WorldWideScience

Sample records for finite size corrections

  1. Finite-size effects for anisotropic bootstrap percolation : Logarithmic corrections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Enter, Aernout C. D.; Hulshof, Tim

    In this note we analyse an anisotropic, two-dimensional bootstrap percolation model introduced by Gravner and Griffeath. We present upper and lower bounds on the finite-size effects. We discuss the similarities with the semi-oriented model introduced by Duarte.

  2. Finite-size corrections for logarithmic representations in critical dense polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izmailian, Nickolay Sh., E-mail: izmailan@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Yerevan Physics Institute, Alikhanian Br. 2, 375036 Yerevan (Armenia); National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Physics Division, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Ruelle, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.ruelle@uclouvain.be [Institut de Recherche en Mathematique et Physique, Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium); Hu, Chin-Kun, E-mail: huck@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2012-05-01

    We study (analytic) finite-size corrections in the dense polymer model on the strip by perturbing the critical Hamiltonian with irrelevant operators belonging to the tower of the identity. We generalize the perturbation expansion to include Jordan cells, and examine whether the finite-size corrections are sensitive to the properties of indecomposable representations appearing in the conformal spectrum, in particular their indecomposability parameters. We find, at first order, that the corrections do not depend on these parameters nor even on the presence of Jordan cells. Though the corrections themselves are not universal, the ratios are universal and correctly reproduced by the conformal perturbative approach, to first order.

  3. Finite-size corrections to the free energies of crystalline solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polson, J.M.; Trizac, E.; Pronk, S.; Frenkel, D.

    2000-01-01

    We analyze the finite-size corrections to the free energy of crystals with a fixed center of mass. When we explicitly correct for the leading (ln N/N) corrections, the remaining free energy is found to depend linearly on 1/N. Extrapolating to the thermodynamic limit (N → ∞), we estimate the free

  4. An improved Landauer principle with finite-size corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeb, David; Wolf, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Landauer's principle relates entropy decrease and heat dissipation during logically irreversible processes. Most theoretical justifications of Landauer's principle either use thermodynamic reasoning or rely on specific models based on arguable assumptions. Here, we aim at a general and minimal setup to formulate Landauer's principle in precise terms. We provide a simple and rigorous proof of an improved version of the principle, which is formulated in terms of an equality rather than an inequality. The proof is based on quantum statistical mechanics concepts rather than on thermodynamic argumentation. From this equality version, we obtain explicit improvements of Landauer's bound that depend on the effective size of the thermal reservoir and reduce to Landauer's bound only for infinite-sized reservoirs. (paper)

  5. Finite Size Corrections to the Parisi Overlap Function in the GREM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrida, Bernard; Mottishaw, Peter

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the effects of finite size corrections on the overlap probabilities in the Generalized Random Energy Model in two situations where replica symmetry is broken in the thermodynamic limit. Our calculations do not use replicas, but shed some light on what the replica method should give for finite size corrections. In the gradual freezing situation, which is known to exhibit full replica symmetry breaking, we show that the finite size corrections lead to a modification of the simple relations between the sample averages of the overlaps Y_k between k configurations predicted by replica theory. This can be interpreted as fluctuations in the replica block size with a negative variance. The mechanism is similar to the one we found recently in the random energy model in Derrida and Mottishaw (J Stat Mech 2015(1): P01021, 2015). We also consider a simultaneous freezing situation, which is known to exhibit one step replica symmetry breaking. We show that finite size corrections lead to full replica symmetry breaking and give a more complete derivation of the results presented in Derrida and Mottishaw (Europhys Lett 115(4): 40005, 2016) for the directed polymer on a tree.

  6. Exact Derivation of a Finite-Size Scaling Law and Corrections to Scaling in the Geometric Galton-Watson Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Álvaro; Garcia-Millan, Rosalba; Font-Clos, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    The theory of finite-size scaling explains how the singular behavior of thermodynamic quantities in the critical point of a phase transition emerges when the size of the system becomes infinite. Usually, this theory is presented in a phenomenological way. Here, we exactly demonstrate the existence of a finite-size scaling law for the Galton-Watson branching processes when the number of offsprings of each individual follows either a geometric distribution or a generalized geometric distribution. We also derive the corrections to scaling and the limits of validity of the finite-size scaling law away the critical point. A mapping between branching processes and random walks allows us to establish that these results also hold for the latter case, for which the order parameter turns out to be the probability of hitting a distant boundary. PMID:27584596

  7. Finite size and Coulomb corrections: from nuclei to nuclear liquid vapor phase diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Elliott, J.B.; Phair, L.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of obtaining the infinite symmetric uncharged nuclear matter phase diagram from a thermal nuclear reaction. In the first part we shall consider the Coulomb interaction which, because of its long range makes the definition of phases problematic. This Coulomb effect seems truly devastating since it does not allow one to define nuclear phase transitions much above A ∼ 30. However there may be a solution to this difficulty. If we consider the emission of particles with a sizable charge, we notice that a large Coulomb barrier Bc is present. For T << Bc these channels may be considered effectively closed. Consequently the unbound channels may not play a role on a suitably short time scale. Then a phase transition may still be definable in an approximate way. In the second part of the article we shall deal with the finite size problem by means of a new method, the complement method, which shall permit a straightforward extrapolation to the infinite system. The complement approach consists of evaluating the change in free energy occurring when a particle or cluster is moved from one (finite) phase to another. In the case of a liquid drop in equilibrium with its vapor, this is done by extracting a vapor particle of any given size from the drop and evaluating the energy and entropy changes associated with both the vapor particle and the residual liquid drop (complement)

  8. Charge and finite size corrections for virtual photon spectra in second order Born approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durgapal, P.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of finite nuclear size and charge on the spectrum of virtual photons emitted when a relativistic electron is scattered in the field of an atomic nucleus. The method consisted in expanding the scattering cross section in terms of integrals over the nuclear inelastic form factor with a kernel which was evaluated in second order Born approximation and was derived from the elastic-electron scattering form factor. The kernel could be evaluated analytically provided the elastic form factor contained only poles. For this reason the author used a Yukawa form factor. Before calculating the second order term the author studied the first order term containing finite size effects in the inelastic form factor. The author observed that the virtual photon spectrum is insensitive to the details of the inelastic distribution over a large range of energies and depends only on the transition radius. This gave the author the freedom of choosing an inelastic distribution for which the form factor has only poles and the author chose a modified form of the exponential distribution, which enabled the author to evaluate the matrix element analytically. The remaining integral over the physical momentum transfer was performed numerically. The author evaluated the virtual photon spectra for E1 and M1 transitions for a variety of electron energies using several nuclei and compared the results with the distorted wave calculations. Except for low energy and high Z, the second order results compared well with the distorted wave calculations

  9. Radiative nonrecoil nuclear finite size corrections of order α(Zα)5 to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustov, R. N.; Martynenko, A. P.; Martynenko, F. A.; Sorokin, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    On the basis of quasipotential method in quantum electrodynamics we calculate nuclear finite size radiative corrections of order α(Zα) 5 to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen and helium. To construct the interaction potential of particles, which gives the necessary contributions to the energy spectrum, we use the method of projection operators to states with a definite spin. Separate analytic expressions for the contributions of the muon self-energy, the muon vertex operator and the amplitude with spanning photon are obtained. We present also numerical results for these contributions using modern experimental data on the electromagnetic form factors of light nuclei.

  10. Exact finite-size corrections and corner free energies for the c=−2 universality class

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izmailian, Nickolay; Kenna, Ralph; Guo, Wenan; Wu, Xintian

    2014-01-01

    We consider the partition functions of the anisotropic dimer model on the rectangular (2M−1)×(2N−1) lattice with (a) free and (b) cylindrical boundary conditions with a single monomer residing on the boundary. We express (a) and (b) in terms of a principal partition function with twisted boundary conditions. Based on these expressions, we derive the exact asymptotic expansions of the free energy for both cases (a) and (b). We confirm the conformal field theory prediction for the corner free energy of these models, and find the central charge is c=−2. We also show that the dimer model on the cylinder with an odd number of sites on the perimeter exhibits the same finite-size corrections as on the plane

  11. A corrected model for static and dynamic electromechanical instability of narrow nanotweezers: Incorporation of size effect, surface layer and finite dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koochi, Ali; Hosseini-Toudeshky, Hossein; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2018-03-01

    Herein, a corrected theoretical model is proposed for modeling the static and dynamic behavior of electrostatically actuated narrow-width nanotweezers considering the correction due to finite dimensions, size dependency and surface energy. The Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity in conjunction with the modified couple stress theory is employed to consider the coupling effect of surface stresses and size phenomenon. In addition, the model accounts for the external force corrections by incorporating the impact of narrow width on the distribution of Casimir attraction, van der Waals (vdW) force and the fringing field effect. The proposed model is beneficial for the precise modeling of the narrow nanotweezers in nano-scale.

  12. Finite size scaling and lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Finite size (Fisher) scaling is investigated for four dimensional SU(2) and SU(3) lattice gauge theories without quarks. It allows to disentangle violations of (asymptotic) scaling and finite volume corrections. Mass spectrum, string tension, deconfinement temperature and lattice β-function are considered. For appropriate volumes, Monte Carlo investigations seem to be able to control the finite volume continuum limit. Contact is made with Luescher's small volume expansion and possibly also with the asymptotic large volume behavior. 41 refs., 19 figs

  13. Numerical estimate of the finite-size corrections to the free energy of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model using Guerra-Toninelli interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billoire, Alain

    2006-04-01

    I use an interpolation formula, introduced recently by Guerra and Toninelli, in order to prove the existence of the free energy of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass model in the infinite volume limit, to investigate numerically the finite-size corrections to the free energy of this model. The results are compatible with a (1/12N)ln(N/N0) behavior at Tc , as predicted by Parisi, Ritort, and Slanina, and a 1/N2/3 behavior below Tc .

  14. Finite-size effects in transcript sequencing count distribution: its power-law correction necessarily precedes downstream normalization and comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wing-Cheong; Ng, Hong-Kiat; Tantoso, Erwin; Soong, Richie; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2018-02-12

    Though earlier works on modelling transcript abundance from vertebrates to lower eukaroytes have specifically singled out the Zip's law, the observed distributions often deviate from a single power-law slope. In hindsight, while power-laws of critical phenomena are derived asymptotically under the conditions of infinite observations, real world observations are finite where the finite-size effects will set in to force a power-law distribution into an exponential decay and consequently, manifests as a curvature (i.e., varying exponent values) in a log-log plot. If transcript abundance is truly power-law distributed, the varying exponent signifies changing mathematical moments (e.g., mean, variance) and creates heteroskedasticity which compromises statistical rigor in analysis. The impact of this deviation from the asymptotic power-law on sequencing count data has never truly been examined and quantified. The anecdotal description of transcript abundance being almost Zipf's law-like distributed can be conceptualized as the imperfect mathematical rendition of the Pareto power-law distribution when subjected to the finite-size effects in the real world; This is regardless of the advancement in sequencing technology since sampling is finite in practice. Our conceptualization agrees well with our empirical analysis of two modern day NGS (Next-generation sequencing) datasets: an in-house generated dilution miRNA study of two gastric cancer cell lines (NUGC3 and AGS) and a publicly available spike-in miRNA data; Firstly, the finite-size effects causes the deviations of sequencing count data from Zipf's law and issues of reproducibility in sequencing experiments. Secondly, it manifests as heteroskedasticity among experimental replicates to bring about statistical woes. Surprisingly, a straightforward power-law correction that restores the distribution distortion to a single exponent value can dramatically reduce data heteroskedasticity to invoke an instant increase in

  15. Nonvariational calculation of the relativistic, finite-size, and QED corrections for the 2 1S excited state of the helium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haftel, M.I.; Mandelzweig, V.B.

    1994-01-01

    Relativistic and QED corrections are calculated by using a direct solution of the Schroedinger equation for the 2 1 S excited state of the helium atom obtained with the correlation-function hyperspherical-harmonic method. Our extremely accurate nonvariational results for relativistic, QED, and finite-size corrections coincide exactly (up to 0.000 03 cm -1 ) with the values obtained in precision variational calculations of Drake [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 5, 2207 (1988)] and Baker, Hill, and Morgan [in Relativistic, Quantum Electrodynamic and Weak Interaction Effects in Atoms, edited by Walter Johnson, Peter Mohr, and Joseph Sucher, AIP Conf. Proc. No. 189 (AIP, New York, 1989), p. 123] for both infinite and finite nuclear masses. This confirms that a discrepancy of 0.0033 cm -1 between theory and experiment is not a result of an inaccuracy of variational wave functions, but is rooted in our inadequate knowledge of the QED operators. A better understanding of the different QED contributions to the operators (such as, for example, a more precise estimate of the Bethe logarithm) is therefore needed to explain the discrepancy

  16. On static second order correction to cross sections of electron elastic scattering by nuclei of finite size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerimov, B.K.; Safin, M.Ya.; Al'-Khamis, I.M.

    1978-01-01

    The second Born approximation static correction to the differential cross section of elastic scattering of electrons on nuclei is studied with account for the nuclear charge and magnetic dipole formfactors. Only Coulomb potential contribution is taken into account in the electron scattering cross section. In the case of the magnetic scattering the cross sections are summed and averaged over spin states of a nucleus. The general expressions for the static correction are obtained. The angular dependences of the relative correction to the magnetic dipole elastic electron- 9 Be scattering cross section are presented

  17. Finite Size Scaling of Perceptron

    OpenAIRE

    Korutcheva, Elka; Tonchev, N.

    2000-01-01

    We study the first-order transition in the model of a simple perceptron with continuous weights and large, bit finite value of the inputs. Making the analogy with the usual finite-size physical systems, we calculate the shift and the rounding exponents near the transition point. In the case of a general perceptron with larger variety of inputs, the analysis only gives bounds for the exponents.

  18. Finite size vertex correction to the strong decay of eta sub c and chi sub c states and a determination of alpha sub s (m sub c)

    CERN Document Server

    Ping Rong Gang; Zou Bing Song

    2002-01-01

    The authors calculate the correction to the two-gluon decay width due to the finite extension of the vertex function. The authors obtain the corrected factor to the zero-range vertex gamma = 1.32, gamma = 1.45, gamma= 1.26 for eta sub c , chi sub c sub 0 , and chi sub c sub 2 , respectively. With the decay width GAMMA(eta sub c->2 g) the authors extract the value alpha sub s (m sub c) 0.28 +- 0.05 which agrees with that calculated from the same correction to the process GAMMA(J/psi -> 3 g). This correction to the process GAMMA(eta sub c -> 2 g) is not as large as that to the process GAMMA(J/psi -> 3 g)

  19. Finite-size effects from giant magnons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arutyunov, Gleb [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)]. E-mail: g.arutyunov@phys.uu.nl; Frolov, Sergey [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)]. E-mail: frolovs@aei.mpg.de; Zamaklar, Marija [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)]. E-mail: marzam@aei.mpg.de

    2007-08-27

    In order to analyze finite-size effects for the gauge-fixed string sigma model on AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}, we construct one-soliton solutions carrying finite angular momentum J. In the infinite J limit the solutions reduce to the recently constructed one-magnon configuration of Hofman and Maldacena. The solutions do not satisfy the level-matching condition and hence exhibit a dependence on the gauge choice, which however disappears as the size J is taken to infinity. Interestingly, the solutions do not conserve all the global charges of the psu(2,2-vertical bar4) algebra of the sigma model, implying that the symmetry algebra of the gauge-fixed string sigma model is different from psu(2,2-vertical bar4) for finite J, once one gives up the level-matching condition. The magnon dispersion relation exhibits exponential corrections with respect to the infinite J solution. We also find a generalisation of our one-magnon configuration to a solution carrying two charges on the sphere. We comment on the possible implications of our findings for the existence of the Bethe ansatz describing the spectrum of strings carrying finite charges.

  20. Quark bag coupling to finite size pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Kam, J.; Pirner, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    A standard approximation in theories of quark bags coupled to a pion field is to treat the pion as an elementary field ignoring its substructure and finite size. A difficulty associated with these treatments in the lack of stability of the quark bag due to the rapid increase of the pion pressure on the bad as the bag size diminishes. We investigate the effects of the finite size of the qanti q pion on the pion quark bag coupling by means of a simple nonlocal pion quark interaction. With this amendment the pion pressure on the bag vanishes if the bag size goes to zero. No stability problems are encountered in this description. Furthermore, for extended pions, no longer a maximum is set to the bag parameter B. Therefore 'little bag' solutions may be found provided that B is large enough. We also discuss the possibility of a second minimum in the bag energy function. (orig.)

  1. Effect of Hall Current and Finite Larmor Radius Corrections on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effects of finite ion Larmor radius (FLR) corrections,. Hall current and radiative heat-loss function on the thermal instability of an infinite homogeneous, viscous plasma incorporating the effects of finite electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and permeability for star formation in interstellar medium have been ...

  2. Dynamic finite size effects in spiking neural networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Buice

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamics of a deterministic finite-sized network of synaptically coupled spiking neurons and present a formalism for computing the network statistics in a perturbative expansion. The small parameter for the expansion is the inverse number of neurons in the network. The network dynamics are fully characterized by a neuron population density that obeys a conservation law analogous to the Klimontovich equation in the kinetic theory of plasmas. The Klimontovich equation does not possess well-behaved solutions but can be recast in terms of a coupled system of well-behaved moment equations, known as a moment hierarchy. The moment hierarchy is impossible to solve but in the mean field limit of an infinite number of neurons, it reduces to a single well-behaved conservation law for the mean neuron density. For a large but finite system, the moment hierarchy can be truncated perturbatively with the inverse system size as a small parameter but the resulting set of reduced moment equations that are still very difficult to solve. However, the entire moment hierarchy can also be re-expressed in terms of a functional probability distribution of the neuron density. The moments can then be computed perturbatively using methods from statistical field theory. Here we derive the complete mean field theory and the lowest order second moment corrections for physiologically relevant quantities. Although we focus on finite-size corrections, our method can be used to compute perturbative expansions in any parameter.

  3. Static phantom wormholes of finite size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Orellana, Fabian

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we derive new static phantom traversable wormholes by assuming a shape function with a quadratic dependence on the radial coordinate r . We mainly focus our study on wormholes sustained by exotic matter with positive energy density (as seen by any static observer) and a variable equation of state pr/ρ wormhole spacetimes extending to infinity, we show that a quadratic shape function allows us to construct static spacetimes of finite size, composed of a phantom wormhole connected to an anisotropic spherically symmetric distribution of dark energy. The wormhole part of the full spacetime does not fulfill the dominant energy condition, while the dark energy part does.

  4. Optimization of finite-size errors in finite-temperature calculations of unordered phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Deepak; Srednicki, Mark; Rigol, Marcos

    2015-06-01

    It is common knowledge that the microcanonical, canonical, and grand-canonical ensembles are equivalent in thermodynamically large systems. Here, we study finite-size effects in the latter two ensembles. We show that contrary to naive expectations, finite-size errors are exponentially small in grand canonical ensemble calculations of translationally invariant systems in unordered phases at finite temperature. Open boundary conditions and canonical ensemble calculations suffer from finite-size errors that are only polynomially small in the system size. We further show that finite-size effects are generally smallest in numerical linked cluster expansions. Our conclusions are supported by analytical and numerical analyses of classical and quantum systems.

  5. The Nuclear Finite–Size Corrections to Energies of n = 1, n = 2 AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The first order perturbative approach has been applied and the finite-size nuclear corrections of order of the scaling factors, ξ, ξ2 and ξ3 for n = 1, n = 2 and n = 3 energy levels respectively for the hydrogen atom, have been computed. Results show that as the energy levels increases, the effects of the finitesize nucleus on ...

  6. Finite Sample Corrections for Parameters Estimation and Significance Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boon Kin Teh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasingly important problem in the era of Big Data is fitting data to distributions. However, many stop at visually inspecting the fits or use the coefficient of determination as a measure of the goodness of fit. In general, goodness-of-fit measures do not allow us to tell which of several distributions fit the data best. Also, the likelihood of drawing the data from a distribution can be low even when the fit is good. To overcome these limitations, Clauset et al. advocated a three-step procedure for fitting any distribution: (i estimate parameter(s accurately, (ii choosing and calculating an appropriate goodness of fit, (iii test its significance to determine how likely this goodness of fit will appear in samples of the distribution. When we perform this significance testing on exponential distributions, we often obtain low significance values despite the fits being visually good. This led to our realization that most fitting methods do not account for effects due to the finite number of elements and the finite largest element. The former produces sample size dependence in the goodness of fits and the latter introduces a bias in the estimated parameter and the goodness of fit. We propose modifications to account for both and show that these corrections improve the significance of the fits of both real and simulated data. In addition, we used simulations and analytical approximations to verify that convergence rate of the estimated parameters toward its true value depends on how fast the largest element converge to infinity, and provide fast inversion formulas to obtain p-values directly from the adjusted test statistics, in place of doing more Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Effect of Hall Current and Finite Larmor Radius Corrections on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 37; Issue 3. Effect of Hall Current and Finite Larmor Radius Corrections on Thermal Instability of Radiative Plasma for Star Formation in Interstellar Medium (ISM). Sachin Kaothekar. Research Article Volume 37 Issue 3 September 2016 Article ID 23 ...

  8. A Generalized Finite Source Calibration Factor: A Natural Improvement to the Finite Source Correction Factor for Uranium Holdup Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, C.A.; Oberer, R.B.; Chiang, L.G.; Ceo, R.N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes refinements to the finite source correction factor used in holdup measurements. Specifically it focuses on a more general method to estimate the average detector response for a finite source. This proposed method for the average detector response is based directly on the Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) assay method. First, the finite source correction factor as originally proposed is reviewed in this paper. Following this review the GGH assay method is described. Lastly, a new finite area calibration factor based on GGH is then proposed for finite point and line sources. As an alternative to the direct use of the finite arca calibration factor, finite source correction factors are also derived from this calibration factor. This new correction factor can be used in a manner similar to the finite source correction factor as currently implemented

  9. Finite-Q22 Corrections to Parity-Violating DIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Hobbs; W. Melnitchouk

    2008-01-01

    Parity-violating deep inelastic scattering (PVDIS) has been proposed as an important new tool to extract the flavor and isospin dependence of parton distributions in the nucleon. We discuss finite-Q 2 effects in PVDIS asymmetries arising from subleading kinematical corrections and longitudinal contributions to the gamma Z interference. For the proton, these need to be accounted for when extracting the d/u ratio at large x. For the deuteron, the finite-Q 2 corrections can distort the effects of charge symmetry violation in parton distributions, or signals for physics beyond the standard model. We further explore the dependence of PVDIS asymmetries for polarized targets on the u and d helicity distributions at large x

  10. Rational three-spin string duals and non-anomalous finite size effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freyhult, Lisa; Kristjansen, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    We determine by a one line computation the one-loop conformal dimension and the associated non-anomalous finite size correction for all operators dual to spinning strings of rational type having three angular momenta (J_1,J_2,J_3) on S^5. Finite size corrections are conjectured to encode informat......We determine by a one line computation the one-loop conformal dimension and the associated non-anomalous finite size correction for all operators dual to spinning strings of rational type having three angular momenta (J_1,J_2,J_3) on S^5. Finite size corrections are conjectured to encode...... information about string sigma model loop corrections to the spectrum of type IIB superstrings on AdS_5xS^5. We compare our result to the zero-mode contribution to the leading quantum string correction derived for the stable three-spin string with two out of the three spin labels identical and observe...... agreement. As a side result we clarify the relation between the Bethe root description of three-spin strings of the type (J,J',J') with respectively J>J' and JJ....

  11. Finite-size scaling of survival probability in branching processes

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Millan, Rosalba; Font-Clos, Francesc; Corral, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Branching processes pervade many models in statistical physics. We investigate the survival probability of a Galton-Watson branching process after a finite number of generations. We reveal the finite-size scaling law of the survival probability for a given branching process ruled by a probability distribution of the number of offspring per element whose standard deviation is finite, obtaining the exact scaling function as well as the critical exponents. Our findings prove the universal behavi...

  12. Finite-State Complexity and the Size of Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Calude

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Finite-state complexity is a variant of algorithmic information theory obtained by replacing Turing machines with finite transducers. We consider the state-size of transducers needed for minimal descriptions of arbitrary strings and, as our main result, we show that the state-size hierarchy with respect to a standard encoding is infinite. We consider also hierarchies yielded by more general computable encodings.

  13. Finite-size scaling on the Ising coexistence line

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Sourendu

    1992-01-01

    We report tests of finite-size scaling ansatzes in the low temperature phase of the two-dimensional Ising model. For moments of the magnetisation density, we find good agreement with the new ansatz of Borgs and Koteck\\'y, and clear evi consequences of the convexity of the free energy are not adequately treated in either of these approaches.\\lb {\\it Keywords}\\/: Finite-size scaling, 2-d Ising, pure-phase susceptibility.

  14. Wave functions and finite size effects in a two-dimensional lattice field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thacker, H.B.

    1985-06-01

    A study of finite size corrections to the masses of fermions and bound states in the Baxter/massive Thirring/sine Gordon lattice field theory is discussed. It is shown that information on bound tate wave functions may be used to extrapolate Monte Carlo mass calculations to infinite volume. 10 refs., 4 figs

  15. Size effects in finite systems with long-range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscar, E. S.; Horowitz, C. M.

    2018-03-01

    Small systems consisting of particles interacting with long-range potentials exhibit enormous size effects. The Tsallis conjecture [Tsallis, Fractals 3, 541 (1995), 10.1142/S0218348X95000473], valid for translationally invariant systems with long-range interactions, states a well-known scaling relating different sizes. Here we propose to generalize this conjecture to systems with this symmetry broken, by adjusting one parameter that determines an effective distance to compute the strength of the interaction. We apply this proposal to the one-dimensional Ising model with ferromagnetic interactions that decay as 1 /r1 +σ in the region where the model has a finite critical temperature. We demonstrate the convenience of using this generalization to study finite-size effects, and we compare this approach with the finite-size scaling theory.

  16. Finite-size scaling of survival probability in branching processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Millan, Rosalba; Font-Clos, Francesc; Corral, Álvaro

    2015-04-01

    Branching processes pervade many models in statistical physics. We investigate the survival probability of a Galton-Watson branching process after a finite number of generations. We derive analytically the existence of finite-size scaling for the survival probability as a function of the control parameter and the maximum number of generations, obtaining the critical exponents as well as the exact scaling function, which is G(y)=2ye(y)/(e(y)-1), with y the rescaled distance to the critical point. Our findings are valid for any branching process of the Galton-Watson type, independently of the distribution of the number of offspring, provided its variance is finite. This proves the universal behavior of the finite-size effects in branching processes, including the universality of the metric factors. The direct relation to mean-field percolation is also discussed.

  17. Three-point correlation functions of giant magnons with finite size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Changrim; Bozhilov, Plamen

    2011-01-01

    We compute holographic three-point correlation functions or structure constants of a zero-momentum dilaton operator and two (dyonic) giant magnon string states with a finite-size length in the semiclassical approximation. We show that the semiclassical structure constants match exactly with the three-point functions between two su(2) magnon single trace operators with finite size and the Lagrangian in the large 't Hooft coupling constant limit. A special limit J>>√(λ) of our result is compared with the relevant result based on the Luescher corrections.

  18. Finite size and dynamical effects in pair production by an external field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.; Vautherin, D.

    1988-12-01

    We evaluate the rate of pair production in a uniform electric field confined into a bounded region in space. Using the Balian-Bloch expansion of Green's functions we obtain explicit expressions for finite size corrections to Schwinger's formula. The case of a time-dependent boundary, relevant to describe energy deposition by quark-antiquark pair production in ultrarelativistic collisions, is also investigated. We find that finite size effects are important in nuclear collisions. They decrease when the strength of the chromo-electric field between the nuclei is large. As a result, the rate of energy deposition increases sharply with the mass number A of the colliding nuclei

  19. Electroweak vacuum stability and finite quadratic radiative corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masina, Isabella [Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica e Scienze della Terra; INFN, Sezione di Ferrara (Italy); Southern Denmark Univ., Odense (Denmark). CP3-Origins; Southern Denmark Univ., Odense (Denmark). DIAS; Nardini, Germano [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Quiros, Mariano [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); IFAE-IAB, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    If the Standard Model (SM) is an effective theory, as currently believed, it is valid up to some energy scale Λ to which the Higgs vacuum expectation value is sensitive throughout radiative quadratic terms. The latter ones destabilize the electroweak vacuum and generate the SM hierarchy problem. For a given perturbative Ultraviolet (UV) completion, the SM cutoff can be computed in terms of fundamental parameters. If the UV mass spectrum involves several scales the cutoff is not unique and each SM sector has its own UV cutoff Λ{sub i}. We have performed this calculation assuming the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) is the SM UV completion. As a result, from the SM point of view, the quadratic corrections to the Higgs mass are equivalent to finite threshold contributions. For the measured values of the top quark and Higgs masses, and depending on the values of the different cutoffs Λ{sub i}, these contributions can cancel even at renormalization scales as low as multi-TeV, unlike the case of a single cutoff where the cancellation only occurs at Planckian energies, a result originally obtained by Veltman. From the MSSM point of view, the requirement of stability of the electroweak minimum under radiative corrections is incorporated into the matching conditions and provides an extra constraint on the Focus Point solution to the little hierarchy problem in the MSSM. These matching conditions can be employed for precise calculations of the Higgs sector in scenarios with heavy supersymmetric fields.

  20. Comparison study of finite element and basis set methods for finite size scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antillon, Edwin; Moy, Winton; Wei Qi; Kais, Sabre

    2009-01-01

    We compare two methods of obtaining critical parameters for a quantum Hamiltonian using a finite size scaling approach. A finite element and basis set method were used in conjunction with the finite size scaling to obtain the critical parameters for the Hulthen potential. The critical parameters obtained analytically were the coupling constant λ c =(1/2), the critical exponents for the energy α=2 and for the 'correlation length 'ν=1. The extrapolated results for finite size scaling with the basis set method are λ c =0.499 99, α=1.9960, and ν=0.999 10. The results for the finite element solutions are λ c =0.501 84, α=1.999 93, and ν=1.000 79 for the linear interpolation and λ c =0.500 00, α=2.000 11, and ν=1.000 32 for the Hermite interpolation. The results for each method compare very well with the analytical results obtained for the Hulthen potential. However, the finite element method is easier to implement and may be combined with ab initio and density functional theory to obtain quantum critical parameters for more complex systems.

  1. Simulation of finite size effects of the fiber bundle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Da-Peng; Tang, Gang; Xun, Zhi-Peng; Xia, Hui; Han, Kui

    2018-01-01

    In theory, the macroscopic fracture of materials should correspond with the thermodynamic limit of the fiber bundle model. However, the simulation of a fiber bundle model with an infinite size is unrealistic. To study the finite size effects of the fiber bundle model, fiber bundle models of various size are simulated in detail. The effects of system size on the constitutive behavior, critical stress, maximum avalanche size, avalanche size distribution, and increased step number of external load are explored. The simulation results imply that there is no feature size or cut size for macroscopic mechanical and statistical properties of the model. The constitutive curves near the macroscopic failure for various system size can collapse well with a simple scaling relationship. Simultaneously, the introduction of a simple extrapolation method facilitates the acquisition of more accurate simulation results in a large-limit system, which is better for comparison with theoretical results.

  2. Finite-Size Effects for Some Bootstrap Percolation Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enter, A.C.D. van; Adler, Joan; Duarte, J.A.M.S.

    The consequences of Schonmann's new proof that the critical threshold is unity for certain bootstrap percolation models are explored. It is shown that this proof provides an upper bound for the finite-size scaling in these systems. Comparison with data for one case demonstrates that this scaling

  3. Conjugacy class sizes and solvability of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Let be a finite group and * be the set of primary, biprimary and triprimary elements of . We prove that if the conjugacy class sizes of * are {1,,,} with positive coprime integers and ,then is solvable. This extends a recent result of Kong (Manatsh. Math. 168(2)(2012) 267–271).

  4. Finite-size effects for the gap in the excitation spectrum of the one-dimensional Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colomé-Tatché, M.; Matveenko, S.I.; Shlyapnikov, G.V.

    2010-01-01

    We study finite-size effects for the gap of the quasiparticle excitation spectrum in the weakly interacting regime one-dimensional Hubbard model with on-site attraction. Two types of corrections to the result of the thermodynamic limit are obtained. Aside from a power law (conformal) correction due

  5. A correction for emittance-measurement errors caused by finite slit and collector widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    One method of measuring the transverse phase-space distribution of a particle beam is to intercept the beam with a slit and measure the angular distribution of the beam passing through the slit using a parallel-strip collector. Together the finite widths of the slit and each collector strip form an acceptance window in phase space whose size and orientation are determined by the slit width, the strip width, and the slit-collector distance. If a beam is measured using a detector with a finite-size phase-space window, the measured distribution is different from the true distribution. The calculated emittance is larger than the true emittance, and the error depends both on the dimensions of the detector and on the Courant-Snyder parameters of the beam. Specifically, the error gets larger as the beam drifts farther from a waist. This can be important for measurements made on high-brightness beams, since power density considerations require that the beam be intercepted far from a waist. In this paper we calculate the measurement error and we show how the calculated emittance and Courant-Snyder parameters can be corrected for the effects of finite sizes of slit and collector. (Author) 5 figs., 3 refs

  6. Spin stiffness of frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnets: Finite size scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feiguin, A.E.; Gazza, C.J.; Trumper, A.E.

    1995-07-01

    We calculate the spin stiffness of the S = 1/2 frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnet on finite square lattices by means of the Schwinger - boson approach. COmparison with recent exact numerical results reveals that the observed lack of scaling with lattice size for intermediate to large frustration cannot be taken as an indication of absence of Neel order. This lack of scaling is already apparent for small frustration and is a finite lattice effect. Our results also indicate that the expected behaviour is regained for larger lattices than those considered in numerical studies. (author). 18 refs, 2 figs

  7. Finite size effects in simulations of protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Pawar

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that the soluble protofibrillar species that proceed amyloid fibril formation are associated with a range of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases. Computer simulations of the processes that lead to the formation of these oligomeric species are starting to make significant contributions to our understanding of the determinants of protein aggregation. We simulate different systems at constant concentration but with a different number of peptides and we study the how the finite number of proteins affects the underlying free energy of the system and therefore the relative stability of the species involved in the process. If not taken into account, this finite size effect can undermine the validity of theoretical predictions regarding the relative stability of the species involved and the rates of conversion from one to the other. We discuss the reasons that give rise to this finite size effect form both a probabilistic and energy fluctuations point of view and also how this problem can be dealt by a finite size scaling analysis.

  8. Finite-size effects in a cellular automaton for diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froboese, K.

    1989-01-01

    The question whether diffusion in the hard-square lattice gas is blocked in the thermodynamic limit is mapped to the problem whether percolation occurs in the time evolution of a cellular automaton. The final states of the cellular automaton are investigated for varying lattice sizes from 6 x 6 up to 20,035 x 20,032. The results seem to indicate that there is a percolation threshold, i.e., a range of concentrations for which diffusion is blocked. However, since this cannot be true for the infinite system, as proven rigorously, it is concluded that finite-size effects persist for this system up to very large sizes

  9. Sensitivity of resistive and Hall measurements to local inhomogeneities: Finite-field, intensity, and area corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koon, Daniel W.; Wang, Fei; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Hansen, Ole

    2014-10-01

    We derive exact, analytic expressions for the sensitivity of sheet resistance and Hall sheet resistance measurements to local inhomogeneities for the cases of nonzero magnetic fields, strong perturbations, and perturbations over a finite area, extending our earlier results on weak perturbations. We express these sensitivities for conductance tensor components and for other charge transport quantities. Both resistive and Hall sensitivities, for a van der Pauw specimen in a finite magnetic field, are a superposition of the zero-field sensitivities to both sheet resistance and Hall sheet resistance. Strong perturbations produce a nonlinear correction term that depends on the strength of the inhomogeneity. Solution of the specific case of a finite-sized circular inhomogeneity coaxial with a circular specimen suggests a first-order correction for the general case. Our results are confirmed by computer simulations on both a linear four-point probe array on a large circular disc and a van der Pauw square geometry. Furthermore, the results also agree well with Náhlík et al. published experimental results for physical holes in a circular copper foil disc.

  10. Finite groups with three conjugacy class sizes of some elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Let G be a finite group. We prove as follows: Let G be a p-solvable group for a fixed prime p. If the conjugacy class sizes of all elements of primary and biprimary orders of G are {1, pa, n} with a and n two positive integers and (p, n) = 1, then G is p-nilpotent or G has abelian Sylow p-subgroups. Keywords. Conjugacy ...

  11. Do Reichenbachian Common Cause Systems of Arbitrary Finite Size Exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Claudio; Evans, Peter W.

    2017-12-01

    The principle of common cause asserts that positive correlations between causally unrelated events ought to be explained through the action of some shared causal factors. Reichenbachian common cause systems are probabilistic structures aimed at accounting for cases where correlations of the aforesaid sort cannot be explained through the action of a single common cause. The existence of Reichenbachian common cause systems of arbitrary finite size for each pair of non-causally correlated events was allegedly demonstrated by Hofer-Szabó and Rédei in 2006. This paper shows that their proof is logically deficient, and we propose an improved proof.

  12. Finite size scaling study of Nf=4 finite density QCD on the lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiao-Yong; Kuramashi, Yoshinobu; Nakamura, Yoshifumi; Takeda, Shinji; Ukawa, Akira

    2013-11-01

    We explore the phase space spanned by the temperature and the chemical potential for four-flavor lattice QCD using the Wilson-clover quark action. In order to determine the order of the phase transition, we apply finite-size scaling analyses to gluonic and quark observables, including plaquette, Polyakov loop, and quark number density, and examine their susceptibility, skewness, kurtosis, and Challa-Landau-Binder cumulant. Simulations were carried out on lattices of a temporal size fixed at Nt=4 and spatial sizes chosen from 63 up to 103. Configurations were generated using the phase-reweighting approach, while the value of the phase of the quark determinant was carefully monitored. The μ-parameter reweighting technique is employed to precisely locate the point of the phase transition. Among various approximation schemes for calculating the ratio of quark determinants needed for μ reweighting, we found the Taylor expansion of the logarithm of the quark determinant to be the most reliable. Our finite-size analyses show that the transition is first order at (β,κ,μ/T)=(1.58,0.1385,0.584±0.008), where (mπ/mρ,T/mρ)=(0.822,0.154). It weakens considerably at (β,κ,μ/T)=(1.60,0.1371,0.821±0.008), where (mπ/mρ,T/mρ)=(0.839,0.150), and a crossover rather than a first-order phase transition cannot be ruled out.

  13. Effect of Hall Current and Finite Larmor Radius Corrections on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The finite electrical resistivity removes the effect of magnetic field and the viscosity of the medium removes the effect of FLR from the condition of radiative instability. The Hall parameter affects only the longitudinal mode of propagation and it has no effect on the transverse mode of propagation. Numerical calculation shows ...

  14. Finite-size effects on multibody neutrino exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Abada, A; Rodríguez-Quintero, J; Abada, As

    1998-01-01

    The effect of multibody massless neutrino exchanges between neutrons inside a finite-size neutron star is studied. We use an effective Lagrangian, which incorporates the effect of the neutrons on the neutrinos. Following Schwinger, it is shown that the total interaction energy density is computed by comparing the zero point energy of the neutrino sea with and without the star. It has already been shown that in an infinite-size star the total energy due to neutrino exchange vanishes exactly. The opposite claim that massless neutrino exchange would produce a huge energy is due to an improper summation of an infrared-divergent quantity. The same vanishing of the total energy has been proved exactly in the case of a finite star in a one-dimensional toy model. Here we study the three-dimensional case. We first consider the effect of a sharp star border, assumed to be a plane. We find that there is a non- vanishing of the zero point energy density difference between the inside and the outside due to the refraction ...

  15. Diffusion of finite-size particles in confined geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Maria; Chapman, S Jonathan

    2014-04-01

    The diffusion of finite-size hard-core interacting particles in two- or three-dimensional confined domains is considered in the limit that the confinement dimensions become comparable to the particle's dimensions. The result is a nonlinear diffusion equation for the one-particle probability density function, with an overall collective diffusion that depends on both the excluded-volume and the narrow confinement. By including both these effects, the equation is able to interpolate between severe confinement (for example, single-file diffusion) and unconfined diffusion. Numerical solutions of both the effective nonlinear diffusion equation and the stochastic particle system are presented and compared. As an application, the case of diffusion under a ratchet potential is considered, and the change in transport properties due to excluded-volume and confinement effects is examined.

  16. Diffusion of Finite-Size Particles in Confined Geometries

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, Maria

    2013-05-10

    The diffusion of finite-size hard-core interacting particles in two- or three-dimensional confined domains is considered in the limit that the confinement dimensions become comparable to the particle\\'s dimensions. The result is a nonlinear diffusion equation for the one-particle probability density function, with an overall collective diffusion that depends on both the excluded-volume and the narrow confinement. By including both these effects, the equation is able to interpolate between severe confinement (for example, single-file diffusion) and unconfined diffusion. Numerical solutions of both the effective nonlinear diffusion equation and the stochastic particle system are presented and compared. As an application, the case of diffusion under a ratchet potential is considered, and the change in transport properties due to excluded-volume and confinement effects is examined. © 2013 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  17. Finite-size giant magnons on η-deformed AdS5×S5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changrim Ahn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider strings moving in the Rt×Sη3 subspace of the η-deformed AdS5×S5 and obtain a class of solutions depending on several parameters. They are characterized by the string energy and two angular momenta. Finite-size dyonic giant magnon belongs to this class of solutions. Further on, we restrict ourselves to the case of giant magnon with one nonzero angular momentum, and obtain the leading finite-size correction to the dispersion relation.

  18. Equilibrium between a Droplet and Surrounding Vapor: A Discussion of Finite Size Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröster, Andreas; Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2018-01-10

    In a theoretical description of homogeneous nucleation one frequently assumes an "equilibrium" coexistence of a liquid droplet with surrounding vapor of a density exceeding that of a saturated vapor at bulk vapor-liquid two-phase coexistence. Thereby one ignores the caveat that in the thermodynamic limit, for which the vapor would be called supersaturated, such states will at best be metastable with finite lifetime, and thus not be well-defined within equilibrium statistical mechanics. In contrast, in a system of finite volume stable equilibrium coexistence of droplet and supersaturated vapor at constant total density is perfectly possible, and numerical analysis of equilibrium free energies of finite systems allows to obtain physically relevant results. In particular, such an analysis can be used to derive the dependence of the droplet surface tension γ(R) on the droplet radius R by computer simulations. Unfortunately, however, the precision of the results produced by this approach turns out to be seriously affected by a hitherto unexplained spurious dependence of γ(R) on the total volume V of the simulation box. These finite size effects are studied here for the standard Ising/lattice gas model in d = 2 dimensions and an Ising model on the face-centered cubic lattice with 3-spin interaction, lacking symmetry between vapor and liquid phases. There also the analogous case of bubbles surrounded by undersaturated liquid is treated. It is argued that (at least a large part of) the finite size effects result from the translation entropy of the droplet or bubble in the system. This effect has been shown earlier to occur also for planar interfaces for simulations in the slab geometry. Consequences for the estimation of the Tolman length are briefly discussed. In particular, we find clear evidence that in d = 2 the leading correction of the curvature-dependent interface tension is a logarithmic term, compatible with theoretical expectations, and we show that then the

  19. Star formation through thermal instability of radiative plasma with finite electron inertia and finite Larmor radius corrections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Kaothekar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available I have studied the effects of finite electron inertia, finite ion Larmor radius (FLR corrections, and radiative heat-loss function on the thermal instability of an infinite homogeneous, viscous plasma incorporating the effect of thermal conductivity for star formation in interstellar medium (ISM. A general dispersion relation is derived using the normal mode analysis method with the help of relevant linearized perturbation equations of the problem. The wave propagation is discussed for longitudinal and transverse directions to the external magnetic field and the conditions of modified thermal instabilities and stabilities are discussed in different cases. We find that the thermal instability criterion is get modified into radiative instability criterion by inclusion of radiative heat-loss functions with thermal conductivity. The viscosity of medium removes the effect of FLR corrections from the condition of radiative instability. Numerical calculation shows stabilizing effect of heat-loss function, viscosity and FLR corrections, and destabilizing effect of finite electron inertia on the thermal instability. Results carried out in this paper shows that stars are formed in interstellar medium mainly due to thermal instability.

  20. Revisionist integral deferred correction with adaptive step-size control

    KAUST Repository

    Christlieb, Andrew

    2015-03-27

    © 2015 Mathematical Sciences Publishers. Adaptive step-size control is a critical feature for the robust and efficient numerical solution of initial-value problems in ordinary differential equations. In this paper, we show that adaptive step-size control can be incorporated within a family of parallel time integrators known as revisionist integral deferred correction (RIDC) methods. The RIDC framework allows for various strategies to implement stepsize control, and we report results from exploring a few of them.

  1. Quantum size correction to the work function and centroid of excess charge in positively ionized simple metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payami, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, we have shown the important role of the finite-size correction to the work function in predicting the correct position of the centroid of excess charge in positively charged simple metal clusters with different r s values (2≤ r s ≥ 7). For this purpose, firstly we have calculated the self-consistent Kohn-Sham energies of neutral and singly-ionized clusters with sizes 2≤ N ≥100 in the framework of local spin-density approximation and stabilized jellium model as well as simple jellium model with rigid jellium. Secondly, we have fitted our results to the asymptotic ionization formulas both with and without the size correction to the work function. The results of fittings show that the formula containing the size correction predict a correct position of the centroid inside the jellium while the other predicts a false position, outside the jellium sphere

  2. Finite size scaling analysis of disordered electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markos, P.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrated the application of the finite size scaling method to the analysis of the transition of the disordered system from the metallic to the insulating regime. The method enables us to calculate the critical point and the critical exponent which determines the divergence of the correlation length in the vicinity of the critical point. The universality of the metal-insulator transition was verified by numerical analysis of various physical parameters and the critical exponent was calculated with high accuracy for different disordered models. Numerically obtained value of the critical exponent for the three dimensional disordered model (1) has been recently supported by the semi-analytical work and verified by experimental optical measurements equivalent to the three dimensional disordered model (1). Another unsolved problem of the localization is the disagreement between numerical results and predictions of the analytical theories. At present, no analytical theory confirms numerically obtained values of critical exponents. The reason for this disagreement lies in the statistical character of the process of localization. The theory must consider all possible scattering processes on randomly distributed impurities. All physical variables are statistical quantities with broad probability distributions. It is in general not know how to calculate analytically their mean values. We believe that detailed numerical analysis of various disordered systems bring inspiration for the formulation of analytical theory. (authors)

  3. Holographic relaxation of finite size isolated quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abajo-Arrastia, Javier; Silva, Emilia da; Lopez, Esperanza; Mas, Javier; Serantes, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    We study holographically the out of equilibrium dynamics of a finite size closed quantum system in 2+1 dimensions, modelled by the collapse of a shell of a massless scalar field in AdS 4 . In global coordinates there exists a variety of evolutions towards final black hole formation which we relate with different patterns of relaxation in the dual field theory. For large scalar initial data rapid thermalization is achieved as a priori expected. Interesting phenomena appear for small enough amplitudes. Such shells do not generate a black hole by direct collapse, but quite generically, an apparent horizon emerges after enough bounces off the AdS boundary. We relate this bulk evolution with relaxation processes at strong coupling which delay in reaching an ergodic stage. Besides the dynamics of bulk fields, we monitor the entanglement entropy, finding that it oscillates quasi-periodically before final equilibration. The radial position of the travelling shell is brought in correspondence with the evolution of the pattern of entanglement in the dual field theory. We propose, thereafter, that the observed oscillations are the dual counterpart of the quantum revivals studied in the literature. The entanglement entropy is not only able to portrait the streaming of entangled excitations, but it is also a useful probe of interaction effects

  4. The Optimal Inhomogeneity for Superconductivity: Finite Size Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, W-F.

    2010-04-06

    We report the results of exact diagonalization studies of Hubbard models on a 4 x 4 square lattice with periodic boundary conditions and various degrees and patterns of inhomogeneity, which are represented by inequivalent hopping integrals t and t{prime}. We focus primarily on two patterns, the checkerboard and the striped cases, for a large range of values of the on-site repulsion U and doped hole concentration, x. We present evidence that superconductivity is strongest for U of order the bandwidth, and intermediate inhomogeneity, 0 < t{prime} < t. The maximum value of the 'pair-binding energy' we have found with purely repulsive interactions is {Delta}{sub pb} = 0.32t for the checkerboard Hubbard model with U = 8t and t{prime} = 0.5t. Moreover, for near optimal values, our results are insensitive to changes in boundary conditions, suggesting that the correlation length is sufficiently short that finite size effects are already unimportant.

  5. Finite-size scaling of the entanglement entropy of the quantum Ising chain with homogeneous, periodically modulated and random couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglói, Ferenc; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    Using free-fermionic techniques we study the entanglement entropy of a block of contiguous spins in a large finite quantum Ising chain in a transverse field, with couplings of different types: homogeneous, periodically modulated and random. We carry out a systematic study of finite-size effects at the quantum critical point, and evaluate subleading corrections both for open and for periodic boundary conditions. For a block corresponding to a half of a finite chain, the position of the maximum of the entropy as a function of the control parameter (e.g. the transverse field) can define the effective critical point in the finite sample. On the basis of homogeneous chains, we demonstrate that the scaling behavior of the entropy near the quantum phase transition is in agreement with the universality hypothesis, and calculate the shift of the effective critical point, which has different scaling behaviors for open and for periodic boundary conditions

  6. Finite size effects in the intermittency analysis of the fragment-size correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, P.; Ploszajczak, M.; Tucholski, A.

    1991-01-01

    An influence of the finite size effect on the fragment-size correlations in the nuclear multifragmentation is studied using the method of scaled factorial moments for a 1 - dim percolation model and for a statistical model of the fragmentation process, which for a certain value of a tuning parameter yields the power-law behaviour of the fragment-size distribution. It is shown that the statistical models of this type contain only repulsive correlations due to the conservation laws. The comparison of the results with those obtained in the non-critical 1 - dim percolation and in the 3 - dim percolation at around the critical point is presented. Correlations in the 1 - dim percolation model are analysed analytically and the mechanism of the attractive correlations in 1 - dim and 3 - dim is identified. (author) 30 refs., 7 figs

  7. Finite size effects in lattice QCD with dynamical Wilson fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, B.

    2004-06-01

    Due to limited computing resources choosing the parameters for a full lattice QCD simulation always amounts to a compromise between the competing objectives of a lattice spacing as small, quarks as light, and a volume as large as possible. Aiming at pushing unquenched simulations with the standard Wilson action towards the computationally expensive regime of small quark masses, the GRAL project addresses the question whether computing time can be saved by sticking to lattices with rather modest numbers of grid sites and extrapolating the finite-volume results to the infinite volume (prior to the usual chiral and continuum extrapolations). In this context we investigate in this work finite-size effects in simulated light hadron masses. Understanding their systematic volume dependence may not only help saving computer time in light quark simulations with the Wilson action, but also guide future simulations with dynamical chiral fermions which for a foreseeable time will be restricted to rather small lattices. We analyze data from hybrid Monte Carlo simulations with the N{sub f} = 2 Wilson action at two values of the coupling parameter, {beta} = 5.6 (lattice spacing {alpha} {approx} 0.08 fm) and {beta} = 5.32144 ({alpha} {approx} 0.13 fm). The larger {beta} corresponds to the coupling used previously by SESAM/T{chi}L. The considered hopping parameters {kappa} = 0.1575, 0.158 (at the larger {beta}) and {kappa} = 0.1665 (at the smaller {beta}) correspond to quark masses of 85, 50 and 36% of the strange quark mass, respectively. At each quark mass we study at least three different lattice extents in the range from L = 10 to L = 24 (0.85-2.04 fm). Estimates of autocorrelation times in the stochastic updating process and of the computational cost of every run are given. For each simulated sea quark mass we calculate quark propagators and hadronic correlation functions in order to extract the pion, rho and nucleon masses as well as the pion decay constant and the quark mass

  8. A multilevel correction adaptive finite element method for Kohn-Sham equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guanghui; Xie, Hehu; Xu, Fei

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, an adaptive finite element method is proposed for solving Kohn-Sham equation with the multilevel correction technique. In the method, the Kohn-Sham equation is solved on a fixed and appropriately coarse mesh with the finite element method in which the finite element space is kept improving by solving the derived boundary value problems on a series of adaptively and successively refined meshes. A main feature of the method is that solving large scale Kohn-Sham system is avoided effectively, and solving the derived boundary value problems can be handled efficiently by classical methods such as the multigrid method. Hence, the significant acceleration can be obtained on solving Kohn-Sham equation with the proposed multilevel correction technique. The performance of the method is examined by a variety of numerical experiments.

  9. Layout Optimization of Structures with Finite-size Features using Multiresolution Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chellappa, S.; Diaz, A. R.; Bendsøe, Martin P.

    2004-01-01

    A scheme for layout optimization in structures with multiple finite-sized heterogeneities is presented. Multiresolution analysis is used to compute reduced operators (stiffness matrices) representing the elastic behavior of material distributions with heterogeneities of sizes that are comparable...

  10. Leading order finite size effects with spins for inspiralling compact binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi, Michele; Steinhoff, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The leading order finite size effects due to spin, namely that of the cubic and quartic in spin interactions, are derived for the first time for generic compact binaries via the effective field theory for gravitating spinning objects. These corrections enter at the third and a half and fourth post-Newtonian orders, respectively, for rapidly rotating compact objects. Hence, we complete the leading order finite size effects with spin up to the fourth post-Newtonian accuracy. We arrive at this by augmenting the point particle effective action with new higher dimensional nonminimal coupling worldline operators, involving higher-order derivatives of the gravitational field, and introducing new Wilson coefficients, corresponding to constants, which describe the octupole and hexadecapole deformations of the object due to spin. These Wilson coefficients are fixed to unity in the black hole case. The nonminimal coupling worldline operators enter the action with the electric and magnetic components of the Weyl tensor of even and odd parity, coupled to even and odd worldline spin tensors, respectively. Moreover, the non relativistic gravitational field decomposition, which we employ, demonstrates a coupling hierarchy of the gravito-magnetic vector and the Newtonian scalar, to the odd and even in spin operators, respectively, which extends that of minimal coupling. This observation is useful for the construction of the Feynman diagrams, and provides an instructive analogy between the leading order spin-orbit and cubic in spin interactions, and between the leading order quadratic and quartic in spin interactions.

  11. EMPIRICAL MODEL FOR HYDROCYCLONES CORRECTED CUT SIZE CALCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Carlos Silva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocyclones are devices worldwide used in mineral processing for desliming, classification, selective classification, thickening and pre-concentration. A hydrocyclone is composed by one cylindrical and one conical section joint together, without any moving parts and it is capable of perform granular material separation in pulp. The mineral particles separation mechanism acting in a hydrocyclone is complex and its mathematical modelling is usually empirical. The most used model for hydrocyclone corrected cut size is proposed by Plitt. Over the years many revisions and corrections to Plitt´s model were proposed. The present paper shows a modification in the Plitt´s model constant, obtained by exponential regression of simulated data for three different hydrocyclones geometry: Rietema, Bradley and Krebs. To validate the proposed model literature data obtained from phosphate ore using fifteen different hydrocyclones geometry are used. The proposed model shows a correlation equals to 88.2% between experimental and calculated corrected cut size, while the correlation obtained using Plitt´s model is 11.5%.

  12. Deconfinement phase transition and finite-size scaling in SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mogilevskij, O.A.

    1988-01-01

    Calculation technique for deconfinement phase transition parameters based on application of finite-size scaling theory is suggested. The essence of the technique lies in plotting of universal scaling function on the basis of numerical data obtained at different-size final lattices and discrimination of phase transition parameters for infinite lattice system. Finite-size scaling technique was developed as applied to spin system theory. β critical index for Polyakov loop and SU(2) deconfinement temperature of lattice gauge theory are calculated on the basis of finite-size scaling technique. The obtained value agrees with critical index of magnetization in Ising three-dimensional model

  13. Divergence correction schemes in finite difference method for 3D tensor CSAMT in axial anisotropic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kunpeng; Tan, Handong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Li, Zhiqiang; Cao, Meng

    2017-05-01

    Resistivity anisotropy and full-tensor controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotellurics (CSAMT) have gradually become hot research topics. However, much of the current anisotropy research for tensor CSAMT only focuses on the one-dimensional (1D) solution. As the subsurface is rarely 1D, it is necessary to study three-dimensional (3D) model response. The staggered-grid finite difference method is an effective simulation method for 3D electromagnetic forward modelling. Previous studies have suggested using the divergence correction to constrain the iterative process when using a staggered-grid finite difference model so as to accelerate the 3D forward speed and enhance the computational accuracy. However, the traditional divergence correction method was developed assuming an isotropic medium. This paper improves the traditional isotropic divergence correction method and derivation process to meet the tensor CSAMT requirements for anisotropy using the volume integral of the divergence equation. This method is more intuitive, enabling a simple derivation of a discrete equation and then calculation of coefficients related to the anisotropic divergence correction equation. We validate the result of our 3D computational results by comparing them to the results computed using an anisotropic, controlled-source 2.5D program. The 3D resistivity anisotropy model allows us to evaluate the consequences of using the divergence correction at different frequencies and for two orthogonal finite length sources. Our results show that the divergence correction plays an important role in 3D tensor CSAMT resistivity anisotropy research and offers a solid foundation for inversion of CSAMT data collected over an anisotropic body.

  14. Error-tolerant Finite State Recognition with Applications to Morphological Analysis and Spelling Correction

    OpenAIRE

    Oflazer, Kemal

    1995-01-01

    Error-tolerant recognition enables the recognition of strings that deviate mildly from any string in the regular set recognized by the underlying finite state recognizer. Such recognition has applications in error-tolerant morphological processing, spelling correction, and approximate string matching in information retrieval. After a description of the concepts and algorithms involved, we give examples from two applications: In the context of morphological analysis, error-tolerant recognition...

  15. Theory of critical phenomena in finite-size systems scaling and quantum effects

    CERN Document Server

    Brankov, Jordan G; Tonchev, Nicholai S

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this book is to familiarise the reader with the rich collection of ideas, methods and results available in the theory of critical phenomena in systems with confined geometry. The existence of universal features of the finite-size effects arising due to highly correlated classical or quantum fluctuations is explained by the finite-size scaling theory. This theory (1) offers an interpretation of experimental results on finite-size effects in real systems; (2) gives the most reliable tool for extrapolation to the thermodynamic limit of data obtained by computer simulations; (3) reveals

  16. Sifting attacks in finite-size quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Corsin; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Wehner, Stephanie; Coles, Patrick J.

    2016-05-01

    A central assumption in quantum key distribution (QKD) is that Eve has no knowledge about which rounds will be used for parameter estimation or key distillation. Here we show that this assumption is violated for iterative sifting, a sifting procedure that has been employed in some (but not all) of the recently suggested QKD protocols in order to increase their efficiency. We show that iterative sifting leads to two security issues: (1) some rounds are more likely to be key rounds than others, (2) the public communication of past measurement choices changes this bias round by round. We analyze these two previously unnoticed problems, present eavesdropping strategies that exploit them, and find that the two problems are independent. We discuss some sifting protocols in the literature that are immune to these problems. While some of these would be inefficient replacements for iterative sifting, we find that the sifting subroutine of an asymptotically secure protocol suggested by Lo et al (2005 J. Cryptol. 18 133-65), which we call LCA sifting, has an efficiency on par with that of iterative sifting. One of our main results is to show that LCA sifting can be adapted to achieve secure sifting in the finite-key regime. More precisely, we combine LCA sifting with a certain parameter estimation protocol, and we prove the finite-key security of this combination. Hence we propose that LCA sifting should replace iterative sifting in future QKD implementations. More generally, we present two formal criteria for a sifting protocol that guarantee its finite-key security. Our criteria may guide the design of future protocols and inspire a more rigorous QKD analysis, which has neglected sifting-related attacks so far.

  17. Flow adjustment inside large finite-size wind farms approaching the infinite wind farm regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ka Ling; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Due to the increasing number and the growing size of wind farms, the distance among them continues to decrease. Thus, it is necessary to understand how these large finite-size wind farms and their wakes could interfere the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics and adjacent wind farms. Fully-developed flow inside wind farms has been extensively studied through numerical simulations of infinite wind farms. The transportation of momentum and energy is only vertical and the advection of them is neglected in these infinite wind farms. However, less attention has been paid to examine the length of wind farms required to reach such asymptotic regime and the ABL dynamics in the leading and trailing edges of the large finite-size wind farms. Large eddy simulations are performed in this study to investigate the flow adjustment inside large finite-size wind farms in conventionally-neutral boundary layer with the effect of Coriolis force and free-atmosphere stratification from 1 to 5 K/km. For the large finite-size wind farms considered in the present work, when the potential temperature lapse rate is 5 K/km, the wind farms exceed the height of the ABL by two orders of magnitude for the incoming flow inside the farms to approach the fully-developed regime. An entrance fetch of approximately 40 times of the ABL height is also required for such flow adjustment. At the fully-developed flow regime of the large finite-size wind farms, the flow characteristics match those of infinite wind farms even though they have different adjustment length scales. The role of advection at the entrance and exit regions of the large finite-size wind farms is also examined. The interaction between the internal boundary layer developed above the large finite-size wind farms and the ABL under different potential temperature lapse rates are compared. It is shown that the potential temperature lapse rate plays a role in whether the flow inside the large finite-size wind farms adjusts to the fully

  18. Some aspects of fracture assessment diagrams, plastic zone size corrections and contour integrals in post-yield fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, R.A.

    1981-03-01

    The CEGB failure assessment route is briefly described and is shown to be consistent with a plastic zone size correction method. Modifications to the assessment route which have recently been suggested for describing the effects of thermal and residual stresses are examined. It is shown that the plastic zone size correction method may be used to include local thermal and residual stresses in the assessment route in a simple manner. The assessment route is compared with finite-element solutions for a thermal stress problem and with strip-yield model solutions for a residual stress problem. In using finite-element solutions there are different contour integral methods available for calculating a post-yield fracture parameter. The J-integral of Rice and the J*-integral of Blackburn are examined and compared and the appropriate parameter is identified. (author)

  19. Fast, accurate and stable scattering calculation method with application to finite sized photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Lodahl, Peter; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    We present a multipole solution to the Lippmann-Schwinger equation for electromagnetic scattering in inhomogeneous geometries. The method is illustrated by calculating the Green’s function for a finite sized two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide.......We present a multipole solution to the Lippmann-Schwinger equation for electromagnetic scattering in inhomogeneous geometries. The method is illustrated by calculating the Green’s function for a finite sized two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide....

  20. Finite-size effects in the three-state quantum asymmetric clock model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehlen, G. v.; Rittenberg, V.

    1983-04-01

    The one-dimensional quantum Hamiltonian of the asymmetric three-state clock model is studied using finite-size scaling. Various boundary conditions are considered on chains containing up to eight sites. We calculate the boundary of the commensurate phase and the mass gap index. The model shows an interesting finite-size dependence in connexion with the presence of the incommensurate phase indicating that for the infinite system there is no Lifshitz point. (orig.)

  1. Conjugacy class sizes and solvability of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the notations and terminologies are standard and readers may refer to [6]. A well-known problem in group theory is to study the influence of conjugacy class sizes on the structure of a group. For instance, as regards to groups with conjugacy class sizes. {1, m}, Itô [3] proved that G is nilpotent, m = pa for some prime p, and ...

  2. Measuring and crust-correcting finite-frequency travel time residuals - application to southwestern Scandinavia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolstrup, M. L.; Maupin, V.

    2015-10-01

    We present a data-processing routine to compute relative finite-frequency travel time residuals using a combination of the Iterative Cross-Correlation and Stack (ICCS) algorithm and the Multi-Channel Cross-Correlation method (MCCC). The routine has been tailored for robust measurement of P- and S-wave travel times in several frequency bands and for avoiding cycle-skipping problems at the shortest periods. We also investigate the adequacy of ray theory to calculate crustal corrections for finite-frequency regional tomography in normal continental settings with non-thinned crust. We find that ray theory is valid for both P and S waves at all relevant frequencies as long as the crust does not contain low-velocity layers associated with sediments at the surface. Reverberations in the sediments perturb the arrival times of the S waves and the long-period P waves significantly, and need to be accounted for in crustal corrections. The data-processing routine and crustal corrections are illustrated using data from a~network in southwestern Scandinavia.

  3. Finite-size modifications of the magnetic properties of clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Linderoth, Søren; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1993-01-01

    The spin-wave spectrum of Heisenberg spin clusters of various structures (bcc, fcc, and disordered) ranging in size between 9 and 749 spins is calculated by a self-consistent diagonalization of the equation of motion of S+ in real space. The spin-wave spectrum of the clusters is strongly modified...... find the temperature dependence of the cluster magnetization to be well described by an effective power law, M(mean) is-proportional-to 1 - BT(alpha), with a size-dependent, but structure-independent, exponent larger than the bulk value. The critical temperature of the clusters is calculated from...

  4. Jeans instability of magnetized quantum plasma: Effect of viscosity, rotation and finite Larmor radius corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Shweta, E-mail: jshweta09@gmail.com; Sharma, Prerana [Department of Physics, Ujjain Engineering College, Ujjain, M.P.456010 (India); Chhajlani, R. K. [School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University Ujjain, M. P. - 456010 (India)

    2015-07-31

    The Jeans instability of self-gravitating quantum plasma is examined considering the effects of viscosity, finite Larmor radius (FLR) corrections and rotation. The analysis is done by normal mode analysis theory with the help of relevant linearized perturbation equations of the problem. The general dispersion relation is obtained using the quantum magneto hydrodynamic model. The modified condition of Jeans instability is obtained and the numerical calculations have been performed to show the effects of various parameters on the growth rate of Jeans instability.

  5. Finite-size effect of η-deformed AdS5×S5 at strong coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changrim Ahn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We compute Lüscher corrections for a giant magnon in the η-deformed (AdS5×S5η using the su(2|2q-invariant S-matrix at strong coupling and compare with the finite-size effect of the corresponding string state, derived previously. We find that these two results match and confirm that the su(2|2q-invariant S-matrix is describing world-sheet excitations of the η-deformed background.

  6. Finite-size effect of η-deformed AdS5 × S5 at strong coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Changrim

    2017-04-01

    We compute Lüscher corrections for a giant magnon in the η-deformed (AdS5×S5)η using the su(2 | 2) q-invariant S-matrix at strong coupling and compare with the finite-size effect of the corresponding string state, derived previously. We find that these two results match and confirm that the su(2 | 2) q-invariant S-matrix is describing world-sheet excitations of the η-deformed background.

  7. Finite-size effects for anisotropic 2D Ising model with various boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmailian, N. Sh

    2012-12-01

    We analyze the exact partition function of the anisotropic Ising model on finite M × N rectangular lattices under four different boundary conditions (periodic-periodic (pp), periodic-antiperiodic (pa), antiperiodic-periodic (ap) and antiperiodic-antiperiodic (aa)) obtained by Kaufman (1949 Phys. Rev. 76 1232), Wu and Hu (2002 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 35 5189) and Kastening (2002 Phys. Rev. E 66 057103)). We express the partition functions in terms of the partition functions Zα, β(J, k) with (α, β) = (0, 0), (1/2, 0), (0, 1/2) and (1/2, 1/2), J is an interaction coupling and k is an anisotropy parameter. Based on such expressions, we then extend the algorithm of Ivashkevich et al (2002 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 35 5543) to derive the exact asymptotic expansion of the logarithm of the partition function for all boundary conditions mentioned above. Our result is f = fbulk + ∑∞p = 0fp(ρ, k)S-p - 1, where f is the free energy of the system, fbulk is the free energy of the bulk, S = MN is the area of the lattice and ρ = M/N is the aspect ratio. All coefficients in this expansion are expressed through analytical functions. We have introduced the effective aspect ratio ρeff = ρ/sinh 2Jc and show that for pp and aa boundary conditions all finite size correction terms are invariant under the transformation ρeff → 1/ρeff. This article is part of ‘Lattice models and integrability’, a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of F Y Wu's 80th birthday.

  8. Kaellen-Sabry energy shift for hydrogen-like atoms with finite size nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, S.M.

    1993-05-01

    The vacuum polarization potential of order α 2 (Zα) is evaluated numerically for elements with 1 ≤Z≤100. The finite size of nuclei is taken into account. The nuclear charge distribution is described by a homogeneously charged sphere. We compare the resulting energy shift for finite size nuclei with point nucleus values and find a maximum effect of 0.1 eV for K-shell electrons in 100 Fm, which represents a 8% modification. This nuclear size effect might be of relevance for future Lamb-shift measurements. (orig.)

  9. Finite-size Lagrangian coherent particle structures in thermocapillary liquid bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Francesco; Kuhlmann, Hendrik

    2017-11-01

    A surprisingly rapid accumulation of small but finite-size particles taking curious shapes is observed in travelling hydrothermal waves in liquid bridges. The phenomenon has been termed particle accumulation structure (PAS) and belongs to the wider class of Lagrangian coherent structures. In PAS, particles are transferred from chaotic to regular regions of the flow by way of collision with the boundaries. Lubrication forces cause a dissipation of kinetic energy of the particle and give rise to particle motion attractors in the incompressible flow. Since the mechanism relies solely on the particle size, PAS is nothing but a finite-size Lagrangian coherent structure. Different theoretical models are investigated to find a minimum model for the simulation of Lagrangian finite-size coherent structures. Corresponding numerical simulations compare very well with experiments on SL-I and SL-II PAS.

  10. Finite size scaling in disordered systems: Mean field analysis and self-averaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamati, H.; Korutcheva, E.; Tonchev, N.S.

    2001-08-01

    The critical behavior of a quenched random hypercubic sample of linear size L is considered, within the 'random-T c ' field theoretical model and the mean-field approximation. A finite-size scaling behavior is established and analyzed and the problem of self-averaging is clarified for different critical regimes. (author)

  11. Finite-Volume QED Corrections to Decay Amplitudes in Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Lubicz, V.; Sachrajda, C.T.; Sanfilippo, F.; Simula, S.; Tantalo, N.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that the leading and next-to-leading finite-volume effects in the evaluation of leptonic decay widths of pseudoscalar mesons at $O(\\alpha)$ are universal, i.e. they are independent of the structure of the meson. This is analogous to a similar result for the spectrum but with some fundamental differences, most notably the presence of infrared divergences in decay amplitudes. The leading non-universal, structure-dependent terms are of $O(1/L^2)$ (compared to the $O(1/L^3)$ leading non-universal corrections in the spectrum). We calculate the universal finite-volume effects, which requires an extension of previously developed techniques to include a dependence on an external three-momentum (in our case, the momentum of the final state lepton). The result can be included in the strategy proposed in Ref.\\,\\cite{Carrasco:2015xwa} for using lattice simulations to compute the decay widths at $O(\\alpha)$, with the remaining finite-volume effects starting at order $O(1/L^2)$. The methods developed in this...

  12. On a cluster expansion for lattice spin systems: A finite-size condition for the convergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Enzo

    1988-03-01

    A study is made of the statistical mechanics of classical lattice spin systems with finite-range interactions in two dimensions. By means of a decimation procedure, a finite-size condition is given for the convergence of a cluster expansion that is believed to be useful for treating the range of temperature between the critical one T c and the estimated threshold T 0 of convergence of the usual high-temperature expansion.

  13. Point source atom interferometry with a cloud of finite size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoth, Gregory W., E-mail: gregory.hoth@nist.gov; Pelle, Bruno; Riedl, Stefan; Kitching, John; Donley, Elizabeth A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We demonstrate a two axis gyroscope by the use of light pulse atom interferometry with an expanding cloud of atoms in the regime where the cloud has expanded by 1.1–5 times its initial size during the interrogation. Rotations are measured by analyzing spatial fringe patterns in the atom population obtained by imaging the final cloud. The fringes arise from a correlation between an atom's initial velocity and its final position. This correlation is naturally created by the expansion of the cloud, but it also depends on the initial atomic distribution. We show that the frequency and contrast of these spatial fringes depend on the details of the initial distribution and develop an analytical model to explain this dependence. We also discuss several challenges that must be overcome to realize a high-performance gyroscope with this technique.

  14. Finite-size effects in Luther-Emery phases of Holstein and Hubbard models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greitemann, J.; Hesselmann, S.; Wessel, S.; Assaad, F. F.; Hohenadler, M.

    2015-12-01

    The one-dimensional Holstein model and its generalizations have been studied extensively to understand the effects of electron-phonon interaction. The half-filled case is of particular interest, as it describes a transition from a metallic phase with a spin gap due to attractive backscattering to a Peierls insulator with charge-density-wave order. Our quantum Monte Carlo results support the existence of a metallic phase with dominant power-law charge correlations, as described by the Luther-Emery fixed point. We demonstrate that for Holstein and also for purely fermionic models the spin gap significantly complicates finite-size numerical studies, and explains inconsistent previous results for Luttinger parameters and phase boundaries. On the other hand, no such complications arise in spinless models. The correct low-energy theory of the spinful Holstein model is argued to be that of singlet bipolarons with a repulsive, mutual interaction. This picture naturally explains the existence of a metallic phase, but also implies that gapless Luttinger liquid theory is not applicable.

  15. Locating the QCD critical endpoint through finite-size scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, N. G.; Diakonos, F. K.; Maintas, X. N.; Tsagkarakis, C. E.

    2018-02-01

    Considering the 3D Ising universality class of the QCD critical endpoint, we use a universal effective action for the description of the baryon-number density fluctuations around the critical region. Calculating the baryon-number multiplicity moments and determining their scaling with system's size, we show that the critical region is very narrow in the direction of the baryon chemical potential μ and wider in the temperature (T ) direction. In this context, published experimental results on local proton density-fluctuation measurements, obtained by intermittency analysis in transverse momentum space in NA49 central A +A collisions at √{sN N }=17.2 GeV (A =C ,Si ,Pb ), restrict significantly the location (μc,Tc) of the QCD critical endpoint. The main constraint is provided by the freeze-out chemical potential of the Si +Si system, which shows nonconventional baryon density fluctuations. An indicative solution, ignoring experimental uncertainties, is 119 MeV ≤Tc≤162 MeV , 252 MeV ≤μc≤258 MeV .

  16. Strange scaling and relaxation of finite-size fluctuation in thermal equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki Y

    2016-07-01

    We numerically exhibit two strange phenomena of finite-size fluctuation in thermal equilibrium of a paradigmatic long-range interacting system having a second-order phase transition. One is a nonclassical finite-size scaling at the critical point, which differs from the prediction by statistical mechanics. With the aid of this strange scaling, the scaling theory for infinite-range models conjectures the nonclassical values of critical exponents for the correlation length. The other is relaxation of the fluctuation strength from one level to another in spite of being in thermal equilibrium. A scenario is proposed to explain these phenomena from the viewpoint of the Casimir invariants and their nonexactness in finite-size systems, where the Casimir invariants are conserved in the Vlasov dynamics describing the long-range interacting systems in the limit of large population. This scenario suggests appearance of the reported phenomena in a wide class of isolated long-range interacting systems.

  17. Reflection of sound from finite-size plane and curved surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    The author’s research on reflectors over nearly 25 years is summarized. The influence of curvature was analyzed by a geometrical model in order to quantify the attenuation by a simple expression. Reflection from a finite size plate was studied using the Kirchhoff-Fresnel approximation and the des......The author’s research on reflectors over nearly 25 years is summarized. The influence of curvature was analyzed by a geometrical model in order to quantify the attenuation by a simple expression. Reflection from a finite size plate was studied using the Kirchhoff-Fresnel approximation...... in the refurbishment of the concert hall of the Danish Radio in Copenhagen 1989, and later in many other halls. In order to describe the scattering due to edge diffraction the directional characteristic of reflections from a finite-size plate has been studied and a simple approximation valid for octave bands has been...

  18. Finite size effects on pion spectra in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Cuautle, Eleazar; Magnin, J.; Montano, Luis Manuel; Raya, Alfredo

    2006-01-01

    We compute the pion inclusive transverse momentum distribution assuming thermal equilibrium together with transverse flow and accounting for finite size effects and energy loss at the time of decoupling. We compare to data on mid-rapidity pions produced in central collisions in RHIC at s NN =200 GeV. We find that a finite size for the system of emitting particles results in a power-like fall-off of the spectra that follows the data up to larger p t values, as compared to a simple thermal model

  19. Importance of elastic finite-size effects: Neutral defects in ionic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, P. A.; Cooper, M. W. D.

    2017-09-01

    Small system sizes are a well-known source of error in density functional theory (DFT) calculations, yet computational constraints frequently dictate the use of small supercells, often as small as 96 atoms in oxides and compound semiconductors. In ionic compounds, electrostatic finite-size effects have been well characterized, but self-interaction of charge-neutral defects is often discounted or assumed to follow an asymptotic behavior and thus easily corrected with linear elastic theory. Here we show that elastic effects are also important in the description of defects in ionic compounds and can lead to qualitatively incorrect conclusions if inadequately small supercells are used; moreover, the spurious self-interaction does not follow the behavior predicted by linear elastic theory. Considering the exemplar cases of metal oxides with fluorite structure, we show that numerous previous studies, employing 96-atom supercells, misidentify the ground-state structure of (charge-neutral) Schottky defects. We show that the error is eliminated by employing larger cells (324, 768, and 1500 atoms), and careful analysis determines that elastic, not electrostatic, effects are responsible. The spurious self-interaction was also observed in nonoxide ionic compounds irrespective of the computational method used, thereby resolving long-standing discrepancies between DFT and force-field methods, previously attributed to the level of theory. The surprising magnitude of the elastic effects is a cautionary tale for defect calculations in ionic materials, particularly when employing computationally expensive methods (e.g., hybrid functionals) or when modeling large defect clusters. We propose two computationally practicable methods to test the magnitude of the elastic self-interaction in any ionic system. In commonly studied oxides, where electrostatic effects would be expected to be dominant, it is the elastic effects that dictate the need for larger supercells: greater than 96 atoms.

  20. Flux-corrected transport techniques applied to the radiation transport equation discretized with continuous finite elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Joshua E.; Ragusa, Jean C.

    2018-02-01

    The Flux-Corrected Transport (FCT) algorithm is applied to the unsteady and steady-state particle transport equation. The proposed FCT method employs the following: (1) a low-order, positivity-preserving scheme, based on the application of M-matrix properties, (2) a high-order scheme based on the entropy viscosity method introduced by Guermond [1], and (3) local, discrete solution bounds derived from the integral transport equation. The resulting scheme is second-order accurate in space, enforces an entropy inequality, mitigates the formation of spurious oscillations, and guarantees the absence of negativities. Space discretization is achieved using continuous finite elements. Time discretizations for unsteady problems include theta schemes such as explicit and implicit Euler, and strong-stability preserving Runge-Kutta (SSPRK) methods. The developed FCT scheme is shown to be robust with explicit time discretizations but may require damping in the nonlinear iterations for steady-state and implicit time discretizations.

  1. Dominant two-loop corrections to the MSSM finite temperature effective potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    We show that two-loop corrections to the finite temperature effective potential in the MSSM can have a dramatic effect on the strength of the electroweak phase transition, making it more strongly first order. The change in the order parameter v/Tc can be as large as 75% of the one-loop daisy improved result. This effect can be decisive to widen the region in parameter space where erasure of the created baryons by sphaleron processes after the transition is suppressed and hence, where electroweak baryogenesis might be successful. We find an allowed region with tan β< or∼4.5 and a Higgs boson with standard couplings and mass below 80 GeV within the reach of LEP II. (orig.)

  2. Finite temperature corrections to tachyon mass in intersecting D-branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, Varun [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi,Delhi 110007 (India); Chowdhury, Sudipto Paul [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg,Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Sarkar, Swarnendu [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi,Delhi 110007 (India)

    2017-04-19

    We continue with the analysis of finite temperature corrections to the Tachyon mass in intersecting branes which was initiated in https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP09(2014)063. In this paper we extend the computation to the case of intersecting D3 branes by considering a setup of two intersecting branes in flat-space background. A holographic model dual to BCS superconductor consisting of intersecting D8 branes in D4 brane background was proposed in https://www.doi.org/10.1016/j.nuclphysb.2011.07.011. The background considered here is a simplified configuration of this dual model. We compute the one-loop Tachyon amplitude in the Yang-Mills approximation and show that the result is finite. Analyzing the amplitudes further we numerically compute the transition temperature at which the Tachyon becomes massless. The analytic expressions for the one-loop amplitudes obtained here reduce to those for intersecting D1 branes obtained in https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP09(2014)063 as well as those for intersecting D2 branes.

  3. Finite temperature corrections to tachyon mass in intersecting D-branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, Varun; Chowdhury, Sudipto Paul; Sarkar, Swarnendu

    2017-01-01

    We continue with the analysis of finite temperature corrections to the Tachyon mass in intersecting branes which was initiated in https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP09(2014)063. In this paper we extend the computation to the case of intersecting D3 branes by considering a setup of two intersecting branes in flat-space background. A holographic model dual to BCS superconductor consisting of intersecting D8 branes in D4 brane background was proposed in https://www.doi.org/10.1016/j.nuclphysb.2011.07.011. The background considered here is a simplified configuration of this dual model. We compute the one-loop Tachyon amplitude in the Yang-Mills approximation and show that the result is finite. Analyzing the amplitudes further we numerically compute the transition temperature at which the Tachyon becomes massless. The analytic expressions for the one-loop amplitudes obtained here reduce to those for intersecting D1 branes obtained in https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP09(2014)063 as well as those for intersecting D2 branes.

  4. Percolation through voids around overlapping spheres: A dynamically based finite-size scaling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priour, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    The percolation threshold for flow or conduction through voids surrounding randomly placed spheres is calculated. With large-scale Monte Carlo simulations, we give a rigorous continuum treatment to the geometry of the impenetrable spheres and the spaces between them. To properly exploit finite-size scaling, we examine multiple systems of differing sizes, with suitable averaging over disorder, and extrapolate to the thermodynamic limit. An order parameter based on the statistical sampling of stochastically driven dynamical excursions and amenable to finite-size scaling analysis is defined, calculated for various system sizes, and used to determine the critical volume fraction ϕc=0.0317±0.0004 and the correlation length exponent ν =0.92±0.05.

  5. Exploiting finite-size-effects to simulate full QCD with light quarks - a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orth, B.; Eicker, N.; Lippert, Th.; Schilling, K.; Schroers, W.; Sroczynski, Z.

    2002-01-01

    We present a report on the status of the GRAL project (Going Realistic And Light), which aims at simulating full QCD with two dynamical Wilson quarks below the vector meson decay threshold, m ps /m v < 0.5, making use of finite-size-scaling techniques

  6. Lower Bounds on Q for Finite Size Antennas of Arbitrary Shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of the lower bound on the radiation Q for an arbitrarily shaped finite size antenna of non-zero volume is formulated in terms of equivalent electric and magnetic currents densities distributed on a closed surface coinciding with antenna exterior surface. When these equivalent currents...

  7. Entrainment Phenomena in Potential Flow: Brachistochrones and Finite-Time Corrections to Darwin's Drift Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Matthew; McLaughlin, Rich; Camassa, Roberto; Vaidya, Ashwin

    2008-11-01

    For a body moving uniformly in an ideal fluid there exists a region in which particles are swept in the same direction as the motion of the body, called the drift region, as well as a region in which particles are forced in the opposite direction as that of the body, called the reflux region. In Darwin's Theorem, the drift volume is defined as the volume swept out by particles originating on a plane perpendicular to the motion of the body, as the body moves from an infinite distance upstream of the plane to an infinite distance downstream of the plane. Here, we present finite-time corrections to Darwin's calculation of the drift volume for a sphere, which extend the previously obtained semi-infinite correction of Eames, Belcher, and Hunt (1994). Additionally, we solve the problem of finding the particle who minimizes its time of flight for uniform flow past a sphere. The path of this particle who minimizes flight time is termed the brachistochrone path, and a connection is drawn to the geometry of the reflux region.

  8. Finite difference approximations for measure-valued solutions of a hierarchically size-structured population model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackleh, Azmy S; Chellamuthu, Vinodh K; Ito, Kazufumi

    2015-04-01

    We study a quasilinear hierarchically size-structured population model presented in [4]. In this model the growth, mortality and reproduction rates are assumed to depend on a function of the population density. In [4] we showed that solutions to this model can become singular (measure-valued) in finite time even if all the individual parameters are smooth. Therefore, in this paper we develop a first order finite difference scheme to compute these measure-valued solutions. Convergence analysis for this method is provided. We also develop a high resolution second order scheme to compute the measure-valued solution of the model and perform a comparative study between the two schemes.

  9. Finite-size analysis of measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography with continuous variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, Panagiotis; Ottaviani, Carlo; Pirandola, Stefano

    2017-10-01

    We study the impact of finite-size effects on the key rate of continuous-variable (CV) measurement-device-independent (MDI) quantum key distribution (QKD), considering two-mode Gaussian attacks. Inspired by the parameter estimation technique developed in by Ruppert et al. [Phys. Rev. A 90, 062310 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.062310], we adapt it to study CV-MDI-QKD and, assuming realistic experimental conditions, we analyze the impact of finite-size effects on the key rate. We find that the performance of the protocol approaches the ideal one, increasing the block size, and, most importantly, that blocks between 106 and 109 data points may provide key rates ˜10-2 bit/use over metropolitan distances.

  10. Finite particle size drives defect-mediated domain structures in strongly confined colloidal liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gârlea, Ioana C; Mulder, Pieter; Alvarado, José; Dammone, Oliver; Aarts, Dirk G A L; Lettinga, M Pavlik; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Mulder, Bela M

    2016-06-29

    When liquid crystals are confined to finite volumes, the competition between the surface anchoring imposed by the boundaries and the intrinsic orientational symmetry-breaking of these materials gives rise to a host of intriguing phenomena involving topological defect structures. For synthetic molecular mesogens, like the ones used in liquid-crystal displays, these defect structures are independent of the size of the molecules and well described by continuum theories. In contrast, colloidal systems such as carbon nanotubes and biopolymers have micron-sized lengths, so continuum descriptions are expected to break down under strong confinement conditions. Here, we show, by a combination of computer simulations and experiments with virus particles in tailor-made disk- and annulus-shaped microchambers, that strong confinement of colloidal liquid crystals leads to novel defect-stabilized symmetrical domain structures. These finite-size effects point to a potential for designing optically active microstructures, exploiting the as yet unexplored regime of highly confined liquid crystals.

  11. Finite size effects on the helical edge states on the Lieb lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Rui; Zhou Bin

    2016-01-01

    For a two-dimensional Lieb lattice, that is, a line-centered square lattice, the inclusion of the intrinsic spin–orbit (ISO) coupling opens a topologically nontrivial gap, and gives rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect characterized by two pairs of gapless helical edge states within the bulk gap. Generally, due to the finite size effect in QSH systems, the edge states on the two sides of a strip of finite width can couple together to open a gap in the spectrum. In this paper, we investigate the finite size effect of helical edge states on the Lieb lattice with ISO coupling under three different kinds of boundary conditions, i.e., the straight, bearded and asymmetry edges. The spectrum and wave function of edge modes are derived analytically for a tight-binding model on the Lieb lattice. For a strip Lieb lattice with two straight edges, the ISO coupling induces the Dirac-like bulk states to localize at the edges to become the helical edge states with the same Dirac-like spectrum. Moreover, it is found that in the case with two straight edges the gapless Dirac-like spectrum remains unchanged with decreasing the width of the strip Lieb lattice, and no gap is opened in the edge band. It is concluded that the finite size effect of QSH states is absent in the case with the straight edges. However, in the other two cases with the bearded and asymmetry edges, the energy gap induced by the finite size effect is still opened with decreasing the width of the strip. It is also proposed that the edge band dispersion can be controlled by applying an on-site potential energy on the outermost atoms. (paper)

  12. Overcoming time scale and finite size limitations to compute nucleation rates from small scale well tempered metadynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Tiwary, Pratyush; Maggioni, Giovanni Maria; Mazzotti, Marco; Parrinello, Michele

    2016-12-01

    Condensation of a liquid droplet from a supersaturated vapour phase is initiated by a prototypical nucleation event. As such it is challenging to compute its rate from atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. In fact at realistic supersaturation conditions condensation occurs on time scales that far exceed what can be reached with conventional molecular dynamics methods. Another known problem in this context is the distortion of the free energy profile associated to nucleation due to the small, finite size of typical simulation boxes. In this work the problem of time scale is addressed with a recently developed enhanced sampling method while contextually correcting for finite size effects. We demonstrate our approach by studying the condensation of argon, and showing that characteristic nucleation times of the order of magnitude of hours can be reliably calculated. Nucleation rates spanning a range of 10 orders of magnitude are computed at moderate supersaturation levels, thus bridging the gap between what standard molecular dynamics simulations can do and real physical systems.

  13. Main transition in the Pink membrane model: finite-size scaling and the influence of surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Sina; Vink, R L C

    2012-06-01

    We consider the main transition in single-component membranes using computer simulations of the Pink model [D. A. Pink et al., Biochemistry 19, 349 (1980)]. We first show that the accepted parameters of the Pink model yield a main transition temperature that is systematically below experimental values. This resolves an issue that was first pointed out by Corvera and co-workers [Phys. Rev. E 47, 696 (1993)]. In order to yield the correct transition temperature, the strength of the van der Waals coupling in the Pink model must be increased; by using finite-size scaling, a set of optimal values is proposed. We also provide finite-size scaling evidence that the Pink model belongs to the universality class of the two-dimensional Ising model. This finding holds irrespective of the number of conformational states. Finally, we address the main transition in the presence of quenched disorder, which may arise in situations where the membrane is deposited on a rough support. In this case, we observe a stable multidomain structure of gel and fluid domains, and the absence of a sharp transition in the thermodynamic limit.

  14. Finite-key-size effect in a commercial plug-and-play QKD system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiwongkhot, Poompong; Sajeed, Shihan; Lydersen, Lars; Makarov, Vadim

    2017-12-01

    A security evaluation against the finite-key-size effect was performed for a commercial plug-and-play quantum key distribution (QKD) system. We demonstrate the ability of an eavesdropper to force the system to distill key from a smaller length of sifted-key. We also derive a key-rate equation that is specific for this system. This equation provides bounds above the upper bound of secure key under finite-key-size analysis. From this equation and our experimental data, we show that the keys that have been distilled from the smaller sifted-key size fall above our bound. Thus, their security is not covered by finite-key-size analysis. Experimentally, we could consistently force the system to generate the key outside of the bound. We also test manufacturer’s software update. Although all the keys after the patch fall under our bound, their security cannot be guaranteed under this analysis. Our methodology can be used for security certification and standardization of QKD systems.

  15. Finite size specimens with cracks of icosahedral Al—Pd—Mn quasicrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lian-Zhi; Gao Yang; Andreas Ricoeur; He Fan-Min

    2014-01-01

    Icosahedral quasicrystals are the most important and thermodynamically stable in all about 200 kinds of quasicrystals currently observed. Beyond the scope of classical elasticity, apart from a phonon displacement field, there is a phason displacement field in the elasticity of the quasicrystal, which induces an important effect on the mechanical properties of the material and makes an analytical solution difficult to obtain. In this paper, a finite element algorithm for the static elasticity of icosahedral quasicrystals is developed by transforming the elastic boundary value problem of the icosahedral quasicrystals into an equivalent variational problem. Analytical and numerical solutions for an icosahedral Al—Pd—Mn quasicrystal cuboid subjected to a uniaxial tension with different phonon—phason coupling parameters are given to verify the validity of the numerical approach. A comparison between the analytical and numerical solutions of the specimen demonstrates the accuracy and efficiency of the present algorithm. Finally, in order to reveal the fracture behavior of the icosahedral Al—Pd—Mn quasicrystal, a cracked specimen with a finite size of matter is investigated, both with and without phonon—phason coupling. Meanwhile, the geometry factors are calculated, including the stress intensity factor and the crack opening displacement for the finite-size specimen. Computational results reveal the importance of phonon—phason coupling effect on the icosahedral Al—Pd—Mn quasicrystal. Furthermore, the finite element procedure can be used to solve more complicated boundary value problems. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  16. 78 FR 36083 - Small Business Size Standards; Educational Services; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... industries and the Job Corps Centers exception under NAICS 611519, Other Technical and Trade Schools, within that Sector. However, the Job Corps Centers exception and its size standard were deleted in error from... * * * * * * * 611519 Other Technical and Trade Schools. $14.0 Except, Job Corps Centers \\16\\ \\16\\ 35.5...

  17. Finite-time and finite-size scalings in the evaluation of large-deviation functions: Numerical approach in continuous time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara Hidalgo, Esteban; Nemoto, Takahiro; Lecomte, Vivien

    2017-06-01

    Rare trajectories of stochastic systems are important to understand because of their potential impact. However, their properties are by definition difficult to sample directly. Population dynamics provides a numerical tool allowing their study, by means of simulating a large number of copies of the system, which are subjected to selection rules that favor the rare trajectories of interest. Such algorithms are plagued by finite simulation time and finite population size, effects that can render their use delicate. In this paper, we present a numerical approach which uses the finite-time and finite-size scalings of estimators of the large deviation functions associated to the distribution of rare trajectories. The method we propose allows one to extract the infinite-time and infinite-size limit of these estimators, which—as shown on the contact process—provides a significant improvement of the large deviation function estimators compared to the standard one.

  18. Finite-time and finite-size scalings in the evaluation of large-deviation functions: Numerical approach in continuous time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara Hidalgo, Esteban; Nemoto, Takahiro; Lecomte, Vivien

    2017-06-01

    Rare trajectories of stochastic systems are important to understand because of their potential impact. However, their properties are by definition difficult to sample directly. Population dynamics provides a numerical tool allowing their study, by means of simulating a large number of copies of the system, which are subjected to selection rules that favor the rare trajectories of interest. Such algorithms are plagued by finite simulation time and finite population size, effects that can render their use delicate. In this paper, we present a numerical approach which uses the finite-time and finite-size scalings of estimators of the large deviation functions associated to the distribution of rare trajectories. The method we propose allows one to extract the infinite-time and infinite-size limit of these estimators, which-as shown on the contact process-provides a significant improvement of the large deviation function estimators compared to the standard one.

  19. Transient queue-size distribution in a finite-capacity queueing system with server breakdowns and Bernoulli feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempa, Wojciech M.

    2017-12-01

    A finite-capacity queueing system with server breakdowns is investigated, in which successive exponentially distributed failure-free times are followed by repair periods. After the processing a customer may either rejoin the queue (feedback) with probability q, or definitely leave the system with probability 1 - q. The system of integral equations for transient queue-size distribution, conditioned by the initial level of buffer saturation, is build. The solution of the corresponding system written for Laplace transforms is found using the linear algebraic approach. The considered queueing system can be successfully used in modelling production lines with machine failures, in which the parameter q may be considered as a typical fraction of items demanding corrections. Morever, this queueing model can be applied in the analysis of real TCP/IP performance, where q stands for the fraction of packets requiring retransmission.

  20. Finite Element Prediction of Multi-Size Particulate Flow through Three-Dimensional Channel: Code Validation

    OpenAIRE

    K. V. Pagalthivarthi; R. J. Visintainer

    2013-01-01

    Multi-size particulate dense slurry flow through three-dimensional rectangular channel is modeled using penalty finite elements with 8-noded hexahedral elements. The methodology previously developed for two-dimensional channel is extended. The computed eddy viscosity of the pure carrier flow is modified to account for the presence of solid particles. Predictions from Spalart-Almaras and k-ε turbulence models are compared to show consistency of trends in results. Results are also found to comp...

  1. Asymptotic investigation of the nonlinear boundary value dynamic problem for the systems with finite sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrianov, I.V.; Danishevsky, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Asymptotic approaches for nonlinear dynamics of continual system are developed well for the infinite in spatial variables. For the systems with finite sizes we have an infinite number of resonance, and Poincare-Lighthill-Go method does riot work. Using of averaging procedure or method of multiple scales leads to the infinite systems of nonlinear algebraic or ordinary differential equations systems and then using truncation method. which does not gives possibility to obtain all important properties of the solutions

  2. Towards a theory of cortical columns: From spiking neurons to interacting neural populations of finite size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalger, Tilo; Deger, Moritz; Gerstner, Wulfram

    2017-04-01

    Neural population equations such as neural mass or field models are widely used to study brain activity on a large scale. However, the relation of these models to the properties of single neurons is unclear. Here we derive an equation for several interacting populations at the mesoscopic scale starting from a microscopic model of randomly connected generalized integrate-and-fire neuron models. Each population consists of 50-2000 neurons of the same type but different populations account for different neuron types. The stochastic population equations that we find reveal how spike-history effects in single-neuron dynamics such as refractoriness and adaptation interact with finite-size fluctuations on the population level. Efficient integration of the stochastic mesoscopic equations reproduces the statistical behavior of the population activities obtained from microscopic simulations of a full spiking neural network model. The theory describes nonlinear emergent dynamics such as finite-size-induced stochastic transitions in multistable networks and synchronization in balanced networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. The mesoscopic equations are employed to rapidly integrate a model of a cortical microcircuit consisting of eight neuron types, which allows us to predict spontaneous population activities as well as evoked responses to thalamic input. Our theory establishes a general framework for modeling finite-size neural population dynamics based on single cell and synapse parameters and offers an efficient approach to analyzing cortical circuits and computations.

  3. Finite-Size Conformational Transitions: A Unifying Concept Underlying Chromosome Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caré, Bertrand R.; Victor, Jean-Marc; Lesne, Annick; Carrivain, Pascal; Forné, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Investigating average thermodynamic quantities is not sufficient to understand conformational transitions of a finite-size polymer. We propose that such transitions are better described in terms of the probability distribution of some finite-size order parameter, and the evolution of this distribution as a control parameter varies. We demonstrate this claim for the coil-globule transition of a linear polymer and its mapping onto a two-state model. In a biological context, polymer models delineate the physical constraints experienced by the genome at different levels of organization, from DNA to chromatin to chromosome. We apply our finite-size approach to the formation of plectonemes in a DNA segment submitted to an applied torque and the ensuing helix-coil transition that can be numerically observed, with a coexistence of the helix and coil states in a range of parameters. Polymer models are also essential to analyze recent in vivo experiments providing the frequency of pairwise contacts between genomic loci. The probability distribution of these contacts yields quantitative information on the conformational fluctuations of chromosome regions. The changes observed in the shape of the distribution when the cell type or the physiological conditions vary may reveal an epigenetic modulation of the conformational constraints experienced by the chromosomes. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  4. Exchange bias in finite sized NiO nanoparticles with Ni clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, Ashish Chhaganlal; Lin, Jauyn Grace, E-mail: jglin@ntu.edu.tw

    2017-02-15

    Structural and magnetic properties of finite sized NiO nanoparticles are investigated with synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, magnetometer and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy. A minor Ni phase is detected with synchrotron XRD, attributed to the oxygen defects in the NiO core. A considerable exchange bias of ~100 Oe is observed at 50 K and it drops abruptly and vanishes above 150 K, in association with the reduction of frozen spins. FMR data indicate a strong interaction between ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) phases below 150 K, consistent with the picture of isolated FM clusters in AFM matrix. - Highlights: • Structural and magnetic properties of finite sized NiO nanoparticles are systematically investigated with several advanced techniques. • A strong interaction between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases is found below 150 K. • Exchange bias field in finite sized NiO nanoparticles is due to anisotropy energy of Ni clusters over riding the domain wall energy of NiO.

  5. Exchange bias in finite sized NiO nanoparticles with Ni clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandhi, Ashish Chhaganlal; Lin, Jauyn Grace

    2017-01-01

    Structural and magnetic properties of finite sized NiO nanoparticles are investigated with synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, magnetometer and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy. A minor Ni phase is detected with synchrotron XRD, attributed to the oxygen defects in the NiO core. A considerable exchange bias of ~100 Oe is observed at 50 K and it drops abruptly and vanishes above 150 K, in association with the reduction of frozen spins. FMR data indicate a strong interaction between ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) phases below 150 K, consistent with the picture of isolated FM clusters in AFM matrix. - Highlights: • Structural and magnetic properties of finite sized NiO nanoparticles are systematically investigated with several advanced techniques. • A strong interaction between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases is found below 150 K. • Exchange bias field in finite sized NiO nanoparticles is due to anisotropy energy of Ni clusters over riding the domain wall energy of NiO.

  6. Finite-size scaling in the system of coupled oscillators with heterogeneity in coupling strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyunsuk

    2017-07-01

    We consider a mean-field model of coupled phase oscillators with random heterogeneity in the coupling strength. The system that we investigate here is a minimal model that contains randomness in diverse values of the coupling strength, and it is found to return to the original Kuramoto model [Y. Kuramoto, Prog. Theor. Phys. Suppl. 79, 223 (1984)10.1143/PTPS.79.223] when the coupling heterogeneity disappears. According to one recent paper [H. Hong, H. Chaté, L.-H. Tang, and H. Park, Phys. Rev. E 92, 022122 (2015)10.1103/PhysRevE.92.022122], when the natural frequency of the oscillator in the system is "deterministically" chosen, with no randomness in it, the system is found to exhibit the finite-size scaling exponent ν[over ¯]=5/4. Also, the critical exponent for the dynamic fluctuation of the order parameter is found to be given by γ=1/4, which is different from the critical exponents for the Kuramoto model with the natural frequencies randomly chosen. Originally, the unusual finite-size scaling behavior of the Kuramoto model was reported by Hong et al. [H. Hong, H. Chaté, H. Park, and L.-H. Tang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 184101 (2007)10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.184101], where the scaling behavior is found to be characterized by the unusual exponent ν[over ¯]=5/2. On the other hand, if the randomness in the natural frequency is removed, it is found that the finite-size scaling behavior is characterized by a different exponent, ν[over ¯]=5/4 [H. Hong, H. Chaté, L.-H. Tang, and H. Park, Phys. Rev. E 92, 022122 (2015)10.1103/PhysRevE.92.022122]. Those findings brought about our curiosity and led us to explore the effects of the randomness on the finite-size scaling behavior. In this paper, we pay particular attention to investigating the finite-size scaling and dynamic fluctuation when the randomness in the coupling strength is considered.

  7. Safe and sensible preprocessing and baseline correction of pupil-size data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathôt, Sebastiaan; Fabius, Jasper; Van Heusden, Elle; Van der Stigchel, Stefan

    Measurement of pupil size (pupillometry) has recently gained renewed interest from psychologists, but there is little agreement on how pupil-size data is best analyzed. Here we focus on one aspect of pupillometric analyses: baseline correction, i.e., analyzing changes in pupil size relative to a

  8. Element size and other restrictions in finite-element modeling of reinforced concrete at elevated temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Josephine Voigt; Jomaas, Grunde; Pankaj, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    One of the accepted approaches for postpeak finite-element modeling of RC comprises combining plain concrete, reinforcement, and interaction behaviors. In these, the postpeak strain-softening behavior of plain concrete is incorporated by the use of fracture energy concepts. This study attempts to...... variation in values. Application of the evaluated fracture energy values shows that these impose severe element size and reinforcement ratio limits. The effect of the limits is illustrated for a RC specimen. © 2013 American Society of Civil Engineers.......One of the accepted approaches for postpeak finite-element modeling of RC comprises combining plain concrete, reinforcement, and interaction behaviors. In these, the postpeak strain-softening behavior of plain concrete is incorporated by the use of fracture energy concepts. This study attempts...

  9. Thermodynamic theory of intrinsic finite-size effects in PbTiO3 nanocrystals. I. Nanoparticle size-dependent tetragonal phase stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdogan, E. K.; Safari, A.

    2007-03-01

    We propose a phenomenological intrinsic finite-size effect model for single domain, mechanically free, and surface charge compensated ΔG-P ⃗s-ξ space, which describes the decrease in tetragonal phase stability with decreasing ξ rigorously.

  10. Finite Element Analysis of High Heat Load Deformation and Mechanical Bending Correction of a Beamline Mirror for the APS Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldring, Nicholas

    The impending Advanced Photon Source Upgrade (APS-U) will introduce a hard x-ray source that is set to surpass the current APS in brightness and coherence by two to three orders of magnitude. To achieve this, the storage ring light source will be equipped with a multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice. In order to fully exploit and preserve the integrity of new beams actualized by upgraded storage ring components, improved beamline optics must also be introduced. The design process of new optics for the APS-U and other fourth generation synchrotrons involves the challenge of accommodating unprecedented heat loads. This dissertation presents an ex-situ analysis of heat load deformation and the subsequent mechanical bending correction of a 400 mm long, grazing-incidence, H2O side-cooled, reflecting mirror subjected to x-ray beams produced by the APS-U undulator source. Bending correction is measured as the smallest rms slope error, sigmarms, that can be resolved over a given length of the heat deformed geometry due to mechanical bending. Values of sigmarms in the account for finish errors or other contributions to sigmarms beyond the scope of thermal deformation and elastic bending. The methodology of this research includes finite element analysis (FEA) employed conjointly with an analytical solution for mechanical bending deflection by means of an end couple. Additionally, the study will focus on two beam power density profiles predicted by the APS-U which were created using the software SRCalc. The profiles account for a 6 GeV electron beam with second moment widths of 0.058 and 0.011 mm in the x- and y- directions respectively; the electron beam is passed through a 4.8 m long, 28 mm period APS-U undulator which produces the x-ray beam incident at a 3 mrad grazing angle on the flat mirror surface for both cases. The first power density profile is the most extreme case created by the undulator at it's closest gap with a critical energy of 3 keV (k y=2.459); the second

  11. 78 FR 45051 - Small Business Size Standards; Support Activities for Mining; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Industry Classification System (NAICS) Subsector 213, Support Activities for Mining, that are based on... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Part 121 RIN 3245-AG44 Small Business Size Standards; Support Activities for Mining; Correction AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Final rule; correction...

  12. Investigating size effects of complex nanostructures through Young-Laplace equation and finite element analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Dingjie; Xie, Yi Min; Huang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Shiwei, E-mail: shiwei.zhou@rmit.edu.au [Centre for Innovative Structures and Materials, School of Civil, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne 3001 (Australia); Li, Qing [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2015-11-28

    Analytical studies on the size effects of a simply-shaped beam fixed at both ends have successfully explained the sudden changes of effective Young's modulus as its diameter decreases below 100 nm. Yet they are invalid for complex nanostructures ubiquitously existing in nature. In accordance with a generalized Young-Laplace equation, one of the representative size effects is transferred to non-uniformly distributed pressure against an external surface due to the imbalance of inward and outward loads. Because the magnitude of pressure depends on the principal curvatures, iterative steps have to be adopted to gradually stabilize the structure in finite element analysis. Computational results are in good agreement with both experiment data and theoretical prediction. Furthermore, the investigation on strengthened and softened Young's modulus for two complex nanostructures demonstrates that the proposed computational method provides a general and effective approach to analyze the size effects for nanostructures in arbitrary shape.

  13. Detection of crack location and size in structures using improved damaged finite element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanad, Aysha; Rao, B. N.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper two-dimensional finite element with an embedded edge crack proposed by Potirniche et al [1] is improved further for crack depth ratios ranging up to 0.9 h (h is the element depth) and for predicting natural frequency of a cracked beam more accurately. The element is implemented in the commercial finite element code ABAQUS as user element (UEL) subroutine. The accuracy of the UEL is verified by comparing the first natural frequency for the bending mode for several beam cases with different damage locations with available experimental data. Subsequently a methodology to detect crack location and size in conjunction the proposed improved cracked element with is presented for singularity problems like a cracked beam. The frequency response functions, function of crack location and size, are approximated by means of surface-fitting techniques. Measured natural frequencies are used in a crack detection process and the crack location and size can be identified by finding the point of intersection of three frequency contour lines. The experimental data from beams studied by other researchers is employed to verify the accuracy of the proposed methodology in the diagnosis of structural crack faults.

  14. Finite-size scaling in silver nanowire films: design considerations for practical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, Matthew J; Cann, Maria; Ogilvie, Sean P; King, Alice A K; Jurewicz, Izabela; Dalton, Alan B

    2016-07-14

    We report the first application of finite-size scaling theory to nanostructured percolating networks, using silver nanowire (AgNW) films as a model system for experiment and simulation. AgNWs have been shown to be a prime candidate for replacing Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) in applications such as capacitive touch sensing. While their performance as large area films is well-studied, the production of working devices involves patterning of the films to produce isolated electrode structures, which exhibit finite-size scaling when these features are sufficiently small. We demonstrate a generalised method for understanding this behaviour in practical rod percolation systems, such as AgNW films, and study the effect of systematic variation of the length distribution of the percolating material. We derive a design rule for the minimum viable feature size in a device pattern, relating it to parameters which can be derived from a transmittance-sheet resistance data series for the material in question. This understanding has direct implications for the industrial adoption of silver nanowire electrodes in applications where small features are required including single-layer capacitive touch sensors, LCD and OLED display panels.

  15. Finite-size effect and the components of multifractality in financial volatility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Weixing

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The apparent multifractality can be decomposed quantitatively. ► There is a marked finite-size effect in the detection of multifractality. ► The effective multifractality can be further decomposed into two components. ► A time series exhibits effective multifractality only if it possesses nonlinearity. ► The daily DJIA volatility is analyzed as an example. - Abstract: Many financial variables are found to exhibit multifractal nature, which is usually attributed to the influence of temporal correlations and fat-tailedness in the probability distribution (PDF). Based on the partition function approach of multifractal analysis, we show that there is a marked finite-size effect in the detection of multifractality, and the effective multifractality is the apparent multifractality after removing the finite-size effect. We find that the effective multifractality can be further decomposed into two components, the PDF component and the nonlinearity component. Referring to the normal distribution, we can determine the PDF component by comparing the effective multifractality of the original time series and the surrogate data that have a normal distribution and keep the same linear and nonlinear correlations as the original data. We demonstrate our method by taking the daily volatility data of Dow Jones Industrial Average from 26 May 1896 to 27 April 2007 as an example. Extensive numerical experiments show that a time series exhibits effective multifractality only if it possesses nonlinearity and the PDF has an impact on the effective multifractality only when the time series possesses nonlinearity. Our method can also be applied to judge the presence of multifractality and determine its components of multifractal time series in other complex systems.

  16. Finite size effects in the static structure factor of dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davletov, A. E., E-mail: askar@physics.kz; Yerimbetova, L. T.; Mukhametkarimov, Ye. S.; Ospanova, A. K. [Department of Physics and Technology, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Al-Farabi av. 71, 050040 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2014-07-15

    Based on the previously developed pseudopotential model of the dust particles interaction, which takes into account both the finite size and screening effects, the equilibrium distribution functions are investigated in a broad range of plasma parameters. The treatment stems entirely from the renormalization theory of plasma particles interactions which leads to the so-called generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. In particular, an analytical expression for the static structure factor of the dust particles is proposed and its non-monotonic behavior in the hyper-netted chain approximation is found in a specified domain of plasma parameters to indicate the formation of short- or even long-range order in the system.

  17. Finite Element Prediction of Multi-Size Particulate Flow through Three-Dimensional Channel: Code Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Pagalthivarthi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Multi-size particulate dense slurry flow through three-dimensional rectangular channel is modeled using penalty finite elements with 8-noded hexahedral elements. The methodology previously developed for two-dimensional channel is extended. The computed eddy viscosity of the pure carrier flow is modified to account for the presence of solid particles. Predictions from Spalart-Almaras and k-ε turbulence models are compared to show consistency of trends in results. Results are also found to compare well with experimental results from the literature.

  18. Lagrangian evolution of deformation of finite-size bubbles in turbulent multiphase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuk, Ashik Ullah Mohammad; Salibindla, Ashwanth; Ni, Rui

    2017-11-01

    Finite-size bubbles tend to deform in a strong turbulent environment because of the complex interfacial momentum transfer between them. We have utilized the new V-ONSET turbulence multiphase flow facility to track the deformation and the couplings between two phases in a 3D Lagrangian framework. This rich dataset allows us to understand the roles played by the dynamic pressure and viscous stress, as well as different forces that contribute to the interfacial momentum transfer. Financial support for this project was provided by National Science Foundation under Grant Number: 1653389 and 1705246.

  19. Assessment of relative individual renal function based on DMSA uptake corrected for renal size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estorch, M.; Camacho, V.; Tembl, A.; Mena, I.; Hernandez, A.; Flotats, A.; Carrio, I.; Torres, G.; Prat, L.

    2002-01-01

    Decreased relative renal DMSA uptake can be a consequence of abnormal kidney size, associated with normal or impaired renal function. The quantification of relative renal function based on DMSA uptake in both kidneys is an established method for the assessment of individual renal function. Aim: To assess relative renal function by means of quantification of renal DMSA uptake corrected for kidney size. Results were compared with relative renal DMSA uptake without size correction, and were validated against the absolute renal DMSA uptake. Material and Methods: Four-hundred-forty-four consecutive patients (147 adults, mean age 14 years) underwent a DMSA study for several renal diseases. The relative renal function, based on the relative DMSA uptake uncorrected and corrected for renal size, and the absolute renal DMSA uptake were calculated. In order to relate the relative DMSA uptake uncorrected and corrected for renal size with the absolute DMSA uptake, subtraction of uncorrected (SU) and corrected (SC) relative uptake percentages of each pair of kidneys was obtained, and these values were correlated to the matched subtraction percentages of absolute uptake (SA). If the individual relative renal function is normal (45%-55%), the subtraction value is less or equal to 10%. Results: In 227 patients (51%) the relative renal DMSA uptake value was normal either uncorrected or corrected for renal size (A), and in 149 patients (34%) it was abnormal by both quantification methods (B). Seventy-seven patients (15%) had the relative renal DMSA uptake abnormal only by the uncorrected method (C). Subtraction value of absolute DMSA uptake percentages was not significantly different of subtraction value of relative DMSA uptake percentages corrected for renal size when relative uncorrected uptake was abnormal and corrected normal. where * p<0.0001, and p=NS. Conclusion: When uncorrected and corrected relative DMSA uptake are abnormal, the absolute uptake is also impaired, while when

  20. Bulk vs nanoscale WS2: finite size effects and solid-state lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S; Musfeldt, J L; Mihut, I; Betts, J B; Migliori, A; Zak, A; Tenne, R

    2007-08-01

    To investigate phonon confinement in nanoscale metal dichalcogenides, we measured the low-temperature specific heat of layered and nanoparticle WS2. Below 9 K, the specific heat of the nanoparticles deviates from that of the bulk counterpart. Further, it deviates from the usual T 3 dependence below 4 K due to finite size effects that eliminate long wavelength acoustic phonons and interparticle-motion entropy. This separation of nanoscale effects from T 3 dependence can be modeled by assuming that the phonon density of states is flexible, changing with size and shape. We invoke relationships between the low-temperature T 3 phonon term, Young's modulus, and friction coefficient to assess the difference in the tribological properties. On the basis of this analysis, we conclude that the improved lubrication properties of the nanoparticles are extrinsic.

  1. Finite element model of size, shape and blood pressure on rupture of intracranial saccular aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rica Nabong, Jennica; David, Guido

    2017-10-01

    Rupture of intracranial saccular aneurysms is a primary concern for neurologists and patients because it leads to stroke and permanent disability. This paper examines the role of blood pressure, in connection with size of and wall thickness, in the rupture of saccular aneurysms. A bulb-shaped geometry of a saccular aneurysm is obtained from angiographic images of a patient and modeled using Finite Elements based on the principle of virtual work under the Fung stress-strain relationship. The numerical model is subjected to varying levels of systolic blood pressure. Rupture is assumed to occur when the wall stress exceeded its mechanical strength. The results show which sizes of this class of aneurysms are at high risk of rupture for varying levels of blood pressure.

  2. Finite size effects in the thermodynamics of a free neutral scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvan, A. S.

    2018-04-01

    The exact analytical lattice results for the partition function of the free neutral scalar field in one spatial dimension in both the configuration and the momentum space were obtained in the framework of the path integral method. The symmetric square matrices of the bilinear forms on the vector space of fields in both configuration space and momentum space were found explicitly. The exact lattice results for the partition function were generalized to the three-dimensional spatial momentum space and the main thermodynamic quantities were derived both on the lattice and in the continuum limit. The thermodynamic properties and the finite volume corrections to the thermodynamic quantities of the free real scalar field were studied. We found that on the finite lattice the exact lattice results for the free massive neutral scalar field agree with the continuum limit only in the region of small values of temperature and volume. However, at these temperatures and volumes the continuum physical quantities for both massive and massless scalar field deviate essentially from their thermodynamic limit values and recover them only at high temperatures or/and large volumes in the thermodynamic limit.

  3. Finite-size anomalies of the Drude weight: Role of symmetries and ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, R. J.; Varma, V. K.

    2017-12-01

    We revisit the numerical problem of computing the high temperature spin stiffness, or Drude weight, D of the spin-1 /2 X X Z chain using exact diagonalization to systematically analyze its dependence on system symmetries and ensemble. Within the canonical ensemble and for states with zero total magnetization, we find D vanishes exactly due to spin-inversion symmetry for all but the anisotropies Δ˜M N=cos(π M /N ) with N ,M ∈Z+ coprimes and N >M , provided system sizes L ≥2 N , for which states with different spin-inversion signature become degenerate due to the underlying s l2 loop algebra symmetry. All these loop-algebra degenerate states carry finite currents which we conjecture [based on data from the system sizes and anisotropies Δ˜M N (with N magnetic flux not only breaks spin-inversion in the zero magnetization sector but also lifts the loop-algebra degeneracies in all symmetry sectors—this effect is more pertinent at smaller Δ due to the larger contributions to D coming from the low-magnetization sectors which are more sensitive to the system's symmetries. Thus we generically find a finite D for fluxed rings and arbitrary 0 lifted.

  4. Finite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.R. Azzam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the application of using a skirted foundation system to study the behavior of foundations with structural skirts adjacent to a sand slope and subjected to earthquake loading. The effect of the adopted skirts to safeguard foundation and slope from collapse is studied. The skirts effect on controlling horizontal soil movement and decreasing pore water pressure beneath foundations and beside the slopes during earthquake is investigated. This technique is investigated numerically using finite element analysis. A four story reinforced concrete building that rests on a raft foundation is idealized as a two-dimensional model with and without skirts. A two dimensional plain strain program PLAXIS, (dynamic version is adopted. A series of models for the problem under investigation were run under different skirt depths and lactation from the slope crest. The effect of subgrade relative density and skirts thickness is also discussed. Nodal displacement and element strains were analyzed for the foundation with and without skirts and at different studied parameters. The research results showed a great effectiveness in increasing the overall stability of the slope and foundation. The confined soil footing system by such skirts reduced the foundation acceleration therefore it can be tended to damping element and relieved the transmitted disturbance to the adjacent slope. This technique can be considered as a good method to control the slope deformation and decrease the slope acceleration during earthquakes.

  5. Finite-Time and -Size Scalings in the Evaluation of Large Deviation Functions. Numerical Analysis in Continuous Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara Hidalgo, Esteban; Nemoto, Takahiro; Lecomte, Vivien

    Rare trajectories of stochastic systems are important to understand because of their potential impact. However, their properties are by definition difficult to sample directly. Population dynamics provide a numerical tool allowing their study, by means of simulating a large number of copies of the system, which are subjected to a selection rule that favors the rare trajectories of interest. However, such algorithms are plagued by finite simulation time- and finite population size- effects that can render their use delicate. Using the continuous-time cloning algorithm, we analyze the finite-time and finite-size scalings of estimators of the large deviation functions associated to the distribution of the rare trajectories. We use these scalings in order to propose a numerical approach which allows to extract the infinite-time and infinite-size limit of these estimators.

  6. Influence of Finite Element Size in Residual Strength Prediction of Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Bogert, Philip B.; Karayev, Kazbek Z.; Nordman, Paul S.; Razi, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity of failure load to the element size used in a progressive failure analysis (PFA) of carbon composite center notched laminates is evaluated. The sensitivity study employs a PFA methodology previously developed by the authors consisting of Hashin-Rotem intra-laminar fiber and matrix failure criteria and a complete stress degradation scheme for damage simulation. The approach is implemented with a user defined subroutine in the ABAQUS/Explicit finite element package. The effect of element size near the notch tips on residual strength predictions was assessed for a brittle failure mode with a parametric study that included three laminates of varying material system, thickness and stacking sequence. The study resulted in the selection of an element size of 0.09 in. X 0.09 in., which was later used for predicting crack paths and failure loads in sandwich panels and monolithic laminated panels. Comparison of predicted crack paths and failure loads for these panels agreed well with experimental observations. Additionally, the element size vs. normalized failure load relationship, determined in the parametric study, was used to evaluate strength-scaling factors for three different element sizes. The failure loads predicted with all three element sizes provided converged failure loads with respect to that corresponding with the 0.09 in. X 0.09 in. element size. Though preliminary in nature, the strength-scaling concept has the potential to greatly reduce the computational time required for PFA and can enable the analysis of large scale structural components where failure is dominated by fiber failure in tension.

  7. A Markov model for the temporal dynamics of balanced random networks of finite size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagzi, Fereshteh; Rotter, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The balanced state of recurrent networks of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons is characterized by fluctuations of population activity about an attractive fixed point. Numerical simulations show that these dynamics are essentially nonlinear, and the intrinsic noise (self-generated fluctuations) in networks of finite size is state-dependent. Therefore, stochastic differential equations with additive noise of fixed amplitude cannot provide an adequate description of the stochastic dynamics. The noise model should, rather, result from a self-consistent description of the network dynamics. Here, we consider a two-state Markovian neuron model, where spikes correspond to transitions from the active state to the refractory state. Excitatory and inhibitory input to this neuron affects the transition rates between the two states. The corresponding nonlinear dependencies can be identified directly from numerical simulations of networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, discretized at a time resolution in the sub-millisecond range. Deterministic mean-field equations, and a noise component that depends on the dynamic state of the network, are obtained from this model. The resulting stochastic model reflects the behavior observed in numerical simulations quite well, irrespective of the size of the network. In particular, a strong temporal correlation between the two populations, a hallmark of the balanced state in random recurrent networks, are well represented by our model. Numerical simulations of such networks show that a log-normal distribution of short-term spike counts is a property of balanced random networks with fixed in-degree that has not been considered before, and our model shares this statistical property. Furthermore, the reconstruction of the flow from simulated time series suggests that the mean-field dynamics of finite-size networks are essentially of Wilson-Cowan type. We expect that this novel nonlinear stochastic model of the interaction between

  8. Finite size scaling of the Higgs-Yukawa model near the Gaussian fixed point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, David Y.J.; Lin, C.J. David [National Chiao-Tung Univ., Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Knippschild, Bastian [HISKP, Bonn (Germany); Nagy, Attila [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Humboldt-Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    We study the scaling properties of Higgs-Yukawa models. Using the technique of Finite-Size Scaling, we are able to derive scaling functions that describe the observables of the model in the vicinity of a Gaussian fixed point. A feasibility study of our strategy is performed for the pure scalar theory in the weak-coupling regime. Choosing the on-shell renormalisation scheme gives us an advantage to fit the scaling functions against lattice data with only a small number of fit parameters. These formulae can be used to determine the universality of the observed phase transitions, and thus play an essential role in future investigations of Higgs-Yukawa models, in particular in the strong Yukawa coupling region.

  9. Finite-size effects in the spectrum of the OSp (3 | 2) superspin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Holger; Martins, Márcio J.

    2015-05-01

    The low energy spectrum of a spin chain with OSp (3 | 2) supergroup symmetry is studied based on the Bethe ansatz solution of the related vertex model. This model is a lattice realization of intersecting loops in two dimensions with loop fugacity z = 1 which provides a framework to study the critical properties of the unusual low temperature Goldstone phase of the O (N) sigma model for N = 1 in the context of an integrable model. Our finite-size analysis provides strong evidence for the existence of continua of scaling dimensions, the lowest of them starting at the ground state. Based on our data we conjecture that the so-called watermelon correlation functions decay logarithmically with exponents related to the quadratic Casimir operator of OSp (3 | 2). The presence of a continuous spectrum is not affected by a change to the boundary conditions although the density of states in the continua appears to be modified.

  10. Finite-size effects in the spectrum of the OSp(3|2 superspin chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Frahm

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The low energy spectrum of a spin chain with OSp(3|2 supergroup symmetry is studied based on the Bethe ansatz solution of the related vertex model. This model is a lattice realization of intersecting loops in two dimensions with loop fugacity z=1 which provides a framework to study the critical properties of the unusual low temperature Goldstone phase of the O(N sigma model for N=1 in the context of an integrable model. Our finite-size analysis provides strong evidence for the existence of continua of scaling dimensions, the lowest of them starting at the ground state. Based on our data we conjecture that the so-called watermelon correlation functions decay logarithmically with exponents related to the quadratic Casimir operator of OSp(3|2. The presence of a continuous spectrum is not affected by a change to the boundary conditions although the density of states in the continua appears to be modified.

  11. Finite size effects on textured surfaces: recovering contact angles from vagarious drop edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Anaïs; Rivetti, Marco; Teisseire, Jérémie; Barthel, Etienne

    2014-02-18

    A clue to understand wetting hysteresis on superhydrophobic surfaces is the relation between receding contact angle and surface textures. When the surface textures are large, there is a significant distribution of local contact angles around the drop. As seen from the cross section, the apparent contact angle oscillates as the triple line recedes. Our experiments demonstrate that the origin of these oscillations is a finite size effect. Combining side and bottom views of the drop, we take into account the 3D conformation of the surface near the edge to evaluate an intrinsic contact angle from the oscillations of the apparent contact angle. We find that for drops receding on axisymmetric textures the intrinsic receding contact angle is the minimum value of the oscillation while for a square lattice it is the maximum.

  12. Loss of acoustic black hole effect in a structure of finite size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Liling; Cheng, Li, E-mail: li.cheng@polyu.edu.hk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2016-07-04

    The Acoustic Black Hole (ABH) effect takes place in thin-walled structures with diminishing thickness as a result of the reduction in the bending wave speed. It was shown to exist as a broadband phenomenon, based on wave propagation theory in structures of semi-infinite size. The ABH effect exhibits appealing features for various applications, such as passive vibration control, energy harvesting, and sound radiation control. In this paper, we demonstrate the disappearance of the ABH effect in a finite beam at specific frequency ranges above the cut-on frequency, both experimentally and theoretically. Analyses show that the phenomenon takes place at frequencies which are close to the low order local resonant frequencies of the portion of the beam demarcated by the position of the excitation force. These frequencies can be predicted so that the phenomenon can be avoided for the targeted frequency ranges in ABH applications.

  13. Dependence of exponents on text length versus finite-size scaling for word-frequency distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Álvaro; Font-Clos, Francesc

    2017-08-01

    Some authors have recently argued that a finite-size scaling law for the text-length dependence of word-frequency distributions cannot be conceptually valid. Here we give solid quantitative evidence for the validity of this scaling law, using both careful statistical tests and analytical arguments based on the generalized central-limit theorem applied to the moments of the distribution (and obtaining a novel derivation of Heaps' law as a by-product). We also find that the picture of word-frequency distributions with power-law exponents that decrease with text length [X. Yan and P. Minnhagen, Physica A 444, 828 (2016), 10.1016/j.physa.2015.10.082] does not stand with rigorous statistical analysis. Instead, we show that the distributions are perfectly described by power-law tails with stable exponents, whose values are close to 2, in agreement with the classical Zipf's law. Some misconceptions about scaling are also clarified.

  14. Terahertz transmission enhancement in finite-size arrays of subwavelength holes modified with dielectric peg layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whisenhunt, Brady Andrew

    Scope and Method of Study: This thesis investigates terahertz transmission through finite-size arrays of subwavelength holes perforated in a thin aluminum film modified with a periodic layer of dielectric pegs resting on the hole openings. Samples of differing patterns and numbers of holes were fabricated in a 350 nm thick layer of aluminum on top of a 640 µm thick silicon substrate layer. The dielectric peg layer (DPL) consisted of periodically-spaced pegs made out of negative photoresist material. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy measurements of the transmission was taken both before and after fabrication of the DPL on top of the hole array samples. The results were analyzed and compared to simulation of an infinitely periodic hole array modified with a DPL. Findings and Conclusions: A peak in the transmission spectrum was observed at the predicted surface plasmon resonance frequency for the array. The transmission peak was enhanced 5%-20% with addition of the DPL, depending on the arrangement and number of holes in the sample. A weaker peak was observed in some samples at higher frequencies with addition of the DPL, which is attributed to a resonance of the DPL layer itself. Both resonant and nonresonant transmission was enhanced with addition of the DPL. Simulation showed a similar enhancement of the resonant and nonresonant transmission due to DPL. Varying the value of the dielectric constant of the simulated pegs changed the strength of the fundamental surface plasmon resonance as well as the location of the higher frequency peaks. A distinct Fano-like asymmetry was observed in the experimentally measured transmission spectra but not observed in simulation. The results suggest that a heterostructure consisting of a finite-size array of subwavelength holes combined with a DPL can be used to enhance the transmission of light through the holes as well as tune the asymmetry of the main surface plasmon resonance peak.

  15. Finite size effects in a model for platicity of amorphous composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyukodi, Botond; Lemarchand, Claire A.; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the plastic behavior of an amorphous matrix reinforced by hard particles. A mesoscopic depinning-like model accounting for Eshelby elastic interactions is implemented. Only the effect of a plastic disorder is considered. Numerical results show a complex size dependence of the effective...... numerically. Predictions of the effective flow stress accounting for further logarithmic corrections show a very good agreement with numerical results.......We discuss the plastic behavior of an amorphous matrix reinforced by hard particles. A mesoscopic depinning-like model accounting for Eshelby elastic interactions is implemented. Only the effect of a plastic disorder is considered. Numerical results show a complex size dependence of the effective...... flow stress of the amorphous composite. In particular, the departure from the mixing law shows opposite trends associated to the competing effects of the matrix and the reinforcing particles, respectively. The reinforcing mechanisms and their effects on localization are discussed. Plastic strain...

  16. GPU-based ultra-fast dose calculation using a finite size pencil beam model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xuejun; Choi, Dongju; Men, Chunhua; Pan, Hubert; Majumdar, Amitava; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-10-01

    Online adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is an attractive concept that promises the ability to deliver an optimal treatment in response to the inter-fraction variability in patient anatomy. However, it has yet to be realized due to technical limitations. Fast dose deposit coefficient calculation is a critical component of the online planning process that is required for plan optimization of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Computer graphics processing units (GPUs) are well suited to provide the requisite fast performance for the data-parallel nature of dose calculation. In this work, we develop a dose calculation engine based on a finite-size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm and a GPU parallel computing framework. The developed framework can accommodate any FSPB model. We test our implementation in the case of a water phantom and the case of a prostate cancer patient with varying beamlet and voxel sizes. All testing scenarios achieved speedup ranging from 200 to 400 times when using a NVIDIA Tesla C1060 card in comparison with a 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon CPU. The computational time for calculating dose deposition coefficients for a nine-field prostate IMRT plan with this new framework is less than 1 s. This indicates that the GPU-based FSPB algorithm is well suited for online re-planning for adaptive radiotherapy.

  17. Finite size scaling study of a two parameter percolation model: Constant and correlated growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Bappaditya; Santra, S. B.

    2018-02-01

    A new percolation model of enhanced parameter space with nucleation and growth is developed taking the initial seed concentration ρ and a growth parameter g as two tunable parameters. Percolation transition is determined by the final static configurations of spanning clusters once taking uniform growth probability for all the clusters and then taking a cluster size dependent dynamic growth probability. The uniform growth probability remains constant over time and leads to a constant growth model whereas the dynamically varying growth probability leads to a correlated growth model. In the first case, the growth of a cluster will encounter partial hindrance due to the presence of other clusters whereas in the second case the growth of a larger cluster will be further suppressed in comparison to the growth of smaller clusters. A finite size scaling theory for percolation transition is developed and numerically verified for both the models. The scaling functions are found to depend on both g and ρ. At the critical growth parameter gc, the values of the critical exponents are found to be same as that of the original percolation at all values of ρ for the constant growth model whereas in the case of correlated growth model the scaling behavior deviates from ordinary percolation in the dilute limit of ρ. The constant growth model then belongs to the same universality class of percolation for a wide range of ρ whereas the correlated growth model displays a continuously varying universality class as ρ decreases towards zero.

  18. The finite, kinematic rupture properties of great-sized earthquakes since 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Gavin P.

    2017-06-01

    Here, I present a database of >160 finite fault models for all earthquakes of M 7.5 and above since 1990, created using a consistent modeling approach. The use of a common approach facilitates easier comparisons between models, and reduces uncertainties that arise when comparing models generated by different authors, data sets and modeling techniques. I use this database to verify published scaling relationships, and for the first time show a clear and intriguing relationship between maximum potency (the product of slip and area) and average potency for a given earthquake. This relationship implies that earthquakes do not reach the potential size given by the tectonic load of a fault (sometimes called ;moment deficit,; calculated via a plate rate over time since the last earthquake, multiplied by geodetic fault coupling). Instead, average potency (or slip) scales with but is less than maximum potency (dictated by tectonic loading). Importantly, this relationship facilitates a more accurate assessment of maximum earthquake size for a given fault segment, and thus has implications for long-term hazard assessments. The relationship also suggests earthquake cycles may not completely reset after a large earthquake, and thus repeat rates of such events may appear shorter than is expected from tectonic loading. This in turn may help explain the phenomenon of ;earthquake super-cycles; observed in some global subduction zones.

  19. A method of selecting grid size to account for Hertz deformation in finite element analysis of spur gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, J. J.; Chao, C. H. C.

    1981-01-01

    A method of selecting grid size for the finite element analysis of gear tooth deflection is presented. The method is based on a finite element study of two cylinders in line contact, where the criterion for establishing element size was that there be agreement with the classical Hertzian solution for deflection. The results are applied to calculate deflection for the gear specimen used in the NASA spur gear test rig. Comparisons are made between the present results and the results of two other methods of calculation. The results have application in design of gear tooth profile modifications to reduce noise and dynamic loads.

  20. Finite-size corrections for quantum strings on AdS_4 x CP^3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astolfi, Davide; Orselli, Marta; Harmark, Troels

    2011-01-01

    fermionic and bosonic string states, we find that there exist logarithmic divergences in the sums over mode numbers which cancel between the cubic and quartic Hamiltonian. We show that from the form of the cubic Hamiltonian it is natural to require that the cutoff for summing over heavy modes must be twice...

  1. In situ measurements of the oblique incidence sound absorption coefficient for finite sized absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottink, Marco; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2016-01-01

    for the finiteness of the absorber. A sound field model, which accounts for scattering from the finite absorber edges, assuming plane wave incidence is derived. A significant influence of the finiteness on the radiation impedance and the corresponding absorption coefficient is found. A finite surface method, which......Absorption coefficients are mostly measured in reverberation rooms or with impedance tubes. Since these methods are only suitable for measuring the random incidence and the normal incidence absorption coefficient, there exists an increasing need for absorption coefficient measurement of finite...... absorbers at oblique incidence in situ. Due to the edge diffraction effect, oblique incidence methods considering an infinite sample fail to measure the absorption coefficient at large incidence angles of finite samples. This paper aims for the development of a measurement method that accounts...

  2. In situ measurements of the oblique incidence sound absorption coefficient for finite sized absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottink, Marco; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Fernandez-Grande, Efren; Trojgaard, Per; Tiana-Roig, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Absorption coefficients are mostly measured in reverberation rooms or with impedance tubes. Since these methods are only suitable for measuring the random incidence and the normal incidence absorption coefficient, there exists an increasing need for absorption coefficient measurement of finite absorbers at oblique incidence in situ. Due to the edge diffraction effect, oblique incidence methods considering an infinite sample fail to measure the absorption coefficient at large incidence angles of finite samples. This paper aims for the development of a measurement method that accounts for the finiteness of the absorber. A sound field model, which accounts for scattering from the finite absorber edges, assuming plane wave incidence is derived. A significant influence of the finiteness on the radiation impedance and the corresponding absorption coefficient is found. A finite surface method, which combines microphone array measurements over a finite sample with the sound field model in an inverse manner, is proposed. Besides, a temporal subtraction method, a microphone array method, impedance tube measurements, and an equivalent fluid model are used for validation. The finite surface method gives promising agreement with theory, especially at near grazing incidence. Thus, the finite surface method is proposed for further measurements at large incidence angles.

  3. Length and temperature dependence of the mechanical properties of finite-size carbyne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueming; Huang, Yanhui; Cao, Bingyang; To, Albert C.

    2017-09-01

    Carbyne is an ideal one-dimensional conductor and the thinnest interconnection in an ultimate nano-device and it requires an understanding of the mechanical properties that affect device performance and reliability. Here, we report the mechanical properties of finite-size carbyne, obtained by a molecular dynamics simulation study based on the adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order potential. To avoid confusion in assigning the effective cross-sectional area of carbyne, the value of the effective cross-sectional area of carbyne (4.148 Å2) was deduced via experiment and adopted in our study. Ends-constraints effects on the ultimate stress (maximum force) of the carbyne chains are investigated, revealing that the molecular dynamics simulation results agree very well with the experimental results. The ultimate strength, Young's Modulus and maximum strain of carbyne are rather sensitive to the temperature and all decrease with the temperature. Opposite tendencies of the length dependence of the overall ultimate strength and maximum strain of carbyne at room temperature and very low temperature have been found, and analyses show that this originates in the ends effect of carbyne.

  4. Avalanching Systems with Longer Range Connectivity: Occurrence of a Crossover Phenomenon and Multifractal Finite Size Scaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Benella

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many out-of-equilibrium systems respond to external driving with nonlinear and self-similar dynamics. This near scale-invariant behavior of relaxation events has been modeled through sand pile cellular automata. However, a common feature of these models is the assumption of a local connectivity, while in many real systems, we have evidence for longer range connectivity and a complex topology of the interacting structures. Here, we investigate the role that longer range connectivity might play in near scale-invariant systems, by analyzing the results of a sand pile cellular automaton model on a Newman–Watts network. The analysis clearly indicates the occurrence of a crossover phenomenon in the statistics of the relaxation events as a function of the percentage of longer range links and the breaking of the simple Finite Size Scaling (FSS. The more complex nature of the dynamics in the presence of long-range connectivity is investigated in terms of multi-scaling features and analyzed by the Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis (ROMA.

  5. Finite size effects on magnetic flux penetration into YBCO/LSMO hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uspenskaya, L S [Institute of Solid State Physics RAS, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Nurgaliev, T; Miteva, S, E-mail: uspenska@issp.ac.r [Institute of Electronica BAS, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-06-01

    The attractive idea to create artificial superconductor/ferromagnet heterostructures (SC/FM) for easy control of the superconductor properties by magnetic field is widely considered last decade. Of a special interest for applications are the HTSC/FM heterostructures, particularly the YBCO/LSMO, where the magnetization value of LSMO could be adjusted by doping, by variation of oxygen content, and magnetic domain structure could be controlled by reasonable magnetic field. We concentrate on the in-plane field penetration into the YBCO/LSMO hybrid film, which is of practical interest as the in-plane field easier saturates the magnetic film. The study is performed by the magneto-optic visualization technique at T down to 7 K. We found a striking transformation of the in-plane external field into a wave of alternating perpendicular flux, the particular features of which depended on the temperature and magnetic prehistory at temperature above superconducting transition. To shed light on the mechanism of the effect, we have investigated the magnetic domain pattern of manganite film and it's transformations due to variation of temperature and the field. The results are discussed taking into account the finite size of the hybrid structure and the magnetostatic field distribution.

  6. Evaluation of cavity size, kind, and filling technique of composite shrinkage by finite element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Toloo; Alaghehmad, Homayoon; Moodi, Ehsan

    2018-01-01

    Cavity preparation reduces the rigidity of tooth and its resistance to deformation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dimensional changes of the repaired teeth using two types of light cure composite and two methods of incremental and bulk filling by the use of finite element method. In this computerized in vitro experimental study, an intact maxillary premolar was scanned using cone beam computed tomography instrument (SCANORA, Switzerland), then each section of tooth image was transmitted to Ansys software using AUTOCAD. Then, eight sizes of cavity preparations and two methods of restoration (bulk and incremental) using two different types of composite resin materials (Heliomolar, Brilliant) were proposed on software and analysis was completed with Ansys software. Dimensional change increased by widening and deepening of the cavities. It was also increased using Brilliant composite resin and incremental filling technique. Increase in depth and type of filling technique has the greatest role of dimensional change after curing, but the type of composite resin does not have a significant role.

  7. Finite-size behaviour of generalized susceptibilities in the whole phase plane of the Potts model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xue; Zhang, Yanhua; Chen, Lizhu; Xu, Mingmei; Wu, Yuanfang

    2018-01-01

    We study the sign distribution of generalized magnetic susceptibilities in the temperature-external magnetic field plane using the three-dimensional three-state Potts model. We find that the sign of odd-order susceptibility is opposite in the symmetric (disorder) and broken (order) phases, but that of the even-order one remains positive when it is far away from the phase boundary. When the critical point is approached from the crossover side, negative fourth-order magnetic susceptibility is observable. It is also demonstrated that non-monotonic behavior occurs in the temperature dependence of the generalized susceptibilities of the energy. The finite-size scaling behavior of the specific heat in this model is mainly controlled by the critical exponent of the magnetic susceptibility in the three-dimensional Ising universality class. Supported by Fund Project of National Natural Science Foundation of China (11647093, 11405088, 11521064), Fund Project of Sichuan Provincial Department of Education (16ZB0339), Fund Project of Chengdu Technological University (2016RC004) and the Major State Basic Research Development Program of China (2014CB845402)

  8. Finite element modeling of grain size effects on the ultrasonic microstructural noise backscattering in polycrystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, X; Tie, B; Schmitt, J-H; Aubry, D

    2018-07-01

    The correlation between ultrasonic wave propagation and polycrystalline microstructures has significant implications in nondestructive evaluation. An original numerical approach using the finite element method to quantify in both time and frequency domains the ultrasonic noise scattering due to the elastic heterogeneity of polycrystalline microstructures is presented. Based on the reciprocity theorem, it allows the scattering evaluation using mechanical data recorded only on the boundary of polycrystal instead of within its volume and is applicable to any polycrystalline aggregate regardless of its crystallographic or morphological characteristics. Consequently it gives a more realistic and accurate access of polycrystalline microstructures than the classical analytical models developed under the assumption of single scattering and the Born approximation. The numerical approach is proposed within the same unified theoretical framework as the classical analytical models, so it is possible to validate it in the cases of idealized microstructures for which the considered analytical models remain relevant. As an original result, assuming single phase, untextured and equiaxed microstructures, two-dimensional (2D) theoretical formulas are developed and a frequency-dependent coefficient is found compared to the classical three-dimensional (3D) formulas. 2D numerical simulations are then performed for idealized microstructures composed of hexagonal grains with a uniform grain-size. Three grain sizes are considered herein and involve different scattering regions. Good comparisons are obtained between theoretical and numerical estimates of the backscattering coefficient, which validate the numerical approach. Effects of the grain boundary orientations are analyzed by modeling an irregular hexagonal grain morphology and a random grain morphology generated by an established Voronoi approach. The origin of the significant oscillation level of backscattering is then investigated

  9. Fluctuations, Finite-Size Effects and the Thermodynamic Limit in Computer Simulations: Revisiting the Spatial Block Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Heidari

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The spatial block analysis (SBA method has been introduced to efficiently extrapolate thermodynamic quantities from finite-size computer simulations of a large variety of physical systems. In the particular case of simple liquids and liquid mixtures, by subdividing the simulation box into blocks of increasing size and calculating volume-dependent fluctuations of the number of particles, it is possible to extrapolate the bulk isothermal compressibility and Kirkwood–Buff integrals in the thermodynamic limit. Only by explicitly including finite-size effects, ubiquitous in computer simulations, into the SBA method, the extrapolation to the thermodynamic limit can be achieved. In this review, we discuss two of these finite-size effects in the context of the SBA method due to (i the statistical ensemble and (ii the finite integration domains used in computer simulations. To illustrate the method, we consider prototypical liquids and liquid mixtures described by truncated and shifted Lennard–Jones (TSLJ potentials. Furthermore, we show some of the most recent developments of the SBA method, in particular its use to calculate chemical potentials of liquids in a wide range of density/concentration conditions.

  10. Finite ε2-corrections to the N=2 SYM prepotential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Emile Bourgine

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We derive the first ε2-correction of the instanton partition functions in 4D N=2 Super Yang–Mills (SYM to the Nekrasov–Shatashvili limit ε2→0. In the latter we recall the emergence of the famous Thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz-like equation which has been found by Mayer expansion techniques. Here we combine efficiently these to field theory arguments. In a nutshell, we find natural and resolutive the introduction of a new operator ∇ that distinguishes the singularities within and outside the integration contour of the partition function.

  11. Martian particle size based on thermal inertia corrected for elevation-dependent atmospheric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N. T.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal inertia is commonly used to derive physical properties of the Martian surface. If the surface is composed of loosely consolidated grains, then the thermal conductivity derived from the inertia can theoretically be used to compute the particle size. However, one persistent difficulty associated with the interpretation of thermal inertia and the derivation of particle size from it has been the degree to which atmospheric properties affect both the radiation balance at the surface and the gas conductivity. These factors vary with atmospheric pressure so that derived thermal inertias and particle sizes are a function of elevation. By utilizing currently available thermal models and laboratory information, a fine component thermal inertia map was convolved with digital topography to produce particle size maps of the Martian surface corrected for these elevation-dependent effects. Such an approach is especially applicable for the highest elevations on Mars, where atmospheric back radiation and gas conductivity are low.

  12. Proposal for element size and time increment selection guideline by 3-D finite element method for elastic waves propagation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Hitoshi; Meshii, Toshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a guideline for selection of element size and time increment by 3-D finite element method, which is applied to elastic wave propagation analysis for a long distance of a large structure. An element size and a time increment are determined by quantitative evaluation of strain, which must be 0 on the analysis model with a uniform motion, caused by spatial and time discretization. (author)

  13. Influence of size-corrected bound-electron contribution on nanometric silver dielectric function. Sizing through optical extinction spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santillán, J M J; Videla, F A; Scaffardi, L B; Schinca, D C; Fernández van Raap, M B; Muraca, D

    2013-01-01

    The study of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is of great interest due to their ability to enhance optical fields on the nanometric scale, which makes them interesting for various applications in several fields of science and technology. In particular, their optical properties depend on the dielectric function of the metal, its size, shape and surrounding environment. This work analyses the contributions of free and bound electrons to the complex dielectric function of spherical silver NPs and their influence on the optical extinction spectra. The contribution of free electrons is usually corrected for particle size under 10 nm, introducing a modification of the damping constant to account for the extra collisions with the particle's boundary. For the contribution of bound electrons, we considered the interband transitions from the d-band to the conduction band including the size dependence of the electronic density states for radii below 2 nm. Bearing in mind these specific modifications, it was possible to determine optical and band energy parameters by fitting the bulk complex dielectric function. The results obtained from the optimum fit are: K bulk = 2 × 10 24 (coefficient for bound-electron contribution), E g = 1.91 eV (gap energy), E F = 4.12 eV (Fermi energy), and γ b = 1.5 × 10 14 Hz (damping constant for bound electrons). Based on this size-dependent dielectric function, extinction spectra of silver particles in the nanometric–subnanometric radius range can be calculated using Mie's theory, and its size behaviour analysed. These studies are applied to fit experimental extinction spectrum of very small spherical particles fabricated by fs laser ablation of a solid target in water. From the fitting, the structure and size distribution of core radius and shell thickness of the colloidal suspension could be determined. The spectroscopic results suggest that the colloidal suspension is composed by two types of structures: bare core and core–shell. The former

  14. Inherent stress correlations in a quiescent two-dimensional liquid: Static analysis including finite-size effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaître, Anaël

    2017-11-01

    After constructing a formalism to analyze spatial stress correlations in two-dimensional equilibrated liquids, we show that the sole conjunction of mechanical balance and material isotropy demands all anisotropic components of the inherent state (IS) stress autocorrelation matrix to decay at long range as 1 /r2 in the large system size limit. Furthermore, analyzing numerical simulation data for an equilibrated supercooled liquid, we bring evidence that, in finite-sized periodic systems, the autocorrelations of pressure and shear stresses present uniform backgrounds of amplitudes proportional to the inverse cell area. These backgrounds bring relevant contributions to macroscopic IS stress fluctuations, with the consequence that the latter scale as inverse area, yet in an anomalous way, inconsistent with viewing an IS as equivalent, in the thermodynamic limit, to an ensemble of independent finite-sized subsystems. In that sense, ISs are not spatially ergodic.

  15. Finite-size, chemical-potential and magnetic effects on the phase transition in a four-fermion interacting model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, E.B.S. [Universidade Federal do Sul e Sudeste do Para, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Maraba (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCTI, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Linhares, C.A. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Malbouisson, A.P.C. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCTI, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Malbouisson, J.M.C. [Universidade Federal da Bahia, Instituto de Fisica, Salvador (Brazil); Santana, A.E. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2017-04-15

    We study effects coming from finite size, chemical potential and from a magnetic background on a massive version of a four-fermion interacting model. This is performed in four dimensions as an application of recent developments for dealing with field theories defined on toroidal spaces. We study effects of the magnetic field and chemical potential on the size-dependent phase structure of the model, in particular, how the applied magnetic field affects the size-dependent critical temperature. A connection with some aspects of the hadronic phase transition is established. (orig.)

  16. Multi-state effective Hamiltonian and size-consistency corrections in stochastic configuration interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten-no, Seiichiro L.

    2017-12-01

    Model space quantum Monte Carlo (MSQMC) is an extension of full configuration interaction QMC that allows us to calculate quasi-degenerate and excited electronic states by sampling the effective Hamiltonian in the model space. We introduce a novel algorithm based on the state-selective partitioning for the effective Hamiltonian using left eigenvectors to calculate several electronic states simultaneously at much less computational cost than the original MSQMC with the energy-dependent partitioning. The sampling of walkers in MSQMC is analyzed in the single reference limit using a stochastic algorithm for higher-order perturbation energies by the analogy of the deterministic case utilizing a full configuration interaction program. We further develop size-consistency corrections of the initiator adaptation (i-MSQMC) in three different ways, i.e., the coupled electron pair approximation, a posteriori, and second-order perturbative corrections. It is clearly demonstrated that most of the initiator error is originating from the deficiency of proper scaling of correlation energy due to its truncated CI nature of the initiator approximation and that the greater part of the error can be recovered by the size-consistency corrections developed in this work.

  17. Dynamic finite element analysis of third size charpy specimens of V-4Cr-4Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lansberry, M.R.; Kumar, A.S.; Mueller, G.E.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    A 2-D finite element analysis was performed on precracked, one third scale CVN specimens to investigate the sensitivity of model results to key material parameters such as yield strength, failure strain and work hardening characteristics. Calculations were carried out at temperatures of -196 degree C and 50 degree C. The dynamic finite element analyses were conducted using ABAQUS/Explicit V5.4. The finite element results were compared to experimental results for the production-scale heat of V-4Cr-4Ti (ANL Heat No. 832665) as a benchmark. Agreement between the finite element model and experimental data was very good at -196 degree C, whereas at 50 degree C the model predicted a slightly lower absorbed energy than actually measured

  18. Finite size effects of ionic species sensitively determine load bearing capacities of lubricated systems under combined influence of electrokinetics and surface compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Kaustubh Girish; Chakraborty, Suman; Chakraborty, Jeevanjyoti

    2017-09-27

    The behaviour and health of lubricated systems in various natural and artificial settings are often characterized by their load bearing capacity. This capacity stemming from the lift force associated with confined fluid flow can be significantly altered due to surface compliance and electrokinetic effects. Here, we highlight the influence of finite size of the ionic species participating in electrokinetic transport with substrate compliance in determining the electromechanical characteristics of lubricated systems. With these new considerations, anomalous trends previously observed for the load bearing capacity corresponding to high values of zeta potential are corrected. Simultaneously, trends associated with the finite ionic size are also found to be reversed, but fall in line with the consistent theory. Importantly, despite an intricate interplay among the various influences - electrokinetic, hydrodynamic, geometric, and elastic - previously established trends due to geometric (non-parallel slider geometry) and elastic effects are found to persist. Specifically, in the presence of electrokinetic effects, an increase in the obliqueness of the slider geometry results in lower values of load bearing capacity while an increase in the stiffness leads to higher values. These results point to a certain robustness in the overall theory and it is hoped that they can contribute to better practical designs of slider bearings and an improved understanding of lubricated sliding surfaces in biological settings.

  19. Vision correction for computer users based on image pre-compensation with changing pupil size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Barreto, Armando; Alonso, Miguel; Adjouadi, Malek

    2011-01-01

    Many computer users suffer varying degrees of visual impairment, which hinder their interaction with computers. In contrast with available methods of vision correction (spectacles, contact lenses, LASIK, etc.), this paper proposes a vision correction method for computer users based on image pre-compensation. The blurring caused by visual aberration is counteracted through the pre-compensation performed on images displayed on the computer screen. The pre-compensation model used is based on the visual aberration of the user's eye, which can be measured by a wavefront analyzer. However, the aberration measured is associated with one specific pupil size. If the pupil has a different size during viewing of the pre-compensated images, the pre-compensation model should also be modified to sustain appropriate performance. In order to solve this problem, an adjustment of the wavefront function used for pre-compensation is implemented to match the viewing pupil size. The efficiency of these adjustments is evaluated with an "artificial eye" (high resolution camera). Results indicate that the adjustment used is successful and significantly improves the images perceived and recorded by the artificial eye.

  20. Coronal reconstruction of unenhanced abdominal CT for correct ureteral stone size classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkovitz, Nadav; Simanovsky, Natalia; Hiller, Nurith; Katz, Ran; Salama, Shaden

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether size measurement of a urinary calculus in coronal reconstruction of computed tomography (CT) differs from stone size measured in the axial plane, and whether the difference alters clinical decision making. We retrospectively reviewed unenhanced CT examinations of 150 patients admitted to the emergency room (ER) with acute renal colic. Maximal ureteral calculus size was measured on axial slices and coronal reconstructions. Clinical significance was defined as an upgrading or downgrading of stone size according to accepted thresholds of treatment: ≤5 mm, 6-9 mm and ≥10 mm. There were 151 stones in 150 patients (male:female 115:34, mean age 41 years). Transverse stone diameters ranged from 1 to 11 mm (mean 4 mm). On coronal images, 56 (37%) stones were upgraded in severity; 46 (30%) from below 5 mm to 6 mm or more, and ten (7%) from 6-9 mm to 10 mm or more. Transverse measurement on the axial slices enabled correct categorization of 95 stones (63%). Transverse calculus measurement on axial slices often underestimates stone size and provides incorrect clinical classification of the true maximal stone diameter. Coronal reconstruction provides additional information in patients with renal colic that may alter treatment strategy. (orig.)

  1. Coronal reconstruction of unenhanced abdominal CT for correct ureteral stone size classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkovitz, Nadav; Simanovsky, Natalia; Hiller, Nurith [Hadassah Mount Scopus - Hebrew University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Jerusalem (Israel); Katz, Ran [Hadassah Mount Scopus - Hebrew University Medical Center, Department of Urology, Jerusalem (Israel); Salama, Shaden [Hadassah Mount Scopus - Hebrew University Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2010-05-15

    To determine whether size measurement of a urinary calculus in coronal reconstruction of computed tomography (CT) differs from stone size measured in the axial plane, and whether the difference alters clinical decision making. We retrospectively reviewed unenhanced CT examinations of 150 patients admitted to the emergency room (ER) with acute renal colic. Maximal ureteral calculus size was measured on axial slices and coronal reconstructions. Clinical significance was defined as an upgrading or downgrading of stone size according to accepted thresholds of treatment: {<=}5 mm, 6-9 mm and {>=}10 mm. There were 151 stones in 150 patients (male:female 115:34, mean age 41 years). Transverse stone diameters ranged from 1 to 11 mm (mean 4 mm). On coronal images, 56 (37%) stones were upgraded in severity; 46 (30%) from below 5 mm to 6 mm or more, and ten (7%) from 6-9 mm to 10 mm or more. Transverse measurement on the axial slices enabled correct categorization of 95 stones (63%). Transverse calculus measurement on axial slices often underestimates stone size and provides incorrect clinical classification of the true maximal stone diameter. Coronal reconstruction provides additional information in patients with renal colic that may alter treatment strategy. (orig.)

  2. Theoretical studies of finite size effects and screening effects caused by a STM tip in Luettinger liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guigou, Marine

    2009-01-01

    This thesis takes place in the field of condensed matter. More precisely, we focus on the finite size effects and the screening effects caused by a STM tip in a quantum wire. For that, we use, first, the Luettinger liquid theory, which allows to describe strongly correlated systems and secondly, the Keldysh formalism, which is necessary to treat the out-of-equilibrium systems. For these studies, we consider, the currant, the noise and the conductance. The noise presents a non-Poissonian behaviour, when finite size effects appear. Through the photo-assisted transport, it is shown that those effects hide the effects of the Coulomb interactions. Considering the proximity between the STM tip, used as a probe or as an injector, and a quantum wire, screening effects appear. We can conclude that they play a similar role to those of Coulomb interactions. (author) [fr

  3. Excited-state quantum phase transitions in systems with two degrees of freedom: II. Finite-size effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stránský, Pavel [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Macek, Michal [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States); Leviatan, Amiram [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Cejnar, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.cejnar@mff.cuni.cz [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-15

    This article extends our previous analysis Stránský et al. (2014) of Excited-State Quantum Phase Transitions (ESQPTs) in systems of dimension two. We focus on the oscillatory component of the quantum state density in connection with ESQPT structures accompanying a first-order ground-state transition. It is shown that a separable (integrable) system can develop rather strong finite-size precursors of ESQPT expressed as singularities in the oscillatory component of the state density. The singularities originate in effectively 1-dimensional dynamics and in some cases appear in multiple replicas with increasing excitation energy. Using a specific model example, we demonstrate that these precursors are rather resistant to proliferation of chaotic dynamics. - Highlights: • Oscillatory components of state density and spectral flow studied near ESQPTs. • Enhanced finite-size precursors of ESQPT caused by fully/partly separable dynamics. • These precursors appear due to criticality of a subsystem with lower dimension. • Separability-induced finite-size effects disappear in case of fully chaotic dynamics.

  4. On the extreme value statistics of normal random matrices and 2D Coulomb gases: Universality and finite N corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, R.; Zohren, S.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper we extend the orthogonal polynomials approach for extreme value calculations of Hermitian random matrices, developed by Nadal and Majumdar (J. Stat. Mech. P04001 arXiv:1102.0738), to normal random matrices and 2D Coulomb gases in general. Firstly, we show that this approach provides an alternative derivation of results in the literature. More precisely, we show convergence of the rescaled eigenvalue with largest modulus of a normal Gaussian ensemble to a Gumbel distribution, as well as universality for an arbitrary radially symmetric potential. Secondly, it is shown that this approach can be generalised to obtain convergence of the eigenvalue with smallest modulus and its universality for ring distributions. Most interestingly, the here presented techniques are used to compute all slowly varying finite N correction of the above distributions, which is important for practical applications, given the slow convergence. Another interesting aspect of this work is the fact that we can use standard techniques from Hermitian random matrices to obtain the extreme value statistics of non-Hermitian random matrices resembling the large N expansion used in context of the double scaling limit of Hermitian matrix models in string theory.

  5. Distortion correction of echo planar images applying the concept of finite rate of innovation to point spread function mapping (FRIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Rita G; Hajnal, Joseph V

    2018-01-03

    Point spread function (PSF) mapping enables estimating the displacement fields required for distortion correction of echo planar images. Recently, a highly accelerated approach was introduced for estimating displacements from the phase slope of under-sampled PSF mapping data. Sampling schemes with varying spacing were proposed requiring stepwise phase unwrapping. To avoid unwrapping errors, an alternative approach applying the concept of finite rate of innovation to PSF mapping (FRIP) is introduced, using a pattern search strategy to locate the PSF peak, and the two methods are compared. Fully sampled PSF data was acquired in six subjects at 3.0 T, and distortion maps were estimated after retrospective under-sampling. The two methods were compared for both previously published and newly optimized sampling patterns. Prospectively under-sampled data were also acquired. Shift maps were estimated and deviations relative to the fully sampled reference map were calculated. The best performance was achieved when using FRIP with a previously proposed sampling scheme. The two methods were comparable for the remaining schemes. The displacement field errors tended to be lower as the number of samples or their spacing increased. A robust method for estimating the position of the PSF peak has been introduced.

  6. Thermodynamic theory of intrinsic finite size effects in PbTiO3 nanocrystals. II. Dielectric and piezoelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdogan, E. K.; Safari, A.

    2007-03-01

    We compute the intrinsic dielectric and piezoelectric properties of single domain, mechanically free, and surface charge compensated PbTiO3 nanocrystals (n-Pt) with no depolarization fields, undergoing a finite size induced first order tetragonal→cubic ferrodistortive phase transition. By using a Landau-Devonshire type free energy functional, in which Landau coefficients are a function of nanoparticle size, we demonstrate substantial deviations from bulk properties in the range <150 nm. We find a decrease in dielectric susceptibility at the transition temperature with decreasing particle size, which we verify to be in conformity with predictions of lattice dynamics considerations. We also find an anomalous increase in piezocharge coefficients near ˜15 nm , the critical size for n-Pt.

  7. Modeling and Analysis of Size-Dependent Structural Problems by Using Low- Order Finite Elements with Strain Gradient Plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moon Shik; Suh, Yeong Sung; Song, Seung

    2011-01-01

    An elasto-plastic finite element method using the theory of strain gradient plasticity is proposed to evaluate the size dependency of structural plasticity that occurs when the configuration size decreases to micron scale. For this method, we suggest a low-order plane and three-dimensional displacement-based elements, eliminating the need for a high order, many degrees of freedom, a mixed element, or super elements, which have been considered necessary in previous researches. The proposed method can be performed in the framework of nonlinear incremental analysis in which plastic strains are calculated and averaged at nodes. These strains are then interpolated and differentiated for gradient calculation. We adopted a strain-gradient-hardening constitutive equation from the Taylor dislocation model, which requires the plastic strain gradient. The developed finite elements are tested numerically on the basis of typical size-effect problems such as micro-bending, micro-torsion, and micro-voids. With respect to the strain gradient plasticity, i.e., the size effects, the results obtained by using the proposed method, which are simple in their calculation, are in good agreement with the experimental results cited in previously published papers

  8. Icosahedron-fcc transition size by molecular dynamics simulation of Lennard-Jones clusters at a finite temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeshoji, T; Torchet, G; de Feraudy, M F; Koga, K

    2001-03-01

    We studied finite-temperature ensembles of solid clusters produced by cooling liquid droplets either by evaporation or by a thermostat through a molecular dynamics calculation using the Lennard-Jones potential. The ensembles consist of either single or binary component clusters with 25% of the atoms 8% smaller in diameter than the other 75%. These clusters (380 clusters in total) exhibit various structures in the size range of n=160-2200, where n is the number of atoms in a cluster. For increasing size, the clusters show a gradual transition from icosahedral to a variety of structures: decahedral, face centered cubic, a small amount of hexagonal, and some icosahedral structures. They are asymmetrical or faulted. Electron diffraction patterns calculated with average structure factors of clusters after grouping them into several size regions are very similar to those experimentally observed. The size transition is around n=450 for single component clusters whatever the cooling process, evaporation or thermostat. This size is smaller than the experimental transition size estimated for argon clusters formed in a supersonic expansion. The transition size for binary component clusters is around n=600 for evaporative cooling, and larger for thermostatic cooling. The larger transition size found for the binary component clusters is consistent with the large icosahedral Au-Fe and Au-Cu alloy clusters observed experimentally.

  9. Electronic states in crystals of finite size quantum confinement of bloch waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Shang Yuan

    2017-01-01

    This book presents an analytical theory of the electronic states in ideal low dimensional systems and finite crystals based on a differential equation theory approach. It provides precise and fundamental understandings on the electronic states in ideal low-dimensional systems and finite crystals, and offers new insights into some of the basic problems in low-dimensional systems, such as the surface states and quantum confinement effects, etc., some of which are quite different from what is traditionally believed in the solid state physics community. Many previous predictions have been confirmed in subsequent investigations by other authors on various relevant problems. In this new edition, the theory is further extended to one-dimensional photonic crystals and phononic crystals, and a general theoretical formalism for investigating the existence and properties of surface states/modes in semi-infinite one-dimensional crystals is developed. In addition, there are various revisions and improvements, including us...

  10. Correction

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Tile Calorimeter modules stored at CERN. The larger modules belong to the Barrel, whereas the smaller ones are for the two Extended Barrels. (The article was about the completion of the 64 modules for one of the latter.) The photo on the first page of the Bulletin n°26/2002, from 24 July 2002, illustrating the article «The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter gets into shape» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.

  11. Proton and pion transverse spectra at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider from radial flow and finite size effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Cuautle, Eleazar; Magnin, J.; Montano, Luis Manuel

    2006-01-01

    We show that the proton and pion transverse momentum distributions measured at BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), for all collision centralities for pions and most of the collision centralities for protons, can be simultaneously described in terms of a thermal model with common values for the radial flow and temperature, when accounting for the finite size of the interaction region at the time of decoupling. We show that this description is obtained in terms of a simple scaling law of the size of the interaction region with the number of participants in the collision. The behavior of the proton to pion ratio at mid-rapidity can also be understood as a consequence of the strength of the radial flow and system size reached at RHIC energies

  12. Effect of Finite Particle Size on Convergence of Point Particle Models in Euler-Lagrange Multiphase Dispersed Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nili, Samaun; Park, Chanyoung; Haftka, Raphael T.; Kim, Nam H.; Balachandar, S.

    2017-11-01

    Point particle methods are extensively used in simulating Euler-Lagrange multiphase dispersed flow. When particles are much smaller than the Eulerian grid the point particle model is on firm theoretical ground. However, this standard approach of evaluating the gas-particle coupling at the particle center fails to converge as the Eulerian grid is reduced below particle size. We present an approach to model the interaction between particles and fluid for finite size particles that permits convergence. We use the generalized Faxen form to compute the force on a particle and compare the results against traditional point particle method. We apportion the different force components on the particle to fluid cells based on the fraction of particle volume or surface in the cell. The application is to a one-dimensional model of shock propagation through a particle-laden field at moderate volume fraction, where the convergence is achieved for a well-formulated force model and back coupling for finite size particles. Comparison with 3D direct fully resolved numerical simulations will be used to check if the approach also improves accuracy compared to the point particle model. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  13. SMPBS: Web server for computing biomolecular electrostatics using finite element solvers of size modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yang; Ying, Jinyong; Xie, Dexuan

    2017-03-30

    SMPBS (Size Modified Poisson-Boltzmann Solvers) is a web server for computing biomolecular electrostatics using finite element solvers of the size modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation (SMPBE). SMPBE not only reflects ionic size effects but also includes the classic Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE) as a special case. Thus, its web server is expected to have a broader range of applications than a PBE web server. SMPBS is designed with a dynamic, mobile-friendly user interface, and features easily accessible help text, asynchronous data submission, and an interactive, hardware-accelerated molecular visualization viewer based on the 3Dmol.js library. In particular, the viewer allows computed electrostatics to be directly mapped onto an irregular triangular mesh of a molecular surface. Due to this functionality and the fast SMPBE finite element solvers, the web server is very efficient in the calculation and visualization of electrostatics. In addition, SMPBE is reconstructed using a new objective electrostatic free energy, clearly showing that the electrostatics and ionic concentrations predicted by SMPBE are optimal in the sense of minimizing the objective electrostatic free energy. SMPBS is available at the URL: smpbs.math.uwm.edu © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Finite-size effect on the dynamic and sensing performances of graphene resonators: the role of edge stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Wan; Dai, Mai Duc; Eom, Kilho

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the finite-size effect on the dynamic behavior of graphene resonators and their applications in atomic mass detection using a continuum elastic model such as modified plate theory. In particular, we developed a model based on von Karman plate theory with including the edge stress, which arises from the imbalance between the coordination numbers of bulk atoms and edge atoms of graphene. It is shown that as the size of a graphene resonator decreases, the edge stress depending on the edge structure of a graphene resonator plays a critical role on both its dynamic and sensing performances. We found that the resonance behavior of graphene can be tuned not only through edge stress but also through nonlinear vibration, and that the detection sensitivity of a graphene resonator can be controlled by using the edge stress. Our study sheds light on the important role of the finite-size effect in the effective design of graphene resonators for their mass sensing applications.

  15. Finite-size effect on the Raman-active modes of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sbai, K [Equipe de Physique Informatique et Modelisation des Systemes, Universite MY Ismail, Faculte des Sciences, BP 11201, Zitoune, 50000 Meknes (Morocco); Rahmani, A [Equipe de Physique Informatique et Modelisation des Systemes, Universite MY Ismail, Faculte des Sciences, BP 11201, Zitoune, 50000 Meknes (Morocco); Chadli, H [Equipe de Physique Informatique et Modelisation des Systemes, Universite MY Ismail, Faculte des Sciences, BP 11201, Zitoune, 50000 Meknes (Morocco); Sauvajol, J-L [Laboratoire des Colloides, Verres et Nanomateriaux (UMR CNRS 5587), Universite Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2008-01-09

    The dependence of the breathing-like phonon modes (BLM) and tangential-like phonon modes (TLM) of individual, finite and infinite bundles of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) as a function of the relative lengths of the inner (L{sub i}) and outer (L{sub o}) tubes is calculated by using the spectral moments method in the framework of the bond-polarization theory. Depending on the relative lengths of the inner (L{sub i}) and outer (L{sub o}) tubes, additional modes are evidenced in the BLM region. These modes must be considered in the analysis of the experimental data.

  16. Grid size effects with smeared cracking in finite element analysis of reinforced concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, R. H.; Darwin, D.; Smith, J. L.; Leibengood, L. D.

    1982-08-01

    The effects of modeling parameters on the response of finite element representations of reinforced concrete members are examined. The convergence of load deflection curves and cracking patterns is studied. Nonlinear behavior is limited to cracking of the concrete and yielding of the reinforcement. The smeared crack representation is governed by a limiting tensile stress criterion. Concrete is treated as linear elastic in compression. Reinforcement has a bilinear stress-strain curve. Constant strain bar elements and rectangular isoparametric elements model the steel and concrete, respectively. Analyses are performed for flexural members under both a uniformly distributed load and a concentrated load at midspan, using a minimum of three variations in grid refinement.

  17. Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding Gorelik, G., & Shackelford, T.K. (2011. Human sexual conflict from molecules to culture. Evolutionary Psychology, 9, 564–587: The authors wish to correct an omission in citation to the existing literature. In the final paragraph on p. 570, we neglected to cite Burch and Gallup (2006 [Burch, R. L., & Gallup, G. G., Jr. (2006. The psychobiology of human semen. In S. M. Platek & T. K. Shackelford (Eds., Female infidelity and paternal uncertainty (pp. 141–172. New York: Cambridge University Press.]. Burch and Gallup (2006 reviewed the relevant literature on FSH and LH discussed in this paragraph, and should have been cited accordingly. In addition, Burch and Gallup (2006 should have been cited as the originators of the hypothesis regarding the role of FSH and LH in the semen of rapists. The authors apologize for this oversight.

  18. Correction

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The photo on the second page of the Bulletin n°48/2002, from 25 November 2002, illustrating the article «Spanish Visit to CERN» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.   The Spanish delegation, accompanied by Spanish scientists at CERN, also visited the LHC superconducting magnet test hall (photo). From left to right: Felix Rodriguez Mateos of CERN LHC Division, Josep Piqué i Camps, Spanish Minister of Science and Technology, César Dopazo, Director-General of CIEMAT (Spanish Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology), Juan Antonio Rubio, ETT Division Leader at CERN, Manuel Aguilar-Benitez, Spanish Delegate to Council, Manuel Delfino, IT Division Leader at CERN, and Gonzalo León, Secretary-General of Scientific Policy to the Minister.

  19. Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding Tagler, M. J., and Jeffers, H. M. (2013. Sex differences in attitudes toward partner infidelity. Evolutionary Psychology, 11, 821–832: The authors wish to correct values in the originally published manuscript. Specifically, incorrect 95% confidence intervals around the Cohen's d values were reported on page 826 of the manuscript where we reported the within-sex simple effects for the significant Participant Sex × Infidelity Type interaction (first paragraph, and for attitudes toward partner infidelity (second paragraph. Corrected values are presented in bold below. The authors would like to thank Dr. Bernard Beins at Ithaca College for bringing these errors to our attention. Men rated sexual infidelity significantly more distressing (M = 4.69, SD = 0.74 than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 4.32, SD = 0.92, F(1, 322 = 23.96, p < .001, d = 0.44, 95% CI [0.23, 0.65], but there was little difference between women's ratings of sexual (M = 4.80, SD = 0.48 and emotional infidelity (M = 4.76, SD = 0.57, F(1, 322 = 0.48, p = .29, d = 0.08, 95% CI [−0.10, 0.26]. As expected, men rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.44, SD = 0.70 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.66, SD = 1.37, F(1, 322 = 120.00, p < .001, d = 1.12, 95% CI [0.85, 1.39]. Although women also rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.40, SD = 0.62 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.09, SD = 1.10, this difference was not as large and thus in the evolutionary theory supportive direction, F(1, 322 = 72.03, p < .001, d = 0.77, 95% CI [0.60, 0.94].

  20. Lippmann-Schwinger integral equation approach to the emission of radiation by sources located inside finite-sized dielectric structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, T.; Tromborg, Bjarne

    2002-01-01

    A full-vectorial integral equation method is presented for calculating near fields and far fields generated by a given distribution of sources located inside finite-sized dielectric structures. Special attention is given to the treatment of the singularity of the dipole source field. A method...... uses for analyzing the emission of light by sources in some antennas and optical components such as vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, microdisk lasers, and light emitting diodes. The methods also have prospective uses in quantum electrodynamics for studies of spontaneous emission from, e...

  1. The exact solution and the finite-size behaviour of the Osp(1vertical stroke 2)-invariant spin chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    We have solved exactly the Osp(1vertical stroke 2) spin chain by the Bethe ansatz approach. Our solution is based on an equivalence between the Osp(1vertical stroke 2) chain and a certain special limit of the Izergin-Korepin vertex model. The completeness of the Bethe ansatz equations is discussed for a system with four sites and the appearance of special string structures is noted. The Bethe ansatz presents an important phase factor which distinguishes the even and odd sectors of the theory. The finite-size properties are governed by a conformal field theory with central charge c=1. (orig.)

  2. On the non-randomness of maximum Lempel Ziv complexity sequences of finite size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez-Rams, E.; Lora Serrano, R.; Aragón Fernández, B.; Brito Reyes, I.

    2013-06-01

    Random sequences attain the highest entropy rate. The estimation of entropy rate for an ergodic source can be done using the Lempel Ziv complexity measure yet, the exact entropy rate value is only reached in the infinite limit. We prove that typical random sequences of finite length fall short of the maximum Lempel-Ziv complexity, contrary to common belief. We discuss that, for a finite length, maximum Lempel-Ziv sequences can be built from a well defined generating algorithm, which makes them of low Kolmogorov-Chaitin complexity, quite the opposite to randomness. It will be discussed that Lempel-Ziv measure is, in this sense, less general than Kolmogorov-Chaitin complexity, as it can be fooled by an intelligent enough agent. The latter will be shown to be the case for the binary expansion of certain irrational numbers. Maximum Lempel-Ziv sequences induce a normalization that gives good estimates of entropy rate for several sources, while keeping bounded values for all sequence length, making it an alternative to other normalization schemes in use.

  3. Finite-size effects in thermodynamics: Negative compressibility and global instability in two-phase systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoshchenko, I.

    2018-04-01

    We have measured the equilibrium melting pressure of helium-4 as a function of the crystal size. Negative compressibility of a liquid with an inclusion of solid seed is predicted theoretically and verified experimentally with helium-4 crystal-superfluid system at 0.15 K. This two-phase system is shown to be stable if the crystal size is large enough, which is proven by the experiment. Crystal seeds that are too small spontaneously either melt completely or grow to a large enough size.

  4. Metastable configurations of a finite-size chain of classical spins within the one-dimensional chiral XY-model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, Alexander P., E-mail: APPopov@mephi.ru [Department of Molecular Physics, National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gloria Pini, Maria, E-mail: mariagloria.pini@isc.cnr.it [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi del CNR (CNR-ISC), Unità di Firenze, Via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Rettori, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    The metastable states of a finite-size chain of N classical spins described by the chiral XY-model on a discrete one-dimensional lattice are calculated by means of a general theoretical method recently developed by one of us. This method allows one to determine all the possible equilibrium magnetic states in an accurate and systematic way. The ground state of a chain consisting of N classical XY spins is calculated in the presence of (i) a symmetric ferromagnetic exchange interaction, favoring parallel alignment of nearest neighbor spins, (ii) a uniaxial anisotropy, favoring a given direction in the film plane, and (iii) an antisymmetric Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI), favoring perpendicular alignment of nearest neighbor spins. In addition to the ground state with a non-uniform helical spin arrangement, which originates from the energy competition in the finite-size chain with open boundary conditions, we have found a considerable number of higher-energy equilibrium states. In the investigated case of a chain with N=10 spins and a DMI much smaller than the in-plane uniaxial anisotropy, it turns out that a metastable (unstable) state of the finite chain is characterized by a configuration where none (at least one) of the inner spins is nearly parallel to the hard axis. The role of the DMI is to establish a unique rotational sense for the helical ground state. Moreover, the number of both metastable and unstable equilibrium states is doubled with respect to the case of zero DMI. This produces modifications in the Peierls–Nabarro potential encountered by a domain wall during its displacement along the discrete spin chain. - Highlights: • A finite-size chain of N classical spins within the XY-chiral model is investigated. • Using a systematic theoretical method, all equilibrium states are calculated for N=10. • The ground state has a non-uniform helical order with unique rotational sense. • Metastable states contain a domain wall whose energy

  5. Wrinkles and folds in a fluid-supported sheet of finite size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshri, Oz; Brau, Fabian; Diamant, Haim

    2015-05-01

    A laterally confined thin elastic sheet lying on a liquid substrate displays regular undulations, called wrinkles, characterized by a spatially extended energy distribution and a well-defined wavelength λ. As the confinement increases, the deformation energy is progressively localized into a single narrow fold. An exact solution for the deformation of an infinite sheet was previously found, indicating that wrinkles in an infinite sheet are unstable against localization for arbitrarily small confinement. We present an extension of the theory to sheets of finite length L, accounting for the experimentally observed wrinkle-to-fold transition. We derive an exact solution for the periodic deformation in the wrinkled state, and an approximate solution for the localized, folded state. We find that a second-order transition between these two states occurs at a critical confinement Δ(F)=λ(2)/L.

  6. Phase transition in the rich-get-richer mechanism due to finite-size effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagrow, James P; Ben-Avraham, Daniel; Sun Jie

    2008-01-01

    The rich-get-richer mechanism (agents increase their 'wealth' randomly at a rate proportional to their holdings) is often invoked to explain the Pareto power-law distribution observed in many physical situations, such as the degree distribution of growing scale-free nets. We use two different analytical approaches, as well as numerical simulations, to study the case where the number of agents is fixed and finite (but large), and the rich-get-richer mechanism is invoked a fraction r of the time (the remainder of the time wealth is disbursed by a homogeneous process). At short times, we recover the Pareto law observed for an unbounded number of agents. In later times, the (moving) distribution can be scaled to reveal a phase transition with a Gaussian asymptotic form for r<1/2, and a Pareto-like tail (on the positive side) and a novel stretched exponential decay (on the negative side) for r<1/2

  7. Finite element method calculations of GMI in thin films and sandwiched structures: Size and edge effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Arribas, A.; Barandiaran, J.M.; Cos, D. de

    2008-01-01

    The impedance values of magnetic thin films and magnetic/conductor/magnetic sandwiched structures with different widths are computed using the finite element method (FEM). The giant magneto-impedance (GMI) is calculated from the difference of the impedance values obtained with high and low permeability of the magnetic material. The results depend considerably on the width of the sample, demonstrating that edge effects are decisive for the GMI performance. It is shown that, besides the usual skin effect that is responsible for GMI, an 'unexpected' increase of the current density takes place at the lateral edge of the sample. In magnetic thin films this effect is dominant when the permeability is low. In the trilayers, it is combined with the lack of shielding of the central conductor at the edge. The resulting effects on GMI are shown to be large for both kinds of samples. The conclusions of this study are of great importance for the successful design of miniaturized GMI devices

  8. Martensitic transformations in nanostructured nitinol: Finite element modeling of grain size and distribution effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hong-Sheng; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2013-01-01

    A computational model of martensitic phase transformation in nanostructured nitinol is developed which takes into account the grain size effect. On the basis of the theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic transformation criterion and the energy barrier for phase transformation, it was demonstra......A computational model of martensitic phase transformation in nanostructured nitinol is developed which takes into account the grain size effect. On the basis of the theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic transformation criterion and the energy barrier for phase transformation...... transformation are totally suppressed. Graded and localized distributions of grain sizes of nitinol were compared with nitinol samples with homogeneous grain size distribution. In the materials with localized region of small grains, it was observed that the martensite rich regions form first on the border...

  9. Influence of sizes of abutments and fixation screws on dental implant system: a non-linear finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhihong; Yi, Dake; Cao, Guo

    2017-08-28

    The purpose of this study is to discuss the influence of sizes of abutments and fixation screws on immediately loaded dental implants in mandibular bones using nonlinear finite element methods. Abutments with three unilateral wall thicknesses and fixation screws with three diameters are analyzed to compare the stresses and deformations under a vertical or oblique force of 130 N. The nonlinearity due to friction contacts between the fixation screw, the abutment, the implant, and the bone is taken into account. The results showed that improper sizes of abutments and fixation screws would increase the stress and deformation of the dental implant system. If possible, the diameter of fixation screw should not be smaller than Φ1.0 mm, the diameter between Φ1.0 mm and Φ1.2 mm is acceptable. The fixation screw diameter preferably exceeds Φ1.4 mm. The unilateral wall thickness >0.5 mm is optimal selection for abutments.

  10. Finite-size effects on the chiral phase diagram of four-fermion models in four dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, L.M.; Malbouisson, A.P.C.; Malbouisson, J.M.C.; Santana, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    We study the size dependence of the dynamical symmetry breaking in the four-dimensional Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We show that the presence of boundaries reduces the chiral breaking region, and this effect is strengthened for a larger number of compactified dimensions. A critical value for the length of the compactified dimensions exists, below which the dynamical symmetry breaking is not possible. Considering finite temperature and chemical potential, the chiral phase structure for the system with compactified dimensions is obtained. A gradual decreasing of the chiral breaking region with increasing of chemical potential is found. Also, at fixed chemical potential, the decreasing of the size of the system changes the order of the chiral phase transition.

  11. The critical behaviour of self-dual Z(N) spin systems - Finite size scaling and conformal invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, F.C.

    1986-01-01

    Critical properties of a family of self-dual two dimensional Z(N) models whose bulk free energy is exacly known at the self-dual point are studied. The analysis is performed by studing the finite size behaviour of the corresponding one dimensional quantum Hamiltonians which also possess an exact solution at their self-dual point. By exploring finite size scaling ideas and the conformal invariance of the critical infinite system the critical temperature and critical exponents as well as the central charge associated with the underlying conformal algebra are calculated for N up to 8. The results strongly suggest that the recently constructed Z(N) quantum field theory of Zamolodchikov and Fateev (1985) is the underlying field theory associated with these statistical mechanical systems. It is also tested, for the Z(5) case, the conjecture that these models correspond to the bifurcation points, in the phase diagram of the general Z(N) spin model, where a massless phase originates. (Author) [pt

  12. Guided wave radiation in a finite-sized metallic or composite plate-like structure for its nondestructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenin, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    Different models are developed to provide generic tools for simulating nondestructive methods relying on elastic guided waves applied to metallic or composite plates. Various inspection methods of these structures exist or are under study. Most of them make use of ultrasonic sources of finite size; all are sensitive to reflection phenomena resulting from the finite size of the monitored objects. The developed models deal with transducer diffraction effects and edge reflection. As the interpretation of signals measured in guided wave inspection often uses the concept of modes, the models themselves are explicitly modal. The case of isotropic plates (metal) and anisotropic (multilayer composites) are considered; a general approach under the stationary phase approximation allows us to consider all the cases of interest. For the first, the validity of a Fraunhofer-like approximation leads to a very efficient computation of the direct and reflected fields radiated by a source. For the second, special attention is paid to the treatment of caustics. The stationary phase approximation being difficult to generalize, a model (so-called 'pencil model') of more geometrical nature is proposed with a high degree of genericity. It chains terms of isotropic or anisotropic propagation and terms of interaction with a boundary. The equivalence of the stationary phase approximation and the pencil model is demonstrated in the case of the radiation and reflection in an isotropic plate, for which an experimental validation is proceeded. (author) [fr

  13. Numerical simulation of temperature distribution using finite difference equations and estimation of the grain size during friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, H.S.; Singh, H.; Dhindaw, B.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Magnesium alloy AE42 was friction stir processed under different cooling conditions. ► Heat flow model was developed using finite difference heat equations. ► Generalized MATLAB code was developed for solving heat flow model. ► Regression equation for estimation of grain size was developed. - Abstract: The present investigation is aimed at developing a heat flow model to simulate temperature history during friction stir processing (FSP). A new approach of developing implicit form of finite difference heat equations solved using MATLAB code was used. A magnesium based alloy AE42 was friction stir processed (FSPed) at different FSP parameters and cooling conditions. Temperature history was continuously recorded in the nugget zone during FSP using data acquisition system and k type thermocouples. The developed code was validated at different FSP parameters and cooling conditions during FSP experimentation. The temperature history at different locations in the nugget zone at different instants of time was further utilized for the estimation of grain growth rate and final average grain size of the FSPed specimen. A regression equation relating the final grain size, maximum temperature during FSP and the cooling rate was developed. The metallurgical characterization was done using optical microscopy, SEM, and FIB-SIM analysis. The simulated temperature profiles and final average grain size were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The presence of fine precipitate particles generated in situ in the investigated magnesium alloy also contributed in the evolution of fine grain structure through Zener pining effect at the grain boundaries.

  14. Simultaneous Topology, Shape, and Sizing Optimisation of Plane Trusses with Adaptive Ground Finite Elements Using MOEAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norapat Noilublao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel integrated design strategy to accomplish simultaneous topology shape and sizing optimisation of a two-dimensional (2D truss. An optimisation problem is posed to find a structural topology, shape, and element sizes of the truss such that two objective functions, mass and compliance, are minimised. Design constraints include stress, buckling, and compliance. The procedure for an adaptive ground elements approach is proposed and its encoding/decoding process is detailed. Two sets of design variables defining truss layout, shape, and element sizes at the same time are applied. A number of multiobjective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs are implemented to solve the design problem. Comparative performance based on a hypervolume indicator shows that multiobjective population-based incremental learning (PBIL is the best performer. Optimising three design variable types simultaneously is more efficient and effective.

  15. Finite-size effects and analytical modeling of electrostatic force microscopy applied to dielectric films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomila, G; Gramse, G; Fumagalli, L

    2014-06-27

    A numerical analysis of the polarization force between a sharp conducting probe and a dielectric film of finite lateral dimensions on a metallic substrate is presented with the double objective of (i) determining the conditions under which the film can be approximated by a laterally infinite film and (ii) proposing an analytical model valid in this limit. We show that, for a given dielectric film, the critical diameter above which the film can be modeled as laterally infinite depends not only on the probe geometry, as expected, but mainly on the film thickness. In particular, for films with intermediate to large thicknesses (>100 nm), the critical diameter is nearly independent from the probe geometry and essentially depends on the film thickness and dielectric constant following a relatively simple phenomenological expression. For films that can be considered as laterally infinite, we propose a generalized analytical model valid in the thin-ultrathin limit (<20-50 nm) that reproduces the numerical calculations and the experimental data. Present results provide a general framework under which accurate quantification of electrostatic force microscopy measurements on dielectric films on metallic substrates can be achieved.

  16. Molecular finite-size effects in stochastic models of equilibrium chemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianci, Claudia; Smith, Stephen; Grima, Ramon

    2016-02-28

    The reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a standard modelling approach for understanding stochastic and spatial chemical kinetics. An inherent assumption is that molecules are point-like. Here, we introduce the excluded volume reaction-diffusion master equation (vRDME) which takes into account volume exclusion effects on stochastic kinetics due to a finite molecular radius. We obtain an exact closed form solution of the RDME and of the vRDME for a general chemical system in equilibrium conditions. The difference between the two solutions increases with the ratio of molecular diameter to the compartment length scale. We show that an increase in the fraction of excluded space can (i) lead to deviations from the classical inverse square root law for the noise-strength, (ii) flip the skewness of the probability distribution from right to left-skewed, (iii) shift the equilibrium of bimolecular reactions so that more product molecules are formed, and (iv) strongly modulate the Fano factors and coefficients of variation. These volume exclusion effects are found to be particularly pronounced for chemical species not involved in chemical conservation laws. Finally, we show that statistics obtained using the vRDME are in good agreement with those obtained from Brownian dynamics with excluded volume interactions.

  17. Finite Size Effects in Chemical Bonding: From Small Clusters to Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleis, Jesper; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Romero, N. A.

    2011-01-01

    We address the fundamental question of which size a metallic nano-particle needs to have before its surface chemical properties can be considered to be those of a solid, rather than those of a large molecule. Calculations of adsorption energies for carbon monoxide and oxygen on a series of gold...

  18. Investigation of Catalytic Finite-Size-Effects of Platinum Metal Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lin; Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Romero, Nichols A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we use density functional theory (DFT) calculations on highly parallel computing resources to study size-dependent changes in the chemical and electronic properties of platinum (Pt) for a number of fixed freestanding clusters ranging from 13 to 1415 atoms, or 0.7–3.5 nm in diameter...

  19. Collision model for fully resolved simulations of flows laden with finite-size particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Pedro; Boersma, Bendiks Jan; Westerweel, Jerry; Breugem, Wim-Paul

    2015-11-01

    We present a collision model for particle-particle and particle-wall interactions in interface-resolved simulations of particle-laden flows. Three types of interparticle interactions are taken into account: (1) long- and (2) short-range hydrodynamic interactions, and (3) solid-solid contact. Long-range interactions are incorporated through an efficient and second-order-accurate immersed boundary method (IBM). Short-range interactions are also partly reproduced by the IBM. However, since the IBM uses a fixed grid, a lubrication model is needed for an interparticle gap width smaller than the grid spacing. The lubrication model is based on asymptotic expansions of analytical solutions for canonical lubrication interactions between spheres in the Stokes regime. Roughness effects are incorporated by making the lubrication correction independent of the gap width for gap widths smaller than ∼1% of the particle radius. This correction is applied until the particles reach solid-solid contact. To model solid-solid contact we use a variant of a linear soft-sphere collision model capable of stretching the collision time. This choice is computationally attractive because it allows us to reduce the number of time steps required for integrating the collision force accurately and is physically realistic, provided that the prescribed collision time is much smaller than the characteristic time scale of particle motion. We verified the numerical implementation of our collision model and validated it against several benchmark cases for immersed head-on particle-wall and particle-particle collisions, and oblique particle-wall collisions. The results show good agreement with experimental data.

  20. Nonlinear dynamics of a vapor bubble expanding in a superheated region of finite size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annenkova, E. A., E-mail: a-a-annenkova@yandex.ru [Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kreider, W. [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th St., Seattle, WA 98105 (United States); Sapozhnikov, O. A. [Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th St., Seattle, WA 98105 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Growth of a vapor bubble in a superheated liquid is studied theoretically. Contrary to the typical situation of boiling, when bubbles grow in a uniformly heated liquid, here the superheated region is considered in the form of a millimeter-sized spherical hot spot. An initial micron-sized bubble is positioned at the hot spot center and a theoretical model is developed that is capable of studying bubble growth caused by vapor pressure inside the bubble and corresponding hydrodynamic and thermal processes in the surrounding liquid. Such a situation is relevant to the dynamics of vapor cavities that are created in soft biological tissue in the focal region of a high-intensity focused ultrasound beam with a shocked pressure waveform. Such beams are used in the recently proposed treatment called boiling histotripsy. Knowing the typical behavior of vapor cavities during boiling histotripsy could help to optimize the therapeutic procedure.

  1. Probabilistic finite-size transport models for fusion: Anomalous transport and scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milligen, B.Ph. van; Sanchez, R.; Carreras, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Transport in fusion plasmas in the low confinement mode is characterized by several remarkable properties: the anomalous scaling of transport with system size, stiff (or 'canonical') profiles, power degradation, and rapid transport phenomena. The present article explores the possibilities of constructing a unified transport model, based on the continuous-time random walk, in which all these phenomena are handled adequately. The resulting formalism appears to be sufficiently general to provide a sound starting point for the development of a full-blown plasma transport code, capable of incorporating the relevant microscopic transport mechanisms, and allowing predictions of confinement properties

  2. Finite size effect on spread of resonance frequencies in arrays of coupled vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Andreas; Drews, André; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido

    2011-01-25

    Dynamical properties of magnetic vortices in arrays of magnetostatically coupled ferromagnetic disks are studied by means of a broadband ferromagnetic-resonance (FMR) setup. Magnetic force microscopy and magnetic transmission soft X-ray microscopy are used to image the core polarizations and the chiralities which are both found to be randomly distributed. The resonance frequency of vortex-core motion strongly depends on the magnetostatic coupling between the disks. The parameter describing the relative broadening of the absorption peak observed in the FMR transmission spectra for a given normalized center-to-center distance between the elements is shown to depend on the size of the array.

  3. Energy landscape of the finite-size mean-field 2-spin spherical model and topology trivialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Dhagash; Hauenstein, Jonathan D; Niemerg, Matthew; Simm, Nicholas J; Stariolo, Daniel A

    2015-02-01

    Motivated by the recently observed phenomenon of topology trivialization of potential energy landscapes (PELs) for several statistical mechanics models, we perform a numerical study of the finite-size 2-spin spherical model using both numerical polynomial homotopy continuation and a reformulation via non-Hermitian matrices. The continuation approach computes all of the complex stationary points of this model while the matrix approach computes the real stationary points. Using these methods, we compute the average number of stationary points while changing the topology of the PEL as well as the variance. Histograms of these stationary points are presented along with an analysis regarding the complex stationary points. This work connects topology trivialization to two different branches of mathematics: algebraic geometry and catastrophe theory, which is fertile ground for further interdisciplinary research.

  4. Correction of raindrop size distributions measured by Parsivel disdrometers, using a two-dimensional video disdrometer as a reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Raupach

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The raindrop size distribution (DSD quantifies the microstructure of rainfall and is critical to studying precipitation processes. We present a method to improve the accuracy of DSD measurements from Parsivel (particle size and velocity disdrometers, using a two-dimensional video disdrometer (2DVD as a reference instrument. Parsivel disdrometers bin raindrops into velocity and equivolume diameter classes, but may misestimate the number of drops per class. In our correction method, drop velocities are corrected with reference to theoretical models of terminal drop velocity. We define a filter for raw disdrometer measurements to remove particles that are unlikely to be plausible raindrops. Drop concentrations are corrected such that on average the Parsivel concentrations match those recorded by a 2DVD. The correction can be trained on and applied to data from both generations of OTT Parsivel disdrometers, and indeed any disdrometer in general. The method was applied to data collected during field campaigns in Mediterranean France for a network of first- and second-generation Parsivel disdrometers, and on a first-generation Parsivel in Payerne, Switzerland. We compared the moments of the resulting DSDs to those of a collocated 2DVD, and the resulting DSD-derived rain rates to collocated rain gauges. The correction improved the accuracy of the moments of the Parsivel DSDs, and in the majority of cases the rain rate match with collocated rain gauges was improved. In addition, the correction was shown to be similar for two different climatologies, suggesting its general applicability.

  5. Finite-size scaling of flexoelectricity in Langmuir-Blodgett polymer thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Shashi; Foreman, Keith; Adenwalla, Shireen; Ducharme, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The flexoelectric effect, which is a linear coupling between a strain gradient and electrical polarization, is a fundamental electromechanical property of all materials with potential for use in nanoscale devices, where strain gradients can be quite large. We report a study of the dependence of the flexoelectric response on thickness in ultrathin films of polar and non-polar polymers. The measurements of the flexoelectric response in non-polar polyethylene and the polar relaxor polymer polyvinylidene-co-trifluoroethylene-co-chlorofluoroethylene were made using a bent cantilever method and corrected for the contribution from the electrode oxide. The results show that the value of the flexoelectric coefficient increases with decreasing thickness, by up to a factor of 70 compared to the bulk value, reaching such enhanced values in films of only 10 nm thickness. These results are consistent with a model accounting for interfacial contributions, and underline how large electromechanical coupling can be produced at the nanoscale. The results also distinguish the surface flexoelectric response from that coming from the volume.

  6. Higher correlations, universal distributions, and finite size scaling in the field theory of depinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Doussal, Pierre; Wiese, Kay Jörg

    2003-10-01

    Recently we constructed a renormalizable field theory up to two loops for the quasistatic depinning of elastic manifolds in a disordered environment. Here we explore further properties of the theory. We show how higher correlation functions of the displacement field can be computed. Drastic simplifications occur, unveiling much simpler diagrammatic rules than anticipated. This is applied to the universal scaled width distribution. The expansion in d=4-epsilon predicts that the scaled distribution coincides to the lowest orders with the one for a Gaussian theory with propagator G(q)=1/q(d+2 zeta), zeta being the roughness exponent. The deviations from this Gaussian result are small and involve higher correlation functions, which are computed here for different boundary conditions. Other universal quantities are defined and evaluated: We perform a general analysis of the stability of the fixed point. We find that the correction-to-scaling exponent is omega=-epsilon and not -epsilon/3 as used in the analysis of some simulations. A more detailed study of the upper critical dimension is given, where the roughness of interfaces grows as a power of a logarithm instead of a pure power.

  7. Linked Gauss-Diffusion processes for modeling a finite-size neuronal network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carfora, M F; Pirozzi, E

    2017-11-01

    A Leaky Integrate-and-Fire (LIF) model with stochastic current-based linkages is considered to describe the firing activity of neurons interacting in a (2×2)-size feed-forward network. In the subthreshold regime and under the assumption that no more than one spike is exchanged between coupled neurons, the stochastic evolution of the neuronal membrane voltage is subject to random jumps due to interactions in the network. Linked Gauss-Diffusion processes are proposed to describe this dynamics and to provide estimates of the firing probability density of each neuron. To this end, an iterated integral equation-based approach is applied to evaluate numerically the first passage time density of such processes through the firing threshold. Asymptotic approximations of the firing densities of surrounding neurons are used to obtain closed-form expressions for the mean of the involved processes and to simplify the numerical procedure. An extension of the model to an (N×N)-size network is also given. Histograms of firing times obtained by simulations of the LIF dynamics and numerical firings estimates are compared. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of anisotropic diffusion and finite island sizes in homoepitaxial growth Pt on Pt(100)-hex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jens Jørgen; Linderoth, T.R.; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    1998-01-01

    exhibits a height modulation caused by the misfit between the topmost quasi-hexagonal layer and the quadratic substrate. resulting in a highly anisotropic large scale surface morphology with six-atom wide channels running along the [1(1) over bar0$] direction. From an autocorrelation analysis...... coverage regime. have been determined for substrate temperatures in the range T = 318-497 K and adatom deposition rates from R=4 x 10(-5) to 7 x 10(-3) site(-1) s(-1). The measurements are compared to the results of kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations and rate equation theory. The Pt(100)-hex surface...... of the determined island positions, it is revealed that the islands are distributed with long/short correlation lengths along, perpendicular to the reconstruction channels. The autocorrelation analysis allows us to quantify the degree of anisotropy in adatom diffusion. Island size distributions obtained...

  9. A voxelation-corrected non-stationary 3D cluster-size test based on random field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanjie; Nickerson, Lisa D; Zhao, Xuna; Nichols, Thomas E; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2015-09-01

    Cluster-size tests (CSTs) based on random field theory (RFT) are commonly adopted to identify significant differences in brain images. However, the use of RFT in CSTs rests on the assumption of uniform smoothness (stationarity). When images are non-stationary, CSTs based on RFT will likely lead to increased false positives in smooth regions and reduced power in rough regions. An adjustment to the cluster size according to the local smoothness at each voxel has been proposed for the standard test based on RFT to address non-stationarity, however, this technique requires images with a large degree of spatial smoothing, large degrees of freedom and high intensity thresholding. Recently, we proposed a voxelation-corrected 3D CST based on Gaussian random field theory that does not place constraints on the degree of spatial smoothness. However, this approach is only applicable to stationary images, requiring further modification to enable use for non-stationary images. In this study, we present modifications of this method to develop a voxelation-corrected non-stationary 3D CST based on RFT. Both simulated and real data were used to compare the voxelation-corrected non-stationary CST to the standard cluster-size adjusted non-stationary CST based on RFT and the voxelation-corrected stationary CST. We found that voxelation-corrected stationary CST is liberal for non-stationary images and the voxelation-corrected non-stationary CST performs better than cluster-size adjusted non-stationary CST based on RFT under low smoothness, low intensity threshold and low degrees of freedom. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Certified dual-corrected radiation patterns of phased antenna arrays by offline–online order reduction of finite-element models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, A.; Farle, O.; Dyczij-Edlinger, R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a fast numerical method for computing certified far-field patterns of phased antenna arrays over broad frequency bands as well as wide ranges of steering and look angles. The proposed scheme combines finite-element analysis, dual-corrected model-order reduction, and empirical interpolation. To assure the reliability of the results, improved a posteriori error bounds for the radiated power and directive gain are derived. Both the reduced-order model and the error-bounds algorithm feature offline–online decomposition. A real-world example is provided to demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the suggested approach

  11. Influence of surface and finite size effects on the structural and magnetic properties of nanocrystalline lanthanum strontium perovskite manganites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Žvátora, Pavel [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Veverka, Miroslav; Veverka, Pavel; Knížek, Karel; Závěta, Karel; Pollert, Emil [Department of Magnetism and Superconductors, Institute of Physics AS CR, Cukrovarnická 10/112, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Král, Vladimír [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Zentiva Development (Part of Sanofi Group), U Kabelovny 130, 102 37 Prague (Czech Republic); Goglio, Graziella; Duguet, Etienne [CNRS, University of Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, 33600 Pessac (France); Kaman, Ondřej, E-mail: kamano@seznam.cz [Department of Magnetism and Superconductors, Institute of Physics AS CR, Cukrovarnická 10/112, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Viničná 7, 128 40 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-08-15

    Syntheses of nanocrystalline perovskite phases of the general formula La{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3+δ} were carried out employing sol–gel technique followed by thermal treatment at 700–900 °C under oxygen flow. The prepared samples exhibit a rhombohedral structure with space group R3{sup ¯}c in the whole investigated range of composition 0.20≤x≤0.45. The studies were aimed at the chemical composition including oxygen stoichiometry and extrinsic properties, i.e. size of the particles, both influencing the resulting structural and magnetic properties. The oxygen stoichiometry was determined by chemical analysis revealing oxygen excess in most of the studied phases. The excess was particularly high for the samples with the smallest crystallites (12–28 nm) while comparative bulk materials showed moderate non-stoichiometry. These differences are tentatively attributed to the surface effects in view of the volume fraction occupied by the upper layer whose atomic composition does not comply with the ideal bulk stoichiometry. - Graphical abstract: Evolution of the particle size with annealing temperature in the nanocrystalline La{sub 0.70}Sr{sub 0.30}MnO{sub 3+δ} phase. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The magnetic behaviour of nanocrystalline La{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3+δ} phases was analyzed on the basis of their crystal structure, chemical composition and size of the particles. • Their Curie temperature and magnetization are markedly affected by finite size and surface effects. • The oxygen excess observed in the La{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3+δ} nanoparticles might be generated by the surface layer with deviated oxygen stoichiometry.

  12. Excitation energy spectra of the Λc and Λb baryons in a finite-size diquark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumakawa, Kento; Jido, Daisuke

    2017-12-01

    The excitation energies of the Λc and Λb baryons are investigated in a finite-size diquark potential model, in which the heavy baryons are treated as bound states of a charm quark and a scalar-isoscalar diquark. The diquark is considered as a sizable object. The quark-diquark interaction is calculated as a sum of the quark-quark interaction that is assumed to be half of the quark-antiquark interaction for the color singlet. The potential parameters in the quark-antiquark interaction are fixed so as to reproduce the charmonium spectrum. We find the diquark size to be 1.1 fm for the diquark mass 0.5 GeV/c2 to reproduce the 1p excitation energy of Λc. In this model, the Λc and Λb excitation spectra are reproduced well, while this model does not explain Λc(2765), whose isospin and spin-parity are still unknown. Thus, the detailed properties of Λc(2765) are very important to the presence of the diquark in heavy baryons as an effective constituent. We also discuss the Ξc spectrum with the scalar strange diquark.

  13. Semi-empirical procedures for correcting detector size effect on clinical MV x-ray beam profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Narayan; Kazi, Abdul M.; Hoffman, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The measured radiation beam profiles need to be corrected for the detector size effect to derive the real profiles. This paper describes two new semi-empirical procedures to determine the real profiles of high-energy x-ray beams by removing the detector size effect from the measured profiles. Measured profiles are corrected by shifting the position of each measurement point by a specific amount determined from available theoretical and experimental knowledge in the literature. The authors developed two procedures to determine the amount of shift. In the first procedure, which employs the published analytical deconvolution procedure of other investigators, the shift is determined from the comparison of the analytical fit of the measured profile and the corresponding analytical real profile derived from the deconvolution of the fitted measured profile and the Gaussian detector response function. In the second procedure, the amount of shift at any measurement point is considered to be proportional to the value of an analytical function related to the second derivative of the real profile at that point. The constant of proportionality and a parameter in the function are obtained from the values of the shifts at the 90%, 80%, 20%, and 10% dose levels, which are experimentally known from the published results of other investigators to be approximately equal to half of the radius of the detector. These procedures were tested by correcting the profiles of 6 and 18 MV x-ray beams measured by three different ionization chambers and a stereotactic field diode detector with 2.75, 2, 1, and 0.3 mm radii of their respective active cylindrical volumes. The corrected profiles measured by different detectors are found to be in close agreement. The detector size corrected penumbra widths also agree with the expected values based on the results of an earlier investigation. Thus, the authors concluded that the proposed procedures are accurate and can be used to derive the real

  14. Correct Effect Size Estimates for Strength of Association Statistics: Comment on Odgaard and Fowler (2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Matthew D.; Mikami, Amori Yee

    2013-01-01

    Odgaard and Fowler (2010) articulated the importance of reporting confidence intervals (CIs) on effect size estimates, and they provided useful formulas for doing so. However, one of their reported formulas, pertaining to the calculation of CIs on strength of association effect sizes (e.g., R[squared] or [eta][squared]), is erroneous. This comment…

  15. Size-extensivity-corrected multireference configuration interaction schemes to accurately predict bond dissociation energies of oxygenated hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeyemi, Victor B; Krisiloff, David B; Keith, John A; Libisch, Florian; Pavone, Michele; Carter, Emily A

    2014-01-28

    Oxygenated hydrocarbons play important roles in combustion science as renewable fuels and additives, but many details about their combustion chemistry remain poorly understood. Although many methods exist for computing accurate electronic energies of molecules at equilibrium geometries, a consistent description of entire combustion reaction potential energy surfaces (PESs) requires multireference correlated wavefunction theories. Here we use bond dissociation energies (BDEs) as a foundational metric to benchmark methods based on multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) for several classes of oxygenated compounds (alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and methyl esters). We compare results from multireference singles and doubles configuration interaction to those utilizing a posteriori and a priori size-extensivity corrections, benchmarked against experiment and coupled cluster theory. We demonstrate that size-extensivity corrections are necessary for chemically accurate BDE predictions even in relatively small molecules and furnish examples of unphysical BDE predictions resulting from using too-small orbital active spaces. We also outline the specific challenges in using MRCI methods for carbonyl-containing compounds. The resulting complete basis set extrapolated, size-extensivity-corrected MRCI scheme produces BDEs generally accurate to within 1 kcal/mol, laying the foundation for this scheme's use on larger molecules and for more complex regions of combustion PESs.

  16. Impact of high-frequency pumping on anomalous finite-size effects in three-dimensional topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervishko, Anastasiia A.; Yudin, Dmitry; Shelykh, Ivan A.

    2018-02-01

    Lowering of the thickness of a thin-film three-dimensional topological insulator down to a few nanometers results in the gap opening in the spectrum of topologically protected two-dimensional surface states. This phenomenon, which is referred to as the anomalous finite-size effect, originates from hybridization between the states propagating along the opposite boundaries. In this work, we consider a bismuth-based topological insulator and show how the coupling to an intense high-frequency linearly polarized pumping can further be used to manipulate the value of a gap. We address this effect within recently proposed Brillouin-Wigner perturbation theory that allows us to map a time-dependent problem into a stationary one. Our analysis reveals that both the gap and the components of the group velocity of the surface states can be tuned in a controllable fashion by adjusting the intensity of the driving field within an experimentally accessible range and demonstrate the effect of light-induced band inversion in the spectrum of the surface states for high enough values of the pump.

  17. Finite element modelling to assess the effect of surface mounted piezoelectric patch size on vibration response of a hybrid beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, N.; Alam, M. N.

    2018-02-01

    Vibration response analysis of a hybrid beam with surface mounted patch piezoelectric layer is presented in this work. A one dimensional finite element (1D-FE) model based on efficient layerwise (zigzag) theory is used for the analysis. The beam element has eight mechanical and a variable number of electrical degrees of freedom. The beams are also modelled in 2D-FE (ABAQUS) using a plane stress piezoelectric quadrilateral element for piezo layers and a plane stress quadrilateral element for the elastic layers of hybrid beams. Results are presented to assess the effect of size of piezoelectric patch layer on the free and forced vibration responses of thin and moderately thick beams under clamped-free and clamped-clamped configurations. The beams are subjected to unit step loading and harmonic loading to obtain the forced vibration responses. The vibration control using in phase actuation potential on piezoelectric patches is also studied. The 1D-FE results are compared with the 2D-FE results.

  18. Optimal performance of generalized heat engines with finite-size baths of arbitrary multiple conserved quantities beyond independent-and-identical-distribution scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kosuke; Hayashi, Masahito

    2018-01-01

    In quantum thermodynamics, effects of finiteness of the baths have been less considered. In particular, there is no general theory which focuses on finiteness of the baths of multiple conserved quantities. Then, we investigate how the optimal performance of generalized heat engines with multiple conserved quantities alters in response to the size of the baths. In the context of general theories of quantum thermodynamics, the size of the baths has been given in terms of the number of identical copies of a system, which does not cover even such a natural scaling as the volume. In consideration of the asymptotic extensivity, we deal with a generic scaling of the baths to naturally include the volume scaling. Based on it, we derive a bound for the performance of generalized heat engines reflecting finite-size effects of the baths, which we call fine-grained generalized Carnot bound. We also construct a protocol to achieve the optimal performance of the engine given by this bound. Finally, applying the obtained general theory, we deal with simple examples of generalized heat engines. As for an example of non-independent-and-identical-distribution scaling and multiple conserved quantities, we investigate a heat engine with two baths composed of an ideal gas exchanging particles, where the volume scaling is applied. The result implies that the mass of the particle explicitly affects the performance of this engine with finite-size baths.

  19. Finite-sample corrected generalized estimating equation of population average treatment effects in stepped wedge cluster randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, JoAnna M; deCamp, Allan; Juraska, Michal; Fay, Michael P; Gilbert, Peter B

    2017-04-01

    Stepped wedge designs are increasingly commonplace and advantageous for cluster randomized trials when it is both unethical to assign placebo, and it is logistically difficult to allocate an intervention simultaneously to many clusters. We study marginal mean models fit with generalized estimating equations for assessing treatment effectiveness in stepped wedge cluster randomized trials. This approach has advantages over the more commonly used mixed models that (1) the population-average parameters have an important interpretation for public health applications and (2) they avoid untestable assumptions on latent variable distributions and avoid parametric assumptions about error distributions, therefore, providing more robust evidence on treatment effects. However, cluster randomized trials typically have a small number of clusters, rendering the standard generalized estimating equation sandwich variance estimator biased and highly variable and hence yielding incorrect inferences. We study the usual asymptotic generalized estimating equation inferences (i.e., using sandwich variance estimators and asymptotic normality) and four small-sample corrections to generalized estimating equation for stepped wedge cluster randomized trials and for parallel cluster randomized trials as a comparison. We show by simulation that the small-sample corrections provide improvement, with one correction appearing to provide at least nominal coverage even with only 10 clusters per group. These results demonstrate the viability of the marginal mean approach for both stepped wedge and parallel cluster randomized trials. We also study the comparative performance of the corrected methods for stepped wedge and parallel designs, and describe how the methods can accommodate interval censoring of individual failure times and incorporate semiparametric efficient estimators.

  20. Mean grain size detection of DP590 steel plate using a corrected method with electromagnetic acoustic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Xiaokai; Hua, Lin; Li, Juanjuan; Xiang, Qing

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR) is a considerable method to determine the mean grain size of the metal material with a high precision. The basic ultrasonic attenuation theory used for the mean grain size detection of EMAR is come from the single phase theory. In this paper, the EMAR testing was carried out based on the ultrasonic attenuation theory. The detection results show that the double peaks phenomenon occurs in the EMAR testing of DP590 steel plate. The dual phase structure of DP590 steel is the inducement of the double peaks phenomenon in the EMAR testing. In reaction to the phenomenon, a corrected method with EMAR was put forward to detect the mean grain size of dual phase steel. Compared with the traditional attenuation evaluation method and the uncorrected method with EMAR, the corrected method with EMAR shows great effectiveness and superiority for the mean grain size detection of DP590 steel plate. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Correcting for particle size effects on plasma actuator particle image velocimetry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masati, A.; Sedwick, R. J.

    2018-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is often used to characterize plasma actuator flow, but particle charging effects are rarely taken into account. A parametric study was conducted to determine the effects of particle size on the velocity results of plasma actuator PIV experiments. Results showed that smaller particles more closely match air flow velocities than larger particles. The measurement uncertainty was quantified by deconvolving the particle image diameter from the correlation diameter. The true air velocity was calculated by linearly extrapolating to the zero-size particle diameter.

  2. Reproducibility of R-fMRI metrics on the impact of different strategies for multiple comparison correction and sample sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Lu, Bin; Yan, Chao-Gan

    2018-01-01

    Concerns regarding reproducibility of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) findings have been raised. Little is known about how to operationally define R-fMRI reproducibility and to what extent it is affected by multiple comparison correction strategies and sample size. We comprehensively assessed two aspects of reproducibility, test-retest reliability and replicability, on widely used R-fMRI metrics in both between-subject contrasts of sex differences and within-subject comparisons of eyes-open and eyes-closed (EOEC) conditions. We noted permutation test with Threshold-Free Cluster Enhancement (TFCE), a strict multiple comparison correction strategy, reached the best balance between family-wise error rate (under 5%) and test-retest reliability/replicability (e.g., 0.68 for test-retest reliability and 0.25 for replicability of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) for between-subject sex differences, 0.49 for replicability of ALFF for within-subject EOEC differences). Although R-fMRI indices attained moderate reliabilities, they replicated poorly in distinct datasets (replicability comparison correction strategies and highlight the importance of sufficiently large sample sizes in R-fMRI studies to enhance reproducibility. Hum Brain Mapp 39:300-318, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Wavefront-sensor-induced beam size error: physical mechanism, sensitivity-analysis and correction method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, W.D.; Zwet, E.J. van

    2015-01-01

    When using a commonly-used quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer wavefront sensor (QWLSI WFS) for beam size measurements on a high power CO2 laser, artefacts have been observed in the measured irradiance distribution. The grating in the QWLSI WFS not only generates the diffracted first orders

  4. Characterization of coherent structures in three-dimensional turbulent flows using the finite-size Lyapunov exponent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettencourt, João H; López, Cristóbal; Hernández-García, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we use the finite-size Lyapunov exponent (FSLE) to characterize Lagrangian coherent structures in three-dimensional (3D) turbulent flows. Lagrangian coherent structures act as the organizers of transport in fluid flows and are crucial to understand their stirring and mixing properties. Generalized maxima (ridges) of the FSLE fields are used to locate these coherent structures. 3D FSLE fields are calculated in two phenomenologically distinct turbulent flows: a wall-bounded flow (channel flow) and a regional oceanic flow obtained by the numerical solution of the primitive equations where two-dimensional (2D) turbulence dominates. In the channel flow, autocorrelations of the FSLE field show that the structure is substantially different from the near wall to the mid-channel region and relates well to the more widely studied Eulerian coherent structure of the turbulent channel flow. The ridges of the FSLE field have complex shapes due to the 3D character of the turbulent fluctuations. In the oceanic flow, strong horizontal stirring is present and the flow regime is similar to that of 2D turbulence where the domain is populated by coherent eddies that interact strongly. This in turn results in the presence of high FSLE lines throughout the domain leading to strong non-local mixing. The ridges of the FSLE field are quasi-vertical surfaces, indicating that the horizontal dynamics dominates the flow. Indeed, due to rotation and stratification, vertical motions in the ocean are much less intense than horizontal ones. This suppression is absent in the channel flow, as the 3D character of the FSLE ridges shows. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Lyapunov analysis: from dynamical systems theory to applications’. (paper)

  5. Effect of source depth correction on the estimation of earthquake size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, F.; Panza, G.

    1995-03-01

    The relationship between surface wave magnitude, M s , and seismic moment, M o , of earthquakes is essential for the estimation of seismic risk in any region. In the hypothesis of constant stress drop, theoretical models predict that Log M o and M s are related by a linear law. The slope most commonly found in the literature is around 1.5. Here we show that the application to the Ms values of the necessary correction for the focal depth, gives a general increment of the correlation coefficient, and that a slope around 1.0 is consistent with the global data, while for regionalized data it can vary from about 1.0 to 2.0. (author). 14 refs, 3 tabs

  6. How does a single cell know when the liver has reached its correct size?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Hohmann

    Full Text Available The liver is a multi-functional organ that regulates major physiological processes and that possesses a remarkable regeneration capacity. After loss of functional liver mass the liver grows back to its original, individual size through hepatocyte proliferation and apoptosis. How does a single hepatocyte 'know' when the organ has grown to its final size? This work considers the initial growth phase of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in which the mass is restored. There are strong and valid arguments that the trigger of proliferation after partial hepatectomy is mediated through the portal blood flow. It remains unclear, if either or both the concentration of metabolites in the blood or the shear stress are crucial to hepatocyte proliferation and liver size control. A cell-based mathematical model is developed that helps discriminate the effects of these two potential triggers. Analysis of the mathematical model shows that a metabolic load and a hemodynamical hypothesis imply different feedback mechanisms at the cellular scale. The predictions of the developed mathematical model are compared to experimental data in rats. The assumption that hepatocytes are able to buffer the metabolic load leads to a robustness against short-term fluctuations of the trigger which can not be achieved with a purely hemodynamical trigger.

  7. Traduction et typologie des textes : pour une définition de la traduction «correcte»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Irina Durdureanu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at establishing a short definition of translation in order to demonstrate the fact that the translation process is a very complex and complicated one, which implies an extra-linguistic universe from the translator. Translating literature, especially poetry, means using some “rules”, which are different from the rules used in the translation of specialized texts. Many theorists say that it is impossible to translate poetry, but we can talk in fact about what we lose and what we gain in translation. Modern translation theories established a series of translation typologies that take into account the type of text to translate so as the translator can transmit into another language the correct meaning

  8. Is the market size hypothesis relevant for Botswana? Vector error correction framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunofiwa Tsaurai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated the relevancy of the market size hypothesis of FDI in Botswana in Botswana using the VECM approach with data ranging from 1975 to 2013. The study used FDI net inflows (% of GDP as a measure of FDI and GDP per capita as a proxy of market size. The findings of the study are threefold: (1 observed that there exists a long run uni-directional causality relationship running from GDP per capita to FDI in Botswana, (2 there is no long run causality running from FDI to GDP per capita in Botswana between 1975 and 2013 and (3 failed to establish any short run causality either from GDP per capita to FDI or from FDI to GDP per capita in Botswana. Although, GDP per capita of Botswana was a conditional characteristic that attracted FDI, Botswana did not economically benefit from FDI net inflows during the period from 1975 to 2013. The findings defied the theory that mentions that FDI brings into the host country an improvement of human capital development and technology improvement among other advantages which boost economic growth. Possibly, there are other host country characteristics that Botswana needs to address if it hopes to benefit from FDI. The current study recommends further research to find out which are the other conditional characteristics that Botswana authorities need to put in place in ensure that FDI inflows is translated into economic benefits for the country

  9. Restricting minimum size of DGs to confirm correct operation of fast directional protection switches in their simultaneous allocation with DGs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorkhosh, Seyed Salman; Samet, Haidar

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Simultaneous allocation of DGs and fast directional protection switches (FPDSs) is made. • A protection constraint is proposed which restricts the allowable size of DGs. • The proposed constraint ensures the correct operation of upstream installed FDPS in all conditions. - Abstract: This paper presents simultaneous allocation of distributed generations (DGs) and fast directional protection switches (FDPSs) to decrease energy losses and enhance reliability of the network. The main contribution of the paper is restricting the allowable size of DGs to ensure the correct operation of upstream installed FDPS in all conditions. The paper introduces a method based on genetic algorithm to solve the optimization problem. Finally, to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method some simulations considering a 33 bus test network are performed. The optimization problem with and without applying protection constraint is solved. Customer’s load is modeled by a three level yearly load. Time value of money and load growth rate are also considered. To assess the importance of the proposed protection constraint, fault studies after adding DGs and FDPSs to a 33 bus test network are performed. Results confirm the importance of the proposed protection constraint

  10. Computer simulation of small-angle X-ray reflection from finite size samples with accounting for the instrumental errors of a diffractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorina, M.V.; Mironov, V.L.; Mironov, S.V.

    2005-01-01

    A model is developed, which enables computation of the the angular dependences of X-ray reflection, with taking into account the finiteness of sample sizes and the diffractometer alignment errors. It is shown that the angular dependences of refraction for glass and quartz wafers calculated with account of possible errors of the diffractometer optical system alignment are in good agreement with the experimental curves in the entire range of angles [ru

  11. Controlling the numerical Cerenkov instability in PIC simulations using a customized finite difference Maxwell solver and a local FFT based current correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Fiuza, Frederico; Decyk, Viktor K.; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; An, Weiming; Tsung, Frank S.; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Mori, Warren B.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we present a customized finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) Maxwell solver for the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. The solver is customized to effectively eliminate the numerical Cerenkov instability (NCI) which arises when a plasma (neutral or non-neutral) relativistically drifts on a grid when using the PIC algorithm. We control the EM dispersion curve in the direction of the plasma drift of a FDTD Maxwell solver by using a customized higher order finite difference operator for the spatial derivative along the direction of the drift (1 ˆ direction). We show that this eliminates the main NCI modes with moderate |k1 | , while keeps additional main NCI modes well outside the range of physical interest with higher |k1 | . These main NCI modes can be easily filtered out along with first spatial aliasing NCI modes which are also at the edge of the fundamental Brillouin zone. The customized solver has the possible advantage of improved parallel scalability because it can be easily partitioned along 1 ˆ which typically has many more cells than other directions for the problems of interest. We show that FFTs can be performed locally to current on each partition to filter out the main and first spatial aliasing NCI modes, and to correct the current so that it satisfies the continuity equation for the customized spatial derivative. This ensures that Gauss' Law is satisfied. We present simulation examples of one relativistically drifting plasma, of two colliding relativistically drifting plasmas, and of nonlinear laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a Lorentz boosted frame that show no evidence of the NCI can be observed when using this customized Maxwell solver together with its NCI elimination scheme.

  12. Modification of Deposited, Size-Selected MoS2 Nanoclusters by Sulphur Addition: An Aberration-Corrected STEM Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubiao Niu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum disulphide (MoS2 is an earth-abundant material which has several industrial applications and is considered a candidate for platinum replacement in electrochemistry. Size-selected MoS2 nanoclusters were synthesised in the gas phase using a magnetron sputtering, gas condensation cluster beam source with a lateral time-of-flight mass selector. Most of the deposited MoS2 nanoclusters, analysed by an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM in high-angle annular dark field (HAADF mode, showed poorly ordered layer structures with an average diameter of 5.5 nm. By annealing and the addition of sulphur to the clusters (by sublimation in the cluster source, the clusters were transformed into larger, crystalline structures. Annealing alone did not lead to crystallization, only to a cluster size increase by decomposition and coalescence of the primary clusters. Sulphur addition alone led to a partially crystalline structure without a significant change in the size. Thus, both annealing and sulphur addition processes were needed to obtain highly crystalline MoS2 nanoclusters.

  13. Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class in (2+1) dimensions: universal geometry-dependent distributions and finite-time corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, T J; Alves, S G; Ferreira, S C

    2013-04-01

    The dynamical regimes of models belonging to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class are investigated in d=2+1 by extensive simulations considering flat and curved geometries. Geometry-dependent universal distributions, different from their Tracy-Widom counterpart in one dimension, were found. Distributions exhibit finite-time corrections hallmarked by a shift in the mean decaying as t(-β), where β is the growth exponent. Our results support a generalization of the ansatz h=v(∞)t+(Γt)(β)χ+η+ζt(-β) to higher dimensions, where v(∞), Γ, ζ, and η are nonuniversal quantities whereas β and χ are universal and the last one depends on the surface geometry. Generalized Gumbel distributions provide very good fits of the distributions in at least four orders of magnitude around the peak, which can be used for comparisons with experiments. Our numerical results call for analytical approaches and experimental realizations of the KPZ class in two-dimensional systems.

  14. Symmetry-breaking dynamics of the finite-size Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model near ground state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Li, Tongcang; Yin, Zhang-qi

    2018-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick (LMG) model with a finite number of spins. In the thermodynamic limit, the ground state of the LMG model with an isotropic Hamiltonian in the broken phase breaks to a mean-field ground state with a certain direction. However, when the spin number N is finite, the exact ground state is always unique and is not given by a classical mean-field ground state. Here, we prove that when N is large but finite, through a tiny external perturbation, a localized state which is close to a mean-field ground state can be prepared, which mimics spontaneous symmetry breaking. Also, we find the localized in-plane spin polarization oscillates with two different frequencies ˜O (1 /N ) , and the lifetime of the localized state is long enough to exhibit this oscillation. We numerically test the analytical results and find that they agree very well with each other. Finally, we link the phenomena to quantum time crystals and time quasicrystals.

  15. The main postulates of adaptive correction of distortions of the wave front in large-size optical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Sychev

    2014-01-01

    laser cavity, a transport channel of powerful laser radiation with deflecting mirrors and a forming telescope with a segmented primary mirror;- formation of the performance criteria of adaptive optical systems;- multiplanimetric system of adaptive correction of distortions.The paper discusses test results of the transportation of powerful laser radiation on a horizontal track and shows an external view of forming optical system of comprehensive test stand.It is conclusively proven that using the proposed postulates when developing or modernizing the optical systems provides the lowest level of residual distortions and the operating efficiency of adaptive optical means.The proposed postulates for adaptive correction of radiation WF and positive experience of their use in full-scale optical complexes significantly reduce time and cost in developing the effective means to observe the distant objects, as well as the means to generate and supply power to various space objects for its multiple use such as power supply, telecommunications, fighting with space debris, providing security asteroid etc.It can be concluded that the state of the domestic optical science and its potential in the field of adaptive means to form and transport high-power laser radiation, as well as the results of theoretical and experimental studies, inspire the reasonable hope for the high-performance large-sized multipurpose optoelectronic devices to be available in the future.

  16. Finite difference simulation of ultrasonic NDE methods for the detection and sizing of Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pörtzgen, N.; Volker, A.W.F.; Fingerhut, M.; Tomar, M.; Wassink, C.

    2006-01-01

    Although solutions for detection and sizing of longitudinal and circumferential cracks in pipeline walls exist, reliable detection and sizing of SCC in pipelines has been a challenge for Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) for many years. Detection and sizing are impeded by the fact that SCC can have

  17. Detecting and correcting for family size differences in the study of sexual orientation and fraternal birth order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Ray

    2014-07-01

    The term "fraternal birth order effect" denotes a statistical relation most commonly expressed in one of two ways: Older brothers increase the odds of homosexuality in later born males or, alternatively, homosexual men tend to have more older brothers than do heterosexual men. The demonstrability of this effect depends partly on the adequate matching of the homosexual and heterosexual study groups with respect to mean family size. If the homosexual group has too many siblings, relative to the heterosexual group, the homosexual group will tend to show the expected excess of older brothers but may also show an excess of other sibling-types (most likely older sisters); if the homosexual group has too few siblings, it will tend not to show a difference in number of older brothers but instead may show a deficiency of other sibling-types (most likely younger brothers and younger sisters). In the first part of this article, these consequences are illustrated with deliberately mismatched groups selected from archived data sets. In the second part, two slightly different methods for transforming raw sibling data are presented. These are intended to produce family-size-corrected variables for each of the four original sibling parameters (older brothers, older sisters, younger brothers, and younger sisters). Both versions are shown to render the fraternal birth order effect observable in the deliberately mismatched groups. In the third part of the article, fraternal birth order studies published in the last 5 years were surveyed for failures to find a statistically significant excess of older brothers for the homosexual group. Two such studies were found in the nine examined. In both cases, the collective findings for older sisters, younger brothers, and younger sisters suggested that the mean family size of the homosexual groups was smaller than that of the heterosexual comparison groups. Furthermore, the individual findings for the four classes of siblings resembled those

  18. Fast mean and variance computation of the diffuse sound transmission through finite-sized thick and layered wall and floor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decraene, Carolina; Dijckmans, Arne; Reynders, Edwin P. B.

    2018-05-01

    A method is developed for computing the mean and variance of the diffuse field sound transmission loss of finite-sized layered wall and floor systems that consist of solid, fluid and/or poroelastic layers. This is achieved by coupling a transfer matrix model of the wall or floor to statistical energy analysis subsystem models of the adjacent room volumes. The modal behavior of the wall is approximately accounted for by projecting the wall displacement onto a set of sinusoidal lateral basis functions. This hybrid modal transfer matrix-statistical energy analysis method is validated on multiple wall systems: a thin steel plate, a polymethyl methacrylate panel, a thick brick wall, a sandwich panel, a double-leaf wall with poro-elastic material in the cavity, and a double glazing. The predictions are compared with experimental data and with results obtained using alternative prediction methods such as the transfer matrix method with spatial windowing, the hybrid wave based-transfer matrix method, and the hybrid finite element-statistical energy analysis method. These comparisons confirm the prediction accuracy of the proposed method and the computational efficiency against the conventional hybrid finite element-statistical energy analysis method.

  19. [The finite element analysis of stress distribution in different size of MO cavities restored with composite resin inlays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long; Lu, Yi; Yang, Bo-song; Guo, Yan; Li, Fang-ping

    2015-04-01

    To explore the effect of different depth and width of meiso-occlusal (Class II) cavity type on the tooth tissue resistance stress after restoration with composite resin inlays. The 3-D finite element model of mandibular first molar with meiso-occlusal (Class II) cavity restored with composite resin inlay was established by using CBCT scanning and reverse engineering software Mimics, Geomagic Studio, and finite element analysis software ANSYS. Comparative analysis of restoration with different depth and width meiso-occlusal (Class II) cavity under the same load of perpendicular and 45° deviation was explored, and finally the main stress and Von-mises stress changed as well as stress distribution were analyzed. The main stress was located in the gingival wall opposite to the inlay, while the major stress concentration area of the tooth was distributed near the canal at the bottom of the cavity. With the increase of the depth and width, the main stress and Von-mises stress distribution areas of tooth were getting larger. The Von-mises stress of tooth was influenced by the width variation of the cavity, while that depth change of cavity was affected by Von Mises stress of the inlay. With the increase of the depth and width of the cavity as well as lateral loading force, the peak stress of tooth with inlays increased and the distribution of stress concentration is modified after meiso-occlusal (Class II) cavity being inlayed with composite resin.

  20. Power-law correlations and finite-size effects in silica particle aggregates studied by small-angle neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freltoft, T.; Kjems, Jørgen; Sinha, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering from normal, compressed, and water-suspended powders of aggregates of fine silica particles has been studied. The samples possessed average densities ranging from 0.008 to 0.45 g/cm3. Assuming power-law correlations between particles and a finite correlation length ξ......, the authors derive the scattering function S(q) from specific models for particle-particle correlation in these systems. S(q) was found to provide a satisfactory fit to the data for all samples studied. The fractal dimension df corresponding to the power-law correlation was 2.61±0.1 for all dry samples, and 2...

  1. Kelvin modes as Nambu–Goldstone modes along superfluid vortices and relativistic strings: Finite volume size effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Michikazu; Nitta, Muneto

    2014-01-01

    We study Kelvin modes and translational zero modes excited along a quantized vortex and relativistic global string in superfluids and a relativistic field theory, respectively, by constructing the low-energy effective theory of these modes. We find that they become exact gapless Nambu–Goldstone modes only in a system with the infinite volume limit. On the other hand, in a system with finite volume, we find an imaginary massive gap causing tachyonic instability above some critical wavelength in the relativistic theory. We also find in the non-relativistic theory that Kelvin modes with wavelengths longer than some critical value propagate in the direction opposite to those with shorter length, contrary to conventional understanding. The number of Nambu–Goldstone modes also saturate the equality of the Nielsen–Chadha inequality for both relativistic and non-relativistic theories

  2. Dilution correction equation revisited: The impact of stream slope, relief ratio and area size of basin on geochemical anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrestani, Shahed; Mokhtari, Ahmad Reza

    2017-04-01

    Stream sediment sampling is a well-known technique used to discover the geochemical anomalies in regional exploration activities. In an upstream catchment basin of stream sediment sample, the geochemical signals originating from probable mineralization could be diluted due to mixing with the weathering material coming from the non-anomalous sources. Hawkes's equation (1976) was an attempt to overcome the problem in which the area size of catchment basin was used to remove dilution from geochemical anomalies. However, the metal content of a stream sediment sample could be linked to several geomorphological, sedimentological, climatic and geological factors. The area size is not itself a comprehensive representative of dilution taking place in a catchment basin. The aim of the present study was to consider a number of geomorphological factors affecting the sediment supply, transportation processes, storage and in general, the geochemistry of stream sediments and their incorporation in the dilution correction procedure. This was organized through employing the concept of sediment yield and sediment delivery ratio and linking such characteristics to the dilution phenomenon in a catchment basin. Main stream slope (MSS), relief ratio (RR) and area size (Aa) of catchment basin were selected as the important proxies (PSDRa) for sediment delivery ratio and then entered to the Hawkes's equation. Then, Hawkes's and new equations were applied on the stream sediment dataset collected from Takhte-Soleyman district, west of Iran for Au, As and Sb values. A number of large and small gold, antimony and arsenic mineral occurrences were used to evaluate the results. Anomaly maps based on the new equations displayed improvement in anomaly delineation taking the spatial distribution of mineral deposits into account and could present new catchment basins containing known mineralization as the anomaly class, especially in the case of Au and As. Four catchment basins having Au and As

  3. Artificial Leaks in Container Closure Integrity Testing: Nonlinear Finite Element Simulation of Aperture Size Originated by a Copper Wire Sandwiched between the Stopper and the Glass Vial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Alejandra; Roehl, Holger; Brown, Helen; Adler, Michael; Chalus, Pascal; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Container closure integrity (CCI) testing is required by different regulatory authorities in order to provide assurance of tightness of the container closure system against possible contamination, for example, by microorganisms. Microbial ingress CCI testing is performed by incubation of the container closure system with microorganisms under specified testing conditions. Physical CCI uses surrogate endpoints, such as coloration by dye solution ingress or gas flow (helium leakage testing). In order to correlate microbial CCI and physical CCI test methods and to evaluate the methods' capability to detect a given leak, artificial leaks are being introduced into the container closure system in a variety of different ways. In our study, artificial leaks were generated using inserted copper wires between the glass vial opening and rubber stopper. However, the insertion of copper wires introduces leaks of unknown size and shape. With nonlinear finite element simulations, the aperture size between the rubber stopper and the glass vial was calculated, depending on wire diameter and capping force. The dependency of the aperture size on the copper wire diameter was quadratic. With the data obtained, we were able to calculate the leak size and model leak shape. Our results suggest that the size as well as the shape of the artificial leaks should be taken into account when evaluating critical leak sizes, as flow rate does not, independently, correlate to hole size. Capping force also affected leak size. An increase in the capping force from 30 to 70 N resulted in a reduction of the aperture (leak size) by approximately 50% for all wire diameters. From 30 to 50 N, the reduction was approximately 33%. Container closure integrity (CCI) testing is required by different regulatory authorities in order to provide assurance of tightness of the container closure system against contamination, for example, by microorganisms. Microbial ingress CCI testing is performed by incubation of the

  4. Probabilistic Model Updating for Sizing of Hole-Edge Crack Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors and the High-Order Extended Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing He

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel framework for probabilistic crack size quantification using fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensors. The key idea is to use a high-order extended finite element method (XFEM together with a transfer (T-matrix method to analyze the reflection intensity spectra of FBG sensors, for various crack sizes. Compared with the standard FEM, the XFEM offers two superior capabilities: (i a more accurate representation of fields in the vicinity of the crack tip singularity and (ii alleviation of the need for costly re-meshing as the crack size changes. Apart from the classical four-term asymptotic enrichment functions in XFEM, we also propose to incorporate higher-order functions, aiming to further improve the accuracy of strain fields upon which the reflection intensity spectra are based. The wavelength of the reflection intensity spectra is extracted as a damage sensitive quantity, and a baseline model with five parameters is established to quantify its correlation with the crack size. In order to test the feasibility of the predictive model, we design FBG sensor-based experiments to detect fatigue crack growth in structures. Furthermore, a Bayesian method is proposed to update the parameters of the baseline model using only a few available experimental data points (wavelength versus crack size measured by one of the FBG sensors and an optical microscope, respectively. Given the remaining data points of wavelengths, even measured by FBG sensors at different positions, the updated model is shown to give crack size predictions that match well with the experimental observations.

  5. Probabilistic Model Updating for Sizing of Hole-Edge Crack Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors and the High-Order Extended Finite Element Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jingjing; Yang, Jinsong; Wang, Yongxiang; Waisman, Haim; Zhang, Weifang

    2016-11-21

    This paper presents a novel framework for probabilistic crack size quantification using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. The key idea is to use a high-order extended finite element method (XFEM) together with a transfer (T)-matrix method to analyze the reflection intensity spectra of FBG sensors, for various crack sizes. Compared with the standard FEM, the XFEM offers two superior capabilities: (i) a more accurate representation of fields in the vicinity of the crack tip singularity and (ii) alleviation of the need for costly re-meshing as the crack size changes. Apart from the classical four-term asymptotic enrichment functions in XFEM, we also propose to incorporate higher-order functions, aiming to further improve the accuracy of strain fields upon which the reflection intensity spectra are based. The wavelength of the reflection intensity spectra is extracted as a damage sensitive quantity, and a baseline model with five parameters is established to quantify its correlation with the crack size. In order to test the feasibility of the predictive model, we design FBG sensor-based experiments to detect fatigue crack growth in structures. Furthermore, a Bayesian method is proposed to update the parameters of the baseline model using only a few available experimental data points (wavelength versus crack size) measured by one of the FBG sensors and an optical microscope, respectively. Given the remaining data points of wavelengths, even measured by FBG sensors at different positions, the updated model is shown to give crack size predictions that match well with the experimental observations.

  6. Surface and finite size effects impact on the phase diagrams, polar, and dielectric properties of (Sr,Bi)Ta2O9 ferroelectric nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliseev, E. A.; Fomichov, Y. M.; Glinchuk, M. D.; Semchenko, A. V.; Sidsky, V. V.; Kolos, V. V.; Pleskachevsky, Yu. M.; Silibin, M. V.; Morozovsky, N. V.; Morozovska, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the thermodynamic approach Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire (LGD) combined with the equations of electrostatics, we investigated the effect of polarization surface screening on finite size effects of the phase diagrams, polar, and dielectric properties of ferroelectric nanoparticles of different shapes. We obtained and analyzed the analytical results for the dependences of the ferroelectric phase transition temperature, critical size, spontaneous polarization, and thermodynamic coercive field on the shape and size of the nanoparticles. The pronounced size effect of these characteristics on the scaling parameter, the ratio of the particle characteristic size to the length of the surface screening, was revealed. Also our modeling predicts a significant impact of the flexo-chemical effect (that is a joint action of flexoelectric effect and chemical pressure) on the temperature of phase transition, polar, and dielectric properties of nanoparticles when their chemical composition deviates from the stoichiometric one. We showed on the example of the stoichiometric nanosized SrBi 2 Ta 2 O 9 particles that except the vicinity of the critical size, where the system splitting into domains has an important role, results of analytical calculation of the spontaneous polarization have a little difference from the numerical ones. We revealed a strong impact of the flexo-chemical effect on the phase transition temperature, polar, and dielectric properties of Sr y Bi 2+x Ta 2 O 9 nanoparticles when the ratio Sr/Bi deviates from the stoichiometric value of 0.5 within the range from 0.35 to 0.65. From the analysis of experimental data, we derived the parameters of the theory, namely, the coefficients of expansion of the LGD functional, the contribution of flexo-chemical effect, and the length of the surface screening.

  7. Correction: Challenge in optoelectronic duplex switches: a red emission large-size single crystal and a unidirectional flexible thin film of a hybrid multifunctional material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao; Zhang, Wan-Ying; Chen, Cheng; Ye, Qiong; Fu, Da-Wei

    2018-02-20

    Correction for 'Challenge in optoelectronic duplex switches: a red emission large-size single crystal and a unidirectional flexible thin film of a hybrid multifunctional material' by Xiao Zhu et al., Dalton Trans., 2018, DOI: 10.1039/c7dt04489e.

  8. On sets of vectors of a finite vector space in which every subset of basis size is a basis II

    OpenAIRE

    Ball, Simeon; De Beule, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This article contains a proof of the MDS conjecture for k a parts per thousand currency sign 2p - 2. That is, that if S is a set of vectors of in which every subset of S of size k is a basis, where q = p (h) , p is prime and q is not and k a parts per thousand currency sign 2p - 2, then |S| a parts per thousand currency sign q + 1. It also contains a short proof of the same fact for k a parts per thousand currency sign p, for all q.

  9. Universal Signatures of Quantum Critical Points from Finite-Size Torus Spectra: A Window into the Operator Content of Higher-Dimensional Conformal Field Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Michael; Whitsitt, Seth; Henry, Louis-Paul; Sachdev, Subir; Läuchli, Andreas M

    2016-11-18

    The low-energy spectra of many body systems on a torus, of finite size L, are well understood in magnetically ordered and gapped topological phases. However, the spectra at quantum critical points separating such phases are largely unexplored for (2+1)D systems. Using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we accurately calculate and analyze the low-energy torus spectrum at an Ising critical point which provides a universal fingerprint of the underlying quantum field theory, with the energy levels given by universal numbers times 1/L. We highlight the implications of a neighboring topological phase on the spectrum by studying the Ising* transition (i.e. the transition between a Z_{2} topological phase and a trivial paramagnet), in the example of the toric code in a longitudinal field, and advocate a phenomenological picture that provides qualitative insight into the operator content of the critical field theory.

  10. Effects of heater location and heater size on the natural convection heat transfer in a square cavity using finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, Ich Long; Byon, Chan [Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Finite element method was used to investigate the effects of heater location and heater size on the natural convection heat transfer in a 2D square cavity heated partially or fully from below and cooled from above. Rayleigh number (5 X 10{sup 2} ≤ Ra ≤ 5X10{sup 5}), heater size (0.1 ≤ D/L ≤ 1.0), and heater location (0.1 ≤ x{sub h}/L ≤ 0.5) were considered. Numerical results indicated that the average Nusselt number (Nu{sub m}) increases as the heater size decreases. In addition, when x{sub h}/L is less than 0.4, Nu{sub m} increases as x{sub h}/L increases, and Num decreases again for a larger value of x{sub h}/L. However, this trend changes when Ra is less than 10{sup 4}, suggesting that Nu{sub m} attains its maximum value at the region close to the bottom surface center. This study aims to gain insight into the behaviors of natural convection in order to potentially improve internal natural convection heat transfer.

  11. Biology of biomechanics: Finite element analysis of a statically determinate system to rotate the occlusal plane for correction of a skeletal Class III open-bite malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W Eugene; Viecilli, Rodrigo F; Chang, Chris; Katona, Thomas R; Paydar, Nasser H

    2015-12-01

    In the absence of adequate animal or in-vitro models, the biomechanics of human malocclusion must be studied indirectly. Finite element analysis (FEA) is emerging as a clinical technology to assist in diagnosis, treatment planning, and retrospective analysis. The hypothesis tested is that instantaneous FEA can retrospectively simulate long-term mandibular arch retraction and occlusal plane rotation for the correction of a skeletal Class III malocclusion. Seventeen published case reports were selected of patients treated with statically determinate mechanics using posterior mandible or infrazygomatic crest bone screw anchorage to retract the mandibular arch. Two-dimensional measurements were made for incisor and molar movements, mandibular arch rotation, and retraction relative to the maxillary arch. A patient with cone-beam computed tomography imaging was selected for a retrospective FEA. The mean age for the sample was 23.3 ± 3.3 years; there were 7 men and 10 women. Mean incisor movements were 3.35 ± 1.55 mm of retraction and 2.18 ± 2.51 mm of extrusion. Corresponding molar movements were retractions of 4.85 ± 1.78 mm and intrusions of 0.85 ± 2.22 mm. Retraction of the mandibular arch relative to the maxillary arch was 4.88 ± 1.41 mm. Mean posterior rotation of the mandibular arch was -5.76° ± 4.77° (counterclockwise). The mean treatment time (n = 16) was 36.2 ± 15.3 months. Bone screws in the posterior mandibular region were more efficient for intruding molars and decreasing the vertical dimension of the occlusion to close an open bite. The full-cusp, skeletal Class III patient selected for FEA was treated to an American Board of Orthodontics Cast-Radiograph Evaluation score of 24 points in about 36 months by en-masse retraction and posterior rotation of the mandibular arch: the bilateral load on the mandibular segment was about 200 cN. The mandibular arch was retracted by about 5 mm, posterior rotation was about 16.5°, and molar intrusion was about 3

  12. Size effects on the structural, electronic, and optical properties of (5,0) finite-length carbon nanotube: An ab-initio electronic structure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarighi Ahmadpour, Mahdi; Rostamnejadi, Ali [Electroceram Research Center, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Shahin Shahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemifar, S. Javad [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-07-07

    We use density functional computations to study the zero temperature structural, electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of (5,0) finite carbon nanotubes (FCNT), with length in the range of 4–44 Å. It is found that the structural and electronic properties of (5,0) FCNTs, in the ground state, converge at a length of about 30 Å, while the excited state properties exhibit long-range edge effects. We discuss that curvature effects enhance energy gap of FCNTs, in contrast to the known trend in the periodic limit. It is seen that compensation of curvature effects in two special small sizes may give rise to spontaneous magnetization. The obtained cohesive energies provide some insights into the effects of environment on the growth of FCNTs. The second-order difference of the total energies reveals an important magic size of about 15 Å. The optical and dynamical magnetic responses of the FCNTs to polarized electromagnetic pulses are studied by time dependent density functional theory. The results show that the static and dynamic magnetic properties mainly come from the edge carbon atoms. The optical absorption properties are described in terms of local field effects and characterized by Casida linear response method.

  13. Simultaneous 3D measurement of the translation and rotation of finite-size particles and the flow field in a fully developed turbulent water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Simon; Gibert, Mathieu; Bérut, Antoine; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2013-02-01

    We report a novel experimental technique that measures simultaneously in three dimensions the trajectories, the translation and the rotation of finite-size inertial particles together with the turbulent flow. The flow field is analyzed by tracking the temporal evolution of small fluorescent tracer particles. The inertial particles consist of a super-absorbent polymer that renders them index and density matched with water and thus invisible. The particles are marked by inserting at various locations tracer particles into the polymer. Translation and rotation, as well as the flow field around the particle are recovered dynamically from the analysis of the marker and tracer particle trajectories. We apply this technique to study the dynamics of inertial particles much larger in size (Rp/η ≈ 100) than the Kolmogorov length scale η in a von Kármán swirling water flow (Rλ ≈ 400). We show, using the mixed (particle/fluid) Eulerian second-order velocity structure function, that the interaction zone between the particle and the flow develops in a spherical shell of width 2Rp around the particle of radius Rp. This we interpret as an indication of a wake induced by the particle. This measurement technique has many additional advantages that will make it useful to address other problems such as particle collisions, dynamics of non-spherical solid objects, or even of wet granular matter.

  14. Simultaneous 3D measurement of the translation and rotation of finite size particles and the flow field in a fully developed turbulent water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, Mathieu; Klein, Simon; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2012-11-01

    We report a novel experimental technique that measures simultaneously in three dimensions the trajectories, the translation, and the rotation of finite size inertial particles together with the turbulent flow. The flow field is analyzed by tracking the temporal evolution of small fluorescent tracer particles. The inertial particles consist of a super-absorbent polymer that renders them index and density matched with water and thus invisible. The particles are marked by inserting at various locations tracer particles into the polymer. Translation and rotation, as well as the flow field around the particle are recovered dynamically from the analysis of the marker and tracer particle trajectories. We apply this technique to study the dynamics of inertial particles much larger in size (Rp / η ~ 100) than the Kolmogorov length scale η in a von Kármán swirling water flow (Rλ ~ 400). We show, using the mixed (particle/fluid) Eulerian second order velocity structure function, that the interaction zone between the particle and the flow develops in a spherical shell of width 2Rp around the particle of radius Rp. This we interpret as an indication of a wake induced by the particle. (http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2181) This work was funded generously by the Max Planck Society and the Marie Curie Fellowship, Program PEOPLE - Call FP7-PEOPLE-IEF-2008 Proposal No 237521. Support from COST Action MP0806 is kindly acknowledged.

  15. Corrections for the effects of accidental coincidences, Compton scatter, and object size in positron emission mammography (PEM) imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond Raylman; Stanislaw Majewski; Randolph Wojcik; Andrew Weisenberger; Brian Kross; Vladimir Popov

    2001-06-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) has begun to show promise as an effective method for the detection of breast lesions. Due to its utilization of tumor-avid radiopharmaceuticals labeled with positron-emitting radionuclides, this technique may be especially useful in imaging of women with radiodense or fibrocystic breasts. While the use of these radiotracers affords PEM unique capabilities, it also introduces some limitations. Specifically, acceptance of accidental and Compton-scattered coincidence events can decrease lesion detectability. The authors studied the effect of accidental coincidence events on PEM images produced by the presence of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose in the organs of a subject using an anthropomorphic phantom. A delayed-coincidence technique was tested as a method for correcting PEM images for the occurrence of accidental events. Also, a Compton scatter correction algorithm designed specifically for PEM was developed and tested using a compressed breast phantom.

  16. The inverse problem of a Gaussian convolution and its application to the finite size of the measurement chambers/detectors in photon and proton dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulmer, W; Kaissl, W

    2003-01-01

    A Gaussian convolution kernel K is deduced as a Green's function of a Lie operator series. The deconvolution of a Gaussian kernel is developed by the inverse Green's function K -1 . A practical application is the deconvolution of measured profiles D m (x) of photons and protons with finite detector size to determine the profiles D p (x) of point-detectors or Monte Carlo Bragg curves of protons. The presented algorithms work if D m (x) is either an analytical function or only given in a numerical form. Some approximation methods of the deconvolution are compared (differential operator expansion to analytical adaptations of 2 x 2 cm 2 and 4 x 4 cm 2 profiles, Hermite expansions to measured 6 x 6 cm 2 and 20 x 20 cm 2 profiles and Bragg curves of 80/180 MeV protons, FFT to an analytical 4 x 4 cm 2 profile). The inverse problem may imply ill-posed problems, and, in particular, the use of FFT may be susceptible to them

  17. String-Corrected Black Holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubeny, V.

    2005-01-12

    We investigate the geometry of four dimensional black hole solutions in the presence of stringy higher curvature corrections to the low energy effective action. For certain supersymmetric two charge black holes these corrections drastically alter the causal structure of the solution, converting seemingly pathological null singularities into timelike singularities hidden behind a finite area horizon. We establish, analytically and numerically, that the string-corrected two-charge black hole metric has the same Penrose diagram as the extremal four-charge black hole. The higher derivative terms lead to another dramatic effect--the gravitational force exerted by a black hole on an inertial observer is no longer purely attractive. The magnitude of this effect is related to the size of the compactification manifold.

  18. Modern Hypofractionation Schedules for Tangential Whole Breast Irradiation Decrease the Fraction Size-corrected Dose to the Heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Vogelius, Ivan R; Bentzen, Søren M

    2013-01-01

    -corrected dose to the heart for four evidence-based hypofractionation regimens. Materials and methods: Dose plans for 60 left-sided breast cancer patients were analysed. All patients were planned with tangential fields for whole breast irradiation. Dose distributions were corrected to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy...... fractions (EQD(2)) using the linear quadratic model for five different fractionation schedules (50 Gy/25 fractions and four hypofractionation regimens) and for a range of alpha/beta. values (0-5 Gy). The mean EQD(2) to the heart (D-mean(EQD2)) and the volume receiving 40 Gy (V-40(Gy)EQD2), both...... as calculated from the EQD(2) dose distributions, were compared between schedules. Results: For alpha/beta = 3 Gy, V-40(Gy)EQD2 favours hypofractionation for 40 Gy/15 fractions, 39 Gy/13 fractions and 42.5 Gy/16 fractions, but not for 41.6 Gy/13 fractions. All of the hypofractionation schedules result in lower...

  19. The value of attenuation correction by hybrid SPECT/CT imaging on infarct size quantification in male patients with previous inferior myocardial infarct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubbini, Raffaele Mario Tarquinio; Gabanelli, Sara; Lucchini, Silvia; Merli, Giuseppe; Puta, Erinda; Rodella, Carlo; Motta, Federica; Paghera, Barbara; Rossini, Pierluigi; Terzi, Arturo; Bertagna, Francesco

    2011-11-01

    Attenuation correction (AC) has been shown to improve the accuracy of myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for the detection and evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease. Attenuation artifacts, because of diaphragmatic attenuation, frequently affect the evaluation of the inferior wall, especially in male patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of AC for the assessment of infarct size in coronary artery disease patients after inferior myocardial infarction. Gated-SPECT with Tc-labeled compounds with AC by hybrid SPECT/computed tomography (CT) was performed in 56 male patients with documented previous inferior myocardial infarction. Both corrected and uncorrected SPECT images were processed after motion and scatter correction by ordered-subset expectation maximization iterative reconstruction. When needed, a manual realignment between SPECT and computed tomography (CT) sections was performed. Uncorrected and corrected SPECT images were analyzed for perfusion using a 5-point segmental scoring scale from 0 (normal) to 4 (absent). Summed stress score (SSS), summed rest score (SRS), and summed difference score (SDS) of the inferior left ventricle wall (inferoseptal, inferior, infero-apical and infero-lateral segments) were determined and compared with the regional wall motion score as determined by uncorrected gated-SPECT. The SSS, SRS, SDS for attenuation-uncorrected and attenuation-corrected studies were 14.02 ± 7.9, 9.51 ± 7, 4.5 ± 3.2 and 9.39 ± 7.1, 5.6 ± 6.1, 3.8 ± 2.8, respectively. Differences were statistically significant (P<0.0001) for SSS and SRS but not for SDS. The regional summed rest score of the inferior wall (SRS of inferior segments) showed a better correlation with the regional summed wall motion score of the same segments: R²=0.50 in comparison to uncorrected SRS, R²=0.46. The combination of diaphragmatic attenuation and inferior myocardial infarction determines an artifactual

  20. Particle sizing calibration with refractive index correction for light scattering optical particle counters and impacts upon PCASP and CDP data collected during the Fennec campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Rosenberg

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Optical particle counters (OPCs are used regularly for atmospheric research, measuring particle scattering cross sections to generate particle size distribution histograms. This manuscript presents two methods for calibrating OPCs with case studies based on a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP and a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP, both of which are operated on the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements BAe-146 research aircraft.

    A probability density function based method is provided for modification of the OPC bin boundaries when the scattering properties of measured particles are different to those of the calibration particles due to differences in refractive index or shape. This method provides mean diameters and widths for OPC bins based upon Mie-Lorenz theory or any other particle scattering theory, without the need for smoothing, despite the highly nonlinear and non-monotonic relationship between particle size and scattering cross section. By calibrating an OPC in terms of its scattering cross section the optical properties correction can be applied with minimal information loss, and performing correction in this manner provides traceable and transparent uncertainty propagation throughout the whole process.

    Analysis of multiple calibrations has shown that for the PCASP the bin centres differ by up to 30% from the manufacturer's nominal values and can change by up to approximately 20% when routine maintenance is performed. The CDP has been found to be less sensitive than the manufacturer's specification with differences in sizing of between 1.6 ± 0.8 μm and 4.7 ± 1.8 μm for one flight. Over the course of the Fennec project in the Sahara the variability of calibration was less than the calibration uncertainty in 6 out of 7 calibrations performed.

    As would be expected from Mie-Lorenz theory, the impact of the refractive index corrections has been found to be largest for absorbing materials and

  1. Effects of Optical Purity and Finite System Size on Self-Assembly of 12-Hydroxystearic Acid in Hexane: Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Ryan; Stober, Spencer T; Abrams, Cameron F

    2017-10-05

    12-Hydroxystearic acid (12HSA) and its derivatives are well-known organogelators, and they play critical roles in a variety of applications. The overall aggregate structure of 12HSA is sensitive to the chirality at the 12th carbon, but a fundamental understanding of this dependence is lacking. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted on microsecond long time scales for (1) (R)-12HSA, (2) (S)-12HSA, and (3) a 50/50 racemic mixture, each solvated at 12.5 wt % in explicit hexane. Self-assembly was accelerated by turning off alkyl chain dihedral gauche states and forcing the molecules to adopt an all-trans conformation. The stability of the resulting aggregates was tested by quenching them with access to gauche states restored. Ordered aggregates produced from optically pure (R)- and (S)-12HSA remained stable for at least 1 μs. The characteristic ordered structure observed is termed a "ring-of-rings" motif, and it contains two twisted six-membered ringlike bundles connected through acetic acid dimerization and surrounded by six satellite bundles. The chirality at the 12th carbon dictates the overall twist of the rings and thereby the handedness of the aggregates. Racemic mixtures did not produce stable ordered aggregates likely due to insufficient enantiomerically pure ring formation. The most prevalent finite-size effect observed was the stochastic formation of percolating aggregates, which were later avoided by using solvent-permeable, solute-impermeable, confining walls. The resulting ordered aggregates were in all important ways identical to those produced in unconfined systems. The combination of cycling off and on gauche states and the semipermeable walls may be an important new way to study the self-assembly underlying aggregation at industrially relevant concentrations of surfactants in organic solvents.

  2. Droplet Size-Aware and Error-Correcting Sample Preparation Using Micro-Electrode-Dot-Array Digital Microfluidic Biochips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zipeng; Lai, Kelvin Yi-Tse; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu; Ho, Tsung-Yi; Lee, Chen-Yi

    2017-12-01

    Sample preparation in digital microfluidics refers to the generation of droplets with target concentrations for on-chip biochemical applications. In recent years, digital microfluidic biochips (DMFBs) have been adopted as a platform for sample preparation. However, there remain two major problems associated with sample preparation on a conventional DMFB. First, only a (1:1) mixing/splitting model can be used, leading to an increase in the number of fluidic operations required for sample preparation. Second, only a limited number of sensors can be integrated on a conventional DMFB; as a result, the latency for error detection during sample preparation is significant. To overcome these drawbacks, we adopt a next generation DMFB platform, referred to as micro-electrode-dot-array (MEDA), for sample preparation. We propose the first sample-preparation method that exploits the MEDA-specific advantages of fine-grained control of droplet sizes and real-time droplet sensing. Experimental demonstration using a fabricated MEDA biochip and simulation results highlight the effectiveness of the proposed sample-preparation method.

  3. Isotropic-Heisenberg to isotropic-dipolar crossover and finite-size scaling in Cr75-xFe25+x (x = 0, 5) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi Kumar, B.; Kaul, S. N.

    2018-02-01

    'Zero-field' linear ac magnetic susceptibility, χ1 (T), of the Cr75-xFe25+x (x = 0, 5) thin films with thickness, t, ranging from 980 to 10 nm has been measured at temperatures close to Tc , the temperature at which the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition occurs. An elaborate analysis of χ1 (T ⩾Tc) for the films with t ⩾ 40nm yields the temperature dependence of the effective critical exponent for susceptibility, γeff (T) , that is characteristic of the three-dimensional (3D) isotropic Heisenberg-to-3D isotropic dipolar crossover. In the asymptotic critical region (ACR), these thin-film samples behave as a 3D isotropic dipolar (ID) ferromagnet. As the film thickness reduces from t ≃ 980 nm to 40 nm, ACR narrows down while the temperature, Tdip , at which a dip in γeff (T) occurs and the temperature, TIH∗, that marks the onset of the 3D isotropic Heisenberg (IH) behavior, shift to lower temperatures. For a given t, the width of ACR as well as the characteristic temperatures Tdip and TIH∗ increase with decreasing (increasing) Fe (Cr) concentration. Consistent with these observations, the ratios involving nonlinear ac magnetic susceptibilities obey the generalized magnetic equation of state with 3D ID critical exponents and the value of Tc same as that determined from χ1 (T). A quantitative comparison between theory and experiment highlights certain limitations of the existing theories. The films with t ≲ 20 nm do not exhibit 3D IH-to-3D ID crossover. Instead, the critical behavior of Cr70Fe30 thin films with t = 21 nm and t = 11 nm is that of a 3D IH and 3D Ising ferromagnet, respectively. By contrast, a 3D Ising (spin glass) critical behavior is observed in the Cr75Fe25 thin film with t = 19 nm (t = 12 nm). Curie temperature, Tc , decreases with film thickness in accordance with the finite-size scaling.

  4. A comparative study of intra canal stress pattern in endodontically treated teeth with average sized canal diameter and reinforced wide canals with three different post systems using finite element analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Amandeep; N, Meena; N, Shubhashini; Kumari, Anitha; Shetty, Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Study methodology: This is a comparative study of intra canal stress patterns in endodontically treated maxillary central incisor with: average sized canal diameter and wide canals reinforced with three different post systems - cast post and core, carbon fiber post, stainless steel post; restored with ceramic crown using finite element analysis (FEA). All the models were subjected to a force of 100N applied at 450 to the long axis of the tooth at the middle third of the palatal surface of the...

  5. A comparative study of intra canal stress pattern in endodontically treated teeth with average sized canal diameter and reinforced wide canals with three different post systems using finite element analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur Amandeep; Meena N; Shubhashini N; Kumari Anitha; Shetty Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Study methodology: This is a comparative study of intra canal stress patterns in endodontically treated maxillary central incisor with: average sized canal diameter and wide canals reinforced with three different post systems - cast post and core, carbon fiber post, stainless steel post; restored with ceramic crown using finite element analysis (FEA). All the models were subjected to a force of 100N applied at 450 to the long axis of the tooth at the middle third of the palatal surface of th...

  6. Patient-specific finite element model of the spine and spinal cord to assess the neurological impact of scoliosis correction: preliminary application on two cases with and without intraoperative neurological complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henao, Juan; Aubin, Carl-Éric; Labelle, Hubert; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean

    2016-01-01

    Scoliosis is a 3D deformation of the spine and rib cage. For severe cases, surgery with spine instrumentation is required to restore a balanced spine curvature. This surgical procedure may represent a neurological risk for the patient, especially during corrective maneuvers. This study aimed to computationally simulate the surgical instrumentation maneuvers on a patient-specific biomechanical model of the spine and spinal cord to assess and predict potential damage to the spinal cord and spinal nerves. A detailed finite element model (FEM) of the spine and spinal cord of a healthy subject was used as reference geometry. The FEM was personalized to the geometry of the patient using a 3D biplanar radiographic reconstruction technique and 3D dual kriging. Step by step surgical instrumentation maneuvers were simulated in order to assess the neurological risk associated to each maneuver. The surgical simulation methodology implemented was divided into two parts. First, a global multi-body simulation was used to extract the 3D displacement of six vertebral landmarks, which were then introduced as boundary conditions into the personalized FEM in order to reproduce the surgical procedure. The results of the FEM simulation for two cases were compared to published values on spinal cord neurological functional threshold. The efficiency of the reported method was checked considering one patient with neurological complications detected during surgery and one control patient. This comparison study showed that the patient-specific hybrid model reproduced successfully the biomechanics of neurological injury during scoliosis correction maneuvers.

  7. Nucleation rate of the quark-gluon plasma droplet at finite quark ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    evolution of the system [4]. Another important issue is that while calculating the nucle- ation rate of the QGP droplet, it is necessary to consider the finite size of hadrons [5]. These corrections are properly taken care of in the workout of this paper. Now, in the framework of the homogeneous nucleation theory, the nucleation ...

  8. Population Size Predicts Lexical Diversity, but so Does the Mean Sea Level --Why It Is Important to Correctly Account for the Structure of Temporal Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplenig, Alexander; Müller-Spitzer, Carolin

    2016-01-01

    In order to demonstrate why it is important to correctly account for the (serial dependent) structure of temporal data, we document an apparently spectacular relationship between population size and lexical diversity: for five out of seven investigated languages, there is a strong relationship between population size and lexical diversity of the primary language in this country. We show that this relationship is the result of a misspecified model that does not consider the temporal aspect of the data by presenting a similar but nonsensical relationship between the global annual mean sea level and lexical diversity. Given the fact that in the recent past, several studies were published that present surprising links between different economic, cultural, political and (socio-)demographical variables on the one hand and cultural or linguistic characteristics on the other hand, but seem to suffer from exactly this problem, we explain the cause of the misspecification and show that it has profound consequences. We demonstrate how simple transformation of the time series can often solve problems of this type and argue that the evaluation of the plausibility of a relationship is important in this context. We hope that our paper will help both researchers and reviewers to understand why it is important to use special models for the analysis of data with a natural temporal ordering.

  9. Correctness of concurrent processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.R. Olderog (Ernst-Rüdiger)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractA new notion of correctness for concurrent processes is introduced and investigated. It is a relationship P sat S between process terms P built up from operators of CCS [Mi 80], CSP [Ho 85] and COSY [LTS 79] and logical formulas S specifying sets of finite communication sequences as in

  10. Tuning the dispersion and single/multimodeness in a hole-assisted fiber: a finite-element study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uranus, H.P.; Hoekstra, Hugo; van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.

    Using a vectorial finite element mode solver developed earlier, we studied a hole-assisted multi-ring fiber. We report the role of the holes in tuning the waveguide dispersion and the single/multi-modeness of the particular fiber. By correctly selecting the hole’s size and position, a single-mode

  11. Study of the relationship between the target tissue necrosis volume and the target tissue size in liver tumours using two-compartment finite element RFA modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Moser, Michael A J; Zhang, Edwin M; Luo, Yigang; Zhang, Hongbo; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the target tissue necrosis volume and the target tissue size during the radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedure. The target tissues with four different sizes (dxy = 20, 25, 30 and 35 mm) were modelled using a two-compartment radiofrequency ablation model. Different voltages were applied to seek the maximum target tissue necrosis volume for each target tissue size. The first roll-off occurrence or the standard ablation time (12 min) was taken as the sign for the termination of the RFA procedure. Four different maximum voltages without the roll-off occurrence were found for the four different sizes of target tissues (dxy = 20, 25, 30 and 35 mm), and they were 36.6, 35.4, 33.9 and 32.5 V, respectively. The target tissues with diameters of 20, 25 mm can be cleanly ablated at their own maximum voltages applied (MVA) but the same finding was not found for the 35-mm target tissue. For the target tissue with diameter of 30 mm, the 50 °C isothermal contour (IT50) result showed that the target tissue can be cleanly ablated, but the same result did not show in the Arrhenius damage model result. Furthermore, two optimal RFA protocols with a minimal thermal damage to the healthy tissues were found for the target tissues with diameters of 20 and 25 mm, respectively. The study suggests that target tissues of different sizes should be treated with different RFA protocols. The maximum target tissue volume was achieved with the MVA without the roll-off occurrence for each target tissue size when a constant RF power supply was used.

  12. Modifying Spearman's Attenuation Equation to Yield Partial Corrections for Measurement Error--With Application to Sample Size Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicewander, W. Alan

    2018-01-01

    Spearman's correction for attenuation (measurement error) corrects a correlation coefficient for measurement errors in either-or-both of two variables, and follows from the assumptions of classical test theory. Spearman's equation removes all measurement error from a correlation coefficient which translates into "increasing the reliability of…

  13. finite induc

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    com. Email: singh_shivaraj@rediffmail.com. In this article we provide a solution to a problem in the famous analysis book [1] by Rudin. It does not use trans- finite induction, and readers may find it more transpar- ent than the treatment in [2]. Here is ...

  14. Political Correctness--Correct?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boase, Paul H.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the phenomenon of political correctness, its roots and objectives, and its successes and failures in coping with the conflicts and clashes of multicultural campuses. Argues that speech codes indicate failure in academia's primary mission to civilize and educate through talk, discussion, thought,166 and persuasion. (SR)

  15. A comparative study of intra canal stress pattern in endodontically treated teeth with average sized canal diameter and reinforced wide canals with three different post systems using finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amandeep; N, Meena; N, Shubhashini; Kumari, Anitha; Shetty, Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Study methodology: This is a comparative study of intra canal stress patterns in endodontically treated maxillary central incisor with: average sized canal diameter and wide canals reinforced with three different post systems - cast post and core, carbon fiber post, stainless steel post; restored with ceramic crown using finite element analysis (FEA). All the models were subjected to a force of 100N applied at 450 to the long axis of the tooth at the middle third of the palatal surface of the restored ceramic crown. Results: The FEA revealed that all the post systems showed maximum stress in the coronal and middle third of the root. Maximum stress was seen on the inner dentinal wall in case of stainless steel post followed by cast gold and carbon fiber post, both in the models without reinforcement as well as in the reinforced models. PMID:20582216

  16. The impact of reflectivity correction and accounting for raindrop size distribution variabilty to improve precipitation estimation by weather radar for an extreme low-land Mesoscale Convective System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, P.; Leijnse, H.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2014-01-01

    Between 25 and 27 August 2010 a long-duration mesoscale convective system was observed above the Netherlands, locally giving rise to rainfall accumulations exceeding 150 mm. Correctly measuring the amount of precipitation during such an extreme event is important, both from a hydrological and

  17. Influence of host size on the clutch size and developmental success of the gregarious ectoparasitoid Eulophus pennicornis (Nees) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) [corrected] attacking larvae of the tomato moth Lacanobia oleracea (L.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, H A; Marris, G C; Prickett, A J; Edwards, J P

    2005-08-01

    The relationship between clutch size, host size and progeny survival in the gregarious ectoparasitoid Eulophus pennicornis was investigated in a number of scenarios. When naive parasitoids were exposed singly to Lacanobia oleracea hosts, clutch size was strongly correlated with the size of the host. However, survival of parasitoid offspring was negatively affected by the size of the host such that, in larger hosts, greater wasp larval and pupal mortality was recorded. As a result, no gain in realised fecundity was achieved through parasitizing L. oleracea larvae of mass >0.4 g over hosts of mass between 0.2-0.3 g. When exposed to populations of mixed stadium hosts (larvae in the fourth, fifth and sixth instars) during the entire lifespan of the wasp, host size and clutch size were correlated in early ovipositions (first three ovipositions). However, as the wasps aged, the relationship was much less apparent. When the parasitoid was restricted to foraging upon populations of sixth instar hosts only, no relationship between host size and clutch size was apparent. Exposure of the parasitoid to mixed and fixed stadium host populations showed that final (sixth) stadium hosts were the most frequently parasitized (ca. 96% of parasitized hosts) and that the average numbers of eggs laid per wasp, and the number of hosts parasitized, was significantly lower when the parasitoid was provided with fourth or fifth instar hosts only. The results indicate that the reproductive success of E. pennicornis does not increase with increasing host size or greater resource availability above a certain threshold, and that the physiological status of the host at the time of parasitism is the governing factor determining oviposition decisions and parasitoid survival. We conclude that E. pennicornis has been selected to preferentially utilize those hosts that maximize progeny survival and to adapt clutch size to the size of such hosts. We hypothesize that the major driver leading to the

  18. Large scale structure statistics: Finite volume effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, S.; Bouchet, F. R.; Schaeffer, R.

    1994-01-01

    We study finite volume effects on the count probability distribution function PN(l) and the averaged Q-body correlations Xi-barQ (2 less than or = Q less than or equal 5). These statistics are computed for cubic cells, of size l. We use as an example the case of the matter distribution of a cold dark matter (CDM) universe involving approximately 3 x 105 particles. The main effect of the finiteness of the sampled volume is to induce an abrupt cut-off on the function PN(l) at large N. This clear signature makes an analysis of the consequences easy, and one can envisage a correction procedure. As a matter of fact, we demonstrate how an unfair sample can strongly affect the estimates of the functions Xi-barQ for Q greater than or = 3 (and decrease the measured zero of the two-body correlation function). We propose a method to correct for this are fact, or at least to evaluate the corresponding errors. We show that the correlations are systematically underestimated by direct measurements. We find that, once corrected, the statistical properties of the CDM universe appear compatible with the scaling relation SQ identically equals Xi-bar2 exp Q-1 = constant with respect to scale, in the non-linear regime; it was not the case with direct measurments. However, we note a deviation from scaling at scales close to the correlation length. It is probably due to the transition between the highly non-linear regime and the weakly correlated regime, where the functions SQ also seem to present a plateau. We apply the same procedure to simulations with hot dark matter (HDM) and white noise initial conditions, with similar results. Our method thus provides the first accurate measurement of the normalized skewness, S3, and the normalized kurtosis, S4, for three typical models of large scale structure formation in an expanding universe.

  19. Nonlinear, finite deformation, finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhung; Waas, Anthony M.

    2016-06-01

    The roles of the consistent Jacobian matrix and the material tangent moduli, which are used in nonlinear incremental finite deformation mechanics problems solved using the finite element method, are emphasized in this paper, and demonstrated using the commercial software ABAQUS standard. In doing so, the necessity for correctly employing user material subroutines to solve nonlinear problems involving large deformation and/or large rotation is clarified. Starting with the rate form of the principle of virtual work, the derivations of the material tangent moduli, the consistent Jacobian matrix, the stress/strain measures, and the objective stress rates are discussed and clarified. The difference between the consistent Jacobian matrix (which, in the ABAQUS UMAT user material subroutine is referred to as DDSDDE) and the material tangent moduli ( C e ) needed for the stress update is pointed out and emphasized in this paper. While the former is derived based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress, the latter is derived using the Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress. Understanding the difference between these two objective stress rates is crucial for correctly implementing a constitutive model, especially a rate form constitutive relation, and for ensuring fast convergence. Specifically, the implementation requires the stresses to be updated correctly. For this, the strains must be computed directly from the deformation gradient and corresponding strain measure (for a total form model). Alternatively, the material tangent moduli derived from the corresponding Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress of the constitutive relation (for a rate form model) should be used. Given that this requirement is satisfied, the consistent Jacobian matrix only influences the rate of convergence. Its derivation should be based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress to ensure fast convergence; however, the use of a different objective stress rate may also be possible. The error associated

  20. Effects of the Size of Cosmological N-body Simulations on Physical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this study we show how errors due to finite box size affect formation and the destruction rate for haloes in cosmological N-body simulations. In an earlier study we gave an analytic prescription of finding the corrections in the mass function. Following the same approach, in this paper we give analytical expressions ...

  1. Effects of the Size of Cosmological N-body Simulations on Physical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... In this study we show how errors due to finite box size affect formation and the destruction rate for haloes in cosmological N-body simulations. In an earlier study we gave an analytic prescription of finding the corrections in the mass function. Following the same approach, in this paper we give analytical ...

  2. The feasibility of using explicit method for linear correction of the particle size variation using NIR Spectroscopy combined with PLS2regression method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulia, M.; Suhandy, D.

    2018-03-01

    NIR spectra obtained from spectral data acquisition system contains both chemical information of samples as well as physical information of the samples, such as particle size and bulk density. Several methods have been established for developing calibration models that can compensate for sample physical information variations. One common approach is to include physical information variation in the calibration model both explicitly and implicitly. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using explicit method to compensate the influence of different particle size of coffee powder in NIR calibration model performance. A number of 220 coffee powder samples with two different types of coffee (civet and non-civet) and two different particle sizes (212 and 500 µm) were prepared. Spectral data was acquired using NIR spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere for diffuse reflectance measurement. A discrimination method based on PLS-DA was conducted and the influence of different particle size on the performance of PLS-DA was investigated. In explicit method, we add directly the particle size as predicted variable results in an X block containing only the NIR spectra and a Y block containing the particle size and type of coffee. The explicit inclusion of the particle size into the calibration model is expected to improve the accuracy of type of coffee determination. The result shows that using explicit method the quality of the developed calibration model for type of coffee determination is a little bit superior with coefficient of determination (R2) = 0.99 and root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV) = 0.041. The performance of the PLS2 calibration model for type of coffee determination with particle size compensation was quite good and able to predict the type of coffee in two different particle sizes with relatively high R2 pred values. The prediction also resulted in low bias and RMSEP values.

  3. Correction of an image size difference between positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) improves image fusion of dedicated PET and CT.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, W.V.; Dalen, J.A. van; Schinagl, D.A.X.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Huisman, H.J.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Clinical work in software positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) image fusion has raised suspicion that the image sizes of PET and CT differ slightly from each other, thus rendering the images suboptimal for image fusion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of

  4. Automated Traffic and the Finite Size Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerman, J. J. P.; Stošić, B. D.; Tangerman, F. M.

    2009-10-01

    We investigate in detail what one might call the canonical (automated) traffic problem: A long string of N+1 cars (numbered from 0 to N) moves along a one-lane road "in formation" at a constant velocity and with a unit distance between successive cars. Each car monitors the relative velocity and position of only its neighboring cars. This information is then fed back to its own engine which decelerates (brakes) or accelerates according to the information it receives. The question is: What happens when due to an external influence—a traffic light turning green—the `zero'th' car (the "leader") accelerates? As a first approximation, we analyze linear(ized) equations and show that in this scenario the traffic flow has a tendency to be stop-and-go. We give approximate solutions for the global traffic as function of all the relevant parameters (the feed back parameters as well as cruise velocity and so on). We discuss general design principles for these algorithms, that is: how does the choice of parameters influence the performance.

  5. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaya, S; Maeda, H; Funaki, M; Fukui, H

    2008-12-14

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Delta sigma = sigma(parallel) - sigma(perpendicular), for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator sigma x piU/2c, in which pi = p + A, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c approximately = 137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c(-2) and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c(-4). It is shown that the small Delta sigma for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  6. A new, low cost, locking plate for the long-term fixation of a critical size bone defect in the ratfemur: in vivo performance, biomechanical and finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataliotakis, George I; Tsouknidas, Alexander; Panteliou, Sofia; Vekris, Marios D; Mitsionis, Grigorios I; Agathopoulos, Simeon; Beris, Alexander E

    2015-01-01

    The optimum fixation device for the critical size bone defect is not established yet. A reliable, feasible and low-cost fixation device for the long-term maintenance of a critical bone defect. A custom-made plate made of poly-methyl-methacrylate was used for the fixation of a critical defect of rats' femurs. The screws were securely fixing both on the plate and the bone. A three point bending test, aimed to resemble the in vivo loading pattern, a Finite Element Analysis and a 24-week in vivo monitoring of the integrity of the plate fixation were utilized. The plate has linear and reproducible behavior. It presents no discontinuities in the stress field of the fixation. Its properties are attributed to the material and the locking principle. It fails beyond the level of magnitude of the normal ambulatory loads. In vivo, 100% of the plates maintained the bone defect intact up to 12 weeks and 85% of them at 24 weeks. This novel locking plate shows optimal biomechanical performance and reliability with high long-term in vivo survival rate. It is fully implantable, inexpensive and easily manufactured. It can be qualified for long term critical defect fixation in bone regeneration studies.

  7. Calculating modes of quantum wire systems using a finite difference technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Mardani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, the Schrodinger equation for a quantum wire is solved using a finite difference approach. A new aspect in this work is plotting wave function on cross section of rectangular cross-sectional wire in two dimensions, periodically. It is found that the correct eigen energies occur when wave functions have a complete symmetry. If the value of eigen energy has a small increase or decrease in neighborhood of the correct energy the symmetry will be destroyed and aperturbation value at the first of wave function will be observed. In addition, the demand on computer memory varies linearly with the size of the system under investigation.

  8. Sound radiation from finite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    A method to account for the effect of finite size in acoustic power radiation problem of planar surfaces using spatial windowing is developed. Cremer and Heckl presents a very useful formula for the power radiating from a structure using the spatially Fourier transformed velocity, which combined...... with spatially windowing of a plane waves can be used to take into account the finite size. In the present paper, this is developed by means of a radiation impedance for finite surfaces, that is used instead of the radiation impedance for infinite surfaces. In this way, the spatial windowing is included...... in the radiation formula directly, and no pre-windowing is needed. Examples are given for the radiation efficiency, and the results are compared with results found in the literature....

  9. Locally Finite Root Supersystems

    OpenAIRE

    Yousofzadeh, Malihe

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of locally finite root supersystems as a generalization of both locally finite root systems and generalized root systems. We classify irreducible locally finite root supersystems.

  10. Perturbative QCD at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altherr, T.

    1989-03-01

    We discuss an application of finite temperature QCD to lepton-pair production in a quark-gluon plasma. The perturbative calculation is performed within the realtime formalism. After cancellation of infrared and mass singularities, the corrections at O (α s ) are found to be very small in the region where the mass of the Drell-Yan pair is much larger than the temperature of the plasma. Interesting effects, however, appear at the annihilation threshold of the thermalized quarks

  11. Testing and Inference in Nonlinear Cointegrating Vector Error Correction Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Dennis; Rahbek, Anders

    In this paper, we consider a general class of vector error correction models which allow for asymmetric and non-linear error correction. We provide asymptotic results for (quasi-)maximum likelihood (QML) based estimators and tests. General hypothesis testing is considered, where testing for linea...... symmetric non-linear error correction are considered. A simulation study shows that the finite sample properties of the bootstrapped tests are satisfactory with good size and power properties for reasonable sample sizes....... for linearity is of particular interest as parameters of non-linear components vanish under the null. To solve the latter type of testing, we use the so-called sup tests, which here requires development of new (uniform) weak convergence results. These results are potentially useful in general for analysis......In this paper, we consider a general class of vector error correction models which allow for asymmetric and non-linear error correction. We provide asymptotic results for (quasi-)maximum likelihood (QML) based estimators and tests. General hypothesis testing is considered, where testing...

  12. Statistical mechanics of error-correcting codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashima, Y.; Saad, D.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the performance of error-correcting codes, where the code word comprises products of K bits selected from the original message and decoding is carried out utilizing a connectivity tensor with C connections per index. Shannon's bound for the channel capacity is recovered for large K and zero temperature when the code rate K/C is finite. Close to optimal error-correcting capability is obtained for finite K and C. We examine the finite-temperature case to assess the use of simulated annealing for decoding and extend the analysis to accommodate other types of noisy channels.

  13. Exact combinatorial approach to finite coagulating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronczak, Agata; Chmiel, Anna; Fronczak, Piotr

    2018-02-01

    This paper outlines an exact combinatorial approach to finite coagulating systems. In this approach, cluster sizes and time are discrete and the binary aggregation alone governs the time evolution of the systems. By considering the growth histories of all possible clusters, an exact expression is derived for the probability of a coagulating system with an arbitrary kernel being found in a given cluster configuration when monodisperse initial conditions are applied. Then this probability is used to calculate the time-dependent distribution for the number of clusters of a given size, the average number of such clusters, and that average's standard deviation. The correctness of our general expressions is proved based on the (analytical and numerical) results obtained for systems with the constant kernel. In addition, the results obtained are compared with the results arising from the solutions to the mean-field Smoluchowski coagulation equation, indicating its weak points. The paper closes with a brief discussion on the extensibility to other systems of the approach presented herein, emphasizing the issue of arbitrary initial conditions.

  14. Author Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grundle, D S; Löscher, C R; Krahmann, G

    2018-01-01

    A correction to this article has been published and is linked from the HTML and PDF versions of this paper. The error has not been fixed in the paper.......A correction to this article has been published and is linked from the HTML and PDF versions of this paper. The error has not been fixed in the paper....

  15. The Total Number of Parameters in the Finite Element ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rectangular finite elements are important in Finite Element Method. This paper establishes a general formula for obtaining the total number of parameters associated with any finite element rectangulation of a domain. This number is also the dimension of the trail space as well as the size of the associated linear system.

  16. Inclusion of temperature dependent shell corrections in Landau ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nium isotopes [7]. However, it is possible to evaluate shell corrections at finite temperatures more accurately [8,9] i.e. ÆF = (E T S) (E TS). In this paper we will focus on the method which we use to evaluate the shell corrections at finite temperature and the consequences of incorporating this method in our calculations. 223 ...

  17. Corrections to the Banks-Casher relation with Wilson quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Necco, S

    2013-01-01

    The Banks-Casher relation links the spectral density of the Dirac operator with the existence of a chiral condensate and spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. This relation receives corrections from a finite value of the quark mass, a finite space-time volume and, if evaluated on a discrete lattice, from the finite value of the lattice spacing a. We present a status report of a determination of these corrections for Wilson quarks.

  18. Correct Models

    OpenAIRE

    Blacher, René

    2010-01-01

    Ce rapport complete les deux rapports précédents et apporte une explication plus simple aux résultats précédents : à savoir la preuve que les suites obtenues sont aléatoires.; In previous reports, we have show how to transform a text $y_n$ in a random sequence by using functions of Fibonacci $T_q$. Now, in this report, we obtain a clearer result by proving that $T_q(y_n)$ has the IID model as correct model. But, it is necessary to define correctly a correct model. Then, we study also this pro...

  19. NLO corrections to the photon impact factor: Combining real and virtual corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, J.; Colferai, D.; Kyrieleis, A.; Gieseke, S.

    2002-08-01

    In this third part of our calculation of the QCD NLO corrections to the photon impact factor we combine our previous results for the real corrections with the singular pieces of the virtual corrections and present finite analytic expressions for the quark-antiquark-gluon intermediate state inside the photon impact factor. We begin with a list of the infrared singular pieces of the virtual correction, obtained in the first step of our program. We then list the complete results for the real corrections (longitudinal and transverse photon polarization). In the next step we defined, for the real corrections, the collinear and soft singular regions and calculate their contributions to the impact factor. We then subtract the contribution due to the central region. Finally, we combine the real corrections with the singular pieces of the virtual corrections and obtain our finite results. (orig.)

  20. Nilpotent -local finite groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, José; Scherer, Jérôme; Viruel, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    We provide characterizations of -nilpotency for fusion systems and -local finite groups that are inspired by known result for finite groups. In particular, we generalize criteria by Atiyah, Brunetti, Frobenius, Quillen, Stammbach and Tate.

  1. Adsorption of finite semiflexible polymers and their loop and tail distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampmann, Tobias A.; Kierfeld, Jan

    2017-07-01

    We discuss the adsorption of semiflexible polymers to a planar attractive wall and focus on the questions of the adsorption threshold for polymers of finite length and their loop and tail distributions using both Monte Carlo simulations and analytical arguments. For the adsorption threshold, we find three regimes: (i) a flexible or Gaussian regime if the persistence length is smaller than the adsorption potential range, (ii) a semiflexible regime if the persistence length is larger than the potential range, and (iii) for finite polymers, a novel crossover to a rigid rod regime if the deflection length exceeds the contour length. In the flexible and semiflexible regimes, finite size corrections arise because the correlation length exceeds the contour length. In the rigid rod regime, however, it is essential how the global orientational or translational degrees of freedom are restricted by grafting or confinement. We discuss finite size corrections for polymers grafted to the adsorbing surface and for polymers confined by a second (parallel) hard wall. Based on these results, we obtain a method to analyze adsorption data for finite semiflexible polymers such as filamentous actin. For the loop and tail distributions, we find power laws with an exponential decay on length scales exceeding the correlation length. We derive and confirm the loop and tail power law exponents for flexible and semiflexible polymers. This allows us to explain that, close to the transition, semiflexible polymers have significantly smaller loops and both flexible and semiflexible polymers desorb by expanding their tail length. The tail distribution allows us to extract the free energy per length of adsorption for actin filaments from experimental data [D. Welch et al., Soft Matter 11, 7507 (2015)].

  2. Basic Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Hae

    1992-02-01

    This book gives descriptions of basic finite element method, which includes basic finite element method and data, black box, writing of data, definition of VECTOR, definition of matrix, matrix and multiplication of matrix, addition of matrix, and unit matrix, conception of hardness matrix like spring power and displacement, governed equation of an elastic body, finite element method, Fortran method and programming such as composition of computer, order of programming and data card and Fortran card, finite element program and application of nonelastic problem.

  3. Composite Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    In this chapter, we extend the previous results of Chap. 2 to the more general case of composite finite sums. We describe what composite finite sums are and how their analysis can be reduced to the analysis of simple finite sums using the chain rule. We apply these techniques, next, on numerical integration and on some identities of Ramanujan.

  4. Finite Amplitude Ocean Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    plitude waves and finite amplitude waves. This article provides a brief introduction to finite amplitude wave theories. Some of the general characteristics of waves as well as the importance of finite amplitude wave theories are touched upon. 2. Small Amplitude Waves. The topmost and the lowest levels of the waves are re-.

  5. Finite volume spectrum of 2D field theories from Hirota dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromov, Nikolay; Kazakov, Vladimir; Vieira, Pedro; Univ. do Porto

    2008-12-01

    We propose, using the example of the O(4) sigma model, a general method for solving integrable two dimensional relativistic sigma models in a finite size periodic box. Our starting point is the so-called Y-system, which is equivalent to the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz equations of Yang and Yang. It is derived from the Zamolodchikov scattering theory in the cross channel, for virtual particles along the non-compact direction of the space-time cylinder. The method is based on the integrable Hirota dynamics that follows from the Y-system. The outcome is a nonlinear integral equation for a single complex function, valid for an arbitrary quantum state and accompanied by the finite size analogue of Bethe equations. It is close in spirit to the Destri-deVega (DdV) equation. We present the numerical data for the energy of various states as a function of the size, and derive the general Luescher-type formulas for the finite size corrections. We also re-derive by our method the DdV equation for the SU(2) chiral Gross-Neveu model. (orig.)

  6. Testing and Inference in Nonlinear Cointegrating Vector Error Correction Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Dennis; Rahbek, Anders

    2013-01-01

    We analyze estimators and tests for a general class of vector error correction models that allows for asymmetric and nonlinear error correction. For a given number of cointegration relationships, general hypothesis testing is considered, where testing for linearity is of particular interest. Unde...... versions that are simple to compute. A simulation study shows that the finite-sample properties of the bootstrapped tests are satisfactory with good size and power properties for reasonable sample sizes....... the null of linearity, parameters of nonlinear components vanish, leading to a nonstandard testing problem. We apply so-called sup-tests to resolve this issue, which requires development of new(uniform) functional central limit theory and results for convergence of stochastic integrals. We provide a full......We analyze estimators and tests for a general class of vector error correction models that allows for asymmetric and nonlinear error correction. For a given number of cointegration relationships, general hypothesis testing is considered, where testing for linearity is of particular interest. Under...

  7. Finite element approximation of the Isaacs equation

    OpenAIRE

    Salgado, Abner J.; Zhang, Wujun

    2015-01-01

    We propose and analyze a two-scale finite element method for the Isaacs equation. The fine scale is given by the mesh size $h$ whereas the coarse scale $\\varepsilon$ is dictated by an integro-differential approximation of the partial differential equation. We show that the method satisfies the discrete maximum principle provided that the mesh is weakly acute. This, in conjunction with weak operator consistency of the finite element method, allows us to establish convergence of the numerical s...

  8. Publisher Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flachsbart, Friederike; Dose, Janina; Gentschew, Liljana

    2018-01-01

    The original version of this Article contained an error in the spelling of the author Robert Häsler, which was incorrectly given as Robert Häesler. This has now been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the Article....

  9. Publisher Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, Jakob; Blaser, Martin J.; Thorsen, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    The originally published version of this Article contained an incorrect version of Figure 3 that was introduced following peer review and inadvertently not corrected during the production process. Both versions contain the same set of abundance data, but the incorrect version has the children...

  10. Self-correcting quantum computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombin, H; Chhajlany, R W; Horodecki, M; Martin-Delgado, M A

    2013-01-01

    Is the notion of a quantum computer (QC) resilient to thermal noise unphysical? We address this question from a constructive perspective and show that local quantum Hamiltonian models provide self-correcting QCs. To this end, we first give a sufficient condition on the connectedness of excitations for a stabilizer code model to be a self-correcting quantum memory. We then study the two main examples of topological stabilizer codes in arbitrary dimensions and establish their self-correcting capabilities. Also, we address the transversality properties of topological color codes, showing that six-dimensional color codes provide a self-correcting model that allows the transversal and local implementation of a universal set of operations in seven spatial dimensions. Finally, we give a procedure for initializing such quantum memories at finite temperature. (paper)

  11. Optimization of a collimator size for the pin-hole camera of X-rays, and proposal of a method to correct degradations of efficiencies in neighboring parts of the image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hiroaki; Nishihara, Sadamitsu; Taniuchi, Shou; Kamiya, Naotaka

    2012-01-01

    A visual image of the scattered X-ray distributions gives us useful information for beginners to study radiation physics. A pin-hole camera for X-rays can be made by use of simple materials as well as a two-dimensional X-ray detector (imaging plate: IP). In contrast with a pin-hole camera for the visible radiations, a pin-hole camera for X-rays uses a collimator, having a sufficient thickness to reduce X-rays. This design causes the following problem: in the case in which the X-rays are incident to the collimator from the diagonal direction, the some X-rays are absorbed by the wall of the collimator. Namely, the images in the surrounding part of the IP are underrepresented. The aim of this study is to suggest a correction method of the underrepresentation. We used a pin-hole camera (320 mm(long)×270 mm(wide)×300 mm(depth)) by means of the clinically applied IP (10×12 inch). In order to determine proper conditions for a size of collimators (pin-hole), experiments using medical X-ray equipments were carried out. The efficiencies and resolutions were experimentally determined for the collimator sizes of 2 to 8 mm φ . Then, images of scattered X-ray distributions were measured by the irradiation of a head phantom, and considerations were taken for a practical use of the pin-hole camera. Moreover, an exponential absorption of X-rays in the phantom was visualized by our camera in order to indicate a potential of quantitative analysis based on the image of scattered X-ray distributions. (author)

  12. Correction note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Correction note for Sanders, M., Calam, R., Durand, M., Liversidge, T. and Carmont, S. A. (2008), Does self-directed and web-based support for parents enhance the effects of viewing a reality television series based on the Triple P - Positive Parenting Programme?. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 49: 924-932. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-7610.2008.01901.x. © 2014 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  13. Finite-volume effects due to spatially non-local operators arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Hansen, Maxwell T.; Monahan, Christopher J.

    Spatially non-local matrix elements are useful lattice-QCD observables in a variety of contexts, for example in determining hadron structure. To quote credible estimates of the systematic uncertainties in these calculations, one must understand, among other things, the size of the finite-volume effects when such matrix elements are extracted from numerical lattice calculations. In this work, we estimate finite-volume effects for matrix elements of non-local operators, composed of two currents displaced in a spatial direction by a distance $\\xi$. We find that the finite-volume corrections depend on the details of the matrix element. If the external state is the lightest degree of freedom in the theory, e.g.~the pion in QCD, then the volume corrections scale as $ e^{-m_\\pi (L- \\xi)} $, where $m_\\pi$ is the mass of the light state. For heavier external states the usual $e^{- m_\\pi L}$ form is recovered, but with a polynomial prefactor of the form $L^m/|L - \\xi|^n$ that can lead to enhanced volume effects. These ...

  14. Correcting intensity loss errors in the absence of texture-free reference samples during pole figure measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, Ahmed A.; Vu, Viet Q.; Gazder, Azdiar A.

    2016-01-01

    Even with the use of X-ray polycapillary lenses, sample tilting during pole figure measurement results in a decrease in the recorded X-ray intensity. The magnitude of this error is affected by the sample size and/or the finite detector size. These errors can be typically corrected by measuring the intensity loss as a function of the tilt angle using a texture-free reference sample (ideally made of the same alloy as the investigated material). Since texture-free reference samples are not readily available for all alloys, the present study employs an empirical procedure to estimate the correction curve for a particular experimental configuration. It involves the use of real texture-free reference samples that pre-exist in any X-ray diffraction laboratory to first establish the empirical correlations between X-ray intensity, sample tilt and their Bragg angles and thereafter generate correction curves for any Bragg angle. It will be shown that the empirically corrected textures are in very good agreement with the experimentally corrected ones. - Highlights: •Sample tilting during X-ray pole figure measurement leads to intensity loss errors. •Texture-free reference samples are typically used to correct the pole figures. •An empirical correction procedure is proposed in the absence of reference samples. •The procedure relies on reference samples that pre-exist in any texture laboratory. •Experimentally and empirically corrected textures are in very good agreement.

  15. Supersymmetric theories and finiteness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helayel-Neto, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    We attempt here to present a short survey of the all-order finite Lagrangian field theories known at present in four-and two-dimensional space-times. The question of the possible relevance of these ultraviolet finite models in the formulation of consistent unified frameworks for the fundamental forces is also addressed to. (author)

  16. Designs and finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Designs and Finite Geometries brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this important area of mathematics. Designs and Finite Geometries serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most important research issues in the field.

  17. Chiral crossover transition in a finite volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chao; Jia, Wenbao; Sun, An; Zhang, Liping; Zong, Hongshi

    2018-02-01

    Finite volume effects on the chiral crossover transition of strong interactions at finite temperature are studied by solving the quark gap equation within a cubic volume of finite size L. With the anti-periodic boundary condition, our calculation shows the chiral quark condensate, which characterizes the strength of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, decreases as L decreases below 2.5 fm. We further study the finite volume effects on the pseudo-transition temperature {T}{{c}} of the crossover, showing a significant decrease in {T}{{c}} as L decreases below 3 fm. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475085, 11535005, 11690030, 51405027), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (020414380074), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2016M591808) and Open Research Foundation of State Key Lab. of Digital Manufacturing Equipment & Technology in Huazhong University of Science & Technology (DMETKF2015015)

  18. Simple Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    We will begin our treatment of summability calculus by analyzing what will be referred to, throughout this book, as simple finite sums. Even though the results of this chapter are particular cases of the more general results presented in later chapters, they are important to start with for a few reasons. First, this chapter serves as an excellent introduction to what summability calculus can markedly accomplish. Second, simple finite sums are encountered more often and, hence, they deserve special treatment. Third, the results presented in this chapter for simple finite sums will, themselves, be used as building blocks for deriving the most general results in subsequent chapters. Among others, we establish that fractional finite sums are well-defined mathematical objects and show how various identities related to the Euler constant as well as the Riemann zeta function can actually be derived in an elementary manner using fractional finite sums.

  19. Selecting cryptographic key sizes

    OpenAIRE

    Verheul, E. R.; Lenstra, Arjen K.

    2001-01-01

    In this article we offer guidelines for the determination of key sizes for symmetric cryptosystems, RSA, and discrete logarithm-based cryptosystems both over finite fields and over groups of elliptic curves over prime fields. Our recommendations are based on a set of explicitly formulated parameter settings, combined with existing data points about the cryptosystems.

  20. Multichannel 1 → 2 transition amplitudes in a finite volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briceno, Raul A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Hansen, Maxwell T. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Walker-Loud, Andre [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2015-02-03

    We perform a model-independent, non-perturbative investigation of two-point and three-point finite-volume correlation functions in the energy regime where two-particle states can go on-shell. We study three-point functions involving a single incoming particle and an outgoing two-particle state, relevant, for example, for studies of meson decays (e.g., B⁰ → K*l⁺l⁻) or meson photo production (e.g., πγ* → ππ). We observe that, while the spectrum solely depends upon the on-shell scattering amplitude, the correlation functions also depend upon off-shell amplitudes. The main result of this work is a non-perturbative generalization of the Lellouch-Luscher formula relating matrix elements of currents in finite and infinite spatial volumes. We extend that work by considering a theory with multiple, strongly-coupled channels and by accommodating external currents which inject arbitrary four-momentum as well as arbitrary angular-momentum. The result is exact up to exponentially suppressed corrections governed by the pion mass times the box size. We also apply our master equation to various examples, including two processes mentioned above as well as examples where the final state is an admixture of two open channels.

  1. Thermal quench at finite 't Hooft coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ebrahim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Using holography we have studied thermal electric field quench for infinite and finite 't Hooft coupling constant. The set-up we consider here is D7-brane embedded in (α′ corrected AdS-black hole background. It is well-known that due to a time-dependent electric field on the probe brane, a time-dependent current will be produced and it will finally relax to its equilibrium value. We have studied the effect of different parameters of the system on equilibration time. As the most important results, for massless fundamental matter, we have observed a universal behaviour in the rescaled equilibration time in the very fast quench regime for different values of the temperature and α′ correction parameter. It seems that in the slow quench regime the system behaves adiabatically. We have also observed that the equilibration time decreases in finite 't Hooft coupling limit.

  2. Effect of Hall Current and Finite Larmor Radius Corrections on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    discussed the magnetothermal instability with generalized Ohms law taking the effects of electrical resistivity, Hall current, electron inertia, thermal conductivity and radiative heat-loss function. Burkert and Lin (2000) pointed out the importance of thermal instability in the formation of clumpy gas clouds and they showed that.

  3. Finite elements and approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zienkiewicz, O C

    2006-01-01

    A powerful tool for the approximate solution of differential equations, the finite element is extensively used in industry and research. This book offers students of engineering and physics a comprehensive view of the principles involved, with numerous illustrative examples and exercises.Starting with continuum boundary value problems and the need for numerical discretization, the text examines finite difference methods, weighted residual methods in the context of continuous trial functions, and piecewise defined trial functions and the finite element method. Additional topics include higher o

  4. Compton scattering at finite temperature: thermal field dynamics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juraev, F.I.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Compton scattering is a classical problem of quantum electrodynamics and has been studied in its early beginnings. Perturbation theory and Feynman diagram technique enables comprehensive analysis of this problem on the basis of which famous Klein-Nishina formula is obtained [1, 2]. In this work this problem is extended to the case of finite temperature. Finite-temperature effects in Compton scattering is of practical importance for various processes in relativistic thermal plasmas in astrophysics. Recently Compton effect have been explored using closed-time path formalism with temperature corrections estimated [3]. It was found that the thermal cross section can be larger than that for zero-temperature by several orders of magnitude for the high temperature realistic in astrophysics [3]. In our work we use a main tool to account finite-temperature effects, a real-time finite-temperature quantum field theory, so-called thermofield dynamics [4, 5]. Thermofield dynamics is a canonical formalism to explore field-theoretical processes at finite temperature. It consists of two steps, doubling of Fock space and Bogolyubov transformations. Doubling leads to appearing additional degrees of freedom, called tilded operators which together with usual field operators create so-called thermal doublet. Bogolyubov transformations make field operators temperature-dependent. Using this formalism we treat Compton scattering at finite temperature via replacing in transition amplitude zero-temperature propagators by finite-temperature ones. As a result finite-temperature extension of the Klein-Nishina formula is obtained in which differential cross section is represented as a sum of zero-temperature cross section and finite-temperature correction. The obtained result could be useful in quantum electrodynamics of lasers and for relativistic thermal plasma processes in astrophysics where correct account of finite-temperature effects is important. (author)

  5. Olber's Paradox Revisited in a Static and Finite Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Building a Universe populated by stars identical to our Sun and taking into consideration the wave-particle duality of light, the biological limits of the human eye, the finite size of stars and the finiteness of our Universe, we conclude that the sky could very well be dark at night. Besides the human eye, the dominant parameter is the finite…

  6. Inflation with finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellini, M.; Michoacan, Univ. Michoacana de S.Nicola de Hidalgo

    1998-01-01

    In this work the inflationary scenario of the Universe with finite temperature is studied. In this context, thermal equilibrium is closely maintained at the end of inflation. The example of the de Sitter expansion is developed

  7. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.E.; Love, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Finite-temperature supersymmetry (SUSY) is characterized by unbroken Ward identities for SUSY variations of ensemble averages of Klein-operator inserted imaginary time-ordered products of fields. Path-integral representations of these products are defined and the Feynman rules in superspace are given. The finite-temperature no-renormalization theorem is derived. Spontaneously broken SUSY at zero temperature is shown not to be restored at high temperature. (orig.)

  8. Sample size methodology

    CERN Document Server

    Desu, M M

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important problems in designing an experiment or a survey is sample size determination and this book presents the currently available methodology. It includes both random sampling from standard probability distributions and from finite populations. Also discussed is sample size determination for estimating parameters in a Bayesian setting by considering the posterior distribution of the parameter and specifying the necessary requirements. The determination of the sample size is considered for ranking and selection problems as well as for the design of clinical trials. Appropria

  9. Stochastic delocalization of finite populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyrhofer, Lukas; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    The localization of populations of replicating bacteria, viruses or autocatalytic chemicals arises in various contexts, such as ecology, evolution, medicine or chemistry. Several deterministic mathematical models have been used to characterize the conditions under which localized states can form, and how they break down due to convective driving forces. It has been repeatedly found that populations remain localized unless the bias exceeds a critical threshold value, and that close to the transition the population is characterized by a diverging length scale. These results, however, have been obtained upon ignoring number fluctuations (‘genetic drift’), which are inevitable given the discreteness of the replicating entities. Here, we study the localization/delocalization of a finite population in the presence of genetic drift. The population is modeled by a linear chain of subpopulations, or demes, which exchange migrants at a constant rate. Individuals in one particular deme, called ‘oasis’, receive a growth rate benefit, and the total population is regulated to have constant size N. In this ecological setting, we find that any finite population delocalizes on sufficiently long time scales. Depending on parameters, however, populations may remain localized for a very long time. The typical waiting time to delocalization increases exponentially with both population size and distance to the critical wind speed of the deterministic approximation. We augment these simulation results by a mathematical analysis that treats the reproduction and migration of individuals as branching random walks subject to global constraints. For a particular constraint, different from a fixed population size constraint, this model yields a solvable first moment equation. We find that this solvable model approximates very well the fixed population size model for large populations, but starts to deviate as population sizes are small. Nevertheless, the qualitative behavior of the

  10. Higher-order corrections to the effective potential close to the jamming transition in the perceptron model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Ada

    2018-01-01

    In view of the results achieved in a previously related work [A. Altieri, S. Franz, and G. Parisi, J. Stat. Mech. (2016) 093301], 10.1088/1742-5468/2016/09/093301, regarding a Plefka-like expansion of the free energy up to the second order in the perceptron model, we improve the computation here focusing on the role of third-order corrections. The perceptron model is a simple example of constraint satisfaction problem, falling in the same universality class as hard spheres near jamming and hence allowing us to get exact results in high dimensions for more complex settings. Our method enables to define an effective potential (or Thouless-Anderson-Palmer free energy), namely a coarse-grained functional, which depends on the generalized forces and the effective gaps between particles. The analysis of the third-order corrections to the effective potential reveals that, albeit irrelevant in a mean-field framework in the thermodynamic limit, they might instead play a fundamental role in considering finite-size effects. We also study the typical behavior of generalized forces and we show that two kinds of corrections can occur. The first contribution arises since the system is analyzed at a finite distance from jamming, while the second one is due to finite-size corrections. We nevertheless show that third-order corrections in the perturbative expansion vanish in the jamming limit both for the potential and the generalized forces, in agreement with the isostaticity argument proposed by Wyart and coworkers. Finally, we analyze the relevant scaling solutions emerging close to the jamming line, which define a crossover regime connecting the control parameters of the model to an effective temperature.

  11. Topological quantum error correction in the Kitaev honeycomb model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Chan; Brell, Courtney G.; Flammia, Steven T.

    2017-08-01

    The Kitaev honeycomb model is an approximate topological quantum error correcting code in the same phase as the toric code, but requiring only a 2-body Hamiltonian. As a frustrated spin model, it is well outside the commuting models of topological quantum codes that are typically studied, but its exact solubility makes it more amenable to analysis of effects arising in this noncommutative setting than a generic topologically ordered Hamiltonian. Here we study quantum error correction in the honeycomb model using both analytic and numerical techniques. We first prove explicit exponential bounds on the approximate degeneracy, local indistinguishability, and correctability of the code space. These bounds are tighter than can be achieved using known general properties of topological phases. Our proofs are specialized to the honeycomb model, but some of the methods may nonetheless be of broader interest. Following this, we numerically study noise caused by thermalization processes in the perturbative regime close to the toric code renormalization group fixed point. The appearance of non-topological excitations in this setting has no significant effect on the error correction properties of the honeycomb model in the regimes we study. Although the behavior of this model is found to be qualitatively similar to that of the standard toric code in most regimes, we find numerical evidence of an interesting effect in the low-temperature, finite-size regime where a preferred lattice direction emerges and anyon diffusion is geometrically constrained. We expect this effect to yield an improvement in the scaling of the lifetime with system size as compared to the standard toric code.

  12. Classical corrections to instanton-induced interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    We consider instanton-induced production of vector particles at high energies. In the leading-order approximation for n-particle cross sections the total cross section grows exponentially with energy and hits the unitarity bound at energy s of order ρ -2 g -2 , where ρ is the instanton size. The approximation implies in fact that smearing of the classical solution at short distances due to ρ≠0 is neglected, and we look for the effect of finite ρ. We argue that the smearing of the classical solution can be reproduced in terms of quantum exchanges by combining instanton-induced vertices with ordinary perturbation theory. The first correction to the total cross section becomes of order unity at energy s of order ρ -2 and does not have any extra factor g. Moreover, an exponential form factor can be derived under some conditions. However the form factor can stop the cross section growing only at energies of order ρ -2 g -2 , where the approximations made are no longer valid. (orig.)

  13. Fibonacci-Hubbard chain at zero and finite temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Sanjay [Theoretical Condensed Matter (TCMP) Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF-Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)]. E-mail: sanjay@cmp.saha.ernet.in; Sil, Shreekantha [Department of Physics, Vishwabharati, Shantiniketan, Birbhum (India); Bhattacharyya, Bibhas [Department of Physics, Scottish Church College, 1 and 3, Urquhart Square, Kolkata 700006 (India)

    2005-01-31

    We have studied finite-sized single band Hubbard chains with Fibonacci modulation for half-filling within a mean field approximation. The ground state properties, together with the DC conductivity both at zero and non-zero temperatures, are calculated for such quasiperiodic Hubbard chains. While a reduction in the conductivity is found due to strong electronic interaction or strong Fibonacci modulation, a competition between these two is observed to enhance the conductivity. The results at finite temperatures also illustrate some interesting features of such finite-sized systems.

  14. Finite Discrete Gabor Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Peter Lempel

    2007-01-01

    on the real line to be well approximated by finite and discrete Gabor frames. This method of approximation is especially attractive because efficient numerical methods exists for doing computations with finite, discrete Gabor systems. This thesis presents new algorithms for the efficient computation of finite......, discrete Gabor coefficients. Reconstruction of a signal from its Gabor coefficients is done by the use of a so-called dual window. This thesis presents a number of iterative algorithms to compute dual and self-dual windows. The Linear Time Frequency Toolbox is a Matlab/Octave/C toolbox for doing basic...... discrete time/frequency and Gabor analysis. It is intended to be both an educational and a computational tool. The toolbox was developed as part of this Ph.D. project to provide a solid foundation for the field of computational Gabor analysis....

  15. Products of Finite Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ballester-Bolinches, Adolfo; Asaad, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    The study of finite groups factorised as a product of two or more subgroups has become a subject of great interest during the last years with applications not only in group theory, but also in other areas like cryptography and coding theory. It has experienced a big impulse with the introduction of some permutability conditions. The aim of this book is to gather, order, and examine part of this material, including the latest advances made, give some new approach to some topics, and present some new subjects of research in the theory of finite factorised groups.

  16. Corrected Fourier series and its application to function approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Hua Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Any quasismooth function f(x in a finite interval [0,x0], which has only a finite number of finite discontinuities and has only a finite number of extremes, can be approximated by a uniformly convergent Fourier series and a correction function. The correction function consists of algebraic polynomials and Heaviside step functions and is required by the aperiodicity at the endpoints (i.e., f(0≠f(x0 and the finite discontinuities in between. The uniformly convergent Fourier series and the correction function are collectively referred to as the corrected Fourier series. We prove that in order for the mth derivative of the Fourier series to be uniformly convergent, the order of the polynomial need not exceed (m+1. In other words, including the no-more-than-(m+1 polynomial has eliminated the Gibbs phenomenon of the Fourier series until its mth derivative. The corrected Fourier series is then applied to function approximation; the procedures to determine the coefficients of the corrected Fourier series are illustrated in detail using examples.

  17. Undecidability and finite automata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endrullis, Jörg; Shallit, Jeffrey; Smith, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Using a novel rewriting problem, we show that several natural decision problems about finite automata are undecidable (i.e., recursively unsolvable). In contrast, we also prove three related problems are decidable. We apply one result to prove the undecidability of a related problem about

  18. Robust RBF Finite Automata

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šorel, Michal; Šíma, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 62, - (2004), s. 93-110 ISSN 0925-2312 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB2030007; GA MŠk LN00A056 Keywords : radial basis function * neural network * finite automaton * Boolean circuit * computational power Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.641, year: 2004

  19. Inside finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Weiser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    All relevant implementation aspects of finite element methods are discussed in this book. The focus is on algorithms and data structures as well as on their concrete implementation. Theory is covered as far as it gives insight into the construction of algorithms. Throughout the exercises a complete FE-solver for scalar 2D problems will be implemented in Matlab/Octave.

  20. Finite unified models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapetanakis, D. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Mondragon, M. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Zoupanos, G. (National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece). Physics Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    We present phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the case of two models with three families the top quark mass is predicted to be 178.8 GeV. (orig.)

  1. Finite unified models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakis, D.; Mondragon, M.; Zoupanos, G.

    1993-01-01

    We present phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the case of two models with three families the top quark mass is predicted to be 178.8 GeV. (orig.)

  2. Finiteness and GUTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakis, D.; Mondragon, M.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown how to obtain phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. A very interesting feature of the models with three families is that they predict the top quark mass to be around 178 GeV. 16 refs

  3. Lattice study of finite volume effect in HVP for muon g-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izubuchi Taku

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the finite volume effect of the hadronic vacuum polarization contribution to muon g-2, aμhvp,in lattice QCD by comparison with two different volumes, L4 = (5.44 and (8.14 fm4, at physical pion. We perform the lattice computation of highly precise vector-vector current correlator with optimized AMA technique on Nf = 2 + 1 PACS gauge configurations in Wilson-clover fermion and stout smeared gluon action at one lattice cut-off, a−1 = 2.33 GeV. We compare two integrals of aμhvp, momentum integral and time-slice summation, on the lattice and numerically show that the different size of finite volume effect appears between two methods. We also discuss the effect of backward-state propagation into the result of aμhvp with the different boundary condition. Our model-independent study suggest that the lattice computation at physical pion is important for correct estimate of finite volume and other lattice systematics in aμhvp.

  4. 78 FR 75449 - Miscellaneous Corrections; Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    ... cross- references, correcting grammatical errors, revising language for clarity and consistency, and... practice. Specifically, these amendments are to correct grammatical errors and to revise cross-references.... The final rule contained minor errors in grammar, punctuation, and referencing. This document corrects...

  5. Effect of finite β on stellarator transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynick, H.E.

    1984-04-01

    A theory of the modification of stellarator transport due to the presence of finite plasma pressure is developed, and applied to a range of stellarator configurations. For many configurations of interest, plasma transport can change by more than an order of magnitude in the progression from zero pressure to the equilibrium β limit of the device. Thus, a stellarator with transport-optimized vacuum fields can have poor confinement at the desired operating β. Without an external compensating field, increasing β tends to degrade confinement, unless the initial field structure is very carefully chosen. The theory permits one to correctly determine this vacuum structure, in terms of the desired structure of the field at a prescribed operating β. With a compensating external field, the deleterious effect of finite β on transport can be partially eliminated

  6. Robust weak measurements on finite samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tollaksen, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    A new weak measurement procedure is introduced for finite samples which yields accurate weak values that are outside the range of eigenvalues and which do not require an exponentially rare ensemble. This procedure provides a unique advantage in the amplification of small nonrandom signals by minimizing uncertainties in determining the weak value and by minimizing sample size. This procedure can also extend the strength of the coupling between the system and measuring device to a new regime

  7. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.W. de.

    1986-01-01

    The consequences of the incorporation of finite temperature effects in fields theories are investigated. Particularly, we consider the sypersymmetric non-linear sigma model, calculating the effective potencial in the large N limit. Initially, we present the 1/N expantion formalism and, for the O(N) model of scalar field, we show the impossibility of spontaneous symmetry breaking. Next, we study the same model at finite temperature and in the presence of conserved charges (the O(N) symmetry's generator). We conclude that these conserved charges explicitly break the symmetry. We introduce a calculation method for the thermodynamic potential of the theory in the presence of chemical potentials. We present an introduction to Supersymmetry in the aim of describing some important concepts for the treatment at T>0. We show that Suppersymmetry is broken for any T>0, in opposition to what one expects, by the solution of the Hierachy Problem. (author) [pt

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  9. Environmental corrections of a dual-induction logging while drilling tool in vertical wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhengming; Ke, Shizhen; Jiang, Ming; Yin, Chengfang; Li, Anzong; Li, Junjian

    2018-04-01

    With the development of Logging While Drilling (LWD) technology, dual-induction LWD logging is not only widely applied in deviated wells and horizontal wells, but it is used commonly in vertical wells. Accordingly, it is necessary to simulate the response of LWD tools in vertical wells for logging interpretation. In this paper, the investigation characteristics, the effects of the tool structure, skin effect and drilling environment of a dual-induction LWD tool are simulated by the three-dimensional (3D) finite element method (FEM). In order to closely simulate the actual situation, real structure of the tool is taking into account. The results demonstrate that the influence of the background value of the tool structure can be eliminated. The values of deducting the background of a tool structure and analytical solution have a quantitative agreement in homogeneous formations. The effect of measurement frequency could be effectively eliminated by chart of skin effect correction. In addition, the measurement environment, borehole size, mud resistivity, shoulder bed, layer thickness and invasion, have an effect on the true resistivity. To eliminate these effects, borehole correction charts, shoulder bed correction charts and tornado charts are computed based on real tool structure. Based on correction charts, well logging data can be corrected automatically by a suitable interpolation method, which is convenient and fast. Verified with actual logging data in vertical wells, this method could obtain the true resistivity of formation.

  10. Optimization of Broadband Wavefront Correction at the Princeton High Contrast Imaging Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groff, Tyler Dean; Kasdin, N.; Carlotti, A.

    2011-01-01

    Wavefront control for imaging of terrestrial planets using coronagraphic techniques requires improving the performance of the wavefront control techniques to expand the correction bandwidth and the size of the dark hole over which it is effective. At the Princeton High Contrast Imaging Laboratory we have focused on increasing the search area using two deformable mirrors (DMs) in series to achieve symmetric correction by correcting both amplitude and phase aberrations. Here we are concerned with increasing the bandwidth of light over which this correction is effective so we include a finite bandwidth into the optimization problem to generate a new stroke minimization algorithm. This allows us to minimize the actuator stroke on the DMs given contrast constraints at multiple wavelengths which define a window over which the dark hole will persist. This windowed stroke minimization algorithm is written in such a way that a weight may be applied to dictate the relative importance of the outer wavelengths to the central wavelength. In order to supply the estimates at multiple wavelengths a functional relationship to a central estimation wavelength is formed. Computational overhead and new experimental results of this windowed stroke minimization algorithm are discussed. The tradeoff between symmetric correction and achievable bandwidth is compared to the observed contrast degradation with wavelength in the experimental results. This work is supported by NASA APRA Grant #NNX09AB96G. The author is also supported under an NESSF Fellowship.

  11. Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.R. Ghoreishy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This research work is devoted to the footprint analysis of a steel-belted radial tyre (185/65R14 under vertical static load using finite element method. Two models have been developed in which in the first model the tread patterns were replaced by simple ribs while the second model was consisted of details of the tread blocks. Linear elastic and hyper elastic (Arruda-Boyce material models were selected to describe the mechanical behavior of the reinforcing and rubbery parts, respectively. The above two finite element models of the tyre were analyzed under inflation pressure and vertical static loads. The second model (with detailed tread patterns was analyzed with and without friction effect between tread and contact surfaces. In every stage of the analysis, the results were compared with the experimental data to confirm the accuracy and applicability of the model. Results showed that neglecting the tread pattern design not only reduces the computational cost and effort but also the differences between computed deformations do not show significant changes. However, more complicated variables such as shape and area of the footprint zone and contact pressure are affected considerably by the finite element model selected for the tread blocks. In addition, inclusion of friction even in static state changes these variables significantly.

  12. Synthetic Modifications In the Frequency Domain for Finite Element Model Update and Damage Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Aeronautical Society , 24, pp. 590–591. [23] Fritzen, C., and Kiefer, T., 1992, “Localization and Correction of Errors in Finite Element Models Based on...MODIFICATIONS IN THE FREQUENCY DOMAIN FOR FINITE ELEMENT MODEL UPDATE AND DAMAGE DETECTION by Ryun J. C. Konze September 2017 Thesis Advisor...FINITE ELEMENT MODEL UPDATE AND DAMAGE DETECTION 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Ryun J. C. Konze 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES

  13. Anti-Diffusive Finite Difference WENO Methods for Shallow Water with Transport of Pollutant

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Zhengfu; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we further explore and apply our recent anti-diffusive flux corrected high order finite difference WENO schemes for conservation laws to compute the Saint-Venant system of shallow water...

  14. Modelling Convergence of Finite Element Analysis of Cantilever Beam

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Convergence studies are carried out by investigating the convergence of numerical results as the number of elements is increased. If convergence is not obtained, the engineer using the finite element method has absolutely no indication whether the results are indicative of a meaningful approximation to the correct solution ...

  15. From Heavy-Ion Collisions to Compact Stars: Equation of State and Relevance of the System Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Mogliacci

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we start by presenting state-of-the-art methods allowing us to compute moments related to the globally conserved baryon number, by means of first principle resummed perturbative frameworks. We focus on such quantities for they convey important properties of the finite temperature and density equation of state, being particularly sensitive to changes in the degrees of freedom across the quark-hadron phase transition. We thus present various number susceptibilities along with the corresponding results as obtained by lattice quantum chromodynamics collaborations, and comment on their comparison. Next, omitting the importance of coupling corrections and considering a zero-density toy model for the sake of argument, we focus on corrections due to the small size of heavy-ion collision systems, by means of spatial compactifications. Briefly motivating the relevance of finite size effects in heavy-ion physics, in opposition to the compact star physics, we present a few preliminary thermodynamic results together with the speed of sound for certain finite size relativistic quantum systems at very high temperature.

  16. Precision corrections and supersymmetric unification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchev, Konstantin Tzvetanov

    1998-07-01

    In this thesis we compute a full set of one-loop corrections to the masses and couplings in the minimal supersymmetric standard model and study their implications in various precision analyses: (1) We use the weak-scale gauge and Yukawa threshold corrections, including the non-logarithmic terms, in a complete next- to-leading order analysis of gauge and Yukawa coupling unification, both for the case of the minimal supergravity and gauge-mediated models. We then examine the effects of unification-scale threshold corrections in the minimal and missing-doublet SU(5) models. (2) We show the generic size of the one-loop mass corrections to the supersymmetric spectrum and provide a set of compact approximations which hold over the unified parameter space of the supergravity models. (3) We compute the superpartner spectrum across the entire parameter space of the gauge-mediated models, comparing it to that of the minimal supergravity model. We delineate the regions where the lightest neutralino or tau slepton is the next- to-lightest supersymmetric particle, and compute its lifetime and various branching ratios. (4) We make a classification of the tree-level mass sum rules, derive in the supergravity and gauge-mediated unification models, and study their stability against radiative corrections. (5) We calculate the leading order QCD correction to K-/overline[K] mixing within a general supersymmetric model. Using an effective field theory language, we construct /Delta S = 2 effective Lagrangians for different hierarchies of the gluino and the first two generation squark masses. For each case, we show the size of the corrections and find that they usually modify previous bounds on intergenerational squark mass mixing by more than a factor of two.

  17. Infrared propagator corrections for constant deceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, T M; Miao, S P; Prokopec, T [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, Postbus 80.195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Woodard, R P [Department of Physics, University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)], E-mail: T.M.Janssen@uu.nl, E-mail: S.Miao@uu.nl, E-mail: T.Prokopec@uu.nl, E-mail: woodard@phys.ufl.edu

    2008-12-21

    We derive the propagator for a massless, minimally coupled scalar on a D-dimensional, spatially flat, homogeneous and isotropic background with arbitrary constant deceleration parameter. Our construction uses the operator formalism by integrating the Fourier mode sum. We give special attention to infrared corrections from the nonzero lower limit associated with working on finite spatial sections. These corrections eliminate infrared divergences that would otherwise be incorrectly treated by dimensional regularization, resulting in off-coincidence divergences for those special values of the deceleration parameter at which the infrared divergence is logarithmic. As an application we compute the expectation value of the scalar stress-energy tensor.

  18. Phylogenetic effective sample size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoszek, Krzysztof

    2016-10-21

    In this paper I address the question-how large is a phylogenetic sample? I propose a definition of a phylogenetic effective sample size for Brownian motion and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes-the regression effective sample size. I discuss how mutual information can be used to define an effective sample size in the non-normal process case and compare these two definitions to an already present concept of effective sample size (the mean effective sample size). Through a simulation study I find that the AICc is robust if one corrects for the number of species or effective number of species. Lastly I discuss how the concept of the phylogenetic effective sample size can be useful for biodiversity quantification, identification of interesting clades and deciding on the importance of phylogenetic correlations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Z decay width in the SMEFT: y{sub t} and λ corrections at one loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Christine [Niels Bohr International Academy, University of Copenhagen,Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Shepherd, William [Niels Bohr International Academy, University of Copenhagen,Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Institut für Physik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universität Mainz,Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Trott, Michael [Niels Bohr International Academy, University of Copenhagen,Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2017-03-10

    We calculate one loop y{sub t} and λ dependent corrections to Γ̄{sub Z},R̄{sub f}{sup 0} and the partial Z widths due to dimension six operators in the Standard Model Effective Field Theory (SMEFT), including finite terms. We assume CP symmetry and a U(3){sup 5} symmetry in the UV matching onto the dimension six operators, dominantly broken by the Standard Model Yukawa matrices. Corrections to these observables are predicted using the input parameters {α̂_e_w,M̂_Z,Ĝ_F,m̂_t,m̂_h} extracted with one loop corrections in the same limit. We show that at one loop the number of SMEFT parameters contributing to the precise LEPI pseudo-observables exceeds the number of measurements. As a result the SMEFT parameters contributing to LEP data are formally unbounded when the size of loop corrections are reached until other data is considered in a global analysis. The size of these loop effects is generically a correction of order ∼% to leading effects in the SMEFT, but we find multiple large numerical coefficients in our calculation at this order. We use a (MS)-bar scheme, modified for the SMEFT, for renormalization. Some subtleties involving novel evanescent scheme dependence present in this result are explained.

  20. Portion size

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with hummus. To control your portion sizes when eating out, try these tips: Order the small size. Instead of a medium or large, ask for the smallest size. By eating a small hamburger instead of a large, you ...

  1. A Dual Orthogonality Procedure for Nonlinear Finite Element Equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, S.; Hededal, O.

    In the orthogonal residual procedure for solution of nonlinear finite element equations the load is adjusted in each equilibrium iteration to satisfy an orthogonality condition to the current displacement increment. It is here shown that the quasi-newton formulation of the orthogonal residual...... method consists of a simple one-term correction of the displacement subincrement, and that this correction leads to orthogonality between the corrected displacement subincrement and the current increment of the internal force vector, thus defining a dual orthogonality algorithm. It is demonstrated how...

  2. Finite key analysis in quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, T.

    2007-01-01

    finite number of input signals, without making any approximations. As an application, we investigate the so-called ''Tomographic Protocol'', which is based on the Six-State Protocol and where Alice and Bob can obtain the additional information which quantum state they share after the distribution step of the protocol. We calculate the obtainable secret key rate under the assumption that the eavesdropper only conducts collective attacks and give a detailed analysis of the dependence of the key rate on various parameters: The number of input signals (the block size), the error rate in the sifted key (the QBER), and the security parameter. Furthermore, we study the influence of multi-photon events which naturally occur in a realistic implementation (orig.)

  3. Combinatorics of finite sets

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Coherent treatment provides comprehensive view of basic methods and results of the combinatorial study of finite set systems. The Clements-Lindstrom extension of the Kruskal-Katona theorem to multisets is explored, as is the Greene-Kleitman result concerning k-saturated chain partitions of general partially ordered sets. Connections with Dilworth's theorem, the marriage problem, and probability are also discussed. Each chapter ends with a helpful series of exercises and outline solutions appear at the end. ""An excellent text for a topics course in discrete mathematics."" - Bulletin of the Ame

  4. Optical Finite Element Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, David; Taylor, Bradley K.

    1986-01-01

    A new high-accuracy optical linear algebra processor (OLAP) with many advantageous features is described. It achieves floating point accuracy, handles bipolar data by sign-magnitude representation, performs LU decomposition using only one channel, easily partitions and considers data flow. A new application (finite element (FE) structural analysis) for OLAPs is introduced and the results of a case study presented. Error sources in encoded OLAPs are addressed for the first time. Their modeling and simulation are discussed and quantitative data are presented. Dominant error sources and the effects of composite error sources are analyzed.

  5. The effectiveness of correcting codes in reception in the whole in additive normal white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtarkov, Y. M.

    1974-01-01

    Some possible criteria for estimating the effectiveness of correcting codes are presented, and the energy effectiveness of correcting codes is studied for symbol-by-symbol reception. Expressions for the energetic effectiveness of binary correcting codes for reception in the whole are produced. Asymptotic energetic effectiveness and finite signal/noise ratio cases are considered.

  6. Effect of finite container size on granular jet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kann, Stefan; Joubaud, Sylvain; Caballero-Robledo, Gabriel A.; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2010-04-01

    When an object is dropped into a bed of fine, loosely packed sand, a surprisingly energetic jet shoots out of the bed. In this work we study the effect that boundaries have on the granular jet formation. We did this by (i) decreasing the depth of the sand bed and (ii) reducing the container diameter to only a few ball diameters. These confinements change the behavior of the ball inside the bed, the void collapse, and the resulting jet height and shape. We map the parameter space of impact with Froude number, ambient pressure, and container dimensions as parameters. From these results we propose an explanation for the thick-thin structure of the jet reported by several groups ([J. R. Royer , Nat. Phys. 1, 164 (2005)], [G. Caballero , Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 018001 (2007)], and [J. O. Marston , Phys. Fluids 20, 023301 (2008)]).

  7. Finite groups with three conjugacy class sizes of some elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (G)). Hence the Sylow p-subgroup of G is abelian as required. Now by the hypothesis we suppose that x is a p-element of G such that [G : CG(x)] = pa. By Lemma 2.1, we know that the normal closure of x will be a p-group, say H. Let Z = CG(H).

  8. Effects of finite size on spin glass dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tetsuya; Komatsu, Katsuyoshi

    2010-12-01

    In spite of comprehensive studies to clarify a variety of interesting phenomena of spin glasses, their understanding has been insufficiently established. To overcome such a problem, fabrication of a mesoscopic spin glass system, whose dynamics can be observed over the entire range to the equilibrium, is useful. In this review the challenges of research that has been performed up to now in this direction and our recent related studies are introduced. We have established to study the spin glass behaviour in terms of droplet picture using nanofabricated mesoscopic samples to some extent, but some problems that should be clarified have been left. Finally, the direction of some new studies is proposed to solve the problems.

  9. Size-dependent homogenized diffusion parameters for a finite lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premuda, F.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical technique is reported for solving the transcendental equation for unknown Ysub(n+1). The solution is expressed in terms of quantities related to Ysub(n). This is an iterative reversion technique which has already been proven to converge rapidly in the homogeneous slab problem considered herein. (author)

  10. Kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at a finite sized object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, V. A.

    1995-01-01

    Two-dimensional hybrid simulations with particle ions and fluid electrons are used to calculate the kinetic evolution of the self-consistent flow around a two-dimensional obstacle with zero intrinsic magnetic field. Plasma outlfow from the obstacle is used to establish a boundary layer between the incoming solar wind and the outgoing plasma. Because the self-consistent flow solution, a velocity shear is naturally set up at this interface, and since the magnetic field for these simulations is transverse to this flow, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability can be excited at low-velocity shear. Simulations demonstrate the existence of the instability even near the subsolar location, which normally is thought to be stable to this instability. The apparent reason for this result is the overall time dependence at the boundary layer, which gives rise to a Rayleigh-Taylor like instability which provides seed perturbations for the K-H instability. These results are directly applicable to Venus, comets, artificial plasma releases, and laser target experiments. This result has potentially important ramifications for the interpretation of observational results as well as for an estimation of the cross-field transport. The results suggest that the K-H instability may play a role in dayside processes and the Venus ionopause, and may exist within the context of more general situations, for example, the Earth's magnetopause.

  11. Finiteness of corner vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Jiten C.; Biswas, Sougata; Panda, Swapnendu

    2018-04-01

    Till date, the sequence of vortices present in the solid corners of steady internal viscous incompressible flows was thought to be infinite. However, the already existing and most recent geometric theories on incompressible viscous flows that express vortical structures in terms of critical points in bounded domains indicate a strong opposition to this notion of infiniteness. In this study, we endeavor to bridge the gap between the two opposing stream of thoughts by diagnosing the assumptions of the existing theorems on such vortices. We provide our own set of proofs for establishing the finiteness of the sequence of corner vortices by making use of the continuum hypothesis and Kolmogorov scale, which guarantee a nonzero scale for the smallest vortex structure possible in incompressible viscous flows. We point out that the notion of infiniteness resulting from discrete self-similarity of the vortex structures is not physically feasible. Making use of some elementary concepts of mathematical analysis and our own construction of diametric disks, we conclude that the sequence of corner vortices is finite.

  12. Finite element modelling of solidification phenomena

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    a shape as a discerning customer would prefer. Occasionally, it may be very seriously distorted. Again, wishing ourselves in Utopia, we can envisage that if the constraint by the mould were either zero or infinite, the casting would be of predictable size and correct shape in both cases. Even if the castings were subjected to ...

  13. Correcting slightly less simple movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Aivar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have analysed how goal directed movements are corrected in response to changes in the properties of the target. However, only simple movements to single targets have been used in those studies, so little is known about movement corrections under more complex situations. Evidence from studies that ask for movements to several targets in sequence suggests that whole sequences of movements are planned together. Planning related segments of a movement together makes it possible to optimise the whole sequence, but it means that some parts are planned quite long in advance, so that it is likely that they will have to be modified. In the present study we examined how people respond to changes that occur while they are moving to the first target of a sequence. Subjects moved a stylus across a digitising tablet. They moved from a specified starting point to two targets in succession. The first of these targets was always at the same position but it could have one of two sizes. The second target could be in one of two different positions and its size was different in each case. On some trials the first target changed size, and on some others the second target changed size and position, as soon as the subject started to move. When the size of the first target changed the subjects slowed down the first segment of their movements. Even the peak velocity, which was only about 150 ms after the change in size, was lower. Beside this fast response to the change itself, the dwell time at the first target was also affected: its duration increased after the change. Changing the size and position of the second target did not influence the first segment of the movement, but also increased the dwell time. The dwell time was much longer for a small target, irrespective of its initial size. If subjects knew in advance which target could change, they moved faster than if they did not know which could change. Taken together, these

  14. ACCEPT: a three-dimensional finite element program for large deformation elastic-plastic-creep analysis of pressurized tubes (LWBR/AWBA Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutula, D.N.; Wiancko, B.E.

    1980-03-01

    ACCEPT is a three-dimensional finite element computer program for analysis of large-deformation elastic-plastic-creep response of Zircaloy tubes subjected to temperature, surface pressures, and axial force. A twenty-mode, tri-quadratic, isoparametric element is used along with a Zircaloy materials model. A linear time-incremental procedure with residual force correction is used to solve for the time-dependent response. The program features an algorithm which automatically chooses the time step sizes to control the accuracy and numerical stability of the solution. A contact-separation capability allows modeling of interaction of reactor fuel rod cladding with fuel pellets or external supports

  15. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S.

    2002-01-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T c . The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64) 3 x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature

  16. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S.

    2001-10-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T c . The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64) 3 x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature. (orig.)

  17. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S

    2002-03-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T{sub c}. The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64){sup 3} x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature.

  18. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S. [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik

    2001-10-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T{sub c}. The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64){sup 3} x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature. (orig.)

  19. The principle of finiteness – a guideline for physical laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternlieb, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    I propose a new principle in physics-the principle of finiteness (FP). It stems from the definition of physics as a science that deals with measurable dimensional physical quantities. Since measurement results including their errors, are always finite, FP postulates that the mathematical formulation of legitimate laws in physics should prevent exactly zero or infinite solutions. I propose finiteness as a postulate, as opposed to a statement whose validity has to be corroborated by, or derived theoretically or experimentally from other facts, theories or principles. Some consequences of FP are discussed, first in general, and then more specifically in the fields of special relativity, quantum mechanics, and quantum gravity. The corrected Lorentz transformations include an additional translation term depending on the minimum length epsilon. The relativistic gamma is replaced by a corrected gamma, that is finite for v=c. To comply with FP, physical laws should include the relevant extremum finite values in their mathematical formulation. An important prediction of FP is that there is a maximum attainable relativistic mass/energy which is the same for all subatomic particles, meaning that there is a maximum theoretical value for cosmic rays energy. The Generalized Uncertainty Principle required by Quantum Gravity is actually a necessary consequence of FP at Planck's scale. Therefore, FP may possibly contribute to the axiomatic foundation of Quantum Gravity.

  20. Generalized subspace correction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolm, P. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Arbenz, P.; Gander, W. [Eidgenoessiche Technische Hochschule, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    A fundamental problem in scientific computing is the solution of large sparse systems of linear equations. Often these systems arise from the discretization of differential equations by finite difference, finite volume or finite element methods. Iterative methods exploiting these sparse structures have proven to be very effective on conventional computers for a wide area of applications. Due to the rapid development and increasing demand for the large computing powers of parallel computers, it has become important to design iterative methods specialized for these new architectures.

  1. The Determining Finite Automata Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Vinogradova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of formal languages widely uses finite state automata both in implementation of automata-based approach to programming, and in synthesis of logical control algorithms.To ensure unambiguous operation of the algorithms, the synthesized finite state automata must be deterministic. Within the approach to the synthesis of the mobile robot controls, for example, based on the theory of formal languages, there are problems concerning the construction of various finite automata, but such finite automata, as a rule, will not be deterministic. The algorithm of determinization can be applied to the finite automata, as specified, in various ways. The basic ideas of the algorithm of determinization can be most simply explained using the representations of a finite automaton in the form of a weighted directed graph.The paper deals with finite automata represented as weighted directed graphs, and discusses in detail the procedure for determining the finite automata represented in this way. Gives a detailed description of the algorithm for determining finite automata. A large number of examples illustrate a capability of the determinization algorithm.

  2. Statistical finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaji, Iman; Rahemifar, Kaamran; Samani, Abbas

    2008-01-01

    A novel technique is introduced for tissue deformation and stress analysis. Compared to the conventional Finite Element method, this technique is orders of magnitude faster and yet still very accurate. The proposed technique uses preprocessed data obtained from FE analyses of a number of similar objects in a Statistical Shape Model framework as described below. This technique takes advantage of the fact that the body organs have limited variability, especially in terms of their geometry. As such, it is well suited for calculating tissue displacements of body organs. The proposed technique can be applied in many biomedical applications such as image guided surgery, or virtual reality environment development where tissue behavior is simulated for training purposes.

  3. AEROTAXI ground static test and finite element model validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu BISCA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this presentation, we will concentrate on typical Ground Static Test (GST and Finite Element (FE software comparisons. It is necessary to note, that standard GST are obligatory for any new aircraft configuration. We can mention here the investigations of the AeroTAXITM, a small aircraft configuration, using PRODERA® equipment. A Finite Element Model (FEM of the AeroTAXITM has been developed in PATRAN/NASTRAN®, partly from a previous ANSYS® model. FEM can be used to investigate potential structural modifications or changes with realistic component corrections. Model validation should be part of every modern engineering analysis and quality assurance procedure.

  4. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more surgeries depending on the extent of the repair needed. Click here to find out more. Corrective ... more surgeries depending on the extent of the repair needed. Click here to find out more. Corrective ...

  5. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Jaw Surgery Download Download the ebook for further information Corrective jaw, or orthognathic surgery is performed by ... your treatment. Correction of Common Dentofacial Deformities ​ ​ The information provided here is not intended as a substitute ...

  6. NWS Corrections to Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Form B-14 is the National Weather Service form entitled 'Notice of Corrections to Weather Records.' The forms are used to make corrections to observations on forms...

  7. Relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussurier, Gérald

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model, which has been proposed recently in an astrophysical context. Assuming a constant distribution of protons inside the nucleus of finite size avoids severe divergence of the electron density with respect to a point-like nucleus. A formula for the nuclear radius is chosen to treat any element. The relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model matches the two asymptotic regimes, i.e., the non-relativistic and the ultra-relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi models. The equation of state is considered in detail. For each version of the finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model, the pressure, the kinetic energy, and the entropy are calculated. The internal energy and free energy are also considered. The thermodynamic consistency of the three models is considered by working from the free energy. The virial question is also studied in the three cases as well as the relationship with the density functional theory. The relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model is far more involved than the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi models that are very close to each other from a mathematical point of view.

  8. Teaching Politically Correct Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsehelska, Maryna

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that teaching politically correct language to English learners provides them with important information and opportunities to be exposed to cultural issues. The author offers a brief review of how political correctness became an issue and how being politically correct influences the use of language. The article then presents…

  9. Axial anomaly at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, S.; Gupte, Neelima; Srinivasan, V.

    1985-01-01

    The Jackiw-Bardeen-Adler anomaly for QED 4 and QED 2 are calculated at finite temperature. It is found that the anomaly is independent of temperature. Ishikawa's method [1984, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 53 1615] for calculating the quantised Hall effect is extended to finite temperature. (author)

  10. Solution of Finite Element Equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    An important step in solving any problem by the finite element method is the solution of the global equations. Numerical solution of linear equations is a subject covered in most courses in numerical analysis. However, the equations encountered in most finite element applications have some special...... features that justify the development of specialized solution algorithms....

  11. Finite strain discrete dislocation plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshpande, VS; Needleman, A; Van der Giessen, E

    2003-01-01

    A framework for carrying out finite deformation discrete dislocation plasticity calculations is presented. The discrete dislocations are presumed to be adequately represented by the singular linear elastic fields so that the large deformations near dislocation cores are not modeled. The finite

  12. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Today\\'s large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  13. Finite element and finite difference methods in electromagnetic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, MA

    2013-01-01

    This second volume in the Progress in Electromagnetic Research series examines recent advances in computational electromagnetics, with emphasis on scattering, as brought about by new formulations and algorithms which use finite element or finite difference techniques. Containing contributions by some of the world's leading experts, the papers thoroughly review and analyze this rapidly evolving area of computational electromagnetics. Covering topics ranging from the new finite-element based formulation for representing time-harmonic vector fields in 3-D inhomogeneous media using two coupled sca

  14. Finite discrete field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Manoelito M. de

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the physical meaning and the geometric interpretation of implementation in classical field theories. The origin of infinities and other inconsistencies in field theories is traced to fields defined with support on the light cone; a finite and consistent field theory requires a light-cone generator as the field support. Then, we introduce a classical field theory with support on the light cone generators. It results on a description of discrete (point-like) interactions in terms of localized particle-like fields. We find the propagators of these particle-like fields and discuss their physical meaning, properties and consequences. They are conformally invariant, singularity-free, and describing a manifestly covariant (1 + 1)-dimensional dynamics in a (3 = 1) spacetime. Remarkably this conformal symmetry remains even for the propagation of a massive field in four spacetime dimensions. We apply this formalism to Classical electrodynamics and to the General Relativity Theory. The standard formalism with its distributed fields is retrieved in terms of spacetime average of the discrete field. Singularities are the by-products of the averaging process. This new formalism enlighten the meaning and the problem of field theory, and may allow a softer transition to a quantum theory. (author)

  15. Bias-corrected estimation of stable tail dependence function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beirlant, Jan; Escobar-Bach, Mikael; Goegebeur, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    We consider the estimation of the stable tail dependence function. We propose a bias-corrected estimator and we establish its asymptotic behaviour under suitable assumptions. The finite sample performance of the proposed estimator is evaluated by means of an extensive simulation study where...

  16. A Bartlett correction factor for tests on the cointegrating relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren

    2000-01-01

    Likelihood ratio tests for restrictions on cointegrating vectors are asymptotically [chi]2 distributed. For some values of the parameters this asymptotic distribution does not give a good approximation to the finite sample distribution. In this paper we derive the Bartlett correction factor...... for the likelihood ratio test and show by some simulation experiments that it can be a useful tool for making inference....

  17. quadratic spline finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bahadir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of heat transfer in a Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC thermistor, which may form one element of an electric circuit, is solved numerically by a finite element method. The approach used is based on Galerkin finite element using quadratic splines as shape functions. The resulting system of ordinary differential equations is solved by the finite difference method. Comparison is made with numerical and analytical solutions and the accuracy of the computed solutions indicates that the method is well suited for the solution of the PTC thermistor problem.

  18. Efficient implicit finite element analysis of sheet forming processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Huetink, Han

    2003-01-01

    The computation time for implicit finite element analyses tends to increase disproportionally with increasing problem size. This is due to the repeated solution of linear sets of equations, if direct solvers are used. By using iterative linear equation solvers the total analysis time can be reduced

  19. Using a satisfiability solver to identify deterministic finite state automata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heule, M.J.H.; Verwer, S.

    2009-01-01

    We present an exact algorithm for identification of deterministic finite automata (DFA) which is based on satisfiability (SAT) solvers. Despite the size of the low level SAT representation, our approach seems to be competitive with alternative techniques. Our contributions are threefold: First, we

  20. Different radiation impedance models for finite porous materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolan, Melanie; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The Sabine absorption coefficients of finite absorbers are measured in a reverberation chamber according to the international standard ISO 354. They vary with the specimen size essentially due to diffraction at the specimen edges, which can be seen as the radiation impedance differing from the in...

  1. Finite element analyses of wood laminated composite poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; R.C. Tang; Chung Y. Hse

    2005-01-01

    Finite element analyses using ANSYS were conducted on orthotropic, polygonal, wood laminated composite poles subjected to a body force and a concentrated load at the free end. Deflections and stress distributions of small-scale and full-size composite poles were analyzed and compared to the results obtained in an experimental study. The predicted deflection for both...

  2. A finite difference method for free boundary problems

    KAUST Repository

    Fornberg, Bengt

    2010-04-01

    Fornberg and Meyer-Spasche proposed some time ago a simple strategy to correct finite difference schemes in the presence of a free boundary that cuts across a Cartesian grid. We show here how this procedure can be combined with a minimax-based optimization procedure to rapidly solve a wide range of elliptic-type free boundary value problems. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. On the finite line source problem in diffusion theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, T.; Troen, I.; Larsen, S.E.

    1981-09-01

    A simple formula for calculating dispersion from a continuous finite line source, placed at right angles to the mean wind direction, is derived on the basis of statistical theory. Comparison is made with the virtual source concept usually used and this is shown to be correct only in the limit where the virtual time lag Tsub(v) is small compared to the timescale of the turbulence tsub(l). (Auth.)

  4. Abstract Level Parallelization of Finite Difference Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Vollebregt

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A formalism is proposed for describing finite difference calculations in an abstract way. The formalism consists of index sets and stencils, for characterizing the structure of sets of data items and interactions between data items (“neighbouring relations”. The formalism provides a means for lifting programming to a more abstract level. This simplifies the tasks of performance analysis and verification of correctness, and opens the way for automaticcode generation. The notation is particularly useful in parallelization, for the systematic construction of parallel programs in a process/channel programming paradigm (e.g., message passing. This is important because message passing, unfortunately, still is the only approach that leads to acceptable performance for many more unstructured or irregular problems on parallel computers that have non-uniform memory access times. It will be shown that the use of index sets and stencils greatly simplifies the determination of which data must be exchanged between different computing processes.

  5. Investigation of faulted tunnel models by combined photoelasticity and finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladkany, S.G.; Huang, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Models of square and circular tunnels with short faults cutting through their surfaces are investigated by photoelasticity. These models, when duplicated by finite element analysis can predict the stress states of square or circular faulted tunnels adequately. Finite element analysis, using gap elements, may be used to investigate full size faulted tunnel system

  6. An Autonomous Onboard Targeting Algorithm Using Finite Thrust Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarritt, Sara K.; Marchand, Belinda G.; Weeks, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    In earlier investigations, the adaptation and implementation of a modified two-level corrections process as the onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion is presented. The objective of that targeting algorithm is to generate the times of ignition and magnitudes of the required maneuvers such that the desired state at entry interface is achieved. In an actual onboard flight software implementation, these times of ignition and maneuvers are relayed onto Flight Control for command and execution. Although this process works well when the burn durations or burn arcs are small, this might not be the case during a contingency situation when lower thrust engines are employed to perform the maneuvers. Therefore, a new version of the modified two-level corrections process is formulated to handle the case of finite burn arcs. This paper presents the development and formulation of that finite burn modified two-level corrections process which can again be used as an onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion. Additionally, performance results and a comparison between the two methods are presented. The finite burn two-level corrector formulation presented here ensures the entry constraints at entry interface are still met without violating the available fuel budget, while still accounting for much longer burn times in its design.

  7. Logarithmic corrections from ferromagnetic impurity ending bonds of open antiferromagnetic host chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou Jizhong; Qin Shaojin; Su Zhaobin; Dai Jianhui; Yu Lu

    2000-06-01

    We analyze the logarithmic corrections due to ferromagnetic impurity ending bonds of open spin 1/2 antiferromagnetic chains, using the density matrix renormalization group technique. A universal finite size scaling ∼ 1/L log L for impurity contributions in the quasi-degenerate ground state energy is demonstrated for a zigzag spin 1/2 chain at the critical next nearest neighbor coupling and the standard Heisenberg spin 1/2 chain, in the long chain limit. Using an exact solution for the latter case it is argued that one can extract the impurity contributions to the entropy and specific heat from the scaling analysis. It is also shown that a pure spin 3/2 open Heisenberg chain belongs to the same universality class. (author)

  8. Finite nucleus Dirac mean field theory and random phase approximation using finite B splines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeil, J.A.; Furnstahl, R.J.; Rost, E.; Shepard, J.R.; Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742; Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309)

    1989-01-01

    We calculate the finite nucleus Dirac mean field spectrum in a Galerkin approach using finite basis splines. We review the method and present results for the relativistic σ-ω model for the closed-shell nuclei 16 O and 40 Ca. We study the convergence of the method as a function of the size of the basis and the closure properties of the spectrum using an energy-weighted dipole sum rule. We apply the method to the Dirac random-phase-approximation response and present results for the isoscalar 1/sup -/ and 3/sup -/ longitudinal form factors of 16 O and 40 Ca. We also use a B-spline spectral representation of the positive-energy projector to evaluate partial energy-weighted sum rules and compare with nonrelativistic sum rule results

  9. Incompleteness in the finite domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2017), s. 405-441 ISSN 1079-8986 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : finite domain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bulletin-of-symbolic-logic/article/incompleteness-in-the-finite-domain/D239B1761A73DCA534A4805A76D81C76

  10. Programming the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, I M; Margetts, L

    2013-01-01

    Many students, engineers, scientists and researchers have benefited from the practical, programming-oriented style of the previous editions of Programming the Finite Element Method, learning how to develop computer programs to solve specific engineering problems using the finite element method. This new fifth edition offers timely revisions that include programs and subroutine libraries fully updated to Fortran 2003, which are freely available online, and provides updated material on advances in parallel computing, thermal stress analysis, plasticity return algorithms, convection boundary c

  11. Incompleteness in the finite domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2017), s. 405-441 ISSN 1079-8986 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : finite domain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/ journals /bulletin-of-symbolic-logic/article/incompleteness-in-the-finite-domain/D239B1761A73DCA534A4805A76D81C76

  12. Attenuation correction for small animal PET tomographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Patrick L [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California, 700 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Rannou, Fernando R [Departamento de Ingenieria Informatica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3659, Santiago (Chile); Chatziioannou, Arion F [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California, 700 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2005-04-21

    Attenuation correction is one of the important corrections required for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET). This work will compare the quantitative accuracy of attenuation correction using a simple global scale factor with traditional transmission-based methods acquired either with a small animal PET or a small animal x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. Two phantoms (one mouse-sized and one rat-sized) and two animal subjects (one mouse and one rat) were scanned in CTI Concorde Microsystem's microPET (registered) Focus{sup TM} for emission and transmission data and in ImTek's MicroCAT{sup TM} II for transmission data. PET emission image values were calibrated against a scintillation well counter. Results indicate that the scale factor method of attenuation correction places the average measured activity concentration about the expected value, without correcting for the cupping artefact from attenuation. Noise analysis in the phantom studies with the PET-based method shows that noise in the transmission data increases the noise in the corrected emission data. The CT-based method was accurate and delivered low-noise images suitable for both PET data correction and PET tracer localization.

  13. Finite key analysis in quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, T.

    2007-10-31

    the obtainable key rate for any finite number of input signals, without making any approximations. As an application, we investigate the so-called ''Tomographic Protocol'', which is based on the Six-State Protocol and where Alice and Bob can obtain the additional information which quantum state they share after the distribution step of the protocol. We calculate the obtainable secret key rate under the assumption that the eavesdropper only conducts collective attacks and give a detailed analysis of the dependence of the key rate on various parameters: The number of input signals (the block size), the error rate in the sifted key (the QBER), and the security parameter. Furthermore, we study the influence of multi-photon events which naturally occur in a realistic implementation (orig.)

  14. A hybrid finite-volume and finite difference scheme for depth-integrated non-hydrostatic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jing; Sun, Jia-wen; Wang, Xing-gang; Yu, Yong-hai; Sun, Zhao-chen

    2017-06-01

    A depth-integrated, non-hydrostatic model with hybrid finite difference and finite volume numerical algorithm is proposed in this paper. By utilizing a fraction step method, the governing equations are decomposed into hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic parts. The first part is solved by using the finite volume conservative discretization method, whilst the latter is considered by solving discretized Poisson-type equations with the finite difference method. The second-order accuracy, both in time and space, of the finite volume scheme is achieved by using an explicit predictor-correction step and linear construction of variable state in cells. The fluxes across the cell faces are computed in a Godunov-based manner by using MUSTA scheme. Slope and flux limiting technique is used to equip the algorithm with total variation dimensioning property for shock capturing purpose. Wave breaking is treated as a shock by switching off the non-hydrostatic pressure in the steep wave front locally. The model deals with moving wet/dry front in a simple way. Numerical experiments are conducted to verify the proposed model.

  15. Conservative multi-implicit integral deferred correction methods with adaptive mesh refinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layton, A.T.

    2004-01-01

    In most models of reacting gas dynamics, the characteristic time scales of chemical reactions are much shorter than the hydrodynamic and diffusive time scales, rendering the reaction part of the model equations stiff. Moreover, nonlinear forcings may introduce into the solutions sharp gradients or shocks, the robust behavior and correct propagation of which require the use of specialized spatial discretization procedures. This study presents high-order conservative methods for the temporal integration of model equations of reacting flows. By means of a method of lines discretization on the flux difference form of the equations, these methods compute approximations to the cell-averaged or finite-volume solution. The temporal discretization is based on a multi-implicit generalization of integral deferred correction methods. The advection term is integrated explicitly, and the diffusion and reaction terms are treated implicitly but independently, with the splitting errors present in traditional operator splitting methods reduced via the integral deferred correction procedure. To reduce computational cost, time steps used to integrate processes with widely-differing time scales may differ in size. (author)

  16. A finite element model for sound transmission through laminated composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, J. V.; Koval, L. R.

    1987-01-01

    The finite element method is used to model the noise transmission through unstiffened and stiffened laminated composite panels of finite size into a closed cavity. Plate and acoustic finite elements are coupled and the frequencies of the coupled modes are determined. The model is then used to calculate the noise reduction of the panel. Results are compared to experimental values obtained at the NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the use of finite elements to model, for noise transmission calculations, complex structures, such as a stiffened composite panel or a composite panel with windows.

  17. Radiative corrections to the atomic photoeffect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEnnan, J.; Gavrila, M.

    1977-01-01

    The radiative corrections to the photoeffect are evaluated for the K-shell of hydrogenlike atoms to lowest order in the radiation field. The corrective matrix element is first discussed within the framework of the bound-state interaction (Furry) picture. We then employ the relativistic Born approximation for the Coulomb Dirac propagator and the final continuum wave function of the electron to obtain an expression which is correct to lowest order in αZ, provided αZ/β very-much-less-than 1, where β is the velocity of the ejected electron. The renormalization program is carried out completely, and the lowest-order radiative corrections are given explicitly in terms of the familiar first-order invariant functions of QED. The matrix element which results is further analyzed in terms of invariant amplitudes which are expressed as sums of Feynman parameter integrals. Finally, we evaluate the differential cross section assuming the polarizations of the electron and photon are not observed. Infrared divergences are eliminated from this cross section by allowing for the possibility that an unobserved soft photon is emitted along with the photoelectron. Although in general a numerical evaluation is necessary, analytic expressions are given for the low- and high-energy limits of our final expression for the radiative corrections to the photoeffect. We find that, while the corrections are small at low energy, for incident photons in the range 1--10 MeV and for electrons emitted near the forward direction (finite momentum transfer), the radiative corrections tend to reduce the photoeffect differential cross section by 1.0 to 7.0%

  18. Preconditioning for Mixed Finite Element Formulations of Elliptic Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Wildey, Tim

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a preconditioning technique for mixed finite element discretizations of elliptic equations. The technique is based on a block-diagonal approximation of the mass matrix which maintains the sparsity and positive definiteness of the corresponding Schur complement. This preconditioner arises from the multipoint flux mixed finite element method and is robust with respect to mesh size and is better conditioned for full permeability tensors than a preconditioner based on a diagonal approximation of the mass matrix. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013.

  19. Stochastic Neural Field Theory and the System-Size Expansion

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze a master equation formulation of stochastic neurodynamics for a network of synaptically coupled homogeneous neuronal populations each consisting of N identical neurons. The state of the network is specified by the fraction of active or spiking neurons in each population, and transition rates are chosen so that in the thermodynamic or deterministic limit (N → ∞) we recover standard activity-based or voltage-based rate models. We derive the lowest order corrections to these rate equations for large but finite N using two different approximation schemes, one based on the Van Kampen system-size expansion and the other based on path integral methods. Both methods yield the same series expansion of the moment equations, which at O(1/N) can be truncated to form a closed system of equations for the first-and second-order moments. Taking a continuum limit of the moment equations while keeping the system size N fixed generates a system of integrodifferential equations for the mean and covariance of the corresponding stochastic neural field model. We also show how the path integral approach can be used to study large deviation or rare event statistics underlying escape from the basin of attraction of a stable fixed point of the mean-field dynamics; such an analysis is not possible using the system-size expansion since the latter cannot accurately determine exponentially small transitions. © by SIAM.

  20. Fracture analysis of one-dimensional hexagonal quasicrystals: Researches of a finite dimension rectangular plate by boundary collocation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiaxing, Cheng; Dongfa, Sheng [Southwest Forestry University, Yunnan (China)

    2017-05-15

    As an important supplement and development to crystallography, the applications about quasicrystal materials have played a core role in many fields, such as manufacturing and the space industry. Due to the sensitivity of quasicrystals to defects, the research on the fracture problem of quasicrystals has attracted a great deal of attention. We present a boundary collocation method to research fracture problems for a finite dimension rectangular one-dimensional hexagonal quasicrystal plate. Because mode I and mode II problems for one- dimensional hexagonal quasicrystals are like that for the classical elastic materials, only the anti-plane problem is discussed in this paper. The correctness of the present numerical method is verified through a comparison of the present results and the existing results. And then, the size effects on stress field, stress intensity factor and energy release rate are discussed in detail. The obtained results can provide valuable references for the fracture behavior of quasicrystals.

  1. Linear embeddings of finite-dimensional subsets of Banach spaces into Euclidean spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, James C

    2009-01-01

    This paper treats the embedding of finite-dimensional subsets of a Banach space B into finite-dimensional Euclidean spaces. When the Hausdorff dimension of X − X is finite, d H (X − X) k are injective on X. The proof motivates the definition of the 'dual thickness exponent', which is the key to proving that a prevalent set of such linear maps have Hölder continuous inverse when the box-counting dimension of X is finite and k > 2d B (X). A related argument shows that if the Assouad dimension of X − X is finite and k > d A (X − X), a prevalent set of such maps are bi-Lipschitz with logarithmic corrections. This provides a new result for compact homogeneous metric spaces via the Kuratowksi embedding of (X, d) into L ∞ (X)

  2. Corrections in the gold foil activation method for determination of neutron beam density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1967-01-01

    A finite foil thickness and deviation in the cross section from the 1ν law imply corrections in the determination of neutron beam densities by means of foil activation. These corrections, which depend on the neutron velocity distribution, have been examined in general and are given in a specific...

  3. Solid finite elements through three decades

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesh, DN; Shrinivasa, U

    1994-01-01

    conventionally, solid finite elements have been looked upon as just generalizations of two-dimensional finite elements. In this article we trace their development starting from the days of their inception. Keeping in tune with our perceptions on developing finite elements, without taking recourse to any extra variational techniques, we discuss a few of the techniques which have been applied to solid finite elements. Finally we critically examine our own work on formulating solid finite elemen...

  4. Analysis method by fracture finite element for tee with longitudinal through-wall crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yuechuan; Zhang Fenggang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents how to use finite element procedure ABAQUS to conduct the fracture finite element analysis for tee with longitudinal through-wall crack, and focuses on the establishment of computation model and calculation method of J-integral. The finite element computation results are compared with the theoretical results for the straight pipe, which shows that the two results are almost the same. This indicates that the method, input and singular element which used to calculate J-integral are correct. The methods and processes can be used to analyze J-integral of tee with longitudinal through-wall crack by ABAQUS. (authors)

  5. Sustainable Sizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinette, Kathleen M; Veitch, Daisy

    2016-08-01

    To provide a review of sustainable sizing practices that reduce waste, increase sales, and simultaneously produce safer, better fitting, accommodating products. Sustainable sizing involves a set of methods good for both the environment (sustainable environment) and business (sustainable business). Sustainable sizing methods reduce (1) materials used, (2) the number of sizes or adjustments, and (3) the amount of product unsold or marked down for sale. This reduces waste and cost. The methods can also increase sales by fitting more people in the target market and produce happier, loyal customers with better fitting products. This is a mini-review of methods that result in more sustainable sizing practices. It also reviews and contrasts current statistical and modeling practices that lead to poor fit and sizing. Fit-mapping and the use of cases are two excellent methods suited for creating sustainable sizing, when real people (vs. virtual people) are used. These methods are described and reviewed. Evidence presented supports the view that virtual fitting with simulated people and products is not yet effective. Fit-mapping and cases with real people and actual products result in good design and products that are fit for person, fit for purpose, with good accommodation and comfortable, optimized sizing. While virtual models have been shown to be ineffective for predicting or representing fit, there is an opportunity to improve them by adding fit-mapping data to the models. This will require saving fit data, product data, anthropometry, and demographics in a standardized manner. For this success to extend to the wider design community, the development of a standardized method of data collection for fit-mapping with a globally shared fit-map database is needed. It will enable the world community to build knowledge of fit and accommodation and generate effective virtual fitting for the future. A standardized method of data collection that tests products' fit methodically

  6. Students' Attitude toward Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinda Fitriana

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Students’ attitudes influence their decision to whether or not accept the teachers’ feedback. Therefore, questionnaire was administered to one hundred and ninety-six twelfth grade of vocational high school students, wherein, ten of them were involved in interview, to figure out their perspective concerning to the teachers’ correction on their oral production. From both instruments, it is found that the students preferred the teachers as the correctors, although, they did not mind for peer correction. They also expected the teachers to give correction at every time they did error and for all types of errors. Additionally, students agreed that teachers’ personality and their way of teaching influenced their willingness to accept the corrective feedback.

  7. Corrected Age for Preemies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & Colic ... Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Preemie > Corrected Age For Preemies Ages & Stages ...

  8. Eyeglasses for Vision Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... light. Another option for vision correction with UV protection is prescription sunglasses . Also, for people who prefer one set of eyeglasses for both inside and outdoors, photochromatic lenses are ...

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is performed by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) to correct a wide range of minor and ... when sleeping, including snoring) Your dentist, orthodontist and OMS will work together to determine whether you are ...

  10. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Corrective Jaw ...

  11. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Corrective Jaw ...

  12. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... surgery, orthognathic surgery is performed to correct functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on ... without straining Chronic mouth breathing Sleep apnea (breathing problems when sleeping, including snoring) Your dentist, orthodontist and ...

  13. Finite and profinite quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vourdas, Apostolos

    2017-01-01

    This monograph provides an introduction to finite quantum systems, a field at the interface between quantum information and number theory, with applications in quantum computation and condensed matter physics. The first major part of this monograph studies the so-called `qubits' and `qudits', systems with periodic finite lattice as position space. It also discusses the so-called mutually unbiased bases, which have applications in quantum information and quantum cryptography. Quantum logic and its applications to quantum gates is also studied. The second part studies finite quantum systems, where the position takes values in a Galois field. This combines quantum mechanics with Galois theory. The third part extends the discussion to quantum systems with variables in profinite groups, considering the limit where the dimension of the system becomes very large. It uses the concepts of inverse and direct limit and studies quantum mechanics on p-adic numbers. Applications of the formalism include quantum optics and ...

  14. Finite element methods for engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Fenner, Roger T

    2013-01-01

    This book is intended as a textbook providing a deliberately simple introduction to finite element methods in a way that should be readily understandable to engineers, both students and practising professionals. Only the very simplest elements are considered, mainly two dimensional three-noded “constant strain triangles”, with simple linear variation of the relevant variables. Chapters of the book deal with structural problems (beams), classification of a broad range of engineering into harmonic and biharmonic types, finite element analysis of harmonic problems, and finite element analysis of biharmonic problems (plane stress and plane strain). Full Fortran programs are listed and explained in detail, and a range of practical problems solved in the text. Despite being somewhat unfashionable for general programming purposes, the Fortran language remains very widely used in engineering. The programs listed, which were originally developed for use on mainframe computers, have been thoroughly updated for use ...

  15. On characters of finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Broué, Michel

    2017-01-01

    This book explores the classical and beautiful character theory of finite groups. It does it by using some rudiments of the language of categories. Originally emerging from two courses offered at Peking University (PKU), primarily for third-year students, it is now better suited for graduate courses, and provides broader coverage than books that focus almost exclusively on groups. The book presents the basic tools, notions and theorems of character theory (including a new treatment of the control of fusion and isometries), and introduces readers to the categorical language at several levels. It includes and proves the major results on characteristic zero representations without any assumptions about the base field. The book includes a dedicated chapter on graded representations and applications of polynomial invariants of finite groups, and its closing chapter addresses the more recent notion of the Drinfeld double of a finite group and the corresponding representation of GL_2(Z).

  16. On the definition and measurement of fitness in finite populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thomas F

    2017-04-21

    I argue that some standard accounts of fitness in finite populations are both inaccurate and conceptually misleading. I show that the usual population-genetics conceptualization of fitness as the ratio between amounts of a type after selection and before selection works just as well in finite as in infinite populations. Fitness then becomes a random variable, and selection can be conceptualized as any difference in the distribution of this variable while genetic drift can be conceptualized through realized variation in the variable. I derive exact equations for and novel approximations to the mean and variance of relative fitness, approximations for selection gradients in finite populations, and an expression for the variance effective population size in the presence of selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Stress concentration in a finite functionally graded material plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, QuanQuan; Gao, CunFa; Chen, WenTao

    2012-07-01

    This paper is to study the two-dimensional stress distribution of a finite functionally graded material (FGM) plate with a circular hole under arbitrary constant loads. Using the method of piece-wise homogeneous layers, the stress analysis of the finite FGM plate having radial arbitrary elastic properties is made based on the complex variable method combined with the least square boundary collocation technique. Numerical results of stress distribution around the hole are then presented for different loading conditions, different material properties and different plate sizes, respectively. It is shown that the stress concentration in the finite plate is generally enhanced compared with the case of an infinite plate, but it can be significantly reduced by choosing proper change ways of the radial elastic modulus.

  18. Nonstandard Finite Difference Method Applied to a Linear Pharmacokinetics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwaseun Egbelowo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We extend the nonstandard finite difference method of solution to the study of pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic models. Pharmacokinetic (PK models are commonly used to predict drug concentrations that drive controlled intravenous (I.V. transfers (or infusion and oral transfers while pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PD interaction models are used to provide predictions of drug concentrations affecting the response of these clinical drugs. We structure a nonstandard finite difference (NSFD scheme for the relevant system of equations which models this pharamcokinetic process. We compare the results obtained to standard methods. The scheme is dynamically consistent and reliable in replicating complex dynamic properties of the relevant continuous models for varying step sizes. This study provides assistance in understanding the long-term behavior of the drug in the system, and validation of the efficiency of the nonstandard finite difference scheme as the method of choice.

  19. Radiative corrections in strong Coulomb fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soff, G.

    1993-04-01

    Contributions to the electron Lamb shift in highly charged ions are summarized. Recent theoretical developments as well as current experimental results are considered. Special emphasis is laid on higher-order vacuum polarization corrections as well as on the nuclear size effect on the electron self energy. (orig.). 5 figs

  20. Correcting for Nonresponse in Latent Class Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Rita R.; Dayton, C. Mitchell

    1996-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods were used to evaluate an EM algorithm used for the correction of missing data in latent class analysis. Findings regarding bias in parameter estimates suggest practical limits for the utility of the EM algorithm in terms of sample size and nonresponse rate. (SLD)

  1. Exploring Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    "Exploring" is a magazine of science, art, and human perception that communicates ideas museum exhibits cannot demonstrate easily by using experiments and activities for the classroom. This issue concentrates on size, examining it from a variety of viewpoints. The focus allows students to investigate and discuss interconnections among…

  2. Size matter!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg; Jespersen, Andreas Maaløe; Skov, Laurits Rhoden

    2015-01-01

    the hypothesis that a decrease in the size of food plates may lead to significant reductions in food waste from buffets. It supports and extends the set of circumstances in which a recent experiment found that reduced dinner plates in a hotel chain lead to reduced quantities of leftovers....

  3. Finite connectivity attractor neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wemmenhove, B; Coolen, A C C

    2003-01-01

    We study a family of diluted attractor neural networks with a finite average number of (symmetric) connections per neuron. As in finite connectivity spin glasses, their equilibrium properties are described by order parameter functions, for which we derive an integral equation in replica symmetric approximation. A bifurcation analysis of this equation reveals the locations of the paramagnetic to recall and paramagnetic to spin-glass transition lines in the phase diagram. The line separating the retrieval phase from the spin-glass phase is calculated at zero temperature. All phase transitions are found to be continuous

  4. Finite connectivity attractor neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemmenhove, B.; Coolen, A. C. C.

    2003-09-01

    We study a family of diluted attractor neural networks with a finite average number of (symmetric) connections per neuron. As in finite connectivity spin glasses, their equilibrium properties are described by order parameter functions, for which we derive an integral equation in replica symmetric approximation. A bifurcation analysis of this equation reveals the locations of the paramagnetic to recall and paramagnetic to spin-glass transition lines in the phase diagram. The line separating the retrieval phase from the spin-glass phase is calculated at zero temperature. All phase transitions are found to be continuous.

  5. Variational collocation on finite intervals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amore, Paolo; Cervantes, Mayra; Fernandez, Francisco M

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we study a set of functions, defined on an interval of finite width, which are orthogonal and which reduce to the sinc functions when the appropriate limit is taken. We show that these functions can be used within a variational approach to obtain accurate results for a variety of problems. We have applied them to the interpolation of functions on finite domains and to the solution of the Schroedinger equation, and we have compared the performance of the present approach with others

  6. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PECINGINA OLIMPIA-MIOARA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The application of finite element method is analytical when solutions can not be applied for deeper study analyzes static, dynamic or other types of requirements in different points of the structures .In practice it is necessary to know the behavior of the structure or certain parts components of the machine under the influence of certain factors static and dynamic . The application of finite element in the optimization of components leads to economic growth , to increase reliability and durability organs studied, thus the machine itself.

  7. Deterministic figure correction of piezoelectrically adjustable slumped glass optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRoo, Casey T.; Allured, Ryan; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Hertz, Edward; Marquez, Vanessa; Reid, Paul B.; Schwartz, Eric D.; Vikhlinin, Alexey A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Walker, Julian; Jackson, Thomas N.; Liu, Tianning; Tendulkar, Mohit

    2018-01-01

    Thin x-ray optics with high angular resolution (≤ 0.5 arcsec) over a wide field of view enable the study of a number of astrophysically important topics and feature prominently in Lynx, a next-generation x-ray observatory concept currently under NASA study. In an effort to address this technology need, piezoelectrically adjustable, thin mirror segments capable of figure correction after mounting and on-orbit are under development. We report on the fabrication and characterization of an adjustable cylindrical slumped glass optic. This optic has realized 100% piezoelectric cell yield and employs lithographically patterned traces and anisotropic conductive film connections to address the piezoelectric cells. In addition, the measured responses of the piezoelectric cells are found to be in good agreement with finite-element analysis models. While the optic as manufactured is outside the range of absolute figure correction, simulated corrections using the measured responses of the piezoelectric cells are found to improve 5 to 10 arcsec mirrors to 1 to 3 arcsec [half-power diameter (HPD), single reflection at 1 keV]. Moreover, a measured relative figure change which would correct the figure of a representative slumped glass piece from 6.7 to 1.2 arcsec HPD is empirically demonstrated. We employ finite-element analysis-modeled influence functions to understand the current frequency limitations of the correction algorithm employed and identify a path toward achieving subarcsecond corrections.

  8. An Autonomous Onboard Targeting Algorithm Using Finite Thrust Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarritt, Sara K.; Marchand, Belinda G.; Brown, Aaron J.; Tracy, William H.; Weeks, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    In earlier investigations, the adaptation and implementation of a modified two-level corrections (or targeting) process as the onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion is presented. The objective of that targeting algorithm is to generate the times of ignition and magnitudes of the required maneuvers such that the desired state at entry interface is achieved. In an actual onboard flight software implementation, these times of ignition and maneuvers are relayed onto Flight Control for command and execution. Although this process works well when the burn durations or burn arcs are small, this might not be the case during a contingency situation when lower thrust engines are employed to perform the maneuvers. Therefore, a new model for the two-level corrections process is formulated here to accommodate finite burn arcs. This paper presents the development and formulation of the finite burn two-level corrector, used as an onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion. A performance comparison between the impulsive and finite burn models is also presented. The present formulation ensures all entry constraints are met, without violating the available fuel budget, while allowing for low-thrust scenarios with long burn durations.

  9. Geological Corrections in Gravimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikuška, J.; Marušiak, I.

    2015-12-01

    Applying corrections for the known geology to gravity data can be traced back into the first quarter of the 20th century. Later on, mostly in areas with sedimentary cover, at local and regional scales, the correction known as gravity stripping has been in use since the mid 1960s, provided that there was enough geological information. Stripping at regional to global scales became possible after releasing the CRUST 2.0 and later CRUST 1.0 models in the years 2000 and 2013, respectively. Especially the later model provides quite a new view on the relevant geometries and on the topographic and crustal densities as well as on the crust/mantle density contrast. Thus, the isostatic corrections, which have been often used in the past, can now be replaced by procedures working with an independent information interpreted primarily from seismic studies. We have developed software for performing geological corrections in space domain, based on a-priori geometry and density grids which can be of either rectangular or spherical/ellipsoidal types with cells of the shapes of rectangles, tesseroids or triangles. It enables us to calculate the required gravitational effects not only in the form of surface maps or profiles but, for instance, also along vertical lines, which can shed some additional light on the nature of the geological correction. The software can work at a variety of scales and considers the input information to an optional distance from the calculation point up to the antipodes. Our main objective is to treat geological correction as an alternative to accounting for the topography with varying densities since the bottoms of the topographic masses, namely the geoid or ellipsoid, generally do not represent geological boundaries. As well we would like to call attention to the possible distortions of the corrected gravity anomalies. This work was supported by the Slovak Research and Development Agency under the contract APVV-0827-12.

  10. Group-invariant finite Fourier transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenefelt, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    The computation of the finite Fourier transform of functions is one of the most used computations in crystallography. Since the Fourier transform involved in 3-dimensional, the size of the computation becomes very large even for relatively few sample points along each edge. In this thesis, there is a family of algorithms that reduce the computation of Fourier transform of functions respecting the symmetries. Some properties of these algorithms are: (1) The algorithms make full use of the group of symmetries of a crystal. (2) The algorithms can be factored and combined according to the prime factorization of the number of points in the sample space. (3) The algorithms are organized into a family using the group structure of the crystallographic groups to make iterative procedures possible

  11. Lattice QCD at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeTar, C.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the numerical simulation of QCD at finite temperature is reviewed. Eight topics are treated briefly: (1) T c scaling, (2) Equation of state, (3) Baryon susceptibility, (4) The QCD Phase Diagram, (5) J/Ψ Binding in the Plasma, (6) The Screening Spectrum of the Plasma, (7) Gauge Symmetry Breaking at High T, (8) Progress in Computing Power. (author)

  12. Linguistics, Logic, and Finite Trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blackburn, P.; Meyer-Viol, W.

    1993-01-01

    A modal logic is developed to deal with finite ordered binary trees as they are used in (computational) linguistics. A modal language is introduced with operators for the 'mother of', 'first daughter of' and 'second daughter of' relations together with their transitive reflexive closures.

  13. On symmetric pyramidal finite elements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liu, L.; Davies, K. B.; Yuan, K.; Křížek, Michal

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 11, 1-2 (2004), s. 213-227 ISSN 1492-8760 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1019201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : mesh generation * finite element method * composite elements Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.108, year: 2004

  14. Ward identities at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOlivo, J.C.; Torres, M.; Tututi, E.

    1996-01-01

    The Ward identities for QED at finite temperature are derived using the functional real-time formalism. They are verified by an explicit one-loop calculation. An effective causal vertex is constructed which satisfy the Ward identity with the associated retarded self-energy. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  15. Finite-temperature confinement transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svetitsky, B.

    1984-01-01

    The formalism of lattice gauge theory at finite temperature is introduced. The framework of universality predictions for critical behavior is outlined, and recent analytic work in this direction is reviewed. New Monte Carlo information for the SU(4) theory are represented, and possible results of the inclusion of fermions in the SU(3) theory are listed

  16. Model Correction Factor Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Randrup-Thomsen, Søren; Morsing Johannesen, Johannes

    1997-01-01

    The model correction factor method is proposed as an alternative to traditional polynomial based response surface techniques in structural reliability considering a computationally time consuming limit state procedure as a 'black box'. The class of polynomial functions is replaced by a limit...... statebased on an idealized mechanical model to be adapted to the original limit state by the model correction factor. Reliable approximations are obtained by iterative use of gradient information on the original limit state function analogously to previous response surface approaches. However, the strength...... of the model correction factor method, is that in simpler form not using gradient information on the original limit state function or only using this information once, a drastic reduction of the number of limit state evaluation is obtained together with good approximations on the reliability. Methods...

  17. Bryant J. correction formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejera R, A.; Cortes P, A.; Becerril V, A.

    1990-03-01

    For the practical application of the method proposed by J. Bryant, the authors carried out a series of small corrections, related with the bottom, the dead time of the detectors and channels, with the resolution time of the coincidences, with the accidental coincidences, with the decay scheme and with the gamma efficiency of the beta detector beta and the beta efficiency beta of the gamma detector. The calculation of the correction formula is presented in the development of the present report, being presented 25 combinations of the probability of the first existent state at once of one disintegration and the second state at once of the following disintegration. (Author)

  18. Realistic finite temperature simulations of magnetic systems using quantum statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, Lars; Bergman, Anders

    2018-01-01

    We have performed realistic atomistic simulations at finite temperatures using Monte Carlo and atomistic spin dynamics simulations incorporating quantum (Bose-Einstein) statistics. The description is much improved at low temperatures compared to classical (Boltzmann) statistics normally used in these kind of simulations, while at higher temperatures the classical statistics are recovered. This corrected low-temperature description is reflected in both magnetization and the magnetic specific heat, the latter allowing for improved modeling of the magnetic contribution to free energies. A central property in the method is the magnon density of states at finite temperatures, and we have compared several different implementations for obtaining it. The method has no restrictions regarding chemical and magnetic order of the considered materials. This is demonstrated by applying the method to elemental ferromagnetic systems, including Fe and Ni, as well as Fe-Co random alloys and the ferrimagnetic system GdFe3.

  19. Approximate hydrodynamic design of a finite span hydrofoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirov, A N

    1955-01-01

    Previous work on the motion of various bodies under the surface of a heavy fluid is discussed. The solution of the motion of a flat plate by Keldysh and Lavrentiev is applied to the motion of a hydrofoil, making possible the presentation of charts for determining the lift and resistance of an infinite span hydrofoil operating in a heavy frictionless fluid having infinite depth below the free water surface. Consideration is given to the effects of viscosity and a method is suggested to correct for the finite span. The effect of the water surface on the downwash behind the foil is also discussed. A comparison of theoretical results obtained from this work with experimental data indicates that a basis for the approximate hydrodynamic design of a finite span hydrofoil has been achieved.

  20. Size-effects in porous metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    The intrinsic size-effect for porous metals is investigated. The analyses are carried out numerically using a finite strain generalization of a higher order strain gradient plasticity model. Results for plane strain growth of cylindrical voids are presented in terms of response curves and curves...

  1. Size-effects in porous metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2007-01-01

    The intrinsic size-effect for porous metals is investigated. The analyses are carried out numerically using a finite strain generalization of a higher order strain gradient plasticity model. Results for plane strain growth of cylindrical voids are presented in terms of response curves and curves...

  2. Introduction to finite temperature and finite density QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2014-01-01

    It has been pointed out that QCD (Quantum Chromodynamics) in the circumstances of medium at finite temperature and density shows numbers of phenomena similar to the characteristics of solid state physics, e.g. phase transitions. In the past ten years, the very high temperature and density matter came to be observed experimentally at the heavy ion collisions. At the same time, the numerical QCD analysis at finite temperature and density attained quantitative level analysis possible owing to the remarkable progress of computers. In this summer school lecture, it has been set out to give not only the recent results, but also the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry, the fundamental theory of finite temperature and further expositions as in the following four sections. The first section is titled as 'Introduction to Finite Temperature and Density QCD' with subsections of 1.1 standard model and QCD, 1.2 phase transition and phase structure of QCD, 1.3 lattice QCD and thermodynamic quantity, 1.4 heavy ion collision experiments, and 1.5 neutron stars. The second one is 'Equilibrium State' with subsections of 2.1 chiral symmetry, 2.2 vacuum state: BCS theory, 2.3 NJL (Nambu-Jona-Lasinio) model, and 2.4 color superconductivity. The third one is 'Static fluctuations' with subsections of 3.1 fluctuations, 3.2 moment and cumulant, 3.3 increase of fluctuations at critical points, 3.4 analysis of fluctuations by lattice QCD and Taylor expansion, and 3.5 experimental exploration of QCD phase structure. The fourth one is 'Dynamical Structure' with 4.1 linear response theory, 4.2 spectral functions, 4.3 Matsubara function, and 4.4 analyses of dynamical structure by lattice QCD. (S. Funahashi)

  3. Gap Size Uncertainty Quantification in Advanced Gas Reactor TRISO Fuel Irradiation Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Binh T.; Einerson, Jeffrey J.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Lybeck, Nancy J.; Petti, David A.

    2016-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-3/4 experiment is the combination of the third and fourth tests conducted within the tristructural isotropic fuel development and qualification research program. The AGR-3/4 test consists of twelve independent capsules containing a fuel stack in the center surrounded by three graphite cylinders and shrouded by a stainless steel shell. This capsule design enables temperature control of both the fuel and the graphite rings by varying the neon/helium gas mixture flowing through the four resulting gaps. Knowledge of fuel and graphite temperatures is crucial for establishing the functional relationship between fission product release and irradiation thermal conditions. These temperatures are predicted for each capsule using the commercial finite-element heat transfer code ABAQUS. Uncertainty quantification reveals that the gap size uncertainties are among the dominant factors contributing to predicted temperature uncertainty due to high input sensitivity and uncertainty. Gap size uncertainty originates from the fact that all gap sizes vary with time due to dimensional changes of the fuel compacts and three graphite rings caused by extended exposure to high temperatures and fast neutron irradiation. Gap sizes are estimated using as-fabricated dimensional measurements at the start of irradiation and post irradiation examination dimensional measurements at the end of irradiation. Uncertainties in these measurements provide a basis for quantifying gap size uncertainty. However, lack of gap size measurements during irradiation and lack of knowledge about the dimension change rates lead to gap size modeling assumptions, which could increase gap size uncertainty. In addition, the dimensional measurements are performed at room temperature, and must be corrected to account for thermal expansion of the materials at high irradiation temperatures. Uncertainty in the thermal expansion coefficients for the graphite materials used in the AGR-3/4 capsules

  4. Computer correction of turbulent distortions of image of extended objects on near-Earth paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averin, A P; Morozov, Yu B; Pryanichkov, V S; Tyapin, V V

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm of computer-based correction of images of extended objects distorted by turbulent atmosphere is developed. The method of computer correction is used to correct a distorted image of an extended object on a horizontal 2300-m-long observation path. The angular size of the corrected-image region was 15'. (image processing)

  5. Nuclear sizes and the isotope shift

    OpenAIRE

    Friar, J. L.; Martorell Domenech, Juan; Sprung, Donald W. L.

    1997-01-01

    Darwin-Foldy nuclear-size corrections in electronic atoms and nuclear radii are discussed from the nuclear-physics perspective. The interpretation of precise isotope-shift measurements is formalism dependent, and care must be exercised in interpreting these results and those obtained from relativistic electron scattering from nuclei. We strongly advocate that the entire nuclear-charge operator be used in calculating nuclear-size corrections in atoms rather than relegating portions of it to th...

  6. Error Correcting Codes -34 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Science, Bangalore. Her interests are in. Theoretical Computer. Science. SERIES I ARTICLE. Error Correcting Codes. 2. The Hamming Codes. Priti Shankar. In the first article of this series we showed how redundancy introduced into a message transmitted over a noisy channel could improve the reliability of transmission. In.

  7. Error Correcting Codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 3. Error Correcting Codes - Reed Solomon Codes. Priti Shankar. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 3 March 1997 pp 33-47. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/03/0033-0047 ...

  8. Error Correcting Codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    focused pictures of Triton, Neptune's largest moon. This great feat was in no small measure due to the fact that the sophisticated communication system on Voyager had an elaborate error correcting scheme built into it. At Jupiter and Saturn, a convolutional code was used to enhance the reliability of transmission, and at ...

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their surgery, orthognathic surgery is performed to correct functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on many aspects of life. Following are some of the conditions that may ... front, or side Facial injury Birth defects Receding lower jaw and ...

  10. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We Are Find a Surgeon News Videos Contact Anesthesia Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic ...

  11. Error Correcting Codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It was engineering on the grand scale. - the use of new material for .... ROAD REPAIRSCE!STOP}!TL.,ZBFALK where errors occur in both the message as well as the check symbols, the decoder would be able to correct all of these (as there are not more than 8 .... before it is conveyed to the master disc. Modulation caters for.

  12. Text Induced Spelling Correction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynaert, M.W.C.

    2004-01-01

    We present TISC, a language-independent and context-sensitive spelling checking and correction system designed to facilitate the automatic removal of non-word spelling errors in large corpora. Its lexicon is derived from a very large corpus of raw text, without supervision, and contains word

  13. Error Correcting Codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 3. Error Correcting Codes - Reed Solomon Codes. Priti Shankar. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 3 March ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India ...

  14. 10. Correctness of Programs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 4. Algorithms - Correctness of Programs. R K Shyamasundar. Series Article Volume 3 ... Author Affiliations. R K Shyamasundar1. Computer Science Group, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India.

  15. Correctional Practices in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskridge, Chris W.

    1989-01-01

    Describes Japanese correctional system including its early history and adoption of Western ideas in the late nineteenth century. Presents current Japanese treatment practices, probation/parole systems, and other offender assistance programs pointing out the importance of individual responsibility and community involvement to the system. Compares…

  16. Rigorous characterization of photonic devices by finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, B. M. A.; Kejalakshmy, N.

    2015-01-01

    A review on the characterisations of photonics devices by using the frequency domain modal solution, junction analysis and beam propagation methods and additionally time-domain approach, but all based on the numerically efficient finite element method is presented. Numerically simulated results for various photonic devices such as uniform optical waveguides, photonic crystal fibres, high-speed optical modulators, spot-size converters, compact power splitters, metalclad terahertz waveguides, photonic crystals and nonlinear acousto-optical interactions in optical waveguide are presented.

  17. OPTIMIZATION OF EQUIPMENT "RAKECUP TYPE " USING FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ŞOMOIAG Adrian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been designed a new solution technological constructive of navvy equipment like rake cup attachable to the excavator arm. Cup shape and size were determined after repeated attempts for a specific cup, with the technological requirements required by the designer, the attempts being made in AutoCAD, 2D - 3D, until the desired results, based on the calculations. Finally, the structure was optimized to load applications from the cup, using finite element analysis method.

  18. Acoustic length correction of closed cylindrical side-branched tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Z. L.

    2005-05-01

    A numerical approach based on the three-dimensional boundary element method (BEM) is developed to determine the acoustic length correction of closed cylindrical side-branched tube mounted perpendicular to a cylindrical main pipe. The effects of Helmholtz number and finite length of side-branched tube on the acoustic length correction are examined, and a curve-fitting expression is provided for the acoustically long side-branched tube. For a pipe-mounted concentric Helmholtz resonator, the transmission loss and resonance frequency are predicted by using the 3-D BEM and the corrected 1-D analytical approach to assess the accuracy and applicability of the latter, as well as to illustrate the importance of acoustic length correction for an accurate prediction of resonance frequency of the pipe-mounted resonator.

  19. Hadron mass corrections in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accardi, A.; Hobbs, T.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2009-01-01

    We derive mass corrections for semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of leptons from nucleons using a collinear factorization framework which incorporates the initial state mass of the target nucleon and the final state mass of the produced hadron h. The hadron mass correction is made by introducing a generalized, finite-Q 2 scaling variable ζ h for the hadron fragmentation function, which approaches the usual energy fraction z h = E h /ν in the Bjorken limit. We systematically examine the kinematic dependencies of the mass corrections to semi-inclusive cross sections, and find that these are even larger than for inclusive structure functions. The hadron mass corrections compete with the experimental uncertainties at kinematics typical of current facilities, Q 2 2 and intermediate x B > 0.3, and will be important to efforts at extracting parton distributions from semi-inclusive processes at intermediate energies.

  20. Issues in Correctional Training and Casework. Correctional Monograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolford, Bruce I., Ed.; Lawrenz, Pam, Ed.

    The eight papers contained in this monograph were drawn from two national meetings on correctional training and casework. Titles and authors are: "The Challenge of Professionalism in Correctional Training" (Michael J. Gilbert); "A New Perspective in Correctional Training" (Jack Lewis); "Reasonable Expectations in Correctional Officer Training:…