend, Ivan

    2013-04-01

    This paper examines some of the social processes associated with disaster conditions. Utilising an asset-based perspective of community capacity, it focuses on four types of normative systems to interpret the ability of communities to manage disasters through market-, bureaucratic-, associative-, and communal-based norms. Drawing on experience of a wildfire in the Crowsnest Pass region of southwest Alberta, Canada, in 2003, the tensions and compatibilities among these normative systems are evaluated through interviews with 30 community leaders. The results confirm the contributions of all types of social capital to resiliency, the necessity for rapid use of place-based knowledge, and the importance of communication among all types and levels of agents. In addition, they point to the value of identifying and managing potential conflicts among the normative systems as a means to maximising their contributions. The integration of local networks and groups into the more general disaster response minimised the impacts on health and property.

  4. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic management of a caliceal diverticular calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torricelli, Fabio Cesar Miranda; Batista, Lucas T; Colombo, Jose Roberto; Coelho, Rafael Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the first case of robotic-assisted laparoscopic management of a symptomatic caliceal diverticular calculus and review the literature on laparoscopic treatment for this condition. Case report A 33-year-old obese woman with a 2×1 cm calculus within an anterior caliceal diverticulum located in the middle pole of the left kidney was referred to our service. She had already undergone two flexible ureterorenoscopies without success. We considered that a percutaneous approach would be very challenging due to stone location, thus we elected to perform a robotic-assisted laparoscopic procedure for stone removal and diverticulum fulguration. The procedure was uneventfully performed with no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The patient was discharged from the hospital on the second postoperative day and after 1.5 years of follow-up she is asymptomatic with no recurrence. Conclusions The robotic-assisted laparoscopic approach to caliceal diverticular calculi is feasible and safe, providing one more option for treatment of stones in challenging locations. PMID:25188925

  5. Use of fire spread and hydrology models to target forest management on a municipal watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anurag Srivastava; William J. Elliot; Joan Wu

    2015-01-01

    A small town relies on a forested watershed for its water supply. The forest is at risk for a wildfire. To reduce this risk, some of the watershed will be thinned followed by a prescribed burn. This paper reports on a study to evaluate the impact of such watershed disturbances on water yield. To target management activities, a fire spread model was applied to the...

  6. The challenge of applying governance and sustainable development to wildland fire management in Southern Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar Fernández, Susana; Montiel, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses participatory processes in wildland fire management (WFM). Participation is an essential element of both the European Sustainable Development (SD) Strategy and the White Paper on Governance. Governance and SD have thus become an interconnected challenge to be applied to WFM (as a sub-area in forest policy), amongst other policies. An overspread weakness in WFM is lack of real participation of stakeholders. Absence of (or deficient) participation can seriously impair contr...

  7. A comparison of geospatially modeled fire behavior and potential application to fire and fuels management for the Savannah River Site.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurth, Laurie; Hollingsworth, LaWen; Shea, Dan

    2011-12-20

    This study evaluates modeled fire behavior for the Savannah River Site in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern U.S. using three data sources: FCCS, LANDFIRE, and SWRA. The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) was used to build fuelbeds from intensive field sampling of 629 plots. Custom fire behavior fuel models were derived from these fuelbeds. LANDFIRE developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy attributes for the U.S. using satellite imagery informed by field data. The Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment (SWRA) developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover for the southeastern U.S. using satellite imagery.

  8. Wildfire policy and management in England: an evolving response from Fire and Rescue Services, forestry and cross-sector groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzard, Rob; McMorrow, Julia; Aylen, Jonathan

    2016-06-05

    Severe wildfires are an intermittent problem in England. The paper presents the first analysis of wildfire policy, showing its halting evolution over two decades. First efforts to coordinate wildfire management came from local fire operation groups, where stakeholders such as fire services, land owners and amenity groups shared knowledge and equipment to tackle the problem. A variety of structures and informal management solutions emerged in response to local needs. Knowledge of wildfire accumulated within regional and national wildfire forums and academic networks. Only later did the need for central emergency planning and the response to climate change produce a national policy response. Fire statistics have allowed wildfires to be spatially evidenced on a national scale only since 2009. National awareness of wildfire was spurred by the 2011 fire season, and the high-impact Swinley Forest fire, which threatened critical infrastructure and communities within 50 miles of London. Severe wildfire was included in the National Risk Register for the first time in 2013. Cross-sector approaches to wildfire proved difficult as government responsibility is fragmented along the hazard chain. Stakeholders such as the Forestry Commission pioneered good practice in adaptive land management to build fire resilience into UK forests. The grass-roots evolution of participatory solutions has also been a key enabling process. A coordinated policy is now needed to identify best practice and to promote understanding of the role of fire in the ecosystem.This article is part of a themed issue 'The interaction of fire and mankind'.

  9. Assistive technologies for managing language disorders in dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimova B

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Blanka Klimova,1 Petra Maresova,2 Kamil Kuca3,4 1Department of Applied Linguistics, 2Department of Economics, Faculty of Informatics and Management, University of Hradec Kralove, 3Biomedical Research Centre, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, 4Center for Basic and Applied Research, Faculty of Informatics and Management, University of Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic Abstract: At present, the number of elderly people is rapidly increasing, which represents a significant threat in terms of their care when they fall ill. One of the most common aging diseases nowadays is dementia, whose symptoms sooner or later include loss of cognitive functioning. Cognitive disorders can vary from serious mental retardation to inability to recall things, to the loss or disorder of specific cognitive functions such as communication. These disorders not only affect the quality of people’s own life but also impose a substantial burden on their families, particularly on their caregivers. Therefore, the aim of this article is to highlight the role of assistive technologies (ATs for managing language impairments in dementia in order to improve patients’ quality of life. In addition, ATs focused on training patients’ memory are also mentioned, since they can help patients to maintain their language skills. Furthermore, these ATs can delay the need for institutional care, as well as significantly reduce costs on patient care. The importance of future research in the area of the development of ATs for managing the language impairments in dementia is also discussed. There is a general trend toward the personalization of patient needs and requirements in the area of ATs. For the purpose of this article, a method of literature review of available sources defining language disorders and providing characteristic features of language disorders in dementia is used. In addition, a method of comparison of different research studies exploring ATs focused on

  10. Battery management systems with thermally integrated fire suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandhauer, Todd M.; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2017-07-11

    A thermal management system is integral to a battery pack and/or individual cells. It relies on passive liquid-vapor phase change heat removal to provide enhanced thermal protection via rapid expulsion of inert high pressure refrigerant during abnormal abuse events and can be integrated with a cooling system that operates during normal operation. When a thermal runaway event occurs and sensed by either active or passive sensors, the high pressure refrigerant is preferentially ejected through strategically placed passages within the pack to rapidly quench the battery.

  11. An assessment of the implementation and outcomes of recent changes to fire management in the Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W. van Wilgen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews recent changes in fire management in the Kruger National Park, and assesses the resulting fire patterns against thresholds of potential concern. In 2002, a lightning-driven approach was replaced by an approach that combined point ignitions with unplanned and lightning fires. The approach aimed to burn an annual target area, determined by rainfall and fuel conditions, in point-ignition fires of different sizes. Most of the original fire-related thresholds of potential concern (TPCs were incorporated into the new approach. The annual target area to be burnt ranged from 12 to 24% of the park between 2002 and 2006. The total area burnt generally exceeded the targets each year, and management fires accounted for less than half of the total area burnt. The fire regime was dominated by very large fires (> 5 000 ha which accounted for 77% of the total area burnt. New TPCs were developed to assess whether the fire regime encompassed a sufficient degree of variability, in terms of fire intensity and the spatial distribution of burnt areas. After assessment and adjustment, it appears that these TPCs have not yet been exceeded. The point-ignition approach, and its evaluation in terms of variability and heterogeneity, is based on the untested assumption that a diverse fire regime will promote biodiversity. This assumption needs to be critically assessed. We recommend that the practice of point ignitions be continued, but that greater efforts be made to burn larger areas earlier in the season to reduce large and intense dry-season fires.

  12. Measuring the impact of prescribed fire management on the carbon balance of a flatwoods ecosystem in Kissimmee, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, K.; Hinkle, C.

    2012-12-01

    It has been well documented that terrestrial ecosystems have a great potential to store and sequester carbon. Therefore, a former ranch land at the Disney Wilderness Preserve (DWP), Kissimmee, Florida, USA is being restored to native ecosystems and managed to preserve biodiversity and increase carbon storage. Here, we present measurements of C flux from an eddy covariance system located in a longleaf pine flatwoods ecosystem at DWP. C flux measurements were taken at the site before, during, and after a prescribed fire event. C stock measurements were also taken for aboveground biomass immediately before and after the fire, as well as one year post fire. This study indicated that this ecosystem typically serves as a net sink of C. However, the system became a net source of C immediately following the fire event, with a ~40% loss of aboveground C stock, but recovered to a net sink of C within 6 weeks of the fire. Annually this ecosystem was found to serve as a net C sink even with a prescribed fire event, with annual net ecosystem productivity (NEP) of 508 g C/m2 in a non-fire year (2010) and 237 g C/m2 in a fire year (2011). In addition to the fire, it is important to note that the growing season of 2011 was anomalously dry, which likely hindered productivity, and thus the NEP of the fire year would probably be more similar to the non-fire year under more typical hydrologic conditions. Despite the variability of rainfall between years, this study shows that the longleaf pine flatwoods ecosystem provides the service of C sequestration even in the context of frequent prescribed fire management.

  13. 78 FR 52131 - Notice of Funds Availability: Agricultural Management Assistance Organic Certification Cost-Share...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service Notice of Funds Availability: Agricultural Management Assistance Organic Certification Cost-Share Program AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of Funds... Application (Application for Federal Assistance Standard Form 424) to the Agricultural Marketing Service...

  14. Forest Management and the Evolution of Project Design in Dynamic Wildland Urban Interface Fire Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Truckee Ranger District on the Tahoe National Forest, in the heart of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, has a rich history of human activities. Native American influences, comstock-era logging, fire suppression, development, and recreation have all shaped the natural environment into what it is today. Like much of our national forests in California, forest conditions that have developed are generally much more homogenous and less resistant to disturbance from fire, insect, and disease than they might have been without the myriad of human influences. However, in order to improve the resiliency of our forests to stand replacing disturbances like high severity fire, while managing for integrated anthropomorphic values, it is imperative that management evolve to meet those dynamic needs. Recent advances in remote sensing and GIS allow land managers more access to forest information and can inform site specific prescriptions to change site specific undesirable conditions. It is ecologically and politically complex, yet our forests deserve that microscope. This particular presentation will focus on how the Truckee Ranger District began this process of incorporating several values, generated from stakeholder collaboration, into one project's goals and how those lessons learned informed their most recent project.

  15. Coal fires in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehouse, Alfred E.; Mulyana, Asep A.S. [Office of Surface Mining/Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources Coal Fire Project, Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Agency for Training and Education, Jl. Gatot Subroto, Kav. 49, Jakarta 12950 (Indonesia)

    2004-07-12

    Indonesia's fire and haze problem is increasingly being ascribed to large-scale forest conversion and land clearing activities making way for pulpwood, rubber and oil palm plantations. Fire is the cheapest tool available to small holders and plantation owners to reduce vegetation cover and prepare and fertilize extremely poor soils. Fires that escaped from agricultural burns have ravaged East Kalimantan forests on the island of Borneo during extreme drought periods in 1982-1983, 1987, 1991, 1994 and 1997-1998. Estimates based on satellite data and ground observations are that more than five million hectares were burned in East Kalimantan during the 1997/1998 dry season. Not only were the economic losses and ecological damage from these surface fires enormous, they ignited coal seams exposed at the ground surface along their outcrops.Coal fires now threaten Indonesia's shrinking ecological resources in Kutai National Park and Sungai Wain Nature Reserve. Sungai Wain has one of the last areas of unburned primary rainforest in the Balikpapan-Samarinda area with an extremely rich biodiversity. Although fires in 1997/1998 damaged nearly 50% of this Reserve and ignited 76 coal fires, it remains the most valuable water catchment area in the region and it has been used as a reintroduction site for the endangered orangutan. The Office of Surface Mining provided Indonesia with the capability to take quick action on coal fires that presented threats to public health and safety, infrastructure or the environment. The US Department of State's Southeast Asia Environmental Protection Initiative through the US Agency for International Development funded the project. Technical assistance and training transferred skills in coal fire management through the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resource's Training Agency to the regional offices; giving the regions the long-term capability to manage coal fires. Funding was also included to extinguish coal fires as

  16. Past approaches and future challenges to the management of fire and invasive alien plants in the new Garden Route National Park

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kraaij, T

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available conflicting fire management requirements for plantation safety against fynbos conservation; (2) the continual invasion of fynbos by fire-propagated alien pines sourced from plantations; (3) inadequate resources to redress the ‘invasion debt’ caused...

  17. The Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy Actionable Science Plan: U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington D.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy Actionable Science Plan Team

    2016-01-01

    The Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy (hereafter Strategy, DOI 2015) outlined the need for coordinated, science-based adaptive management to achieve long-term protection, conservation, and restoration of the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystem. A key component of this management approach is the identification of knowledge gaps that limit...

  18. A participatory assessment of post-fire management alternatives in eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llovet, Joan

    2015-04-01

    Transformational socio-economic changes during the last decades of the 20th century led to the abandonment of mountainous areas in western Mediterranean countries (Puigdefábregas and Mendizábal, 1998). This process was accelerated in the Ayora Valley (inland Valencia province, E Spain) by a major forest fire in 1979. Restoration and management actions were implemented through the 1990's to promote the recovery of the area affected by this fire. In 2010 these past actions were assessed using an integrated and participatory evaluation protocol (IAPro). The selected actions were shrubland regenerated after the fire (no-action); pine plantation over the shrubland; pine forest regenerated after the fire (no-action); and thinning of densely regenerated pines. The assessment involved the identification and engagement of a comprehensive and representative set of local and regional stakeholders who provided a baseline assessment, identified and prioritized essential indicators, considered data collected against those indicators, and participated in re-assessment of actions after an outranking multi-criteria decision aiding integration (MCDA) conducted by the expert team (Roy and Bertier, 1973). This process facilitated a collaborative integration of biophysical indicators (i.e. carbon sequestration, water and soil conservation, soil quality, biodiversity, fire risk and forest health) and socio-economic indicators (i.e. productive, recreational and touristic, aesthetic, and cultural values, cost of the actions, and impact on family finances). It was completed with activities for exchanging experiences and sharing knowledge with the platform of stakeholders. Stakeholder platform suggested that fire risk was the most important indicator, followed by water conservation and soil conservation. Least important indicators were cost of actions, aesthetic value, and recreational and touristic value. Data collected on each action showed the thinned pine forest action with the lowest

  19. 浅谈森林防火安全管理%Brief Talk about on Forest Fire Safety Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐华

    2012-01-01

    Strengthening forest fire safety management is essential to protecting forest and developing forestry. At present, there still exist some weak links and problems in forest fire prevention work. With foreign forest fire safety management experience used for reference, it is necessary to take measures to strengthen forest fire safety management.%加强森林防火安全管理对保护森林、发展林业至关重要。当前,森林防火工作还存在一些薄弱环节和问题,在借鉴国外森林防火安全管理经验的基础上,需要制定森林防火安全管理的应对策略。

  20. GIS Fuzzy Expert System for the assessment of ecosystems vulnerability to fire in managing Mediterranean natural protected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, Teodoro; Mastroleo, Giovanni; Aretano, Roberta; Facchinetti, Gisella; Zurlini, Giovanni; Petrosillo, Irene

    2016-03-01

    A significant threat to the natural and cultural heritage of Mediterranean natural protected areas (NPAs) is related to uncontrolled fires that can cause potential damages related to the loss or a reduction of ecosystems. The assessment and mapping of the vulnerability to fire can be useful to reduce landscape damages and to establish priority areas where it is necessary to plan measures to reduce the fire vulnerability. To this aim, a methodology based on an interactive computer-based system has been proposed in order to support NPA's management authority for the identification of vulnerable hotspots to fire through the selection of suitable indicators that allow discriminating different levels of sensitivity (e.g. Habitat relevance, Fragmentation, Fire behavior, Ecosystem Services, Vegetation recovery after fire) and stresses (agriculture, tourism, urbanization). In particular, a multi-criteria analysis based on Fuzzy Expert System (FES) integrated in a GIS environment has been developed in order to identify and map potential "hotspots" of fire vulnerability, where fire protection measures can be undertaken in advance. In order to test the effectiveness of this approach, this approach has been applied to the NPA of Torre Guaceto (Apulia Region, southern Italy). The most fire vulnerable areas are the patch of century-old forest characterized by high sensitivity and stress, and the wetlands and century-old olive groves due to their high sensitivity. The GIS fuzzy expert system provides evidence of its potential usefulness for the effective management of natural protected areas and can help conservation managers to plan and intervene in order to mitigate the fire vulnerability in accordance with conservation goals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Managing burn patients in a fire disaster: Experience from a burn unit in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashreky, S R; Bari, S; Sen, S L; Rahman, A; Khan, T F; Rahman, F

    2010-09-01

    Although burn disaster is not a frequent event, with urbanisation and industrialisation, burn disaster is becoming an emerging problem in Bangladesh. On 3 June 2010, a fire disaster killed 124 people in Neemtali, Dhaka, Bangladesh. This paper narrates the management of burn patients of this disaster in the burn unit of Dhaka Medical College Hospital. The burn unit managed 192 burn victims of the disaster. Forty-two victims were admitted and 150 of them received primary care at the emergency room and were sent back home. Ten patients among 42 in-patients died. The in-patient mortality was 23.8%. Burn unit in Dhaka Medical College Hospital is the only burn management centre in Bangladesh. Proper planning and coordinated effort by all sectors and persons concerned were the key elements in this successful management.

  2. Managing burn patients in a fire disaster: Experience from a burn unit in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashreky S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Although burn disaster is not a frequent event, with urbanisation and industrialisation, burn disaster is becoming an emerging problem in Bangladesh. On 3 June 2010, a fire disaster killed 124 people in Neemtali, Dhaka, Bangladesh. This paper narrates the management of burn patients of this disaster in the burn unit of Dhaka Medical College Hospital. The burn unit managed 192 burn victims of the disaster. Forty-two victims were admitted and 150 of them received primary care at the emergency room and were sent back home. Ten patients among 42 in-patients died. The in-patient mortality was 23.8%. Burn unit in Dhaka Medical College Hospital is the only burn management centre in Bangladesh. Proper planning and coordinated effort by all sectors and persons concerned were the key elements in this successful management.

  3. Effects of fire management on the richness and abundance of central North American grassland land snail faunas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nekola, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The land snail faunas from 72 upland and lowland grassland sites from central North America were analyzed. Sixteen of these had been exposed to fire management within the last 15 years, while the remainder had not. A total of 91,074 individuals in 72 different species were observed. Richness was reduced by approximately 30% on burned sites, while abundance was reduced by 50-90%. One-way ANOVA of all sites (using management type as the independent variable, a full 2-way ANOVA (using management and grassland type of all sites, and a 2-way ANOVA limited to 26 sites paired according to their habitat type and geographic location, demonstrated in all cases a highly significant (up to p < 0.0005 reduction in richness and abundance on fire managed sites. Contingency table analysis of individual species demonstrated that 44% experienced a significant reduction in abundance on fire-managed sites. Only six species positively responded to fire. Comparisons of fire response to the general ecological preferences of these species demonstrated that fully 72% of turf-specialists were negatively impacted by fire, while 67% of duff-specialists demonstrated no significant response. These differences were highly significant (p = 0.0006. Thus, frequent use of fire management represents a significant threat to the health and diversity of North American grassland land snail communities. Protecting this fauna will require the preservation of site organic litter layers, which will require the increase of fire return intervals to 15+ years in conjunction with use of more diversified methods to remove woody and invasive plants.

  4. A stochastic forest fire model for future land cover scenarios assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. D' Andrea; P. Fiorucci; T.P. Holmes

    2011-01-01

    Land cover is affected by many factors including economic development, climate and natural disturbances such as wildfires. The ability to evaluate how fire regimes may alter future vegetation, and how future vegetation may alter fire regimes, would assist forest managers in planning management actions to be carried out in the face of anticipated socio-economic and...

  5. Establishment and Application of Forest Fire Suppression Command Assistant Decision System Based on GIS System%基于GIS的森林火灾扑救指挥辅助决策系统的建立及应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶江霞; 舒立福; 邓忠坚; 赵璠; 王艳霞; 周汝良

    2013-01-01

    According to the characteristics of forest disaster,a basic geographic database was set up and a forest fire suppression command assistant decision system was developed integrating with spatial information,network communication,hardware development techniques and forest fire theory.This system realized GPS dynamic tracking and fire capture,fire hotspots management,forest fire spreading simulation,fire suppression assistant decision,forest fire trend release and 3D fire environment scene browse.Based on the.net technique,SQL Server database technique,Skyline 3D visualization technique and ArcGIS engine components,the system were developed by integrated communication network,GPS chip and intelligent mobile phone.The system could find out potential forest fire,make computer assistant decision and disposal,and realize forest fire prevention by computer information,which greatly enhanced the efficiency of forest fire management.%针对山地森林火灾预防难、扑救难、易伤亡的特点,在对森林防火业务进行需求分析的基础上,以GIS为核心,建立森林防火基础地理数据库,综合应用空间信息技术、网络通讯技术、硬件开发技术及林火理论对其进行研发,建立了森林火灾扑救指挥辅助决策系统.系统实现了GPS人员动态跟踪及火情采集、林火热点管理、林火蔓延模拟、灭火扑救辅助决策、森林火灾发展态势发布、三维火环境场景浏览等多个功能.系统以.net技术、SQL Server数据库技术、Skyline三维可视化技术、ArcGIS Engine开发组件为基础,结合GPS芯片、通讯网络及智能手机进行集成开发.系统建立示范以来,在日常林火管理中能及时发现潜在森林火灾、开展计算机辅助决策与处置,实现森林防火计算机信息化,从而提高林火管理水平,取得良好的防灾、减灾效果.

  6. Wildfire, Land Management, and Aeolian Processes in Dryland Ecosystems - Lessons from the Milford Flat Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. E.; Reynolds, R. L.; Goldstein, H.; Reheis, M. C.; Yount, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    Wildfire can increase risks of wind erosion through the removal of vegetation that protects soil, decreases wind velocity at the surface, and captures sediment. Post-fire rehabilitation treatments implemented by land-management agencies are intended to stabilize burned sites by facilitating the establishment of perennial vegetation, but treatments also can decrease erosion resistance through impacts on soil erodibility (aggregation and roughness) where treatments involve surface disturbance, and vegetation structure where treatments involve herbicide applications to suppress invasive exotic annuals. To begin examining these issues, 25 plots were established to monitor erosion resistance and dust emissions on a low-elevation portion of the 2007 Milford Flat Fire in the Lake Bonneville basin of west-central Utah. Post-fire dust emissions have exhibited an extreme degree of spatial variability. During Mar-Jun 2009, horizontal dust fluxes measured with BSNE samplers at 1 m above the ground surface ranged from 18 to 1,307 g m-2 d-1 in unburned plots (n=8), 25 to 565 g m-2 d-1 in burned plots that were untreated (n=5), and 15 to 25,266 g m-2 d-1 in burned plots that received one or more treatments consisting of herbicide application, seeding with a rangeland drill, or chaining following aerial seeding (n=12). Fluxes have been highly contingent on landscape setting and surficial soil properties, with maximum fluxes recorded in settings characterized by a high degree of connectivity with upwind sources of unstable fine sands that abrade the surface, dislodge downwind soil particles, and contribute to positive feedbacks that generate avalanches of wind erosion. Nonlinear patterns of wind erosion attributable to this fetch effect highlight the profound importance of soil properties and landscape setting as spatial factors to be considered in evaluating risks of alternative post-fire rehabilitation strategies. During the Mar-Jul 2010 period, average dust flux had declined by

  7. Introduction: Strengthening the foundation of wildland fire Effects prediction for research and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew B. Dickinson; Kevin C. Ryan

    2010-01-01

    As prescribed fire use increases and the options for responding to wildfires continue to expand beyond suppression, the need for improving fire effects prediction capabilities be¬comes increasingly apparent. The papers in this Fire Ecology special issue describe recent advances in fire effects prediction for key classes of direct (first-order) fire effects. Important...

  8. 44 CFR 206.393 - Providing assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE FEDERAL DISASTER ASSISTANCE Fire Suppression Assistance § 206.393 Providing assistance. Following the Assistant Administrator for the Disaster Assistance Directorate's... requested by the State. For each fire or fire situation, the State shall prepare a separate Fire...

  9. Sustainable Forest Management Support Based on the Spatial Distribution of Fuels for Fire Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Germán Flores Garnica; Juan de Dios Benavides Solorio; David Arturo Moreno Gonzalez

    2006-01-01

    Fire behavior simulation is based mainly on the fuel model-concept. However, there are great difficulties to develop the corresponding maps, therefore it is suggested the generation of four fuel maps (1-hour, 10-hours, 100-hours and alive). These maps will allow a better definition of the spatial variation of forest fuels, even within a zone classified as a given fuel...

  10. 3-D diagnosis-assisted management of anomalous mandibular molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Mittal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the successful non-surgical endodontic management of carious exposed three-rooted mandibular molar with four root canals detected on the pre-operative radiograph taken with 20 degrees mesial angulation and confirmed with a 64-slice helical computed tomography scan-assisted 3-D-reconstructed images. Access cavity shape was modified to locate the extra canal with respect to the distolingual root in the left mandibular first molar. Copious irrigation was accomplished with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and 17% EDTA. Biomechanical preparation was done using protapers. Calcium hydroxide dressing was done for 1 week. The tooth was obturated using gutta percha and AH 26 root canal sealer, and it was permanently restored with composite. Clinical examination on follow-up visits revealed no sensitivity to percussion and palpation in the left mandibular first molar. Thorough knowledge of root canal variations and use of advanced diagnostic modalities lead to successful non-surgical management of the complex cases.

  11. Landscape management of fire and grazing regimes alters the fine-scale habitat utilisation by feral cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh W McGregor

    Full Text Available Intensification of fires and grazing by large herbivores has caused population declines in small vertebrates in many ecosystems worldwide. Impacts are rarely direct, and usually appear driven via indirect pathways, such as changes to predator-prey dynamics. Fire events and grazing may improve habitat and/or hunting success for the predators of small mammals, however, such impacts have not been documented. To test for such an interaction, we investigated fine-scale habitat selection by feral cats in relation to fire, grazing and small-mammal abundance. Our study was conducted in north-western Australia, where small mammal populations are sensitive to changes in fire and grazing management. We deployed GPS collars on 32 cats in landscapes with contrasting fire and grazing treatments. Fine-scale habitat selection was determined using discrete choice modelling of cat movements. We found that cats selected areas with open grass cover, including heavily-grazed areas. They strongly selected for areas recently burnt by intense fires, but only in habitats that typically support high abundance of small mammals. Intense fires and grazing by introduced herbivores created conditions that are favoured by cats, probably because their hunting success is improved. This mechanism could explain why, in northern Australia, impacts of feral cats on small mammals might have increased. Our results suggest the impact of feral cats could be reduced in most ecosystems by maximising grass cover, minimising the incidence of intense fires, and reducing grazing by large herbivores.

  12. Landscape management of fire and grazing regimes alters the fine-scale habitat utilisation by feral cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Hugh W; Legge, Sarah; Jones, Menna E; Johnson, Christopher N

    2014-01-01

    Intensification of fires and grazing by large herbivores has caused population declines in small vertebrates in many ecosystems worldwide. Impacts are rarely direct, and usually appear driven via indirect pathways, such as changes to predator-prey dynamics. Fire events and grazing may improve habitat and/or hunting success for the predators of small mammals, however, such impacts have not been documented. To test for such an interaction, we investigated fine-scale habitat selection by feral cats in relation to fire, grazing and small-mammal abundance. Our study was conducted in north-western Australia, where small mammal populations are sensitive to changes in fire and grazing management. We deployed GPS collars on 32 cats in landscapes with contrasting fire and grazing treatments. Fine-scale habitat selection was determined using discrete choice modelling of cat movements. We found that cats selected areas with open grass cover, including heavily-grazed areas. They strongly selected for areas recently burnt by intense fires, but only in habitats that typically support high abundance of small mammals. Intense fires and grazing by introduced herbivores created conditions that are favoured by cats, probably because their hunting success is improved. This mechanism could explain why, in northern Australia, impacts of feral cats on small mammals might have increased. Our results suggest the impact of feral cats could be reduced in most ecosystems by maximising grass cover, minimising the incidence of intense fires, and reducing grazing by large herbivores.

  13. Environmental assessment wildland fire management plan Modoc National Wildlife Refuge [2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fire was a natural component of this ecosystem until suppression of fire started around the turn of the century. With the decades of fire suppression and...

  14. Radiation management during restoration works after fire and explosion accident of Asphalt Solidification Facility (ASP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyabe, Kenjiro; Ninomiya, Kazushige; Imakuma, Yoshikazu (and others)

    1999-04-01

    A fire broke out at 10:06 a.m. March 11 in 1997 in asphalt filling up room of Asphalt Solidification Processing Facility (ASP) in Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), and an explosion occurred at 8:04 p.m. on the same day. A large number of installations and equipment in the facility were damaged by the accident. As the containment function of the facility were lost, radioactive materials were released to outside of the facility. Thirty seven workers (thirty four workers inside the ASP building at fire, and three workers near the ASP at explosion) suffered internal exposures. Effective dose equivalent for each worker which was estimated based on the intake of radioactive materials, was below the record level for internal exposure management (2msv). Restoration works of the ASP including repairs of broken windows, shutters, doors, ventilation exhaust systems, radiation control and management equipment, and decontamination, were completed on July 31 in 1998. The radiation management during the restoration are described in this report. (Suetake, M.)

  15. Competency-Based Performance Appraisals: Improving Performance Evaluations of School Nutrition Managers and Assistants/Technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Evelina W.; Asperin, Amelia Estepa; Nettles, Mary Frances

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the research was to develop a competency-based performance appraisal resource for evaluating school nutrition (SN) managers and assistants/technicians. Methods: A two-phased process was used to develop the competency-based performance appraisal resource for SN managers and assistants/technicians. In Phase I, draft…

  16. Communication management during the veld fires of 23 August 2011 in the Tlokwe Local Municipality: A cautionary tale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magrita N. Wiggill

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A veld fire disaster in the Tlokwe Local Municipality on 23 August 2011, resulted in an estimated monetary loss of over R43 million. The veld fire disaster was characterised by a lack of strategic management and a subsequent lack of planned, coordinated communication between all role players involved. The lack of strategic communication management indirectly contributed to the losses suffered during the disaster, and afterwards relationships between many role players were strained. Objectives and method: The objectives for the qualitative research project were to determine the different role players’ perception of communication management during the veld fires of 23 August 2011, and in what way relationships between role players were affected by the lack of communication management during the veld fire disaster. Data were gathered by means of semi-structured interviews with the relevant role players.Results and conclusion: Most of the role players were convinced that communication was not managed effectively on 23 August 2011. It resulted in, most especially, a loss of trust and perceived lack of commitment between some of the role players. It is recommended that emergency services and other role players receive more training (also focusing on communication management, participate in simulations and incorporate a communication and relationship management approach to disaster risk management

  17. Research and development supporting risk-based wildfire effects prediction for fuels and fire management: Status and needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin Hyde; Matthew B. Dickinson; Gil Bohrer; David Calkin; Louisa Evers; Julie Gilbertson-Day; Tessa Nicolet; Kevin Ryan; Christina Tague

    2013-01-01

    Wildland fire management has moved beyond a singular focus on suppression, calling for wildfire management for ecological benefit where no critical human assets are at risk. Processes causing direct effects and indirect, long-term ecosystem changes are complex and multidimensional. Robust risk-assessment tools are required that account for highly variable effects on...

  18. Modeling potential outcomes of fire and fuel management scenarios on the structure of forested habitats in northeast Oregon, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.C. Wales; L.H. Suring; M.A. Hemstrom

    2007-01-01

    Thinning and prescribed fire are being used extensively across the interior Western United States to reduce the risk of large, severe wildfires. However, the full ecological consequences of implementing these management practices on the landscape have not been completely evaluated. We projected future vegetation trends resulting from four management scenarios and...

  19. Adenoid facies and chronic refractory rhinosinusitis managed by endoscopic-assisted adenoidectomy

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background /Objectives: To study 30 cases of patients of chronic adenoiditis with adenoid facies and refractory chronic rhinosinusitis managed by endoscopic assisted adenoidectomy. Materials and method: 7 cases of adenoid facies and 23 cases of chronic refractory rhinosinusitis with adenoiditis were managed by endoscopic assisted adenoidectomy during the study period of 12 months from August 2012 to July 2013. Result: endoscopic assisted adenoidectomy proves to be more effective in m...

  20. Assistive technologies for managing language disorders in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova, Blanka; Maresova, Petra; Kuca, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    At present, the number of elderly people is rapidly increasing, which represents a significant threat in terms of their care when they fall ill. One of the most common aging diseases nowadays is dementia, whose symptoms sooner or later include loss of cognitive functioning. Cognitive disorders can vary from serious mental retardation to inability to recall things, to the loss or disorder of specific cognitive functions such as communication. These disorders not only affect the quality of people's own life but also impose a substantial burden on their families, particularly on their caregivers. Therefore, the aim of this article is to highlight the role of assistive technologies (ATs) for managing language impairments in dementia in order to improve patients' quality of life. In addition, ATs focused on training patients' memory are also mentioned, since they can help patients to maintain their language skills. Furthermore, these ATs can delay the need for institutional care, as well as significantly reduce costs on patient care. The importance of future research in the area of the development of ATs for managing the language impairments in dementia is also discussed. There is a general trend toward the personalization of patient needs and requirements in the area of ATs. For the purpose of this article, a method of literature review of available sources defining language disorders and providing characteristic features of language disorders in dementia is used. In addition, a method of comparison of different research studies exploring ATs focused on delaying language disorders in dementia in order to postpone patients' need for institutional care is also exploited.

  1. The influence of fire history, plant species and post-fire management on soil water repellency in a Mediterranean catchment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keesstra, Saskia; Wittenberg, Lea; Maroulis, Jerry; Sambalino, Francesco; Malkinson, Dan; Cerdà, Artemi; Pereira, Paulo

    2017-01-01

    Fire is a key factor impacting soil hydrology in many Mediterranean catchments. Soil water repellency (SWR) can stimulate land degradation processes by reducing the affinity of soil and water thereby triggering a reduction in soil fertility and increasing soil and water losses. The effects of two

  2. Web-of-Objects (WoO-Based Context Aware Emergency Fire Management Systems for the Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia Ush Shamszaman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent advancements in the Internet of Things (IoT and the Web of Things (WoT accompany a smart life where real world objects, including sensing devices, are interconnected with each other. The Web representation of smart objects empowers innovative applications and services for various domains. To accelerate this approach, Web of Objects (WoO focuses on the implementation aspects of bringing the assorted real world objects to the Web applications. In this paper; we propose an emergency fire management system in the WoO infrastructure. Consequently, we integrate the formation and management of Virtual Objects (ViO which are derived from real world physical objects and are virtually connected with each other into the semantic ontology model. The charm of using the semantic ontology is that it allows information reusability, extensibility and interoperability, which enable ViOs to uphold orchestration, federation, collaboration and harmonization. Our system is context aware, as it receives contextual environmental information from distributed sensors and detects emergency situations. To handle a fire emergency, we present a decision support tool for the emergency fire management team. The previous fire incident log is the basis of the decision support system. A log repository collects all the emergency fire incident logs from ViOs and stores them in a repository.

  3. Web-of-Objects (WoO)-based context aware emergency fire management systems for the Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamszaman, Zia Ush; Ara, Safina Showkat; Chong, Ilyoung; Jeong, Youn Kwae

    2014-02-13

    Recent advancements in the Internet of Things (IoT) and the Web of Things (WoT) accompany a smart life where real world objects, including sensing devices, are interconnected with each other. The Web representation of smart objects empowers innovative applications and services for various domains. To accelerate this approach, Web of Objects (WoO) focuses on the implementation aspects of bringing the assorted real world objects to the Web applications. In this paper; we propose an emergency fire management system in the WoO infrastructure. Consequently, we integrate the formation and management of Virtual Objects (ViO) which are derived from real world physical objects and are virtually connected with each other into the semantic ontology model. The charm of using the semantic ontology is that it allows information reusability, extensibility and interoperability, which enable ViOs to uphold orchestration, federation, collaboration and harmonization. Our system is context aware, as it receives contextual environmental information from distributed sensors and detects emergency situations. To handle a fire emergency, we present a decision support tool for the emergency fire management team. The previous fire incident log is the basis of the decision support system. A log repository collects all the emergency fire incident logs from ViOs and stores them in a repository.

  4. Using National Ambient Air Quality Standards for fine particulate matter to assess regional wildland fire smoke and air quality management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Don; Cisneros, Ricardo; Traina, Samuel; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A; Shaw, Glenn

    2017-10-01

    Wildland fire is an important ecological process in the California Sierra Nevada. Personal accounts from pre-20th century describe a much smokier environment than present day. The policy of suppression beginning in the early 20th century and climate change are contributing to increased megafires. We use a single particulate monitoring site at the wildland urban interface to explore impacts from prescribed, managed, and full suppression wildland fires from 2006 to 2015 producing a contextual assessment of smoke impacts over time at the landscape level. Prescribed fire had little effect on local fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air quality with readings typical of similar non-fire times; hourly and daily good to moderate Air Quality Index (AQI) for PM2.5, maximum hourly concentrations 21-103 μg m(-3), and mean concentrations between 7.7 and 13.2 μg m(-3). Hourly and daily AQI was typically good or moderate during managed fires with 3 h and one day reaching unhealthy while the site remained below National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), with maximum hourly concentrations 27-244 μg m(-3), and mean concentrations 6.7-11.7 μg m(-3). The large high intensity fire in this area created the highest short term impacts (AQI unhealthy for 4 h and very unhealthy for 1 h), 11 unhealthy for sensitive days, and produced the only annual value (43.9 μg m(-3)) over the NAAQS 98th percentile for PM2.5 (35 μg m(-3)). Pinehurst remained below the federal standards for PM2.5 when wildland fire in the local area was managed to 7800 ha (8-22% of the historic burn area). Considering air quality impacts from smoke using the NAAQS at a landscape level over time can give land and air managers a metric for broader evaluation of smoke impacts particularly when assessing ecologically beneficial fire. Allowing managers to control the amount and timing of individual wildland fire emissions can help lessen large smoke impacts to public health from a megafire. Published by

  5. Post-fire management and recovery of a pine forest in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Spanos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of management after fire in Pinus halepensis forests were assessed in northern Greece. Seeding, logging and building of log barriers were applied in burned sites and compared to a control site. Two years after treatment application, 70–80% of the ground in all sites was covered with vegetation. Seeding with herbaceous plants did not increase plant cover. Logging and building of log barriers negatively affected herbaceous species but increased woody species. During the first spring after fire, the highest numbers of P. halepensis seedlings were observed in the control site and the lowest number in the logged site. Logging and log barrier building had a negative effect on pine regeneration compared to control and seeding treatments. Woody plant composition was similar in control and seeding sites, with dominance of P. halepensis and Cistus species. A different pattern was observed in the logging and log-barrier sites with a low number of seeders and a high number of resprouter species.

  6. Post-Fire Soil Respiration in Relation to the Burnt Wood Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón Jiménez, Sara; Castro, J.; Kowalski, A.; Serrano-Ortiz, P.; Ruiz, B.; Sancez-Canete, Ep; Zamora, R.

    2010-05-01

    important for the management of forest areas affected by wildfires, now that they offer key information about the influence of the forest intervention related to the burnt wood after fires in the carbon cycle and about the soil capacity of CO2 sequestration.

  7. Managing wildfire events: risk-based decision making among a group of federal fire managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robyn S. Wilson; Patricia L. Winter; Lynn A. Maguire; Timothy. Ascher

    2011-01-01

    Managing wildfire events to achieve multiple management objectives involves a high degree of decision complexity and uncertainty, increasing the likelihood that decisions will be informed by experience-based heuristics triggered by available cues at the time of the decision. The research reported here tests the prevalence of three risk-based biases among 206...

  8. Modeling Effects of Climate Change and Fire Management on Western White Pine (Pinus monticola in the Northern Rocky Mountains, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Keane

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is projected to profoundly influence vegetation patterns and community compositions, either directly through increased species mortality and shifts in species distributions or indirectly through disturbance dynamics such as increased wildfire activity and extent, shifting fire regimes, and pathogenesis. Mountainous landscapes have been shown to be particularly sensitive to climate changes and are likely to experience significant impacts under predicted future climate regimes. Western white pine (Pinus monticola, a five-needle pine species that forms the most diverse of the white pine forest cover types in the western United States, is vulnerable to an interacting suite of threats that includes climate change, fire suppression, white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola, and mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae that have already caused major changes in species distribution and abundance. We used the mechanistic simulation model FireBGCv2 to simulate effects of climate change and fire management on western white pines in a mountainous watershed in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA. Our results suggest that warming temperatures favor increased abundance of western white pine over existing climax and shade tolerant species in the study area, mainly because warmer conditions potentiate fire dynamics, including increased wildfire frequency and extent, which facilitates regeneration. Suppression of wildfires reduced the area dominated by western white pine, but fire suppression was less effective at limiting burned area extent and fire frequency in a warmer and drier climate. Wildfires created canopy gaps that allowed for western white pine regeneration at a high enough rate to escape local extirpation from white pine blister rust. Western white pine appears to be a resilient species even under fairly extreme warming trajectories and shifting fire regimes, and may provide a hedge against vegetation community shifts away

  9. Safety climate in the federal fire management community: Influences of organizational, environmental, group, and individual characteristics (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke Baldauf McBride; Anne E. Black

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of organizational, environmental, group and individual characteristics on five components of safety climate in the US federal fire management community (HRO Practices, Leadership, Group Culture, Learning Orientation and Mission Clarity). Multiple analyses of variance revealed that all types of characteristics had a significant effect on...

  10. Safety climate in the US federal wildland fire management community: influences of organizational, environmental, group, and individual characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne E. Black; Brooke Baldauf. McBride

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of organisational, environmental, group and individual characteristics on five components of safety climate (High Reliability Organising Practices, Leadership, Group Culture, Learning Orientation and Mission Clarity) in the US federal wildland fire management community. Of particular interest were differences between perceptions based on...

  11. Urban Fire Risk Clustering Method Based on Fire Statistics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Lizhi; REN Aizhu

    2008-01-01

    Fire statistics and fire analysis have become important ways for us to understand the law of fire,prevent the occurrence of fire, and improve the ability to control fire. According to existing fire statistics, the weighted fire risk calculating method characterized by the number of fire occurrence, direct economic losses,and fire casualties was put forward. On the basis of this method, meanwhile having improved K-mean clus-tering arithmetic, this paper established fire dsk K-mean clustering model, which could better resolve the automatic classifying problems towards fire risk. Fire risk cluster should be classified by the absolute dis-tance of the target instead of the relative distance in the traditional cluster arithmetic. Finally, for applying the established model, this paper carded out fire risk clustering on fire statistics from January 2000 to December 2004 of Shenyang in China. This research would provide technical support for urban fire management.

  12. Ventricular Assist Device Support: for Management of Sustained Ventricular Arrhythmias

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    We describe herein the cases of 2 patients who had ventricular arrhythmias. In one, a short-term biventricular assist device, the ABIOMED BVS 5000, was placed because the patient had sustained ventricular tachycardia and could not be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass. Excellent hemodynamic support was maintained for several days while the antiarrhythmic therapy was maximized. Sinus rhythm was restored, and the patient was successfully weaned from the ventricular assist device. However, the s...

  13. Fire management in Mediterranean-climate shrublands: a case study from the Cape fynbos, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    van Wilgen, BW

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors used a spatial data base of fires within 10 protected areas covering >720 000 ha to examine the frequency, seasonality, size and cause of fires over four decades. Their study covered five fire climate zones and a range of mountain fynbos...

  14. Final priority; Technical Assistance on State Data Collection--IDEA Data Management Center. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-05

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) announces a priority under the Technical Assistance on State Data Collection program. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years. We take this action to fund a cooperative agreement to establish and operate an IDEA Data Management Center (Center) that will provide technical assistance (TA) to improve the capacity of States to meet the data collection requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

  15. Ventricular assist device support for management of sustained ventricular arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasseas, Panayotis; Kutalek, Steven P; Samuels, Fania L; Holmes, Elena C; Samuels, Louis E

    2002-01-01

    We describe herein the cases of 2 patients who had ventricular arrhythmias. In one, a short-term biventricular assist device, the ABIOMED BVS 5000, was placed because the patient had sustained ventricular tachycardia and could not be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass. Excellent hemodynamic support was maintained for several days while the antiarrhythmic therapy was maximized. Sinus rhythm was restored, and the patient was successfully weaned from the ventricular assist device. However, the substrate for the arrhythmia persisted, and a recurrence, 1 week later, resulted in the patient's death. In the 2nd patient, the use of an implantable left ventricular assist device was successful in temporarily alleviating the ventricular tachycardia associated with ischemic cardiomyopathy. However, after 2 days of device assistance, the patient experienced a recurrence of the tachycardia, which degenerated into ventricular fibrillation with a marked deterioration in the patient's hemodynamics. The arrhythmia persisted despite multiple attempts at external cardioversion, and internal cardioversion and placement of an automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator were necessary. This treatment, along with repeated boluses of amiodarone, led to successful suppression of the arrhythmias, and the patient eventually underwent transplantation. The mechanical hemodynamic support of the circulation by ventricular assist devices was effective in supporting these 2 patients who had sustained ventricular arrhythmias.

  16. Adenoid facies and chronic refractory rhinosinusitis managed by endoscopic-assisted adenoidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir M Naik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background /Objectives: To study 30 cases of patients of chronic adenoiditis with adenoid facies and refractory chronic rhinosinusitis managed by endoscopic assisted adenoidectomy. Materials and method: 7 cases of adenoid facies and 23 cases of chronic refractory rhinosinusitis with adenoiditis were managed by endoscopic assisted adenoidectomy during the study period of 12 months from August 2012 to July 2013. Result: endoscopic assisted adenoidectomy proves to be more effective in managing adenoid facies and chronic refractory rhinosinusitis with adenoid hyperplasia. Conclusion: visualization of the adenoid mass using endoscope helps complete removal of the diseased adenoids. Endoscopic assisted adenoidectomy is treatment of choice in adenoid facies and chronic refractory rhinosinusitis with adenoid hyperplasia and more effective than conventional adenoidectomy.

  17. Increasing microbial diversity and nitrogen cycling potential of burnt forest soil in Spain through post-fire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereg, Lily; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; McMillan, Mary; García-Orenes, Fuensanta

    2016-04-01

    Microbial diversity and function in soils are increasingly assessed by the application of molecular methods such as sequencing and PCR technology. We applied these techniques to study microbial recovery in post-fire forest soils. The recovery of forest ecosystems following severe fire is influenced by post-fire management. The removal of burnt tree stumps (salvage logging) is a common practice in Spain following fire. In some cases, the use of heavy machinery in addition to the vulnerability of soils to erosion and degradation make this management potentially damaging to soil, and therefore to the ecosystem. We hypothesized that tree removal slows down the recovery of soil biological communities including microbial and plant communities and contributes to soil degradation in the burnt affected area. The study area is located in "Sierra de Mariola Natural Park" in Alcoi, Alicante (E Spain). A big forest fire (>500 has) occurred in July 2012. The forest is composed mainly of Pinus halepensis trees with an understory of typical Mediterranean shrubs species such as Quercus coccifera, Rosmarinus officinalis, Thymus vulgaris, Brachypodium retusum, etc. Soil is classified as a Typic Xerorthent (Soil Survey Staff, 2014) developed over marls. In February 2013, salvage logging (SL) treatment, with a complete extraction of the burned wood using heavy machinery, was applied to a part of the affected forest. Plots for monitoring the effects of SL were installed in this area and in a similar nearby control (C) area, where no SL treatment was done. The recovery of soil bacterial and fungal communities post-fire with and without tree removal was analysed by using Next-Generation sequencing and the abundance of functional genes, related to nitrogen cycling, in the soil was estimated using quantitative PCR (qPCR). We will present the methods used and the results of our study in this PICO presentation.

  18. Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Lendvay

    2008-01-01

    Robotic-assisted laparoscopy (RAL) has become a promising means for performing correction of vesicoureteral reflux disease in children through both intravesical and extravesical techniques. We describe the importance of patient selection, intraoperative patient positioning, employing certain helpful techniques for exposure, and recognizing the limitations and potential complications of robotic reimplant surgery. As more clinicians embrace robotic surgery and more urology residents are traine...

  19. Testing the hypothesis of fire use for ecosystem management by neanderthal and upper palaeolithic modern human populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Daniau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been proposed that a greater control and more extensive use of fire was one of the behavioral innovations that emerged in Africa among early Modern Humans, favouring their spread throughout the world and determining their eventual evolutionary success. We would expect, if extensive fire use for ecosystem management were a component of the modern human technical and cognitive package, as suggested for Australia, to find major disturbances in the natural biomass burning variability associated with the colonisation of Europe by Modern Humans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Analyses of microcharcoal preserved in two deep-sea cores located off Iberia and France were used to reconstruct changes in biomass burning between 70 and 10 kyr cal BP. Results indicate that fire regime follows the Dansgaard-Oeschger climatic variability and its impacts on fuel load. No major disturbance in natural fire regime variability is observed at the time of the arrival of Modern Humans in Europe or during the remainder of the Upper Palaeolithic (40-10 kyr cal BP. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results indicate that either Neanderthals and Modern humans did not influence fire regime or that, if they did, their respective influence was comparable at a regional scale, and not as pronounced as that observed in the biomass burning history of Southeast Asia.

  20. Enhancing Saarc Disaster Management: A Comparative Study With Asean Coordinating Centre For Humanitarian Assistance On Disaster Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Disaster Management Organizations Ferris highlights that regional organizations are more suitable for mobilization as they will share culture , customs...greater political, security, economic and socio cultural ” co-operation, serves the formation and operationalization of regional disaster management ... Malaysia Air Force Base in Subang, Malaysia on Dec 07, 2012, with assistance from the Japan-ASEAN Integration Fund (JAIF) to manage the logistics

  1. Grants Management Training Materials for Tribal Organizations: Introduction to Tribal Administrative and Financial Guidance for Assistance Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA training can help grant recipients manage assistance agreement awards. Learn about grant requirements and EPA expectations. Learn how to manage an entire program, manage a specific piece of the project, or refresh understanding of specific tasks.

  2. Integrated management software files action in case of fire; Software de gestion integral de fichas de actuacion en caso de incendio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Ventas Garcia, V.; Gimeno Serrano, F.

    2010-07-01

    The proper management of emergencies, is a challenge for which it is essential to be prepared. Integrated Software Performance Chips In case of fire and rapid access to information, make this application a must to effectively drive any emergency due to fire at any nuclear facility.

  3. Participatory Geographic Information Systems as an organizational platform for the integration of traditional and scientific knowledge in contemporary fire and fuels management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke Balauf McBride; Fernando Sanchez-Trigueros; Stephen J Carver; Alan E Watson; Linda Moon Stumpff; Roian Matt; William T. Borrie

    2016-01-01

    Traditional knowledge about fire and its effects held by indigenous people, who are connected to specific landscapes, holds promise for informing contemporary fire and fuels management strategies and augmenting knowledge and information derived from western science. In practice, however, inadequate means to organize and communicate this traditional knowledge with...

  4. Anesthetic management of robot-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Karlekar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG is a rare disorder involving neuromuscular junction. In conjunction with medical therapy, thymectomy is a known modality of treatment of MG and has shown to increase the probability of remission and overall symptomatic improvement. For minimally invasive thymectomy, video-.assisted thoracoscopic surgery has been the preferred surgical approach till recently. The robotic surgical procedure must necessarily bring new challenges to the anesthesiologists to effectively meet the specific requirements of the technique. At present, there is a paucity of literature regarding the anesthetic concerns of robotic assisted thymectomy, patient in question specifically posed a challenge since different maneuvers and techniques had to be tried to obtain optimum surgical conditions with stable ventilatory and hemodynamic parameters. Concerns of patient positioning and hemodynamic monitoring have also been discussed.

  5. Evaluating impacts of fire management strategies on native and invasive plants using an individual-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangur, Alexander N.; Fill, Jennifer M.; Northfield, Tobin D.; van de Wiel, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The capacity for species to coexist and potentially exclude one another can broadly be attributed to drivers that influence fitness differences (such as competitive ability) and niche differences (such as environmental change). These drivers, and thus the determinants of coexistence they influence, can interact and fluctuate both spatially and temporally. Understanding the spatiotemporal variation in niche and fitness differences in systems prone to fluctuating drivers, such as fire, can help to inform the management of invasive species. In the Cape floristic region of South Africa, invasive Pinus pinaster seedlings are strong competitors in the post-burn environment of the fire-driven Fynbos vegetation. In this, system native Protea spp. are especially vulnerable to unseasonal burns, but seasonal prescribed (Summer) burns are thought to present a high safety risk. Together, these issues have limited the appeal of prescribed burn management as an alternative to costly manual eradication of P. pinaster. Using a spatially-explicit field-of-neighbourhood individual-based model, we represent the drivers of spatiotemporal variation in niche differences (driven by fire regimes) and fitness differences (driven by competitive ability). In doing so, we evaluate optimal fire management strategies to a) control invasive P. pinaster in the Cape floristic region of South Africa, while b) minimizing deleterious effects of management on native Protea spp. The scarcity of appropriate data for model calibration has been problematic for models in invasion biology, but we use recent advances in Approximate Bayesian Computing techniques to overcome this limitation. We present early conclusions on the viability of prescribed burn management to control P. pinaster in South Africa.

  6. Innovate community fire management and improve fire prevention and control system%创新社会消防管理完善火灾防控体系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范平安

    2011-01-01

    Explore a new mechanism of innovating community fire management and improving fire prevention and control system from several fields as follows: the implementation of responsible engineering and the establishment of the prevention and control mechanism in accordance with the laws the implementation of key engineering and the establishment of the key prevention and control mechanism;the implementation of infrastructure engineering and the establishment of the basic prevention and control mechanism; the implementation of quality engineering and the establishment of the whole people prevention and control mechanism; the implementation of people-oriented engineering and the establishment of the law enforcement service mechanism ;the implementation of linkage engineering and the establishment of the rescue mechanism) the implementation of security engineering and the establishment of fire revitaliza-tion with technology mechanism; and etc.%从实施责任工程、建立依法防控机制,实施关键工程、建立重点防控机制,实施基础工程、建立基础防控机制,实施素质工程、建立全民防控机制,实施人本工程、建立执法服务机制,实施联动工程、建立应急救援机制,以及实施保障工程、建立科技兴消机制等方面,探讨创新社会消防管理、完善火灾防控体系的新机制.

  7. Rapport Management of International Teaching Assistants in Their Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The current study adopts Spencer-Oatey's theory of rapport management as the main framework, and examines the IT A participants' perceptions of their management of rapport, i.e. social relationship, with their American undergraduates, which are also compared with perceptions of American counterparts, including American professor and ATA…

  8. Assistive Technology and Older Adults in Disasters: Implications for Emergency Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSweeney-Feld, Mary Helen

    2017-02-01

    This article identifies concepts, trends, and policy gaps in the availability and service delivery of assistive technology utilized by older adults in disasters, as well as implications for emergency management planning and shelter administration. Definitions of types of assistive technology, as well as views of older adults using technology as at-risk individuals for emergency management service provision, are provided. An overview of peer-reviewed articles and gray literature is conducted, focusing on publications from 2001 to the present in the United States. Analytical frameworks used by emergency management organizations as well as regulations such as the Americans with Disabilities Act and recent court decisions on emergency shelter accessibility in disasters are reviewed. Research on the use of assistive technology by older adults during disasters is a neglected issue. The current and potential benefits of defining standards for provision and use of assistive technology for older adults during disasters has received limited recognition in emergency management planning. Older adults with disabilities utilize assistive technology to maintain their independence and dignity, and communities as well as emergency services managers need to become more aware of the needs and preferences of these older adults in their planning processes and drills as well as in service delivery during actual events. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:135-139).

  9. Dynamic management of multi-channel interfaces for human interactions with computer-based intelligent assistants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strickland, T.D. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    For complex man-machine tasks where multi-media interaction with computer-based assistants is appropriate, a portion of the assistant's intelligence must be devoted to managing its communication processes with the user. Since people often serve the role of assistants, the conventions of human communication provide a basis for designing the communication processes of the computer-based assistant. Human decision making for communication requires knowledge of the user's style, the task demands, and communication practices, and knowledge of the current situation. Decisions necessary for effective communication, when, how, and what to communicate, can be expressed using these knowledge sources. A system based on human communication rules was developed to manage the communication decisions of an intelligent assistant. The Dynamic Communication Management (DCM) system consists of four components, three models and a manager. The model of the user describes the user's communication preferences for different task situations. The model of the task is used to establish the user's current activity and to describe how communication should be conducted for this activity. The communication model provides the rules needed to make decisions: when to communicate the message, how to present the message to the user, and what information should be communicated. The Communication Manager controls and coordinates these models to conduct all communication with the user. Performance with DCM as the interface to a simulated Flexible Manufacturing System (FMS) control task was established to learn about the potential benefits of the concept.

  10. Effects of overstory composition and prescribed fire on fuel loading across a heterogeneous managed landscape in the southeastern USA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    In the southeastern USA, land use history, forest management and natural geomorphic features have created heterogeneous fuel loads. This apparent temporal and spatial variation in fuel loads make it difficult to reliably assess potential fire behavior from remotely sensed canopy variables to determine risk and to prescribe treatments. We examined this variation by exploring the relationships between overstory forest vegetation attributes, recent fire history, and selected surface fuel components across an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape. Measurements of dead and live vegetation components of surface fuels were obtained from 624 permanent plots, or about 1 plot per 100 ha of forest cover. Within forest vegetation groups, we modeled the relationship between individual surface fuel components and overstory stand age, basal area, site quality and recent fire history, then stochastically predicted fuel loads across the landscape using the same linkage variables. The fraction of the plot variation, i.e., R2, explained by predictive models for individual fuel components ranged from 0.05 to 0.66 for dead fuels and 0.03 to 0.97 for live fuels in pine dominated vegetation groups. Stand age and basal area were generally more important than recent fire history for predicting fuel loads. Mapped fuel loads using these regressor variables showed a very heterogeneous landscape even at the scale of a few square kilometers. The mapped patterns corresponded to stand based forest management disturbances that are reflected in age, basal area, and fire history. Recent fire history was significant in explaining variation in litter and duff biomass. Stand basal area was positively and consistently related to dead fuel biomass in most groups and was present in many predictive equations. Patterns in live fuel biomass were related to recent fire history, but the patterns were not consistent among forest vegetation groups. Age and basal area were related to live fuels in a complex manner that

  11. Postfledging survival of Grasshopper Sparrows in grasslands managed with fire and grazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovick, Torre J.; Miller, James R.; Koford, Rolf R.; Engle, David M.; Debinski, Diane M.

    2011-01-01

    More accurate estimates of survival after nestlings fledge are needed for population models to be parameterized and population dynamics to be understood during this vulnerable life stage. The period after fledging is the time when chicks learn to fly, forage, and hide from predators. We monitored postfledging survival, causespecific mortality, and movements of Grasshopper Sparrows (Ammodramus savannarum) in grassland managed with fire and grazing. In 2009, we attached radio transmitters to 50 nestlings from 50 different broods and modeled their survival in response to climatic, biological, and ecological variables. There was no effect of treatment on survival. The factor most influencing postfledging survival was age; no other variable was significant. The majority of chicks (74%) died within 3 days of radio-transmitter attachment. We attributed most mortality to mesopredators (48%) and exposure (28%). Fledglings' movements increased rapidly for the first 4 days after they left the nest and were relatively stable for the remaining 10 days we tracked them. On average, fledglings took flight for the first time 4 days after fledging and flew ≥10 m 9 days after fledging. Our data show that the Grasshopper Sparrow's survival rates may be less than most models relying on nest-success estimates predict, and we emphasize the importance of incorporating estimates of survival during the postfledging period in demographic models.

  12. Fire in upper Midwestern oak forest ecosystems: an oak forest restoration and management handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee E. Frelich; Peter B. Reich; David W. Peterson

    2015-01-01

    We reviewed the literature to synthesize what is known about the use of fire to maintain and restore oak forests, woodlands, and savannas of the upper Midwestern United States, with emphasis on Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan. Included are (1) known physical and ecological effects of fire on oaks from acorn through seedling, established sapling, and mature stages of...

  13. External human factors in incident management team decisionmaking and their effect on large fire suppression expenditures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janie Canton-Tompson; Krista M. Gebert; Brooke Thompson; Greg Jones; David Calkin; Geoff. Donovan

    2008-01-01

    Large wildland fires are complex, costly events influenced by a vast array of physical, climatic, and social factors. Changing climate, fuel buildup due to past suppression, and increasing populations in the wildland-urban interface have all been blamed for the extreme fire seasons and rising suppression expenditures of recent years. With each high-cost year comes a...

  14. Managing the changing risk of fire in the South African landscape

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wilgen, BW

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Fires are a natural and common feature of many of South Africa's landscapes. The research has three main goals namely, to quantify the nature of the risks associated with vegetation fires, to assess how these risks may change in future...

  15. Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lendvay

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic-assisted laparoscopy (RAL has become a promising means for performing correction of vesicoureteral reflux disease in children through both intravesical and extravesical techniques. We describe the importance of patient selection, intraoperative patient positioning, employing certain helpful techniques for exposure, and recognizing the limitations and potential complications of robotic reimplant surgery. As more clinicians embrace robotic surgery and more urology residents are trained in robotics, we anticipate an expansion of the applications of robotics in children. We believe that it is necessary to develop robotic surgery curricula for novice roboticists and residents so that patients may experience improved surgical outcomes.

  16. Risk Management and Portfolio Optimization for Gas- and Coal-fired Power Plants in Germany: A Multivariate GARCH Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Charalampous, Georgios; Madlener, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    This study revisits risk management in the German power market, specifically focusing on conventional thermal power generation. The subsidizing and prioritizing of electricity produced from renewable energy sources (RES) by means of the Renewable Energy Sources Act (EEG) has changed the market’s structure. Specifically, it has led to an erosion of the revenues gained by coal- and natural-gas-fired power plants and, therefore, undermined the competitiveness of traditional power generation. Thi...

  17. Teaching Laboratory Management Principles and Practices Through Mentorship and Graduated Responsibility: The Assistant Medical Directorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Timothy; Sowder, Aleksandra M; Palmer, Cheryl Ann; Weiss, Ronald L

    2016-01-01

    With the changing landscape of medicine in general, and pathology in particular, a greater emphasis is being placed on laboratory management as a means of controlling spiraling medical costs and improving health-care efficiency. To meet this challenge, pathology residency programs have begun to incorporate formal laboratory management training into their curricula, using institutional curricula and/or online laboratory management courses offered by professional organizations. At the University of Utah, and its affiliated national reference laboratory, ARUP Laboratories, Inc, interested residents are able to supplement the departmental lecture-based and online laboratory management curriculum by participating in assistant medical directorship programs in one of several pathology subspecialty disciplines. The goals of many of the assistant medical directorship positions include the development of laboratory management skills and competencies. A survey of current and recent assistant medical directorship participants revealed that the assistant medical directorship program serves as an excellent means of improving laboratory management skills, as well as improving performance as a fellow and practicing pathologist.

  18. Developing a trust model for assisting management during change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Martins

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the relation of the "Big Five" personality dimensions and managerial practices to the dimension of trust relationships between managers and employees. The "Big Five" dimensions are conscientiousness, agreeableness, emotional stability, resourcefulness and extraversion. Managerial practices are credibility, team management, information sharing and work support. Results indicate that managerial practices have an influence on the trust relationships between managers and employees. For the "Big Five" personality dimensions, a weaker relationship with the dimension of trust was obtained. Although there appears to be a weaker relationship between the "Big Five" and the dimension of trust relationships, the relatively good fit of the model indicates that an overall implication of the model is that both managerial practices and the "Big Five" personality aspects of the manager might influence his/her subordinates indirectly. These findings have numerous implications for the relationships between managers and employees, especially in the selection, recruitment and appointment of managers and the role of managers during transformation. Opsomming Die studie ondersoek die verhouding tussen die Groot Vyf ("Big Five" persoonlikheidsdimensies en bestuurspraktyke en die dimensie van vertroue tussen bestuur en werknemers. Die Groot Vyf dimensies is konsensieusheid, eenstemmigheid, emosionele stabiliteit, vernuftigheid en ekstroversie. Die bestuurspraktyke is kredietwaardigheid, spanbestuur, die deel van inligting en werksondersteuning. Die resultate dui aan dat die bestuurspraktyke 'n invloed het op die verhouding tussen bestuur en werknemers. Wat die Groot Vyf dimensies aanbetref, is n swakker verhouding met die dimensie van vertroue bevind. Alhoewel dit skyn as of daar n swakker verhouding tussen die Groot Vyf en die dimensie van vertroue is, toon die relatiewe goeie passing van die model dat beide die bestuurspraktyke en die Groot Vyf

  19. Boreal Forest Fires - Behavior and Atmospheric Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, B. J.

    2003-12-01

    Fire is a natural and essential stand-renewing agent in circumboreal forests, and eliminating fire in this region is neither economically possible nor ecologically desirable. In general, boreal fire is managed on the basis of values-at-risk, with high levels of protection afforded to economically and recreationally important areas, while fire is permitted to burn naturally in many remote areas. Current estimates are that an average of 5-15 million hectares burn annually across the boreal zone, with at least 50% of the area burning in largely unmanaged forest. High-intensity crown fires account for the vast majority of the area burned in the boreal zone, particularly in North America. These fires typically consume 20-30 tonnes/ha of fuel, spread at rates up to 100 m/min, and generate intensity levels (or energy release rates) approaching 100,000 kW/m of fire front. Deep forest floor (organic) layers common to boreal forests contribute significantly to high levels of fuel consumption and assist in the propagation of crown fires. When crown fires are sustained through a peak afternoon burning period, they usually produce towering convection columns that can reach the upper troposphere directly. Numerous boreal fires columns reaching 11-14 kilometres in height have been documented in the fire literature. Given the lower altitude of the tropopause at boreal zone latitudes it is not surprising that some boreal fire columns have been recently reported reaching the lower stratosphere. Current global and regional climate models suggest a significant increase in both the severity and frequency of boreal fires under a changing climate, with potentially major impacts on terrestrial carbon storage and the global carbon budget, as well as hemispheric smoke transport. Modelling convection column dynamics is essential to predicting the future transport and atmospheric impacts of boreal fire smoke, and this science requires a solid understanding of fuel consumption and fire

  20. 44 CFR 204.51 - Application and approval procedures for a fire management assistance grant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...; or (ii) Five percent × $1.07 × the State population, adjusted annually for inflation using the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers published annually by the Department of Labor. (3) The...

  1. LANDFIRE 2010—Updates to the national dataset to support improved fire and natural resource management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kurtis J.; Long, Donald G.; Connot, Joel A.

    2016-02-29

    The Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools (LANDFIRE) 2010 data release provides updated and enhanced vegetation, fuel, and fire regime layers consistently across the United States. The data represent landscape conditions from approximately 2010 and are the latest release in a series of planned updates to maintain currency of LANDFIRE data products. Enhancements to the data products included refinement of urban areas by incorporating the National Land Cover Database 2006 land cover product, refinement of agricultural lands by integrating the National Agriculture Statistics Service 2011 cropland data layer, and improved wetlands delineations using the National Land Cover Database 2006 land cover and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory data. Disturbance layers were generated for years 2008 through 2010 using remotely sensed imagery, polygons representing disturbance events submitted by local organizations, and fire mapping program data such as the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity perimeters produced by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Forest Service. Existing vegetation data were updated to account for transitions in disturbed areas and to account for vegetation growth and succession in undisturbed areas. Surface and canopy fuel data were computed from the updated vegetation type, cover, and height and occasionally from potential vegetation. Historical fire frequency and succession classes were also updated. Revised topographic layers were created based on updated elevation data from the National Elevation Dataset. The LANDFIRE program also released a new Web site offering updated content, enhanced usability, and more efficient navigation.

  2. 关于煤矿火区封闭与管理的探讨%Investigate on Fire Zone Sealing and Management in Coal Mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任振宇

    2013-01-01

    In our country every year because of fire accidents make many of the mining area are closed,and thus lead to a large number of resources are frozen.The author summarize site management experience for many years,discuss fire zone sealing,fire zone management and closed fire zone unsealed,emphasize the programmatic role of the "coal mine safety regulations"and "mine sealing fire preventing and extinguishing specification"in fire zone management and have a certain reference value for management personnel of the mine fire zone.%在我国每年都会因为火灾事故而使得许多采区被封闭,因而也导致大量资源被冻结。作者总结多年的现场管理经验,对火区封闭、火区管理及封闭火区的启封进行了论述,强调了在火区管理中《煤矿安全规程》及《矿井密闭防灭火规范》的纲领性作用,对矿井现场火区的管理人员均有一定的参考价值。

  3. Thrombectomy assisted by carotid stenting in acute ischemic stroke management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steglich-Arnholm, Henrik; Holtmannspötter, Markus; Kondziella, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    -term outcome (mRS ≤ 2). Harms included complications during and following EVT. Mean age was 64.3 years (standard deviation ±12.5), 40 (85%) patients received IVT initially. Median NIHSS was 16 (inter-quartile range 14-19). Mean time from stroke onset to recanalization was 311 min (standard deviation ±78......Extracranial carotid artery occlusion or high-grade stenosis with concomitant intracranial embolism causes severe ischemic stroke and shows poor response rates to intravenous thrombolysis (IVT). Endovascular therapy (EVT) utilizing thrombectomy assisted by carotid stenting was long considered risky......-center analysis of 47 consecutive stroke patients with carotid occlusion or high-grade stenosis and concomitant intracranial embolus treated between September 2011 and December 2014. Benefits included early improvement of stroke severity (NIHSS ≥ 10) or complete remission within 72 h and favorable long...

  4. WebFIRE

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Factor Information Retrieval (FIRE) Data System is a database management system containing EPA's recommended emission estimation factors for criteria and...

  5. Post-fire wood management alters water stress, growth, and performance of pine regeneration in a Mediterranean ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranon-Jimenez, Sara; Castro, Jorge; Querejeta, José Ignacio; Fernandez-Ondono, Emilia; Allen, Craig D.

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research has focused on comparing the impacts of post-fire salvage logging versus those of less aggressive management practices on forest regeneration. However, few studies have addressed the effects of different burnt-wood management options on seedling/sapling performance, or the ecophysiological mechanisms underlying differences among treatments. In this study, we experimentally assess the effects of post-fire management of the burnt wood on the growth and performance of naturally regenerating pine seedlings (Pinus pinaster). Three post-fire management treatments varying in degree of intervention were implemented seven months after a high-severity wildfire burned Mediterranean pine forests in the Sierra Nevada, southeast Spain: (a) “No Intervention” (NI, all burnt trees left standing); (b) “Partial Cut plus Lopping” (PCL, felling most of the burnt trees, cutting off branches, and leaving all the biomass on site without mastication); and (c) “Salvage Logging” (SL, felling the burnt trees, piling up the logs and masticating the fine woody debris). Three years after the fire, the growth, foliar nutrient concentrations, and leaf carbon, nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition (δ13C, δ18O and δ15N) of naturally regenerating seedlings were measured in all the treatments. Pine seedlings showed greatest vigor and size in the PCL treatment, whereas growth was poorest in SL. The nutrient concentrations were similar among treatments, although greater growth in the two treatments with residual wood present indicated higher plant uptake. Seedlings in the SL treatment showed high leaf δ13C and δ18O values indicating severe water stress, in contrast to significantly alleviated water stress indications in the PCL treatment. Seedling growth and physiological performance in NI was intermediate between that of PCL and SL. After six growing seasons, P. pinaster saplings in PCL showed greater growth and cone production than SL saplings. In summary

  6. Gestão de desastres e política de assistência social Management of disasters and social assistance policy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rúbia dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    ..., ausência de interdisciplinaridade e descompasso entre gestores, técnicos e afetados.This article reflects on the risk management system in the municipality of Blumenau, Santa Catarina, through actions undertaken by the Social Assistance Policy...

  7. Fire Protection Program Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2012-05-18

    This manual documents the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Fire Protection Program. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 420.1B, Facility Safety, requires LLNL to have a comprehensive and effective fire protection program that protects LLNL personnel and property, the public and the environment. The manual provides LLNL and its facilities with general information and guidance for meeting DOE 420.1B requirements. The recommended readers for this manual are: fire protection officers, fire protection engineers, fire fighters, facility managers, directorage assurance managers, facility coordinators, and ES and H team members.

  8. Fire behavior modeling-a decision tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack Cohen; Bill Bradshaw

    1986-01-01

    The usefulness of an analytical model as a fire management decision tool is determined by the correspondence of its descriptive capability to the specific decision context. Fire managers must determine the usefulness of fire models as a decision tool when applied to varied situations. Because the wildland fire phenomenon is complex, analytical fire spread models will...

  9. Global relationship of fire occurrence and fire intensity: A test of intermediate fire occurrence-intensity hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ruisen; Hui, Dafeng; Miao, Ning; Liang, Chuan; Wells, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Fire plays a significant role in global atmosphere and biosphere carbon and nutrient cycles. Globally, there are substantially different distributions and impacts between fire occurrence and fire intensity. It is prominent to have a thorough investigation of global relationship between fire occurrence and fire intensity for future fire prediction and management. In this study, we proposed an intermediate fire occurrence-intensity (IFOI) hypothesis for the global relationship between fire occurrence and fire intensity, suggesting that fire occurrence changes with fire intensity following a humped relationship. We examined this hypothesis via satellite data from January 2001 to December 2013 at a global scale, and in small and large fire intensity zones, respectively. Furthermore, the fire occurrence and fire intensity relationship was developed among different vegetation types to reveal the changes of parameters and strengths. Finally, the environmental factors (including climatic, hydraulic, biological, and anthropogenic variables) underpinning the fire occurrence and intensity pattern were evaluated for the underlying mechanisms. The results supported our IFOI hypothesis and demonstrated that the humped relationship is driven by different causes among vegetation types. Fire occurrence increases with fire intensity in small fire intensity zones due to alleviation of the factors limiting both fire occurrence and intensity. Beyond a certain fire intensity threshold, fire occurrence is constrained, probably due to the limitation of available fuels. The information generated in this study could be helpful for understanding global variation of fire occurrence and fire intensity due to fire-vegetation-climate-human interactions and facilitating future fire management.

  10. Environmental assessment wildland fire management plan Modoc National Wildlife Refuge [2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Two alternatives were analyzed for this environmental assessment. Under both alternatives, appropriate fire suppression response would be taken on all wildland...

  11. Section 7 Biological Evaluation : FY07 Prescribed Fire Management Plan for Compartment 10 and 13

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document examines the effects that prescribed fire on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge will have on red wolves and bald eagles. It is determined that the...

  12. A Study of Creative Social Fire Management as Well as Suggested Measures%创新社会消防管理对策探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊华; 邓炳华

    2011-01-01

    With our country's rapid economic and social development,fire departments confronts many new challenges and serious issues involving social fire management.It is urgent to solve these problems to better sever the economic development by means of further innovation in community fire management.This paper analyzes the main problems existing in the social fire management and explores the strategies to it.%随着我国经济社会快速发展,社会消防管理工作面临着诸多新挑战,存在新的突出问题,进一步创新社会消防管理,更好地服务于经济建设已显得尤为紧迫。简析社会消防管理存在的主要问题,探讨创新社会消防管理的对策。

  13. Information as Adaptation to a Changing Climate: Managing the Intersection of Forests, Fish, Fire, and Water Resources on Public Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, C.; Morgan, P.; Dwire, K. A.; Isaak, D.; Holden, Z. A.; Rieman, B.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change is altering the wildlands of the west, principally through changes in the water cycle. In many places there is and will be less water than there once was, and such water as there is will runoff from mountain snowpacks earlier each year. A drier climate in the western U.S. will promote a greater role of fire and other mortality events for many forests. Consequently, how managers prepare for and respond to events such as fire, or large scale insect outbreaks is becoming more important as the climate changes. Sometimes, these events punctuate gradual changes to ecosystems, and sometimes they generate stepwise changes in ecosystems, making it clear that climate vulnerability assessments should account for disturbance in their calculus. We describe a framework of how fire and climate change work together to affect forest and fish communities. Learning how to adapt will come from testing, probing, and pushing that framework to discover the most robust strategies to increased disturbance risks. The western U.S. defies generalizations, and much learning must necessarily be local in implication. We argue that successful adaptation does not simply constitute setting forest and stream communities on the appropriate path, rather it requires teaching wildland resource managers how to learn quickly and respond insightfully as the events associated climate change unfold.

  14. Palliative management of lymphangioleiomyomatosis: Using video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoja, Amir M; Duggal, Damanjit; Keni, Ajay; Patel, Chintan S; Chavan, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare, progressive systemic disease of unknown etiology, insidious onset, often fatal, and underdiagnosed. It is exclusively found among women. LAM mainly involves the lungs where, as its name suggests, lymphatic (lymph), blood vessel (angio), and airways are surrounded by smooth muscle (leiomyoma) proliferation. It may be associated with tuberous sclerosis with clinical manifestations varying from simple cough to the development of recurrent pneumothoraces, haemoptysis, and pleural effusions. There is currently no treatment or cure. We present a rare case of a 41-year-old female, who presented with recurrent pneumothoraces, whose high-resolution computed tomography findings that were suggestive of multiple bullous lung disease, and the thoracoscopic biopsy revealed features of LAM. She was offered video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in form of bullectomy and pleurodesis to reduce the volume of abnormal tissue and treated with progesterone hormonal therapy. The present case aims to focus on clinical-radiologic and pathologic findings and the treatment modalities available in developing countries like India where lung transplantation is seldom performed.

  15. Development of molecular markers linked to the 'Fiesta' linkage group 7 major QTL for fire blight resistance and their application for marker-assisted selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad A; Durel, Charles-Eric; Duffy, Brion; Drouet, Damien; Kellerhals, Markus; Gessler, Cesare; Patocchi, Andrea

    2007-06-01

    A fire blight resistance QTL explaining 34.3%-46.6% of the phenotypic variation was recently identified on linkage group 7 of apple cultivar 'Fiesta' (F7). However, markers flanking this QTL were AFLP and RAPD markers unsuitable for marker-assisted selection (MAS). Two RAPD markers bracketing the QTL have been transformed into SCAR (sequence-characterized amplified region) markers, and an SSR marker specific for the region was developed. Pedigree analysis of 'Fiesta' with these markers enabled tracking of the F7 QTL allele back to 'Cox's Orange Pippin'. Stability of the effect of this QTL allele in different backgrounds was analyzed by inoculating progeny plants of a cross between 'Milwa', a susceptible cultivar, and '1217', a moderately resistant cultivar, and a set of cultivars that carry or lack the allele conferring increased fire blight resistance. Progenies and cultivars that carried both markers were significantly more resistant than those that did not carry both markers, indicating high stability of the F7 QTL allele in different backgrounds. This stability and the availability of reproducible markers bracketing the QTL make this locus promising for use in MAS.

  16. The impact on the workload of the Ward Manager with the introduction of administrative assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Rachel; Leach, Camilla; Kitsell, Fleur; Griffith, Jacki

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the impact on the workload of the Ward Manager (WM) with the introduction of administrative assistants into eight trusts in the South of England in a year-long pilot. Ward Managers are nurse leaders who are responsible for ward management and delivering expert clinical care to patients. They have traditionally been expected to achieve this role without administrative assistance. Meeting the workload demands of multiple roles and overload has meant the leadership and clinical role has suffered, presenting issues of low morale among existing WMs and issues of recruiting the next generation of WMs. Sixty qualitative interviews were carried out with 16 WMs, 12 Ward Manager Assistants (WMAs), and six senior nurse executives about the impact of the introduction of the WMA post. Quantitative data to measure change in WM workload and ward activity was supplied by 24 wards. Ward Managers reported spending reduced time on administrative tasks and having increased time available to spend on the ward with patients and leading staff. With the introduction of WMAs, there was also improvement in key performance measures (the maintenance of quality under service pressures) and increased staff motivation. There was overwhelming support for the introduction of administrative assistants from participating WMs. The WMAs enabled WMs to spend more time with patients and, more widely, to provide greater support to ward teams. The success of the pilot is reflected in wards working hard to be able to extend contracts of WMAs. The extent of the success is reflected in wards that were not participants in the pilot, observing the benefits of the post, having worked to secure funding to recruit their own WMAs. The widespread introduction of administrative assistance could increase ward productivity and provide support for clinical leaders. Continuing professional development for WMs needs to incorporate training about management responsibilities and how to best use administrative

  17. Management of DoD Irregular Warfare (IW) and Security Force Assistance (SFA) Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-03

    manage DoD personnel with skills , training, education, and experience related to IW and SFA. DoDI 3000.11, May 3, 2016 TABLE OF CONTENTS 2...DOD INSTRUCTION 3000.11 MANAGEMENT OF DOD IRREGULAR WARFARE (IW) AND SECURITY FORCE ASSISTANCE (SFA) CAPABILITIES Originating Component...well as building the security capacity and capability of U.S. partners and allies. c. IW and SFA skills , training, education, and experience must be

  18. Assisting community management of groundwater: Irrigator attitudes in two watersheds in Rajasthan and Gujarat, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varua, M. E.; Ward, J.; Maheshwari, B.; Oza, S.; Purohit, R.; Hakimuddin; Chinnasamy, P.

    2016-06-01

    The absence of either state regulations or markets to coordinate the operation of individual wells has focussed attention on community level institutions as the primary loci for sustainable groundwater management in Rajasthan and Gujarat, India. The reported research relied on theoretical propositions that livelihood strategies, groundwater management and the propensity to cooperate are associated with the attitudinal orientations of well owners in the Meghraj and Dharta watersheds, located in Gujarat and Rajasthan respectively. The research tested the hypothesis that attitudes to groundwater management and farming practices, household income and trust levels of assisting agencies were not consistent across the watersheds, implying that a targeted approach, in contrast to default uniform programs, would assist communities craft rules to manage groundwater across multiple hydro-geological settings. Hierarchical cluster analysis of attitudes held by survey respondents revealed four statistically significant discrete clusters, supporting acceptance of the hypothesis. Further analyses revealed significant differences in farming practices, household wealth and willingness to adapt across the four groundwater management clusters. In conclusion, the need to account for attitudinal diversity is highlighted and a framework to guide the specific design of processes to assist communities craft coordinating instruments to sustainably manage local aquifers described.

  19. 75 FR 54591 - Notice of Agricultural Management Assistance Organic Certification Cost-Share Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service Notice of Agricultural Management Assistance Organic Certification Cost-Share Program AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of Funds Availability. Inviting... Organic Foods Production Act of 1990, as amended (7 U.S.C. 6501 et seq.). This program is in addition...

  20. 76 FR 55000 - Notice of Agricultural Management Assistance Organic Certification Cost-Share Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service Notice of Agricultural Management Assistance Organic Certification Cost-Share Program AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of Funds Availability: Inviting... Organic Regulations (7 CFR part 205), which were authorized under the Organic Foods Production Act of...

  1. Concurrent management of bilateral ureteropelvic junction obstruction in children using robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew A. Freilich

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Bilateral ureteropelvic junction (UPJ obstruction occurs infrequently. When surgical management is deemed necessary, staged pyeloplasties traditionally have been recommended to minimize the morbidity associated with performing procedures concurrently. With the advent of robotic-assistance, concurrent surgical management can more readily be performed laparoscopically. In this report, we evaluated the safety and outcome of managing patients with bilateral UPJ obstruction with concurrent robotic-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of five patients with bilateral ureteropelvic junction obstruction who underwent concurrent bilateral robotic-assisted pyeloplasties at our institution between October 2003 and April 2007. Technical consideration for patient positioning, robotic set-up, port placement, and the use of a hitch stitches was assessed. The operative time, complications, analgesic needs, length of hospitalization, and overall success of the procedure were evaluated. RESULTS: Operative time ranged from 235 to 541 minutes (mean = 384. Estimated blood loss was 5-100 cc (mean = 48.0. Length of hospitalization ranged from 1.3 to 3.6 days (mean = 2.4. Ureteral stents were removed 3-8 weeks postoperatively. There were no complications. All kidneys demonstrated decreased hydronephrosis on postoperative ultrasound or improved drainage parameters on diuretic renography or IVP. CONCLUSIONS: Simultaneous bilateral robotic-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasties utilizing 4-port access is feasible and safe. It provides an effective method of managing patients with bilateral UPJ obstruction, avoiding the burden and morbidity of performing staged surgeries.

  2. Managing the Openness-Closedness Dialectic: How Graduate Teaching Assistants Handle the Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nathan G.

    2012-01-01

    Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) are a pervasive part of undergraduate education. When interacting with undergraduate students, GTAs must balance a tension of being a friend and an authority figure with students. One of the ways that balance is managed is through GTA self-disclosure. Self-disclosure is defined as, "the act of revealing…

  3. Beating Obesity: Factors Associated with Interest in Workplace Weight Management Assistance in the Mining Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara D. Street

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Weight management programs should provide information, motivation. and trouble-shooting assistance to meet the needs of at-risk mining employees, including those who are attempting to change and maintain behaviors to achieve a healthy weight and be suitably fit for work.

  4. Use of film digitizers to assist radiology image management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeyman-Buck, Janice C.; Frost, Meryll M.; Staab, Edward V.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this development effort was to evaluate the possibility of using digital technologies to solve image management problems in the Department of Radiology at the University of Florida. The three problem areas investigated were local interpretation of images produced in remote locations, distribution of images to areas outside of radiology, and film handling. In all cases the use of a laser film digitizer interfaced to an existing Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) was investigated as a solution to the problem. In each case the volume of studies involved were evaluated to estimate the impact of the solution on the network, archive, and workstations. Communications were stressed in the analysis of the needs for all image transmission. The operational aspects of the solution were examined to determine the needs for training, service, and maintenance. The remote sites requiring local interpretation included were a rural hospital needing coverage for after hours studies, the University of Florida student infirmary, and the emergency room. Distribution of images to the intensive care units was studied to improve image access and patient care. Handling of films originating from remote sites and those requiring urgent reporting were evaluated to improve management functions. The results of our analysis and the decisions that were made based on the analysis are described below. In the cases where systems were installed, a description of the system and its integration into the PACS system is included. For all three problem areas, although we could move images via a digitizer to the archive and a workstation, there was no way to inform the radiologist that a study needed attention. In the case of outside films, the patient did not always have a medical record number that matched one in our Radiology Information Systems (RIS). In order to incorporate all studies for a patient, we needed common locations for orders, reports, and images. RIS orders

  5. Radiation management at the occurrence of accident and restoration works. Fire and explosion of asphalt solidification processing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyabe, Kenjiro; Jin, K.; Namiki, A.; Mizutani, K.; Horiuchi, N.; Saruta, J. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Health and Safety Division, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ninomiya, Kazushige [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tsuruga, Fukui (Japan). Monju Construction Office

    1998-06-01

    Fire and explosion accident in the cell of Asphalt Solidification Processing Facility(ASP) in PNC took placed at March 11 in 1997. Following to the alarm of many radiation monitoring system in the facility, some of workers inhale radioactive materials in their bodies. Indication values of an exhaust monitor installed in the first auxiliary exhaust stack increased suddenly. A large number of windows, doors, and shutters in the facility were raptured by the explosion. A lot of radioactive materials blew up and were released to the outside of the facility. Reinforcement of radiation surveillance function, nose smearing test for the workers and confirmation of contamination situation were implemented on the fire. Investigation of radiation situation, radiation management on the site, exposure management for the workers, surveillance of exhaustion, and restoration works of the damaged radiation management monitoring system were carried out after the explosion. The detailed data of radiation management measures taken during three months after the accident are described in the paper. (M. Suetake)

  6. 78 FR 63974 - Student Assistance General Provisions-Subpart K-Cash Management; Extension of Public Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Student Assistance General Provisions--Subpart K--Cash Management; Extension of Public Comment Period..., ``Student Assistance General Provisions--Subpart K--Cash Management''. ED is extending the comment period...

  7. Photon management assisted by surface waves on photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Angelini, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    This book illustrates original pathways to manipulate light at the nanoscale by means of surface electromagnetic waves (here, Bloch surface waves, BSWs) on planar dielectric multilayers, also known as one-dimensional photonic crystals. This approach is particularly valuable as it represents an effective alternative to the widely exploited surface plasmon paradigm. After a brief overview on the fundamentals of BSWs, several significant applications of BSW-sustaining structures are described. Particular consideration is given to the propagation, guiding, and diffraction of BSW-coupled radiation. Further, the interaction of organic emitters with BSWs on planar and corrugated multilayers is investigated, including fluorescence beaming in free space. To provide greater insight into sensing applications, an illustrative example of fluorescent microarray-based detection is presented. The book is intended for scientists and researchers working on photon management opportunities in fields such as biosensing, optical c...

  8. Past approaches and future challenges to the management of fire and invasive alien plants in the new Garden Route National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Cowling

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The recently established Garden Route National Park (GRNP along the Cape south coast of South Africa occurs in a landscape where indigenous forests, fire-prone fynbos shrublands and fire-sensitive plantations of alien invasive trees are interspersed. We used the area as a case study in the challenges facing conservation managers in the achievement of biodiversity goals in a fire-prone environment. We explored the context within which fire management was practised during the past century by interviewing former catchment managers and reviewing forestry and catchment management policies. Mountain fynbos adjacent to plantations was subjected to burning regimes aimed at the protection of commercial timber resources rather than the preservation of fynbos biodiversity. Prescribed burning of fynbos adjacent to the plantations was typically done in multiple belt systems at rotations of about 4–8 years during spring, summer and autumn, to avoid the winter berg wind season. Such short-rotation and low-intensity fires favour resprouting graminoids over slow-maturing reseeders, and likely account for the compositional impoverishment observed in fynbos near plantations. Current and future challenges faced by the GRNP include (1 balancing conflicting fire management requirements for plantation safety against fynbos conservation; (2 the continual invasion of fynbos by fire-propagated alien pines sourced from plantations; (3 inadequate resources to redress the ‘invasion debt’ caused by the socio-economic legacy and past management neglect; and (4 fragmentation of land use between conservation and forestry threatening the sustainability of the region at large. We provide recommendations for management actions and research priorities to address these challenges.

  9. Managing fire risk during drought: the influence of certification and El Niño on fire-driven forest conversion for oil palm in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noojipady, Praveen; Morton, Douglas C.; Schroeder, Wilfrid; Carlson, Kimberly M.; Huang, Chengquan; Gibbs, Holly K.; Burns, David; Walker, Nathalie F.; Prince, Stephen D.

    2017-08-01

    Indonesia and Malaysia have emerged as leading producers of palm oil in the past several decades, expanding production through the conversion of tropical forests to industrial plantations. Efforts to produce sustainable palm oil, including certification by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), include guidelines designed to reduce the environmental impact of palm oil production. Fire-driven deforestation is prohibited by law in both countries and a stipulation of RSPO certification, yet the degree of environmental compliance is unclear, especially during El Niño events when drought conditions increase fire risk. Here, we used time series of satellite data to estimate the spatial and temporal patterns of fire-driven deforestation on and around oil palm plantations. In Indonesia, fire-driven deforestation accounted for one-quarter of total forest losses on both certified and noncertified plantations. After the first plantations in Indonesia received RSPO certification in 2009, forest loss and fire-driven deforestation declined on certified plantations but did not stop altogether. Oil palm expansion in Malaysia rarely involved fire; only 5 % of forest loss on certified plantations had coincident active fire detections. Interannual variability in fire detections was strongly influenced by El Niño and the timing of certification. Fire activity during the 2002, 2004, and 2006 El Niño events was similar among oil palm plantations in Indonesia that would later become certified, noncertified plantations, and surrounding areas. However, total fire activity was 75 % and 66 % lower on certified plantations than noncertified plantations during the 2009 and 2015 El Niño events, respectively. The decline in fire activity on certified plantations, including during drought periods, highlights the potential for RSPO certification to safeguard carbon stocks in peatlands and remaining forests in accordance with legislation banning fires. However, aligning certification

  10. Corridors promote fire via connectivity and edge effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudvig, Lars A; Wagner, Stephanie A; Damschen, Ellen I

    2012-04-01

    Landscape corridors, strips of habitat that connect otherwise isolated habitat patches, are commonly employed during management of fragmented landscapes. To date, most reported effects of corridors have been positive; however, there are long-standing concerns that corridors may have unintended consequences. Here, we address concerns over whether corridors promote propagation of disturbances such as fire. We collected data during prescribed fires in the world's largest and best replicated corridor experiment (Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA), six -50-ha landscapes of open (shrubby/herbaceous) habitat within a pine plantation matrix, to test several mechanisms for how corridors might influence fire. Corridors altered patterns of fire temperature through a direct connectivity effect and an indirect edge effect. The connectivity effect was independent of fuel levels and was consistent with a hypothesized wind-driven "bellows effect." Edges, a consequence of corridor implementation, elevated leaf litter (fuel) input from matrix pine trees, which in turn increased fire temperatures. We found no evidence for corridors or edges impacting patterns of fire spread: plots across all landscape positions burned with similar probability. Impacts of edges and connectivity on fire temperature led to changes in vegetation: hotter-burning plots supported higher bunch grass cover during the field season after burning, suggesting implications for woody/herbaceous species coexistence. To our knowledge, this represents the first experimental evidence that corridors can modify landscape-scale patterns of fire intensity. Corridor impacts on fire should be carefully considered during landscape management, both in the context of how corridors connect or break distributions of fuels and the desired role of fire as a disturbance, which may range from a management tool to an agent to be suppressed. In our focal ecosystem, longleaf pine woodland, corridors might provide a previously

  11. Post-Fire Restoration Plan for Sustainable Forest Management in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soung-Ryoul Ryu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This review was to determine a standard post-fire restoration strategy for use in South Korea according to the magnitude of the damage and the condition of the affected site. The government has strongly enforced reforestation in deforested areas as well as fire prevention and suppression since the 1960s. These efforts have successfully recovered dense even-aged forests over the last five decades. However, high fuel loading and the homogeneous structure have made forests vulnerable to large fires. In recent years, large forest fires have occurred in the eastern coastal region of Korea. Forest fires can significantly influence the economic and social activities of the residents of such affected forest regions. Burned areas may require urgent and long-term restoration strategies, depending on the condition of the affected site. Erosion control is the most important component of an urgent restoration and should be completed before a rainy season to prevent secondary damage such as landslides and sediment runoff in burned areas. Long-term restoration is necessary to renew forest functions such as timber production, water conservation, ecosystem conservation, and recreation for residents. Sound restoration for burned areas is critical for restoring healthy ecological functions of forests and providing economic incentives to local residents.

  12. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or chronic heart failure and a likelihood of hospitalization in the upper quartile of the population, as predicted by insurance data analysis. Intervention: We compared protocol-based care management including structured assessment, action planning......Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients with type 2...

  13. Challenges in Anaesthetic management of a child for thoracoscopic assisted oesophageal replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K R Chandrakala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of oesophageal length or obliteration of oesophageal lumen due to stricture acquired by accidental caustic ingestion is more common in children that may require major operative reconstruction. A number of procedures have been developed for anatomic replacement of oesophagus of which thoracoscopic assisted gastric transposition has shown the best outcome in children. This demands an extensive pre-operative evaluation, preparation and anaesthetic management since this is challenging and prolonged procedure done under one lung ventilation (OLV. Though it is a minimally invasive procedure, providing OLV and management of complications associated with it are the anaesthetic challenges among these children. We report anaesthetic management of an 8-year-old boy with oesophageal stricture following corrosive injury posted for thoracoscopic assisted gastric transposition.

  14. Management of the assisted instruction environment in economic higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana REVEIU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The world has entered the Knowledge Age. Information Technology is gradually turning the world into an Information Highway Network. The development of technology has greatly accelerated the international flow of information, capital and commodities and speeded the growth of economic integration. At the same time, the cycle of technological development and commercialization is becoming shorter and shorter [Zhouying, 1999]. Information technology is bringing rapid and profound changes to higher education, as it has to virtually every process in our society. Productivity often suffers because is difficult and timeconsuming to conduct a team effort. A portal solution base on SharePoint Portal Server can greatly facilitate the process of bringing knowledge teachers together as a team to achieve educational goals by providing a single point to access: automated essential day-to-day email communication, management of contacts, calendars, and instant messages, shared facilities to allow small teams of teachers to contribute to team and project-focused Web site, track tasks and events, shortened web-publishing cycles by linking collaboration and publishing processes.

  15. 消防监督管理模式发展趋势研究%Development Trend of Fire Supervision and Management Mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周旭; 徐大真

    2012-01-01

    结合当前经济发展状况和社会制度,提出我国未来消防监督管理模式应主要从不断推进对政府职能、消防培训、消防宣传教育、社会人员的消防责任、中介组织等社会化进程入手,逐步建立起全方位多层次的消防监督管理模式,并在此基础上建立分级分类的专业化消防监督检查体系和消防监督检查的社会化模式.%Combining with the current economic development situation and social system, this paper proposed that the future fire supervision management mode should mainly start from constantly promoting the socialization process of government functions, fire training, fire publicity education, social personnel of fire responsibility, and intermediary organization, gradually establishing the omni-directional and multi-level fire oversight management mode, and establishing the socialization mode of grading and classific specialization fire oversight check system and fire supervision check.

  16. Management of Peat Fires on Smoldering Phase (Case Study: District Siak and District Kampar Riau Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syafrudin Syafrudin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The difficulty of finding land for farming activities in Indonesia caused some communities began to switch utilizing peat land for agricultural areas such as oil palm. Oil palm plantation is a commodity that has been developed in Indonesia.Oil palm planted area has increased rapidly.Since 1967 extensive oil palm plantations has increased 35times to 5.6 million ha in 2005 and about 7.8 million ha in 2009. The biggest expansion of oil palm plantations occur in 6 province,one of them is Riau.Most people take a practical way to open agricultural areas by burning peat.Riau Province in Indonesia is one of the major hotspots for peat fires during the dry season. Peat fire at smouldering phaseemits a lot of compounds that are not completely oxidized (e.g. CO, VOCs, PAHs that more dangerous than the emissions released during combustion at flaming fires. Particulate Matter (PM 2.5 is one of the emissions from peat fires too.However, existing data on VOCs and PM 2.5 of smoke from peat fires Indonesia is still limited.The aim of this study was to analyze the concentration of VOCs and PM 2.5 on emissions from peat fires in the Langkai Village Siak District and RimboPanjang Village Kampar District Riau Province when compared with background site and the permissible exposure limit and provide recommendations based on the results of this research.VOCs measurement method is based on NIOSH 1500 and EPA TO-17 while the PM 2.5 based on IMPROVE A method. The average concentration of PM 2.5 is 996.72 ± 531.01μg/m3. PM2.5 concentrations increased (compared with the background site was very high at 4,838%.This condition causes a decrease in air quality and serious health problems. While the results of the maximum TVOCs concentration obtained in Siak District was 391,880 g/m3, while in Kampar Districtwas 195,940 g/m3. TVOCs concentration atSiak Districtwas 130.63 times greater than the existing quality standards, while at Kampar District regency was 65.31 times

  17. Terrorism Information Management Within the New York City Fire Department: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    and Bill Manning, “One Meridian Plaza,” Fire Engineering Magazine, August 1991, 51-70. 70 Harvey Eisner, “Towering Inferno ,” Firehouse Magazine...California, 496 U.S. 128, 136-137 (1990); Texas v. Brown , 460 U.S. 730, 739 (1983). 101 officials are lawfully in a position from which they view an...Towering Inferno .” Firehouse Magazine. October 1988, 51-58. Eisner, Harvey and Bill Manning. “One Meridian Plaza.” Fire Engineering Magazine. August

  18. Fire Control Safety Management Strategies in Machinery Manufacturing Industry%机械制造业消防安全管理对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兵兵

    2014-01-01

    The paper objectively analyzes the fire risk in machinery manufacturing, points out many problems existing in the management of fire safety and provides the specific guiding opinions.%文章客观地分析了机械制造存在的火灾危险性,指出了消防安全管理中存在的诸多问题,并针对具体问题提出了指导性意见。

  19. Fire danger and fire behavior modeling systems in Australia, Europe, and North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis M. Fujioka; A. Malcolm Gill; Domingos X. Viegas; B. Mike Wotton

    2009-01-01

    Wildland fire occurrence and behavior are complex phenomena involving essentially fuel (vegetation), topography, and weather. Fire managers around the world use a variety of systems to track and predict fire danger and fire behavior, at spatial scales that span from local to global extents, and temporal scales ranging from minutes to seasons. The fire management...

  20. Linking 3D spatial models of fuels and fire: Effects of spatial heterogeneity on fire behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell A. Parsons; William E. Mell; Peter McCauley

    2011-01-01

    Crownfire endangers fire fighters and can have severe ecological consequences. Prediction of fire behavior in tree crowns is essential to informed decisions in fire management. Current methods used in fire management do not address variability in crown fuels. New mechanistic physics-based fire models address convective heat transfer with computational fluid dynamics (...

  1. Prescribed fire and air quality in the American South: a review of conflicting interests and a technique for incorporating the land manager into regional air quality modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary L. Achtemeier

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, conflicting interests in prescribed burn practice and improving air quality in the South are reviewed. Conflicting societal interests and legislative actions threaten to curtail the use of prescribed fire to manage for endangered species and for other land management objectives in the South. This comes at a time when efforts are being made to increase...

  2. Science You Can Use Bulletin: Fire and forethought: Fire effects syntheses are a powerful tool for planning and management across resource fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Cooke; Jane Kapler Smith; Robin Innes; Janet Fryer; Kris Zouhar; Ilana Abrahamson; Shannon Murphy; Eva Masin

    2015-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain Research Station’s Fire Effects Information System (FEIS) team synthesizes information about wildland fires, their history in U.S. ecosystems, and their effects on U.S. wildland plants, lichens, and animals. Found at www.feis-crs.org/feis/, FEIS publications can be used for many purposes, including land use planning, restoration and rehabilitation...

  3. Modules for Modeling Firing Range Best Management Practices within TREECS (trademark)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    basin is fully mixed , i.e., a batch reactor . The only removal process is settling of particulate MC (i.e., adsorbed to total suspended solids, TSS...Training Range Environmental Evaluation and Characterization System (TREECS™) was developed for Army firing and training ranges. TREECS™ contains varying...13 Degradation reactor

  4. Classification of veldfire risk in South Africa for the administration of the legislation regarding fire management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kruger, FJ

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The risk associated with vegetation fires (veldfires) in South Africa is substantial, and veldfires cause severe losses to life, property and the environment in most areas of the country. However, this risk has two parts: first, that arising from...

  5. A modified critical velocity for road tunnel fire smoke management with dedicated smoke extraction configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Liu

    2014-10-01

    It is concluded that the smoke extraction performance is similar whether using ceiling dampers or vertical wall-mounted dampers for smoke capture to maintain tunnel tenability. However, tunnel gradients play a major role on the modified critical velocity for a nominated design fire and the required smoke extraction rate.

  6. Economics of forest fire management: Spatial accounting of costs and benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    José J. Sánchez; Ken Baerenklau; Armando González-Cabán; Kurt Schwabe

    2013-01-01

    To better evaluate the potential impacts of wildland fire in the San Bernardino National Forest, we developed a geographic information system (GIS) data layer containing nonmarket economic values for the San Jacinto Ranger District. Each pixel in the data layer contains an estimate of the most prominent nonmarket values at that location. This information can be used by...

  7. Avoiding and managing vascular injury during robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, René; Nunez Bragayrac, Luciano A; Machuca, Victor; Garza Cortes, Roberto; Azhar, Raed A

    2015-02-01

    There has been an increase in the number of urologic procedures performed robotically assisted; this is the case for radical prostatectomy. Currently, in the USA, 67% of prostatectomies are performed robotically assisted. With this increase in robotic urologic surgery it is clear that there are more surgeons in their learning curve, where most of the complications occur. Among the complications that can occur are vascular injuries. These can occur in the initial stages of surgery, such as in accessing the abdominal cavity, as well as in the intraoperative or postoperative setting. We present the most common vascular injuries in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, as well as their management and prevention. We believe that it is of vital importance to be able to recognize these injuries so that they can be prevented.

  8. Bottlenecks in Geospatial Data-Driven Decision-Making for Natural Disaster Management: A Case Study of Forest Fire Prevention and Control in Guatemala's Maya Biosphere Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenter, J. S.; Mueller, J. M.; Morrison, I.

    2016-12-01

    Annual forest fires are a source of great economic and environmental cost in the Maya Biosphere Reserve (MBR), a region of high ecological and historical value in Guatemala's department of Petén. Scarce institutional resources, limited local response capacity, and difficult terrain place a premium on the use of Earth observation data for forest fire management in the MBR, but also present significant institutional barriers to optimizing the value of this data. Drawing upon key informant interviews and a contingent valuation survey of national and local actors conducted during a three-year performance evaluation of the USAID/NASA Regional Visualization and Monitoring System (SERVIR), this paper traces the flow of SERVIR data from acquisition to decision in order to assess the institutional and contextual factors affecting the value of Earth observation data for forest fire management in the MBR. Findings indicate that the use of satellite data for forest fire management in the MBR is widespread and multi-dimensional: historical assessments of land use and land cover, fire scarring, and climate data help central-level fire management agencies identify and regulate fire-sensitive areas; regular monitoring and dissemination of climate data enables coordination between agricultural burning activities and fire early warning systems; and daily satellite detection of thermal anomalies in land surface temperature permits first responders to monitor and react to "hotspot" activity. Findings also suggest, however, that while the decentralized operations of Petén's fire management systems foster the use of Earth observation data, systemic bottlenecks, including budgetary constraints, inadequate data infrastructure and interpretation capacity, and obstacles to regulatory enforcement, impede the flow of information and use of technology and thus impact the value of that data, particularly in remote and under-resourced areas of the MBR. A geographic expansion and fortification

  9. Fire History

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Fire Perimeters data consists of CDF fires 300 acres and greater in size and USFS fires 10 acres and greater throughout California from 1950 to 2002. Some fires...

  10. Fire Perimeters

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Fire Perimeters data consists of CDF fires 300 acres and greater in size and USFS fires 10 acres and greater throughout California from 1950 to 2003. Some fires...

  11. Fine-tuning management of the Heart Assist 5 left ventricular assist device with two- and three-dimensional echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirozu, Zumrut Tuba; Kucukaksu, Deniz Suha; Arat, Nurcan

    2016-01-01

    caused by a possible thrombus. Close follow up with TTE studies were carried out to clear the LV of thrombus formation, and the inflow cannula position was checked to maintain the septum in the midline, so preventing the suction cascade. Four patients were followed up for more than two years, and two were followed up for more than a year. Three patients died due to multi-organ failure. Follow-up speed-change TTE studies of six patients showed that the mean speed was 9 800 ± 600 (9 500–10 400) rpm, and mean CO was 4.7 ± 0.3 (4.3– 5.0) l/min during the three-month post-implant period. Conclusion: We believe that TTE can play a major role in managing LVAD patients to achieve optimal settings for each patient. A large series is mandatory for assessment of echocardiographic studies on Heart Assist 5 LVAD. PMID:27841907

  12. Fire history of southeastern Glacier National Park: Missouri River Drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Stephen W.

    1993-01-01

    information existed for GNP's east-side forests, which are dominated primarily by lodgepole pine. In fall 1992, the park initiated a study to determine the fire history of the Missouri River drainage portion of southeastern GNP. Given the known variation in pre-1900 fire patterns for lodgepole pine, this study was seen as a potentially important contribution to GNP's Fire Management Plan, and to the expanding data base of fire history studies in the region. Resource managers sought this information to assist their development of appropriate fire management strategies for the east-side forests, and the fire history data also would be a useful interactive component of the park's Geographic Information System (GIS). Primary objectives were to: 1) determine pre-1900 fire periodicities, severities, burning patterns, and post-fire succession for major forest types, and 2) document and map the forest age class mosaic, reflecting the history of stand replacing fires at the landscape level of analysis. Secondary objectives were to interpret the possible effects of modern fire suppression on area forests, and to determine fire regime patterns relative to other lodgepole pine ecosystems in the Northern Rockies.

  13. Fire in the Earth system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, David M.J.S.; Balch, Jennifer; Artaxo, Paulo; Bond, William J.; Carlson, Jean M.; Cochrane, Mark A.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; DeFries, Ruth S.; Doyle, John C.; Harrison, Sandy P.; Johnston, Fay H.; Keeley, Jon E.; Krawchuk, Meg A.; Kull, Christian A.; Marston, J. Brad; Moritz, Max A.; Prentice, I. Colin; Roos, Christopher I.; Scott, Andrew C.; Swetnam, Thomas W.; van der Werf, Guido R.; Pyne, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Fire is a worldwide phenomenon that appears in the geological record soon after the appearance of terrestrial plants. Fire influences global ecosystem patterns and processes, including vegetation distribution and structure, the carbon cycle, and climate. Although humans and fire have always coexisted, our capacity to manage fire remains imperfect and may become more difficult in the future as climate change alters fire regimes. This risk is difficult to assess, however, because fires are still poorly represented in global models. Here, we discuss some of the most important issues involved in developing a better understanding of the role of fire in the Earth system.

  14. Fire in the Earth system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, David M J S; Balch, Jennifer K; Artaxo, Paulo; Bond, William J; Carlson, Jean M; Cochrane, Mark A; D'Antonio, Carla M; Defries, Ruth S; Doyle, John C; Harrison, Sandy P; Johnston, Fay H; Keeley, Jon E; Krawchuk, Meg A; Kull, Christian A; Marston, J Brad; Moritz, Max A; Prentice, I Colin; Roos, Christopher I; Scott, Andrew C; Swetnam, Thomas W; van der Werf, Guido R; Pyne, Stephen J

    2009-04-24

    Fire is a worldwide phenomenon that appears in the geological record soon after the appearance of terrestrial plants. Fire influences global ecosystem patterns and processes, including vegetation distribution and structure, the carbon cycle, and climate. Although humans and fire have always coexisted, our capacity to manage fire remains imperfect and may become more difficult in the future as climate change alters fire regimes. This risk is difficult to assess, however, because fires are still poorly represented in global models. Here, we discuss some of the most important issues involved in developing a better understanding of the role of fire in the Earth system.

  15. Creating a fuels baseline and establishing fire frequency relationships to develop a landscape management strategy at the Savannah River Site.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parresol, Bernard R; Shea, Dan; Ottmar, Roger

    2006-03-15

    USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-41. pp 351-366. Abstract—The Savannah River Site is a Department of Energy Nuclear Defense Facility and a National Environmental Research Park located in the upper coastal plain of South Carolina. Prescribed burning is conducted on 15,000 to 20,000 ac annually. We modifi ed standard forest inventory methods to incorporate a complete assessment of fuel components on 622 plots, assessing coarse woody debris, ladder fuels, and the litter and duff layers. Because of deficiencies in south-wide data on litter-duff bulk densities, which are the fuels most often consumed in prescribed fires, we developed new bulk density relationships. Total surface fuel loading across the landscape ranged from 0.8 to 48.7 tons/ac. The variables basal area, stand age, and site index were important in accounting for variability in ladder fuel, coarse woody debris, and litter-duff for pine types. For a given pine stand condition, litter-duff loading decreased in direct proportion to the number of burns in the preceding thirty years. Ladder fuels for loblolly and longleaf increased in direct proportion to the years since the last prescribed burn. The pattern of fuel loading on the SRS reflects stand dynamics, stand management and fire management. It is suggested that the Forest Inventory and Analysis Program can easily modify sampling protocols to incorporate collection of fuels data.

  16. Research perspectives on the public and fire management: a synthesis of current social science on eight essential questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah M. McCaffrey; Christine S. Olsen

    2012-01-01

    As part of a Joint Fire Science Program project, a team of social scientists reviewed existing fire social science literature to develop a targeted synthesis of scientific knowledge on the following questions: 1. What is the public's understanding of fire's role in the ecosystem? 2. Who are trusted sources of information about fire? 3. What are the public...

  17. A new website with real-time dissemination of information on fire activity and meteorological fire danger in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaCamara, Carlos; Trigo, Ricardo; Nunes, Sílvia; Pinto, Miguel; Oliveira, Tiago; Almeida, Rui

    2017-04-01

    In Portugal, like in Mediterranean Europe, fire activity is a natural phenomenon linking climate, humans and vegetation and is therefore conditioned by natural and anthropogenic factors. Natural factors include topography, vegetation cover and prevailing weather conditions whereas anthropogenic factors encompass land management practices and fire prevention policies. Land management practices, in particular the inadequate use of fire, is a crucial anthropogenic factor that accounts for about 90% of fire ignitions. Fire prevention policies require adequate and timely information about wildfire potential assessment, which is usually based on fire danger rating systems that provide indices to be used on an operational and tactical basis in decision support systems. We present a new website designed to provide the user community with relevant real-time information on fire activity and meteorological fire danger that will allow adopting the adequate measures to mitigate fire damage. The fire danger product consists of forecasts of fire danger over Portugal based on a statistical procedure that combines information about fire history derived from the Fire Radiative Power product disseminated by the Land Surface Analysis Satellite Application Facility (LSA SAF) with daily meteorological forecasts provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The aim of the website is fourfold; 1) to concentrate all information available (databases and maps) relevant to fire management in a unique platform so that access by end users becomes easier, faster and friendlier; 2) to supervise the access of users to the different products available; 3) to control and assist the access to the platform and obtain feedbacks from users for further improvements; 4) to outreach the operational community and foster the use of better information that increase efficiency in risk management. The website is sponsored by The Navigator Company, a leading force in the global pulp

  18. Management of Gingival Overgrowth in a Cardiac Transplant Patient Using Laser-Assisted Gingivectomy/Gingivoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddi, Abhiram; Alluri, Leela Subhashini; Ciancio, Sebastian G

    2015-07-01

    Drug-induced gingival overgrowth (DIGO) is an oral clinical manifestation associated with certain medications such as immunosuppressants that are administered to organ transplant patients to prevent graft rejection. In patients with cardiac transplants, management of DIGO is critical. In such patients, plaque biofilm accumulation at the gingival interface might be detrimental as it may lead to transient bacteremia as well as systemic inflammation resulting in thromboembolic events. This case report describes the management of DIGO in a cardiac transplant recipient by change of immunosuppressant medication, non-surgical periodontal therapy and laser-assisted gingivectomy.

  19. Computer-assisted information management for the pediatric residency review process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallen, R J

    1986-10-01

    Directors of training programs must systematically compile information on the patient population used for graduate education. The revised special requirements and application form of the Residency Review Committee for Pediatrics of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education call for detailed information on the patient-centered activities of residents. Since data on patient contacts cumulate rapidly, the Pediatrics Residency Program of the Mt. Sinai Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio, instituted a microcomputer-assisted information management system. Under the system, a personal computer with a fixed disk and data-base management software provides the means for documenting the residents' patient contacts and learning experiences.

  20. Vacuum-assisted vaginal delivery (VAVD)-basics for the risk manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltman, Larry

    2014-01-01

    The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) manager calls you about a baby delivered last night now with brain trauma. She understands that it was a difficult delivery with a vacuum. There were "multiple pop-offs" and, after the baby was delivered, the NICU resuscitation team was called. The Apgar scores were 3 and 5. They are requesting risk management to lead a debriefing today. What to ask? How many pop-offs are allowed? What was the interaction between the nurses and physician? Why wasn't the resuscitation team in attendance before the delivery? Was the vacuum placed properly? How many pulls? How long was the vacuum in place? What should be documented, and was the documentation adequate? All of these are appropriate questions for an adequate analysis of an adverse outcome resulting from a vacuum-assisted vaginal delivery (VAVD). This article focuses on the risk management issues of VAVD in order to give the risk manager a better understanding of appropriate use, data-gathering tools, educational opportunities, and assistance in establishing a culture of safety for the entire perinatal team regarding the use of the vacuum device. © 2014 American Society for Healthcare Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.

  1. Music therapy for assistance with pain and anxiety management in burn treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prensner, J D; Yowler, C J; Smith, L F; Steele, A L; Fratianne, R B

    2001-01-01

    The management of pain is one of the primary issues in burn care. Pain is not only a physiologic experience, but a psychological one as well. With this in mind, the treatment of burned patients must incorporate a holistic view of pain management and healing. Cognitive, behavioral, and pharmacologic interventions all have a role in pain management. Studies, as well as clinical experience, have shown that musical intervention has been helpful in assisting patients with pain management in a variety of medical settings. Music is an element of normal life that can be easily adapted for the needs of individual patients and their current environment while providing a means for self expression and for normalizing the environment. This article examines the rationale for using music therapy with burned patients, describes several protocols that have been adapted to meet the specific needs of burned patients, and summarizes our preliminary findings, which demonstrate significant response to music therapy protocols employed on our patients.

  2. Why has a woman with mental illness been fired? Discourses on fairness and diversity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Being fired can be perceived as a form of unfair treatment and as a personal and social defeat. It can generate feelings of anger, outrage and resentment that can elicit a desire for retribution. This qualitative study focuses on a case of failed integration of a person with a mental illness at the workplace. Texts were analysed from a rhetorical perspective, considering how the company leaders and the employee re-constructed and gave meaning to the events that lead to the firing, trying to justify them. Policies dealing with workplace diversity and the hiring of people with disabilities, power relations, fit between organizational goals and ideal models of behaviour in the company on one hand, and personal needs of the employee on the other, seem to be determinant in influencing the perception the parties have of interactional and procedural justice.

  3. 'Swinging the Lamp': The Watch Manager's Career, Role and Occupational Identity within the Modernising Agenda of the UK Fire and Rescue Service

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, Sarah Jane

    2017-01-01

    This research focuses on the career and work identity of watch managers in the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS). Their role is to manage firefighters who are infamously known in political circles to possess grass root cultures that remain resistant to forms of change and modernisation. Watch managers are not only tasked with leading emergency teams at incidents but they are also at the receiving end of a relentless stream of political pressure to achieve change. This research draws on qualitativ...

  4. Assistance to the states with risk based data management. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This report describes activities associated with the risk based data management systems (RBDMS) project. The RBDMS applies to data pertaining to injection well operations. This report describes assistance provided to the states of ALaska, Mississippi, Montana, and Nebraska for the conversion of data from existing data management systems, coding and internal testing of the RBDMS, document preparation, training, technology transfer, and project management.

  5. Quality Computer Assisted Mobile Learning (CAML) and Distance Education Leadership in Managing Technology Enhanced Learning Management System (TELMS) in the Malaysian Public Tertiary Education

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Tan Luck

    2009-01-01

    Abstract - The success in the implementation of a quality computer assisted mobile learning and distance education in a Technology Enhanced Learning Management System is highly rely on the academic leadership in managing and application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in the tertiary level. The effectiveness of its leadership, knowledge, application and management of ICT and learning management system is of utmost important. Successful application and management includes qua...

  6. 75 FR 51487 - Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management; Notice of Online Posting of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management; Notice of Online Posting of Department... HTML formats. Dated: August 17, 2010. T. Michael Kerr, Assistant Secretary for Administration and...

  7. Modelling of fire count data: fire disaster risk in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boadi, Caleb; Harvey, Simon K; Gyeke-Dako, Agyapomaa

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic dynamics involved in ecological count data require distribution fitting procedures to model and make informed judgments. The study provides empirical research, focused on the provision of an early warning system and a spatial graph that can detect societal fire risks. It offers an opportunity for communities, organizations, risk managers, actuaries and governments to be aware of, and understand fire risks, so that they will increase the direct tackling of the threats posed by fire. Statistical distribution fitting method that best helps identify the stochastic dynamics of fire count data is used. The aim is to provide a fire-prediction model and fire spatial graph for observed fire count data. An empirical probability distribution model is fitted to the fire count data and compared to the theoretical probability distribution of the stochastic process of fire count data. The distribution fitted to the fire frequency count data helps identify the class of models that are exhibited by the fire and provides time leading decisions. The research suggests that fire frequency and loss (fire fatalities) count data in Ghana are best modelled with a Negative Binomial Distribution. The spatial map of observed fire frequency and fatality measured over 5 years (2007-2011) offers in this study a first regional assessment of fire frequency and fire fatality in Ghana.

  8. Understanding interaction effects of climate change and fire management on bird distributions through combined process and habitat models

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joseph D.; Gutzwiller, Kevin J.; Barrow, Wylie C.; Johnson-Randall, Lori; Zygo, Lisa; Swint, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    Avian conservation efforts must account for changes in vegetation composition and structure associated with climate change. We modeled vegetation change and the probability of occurrence of birds to project changes in winter bird distributions associated with climate change and fire management in the northern Chihuahuan Desert (southwestern U.S.A.). We simulated vegetation change in a process-based model (Landscape and Fire Simulator) in which anticipated climate change was associated with doubling of current atmospheric carbon dioxide over the next 50 years. We estimated the relative probability of bird occurrence on the basis of statistical models derived from field observations of birds and data on vegetation type, topography, and roads. We selected 3 focal species, Scaled Quail (Callipepla squamata), Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus), and Rock Wren (Salpinctes obsoletus), that had a range of probabilities of occurrence for our study area. Our simulations projected increases in relative probability of bird occurrence in shrubland and decreases in grassland and Yucca spp. and ocotillo (Fouquieria splendens) vegetation. Generally, the relative probability of occurrence of all 3 species was highest in shrubland because leaf-area index values were lower in shrubland. This high probability of occurrence likely is related to the species' use of open vegetation for foraging. Fire suppression had little effect on projected vegetation composition because as climate changed there was less fuel and burned area. Our results show that if future water limits on plant type are considered, models that incorporate spatial data may suggest how and where different species of birds may respond to vegetation changes.

  9. Understanding interaction effects of climate change and fire management on bird distributions through combined process and habitat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joseph D; Gutzwiller, Kevin J; Barrow, Wylie C; Johnson-Randall, Lori; Zygo, Lisa; Swint, Pamela

    2011-06-01

    Avian conservation efforts must account for changes in vegetation composition and structure associated with climate change. We modeled vegetation change and the probability of occurrence of birds to project changes in winter bird distributions associated with climate change and fire management in the northern Chihuahuan Desert (southwestern U.S.A.). We simulated vegetation change in a process-based model (Landscape and Fire Simulator) in which anticipated climate change was associated with doubling of current atmospheric carbon dioxide over the next 50 years. We estimated the relative probability of bird occurrence on the basis of statistical models derived from field observations of birds and data on vegetation type, topography, and roads. We selected 3 focal species, Scaled Quail (Callipepla squamata), Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus), and Rock Wren (Salpinctes obsoletus), that had a range of probabilities of occurrence for our study area. Our simulations projected increases in relative probability of bird occurrence in shrubland and decreases in grassland and Yucca spp. and ocotillo (Fouquieria splendens) vegetation. Generally, the relative probability of occurrence of all 3 species was highest in shrubland because leaf-area index values were lower in shrubland. This high probability of occurrence likely is related to the species' use of open vegetation for foraging. Fire suppression had little effect on projected vegetation composition because as climate changed there was less fuel and burned area. Our results show that if future water limits on plant type are considered, models that incorporate spatial data may suggest how and where different species of birds may respond to vegetation changes.

  10. Science framework for conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome: Linking the Department of the Interior’s Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy to long-term strategic conservation actions, Part 1. Science basis and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Jeanne C.; Beck, Jeffrey L.; Bradford, John B.; Bybee, Jared; Campbell, Steve; Carlson, John; Christiansen, Thomas J; Clause, Karen J.; Collins, Gail; Crist, Michele R.; Dinkins, Jonathan B.; Doherty, Kevin E; Edwards, Fred; Espinosa, Shawn; Griffin, Kathleen A.; Griffin, Paul; Haas, Jessica R.; Hanser, Steve; Havlina, Douglas W.; Henke, Kenneth F.; Hennig, Jacob D.; Joyce, Linda A; Kilkenny, Francis F.; Kulpa, Sarah M; Kurth, Laurie L; Maestas, Jeremy D; Manning, Mary; Mayer, Kenneth E.; Mealor, Brian A.; McCarthy, Clinton; Pellant, Mike; Perea, Marco A.; Prentice, Karen L.; Pyke, David A.; Wiechman , Lief A.; Wuenschel, Amarina

    2017-01-01

    The Science Framework is intended to link the Department of the Interior’s Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy with long-term strategic conservation actions in the sagebrush biome. The Science Framework provides a multiscale approach for prioritizing areas for management and determining effective management strategies within the sagebrush biome. The emphasis is on sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystems and Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). The approach provided in the Science Framework links sagebrush ecosystem resilience to disturbance and resistance to nonnative, invasive plant species to species habitat information based on the distribution and abundance of focal species. A geospatial process is presented that overlays information on ecosystem resilience and resistance, species habitats, and predominant threats and that can be used at the mid-scale to prioritize areas for management. A resilience and resistance habitat matrix is provided that can help decisionmakers evaluate risks and determine appropriate management strategies. Prioritized areas and management strategies can be refined by managers and stakeholders at the local scale based on higher resolution data and local knowledge. Decision tools are discussed for determining appropriate management actions for areas that are prioritized for management. Geospatial data, maps, and models are provided through the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) ScienceBase and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Landscape Approach Data Portal. The Science Framework is intended to be adaptive and will be updated as additional data become available on other values and species at risk. It is anticipated that the Science Framework will be widely used to: (1) inform emerging strategies to conserve sagebrush ecosystems, sagebrush dependent species, and human uses of the sagebrush system, and (2) assist managers in prioritizing and planning on-the-ground restoration and mitigation actions across the sagebrush biome.

  11. MANAGEMENT OF NURSING ASSISTANCE: CASE STUDY IN A MEDICAL CLINIC IN A UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Gonçalves Rodrigues

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It was aimed to show a case study about the management of nursing assistance. This paper is descriptive, a case study. As its source of study, the medical clinic in a school-hospital in Montes Claros, Minas Gerais was chosen. For the management, tools as Matrix SWOT, 5W2H and Protocol Forms of Risk Prevention were used in the management of caring in nursing. The tools and the results reached through the tools were contextualized in the light of literature, in which highlights the relevance of these tools. Through its use, it is possible to promote improvements in the given assistance to clients, once it shows opportunities, threats, strengths, weaknesses and the risk analysis in which the people involved in the care are exposed. In this way, it is needed that the tools are more and more utilized in the daily routine of the nursing work, and that this joins forces with the leadership and the management of care.

  12. Traffic Steering Framework for Mobile-Assisted Resource Management in Heterogeneous Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dogadaev, Anton Konstantinovich; Checko, Aleksandra; Popovska Avramova, Andrijana

    2013-01-01

    With the expected growth of mobile data traffic it is essential to manage the network resources efficiently. In order to undertake this challenge, we propose a framework for network-centric, mobile-assisted resource management, which facilitates traffic offloading from mobile network to Wi......-Fi or open access small cells. A provision of desired quality of experience to the end-user is carried out by an operator-configurable monitoring application that is running on a mobile device. A potential to enhance network-centric resource management is provided by delegating traffic steering authorities...... to the network backbone. What is more, we give an overview of existing standardization activities on offloading the mobile traffic through Wi-Fi....

  13. Transoral endoscopic-assisted styloidectomy: How should Eagle syndrome be managed surgically?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Weteid, A S; Miloro, M

    2015-09-01

    Eagle syndrome, or calcification of the stylohyoid ligament, is a rare condition that may present a clinical diagnostic dilemma for those unfamiliar with its existence and its typical presenting signs and symptoms. Management of this disease process may involve either non-surgical or surgical treatment options. When surgery is indicated, the choice of a specific surgical modality is highly variable and is generally dependent upon individual surgeon preference and experience, since the location of the styloid process is consistent between patients, and the required surgical access is also similar depending upon the specific surgical plan. This paper reports a case of Eagle syndrome managed with a transoral endoscopic-assisted approach, explores the advantages and disadvantages of each surgical approach, and reviews the literature regarding surgical management options for Eagle syndrome.

  14. Developing a Knowledge Management Framework to Assist With Current USMC Information Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    23 Figure 8. AFKN Build Learning Communities (from AFMC Briefing...the goals. Figure 8. AFKN Build Learning Communities (from AFMC Briefing, 2001) 41 HQ AFMC/A5BK provides expertise in management of information

  15. Fire forum 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The conference contains 18 presentations on various aspects of fire prevention and protection within the power production plants and industry, safety of building constructions, cable and transformer problems, risk and safety evaluation methods, management aspects, relevant Norwegian and Icelandic laws and regulations and oil analysis. Some examples of fires and explosions are also presented. (tk)

  16. Savanna burning methodology for fire management and emissions reduction: a critical review of influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraseni, Tek Narayan; Reardon-Smith, Kathryn; Griffiths, Greg; Apan, Armando

    2016-12-01

    Savanna fire is a major source of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In Australia, savanna fire contributes about 3% of annual GHG emissions reportable to the Kyoto Protocol. In order to reduce GHG emissions from savanna burning, the Australian government has developed and approved a Kyoto compliant savanna controlled burning methodology-the first legal instrument of this kind at a global level-under its Emission Reduction Fund. However, this approved methodology is currently only applicable to nine vegetation fuel types across northern parts of Australia in areas which receive on average over 600 mm rainfall annually, covering only 15.4% of the total land area in Australia. Savanna ecosystems extend across a large proportion of mainland Australia. This paper provides a critical review of ten key factors that need to be considered in developing a savanna burning methodology applicable to the other parts of Australia. It will also inform discussion in other countries intent on developing similar emissions reduction strategies.

  17. A comparison of three approaches for simulating fine-scale surface winds in support of wildland fire management: Part I. Model formulation and comparison against measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason M. Forthofer; Bret W. Butler; Natalie S. Wagenbrenner

    2014-01-01

    For this study three types of wind models have been defined for simulating surface wind flow in support of wildland fire management: (1) a uniform wind field (typically acquired from coarse-resolution (,4 km) weather service forecast models); (2) a newly developed mass-conserving model and (3) a newly developed mass and momentumconserving model (referred to as the...

  18. Improving the fire supervision and management system%完善消防监督管理制度的思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李佳

    2012-01-01

      The fire supervision management is important of fire control work, related to the social and economic development and the social stability. At present our country fire supervision and management system is not perfect. This paper considers that we should set up the relevant fire laws and regulations system, strengthen supervision of fire team construction, to promote science and technology application and education and so on to improve.%  消防监督管理是消防工作的重中之重,关系到社会经济的发展及社会的稳定。目前我国消防监督管理制度不够不完善。本文认为应当从建立健全相关的消防法律法规体系、加大消防监督队伍建设、提升科技应用和教育培训水平等方面予以完善

  19. The role of forest fire severity on vegetation recovery after 18 years. Implications for forest management of Quercus suber L. in Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francos, Marcos; Úbeda, Xavier; Tort, Joan; Panareda, Josep María; Cerdà, Artemio

    2016-10-01

    Wildfires are a widespread phenomenon in Mediterranean environments. Wildfires result in different fire severities, and then in contrasting plant cover and floristic composition. This paper analyses the recovery of the vegetation eighteen years after a wildfire in Catalonia. The Pinus pinaster ssp. forest was affected by three different severities in July 1994, and studied the spring of 1995 and again in 2008. After eighteen years (2012), our research found that burnt sites constitute a dense forest with a broad variety of species, including many young pines, shrubs and herbaceous plants, but that the risk of fire remains very high, due to the large quantity of fuel and the flammability of the species. The management of the post-fire is critical when high severity fires take places, and it is recommended that high-severity fires must be avoided for a sustainable forest management. We recommend that once the timber (Pinus plantations) production is not profitable, Quercus suber L. and Pinus pinaster ssp. forest should be promoted, and pine plantations avoided.

  20. Evaluation of kasugamycin for fire blight management, effect on nontarget bacteria, and assessment of kasugamycin resistance potential in Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, Gayle C; Sundin, George W

    2011-02-01

    that had received at least one Kasumin application. In total, 401 Ks(R) isolates (42 different species) were recovered from apple flowers and leaves and orchard soil samples. Although we have not established the presence of a transferrable Ks(R) gene in orchard bacteria, the frequency, number of species, and presence of Ks(R) enterobacterial species in orchard samples suggests the possible role of nontarget bacteria in the future transfer of a Ks(R) gene to E. amylovora. Our data confirm the importance of kasugamycin as an alternate antibiotic for fire blight management and lay the groundwork for the development and incorporation of resistance management strategies.

  1. Management of pelvic lymphoceles following robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer A Raheem

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic lymphocele is a potential complication of radical prostatectomy. Although lymphoceles often regress spontaneously, many may progress, precipitate clinical symptoms, and ultimately require intervention. To date, the best treatment of pelvic lymphoceles has not yet been fully defined. However, laparoscopic marsupialization is a definitive and efficacious surgical alternative to percutaneous drainage. It is effective, results in minimal patient morbidity, and allows for rapid recovery. We report our experience with management of clinically symptomatic pelvic lymphoceles following robotic-assisted prostatectomy using laparoscopic marsupialization.

  2. Biofeedback assisted relaxation (bar in management of hyperhidrosis : A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gurmukh

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Ten adult male patients suffering from hyperhidrosis were managed with biofeedback assisted relaxation (BAR regimen using skin conductivity. Six of them showed significant improvement, 2 showed minimal to moderate improvement, whereas no improvement was observed in the remaining 2 cases. Mean values of skin conductivity showed a range of 1.29 to 6.79 mho units before biofeedback session with reduction in these values to the range of 0.53 to 1.64 mho units after therapy in 6 patients showing good response. The grades of clinical improvement correlated well with corresponding reduction in skin conductivity in all the cases.

  3. Fighting Fires in Educational Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weick, Karl E.

    1996-01-01

    Recent research on wildland fire fighting supports educational administrators' use of the fire-fighting metaphor to describe the nature of their work. Fire-fighting nuances illuminate subtle conditions in educational organizations that increase their vulnerability to failure. These parallels suggest five management conditions that determine…

  4. FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristov Denis Ivanovich

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The All-Russian Congress “Fire Stop Moscow” was de-voted to the analysis of the four segments of the industry of fire protection systems and technologies: the design of fire protec-tion systems, the latest developments and technologies of active and passive fire protection of buildings, the state and the devel-opment of the legal framework, the practice of fire protection of buildings and structures. The forum brought together the repre-sentatives of the industry of fire protection systems, scientists, leading experts, specialists in fire protection and representatives of construction companies from different regions of Russia. In parallel with the Congress Industrial Exhibition of fire protection systems, materials and technology was held, where manufacturers presented their products. The urgency of the “Fire Stop Moscow” Congress in 2015 organized by the Congress Bureau ODF Events lies primarily in the fact that it considered the full range of issues related to the fire protection of building and construction projects; studied the state of the regulatory framework for fire safety and efficiency of public services, research centers, private companies and busi-nesses in the area of fire safety. The main practical significance of the event which was widely covered in the media space, was the opportunity to share the views and information between management, science, and practice of business on implementing fire protection systems in the conditions of modern economic relations and market realities. : congress, fire protection, systems, technologies, fire protection systems, exhibition

  5. Computer assisted chronic disease management: does it work? A pilot study using mixed methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kay M; Biezen, Ruby; Piterman, Leon

    2013-01-01

    Background. Key factors for the effective chronic disease management (CDM) include the availability of practical and effective computer tools and continuing professional development/education. This study tested the effectiveness of a computer assisted chronic disease management tool, a broadband-based service known as cdmNet in increasing the development of care plans for patients with chronic disease in general practice. Methodology. Mixed methods are the breakthrough series methodology (workshops and plan-do-study-act cycles) and semistructured interviews. Results. Throughout the intervention period a pattern emerged suggesting GPs use of cdmNet initially increased, then plateaued practice nurses' and practice managers' roles expanded as they became more involved in using cdmNet. Seven main messages emerged from the GP interviews. Discussion. The overall use of cdmNet by participating GPs varied from "no change" to "significant change and developing many the GPMPs (general practice management plans) using cdmNet." The variation may be due to several factors, not the least, allowing GPs adequate time to familiarise themselves with the software and recognising the benefit of the team approach. Conclusion. The breakthrough series methodology facilitated upskilling GPs' management of patients diagnosed with a chronic disease and learning how to use the broadband-based service cdmNet.

  6. Assistive technologies for self-managed pressure ulcer prevention in spinal cord injury: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, James Y; Stead, Brent; Mann, William; Ba'Pham; Popovic, Milos R

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) present a persistent and costly problem. Continuing effort in developing new technologies that support self-managed care is an important prevention strategy. Specifically, the aims of this scoping review are to review the key concepts and factors related to self-managed prevention of PUs in individuals with SCI and appraise the technologies available to assist patients in self-management of PU prevention practices. There is broad consensus that sustaining long-term adherence to prevention regimens is a major concern. Recent literature highlights the interactions between behavioral and physiological risk factors. We identify four technology categories that support self-management: computer-based educational technologies demonstrated improved short-term gains in knowledge (2 studies), interface pressure mapping technologies demonstrated improved adherence to pressure-relief schedules up to 3 mo (5 studies), electrical stimulation confirmed improvements in tissue tolerance after 8 wk of training (3 studies), and telemedicine programs demonstrated improvements in independence and reduced hospital visits over 6 mo (2 studies). Overall, self-management technologies demonstrated low-to-moderate effectiveness in addressing a subset of risk factors. However, the effectiveness of technologies in preventing PUs is limited due to a lack of incidence reporting. In light of the key findings, we recommend developing integrated technologies that address multiple risk factors.

  7. Fire Risks and Prevention Strategies for Architecture at Historic Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper mainly discusses the features of China's architecture at historic sites with regard to fire protection, the causes of fire since 1949, reviewing their weaknesses in fire protection, and exploring modern technologies for fire prevention that are applicable to ancient buildings. We put forward suggestions to improve fire prevention and management: eliminating potential problems of fire, improving fire protection and establishing a better fire security system, which is especially important to protect ancient buildings.

  8. Core Competencies in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll Gallardo, Alba; Djalali, Ahmadreza; Foletti, Marco; Ragazzoni, Luca; Della Corte, Francesco; Lupescu, Olivera; Arculeo, Chris; von Arnim, Gotz; Friedl, Tom; Ashkenazi, Michael; Fisher, Philipp; Hreckovski, Boris; Khorram-Manesh, Amir; Komadina, Radko; Lechner, Konstanze; Stal, Marc; Patru, Cristina; Burkle, Frederick M; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi

    2015-08-01

    Disaster response demands a large workforce covering diverse professional sectors. Throughout this article, we illustrate the results of a systematic review of peer-reviewed studies to identify existing competency sets for disaster management and humanitarian assistance that would serve as guidance for the development of a common disaster curriculum. A systematic review of English-language articles was performed on PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, ERIC, and Cochrane Library. Studies were included if reporting competency domains, abilities, knowledge, skills, or attitudes for professionals involved disaster relief or humanitarian assistance. Exclusion criteria included abstracts, citations, case studies, and studies not dealing with disasters or humanitarian assistance. Thirty-eight papers were analyzed. Target audience was defined in all articles. Five references (13%) reported cross-sectorial competencies. Most of the articles (81.6%) were specific to health care. Eighteen (47%) papers included competencies for at least 2 different disciplines and 18 (47%) for different professional groups. Nursing was the most widely represented cadre. Eighteen papers (47%) defined competency domains and 36 (94%) reported list of competencies. Nineteen articles (50%) adopted consensus-building to define competencies, and 12 (31%) included competencies adapted to different professional responsibility levels. This systematic review revealed that the largest number of papers were mainly focused on the health care sector and presented a lack of agreement on the terminology used for competency-based definition.

  9. Video-assisted thoracoscopic pericardial window for diagnosis and management of pericardial effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georghiou, Georgios P; Stamler, Alon; Sharoni, Erez; Fichman-Horn, Suzana; Berman, Marius; Vidne, Bernardo A; Saute, Milton

    2005-08-01

    Video-assisted thoracoscopy with the creation of a pericardial window is a noninvasive method of pericardial drainage. It also allows an excellent view of both the pleural cavity and pericardium and the precise selection of biopsy sites. We review our 3-year experience with this technique. Between January 2001 and February 2004, 18 patients (10 men, 8 women; mean age 57 years) with echocardiographically diagnosed pericardial effusion underwent video-assisted thoracoscopy at our center. Pericardial windows were created under general anesthesia and single-lung ventilation using 2 to 3 trocars. Mean operating time was 46 minutes. A right thoracic approach was used in 16 patients and a left thoracic approach in 2. Microbiology and virology cultures of the pericardial fluid were negative. Histologic findings were compatible with tuberculosis in 2 cases and granulocytic sarcoma, infiltrating breast carcinoma, and infiltrating nonsmall cell carcinoma in 1 case each. In the remaining patients, the histologic diagnosis was chronic or subacute nonspecific pericarditis. Talc pleurodesis was performed in 3 patients for concomitant malignant pleural effusion. In 4 patients, the pericardial effusion occurred secondary to cardiac surgery; 3 were receiving anticoagulants after valve replacement, and 1 had a heart transplant. There were no complications of the thoracoscopy technique. Video-assisted thoracoscopic fenestration is an effective technique for pericardial drainage and biopsy. Apart from its diagnostic value, it allows the physician to fashion a pleuropericardial window for effective drainage while avoiding the complications of classic surgical procedures. Concomitant pleural and pulmonary disorders may be managed simultaneously.

  10. United States Fire Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content About USFA Hotel/Motel Contact Us Search Email subscriptions Training & Professional Development Fire Prevention & Public Education Operations Management & Safety Data Publications & Library Grants & Funding About USFA Hotel/Motel Contact Us Email subscriptions Disaster sheltering ...

  11. Fire Perimeters (2012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Geospatial Multi-Agency Coordination Group, or GeoMAC, is an internet-based mapping tool originally designed for fire managers to access online maps of current...

  12. A pilot study examining patient attitudes and intentions to adopt assistive technologies into type 2 diabetes self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Kathleen G; Hall, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Approximately half of individuals living with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have suboptimal self-management, which could be improved by using assistive technologies in self-management regimes. This study examines patient attitudes and intentions to adopt assistive technologies into T2DM self-management. Forty-four participants (M = 58.7 years) with T2DM were recruited from diabetes education classes in the southwestern Ontario, Canada, between February and April 2014. Participants completed a self-reported in-person survey assessing demographic characteristics, current diabetes management, and attitudes toward using assistive technologies in their diabetes self-management. Demographics, disease characteristics, and current technology use and preferences of the cohort were examined, followed by a correlational analysis of descriptive characteristics and attitudes and intentions to use technology in self-management. The majority of (but not all) participants felt that using Internet applications (65%) and smartphone (53.5%) applications for self-management was a good idea. The majority of participants did not currently use an Internet (92.5%) or mobile (96%) application for self-management. Of participants, 77% intended to use an Internet application to manage their diabetes in the future and 58% intended to use mobile applications. Younger age was associated with more positive attitudes (r = -.432, P = .003) and intentions (r = -.425, P = .005) to use assistive technologies in diabetes self-management. Findings suggest that patients, especially those younger in age, are favorable toward adopting assistive technologies into management practice. However, attitudes among older adults are less positive, and few currently make use of such technologies in any age group. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  13. Managing everyday ethics in assisted living: a research-based case analysis for the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messikomer, Carla M; Cirka, Carol C

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a complex, but realistic, picture of the lived experience in assisted living (AL), and provokes thoughtful reflection about the operational and ethical challenges faced in the delivery of care to an increasingly frail population in a typical AL facility. Developed from the findings of a two-year qualitative research project, the case represents a composite of selected data collected at five AL facilities that participated in the study. Students will participate in individual and small group exercises that challenge them to identify everyday ethical concerns in AL, and to suggest ways that management can address these issues. The case is suitable for cross-disciplinary use, and can be effectively applied in the fields of management, health care administration, sociology, gerontology, social work, and nursing, either on the graduate or undergraduate level. It is especially well suited to courses that incorporate the topics of long-term care, senior housing, or ethics.

  14. An ethics framework for assisting clinician-managers in resource allocation decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslin, E M; Lemieux-Charles, L; Wortley, J T

    1997-01-01

    In response to continued pressure on the Canadian healthcare system, hospitals are implementing structural changes to address issues of cost containment, utilization, and resource allocation. One strategy has been to decentralize managerial decision making to clinicians, creating "clinician-managers" (CMs). We surveyed 3,000 hospital-based CMs in Ontario, Canada (including physicians, nurses, and other health professionals), in order to understand the nature and frequency of the ethical issues they face as a consequence of their involvement in resource allocation decisions, and to identify mechanisms for dealing with these problems in their hospitals. Based on the survey results, we developed a Management Ethics Framework to assist CMs to reach an ethically justifiable resolution of these types of problems, both individually, and in the context of their membership in the healthcare team. The results, and particularly the discussion that follows, represent a confluence of philosophical, clinical, and organizational perspective on ethics and resource allocation by clinicians.

  15. Assessing the accuracy of wildland fire situation analysis (WFSA) fire size and suppression cost estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey H. Donovan; Peter. Noordijk

    2005-01-01

    To determine the optimal suppression strategy for escaped wildfires, federal land managers are requiredto conduct a wildland fire situation analysis (WFSA). As part of the WFSA process, fire managers estimate final fire size and suppression costs. Estimates from 58 WFSAs conducted during the 2002 fire season are compared to actual outcomes. Results indicate that...

  16. Inadequate results for microkeratome-assisted additive stromal keratoplasty for management of keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coullet, Julien; Fournié, Pierre; Malecaze, François; Arné, Jean-Louis

    2008-02-01

    To evaluate a new automated technique--microkeratome-assisted additive stromal keratoplasty (MASK)--for the management of keratoconus in eyes scheduled for surgery with clear cornea associated with total contact lens intolerance. This non-comparative, interventional case series included four eyes of four patients with stage I and II keratoconus associated with total contact lens intolerance. The first step of the surgical procedure consisted of performing a nasal-hinged flap on the host cornea with a microkeratome. The second step consisted of extracting a stromal piano-powered disk from the donor's cornea using an artificial chamber. The 80-microm thick lamellar graft was punched with a 7.5-mm circular trephine and positioned beneath the flap. Corneal refractive surgery was scheduled for the end of the sixth postoperative month. No corneal refractive surgery was performed after 6 months of follow-up. Only one eye gained five lines of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA). Among the other three eyes, two had unchanged BSCVA and one lost one line of BSCVA. At the end of surgery, mean corneal thickness was increased by 148.75 microm. Microkeratome-assisted additive stromal keratoplasty appears to be a safe and straightforward surgical technique that preserves the host endothelium and avoids the need of an open-sky procedure. However, in our study, MASK is not considered as an alternative to penetrating or deep lamellar keratoplasty in the management of keratoconus with clear cornea because of imprecise anatomic and refractive outcomes.

  17. 浅谈地铁运营消防安全管理体系%Introduction to the subway operation fire-control management system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶辉; 孙乐胜

    2015-01-01

    目前,中国各大城市均在快速发展地铁,地铁将作为城市居民出行的重要交通工具,在提供方便快捷出行方式的同时,我们也要考虑到由于身处地下狭小空间,地铁火灾具排烟困难,散热慢,高温高热全面燃烧,安全疏散和扑救困难,人员密集,易造成群死群伤等特点,一旦发生火灾,将巨大的经济损失和不可估量的社会影响,消防管理是地铁安全管理的重中之重。本文以天津地铁运营消防管理模式为出发点,简单探讨地铁运营消防管理体系建设。%At present, China's big cities are in the rapid development of the subway, The subway wil be as an important vehicle of urban residents travel. In providing fast and convenient way to travel at the same time, we also want to consider because in narrow space, underground subway fire smoke exhaust difficult, slow cooling, high temperature and high heat comprehensive combustion, safety evacuation and save trouble, crowded, easy cause group die group of injury. In the event of fire, wil be of great economic loss and immeasurable social impact, fire management is the key of the subway safety management. Taking subway fire management model as a starting point, simple subway fire management system construction is discussed in this paper.

  18. Annual Fire Management Program 1988 for Prime Hook Natioinal Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — When environmental and weather conditions are right Prescribed Burning will be used for hazardous fuel reduction, wildlife habitat management and habitat improvement...

  19. Annual Fire Management Program 1986 for Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — When environmental and weather conditions are right Prescribed Burning will be used for hazardous fuel reduction, wildlife habitat management and habitat improvement...

  20. Fire Management Plan for Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge Fiscal Year 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — If habitat conditions permit, prescribed burning will be used for management in eight areas totaling 1685 acres at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge in the fiscal...

  1. Duck Manager: 'I am the wolf, the bison, the prairie fire.'

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains only the 'Feature' story from the Winter 2009 issue of the Delta Waterfowl magazine. The story discusses Roger Hollevoet, refuge manager for...

  2. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in the management of penetrating and blunt thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanchi S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS is still being defined in the management of thoracic trauma. We report our trauma cases managed by VATS and review the role of VATS in the management of thoracic trauma. Materials and Methods: All the trauma patients who underwent VATS from 2000 to 2007 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Results: Twenty-three trauma patients underwent 25 cases of VATS. The most common indication for VATS was retained haemothorax. Thoracotomy was avoided in 21 patients. VATS failed in two cases. On an average VATS was performed on trauma day seven (range 1-26 and the length of hospital stay was 20 days (range 3-58. There was no mortality. VATS was performed in an emergency (day 1-2, or in the early (day 2-7 or late (after day 7 phases of trauma. Conclusion: VATS can be performed safely for the management of thoracic traumas. VATS can be performed before or after thoracotomy and at any stage of trauma. The use of VATS in trauma has a trimodal distribution (emergent, early, late, each with different indications.

  3. GPS Fire Vehicle Monitoring and Management System Design and Research%GPS消防车辆监控管理系统设计研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栾涛

    2012-01-01

    首先分析了GPS导航定位技术,然后着重分析了GPS在消防车辆调度中的应用,开发了一套以GPS技术为核心的消防车辆调度监控管理信息系统.该系统管理高效,有效地提高了数字化管理水平,能够合理调度消防车辆,提高企业管理效率,同时节约了开支,实现管理成本和运营成本量化,大大节省运营成本.%This paper first analyzes the CPS navigation and positioning technology, and then focuses on the analysis of GPS in fire fighting vehicle scheduling, develops a set to GPS technology as the core of fire vehicle scheduling and monitoring management information system, the system of efficient management, effectively improve the digital management level, to schedule fire vehicles, improve enterprise management efficiency, at the same lime, save money, to realize the management cost and the operating cost of quantification, greatly saves the operation coat.

  4. Investigation of Lab Fire Prevention Management System of Combining Root Cause Analysis and Analytic Hierarchy Process with Event Tree Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chan Shih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a new approach, combining root cause analysis (RCA, analytic hierarchy process (AHP, and event tree analysis (ETA in a loop to systematically evaluate various laboratory safety prevention strategies. First, 139 fire accidents were reviewed to identify the root causes and draw out prevention strategies. Most fires were caused due to runaway reactions, operation error and equipment failure, and flammable material release. These mostly occurred in working places of no prompt fire protection. We also used AHP to evaluate the priority of these strategies and found that chemical fire prevention strategy is the most important control element, and strengthening maintenance and safety inspection intensity is the most important action. Also together with our surveys results, we proposed that equipment design is also critical for fire prevention. Therefore a technical improvement was propounded: installing fire detector, automatic sprinkler, and manual extinguisher in the lab hood as proactive fire protections. ETA was then used as a tool to evaluate laboratory fire risks. The results indicated that the total risk of a fire occurring decreases from 0.0351 to 0.0042 without/with equipment taking actions. Establishing such system can make Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S office not only analyze and prioritize fire prevention policies more practically, but also demonstrate how effective protective equipment improvement can achieve and the probabilities of the initiating event developing into a serious accident or controlled by the existing safety system.

  5. Supporting FIRE-suppression strategies combining fire spread MODelling and SATellite data in an operational context in Portugal: the FIRE-MODSAT project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Ana C. L.; Benali, Akli; Pinto, Renata M. S.; Pereira, José M. C.; Trigo, Ricardo M.; DaCamara, Carlos C.

    2014-05-01

    Large wildfires are infrequent but account for the most severe environmental, ecological and socio-economic impacts. In recent years Portugal has suffered the impact of major heat waves that fuelled records of burnt area exceeding 400.000ha and 300.000ha in 2003 and 2005, respectively. According to the latest IPCC reports, the frequency and amplitude of summer heat waves over Iberia will very likely increase in the future. Therefore, most climate change studies point to an increase in the number and extent of wildfires. Thus, an increase in both wildfire impacts and fire suppression difficulties is expected. The spread of large wildfires results from a complex interaction between topography, meteorology and fuel properties. Wildfire spread models (e.g. FARSITE) are commonly used to simulate fire growth and behaviour and are an essential tool to understand their main drivers. Additionally, satellite active-fire data have been used to monitor the occurrence, extent, and spread of wildfires. Both satellite data and fire spread models provide different types of information about the spatial and temporal distribution of large wildfires and can potentially be used to support strategic decisions regarding fire suppression resource allocation. However, they have not been combined in a manner that fully exploits their potential and minimizes their limitations. A knowledge gap still exists in understanding how to minimize the impacts of large wildfires, leading to the following research question: What can we learn from past large wildfires in order to mitigate future fire impacts? FIRE-MODSAT is a one-year funded project by the Portuguese Foundation for the Science and Technology (FCT) that is founded on this research question, with the main goal of improving our understanding on the interactions between fire spread and its environmental drivers, to support fire management decisions in an operational context and generate valuable information to improve the efficiency of the

  6. Gallstone ileus with jejunum perforation managed with laparoscopic-assisted surgery: rare case report and minimal invasive management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Hung; Yin, Wen-Yao; Chen, Jian-Han

    2015-05-01

    Gallstone ileus is an uncommon complication of cholelithiasis. Most patients affected by gallstone ileus are elderly and have multiple comorbidities. Symptoms are vague and insidious, which may delay the correct diagnosis for days. Here we are reporting an uncommon complication of gallstone ileus. We report on a 70-year-old man with small bowel obstruction at the jejunum due to an impacted stone, which led to necrosis and perforation of the proximal bowel wall. Laparoscope-assisted small bowel resection with enterolithotomy was used to successfully treat the patient's perforation and obstruction. His recovery was uneventful. Gallstone ileus commonly presents with bowel obstruction, but intestinal perforation occurs very rarely. A laparoscopic approach can provide both diagnostic and therapeutic roles in management.

  7. Chapter 1: Fire and fuels reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.M. Collins; S.L. Stephens

    2012-01-01

    Fire will continue to be a major management challenge in mixed-conifer forests in the Sierra Nevada. Fire is a fundamental ecosystem process in these forests that was largely eliminated in the 20th century. Fire reintroduction is a critical goal but is subject to constraints such as smoke production, risk of fire moving outside designated boundaries, the expanding...

  8. Fire phenomena and nonlinearity (II). Catastrophic fire dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Z. [University of Science and Technology, Hefei (China). State Key Laboratory of Fire Science

    2000-09-01

    As one of the most important non-linear mechanisms to cause fire or exacerbate fire disaster, there is a great deal of catastrophe behaviours existing in fire processes. The main tasks of the study of catastrophic fire dynamics are: 1) analysis of the catastrophe mechanisms of discontinuity behaviours in fire systems; 2) investigation of the controlling methods of discontinuity behaviours of fire system; 3) qualitative analysis of the dynamical characteristics of fire systems; and 4) catastrophe classifying of discontinuity phenomena in fire system. The other disciplines, such as physics, chemistry, biology, geoscience, astronomy, or even social sciences (for instance, political, economics, strategics and management science), may also take the similar method to establish the corresponding branch discipline of catastrophe science and catastrophe classification method. It is pointed out that an ignition behaviour of the uniform temperature thermal explosion system under the control of radiation has cusp catastrophe mechanism. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  9. 加强对消防装备管理和使用的思考%Strengthen the Management and Use of Fire Equipment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张璐

    2016-01-01

    消防装备是部队战斗力的重要组成部分,也是消防部队实施灭火的重要武器,是决定灭火战斗成败的一个主要因素。笔者因为工作需要,也为全面掌握消防装备器材的配备情况,对所在单位装备管理进行全面摸排,并分析对日常装备管理、使用的思考。%Fire fighting equipment is an important part of the armed forces, and it is also an important weapon to carry out the fire fighting. It is a main factor to determine the success or failure of the fire fighting. The author because of the work needs, also for a comprehensive grasp of the equipment and equipment of fire equipment, the location of the unit equipment management to carry out a comprehensive, and analysis of daily equipment management, use of thinking.

  10. Demographic trends in the Eastern US and the wildland urban interface: implications for fire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Stanturf; Michael C. Wimberly

    2013-01-01

    Over the last century, the United States has evolved from a predominantly rural to an urbanized society with an exurban area currently referred to as the wildland urban interface (WUI). This WUI is critical as it occupies three to five times as much land area as urban areas with emerging and latent conflicts between traditional resource management and preferences of...

  11. Understanding coastal processes to assist with coastal erosion management in Darwin Harbour, Northern Territory, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonyes, S. G.; Wasson, R. J.; Munksgaard, N. C.; Evans, K. G.; Brinkman, R.; Williams, D. K.

    2017-02-01

    Sand transport pathways in Darwin Harbour, Northern Territory, Australia, are being investigated to assist with coastal management. Coastal erosion, which threatens public and private infrastructure, is one of the major problems along the harbour beaches. A study of sediment transport is essential to identify the challenges encountered by the stakeholders in coastal management. Darwin Harbour, located in the tropical, cyclone prone area of Australia, was, until recently, considered a near pristine estuary. A semi-diurnal macro-tidal embayment, the tidal variation in the harbour reaches up to 8 m with a mean tidal range of 3.7 m. The beach morphology consists of sandy pocket beaches between coastal cliffs, sandbars, rocky shore platforms, tidal flats and mangrove fringes. A two-dimensional depth averaged finite-element hydrodynamic model (RMA-2), coupled with a sediment transport model (RMA-11) from Resource Modelling Associates, has been used to infer the sources and the depositional areas of sand in the harbour. Grain size distributions and geochemical analysis are also used to characterize the sand and its source(s). Initial results show that the beach sand is mostly of offshore origin with small sand input from the rivers. Potential supplementary sand sources are the eroded materials from the shore platforms and the rocky cliffs. Due to the rapid development in Darwin Harbour, this study is fundamental in understanding coastal processes to support decision making in coastal management, particularly in a macro-tidal, tropical estuary.

  12. A Research on Determination of Individual Career Goals of the Students in Office Management and Assistance Manager Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezgi CEVHER

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The majority of the students spend their time on making plans for their education and career. The career planning process varies for each student according to their experiences, interests, abilities and values. The students' awareness about their career aims at the first or last period of their education is an important factor in managing their future. In career planning, the aim which is desired to be achieved is put forth with the help of the curriculum vitae in line with the interest and expectations. The curriculum vitae is a presentation about the person's education, work experience, fields of interests, career aims, the owned skills and about the things what the person wants to do in the future. In the research the curriculum vitae of the students were examined according to content analysis in order to identify and determine the career plans of the students attending the department of office management and executive assistant. The students were especially asked to specify their” aims and objectives, fields of interests, past experiences”, and these curriculum vitaes were subjected to evaluation within the scope of “career planning steps”. The obtained findings revealed the self-awareness, knowledge skills and experiences of the students attending this department, whether they made researches about their career options or not. The universities offered suggestions by taking the “career development efforts” into consideration in order to shape the students' career plans and to help them determine their career aims.

  13. Successful Management of Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage Associated with Ischaemic Colonic Ulceration in Acute Pancreatitis with Video Assisted Retroperitoneal Debridement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Puri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Colonic involvement is an uncommon but potentially lethal complication of severe acute pancreatitis and has received little attention in the surgical literature. Such complications can range from localized colonic pathology to widespread ischaemic pancolitis. Treatment options have historically been limited to resection of the affected segment. Case report We describe the successful role of video assisted retroperitoneal pancreatic debridement in the management of two cases presenting with major gastrointestinal haemorrhage due to localised colonic ulceration on the background of acute necrotising pancreatitis. Conclusion Video assisted retroperitoneal debridement should be considered early in the management of local colonic complications associated with severe acute necrotising pancreatitis.

  14. Mathematical optimization techniques for managing selective catalytic reduction for a fleet of coal-fired power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanis Pena, Antonio Alejandro

    Major commercial electricity generation is done by burning fossil fuels out of which coal-fired power plants produce a substantial quantity of electricity worldwide. The United States has large reserves of coal, and it is cheaply available, making it a good choice for the generation of electricity on a large scale. However, one major problem associated with using coal for combustion is that it produces a group of pollutants known as nitrogen oxides (NO x). NOx are strong oxidizers and contribute to ozone formation and respiratory illness. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates the quantity of NOx emitted to the atmosphere in the United States. One technique coal-fired power plants use to reduce NOx emissions is Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR). SCR uses layers of catalyst that need to be added or changed to maintain the required performance. Power plants do add or change catalyst layers during temporary shutdowns, but it is expensive. However, many companies do not have only one power plant, but instead they can have a fleet of coal-fired power plants. A fleet of power plants can use EPA cap and trade programs to have an outlet NOx emission below the allowances for the fleet. For that reason, the main aim of this research is to develop an SCR management mathematical optimization methods that, with a given set of scheduled outages for a fleet of power plants, minimizes the total cost of the entire fleet of power plants and also maintain outlet NO x below the desired target for the entire fleet. We use a multi commodity network flow problem (MCFP) that creates edges that represent all the SCR catalyst layers for each plant. This MCFP is relaxed because it does not consider average daily NOx constraint, and it is solved by a binary integer program. After that, we add the average daily NOx constraint to the model with a schedule elimination constraint (MCFPwSEC). The MCFPwSEC eliminates, one by one, the solutions that do not satisfy the average daily

  15. Context management: toward assessing quality of context parameters in a ubiquitous ambient assisted living environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Cabral Nazário

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an approach to assessing Quality of Context (QoC parameters in a ubiquitous Ambient Assisted Living (AAL environment. Initially, the study presents a literature review on QoC, generating taxonomy. Then it introduces the context management architecture used. The proposal is verified with the Siafu simulator in an AAL scenario where the user’s health is monitored with information about blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature. Considering some parameters, the proposed QoC assessment allows verifying the extent to which the context information is up-to-date, valid, accurate, complete and significant. The implementation of this proposal might mean a big social impact and a technological innovation applied to AAL, at the disposal and support of a significant number of individuals such as elderly or sick people, and with a more precise technology.

  16. Biofeedback Assisted Stress Management in Patients with Lung Cancer: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Benjamin R; Grossman, Elizabeth F; Bolwell, Gregory; Reynard, Alison K; Pennell, Nathan A; Moravec, Christine S; McKee, Michael G

    2015-09-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related death for men and women in the United States. NSCLC causes a variety of symptoms which result in significant distress and reduced quality of life for patients. Behavioral and other non-pharmacologic treatment interventions for NSCLC have resulted in improved quality of life, reduced emotional distress, and improved longevity. This study investigates the feasibility and effectiveness of biofeedback assisted stress management (BFSM) to reduce stress in patients with NSCLC. Because of patient dropout, this study was terminated prematurely. Despite this, evaluation of data revealed positive trends, with patients learning to reduce their stress, improve their respiration and heart rate variability, and improve coping. These trends suggest that patients with NSCLC can learn to self-regulate physiology and BFSM may be useful for them, although a less ill patient population may be desirable for future investigations.

  17. Integrated Management of Secondary Fire Caused by Small Kiln Fires%煤矿次生火灾的综合治理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李强强

    2014-01-01

    Small kiln compete with the big mining resources,mining original pillar,causing gob oxygen for long -term wind before Integration of resources.The spontaneous combusted in gob will make a large number of toxic and harmful gases through air leakage channels into large mine,and could serious threaten to mine safety and worker safety.Gob secondary event of fire and CO gas escaped happened in Datong Coal Mine Group affected by small kiln mine fire. However,it had been timely treatment and summarizes the corresponding measures.Due to the success from the 8913 fire area face removed 86 brackets,it saved 15.48 million Yuan,and guaranteeing that the centralized system of coal mine belt running.%在资源整合前,小窑与大矿争资源,开采原有煤柱,导致采空区长期供风供氧。采空区一旦发生自燃火灾,大量有毒有害气体将通过漏风通道进入大矿,严重威胁矿井安全和职工人身安全。某矿曾受小窑火灾影响发生采空区次生火灾及 CO气体泄出事件,但都得到及时治理并总结了相应措施。由于成功从工作面火区撤下86个支架,减少损失1548万元,同时保证了全矿运煤系统集中皮带的正常运行。

  18. Modeling the spatial distribution of forest crown biomass and effects on fire behavior with FUEL3D and WFDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell A. Parsons; William Mell; Peter McCauley

    2010-01-01

    Crown fire poses challenges to fire managers and can endanger fire fighters. Understanding of how fire interacts with tree crowns is essential to informed decisions about crown fire. Current operational crown fire predictions in the United States assume homogeneous crown fuels. While a new class of research fire models, which model fire behavior with computational...

  19. Preliminary results of fire behavior in maquis fuels under varying weather and slope conditions in turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulent Saglam; Ertugrul Bilgili; Omer Kucuk; Bahar Dinc Durmaz; Ismail Baysal

    2007-01-01

    The prediction of fire behavior is of vital importance to all fire management planning and decisionmaking processes including fire prevention, presuppression planning, and fire use. The effect of slope on fire behavior is well acknowledged, yet its effect on fire behavior is not well accounted for. Determining the effects of slope on fire behavior under field...

  20. Social science to improve fuels management: a synthesis of research on the impacts of wildland fires on communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen F. McCool; James Burchfield; Daniel R. Williams; Matt Carroll; Patricia Cohn; Yoshitaka Kumagai; Tam Ubben

    2007-01-01

    A series of syntheses were commissioned by the U.S. Forest Service to aid in fuels mitigation project planning. Focusing on research on the social impacts of wildland fire, this synthesis explores decisions and actions taken by communities before, during, and after a wildland fire to minimize its impacts. It then synthesizes the research studying (1) the consequences...

  1. Distribution and demographics of Ailanthus altissima in an oak forest landscape managed with timber harvesting and prescribed fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joanne Rebbeck; Todd Hutchinson; Louis Iverson; Daniel Yaussy; Timothy Fox

    2017-01-01

    Ailanthus altissima ((Mill.) Swingle, tree-of-heaven), an exotic invasive tree that is common throughout much of the eastern United States, can invade and expand dramatically when forests are disturbed. Anecdotal evidence suggests that fire facilitates its spread, but the relationship between fire and this prolific invasive tree is poorly...

  2. Examine the Relationship between Self-Efficacy Perception and Organizational Citizenship Behavior of Managers and Assistants (Case Study:School’s Managers And Assistants Of Zabarkhan Area Of Neyshabur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Mahrughy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-efficacy perception and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB of Zabarkhan’s schools managers and assistants. the sample size, the proportion of community members (220 persons 140 deputy from assistant and managers are working in schools. To determine the number of multi-stage cluster sampling method was used. for data collection and measurement variables was used from Podsakoff questionnaire and a questionnaire to feeling self-Scherrer and calligues. to describe data, descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation coefficient was used to analyze the data. the results showed that the sense of self-efficacy and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB is positive and meaningful correlation among the Zabarkhan’s school administrators and assistants. The result show that there is relationship between OCB with some personality variables such as feelings of selfefficacy

  3. On the Problems of the Municipal Gas Fire Safety Management%城市燃气消防安全管理存在问题探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高臣勇

    2012-01-01

    对目前燃气消防安全管理方面存在的问题进行了深入的研究、分析,指出当前我国燃气消防安全管理主要存在安全管理机制不适应燃气产业市场经济发展,相关法制建设滞后,规范、标准不健全,设计、建审和验收可操作性不强,日常运行管理不完善,应急处置能力不强,从业人员素质不高,保险行业未介入安全管理等问题,应引起重视。%This paper analyzes the problems with the municipal gas fire safety management, pointing out that the gas fire safety manangement is inadequate with the development of gas consumption markets. The standard and regula- tions are fall behind the fas fire safety management. The design and building check are impractical. The routine management is poor and unable to deal with emergencies.

  4. Conserving and promoting evenness: organic farming and fire-based wildland management as case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowder, David W; Northfield, Tobin D; Gomulkiewicz, Richard; Snyderi, William E

    2012-09-01

    Healthy ecosystems include many species (high richness) with similar abundances (high evenness). Thus, both aspects of biodiversity are worthy of conservation. Simultaneously conserving richness and evenness might be difficult, however, if, for example, the restoration of previously absent species to low densities brings a cost in reduced evenness. Using meta-analysis, we searched for benefits to biodiversity following adoption of two common land-management schemes: the implementation of organic practices by farmers and of controlled burning by natural-land managers. We used rarefaction to eliminate sampling bias in all of our estimates of richness and evenness. Both conservation practices significantly increased evenness and overall abundance across taxonomic classifications (arthropods, birds, non-bird vertebrates, plants, soil organisms). Evenness and richness varied independently, leading to no richness-evenness correlation and no significant overall change in richness. Demonstrating the importance of rarefaction, analyses of raw data that did not receive rarefaction indicated misleadingly strong benefits of organic agriculture and burning for richness while underestimating true gains in evenness. Both organic farming and burning favored species that were not numerically dominant, re-balancing communities as uncommon species gained individuals. Our results support the assertion that richness and evenness capture separate facets of biodiversity, each needing individual attention during conservation.

  5. Assistive Technology as a Self-Management Tool for Prompting Students with Intellectual Disabilities to Initiate and Complete Daily Tasks: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a review of the empirical literature (1990-2005) focusing on use of assistive technology as a self-management tool for persons with intellectual disabilities. Forty investigations were identified which provided information on assistive technology to assist persons with disabilities to initiate and complete…

  6. Coal-fired generation

    CERN Document Server

    Breeze, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Coal-Fired Generation is a concise, up-to-date and readable guide providing an introduction to this traditional power generation technology. It includes detailed descriptions of coal fired generation systems, demystifies the coal fired technology functions in practice as well as exploring the economic and environmental risk factors. Engineers, managers, policymakers and those involved in planning and delivering energy resources will find this reference a valuable guide, to help establish a reliable power supply address social and economic objectives. Focuses on the evolution of the traditio

  7. Assessing the risk of ignition in the Russian far east within a modeling framework of fire threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loboda, Tatiana V; Csiszar, Ivan A

    2007-04-01

    The forests of high biological importance in the Russian Far East (RFE) have been experiencing increasing pressure from growing demands for natural resources under the changing economy of post-Soviet Russia. This pressure is further amplified by the rising threat of large and catastrophic fire occurrence, which threatens both the resources and the economic potential of the region. In this paper we introduce a conceptual Fire Threat Model (FTM) and use it to provide quantitative assessment of the risk of ignition in the Russian Far East. The remotely sensed data driven FTM is aimed at evaluating potential wildland fire occurrence and its impact and recovery potential for a given resource. This model is intended for use by resource managers to assist in assessing current levels of fire threat to a given resource, projecting the changes in fire threat under changing climate and land use, and evaluating the efficiency of various management approaches aimed at minimizing the fire impact. Risk of ignition (one of the major uncertainties within fire threat modeling) was analyzed using the MODIS active fire product. The risk of ignition in the RFE is shown to be highly variable in spatial and temporal domains. However, the number of ignition points is not directly proportional to the amount of fire occurrence in the area. Fire ignitions in the RFE are strongly linked to anthropogenic activity (transportation routes, settlements, and land use). An increase in the number of fire ignitions during summer months could be attributed to (1) disruption of the summer monsoons and subsequent changes in fire weather and (2) an increase in natural sources of fire ignitions.

  8. Persuasive robotic assistant for health self-management of older adults: Design and evaluation of social behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looije, R.; Neerincx, M.A.; Cnossen, F.

    2010-01-01

    Daily health self-management, such as the harmonization of food, exercise and medication, is a major problem for a large group of older adults with obesity or diabetics. Computer-based personal assistance can help to behave healthy by persuading and guiding older adults. For effective persuasion, th

  9. Persuasive robotic assistant for health self-management of older adults : Design and evaluation of social behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looije, Rosemarijn; Neerincx, Mark A.; Cnossen, Fokie

    2010-01-01

    Daily health self-management, such as the harmonization of food, exercise and medication, is a major problem for a large group of older adults with obesity or diabetics Computer-based personal assistance can help to behave healthy by persuading and guiding older adults For effective persuasion, the

  10. Persuasive robotic assistant for health self-management of older adults : Design and evaluation of social behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looije, Rosemarijn; Neerincx, Mark A.; Cnossen, Fokie

    2010-01-01

    Daily health self-management, such as the harmonization of food, exercise and medication, is a major problem for a large group of older adults with obesity or diabetics Computer-based personal assistance can help to behave healthy by persuading and guiding older adults For effective persuasion, the

  11. Persuasive robotic assistant for health self-management of older adults: Design and evaluation of social behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looije, R.; Neerincx, M.A.; Cnossen, F.

    2010-01-01

    Daily health self-management, such as the harmonization of food, exercise and medication, is a major problem for a large group of older adults with obesity or diabetics. Computer-based personal assistance can help to behave healthy by persuading and guiding older adults. For effective persuasion, th

  12. Persuasive robotic assistant for health self-management of older adults : Design and evaluation of social behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looije, Rosemarijn; Neerincx, Mark A.; Cnossen, Fokie

    Daily health self-management, such as the harmonization of food, exercise and medication, is a major problem for a large group of older adults with obesity or diabetics Computer-based personal assistance can help to behave healthy by persuading and guiding older adults For effective persuasion, the

  13. Persuasive robotic assistant for health self-management of older adults: Design and evaluation of social behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looije, R.; Neerincx, M.A.; Cnossen, F.

    2010-01-01

    Daily health self-management, such as the harmonization of food, exercise and medication, is a major problem for a large group of older adults with obesity or diabetics. Computer-based personal assistance can help to behave healthy by persuading and guiding older adults. For effective persuasion,

  14. An Evaluation of Farm Management and Agricultural Marketing Microcomputer-Assisted Instruction in Training Vocational Agriculture Instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trede, Larry D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A study found that there is a significant difference in student achievement when teaching farm management and agricultural marketing concepts and problem solving with microcomputer-assisted instruction as compared to the lecture-discussion teaching method; and that there is little difference in achievement when comparing teachers' knowledge and…

  15. Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program: 2013 Research accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith Ann Heinsch; Robin J. Innes; Colin C. Hardy; Kristine M. Lee

    2014-01-01

    The Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program (FFS) of the U.S. Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, focuses on fundamental and applied research in wildland fire, from fire physics and fire ecology to fuels management and smoke emissions. Located at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory in Montana, the scientists, engineers, technicians, and support staff in...

  16. IceVal DatAssistant: An Interactive, Automated Icing Data Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Laurie H.; Wright, William B.

    2008-01-01

    As with any scientific endeavor, the foundation of icing research at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is the data acquired during experimental testing. In the case of the GRC Icing Branch, an important part of this data consists of ice tracings taken following tests carried out in the GRC Icing Research Tunnel (IRT), as well as the associated operational and environmental conditions documented during these tests. Over the years, the large number of experimental runs completed has served to emphasize the need for a consistent strategy for managing this data. To address the situation, the Icing Branch has recently elected to implement the IceVal DatAssistant automated data management system. With the release of this system, all publicly available IRT-generated experimental ice shapes with complete and verifiable conditions have now been compiled into one electronically-searchable database. Simulation software results for the equivalent conditions, generated using the latest version of the LEWICE ice shape prediction code, are likewise included and are linked to the corresponding experimental runs. In addition to this comprehensive database, the IceVal system also includes a graphically-oriented database access utility, which provides reliable and easy access to all data contained in the database. In this paper, the issues surrounding historical icing data management practices are discussed, as well as the anticipated benefits to be achieved as a result of migrating to the new system. A detailed description of the software system features and database content is also provided; and, finally, known issues and plans for future work are presented.

  17. Thrombosis in continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices: pathophysiology, prevention, and pharmacologic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Douglas L; Weeks, Phillip A

    2015-01-01

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices reduce short-term mortality and improve quality of life in patients with end-stage heart failure. Unfortunately, device-related complications remain common, with many patients experiencing adverse events within the first year. New literature suggests that rates of device-related thrombosis may be increasing since 2011, which is particularly troublesome given that this pathology can result in a disabling stroke, organ damage, and death. In 2013, a group of practitioners in the field of mechanical circulatory support published a treatment algorithm based on their expert opinion. However, a comprehensive review of the pharmacotherapy of this condition is lacking. A search of the literature revealed 20 separate publications of case reports or case series describing outcomes associated with the use of drug therapy for suspected pump thrombosis. Each of these experiences was limited by small sample size, nonrandomized treatment allocation, and nonstandardized medication dosing. Data describing the outcomes of surgical versus medical management of device thrombosis are also sparse, with only three published reports identified. Based on the review of this limited literature, surgical management appears to be the preferred treatment modality, especially in those with organ hypoperfusion or hemodynamic instability. In patients ineligible for surgery, pharmacotherapy options remain limited. Use of all drug classes described in the literature for the HeartMate II device-fibrinolytics, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors, and direct thrombin inhibitors-was hindered by either marginal efficacy or bleeding. Based on historical experience with unfractionated heparin in patients under HeartMate II support, we recommend this agent as a possible option for those with suspected pump thrombosis in lieu of surgical device exchange. For the HeartWare HVAD, limited data suggest that direct intraventricular administration of alteplase may be an

  18. Standard fire behavior fuel models: a comprehensive set for use with Rothermel's surface fire spread model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe H. Scott; Robert E. Burgan

    2005-01-01

    This report describes a new set of standard fire behavior fuel models for use with Rothermel's surface fire spread model and the relationship of the new set to the original set of 13 fire behavior fuel models. To assist with transition to using the new fuel models, a fuel model selection guide, fuel model crosswalk, and set of fuel model photos are provided.

  19. Three studies on ponderosa pine management on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation: stocking control in uneven-aged stands, forest products from fire-damage trees, and fuels reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    John V. Arena

    2005-01-01

    Over 60,000 acres of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa P. and C. Lawson) forest on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation (WSIR) in Oregon are managed using an uneven-age system. Three on-going studies on WSIR address current issues in the management of pine forests: determining levels of growing stock for uneven-age management, fire effects on wood...

  20. Science framework for conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome: Linking the Department of the Interior’s Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy to long-term strategic conservation actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.C. Chambers; J.L. Beck; J.B. Bradford; J. Bybee; S. Campbell; J. Carlson; T.J. Christiansen; K.J. Clause; G. Collins; M.R. Crist; J.B. Dinkins; K.E. Doherty; F. Edwards; S. Espinosa; K.A. Griffin; P. Griffin; J.R. Haas; S.E. Hanser; D.W. Havlina; K.F. Henke; J.D. Hennig; L.A. Joyce; F.M. Kilkenny; S.M. Kulpa; L.L. Kurth; J.D. Maestas; M. Manning; K.E. Mayer; B.A. Mealor; C. McCarthy; M. Pellant; M.A. Perea; K.L. Prentice; D.A. Pyke; L.A. Wiechman; A. Wuenschel

    2017-01-01

    The Science Framework is intended to link the Department of the Interior’s Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy with long-term strategic conservation actions in the sagebrush biome. The Science Framework provides a multiscale approach for prioritizing areas for management and determining effective management strategies within the sagebrush biome. The emphasis...

  1. Endoscopic-Assisted Scleral Fixated IOL in the Management of Secondary Aphakia in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Hossam Eldin; Haroun, Hazem Effat; El Deeb, Mohamed Wagieh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the short-term postoperative outcomes in endoscopic-assisted sclera fixation intraocular lens (IOL) for the management of secondary aphakia in children. Methods. This is a prospective study, whereas 40 aphakic eyes with absence of a good capsular support were implanted by endoscopy-assisted sclera fixation technique. Results. No major intraoperative complications were recorded. All cases were followed up for 6 months. Only transient ocular hypertension occurred in 10 (25%) eyes. Lens decentration and/or tilting were clinically detected in 2 eyes (5%). Ultrasonic biomicroscopic (UBM) examination revealed lens tilting in 2 (5%) of the operated eyes, despite the proper haptics positioning in the ciliary sulcus. Postoperative vitreous hemorrhage was reported in 5 eyes (12.5%) in the early postoperative period and retinal detachment in one eye. A postoperative refractive astigmatism ranging from 0.75 D to 3.75 D (mean 1.7 D ± 0.79) was recorded, as compared to mean preoperative values of 2.00 D, with no statistically significant differences being recorded (p ≥ 0.05). An improvement of BCVA, 1-2 lines on Snellen chart at the end of the follow-up period, was detected in 23 eyes (57.5%) with a mean of 0.6 ± 0.08 SD, as compared to a preoperative mean values of 0.5 ± 0.07 SD (p ≥ 0.05). Conclusion. Using an endoscope for transscleral suturing of intraocular lenses in aphakic pediatric eyes might be considered as being an effective technique that can reduce surgical complications, especially postoperative lens decentration. PMID:27595016

  2. Endoscopic-Assisted Scleral Fixated IOL in the Management of Secondary Aphakia in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba A. El Gendy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the short-term postoperative outcomes in endoscopic-assisted sclera fixation intraocular lens (IOL for the management of secondary aphakia in children. Methods. This is a prospective study, whereas 40 aphakic eyes with absence of a good capsular support were implanted by endoscopy-assisted sclera fixation technique. Results. No major intraoperative complications were recorded. All cases were followed up for 6 months. Only transient ocular hypertension occurred in 10 (25% eyes. Lens decentration and/or tilting were clinically detected in 2 eyes (5%. Ultrasonic biomicroscopic (UBM examination revealed lens tilting in 2 (5% of the operated eyes, despite the proper haptics positioning in the ciliary sulcus. Postoperative vitreous hemorrhage was reported in 5 eyes (12.5% in the early postoperative period and retinal detachment in one eye. A postoperative refractive astigmatism ranging from 0.75 D to 3.75 D (mean 1.7 D ± 0.79 was recorded, as compared to mean preoperative values of 2.00 D, with no statistically significant differences being recorded (p≥0.05. An improvement of BCVA, 1-2 lines on Snellen chart at the end of the follow-up period, was detected in 23 eyes (57.5% with a mean of 0.6±0.08 SD, as compared to a preoperative mean values of 0.5±0.07 SD (p≥0.05. Conclusion. Using an endoscope for transscleral suturing of intraocular lenses in aphakic pediatric eyes might be considered as being an effective technique that can reduce surgical complications, especially postoperative lens decentration.

  3. Fire protection system management in nuclear facilities: strengthening factor of integrated management system - a case study; Gestao de sistema de protecao contra incendio em instalacoes nucleares: fator de fortalecimento do sistema de gestao integrada - um estudo de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Joao Regis dos

    2005-07-01

    The present study investigated and analyzed the importance of a system of integrated safety manage, environment and health in a nuclear installation, having as perspective, the fire protection manage. The inquiry was made using a qualitative research involving a case study, where the considered environment was the Reconversion and UO{sub 2} Plant of the Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), located in Resende, Rio de Janeiro and the studied population, the managers and the staff directly involved with the aspects related to the safety of the industrial complex of the related company. The motivation for the research was the search of a bigger interaction of the questions related to the safety, environment and health in the nuclear industry having, as axle of the investigation, the fire protection. As a result, it was observed that in a nuclear installation, although dealing with diversified safety processes, integration is possible and necessary, since there are more reasons for integration than otherwise. (author)

  4. 构建服务型消防行政管理模式的对策思考%Measures for service-oriented Management Mode of Fire Administration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李云波

    2011-01-01

    改革开放和社会进步,给消防工作的发展提供了难得的机遇和挑战。强化政府消防行政职能,改善消防安全环境,构建服务型消防管理新模式成为社会发展的必然。本文分析了当前政府在消防行政管理中存在的问题,从消防行政管理理念、消防监督模式以及消防工作机制等方面给出了构建服务型消防行政管理模式的对策。%The Reform and Opening up and social progress provide precious opportunity and challenge for the fire services. Strengthening the administrative functions of the fire services, inproving fire safety environment, and building new mode for fire service management are necessary for social development. This paper analyzes the problems existing in the current fire administration from fire service administrative concept, fire supervision and fire prevention mechanisms, and put forward measures of constructing service-oriented administration patterns of fire services.

  5. US Fire Administration Fire Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The U.S. Fire Administration collects data from a variety of sources to provide information and analyses on the status and scope of the fire problem in the United...

  6. General radiation management situation at the first stage of accident occurrence. Fire and explosion of asphalt solidification processing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kimio; Shimizu, Takehiko; Ishiguro, Shuji [Health and Safety Division, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Fire accident in the cell of Asphalt Solidification Processing Facility (ASP) in PNC took placed at 10:06 a.m., March 11, 1997. Explosion accident occurred subsequently in the ASP at 8:04 p.m. of the day about 10 hours later. The accident which included loss of confinement function of the cell, release of radioactive materials to the working environment, evacuation of many workers, radioactive materials intake of the workers, alarm of many radiation monitoring system, diffusion of radiation materials to off-site, required the radiation management division to take a prompt and wide-ranging protective action. No one was inflicted an external injury by the accident. The workers who inhaled a few radioactive materials, such as Cs-137, were 37 in number. The maximum committed effective dose equivalent or a person was estimated 0.4-1.6 mSv, taking account of the effects of alpha-ray emission nuclides. Radioactive materials were released outside through the raptured windows of the facility. Radioactive nuclides, such as Cs, Sr, Pu, and Am were detected in site by the environmental monitoring. A small quantity of Cs was detected in the aerosols of Oarai area, where is located at about 20 km south-south-west distant from the accidental site. The total amount of effluent throughout the accident was estimated about 1-4 GBq for {beta}-ray emission nuclides, excluding C-14, and about 1x10{sup -4}-4 x 10{sup -3} GBq for {alpha}-ray emission nuclides. The maximum committed effective dose equivalent for the general public was estimated about 1x10{sup -3}-2 x 10{sup -2} mSv. (M. Suetake)

  7. General radiation management situation at the first stage of accident occurrence. Fire and explosion of asphalt solidification processing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kimio; Shimizu, Takehiko; Ishiguro, Shuji [Health and Safety Division, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Fire accident in the cell of Asphalt Solidification Processing Facility (ASP) in PNC took placed at 10:06 a.m., March 11, 1997. Explosion accident occurred subsequently in the ASP at 8:04 p.m. of the day about 10 hours later. The accident which included loss of confinement function of the cell, release of radioactive materials to the working environment, evacuation of many workers, radioactive materials intake of the workers, alarm of many radiation monitoring system, diffusion of radiation materials to off-site, required the radiation management division to take a prompt and wide-ranging protective action. No one was inflicted an external injury by the accident. The workers who inhaled a few radioactive materials, such as Cs-137, were 37 in number. The maximum committed effective dose equivalent or a person was estimated 0.4-1.6 mSv, taking account of the effects of alpha-ray emission nuclides. Radioactive materials were released outside through the raptured windows of the facility. Radioactive nuclides, such as Cs, Sr, Pu, and Am were detected in site by the environmental monitoring. A small quantity of Cs was detected in the aerosols of Oarai area, where is located at about 20 km south-south-west distant from the accidental site. The total amount of effluent throughout the accident was estimated about 1-4 GBq for {beta}-ray emission nuclides, excluding C-14, and about 1x10{sup -4}-4 x 10{sup -3} GBq for {alpha}-ray emission nuclides. The maximum committed effective dose equivalent for the general public was estimated about 1x10{sup -3}-2 x 10{sup -2} mSv. (M. Suetake)

  8. Investigation of Lab Fire Prevention Management System of Combining Root Cause Analysis and Analytic Hierarchy Process with Event Tree Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Chan Shih; Horng, Richard S.; Shin-Ku Lee

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposed a new approach, combining root cause analysis (RCA), analytic hierarchy process (AHP), and event tree analysis (ETA) in a loop to systematically evaluate various laboratory safety prevention strategies. First, 139 fire accidents were reviewed to identify the root causes and draw out prevention strategies. Most fires were caused due to runaway reactions, operation error and equipment failure, and flammable material release. These mostly occurred in working places of no prom...

  9. A GIS-based decision support system for determining the shortest and safest route to forest fires: a case study in Mediterranean Region of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Abdullah E; Wing, Michael G; Sivrikaya, Fatih; Sakar, Dursun

    2012-03-01

    The ability of firefighting vehicles and staff to reach a fire area as quickly as possible is critical in fighting against forest fires. In this study, a Geographical Information System-based decision support system was developed to assist fire managers in determining the fastest and the safest or more reliable access routes from firefighting headquarters to fire areas. The decision support system was tested in the Kahramanmaras Forestry Regional Directoratein the Mediterranean region of Turkey. The study area consisted of forested lands which had been classified according to fire sensitivity. The fire response routing simulations considered firefighting teams located in 20 firefighting headquarter locations. The road network, the locations of the firefighting headquarters, and possible fire locations were mapped for simulation analysis. In alternative application simulations, inaccessible roads which might be closed due to fire or other reasons were indicated in the network analysis so that the optimum route was not only the fastest but also the safest and most reliable path. The selection of which firefighting headquarters to use was evaluated by considering critical response time to potential fire areas based on fire sensitivity levels. Results indicated that new firefighting headquarters should be established in the region in order to provide sufficient firefighting response to all forested lands. In addition, building new fire access roads and increasing the design speed on current roads could also increase firefighting response capabilities within the study area.

  10. Teaching the teacher program to assist nurse managers to educate nursing staff in Ecuadorian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Sheri P; Heaston, Sondra

    2009-03-01

    Continuing education for hospital staff nurses is a concern worldwide. Current research shows that continuing education among nurses can positively affect patient outcomes (O'Brien, T., Freemantle, N., Oxman, A, et al., 2002. Interactive continuing education workshops or conferences can improve professional practice and patient outcomes. Journal of Evidence Based Nursing. 26 (5)). Seeing a need for improved patient outcomes among hospitals in Ecuador, we conducted a teaching the teacher program to assist nurse managers to carry-out continuing education in their hospital system. This teaching the teacher program was established through the collaboration between one College of Nursing in Utah, USA and a large healthcare system in Guayaquil, Ecuador. The collaboration has been ongoing for five years, 2003 to present. Initial projects included classes for the nursing staff including technical skills, life-saving techniques, and nursing process and assessment. Collaborators from the US and Ecuador believed that in order to maximize the improvement of nursing care in the hospital system it was necessary to turn attention on the nurse managers and not just the staff nurses. This would allow for meaningful ongoing learning beyond the one-time classroom setting. Continuing education is not common in Ecuadorian hospitals as it is in the United States. The purpose of this paper is to describe the project and provide initial evaluative data on the response to the curriculum; including evidence of managers using the teaching principles they were taught. The underlying aim of the project was to achieve a sustainable impact by teaching the leaders of each unit how to be more effective teachers. In May 2007, a two-day "teaching the teacher" workshop was developed with the needs of the managers in mind. The participants in the course included the chief nursing officer and leaders of various units of the hospital. In May 2008 a follow-up class was taught, along with an evaluation by

  11. Post-fire vegetation and fuel development influences fire severity patterns in reburns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppoletta, Michelle; Merriam, Kyle E; Collins, Brandon M

    2016-04-01

    In areas where fire regimes and forest structure have been dramatically altered, there is increasing concern that contemporary fires have the potential to set forests on a positive feedback trajectory with successive reburns, one in which extensive stand-replacing fire could promote more stand-replacing fire. Our study utilized an extensive set of field plots established following four fires that occurred between 2000 and 2010 in the northern Sierra Nevada, California, USA that were subsequently reburned in 2012. The information obtained from these field plots allowed for a unique set of analyses investigating the effect of vegetation, fuels, topography, fire weather, and forest management on reburn severity. We also examined the influence of initial fire severity and time since initial fire on influential predictors of reburn severity. Our results suggest that high- to moderate-severity fire in the initial fires led to an increase in standing snags and shrub vegetation, which in combination with severe fire weather promoted high-severity fire effects in the subsequent reburn. Although fire behavior is largely driven by weather, our study demonstrates that post-fire vegetation composition and structure are also important drivers of reburn severity. In the face of changing climatic regimes and increases in extreme fire weather, these results may provide managers with options to create more fire-resilient ecosystems. In areas where frequent high-severity fire is undesirable, management activities such as thinning, prescribed fire, or managed wildland fire can be used to moderate fire behavior not only prior to initial fires, but also before subsequent reburns.

  12. Temperate and boreal forest mega-fires: characteristics and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Scott L.; Burrows, Neil; Buyantuyev, Alexander; Gray, Robert W.; Keane, Robert E.; Kubian, Rick; Liu, Shirong; Seijo, Francisco; Shu, Lifu; Tolhurst, Kevin G.; Van Wagtendonk, Jan W.

    2014-01-01

    Mega-fires are often defined according to their size and intensity but are more accurately described by their socioeconomic impacts. Three factors – climate change, fire exclusion, and antecedent disturbance, collectively referred to as the “mega-fire triangle” – likely contribute to today's mega-fires. Some characteristics of mega-fires may emulate historical fire regimes and can therefore sustain healthy fire-prone ecosystems, but other attributes decrease ecosystem resiliency. A good example of a program that seeks to mitigate mega-fires is located in Western Australia, where prescribed burning reduces wildfire intensity while conserving ecosystems. Crown-fire-adapted ecosystems are likely at higher risk of frequent mega-fires as a result of climate change, as compared with other ecosystems once subject to frequent less severe fires. Fire and forest managers should recognize that mega-fires will be a part of future wildland fire regimes and should develop strategies to reduce their undesired impacts.

  13. Role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in the management of high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Sood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP in the management of high-risk prostate cancer (PCa, with a focus on oncological, functional and perioperative outcomes. Further, we also aimed to briefly describe our novel modification to conventional RARP that allows immediate organ retrieval and examination for intra-operative surgical margin assessment. A literature search of PubMed was performed for articles on the management of high-risk PCa. Papers written in English and concerning clinical outcomes following RARP for locally advanced and high-risk PCa were selected. Outcomes data from our own center were also included. A total of 10 contemporary series were evaluated. Biopsy Gleason score ≥ 8 was the most common cause for classification of patients into the high-risk PCa group. Biochemical failure rate, in the few series that looked at long-term follow-up, varied from 9% to 26% at 1 year. The positive surgical margin rate varied from 12% to 53.3%. Urinary continence rates varied from 78% to 92% at 1 year. The overall complication rates varied from 2.4% to 30%, with anastomotic leak and lymphocele being the most common complications. Long-term data on oncological control following RARP in high-risk patients is lacking. Short-term oncological outcomes and functional outcomes are equivalent to open radical prostatectomy (RP. Safety outcomes are better in patients undergoing RARP when compared with open RP. Improved tools for predicting the presence of organ-confined disease (OCD are available. High-risk patients with OCD would be ideal candidates for RARP and would benefit most from surgery alone.

  14. The perioperative management of patients with left ventricular assist devices undergoing noncardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, David W; Wetzel, David R; Pulido, Juan N; Pershing, Bryan S; Park, Soon J; Stulak, John M; Zietlow, Scott P; Morris, David S; Boilson, Barry A; Mauermann, William J

    2013-07-01

    To describe the perioperative management of patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) who require general anesthesia while undergoing noncardiac surgery (NCS) at a single, large tertiary referral center. Electronic medical records from September 2, 2005, through May 31, 2012, were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate the perioperative management and outcomes in LVAD patients undergoing NCS. Patients were included only if they required a general anesthetic and had previously been discharged from the hospital after initial LVAD implantation. Thirty-three patients with LVADs underwent general anesthesia for 67 noncardiac operations. The mean ± SD time from LVAD implantation to NCS was 317 ± 349 days. All but 1 patient had axial flow LVADs. Anticoagulation or antiplatelet agents were present within 7 days before NCS in 49 procedures (73%) and reversed in 32 of 49 (65%). No perioperative thrombotic complications related to anticoagulation or antiplatelet reversal were noted. Red blood cell, fresh frozen plasma, and platelet transfusions were administered during 10, 6, and 4 operations, respectively. The only intraoperative complication was surgical bleeding. Postoperative complications were present in 12 patients after NCS and were mainly composed of bleeding. Three patients died within 30 days of NCS, with the causes of death not attributed to NCS. Patients with LVAD safely underwent NCS in a multidisciplinary setting that included preoperative optimization by cardiologists familiar with LVADs when feasible. Anticoagulation or antiplatelet agents were present preoperatively in most patients with LVADs and were safely reversed when necessary for NCS. The relatively high occurrence of postoperative bleeding is consistent with previous series. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. eMedication Meets eHealth with the Electronic Medication Management Assistant (eMMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschanz, Mauro; Dorner, Tim Lucas; Denecke, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    A patient's healthcare team is often missing a complete overview on the prescribed and dispensed medication. This is due to an inconsistent information flow between the different actors of the healthcare system. Often, only the patient himself knows exactly which drugs he is actually taking. Our objective is to exploit different eHealth technologies available or planned in Switzerland to improve the information flow of the medication data among the stakeholder and to support the patient in managing his medication. This work is embedded in the "Hospital of the Future Live" project, involving 16 companies and 6 hospitals in order to develop IT solutions for future optimized health care processes. A comprehensive set of requirements was collected from the different actors and project partners. Further, specifications of the available or planned eHealth infrastructure were reviewed to integrate relevant technologies into a coherent concept. We developed a concept that combines the medication list and an eHealth platform. The resulting electronic medication management assistant (eMMA) designed for the patient provides the current medication plan at any time and supports by providing relevant information through a conversational user interface. In Switzerland, we still need a bridging technology to combine the medication information from the electronic patient record with the medication plan's associated QR-Code. The developed app is intended to provide such bridge and demonstrates the usefulness of the eMediplan. It enables the patient to have all data regarding his medication on his personal mobile phone and he can - if necessary - provide the current medication to the health professional.

  16. Evaluating the Weatherization Assistance Program in Your State: A Manager's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, L

    2000-05-11

    Evaluations of the Weatherization Assistance Program (the Program) serve three major purposes: (1) to document the energy savings and cost effectiveness of the Program, (2) to attract and maintain funding, and (3) to identify opportunities for improving the Program's performance. State managers need detailed and specific information about the performance of their own Program if they are to conduct and market it as effectively as possible. In this evaluation guide, we focus almost entirely on the issues related to the measurement of energy savings. Because the Program's main goal is to reduce the energy use and energy burden of low-income households, the minimum output of an evaluation study should be an estimate of energy savings. If resources are limited, the first priority is to obtain this estimate of savings. Some states may be interested in other issues such as determining Program cost effectiveness, testing the value of various audit types, or identifying the best opportunities for increasing energy savings. Because of limited resources, most will focus only on measuring energy savings.

  17. Pearls and pitfalls in short-term mechanical circulatory assist: how to avoid and manage complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohite, Prashant N; Maunz, Olaf; Simon, Andre R

    2014-10-01

    In today's era, given the worsening risk profiles of patients undergoing cardiac surgery, the increasing number of complex cardiac surgeries, and the increasing number of patients undergoing thoracic organ transplantation, short-term mechanical circulatory assist (MCA) devices are indispensable. MCA devices are capable of supporting heart and lung function and have emerged as potentially lifesaving instruments, but may prove to be as hazardous as helpful due to their inherent tendency toward hemolysis, thromboembolism, and hemorrhage. Although MCA devices are being used regularly at some specialized centers, surgeries involving MCA are not as common as other routine cardiac surgeries, and even though professionals implanting and maintaining short-term MCAs are well acquainted with operating such devices, it is not uncommon to come across complications as a result of minor mistakes committed while dealing with them. Avoiding simple mistakes and taking proper precautions while implanting and maintaining these devices can prevent major catastrophes. We discuss commonly encountered problems and complications during the implantation and maintenance of short-term MCAs and offer reasonable and practical solutions. In addition, crucial issues such as anticoagulation, replacement of the device circuit, and management of the distal perfusion cannula are discussed. Continuous and efficient monitoring of the MCA device and the patient supported on MCA, together with anticipation and avoidance of complications, is key for successful short-term MCA support.

  18. The Importance of the Management of Infectious Complications for Patients with Left Ventricular Assist Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michinari Hieda

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A left ventricular assist device (LVAD therapy is the viable option for patients with advanced heart failure as a bridge to transplantation, bridge to recovery, or destination therapy. Although application of LVAD support has become a standard option, serious complications or adverse events related with LVAD remain a concern. LVAD-related infection including driveline infection (DLI and bloodstream infection (BSI is one of the serious clinical matters for LVAD patients, and especially BSI leads to the high incidence of mortality. The LVAD-related infections negatively impact patient’s quality of life. Therefore, control of infection is one of the primary goals of management in LVAD patients. Several efforts including early and appropriate intervention including antibiotics and wound care may contribute to avert the progress into BSI from localized DLI. Particularly, there are clinical secrets in how to use antibiotics and how to treat wound care in LVAD patients. The rational way of thinking for wound care will be introduced in this review.

  19. The Importance of the Management of Infectious Complications for Patients with Left Ventricular Assist Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieda, Michinari; Sata, Makoto; Nakatani, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    A left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy is the viable option for patients with advanced heart failure as a bridge to transplantation, bridge to recovery, or destination therapy. Although application of LVAD support has become a standard option, serious complications or adverse events related with LVAD remain a concern. LVAD-related infection including driveline infection (DLI) and bloodstream infection (BSI) is one of the serious clinical matters for LVAD patients, and especially BSI leads to the high incidence of mortality. The LVAD-related infections negatively impact patient’s quality of life. Therefore, control of infection is one of the primary goals of management in LVAD patients. Several efforts including early and appropriate intervention including antibiotics and wound care may contribute to avert the progress into BSI from localized DLI. Particularly, there are clinical secrets in how to use antibiotics and how to treat wound care in LVAD patients. The rational way of thinking for wound care will be introduced in this review. PMID:27417794

  20. Clipless management of the renal vein during hand-assist laparoscopic donor nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenblatt Gregory S

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy has become the preferred method of donor nephrectomy at many transplant centers. The laparoscopic stapling device is commonly used for division of the renal vessels. Malfunction of the stapling device can occur, and is often due to interference from previously placed clips. We report our experience with a clipless technique in which no vascular clips are placed on tributaries of the renal vein at or near the renal hilum in order to avoid laparoscopic stapling device misfires. Methods From December 20, 2002 to April 12, 2005, 50 patients underwent hand-assisted laparoscopic left donor nephrectomy (LDN at our institution. Clipless management of the renal vein tributaries was used in all patients, and these vessels were divided using either a laparoscopic stapling device or the LigaSureTM device (Valleylab, Boulder, CO. The medical and operative records of the donors and recipients were reviewed to evaluate patient outcomes. Results The mean follow-up time was 14 months. Of the 50 LDN procedures, there were no laparoscopic stapling device malfunctions and no vascular complications. All renal allografts were functioning at the time of follow-up. Conclusion Laparoscopic stapling device failure due to deployment across previously placed surgical clips during laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy can be prevented by not placing clips on the tributaries of the renal vein. In our series, there were no vascular complications and no device misfires. We believe this clipless technique improves the safety of laparoscopic donor nephrectomy.

  1. 46 CFR 28.820 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.820 Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses. (a) Each vessel must be equipped with a self-priming, power driven fire...

  2. Soils under fire: soils research and the Joint Fire Science Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather E. Erickson; Rachel. White

    2008-01-01

    Soils are fundamental to a healthy and functioning ecosystem. Therefore, forest land managers can greatly benefit from a more thorough understanding of the ecological impacts of fire and fuel management activities on the vital services soils provide. We present a summary of new research on fire effects and soils made possible through the Joint Fire Science Program and...

  3. Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on cultural resources and archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin C. Ryan; Ann Trinkle Jones; Cassandra L. Koerner; Kristine M. Lee

    2012-01-01

    This state-of-knowledge review provides a synthesis of the effects of fire on cultural resources, which can be used by fire managers, cultural resource (CR) specialists, and archaeologists to more effectively manage wildland vegetation, fuels, and fire. The goal of the volume is twofold: (1) to provide cultural resource/archaeological professionals and policy makers...

  4. Evaluation of an accident management strategy of emergency water injection using fire engines in a typical pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soo Yong; Ahn, Kwang Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Following the Fukushima accident, a special safety inspection was conducted in Korea. The inspection results show that Korean nuclear power plants have no imminent risk for expected maximum potential earthquake or coastal flooding. However long- and short-term safety improvements do need to be implemented. One of the measures to increase the mitigation capability during a prolonged station blackout (SBO) accident is installing injection flow paths to provide emergency cooling water of external sources using fire engines to the steam generators or reactor cooling systems. This paper illustrates an evaluation of the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire trucks during a potential extended SBO accident in a 1,000 MWe pressurized water reactor. With regard to the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire engines, the strategies are judged to be very feasible for a long-term SBO, but are not likely to be effective for a short-term SBO.

  5. An integrated model to measure service management and physical constraints' effect on food consumption in assisted-living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Chun; Shanklin, Carol W

    2008-05-01

    The United States is experiencing remarkable growth in the elderly population, which provides both opportunities and challenges for assisted-living facilities. The objective of this study was to explore how service management influences residents' actual food consumption in assisted-living facilities. Physical factors influencing residents' service evaluation and food consumption also were investigated. A total of 394 questionnaires were distributed to assisted-living residents in seven randomly selected facilities. The questionnaire was developed based on an in-depth literature review and pilot study. Residents' perceived quality evaluations, satisfaction, and physical constraints were measured. Residents' actual food consumption was measured using a plate waste technique. A total of 118 residents in five facilities completed both questionnaires and food consumption assessments. Descriptive, multivariate analyses and structural equation modeling techniques were employed. Service management, including food and service quality and customer satisfaction, was found to significantly influence residents' food consumption. Physical constraints associated with aging, including a decline in health status, chewing problems, sensory loss, and functional disability, also significantly influenced residents' food consumption. A significant relationship was found between physical constraints and customer satisfaction. Foodservice that provides good food and service quality increases customer satisfaction and affects residents' actual food consumption. Physical constraints also influence residents' food consumption directly, or indirectly through satisfaction. The findings suggest that food and nutrition professionals in assisted-living should consider the physical profiles of their residents to enhance residents' satisfaction and nutrient intake. Recommendations for exploring residents' perspectives are discussed.

  6. Structural fire risk of Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Joana; Pereira, Mário

    2017-04-01

    Portugal is on the top of the European countries most affected by vegetation fires which underlines the importance of the existence of an updated and coherent fire risk map. This map represent a valuable supporting tool for forest and fire management decisions, focus prevention activities, improve the efficiency of fire detection systems, manage resources and actions of fire fighting with greater effectiveness. Therefore this study proposed a structural fire risk map of the vegetated area of Portugal using a deterministic approach based on the concept of fire risk currently accepted by the scientific community which consists in the combination of the fire hazard and the potential economic damage. The existing fire susceptibility map for Portugal based on the slope, land cover and fire probability, was adopted and updated by the use of a higher resolution digital terrain model, longer burnt area perimeter dataset (1975 - 2013) and the entire set of Corine land cover inventories. Five susceptibility classes were mapped to be in accordance with the Portuguese law and the results confirms the good performance of this model not only in terms of the favourability scores but also in the predictive values. Considering three different scenarios of (maximum, mean, and minimum annual) burnt area, fire hazard were estimate. The vulnerability scores and monetary values of species defined in the literature and by law were used to calculate the potential economic damage. The result was a fire risk map that identifies the areas more prone to be affected by fires in the future and provides an estimate of the economic damage of the fire which will be a valuable tool for forest and fire managers and to minimize the economic and environmental consequences of vegetation fires in Portugal. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by: (i) the project Interact - Integrative Research in Environment,Agro-Chain and Technology, NORTE-01-0145-FEDER-000017, research line BEST, cofinanced by

  7. Interactions among wildland fires in a long-established Sierra Nevada natural fire area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, B.M.; Miller, J.D.; Thode, A.E.; Kelly, M.; van Wagtendonk, J.W.; Stephens, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate interactions between successive naturally occurring fires, and assess to what extent the environments in which fires burn influence these interactions. Using mapped fire perimeters and satellite-based estimates of post-fire effects (referred to hereafter as fire severity) for 19 fires burning relatively freely over a 31-year period, we demonstrate that fire as a landscape process can exhibit self-limiting characteristics in an upper elevation Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest. We use the term 'self-limiting' to refer to recurring fire as a process over time (that is, fire regime) consuming fuel and ultimately constraining the spatial extent and lessening fire-induced effects of subsequent fires. When the amount of time between successive adjacent fires is under 9 years, and when fire weather is not extreme (burning index classes (unchanged, low, moderate, high). This is in contrast to a recent study demonstrating increasing high-severity burning throughout the Sierra Nevada from 1984 to 2006, which suggests freely burning fires over time in upper elevation Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forests can regulate fire-induced effects across the landscape. This information can help managers better anticipate short- and long-term effects of allowing naturally ignited fires to burn, and ultimately, improve their ability to implement Wildland Fire Use programs in similar forest types. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  8. Informed debate on the use of fire for peatland management means acknowledging the complexity of socio-ecological systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davies, G.M.; Kettridge, Nicholas; Stoof, Cathelijne R.; Gray, Alan; Marrs, Rob; Ascoli, Davide; Fernandes, Paulo M.; Allen, Katherine A.; Doerr, Stefan H.; Clay, Gareth D.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of fire and its use on European peatlands and heaths are the focus of considerable research and debate due to the important services these ecosystems provide and the threats they face from climatic and land-use change. Whilst in some countries ecologists are actively promoting the res

  9. Housing Assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Baker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In Australia, an increasing number of households face problems of access to suitable housing in the private market. In response, the Federal and State Governments share responsibility for providing housing assistance to these, mainly low-income, households. A broad range of policy instruments are used to provide and maintain housing assistance across all housing tenures, for example, assisting entry into homeownership, providing affordability assistance in the private rental market, and the provision of socially owned and managed housing options. Underlying each of these interventions is the premise that secure, affordable, and appropriate housing provides not only shelter but also a number of nonshelter benefits to individuals and their households. Although the nonshelter outcomes of housing are well acknowledged in Australia, the understanding of the nonshelter outcomes of housing assistance is less clear. This paper explores nonshelter outcomes of three of the major forms of housing assistance provided by Australian governments—low-income mortgage assistance, social housing, and private rent assistance. It is based upon analysis of a survey of 1,353 low-income recipients of housing assistance, and specifically measures the formulation of health and well-being, financial stress, and housing satisfaction outcomes across these three assistance types. We find clear evidence that health, finance, and housing satisfaction outcomes are associated with quite different factors for individuals in these three major housing assistance types.

  10. Human Caused Fire and Acres

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Land Management, Department of the Interior — Number of wildland fires and acres burned as a result of human causes, from 2001 through 2008 (updated annually). Displayed by the eleven Geographic Areas used by...

  11. Lightning Caused Fires and Acres

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Land Management, Department of the Interior — Number of wildland fires and acres burned as a result of lightning, from 2001 through 2008 (updated annually). Displayed by the eleven Geographic Areas used by the...

  12. Fire Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, Deb; West, Lee

    2009-01-01

    For education administrators, campus fires are not only a distressing loss, but also a stark reminder that a campus faces risks that require special vigilance. In many ways, campuses resemble small communities, with areas for living, working and relaxing. A residence hall fire may raise the specter of careless youth, often with the complication of…

  13. Fire Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, Deb; West, Lee

    2009-01-01

    For education administrators, campus fires are not only a distressing loss, but also a stark reminder that a campus faces risks that require special vigilance. In many ways, campuses resemble small communities, with areas for living, working and relaxing. A residence hall fire may raise the specter of careless youth, often with the complication of…

  14. On fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Helle Rabøl

    The title of this paper: “On fire”, refers to two (maybe three) aspects: firstly as a metaphor of having engagement in a community of practice according to Lave & Wenger (1991), and secondly it refers to the concrete element “fire” in the work of the fire fighters – and thirdly fire as a signifier...

  15. 46 CFR 28.315 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... After September 15, 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.315 Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses. (a) Each vessel 36 feet (11.8 meters) or more in length must...

  16. Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Vegetation Dynamics in Relation to Shifting Inundation and Fire Regimes: Disentangling Environmental Variability from Land Management Decisions in a Southern African Transboundary Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcisa G. Pricope

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasing temperatures and wildfire incidence and decreasing precipitation and river runoff in southern Africa are predicted to have a variety of impacts on the ecology, structure, and function of semi-arid savannas, which provide innumerable livelihood resources for millions of people. This paper builds on previous research that documents change in inundation and fire regimes in the Chobe River Basin (CRB in Namibia and Botswana and proposes to demonstrate a methodology that can be applied to disentangle the effect of environmental variability from land management decisions on changing and ecologically sensitive savanna ecosystems in transboundary contexts. We characterized the temporal dynamics (1985–2010 of vegetation productivity for the CRB using proxies of vegetation productivity and examine the relative importance of shifts in flooding and fire patterns to vegetation dynamics and effects of the association of phases of the El Niño—Southern Oscillation (ENSO on vegetation greenness. Our results indicate that vegetation in these semi-arid environments is highly responsive to climatic fluctuations and the long-term trend is one of increased but heterogeneous vegetation cover. The increased cover and heterogeneity during the growing season is especially noted in communally-managed areas of Botswana where long-term fire suppression has been instituted, in contrast to communal areas in Namibia where heterogeneity in vegetation cover is mostly increasing primarily outside of the growing season and may correspond to mosaic early dry season burns. Observed patterns of increased vegetation productivity and heterogeneity may relate to more frequent and intense burning and higher spatial variability in surface water availability from both precipitation and regional inundation patterns, with implications for global environmental change and adaptation in subsistence-based communities.

  17. A Randomized, Controlled Proof-of-Concept Trial of an Internet-Based, Therapist-Assisted Self-Management Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bryant, Richard A; Engel, Charles C; Litz, Brett T; Papa, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors report an 8-week randomized, controlled proof-of-concept trial of a new therapist-assisted, Internet-based, self-management cognitive behavior therapy versus Internet-based supportive...

  18. The DISAM Journal of International Security Assistance Management. Volume 30, Number 3, September 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    African Affairs “China-Africa Relations and the Global Village: Diplomatic Perspective” ...................... 68 Kurt Volker , Acting Assistant Secretary...75 Kurt D. Volker , Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs “New Faces, Old Problems, Familiar...construct. In the middle of the program are three online seminars. The resident seminars are held in the brand new, state of the art classroom at the

  19. QHSE管理体系在消防工程项目的应用研究%QHSE management system application in fire engineering project research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

      消防工程项目建立和实施QHSE管理体系,对于提高工程质量和职业健康安全与环境的管理水平,减少职业健康安全及环境污染事故,满足顾客需求,提高企业经济效益和社会效益,使企业保持持续竞争力有重要的意义。%Fire engineering project set up and implement QHSE management system, For improving project quality and occupational health and safety and environmental management level ,Reduce the number of occupational health and safety and environmental pollution accidents ,Meet the demand of customer,Improve the enterprise economic benefit and social benefit, Make the enterprise keep sustained competitiveness has important significance.

  20. 基于云计算的现代林火生态管理系统的研究%Research of modern forest-fire ecology management system based on cloud-computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐箭

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing based modern forest fire ecology management system is built on forest-fire ecological resources and related information database. Aiming at the characteristics of forest-fires ecological resources,using cloud computing platform to manage and analyze ecological data,combining with forest-fire ecology management and monitoring center system and forest-fire ecology management decision support system,it provided accurate,timely and comprehensive information and pre-arranged planning for forest-fire ecology management and decision-making, which meets the actual requirements of the forestry sector and the security management setor,and realized intelligence,digitization and automation of modern forest-fire ecological management. The system improves management effficiency,gives a new mode of forest-fire ecology management ,and maintains the forest ecosystem stable and economic prosperous.%基于云计算的现代林火生态管理系统是建立在林火生态资源及相关信息库的基础上,针对林火生态资源的特点,利用云计算平台对林火生态数据的管理、分析功能,结合林火生态管理监控管理中心系统、林火生态管理决策支持系统,为林火生态管理和决策提供准确、及时、全面的信息和预案,以满足林业部门及安全管理部门的实际需要,实现现代林火生态管理的智能化、数字化和自动化.该系统提高了管理的工作效率,给出了林火生态管理的新模式,维护了森林生态系统稳定和林区经济的繁荣.

  1. A stochastic Forest Fire Model for future land cover scenarios assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D'Andrea

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Land cover is affected by many factors including economic development, climate and natural disturbances such as wildfires. The ability to evaluate how fire regimes may alter future vegetation, and how future vegetation may alter fire regimes, would assist forest managers in planning management actions to be carried out in the face of anticipated socio-economic and climatic change. In this paper, we present a method for calibrating a cellular automata wildfire regime simulation model with actual data on land cover and wildfire size-frequency. The method is based on the observation that many forest fire regimes, in different forest types and regions, exhibit power law frequency-area distributions. The standard Drossel-Schwabl cellular automata Forest Fire Model (DS-FFM produces simulations which reproduce this observed pattern. However, the standard model is simplistic in that it considers land cover to be binary – each cell either contains a tree or it is empty – and the model overestimates the frequency of large fires relative to actual landscapes. Our new model, the Modified Forest Fire Model (MFFM, addresses this limitation by incorporating information on actual land use and differentiating among various types of flammable vegetation. The MFFM simulation model was tested on forest types with Mediterranean and sub-tropical fire regimes. The results showed that the MFFM was able to reproduce structural fire regime parameters for these two regions. Further, the model was used to forecast future land cover. Future research will extend this model to refine the forecasts of future land cover and fire regime scenarios under climate, land use and socio-economic change.

  2. Ecohydrologic Implications and Management of Post-fire Soil Water Repellency in Burned Pinon-Juniper Woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Matthew; Zvirzdin, Daniel; Fernelius, Kaitlynn; McMillan, Mica; Kostka, Stanley

    2014-05-01

    Erosion and weed dominance often limit the recovery of piñon-juniper woodlands of western North America after high intensity wildfires. Soil water repellency (SWR) is one factor that may promote overland flow and impede seedling establishment. In spite of these effects, the influence of post-fire SWR on site recovery is poorly understood. Our presentation summarizes data collected within studies on burned piñon-juniper woodlands that provide new insight on: 1) the spatial distribution and severity of SWR, 2) influence of SWR on soil hydrology, nitrogen cycling, and site revegetation, and 3) the suitability of soil surfactants as a post-fire restoration tool. We demonstrate how patterns of SWR are highly correlated to pre-fire woodland canopy structure. At sites where SWR is present, infiltration, soil water content, and plant establishment is significantly less than at non-hydrophobic sites. We show how newly developed soil surfactants can significantly improve ecohydrologic properties required for plant growth by overcoming SWR; thus, increasing the amount and duration of available water for seed germination and plant growth. However, the application of soil surfactants in wildfire-affected ecosystems has been limited due to logistical and economic constraints associated with the standard practice of using large quantities of irrigation water as the surfactant carrier. We have developed a potential solution to this problem by using seed coating technology to use the seed as the carrier for the delivery of soil surfactant. Through this approach, precipitation leaches the surfactant from the seed into the soil where it absorbs onto the soil particles and ameliorates water repellency within the seeds microsite. We present findings from laboratory and field evaluations of surfactant seed coatings, which provide evidence that it may be plausible for the technology to improve post-fire seeding efforts by restoring soil hydrologic function and increasing seedling

  3. State of Fire Behavior Models and their Application to Ecosystem and Smoke Management Issues: Special Session Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    directly captures the first order chemical reactions of combustion requires grid cells approximately 1 mm on a side. Similarly, fire starts with ignition...resources (N, P, water, light ) complicate ecological responses and are difficult to model; and 4) Currently, disturbance regimes are generally...The Soil-Plant-Atmosphere (SPA) model models photosynthesis and water balance at fine spatial and temporal scales across canopy and soil layers

  4. Evaluation of an accident management strategy of emergency water injection using fire engines in a typical pressurized water reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Yong Park

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Following the Fukushima accident, a special safety inspection was conducted in Korea. The inspection results show that Korean nuclear power plants have no imminent risk for expected maximum potential earthquake or coastal flooding. However long- and short-term safety improvements do need to be implemented. One of the measures to increase the mitigation capability during a prolonged station blackout (SBO accident is installing injection flow paths to provide emergency cooling water of external sources using fire engines to the steam generators or reactor cooling systems. This paper illustrates an evaluation of the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire trucks during a potential extended SBO accident in a 1,000 MWe pressurized water reactor. With regard to the effectiveness of external cooling water injection strategies using fire engines, the strategies are judged to be very feasible for a long-term SBO, but are not likely to be effective for a short-term SBO.

  5. Studying the Post-Fire Response of Vegetation in California Protected Areas with NDVI-based Pheno-Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, S.; Gillespie, T. W.

    2016-12-01

    Post-fire response from vegetation is determined by the intensity and timing of fires as well as the nature of local biomes. Though the field-based studies focusing on selected study sites helped to understand the mechanisms of post-fire response, there is a need to extend the analysis to a broader spatial extent with the assistance of remotely sensed imagery of fires and vegetation. Pheno-metrics, a series of variables on the growing cycle extracted from basic satellite measurements of vegetation coverage, translate the basic remote sensing measurements such as NDVI to the language of phenology and fire ecology in a quantitative form. In this study, we analyzed the rate of biomass removal after ignition and the speed of post-fire recovery in California protected areas from 2000 to 2014 with USGS MTBS fire data and USGS eMODIS pheno-metrics. NDVI drop caused by fire showed the aboveground biomass of evergreen forest was removed much slower than shrubland because of higher moisture level and greater density of fuel. In addition, the above two major land cover types experienced a greatly weakened immediate post-fire growing season, featuring a later start and peak of season, a shorter length of season, and a lower start and peak of NDVI. Such weakening was highly correlated with burn severity, and also influenced by the season of fire and the land cover type, according to our modeling between the anomalies of pheno-metrics and the difference of normalized burn ratio (dNBR). The influence generally decayed over time, but can remain high within the first 5 years after fire, mostly because of the introduction of exotic species when the native species were missing. Local-specific variables are necessary to better address the variance within the same fire and improve the outcomes of models. This study can help ecologists in validating the theories of post-fire vegetation response mechanisms and assist local fire managers in post-fire vegetation recovery.

  6. Using computer-assisted learning to engage diverse learning styles in understanding business management principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Mary E; Derby, Dustin C; Haan, Andrea G

    2013-01-01

    Objective : Changes in small business and insurance present challenges for newly graduated chiropractors. Technology that reaches identified, diverse learning styles may assist the chiropractic student in business classes to meet course outcomes better. Thus, the purpose of our study is to determine if the use of technology-based instructional aids enhance students' mastery of course learning outcomes. Methods : Using convenience sampling, 86 students completed a survey assessing course learning outcomes, learning style, and the helpfulness of lecture and computer-assisted learning related to content mastery. Quantitative analyses occurred. Results : Although respondents reported not finding the computer-assisted learning as helpful as the lecture, significant relationships were found between pre- and post-assisted learning measures of the learning outcomes 1 and 2 for the visual and kinesthetic groups. Surprisingly, however, all learning style groups exhibited significant pre- and post-assisted learning appraisal relationships with learning outcomes 3 and 4. Conclusion : While evidence exists within the current study of a relationship between students' learning of the course content corollary to the use of technologic instructional aids, the exact nature of the relationship remains unclear.

  7. Assessing predictive services' 7-day fire potential outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin Riley; Crystal Stonesifer; Dave Calkin; Haiganoush Preisler

    2015-01-01

    The Predictive Services program was created under the National Wildfire Coordinating Group in 2001 to address the need for long- and short-term decision support information for fire managers and operations personnel. The primary mission of Predictive Services is to integrate fire weather, fire danger, and resource availability to enable strategic fire suppression...

  8. Assessing European wild fire vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, F.; Oliveira, S.; Barredo, J. I.; Camia, A.; Ayanz, J. San Miguel; Pettenella, D.; Mavsar, R.

    2012-04-01

    Wild fire vulnerability is a measure of potential socio-economic damage caused by a fire in a specific area. As such it is an important component of long-term fire risk management, helping policy-makers take informed decisions about adequate expenditures for fire prevention and suppression, and to target those regions at highest risk. This paper presents a first approach to assess wild fire vulnerability at the European level. A conservative approach was chosen that assesses the cost of restoring the previous land cover after a potential fire. Based on the CORINE Land Cover, a restoration cost was established for each land cover class at country level, and an average restoration time was assigned according to the recovery capacity of the land cover. The damage caused by fire was then assessed by discounting the cost of restoring the previous land cover over the restoration period. Three different vulnerability scenarios were considered assuming low, medium and high fire severity causing different levels of damage. Over Europe, the potential damage of wild land fires ranges from 10 - 13, 732 Euro*ha-1*yr-1 for low fire severity, 32 - 45,772 Euro*ha-1*yr-1 for medium fire severity and 54 - 77,812 Euro*ha-1*yr-1 for high fire severity. The least vulnerable are natural grasslands, moors and heathland and sclerophyllous vegetation, while the highest cost occurs for restoring broad-leaved forest. Preliminary validation comparing these estimates with official damage assessments for past fires shows reasonable results. The restoration cost approach allows for a straightforward, data extensive assessment of fire vulnerability at European level. A disadvantage is the inherent simplification of the evaluation procedure with the underestimation of non-markets goods and services. Thus, a second approach has been developed, valuing individual wild land goods and services and assessing their annual flow which is lost for a certain period of time in case of a fire event. However

  9. Fires. A Joint Publication for U.S. Artillery Professionals. November - December 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    442-5121/6806. Editor-in-Chief, Acting: Jennifer McFadden Managing Editor: Jennifer McFadden Art Director: Rickey Paape, Jr. Assistant Editor: Paul...future. Finally, 6th ADA Brigade will sustain its current momentum with regards to improving state of the art training facilities and expanding the...disrupt and capture Taliban criminal elements operating in the four districts. The Fires batteries, Aztecs and Big Dogs identified, established and

  10. AIDS Drug Assistance Programs: managers confront uncertainty and need to adapt as the Affordable Care Act kicks in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Erika G; Meehan, Terence; Schackman, Bruce R

    2013-06-01

    With the Affordable Care Act set to expand insurance coverage to millions more Americans next year, existing discretionary health programs that receive federal support might find themselves competing for funds as the health reform law is fully implemented. To assess the implications the Affordable Care Act might have for discretionary health programs, we focused on state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs, which provide free medications to low-income HIV patients. We conducted semistructured interviews with program managers from twenty-two states. Many of the managers predicted that their programs will change focus to provide "wrap-around services," such as helping newly insured clients finance out-of-pocket expenses, including copayments, deductibles, and premiums. Although program managers acknowledged that they must adapt to a changing environment, many said that they were overwhelmed by the complexity of the Affordable Care Act, and some expressed fear that state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs would be eliminated entirely. To remain viable, such programs must identify and justify the need for services in the context of the Affordable Care Act and receive sufficient political support and funding.

  11. Fire characteristics associated with firefighter injury on large federal wildland fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Carla; Lynch, Charles F; Torner, James; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2013-02-01

    Wildland fires present many injury hazards to firefighters. We estimate injury rates and identify fire-related factors associated with injury. Data from the National Interagency Fire Center from 2003 to 2007 provided the number of injuries in which the firefighter could not return to his or her job assignment, person-days worked, and fire characteristics (year, region, season, cause, fuel type, resistance to control, and structures destroyed). We assessed fire-level risk factors of having at least one reported injury using logistic regression. Negative binomial regression was used to examine incidence rate ratios associated with fire-level risk factors. Of 867 fires, 9.5% required the most complex management and 24.7% required the next-highest level of management. Fires most often occurred in the western United States (82.8%), during the summer (69.6%), caused by lightening (54.9%). Timber was the most frequent fuel source (40.2%). Peak incident management level, person-days of exposure, and the fire's resistance to control were significantly related to the odds of a fire having at least one reported injury. However, the most complex fires had a lower injury incidence rate than less complex fires. Although fire complexity and the number of firefighters were associated with the risk for at least one reported injury, the more experienced and specialized firefighting teams had lower injury incidence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fire safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keski-Rahkonen, O.; Bjoerkman, J.; Hostikka, S.; Mangs, J. [VTT Building Technology, Espoo (Finland); Huhtanen, R. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Palmen, H.; Salminen, A.; Turtola, A. [VTT Automation, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-07-01

    According to experience and probabilistic risk assessments, fires present a significant hazard in a nuclear power plant. Fires may be initial events for accidents or affect safety systems planned to prevent accidents and to mitigate their consequences. The project consists of theoretical work, experiments and simulations aiming to increase the fire safety at nuclear power plants. The project has four target areas: (1) to produce validated models for numerical simulation programmes, (2) to produce new information on the behavior of equipment in case of fire, (3) to study applicability of new active fire protecting systems in nuclear power plants, and (4) to obtain quantitative knowledge of ignitions induced by important electric devices in nuclear power plants. These topics have been solved mainly experimentally, but modelling at different level is used to interpret experimental data, and to allow easy generalisation and engineering use of the obtained data. Numerical fire simulation has concentrated in comparison of CFD modelling of room fires, and fire spreading on cables on experimental data. So far the success has been good to fair. A simple analytical and numerical model has been developed for fire effluents spreading beyond the room of origin in mechanically strongly ventilated compartments. For behaviour of equipment in fire several full scale and scaled down calorimetric experiments were carried out on electronic cabinets, as well as on horizontal and vertical cable trays. These were carried out to supply material for CFD numerical simulation code validation. Several analytical models were developed and validated against obtained experimental results to allow quick calculations for PSA estimates as well as inter- and extrapolations to slightly different objects. Response times of different commercial fire detectors were determined for different types of smoke, especially emanating from smoldering and flaming cables to facilitate selection of proper detector

  13. Detection and Characterization of Low Temperature Peat Fires during the 2015 Fire Catastrophe in Indonesia Using a New High-Sensitivity Fire Monitoring Satellite Sensor (FireBird).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Elizabeth C; Englhart, Sandra; Lorenz, Eckehard; Halle, Winfried; Wiedemann, Werner; Siegert, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Vast and disastrous fires occurred on Borneo during the 2015 dry season, pushing Indonesia into the top five carbon emitting countries. The region was affected by a very strong El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate phenomenon, on par with the last severe event in 1997/98. Fire dynamics in Central Kalimantan were investigated using an innovative sensor offering higher sensitivity to a wider range of fire intensities at a finer spatial resolution (160 m) than heretofore available. The sensor is onboard the TET-1 satellite, part of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) FireBird mission. TET-1 images (acquired every 2-3 days) from the middle infrared were used to detect fires continuously burning for almost three weeks in the protected peatlands of Sebangau National Park as well as surrounding areas with active logging and oil palm concessions. TET-1 detection capabilities were compared with MODIS active fire detection and Landsat burned area algorithms. Fire dynamics, including fire front propagation speed and area burned, were investigated. We show that TET-1 has improved detection capabilities over MODIS in monitoring low-intensity peatland fire fronts through thick smoke and haze. Analysis of fire dynamics revealed that the largest burned areas resulted from fire front lines started from multiple locations, and the highest propagation speeds were in excess of 500 m/day (all over peat > 2m deep). Fires were found to occur most often in concessions that contained drainage infrastructure but were not cleared prior to the fire season. Benefits of implementing this sensor system to improve current fire management techniques are discussed. Near real-time fire detection together with enhanced fire behavior monitoring capabilities would not only improve firefighting efforts, but also benefit analysis of fire impact on tropical peatlands, greenhouse gas emission estimations as well as mitigation measures to reduce severe fire events in the future.

  14. Detection and Characterization of Low Temperature Peat Fires during the 2015 Fire Catastrophe in Indonesia Using a New High-Sensitivity Fire Monitoring Satellite Sensor (FireBird)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Elizabeth C.; Englhart, Sandra; Lorenz, Eckehard; Halle, Winfried; Wiedemann, Werner; Siegert, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Vast and disastrous fires occurred on Borneo during the 2015 dry season, pushing Indonesia into the top five carbon emitting countries. The region was affected by a very strong El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate phenomenon, on par with the last severe event in 1997/98. Fire dynamics in Central Kalimantan were investigated using an innovative sensor offering higher sensitivity to a wider range of fire intensities at a finer spatial resolution (160 m) than heretofore available. The sensor is onboard the TET-1 satellite, part of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) FireBird mission. TET-1 images (acquired every 2–3 days) from the middle infrared were used to detect fires continuously burning for almost three weeks in the protected peatlands of Sebangau National Park as well as surrounding areas with active logging and oil palm concessions. TET-1 detection capabilities were compared with MODIS active fire detection and Landsat burned area algorithms. Fire dynamics, including fire front propagation speed and area burned, were investigated. We show that TET-1 has improved detection capabilities over MODIS in monitoring low-intensity peatland fire fronts through thick smoke and haze. Analysis of fire dynamics revealed that the largest burned areas resulted from fire front lines started from multiple locations, and the highest propagation speeds were in excess of 500 m/day (all over peat > 2m deep). Fires were found to occur most often in concessions that contained drainage infrastructure but were not cleared prior to the fire season. Benefits of implementing this sensor system to improve current fire management techniques are discussed. Near real-time fire detection together with enhanced fire behavior monitoring capabilities would not only improve firefighting efforts, but also benefit analysis of fire impact on tropical peatlands, greenhouse gas emission estimations as well as mitigation measures to reduce severe fire events in the future. PMID:27486664

  15. Fire-on-fire interactions in three large wilderness areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Casey C.

    Current knowledge about wildfire occurrence is not complete. Fire researchers and managers hold the assumption that previous wildfires affect subsequent wildfires; however, research regarding the interactions of large wildfires at their common boundaries is missing from the literature. This research focuses on understanding the influence of previous large wildfires on subsequent large wildfires in three wilderness areas: The Greater Bob Marshall, the Selway-Bitterroot, and the Frank Church. Data from the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS) project, which mapped large wildfires in the western United States occurring since 1984, are used for the research. The combination of using wilderness areas and remotely sensed images allows an objective and consistent analysis of fire-on-fire interaction that is extensive in both time and space. Standardized methods for analyzing fire interactions do not currently exist, therefore methods were developed, tested, and refined to describe, quantify, and compare once-burned and re-burned locations within a subset of ten fires in terms of size, location, timing between fires, and severity. These methods were then used to address the question of whether re-burns occur within each of the three wilderness areas. Edge and re-burn characteristics were also derived and quantified. Results were statistically and empirically compared to randomized fire intersections and to published fire history research for each area. Although a low proportion of each study area burns or re-burns, when a new fire encounters a previous fire it re-burns onto the previously burned area approximately 80% of the time. Current large wildfires are behaving in a typical fashion, although on some landscapes the amount of re-burn is not different from what would be expected due to chance. Lastly, the complexity of the post-fire landscape was assessed using texture metrics. Pre-fire and post-fire landscapes were shown to be different, with post-fire landscapes

  16. 33 CFR 149.419 - Can the water supply for the helicopter deck fire protection system be part of a fire water system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... helicopter deck fire protection system be part of a fire water system? 149.419 Section 149.419 Navigation and... § 149.421 may be part of: (1) The fire water system, installed in accordance with Mineral Management... § 149.419 Can the water supply for the helicopter deck fire protection system be part of a fire...

  17. Short- and long-term effects on fuels, forest structure, and wildfire potential from prescribed fire and resource benefit fire in southwestern forests, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molly E. Hunter; Jose M. Iniguez; Leigh B. Lentile

    2011-01-01

    Prescribed and resource benefit fires are used to manage fuels in fire-prone landscapes in the Southwest. These practices, however, typically occur under different conditions, potentially leading to differences in fire behavior and effects. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of recent prescribed fires, resource benefit fires, and repeated...

  18. Wildland fire as a self-regulating mechanism: the role of previous burns and weather in limiting fire progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Sean A; Holsinger, Lisa M; Miller, Carol; Nelson, Cara R

    2015-09-01

    Theory suggests that natural fire regimes can result in landscapes that are both self-regulating and resilient to fire. For example, because fires consume fuel, they may create barriers to the spread of future fires, thereby regulating fire size. Top-down controls such as weather, however, can weaken this effect. While empirical examples demonstrating this pattern-process feedback between vegetation and fire exist, they have been geographically limited or did not consider the influence of time between fires and weather. The availability of remotely sensed data identifying fire activity over the last four decades provides an opportunity to explicitly quantify-the ability of wildland fire to limit the progression of subsequent fire. Furthermore, advances in fire progression mapping now allow an evaluation of how daily weather as a top-down control modifies this effect. In this study, we evaluated the ability of wildland fire to create barriers that limit the spread of subsequent fire along a gradient representing time between fires in four large study areas in the western United States. Using fire progression maps in conjunction with weather station data, we also evaluated the influence of daily weather. Results indicate that wildland fire does limit subsequent fire spread in all four study areas, but this effect decays over time; wildland fire no longer limits subsequent fire spread 6-18 years after fire, depending on the study area. We also found that the ability of fire to regulate, subsequent fire progression was substantially reduced under extreme conditions compared to moderate weather conditions in all four study areas. This study increases understanding of the spatial feedbacks that can lead to self-regulating landscapes as well as the effects of top-down controls, such as weather, on these feedbacks. Our results will be useful to managers who seek to restore natural fire regimes or to exploit recent burns when managing fire.

  19. Historical fire regime and forest variability on two eastern Great Basin fire-sheds (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley G. Kitchen

    2012-01-01

    Proper management of naturally forested landscapes requires knowledge of key disturbance processes and their effects on species composition and structure. Spatially-intensive fire and forest histories provide valuable information about how fire and vegetation may vary and interact on heterogeneous landscapes. I constructed 800-year fire and tree recruitment...

  20. Strata-based forest fuel classification for wild fire hazard assessment using terrestrial LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Zhu, Xuan; Yebra, Marta; Harris, Sarah; Tapper, Nigel

    2016-10-01

    Fuel structural characteristics affect fire behavior including fire intensity, spread rate, flame structure, and duration, therefore, quantifying forest fuel structure has significance in understanding fire behavior as well as providing information for fire management activities (e.g., planned burns, suppression, fuel hazard assessment, and fuel treatment). This paper presents a method of forest fuel strata classification with an integration between terrestrial light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and geographic information system for automatically assessing forest fuel structural characteristics (e.g., fuel horizontal continuity and vertical arrangement). The accuracy of fuel description derived from terrestrial LiDAR scanning (TLS) data was assessed by field measured surface fuel depth and fuel percentage covers at distinct vertical layers. The comparison of TLS-derived depth and percentage cover at surface fuel layer with the field measurements produced root mean square error values of 1.1 cm and 5.4%, respectively. TLS-derived percentage cover explained 92% of the variation in percentage cover at all fuel layers of the entire dataset. The outcome indicated TLS-derived fuel characteristics are strongly consistent with field measured values. TLS can be used to efficiently and consistently classify forest vertical layers to provide more precise information for forest fuel hazard assessment and surface fuel load estimation in order to assist forest fuels management and fire-related operational activities. It can also be beneficial for mapping forest habitat, wildlife conservation, and ecosystem management.