WorldWideScience

Sample records for finite sample size

  1. Finite-sample-size effects on convection in mushy layers

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong, Jin-Qiang; Wells, Andrew J; Wettlaufer, John S

    2012-01-01

    We report theoretical and experimental investigations of the flow instability responsible for the mushy-layer mode of convection and the formation of chimneys, drainage channels devoid of solid, during steady-state solidification of aqueous ammonium chloride. Under certain growth conditions a state of steady mushy-layer growth with no flow is unstable to the onset of convection, resulting in the formation of chimneys. We present regime diagrams to quantify the state of the flow as a function of the initial liquid concentration, the porous-medium Rayleigh number, and the sample width. For a given liquid concentration, increasing both the porous-medium Rayleigh number and the sample width caused the system to change from a stable state of no flow to a different state with the formation of chimneys. Decreasing the concentration ratio destabilized the system and promoted the formation of chimneys. As the initial liquid concentration increased, onset of convection and formation of chimneys occurred at larger value...

  2. Light propagation in tissues: effect of finite size of tissue sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Dets, Sergiy M.; Rusina, Tatyana V.

    1995-12-01

    Laser beam propagation inside tissues with different lateral dimensions has been considered. Scattering and anisotropic properties of tissue critically determine spatial fluence distribution and predict sizes of tissue specimens when deviations of this distribution can be neglected. Along the axis of incident beam the fluence rate weakly depends on sample size whereas its relative increase (more than 20%) towards the lateral boundaries. The finite sizes were considered to be substantial only for samples with sizes comparable with the diameter of the laser beam. Interstitial irradiance patterns simulated by Monte Carlo method were compared with direct measurements in human brain specimens.

  3. A simple method for estimating genetic diversity in large populations from finite sample sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajora Om P

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sample size is one of the critical factors affecting the accuracy of the estimation of population genetic diversity parameters. Small sample sizes often lead to significant errors in determining the allelic richness, which is one of the most important and commonly used estimators of genetic diversity in populations. Correct estimation of allelic richness in natural populations is challenging since they often do not conform to model assumptions. Here, we introduce a simple and robust approach to estimate the genetic diversity in large natural populations based on the empirical data for finite sample sizes. Results We developed a non-linear regression model to infer genetic diversity estimates in large natural populations from finite sample sizes. The allelic richness values predicted by our model were in good agreement with those observed in the simulated data sets and the true allelic richness observed in the source populations. The model has been validated using simulated population genetic data sets with different evolutionary scenarios implied in the simulated populations, as well as large microsatellite and allozyme experimental data sets for four conifer species with contrasting patterns of inherent genetic diversity and mating systems. Our model was a better predictor for allelic richness in natural populations than the widely-used Ewens sampling formula, coalescent approach, and rarefaction algorithm. Conclusions Our regression model was capable of accurately estimating allelic richness in natural populations regardless of the species and marker system. This regression modeling approach is free from assumptions and can be widely used for population genetic and conservation applications.

  4. Effect of dislocation pile-up on size-dependent yield strength in finite single-crystal micro-samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Bo; Shibutani, Yoji, E-mail: sibutani@mech.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka University, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Zhang, Xu [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, School of Aerospace, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); School of Mechanics and Engineering Science, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Shang, Fulin [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, School of Aerospace, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2015-07-07

    Recent research has explained that the steeply increasing yield strength in metals depends on decreasing sample size. In this work, we derive a statistical physical model of the yield strength of finite single-crystal micro-pillars that depends on single-ended dislocation pile-up inside the micro-pillars. We show that this size effect can be explained almost completely by considering the stochastic lengths of the dislocation source and the dislocation pile-up length in the single-crystal micro-pillars. The Hall–Petch-type relation holds even in a microscale single-crystal, which is characterized by its dislocation source lengths. Our quantitative conclusions suggest that the number of dislocation sources and pile-ups are significant factors for the size effect. They also indicate that starvation of dislocation sources is another reason for the size effect. Moreover, we investigated the explicit relationship between the stacking fault energy and the dislocation “pile-up” effect inside the sample: materials with low stacking fault energy exhibit an obvious dislocation pile-up effect. Our proposed physical model predicts a sample strength that agrees well with experimental data, and our model can give a more precise prediction than the current single arm source model, especially for materials with low stacking fault energy.

  5. Sample size methodology

    CERN Document Server

    Desu, M M

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important problems in designing an experiment or a survey is sample size determination and this book presents the currently available methodology. It includes both random sampling from standard probability distributions and from finite populations. Also discussed is sample size determination for estimating parameters in a Bayesian setting by considering the posterior distribution of the parameter and specifying the necessary requirements. The determination of the sample size is considered for ranking and selection problems as well as for the design of clinical trials. Appropria

  6. Levitation force between a small magnet and a superconducting sample of finite size in the Meissner state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Jorge; Sosa, Victor

    1999-10-01

    The repulsion force between a cylindrical superconductor in the Meissner state and a small permanent magnet was calculated under the assumption that the superconductor was formed by a continuous array of dipoles distributed in the finite volume of the sample. After summing up the dipole-dipole interactions with the magnet, we obtained analytical expressions for the levitation force as a function of the superconductor-magnet distance, radius and thickness of the sample. We analyzed two configurations, with the magnet in a horizontal or vertical orientation.

  7. Sampling errors of quantile estimations from finite samples of data

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Philippe; Gachon, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Empirical relationships are derived for the expected sampling error of quantile estimations using Monte Carlo experiments for two frequency distributions frequently encountered in climate sciences. The relationships found are expressed as a scaling factor times the standard error of the mean; these give a quick tool to estimate the uncertainty of quantiles for a given finite sample size.

  8. Small size sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh R. Pathak

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the law of large numbers which is derived from probability theory, we tend to increase the sample size to the maximum. Central limit theorem is another inference from the same probability theory which approves largest possible number as sample size for better validity of measuring central tendencies like mean and median. Sometimes increase in sample-size turns only into negligible betterment or there is no increase at all in statistical relevance due to strong dependence or systematic error. If we can afford a little larger sample, statistically power of 0.90 being taken as acceptable with medium Cohen's d (<0.5 and for that we can take a sample size of 175 very safely and considering problem of attrition 200 samples would suffice. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2012; 1(1.000: 43-44

  9. Probabilistic sampling of finite renewal processes

    CERN Document Server

    Antunes, Nelson; 10.3150/10-BEJ321

    2012-01-01

    Consider a finite renewal process in the sense that interrenewal times are positive i.i.d. variables and the total number of renewals is a random variable, independent of interrenewal times. A finite point process can be obtained by probabilistic sampling of the finite renewal process, where each renewal is sampled with a fixed probability and independently of other renewals. The problem addressed in this work concerns statistical inference of the original distributions of the total number of renewals and interrenewal times from a sample of i.i.d. finite point processes obtained by sampling finite renewal processes. This problem is motivated by traffic measurements in the Internet in order to characterize flows of packets (which can be seen as finite renewal processes) and where the use of packet sampling is becoming prevalent due to increasing link speeds and limited storage and processing capacities.

  10. Stochastic synchronization in finite size spiking networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Brent; Rinzel, John; Reyes, Alex

    2006-09-01

    We study a stochastic synchronization of spiking activity in feedforward networks of integrate-and-fire model neurons. A stochastic mean field analysis shows that synchronization occurs only when the network size is sufficiently small. This gives evidence that the dynamics, and hence processing, of finite size populations can be drastically different from that observed in the infinite size limit. Our results agree with experimentally observed synchrony in cortical networks, and further strengthen the link between synchrony and propagation in cortical systems.

  11. Finite-size effects from giant magnons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arutyunov, Gleb [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)]. E-mail: g.arutyunov@phys.uu.nl; Frolov, Sergey [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)]. E-mail: frolovs@aei.mpg.de; Zamaklar, Marija [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)]. E-mail: marzam@aei.mpg.de

    2007-08-27

    In order to analyze finite-size effects for the gauge-fixed string sigma model on AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}, we construct one-soliton solutions carrying finite angular momentum J. In the infinite J limit the solutions reduce to the recently constructed one-magnon configuration of Hofman and Maldacena. The solutions do not satisfy the level-matching condition and hence exhibit a dependence on the gauge choice, which however disappears as the size J is taken to infinity. Interestingly, the solutions do not conserve all the global charges of the psu(2,2-vertical bar4) algebra of the sigma model, implying that the symmetry algebra of the gauge-fixed string sigma model is different from psu(2,2-vertical bar4) for finite J, once one gives up the level-matching condition. The magnon dispersion relation exhibits exponential corrections with respect to the infinite J solution. We also find a generalisation of our one-magnon configuration to a solution carrying two charges on the sphere. We comment on the possible implications of our findings for the existence of the Bethe ansatz describing the spectrum of strings carrying finite charges.

  12. Learning maximum entropy models from finite-size data sets: A fast data-driven algorithm allows sampling from the posterior distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Ulisse

    2016-08-01

    Maximum entropy models provide the least constrained probability distributions that reproduce statistical properties of experimental datasets. In this work we characterize the learning dynamics that maximizes the log-likelihood in the case of large but finite datasets. We first show how the steepest descent dynamics is not optimal as it is slowed down by the inhomogeneous curvature of the model parameters' space. We then provide a way for rectifying this space which relies only on dataset properties and does not require large computational efforts. We conclude by solving the long-time limit of the parameters' dynamics including the randomness generated by the systematic use of Gibbs sampling. In this stochastic framework, rather than converging to a fixed point, the dynamics reaches a stationary distribution, which for the rectified dynamics reproduces the posterior distribution of the parameters. We sum up all these insights in a "rectified" data-driven algorithm that is fast and by sampling from the parameters' posterior avoids both under- and overfitting along all the directions of the parameters' space. Through the learning of pairwise Ising models from the recording of a large population of retina neurons, we show how our algorithm outperforms the steepest descent method.

  13. Sample size determination and power

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, Thomas P, Jr

    2013-01-01

    THOMAS P. RYAN, PhD, teaches online advanced statistics courses for Northwestern University and The Institute for Statistics Education in sample size determination, design of experiments, engineering statistics, and regression analysis.

  14. Finite-size scaling at quantum transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campostrini, Massimo; Pelissetto, Andrea; Vicari, Ettore

    2014-03-01

    We develop the finite-size scaling (FSS) theory at quantum transitions. We consider various boundary conditions, such as open and periodic boundary conditions, and characterize the corrections to the leading FSS behavior. Using renormalization-group (RG) theory, we generalize the classical scaling ansatz to describe FSS in the quantum case, classifying the different sources of scaling corrections. We identify nonanalytic corrections due to irrelevant (bulk and boundary) RG perturbations and analytic contributions due to regular backgrounds and analytic expansions of the nonlinear scaling fields. To check the general predictions, we consider the quantum XY chain in a transverse field. For this model exact or numerically accurate results can be obtained by exploiting its fermionic quadratic representation. We study the FSS of several observables, such as the free energy, the energy differences between low-energy levels, correlation functions of the order parameter, etc., confirming the general predictions in all cases. Moreover, we consider bipartite entanglement entropies, which are characterized by the presence of additional scaling corrections, as predicted by conformal field theory.

  15. Size definitions for particle sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    The recommendations of an ad hoc working group appointed by Committee TC 146 of the International Standards Organization on size definitions for particle sampling are reported. The task of the group was to collect the various definitions of 'respirable dust' and to propose a practical definition on recommendations for handling standardization on this matter. One of two proposed cut-sizes in regard to division at the larynx will be adopted after a ballot.

  16. Thompson Sampling: An Optimal Finite Time Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufmann, Emilie; Munos, Rémi

    2012-01-01

    The question of the optimality of Thompson Sampling for solving the stochastic multi-armed bandit problem had been open since 1933. In this paper we answer it positively for the case of Bernoulli rewards by providing the first finite-time analysis that matches the asymptotic rate given in the Lai and Robbins lower bound for the cumulative regret. The proof is accompanied by a numerical comparison with other optimal policies, experiments that have been lacking in the literature until now for the Bernoulli case.

  17. [Clinical research V. Sample size].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, Juan O; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Bernal-Rosales, Laura Paola

    2011-01-01

    In clinical research it is impossible and inefficient to study all patients with a specific pathology, so it is necessary to study a sample of them. The estimation of the sample size before starting a study guarantees the stability of the results and allows us to foresee the feasibility of the study depending on the availability of patients and cost. The basic structure of sample size estimation is based on the premise that seeks to demonstrate, among other cases, that the observed difference between two or more maneuvers in the subsequent state is real. Initially, it requires knowing the value of the expected difference (δ) and its data variation (standard deviation). These data are usually obtained from previous studies. Then, other components must be considered: a (alpha), percentage of error in the assertion that the difference between means is real, usually 5 %; and β, error rate accepting the claim that the no-difference between the means is real, usually ranging from 15 to 20 %. Finally, these values are substituted into the formula or in an electronic program for estimating sample size. While summary and dispersion measures vary with the type of variable according to the outcome, the basic structure is the same.

  18. Multipartite geometric entanglement in finite size XY model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasone, Massimo; Dell' Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Giampaolo, Salvatore Marco; Illuminati, Fabrizio, E-mail: blasone@sa.infn.i [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Via Ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2009-06-01

    We investigate the behavior of the multipartite entanglement in the finite size XY model by means of the hierarchical geometric measure of entanglement. By selecting specific components of the hierarchy, we study both global entanglement and genuinely multipartite entanglement.

  19. Finite-size effects in silica: a landscape perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saksaengwijit, A; Heuer, A [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie and International Graduate School of Chemistry, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2007-05-23

    Finite-size effects are analysed for the well-known BKS model of silica. Results are presented for thermodynamic as well as dynamic observables which play a key role in the analysis of the potential energy landscape. It turns out that, for the analysed temperature range (T{>=}3000 K), a system with only N = 99 particles does not display significant finite-size effects in thermodynamic observables. In agreement with previous work, one observes finite-size effects for the dynamics. However, after rescaling of time the finite-size effects nearly disappear. These results suggest that for BKS-silica a system with only N = 99 particles is sufficiently large to study important properties of structural relaxation in the temperature range considered.

  20. Finite-State Complexity and the Size of Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Calude

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Finite-state complexity is a variant of algorithmic information theory obtained by replacing Turing machines with finite transducers. We consider the state-size of transducers needed for minimal descriptions of arbitrary strings and, as our main result, we show that the state-size hierarchy with respect to a standard encoding is infinite. We consider also hierarchies yielded by more general computable encodings.

  1. Finite-size Energy of Non-interacting Fermi Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebert, Martin, E-mail: gebert@math.lmu.de [ETH Zürich , Theoretische Physik (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    We study the asymptotics of the difference of the ground-state energies of two non-interacting N-particle Fermi gases in a finite volume of length L in the thermodynamic limit up to order 1/L. We are particularly interested in subdominant terms proportional to 1/L, called finite-size energy. In the nineties (Affleck, Nuc. Phys. B 58, 35–41 1997; Zagoskin and Affleck, J. Phys. A 30, 5743–5765 1997) claimed that the finite-size energy is related to the decay exponent occurring in Anderson’s orthogonality. We prove that the finite-size energy depends on the details of the thermodynamic limit and is therefore non-universal. Typically, it includes an additional linear term in the scattering phase shift.

  2. Finite-size Energy of Non-interacting Fermi Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebert, Martin

    2015-12-01

    We study the asymptotics of the difference of the ground-state energies of two non-interacting N-particle Fermi gases in a finite volume of length L in the thermodynamic limit up to order 1/ L. We are particularly interested in subdominant terms proportional to 1/ L, called finite-size energy. In the nineties (Affleck, Nuc. Phys. B 58, 35-41 1997; Zagoskin and Affleck, J. Phys. A 30, 5743-5765 1997) claimed that the finite-size energy is related to the decay exponent occurring in Anderson's orthogonality. We prove that the finite-size energy depends on the details of the thermodynamic limit and is therefore non-universal. Typically, it includes an additional linear term in the scattering phase shift.

  3. Dynamic properties of epidemic spreading on finite size complex networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ying; Liu Yang; Shan Xiu-Ming; Ren Yong; Jiao Jian; Qiu Ben

    2005-01-01

    The Internet presents a complex topological structure, on which computer viruses can easily spread. By using theoretical analysis and computer simulation methods, the dynamic process of disease spreading on finite size networks with complex topological structure is investigated. On the finite size networks, the spreading process of SIS (susceptibleinfected-susceptible) model is a finite Markov chain with an absorbing state. Two parameters, the survival probability and the conditional infecting probability, are introduced to describe the dynamic properties of disease spreading on finite size networks. Our results can help understanding computer virus epidemics and other spreading phenomena on communication and social networks. Also, knowledge about the dynamic character of virus spreading is helpful for adopting immunity policy.

  4. Magnetic catalysis of a finite size pion condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Ayala, Alejandro; Villavicencio, C

    2016-01-01

    We study the Bose-Einstein condensation of a finite size pion gas subject to the influence of a magnetic field. We find the expressions for the critical chemical potential and temperature for the onset of condensation. We show that for values of the external magnetic flux larger than the elemental flux, the critical temperature is larger than the one obtained by considering only finite size effects. We use experimentally reported values of pion source sizes and multiplicities at LHC energies to show that if the magnetic flux, produced initially in peripheral heavy-ion collision, is at least partially preserved up to the hadronic phase, the combined finite size and magnetic field effects give rise to a critical temperature above the kinetic freeze-out temperature. We discuss the implications for the evolution of the pion system created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  5. Magnetic catalysis of a finite-size pion condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Mercado, Pedro; Villavicencio, C.

    2017-01-01

    We study the Bose-Einstein condensation of a finite-size pion gas subject to the influence of a magnetic field. We find the expressions for the critical chemical potential and temperature for the onset of condensation. We show that for values of the external magnetic flux larger than the elemental flux, the critical temperature is larger than the one obtained by considering only finite-size effects. We use experimentally reported values of pion source sizes and multiplicities at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies to show that if the magnetic flux, produced initially in peripheral heavy-ion collisions, is at least partially preserved up to the hadronic phase, the combined finite-size and magnetic field effects give rise to a critical temperature above the kinetic freeze-out temperature. We discuss the implications for the evolution of the pion system created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  6. Finite-size effects in the spherical model of finite thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamati, H.

    2008-09-01

    A detailed analysis of the finite-size effects on the bulk critical behaviour of the d-dimensional mean spherical model confined to a film geometry with finite thickness L is reported. Along the finite direction different kinds of boundary conditions are applied: periodic (p), antiperiodic (a) and free surfaces with Dirichlet (D), Neumann (N) and a combination of Neumann and Dirichlet (ND) on both surfaces. A systematic method for the evaluation of the finite-size corrections to the free energy for the different types of boundary conditions is proposed. The free energy density and the equation for the spherical field are computed for arbitrary d. It is found, for 2 finite-size scaling form at the bulk critical temperature only for (p) and (a). For the remaining boundary conditions the standard finite-size scaling hypothesis is not valid. At d = 3, the critical amplitude of the singular part of the free energy (related to the so-called Casimir amplitude) is estimated. We obtain Δ(p) = -2ζ(3)/(5π) = -0.153 051..., Δ(a) = 0.274 543... and Δ(ND) = 0.019 22..., implying a fluctuation-induced attraction between the surfaces for (p) and repulsion in the other two cases. For (D) and (N) we find a logarithmic dependence on L.

  7. Finite-size scaling a collection of reprints

    CERN Document Server

    1988-01-01

    Over the past few years, finite-size scaling has become an increasingly important tool in studies of critical systems. This is partly due to an increased understanding of finite-size effects by analytical means, and partly due to our ability to treat larger systems with large computers. The aim of this volume was to collect those papers which have been important for this progress and which illustrate novel applications of the method. The emphasis has been placed on relatively recent developments, including the use of the &egr;-expansion and of conformal methods.

  8. Finite-size geometric entanglement from tensor network algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Qianqian; Zhou Huanqiang [Centre for Modern Physics and Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Orus, Roman; Fjaerestad, John Ove [University of Queensland, Department of Physics, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: orus@physics.uq.edu.au

    2010-02-15

    The global geometric entanglement (GE) is studied in the context of newly developed tensor network algorithms for finite systems. For one-dimensional quantum spin systems it is found that, at criticality, the leading finite-size correction to the global GE per site behaves as b/n, where n is the size of the system and b a given coefficient. Our conclusion is based on the computation of the GE per spin for the quantum Ising model in a transverse magnetic field and for the spin-1/2 XXZ model. We also discuss the possibility of coefficient b being universal.

  9. Finite-size effects in amorphous indium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sreemanta; Tewari, Girish C.; Mahalu, Diana; Shahar, Dan

    2016-04-01

    We study the low-temperature magnetotransport properties of several highly disordered amorphous indium oxide (a:InO) samples. Simultaneously fabricated devices comprising a two-dimensional (2D) film and 10 -μ m -long wires of different widths were measured to investigate the effect of size as we approach the 1D limit, which is around 4 times the correlation length, and happens to be around 100 nm for a:InO. The film and the wires showed magnetic field (B )-induced superconductor to insulator transition (SIT). In the superconducting side, the resistance increased with decrease in wire width, whereas an opposite trend is observed in the insulating side. We find that this effect can be explained in light of charge-vortex duality picture of the SIT. Resistance of the 2D film follows an activated behavior over the temperature (T ), whereas, the wires show a crossover from the high-T -activated to a T -independent behavior. At high-temperature regime the wires' resistance follow the film's until they deviate and became independent of T . We find that the temperature at which this deviation occurs evolves with the magnetic field and the width of the wire, which show the effect of finite size on the transport.

  10. Finite data-size scaling of clustering in earthquake networks

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Sumiyoshi; Suzuki, Norikazu

    2010-01-01

    Earthquake network introduced in the work [S. Abe and N. Suzuki, Europhys.Lett. 65, 581 (2004)] is known to be of the small-world type. The values of the network characteristics, however, depend not only on the cell size (i.e., the scale of coarse graining needed for constructing the network) but also on the size of a seismic data set. Here, discovery of a scaling law for the clustering coefficient in terms of the data size, which is refereed to here as finite data-size scaling, is reported. Its universality is shown to be supported by the detailed analysis of the data taken from California, Japan, and Iran.

  11. Transition to Turbulence in the Presence of Finite Size Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lashgari, I.; Picano, F.; Breugem, W.P.; Brandt, L.

    2015-01-01

    We study the transition from laminar to turbulent flow in a channel seeded with finite-size neutrally buoyant particles. A fixed ratio of 10 between the channel height and the particle diameter is considered. The flow is examined in the range of Reynolds numbers 500 ≤ Re ≤ 5000 and the particle volu

  12. Finite size scaling in the planar Lebwohl-Lasher model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Enakshi; Roy, Soumen Kumar

    2003-06-01

    The standard finite size scaling method for second order phase transition has been applied to Monte Carlo data obtained for a planar Lebwohl-Lasher lattice model using the Wolff cluster algorithm. We obtain Tc and the exponents γ, ν, and z and the results are different from those obtained by other investigators.

  13. Finite-size effects for anisotropic bootstrap percolation : Logarithmic corrections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Enter, Aernout C. D.; Hulshof, Tim

    2007-01-01

    In this note we analyse an anisotropic, two-dimensional bootstrap percolation model introduced by Gravner and Griffeath. We present upper and lower bounds on the finite-size effects. We discuss the similarities with the semi-oriented model introduced by Duarte.

  14. Analytical theory of finite-size effects in mechanical desorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skvortsov, A.M.; Klushin, L.I.; Fleer, G.J.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a unique system that allows exact analytical investigation of first- and second-order transitions with finite-size effects: mechanical desorption of an ideal lattice polymer chain grafted with one end to a solid substrate with a pulling force applied to the other end. We exploit the analo

  15. Conjugacy Class Sizes and Solvability of Finite Groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qinhui Jiang; Changguo Shao

    2013-05-01

    Let be a finite group and * be the set of primary, biprimary and triprimary elements of . We prove that if the conjugacy class sizes of * are {1,,,} with positive coprime integers and ,then is solvable. This extends a recent result of Kong (Manatsh. Math. 168(2)(2012) 267–271).

  16. Finite Groups with Three Conjugacy Class Sizes of some Elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qingjun Kong

    2012-08-01

    Let be a finite group. We prove as follows: Let be a -solvable group for a fixed prime . If the conjugacy class sizes of all elements of primary and biprimary orders of are $\\{1,p^a,n\\}$ with and two positive integers and (,)=1, then is -nilpotent or has abelian Sylow -subgroups.

  17. Do Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents detect coherent structures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrasch, Daniel; Haller, George

    2013-12-01

    Ridges of the Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponent (FSLE) field have been used as indicators of hyperbolic Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs). A rigorous mathematical link between the FSLE and LCSs, however, has been missing. Here, we prove that an FSLE ridge satisfying certain conditions does signal a nearby ridge of some Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) field, which in turn indicates a hyperbolic LCS under further conditions. Other FSLE ridges violating our conditions, however, are seen to be false positives for LCSs. We also find further limitations of the FSLE in Lagrangian coherence detection, including ill-posedness, artificial jump-discontinuities, and sensitivity with respect to the computational time step.

  18. Chiral anomaly and anomalous finite-size conductivity in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shun-Qing; Li, Chang-An; Niu, Qian

    2017-09-01

    Graphene is a monolayer of carbon atoms packed into a hexagon lattice to host two spin degenerate pairs of massless two-dimensional Dirac fermions with different chirality. It is known that the existence of non-zero electric polarization in reduced momentum space which is associated with a hidden chiral symmetry will lead to the zero-energy flat band of a zigzag nanoribbon and some anomalous transport properties. Here it is proposed that the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly or non-conservation of chiral charges of Dirac fermions at different valleys can be realized in a confined ribbon of finite width, even in the absence of a magnetic field. In the laterally diffusive regime, the finite-size correction to conductivity is always positive and is inversely proportional to the square of the lateral dimension W, which is different from the finite-size correction inversely proportional to W from the boundary modes. This anomalous finite-size conductivity reveals the signature of the chiral anomaly in graphene, and it is measurable experimentally. This finding provides an alternative platform to explore the purely quantum mechanical effect in graphene.

  19. Finite size effects in simulations of protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Pawar

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that the soluble protofibrillar species that proceed amyloid fibril formation are associated with a range of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases. Computer simulations of the processes that lead to the formation of these oligomeric species are starting to make significant contributions to our understanding of the determinants of protein aggregation. We simulate different systems at constant concentration but with a different number of peptides and we study the how the finite number of proteins affects the underlying free energy of the system and therefore the relative stability of the species involved in the process. If not taken into account, this finite size effect can undermine the validity of theoretical predictions regarding the relative stability of the species involved and the rates of conversion from one to the other. We discuss the reasons that give rise to this finite size effect form both a probabilistic and energy fluctuations point of view and also how this problem can be dealt by a finite size scaling analysis.

  20. Sample size in qualitative interview studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malterud, Kirsti; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Guassora, Ann Dorrit Kristiane

    2016-01-01

    Sample sizes must be ascertained in qualitative studies like in quantitative studies but not by the same means. The prevailing concept for sample size in qualitative studies is “saturation.” Saturation is closely tied to a specific methodology, and the term is inconsistently applied. We propose...... the concept “information power” to guide adequate sample size for qualitative studies. Information power indicates that the more information the sample holds, relevant for the actual study, the lower amount of participants is needed. We suggest that the size of a sample with sufficient information power...... and during data collection of a qualitative study is discussed....

  1. Dynamic finite-size scaling at first-order transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelissetto, Andrea; Vicari, Ettore

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the dynamic behavior of finite-size systems close to a first-order transition (FOT). We develop a dynamic finite-size scaling (DFSS) theory for the dynamic behavior in the coexistence region where different phases coexist. This is characterized by an exponentially large time scale related to the tunneling between the two phases. We show that, when considering time scales of the order of the tunneling time, the dynamic behavior can be described by a two-state coarse-grained dynamics. This allows us to obtain exact predictions for the dynamical scaling functions. To test the general DFSS theory at FOTs, we consider the two-dimensional Ising model in the low-temperature phase, where the external magnetic field drives a FOT, and the 20-state Potts model, which undergoes a thermal FOT. Numerical results for a purely relaxational dynamics fully confirm the general theory.

  2. Finite size effects in neutron star and nuclear matter simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giménez Molinelli, P.A., E-mail: pagm@df.uba.ar; Dorso, C.O.

    2015-01-15

    In this work we study molecular dynamics simulations of symmetric nuclear and neutron star matter using a semi-classical nucleon interaction model. Our aim is to gain insight on the nature of the so-called “finite size effects”, unavoidable in this kind of simulations, and to understand what they actually affect. To do so, we explore different geometries for the periodic boundary conditions imposed on the simulation cell: cube, hexagonal prism and truncated octahedron. For nuclear matter simulations we show that, at sub-saturation densities and low temperatures, the solutions are non-homogeneous structures reminiscent of the “nuclear pasta” phases expected in neutron star matter simulations, but only one structure per cell and shaped by specific artificial aspects of the simulations—for the same physical conditions (i.e. number density and temperature) different cells yield different solutions. The particular shape of the solution at low enough temperature and a given density can be predicted analytically by surface minimization. We also show that even if this behavior is due to the imposition of periodic boundary conditions on finite systems, this does not mean that it vanishes for very large systems, and it is actually independent of the system size. We conclude that, for nuclear matter simulations, the cells' size sets the only characteristic length scale for the inhomogeneities, and the geometry of the periodic cell determines the shape of those inhomogeneities. To model neutron star matter we add a screened Coulomb interaction between protons, and perform simulations in the three cell geometries. Our simulations indeed produce the well known nuclear pasta, with (in most cases) several structures per cell. However, we find that for systems not too large results are affected by finite size in different ways depending on the geometry of the cell. In particular, at the same certain physical conditions and system size, the hexagonal prism yields a

  3. Finite-Size Scaling in Random K-SAT Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Meesoon; Lee, Sang Hoon; Jeon, Chanil; Jeong, Hawoong

    2010-03-01

    We propose a comprehensive view of threshold behaviors in random K-satisfiability (K-SAT) problems, in the context of the finite-size scaling (FSS) concept of nonequilibrium absorbing phase transitions using the average SAT (ASAT) algorithm. In particular, we focus on the value of the FSS exponent to characterize the SAT/UNSAT phase transition, which is still debatable. We also discuss the role of the noise (temperature-like) parameter in stochastic local heuristic search algorithms.

  4. Implicit Finite-Size Effects in Computer Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Denton, A. R.; EGELSTAFF, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of periodic boundary conditions (implicit finite-size effects) on the anisotropy of pair correlations in computer simulations is studied for a dense classical fluid of pair-wise interacting krypton atoms near the triple point. Molecular dynamics simulation data for the pair distribution function of N-particle systems, as a function of radial distance, polar angle, and azimuthal angle are compared directly with corresponding theoretical predictions [L. R. Pratt and S. W. Haan, J....

  5. Nonuniversal Finite-Size Effects Near Critical Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohm, V.

    2008-11-01

    We study the finite-size critical behavior of the anisotropic φ4 lattice model with periodic boundary conditions in a d-dimensional hypercubic geometry above, at, and below Tc. Our perturbation approach at fixed d = 3 yields excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo (MC) data for the finite-size amplitude of the free energy of the three-dimensional Ising model at Tc by Mon [Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 2671 (1985)]. Below Tc a minimum of the scaling function of the excess free energy is found. We predict a measurable dependence of this minimum on the anisotropy parameters. Our theory agrees quantitatively with the non-monotonic dependence of the Binder cumulant on the ferromagnetic next-nearest neighbor (NNN) coupling of the two-dimensional Ising model found by MC simulations of Selke and Shchur [J. Phys. A 38, L739 (2005)]. Our theory also predicts a non-monotonic dependence for small values of the anti-ferromagnetic NNN coupling and the existence of a Lifshitz point at a larger value of this coupling. The tails of the large-L behavior at T ≠ Tc violate both finite-size scaling and universality even for isotropic systems as they depend on the bare four-point coupling of the φ4 theory, on the cutoff procedure, and on subleading long-range interactions.

  6. Finite size effects in the dynamics of opinion formation

    CERN Document Server

    Toral, R; Tessone, Claudio J.; Toral, Raul

    2006-01-01

    For some models of relevance in the social sciences we review some examples in which system size plays an important role in the final outcome of the dynamics. We discuss the conditions under which changes of behavior can appear only when the number of agents in the model takes a finite value. Those changes of behavior can be related to the apparent phase transitions that appear in some physical models. We show examples in the Galam's model of opinion transmission and the Axelrod's model of culture formation stressing the role that the network of interactions has on the main results of both models. Finally, we present the phenomenon of system-size stochastic resonance by which a forcing signal (identified as an advertising agent) is optimally amplified by a population of the right (intermediate) size. Our work stresses the role that the system size has in the dynamics of social systems and the inappropriateness of taking the thermodynamic limit for these systems.

  7. How sample size influences research outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Faber

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sample size calculation is part of the early stages of conducting an epidemiological, clinical or lab study. In preparing a scientific paper, there are ethical and methodological indications for its use. Two investigations conducted with the same methodology and achieving equivalent results, but different only in terms of sample size, may point the researcher in different directions when it comes to making clinical decisions. Therefore, ideally, samples should not be small and, contrary to what one might think, should not be excessive. The aim of this paper is to discuss in clinical language the main implications of the sample size when interpreting a study.

  8. Finite Number and Finite Size Effects in Relativistic Bose-Einstein Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Shiokawa, K

    1999-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation of a relativistic ideal Bose gas in a rectangular cavity is studied. Finite size corrections to the critical temperature are obtained by the heat kernel method. Using zeta-function regularization of one-loop effective potential, lower dimensional critical temperatures are calculated. In the presence of strong anisotropy, the condensation is shown to occur in multisteps. The criteria of this behavior is that critical temperatures corresponding to lower dimensional systems are smaller than the three dimensional critical temperature.

  9. Finite-size scaling of heavy-light mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardoni, Fabio; Necco, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    We study the finite-size scaling of heavy-light mesons in the static limit. The most relevant effects are due to the pseudo-Goldstone boson cloud. In the HMChPT framework we compute two-point functions of left current densitities as well as pseudoscalar densitites for the cases in which some or all of them lay in the epsilon-regime. As expected, finite volume dependence turns out to be significant in this regime and can be predicted in the effective theory in terms of the infinite-volume low-energy couplings. These results might be relevant for extraction of heavy-light meson properties from lattice simulations.

  10. Finite-size effects for percolation on Apollonian networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auto, Daniel M; Moreira, André A; Herrmann, Hans J; Andrade, José S

    2008-12-01

    We study the percolation problem on the Apollonian network model. The Apollonian networks display many interesting properties commonly observed in real network systems, such as small-world behavior, scale-free distribution, and a hierarchical structure. By taking advantage of the deterministic hierarchical construction of these networks, we use the real-space renormalization-group technique to write exact iterative equations that relate percolation network properties at different scales. More precisely, our results indicate that the percolation probability and average mass of the percolating cluster approach the thermodynamic limit logarithmically. We suggest that such ultraslow convergence might be a property of hierarchical networks. Since real complex systems are certainly finite and very commonly hierarchical, we believe that taking into account finite-size effects in real-network systems is of fundamental importance.

  11. Biostatistics Series Module 5: Determining Sample Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Avijit; Gogtay, Nithya

    2016-01-01

    Determining the appropriate sample size for a study, whatever be its type, is a fundamental aspect of biomedical research. An adequate sample ensures that the study will yield reliable information, regardless of whether the data ultimately suggests a clinically important difference between the interventions or elements being studied. The probability of Type 1 and Type 2 errors, the expected variance in the sample and the effect size are the essential determinants of sample size in interventional studies. Any method for deriving a conclusion from experimental data carries with it some risk of drawing a false conclusion. Two types of false conclusion may occur, called Type 1 and Type 2 errors, whose probabilities are denoted by the symbols σ and β. A Type 1 error occurs when one concludes that a difference exists between the groups being compared when, in reality, it does not. This is akin to a false positive result. A Type 2 error occurs when one concludes that difference does not exist when, in reality, a difference does exist, and it is equal to or larger than the effect size defined by the alternative to the null hypothesis. This may be viewed as a false negative result. When considering the risk of Type 2 error, it is more intuitive to think in terms of power of the study or (1 - β). Power denotes the probability of detecting a difference when a difference does exist between the groups being compared. Smaller α or larger power will increase sample size. Conventional acceptable values for power and α are 80% or above and 5% or below, respectively, when calculating sample size. Increasing variance in the sample tends to increase the sample size required to achieve a given power level. The effect size is the smallest clinically important difference that is sought to be detected and, rather than statistical convention, is a matter of past experience and clinical judgment. Larger samples are required if smaller differences are to be detected. Although the

  12. Finite size effects in Neutron Star and Nuclear matter simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Molinelli, P A Giménez

    2014-01-01

    In this work we study molecular dynamics simulations of symmetric nuclear matter using a semi-classical nucleon interaction model. We show that, at sub-saturation densities and low temperatures, the solutions are non-homogeneous structures reminiscent of the ``nuclear pasta'' phases expected in Neutron Star Matter simulations, but shaped by artificial aspects of the simulations. We explore different geometries for the periodic boundary conditions imposed on the simulation cell: cube, hexagonal prism and truncated octahedron. We find that different cells may yield different solutions for the same physical conditions (i.e. density and temperature). The particular shape of the solution at a given density can be predicted analytically by energy minimization. We also show that even if this behavior is due to finite size effects, it does not mean that it vanishes for very large systems and it actually is independent of the system size: The system size sets the only characteristic length scale for the inhomogeneitie...

  13. Basic Statistical Concepts for Sample Size Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vithal K Dhulkhed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available For grant proposals the investigator has to include an estimation of sample size .The size of the sample should be adequate enough so that there is sufficient data to reliably answer the research question being addressed by the study. At the very planning stage of the study the investigator has to involve the statistician. To have meaningful dialogue with the statistician every research worker should be familiar with the basic concepts of statistics. This paper is concerned with simple principles of sample size calculation. Concepts are explained based on logic rather than rigorous mathematical calculations to help him assimilate the fundamentals.

  14. Sample size planning for classification models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beleites, Claudia; Neugebauer, Ute; Bocklitz, Thomas; Krafft, Christoph; Popp, Jürgen

    2013-01-14

    In biospectroscopy, suitably annotated and statistically independent samples (e.g. patients, batches, etc.) for classifier training and testing are scarce and costly. Learning curves show the model performance as function of the training sample size and can help to determine the sample size needed to train good classifiers. However, building a good model is actually not enough: the performance must also be proven. We discuss learning curves for typical small sample size situations with 5-25 independent samples per class. Although the classification models achieve acceptable performance, the learning curve can be completely masked by the random testing uncertainty due to the equally limited test sample size. In consequence, we determine test sample sizes necessary to achieve reasonable precision in the validation and find that 75-100 samples will usually be needed to test a good but not perfect classifier. Such a data set will then allow refined sample size planning on the basis of the achieved performance. We also demonstrate how to calculate necessary sample sizes in order to show the superiority of one classifier over another: this often requires hundreds of statistically independent test samples or is even theoretically impossible. We demonstrate our findings with a data set of ca. 2550 Raman spectra of single cells (five classes: erythrocytes, leukocytes and three tumour cell lines BT-20, MCF-7 and OCI-AML3) as well as by an extensive simulation that allows precise determination of the actual performance of the models in question. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Tunable finite-sized chains to control magnetic relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrand, Paul D.; Javier, Daniel J.; Gredig, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic dynamics of low-dimensional iron ion chains have been studied with regards to the tunable finite-sized chain length using iron phthalocyanine thin films. The deposition temperature varies the diffusion length during thin-film growth by limiting the average crystal size in the range from 40 to 110 nm . Using a method common for single chain magnets, the magnetic relaxation time for each chain length is determined from temporal remanence data and fit to a stretched exponential form in the temperature range below 5 K , the onset for magnetic hysteresis. A temperature-independent master curve is generated by scaling the remanence by its relaxation time to fit the energy barrier for spin reversal, and the single spin-relaxation time. The energy barrier of 95 K is found to be independent of the chain length. In contrast, the single spin-relaxation time increases with longer chains from under 1 ps to 800 ps. We show that thin films provide the nanoarchitecture to control magnetic relaxation and a testbed to study finite-size effects in low-dimensional magnetic systems.

  16. Effective Stiffness: Generalizing Effective Resistance Sampling to Finite Element Matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Avron, Haim

    2011-01-01

    We define the notion of effective stiffness and show that it can used to build sparsifiers, algorithms that sparsify linear systems arising from finite-element discretizations of PDEs. In particular, we show that sampling $O(n\\log n)$ elements according to probabilities derived from effective stiffnesses yields an high quality preconditioner that can be used to solve the linear system in a small number of iterations. Effective stiffness generalizes the notion of effective resistance, a key ingredient of recent progress in developing nearly linear symmetric diagonally dominant (SDD) linear solvers. Solving finite elements problems is of considerably more interest than the solution of SDD linear systems, since the finite element method is frequently used to numerically solve PDEs arising in scientific and engineering applications. Unlike SDD systems, which are relatively easy to precondition, there has been limited success in designing fast solvers for finite element systems, and previous algorithms usually tar...

  17. Finite-size scaling approach to dynamic storage allocation problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed-allaei, Hamed

    2003-09-01

    It is demonstrated how dynamic storage allocation algorithms can be analyzed in terms of finite-size scaling. The method is illustrated in the three simple cases of the first-fit, next-fit and best-fit algorithms, and the system works at full capacity. The analysis is done from two different points of view-running speed and employed memory. In both cases, and for all algorithms, it is shown that a simple scaling function exists and the relevant exponents are calculated. The method can be applied on similar problems as well.

  18. Experimental determination of size distributions: analyzing proper sample sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffo, A.; Alopaeus, V.

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of various particle size distributions is a crucial aspect for many applications in the process industry. Size distribution is often related to the final product quality, as in crystallization or polymerization. In other cases it is related to the correct evaluation of heat and mass transfer, as well as reaction rates, depending on the interfacial area between the different phases or to the assessment of yield stresses of polycrystalline metals/alloys samples. The experimental determination of such distributions often involves laborious sampling procedures and the statistical significance of the outcome is rarely investigated. In this work, we propose a novel rigorous tool, based on inferential statistics, to determine the number of samples needed to obtain reliable measurements of size distribution, according to specific requirements defined a priori. Such methodology can be adopted regardless of the measurement technique used.

  19. Finite size and finite temperature studies of the osp(1|2) spin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, T. S.; Ribeiro, G. A. P.

    2017-08-01

    We studied a quantum spin chain invariant by the superalgebra osp (1 | 2). We derived non-linear integral equations for the row-to-row transfer matrix eigenvalue in order to analyze its finite size scaling behavior and we determined its central charge. We also studied the thermodynamical properties of the spin chain via non-linear integral equations for the quantum transfer matrix eigenvalue. We numerically solved these NLIE and evaluated the specific heat and magnetic susceptibility. The analytical low temperature analysis was performed providing the effective central charge. The computed values are in agreement with the numerical predictions in the literature.

  20. Finite-size effects in quasi-one-dimensional conductors with a charge-density wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitsev-Zotov, Sergei V [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-06-30

    Recent studies of finite-size effects in charge-density wave conductors are reviewed. Various manifestations of finite-size effects, including the transverse-size dependence of the nonlinear-conduction threshold field, the Peierls transition temperature, high-frequency conduction, and the relaxation rates of metastable states, are discussed. Resistivity jumps in thin samples, the smeared threshold field for nonlinear conduction, and threshold conduction above the Peierls transition temperature are considered, as are mesoscopic oscillations of the threshold field, one-dimensional conduction in thin crystals, absolute negative conductivity of quasi-one-dimensional conductors, the length dependence of the phase-slip voltage, and the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in sliding CDWs. Problems yet to be solved are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  1. Sample size calculation in metabolic phenotyping studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billoir, Elise; Navratil, Vincent; Blaise, Benjamin J

    2015-09-01

    The number of samples needed to identify significant effects is a key question in biomedical studies, with consequences on experimental designs, costs and potential discoveries. In metabolic phenotyping studies, sample size determination remains a complex step. This is due particularly to the multiple hypothesis-testing framework and the top-down hypothesis-free approach, with no a priori known metabolic target. Until now, there was no standard procedure available to address this purpose. In this review, we discuss sample size estimation procedures for metabolic phenotyping studies. We release an automated implementation of the Data-driven Sample size Determination (DSD) algorithm for MATLAB and GNU Octave. Original research concerning DSD was published elsewhere. DSD allows the determination of an optimized sample size in metabolic phenotyping studies. The procedure uses analytical data only from a small pilot cohort to generate an expanded data set. The statistical recoupling of variables procedure is used to identify metabolic variables, and their intensity distributions are estimated by Kernel smoothing or log-normal density fitting. Statistically significant metabolic variations are evaluated using the Benjamini-Yekutieli correction and processed for data sets of various sizes. Optimal sample size determination is achieved in a context of biomarker discovery (at least one statistically significant variation) or metabolic exploration (a maximum of statistically significant variations). DSD toolbox is encoded in MATLAB R2008A (Mathworks, Natick, MA) for Kernel and log-normal estimates, and in GNU Octave for log-normal estimates (Kernel density estimates are not robust enough in GNU octave). It is available at http://www.prabi.fr/redmine/projects/dsd/repository, with a tutorial at http://www.prabi.fr/redmine/projects/dsd/wiki. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. On finite-size Lyapunov exponents in multiscale systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, Lewis

    2012-01-01

    We study the effect of regime switches on finite size Lyapunov exponents (FSLEs) in determining the error growth rates and predictability of multiscale systems. We consider a dynamical system involving slow and fast regimes and switches between them. The surprising result is that due to the presence of regimes the error growth rate can be a non-monotonic function of initial error amplitude. In particular, troughs in the large scales of FSLE spectra is shown to be a signature of slow regimes, whereas fast regimes are shown to cause large peaks in the spectra where error growth rates far exceed those estimated from the maximal Lyapunov exponent. We present analytical results explaining these signatures and corroborate them with numerical simulations. We show further that these peaks disappear in stochastic parametrizations of the fast chaotic processes, and the associated FSLE spectra reveal that large scale predictability properties of the full deterministic model are well approximated whereas small scale feat...

  3. Thinking outside the box: fluctuations and finite size effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamaina, Dario; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    The isothermal compressibility of an interacting or non-interacting system may be extracted from the fluctuations of the number of particles in a well-chosen control volume. Finite size effects are prevalent and should be accounted for to obtain a meaningful, thermodynamic compressibility. In the traditional computational setup, where a given simulation box is replicated with periodic boundary conditions, we study particle number fluctuations outside the box (i.e. when the control volume exceeds the box itself), which bear relevant thermodynamic information. We also investigate the related problem of extracting the compressibility from the structure factor in the small wave-vector limit (k → 0). The calculation should be restricted to the discrete set of wave-vectors k that are compatible with the periodicity of the system, and we assess the consequences of considering other k values, a widespread error among beginners.

  4. Diffusion of Finite-Size Particles in Confined Geometries

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, Maria

    2013-05-10

    The diffusion of finite-size hard-core interacting particles in two- or three-dimensional confined domains is considered in the limit that the confinement dimensions become comparable to the particle\\'s dimensions. The result is a nonlinear diffusion equation for the one-particle probability density function, with an overall collective diffusion that depends on both the excluded-volume and the narrow confinement. By including both these effects, the equation is able to interpolate between severe confinement (for example, single-file diffusion) and unconfined diffusion. Numerical solutions of both the effective nonlinear diffusion equation and the stochastic particle system are presented and compared. As an application, the case of diffusion under a ratchet potential is considered, and the change in transport properties due to excluded-volume and confinement effects is examined. © 2013 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  5. Predicting sample size required for classification performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueroa Rosa L

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Supervised learning methods need annotated data in order to generate efficient models. Annotated data, however, is a relatively scarce resource and can be expensive to obtain. For both passive and active learning methods, there is a need to estimate the size of the annotated sample required to reach a performance target. Methods We designed and implemented a method that fits an inverse power law model to points of a given learning curve created using a small annotated training set. Fitting is carried out using nonlinear weighted least squares optimization. The fitted model is then used to predict the classifier's performance and confidence interval for larger sample sizes. For evaluation, the nonlinear weighted curve fitting method was applied to a set of learning curves generated using clinical text and waveform classification tasks with active and passive sampling methods, and predictions were validated using standard goodness of fit measures. As control we used an un-weighted fitting method. Results A total of 568 models were fitted and the model predictions were compared with the observed performances. Depending on the data set and sampling method, it took between 80 to 560 annotated samples to achieve mean average and root mean squared error below 0.01. Results also show that our weighted fitting method outperformed the baseline un-weighted method (p Conclusions This paper describes a simple and effective sample size prediction algorithm that conducts weighted fitting of learning curves. The algorithm outperformed an un-weighted algorithm described in previous literature. It can help researchers determine annotation sample size for supervised machine learning.

  6. Simulated identification of epidemic threshold in finite-size networks

    CERN Document Server

    Shu, Panpan; Tang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Epidemic threshold is one of the most important features of the epidemic dynamics. Based on a lot of numerical simulations of classic Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) and Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) models on various types of networks, we study the simulated thresholds for finite-size networks. We confirm that the susceptibility measure goes awry for the SIR model due to the bimodal distribution of outbreak sizes near the critical point, while the simulated thresholds of the SIS and SIR models can be accurately determined by analyzing the peak of the epidemic variability. We further verify the accuracy of theoretical predictions of the heterogeneous mean-field theory (HMF) and of the quenched mean-field theory (QMF), by comparing them with the simulated threshold of the SIR model obtained from the variability measure. The results show that the HMF prediction agrees very well with the simulated threshold, except the case that the networks are disassortive, in which the QMF prediction is more clo...

  7. Magnetic Relaxation and Coercivity of Finite-size Single Chain Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredig, Thomas; Byrne, Matthew; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic coercivity of hysteresis loops for iron phthalocyanine thin films depends on the iron chain length and the measurement sweep speed below 5 K. The average one-dimensional (1D) iron chain length in samples is controlled during deposition. These 1D iron chains can be tuned over one order of magnitude with the shortest chain having 100 elements. We show that the coercivity strongly increases with the average length of the iron chains, which self-assemble parallel to the substrate surface. Magnetic relaxation and sweep speed data suggest spin dynamics play an important role. Implementing Glauber dynamics with a finite-sized 1D Ising model provides qualitative agreement with experimental data. This suggests that iron phthalocyanine thin films act as single chain magnets and provide a solid test system for tunable finite-sized magnetic chains. This research has been supported with the NSF-DMR 0847552 grant.

  8. Estimation of Finite Population Mean in Multivariate Stratified Sampling under Cost Function Using Goal Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atta Ullah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In practical utilization of stratified random sampling scheme, the investigator meets a problem to select a sample that maximizes the precision of a finite population mean under cost constraint. An allocation of sample size becomes complicated when more than one characteristic is observed from each selected unit in a sample. In many real life situations, a linear cost function of a sample size nh is not a good approximation to actual cost of sample survey when traveling cost between selected units in a stratum is significant. In this paper, sample allocation problem in multivariate stratified random sampling with proposed cost function is formulated in integer nonlinear multiobjective mathematical programming. A solution procedure is proposed using extended lexicographic goal programming approach. A numerical example is presented to illustrate the computational details and to compare the efficiency of proposed compromise allocation.

  9. Finite-size effects lead to supercritical bifurcations in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Stephan; Zhong, Jin-Qiang; Clercx, Herman J H; Lohse, Detlef; Ahlers, Guenter; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.224501

    2011-01-01

    In turbulent thermal convection in cylindrical samples of aspect ratio \\Gamma = D/L (D is the diameter and L the height) the Nusselt number Nu is enhanced when the sample is rotated about its vertical axis, because of the formation of Ekman vortices that extract additional fluid out of thermal boundary layers at the top and bottom. We show from experiments and direct numerical simulations that the enhancement occurs only above a bifurcation point at a critical inverse Rossby number $1/\\Ro_c$, with $1/\\Ro_c \\propto 1/\\Gamma$. We present a Ginzburg-Landau like model that explains the existence of a bifurcation at finite $1/\\Ro_c$ as a finite-size effect. The model yields the proportionality between $1/\\Ro_c$ and $1/\\Gamma$ and is consistent with several other measured or computed system properties.

  10. The Optimal Inhomogeneity for Superconductivity: Finite Size Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, W-F.

    2010-04-06

    We report the results of exact diagonalization studies of Hubbard models on a 4 x 4 square lattice with periodic boundary conditions and various degrees and patterns of inhomogeneity, which are represented by inequivalent hopping integrals t and t{prime}. We focus primarily on two patterns, the checkerboard and the striped cases, for a large range of values of the on-site repulsion U and doped hole concentration, x. We present evidence that superconductivity is strongest for U of order the bandwidth, and intermediate inhomogeneity, 0 < t{prime} < t. The maximum value of the 'pair-binding energy' we have found with purely repulsive interactions is {Delta}{sub pb} = 0.32t for the checkerboard Hubbard model with U = 8t and t{prime} = 0.5t. Moreover, for near optimal values, our results are insensitive to changes in boundary conditions, suggesting that the correlation length is sufficiently short that finite size effects are already unimportant.

  11. Scattering from finite size methods in lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Xu; Renner, Dru B

    2009-01-01

    Using two flavors of maximally twisted mass fermions, we calculate the S-wave pion-pion scattering length in the isospin I=2 channel and the P-wave pion-pion scattering phase in the isospin I=1 channel. In the former channel, the lattice calculations are performed at pion masses ranging from 270 MeV to 485 MeV. We use chiral perturbation theory at next-to-leading order to extrapolate our results. At the physical pion mass, we find m_pi a_pipi(I=2)=-0.04385(28)(38) for the scattering length. In the latter channel, the calculation is currently performed at a single pion mass of 391 MeV. Making use of finite size methods, we evaluate the scattering phase in both the center of mass frame and the moving frame. The effective range formula is employed to fit our results, from which the rho resonance mass and decay width are evaluated.

  12. Finite-Size Scaling Effects in Chromia thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echtenkamp, Will; He, Xi; Binek, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Controlling magnetism by electrical means remains a key challenge in the area of spintronics. The use of magnetoelectrically active materials is one of the most promising approaches to this problem. Utilizing Cr2O3 as the magnetoelectric pinning layer in a magnetic heterostructure both temperature assisted and isothermal electrical control of exchange bias have been achieved [1,2]. Interestingly, this ME switching of exchange bias has only been achieved using bulk Cr2O3 crystals, isothermal switching of exchange bias using thin film chromia remains elusive. We investigate the origin of unusually pronounced finite-size scaling effects on the properties of Cr2O3 grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy; in particular we focus on the different temperature dependencies of the magnetic susceptibility of bulk vs. thin film chromia, the change in Nèel temperatures, and the implications for the magneto electric properties of chromia thin films. [4pt] [1] P. Borisov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 117203 (2005).[0pt] [2] X. He et al., Nature Mater. 9, 579 (2010).

  13. Holographic Relaxation of Finite Size Isolated Quantum Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Abajo-Arrastia, Javier; Lopez, Esperanza; Mas, Javier; Serantes, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    We study holographically the out of equilibrium dynamics of a finite size closed quantum system in 2+1 dimensions, modelled by the collapse of a shell of a massless scalar field in AdS4. In global coordinates there exists a variety of evolutions towards final black hole formation which we relate with different patterns of relaxation in the dual field theory. For large scalar initial data rapid thermalization is achieved as a priori expected. Interesting phenomena appear for small enough amplitudes. Such shells do not generate a black hole by direct collapse, but quite generically an apparent horizon emerges after enough bounces off the AdS boundary. We relate this bulk evolution with relaxation processes at strong coupling which delay in reaching an ergodic stage. Besides the dynamics of bulk fields, we monitor the entanglement entropy, finding that it oscillates quasi-periodically before final equilibration. The radial position of the traveling shell is brought into correspondence with the evolution of the e...

  14. How precise is the finite sample approximation of the asymptotic distribution of realised variation measures in the presence of jumps?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veraart, Almut

    and present a new estimator for the asymptotic ‘variance’ of the centered realised variance in the presence of jumps. Next, we compare the finite sample performance of the various estimators by means of detailed Monte Carlo studies where we study the impact of the jump activity, the jump size of the jumps...... in the price and the presence of additional independent or dependent jumps in the volatility on the finite sample performance of the various estimators. We find that the finite sample performance of realised variance, and in particular of the log–transformed realised variance, is generally good, whereas...

  15. A generalization of the inhomogeneity measure for point distributions to the case of finite size objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, Ryszard

    2008-09-01

    The statistical measure of spatial inhomogeneity for n points placed in χ cells each of size k×k is generalized to incorporate finite size objects like black pixels for binary patterns of size L×L. As a function of length scale k, the measure is modified in such a way that it relates to the smallest realizable value for each considered scale. To overcome the limitation of pattern partitions to scales with k being integer divisors of L, we use a sliding cell-sampling approach. For given patterns, particularly in the case of clusters polydispersed in size, the comparison between the statistical measure and the entropic one reveals differences in detection of the first peak while at other scales they well correlate. The universality of the two measures allows both a hidden periodicity traces and attributes of planar quasi-crystals to be explored.

  16. Defining sample size and sampling strategy for dendrogeomorphic rockfall reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Pauline; Trappmann, Daniel; Corona, Christophe; Stoffel, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Optimized sampling strategies have been recently proposed for dendrogeomorphic reconstructions of mass movements with a large spatial footprint, such as landslides, snow avalanches, and debris flows. Such guidelines have, by contrast, been largely missing for rockfalls and cannot be transposed owing to the sporadic nature of this process and the occurrence of individual rocks and boulders. Based on a data set of 314 European larch (Larix decidua Mill.) trees (i.e., 64 trees/ha), growing on an active rockfall slope, this study bridges this gap and proposes an optimized sampling strategy for the spatial and temporal reconstruction of rockfall activity. Using random extractions of trees, iterative mapping, and a stratified sampling strategy based on an arbitrary selection of trees, we investigate subsets of the full tree-ring data set to define optimal sample size and sampling design for the development of frequency maps of rockfall activity. Spatially, our results demonstrate that the sampling of only 6 representative trees per ha can be sufficient to yield a reasonable mapping of the spatial distribution of rockfall frequencies on a slope, especially if the oldest and most heavily affected individuals are included in the analysis. At the same time, however, sampling such a low number of trees risks causing significant errors especially if nonrepresentative trees are chosen for analysis. An increased number of samples therefore improves the quality of the frequency maps in this case. Temporally, we demonstrate that at least 40 trees/ha are needed to obtain reliable rockfall chronologies. These results will facilitate the design of future studies, decrease the cost-benefit ratio of dendrogeomorphic studies and thus will permit production of reliable reconstructions with reasonable temporal efforts.

  17. Sample size estimation and sampling techniques for selecting a representative sample

    OpenAIRE

    Aamir Omair

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this article is to provide a general understanding of the concepts of sampling as applied to health-related research. Sample Size Estimation: It is important to select a representative sample in quantitative research in order to be able to generalize the results to the target population. The sample should be of the required sample size and must be selected using an appropriate probability sampling technique. There are many hidden biases which can adversely affect ...

  18. Finite Size Corrections to the Excitation Energy Transfer in a Massless Scalar Interaction Model

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, N; Tobita, Y; Ishikawa, K

    2016-01-01

    We study the excitation energy transfer (EET) for a simple model in which a virtual massless scalar particle is exchanged between two molecules. If the time interval is finite, then the finite size effect generally appears in a transition amplitude through the regions where the wave nature of quanta remains. We calculated the transition amplitude for EET and obtained finite size corrections to the standard formula derived by using Fermi's golden rule. These corrections for the transition amplitude appear outside the resonance energy region. The estimation in a photosynthesis system indicates that the finite size correction could reduce the EET time considerably.

  19. Layout Optimization of Structures with Finite-size Features using Multiresolution Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chellappa, S.; Diaz, A. R.; Bendsøe, Martin P.

    2004-01-01

    A scheme for layout optimization in structures with multiple finite-sized heterogeneities is presented. Multiresolution analysis is used to compute reduced operators (stiffness matrices) representing the elastic behavior of material distributions with heterogeneities of sizes that are comparable...

  20. Unusual finite size effects on critical temperature in fcc Ising antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, J.; Diep, H. T.; Ghazali, A.; Lallemand, P.

    1988-04-01

    A new multispin coding technique is presented for Monte Carlo simulation of antiferromagnetic Ising spin systems on an fcc lattice. The nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor interactions J1 and J2 are included. This technique allows a considerable gain in CPU time and computer memory. As a first application, we have studied samples of 4L3 spins with L up to 48. An unusual behavior of the critical temperature with increasing L is found in the case of nearest-neighbor interaction in zero field. Finite size effects on the locations of tricrical points in the (T,J2/J1) plane are discussed.

  1. Universal order parameters and quantum phase transitions: a finite-size approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qian-Qian; Zhou, Huan-Qiang; Batchelor, Murray T

    2015-01-08

    We propose a method to construct universal order parameters for quantum phase transitions in many-body lattice systems. The method exploits the H-orthogonality of a few near-degenerate lowest states of the Hamiltonian describing a given finite-size system, which makes it possible to perform finite-size scaling and take full advantage of currently available numerical algorithms. An explicit connection is established between the fidelity per site between two H-orthogonal states and the energy gap between the ground state and low-lying excited states in the finite-size system. The physical information encoded in this gap arising from finite-size fluctuations clarifies the origin of the universal order parameter. We demonstrate the procedure for the one-dimensional quantum formulation of the q-state Potts model, for q = 2, 3, 4 and 5, as prototypical examples, using finite-size data obtained from the density matrix renormalization group algorithm.

  2. Sample size estimation and sampling techniques for selecting a representative sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Omair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this article is to provide a general understanding of the concepts of sampling as applied to health-related research. Sample Size Estimation: It is important to select a representative sample in quantitative research in order to be able to generalize the results to the target population. The sample should be of the required sample size and must be selected using an appropriate probability sampling technique. There are many hidden biases which can adversely affect the outcome of the study. Important factors to consider for estimating the sample size include the size of the study population, confidence level, expected proportion of the outcome variable (for categorical variables/standard deviation of the outcome variable (for numerical variables, and the required precision (margin of accuracy from the study. The more the precision required, the greater is the required sample size. Sampling Techniques: The probability sampling techniques applied for health related research include simple random sampling, systematic random sampling, stratified random sampling, cluster sampling, and multistage sampling. These are more recommended than the nonprobability sampling techniques, because the results of the study can be generalized to the target population.

  3. Finite-size effects in parametric subharmonic instability

    CERN Document Server

    Bourget, Baptiste; Dauxois, Thierry; Bars, Michaël Le; Odier, Philippe; Joubaud, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The parametric subharmonic instability in stratified fluids depends on the frequency and the amplitude of the primary plane wave. In this paper, we present experimental and numerical results emphasizing that the finite width of the beam also plays an important role on this triadic instability. A new theoretical approach based on a simple energy balance is developed and compared to numerical and experimental results. Because of the finite width of the primary wave beam, the secondary pair of waves can leave the interaction zone which affects the transfer of energy. Experimental and numerical results are in good agreement with the prediction of this theory, which brings new insights on energy transfers in the ocean where internal waves with finite-width beams are dominant.

  4. In situ measurements of the oblique incidence sound absorption coefficient for finite sized absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottink, Marco; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2016-01-01

    absorbers at oblique incidence in situ. Due to the edge diffraction effect, oblique incidence methods considering an infinite sample fail to measure the absorption coefficient at large incidence angles of finite samples. This paper aims for the development of a measurement method that accounts...... for the finiteness of the absorber. A sound field model, which accounts for scattering from the finite absorber edges, assuming plane wave incidence is derived. A significant influence of the finiteness on the radiation impedance and the corresponding absorption coefficient is found. A finite surface method, which...

  5. In situ measurements of the oblique incidence sound absorption coefficient for finite sized absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottink, Marco; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2016-01-01

    absorbers at oblique incidence in situ. Due to the edge diffraction effect, oblique incidence methods considering an infinite sample fail to measure the absorption coefficient at large incidence angles of finite samples. This paper aims for the development of a measurement method that accounts...... for the finiteness of the absorber. A sound field model, which accounts for scattering from the finite absorber edges, assuming plane wave incidence is derived. A significant influence of the finiteness on the radiation impedance and the corresponding absorption coefficient is found. A finite surface method, which...

  6. Sample size matters: Investigating the optimal sample size for a logistic regression debris flow susceptibility model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckmann, Tobias; Gegg, Katharina; Becht, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Statistical approaches to landslide susceptibility modelling on the catchment and regional scale are used very frequently compared to heuristic and physically based approaches. In the present study, we deal with the problem of the optimal sample size for a logistic regression model. More specifically, a stepwise approach has been chosen in order to select those independent variables (from a number of derivatives of a digital elevation model and landcover data) that explain best the spatial distribution of debris flow initiation zones in two neighbouring central alpine catchments in Austria (used mutually for model calculation and validation). In order to minimise problems arising from spatial autocorrelation, we sample a single raster cell from each debris flow initiation zone within an inventory. In addition, as suggested by previous work using the "rare events logistic regression" approach, we take a sample of the remaining "non-event" raster cells. The recommendations given in the literature on the size of this sample appear to be motivated by practical considerations, e.g. the time and cost of acquiring data for non-event cases, which do not apply to the case of spatial data. In our study, we aim at finding empirically an "optimal" sample size in order to avoid two problems: First, a sample too large will violate the independent sample assumption as the independent variables are spatially autocorrelated; hence, a variogram analysis leads to a sample size threshold above which the average distance between sampled cells falls below the autocorrelation range of the independent variables. Second, if the sample is too small, repeated sampling will lead to very different results, i.e. the independent variables and hence the result of a single model calculation will be extremely dependent on the choice of non-event cells. Using a Monte-Carlo analysis with stepwise logistic regression, 1000 models are calculated for a wide range of sample sizes. For each sample size

  7. Publication bias in psychology: a diagnosis based on the correlation between effect size and sample size

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kühberger, Anton; Fritz, Astrid; Scherndl, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    .... We extracted p values, effect sizes, and sample sizes of all empirical papers, and calculated the correlation between effect size and sample size, and investigated the distribution of p values...

  8. Compressive Sampling of EEG Signals with Finite Rate of Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poh Kok-Kiong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of electroencephalographic signals and subsequent diagnoses can only be done effectively on long term recordings that preserve the signals' morphologies. Currently, electroencephalographic signals are obtained at Nyquist rate or higher, thus introducing redundancies. Existing compression methods remove these redundancies, thereby achieving compression. We propose an alternative compression scheme based on a sampling theory developed for signals with a finite rate of innovation (FRI which compresses electroencephalographic signals during acquisition. We model the signals as FRI signals and then sample them at their rate of innovation. The signals are thus effectively represented by a small set of Fourier coefficients corresponding to the signals' rate of innovation. Using the FRI theory, original signals can be reconstructed using this set of coefficients. Seventy-two hours of electroencephalographic recording are tested and results based on metrices used in compression literature and morphological similarities of electroencephalographic signals are presented. The proposed method achieves results comparable to that of wavelet compression methods, achieving low reconstruction errors while preserving the morphologiies of the signals. More importantly, it introduces a new framework to acquire electroencephalographic signals at their rate of innovation, thus entailing a less costly low-rate sampling device that does not waste precious computational resources.

  9. Effects of finite system-size and finite inhomogeneity on the conductivity of broadly distributed resistor networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaggs, T.H

    2003-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is used to investigate the critical path calculation of the conductivity of a random resistor network that has a logarithmically broad distribution of bond conductances. It has been argued that in three dimensions the conductivity prefactor exponent y is equal to the percolation correlation length exponent {nu}, but past numerical computations have always found y<{nu}. Finite-size effects are usually blamed but have never been documented. Our analysis of Monte Carlo data also finds y<{nu}, but we show that the result is not due to finite-size effects. Instead, the observed y<{nu} is due to the effects of finite inhomogeneity. The conductivity is controlled by critical conductors, but the distance between current carrying pathways is less than presumed in the theoretical arguments that lead to y={nu}. The shorter separation distance results in y<{nu}.

  10. Finite-key analysis for quantum key distribution with weak coherent pulses based on Bernoulli sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Shun; Sasaki, Toshihiko; Koashi, Masato

    2017-07-01

    An essential step in quantum key distribution is the estimation of parameters related to the leaked amount of information, which is usually done by sampling of the communication data. When the data size is finite, the final key rate depends on how the estimation process handles statistical fluctuations. Many of the present security analyses are based on the method with simple random sampling, where hypergeometric distribution or its known bounds are used for the estimation. Here we propose a concise method based on Bernoulli sampling, which is related to binomial distribution. Our method is suitable for the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) protocol with weak coherent pulses [C. H. Bennett and G. Brassard, Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Computers, Systems and Signal Processing (IEEE, New York, 1984), Vol. 175], reducing the number of estimated parameters to achieve a higher key generation rate compared to the method with simple random sampling. We also apply the method to prove the security of the differential-quadrature-phase-shift (DQPS) protocol in the finite-key regime. The result indicates that the advantage of the DQPS protocol over the phase-encoding BB84 protocol in terms of the key rate, which was previously confirmed in the asymptotic regime, persists in the finite-key regime.

  11. Finite sampling inequalities: an application to two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Evan; Wellner, Jon A

    2016-12-01

    We review a finite-sampling exponential bound due to Serfling and discuss related exponential bounds for the hypergeometric distribution. We then discuss how such bounds motivate some new results for two-sample empirical processes. Our development complements recent results by Wei and Dudley (2012) concerning exponential bounds for two-sided Kolmogorov - Smirnov statistics by giving corresponding results for one-sided statistics with emphasis on "adjusted" inequalities of the type proved originally by Dvoretzky et al. (1956) and by Massart (1990) for one-sample versions of these statistics.

  12. Theory of Finite Size Effects for Electronic Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Liquids and Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Holzmann, Markus; Morales, Miguel A; Tubmann, Norm M; Ceperley, David M; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Concentrating on zero temperature Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electronic systems, we give a general description of the theory of finite size extrapolations of energies to the thermodynamic limit based on one and two-body correlation functions. We introduce new effective procedures, such as using the potential and wavefunction split-up into long and short range functions to simplify the method and we discuss how to treat backflow wavefunctions. Then we explicitly test the accuracy of our method to correct finite size errors on example hydrogen and helium many-body systems and show that the finite size bias can be drastically reduced for even small systems.

  13. Probing finite size effects in $(\\lambda \\Phi^{4})_4$ MonteCarlo calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Agodi, A

    1999-01-01

    The Constrained Effective Potential (CEP) is known to be equivalent to the usual Effective Potential (EP) in the infinite volume limit. We have carried out MonteCarlo calculations based on the two different definitions to get informations on finite size effects. We also compared these calculations with those based on an Improved CEP (ICEP) which takes into account the finite size of the lattice. It turns out that ICEP actually reduces the finite size effects which are more visible near the vanishing of the external source.

  14. SEMI-ELLIPTIC SURFACE CRACK IN AN ELASTIC SOLID WITH FINITE SIZE UNDER IMPACT LOADING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Ruiping; Liu Guanting; Fan Tianyou

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a semi-elliptic surface crack problem in an elastic solid of finite size under impact loading is investigated. An analysis is performed by means of fracture dynamics and the finite element method, and a three-dimensional finite element program is developed to compute the dynamic stress intensity factor. The results reveal that the effects of the solid's boundary surface, crack surface, material inertia and stress wave interactions play significant roles in dynamic fracture.

  15. 7 CFR 52.803 - Sample unit size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sample unit size. 52.803 Section 52.803 Agriculture... United States Standards for Grades of Frozen Red Tart Pitted Cherries Sample Unit Size § 52.803 Sample unit size. Compliance with requirements for size and the various quality factors is based on the...

  16. 7 CFR 52.775 - Sample unit size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sample unit size. 52.775 Section 52.775 Agriculture... United States Standards for Grades of Canned Red Tart Pitted Cherries 1 Sample Unit Size § 52.775 Sample unit size. Compliance with requirements for the size and the various quality factors is based on the...

  17. Sifting attacks in finite-size quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Corsin; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Wehner, Stephanie; Coles, Patrick J.

    2016-05-01

    A central assumption in quantum key distribution (QKD) is that Eve has no knowledge about which rounds will be used for parameter estimation or key distillation. Here we show that this assumption is violated for iterative sifting, a sifting procedure that has been employed in some (but not all) of the recently suggested QKD protocols in order to increase their efficiency. We show that iterative sifting leads to two security issues: (1) some rounds are more likely to be key rounds than others, (2) the public communication of past measurement choices changes this bias round by round. We analyze these two previously unnoticed problems, present eavesdropping strategies that exploit them, and find that the two problems are independent. We discuss some sifting protocols in the literature that are immune to these problems. While some of these would be inefficient replacements for iterative sifting, we find that the sifting subroutine of an asymptotically secure protocol suggested by Lo et al (2005 J. Cryptol. 18 133-65), which we call LCA sifting, has an efficiency on par with that of iterative sifting. One of our main results is to show that LCA sifting can be adapted to achieve secure sifting in the finite-key regime. More precisely, we combine LCA sifting with a certain parameter estimation protocol, and we prove the finite-key security of this combination. Hence we propose that LCA sifting should replace iterative sifting in future QKD implementations. More generally, we present two formal criteria for a sifting protocol that guarantee its finite-key security. Our criteria may guide the design of future protocols and inspire a more rigorous QKD analysis, which has neglected sifting-related attacks so far.

  18. Flow adjustment inside large finite-size wind farms approaching the infinite wind farm regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ka Ling; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Due to the increasing number and the growing size of wind farms, the distance among them continues to decrease. Thus, it is necessary to understand how these large finite-size wind farms and their wakes could interfere the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics and adjacent wind farms. Fully-developed flow inside wind farms has been extensively studied through numerical simulations of infinite wind farms. The transportation of momentum and energy is only vertical and the advection of them is neglected in these infinite wind farms. However, less attention has been paid to examine the length of wind farms required to reach such asymptotic regime and the ABL dynamics in the leading and trailing edges of the large finite-size wind farms. Large eddy simulations are performed in this study to investigate the flow adjustment inside large finite-size wind farms in conventionally-neutral boundary layer with the effect of Coriolis force and free-atmosphere stratification from 1 to 5 K/km. For the large finite-size wind farms considered in the present work, when the potential temperature lapse rate is 5 K/km, the wind farms exceed the height of the ABL by two orders of magnitude for the incoming flow inside the farms to approach the fully-developed regime. An entrance fetch of approximately 40 times of the ABL height is also required for such flow adjustment. At the fully-developed flow regime of the large finite-size wind farms, the flow characteristics match those of infinite wind farms even though they have different adjustment length scales. The role of advection at the entrance and exit regions of the large finite-size wind farms is also examined. The interaction between the internal boundary layer developed above the large finite-size wind farms and the ABL under different potential temperature lapse rates are compared. It is shown that the potential temperature lapse rate plays a role in whether the flow inside the large finite-size wind farms adjusts to the fully

  19. Quantum state discrimination bounds for finite sample size

    CERN Document Server

    Audenaert, Koenraad M R; Verstraete, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In the problem of quantum state discrimination, one has to determine by measurements the state of a quantum system, based on the a priori side information that the true state is one of two given and completely known states, rho or sigma. In general, it is not possible to decide the identity of the true state with certainty, and the optimal measurement strategy depends on whether the two possible errors (mistaking rho for sigma, or the other way around) are treated as of equal importance or not. Recent results on the quantum Chernoff and Hoeffding bounds show that, if several copies of the system are available then the optimal error probabilities decay exponentially in the number of copies, and the decay rate is given by a certain statistical distance between rho and sigma (the Chernoff distance and the Hoeffding distances, respectively). While these results provide a complete solution for the asymptotic problem, they are not completely satisfying from a practical point of view. Indeed, in realistic scenarios ...

  20. Quantifying uncertainty in mean earthquake interevent times for a finite sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, M.; Main, I. G.; Touati, S.

    2009-01-01

    Seismic activity is routinely quantified using means in event rate or interevent time. Standard estimates of the error on such mean values implicitly assume that the events used to calculate the mean are independent. However, earthquakes can be triggered by other events and are thus not necessarily independent. As a result, the errors on mean earthquake interevent times do not exhibit Gaussian convergence with increasing sample size according to the central limit theorem. In this paper we investigate how the errors decay with sample size in real earthquake catalogues and how the nature of this convergence varies with the spatial extent of the region under investigation. We demonstrate that the errors in mean interevent times, as a function of sample size, are well estimated by defining an effective sample size, using the autocorrelation function to estimate the number of pieces of independent data that exist in samples of different length. This allows us to accurately project error estimates from finite natural earthquake catalogues into the future and promotes a definition of stability wherein the autocorrelation function is not varying in time. The technique is easy to apply, and we suggest that it is routinely applied to define errors on mean interevent times as part of seismic hazard assessment studies. This is particularly important for studies that utilize small catalogue subsets (fewer than ˜1000 events) in time-dependent or high spatial resolution (e.g., for catastrophe modeling) hazard assessment.

  1. Fast, accurate and stable scattering calculation method with application to finite sized photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Lodahl, Peter; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    We present a multipole solution to the Lippmann-Schwinger equation for electromagnetic scattering in inhomogeneous geometries. The method is illustrated by calculating the Green’s function for a finite sized two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide.......We present a multipole solution to the Lippmann-Schwinger equation for electromagnetic scattering in inhomogeneous geometries. The method is illustrated by calculating the Green’s function for a finite sized two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide....

  2. Finite Size Corrected Relativistic Mean-Field Model and QCD Critical End Point

    CERN Document Server

    Uddin, Saeed; Ahmad, Jan Shabir

    2012-01-01

    The effect of finite size of hadrons on the QCD phase diagram is analyzed using relativistic mean field model for the hadronic phase and the Bag model for the QGP phase. The corrections to the EOS for hadronic phase are incorporated in a thermodynamic consistent manner for Van der Waals like interaction. It is found that the effect of finite size of baryons is to shift CEP to higher chemical potential values.

  3. Finite Size Scaling and "perfect" actions the three dimensional Ising model

    CERN Document Server

    Ballesteros, H G; Martín-Mayor, V; Muñoz-Sudupe, A

    1998-01-01

    Using Finite-Size Scaling techniques, we numerically show that the first irrelevant operator of the lattice $\\lambda\\phi^4$ theory in three dimensions is (within errors) completely decoupled at $\\lambda=1.0$. This interesting result also holds in the Thermodynamical Limit, where the renormalized coupling constant shows an extraordinary reduction of the scaling-corrections when compared with the Ising model. It is argued that Finite-Size Scaling analysis can be a competitive method for finding improved actions.

  4. Finite-size effects on semi-directed Barabási-Albert networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, M. A.; Sumour, Muneer A.; Elbitar, A. M.; Shabat, M. M.; Lima, F. W. S.

    2016-04-01

    In scale-free Barabási-Albert (BA) networks, we study the finite-size effect at different number m of neighbors. So, we investigate the effects of finite network size N for the recently developed semi-directed BA networks (SDBA1 and SDBA2) at fixed 2≤m≤300) and show and explain the gap in the distribution of the number k(i) of neighbors of the nodes i.

  5. Spontaneous radiation of a finite-size dipole emitter in hyperbolic media

    CERN Document Server

    Poddubny, Alexander N; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2011-01-01

    We study the radiative decay rate and Purcell effect for a finite-size dipole emitter placed in a homogeneous uniaxial medium. We demonstrate that the radiative rate is strongly enhanced when the signs of the longitudinal and transverse dielectric constants of the medium are opposite, and the isofrequency contour has a hyperbolic shape. We reveal that the Purcell enhancement factor remains finite even in the absence of losses, and it depends on the emitter size.

  6. Finite-size anisotropy in statistically uniform porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Koza, Zbigniew; Khalili, Arzhang

    2009-01-01

    Anisotropy of the permeability tensor in statistically uniform porous media of sizes used in typical computer simulations is studied. Although such systems are assumed to be isotropic by default, we show that de facto their anisotropic permeability can give rise to significant changes of transport parameters such as permeability and tortuosity. The main parameter controlling the anisotropy is $a/L$, being the ratio of the obstacle to system size. Distribution of the angle $\\alpha$ between the external force and the volumetric fluid stream is found to be approximately normal, and the standard deviation of $\\alpha$ is found to decay with the system size as $(a/L)^{d/2}$, where $d$ is the space dimensionality. These properties can be used to estimate both anisotropy-related statistical errors in large-scale simulations and the size of the representative elementary volume.

  7. Finite size effects and symmetry breaking in the evolution of networks of competing Boolean nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, M; Bassler, K E, E-mail: bassler@uh.edu [Department of Physics, University of Houston, 617 Science and Research 1, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States)

    2011-01-28

    Finite size effects on the evolutionary dynamics of Boolean networks are analyzed. In the model considered, Boolean networks evolve via a competition between nodes that punishes those in the majority. Previous studies have found that large networks evolve to a statistical steady state that is both critical and highly canalized, and that the evolution of canalization, which is a form of robustness found in genetic regulatory networks, is associated with a particular symmetry of the evolutionary dynamics. Here, it is found that finite size networks evolve in a fundamentally different way than infinitely large networks do. The symmetry of the evolutionary dynamics of infinitely large networks that selects for canalizing Boolean functions is broken in the evolutionary dynamics of finite size networks. In finite size networks, there is an additional selection for input-inverting Boolean functions that output a value opposite to the majority of input values. The reason for the symmetry breaking in the evolutionary dynamics is found to be due to the need for nodes in finite size networks to behave differently in order to cooperate so that the system collectively performs as efficiently as possible. The results suggest that both finite size effects and symmetry are fundamental for understanding the evolution of real-world complex networks, including genetic regulatory networks.

  8. Efficient modeling of flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments for vibroacoustic finite element analysis. Finite size correction by image sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimonti, L.; Atalla, N.

    2017-02-01

    This work is concerned with the hybrid finite element-transfer matrix methodology recently proposed by the authors. The main assumption behind this hybrid method consists in neglecting the actual finite lateral extent of the acoustic treatment. Although a substantial increase of the computational efficiency can be achieved, the effect of the reflected field (i.e. finite size effects) may be sometimes important, preventing the hybrid model from giving quantitative meaningful results. For this reason, a correction to account for wave reflections at the lateral boundaries of the acoustic treatment is sought. It is shown in the present paper that the image source method can be successfully employed to retrieve such finite size effects. Indeed, such methodology is known to be effective when the response of the system is a smooth function of the frequency, like in the case of highly dissipative acoustic treatments. The main concern of this paper is to assess accuracy and feasibility of the image source method in the context of acoustic treatments modeling. Numerical examples show that the performance of the standard hybrid model can be substantially improved by the proposed correction without deteriorating excessively the computational efficiency.

  9. Finite mixture models for the computation of isotope ratios in mixed isotopic samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffler, Daniel; Laaha, Gregor; Leisch, Friedrich; Kappel, Stefanie; Prohaska, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Finite mixture models have been used for more than 100 years, but have seen a real boost in popularity over the last two decades due to the tremendous increase in available computing power. The areas of application of mixture models range from biology and medicine to physics, economics and marketing. These models can be applied to data where observations originate from various groups and where group affiliations are not known, as is the case for multiple isotope ratios present in mixed isotopic samples. Recently, the potential of finite mixture models for the computation of 235U/238U isotope ratios from transient signals measured in individual (sub-)µm-sized particles by laser ablation - multi-collector - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICPMS) was demonstrated by Kappel et al. [1]. The particles, which were deposited on the same substrate, were certified with respect to their isotopic compositions. Here, we focus on the statistical model and its application to isotope data in ecogeochemistry. Commonly applied evaluation approaches for mixed isotopic samples are time-consuming and are dependent on the judgement of the analyst. Thus, isotopic compositions may be overlooked due to the presence of more dominant constituents. Evaluation using finite mixture models can be accomplished unsupervised and automatically. The models try to fit several linear models (regression lines) to subgroups of data taking the respective slope as estimation for the isotope ratio. The finite mixture models are parameterised by: • The number of different ratios. • Number of points belonging to each ratio-group. • The ratios (i.e. slopes) of each group. Fitting of the parameters is done by maximising the log-likelihood function using an iterative expectation-maximisation (EM) algorithm. In each iteration step, groups of size smaller than a control parameter are dropped; thereby the number of different ratios is determined. The analyst only influences some control

  10. Finite size corrections to the radiation reaction force in classical electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galley, Chad R; Leibovich, Adam K; Rothstein, Ira Z

    2010-08-27

    We introduce an effective field theory approach that describes the motion of finite size objects under the influence of electromagnetic fields. We prove that leading order effects due to the finite radius R of a spherically symmetric charge is order R2 rather than order R in any physical model, as widely claimed in the literature. This scaling arises as a consequence of Poincaré and gauge symmetries, which can be shown to exclude linear corrections. We use the formalism to calculate the leading order finite size correction to the Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac force.

  11. In situ measurements of the oblique incidence sound absorption coefficient for finite sized absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottink, Marco; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Fernandez-Grande, Efren; Trojgaard, Per; Tiana-Roig, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Absorption coefficients are mostly measured in reverberation rooms or with impedance tubes. Since these methods are only suitable for measuring the random incidence and the normal incidence absorption coefficient, there exists an increasing need for absorption coefficient measurement of finite absorbers at oblique incidence in situ. Due to the edge diffraction effect, oblique incidence methods considering an infinite sample fail to measure the absorption coefficient at large incidence angles of finite samples. This paper aims for the development of a measurement method that accounts for the finiteness of the absorber. A sound field model, which accounts for scattering from the finite absorber edges, assuming plane wave incidence is derived. A significant influence of the finiteness on the radiation impedance and the corresponding absorption coefficient is found. A finite surface method, which combines microphone array measurements over a finite sample with the sound field model in an inverse manner, is proposed. Besides, a temporal subtraction method, a microphone array method, impedance tube measurements, and an equivalent fluid model are used for validation. The finite surface method gives promising agreement with theory, especially at near grazing incidence. Thus, the finite surface method is proposed for further measurements at large incidence angles.

  12. The attention-weighted sample-size model of visual short-term memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Philip L.; Lilburn, Simon D.; Corbett, Elaine A.

    2016-01-01

    exceeded that predicted by the sample-size model for both simultaneously and sequentially presented stimuli. Instead, the set-size effect and the serial position curves with sequential presentation were predicted by an attention-weighted version of the sample-size model, which assumes that one of the items......We investigated the capacity of visual short-term memory (VSTM) in a phase discrimination task that required judgments about the configural relations between pairs of black and white features. Sewell et al. (2014) previously showed that VSTM capacity in an orientation discrimination task was well...... described by a sample-size model, which views VSTM as a resource comprised of a finite number of noisy stimulus samples. The model predicts the invariance of ∑i(di ′)2, the sum of squared sensitivities across items, for displays of different sizes. For phase discrimination, the set-size effect significantly...

  13. Finite-size modifications of the magnetic properties of clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Linderoth, Søren; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1993-01-01

    The spin-wave spectrum of Heisenberg spin clusters of various structures (bcc, fcc, and disordered) ranging in size between 9 and 749 spins is calculated by a self-consistent diagonalization of the equation of motion of S+ in real space. The spin-wave spectrum of the clusters is strongly modified...

  14. Finite size melting of spherical solid-liquid aluminium interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, J.; Johnson, Erik; Sakai, T.

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the melting of nano-sized cone shaped aluminium needles coated with amorphous carbon using transmission electron microscopy. The interface between solid and liquid aluminium was found to have spherical topology. For needles with fixed apex angle, the depressed melting...

  15. Finite-size effects and percolation properties of Poisson geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmier, C.; Dumonteil, E.; Malvagi, F.; Mazzolo, A.; Zoia, A.

    2016-07-01

    Random tessellations of the space represent a class of prototype models of heterogeneous media, which are central in several applications in physics, engineering, and life sciences. In this work, we investigate the statistical properties of d -dimensional isotropic Poisson geometries by resorting to Monte Carlo simulation, with special emphasis on the case d =3 . We first analyze the behavior of the key features of these stochastic geometries as a function of the dimension d and the linear size L of the domain. Then, we consider the case of Poisson binary mixtures, where the polyhedra are assigned two labels with complementary probabilities. For this latter class of random geometries, we numerically characterize the percolation threshold, the strength of the percolating cluster, and the average cluster size.

  16. Learning algorithms for feedforward networks based on finite samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, N.S.V.; Protopopescu, V.; Mann, R.C.; Oblow, E.M.; Iyengar, S.S.

    1994-09-01

    Two classes of convergent algorithms for learning continuous functions (and also regression functions) that are represented by feedforward networks, are discussed. The first class of algorithms, applicable to networks with unknown weights located only in the output layer, is obtained by utilizing the potential function methods of Aizerman et al. The second class, applicable to general feedforward networks, is obtained by utilizing the classical Robbins-Monro style stochastic approximation methods. Conditions relating the sample sizes to the error bounds are derived for both classes of algorithms using martingale-type inequalities. For concreteness, the discussion is presented in terms of neural networks, but the results are applicable to general feedforward networks, in particular to wavelet networks. The algorithms can be directly adapted to concept learning problems.

  17. Finite-size scaling study of the three-dimensional classical Heisenberg model

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, C; Holm, Christian; Janke, Wolfhard

    1993-01-01

    We use the single-cluster Monte Carlo update algorithm to simulate the three-dimensional classical Heisenberg model in the critical region on simple cubic lattices of size $L^3$ with $L=12, 16, 20, 24, 32, 40$, and $48$. By means of finite-size scaling analyses we compute high-precision estimates of the critical temperature and the critical exponents, using extensively histogram reweighting and optimization techniques. Measurements of the autocorrelation time show the expected reduction of critical slowing down at the phase transition. This allows simulations on significantly larger lattices than in previous studies and consequently a better control over systematic errors in finite-size scaling analyses.

  18. A Hybrid Solver of Size Modified Poisson-Boltzmann Equation by Domain Decomposition, Finite Element, and Finite Difference

    CERN Document Server

    Ying, Jinyong

    2016-01-01

    The size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation (SMPBE) is one important variant of the popular dielectric model, the Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE), to reflect ionic size effects in the prediction of electrostatics for a biomolecule in an ionic solvent. In this paper, a new SMPBE hybrid solver is developed using a solution decomposition, the Schwartz's overlapped domain decomposition, finite element, and finite difference. It is then programmed as a software package in C, Fortran, and Python based on the state-of-the-art finite element library DOLFIN from the FEniCS project. This software package is well validated on a Born ball model with analytical solution and a dipole model with a known physical properties. Numerical results on six proteins with different net charges demonstrate its high performance. Finally, this new SMPBE hybrid solver is shown to be numerically stable and convergent in the calculation of electrostatic solvation free energy for 216 biomolecules and binding free energy for a DNA-drug com...

  19. Approximate solution for frequency synchronization in a finite-size Kuramoto model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengwei; Rubido, Nicolás; Grebogi, Celso; Baptista, Murilo S

    2015-12-01

    Scientists have been considering the Kuramoto model to understand the mechanism behind the appearance of collective behavior, such as frequency synchronization (FS) as a paradigm, in real-world networks with a finite number of oscillators. A major current challenge is to obtain an analytical solution for the phase angles. Here, we provide an approximate analytical solution for this problem by deriving a master solution for the finite-size Kuramoto model, with arbitrary finite-variance distribution of the natural frequencies of the oscillators. The master solution embodies all particular solutions of the finite-size Kuramoto model for any frequency distribution and coupling strength larger than the critical one. Furthermore, we present a criterion to determine the stability of the FS solution. This allows one to analytically infer the relationship between the physical parameters and the stable behavior of networks.

  20. Finite size effect on dynamical entanglement entropy: CFT and holography

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Gautam; Ugajin, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    Time-dependent entanglement entropy (EE) is computed for a single interval in two-dimensional conformal theories from a quenched initial state in the presence of spatial boundaries. The EE is found to be periodic in time with periodicity equal to the system size $L$. For large enough $L$, the EE shows a rise to a thermal value (characterized by a temperature $1/\\beta$ determined by the initial state), followed by periodic returns to the original value. This works irrespective of whether the conformal field theory (CFT) is rational or irrational. For conformal field theories with a holographic dual, the large $c$ limit plays an essential role in ensuring that the EE computed from the CFT is universal (independent of the details of the CFT and of boundary conditions) and is exactly matched by the holographic EE. The dual geometry is computed and it interpolates between a BTZ black hole at large $L$ and global AdS at large $\\beta$.

  1. Finite-size effects and the search for the critical endpoint in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Palhares, Leticia F; Kodama, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    We discuss how the finiteness of the system created in a heavy-ion collision affects possible signatures of the QCD critical endpoint. We show sizable results for the modifications of the chiral phase diagram at volume scales typically encountered in current heavy-ion collisions and address the applicability of finite-size scaling as a tool in the experimental search for the critical endpoint.

  2. Geometric measures of multipartite entanglement in finite-size spin chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasone, M; Dell' Anno, F; De Siena, S; Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F, E-mail: illuminati@sa.infn.i [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Via Ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the behaviour of multipartite entanglement in finite-size quantum spin systems, resorting to a hierarchy of geometric measures of multipartite entanglement recently introduced in the literature. In particular, we investigate the ground-state entanglement in the XY model defined on finite chains of N sites with periodic boundary conditions. We analyse the behaviour of the geometric measures of (N- 1)-partite and (N/2)-partite entanglement and compare them with the Wei-Goldbart geometric measure of global entanglement.

  3. Comparison of Bayesian Sample Size Criteria: ACC, ALC, and WOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jing; Lee, J Jack; Alber, Susan

    2009-12-01

    A challenge for implementing performance based Bayesian sample size determination is selecting which of several methods to use. We compare three Bayesian sample size criteria: the average coverage criterion (ACC) which controls the coverage rate of fixed length credible intervals over the predictive distribution of the data, the average length criterion (ALC) which controls the length of credible intervals with a fixed coverage rate, and the worst outcome criterion (WOC) which ensures the desired coverage rate and interval length over all (or a subset of) possible datasets. For most models, the WOC produces the largest sample size among the three criteria, and sample sizes obtained by the ACC and the ALC are not the same. For Bayesian sample size determination for normal means and differences between normal means, we investigate, for the first time, the direction and magnitude of differences between the ACC and ALC sample sizes. For fixed hyperparameter values, we show that the difference of the ACC and ALC sample size depends on the nominal coverage, and not on the nominal interval length. There exists a threshold value of the nominal coverage level such that below the threshold the ALC sample size is larger than the ACC sample size, and above the threshold the ACC sample size is larger. Furthermore, the ACC sample size is more sensitive to changes in the nominal coverage. We also show that for fixed hyperparameter values, there exists an asymptotic constant ratio between the WOC sample size and the ALC (ACC) sample size. Simulation studies are conducted to show that similar relationships among the ACC, ALC, and WOC may hold for estimating binomial proportions. We provide a heuristic argument that the results can be generalized to a larger class of models.

  4. On bootstrap sample size in extreme value theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L. Geluk (Jaap); L.F.M. de Haan (Laurens)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIt has been known for a long time that for bootstrapping the probability distribution of the maximum of a sample consistently, the bootstrap sample size needs to be of smaller order than the original sample size. See Jun Shao and Dongsheng Tu (1995), Ex. 3.9,p. 123. We show that the same

  5. Finite-size analysis of continuous-variable quantum key distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Leverrier, Anthony; Grangier, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to extend the framework of finite size analysis recently developed for quantum key distribution to continuous-variable protocols. We do not solve this problem completely here, and we mainly consider the finite size effects on the parameter estimation procedure. Despite the fact that some questions are left open, we are able to give an estimation of the secret key rate for protocols which do not contain a postselection procedure. As expected, these results are significantly more pessimistic than the ones obtained in the asymptotic regime. However, we show that recent continuous-variable protocols are able to provide fully secure secret keys in the finite size scenario, over distances larger than 50 km.

  6. Nuclear Zemach Moments and Finite-Size Corrections to Allowed Beta Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, X B; Hayes, A C

    2016-01-01

    The finite-size correction to $\\beta$-decay plays an important role in determining the expected antineutrino spectra from reactors at a level that is important for the reactor-neutrino anomaly. Here we express the leading-order finite-size correction to allowed $\\beta$-decay in terms of Zemach moments. We calculate the Zemach moments within a Hartree-Fock model using a Skyrme-like energy density functional. We find that the Zemach moments are increased relative to predictions based on the simple assumption of identical uniform nuclear-charge and weak-transition densities. However, for allowed ground-state to ground-state transitions in medium and heavy nuclei, the detailed nuclear structure calculations do not change the finite-size corrections significantly from the simple model predictions, and are only 10-15% larger than the latter even though the densities differ significantly.

  7. Sample size determination in clinical trials with multiple endpoints

    CERN Document Server

    Sozu, Takashi; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Evans, Scott R

    2015-01-01

    This book integrates recent methodological developments for calculating the sample size and power in trials with more than one endpoint considered as multiple primary or co-primary, offering an important reference work for statisticians working in this area. The determination of sample size and the evaluation of power are fundamental and critical elements in the design of clinical trials. If the sample size is too small, important effects may go unnoticed; if the sample size is too large, it represents a waste of resources and unethically puts more participants at risk than necessary. Recently many clinical trials have been designed with more than one endpoint considered as multiple primary or co-primary, creating a need for new approaches to the design and analysis of these clinical trials. The book focuses on the evaluation of power and sample size determination when comparing the effects of two interventions in superiority clinical trials with multiple endpoints. Methods for sample size calculation in clin...

  8. How Small Is Big: Sample Size and Skewness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesana, Adina; Senior, Graeme

    2016-09-21

    Sample sizes of 50 have been cited as sufficient to obtain stable means and standard deviations in normative test data. The influence of skewness on this minimum number, however, has not been evaluated. Normative test data with varying levels of skewness were compiled for 12 measures from 7 tests collected as part of ongoing normative studies in Brisbane, Australia. Means and standard deviations were computed from sample sizes of 10 to 100 drawn with replacement from larger samples of 272 to 973 cases. The minimum sample size was determined by the number at which both mean and standard deviation estimates remained within the 90% confidence intervals surrounding the population estimates. Sample sizes of greater than 85 were found to generate stable means and standard deviations regardless of the level of skewness, with smaller samples required in skewed distributions. A formula was derived to compute recommended sample size at differing levels of skewness.

  9. Finite-size corrections for logarithmic representations in critical dense polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izmailian, Nickolay Sh., E-mail: izmailan@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Yerevan Physics Institute, Alikhanian Br. 2, 375036 Yerevan (Armenia); National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Physics Division, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Ruelle, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.ruelle@uclouvain.be [Institut de Recherche en Mathematique et Physique, Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium); Hu, Chin-Kun, E-mail: huck@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2012-05-01

    We study (analytic) finite-size corrections in the dense polymer model on the strip by perturbing the critical Hamiltonian with irrelevant operators belonging to the tower of the identity. We generalize the perturbation expansion to include Jordan cells, and examine whether the finite-size corrections are sensitive to the properties of indecomposable representations appearing in the conformal spectrum, in particular their indecomposability parameters. We find, at first order, that the corrections do not depend on these parameters nor even on the presence of Jordan cells. Though the corrections themselves are not universal, the ratios are universal and correctly reproduced by the conformal perturbative approach, to first order.

  10. Communication: Finite size correction in periodic coupled cluster theory calculations of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ke; Grüneis, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    We present a method to correct for finite size errors in coupled cluster theory calculations of solids. The outlined technique shares similarities with electronic structure factor interpolation methods used in quantum Monte Carlo calculations. However, our approach does not require the calculation of density matrices. Furthermore we show that the proposed finite size corrections achieve chemical accuracy in the convergence of second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation and coupled cluster singles and doubles correlation energies per atom for insulating solids with two atomic unit cells using 2 × 2 × 2 and 3 × 3 × 3 k-point meshes only.

  11. Finite population size effects in quasispecies models with single-peak fitness landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saakian, David B.; Deem, Michael W.; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2012-04-01

    We consider finite population size effects for Crow-Kimura and Eigen quasispecies models with single-peak fitness landscape. We formulate accurately the iteration procedure for the finite population models, then derive the Hamilton-Jacobi equation (HJE) to describe the dynamic of the probability distribution. The steady-state solution of HJE gives the variance of the mean fitness. Our results are useful for understanding the population sizes of viruses in which the infinite population models can give reliable results for biological evolution problems.

  12. Cutoff sample size estimation for survival data: a simulation study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This thesis demonstrates the possible cutoff sample size point that balances goodness of es-timation and study expenditure by a practical cancer case. As it is crucial to determine the sample size in designing an experiment, researchers attempt to find the suitable sample size that achieves desired power and budget efficiency at the same time. The thesis shows how simulation can be used for sample size and precision calculations with survival data. The pre-sentation concentrates on the simula...

  13. Linkage effects and analysis of finite sample errors in the HapMap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitlen, Noah; Kang, Hyun Min; Eskin, Eleazar

    2009-01-01

    The HapMap provides a valuable resource to help uncover genetic variants of important complex phenotypes such as disease risk and outcome. Using the HapMap we can infer the patterns of LD within different human populations. This is a critical step for determining which SNPs to genotype as part of a study, estimating study power, designing a follow-up study to identify the causal variants, 'imputing' untyped SNPs, and estimating recombination rates along the genome. Despite its tremendous importance, the HapMap suffers from the fundamental limitation that at most 60 unrelated individuals are available per population. We present an analytical framework for analyzing the implications of a finite sample HapMap. We present and justify simple approximations for deriving analytical estimates of important statistics such as the square of the correlation coefficient r(2) between two SNPs. Finally, we use this framework to show that current HapMap based estimates of r(2) and power have significant errors, and that tag sets highly overestimate their coverage. We show that a reasonable increase in the number of individuals, such as that proposed by the 1000 genomes project, greatly reduces the errors due to finite sample size for a large proportion of SNPs.

  14. Finite size effects on the phase diagram of the thermodynamical cluster model

    CERN Document Server

    Mallik, S; Chaudhuri, G

    2016-01-01

    The thermodynamical cluster model is known to present a first-order liquid-gas phase transition in the idealized case of an uncharged, infinitely extended medium. However, in most practical applications of this model, the system is finite and charged. In this paper we study how the phase diagram is modified by finite size and Coulomb effects. We show that the thermodynamic anomalies which are associated to the finite system counterpart of first order phase transitions, are correctly reproduced by this effective model. However, approximations in the calculation of the grandcanonical partition sum prevent obtaining the exact mapping between statistical ensembles which should be associated to finite systems. The ensemble inequivalence associated to the transition persists in the presence of Coulomb, but the phase diagram is deeply modified with respect to the simple liquid-gas phase transition characteristic of the neutral system.

  15. Finite-size effects and the search for the critical endpoint of QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, Eduardo S; Palhares, Letícia F; Sorensen, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Taking into account the finiteness of the system created in heavy ion collisions, we show sizable results for the modifications of the chiral phase diagram at volume scales typically encountered in current experiments and demonstrate the applicability of finite-size scaling as a tool in the experimental search for the critical endpoint. Using data from RHIC and SPS and assuming finite-size scaling, we find that RHIC data from 200 GeV down to 19.6 GeV is only consistent with a critical point at \\mu \\gtrsim 510 MeV. We also present predictions for the fluctuations at lower energies currently being investigated in the Beam Energy Scan program.

  16. A toxin-mediated size-structured population model: Finite difference approximation and well-posedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qihua; Wang, Hao

    2016-08-01

    The question of the effects of environmental toxins on ecological communities is of great interest from both environmental and conservational points of view. Mathematical models have been applied increasingly to predict the effects of toxins on a variety of ecological processes. Motivated by the fact that individuals with different sizes may have different sensitivities to toxins, we develop a toxin-mediated size-structured model which is given by a system of first order fully nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). It is very possible that this work represents the first derivation of a PDE model in the area of ecotoxicology. To solve the model, an explicit finite difference approximation to this PDE system is developed. Existence-uniqueness of the weak solution to the model is established and convergence of the finite difference approximation to this unique solution is proved. Numerical examples are provided by numerically solving the PDE model using the finite difference scheme.

  17. Publication bias in psychology: a diagnosis based on the correlation between effect size and sample size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Kühberger

    Full Text Available The p value obtained from a significance test provides no information about the magnitude or importance of the underlying phenomenon. Therefore, additional reporting of effect size is often recommended. Effect sizes are theoretically independent from sample size. Yet this may not hold true empirically: non-independence could indicate publication bias.We investigate whether effect size is independent from sample size in psychological research. We randomly sampled 1,000 psychological articles from all areas of psychological research. We extracted p values, effect sizes, and sample sizes of all empirical papers, and calculated the correlation between effect size and sample size, and investigated the distribution of p values.We found a negative correlation of r = -.45 [95% CI: -.53; -.35] between effect size and sample size. In addition, we found an inordinately high number of p values just passing the boundary of significance. Additional data showed that neither implicit nor explicit power analysis could account for this pattern of findings.The negative correlation between effect size and samples size, and the biased distribution of p values indicate pervasive publication bias in the entire field of psychology.

  18. Publication Bias in Psychology: A Diagnosis Based on the Correlation between Effect Size and Sample Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühberger, Anton; Fritz, Astrid; Scherndl, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background The p value obtained from a significance test provides no information about the magnitude or importance of the underlying phenomenon. Therefore, additional reporting of effect size is often recommended. Effect sizes are theoretically independent from sample size. Yet this may not hold true empirically: non-independence could indicate publication bias. Methods We investigate whether effect size is independent from sample size in psychological research. We randomly sampled 1,000 psychological articles from all areas of psychological research. We extracted p values, effect sizes, and sample sizes of all empirical papers, and calculated the correlation between effect size and sample size, and investigated the distribution of p values. Results We found a negative correlation of r = −.45 [95% CI: −.53; −.35] between effect size and sample size. In addition, we found an inordinately high number of p values just passing the boundary of significance. Additional data showed that neither implicit nor explicit power analysis could account for this pattern of findings. Conclusion The negative correlation between effect size and samples size, and the biased distribution of p values indicate pervasive publication bias in the entire field of psychology. PMID:25192357

  19. 40 CFR 80.127 - Sample size guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample size guidelines. 80.127 Section 80.127 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Attest Engagements § 80.127 Sample size guidelines. In performing...

  20. Approaches to sample size determination for multivariate data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saccenti, Edoardo; Timmerman, Marieke E.

    2016-01-01

    Sample size determination is a fundamental step in the design of experiments. Methods for sample size determination are abundant for univariate analysis methods, but scarce in the multivariate case. Omics data are multivariate in nature and are commonly investigated using multivariate statistical

  1. Sample Size Requirements for Estimating Pearson, Spearman and Kendall Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonett, Douglas G.; Wright, Thomas A.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews interval estimates of the Pearson, Kendall tau-alpha, and Spearman correlates and proposes an improved standard error for the Spearman correlation. Examines the sample size required to yield a confidence interval having the desired width. Findings show accurate results from a two-stage approximation to the sample size. (SLD)

  2. Determination of sample size in genome-scale RNAi screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas; Heyse, Joseph F

    2009-04-01

    For genome-scale RNAi research, it is critical to investigate sample size required for the achievement of reasonably low false negative rate (FNR) and false positive rate. The analysis in this article reveals that current design of sample size contributes to the occurrence of low signal-to-noise ratio in genome-scale RNAi projects. The analysis suggests that (i) an arrangement of 16 wells per plate is acceptable and an arrangement of 20-24 wells per plate is preferable for a negative control to be used for hit selection in a primary screen without replicates; (ii) in a confirmatory screen or a primary screen with replicates, a sample size of 3 is not large enough, and there is a large reduction in FNRs when sample size increases from 3 to 4. To search a tradeoff between benefit and cost, any sample size between 4 and 11 is a reasonable choice. If the main focus is the selection of siRNAs with strong effects, a sample size of 4 or 5 is a good choice. If we want to have enough power to detect siRNAs with moderate effects, sample size needs to be 8, 9, 10 or 11. These discoveries about sample size bring insight to the design of a genome-scale RNAi screen experiment.

  3. Lower Bounds on Q for Finite Size Antennas of Arbitrary Shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of the lower bound on the radiation Q for an arbitrarily shaped finite size antenna of non-zero volume is formulated in terms of equivalent electric and magnetic currents densities distributed on a closed surface coinciding with antenna exterior surface. When these equivalent currents...

  4. Roughness and Finite Size Effect in the NYSE Stock-Price Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Alfi, V; Petri, A; Pietronero, L

    2006-01-01

    We consider the roughness properties of NYSE (New York Stock Exchange) stock-price fluctuations. The statistical properties of the data are relatively homogeneous within the same day but the large jumps between different days prevent the extension of the analysis to large times. This leads to intrinsic finite size effects which alter the apparent Hurst (H) exponent. We show, by analytical methods, that finite size effects always lead to an enhancement of H. We then consider the effect of fat tails on the analysis of the roughness and show that the finite size effects are strongly enhanced by the fat tails. The non stationarity of the stock price dynamics also enhances the finite size effects which, in principle, can become important even in the asymptotic regime. We then compute the Hurst exponent for a set of stocks of the NYSE and argue that the interpretation of the value of H is highly ambiguous in view of the above results. Finally we propose an alternative determination of the roughness in terms of the ...

  5. Finite-size scaling of interface free energies in the 3d Ising model

    CERN Document Server

    Pepé, M; Forcrand, Ph. de

    2002-01-01

    We perform a study of the universality of the finite size scaling functions of interface free energies in the 3d Ising model. Close to the hot/cold phase transition, we observe very good agreement with the same scaling functions of the 4d SU(2) Yang--Mills theory at the deconfinement phase transition.

  6. Finite-size scaling of interface free energies in the 3d Ising model

    OpenAIRE

    Pepe, M.; de Forcrand, Ph.

    2001-01-01

    We perform a study of the universality of the finite size scaling functions of interface free energies in the 3d Ising model. Close to the hot/cold phase transition, we observe very good agreement with the same scaling functions of the 4d SU(2) Yang--Mills theory at the deconfinement phase transition.

  7. Finite size scaling analysis of intermittency moments in the two dimensional Ising model

    CERN Document Server

    Burda, Z; Peschanski, R; Wosiek, J

    1993-01-01

    Finite size scaling is shown to work very well for the block variables used in intermittency studies on a 2-d Ising lattice. The intermittency exponents so derived exhibit the expected relations to the magnetic critical exponent of the model. Email contact: pesch@amoco.saclay.cea.fr

  8. An explicit expression for finite-size corrections to the chemical potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, B.; Frenkel, D.

    1989-01-01

    In this article an expression is derived for the finite-size corrections to the excess chemical potential in an N-particle system with periodic boundary conditions. The leading N-dependence of the chemical potential is predicted to be proportional to 1/N. The authors derive a simple expression relat

  9. The finite size spectrum of the 2-dimensional O(3) nonlinear sigma-model

    OpenAIRE

    Balog, Janos(Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, MTA Lendület Holographic QFT Group, 1525, Budapest 114, P.O.B. 49, Hungary); Hegedus, Arpad

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear integral equations are proposed for the description of the full finite size spectrum of the 2-dimensional O(3) nonlinear sigma-model in a periodic box. Numerical results for the energy eigenvalues are compared to the rotator spectrum and perturbation theory for small volumes and with the recently proposed generalized Luscher formulas at large volumes.

  10. Finite-size corrections to the free energies of crystalline solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polson, J.M.; Trizac, E.; Pronk, S.; Frenkel, D.

    2000-01-01

    We analyze the finite-size corrections to the free energy of crystals with a fixed center of mass. When we explicitly correct for the leading (ln N/N) corrections, the remaining free energy is found to depend linearly on 1/N. Extrapolating to the thermodynamic limit (N → ∞), we estimate the free ene

  11. Finite-size corrections to the free energies of crystalline solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polson, J.M.; Trizac, E.; Pronk, S.; Frenkel, D.

    2000-01-01

    We analyze the finite-size corrections to the free energy of crystals with a fixed center of mass. When we explicitly correct for the leading (ln N/N) corrections, the remaining free energy is found to depend linearly on 1/N. Extrapolating to the thermodynamic limit (N → ∞), we estimate the free

  12. Power Analysis and Sample Size Determination in Metabolic Phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaise, Benjamin J; Correia, Gonçalo; Tin, Adrienne; Young, J Hunter; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Lewis, Matthew; Pearce, Jake T M; Elliott, Paul; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Holmes, Elaine; Ebbels, Timothy M D

    2016-05-17

    Estimation of statistical power and sample size is a key aspect of experimental design. However, in metabolic phenotyping, there is currently no accepted approach for these tasks, in large part due to the unknown nature of the expected effect. In such hypothesis free science, neither the number or class of important analytes nor the effect size are known a priori. We introduce a new approach, based on multivariate simulation, which deals effectively with the highly correlated structure and high-dimensionality of metabolic phenotyping data. First, a large data set is simulated based on the characteristics of a pilot study investigating a given biomedical issue. An effect of a given size, corresponding either to a discrete (classification) or continuous (regression) outcome is then added. Different sample sizes are modeled by randomly selecting data sets of various sizes from the simulated data. We investigate different methods for effect detection, including univariate and multivariate techniques. Our framework allows us to investigate the complex relationship between sample size, power, and effect size for real multivariate data sets. For instance, we demonstrate for an example pilot data set that certain features achieve a power of 0.8 for a sample size of 20 samples or that a cross-validated predictivity QY(2) of 0.8 is reached with an effect size of 0.2 and 200 samples. We exemplify the approach for both nuclear magnetic resonance and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data from humans and the model organism C. elegans.

  13. [Effect sizes, statistical power and sample sizes in "the Japanese Journal of Psychology"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzukawa, Yumi; Toyoda, Hideki

    2012-04-01

    This study analyzed the statistical power of research studies published in the "Japanese Journal of Psychology" in 2008 and 2009. Sample effect sizes and sample statistical powers were calculated for each statistical test and analyzed with respect to the analytical methods and the fields of the studies. The results show that in the fields like perception, cognition or learning, the effect sizes were relatively large, although the sample sizes were small. At the same time, because of the small sample sizes, some meaningful effects could not be detected. In the other fields, because of the large sample sizes, meaningless effects could be detected. This implies that researchers who could not get large enough effect sizes would use larger samples to obtain significant results.

  14. n4Studies: Sample Size Calculation for an Epidemiological Study on a Smart Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetta Ngamjarus

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was to develop a sample size application (called “n4Studies” for free use on iPhone and Android devices and to compare sample size functions between n4Studies with other applications and software. Methods: Objective-C programming language was used to create the application for the iPhone OS (operating system while javaScript, jquery mobile, PhoneGap and jstat were used to develop it for Android phones. Other sample size applications were searched from the Apple app and Google play stores. The applications’ characteristics and sample size functions were collected. Spearman’s rank correlation was used to investigate the relationship between number of sample size functions and price. Results: “n4Studies” provides several functions for sample size and power calculations for various epidemiological study designs. It can be downloaded from the Apple App and Google play store. Comparing n4Studies with other applications, it covers several more types of epidemiological study designs, gives similar results for estimation of infinite/finite population mean and infinite/finite proportion from GRANMO, for comparing two independent means from BioStats, for comparing two independent proportions from EpiCal application. When using the same parameters, n4Studies gives similar results to STATA, epicalc package in R, PS, G*Power, and OpenEpi. Conclusion: “n4Studies” can be an alternative tool for calculating the sample size. It may be useful to students, lecturers and researchers in conducting their research projects.

  15. Spurious finite-size instabilities in nuclear energy density functionals: Spin channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, A.; Tarpanov, D.; Davesne, D.; Navarro, J.

    2015-08-01

    Background: It has been recently shown that some Skyrme functionals can lead to nonconverging results in the calculation of some properties of atomic nuclei. A previous study has pointed out a possible link between these convergence problems and the appearance of finite-size instabilities in symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) around saturation density. Purpose: We show that the finite-size instabilities not only affect the ground-state properties of atomic nuclei, but they can also influence the calculations of vibrational excited states in finite nuclei. Method: We perform systematic fully-self consistent random phase approximation (RPA) calculations in spherical doubly magic nuclei. We employ several Skyrme functionals and vary the isoscalar and isovector coupling constants of the time-odd term s .Δ s . We determine critical values of these coupling constants beyond which the RPA calculations do not converge because the RPA stability matrix becomes nonpositive. Results: By comparing the RPA calculations of atomic nuclei with those performed for SNM we establish a correspondence between the critical densities in the infinite system and the critical coupling constants for which the RPA calculations do not converge. Conclusions: We find a quantitative stability criterion to detect finite-size instabilities related to the spin s .Δ s term of a functional. This criterion could be easily implemented in the standard fitting protocols to fix the coupling constants of the Skyrme functional.

  16. Simulation of suspension flow of finite-size spherical particles in a 3D square channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2008-11-01

    Suspension flow of finite-size particles in a turbulent gas is of importance to many engineering applications and natural phenomena. As a first step, the present work focuses on the motion and hydrodynamic interaction of finite-size particles in the absence of background carrier-fluid turbulence. The major challenge for an accurate simulation is twofold: an efficient implementation of no-slip boundary conditions on the moving particle surface and an accurate representation of short-range lubrication effects that typically are not resolved numerically. A Navier-Stokes based hybrid approach (i.e., Physalis) developed by Prosperetti and co-workers is employed to solve the suspension flows of a pair of finite-size, freely-moving particles at finite particle Reynolds numbers. A lubrication force representation, designed by Ladd, involving particle relative location and velocity, is incorporated to capture the short-range interactions between particles. The accuracy of the representation and its compatibility with the flow simulation will be examined. A mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) approach is also used to simulate the same problem for cross validation. Specific implementation issues will be addressed. Comparison with available numerical data will also be discussed.

  17. Reflection of sound from finite-size plane and curved surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    and the design frequency for a single reflector was derived. Above the design frequency the attenuation due to the finite size can be neglected and the reflection is efficient in the specular direction. The method was extended to the case of a reflector array and it was demonstrated that the performance......The author’s research on reflectors over nearly 25 years is summarized. The influence of curvature was analyzed by a geometrical model in order to quantify the attenuation by a simple expression. Reflection from a finite size plate was studied using the Kirchhoff-Fresnel approximation...... of a reflector array can improve if the size of the panels is decreased. The same design frequency applies to a single reflector and a reflector array, but with different meaning; in the latter case the design frequency is the upper limit for useful reflections. This design rule was first used...

  18. Quasi-long-range ordering in a finite-size 2D Heisenberg model

    CERN Document Server

    Kapikranian, O; Holovatch, Yu; Berche, Bertrand; Holovatch, Yurij; Kapikranian, Oleksandr

    2006-01-01

    We analyse the low-temperature behaviour of the Heisenberg model on a two-dimensional lattice of finite size. Presence of a residual magnetisation in a finite-size system enables us to use the spin wave approximation, which is known to give reliable results for the XY model at low temperatures T. For the system considered, we find that the spin-spin correlation function decays as 1/r^eta(T) for large separations r bringing about presence of a quasi-long-range ordering. We give analytic estimates for the exponent eta(T) in different regimes and support our findings by Monte Carlo simulations of the model on lattices of different sizes at different temperatures.

  19. Finite particle size drives defect-mediated domain structures in strongly confined colloidal liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gârlea, Ioana C.; Mulder, Pieter; Alvarado, José; Dammone, Oliver; Aarts, Dirk G. A. L.; Lettinga, M. Pavlik; Koenderink, Gijsje H.; Mulder, Bela M.

    2016-06-01

    When liquid crystals are confined to finite volumes, the competition between the surface anchoring imposed by the boundaries and the intrinsic orientational symmetry-breaking of these materials gives rise to a host of intriguing phenomena involving topological defect structures. For synthetic molecular mesogens, like the ones used in liquid-crystal displays, these defect structures are independent of the size of the molecules and well described by continuum theories. In contrast, colloidal systems such as carbon nanotubes and biopolymers have micron-sized lengths, so continuum descriptions are expected to break down under strong confinement conditions. Here, we show, by a combination of computer simulations and experiments with virus particles in tailor-made disk- and annulus-shaped microchambers, that strong confinement of colloidal liquid crystals leads to novel defect-stabilized symmetrical domain structures. These finite-size effects point to a potential for designing optically active microstructures, exploiting the as yet unexplored regime of highly confined liquid crystals.

  20. Reflection of sound from finite-size plane and curved surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    and the design frequency for a single reflector was derived. Above the design frequency the attenuation due to the finite size can be neglected and the reflection is efficient in the specular direction. The method was extended to the case of a reflector array and it was demonstrated that the performance...... of a reflector array can improve if the size of the panels is decreased. The same design frequency applies to a single reflector and a reflector array, but with different meaning; in the latter case the design frequency is the upper limit for useful reflections. This design rule was first used...... in the refurbishment of the concert hall of the Danish Radio in Copenhagen 1989, and later in many other halls. In order to describe the scattering due to edge diffraction the directional characteristic of reflections from a finite-size plate has been studied and a simple approximation valid for octave bands has been...

  1. Spatially localized attacks on interdependent networks: the existence of a finite critical attack size

    CERN Document Server

    Berezin, Yehiel; Danziger, Michael M; Li, Daqing; Havlin, Shlomo

    2013-01-01

    Many real world complex systems such as infrastructure, communication and transportation networks are embedded in space, where entities of one system may depend on entities of other systems. These systems are subject to geographically localized failures due to malicious attacks or natural disasters. Here we study the resilience of a system composed of two interdependent spatially embedded networks to localized geographical attacks. We find that if an attack is larger than a finite (zero fraction of the system) critical size, it will spread through the entire system and lead to its complete collapse. If the attack is below the critical size, it will remain localized. In contrast, under random attack a finite fraction of the system needs to be removed to initiate system collapse. We present both numerical simulations and a theoretical approach to analyze and predict the effect of local attacks and the critical attack size. Our results demonstrate the high risk of local attacks on interdependent spatially embedd...

  2. Imaging properties of finite-size left-handed material slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbing J; Grzegorczyk, Tomasz M; Wu, Bae-Ian; Kong, Jin Au

    2006-10-01

    Finite-size left-handed material (LHM) slabs are studied both analytically and numerically. The analytical method is based on Huygens' principles using truncated current sheets that cover only the apertures of the slabs. It is shown that the main effects on the images' spectra due to the size of the slabs can be predicted by the proposed analytical method, which can, therefore, be used as a fast alternative to the numerical simulations. Furthermore, the property of negative-energy streams at the image plane is explained. This unique property is found to be due to the interactions between propagating and evanescent waves and can only occur with LHM slabs, both finite size and infinite.

  3. A design-based approximation to the Bayes Information Criterion in finite population sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Fabrizi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, various issues related to the implementation of the usual Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC are critically examined in the context of modelling a finite population. A suitable design-based approximation to the BIC is proposed in order to avoid the derivation of the exact likelihood of the sample which is often very complex in a finite population sampling. The approximation is justified using a theoretical argument and a Monte Carlo simulation study.

  4. Sample Size Calculations for Population Size Estimation Studies Using Multiplier Methods With Respondent-Driven Sampling Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearon, Elizabeth; Chabata, Sungai T; Thompson, Jennifer A; Cowan, Frances M; Hargreaves, James R

    2017-09-14

    While guidance exists for obtaining population size estimates using multiplier methods with respondent-driven sampling surveys, we lack specific guidance for making sample size decisions. To guide the design of multiplier method population size estimation studies using respondent-driven sampling surveys to reduce the random error around the estimate obtained. The population size estimate is obtained by dividing the number of individuals receiving a service or the number of unique objects distributed (M) by the proportion of individuals in a representative survey who report receipt of the service or object (P). We have developed an approach to sample size calculation, interpreting methods to estimate the variance around estimates obtained using multiplier methods in conjunction with research into design effects and respondent-driven sampling. We describe an application to estimate the number of female sex workers in Harare, Zimbabwe. There is high variance in estimates. Random error around the size estimate reflects uncertainty from M and P, particularly when the estimate of P in the respondent-driven sampling survey is low. As expected, sample size requirements are higher when the design effect of the survey is assumed to be greater. We suggest a method for investigating the effects of sample size on the precision of a population size estimate obtained using multipler methods and respondent-driven sampling. Uncertainty in the size estimate is high, particularly when P is small, so balancing against other potential sources of bias, we advise researchers to consider longer service attendance reference periods and to distribute more unique objects, which is likely to result in a higher estimate of P in the respondent-driven sampling survey.

  5. Finite-size corrections and scaling for the dimer model on the checkerboard lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmailian, Nickolay Sh.; Wu, Ming-Chya; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2016-11-01

    Lattice models are useful for understanding behaviors of interacting complex many-body systems. The lattice dimer model has been proposed to study the adsorption of diatomic molecules on a substrate. Here we analyze the partition function of the dimer model on a 2 M ×2 N checkerboard lattice wrapped on a torus and derive the exact asymptotic expansion of the logarithm of the partition function. We find that the internal energy at the critical point is equal to zero. We also derive the exact finite-size corrections for the free energy, the internal energy, and the specific heat. Using the exact partition function and finite-size corrections for the dimer model on a finite checkerboard lattice, we obtain finite-size scaling functions for the free energy, the internal energy, and the specific heat of the dimer model. We investigate the properties of the specific heat near the critical point and find that the specific-heat pseudocritical point coincides with the critical point of the thermodynamic limit, which means that the specific-heat shift exponent λ is equal to ∞ . We have also considered the limit N →∞ for which we obtain the expansion of the free energy for the dimer model on the infinitely long cylinder. From a finite-size analysis we have found that two conformal field theories with the central charges c =1 for the height function description and c =-2 for the construction using a mapping of spanning trees can be used to describe the dimer model on the checkerboard lattice.

  6. Universal Finite Size Corrections and the Central Charge in Non-solvable Ising Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Alessandro; Mastropietro, Vieri

    2013-11-01

    We investigate a non-solvable two-dimensional ferromagnetic Ising model with nearest neighbor plus weak finite range interactions of strength λ. We rigorously establish one of the predictions of Conformal Field Theory (CFT), namely the fact that at the critical temperature the finite size corrections to the free energy are universal, in the sense that they are exactly independent of the interaction. The corresponding central charge, defined in terms of the coefficient of the first subleading term to the free energy, as proposed by Affleck and Blote-Cardy-Nightingale, is constant and equal to 1/2 for all and λ 0 a small but finite convergence radius. This is one of the very few cases where the predictions of CFT can be rigorously verified starting from a microscopic non solvable statistical model. The proof uses a combination of rigorous renormalization group methods with a novel partition function inequality, valid for ferromagnetic interactions.

  7. Sample size calculation for comparing two negative binomial rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiyuan; Lakkis, Hassan

    2014-02-10

    Negative binomial model has been increasingly used to model the count data in recent clinical trials. It is frequently chosen over Poisson model in cases of overdispersed count data that are commonly seen in clinical trials. One of the challenges of applying negative binomial model in clinical trial design is the sample size estimation. In practice, simulation methods have been frequently used for sample size estimation. In this paper, an explicit formula is developed to calculate sample size based on the negative binomial model. Depending on different approaches to estimate the variance under null hypothesis, three variations of the sample size formula are proposed and discussed. Important characteristics of the formula include its accuracy and its ability to explicitly incorporate dispersion parameter and exposure time. The performance of the formula with each variation is assessed using simulations.

  8. Finite size corrections in the random energy model and the replica approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrida, Bernard; Mottishaw, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic and exact way of computing finite size corrections for the random energy model, in its low temperature phase. We obtain explicit (though complicated) expressions for the finite size corrections of the overlap functions. In its low temperature phase, the random energy model is known to exhibit Parisi's broken symmetry of replicas. The finite size corrections given by our exact calculation can be reproduced using replicas if we make specific assumptions about the fluctuations (with negative variances!) of the number and sizes of the blocks when replica symmetry is broken. As an alternative we show that the exact expression for the non-integer moments of the partition function can be written in terms of coupled contour integrals over what can be thought of as ‘complex replica numbers’. Parisi's one step replica symmetry breaking arises naturally from the saddle point of these integrals without making any ansatz or using the replica method. The fluctuations of the ‘complex replica numbers’ near the saddle point in the imaginary direction correspond to the negative variances we observed in the replica calculation. Finally our approach allows one to see why some apparently diverging series or integrals are harmless.

  9. Reflection of sound from finite-size plane and curved surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindel, Jens H.

    2005-09-01

    The author's research on reflectors over nearly 25 years is summarized. The influence of curvature was analyzed by a geometrical model in order to quantify the attenuation by a simple expression. Reflection from a finite-size plate was studied using the Kirchhoff-Fresnel approximation, and the design frequency for a single reflector was derived. Above the design frequency the attenuation due to the finite size can be neglected and the reflection is efficient in the specular direction. The method was extended to the case of a reflector array, and it was demonstrated that the performance of a reflector array can improve if the size of the panels is decreased. The same design frequency applies to a single reflector and a reflector array, but with different meaning; in the latter case the design frequency is the upper limit for useful reflections. This design rule was first used in the refurbishment of the concert hall of the Danish Radio in Copenhagen 1989, and later in many other halls. In order to describe the scattering due to edge diffraction, the directional characteristic of reflections from a finite-size plate has been studied and a simple approximation valid for octave bands has been derived.

  10. Determination of the optimal sample size for a clinical trial accounting for the population size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallard, Nigel; Miller, Frank; Day, Simon; Hee, Siew Wan; Madan, Jason; Zohar, Sarah; Posch, Martin

    2017-07-01

    The problem of choosing a sample size for a clinical trial is a very common one. In some settings, such as rare diseases or other small populations, the large sample sizes usually associated with the standard frequentist approach may be infeasible, suggesting that the sample size chosen should reflect the size of the population under consideration. Incorporation of the population size is possible in a decision-theoretic approach either explicitly by assuming that the population size is fixed and known, or implicitly through geometric discounting of the gain from future patients reflecting the expected population size. This paper develops such approaches. Building on previous work, an asymptotic expression is derived for the sample size for single and two-arm clinical trials in the general case of a clinical trial with a primary endpoint with a distribution of one parameter exponential family form that optimizes a utility function that quantifies the cost and gain per patient as a continuous function of this parameter. It is shown that as the size of the population, N, or expected size, N∗ in the case of geometric discounting, becomes large, the optimal trial size is O(N1/2) or O(N∗1/2). The sample size obtained from the asymptotic expression is also compared with the exact optimal sample size in examples with responses with Bernoulli and Poisson distributions, showing that the asymptotic approximations can also be reasonable in relatively small sample sizes. © 2016 The Author. Biometrical Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. On power and sample size calculation in ethnic sensitivity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Sethuraman, Venkat

    2011-01-01

    In ethnic sensitivity studies, it is of interest to know whether the same dose has the same effect over populations in different regions. Glasbrenner and Rosenkranz (2006) proposed a criterion for ethnic sensitivity studies in the context of different dose-exposure models. Their method is liberal in the sense that their sample size will not achieve the target power. We will show that the power function can be easily calculated by numeric integration, and the sample size can be determined by bisection.

  12. Sample Size Determination: A Comparison of Attribute, Continuous Variable, and Cell Size Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Philip M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes three methods of sample size determination, each having its use in investigation of social science problems: Attribute method; Continuous Variable method; Galtung's Cell Size method. Statistical generalization, benefits of cell size method (ease of use, trivariate analysis and trichotyomized variables), and choice of method are…

  13. A simulation study of finite-sample properties of marginal structural Cox proportional hazards models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westreich, Daniel; Cole, Stephen R; Schisterman, Enrique F; Platt, Robert W

    2012-08-30

    Motivated by a previously published study of HIV treatment, we simulated data subject to time-varying confounding affected by prior treatment to examine some finite-sample properties of marginal structural Cox proportional hazards models. We compared (a) unadjusted, (b) regression-adjusted, (c) unstabilized, and (d) stabilized marginal structural (inverse probability-of-treatment [IPT] weighted) model estimators of effect in terms of bias, standard error, root mean squared error (MSE), and 95% confidence limit coverage over a range of research scenarios, including relatively small sample sizes and 10 study assessments. In the base-case scenario resembling the motivating example, where the true hazard ratio was 0.5, both IPT-weighted analyses were unbiased, whereas crude and adjusted analyses showed substantial bias towards and across the null. Stabilized IPT-weighted analyses remained unbiased across a range of scenarios, including relatively small sample size; however, the standard error was generally smaller in crude and adjusted models. In many cases, unstabilized weighted analysis showed a substantial increase in standard error compared with other approaches. Root MSE was smallest in the IPT-weighted analyses for the base-case scenario. In situations where time-varying confounding affected by prior treatment was absent, IPT-weighted analyses were less precise and therefore had greater root MSE compared with adjusted analyses. The 95% confidence limit coverage was close to nominal for all stabilized IPT-weighted but poor in crude, adjusted, and unstabilized IPT-weighted analysis. Under realistic scenarios, marginal structural Cox proportional hazards models performed according to expectations based on large-sample theory and provided accurate estimates of the hazard ratio.

  14. Size selective sampling using mobile, 3D nanoporous membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Christina L; Gillespie, Aubri; Singh, Siddarth; Leong, Timothy G; Gracias, David H

    2009-02-01

    We describe the fabrication of 3D membranes with precisely patterned surface nanoporosity and their utilization in size selective sampling. The membranes were self-assembled as porous cubes from lithographically fabricated 2D templates (Leong et al., Langmuir 23:8747-8751, 2007) with face dimensions of 200 microm, volumes of 8 nL, and monodisperse pores ranging in size from approximately 10 microm to 100 nm. As opposed to conventional sampling and filtration schemes where fluid is moved across a static membrane, we demonstrate sampling by instead moving the 3D nanoporous membrane through the fluid. This new scheme allows for straightforward sampling in small volumes, with little to no loss. Membranes with five porous faces and one open face were moved through fluids to sample and retain nanoscale beads and cells based on pore size. Additionally, cells retained within the membranes were subsequently cultured and multiplied using standard cell culture protocols upon retrieval.

  15. Finite-size scaling in silver nanowire films: design considerations for practical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, Matthew J.; Cann, Maria; Ogilvie, Sean P.; King, Alice A. K.; Jurewicz, Izabela; Dalton, Alan B.

    2016-07-01

    We report the first application of finite-size scaling theory to nanostructured percolating networks, using silver nanowire (AgNW) films as a model system for experiment and simulation. AgNWs have been shown to be a prime candidate for replacing Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) in applications such as capacitive touch sensing. While their performance as large area films is well-studied, the production of working devices involves patterning of the films to produce isolated electrode structures, which exhibit finite-size scaling when these features are sufficiently small. We demonstrate a generalised method for understanding this behaviour in practical rod percolation systems, such as AgNW films, and study the effect of systematic variation of the length distribution of the percolating material. We derive a design rule for the minimum viable feature size in a device pattern, relating it to parameters which can be derived from a transmittance-sheet resistance data series for the material in question. This understanding has direct implications for the industrial adoption of silver nanowire electrodes in applications where small features are required including single-layer capacitive touch sensors, LCD and OLED display panels.We report the first application of finite-size scaling theory to nanostructured percolating networks, using silver nanowire (AgNW) films as a model system for experiment and simulation. AgNWs have been shown to be a prime candidate for replacing Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) in applications such as capacitive touch sensing. While their performance as large area films is well-studied, the production of working devices involves patterning of the films to produce isolated electrode structures, which exhibit finite-size scaling when these features are sufficiently small. We demonstrate a generalised method for understanding this behaviour in practical rod percolation systems, such as AgNW films, and study the effect of systematic variation of the length distribution of

  16. A finite-element approach to evaluating the size effects of complex nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dingjie; Xie, Yi Min; Li, Qing; Huang, Xiaodong; Li, Yang Fan; Zhou, Shiwei

    2016-12-01

    The size effects that reveal the dramatic changes of mechanical behaviour at nanoscales have traditionally been analysed for regular beam systems. Here, the method of using finite-element analysis is explored with the intention of evaluating the size effects for complex nanostructures. The surface elasticity theory and generalized Young-Laplace equation are integrated into a beam element to account for the size effects in classical Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam theories. Computational results match well with the theoretical predictions on the size effect for a cantilever beam and a cubic unit cell containing 24 horizontal/vertical ligaments. For a simply supported nanowire, it is found that the results are very close to the experimental data. With the assumption that nanoporous gold is composed of many randomly connected beams, for the first time, the size effect of such a complex structure is numerically determined.

  17. Finite-size effects, pseudocritical quantities and signatures of the chiral critical endpoint of QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Palhares, L F; Kodama, T

    2009-01-01

    We investigate finite-size effects on the phase diagram of strong interactions, and discuss their influence (and utility) on experimental signatures in high-energy heavy ion collisions. We calculate the modification of the pseudocritical transition line and isentropic trajectories, and discuss how this affects proposed signatures of the chiral critical endpoint. We argue that a finite-size scaling analysis may be crucial in the process of data analysis in the Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC and in future experiments at FAIR-GSI. We propose the use of extrapolations, full scaling plots and a chi-squared method as tools for searching the critical endpoint of QCD and determining its universality class.

  18. Spatial Kerr solitons in optical fibres of finite size cross section: beyond the Townes soliton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouart, F.; Renversez, G.; Nicolet, A.; Geuzaine, C.

    2008-12-01

    We propose a new and efficient numerical method to find spatial solitons in optical fibres with a nonlinear Kerr effect including microstructured ones. A nonlinear non-paraxial scalar model of the electric field in the fibre is used (nonlinear Helmholtz equation) and an iterative algorithm is proposed to obtain the nonlinear solutions using the finite element method. The field is supposed to be harmonic in time and along the direction of invariance of the fibre but inhomogeneous in the cross section. In our approach, we solve a nonlinear eigenvalue problem in which the propagation constant is the eigenvalue. Several examples dealing with step-index fibres and microstructured optical fibres with a finite size cross section are described. In each geometry, a single self-coherent nonlinear solution is obtained. This solution, which also depends on the size of the structure, is different from the Townes soliton—but converges towards it at small wavelengths.

  19. Finite-size effects in the Nagel-Schreckenberg traffic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balouchi, Ashkan; Browne, Dana A.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the Nagel-Schreckenberg traffic model for a variety of maximum speeds. We show that the low-density limit can be described as a dilute gas of vehicles with a repulsive core. At the transition to jamming, we observe finite-size effects in a variety of quantities describing the flow and the density correlations, but only if the maximum speed Vmax is larger than a certain value. A finite-size scaling analysis of several order parameters shows universal behavior, with scaling exponents that depend on Vmax. The jamming transition at large Vmax can be viewed as the nucleation of jams in a background of freely flowing vehicles. For small Vmax no such clean separation into jammed and free vehicles is possible.

  20. Finite Size Effect in Path Integral Monte Carlo Simulations of 4He Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xing-Wen; CHENG Xin-Lu

    2008-01-01

    Path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations are a powerful computational method to study interacting quantum systems at finite temperatures. In this work, PIMC has been applied to study the finite size effect of the simulated systems of 4He. We determine the energy as a function of temperature at saturated-vapor-pressure (SVP) conditions in the temperature range of T ∈ [1.0 K,4.0 K], and the equation of state (EOS) in the ground state for systems consisted of 32, 64 and 128 4He atoms, respectively. We find that the energy at SVP is influenced significantly by the size of the simulated system in the temperature range of T ∈ [2.1 K, 3.0 K] and the larger the system is, the better results are obtained in comparison with the experimental values; while the EOS appeared to be unrelated to it.

  1. Calculating sample size in trials using historical controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Cao, Jing; Ahn, Chul

    2010-08-01

    Makuch and Simon [Sample size considerations for non-randomised comparative studies. J Chronic Dis 1980; 33: 175-81.] developed a sample size formula for historical control trials. When assessing power, they assumed the true control treatment effect to be equal to the observed effect from the historical control group. Many researchers have pointed out that the Makuch-Simon approach does not preserve the nominal power and type I error when considering the uncertainty in the true historical control treatment effect. To develop a sample size formula that properly accounts for the underlying randomness in the observations from the historical control group. We reveal the extremely skewed nature in the distributions of power and type I error, obtained over all the random realizations of the historical control data. The skewness motivates us to derive a sample size formula that controls the percentiles, instead of the means, of the power and type I error. A closed-form sample size formula is developed to control arbitrary percentiles of power and type I error for historical control trials. A simulation study further demonstrates that this approach preserves the operational characteristics in a more realistic scenario where the population variances are unknown and replaced by sample variances. The closed-form sample size formula is derived for continuous outcomes. The formula is more complicated for binary or survival time outcomes. We have derived a closed-form sample size formula that controls the percentiles instead of means of power and type I error in historical control trials, which have extremely skewed distributions over all the possible realizations of historical control data.

  2. A Finite Difference Approximation for a Coupled System of Nonlinear Size-Structured Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    We study a quasilinear nonlocal hyperbolic initial-boundary value problem that models the evolution of N size-structured subpopulations competing for common resources. We develop an implicit finite difference scheme to approximate the solution of this model. The convergence of this approximation to a unique bounded variation weak solution is obtained. The numerical results for a special case of this model suggest that when subpopulations are closed under reproduction, one subpopulation survives and the others go to extinction. Moreover

  3. Boundary states and finite size effects in sine-Gordon model with Neumann boundary condition

    CERN Document Server

    Bajnok, Z; Takács, G

    2001-01-01

    The sine-Gordon model with Neumann boundary condition is investigated. Using the bootstrap principle the spectrum of boundary bound states is established. Somewhat surprisingly it is found that Coleman-Thun diagrams and bound state creation may coexist. A framework to describe finite size effects in boundary integrable theories is developed and used together with the truncated conformal space approach to confirm the bound states and reflection factors derived by bootstrap.

  4. Sample Size Requirements for Traditional and Regression-Based Norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhuis, Hannah E M; van der Ark, L Andries; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2016-04-01

    Test norms enable determining the position of an individual test taker in the group. The most frequently used approach to obtain test norms is traditional norming. Regression-based norming may be more efficient than traditional norming and is rapidly growing in popularity, but little is known about its technical properties. A simulation study was conducted to compare the sample size requirements for traditional and regression-based norming by examining the 95% interpercentile ranges for percentile estimates as a function of sample size, norming method, size of covariate effects on the test score, test length, and number of answer categories in an item. Provided the assumptions of the linear regression model hold in the data, for a subdivision of the total group into eight equal-size subgroups, we found that regression-based norming requires samples 2.5 to 5.5 times smaller than traditional norming. Sample size requirements are presented for each norming method, test length, and number of answer categories. We emphasize that additional research is needed to establish sample size requirements when the assumptions of the linear regression model are violated.

  5. Frictional behaviour of sandstone: A sample-size dependent triaxial investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, Hamid; Masoumi, Hossein; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Frictional behaviour of rocks from the initial stage of loading to final shear displacement along the formed shear plane has been widely investigated in the past. However the effect of sample size on such frictional behaviour has not attracted much attention. This is mainly related to the limitations in rock testing facilities as well as the complex mechanisms involved in sample-size dependent frictional behaviour of rocks. In this study, a suite of advanced triaxial experiments was performed on Gosford sandstone samples at different sizes and confining pressures. The post-peak response of the rock along the formed shear plane has been captured for the analysis with particular interest in sample-size dependency. Several important phenomena have been observed from the results of this study: a) the rate of transition from brittleness to ductility in rock is sample-size dependent where the relatively smaller samples showed faster transition toward ductility at any confining pressure; b) the sample size influences the angle of formed shear band and c) the friction coefficient of the formed shear plane is sample-size dependent where the relatively smaller sample exhibits lower friction coefficient compared to larger samples. We interpret our results in terms of a thermodynamics approach in which the frictional properties for finite deformation are viewed as encompassing a multitude of ephemeral slipping surfaces prior to the formation of the through going fracture. The final fracture itself is seen as a result of the self-organisation of a sufficiently large ensemble of micro-slip surfaces and therefore consistent in terms of the theory of thermodynamics. This assumption vindicates the use of classical rock mechanics experiments to constrain failure of pressure sensitive rocks and the future imaging of these micro-slips opens an exciting path for research in rock failure mechanisms.

  6. Competition between finite-size effects and dipole-dipole interactions in few-atom systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damanet, François; Martin, John

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study the competition between finite-size effects (i.e. discernibility of particles) and dipole-dipole interactions in few-atom systems coupled to the electromagnetic field in vacuum. We consider two hallmarks of cooperative effects, superradiance and subradiance, and compute for each the rate of energy radiated by the atoms and the coherence of the atomic state during the time evolution. We adopt a statistical approach in order to extract the typical behaviour of the atomic dynamics and average over random atomic distributions in spherical containers with prescribed {k}0R with k 0 the radiation wavenumber and R the average interatomic distance. Our approach allows us to highlight the tradeoff between finite-size effects and dipole-dipole interactions in superradiance/subradiance. In particular, we show the existence of an optimal value of {k}0R for which the superradiant intensity and coherence pulses are the less affected by dephasing effects induced by dipole-dipole interactions and finite-size effects.

  7. Towards a theory of cortical columns: From spiking neurons to interacting neural populations of finite size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilo Schwalger

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Neural population equations such as neural mass or field models are widely used to study brain activity on a large scale. However, the relation of these models to the properties of single neurons is unclear. Here we derive an equation for several interacting populations at the mesoscopic scale starting from a microscopic model of randomly connected generalized integrate-and-fire neuron models. Each population consists of 50-2000 neurons of the same type but different populations account for different neuron types. The stochastic population equations that we find reveal how spike-history effects in single-neuron dynamics such as refractoriness and adaptation interact with finite-size fluctuations on the population level. Efficient integration of the stochastic mesoscopic equations reproduces the statistical behavior of the population activities obtained from microscopic simulations of a full spiking neural network model. The theory describes nonlinear emergent dynamics such as finite-size-induced stochastic transitions in multistable networks and synchronization in balanced networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. The mesoscopic equations are employed to rapidly integrate a model of a cortical microcircuit consisting of eight neuron types, which allows us to predict spontaneous population activities as well as evoked responses to thalamic input. Our theory establishes a general framework for modeling finite-size neural population dynamics based on single cell and synapse parameters and offers an efficient approach to analyzing cortical circuits and computations.

  8. Finite nuclear size corrections to the recoil effect in hydrogenlike ions

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksandrov, I A; Glazov, D A; Shabaev, V M

    2014-01-01

    The finite nuclear size corrections to the relativistic recoil effect in H-like ions are calculated within the Breit approximation. The calculations are performed for the $1s$, $2s$, and $2p_{1/2}$ states in the range $Z =$ 1-110. The obtained results are compared with previous evaluations of this effect. It is found that for heavy ions the previously neglected corrections amount to about 20% of the total nuclear size contribution to the recoil effect calculated within the Breit approximation.

  9. Finite-size scaling analysis of a nonequilibrium phase transition in the naming game model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigatti, E.; Hernández, A.

    2016-11-01

    We realize an extensive numerical study of the naming game model with a noise term which accounts for perturbations. This model displays a nonequilibrium phase transition between an absorbing ordered consensus state, which occurs for small noise, and a disordered phase with fragmented clusters characterized by heterogeneous memories, which emerges at strong noise levels. The nature of the phase transition is studied by means of a finite-size scaling analysis of the moments. We observe a scaling behavior typical of a discontinuous transition and we are able to estimate the thermodynamic limit. The scaling behavior of the clusters size seems also compatible with this kind of transition.

  10. Finite size scaling analysis of a nonequilibrium phase transition in the naming game model

    CERN Document Server

    Brigatti, E

    2016-01-01

    We realize an extensive numerical study of the Naming Game model with a noise term which accounts for perturbations. This model displays a non-equilibrium phase transition between an absorbing ordered consensus state, which occurs for small noise, and a disordered phase with fragmented clusters characterized by heterogeneous memories, which emerges at strong noise levels. The nature of the phase transition is studied by means of a finite-size scaling analysis of the moments. We observe a scaling behavior typical of a discontinuous transition and we are able to estimate the thermodynamic limit. The scaling behavior of the clusters size seems also compatible with this kind of transition.

  11. Practical security of continuous-variable quantum key distribution with finite sampling bandwidth effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Huang, Peng; Huang, Duan; Lin, Dakai; Zeng, Guihua

    2016-02-01

    Practical security of the continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CVQKD) system with finite sampling bandwidth of analog-to-digital converter (ADC) at the receiver's side is investigated. We find that the finite sampling bandwidth effects may decrease the lower bound of secret key rate without awareness of the legitimate communicators. This leaves security loopholes for Eve to attack the system. In addition, this effect may restrains the linear relationship of secret key bit rate with repetition rate of the system; subsequently, there is a saturation value for the secret key bit rate with the repetition rate. To resist such kind of effects, we propose a dual sampling detection approach in which two ADCs are employed so that the finite sampling bandwidth effects are removed.

  12. Conservative Sample Size Determination for Repeated Measures Analysis of Covariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Timothy M; Case, L Douglas

    2013-07-05

    In the design of a randomized clinical trial with one pre and multiple post randomized assessments of the outcome variable, one needs to account for the repeated measures in determining the appropriate sample size. Unfortunately, one seldom has a good estimate of the variance of the outcome measure, let alone the correlations among the measurements over time. We show how sample sizes can be calculated by making conservative assumptions regarding the correlations for a variety of covariance structures. The most conservative choice for the correlation depends on the covariance structure and the number of repeated measures. In the absence of good estimates of the correlations, the sample size is often based on a two-sample t-test, making the 'ultra' conservative and unrealistic assumption that there are zero correlations between the baseline and follow-up measures while at the same time assuming there are perfect correlations between the follow-up measures. Compared to the case of taking a single measurement, substantial savings in sample size can be realized by accounting for the repeated measures, even with very conservative assumptions regarding the parameters of the assumed correlation matrix. Assuming compound symmetry, the sample size from the two-sample t-test calculation can be reduced at least 44%, 56%, and 61% for repeated measures analysis of covariance by taking 2, 3, and 4 follow-up measures, respectively. The results offer a rational basis for determining a fairly conservative, yet efficient, sample size for clinical trials with repeated measures and a baseline value.

  13. The Kinetic and Equilibrium Cluster Size Distributions of Finite Bond Aggregation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Derin Andrew

    Aggregation is a phenomenon central to many natural and synthetic processes. In this thesis, I explore in detail the phenomenon of antibody-induced colloidal aggregation. I use a new and novel system composed of highly charged uniform polystyrene microspheres to which antigens are covalently coupled. Bivalent antibodies in solution bind to the antigens on the spheres' surfaces and crosslink the spheres causing them to aggregate. As such, the bonds which form between the spheres are discrete and rigid. Using a single particle light scattering instrument developed in the Cohen laboratory, I have measured the temporal evolution of the cluster size distribution for the system of spheres and antibodies. The results show that the cluster size distribution exhibits dynamic scaling. Although antigen coated colloidal spheres have been used extensively in the past, the system I use is unique in that the bonds which form between the antibodies and the spheres are fragile making the aggregation process thermodynamically reversible. This effect causes the system to reach equilibrium in a finite amount of time. The classical theory which predicts the equilibrium cluster size distribution for a variety of aggregating systems is known as Flory -Stockmayer theory. Since each monomer possesses several antibodies and several antigens,m the colloidal system is expected to obey the statistics for the Flory A _{f}RB_{g} model where f,ggg 1. In Flory's model, the system is expected to gel. However, I see no evidence of gelation. I am able to resolve this discrepancy using the ideas of Ball and colleagues. I have also developed the theory by which this system may be used to measure the binding affinity between antibodies and antigens. I have used the light scattering instrument to measure the binding affinity between a monoclonal antibody and a number of different antigens covering a large range of binding affinities. I have demonstrated that the instrument is capable of detecting small

  14. Publication Bias in Psychology: A Diagnosis Based on the Correlation between Effect Size and Sample Size: e105825

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anton Kühberger; Astrid Fritz; Thomas Scherndl

    2014-01-01

    .... We extracted p values, effect sizes, and sample sizes of all empirical papers, and calculated the correlation between effect size and sample size, and investigated the distribution of p values...

  15. Estimating hidden population size using Respondent-Driven Sampling data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handcock, Mark S; Gile, Krista J; Mar, Corinne M

    Respondent-Driven Sampling (RDS) is n approach to sampling design and inference in hard-to-reach human populations. It is often used in situations where the target population is rare and/or stigmatized in the larger population, so that it is prohibitively expensive to contact them through the available frames. Common examples include injecting drug users, men who have sex with men, and female sex workers. Most analysis of RDS data has focused on estimating aggregate characteristics, such as disease prevalence. However, RDS is often conducted in settings where the population size is unknown and of great independent interest. This paper presents an approach to estimating the size of a target population based on data collected through RDS. The proposed approach uses a successive sampling approximation to RDS to leverage information in the ordered sequence of observed personal network sizes. The inference uses the Bayesian framework, allowing for the incorporation of prior knowledge. A flexible class of priors for the population size is used that aids elicitation. An extensive simulation study provides insight into the performance of the method for estimating population size under a broad range of conditions. A further study shows the approach also improves estimation of aggregate characteristics. Finally, the method demonstrates sensible results when used to estimate the size of known networked populations from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, and when used to estimate the size of a hard-to-reach population at high risk for HIV.

  16. Sample-Size Planning for More Accurate Statistical Power: A Method Adjusting Sample Effect Sizes for Publication Bias and Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Samantha F; Kelley, Ken; Maxwell, Scott E

    2017-09-01

    The sample size necessary to obtain a desired level of statistical power depends in part on the population value of the effect size, which is, by definition, unknown. A common approach to sample-size planning uses the sample effect size from a prior study as an estimate of the population value of the effect to be detected in the future study. Although this strategy is intuitively appealing, effect-size estimates, taken at face value, are typically not accurate estimates of the population effect size because of publication bias and uncertainty. We show that the use of this approach often results in underpowered studies, sometimes to an alarming degree. We present an alternative approach that adjusts sample effect sizes for bias and uncertainty, and we demonstrate its effectiveness for several experimental designs. Furthermore, we discuss an open-source R package, BUCSS, and user-friendly Web applications that we have made available to researchers so that they can easily implement our suggested methods.

  17. Sample size considerations for historical control studies with survival outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Song; Ahn, Chul

    2015-01-01

    Historical control trials (HCTs) are frequently conducted to compare an experimental treatment with a control treatment from a previous study, when they are applicable and favored over a randomized clinical trial (RCT) due to feasibility, ethics and cost concerns. Makuch and Simon developed a sample size formula for historical control (HC) studies with binary outcomes, assuming that the observed response rate in the HC group is the true response rate. This method was extended by Dixon and Simon to specify sample size for HC studies comparing survival outcomes. For HC studies with binary and continuous outcomes, many researchers have shown that the popular Makuch and Simon method does not preserve the nominal power and type I error, and suggested alternative approaches. For HC studies with survival outcomes, we reveal through simulation that the conditional power and type I error over all the random realizations of the HC data have highly skewed distributions. Therefore, the sampling variability of the HC data needs to be appropriately accounted for in determining sample size. A flexible sample size formula that controls arbitrary percentiles, instead of means, of the conditional power and type I error, is derived. Although an explicit sample size formula with survival outcomes is not available, the computation is straightforward. Simulations demonstrate that the proposed method preserves the operational characteristics in a more realistic scenario where the true hazard rate of the HC group is unknown. A real data application of an advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) clinical trial is presented to illustrate sample size considerations for HC studies in comparison of survival outcomes. PMID:26098200

  18. Anisotropic finite-size scaling of an elastic string at the depinning threshold in a random-periodic medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Bustingorry

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We numerically study the geometry of a driven elastic string at its sample-dependent depinning threshold in random-periodic media. We find that the anisotropic finite-size scaling of the average square width $overline{w^2}$ and of its associated probability distribution are both controlled by the ratio $k=M/L^{zeta_{dep}}$, where $zeta_{dep}$ is the random-manifold depinning roughness exponent, $L$ is the longitudinal size of the string and $M$ the transverse periodicity of the random medium. The rescaled average square width $overline{w^2}/L^{2zeta_{dep}}$ displays a non-trivial single minimum for a finite value of $k$. We show that the initial decrease for small $k$ reflects the crossover at $k sim 1$ from the random-periodic to the random-manifold roughness. The increase for very large $k$ implies that the increasingly rare critical configurations, accompanying the crossover to Gumbel critical-force statistics, display anomalous roughness properties: a transverse-periodicity scaling in spite that $overline{w^2} ll M$, and subleading corrections to the standard random-manifold longitudinal-size scaling. Our results are relevant tounderstanding the dimensional crossover from interface to particle depinning. Received: 20 October 2010, Accepted: 1 December 2010; Edited by:  A. Vindigni; Reviewed by: A. A. Fedorenko, CNRS-Lab. de Physique, ENS de Lyon, France; DOI: 10.4279/PIP.020008

  19. Current sample size conventions: Flaws, harms, and alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacchetti Peter

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The belief remains widespread that medical research studies must have statistical power of at least 80% in order to be scientifically sound, and peer reviewers often question whether power is high enough. Discussion This requirement and the methods for meeting it have severe flaws. Notably, the true nature of how sample size influences a study's projected scientific or practical value precludes any meaningful blanket designation of value of information methods, simple choices based on cost or feasibility that have recently been justified, sensitivity analyses that examine a meaningful array of possible findings, and following previous analogous studies. To promote more rational approaches, research training should cover the issues presented here, peer reviewers should be extremely careful before raising issues of "inadequate" sample size, and reports of completed studies should not discuss power. Summary Common conventions and expectations concerning sample size are deeply flawed, cause serious harm to the research process, and should be replaced by more rational alternatives.

  20. Power and Sample Size Calculations for Contrast Analysis in ANCOVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) is commonly used in behavioral and educational research to reduce the error variance and improve the power of analysis of variance by adjusting the covariate effects. For planning and evaluating randomized ANCOVA designs, a simple sample-size formula has been proposed to account for the variance deflation factor in the comparison of two treatment groups. The objective of this article is to highlight an overlooked and potential problem of the exiting approximation and to provide an alternative and exact solution of power and sample size assessments for testing treatment contrasts. Numerical investigations are conducted to reveal the relative performance of the two procedures as a reliable technique to accommodate the covariate features that make ANCOVA design particularly distinctive. The described approach has important advantages over the current method in general applicability, methodological justification, and overall accuracy. To enhance the practical usefulness, computer algorithms are presented to implement the recommended power calculations and sample-size determinations.

  1. Sample size in psychological research over the past 30 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszalek, Jacob M; Barber, Carolyn; Kohlhart, Julie; Holmes, Cooper B

    2011-04-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) Task Force on Statistical Inference was formed in 1996 in response to a growing body of research demonstrating methodological issues that threatened the credibility of psychological research, and made recommendations to address them. One issue was the small, even dramatically inadequate, size of samples used in studies published by leading journals. The present study assessed the progress made since the Task Force's final report in 1999. Sample sizes reported in four leading APA journals in 1955, 1977, 1995, and 2006 were compared using nonparametric statistics, while data from the last two waves were fit to a hierarchical generalized linear growth model for more in-depth analysis. Overall, results indicate that the recommendations for increasing sample sizes have not been integrated in core psychological research, although results slightly vary by field. This and other implications are discussed in the context of current methodological critique and practice.

  2. Spurious finite-size instabilities in nuclear energy density functionals: spin channel

    CERN Document Server

    Pastore, A; Davesne, D; Navarro, J

    2015-01-01

    It has been recently shown, that some Skyrme functionals can lead to non-converging results in the calculation of some properties of atomic nuclei. A previous study has pointed out a possible link between these convergence problems and the appearance of finite-size instabilities in symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) around saturation density. We show that the finite-size instabilities not only affect the ground state properties of atomic nuclei, but they can also influence the calculations of vibrational excited states in finite nuclei. We perform systematic fully-self consistent Random Phase Approximation (RPA) calculations in spherical doubly-magic nuclei. We employ several Skyrme functionals and vary the isoscalar and isovector coupling constants of the time-odd term $\\mathbf{s}\\cdot \\Delta \\mathbf{s}$ . We determine critical values of these coupling constants beyond which the RPA calculations do not converge because RPA the stability matrix becomes non-positive.By comparing the RPA calculations of atomic nucl...

  3. Finite-size analysis of the detectability limit of the stochastic block model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jean-Gabriel; Desrosiers, Patrick; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Laurence, Edward; Dubé, Louis J.

    2017-06-01

    It has been shown in recent years that the stochastic block model is sometimes undetectable in the sparse limit, i.e., that no algorithm can identify a partition correlated with the partition used to generate an instance, if the instance is sparse enough and infinitely large. In this contribution, we treat the finite case explicitly, using arguments drawn from information theory and statistics. We give a necessary condition for finite-size detectability in the general SBM. We then distinguish the concept of average detectability from the concept of instance-by-instance detectability and give explicit formulas for both definitions. Using these formulas, we prove that there exist large equivalence classes of parameters, where widely different network ensembles are equally detectable with respect to our definitions of detectability. In an extensive case study, we investigate the finite-size detectability of a simplified variant of the SBM, which encompasses a number of important models as special cases. These models include the symmetric SBM, the planted coloring model, and more exotic SBMs not previously studied. We conclude with three appendices, where we study the interplay of noise and detectability, establish a connection between our information-theoretic approach and random matrix theory, and provide proofs of some of the more technical results.

  4. Causality in Statistical Power: Isomorphic Properties of Measurement, Research Design, Effect Size, and Sample Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidel, R. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Statistical power is the ability to detect a significant effect, given that the effect actually exists in a population. Like most statistical concepts, statistical power tends to induce cognitive dissonance in hepatology researchers. However, planning for statistical power by an a priori sample size calculation is of paramount importance when designing a research study. There are five specific empirical components that make up an a priori sample size calculation: the scale of measurement of the outcome, the research design, the magnitude of the effect size, the variance of the effect size, and the sample size. A framework grounded in the phenomenon of isomorphism, or interdependencies amongst different constructs with similar forms, will be presented to understand the isomorphic effects of decisions made on each of the five aforementioned components of statistical power. PMID:27073717

  5. Causality in Statistical Power: Isomorphic Properties of Measurement, Research Design, Effect Size, and Sample Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Eric Heidel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Statistical power is the ability to detect a significant effect, given that the effect actually exists in a population. Like most statistical concepts, statistical power tends to induce cognitive dissonance in hepatology researchers. However, planning for statistical power by an a priori sample size calculation is of paramount importance when designing a research study. There are five specific empirical components that make up an a priori sample size calculation: the scale of measurement of the outcome, the research design, the magnitude of the effect size, the variance of the effect size, and the sample size. A framework grounded in the phenomenon of isomorphism, or interdependencies amongst different constructs with similar forms, will be presented to understand the isomorphic effects of decisions made on each of the five aforementioned components of statistical power.

  6. Finite Sample Comparison of Parametric, Semiparametric, and Wavelet Estimators of Fractional Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Ø.; Frederiksen, Per Houmann

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we compare through Monte Carlo simulations the finite sample properties of estimators of the fractional differencing parameter, d. This involves frequency domain, time domain, and wavelet based approaches, and we consider both parametric and semiparametric estimation methods. The es...... the time domain parametric methods, and (4) without sufficient trimming of scales the wavelet-based estimators are heavily biased.......In this paper we compare through Monte Carlo simulations the finite sample properties of estimators of the fractional differencing parameter, d. This involves frequency domain, time domain, and wavelet based approaches, and we consider both parametric and semiparametric estimation methods....... The estimators are briefly introduced and compared, and the criteria adopted for measuring finite sample performance are bias and root mean squared error. Most importantly, the simulations reveal that (1) the frequency domain maximum likelihood procedure is superior to the time domain parametric methods, (2) all...

  7. Finite size effects on the helical edge states on the Lieb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Chen; Bin, Zhou

    2016-06-01

    For a two-dimensional Lieb lattice, that is, a line-centered square lattice, the inclusion of the intrinsic spin-orbit (ISO) coupling opens a topologically nontrivial gap, and gives rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect characterized by two pairs of gapless helical edge states within the bulk gap. Generally, due to the finite size effect in QSH systems, the edge states on the two sides of a strip of finite width can couple together to open a gap in the spectrum. In this paper, we investigate the finite size effect of helical edge states on the Lieb lattice with ISO coupling under three different kinds of boundary conditions, i.e., the straight, bearded and asymmetry edges. The spectrum and wave function of edge modes are derived analytically for a tight-binding model on the Lieb lattice. For a strip Lieb lattice with two straight edges, the ISO coupling induces the Dirac-like bulk states to localize at the edges to become the helical edge states with the same Dirac-like spectrum. Moreover, it is found that in the case with two straight edges the gapless Dirac-like spectrum remains unchanged with decreasing the width of the strip Lieb lattice, and no gap is opened in the edge band. It is concluded that the finite size effect of QSH states is absent in the case with the straight edges. However, in the other two cases with the bearded and asymmetry edges, the energy gap induced by the finite size effect is still opened with decreasing the width of the strip. It is also proposed that the edge band dispersion can be controlled by applying an on-site potential energy on the outermost atoms. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274102), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University of the Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. NCET-11-0960), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of the Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20134208110001).

  8. Investigation of finite-size effects in chemical bonding of AuPd nanoalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Beien [Division of Interfacial Water and Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Oğuz, Ismail Can; Guesmi, Hazar, E-mail: hazar.guesmi@enscm.fr [CNRS-ICG UMR 5253, équipe MACS, 8 rue de l’Ecole Normale, 34296 Montpellier (France)

    2015-10-14

    In this paper, the size-dependent changes in energetic, vibrational, and electronic properties of C–O gas molecule interacting with surface Pd atom of a variety of AuPd nanoalloy structures are investigated by means of first principles calculations. The variation in C–O adsorption energies, C–O vibration frequencies (ν{sub C−O}), and Pd d-bond centers (ε{sub d}) on a series of non-supported Au{sub n−1}–Pd{sub 1} nanoparticles (with n varying from 13 to 147) and on two semi-finite surfaces are inspected with cluster size. We demonstrate for the first time that, with small AuPd bimetallic three-dimensional clusters as TOh{sub 38}, one can reach cluster size convergence even for such a sensitive observable as the adsorption energy on a metal surface. Indeed, the results show that the adsorbate-induced perturbation is extremely local and it only concerns the isolated Pd interacting with the reactive gas molecule. Except for 13 atom clusters, in which molecular behaviour is predominant, no finite-size effects are observed for surface Pd atom substituted in AuPd free nanoclusters above 38 atoms.

  9. Sample size in orthodontic randomized controlled trials: are numbers justified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koletsi, Despina; Pandis, Nikolaos; Fleming, Padhraig S

    2014-02-01

    Sample size calculations are advocated by the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) group to justify sample sizes in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This study aimed to analyse the reporting of sample size calculations in trials published as RCTs in orthodontic speciality journals. The performance of sample size calculations was assessed and calculations verified where possible. Related aspects, including number of authors; parallel, split-mouth, or other design; single- or multi-centre study; region of publication; type of data analysis (intention-to-treat or per-protocol basis); and number of participants recruited and lost to follow-up, were considered. Of 139 RCTs identified, complete sample size calculations were reported in 41 studies (29.5 per cent). Parallel designs were typically adopted (n = 113; 81 per cent), with 80 per cent (n = 111) involving two arms and 16 per cent having three arms. Data analysis was conducted on an intention-to-treat (ITT) basis in a small minority of studies (n = 18; 13 per cent). According to the calculations presented, overall, a median of 46 participants were required to demonstrate sufficient power to highlight meaningful differences (typically at a power of 80 per cent). The median number of participants recruited was 60, with a median of 4 participants being lost to follow-up. Our finding indicates good agreement between projected numbers required and those verified (median discrepancy: 5.3 per cent), although only a minority of trials (29.5 per cent) could be examined. Although sample size calculations are often reported in trials published as RCTs in orthodontic speciality journals, presentation is suboptimal and in need of significant improvement.

  10. Ising universality class for the liquid-liquid critical point of a one component fluid: a finite-size scaling test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Paola; Sciortino, Francesco

    2012-10-26

    We present a finite-size scaling study of the liquid-liquid critical point in the Jagla model, a prototype model for liquids that present the same thermodynamic anomalies which characterize liquid water. Performing successive umbrella sampling grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations, we evaluate an accurate density of states for different system sizes and determine the size-dependent critical parameters. Extrapolation to infinite size provides estimates of the bulk critical values for this model. The finite-size study allows us to establish that critical fluctuations are consistent with the Ising universality class and to provide definitive evidence for the existence of a liquid-liquid critical point in the Jagla potential. This finding supports the possibility of the existence of a genuine liquid-liquid critical point in anomalous one-component liquids like water.

  11. On an Approach to Bayesian Sample Sizing in Clinical Trials

    CERN Document Server

    Muirhead, Robb J

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores an approach to Bayesian sample size determination in clinical trials. The approach falls into the category of what is often called "proper Bayesian", in that it does not mix frequentist concepts with Bayesian ones. A criterion for a "successful trial" is defined in terms of a posterior probability, its probability is assessed using the marginal distribution of the data, and this probability forms the basis for choosing sample sizes. We illustrate with a standard problem in clinical trials, that of establishing superiority of a new drug over a control.

  12. Finite-size scaling in a 2D disordered electron gas with spectral nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinner, Andreas; Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-08-03

    We study the DC conductivity of a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and spectral nodes, employing the field theoretical version of the Kubo-Greenwood conductivity formula. Disorder scattering is treated within the standard perturbation theory by summing up ladder and maximally crossed diagrams. The emergent gapless (diffusion) modes determine the behavior of the conductivity on large scales. We find a finite conductivity with an intermediate logarithmic finite-size scaling towards smaller conductivities but do not obtain the logarithmic divergence of the weak-localization approach. Our results agree with the experimentally observed logarithmic scaling of the conductivity in graphene with the formation of a plateau near [Formula: see text].

  13. Homoclinic snaking in plane Couette flow: bending, skewing, and finite-size effects

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, John F

    2015-01-01

    Invariant solutions of shear flows have recently been extended from spatially periodic solutions in minimal flow units to spatially localized solutions on extended domains. One set of spanwise-localized solutions of plane Couette flow exhibits homoclinic snaking, a process by which steady-state solutions grow additional structure smoothly at their fronts when continued parametrically. Homoclinic snaking is well understood mathematically in the context of the one-dimensional Swift-Hohenberg equation. Consequently, the snaking solutions of plane Couette flow form a promising connection between the largely phenomenological study of laminar-turbulent patterns in viscous shear flows and the mathematically well-developed field of pattern-formation theory. In this paper we present a numerical study of the snaking solutions, generalizing beyond the fixed streamwise wavelength of previous studies. We find a number of new solution features, including bending, skewing, and finite-size effects. We show that the finite-si...

  14. N[Formula: see text] azide anion confined inside finite-size carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Stefano; Evangelisti, Stefano; Faginas-Lago, Noelia; Leininger, Thierry

    2017-09-26

    In this work, the confinement of an N[Formula: see text] azide anion inside finite-size single-wall zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes of different diameters has been studied by wave function and density functional theory. Unrelaxed and relaxed interaction energies have been computed, resulting in a favorable interaction between the guest and host system. In particular, the largest interaction has been observed for the confinement in an armchair (5,5) carbon nanotube, for which a natural population analysis as well as an investigation based on the molecular electrostatic potential has been carried out. The nature of the interaction between the two fragments appears to be mainly electrostatic, favored by the enhanced polarizability of the nanotube wall treated as a finite system and passivated by hydrogen atoms. The results obtained are promising for possible applications of this complex as a starting point for the stabilization of larger polynitrogen compounds, suitable as a high-energy density material.

  15. Finite-size scaling in a 2D disordered electron gas with spectral nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinner, Andreas; Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We study the DC conductivity of a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and spectral nodes, employing the field theoretical version of the Kubo-Greenwood conductivity formula. Disorder scattering is treated within the standard perturbation theory by summing up ladder and maximally crossed diagrams. The emergent gapless (diffusion) modes determine the behavior of the conductivity on large scales. We find a finite conductivity with an intermediate logarithmic finite-size scaling towards smaller conductivities but do not obtain the logarithmic divergence of the weak-localization approach. Our results agree with the experimentally observed logarithmic scaling of the conductivity in graphene with the formation of a plateau near {{e}2}/π h .

  16. Topological phase transitions in finite-size periodically driven translationally invariant systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yang; Rigol, Marcos

    2017-08-01

    It is known that, in the thermodynamic limit, the Chern number of a translationally invariant system cannot change under unitary time evolutions that are smooth in momentum space. Yet a real-space counterpart of the Chern number, the Bott index, has been shown to change in periodically driven systems with open boundary conditions. Here we prove that the Bott index and the Chern number are identical in translationally invariant systems in the thermodynamic limit. Using the Bott index, we show that, in finite-size translationally invariant systems, a Fermi sea under a periodic drive that is turned on slowly can acquire a different topology from that of the initial state. This can happen provided that the gap-closing points in the thermodynamic limit are absent in the discrete Brillouin zone of the finite system. Hence, in such systems, a periodic drive can be used to dynamically prepare topologically nontrivial states starting from topologically trivial ones.

  17. Sample Size Calculations for Precise Interval Estimation of the Eta-Squared Effect Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of variance is one of the most frequently used statistical analyses in the behavioral, educational, and social sciences, and special attention has been paid to the selection and use of an appropriate effect size measure of association in analysis of variance. This article presents the sample size procedures for precise interval estimation…

  18. Sample size considerations for clinical research studies in nuclear cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiuzan, Cody; West, Erin A; Duong, Jimmy; Cheung, Ken Y K; Einstein, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Sample size calculation is an important element of research design that investigators need to consider in the planning stage of the study. Funding agencies and research review panels request a power analysis, for example, to determine the minimum number of subjects needed for an experiment to be informative. Calculating the right sample size is crucial to gaining accurate information and ensures that research resources are used efficiently and ethically. The simple question "How many subjects do I need?" does not always have a simple answer. Before calculating the sample size requirements, a researcher must address several aspects, such as purpose of the research (descriptive or comparative), type of samples (one or more groups), and data being collected (continuous or categorical). In this article, we describe some of the most frequent methods for calculating the sample size with examples from nuclear cardiology research, including for t tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), non-parametric tests, correlation, Chi-squared tests, and survival analysis. For the ease of implementation, several examples are also illustrated via user-friendly free statistical software.

  19. Finite-Size and Composition-Driven Topological Phase Transition in (Bi1-xInx)2Se3 Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Maryam; Shapourian, Hassan; Koirala, Nikesh; Brahlek, Matthew J; Moon, Jisoo; Oh, Seongshik

    2016-09-14

    In a topological insulator (TI), if its spin-orbit coupling (SOC) strength is gradually reduced, the TI eventually transforms into a trivial insulator beyond a critical point of SOC, at which point the bulk gap closes: this is the standard description of the topological phase transition (TPT). However, this description of TPT, driven solely by the SOC (or something equivalent) and followed by closing and reopening of the bulk band gap, is valid only for infinite-size samples, and little is known how TPT occurs for finite-size samples. Here, using both systematic transport measurements on interface-engineered (Bi1-xInx)2Se3 thin films and theoretical simulations (with animations in the Supporting Information), we show that description of TPT in finite-size samples needs to be substantially modified from the conventional picture of TPT due to surface-state hybridization and bulk confinement effects. We also show that the finite-size TPT is composed of two separate transitions, topological-normal transition (TNT) and metal-insulator transition (MIT), by providing a detailed phase diagram in the two-dimensional phase space of sample size and SOC strength.

  20. Finite-size corrections to scaling behavior in sorted cell aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopper, A V; Krens, G; Grill, S W; Heisenberg, C-P

    2010-10-01

    Cell sorting is a widespread phenomenon pivotal to the early development of multicellular organisms. In vitro cell sorting studies have been instrumental in revealing the cellular properties driving this process. However, these studies have as yet been limited to two-dimensional analysis of three-dimensional cell sorting events. Here we describe a method to record the sorting of primary zebrafish ectoderm and mesoderm germ layer progenitor cells in three dimensions over time, and quantitatively analyze their sorting behavior using an order parameter related to heterotypic interface length. We investigate the cell population size dependence of sorted aggregates and find that the germ layer progenitor cells engulfed in the final configuration display a relationship between total interfacial length and system size according to a simple geometrical argument, subject to a finite-size effect.

  1. Consultants' forum: should post hoc sample size calculations be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Stephen J

    2009-01-01

    Pre-study sample size calculations for clinical trial research protocols are now mandatory. When an investigator is designing a study to compare the outcomes of an intervention, an essential step is the calculation of sample sizes that will allow a reasonable chance (power) of detecting a pre-determined difference (effect size) in the outcome variable, at a given level of statistical significance. Frequently studies will recruit fewer patients than the initial pre-study sample size calculation suggested. Investigators are faced with the fact that their study may be inadequately powered to detect the pre-specified treatment effect and the statistical analysis of the collected outcome data may or may not report a statistically significant result. If the data produces a "non-statistically significant result" then investigators are frequently tempted to ask the question "Given the actual final study size, what is the power of the study, now, to detect a treatment effect or difference?" The aim of this article is to debate whether or not it is desirable to answer this question and to undertake a power calculation, after the data have been collected and analysed.

  2. Near-Field Characterization of a Printed Circuit Board in the Presence of a Finite-sized Metallic Ground Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franek, Ondrej; Sørensen, Morten; Ebert, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Model of a generic printed circuit board (PCB) in a presence of a finite-sized metallic ground plane is introduced as a commonly occurring scenario of electronic module whose electromagnetic fields are disturbed by a nearby object. Finite-difference time-domain simulations are performed...

  3. Sample size calculation for meta-epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudeau, Bruno; Higgins, Julian P T; Tavernier, Elsa; Trinquart, Ludovic

    2016-01-30

    Meta-epidemiological studies are used to compare treatment effect estimates between randomized clinical trials with and without a characteristic of interest. To our knowledge, there is presently nothing to help researchers to a priori specify the required number of meta-analyses to be included in a meta-epidemiological study. We derived a theoretical power function and sample size formula in the framework of a hierarchical model that allows for variation in the impact of the characteristic between trials within a meta-analysis and between meta-analyses. A simulation study revealed that the theoretical function overestimated power (because of the assumption of equal weights for each trial within and between meta-analyses). We also propose a simulation approach that allows for relaxing the constraints used in the theoretical approach and is more accurate. We illustrate that the two variables that mostly influence power are the number of trials per meta-analysis and the proportion of trials with the characteristic of interest. We derived a closed-form power function and sample size formula for estimating the impact of trial characteristics in meta-epidemiological studies. Our analytical results can be used as a 'rule of thumb' for sample size calculation for a meta-epidemiologic study. A more accurate sample size can be derived with a simulation study.

  4. Reprint of : Finite-size effects on the minimal conductivity in graphene with Rashba spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakyta, Péter; Oroszlány, László; Kormányos, Andor; Cserti, József

    2016-08-01

    We study theoretically the minimal conductivity of monolayer graphene in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The Rashba spin-orbit interaction causes the low-energy bands to undergo trigonal-warping deformation and for energies smaller than the Lifshitz energy, the Fermi circle breaks up into parts, forming four separate Dirac cones. We calculate the minimal conductivity for an ideal strip of length L and width W within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism in a continuum and in a tight binding model. We show that the minimal conductivity depends on the relative orientation of the sample and the probing electrodes due to the interference of states related to different Dirac cones. We also explore the effects of finite system size and find that the minimal conductivity can be lowered compared to that of an infinitely wide sample.

  5. Performance analysis of MIMO FSO systems with radial array beams and finite sized detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, Muhsin C.; Kamacıoǧlu, Canan; Uysal, Murat; Baykal, Yahya

    2014-10-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems are employed in free space optical (FSO) links to mitigate the degrading effects of atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, we consider a MIMO FSO system with practical transmitter and receiver configurations that consists of a radial laser array with Gaussian beams and finite sized detectors. We formulate the average received intensity and the power scinitillation as a function of the receiver coordinates in the presence of weak atmospheric turbulence by using the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. Then, integrations over the finite sized multiple detectors are performed and the effect of the receiver aperture averaging is quantified. We further derive an outage probability expression of this MIMO system in the presence of turbulence-induced fading channels. Using the derived expressions, we demonstrate the effect of several practical system parameters such as the ring radius, the number of array beamlets, the source size, the link length, structure constant and the receiver aperture radius on the system performance.

  6. Critical Behaviors and Finite-Size Scaling of Principal Fluctuation Modes in Complex Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Teng; Chen, Xiao-Song

    2016-09-01

    Complex systems consisting of N agents can be investigated from the aspect of principal fluctuation modes of agents. From the correlations between agents, an N × N correlation matrix C can be obtained. The principal fluctuation modes are defined by the eigenvectors of C. Near the critical point of a complex system, we anticipate that the principal fluctuation modes have the critical behaviors similar to that of the susceptibity. With the Ising model on a two-dimensional square lattice as an example, the critical behaviors of principal fluctuation modes have been studied. The eigenvalues of the first 9 principal fluctuation modes have been invesitigated. Our Monte Carlo data demonstrate that these eigenvalues of the system with size L and the reduced temperature t follow a finite-size scaling form λn (L, t) = Lγ/ν fn(tL1/ν), where γ is critical exponent of susceptibility and ν is the critical exponent of the correlation length. Using eigenvalues λ1, λ2 and λ6, we get the finite-size scaling form of the second moment correlation length ξ (L, t) &equals L\\tilde ξ (tL1/ν ). It is shown that the second moment correlation length in the two-dimensional square lattice is anisotropic. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11121403 and 11504384

  7. Universality of finite-size corrections to geometrical entanglement in one-dimensional quantum critical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi-Jing; Hu, Bing-Quan; Cho, Sam Young; Zhou, Huan-Qiang; Shi, Qian-Qian

    2016-10-01

    Recently, the finite-size corrections to the geometrical entanglement per lattice site in the spin-1/2 chain have been numerically shown to scale inversely with system size, and its prefactor b has been suggested to be possibly universal [Q-Q. Shi et al., New J. Phys. 12, 025008 (2010)]. As possible evidence of its universality, the numerical values of the prefactors have been confirmed analytically by using the Affleck-Ludwig boundary entropy with a Neumann boundary condition for a free compactified field [J-M. Stephan et al., Phys. Rev. B 82, 180406(R) (2010)]. However, the Affleck-Ludwig boundary entropy is not unique and does depend on conformally invariant boundary conditions. Here, we show that a unique Affleck-Ludwig boundary entropy corresponding to a finitesize correction to the geometrical entanglement per lattice site exists and show that the ratio of the prefactor b to the corresponding minimum groundstate degeneracy gmin for the Affleck- Ludwig boundary entropy is a constant for any critical region of the spin-1 XXZ system with the single-ion anisotropy, i.e., b/(2 log2 g min ) = -1. Previously studied spin-1/2 systems, including the quantum three-state Potts model, have verified the universal ratio. Hence, the inverse finite-size correction to the geometrical entanglement per lattice site and its prefactor b are universal for one-dimensional critical systems.

  8. Finite-size scaling of two-point statistics and the turbulent energy cascade generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleve, Jochen; Dziekan, Thomas; Schmiegel, Jürgen; Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E; Pearson, Bruce R; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R; Greiner, Martin

    2005-02-01

    Within the framework of random multiplicative energy cascade models of fully developed turbulence, finite-size-scaling expressions for two-point correlators and cumulants are derived, taking into account the observationally unavoidable conversion from an ultrametric to an Euclidean two-point distance. The comparison with two-point statistics of the surrogate energy dissipation, extracted from various wind tunnel and atmospheric boundary layer records, allows an accurate deduction of multiscaling exponents and cumulants, even at moderate Reynolds numbers for which simple power-law fits are not feasible. The extracted exponents serve as input for parametric estimates of the probabilistic cascade generator. Various cascade generators are evaluated.

  9. Exchange bias in finite sized NiO nanoparticles with Ni clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Ashish Chhaganlal; Lin, Jauyn Grace

    2017-02-01

    Structural and magnetic properties of finite sized NiO nanoparticles are investigated with synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, magnetometer and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy. A minor Ni phase is detected with synchrotron XRD, attributed to the oxygen defects in the NiO core. A considerable exchange bias of 100 Oe is observed at 50 K and it drops abruptly and vanishes above 150 K, in association with the reduction of frozen spins. FMR data indicate a strong interaction between ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) phases below 150 K, consistent with the picture of isolated FM clusters in AFM matrix.

  10. Finite-size scaling study of dynamic critical phenomena in a vapor-liquid transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midya, Jiarul; Das, Subir K.

    2017-01-01

    Via a combination of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and finite-size scaling (FSS) analysis, we study dynamic critical phenomena for the vapor-liquid transition in a three dimensional Lennard-Jones system. The phase behavior of the model has been obtained via the Monte Carlo simulations. The transport properties, viz., the bulk viscosity and the thermal conductivity, are calculated via the Green-Kubo relations, by taking inputs from the MD simulations in the microcanonical ensemble. The critical singularities of these quantities are estimated via the FSS method. The results thus obtained are in nice agreement with the predictions of the dynamic renormalization group and mode-coupling theories.

  11. Finite size effects in the static structure factor of dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davletov, A. E., E-mail: askar@physics.kz; Yerimbetova, L. T.; Mukhametkarimov, Ye. S.; Ospanova, A. K. [Department of Physics and Technology, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Al-Farabi av. 71, 050040 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2014-07-15

    Based on the previously developed pseudopotential model of the dust particles interaction, which takes into account both the finite size and screening effects, the equilibrium distribution functions are investigated in a broad range of plasma parameters. The treatment stems entirely from the renormalization theory of plasma particles interactions which leads to the so-called generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. In particular, an analytical expression for the static structure factor of the dust particles is proposed and its non-monotonic behavior in the hyper-netted chain approximation is found in a specified domain of plasma parameters to indicate the formation of short- or even long-range order in the system.

  12. Interacting spins in a cavity: Finite-size effects and symmetry-breaking dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, Søren; Mølmer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    , and for small chains, we find significant and nontrivial finite-size effects. Below the first-order phase transition, even quite large spin chains of 30–40 spins give rise to a mean photon number and number fluctuations significantly above the mean-field vacuum result. Near the second-order phase critical point......-transition the random character of the measurement process causes a measurement-induced symmetry breaking in the system. This symmetry breaking occurs on the time scale needed for an observer to gather sufficient information to distinguish between the two possible (mean-field) symmetry-broken states....

  13. Linear response, fluctuation-dissipation, and finite-system-size effects in superdiffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2013-07-01

    Lévy walks (LWs) are a popular stochastic tool to model anomalous diffusion and have recently been used to describe a variety of phenomena. We study the linear response behavior of this generic model of superdiffusive LWs in finite systems to an external force field under both stationary and nonstationary conditions. These finite-size LWs are based on power-law waiting time distributions with a finite-time regularization at τ(c), such that the physical requirements are met to apply linear response theory and derive the power spectrum with the correct short frequency limit, without the introduction of artificial cutoffs. We obtain the generalized Einstein relation for both ensemble and time averages over the entire process time and determine the turnover to normal Brownian motion when the full system is explored. In particular, we obtain an exact expression for the long time diffusion constant as a function of the scaling exponent of the waiting time density and the characteristic time scale τ(c).

  14. Single-file diffusion of interacting particles in a finite-sized channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfau, J B; Coste, C; Even, C; Saint Jean, M

    2010-09-01

    We study the dynamics of charged macroscopic particles (millimetric steel balls) confined in a linear channel of finite length, sufficiently narrow to avoid particles crossing. We show that their individual response to thermal fluctuations strongly depends either on their position in the channel or the local potential they experience. Three different dynamical regimes are identified. At small times, a "free regime" takes place, with the outermost particles exhibiting the highest diffusion coefficient. This effect results from an "echo" of the thermal fluctuations reflected by the channel wall. Then, forbidden crossing induces a correlated regime similar to single file diffusion. Surprisingly, the corresponding mobility increases with the local potential. Lastly, the finite length of the channel induces the saturation of fluctuations. We show that those behaviors may be described heuristically with the help of models for N hard-core interacting particles diffusing in a finite channel of length L, provided that we replace the uniform interparticle distance L/N by a characteristic distance (k(B)T/K)(1/2) built upon the temperature T and the stiffness K of the local potential. It provides a very satisfactory estimate for the fluctuations sizes, whereas they are greatly overestimated assuming hard-core interactions.

  15. Investigating feedback mechanisms between stress and grain-size: preliminary findings from finite-element modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, A. J.; Prior, D. J.; Ellis, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    It is widely accepted that changes in stress and grain size can induce a switch between grain-size insensitive (GSI) and sensitive (GSS) creep mechanisms. Under steady-state conditions, grains evolve to an equilibrium size in the boundary region between GSS and GSI, described by the paleopiezometer for a given material. Under these conditions, significant rheological weakening is not expected, as grain size reduction processes are balanced by grain growth processes. However, it has been shown that the stress field surrounding faults varies through the seismic cycle, with both rapid loading and unloading of stress possible in the co- and post-seismic stages. We propose that these changes in stress in the region of the brittle-ductile transition zone may be sufficient to force a deviation from the GSI-GSS boundary and thereby cause a change in grain size and creep mechanism prior to system re-equilibration. Here we present preliminary findings from numerical modelling of stress and grain size changes in response to loading of mechanical inhomogeneities. Our results are attained using a grain-size evolution (GSE) subroutine incorporated into the SULEC finite-element code developed by Susan Ellis and Susanne Buiter, which utilises an iterative approach of solving for spatial and temporal changes in differential stress, grain size and active creep mechanism. Preliminary models demonstrate that stress changes in response to the opening of a fracture in a flowing medium can be significant enough to cause a switch from GSI to GSS creep. These results are significant in the context of understanding spatial variations and feedback between stress, grain size and deformation mechanisms through the seismic cycle.

  16. (Sample) Size Matters: Defining Error in Planktic Foraminiferal Isotope Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, C.; Fraass, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Planktic foraminifera have been used as carriers of stable isotopic signals since the pioneering work of Urey and Emiliani. In those heady days, instrumental limitations required hundreds of individual foraminiferal tests to return a usable value. This had the fortunate side-effect of smoothing any seasonal to decadal changes within the planktic foram population, which generally turns over monthly, removing that potential noise from each sample. With the advent of more sensitive mass spectrometers, smaller sample sizes have now become standard. This has been a tremendous advantage, allowing longer time series with the same investment of time and energy. Unfortunately, the use of smaller numbers of individuals to generate a data point has lessened the amount of time averaging in the isotopic analysis and decreased precision in paleoceanographic datasets. With fewer individuals per sample, the differences between individual specimens will result in larger variation, and therefore error, and less precise values for each sample. Unfortunately, most workers (the authors included) do not make a habit of reporting the error associated with their sample size. We have created an open-source model in R to quantify the effect of sample sizes under various realistic and highly modifiable parameters (calcification depth, diagenesis in a subset of the population, improper identification, vital effects, mass, etc.). For example, a sample in which only 1 in 10 specimens is diagenetically altered can be off by >0.3‰ δ18O VPDB or ~1°C. Additionally, and perhaps more importantly, we show that under unrealistically ideal conditions (perfect preservation, etc.) it takes ~5 individuals from the mixed-layer to achieve an error of less than 0.1‰. Including just the unavoidable vital effects inflates that number to ~10 individuals to achieve ~0.1‰. Combining these errors with the typical machine error inherent in mass spectrometers make this a vital consideration moving forward.

  17. Rock sampling. [method for controlling particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, P. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A method for sampling rock and other brittle materials and for controlling resultant particle sizes is described. The method involves cutting grooves in the rock surface to provide a grouping of parallel ridges and subsequently machining the ridges to provide a powder specimen. The machining step may comprise milling, drilling, lathe cutting or the like; but a planing step is advantageous. Control of the particle size distribution is effected primarily by changing the height and width of these ridges. This control exceeds that obtainable by conventional grinding.

  18. A proof of the Woodward-Lawson sampling method for a finite linear array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Gary A.

    1993-01-01

    An extension of the continuous aperture Woodward-Lawson sampling theorem has been developed for a finite linear array of equidistant identical elements with arbitrary excitations. It is shown that by sampling the array factor at a finite number of specified points in the far field, the exact array factor over all space can be efficiently reconstructed in closed form. The specified sample points lie in real space and hence are measurable provided that the interelement spacing is greater than approximately one half of a wavelength. This paper provides insight as to why the length parameter used in the sampling formulas for discrete arrays is larger than the physical span of the lattice points in contrast with the continuous aperture case where the length parameter is precisely the physical aperture length.

  19. A proof of the Woodward-Lawson sampling method for a finite linear array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Gary A.

    1993-01-01

    An extension of the continuous aperture Woodward-Lawson sampling theorem has been developed for a finite linear array of equidistant identical elements with arbitrary excitations. It is shown that by sampling the array factor at a finite number of specified points in the far field, the exact array factor over all space can be efficiently reconstructed in closed form. The specified sample points lie in real space and hence are measurable provided that the interelement spacing is greater than approximately one half of a wavelength. This paper provides insight as to why the length parameter used in the sampling formulas for discrete arrays is larger than the physical span of the lattice points in contrast with the continuous aperture case where the length parameter is precisely the physical aperture length.

  20. Anomalous finite-size effects in the Battle of the Sexes

    CERN Document Server

    Cremer, Jonas; Frey, Erwin

    2007-01-01

    The Battle of the Sexes describes asymmetric conflicts in mating behavior of males and females. Males can be philanderer or faithful, while females are either fast or coy, leading to a cyclic dynamics. The adjusted replicator equation predicts stable coexistence of all four strategies. In this situation, we consider the effects of fluctuations stemming from a finite population size. We show that they unavoidably lead to extinction of two strategies in the population. However, the typical time until extinction occurs strongly prolongs with increasing system size. In the meantime, a quasi-stationary probability distribution forms that is anomalously flat in the vicinity of the coexistence state. This behavior originates in a vanishing linear deterministic drift near the fixed point. We provide numerical data as well as an analytical approach to the mean extinction time and the quasi-stationary probability distribution.

  1. Finite-size corrections for universal boundary entropy in bond percolation

    CERN Document Server

    de Gier, Jan; Ponsaing, Anita

    2016-01-01

    We compute the boundary entropy for bond percolation on the square lattice in the presence of a boundary loop weight, and prove explicit and exact expressions on a strip and on a cylinder of size $L$. For the cylinder we provide a rigorous asymptotic analysis which allows for the computation of finite-size corrections to arbitrary order. For the strip we provide exact expressions that have been verified using high-precision numerical analysis. Our rigorous and exact results corroborate an argument based on conformal field theory, in particular concerning universal logarithmic corrections for the case of the strip due to the presence of corners in the geometry. We furthermore observe a crossover at a special value of the boundary loop weight.

  2. Weakest-Link Scaling and Finite Size Effects on Recurrence Times Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Hristopulos, Dionissios T; Kaniadakis, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Tectonic earthquakes result from the fracturing of the Earth's crust due to the loading induced by the motion of the tectonic plates. Hence, the statistical laws of earthquakes must be intimately connected to the statistical laws of fracture. The Weibull distribution is a commonly used model of earthquake recurrence times (ERT). Nevertheless, deviations from Weibull scaling have been observed in ERT data and in fracture experiments on quasi-brittle materials. We propose that the weakest-link-scaling theory for finite-size systems leads to the kappa-Weibull function, which implies a power-law tail for the ERT distribution. We show that the ERT hazard rate function decreases linearly after a waiting time which is proportional to the system size (in terms of representative volume elements) raised to the inverse of the Weibull modulus. We also demonstrate that the kappa-Weibull can be applied to strongly correlated systems by means of simulations of a fiber bundle model.

  3. Boundary effects in finite size plasmonic crystals: focusing and routing of plasmonic beams for optical communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetou, M I; Bouillard, J-S; Segovia, P; Dickson, W; Thomsen, B C; Bayvel, P; Zayats, A V

    2015-11-06

    Plasmonic crystals, which consist of periodic arrangements of surface features at a metal-dielectric interface, allow the manipulation of optical information in the form of surface plasmon polaritons. Here we investigate the excitation and propagation of plasmonic beams in and around finite size plasmonic crystals at telecom wavelengths, highlighting the effects of the crystal boundary shape and illumination conditions. Significant differences in broad plasmonic beam generation by crystals of different shapes are demonstrated, while for narrow beams, the propagation from a crystal onto the smooth metal film is less sensitive to the crystal boundary shape. We show that by controlling the boundary shape, the size and the excitation beam parameters, directional control of propagating plasmonic modes and their behaviour such as angular beam splitting, focusing power and beam width can be efficiently achieved. This provides a promising route for robust and alignment-independent integration of plasmonic crystals with optical communication components.

  4. Finite Size Effects in Chemical Bonding: From Small Clusters to Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleis, Jesper; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Romero, N. A.

    2011-01-01

    We address the fundamental question of which size a metallic nano-particle needs to have before its surface chemical properties can be considered to be those of a solid, rather than those of a large molecule. Calculations of adsorption energies for carbon monoxide and oxygen on a series of gold n......). Below that critical size, finite-size effects can be observed, and we show those to be related to variations in the local atomic structure augmented by quantum size effects for the smallest clusters.......We address the fundamental question of which size a metallic nano-particle needs to have before its surface chemical properties can be considered to be those of a solid, rather than those of a large molecule. Calculations of adsorption energies for carbon monoxide and oxygen on a series of gold...... nanoparticles ranging from 13 to 1,415 atoms, or 0.8–3.7 nm, have been made possible by exploiting massively parallel computing on up to 32,768 cores on the Blue Gene/P computer at Argonne National Laboratory. We show that bulk surface properties are obtained for clusters larger than ca. 560 atoms (2.7 nm...

  5. Finite size scaling RG: detailed description and applications to diluted Ising systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Figueiredo Neto, João Monteiro; de Oliveira, Suzana Maria Moss; de Oliveira, Paulo Murilo Castro

    1994-05-01

    The finite size scaling renormalisation group (FSSRG) was introduced in Europhysics Letters 20 (1992) 621. Based only on the finite size scaling hypothesis, with no further assumptions, it differs from other real space renormalisation groups (RSRGs) in the following essential point: one does not need to adopt any particular recipe exp(- H‧( S‧/ T = σ sP( S, S‧) exp[- H( S)/ T] relating the spin states S of the original system to the spin states S' of a renormalised system. The choice of a particular weight function P( S, S‧), e.g. the so called majority rule, is generally based on plausibility arguments, and involves uncontrollable approximations. In addition to being free from these drawbacks, FSSRG shares with RSRG some good features as, for instance, the possibility of extracting qualitative informations from multi-parameter RG flow diagrams, including crossovers, universality classes, universality breakings, multicriticalities, orders of transitions, etc. Other unpleasant consequences of particular weight functions, as the so called proliferation of parameters, are also absent in the FSSRG. Using it in three-dimensions, we were able to find a semi-unstable fixed point in the critical frontier concentration p versus exchange coupling J, characterizing a universality class crossover when one goes from pure to diluted Ising ferromagnets. The specific heat exponents we have obtained for the pure and diluted regimes are in agreement with the Harris criterion.

  6. Sample size cognizant detection of signals in white noise

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, N Raj

    2007-01-01

    The detection and estimation of signals in noisy, limited data is a problem of interest to many scientific and engineering communities. We present a computationally simple, sample eigenvalue based procedure for estimating the number of high-dimensional signals in white noise when there are relatively few samples. We highlight a fundamental asymptotic limit of sample eigenvalue based detection of weak high-dimensional signals from a limited sample size and discuss its implication for the detection of two closely spaced signals. This motivates our heuristic definition of the 'effective number of identifiable signals.' Numerical simulations are used to demonstrate the consistency of the algorithm with respect to the effective number of signals and the superior performance of the algorithm with respect to Wax and Kailath's "asymptotically consistent" MDL based estimator.

  7. Finite size effects and spin transition in ball-milled γ-(FeMn) 30Cu 70 nanostructured alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, J.; Greneche, J. M.; González, J. M.

    2004-12-01

    Fe 15Mn 15Cu 70 alloys were prepared by high-energy ball milling over a wide range of grinding times from 15 min to 72 h. The corresponding magnetic properties were followed by means of vibrating sample magnetometry, magnetic susceptibility and Mössbauer spectroscopy. By using a Rietveld structural analysis of high-resolution X-ray diffraction data, lattice parameter and grain size correlations with magnetization and coercive force were carried out. Results revealed a strong microstructural dependence of the magnetic properties with the grain size, resembling a finite size-driven magnetic transition at a critical crystallite value of around 8.5 nm. This behavior is endorsed by a partial low- to high-spin transition according to isomer shift results, at a critical unit-cell volume of around 50 Å 3 at 77 K attributed to strong local variations of the interatomic spacing as a consequence of the employed ball-milling procedure. Finally, as concerns to temperature behavior, samples exhibited a freezing temperature at around 61 K and a wide distribution of relaxation times ascribed to the presence of interacting CuMn and FeMnCu clusters.

  8. Power and sample size in cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laska, E M; Meisner, M; Siegel, C

    1999-01-01

    For resource allocation under a constrained budget, optimal decision rules for mutually exclusive programs require that the treatment with the highest incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) below a willingness-to-pay (WTP) criterion be funded. This is equivalent to determining the treatment with the smallest net health cost. The designer of a cost-effectiveness study needs to select a sample size so that the power to reject the null hypothesis, the equality of the net health costs of two treatments, is high. A recently published formula derived under normal distribution theory overstates sample-size requirements. Using net health costs, the authors present simple methods for power analysis based on conventional normal and on nonparametric statistical theory.

  9. Estimation of individual reference intervals in small sample sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ase Marie; Garde, Anne Helene; Eller, Nanna Hurwitz

    2007-01-01

    of that order of magnitude for all topics in question. Therefore, new methods to estimate reference intervals for small sample sizes are needed. We present an alternative method based on variance component models. The models are based on data from 37 men and 84 women taking into account biological variation...... presented in this study. The presented method enables occupational health researchers to calculate reference intervals for specific groups, i.e. smokers versus non-smokers, etc. In conclusion, the variance component models provide an appropriate tool to estimate reference intervals based on small sample...

  10. Hydrophobicity of soil samples and soil size fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowen, H.A.; Dudas, M.J. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Renewable Resources; Roy, J.L. [Imperial Oil Resources Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada); Johnson, R.L. [Alberta Research Council, Vegreville, AB (Canada); McGill, W.B. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Renewable Resources

    2001-07-01

    The inability of dry soil to absorb water droplets within 10 seconds or less is defined as soil hydrophobicity. The severity, persistence and circumstances causing it vary greatly. There is a possibility that hydrophobicity in Alberta is a symptom of crude oil spills. In this study, the authors investigated the severity of soil hydrophobicity, as determined by the molarity of ethanol droplet test (MED) and dichloromethane extractable organic (DEO) concentration. The soil samples were collected from pedons within 12 hydrophobic soil sites, located northeast from Calgary to Cold Lake, Alberta. All the sites were located at an elevation ranging from 450 metres to 990 metres above sea level. The samples contained compounds from the Chernozemic, Gleysolic, Luvisolic, and Solonetzic soil orders. The results obtained indicated that the MED and DEO were positively correlated in whole soil samples. No relationships were found between MED and DEO in soil samples divided in soil fractions. More severe hydrophobicity and lower DEO concentrations were exhibited in clay- and silt-sized particles in the less than 53 micrometres, when compared to the samples in the other fraction (between 53 and 2000 micrometres). It was concluded that hydrophobicity was not restricted to a particular soil particle size class. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Simple and multiple linear regression: sample size considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, James A

    2016-11-01

    The suggested "two subjects per variable" (2SPV) rule of thumb in the Austin and Steyerberg article is a chance to bring out some long-established and quite intuitive sample size considerations for both simple and multiple linear regression. This article distinguishes two of the major uses of regression models that imply very different sample size considerations, neither served well by the 2SPV rule. The first is etiological research, which contrasts mean Y levels at differing "exposure" (X) values and thus tends to focus on a single regression coefficient, possibly adjusted for confounders. The second research genre guides clinical practice. It addresses Y levels for individuals with different covariate patterns or "profiles." It focuses on the profile-specific (mean) Y levels themselves, estimating them via linear compounds of regression coefficients and covariates. By drawing on long-established closed-form variance formulae that lie beneath the standard errors in multiple regression, and by rearranging them for heuristic purposes, one arrives at quite intuitive sample size considerations for both research genres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of Finite Element Size in Residual Strength Prediction of Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Bogert, Philip B.; Karayev, Kazbek Z.; Nordman, Paul S.; Razi, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity of failure load to the element size used in a progressive failure analysis (PFA) of carbon composite center notched laminates is evaluated. The sensitivity study employs a PFA methodology previously developed by the authors consisting of Hashin-Rotem intra-laminar fiber and matrix failure criteria and a complete stress degradation scheme for damage simulation. The approach is implemented with a user defined subroutine in the ABAQUS/Explicit finite element package. The effect of element size near the notch tips on residual strength predictions was assessed for a brittle failure mode with a parametric study that included three laminates of varying material system, thickness and stacking sequence. The study resulted in the selection of an element size of 0.09 in. X 0.09 in., which was later used for predicting crack paths and failure loads in sandwich panels and monolithic laminated panels. Comparison of predicted crack paths and failure loads for these panels agreed well with experimental observations. Additionally, the element size vs. normalized failure load relationship, determined in the parametric study, was used to evaluate strength-scaling factors for three different element sizes. The failure loads predicted with all three element sizes provided converged failure loads with respect to that corresponding with the 0.09 in. X 0.09 in. element size. Though preliminary in nature, the strength-scaling concept has the potential to greatly reduce the computational time required for PFA and can enable the analysis of large scale structural components where failure is dominated by fiber failure in tension.

  13. Influences of finite-size effectson the self-organized critical-ity of forest-fire model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The influences of finite-size effects on the self-organized criticality (SOC) of the traditional forest-fire model are investigated by means of a new method. The forest size is originally set to a value much greater than the correlation length of the forest. Finite-size effects are then studied by equally dividing the forest into more and more separate subsystems on condition that the forest size, igniting probability and planting probability are invariant. A new phenomenon, i.e. the finite-size effects with one-side frequency peak, is observed. The boundary between two neighboring subsystems can be regarded as a firebreak. The concept of 'separation ability' is introduced to represent the probability for the firebreak to block off the fire successfully. Restraining effects of separation ability on finite-size effects are analyzed. Finite-size effects and separation ability, as well as their relations are found to have practical importance to the actual forest-fire protection.

  14. Sample size of the reference sample in a case-augmented study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Palash; Dewanji, Anup

    2017-05-01

    The case-augmented study, in which a case sample is augmented with a reference (random) sample from the source population with only covariates information known, is becoming popular in different areas of applied science such as pharmacovigilance, ecology, and econometrics. In general, the case sample is available from some source (for example, hospital database, case registry, etc.); however, the reference sample is required to be drawn from the corresponding source population. The required minimum size of the reference sample is an important issue in this regard. In this work, we address the minimum sample size calculation and discuss related issues. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Estimation of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of soft tissue from indentation using two different-sized indentors: finite element analysis of the finite deformation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, A P C; Zheng, Y P

    2005-03-01

    Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of a tissue can be simultaneously obtained using two indentation tests with two different sized indentors in two indentations. Owing to the assumption of infinitesimal deformation of the indentation, the finite deformation effect of indentation on the calculated material parameters was not fully understood in the double indentation approach. However, indentation tests with infinitesimal deformation are not practical for the measurement of real tissues. Accordingly, finite element models were developed to simulate the indentation with different indentor diameters and different deformation ratios to investigate the finite deformation effect of indentation. The results indicated that Young's modulus E increased with the increase in the indentation deformation w, if the finite deformation effect of indentation was not considered. This phenomenon became obvious when Poisson's ratio v approached 0.5 and/or the ratio of indentor radius and tissue thickness a/h increased. The calculated Young's modulus could be different by 23% at 10% deformation in comparison with its real value. The results also demonstrated that the finite deformation effect to indentation on the calculation of Poisson's ratio v was much smaller. After the finite deformation effect of indentation was considered, the error of the calculated Young's modulus could be controlled within 5% (a/h = 1) and 2% (a/h = 2) for deformation up to 10%.

  16. Sample size for monitoring sirex populations and their natural enemies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susete do Rocio Chiarello Penteado

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The woodwasp Sirex noctilio Fabricius (Hymenoptera: Siricidae was introduced in Brazil in 1988 and became the main pest in pine plantations. It has spread to about 1.000.000 ha, at different population levels, in the states of Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina, Paraná, São Paulo and Minas Gerais. Control is done mainly by using a nematode, Deladenus siricidicola Bedding (Nematoda: Neothylenchidae. The evaluation of the efficiency of natural enemies has been difficult because there are no appropriate sampling systems. This study tested a hierarchical sampling system to define the sample size to monitor the S. noctilio population and the efficiency of their natural enemies, which was found to be perfectly adequate.

  17. Sample size for monitoring sirex populations and their natural enemies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susete do Rocio Chiarello Penteado

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The woodwasp Sirex noctilio Fabricius (Hymenoptera: Siricidae was introduced in Brazil in 1988 and became the main pest in pine plantations. It has spread to about 1.000.000 ha, at different population levels, in the states of Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina, Paraná, São Paulo and Minas Gerais. Control is done mainly by using a nematode, Deladenus siricidicola Bedding (Nematoda: Neothylenchidae. The evaluation of the efficiency of natural enemies has been difficult because there are no appropriate sampling systems. This study tested a hierarchical sampling system to define the sample size to monitor the S. noctilio population and the efficiency of their natural enemies, which was found to be perfectly adequate.

  18. Prediction and standard error estimation for a finite universe total when a stratum is not sampled

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, T.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of a universe of trucks operating in the United States in 1990, this paper presents statistical methodology for estimating a finite universe total on a second occasion when a part of the universe is sampled and the remainder of the universe is not sampled. Prediction is used to compensate for the lack of data from the unsampled portion of the universe. The sample is assumed to be a subsample of an earlier sample where stratification is used on both occasions before sample selection. Accounting for births and deaths in the universe between the two points in time, the detailed sampling plan, estimator, standard error, and optimal sample allocation, are presented with a focus on the second occasion. If prior auxiliary information is available, the methodology is also applicable to a first occasion.

  19. Precision of recombination frequency estimates after random intermating with finite population sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Matthias; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2008-01-01

    Random intermating of F2 populations has been suggested for obtaining precise estimates of recombination frequencies between tightly linked loci. In a simulation study, sampling effects due to small population sizes in the intermating generations were found to abolish the advantages of random intermating that were reported in previous theoretical studies considering an infinite population size. We propose a mating scheme for intermating with planned crosses that yields more precise estimates than those under random intermating.

  20. Spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in QCD:a finite-size scaling study on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Giusti, Leonardo; Giusti, Leonardo; Necco, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in QCD with massless quarks at infinite volume can be seen in a finite box by studying, for instance, the dependence of the chiral condensate from the volume and the quark mass. We perform a feasibility study of this program by computing the quark condensate on the lattice in the quenched approximation of QCD at small quark masses. We carry out simulations in various topological sectors of the theory at several volumes, quark masses and lattice spacings by employing fermions with an exact chiral symmetry, and we focus on observables which are infrared stable and free from mass-dependent ultraviolet divergences. The numerical calculation is carried out with an exact variance-reduction technique, which is designed to be particularly efficient when spontaneous symmetry breaking is at work in generating a few very small low-lying eigenvalues of the Dirac operator. The finite-size scaling behaviour of the condensate in the topological sectors considered agrees, within our stati...

  1. Finite Sample Comparison of Parametric, Semiparametric, and Wavelet Estimators of Fractional Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Ø.; Frederiksen, Per Houmann

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we compare through Monte Carlo simulations the finite sample properties of estimators of the fractional differencing parameter, d. This involves frequency domain, time domain, and wavelet based approaches, and we consider both parametric and semiparametric estimation methods....... The estimators are briefly introduced and compared, and the criteria adopted for measuring finite sample performance are bias and root mean squared error. Most importantly, the simulations reveal that (1) the frequency domain maximum likelihood procedure is superior to the time domain parametric methods, (2) all...... the estimators are fairly robust to conditionally heteroscedastic errors, (3) the local polynomial Whittle and bias-reduced log-periodogram regression estimators are shown to be more robust to short-run dynamics than other semiparametric (frequency domain and wavelet) estimators and in some cases even outperform...

  2. How reliable are Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents for the assessment of ocean dynamics?

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández-Carrasco, Ismael; López, Cristóbal; Turiel, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Much of atmospheric and oceanic transport is associated with coherent structures. Lagrangian methods are emerging as optimal tools for their identification and analysis. An important Lagrangian technique which is starting to be widely used in oceanography is that of Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLEs). Despite this growing relevance there are still many open questions concerning the reliability of the FSLEs in order to analyse the ocean dynamics. In particular, it is still unclear how robust they are when confronted with real data. In this paper we analyze the effect on this Lagrangian technique of the two most important effects when facing real data, namely noise and dynamics of unsolved scales. Our results, using as a benchmarch data from a primitive numerical model of the Mediterranean Sea, show that even when some dynamics is missed the FSLEs results still give an accurate picture of the oceanic transport properties.

  3. Lasing in dark and bright modes of a finite-sized plasmonic lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Hakala, T K; Väkeväinen, A I; Martikainen, J -P; Moilanen, A J; Törmä, P

    2016-01-01

    Lasing at the nanometer scale promises strong light-matter interactions and ultrafast operation. The first realizations of nanoscale lasing have been achieved but suffer from losses and lack of beam directionality. Band-edge lasing in periodic plasmonic structures offered an improvement but radiative losses remained high. Intriguingly, plasmonic nanoparticle arrays support also non-radiative dark modes that offer longer life-times but are inaccessible to far field radiation. Here, we show lasing both in dark and bright modes of an array of silver nanoparticles combined with optically pumped dye molecules. Linewidths of 0.2 nanometers at visible wavelengths and room temperature are observed. Access to the dark modes is provided by a coherent out-coupling mechanism based on the finite size of the array. The results open a route to utilize all modes of plasmonic lattices, also the high-Q ones, for studies of strong light-matter interactions, condensation and photon fluids.

  4. Finite Size Scaling of the Higgs-Yukawa Model near the Gaussian Fixed Point

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, David Y -J; Knippschild, Bastian; Lin, C -J David; Nagy, Attila

    2016-01-01

    We study the scaling properties of Higgs-Yukawa models. Using the technique of Finite-Size Scaling, we are able to derive scaling functions that describe the observables of the model in the vicinity of a Gaussian fixed point. A feasibility study of our strategy is performed for the pure scalar theory in the weak-coupling regime. Choosing the on-shell renormalisation scheme gives us an advantage to fit the scaling functions against lattice data with only a small number of fit parameters. These formulae can be used to determine the universality of the observed phase transitions, and thus play an essential role in future investigations of Higgs-Yukawa models, in particular in the strong Yukawa coupling region.

  5. 1/ f noise from the laws of thermodynamics for finite-size fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Ralph V; Nasir, Derek M

    2014-07-01

    Computer simulations of the Ising model exhibit white noise if thermal fluctuations are governed by Boltzmann's factor alone; whereas we find that the same model exhibits 1/f noise if Boltzmann's factor is extended to include local alignment entropy to all orders. We show that this nonlinear correction maintains maximum entropy during equilibrium fluctuations. Indeed, as with the usual way to resolve Gibbs' paradox that avoids entropy reduction during reversible processes, the correction yields the statistics of indistinguishable particles. The correction also ensures conservation of energy if an instantaneous contribution from local entropy is included. Thus, a common mechanism for 1/f noise comes from assuming that finite-size fluctuations strictly obey the laws of thermodynamics, even in small parts of a large system. Empirical evidence for the model comes from its ability to match the measured temperature dependence of the spectral-density exponents in several metals and to show non-Gaussian fluctuations characteristic of nanoscale systems.

  6. Finite size effects on the electromagnetic field enhancement from low-dimensional silver nanoshell dimer arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Youlin [Zhengzhou University, China; Zhao, Ke [ORNL; Jia, Yu [Zhengzhou University, China; Hu, Xing [Zhengzhou University, China; Zhang, Zhenyu [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Finite size effects on the optical properties of one-dimensional 1D and two-dimensional 2D nanoshell dimer arrays are investigated using generalized Mie theory and coupled dipole approximation within the context of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy SERS. It is shown that the huge enhancement in the electromagnetic EM field at the center of a given dimer oscillates with the length of the 1D array. For an array of fixed length, the EM enhancement also oscillates along the array, but with a different period. Both types of oscillations can be attributed to the interference of the dynamic dipole fields from different dimers in the array. When generalized to 2D arrays, EM enhancement higher than that of the 1D arrays can be gained with a constant magnitude, a salient feature advantageous to experimental realization of single-molecule SERS. 2008 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.3009293

  7. Finite Size Effects on the Electromagnetic Field Enhancement from Low-dimensional Silver Nanoshell Dimer Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Youlin; Zhao, Ke; Jia, Yu; Hu, Xing; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2009-03-01

    Finite size effects on the optical properties of one-dimensional (1D) and 2D nanoshell dimer arrays are investigated using generalized Mie theory and coupled dipole approximation within the context of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). It is shown that the huge enhancement in the electromagnetic (EM) field at the center of a given dimer oscillates with the length of the 1D array. For an array of fixed length, the EM enhancement also oscillates along the array, but with a different period. Both types of oscillations can be attributed to the interference of the dynamic dipole fields from different dimers in the array. When generalized to 2D arrays, EM enhancement higher than that of the 1D arrays can be gained with a constant magnitude, a salient feature advantageous to experimental realization of single-molecule SERS. [K. Zhao et al, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 081102 (2005); Y. L. Song et al, accepted by J. Chem. Phys.

  8. Fully-resolved DNS of finite-size particles exposed to a turbulent stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botto, Lorenzo; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2008-11-01

    A field of homogeneous isotropic turbulence is convected with a mean velocity past a group of fixed, finite-size particles and the structure and intensity of the resulting downstream turbulence are compared to the particle-free case. The diameter of the particles is larger than the Kolmogorov scale and is of the order of the Taylor micro-scale. The results illustrate the central role played by the particle wakes in destroying the isotropy and homogeneity of the incident turbulence. Furthermore, as a result of wake interactions, the time-dependent hydrodynamic forces on the downstream and upstream spheres are correlated. The numerical simulations are carried out on a uniform grid by employing the ``Physalis'' method which can be regarded as a combination of an immersed boundary and spectral method. Among other advantages, it does not require interpolation and its spectral convergence permits computations with relatively few grid nodes per particle.

  9. Transition and self-sustained turbulence in dilute suspensions of finite-size particles

    CERN Document Server

    Lashgari, Iman; Brandt, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We study the transition to turbulence of channel flow of finite-size particle suspensions at low volume fraction, i.e. $\\Phi \\approx 0.001$. The critical Reynolds number above which turbulence is sustained reduces to $Re \\approx 1675$, in the presence of few particles, independently of the initial condition, a value lower than that of the corresponding single-phase flow, i.e. $Re\\approx1775$. In the dilute suspension, the initial arrangement of the particles is important to trigger the transition at a fixed Reynolds number and particle volume fraction. As in single phase flows, streamwise elongated disturbances are initially induced in the flow. If particles can induce oblique disturbances with high enough energy within a certain time, the streaks breakdown, flow experiences the transition to turbulence and the particle trajectories become chaotic. Otherwise, the streaks decay in time and the particles immigrate towards the channel core in a laminar flow.

  10. Loss of acoustic black hole effect in a structure of finite size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liling; Cheng, Li

    2016-07-01

    The Acoustic Black Hole (ABH) effect takes place in thin-walled structures with diminishing thickness as a result of the reduction in the bending wave speed. It was shown to exist as a broadband phenomenon, based on wave propagation theory in structures of semi-infinite size. The ABH effect exhibits appealing features for various applications, such as passive vibration control, energy harvesting, and sound radiation control. In this paper, we demonstrate the disappearance of the ABH effect in a finite beam at specific frequency ranges above the cut-on frequency, both experimentally and theoretically. Analyses show that the phenomenon takes place at frequencies which are close to the low order local resonant frequencies of the portion of the beam demarcated by the position of the excitation force. These frequencies can be predicted so that the phenomenon can be avoided for the targeted frequency ranges in ABH applications.

  11. Dependence of exponents on text length versus finite-size scaling for word-frequency distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Álvaro; Font-Clos, Francesc

    2017-08-01

    Some authors have recently argued that a finite-size scaling law for the text-length dependence of word-frequency distributions cannot be conceptually valid. Here we give solid quantitative evidence for the validity of this scaling law, using both careful statistical tests and analytical arguments based on the generalized central-limit theorem applied to the moments of the distribution (and obtaining a novel derivation of Heaps' law as a by-product). We also find that the picture of word-frequency distributions with power-law exponents that decrease with text length [X. Yan and P. Minnhagen, Physica A 444, 828 (2016), 10.1016/j.physa.2015.10.082] does not stand with rigorous statistical analysis. Instead, we show that the distributions are perfectly described by power-law tails with stable exponents, whose values are close to 2, in agreement with the classical Zipf's law. Some misconceptions about scaling are also clarified.

  12. Finite-size particles, advection, and chaos: a collective phenomenon of intermittent bursting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano-T, Rene O; Moura, Alessandro; Tél, Tamás; Caldas, Iberê L; Grebogi, Celso

    2008-11-01

    We consider finite-size particles colliding elastically, advected by a chaotic flow. The collisionless dynamics has a quasiperiodic attractor and particles are advected towards this attractor. We show in this work that the collisions have dramatic effects in the system's dynamics, giving rise to collective phenomena not found in the one-particle dynamics. In particular, the collisions induce a kind of instability, in which particles abruptly spread out from the vicinity of the attractor, reaching the neighborhood of a coexisting chaotic saddle, in an autoexcitable regime. This saddle, not present in the dynamics of a single particle, emerges due to the collective particle interaction. We argue that this phenomenon is general for advected, interacting particles in chaotic flows.

  13. Finite Size Effects in Adsorption of Helium Mixtures by Alkali Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, M.; Guilleumas, M.; Hernández, E. S.; Mayol, R.; Pi, M.; Szybisz, L.

    2004-08-01

    We investigate the behavior of mixed 3He-4He droplets on alkali surfaces at zero temperature, within the frame of Finite Range Density Functional theory. The properties of one single 3He atom on 4He_N4 droplets on different alkali surfaces are addressed, and the energetics and structure of 4He_N4+3He_N3 systems on Cs surfaces, for nanoscopic 4He drops, are analyzed through the solutions of the mean field equations for varying number N3 of 3He atoms. We discuss the size effects on the single particle spectrum of 3He atoms and on the shapes of both helium distributions.

  14. Finite size scaling analysis on Nagel-Schreckenberg model for traffic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balouchi, Ashkan; Browne, Dana

    2015-03-01

    The traffic flow problem as a many-particle non-equilibrium system has caught the interest of physicists for decades. Understanding the traffic flow properties and though obtaining the ability to control the transition from the free-flow phase to the jammed phase plays a critical role in the future world of urging self-driven cars technology. We have studied phase transitions in one-lane traffic flow through the mean velocity, distributions of car spacing, dynamic susceptibility and jam persistence -as candidates for an order parameter- using the Nagel-Schreckenberg model to simulate traffic flow. The length dependent transition has been observed for a range of maximum velocities greater than a certain value. Finite size scaling analysis indicates power-law scaling of these quantities at the onset of the jammed phase.

  15. Finite-size effects in the spectrum of the OSp(3|2 superspin chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Frahm

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The low energy spectrum of a spin chain with OSp(3|2 supergroup symmetry is studied based on the Bethe ansatz solution of the related vertex model. This model is a lattice realization of intersecting loops in two dimensions with loop fugacity z=1 which provides a framework to study the critical properties of the unusual low temperature Goldstone phase of the O(N sigma model for N=1 in the context of an integrable model. Our finite-size analysis provides strong evidence for the existence of continua of scaling dimensions, the lowest of them starting at the ground state. Based on our data we conjecture that the so-called watermelon correlation functions decay logarithmically with exponents related to the quadratic Casimir operator of OSp(3|2. The presence of a continuous spectrum is not affected by a change to the boundary conditions although the density of states in the continua appears to be modified.

  16. Finite-size effects in the spectrum of the OSp (3 | 2) superspin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Holger; Martins, Márcio J.

    2015-05-01

    The low energy spectrum of a spin chain with OSp (3 | 2) supergroup symmetry is studied based on the Bethe ansatz solution of the related vertex model. This model is a lattice realization of intersecting loops in two dimensions with loop fugacity z = 1 which provides a framework to study the critical properties of the unusual low temperature Goldstone phase of the O (N) sigma model for N = 1 in the context of an integrable model. Our finite-size analysis provides strong evidence for the existence of continua of scaling dimensions, the lowest of them starting at the ground state. Based on our data we conjecture that the so-called watermelon correlation functions decay logarithmically with exponents related to the quadratic Casimir operator of OSp (3 | 2). The presence of a continuous spectrum is not affected by a change to the boundary conditions although the density of states in the continua appears to be modified.

  17. Finite size effects on textured surfaces: recovering contact angles from vagarious drop edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Anaïs; Rivetti, Marco; Teisseire, Jérémie; Barthel, Etienne

    2014-02-18

    A clue to understand wetting hysteresis on superhydrophobic surfaces is the relation between receding contact angle and surface textures. When the surface textures are large, there is a significant distribution of local contact angles around the drop. As seen from the cross section, the apparent contact angle oscillates as the triple line recedes. Our experiments demonstrate that the origin of these oscillations is a finite size effect. Combining side and bottom views of the drop, we take into account the 3D conformation of the surface near the edge to evaluate an intrinsic contact angle from the oscillations of the apparent contact angle. We find that for drops receding on axisymmetric textures the intrinsic receding contact angle is the minimum value of the oscillation while for a square lattice it is the maximum.

  18. Equilibrium states of a test particle coupled to finite-size heat baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qun; Smith, S Taylor; Onofrio, Roberto

    2009-03-01

    We report on numerical simulations of the dynamics of a test particle coupled to competing Boltzmann heat baths of finite size. After discussing some features of the single bath case, we show that the presence of two heat baths further constrains the conditions necessary for the test particle to thermalize with the heat baths. We find that thermalization is a spectral property in which the oscillators of the bath with frequencies in the range of the test particle characteristic frequency determine its degree of thermalization. We also find an unexpected frequency shift of the test particle response with respect to the spectra of the two heat baths. Finally, we discuss implications of our results for the study of high-frequency nanomechanical resonators through cold damping cooling techniques and for engineering reservoirs capable of mitigating the back action on a mechanical system.

  19. Thermal extraction: enhancing thermal emission of finite size macroscopic blackbody to far-field vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Zongfu; Zhang, Torbjorn Skauli Gang; Wang, Hailiang; Fan, Shanhui

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of far-field thermal radiation had directly led to the discovery of quantum mechanics a century ago, and is of great current practical importance for applications in energy conversions, radiative cooling, and thermal control. It is commonly assumed that for any macroscopic thermal emitter, its maximal emitted power within any given frequency range cannot exceed that of a blackbody with the same surface area. In contrast to such conventional wisdom, here we propose, and experimentally demonstrate, that the emitted power from a finite size macroscopic blackbody to far field vacuum can be significantly enhanced, within the constraint of the second law of thermodynamics. To achieve such an enhancement, the thermal body needs to have internal electromagnetic density of states (DOS) greater than that of vacuum, and one needs to provide a thermal extraction mechanism to enable the contributions of all internal modes to far field radiation.

  20. Defect Formation in Superconducting Rings: External Fields and Finite-Size Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, D. J.; Monaco, R.; Rivers, R. J.

    2013-06-01

    Consistent with the predictions of Kibble and Zurek, scaling behaviour has been seen in the production of fluxoids during temperature quenches of superconducting rings. However, deviations from the canonical behaviour arise because of finite-size effects and stray external fields. Technical developments, including laser heating and the use of long Josephson tunnel junctions, have improved the quality of data that can be obtained. With new experiments in mind we perform large-scale 3D simulations of quenches of small, thin rings of various geometries with fully dynamical electromagnetic fields, at nonzero externally applied magnetic flux. We find that the outcomes are, in practise, indistinguishable from those of much simpler Gaussian analytical approximations in which the rings are treated as one-dimensional systems and the magnetic field fluctuation-free.

  1. Simple rules govern finite-size effects in scale-free networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cuenda, Sara

    2011-01-01

    We give an intuitive though general explanation of the finite-size effect in scale-free networks in terms of the degree distribution of the starting network. This result clarifies the relevance of the starting network in the final degree distribution. We use two different approaches: the deterministic mean-field approximation used by Barab\\'asi and Albert (but taking into account the nodes of the starting network), and the probability distribution of the degree of each node, which considers the stochastic process. Numerical simulations show that the accuracy of the predictions of the mean-field approximation depend on the contribution of the dispersion in the final distribution. The results in terms of the probability distribution of the degree of each node are very accurate when compared to numerical simulations. The analysis of the standard deviation of the degree distribution allows us to assess the influence of the starting core when fitting the model to real data.

  2. Mode splitting in high-index-contrast grating with mini-scale finite size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhixin; Ni, Liangfu; Zhang, Haiyang; Zhang, Hanxing; Jin, Jicheng; Peng, Chao; Hu, Weiwei

    2016-08-15

    The mode-splitting phenomenon within finite-size, mini-scale high-index-contrast gratings (HCGs) has been investigated theoretically and experimentally. The high-Q resonance splits into a series of in-plane modes due to the confinement of boundaries but can still survive even on a mini-scale footprint. Q factors up to ∼3300 and ∼2200 have been observed for the HCGs with footprints that are only 55  μm×300  μm and 27.5  μm×300  μm, which would be promising for realizing optical communication and sensing applications with compact footprint.

  3. Lower Bounds on Q for Finite Size Antennas of Arbitrary Shape

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Oleksiy S

    2015-01-01

    The problem of the lower bound on the radiation Q for an arbitrarily shaped finite size antenna of non-zero volume is formulated in terms of equivalent electric and magnetic currents densities distributed on a closed surface coinciding with antenna exterior surface. When these equivalent currents radiate in free space, the magnetic current augments the electric current, so that the fields interior to the surface vanish. In contrast to approaches based solely on electric currents, the proposed technique ensures no stored energy interior to the antenna exterior surface, and thus, allows the fundamental lower bound on Q to be determined. To facilitate the computation of the bound, new expressions for the stored energy, radiated power, and Q of coupled electric and magnetic source currents in free space are derived.

  4. Renormalization-group theory for finite-size scaling in extreme statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Györgyi, G; Moloney, N R; Ozogány, K; Rácz, Z; Droz, M

    2010-04-01

    We present a renormalization-group (RG) approach to explain universal features of extreme statistics applied here to independent identically distributed variables. The outlines of the theory have been described in a previous paper, the main result being that finite-size shape corrections to the limit distribution can be obtained from a linearization of the RG transformation near a fixed point, leading to the computation of stable perturbations as eigenfunctions. Here we show details of the RG theory which exhibit remarkable similarities to the RG known in statistical physics. Besides the fixed points explaining universality, and the least stable eigendirections accounting for convergence rates and shape corrections, the similarities include marginally stable perturbations which turn out to be generic for the Fisher-Tippett-Gumbel class. Distribution functions containing unstable perturbations are also considered. We find that, after a transitory divergence, they return to the universal fixed line at the same or at a different point depending on the type of perturbation.

  5. Finite element analysis of seal mechanism using SMA for Mars sample return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Younse, Paulo

    2014-04-01

    Returning Martian samples to Earth for extensive analysis is of great interest to planetary science community. Current Mars sample return architecture would require leaving the acquired samples on Mars for several years before being retrieved by subsequent mission. Each sample would be sealed securely to keep its integrity. A reliable seal technique that does not affect the integrity of the samples and uses simple low-mass tool is required. The shape memory alloy (SMA) seal technique is a promising candidate. The performances of several primary designs of SMA seal for sample tubes were analyzed by finite element (FE) modeling. The results of thermal heating characteristics had been reported in a previous presentation this paper focus on the preparation and actuation of SMA plugs, the seal pressure, and the stress and strain induced in the sealing procedure with various designs.

  6. Elastic fields of stationary and moving dislocations in three dimensional finite samples

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Integral expressions are determined for the elastic displacement and stress fields due to stationary or moving dislocation loops in three dimensional, not necessarily isotropic, finite samples. A line integral representation is found for the stress field, thus satisfying the expectation that stresses should depend on the location of the dislocation loop, but not on the location of surfaces bounded by such loops that are devoid of physical significance. In the stationary case the line integral...

  7. Sample size and precision in NIH peer review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kaplan

    Full Text Available The Working Group on Peer Review of the Advisory Committee to the Director of NIH has recommended that at least 4 reviewers should be used to assess each grant application. A sample size analysis of the number of reviewers needed to evaluate grant applications reveals that a substantially larger number of evaluators are required to provide the level of precision that is currently mandated. NIH should adjust their peer review system to account for the number of reviewers needed to provide adequate precision in their evaluations.

  8. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1356 - Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Populations C Appendix C to Part 1356 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE... Follow-Up Populations 1. Using Finite Population Correction The Finite Population Correction (FPC) is applied when the sample is drawn from a population of one to 5,000 youth, because the sample is more...

  9. Finite size corrections to scaling of the formation probabilities and the Casimir effect in the conformal field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabpour, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    We calculate formation probabilities of the ground state of the finite size quantum critical chains using conformal field theory (CFT) techniques. In particular, we calculate the formation probability of one interval in the finite open chain and also formation probability of two disjoint intervals in a finite periodic system. The presented formulas can be also interpreted as the Casimir energy of needles in particular geometries. We numerically check the validity of the exact CFT results in the case of the transverse field Ising chain.

  10. Finite-time quantised feedback asynchronously switched control of sampled-data switched linear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ronghao; Xing, Jianchun; Li, Juelong; Xiang, Zhengrong

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies the problem of stabilising a sampled-data switched linear system by quantised feedback asynchronously switched controllers. The idea of a quantised feedback asynchronously switched control strategy originates in earlier work reflecting actual system characteristic of switching and quantising, respectively. A quantised scheme is designed depending on switching time using dynamic quantiser. When sampling time, system switching time and controller switching time are all not uniform, the proposed switching controllers guarantee the system to be finite-time stable by a piecewise Lyapunov function and the average dwell-time method. Simulation examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the developed results.

  11. Shadowing growth of three-dimensional nanostructures on finite size seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, D.-X.; Ellison, C. L.; Lim, B.-K.; Lu, T.-M.

    2008-05-01

    We reported the fabrication of silicon (Si) nanorods and springs on arrays of seeds with different diameters by using glancing angle deposition technique. Single nanorod is possible to grow on individual seeds if the size of the seeds is small enough. On large size seeds, however, multiple Si nanorods are observed in experiments. The effects of the size of seeds were studied by using Monte Carlo simulations based on a ballistic aggregation model. The simulation model also includes ballistic sticking, shadowing, and surface mobility. Both of the top-view and cross-sectional images of the nanostructures were generated in simulation and compared to the images of experimental samples taken by scanning electron microscopy. We also investigated the effect of surface diffusion on the formation of nanostructures. In our experiments, no separate rods formed when the surface mobility is sufficiently high, such as the deposition of cobalt on the large size seeds.

  12. Finite cell-size effects on protein variability in Turing patterned tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buceta, Javier

    2017-08-01

    Herein we present a framework to characterize different sources of protein expression variability in Turing patterned tissues. In this context, we introduce the concept of granular noise to account for the unavoidable fluctuations due to finite cell-size effects and show that the nearest-neighbours autocorrelation function provides the means to measure it. To test our findings, we perform in silico experiments of growing tissues driven by a generic activator-inhibitor dynamics. Our results show that the relative importance of different sources of noise depends on the ratio between the characteristic size of cells and that of the pattern domains and on the ratio between the pattern amplitude and the effective intensity of the biochemical fluctuations. Importantly, our framework provides the tools to measure and distinguish different stochastic contributions during patterning: granularity versus biochemical noise. In addition, our analysis identifies the protein species that buffer the stochasticity the best and, consequently, it can help to determine key instructive signals in systems driven by a Turing instability. Altogether, we expect our study to be relevant in developmental processes leading to the formation of periodic patterns in tissues. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Modeling of finite-size droplets and particles in multiphase flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Khare

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The conventional point-particle approach for treating the dispersed phase in a continuous flowfield is extended by taking into account the effect of finite particle size, using a Gaussian interpolation from Lagrangian points to the Eulerian field. The inter-phase exchange terms in the conservation equations are distributed over the volume encompassing the particle size, as opposed to the Dirac delta function generally used in the point-particle approach. The proposed approach is benchmarked against three different flow configurations in a numerical framework based on large eddy simulation (LES turbulence closure. First, the flow over a circular cylinder is simulated for a Reynolds number of 3900 at 1 atm pressure. Results show good agreement with experimental data for the mean streamwise velocity and the vortex shedding frequency in the wake region. The calculated flowfield exhibits correct physics, which the conventional point-particle approach fails to capture. The second case deals with diesel jet injection in quiescent environment over a pressure range of 1.1–5.0 MPa. The calculated jet penetration depth closely matches measurements. It decreases with increasing chamber pressure, due to enhanced drag force in a denser fluid environment. Finally, water and acetone jet injection normal to air crossflow is studied at 1 atm. The calculated jet penetration and Sauter mean diameter of liquid droplets compare very well with measurements.

  14. Unified approach to thermodynamic Bethe ansatz and finite size corrections for lattice models and field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Destri, C

    1994-01-01

    We present a unified approach to the Thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz (TBA) for magnetic chains and field theories that includes the finite size (and zero temperature) calculations for lattice BA models. In all cases, the free energy follows by quadratures from the solution of a {\\bf single} non-linear integral equation (NLIE). [A system of NLIE appears for nested BA]. We derive the NLIE for: a) the six-vertex model with twisted boundary conditions; b) the XXZ chain in an external magnetic field h_z and c) the sine-Gordon-massive Thirring model (sG-mT) in a periodic box of size \\b \\equiv 1/T using the light-cone approach. This NLIE is solved by iteration in one regime (high T in the XXZ chain and low T in the sG-mT model). In the opposite (conformal) regime, the leading behaviors are obtained in closed form. Higher corrections can be derived from the Riemann-Hilbert form of the NLIE that we present.

  15. The finite, kinematic rupture properties of great-sized earthquakes since 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Gavin

    2017-01-01

    Here, I present a database of >160 finite fault models for all earthquakes of M 7.5 and above since 1990, created using a consistent modeling approach. The use of a common approach facilitates easier comparisons between models, and reduces uncertainties that arise when comparing models generated by different authors, data sets and modeling techniques.I use this database to verify published scaling relationships, and for the first time show a clear and intriguing relationship between maximum potency (the product of slip and area) and average potency for a given earthquake. This relationship implies that earthquakes do not reach the potential size given by the tectonic load of a fault (sometimes called “moment deficit,” calculated via a plate rate over time since the last earthquake, multiplied by geodetic fault coupling). Instead, average potency (or slip) scales with but is less than maximum potency (dictated by tectonic loading). Importantly, this relationship facilitates a more accurate assessment of maximum earthquake size for a given fault segment, and thus has implications for long-term hazard assessments. The relationship also suggests earthquake cycles may not completely reset after a large earthquake, and thus repeat rates of such events may appear shorter than is expected from tectonic loading. This in turn may help explain the phenomenon of “earthquake super-cycles” observed in some global subduction zones.

  16. Finite Size Scaling and the Universality Class of SU(2) Lattice Gauge Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniford-Chen, Stuart Gresley

    For a system near a second order phase transition, the correlation length becomes extremely large. This gives rise to much interesting physics such as the existence of critical exponents and the division of physical theories into universality classes. SU(2) lattice gauge theory has such a phase transition at finite temperature and it has been persuasively argued in the literature that it should be in the same universality class as the Ising model in a space with dimensionality one less than the gauge theory. This is in the sense that the effective theory for the SU(2) Wilson lines is universal with the Ising model. This prediction has been checked for d = 3 + 1 SU(2) by comparing the critical exponents, and those checks appear to confirm it to the modest accuracy currently available. However, the theory of finite size scaling predicts a very rich set of objects which should be the same across universality classes. For example, the shape of the graph of various observables against temperature near the transition is universal. Not only that, but whole collections of probability distributions as a function of temperature can be given a scaling form and the shape of this object is universal. I develop a methodology for comparing such sets of distributions. This gives a two dimensional surface for each theory which can then be used in comparisons. I then use this approach and compare the surface for the order parameter in SU(2) with that in phi^4. The visual similarity is very striking. I perform a semi-quantitative error analysis which does not reveal significant differences between the two surfaces. This strengthens the idea that the SU(2) effective line theory is in the Ising universality class. I conclude by discussing the advantages and disadvantages of the method used here.

  17. Finite-size giant magnons on η-deformed AdS5×S5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changrim Ahn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider strings moving in the Rt×Sη3 subspace of the η-deformed AdS5×S5 and obtain a class of solutions depending on several parameters. They are characterized by the string energy and two angular momenta. Finite-size dyonic giant magnon belongs to this class of solutions. Further on, we restrict ourselves to the case of giant magnon with one nonzero angular momentum, and obtain the leading finite-size correction to the dispersion relation.

  18. Enhancing sampling design in mist-net bat surveys by accounting for sample size optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevelin, Leonardo Carreira; Novaes, Roberto Leonan Morim; Colas-Rosas, Paul François; Benathar, Thayse Cristhina Melo; Peres, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    The advantages of mist-netting, the main technique used in Neotropical bat community studies to date, include logistical implementation, standardization and sampling representativeness. Nonetheless, study designs still have to deal with issues of detectability related to how different species behave and use the environment. Yet there is considerable sampling heterogeneity across available studies in the literature. Here, we approach the problem of sample size optimization. We evaluated the common sense hypothesis that the first six hours comprise the period of peak night activity for several species, thereby resulting in a representative sample for the whole night. To this end, we combined re-sampling techniques, species accumulation curves, threshold analysis, and community concordance of species compositional data, and applied them to datasets of three different Neotropical biomes (Amazonia, Atlantic Forest and Cerrado). We show that the strategy of restricting sampling to only six hours of the night frequently results in incomplete sampling representation of the entire bat community investigated. From a quantitative standpoint, results corroborated the existence of a major Sample Area effect in all datasets, although for the Amazonia dataset the six-hour strategy was significantly less species-rich after extrapolation, and for the Cerrado dataset it was more efficient. From the qualitative standpoint, however, results demonstrated that, for all three datasets, the identity of species that are effectively sampled will be inherently impacted by choices of sub-sampling schedule. We also propose an alternative six-hour sampling strategy (at the beginning and the end of a sample night) which performed better when resampling Amazonian and Atlantic Forest datasets on bat assemblages. Given the observed magnitude of our results, we propose that sample representativeness has to be carefully weighed against study objectives, and recommend that the trade-off between

  19. Enhancing sampling design in mist-net bat surveys by accounting for sample size optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevelin, Leonardo Carreira; Novaes, Roberto Leonan Morim; Colas-Rosas, Paul François; Benathar, Thayse Cristhina Melo; Peres, Carlos A

    2017-01-01

    The advantages of mist-netting, the main technique used in Neotropical bat community studies to date, include logistical implementation, standardization and sampling representativeness. Nonetheless, study designs still have to deal with issues of detectability related to how different species behave and use the environment. Yet there is considerable sampling heterogeneity across available studies in the literature. Here, we approach the problem of sample size optimization. We evaluated the common sense hypothesis that the first six hours comprise the period of peak night activity for several species, thereby resulting in a representative sample for the whole night. To this end, we combined re-sampling techniques, species accumulation curves, threshold analysis, and community concordance of species compositional data, and applied them to datasets of three different Neotropical biomes (Amazonia, Atlantic Forest and Cerrado). We show that the strategy of restricting sampling to only six hours of the night frequently results in incomplete sampling representation of the entire bat community investigated. From a quantitative standpoint, results corroborated the existence of a major Sample Area effect in all datasets, although for the Amazonia dataset the six-hour strategy was significantly less species-rich after extrapolation, and for the Cerrado dataset it was more efficient. From the qualitative standpoint, however, results demonstrated that, for all three datasets, the identity of species that are effectively sampled will be inherently impacted by choices of sub-sampling schedule. We also propose an alternative six-hour sampling strategy (at the beginning and the end of a sample night) which performed better when resampling Amazonian and Atlantic Forest datasets on bat assemblages. Given the observed magnitude of our results, we propose that sample representativeness has to be carefully weighed against study objectives, and recommend that the trade-off between

  20. Finite element method calculations of GMI in thin films and sandwiched structures: Size and edge effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Arribas, A. [Departamento de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)], E-mail: alf@we.lc.ehu.es; Barandiaran, J.M.; Cos, D. de [Departamento de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    The impedance values of magnetic thin films and magnetic/conductor/magnetic sandwiched structures with different widths are computed using the finite element method (FEM). The giant magneto-impedance (GMI) is calculated from the difference of the impedance values obtained with high and low permeability of the magnetic material. The results depend considerably on the width of the sample, demonstrating that edge effects are decisive for the GMI performance. It is shown that, besides the usual skin effect that is responsible for GMI, an 'unexpected' increase of the current density takes place at the lateral edge of the sample. In magnetic thin films this effect is dominant when the permeability is low. In the trilayers, it is combined with the lack of shielding of the central conductor at the edge. The resulting effects on GMI are shown to be large for both kinds of samples. The conclusions of this study are of great importance for the successful design of miniaturized GMI devices.

  1. Size Matters: FTIR Spectral Analysis of Apollo Regolith Samples Exhibits Grain Size Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Dayl; Joy, Katherine; Pernet-Fisher, John; Wogelius, Roy; Morlok, Andreas; Hiesinger, Harald

    2017-04-01

    The Mercury Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS) on the upcoming BepiColombo mission is designed to analyse the surface of Mercury in thermal infrared wavelengths (7-14 μm) to investigate the physical properties of the surface materials [1]. Laboratory analyses of analogue materials are useful for investigating how various sample properties alter the resulting infrared spectrum. Laboratory FTIR analysis of Apollo fine (60%) causes a 'flattening' of the spectrum, with reduced reflectance in the Reststrahlen Band region (RB) as much as 30% in comparison to samples that are dominated by a high proportion of crystalline material. Apollo 15401,147 is an immature regolith with a high proportion of volcanic glass pyroclastic beads [2]. The high mafic mineral content results in a systematic shift in the Christiansen Feature (CF - the point of lowest reflectance) to longer wavelength: 8.6 μm. The glass beads dominate the spectrum, displaying a broad peak around the main Si-O stretch band (at 10.8 μm). As such, individual mineral components of this sample cannot be resolved from the average spectrum alone. Apollo 67481,96 is a sub-mature regolith composed dominantly of anorthite plagioclase [2]. The CF position of the average spectrum is shifted to shorter wavelengths (8.2 μm) due to the higher proportion of felsic minerals. Its average spectrum is dominated by anorthite reflectance bands at 8.7, 9.1, 9.8, and 10.8 μm. The average reflectance is greater than the other samples due to a lower proportion of glassy material. In each soil, the smallest fractions (0-25 and 25-63 μm) have CF positions 0.1-0.4 μm higher than the larger grain sizes. Also, the bulk-sample spectra mostly closely resemble the 0-25 μm sieved size fraction spectrum, indicating that this size fraction of each sample dominates the bulk spectrum regardless of other physical properties. This has implications for surface analyses of other Solar System bodies where some mineral phases or components

  2. Approximate sampling formulas for general finite-alleles models of mutation

    CERN Document Server

    Bhaskar, Anand; Song, Yun S

    2011-01-01

    Many applications in genetic analyses utilize sampling distributions, which describe the probability of observing a sample of DNA sequences randomly drawn from a population. In the one-locus case with special models of mutation such as the infinite-alleles model or the finite-alleles parent-independent mutation model, closed-form sampling distributions under the coalescent have been known for many decades. However, no exact formula is currently known for more general models of mutation that are of biological interest. Models with finitely-many alleles are considered in this paper, and approximate closed-form sampling formulas are derived for an arbitrary recurrent mutation model or for a reversible recurrent mutation model, depending on whether the number of distinct observed allele types is at most three or four, respectively. Two different approaches---one based on perturbation expansion and the other on an urn construction related to the coalescent---are developed here. Computation in the former approach i...

  3. Effects of Sampling Context on the Finite Verb Production of Children with and without Delayed Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealey, Linda R.; Gilmore, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Informal language sampling is ubiquitous in the study of developing grammatical abilities in children with and without delayed language, including study of grammatical abilities in the area of finite verb production. Finite verbs are particularly important to assess as they appear to be the grammatical morphemes most vulnerable to error in the…

  4. Adjustable virtual pore-size filter for automated sample preparation using acoustic radiation force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, B; Fisher, K; Ness, K; Rose, K; Mariella, R

    2008-05-22

    We present a rapid and robust size-based separation method for high throughput microfluidic devices using acoustic radiation force. We developed a finite element modeling tool to predict the two-dimensional acoustic radiation force field perpendicular to the flow direction in microfluidic devices. Here we compare the results from this model with experimental parametric studies including variations of the PZT driving frequencies and voltages as well as various particle sizes and compressidensities. These experimental parametric studies also provide insight into the development of an adjustable 'virtual' pore-size filter as well as optimal operating conditions for various microparticle sizes. We demonstrated the separation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and MS2 bacteriophage using acoustic focusing. The acoustic radiation force did not affect the MS2 viruses, and their concentration profile remained unchanged. With optimized design of our microfluidic flow system we were able to achieve yields of > 90% for the MS2 with > 80% of the S. cerevisiae being removed in this continuous-flow sample preparation device.

  5. Application of finite element, global polynomial, and kriging response surfaces in Progressive Lattice Sampling designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROMERO,VICENTE J.; SWILER,LAURA PAINTON; GIUNTA,ANTHONY A.

    2000-04-25

    This paper examines the modeling accuracy of finite element interpolation, kriging, and polynomial regression used in conjunction with the Progressive Lattice Sampling (PLS) incremental design-of-experiments approach. PLS is a paradigm for sampling a deterministic hypercubic parameter space by placing and incrementally adding samples in a manner intended to maximally reduce lack of knowledge in the parameter space. When combined with suitable interpolation methods, PLS is a formulation for progressive construction of response surface approximations (RSA) in which the RSA are efficiently upgradable, and upon upgrading, offer convergence information essential in estimating error introduced by the use of RSA in the problem. The three interpolation methods tried here are examined for performance in replicating an analytic test function as measured by several different indicators. The process described here provides a framework for future studies using other interpolation schemes, test functions, and measures of approximation quality.

  6. Efficient adaptive designs with mid-course sample size adjustment in clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Bartroff, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive designs have been proposed for clinical trials in which the nuisance parameters or alternative of interest are unknown or likely to be misspecified before the trial. Whereas most previous works on adaptive designs and mid-course sample size re-estimation have focused on two-stage or group sequential designs in the normal case, we consider here a new approach that involves at most three stages and is developed in the general framework of multiparameter exponential families. Not only does this approach maintain the prescribed type I error probability, but it also provides a simple but asymptotically efficient sequential test whose finite-sample performance, measured in terms of the expected sample size and power functions, is shown to be comparable to the optimal sequential design, determined by dynamic programming, in the simplified normal mean case with known variance and prespecified alternative, and superior to the existing two-stage designs and also to adaptive group sequential designs when the al...

  7. Finite sample properties of power-law cross-correlations estimators

    CERN Document Server

    Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2014-01-01

    We study finite sample properties of estimators of power-law cross-correlations -- detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA), height cross-correlation analysis (HXA) and detrending moving-average cross-correlation analysis (DMCA) -- with a special focus on short-term memory bias as well as power-law coherency. Presented broad Monte Carlo simulation study focuses on different time series lengths, specific methods' parameter setting, and memory strength. We find that each method is best suited for different time series dynamics so that there is no clear winner between the three. The method selection should be then made based on observed dynamic properties of the analyzed series.

  8. Finite sample performance of the E-M algorithm for ranks data modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela D'Elia

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We check the finite sample performance of the maximum likelihood estimators of the parameters of a mixture distribution recently introduced for modelling ranks/preference data. The estimates are derived by the E-M algorithm and the performance is evaluated both from an univariate and bivariate points of view. While the results are generally acceptable as far as it concerns the bias, the Monte Carlo experiment shows a different behaviour of the estimators efficiency for the two parameters of the mixture, mainly depending upon their location in the admissible parametric space. Some operative suggestions conclude the paer.

  9. Finite-size effects in Luther-Emery phases of Holstein and Hubbard models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greitemann, J.; Hesselmann, S.; Wessel, S.; Assaad, F. F.; Hohenadler, M.

    2015-12-01

    The one-dimensional Holstein model and its generalizations have been studied extensively to understand the effects of electron-phonon interaction. The half-filled case is of particular interest, as it describes a transition from a metallic phase with a spin gap due to attractive backscattering to a Peierls insulator with charge-density-wave order. Our quantum Monte Carlo results support the existence of a metallic phase with dominant power-law charge correlations, as described by the Luther-Emery fixed point. We demonstrate that for Holstein and also for purely fermionic models the spin gap significantly complicates finite-size numerical studies, and explains inconsistent previous results for Luttinger parameters and phase boundaries. On the other hand, no such complications arise in spinless models. The correct low-energy theory of the spinful Holstein model is argued to be that of singlet bipolarons with a repulsive, mutual interaction. This picture naturally explains the existence of a metallic phase, but also implies that gapless Luttinger liquid theory is not applicable.

  10. Length and temperature dependence of the mechanical properties of finite-size carbyne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueming; Huang, Yanhui; Cao, Bingyang; To, Albert C.

    2017-09-01

    Carbyne is an ideal one-dimensional conductor and the thinnest interconnection in an ultimate nano-device and it requires an understanding of the mechanical properties that affect device performance and reliability. Here, we report the mechanical properties of finite-size carbyne, obtained by a molecular dynamics simulation study based on the adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order potential. To avoid confusion in assigning the effective cross-sectional area of carbyne, the value of the effective cross-sectional area of carbyne (4.148 Å2) was deduced via experiment and adopted in our study. Ends-constraints effects on the ultimate stress (maximum force) of the carbyne chains are investigated, revealing that the molecular dynamics simulation results agree very well with the experimental results. The ultimate strength, Young's Modulus and maximum strain of carbyne are rather sensitive to the temperature and all decrease with the temperature. Opposite tendencies of the length dependence of the overall ultimate strength and maximum strain of carbyne at room temperature and very low temperature have been found, and analyses show that this originates in the ends effect of carbyne.

  11. Finite nuclear size and Lamb shift of p-wave atomic states

    CERN Document Server

    Milstein, A I; Terekhov, I S

    2003-01-01

    We consider corrections to the Lamb shift of p-wave atomic states due to the finite nuclear size (FNS). In other words, these are radiative corrections to the atomic isotop shift related to FNS. It is shown that the structure of the corrections is qualitatively different from that for s-wave states. The perturbation theory expansion for the relative correction for a $p_{1/2}$-state starts from $\\alpha\\ln(1/Z\\alpha)$-term, while for $s_{1/2}$-states it starts from $Z\\alpha^2$ term. Here $\\alpha$ is the fine structure constant and $Z$ is the nuclear charge. In the present work we calculate the $\\alpha$-terms for $2p$-states, the result for $2p_{1/2}$-state reads $(8\\alpha/9\\pi)[\\ln(1/(Z\\alpha)^2)+0.710]$. Even more interesting are $p_{3/2}$-states. In this case the ``correction'' is by several orders of magnitude larger than the ``leading'' FNS shift.

  12. Logarithmic finite-size effects on interfacial free energies: Phenomenological theory and Monte Carlo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2014-07-01

    The computation of interfacial free energies between coexisting phases (e.g., saturated vapor and liquid) by computer simulation methods is still a challenging problem due to the difficulty of an atomistic identification of an interface and interfacial fluctuations on all length scales. The approach to estimate the interfacial tension from the free-energy excess of a system with interfaces relative to corresponding single-phase systems does not suffer from the first problem but still suffers from the latter. Considering d-dimensional systems with interfacial area Ld -1 and linear dimension Lz in the direction perpendicular to the interface, it is argued that the interfacial fluctuations cause logarithmic finite-size effects of order ln(L)/Ld -1 and order ln(Lz)/Ld -1, in addition to regular corrections (with leading-order const/Ld -1). A phenomenological theory predicts that the prefactors of the logarithmic terms are universal (but depend on the applied boundary conditions and the considered statistical ensemble). The physical origin of these corrections are the translational entropy of the interface as a whole, "domain breathing" (coupling of interfacial fluctuations to the bulk order parameter fluctuations of the coexisting domains), and capillary waves. Using a new variant of the ensemble switch method, interfacial tensions are found from Monte Carlo simulations of d =2 and d =3 Ising models and a Lennard-Jones fluid. The simulation results are fully consistent with the theoretical predictions.

  13. Accounting for Finite Size of Ions in Nanofluidic Channels Using Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Christopher; Gillespie, Dirk; Pennathur, Sumita

    2016-11-01

    The physics of nanofluidic devices are dominated by ion-wall interactions within the electric double layer (EDL). A full understanding of the EDL allows for better exploitation of micro and nanofluidic devices for applications such as biologic separations, desalination, and energy conversion, Although continuum theory is generally used to study the fluidics within these channels, in very confined geometries, high surface charge channels, or significant solute concentration systems, continuum theories such as Poisson-Boltzmann cease to be valid because the finite size of ions is not considered. Density functional theory (DFT) provides an accurate and efficient method for predicting the concentration of ions and the electrostatic potential near a charged wall because it accounts for more complex electrostatic and hard-sphere correlations. This subsequently allows for a better model for ion flux, fluid flow, and current in electrokinetic systems at high surface charge, confined geometries, and concentrated systems. In this work, we present a theoretical approach utilizing DFT to predict unique flow phenomena in nanofluidic, electrokinetic systems. CBET-1402736 from the National Science Foundation.

  14. Effect of Large Finite-Size Wind Farms and Their Wakes on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ka Ling; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Through the use of large-eddy simulation, the effect of large finite-size wind farms and their wakes on conventionally-neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics and power extraction is investigated. Specifically, this study focuses on a wind farm that comprises 25 rows of wind turbines, spanning a distance of 10 km. It is shown that large wind farms have a significant effect on internal boundary layer growth both inside and downwind of the wind farms. If the wind farm is large enough, the internal boundary layer interacts with the thermally-stratified free atmosphere above, leading to a modification of the ABL height and power extraction. In addition, it is shown that large wind farms create extensive wakes, which could have an effect on potential downwind wind farms. Specifically, for the case considered here, a power deficit as large as 8% is found at a distance of 10 km downwind from the wind farm. Furthermore, this study compares the wind farm wake dynamics for cases in which the conventionally neutral ABLs are driven by a unidirectional pressure gradient and Coriolis forces.

  15. Finite-size effects in a metallic multichannel ring with Kondo impurity: Persistent currents and magnetoresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zvyagin, A.A. [B. I. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, 47, Lenin Avenue, 310164, Kharkov (Ukraine); Schlottmann, P. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States)

    1996-12-01

    We consider a spin-1/2 impurity interacting with conduction electrons in two different orbital channels via an isotropic spin exchange. The exchange is the same for both channels, but a crystalline field breaks the symmetry between the orbital channels. This corresponds to a splitting of the conduction electron {Gamma}{sub 8} into two doublets in the quadrupolar Kondo effect, or to the electron-assisted tunneling of an atom in a double-well potential in an external magnetic field. Another possible realization could be a quantum dot coupled to two equal rings of the same length subject to an electrostatic potential difference. We consider the Bethe ansatz equations for this model and derive the tower structure of the finite-size corrections to the ground-state energy. These results are used to discuss the Aharonov-Bohm-Casher interference pattern in the persistent charge and spin currents, and the magnetoresistivity due to the scattering of electrons off the impurity. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. Lasing in dark and bright modes of a finite-sized plasmonic lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakala, T. K.; Rekola, H. T.; Väkeväinen, A. I.; Martikainen, J.-P.; Nečada, M.; Moilanen, A. J.; Törmä, P.

    2017-01-01

    Lasing at the nanometre scale promises strong light-matter interactions and ultrafast operation. Plasmonic resonances supported by metallic nanoparticles have extremely small mode volumes and high field enhancements, making them an ideal platform for studying nanoscale lasing. At visible frequencies, however, the applicability of plasmon resonances is limited due to strong ohmic and radiative losses. Intriguingly, plasmonic nanoparticle arrays support non-radiative dark modes that offer longer life-times but are inaccessible to far-field radiation. Here, we show lasing both in dark and bright modes of an array of silver nanoparticles combined with optically pumped dye molecules. Linewidths of 0.2 nm at visible wavelengths and room temperature are observed. Access to the dark modes is provided by a coherent out-coupling mechanism based on the finite size of the array. The results open a route to utilize all modes of plasmonic lattices, also the high-Q ones, for studies of strong light-matter interactions, condensation and photon fluids.

  17. Finite-Size Scaling of Non-Gaussian Fluctuations Near the QCD Critical Point

    CERN Document Server

    Lacey, Roy A; Magdy, Niseem; Schweid, B; Ajitanand, N N

    2016-01-01

    Finite-Size Scaling (FSS) of moment products from recent STAR measurements of the variance $\\sigma$, skewness $S$ and kurtosis $\\kappa$ of net-proton multiplicity distributions, are reported for a broad range of collision centralities in Au+Au ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 7.7 - 200$ GeV) collisions. The products $S\\sigma $ and $\\kappa \\sigma^2 $, which are directly related to the hgher-order baryon number susceptibility ratios $\\chi^{(3)}_B/\\chi^{(2)}_B$ and $\\chi^{(4)}_B/\\chi^{(2)}_B$, show scaling patterns consistent with earlier indications for a second order phase transition at a critical end point (CEP) in the plane of temperature vs. baryon chemical potential ($T,\\mu_B$) of the QCD phase diagram. The resulting scaling functions validate the earlier estimates of $T^{\\text{cep}} \\sim 165$~MeV and $\\mu_B^{\\text{cep}} \\sim 95$~MeV for the location of the CEP, and the critical exponents used to assign its 3D Ising model universality class.

  18. MHD flow in a cylindrical vessel of finite size with turbulent boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbachev, L.P.; Nikitin, N.V.

    1979-01-01

    The hydrodynamic characteristics of flows generated by electromagnetic forces in a cylindrical vessel of finite size, for the case of large values of the hydrodynamic and small values of the magnetic Reynolds numbers have been inadequately analyzed in previous literature, since neither the nonlinear nor the linear theory adequately accounts for secondary flows due to the strong action of boundary layers formed at the end faces of the cylinders at large Reynolds numbers and the results do not agree with experimental data. This paper generalizes the previously more accurate nonlinear scheme of the same authors, the basis for which was the fact that viscosity at large Reynolds numbers is manifest only close to solid surfaces. Two cases are treated: crossed fields and a rotating magnetic field in the cylindrical vessel, where the entire flow region is broken down into an inviscid core and end face boundary layers. It is assumed that the velocity distribution near the end surfaces obeys an empirical one-seventh power law, which is applicable to turbulent liquid flow in a tube in a range of Re = 3 x 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 5/ simple engineering formulas are derived for the angular velocity, which exhibit good agreement with the experimental data for Hartmann numbers less than 10. The procedure can be generalized to the case of a rotating magnetic field having several pairs of poles. 6 references, 2 figures.

  19. Tuning surface reactivity by finite size effects: role of orbital symmetry in the d - band model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Paul; Yin, Xiangshi; Cooper, Valentino; Weitering, Hanno

    Catalytic activity depends sensitively on the strength of the interactions between reactant molecules and catalyst surface: too weak and the catalyst cannot capture enough molecules to react; too strong and the reaction products do not desorb, blocking further reactions. The ability to control the binding strength of molecules to metal surfaces is thus fundamental to the design of efficient and selective catalysts. Catalyst design often relies on increasing the interaction strength on relatively non-reactive materials by introducing active sites. Here, we present a complementary approach: we exploit finite size effects in the electronic structure of ultrathin Pd(111) films grown on Ru(0001) to tune their reactivity by changing the film thickness one atom layer at a time. While bulk Pd(111) is reactive toward oxygen, we find that Pd films thinner than 6 atom layers are surprisingly inert to oxidation. This observation can be explained with the d-band model only when it is applied to the orbitals directly involved in the bonding. The insight into orbital specific contributions to surface reactivity could be useful in the design of catalysts. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  20. Simulation of finite size particles in turbulent flows using entropic lattice boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Abhineet; Clercx, Herman J. H.; Toschi, Federico

    2016-11-01

    Particle-laden turbulent flows occur in variety of industrial applications. While the numerical simulation of such flows has seen significant advances in recent years, it still remains a challenging problem. Many studies investigated the rheology of dense suspensions in laminar flows as well as the dynamics of point-particles in turbulence. Here we will present results on the development of numerical methods, based on the Lattice Boltzmann method, suitable for the study of suspensions of finite-size particles under turbulent flow conditions and with varying geometrical complexity. The turbulent flow is modeled by an entropic lattice Boltzmann method, and the interaction between particles and carrier fluid is modeled using bounce back rule. Direct contact and lubrication force models for particle-particle interactions and particle-wall interaction are taken into account to allow for a full four-way coupled interaction. The accuracy and robustness of the method is discussed by validating velocity profile in turbulent pipe flow, sedimentation velocity of spheres in duct flow and resistance functions of approaching particles. Results show that the velocity profiles and turbulence statistics can be significantly altered by the presence of the dispersed solid phase. The author is supported by Shell-NWO computational sciences for energy research (CSER) Grant (12CSER034).

  1. Finite-size effects and scaling for the thermal QCD deconfinementphase transition within the exact color-singlet partition function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladrem, M.; Ait-El-Djoudi, A. [Ecole Normale Superieure-Kouba, Laboratoire de Physique des Particules et Physique Statistique, B.P. 92, Vieux-Kouba, Algiers (Algeria)

    2005-10-01

    We study the finite-size effects for the thermal quantum chromodynamics (QCD) deconfinement phase transition, and use a numerical finite-size scaling analysis to extract the scaling exponents characterizing its scaling behavior when approaching the thermodynamic limit (V{yields}{infinity}). For this, we use a simple model of coexistence of hadronic gas and color-singlet quark gluon plasma (QGP) phases in a finite volume. The color-singlet partition function of the QGP cannot be exactly calculated and is usually derived within the saddle-point approximation. When we try to do calculations with such an approximate color-singlet partition function, a problem arises in the limit of small temperatures and/or volumes VT{sup 3}<<1, requiring additional approximations if we want to carry out calculations. We propose in this work a method for an accurate calculation of any quantity of the finite system, without any approximation. By probing the behavior of some useful thermodynamic response functions on the whole range of temperature, it turns out that, in a finite-size system, all singularities in the thermodynamic limit are smeared out and the transition point is shifted away. A numerical finite-size scaling (FSS) analysis of the obtained data allows us to determine the scaling exponents of the QCD deconfinement phase transition. Our results expressing the equality between their values and the space dimensionality is a consequence of the singularity characterizing a first-order phase transition and agree very well with the predictions of other FSS theoretical approaches to a first-order phase transition and with the results of calculations using Monte Carlo methods in both lattice QCD and statistical physics models. (orig.)

  2. Lippmann-Schwinger integral equation approach to the emission of radiation by sources located inside finite-sized dielectric structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, T.; Tromborg, Bjarne

    2002-01-01

    A full-vectorial integral equation method is presented for calculating near fields and far fields generated by a given distribution of sources located inside finite-sized dielectric structures. Special attention is given to the treatment of the singularity of the dipole source field. A method is ...

  3. The recoil correction to the proton-finite-size contribution to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Karshenboim, Savely G; Ivanov, Vladimir G; Shelyuto, Valery A

    2015-01-01

    The Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen was measured some time ago to a high accuracy. The theoretical prediction of this value is very sensitive to the proton-finite-size effects. The proton radius extracted from muonic hydrogen is in contradiction with the results extracted from elastic electron-proton scattering. That creates a certain problem for the interpretation of the results from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift. For the latter we need also to take into account the two-photon-exchange contribution with the proton finite size involved. The only way to describe it relies on the data from the scattering, which may produce an internal inconsistency of theory. Recently the leading proton-finite-size contribution to the two-photon exchange was found within the external field approximation. The recoil part of the two-photon-exchange has not been considered. Here we revisit calculation of the external-field part and take the recoil correction to the finite-size effects into account.

  4. Finite-size effects for the gap in the excitation spectrum of the one-dimensional Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colomé-Tatché, M.; Matveenko, S.I.; Shlyapnikov, G.V.

    2010-01-01

    We study finite-size effects for the gap of the quasiparticle excitation spectrum in the weakly interacting regime one-dimensional Hubbard model with on-site attraction. Two types of corrections to the result of the thermodynamic limit are obtained. Aside from a power law (conformal) correction due

  5. Finite-size effects for the gap in the excitation spectrum of the one-dimensional Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colomé-Tatché, M.; Matveenko, S.I.; Shlyapnikov, G.V.

    2010-01-01

    We study finite-size effects for the gap of the quasiparticle excitation spectrum in the weakly interacting regime one-dimensional Hubbard model with on-site attraction. Two types of corrections to the result of the thermodynamic limit are obtained. Aside from a power law (conformal) correction due

  6. Finite-size effect on the dynamic and sensing performances of graphene resonators: the role of edge stress

    OpenAIRE

    Chang-Wan Kim; Mai Duc Dai; Kilho Eom

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the finite-size effect on the dynamic behavior of graphene resonators and their applications in atomic mass detection using a continuum elastic model such as modified plate theory. In particular, we developed a model based on von Karman plate theory with including the edge stress, which arises from the imbalance between the coordination numbers of bulk atoms and edge atoms of graphene. It is shown that as the size of a graphene resonator decreases, the edge stress depending on...

  7. Finite-size scaling relations for a four-dimensional Ising model on Creutz cellular automatons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdan, Z.; Güzelsoy, E.

    2011-06-01

    The four-dimensional Ising model is simulated on Creutz cellular automatons using finite lattices with linear dimensions 4 ≤ L ≤ 8. The temperature variations and finite-size scaling plots of the specific heat and the Binder parameter verify the theoretically predicted expression near the infinite lattice critical temperature for 7, 14, and 21 independent simulations. Approximate values for the critical temperature of the infinite lattice of Tc(∞) = 6.6965(35), 6.6961(30), 6.6960(12), 6.6800(3), 6.6801(2), 6.6802(1) and 6.6925(22) (without the logarithmic factor), 6.6921(22) (without the logarithmic factor), 6.6909(2) (without the logarithmic factor), 6.6822(13) (with the logarithmic factor), 6.6819(11) (with the logarithmic factor), and 6.6808(8) (with the logarithmic factor) are obtained from the intersection points of the specific heat curves, the Binder parameter curves, and straight line fits of specific heat maxima for 7, 14, and 21 independent simulations, respectively. As the number of independent simulations increases, the results, 6.6802(1) and 6.6808(8), are in very good agreement with the results of a series expansion of Tc(∞), 6.6817(15) and 6.6802(2), the dynamic Monte Carlo value Tc(∞) = 6.6803(1), the cluster Monte Carlo value Tc(∞) = 6.680(1), and the Monte Carlo value using the Metropolis-Wolff cluster algorithm Tc(∞) = 6.6802632 ± 5 . 10-5. The average values calculated for the critical exponent of the specific heat are α =- 0.0402(15), - 0.0393(12), - 0.0391(11) with 7, 14, and 21 independent simulations, respectively. As the number of independent simulations increases, the result, α =- 0.0391(11), agrees with the series expansions result, α =- 0.12 ± 0.03 and the Monte Carlo result using the Metropolis-Wolff cluster algorithm, α ≥ 0 ± 0.04. However, α =- 0.0391(11) is inconsistent with the renormalization group prediction of α = 0.

  8. Finite size effects in the presence of a chemical potential: A study in the classical nonlinear O(2) sigma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Debasish; Chandrasekharan, Shailesh

    2010-06-01

    In the presence of a chemical potential, the physics of level crossings leads to singularities at zero temperature, even when the spatial volume is finite. These singularities are smoothed out at a finite temperature but leave behind nontrivial finite size effects which must be understood in order to extract thermodynamic quantities using Monte Carlo methods, particularly close to critical points. We illustrate some of these issues using the classical nonlinear O(2) sigma model with a coupling β and chemical potential μ on a 2+1-dimensional Euclidean lattice. In the conventional formulation this model suffers from a sign problem at nonzero chemical potential and hence cannot be studied with the Wolff cluster algorithm. However, when formulated in terms of the worldline of particles, the sign problem is absent, and the model can be studied efficiently with the “worm algorithm.” Using this method we study the finite size effects that arise due to the chemical potential and develop an effective quantum mechanical approach to capture the effects. As a side result we obtain energy levels of up to four particles as a function of the box size and uncover a part of the phase diagram in the (β,μ) plane.

  9. The finite size effect of galaxies on the cosmic virial theorem and the pairwise peculiar velocity dispersions

    CERN Document Server

    Suto, Y; Suto, Yasushi; Jing, Yi-Peng

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the effect of the finite size of galaxies on estimating small-scale relative pairwise peculiar velocity dispersions from the cosmic virial theorem (CVT). Specifically we evaluate the effect by incorporating the finite core radius $r_c$ in the two-point correlation function of mass, i.e. softening $r_s$ on small scales. We analytically obtain the lowest-order correction term for $\\gamma 2$. Compared with the idealistic point-mass approximation ($r_s=r_c=0$), the finite size effect can significantly reduce the small-scale velocity dispersions of galaxies at scales much larger than $r_s$ and $r_c$. Even without considering the finite size of galaxies, nonzero values for $r_c$ are generally expected, for instance, for cold dark matter (CDM) models with a scale-invariant primordial spectrum. For these CDM models, a reasonable force softening $r_s\\le 100 \\hikpc$ would have rather tiny effect. We present the CVT predictions for the small-scale pairwise velocity dispersion in the CDM models normalized by t...

  10. General finite-size effects for zero-entropy states in one-dimensional quantum integrable models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliëns, Sebas; Caux, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-12-01

    We present a general derivation of the spectrum of excitations for gapless states of zero entropy density in Bethe ansatz solvable models. Our formalism is valid for an arbitrary choice of bare energy function which is relevant to situations where the Hamiltonian for time evolution differs from the Hamiltonian in a (generalized) Gibbs ensemble, i.e. out of equilibrium. The energy of particle and hole excitations, as measured with the time-evolution Hamiltonian, is shown to include additional contributions stemming from the shifts of the Fermi points that may now have finite energy. The finite-size effects are also derived and the connection with conformal field theory discussed. The critical exponents can still be obtained from the finite-size spectrum, however the velocity occurring here differs from the one in the constant Casimir term. The derivation highlights the importance of the phase shifts at the Fermi points for the critical exponents of asymptotes of correlations. We generalize certain results known for the ground state and discuss the relation to the dressed charge (matrix). Finally, we discuss the finite-size corrections in the presence of an additional particle or hole, which are important for dynamical correlation functions.

  11. MetSizeR: selecting the optimal sample size for metabolomic studies using an analysis based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Determining sample sizes for metabolomic experiments is important but due to the complexity of these experiments, there are currently no standard methods for sample size estimation in metabolomics. Since pilot studies are rarely done in metabolomics, currently existing sample size estimation approaches which rely on pilot data can not be applied. Results In this article, an analysis based approach called MetSizeR is developed to estimate sample size for metabolomic experiments even when experimental pilot data are not available. The key motivation for MetSizeR is that it considers the type of analysis the researcher intends to use for data analysis when estimating sample size. MetSizeR uses information about the data analysis technique and prior expert knowledge of the metabolomic experiment to simulate pilot data from a statistical model. Permutation based techniques are then applied to the simulated pilot data to estimate the required sample size. Conclusions The MetSizeR methodology, and a publicly available software package which implements the approach, are illustrated through real metabolomic applications. Sample size estimates, informed by the intended statistical analysis technique, and the associated uncertainty are provided. PMID:24261687

  12. Dispersion of finite size droplets and solid particles in isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Michele

    Turbulent disperse two-phase flows, of either fluid/fluid or fluid/solid type, are common in natural phenomena and engineering devices. Notable examples are atmospheric clouds, i.e. dispersed liquid water droplets and ice particles in a complex turbulent flow, and spray of fuel droplets in the combustion chamber of internal combustion engines. However, the physics of the interaction between a dispersed phase and turbulence is not yet fully understood. The objective of this study is to compare the dispersion of deformable finite size droplets with that of solid particles in a turbulent flow in the absence of gravity, by performing Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). The droplets and the particles have the same diameter, of the order of the Taylor's microscale of turbulence, and the same density ratio to the carrier flow. The solid particle-laden turbulence is simulated by coupling a standard projection method with the Immersed Boundary Method (IBM). The solid particles are fully resolved in space and time without considering particle/particle collisions (two-way coupling). The liquid droplet-laden turbulence is simulated by coupling a variable-density projection method with the Accurate Conservative Level Set Method (ACLSM). The effect of the surface tension is accounted for by using the Ghost Fluid Method (GFM) in order to avoid any numerical smearing, while the discontinuities in the viscous term of the Navier-Stokes equation are smoothed out via the Continuum Surface Force approach. Droplet/droplet interactions are allowed (four-way coupling). The results presented here show that in isotropic turbulence the dispersion of liquid droplets in a given direction is larger than that of solid particles due to the reduced decay rate of turbulence kinetic energy via the four-way coupling effects of the droplets.

  13. No-slip boundary condition in finite-size dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjith, S. Kumar; Patnaik, B. S. V.; Vedantam, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is an efficient, particle based mesoscopic numerical scheme to simulate dynamics of complex fluids and micro-flows, with spatio-temporal scales in the range of micrometers and microseconds. While the traditional DPD method treated particles as point masses, a modified DPD scheme was introduced recently [W. Pan, I.V. Pivkin, G.E. Karniadakis, Single-particle hydrodynamics in DPD: a new formulation, Europhysics Letters 84 (2008) 10012] by including transverse forces between finite sized particles in addition to the central forces of the standard DPD. The capability of a DPD scheme to solve confined wall bounded flows, depends on its ability to model the flow boundaries and effectively impose the classical no-slip boundary condition. Previous simulations with the modified DPD scheme used boundary conditions from the traditional DPD schemes, resorting to the velocity reversal of re-inserted particles which cross the solid wall. In the present work, a new method is proposed to impose no-slip or tunable slip boundary condition by controlling the non-central dissipative components in the modified DPD scheme. The solid wall is modeled in such a way that the fluid particles feel the presence of a continuous wall rather than a few discrete frozen particles as in conventional wall models. The fluid particles interact with the walls using a modified central repulsive potential to reduce the spurious density fluctuations. Several different benchmark problems (Poiseuille flow, lid-driven cavity and flow past circular cylinder) were solved using the new approach to demonstrate its validity.

  14. Finite-size effect on magnetic properties in iron sulfide nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, G H; Yan, P X; Wang, L S; Wang, W; Chen, Y Z; Peng, D L

    2008-05-14

    We report the size effect on the magnetic properties in Fe(7)S(8) nanowire arrays. Samples with diameters in the range of 50-200 nm have been prepared by electrodeposition with AAO films. The Mössbauer measurement results show that four parameters (hyperfine fields, isomer shift, quadrupole splitting, full width at half-maximum) increased with decreasing the diameter of the nanowires. The magnetic properties were investigated. The hysteresis loop shape and the magnetization are dependent on the diameter of the nanowires. The thermomagnetic measurements on the as-synthesized nanowire samples and the corresponding bulk display a mixed-type curve and a Weiss-type curve, respectively.

  15. Finite-size, chemical-potential and magnetic effects on the phase transition in a four-fermion interacting model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, E.B.S. [Universidade Federal do Sul e Sudeste do Para, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Maraba (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCTI, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Linhares, C.A. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Malbouisson, A.P.C. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCTI, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Malbouisson, J.M.C. [Universidade Federal da Bahia, Instituto de Fisica, Salvador (Brazil); Santana, A.E. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2017-04-15

    We study effects coming from finite size, chemical potential and from a magnetic background on a massive version of a four-fermion interacting model. This is performed in four dimensions as an application of recent developments for dealing with field theories defined on toroidal spaces. We study effects of the magnetic field and chemical potential on the size-dependent phase structure of the model, in particular, how the applied magnetic field affects the size-dependent critical temperature. A connection with some aspects of the hadronic phase transition is established. (orig.)

  16. Dynamic finite element analysis of third size charpy specimens of V-4Cr-4Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lansberry, M.R.; Kumar, A.S.; Mueller, G.E. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States); Kurtz, R.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    A 2-D finite element analysis was performed on precracked, one third scale CVN specimens to investigate the sensitivity of model results to key material parameters such as yield strength, failure strain and work hardening characteristics. Calculations were carried out at temperatures of -196{degree}C and 50{degree}C. The dynamic finite element analyses were conducted using ABAQUS/Explicit V5.4. The finite element results were compared to experimental results for the production-scale heat of V-4Cr-4Ti (ANL Heat No. 832665) as a benchmark. Agreement between the finite element model and experimental data was very good at -196{degree}C, whereas at 50{degree}C the model predicted a slightly lower absorbed energy than actually measured.

  17. Finite-size corrections to scaling of the magnetization distribution in the two-dimensional XY model at zero temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, G; Niedermayer, F; Rácz, Z; Riveros, A; Zambrano, D

    2016-08-01

    The zero-temperature, classical XY model on an L×L square lattice is studied by exploring the distribution Φ_{L}(y) of its centered and normalized magnetization y in the large-L limit. An integral representation of the cumulant generating function, known from earlier works, is used for the numerical evaluation of Φ_{L}(y), and the limit distribution Φ_{L→∞}(y)=Φ_{0}(y) is obtained with high precision. The two leading finite-size corrections Φ_{L}(y)-Φ_{0}(y)≈a_{1}(L)Φ_{1}(y)+a_{2}(L)Φ_{2}(y) are also extracted both from numerics and from analytic calculations. We find that the amplitude a_{1}(L) scales as ln(L/L_{0})/L^{2} and the shape correction function Φ_{1}(y) can be expressed through the low-order derivatives of the limit distribution, Φ_{1}(y)=[yΦ_{0}(y)+Φ_{0}^{'}(y)]^{'}. Thus, Φ_{1}(y) carries the same universal features as the limit distribution and can be used for consistency checks of universality claims based on finite-size systems. The second finite-size correction has an amplitude a_{2}(L)∝1/L^{2} and one finds that a_{2}Φ_{2}(y)≪a_{1}Φ_{1}(y) already for small system size (L>10). We illustrate the feasibility of observing the calculated finite-size corrections by performing simulations of the XY model at low temperatures, including T=0.

  18. Comparing Server Energy Use and Efficiency Using Small Sample Sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, Henry C.; Qin, Yong; Price, Phillip N.

    2014-11-01

    This report documents a demonstration that compared the energy consumption and efficiency of a limited sample size of server-type IT equipment from different manufacturers by measuring power at the server power supply power cords. The results are specific to the equipment and methods used. However, it is hoped that those responsible for IT equipment selection can used the methods described to choose models that optimize energy use efficiency. The demonstration was conducted in a data center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. It was performed with five servers of similar mechanical and electronic specifications; three from Intel and one each from Dell and Supermicro. Server IT equipment is constructed using commodity components, server manufacturer-designed assemblies, and control systems. Server compute efficiency is constrained by the commodity component specifications and integration requirements. The design freedom, outside of the commodity component constraints, provides room for the manufacturer to offer a product with competitive efficiency that meets market needs at a compelling price. A goal of the demonstration was to compare and quantify the server efficiency for three different brands. The efficiency is defined as the average compute rate (computations per unit of time) divided by the average energy consumption rate. The research team used an industry standard benchmark software package to provide a repeatable software load to obtain the compute rate and provide a variety of power consumption levels. Energy use when the servers were in an idle state (not providing computing work) were also measured. At high server compute loads, all brands, using the same key components (processors and memory), had similar results; therefore, from these results, it could not be concluded that one brand is more efficient than the other brands. The test results show that the power consumption variability caused by the key components as a

  19. Sample size for cluster randomized trials: effect of coefficient of variation of cluster size and analysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Sandra M; Ashby, Deborah; Kerry, Sally

    2006-10-01

    Cluster randomized trials are increasingly popular. In many of these trials, cluster sizes are unequal. This can affect trial power, but standard sample size formulae for these trials ignore this. Previous studies addressing this issue have mostly focused on continuous outcomes or methods that are sometimes difficult to use in practice. We show how a simple formula can be used to judge the possible effect of unequal cluster sizes for various types of analyses and both continuous and binary outcomes. We explore the practical estimation of the coefficient of variation of cluster size required in this formula and demonstrate the formula's performance for a hypothetical but typical trial randomizing UK general practices. The simple formula provides a good estimate of sample size requirements for trials analysed using cluster-level analyses weighting by cluster size and a conservative estimate for other types of analyses. For trials randomizing UK general practices the coefficient of variation of cluster size depends on variation in practice list size, variation in incidence or prevalence of the medical condition under examination, and practice and patient recruitment strategies, and for many trials is expected to be approximately 0.65. Individual-level analyses can be noticeably more efficient than some cluster-level analyses in this context. When the coefficient of variation is <0.23, the effect of adjustment for variable cluster size on sample size is negligible. Most trials randomizing UK general practices and many other cluster randomized trials should account for variable cluster size in their sample size calculations.

  20. Finite-size effects in surface-enhanced Raman scattering in noble-metal nanoparticles: a semiclassical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovit, Vitaliy N.; Shahbazyan, Tigran V.

    2006-06-01

    We study finite-size effects in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from molecules adsorbed on small metal particles. Within an electromagnetic description of SERS, the enhancement of the Raman signal originates from the local field of the surface plasmon resonance in a nanoparticle. With decreasing particle sizes, this enhancement is reduced due to the size-dependent Landau damping of the surface plasmon. We show that, in small noble-metal particles, the reduction of interband screening in the surface layer leads to an additional increase in the local field acting on a molecule close to the metal surface. The overall size dependence of Raman signal enhancement is determined by the interplay between Landau damping and underscreening effects. Our calculations, based on a two-region model, show that the role of the surface layer increases for smaller nanoparticle sizes due to a larger volume fraction of the underscreened region.

  1. Excitation Gaps of Finite-Sized Systems from Optimally Tuned Range-Separated Hybrid Functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronik, Leeor; Stein, Tamar; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Baer, Roi

    2012-05-08

    Excitation gaps are of considerable significance in electronic structure theory. Two different gaps are of particular interest. The fundamental gap is defined by charged excitations, as the difference between the first ionization potential and the first electron affinity. The optical gap is defined by a neutral excitation, as the difference between the energies of the lowest dipole-allowed excited state and the ground state. Within many-body perturbation theory, the fundamental gap is the difference between the corresponding lowest quasi-hole and quasi-electron excitation energies, and the optical gap is addressed by including the interaction between a quasi-electron and a quasi-hole. A long-standing challenge has been the attainment of a similar description within density functional theory (DFT), with much debate on whether this is an achievable goal even in principle. Recently, we have constructed and applied a new approach to this problem. Anchored in the rigorous theoretical framework of the generalized Kohn-Sham equation, our method is based on a range-split hybrid functional that uses exact long-range exchange. Its main novel feature is that the range-splitting parameter is not a universal constant but rather is determined from first principles, per system, based on satisfaction of the ionization potential theorem. For finite-sized objects, this DFT approach mimics successfully, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, the quasi-particle picture of many-body theory. Specifically, it allows for the extraction of both the fundamental and the optical gap from one underlying functional, based on the HOMO-LUMO gap of a ground-state DFT calculation and the lowest excitation energy of a linear-response time-dependent DFT calculation, respectively. In particular, it produces the correct optical gap for the difficult case of charge-transfer and charge-transfer-like scenarios, where conventional functionals are known to fail. In this perspective, we overview

  2. Exact solution for the inhomogeneous Dicke model in the canonical ensemble: Thermodynamical limit and finite-size corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogosov, W.V., E-mail: walter.pogosov@gmail.com [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Shapiro, D.S. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); V.A. Kotel' nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology MISIS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bork, L.V. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Onishchenko, A.I. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-15

    We consider an exactly solvable inhomogeneous Dicke model which describes an interaction between a disordered ensemble of two-level systems with single mode boson field. The existing method for evaluation of Richardson–Gaudin equations in the thermodynamical limit is extended to the case of Bethe equations in Dicke model. Using this extension, we present expressions both for the ground state and lowest excited states energies as well as leading-order finite-size corrections to these quantities for an arbitrary distribution of individual spin energies. We then evaluate these quantities for an equally-spaced distribution (constant density of states). In particular, we study evolution of the spectral gap and other related quantities. We also reveal regions on the phase diagram, where finite-size corrections are of particular importance.

  3. Exact solution for the inhomogeneous Dicke model in the canonical ensemble: Thermodynamical limit and finite-size corrections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.V. Pogosov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider an exactly solvable inhomogeneous Dicke model which describes an interaction between a disordered ensemble of two-level systems with single mode boson field. The existing method for evaluation of Richardson–Gaudin equations in the thermodynamical limit is extended to the case of Bethe equations in Dicke model. Using this extension, we present expressions both for the ground state and lowest excited states energies as well as leading-order finite-size corrections to these quantities for an arbitrary distribution of individual spin energies. We then evaluate these quantities for an equally-spaced distribution (constant density of states. In particular, we study evolution of the spectral gap and other related quantities. We also reveal regions on the phase diagram, where finite-size corrections are of particular importance.

  4. Finite Size Corrections to the Large Deviation Function of the Density in the One Dimensional Symmetric Simple Exclusion Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrida, Bernard; Retaux, Martin

    2013-09-01

    The symmetric simple exclusion process is one of the simplest out-of-equilibrium systems for which the steady state is known. Its large deviation functional of the density has been computed in the past both by microscopic and macroscopic approaches. Here we obtain the leading finite size correction to this large deviation functional. The result is compared to the similar corrections for equilibrium systems.

  5. Some current problems in perovskite nano-ferroelectrics and multiferroics: kinetically-limited systems of finite lateral size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, James F.; Schilling, Alina; Rowley, S. E.; Gregg, J. Marty

    2015-06-01

    We describe some unsolved problems of current interest; these involve quantum critical points in ferroelectrics and problems which are not amenable to the usual density functional theory, nor to classical Landau free energy approaches (they are kinetically limited), nor even to the Landau-Kittel relationship for domain size (they do not satisfy the assumption of infinite lateral diameter) because they are dominated by finite aperiodic boundary conditions.

  6. Excited-state quantum phase transitions in systems with two degrees of freedom: II. Finite-size effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stránský, Pavel [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Macek, Michal [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States); Leviatan, Amiram [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Cejnar, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.cejnar@mff.cuni.cz [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-15

    This article extends our previous analysis Stránský et al. (2014) of Excited-State Quantum Phase Transitions (ESQPTs) in systems of dimension two. We focus on the oscillatory component of the quantum state density in connection with ESQPT structures accompanying a first-order ground-state transition. It is shown that a separable (integrable) system can develop rather strong finite-size precursors of ESQPT expressed as singularities in the oscillatory component of the state density. The singularities originate in effectively 1-dimensional dynamics and in some cases appear in multiple replicas with increasing excitation energy. Using a specific model example, we demonstrate that these precursors are rather resistant to proliferation of chaotic dynamics. - Highlights: • Oscillatory components of state density and spectral flow studied near ESQPTs. • Enhanced finite-size precursors of ESQPT caused by fully/partly separable dynamics. • These precursors appear due to criticality of a subsystem with lower dimension. • Separability-induced finite-size effects disappear in case of fully chaotic dynamics.

  7. Finite size properties of staggered U{sub q}[sl(2{vert_bar}1)] superspin chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frahm, Holger, E-mail: frahm@itp.uni-hannover.d [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Appelstrasse 2, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Martins, Marcio J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, C.P. 676, 13565-905 Sao Carlos (Brazil)

    2011-06-01

    Based on the exact solution of the eigenvalue problem for the U{sub q}[sl(2{vert_bar}1)] vertex model built from alternating three-dimensional fundamental and dual representations by means of the algebraic Bethe ansatz we investigate the ground state and low energy excitations of the corresponding mixed superspin chain for deformation parameter q=exp(-i{gamma}/2). The model has a line of critical points with central charge c=0 and continua of conformal dimensions grouped into sectors with {gamma}-dependent lower edges for 0{<=}{gamma}<{pi}/2. The finite size scaling behavior is consistent with a low energy effective theory consisting of one compact and one non-compact bosonic degree of freedom. In the 'ferromagnetic' regime {pi}<{gamma}{<=}2{pi} the critical theory has c=-1 with exponents varying continuously with the deformation parameter. Spin and charge degrees of freedom are separated in the finite size spectrum which coincides with that of the U{sub q}[osp(2{vert_bar}2)] spin chain. In the intermediate regime {pi}/2<{gamma}<{pi} the finite size scaling of the ground state energy depends on the deformation parameter.

  8. Size variation in samples of fossil and recent murid teeth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freudenthal, M.; Martín Suárez, E.

    1990-01-01

    The variability coefficient proposed by Freudenthal & Cuenca Bescós (1984) for samples of fossil cricetid teeth, is calculated for about 200 samples of fossil and recent murid teeth. The results are discussed, and compared with those obtained for the Cricetidae.

  9. Size variation in samples of fossil and recent murid teeth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freudenthal, M.; Martín Suárez, E.

    1990-01-01

    The variability coefficient proposed by Freudenthal & Cuenca Bescós (1984) for samples of fossil cricetid teeth, is calculated for about 200 samples of fossil and recent murid teeth. The results are discussed, and compared with those obtained for the Cricetidae.

  10. Sample Size Determination for Regression Models Using Monte Carlo Methods in R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaujean, A. Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A common question asked by researchers using regression models is, What sample size is needed for my study? While there are formulae to estimate sample sizes, their assumptions are often not met in the collected data. A more realistic approach to sample size determination requires more information such as the model of interest, strength of the…

  11. The choice of sample size for mortality forecasting : A Bayesian learning approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Hong; De Waegenaere, Anja; Melenberg, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Forecasted mortality rates using mortality models proposed in the recent literature are sensitive to the sample size. In this paper we propose a method based on Bayesian learning to determine model-specific posterior distributions of the sample sizes. In particular, the sample size is included as an

  12. Work output and efficiency at maximum power of linear irreversible heat engines operating with a finite-sized heat source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumida, Yuki; Okuda, Koji

    2014-05-01

    We formulate the work output and efficiency for linear irreversible heat engines working between a finite-sized hot heat source and an infinite-sized cold heat reservoir until the total system reaches the final thermal equilibrium state with a uniform temperature. We prove that when the heat engines operate at the maximum power under the tight-coupling condition without heat leakage the work output is just half of the exergy, which is known as the maximum available work extracted from a heat source. As a consequence, the corresponding efficiency is also half of its quasistatic counterpart.

  13. Comparison of magnetic field uniformities for discretized and finite-sized standard $\\cos\\theta$, solenoidal, and spherical coils

    CERN Document Server

    Nouri, N

    2013-01-01

    A significant challenge for experiments requiring a highly uniform magnetic field concerns the identification and design of a discretized and finite-sized magnetic field coil of minimal size. In this work we compare calculations of the magnetic field uniformities and field gradients for three different standard (i.e., non-optimized) types of coils: $\\cos\\theta$, solenoidal, and spherical coils. For an experiment with a particular requirement on either the field uniformity or the field gradient, we show that the volume required by a spherical coil form which satisfies these requirements can be significantly less than the volumes required by $\\cos\\theta$ and solenoidal coil forms.

  14. Finite-size scaling of the magnetization probability density for the critical Ising model in slab geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Cardozo, David; Holdsworth, Peter C. W.

    2016-04-01

    The magnetization probability density in d  =  2 and 3 dimensional Ising models in slab geometry of volume L\\paralleld-1× {{L}\\bot} is computed through Monte-Carlo simulation at the critical temperature and zero magnetic field. The finite-size scaling of this distribution and its dependence on the system aspect-ratio ρ =\\frac{{{L}\\bot}}{{{L}\\parallel}} and boundary conditions are discussed. In the limiting case ρ \\to 0 of a macroscopically large slab ({{L}\\parallel}\\gg {{L}\\bot} ) the distribution is found to scale as a Gaussian function for all tested system sizes and boundary conditions.

  15. Finite-particle tracking reveals submicroscopic-size changes of mitochondria during transport in mitral cell dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennerich, Arne; Schild, Detlev

    2006-03-01

    The mechanisms of molecular motor regulation during bidirectional organelle transport are still uncertain. There is, for instance, the unsettled question of whether opposing motor proteins can be engaged in a tug-of-war. Clearly, any non-synchronous activation of the molecular motors of one cargo can principally lead to changes in the cargo's shape and size; the cargo's size and shape parameters would certainly be observables of such changes. We therefore set out to measure position, shape and size parameters of fluorescent mitochondria (during their transport) in dendrites of cultured neurons using a finite-particle tracking algorithm. Our data clearly show transport-related submicroscopic-size changes of mitochondria. The observed displacements of the mitochondrial front and rear ends are consistent with a model in which microtubule plus- and minus-end-directed motor proteins or motors of the same type but moving along anti-parallel microtubules are often out-of-phase and occasionally engaged in a tug-of-war. Mostly the leading and trailing ends of mitochondria undergo similar characteristic movements but with a substantial time delay between the displacements of both ends, a feature reminiscent of an inchworm-like motility mechanism. More generally, we demonstrate that observing the position, shape and size of actively transported finite objects such as mitochondria can yield information on organelle transport that is generally not accessible by tracking the organelles' centroid alone.

  16. Synchronization of oscillators with long range interaction: Phase transition and anomalous finite size effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marodi, M.; D'ovidio, Francesco; Vicsek, T.

    2002-01-01

    Synchronization in a lattice of a finite population of phase oscillators with algebraically decaying, non-normalized coupling is studied by numerical simulations. A critical level of decay is found, below which full locking takes place if the population contains a sufficiently large number of ele...

  17. Knudsen Diffusion in finite-size channels from a forst-passage point of view.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dammers, A.J.; Coppens, M.O.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the distribution of molecular hits on the wall of a finite cylindrical channel in the Knudsen regime. Particles entered the channel and either returned to the entrance or were transmitted to the opposite channel end. Using a first-passage approach we derived expressions for the spatial di

  18. Two Test Items to Explore High School Students' Beliefs of Sample Size When Sampling from Large Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, Anthony; Henderson, Sally; Penman, John

    2010-01-01

    Two test items that examined high school students' beliefs of sample size for large populations using the context of opinion polls conducted prior to national and state elections were developed. A trial of the two items with 21 male and 33 female Year 9 students examined their naive understanding of sample size: over half of students chose a…

  19. Utility of Inferential Norming with Smaller Sample Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianjun; Chen, Hsin-Yi

    2011-01-01

    We examined the utility of inferential norming using small samples drawn from the larger "Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children-Fourth Edition" (WISC-IV) standardization data set. The quality of the norms was estimated with multiple indexes such as polynomial curve fit, percentage of cases receiving the same score, average absolute…

  20. Influence of macroinvertebrate sample size on bioassessment of streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlek, H.E.; Sporka, F.; Krno, I.

    2006-01-01

    In order to standardise biological assessment of surface waters in Europe, a standardised method for sampling, sorting and identification of benthic macroinvertebrates in running waters was developed during the AQEM project. The AQEM method has proved to be relatively time-consuming. Hence, this stu

  1. Statistical properties of the Green function in finite size for Anderson localization models with multifractal eigenvectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2017-03-01

    For Anderson localization models with multifractal eigenvectors on disordered samples containing N sites, we analyze in a unified framework the consequences for the statistical properties of the Green function. We focus in particular on the imaginary part of the Green function at coinciding points GxxI≤ft(E-\\text{i}η \\right) and study the scaling with the size N of the moments of arbitrary indices q when the broadening follows the scaling η =\\frac{c}{{{N}δ}} . For the standard scaling regime δ =1 , we find in the two limits c\\ll 1 and c\\gg 1 that the moments are governed by the anomalous exponents Δ (q) of individual eigenfunctions, without the assumption of strong correlations between the weights of consecutive eigenstates at the same point. For the non-standard scaling regimes 0function follows some Fréchet distribution in the typical region, while rare events are important to obtain the scaling of the moments. We describe the application to the case of Gaussian multifractality and to the case of linear multifractality.

  2. Electronic states in crystals of finite size quantum confinement of bloch waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Shang Yuan

    2017-01-01

    This book presents an analytical theory of the electronic states in ideal low dimensional systems and finite crystals based on a differential equation theory approach. It provides precise and fundamental understandings on the electronic states in ideal low-dimensional systems and finite crystals, and offers new insights into some of the basic problems in low-dimensional systems, such as the surface states and quantum confinement effects, etc., some of which are quite different from what is traditionally believed in the solid state physics community. Many previous predictions have been confirmed in subsequent investigations by other authors on various relevant problems. In this new edition, the theory is further extended to one-dimensional photonic crystals and phononic crystals, and a general theoretical formalism for investigating the existence and properties of surface states/modes in semi-infinite one-dimensional crystals is developed. In addition, there are various revisions and improvements, including us...

  3. Insights on finite size effects in ab initio study of CO adsorption and dissociation on Fe 110 surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Aurab; Bouhali, Othmane; Mousseau, Normand; Becquart, Charlotte S.; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa

    2016-08-01

    Adsorption and dissociation of hydrocarbons on metallic surfaces represent crucial steps on the path to carburization, eventually leading to dusting corrosion. While adsorption of CO molecules on Fe surface is a barrier-less exothermic process, this is not the case for the dissociation of CO into C and O adatoms and the diffusion of C beneath the surface that are found to be associated with large energy barriers. In practice, these barriers can be affected by numerous factors that combine to favour the CO-Fe reaction such as the abundance of CO and other hydrocarbons as well as the presence of structural defects. From a numerical point of view, studying these factors is challenging and a step-by-step approach is necessary to assess, in particular, the influence of the finite box size on the reaction parameters for adsorption and dissociation of CO on metal surfaces. Here, we use density functional theory (DFT) total energy calculations with the climbing-image nudged elastic band method to estimate the adsorption energies and dissociation barriers for different CO coverages with surface supercells of different sizes. We further compute the effect of periodic boundary condition for DFT calculations and find that the contribution from van der Waals interaction in the computation of adsorption parameters is important as they contribute to correcting the finite-size error in small systems. The dissociation process involves carbon insertion into the Fe surface causing a lattice deformation that requires a larger surface system for unrestricted relaxation. We show that, in the larger surface systems associated with dilute CO-coverages, C-insertion is energetically more favourable, leading to a significant decrease in the dissociation barrier. This observation suggests that a large surface system with dilute coverage is necessary for all similar metal-hydrocarbon reactions in order to study their fundamental electronic mechanisms, as an isolated phenomenon, free from

  4. Finite-size scaling tests for spectra in SU(3) lattice gauge theory coupled to 12 fundamental flavor fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrand, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    I carry out a finite-size scaling study of the correlation length in SU(3) lattice gauge theory coupled to 12 fundamental flavor fermions, using recent data published by Fodor, Holland, Kuti, Nógradi and Schroeder [Z. Fodor, K. Holland, J. Kuti, D. Nogradi, and C. Schroeder, Phys. Lett. B 703, 348 (2011).PYLBAJ0370-269310.1016/j.physletb.2011.07.037]. I make the assumption that the system is conformal in the zero-mass, infinite volume limit, that scaling is violated by both nonzero fermion mass and by finite volume, and that the scaling function in each channel is determined self-consistently by the data. From several different observables I extract a common exponent for the scaling of the correlation length ξ with the fermion mass mq, ξ˜mq-1/ym with ym˜1.35. Shortcomings of the analysis are discussed.

  5. Sample size reduction in groundwater surveys via sparse data assimilation

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Z.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we focus on sparse signal recovery methods for data assimilation in groundwater models. The objective of this work is to exploit the commonly understood spatial sparsity in hydrodynamic models and thereby reduce the number of measurements to image a dynamic groundwater profile. To achieve this we employ a Bayesian compressive sensing framework that lets us adaptively select the next measurement to reduce the estimation error. An extension to the Bayesian compressive sensing framework is also proposed which incorporates the additional model information to estimate system states from even lesser measurements. Instead of using cumulative imaging-like measurements, such as those used in standard compressive sensing, we use sparse binary matrices. This choice of measurements can be interpreted as randomly sampling only a small subset of dug wells at each time step, instead of sampling the entire grid. Therefore, this framework offers groundwater surveyors a significant reduction in surveying effort without compromising the quality of the survey. © 2013 IEEE.

  6. Finite-size effect and the components of multifractality in transport economics volatility based on multifractal detrending moving average method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feier; Tian, Kang; Ding, Xiaoxu; Miao, Yuqi; Lu, Chunxia

    2016-11-01

    Analysis of freight rate volatility characteristics attracts more attention after year 2008 due to the effect of credit crunch and slowdown in marine transportation. The multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis technique is employed to analyze the time series of Baltic Dry Bulk Freight Rate Index and the market trend of two bulk ship sizes, namely Capesize and Panamax for the period: March 1st 1999-February 26th 2015. In this paper, the degree of the multifractality with different fluctuation sizes is calculated. Besides, multifractal detrending moving average (MF-DMA) counting technique has been developed to quantify the components of multifractal spectrum with the finite-size effect taken into consideration. Numerical results show that both Capesize and Panamax freight rate index time series are of multifractal nature. The origin of multifractality for the bulk freight rate market series is found mostly due to nonlinear correlation.

  7. Dynamic finite element modeling of the effects of size on the upper shelf energy of pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidener, S.E. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States); Kumar, A.S. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States); Oglesby, D.B. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States); Schubert, L.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hamilton, M.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rosinski, S.T. [Electric Power Research Inst., Inc. (EPRI), Charlotte, NC (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Dynamic finite element modeling (FEM) of the fracture behavior of fatigue-precracked Charpy specimens was performed to determine the effect of single variable changes in ligament size, width, span, and thickness on the upper shelf energy. A tensile fracture-strain based method for modeling crack initiation and propagation was used. It was found that the upper shelf energy of precracked specimens (USE{sub p}) is proportional to b{sup n}, where b is ligament size and n varies from about 1.6 for subsize to 1.9 for full size specimens. The USE{sub p} was found to be proportional to (width){sup 2.5}. The dependence on span was found to be non-linear. The dependence on thickness was found to be linear for all cases studied. Some of the data from the FEM analysis were compared with experimental data and were found to be in reasonable agreement. (orig.).

  8. Finite element modeling of wall-loss sizing in a steam generator tube using a pulsed eddy current probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbar, V. K.; Lepine, B.; Buck, J.; Underhill, P. R.; Morelli, J.; Krause, T. W.

    2015-03-01

    Inspection of steam generator (SG) tubes by conventional eddy current may, in general, involve analysis of indications from volumetric wall loss, cracks, fouling and support-plate degradation; however, it may be difficult to size or quantify effects from support-to-tube gap and tube tilt, especially in the presence of support plates. Pulsed eddy current (PEC) technology is being developed to investigate such complex tube and flaw geometries. The present work employs finite element modeling to investigate the effectiveness of PEC in identifying and sizing the outer diameter wall-loss in SG tubes. The signals analyzed using a modified principal components analysis (PCA) method reveal the potential success of a PEC-PCA combination to produce scores that can be used to size the wall-loss in the presence of support plates. The modeling results are in good agreement with experimental observations.

  9. Calculating sample sizes for cluster randomized trials: we can keep it simple and efficient !

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Breukelen, Gerard J.P.; Candel, Math J.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Simple guidelines for efficient sample sizes in cluster randomized trials with unknown intraclass correlation and varying cluster sizes. Methods: A simple equation is given for the optimal number of clusters and sample size per cluster. Here, optimal means maximizing power for a given

  10. Finite-size scaling as a tool for the search of the critical endpoint of QCD in heavy-ion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palhares, L. F.; Fraga, E. S.

    2012-07-01

    We briefly discuss the role played by the finiteness of the system created in high-energy heavyion collisions (HIC's) in the experimental search of the QCD critical endpoint and, in particular, the applicability of the predicting power of finite-size scaling plots in data analysis of current HIC's.

  11. Finite-size scaling as a tool for the search of the critical endpoint of QCD in heavy-ion data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palhares, L. F., E-mail: leticia@if.ufrj.br [CEA Saclay, Institut de Physique Theorique (France); Fraga, E. S., E-mail: fraga@if.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    We briefly discuss the role played by the finiteness of the system created in high-energy heavyion collisions (HIC's) in the experimental search of the QCD critical endpoint and, in particular, the applicability of the predicting power of finite-size scaling plots in data analysis of current HIC's.

  12. Power-law correlations and finite-size effects in silica particle aggregates studied by small-angle neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freltoft, T.; Kjems, Jørgen; Sinha, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering from normal, compressed, and water-suspended powders of aggregates of fine silica particles has been studied. The samples possessed average densities ranging from 0.008 to 0.45 g/cm3. Assuming power-law correlations between particles and a finite correlation length ξ.......34±0.1 for the water-suspended samples. The intensity of scattering was found to scale with the correlation length in the manner expected for a fractal system...

  13. SMPBS: Web server for computing biomolecular electrostatics using finite element solvers of size modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yang; Ying, Jinyong; Xie, Dexuan

    2017-03-30

    SMPBS (Size Modified Poisson-Boltzmann Solvers) is a web server for computing biomolecular electrostatics using finite element solvers of the size modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation (SMPBE). SMPBE not only reflects ionic size effects but also includes the classic Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE) as a special case. Thus, its web server is expected to have a broader range of applications than a PBE web server. SMPBS is designed with a dynamic, mobile-friendly user interface, and features easily accessible help text, asynchronous data submission, and an interactive, hardware-accelerated molecular visualization viewer based on the 3Dmol.js library. In particular, the viewer allows computed electrostatics to be directly mapped onto an irregular triangular mesh of a molecular surface. Due to this functionality and the fast SMPBE finite element solvers, the web server is very efficient in the calculation and visualization of electrostatics. In addition, SMPBE is reconstructed using a new objective electrostatic free energy, clearly showing that the electrostatics and ionic concentrations predicted by SMPBE are optimal in the sense of minimizing the objective electrostatic free energy. SMPBS is available at the URL: smpbs.math.uwm.edu © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Finite-size scaling in Ising-like systems with quenched random fields: evidence of hyperscaling violation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, R L C; Fischer, T; Binder, K

    2010-11-01

    In systems belonging to the universality class of the random field Ising model, the standard hyperscaling relation between critical exponents does not hold, but is replaced with a modified hyperscaling relation. As a result, standard formulations of finite-size scaling near critical points break down. In this work, the consequences of modified hyperscaling are analyzed in detail. The most striking outcome is that the free-energy cost ΔF of interface formation at the critical point is no longer a universal constant, but instead increases as a power law with system size, ΔF∝L(θ), with θ as the violation of hyperscaling critical exponent and L as the linear extension of the system. This modified behavior facilitates a number of numerical approaches that can be used to locate critical points in random field systems from finite-size simulation data. We test and confirm the approaches on two random field systems in three dimensions, namely, the random field Ising model and the demixing transition in the Widom-Rowlinson fluid with quenched obstacles.

  15. Finite-size effect on the dynamic and sensing performances of graphene resonators: the role of edge stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Wan; Dai, Mai Duc; Eom, Kilho

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the finite-size effect on the dynamic behavior of graphene resonators and their applications in atomic mass detection using a continuum elastic model such as modified plate theory. In particular, we developed a model based on von Karman plate theory with including the edge stress, which arises from the imbalance between the coordination numbers of bulk atoms and edge atoms of graphene. It is shown that as the size of a graphene resonator decreases, the edge stress depending on the edge structure of a graphene resonator plays a critical role on both its dynamic and sensing performances. We found that the resonance behavior of graphene can be tuned not only through edge stress but also through nonlinear vibration, and that the detection sensitivity of a graphene resonator can be controlled by using the edge stress. Our study sheds light on the important role of the finite-size effect in the effective design of graphene resonators for their mass sensing applications.

  16. Behavior and finite-size effects of the sixth order cumulant in the three-dimensional Ising universality class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xue; Chen, Li-Zhu; Wu, Yuan-Fang

    2016-09-01

    The high-order cumulants of conserved charges are suggested to be sensitive observables to search for the critical point of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This has been calculated to the sixth order in experiments. Corresponding theoretical studies on the sixth order cumulant are necessary. Based on the universality of the critical behavior, we study the temperature dependence of the sixth order cumulant of the order parameter using the parametric representation of the three-dimensional Ising model, which is expected to be in the same universality class as QCD. The density plot of the sign of the sixth order cumulant is shown on the temperature and external magnetic field plane. We found that at non-zero external magnetic field, when the critical point is approached from the crossover side, the sixth order cumulant has a negative valley. The width of the negative valley narrows with decreasing external field. Qualitatively, the trend is similar to the result of Monte Carlo simulation on a finite-size system. Quantitatively, the temperature of the sign change is different. Through Monte Carlo simulation of the Ising model, we calculated the sixth order cumulant of different sizes of systems. We discuss the finite-size effects on the temperature at which the cumulant changes sign. Supported by Fund Project of Sichuan Provincial Department of Education (16ZB0339), Fund Project of Chengdu Technological University for Doctor (2016RC004), Major State Basic Research Development Program of China (2014CB845402) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11405088, 11221504)

  17. Minimum Mutual Information and Non-Gaussianity through the Maximum Entropy Method: Estimation from Finite Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. L. Pires

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Minimum Mutual Information (MinMI Principle provides the least committed, maximum-joint-entropy (ME inferential law that is compatible with prescribed marginal distributions and empirical cross constraints. Here, we estimate MI bounds (the MinMI values generated by constraining sets Tcr comprehended by mcr linear and/or nonlinear joint expectations, computed from samples of N iid outcomes. Marginals (and their entropy are imposed by single morphisms of the original random variables. N-asymptotic formulas are given both for the distribution of cross expectation’s estimation errors, the MinMI estimation bias, its variance and distribution. A growing Tcr leads to an increasing MinMI, converging eventually to the total MI. Under N-sized samples, the MinMI increment relative to two encapsulated sets Tcr1 ⊂ Tcr2 (with numbers of constraints mcr1sample sizes can be rather low, the relationship between MinMI bias, probability density over-fitting and outliers is put in evidence for under-sampled data.

  18. Progressive prediction method for failure data with small sample size

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-hua; FU Hui-min; LIU Cheng-rui

    2011-01-01

    The small sample prediction problem which commonly exists in reliability analysis was discussed with the progressive prediction method in this paper.The modeling and estimation procedure,as well as the forecast and confidence limits formula of the progressive auto regressive(PAR) method were discussed in great detail.PAR model not only inherits the simple linear features of auto regressive(AR) model,but also has applicability for nonlinear systems.An application was illustrated for predicting the future fatigue failure for Tantalum electrolytic capacitors.Forecasting results of PAR model were compared with auto regressive moving average(ARMA) model,and it can be seen that the PAR method can be considered good and shows a promise for future applications.

  19. Interface localization-delocalization transition in a symmetric polymer blend: A finite-size scaling Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M.; Binder, K.

    2001-02-01

    Using extensive Monte Carlo simulations, we study the phase diagram of a symmetric binary (AB) polymer blend confined into a thin film as a function of the film thickness D. The monomer-wall interactions are short ranged and antisymmetric, i.e., the left wall attracts the A component of the mixture with the same strength as the right wall does the B component, and this gives rise to a first order wetting transition in a semi-infinite geometry. The phase diagram and the crossover between different critical behaviors is explored. For large film thicknesses we find a first order interface localization-delocalization transition, and the phase diagram comprises two critical points, which are the finite film width analogies of the prewetting critical point. Using finite-size scaling techniques we locate these critical points, and present evidence of a two-dimensional Ising critical behavior. When we reduce the film width the two critical points approach the symmetry axis φ=1/2 of the phase diagram, and for D~2Rg we encounter a tricritical point. For an even smaller film thickness the interface localization-delocalization transition is second order, and we find a single critical point at φ=1/2. Measuring the probability distribution of the interface position, we determine the effective interaction between the wall and the interface. This effective interface potential depends on the lateral system size even away from the critical points. Its system size dependence stems from the large but finite correlation length of capillary waves. This finding gives direct evidence of a renormalization of the interface potential by capillary waves in the framework of a microscopic model.

  20. Interface localization-delocalization transition in a symmetric polymer blend: a finite-size scaling Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M; Binder, K

    2001-02-01

    Using extensive Monte Carlo simulations, we study the phase diagram of a symmetric binary (AB) polymer blend confined into a thin film as a function of the film thickness D. The monomer-wall interactions are short ranged and antisymmetric, i.e., the left wall attracts the A component of the mixture with the same strength as the right wall does the B component, and this gives rise to a first order wetting transition in a semi-infinite geometry. The phase diagram and the crossover between different critical behaviors is explored. For large film thicknesses we find a first order interface localization-delocalization transition, and the phase diagram comprises two critical points, which are the finite film width analogies of the prewetting critical point. Using finite-size scaling techniques we locate these critical points, and present evidence of a two-dimensional Ising critical behavior. When we reduce the film width the two critical points approach the symmetry axis straight phi=1/2 of the phase diagram, and for D approximately 2R(g) we encounter a tricritical point. For an even smaller film thickness the interface localization-delocalization transition is second order, and we find a single critical point at straight phi=1/2. Measuring the probability distribution of the interface position, we determine the effective interaction between the wall and the interface. This effective interface potential depends on the lateral system size even away from the critical points. Its system size dependence stems from the large but finite correlation length of capillary waves. This finding gives direct evidence of a renormalization of the interface potential by capillary waves in the framework of a microscopic model.

  1. On controlling the electronic states of shallow donors using a finite-size metal gate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levchuk, E. A., E-mail: liauchuk@bsu.by; Makarenko, L. F. [Belarusian State University (Belarus)

    2016-01-15

    The effect of an external electric field on the states of a shallow donor near a semiconductor surface is numerically simulated. A disk-shaped metal gate is considered as an electric-field source. The wavefunctions and energies of bound states are determined by the finite-element method. The critical characteristics of electron relocation between the donor and gate are determined for various gate diameters and boundary conditions, taking into account dielectric mismatch. The empirical dependences of these characteristics on the geometrical parameters and semiconductor properties are obtained. A simple trial function is proposed, which can be used to calculate the critical parameters using the Ritz variational method.

  2. Finite-size effect on the Raman-active modes of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sbai, K [Equipe de Physique Informatique et Modelisation des Systemes, Universite MY Ismail, Faculte des Sciences, BP 11201, Zitoune, 50000 Meknes (Morocco); Rahmani, A [Equipe de Physique Informatique et Modelisation des Systemes, Universite MY Ismail, Faculte des Sciences, BP 11201, Zitoune, 50000 Meknes (Morocco); Chadli, H [Equipe de Physique Informatique et Modelisation des Systemes, Universite MY Ismail, Faculte des Sciences, BP 11201, Zitoune, 50000 Meknes (Morocco); Sauvajol, J-L [Laboratoire des Colloides, Verres et Nanomateriaux (UMR CNRS 5587), Universite Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2008-01-09

    The dependence of the breathing-like phonon modes (BLM) and tangential-like phonon modes (TLM) of individual, finite and infinite bundles of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) as a function of the relative lengths of the inner (L{sub i}) and outer (L{sub o}) tubes is calculated by using the spectral moments method in the framework of the bond-polarization theory. Depending on the relative lengths of the inner (L{sub i}) and outer (L{sub o}) tubes, additional modes are evidenced in the BLM region. These modes must be considered in the analysis of the experimental data.

  3. State-Space Modeling of Dynamic Psychological Processes via the Kalman Smoother Algorithm: Rationale, Finite Sample Properties, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hairong; Ferrer, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a state-space modeling (SSM) technique for fitting process factor analysis models directly to raw data. The Kalman smoother via the expectation-maximization algorithm to obtain maximum likelihood parameter estimates is used. To examine the finite sample properties of the estimates in SSM when common factors are involved, a…

  4. Finite size scaling study of dynamical phase transitions in two dimensional models: ferromagnet, symmetric and non symmetric spin glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, A.U.; Derrida, B.

    1988-10-01

    We study the time evolution of two configurations submitted to the same thermal noise for several two dimensional models (Ising ferromagnet, symmetric spin glass, non symmetric spin glass). For all these models, we find a non zero critical temperature above which the two configurations always meet. Using finite size scaling ideas, we determine for these three models this dynamical phase transition and some of the critical exponents. For the ferromagnet, the transition T/sub c/ approx. = 2.25 coincides with the Curie temperature whereas for the two spin glass models +- J distribution of bonds) we obtain T/sub c/ approx. = 1.5-1.7.

  5. Finite size dependence of scaling functions of the three dimensional O(4) model in an external field

    CERN Document Server

    Engels, J

    2014-01-01

    We calculate universal finite size scaling functions for the order parameter and the longitudinal susceptibility of the three-dimensional O(4) model. The phase transition of this model is supposed to be in the same universality class as the chiral transition of two-flavor QCD. The scaling functions serve as a testing device for QCD simulations on small lattices, where, for example, pseudocritical temperatures are difficult to determine. In addition, we have improved the infinite volume limit parametrization of the scaling functions by using newly generated high statistics data for the 3d O(4) model in the high temperature region on an L=120 lattice.

  6. Finite-size effect of \\eta-deformed AdS_5 x S^5 at strong coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, Changrim

    2016-01-01

    We compute Luscher corrections for a giant magnon in the \\eta-deformed (AdS_5\\times S^5)_{\\eta} using the su(2|2)_q-invariant S-matrix at strong coupling and compare with the finite-size effect of the corresponding string state, derived previously. We find that these two results match and confirm that the su(2|2)_q-invariant S-matrix is describing world-sheet excitations of the \\eta-deformed background.

  7. A Note on Sample Size and Solution Propriety for Confirmatory Factor Analytic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dennis L.; Voth, Jennifer; Frey, Marc P.

    2013-01-01

    Determining an appropriate sample size for use in latent variable modeling techniques has presented ongoing challenges to researchers. In particular, small sample sizes are known to present concerns over sampling error for the variances and covariances on which model estimation is based, as well as for fit indexes and convergence failures. The…

  8. Computing a Finite Size Representation of the Set of Approximate Solutions of an MOP

    CERN Document Server

    Schuetze, Oliver; Tantar, Emilia; Talbi, El-Ghazali

    2008-01-01

    Recently, a framework for the approximation of the entire set of $\\epsilon$-efficient solutions (denote by $E_\\epsilon$) of a multi-objective optimization problem with stochastic search algorithms has been proposed. It was proven that such an algorithm produces -- under mild assumptions on the process to generate new candidate solutions --a sequence of archives which converges to $E_{\\epsilon}$ in the limit and in the probabilistic sense. The result, though satisfactory for most discrete MOPs, is at least from the practical viewpoint not sufficient for continuous models: in this case, the set of approximate solutions typically forms an $n$-dimensional object, where $n$ denotes the dimension of the parameter space, and thus, it may come to perfomance problems since in practise one has to cope with a finite archive. Here we focus on obtaining finite and tight approximations of $E_\\epsilon$, the latter measured by the Hausdorff distance. We propose and investigate a novel archiving strategy theoretically and emp...

  9. Finite Size Effect on the Specific Heat of a Bose Gas in Multi-filament Cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guijarro, G.; Solís, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    The specific heat for an ideal Bose gas confined in semi-infinite multi-filament cables is analyzed. We start with a Bose gas inside a semi-infinite tube of impenetrable walls and finite rectangular cross section. The internal filament structure is created by applying to the gas two, mutually perpendicular, finite Kronig-Penney delta potentials along the tube cross section, while particles are free to move perpendicular to the cross section. The energy spectrum accessible to the particles is obtained and introduced into the grand potential to calculate the specific heat of the system as a function of temperature for different values of the periodic structure parameters such as the cross-section area, the wall impenetrability, and the number of filaments. The specific heat as a function of temperature shows at least two maxima and one minimum. The main difference with respect to the infinite case is that the peak associated with the BE condensation becomes a smoothed maximum, namely there is not a jump in the specific heat derivative, whose temperature no longer represents a critical point.

  10. Simulation of chemical potentials and phase equilibria in two- and three-dimensional square-well fluids: finite size effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vörtler, Horst L; Schäfer, Katja; Smith, William R

    2008-04-17

    We study the simulation cell size dependence of chemical potential isotherms in subcritical square-well fluids by means of series of canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulations with increasing numbers of particles, for both three-dimensional bulk systems and two-dimensional planar layers, using Widom-like particle insertion methods. By estimating the corresponding vapor/liquid coexistence densities using a Maxwell-like equal area rule for the subcritical chemical potential isotherms, we are able to study the influence of system size not only on chemical potentials but also on the coexistence properties. The chemical potential versus density isotherms show van der Waals-like loops in the subcritical vapor/liquid coexistence range that exhibit distinct finite size effects for both two- and three-dimensional fluids. Generally, in agreement with recent findings for related studies of Lennard-Jones fluids, the loops shrink with increasing number of particles. In contrast to the subcritical isotherms themselves, the equilibrium vapor/liquid densities show only a weak system size dependence and agree quantitatively with the best-known literature values for three-dimensional fluids. This allows our approach to be used to accurately predict the phase coexistence properties. Our resulting phase equilibrium results for two-dimensional square-well fluids are new. Knowledge concerning finite size effects of square-well systems is important not only for the simulation of thermodynamic properties of simple fluids, but also for the simulation of models of more complex fluids (such as aqueous or polymer fluids) involving square-well interactions.

  11. Evaluation of design flood estimates with respect to sample size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobierska, Florian; Engeland, Kolbjorn

    2016-04-01

    Estimation of design floods forms the basis for hazard management related to flood risk and is a legal obligation when building infrastructure such as dams, bridges and roads close to water bodies. Flood inundation maps used for land use planning are also produced based on design flood estimates. In Norway, the current guidelines for design flood estimates give recommendations on which data, probability distribution, and method to use dependent on length of the local record. If less than 30 years of local data is available, an index flood approach is recommended where the local observations are used for estimating the index flood and regional data are used for estimating the growth curve. For 30-50 years of data, a 2 parameter distribution is recommended, and for more than 50 years of data, a 3 parameter distribution should be used. Many countries have national guidelines for flood frequency estimation, and recommended distributions include the log Pearson II, generalized logistic and generalized extreme value distributions. For estimating distribution parameters, ordinary and linear moments, maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods are used. The aim of this study is to r-evaluate the guidelines for local flood frequency estimation. In particular, we wanted to answer the following questions: (i) Which distribution gives the best fit to the data? (ii) Which estimation method provides the best fit to the data? (iii) Does the answer to (i) and (ii) depend on local data availability? To answer these questions we set up a test bench for local flood frequency analysis using data based cross-validation methods. The criteria were based on indices describing stability and reliability of design flood estimates. Stability is used as a criterion since design flood estimates should not excessively depend on the data sample. The reliability indices describe to which degree design flood predictions can be trusted.

  12. RNAseqPS: A Web Tool for Estimating Sample Size and Power for RNAseq Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Guo; Shilin Zhao; Chung-I Li; Quanhu Sheng; Yu Shyr

    2014-01-01

    Sample size and power determination is the first step in the experimental design of a successful study. Sample size and power calculation is required for applications for National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding. Sample size and power calculation is well established for traditional biological studies such as mouse model, genome wide association study (GWAS), and microarray studies. Recent developments in high-throughput sequencing technology have allowed RNAseq to replace microarray as the...

  13. Design of the sample cell in near-field surface-enhanced Raman scattering by finite difference time domain method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaqin Li; Guoshu Jian; Shifa Wu

    2006-01-01

    The rational design of the sample cell may improve the sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering(SERS) detection in a high degree. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations of the configurationof Ag film-Ag particles illuminated by plane wave and evanescent wave are performed to provide physicalinsight for design of the sample cell. Numerical solutions indicate that the sample cell can provide more"hot spots" and the massive field intensity enhancement occurs in these "hot spots". More information onthe nanometer character of the sample can be got because of gradient-field Raman (GFR) of evanescentwave.

  14. Sampling bee communities using pan traps: alternative methods increase sample size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monitoring of the status of bee populations and inventories of bee faunas require systematic sampling. Efficiency and ease of implementation has encouraged the use of pan traps to sample bees. Efforts to find an optimal standardized sampling method for pan traps have focused on pan trap color. Th...

  15. Kinetic simulation of the electron-cyclotron maser instability: effect of a finite source size

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, A A

    2012-01-01

    The electron-cyclotron maser instability is widespread in the Universe, producing, e.g., radio emission of the magnetized planets and cool substellar objects. Diagnosing the parameters of astrophysical radio sources requires comprehensive nonlinear simulations of the radiation process. We simulate the electron-cyclotron maser instability in a very low-beta plasma. The model used takes into account the radiation escape from the source region and the particle flow through this region. We developed a kinetic code to simulate the time evolution of an electron distribution in a radio emission source. The model includes the terms describing the particle injection to and escape from the emission source region. The spatial escape of the emission from the source is taken into account by using a finite amplification time. The unstable electron distribution of the horseshoe type is considered. A number of simulations were performed for different parameter sets typical of the magnetospheres of planets and ultracool dwarf...

  16. Finite-size corrections for confined polymers in the extended de Gennes regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithe, T. St Clere; Iarko, V.; Muralidhar, A.; Dorfman, K. D.; Mehlig, B.

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical results for the extension of a polymer confined to a channel are usually derived in the limit of infinite contour length. But experimental studies and simulations of DNA molecules confined to nanochannels are not necessarily in this asymptotic limit. We calculate the statistics of the span and the end-to-end distance of a semiflexible polymer of finite length in the extended de Gennes regime, exploiting the fact that the problem can be mapped to a one-dimensional weakly self-avoiding random walk. The results thus obtained compare favourably with pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method (PERM) simulations of a three-dimensional discrete wormlike chain model of DNA confined in a nanochannel. We discuss the implications for experimental studies of linear λ-DNA confined to nanochannels at the high ionic strengths used in many experiments. PMID:26764718

  17. Collective spin excitation in finite size array of patterned magnonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piao, H.-G. [College of Science, China Three Gorges University, Yichang 443002 (China); Shim, J.-H. [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Pan, L. [College of Science, China Three Gorges University, Yichang 443002 (China); Yu, S.-C. [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, D.-H., E-mail: donghyun@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-01

    We explore further details of the collectively excited spin wave mode in finite arrays of elliptically shaped ferromagnetic nanoelements as two-dimensional magnonic crystals by means of micromagnetic simulations. Under a pulsed magnetic driving field, collective spin wave modes were intensively investigated with variation of nanoelement dimensions and interelement separation as structural parameters of the magnonic crystal as well as changing the applied bias magnetic field. Via observing and analyzing the dynamic behavior of collective spin wave modes, we have found that the dynamic behavior strongly depends on the bias magnetic field with a quasi-linear dependency. The quasi-linear dependency of spin wave frequency transition can be achieved to a high sensitivity of the pT/Hz level. By modulating the magnonic crystal lattice structures and the bias magnetic field, the spin wave dynamic behavior is tunable which might be a promising property for a future magnonic crystal application and multifunctional sensors.

  18. Exact finite-size corrections for the spanning-tree model under different boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmailian, N. Sh.; Kenna, R.

    2015-02-01

    We express the partition functions of the spanning tree on finite square lattices under five different sets of boundary conditions in terms of a principal partition function with twisted-boundary conditions. Based on these expressions, we derive the exact asymptotic expansions of the logarithm of the partition function for each case. We have also established several groups of identities relating spanning-tree partition functions for the different boundary conditions. We also explain an apparent discrepancy between logarithmic correction terms in the free energy for a two-dimensional spanning-tree model with periodic and free-boundary conditions and conformal field theory predictions. We have obtained corner free energy for the spanning tree under free-boundary conditions in full agreement with conformal field theory predictions.

  19. Metastable configurations of a finite-size chain of classical spins within the one-dimensional chiral XY-model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, Alexander P., E-mail: APPopov@mephi.ru [Department of Molecular Physics, National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gloria Pini, Maria, E-mail: mariagloria.pini@isc.cnr.it [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi del CNR (CNR-ISC), Unità di Firenze, Via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Rettori, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    The metastable states of a finite-size chain of N classical spins described by the chiral XY-model on a discrete one-dimensional lattice are calculated by means of a general theoretical method recently developed by one of us. This method allows one to determine all the possible equilibrium magnetic states in an accurate and systematic way. The ground state of a chain consisting of N classical XY spins is calculated in the presence of (i) a symmetric ferromagnetic exchange interaction, favoring parallel alignment of nearest neighbor spins, (ii) a uniaxial anisotropy, favoring a given direction in the film plane, and (iii) an antisymmetric Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI), favoring perpendicular alignment of nearest neighbor spins. In addition to the ground state with a non-uniform helical spin arrangement, which originates from the energy competition in the finite-size chain with open boundary conditions, we have found a considerable number of higher-energy equilibrium states. In the investigated case of a chain with N=10 spins and a DMI much smaller than the in-plane uniaxial anisotropy, it turns out that a metastable (unstable) state of the finite chain is characterized by a configuration where none (at least one) of the inner spins is nearly parallel to the hard axis. The role of the DMI is to establish a unique rotational sense for the helical ground state. Moreover, the number of both metastable and unstable equilibrium states is doubled with respect to the case of zero DMI. This produces modifications in the Peierls–Nabarro potential encountered by a domain wall during its displacement along the discrete spin chain. - Highlights: • A finite-size chain of N classical spins within the XY-chiral model is investigated. • Using a systematic theoretical method, all equilibrium states are calculated for N=10. • The ground state has a non-uniform helical order with unique rotational sense. • Metastable states contain a domain wall whose energy

  20. Size-dependent free vibration analysis of rectangular nanoplates with the consideration of surface effects using finite difference method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza karimi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, finite difference method (FDM is used to study the size-dependent free vibration characteristics of rectangular nanoplates considering the surface stress effects. To include the surface effects in the equations, Gurtin-Murdoch continuum elasticity approach has been employed. The effects of surface properties including the surface elasticity, surface residual stress and surface mass density are considered to be the main causes for size-dependent behaviors that arise from the increase in surface-to-volume ratios at smaller scales. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the difference between the natural frequency obtained by considering the surface effects and that obtained without considering surface properties. It is observed that the effects of surface properties tend to diminish in thicker nanoplates, and vice versa.

  1. When the expansion of finite-size corrections to hydrogen Lamb shift in moments of charge distribution breaks down

    CERN Document Server

    Hagelstein, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    We point out a limitation of the standard way of accounting the finite-size effects, i.e., when the leading $[(Z\\alpha)^4]$ and subleading $[(Z\\alpha)^5]$ contributions to the Lamb shift are given by the mean-square radius and the third Zemach moment of the charge distribution. This limitation may have profound consequences for the interpretation of the "proton size puzzle". We find, for instance, that the de R\\'ujula toy model of the proton form factor does not resolve the puzzle as claimed, despite the large value of the third Zemach moment. Given the formula which does not rely on the radii expansion, we show how tiny (less than a hundredth of percent) changes in the proton electric form factor at a MeV scale would be able to explain the puzzle.

  2. Finite-size effect and Kondo screening effect in an A-B ring with a quantum dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Shao-Quan; Wang Shun-Jin; Sun Wei-Li; Yu Wan-Lun

    2004-01-01

    The properties of the ground state of a closed dot-ring system with a magnetic flux in the Kondo regime are studied theoretically by means of a one-impurity Anderson Hamiltonian. The Hamiltonian is solved by means of the slave-boson mean-field theory. It is shown that at T=0, a suppressed Kondo effect exists in this system even when the mean level spacing of electrons in the ring is larger than the bulk Kondo temperature. The physical quantities depend sensitively on both the parity of the system and the size of the ring; the rich physical behaviour can be attributed to the coexistence of both the finite-size effect and the Kondo screening effect. It is also possible to detect the Kondo screening cloud by measuring the persistent current or the zero field impurity susceptibility Ximp directly in future experiments.

  3. Finite-size effects in the microscopic structure of a hard-sphere fluid in a narrow cylindrical pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, F L; White, J A; González, A; Velasco, S

    2006-04-21

    We examine the microscopic structure of a hard-sphere fluid confined to a small cylindrical pore by means of Monte Carlo simulation. In order to analyze finite-size effects, the simulations are carried out in the framework of different statistical mechanics ensembles. We find that the size effects are specially relevant in the canonical ensemble where noticeable differences are found with the results in the grand canonical ensemble (GCE) and the isothermal isobaric ensemble (IIE) which, in most situations, remain very close to the infinite system results. A customary series expansion in terms of fluctuations of either the number of particles (GCE) or the inverse volume (IIE) allows us to connect with the results of the canonical ensemble.

  4. Metastable configurations of a finite-size chain of classical spins within the one-dimensional chiral XY-model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Alexander P.; Gloria Pini, Maria; Rettori, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    The metastable states of a finite-size chain of N classical spins described by the chiral XY-model on a discrete one-dimensional lattice are calculated by means of a general theoretical method recently developed by one of us. This method allows one to determine all the possible equilibrium magnetic states in an accurate and systematic way. The ground state of a chain consisting of N classical XY spins is calculated in the presence of (i) a symmetric ferromagnetic exchange interaction, favoring parallel alignment of nearest neighbor spins, (ii) a uniaxial anisotropy, favoring a given direction in the film plane, and (iii) an antisymmetric Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI), favoring perpendicular alignment of nearest neighbor spins. In addition to the ground state with a non-uniform helical spin arrangement, which originates from the energy competition in the finite-size chain with open boundary conditions, we have found a considerable number of higher-energy equilibrium states. In the investigated case of a chain with N=10 spins and a DMI much smaller than the in-plane uniaxial anisotropy, it turns out that a metastable (unstable) state of the finite chain is characterized by a configuration where none (at least one) of the inner spins is nearly parallel to the hard axis. The role of the DMI is to establish a unique rotational sense for the helical ground state. Moreover, the number of both metastable and unstable equilibrium states is doubled with respect to the case of zero DMI. This produces modifications in the Peierls-Nabarro potential encountered by a domain wall during its displacement along the discrete spin chain.

  5. The finite-size scaling study of four-dimensional Ising model in the presence of external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdan, Ziya; Kürkçü, Cihan; Öztürk, Mustafa K.

    2014-12-01

    The four-dimensional ferromagnetic Ising model in external magnetic field is simulated on the Creutz cellular automaton algorithm using finite-size lattices with linear dimension 4 ≤ L ≤ 8. The critical temperature value of infinite lattice, Tc χ ( ∞ ) = 6 , 680 (1) obtained for h = 0 agrees well with the values T c ( ∞ ) ≈ 6.68 obtained previously using different methods. Moreover, h = 0.00025 in our work also agrees with all the results obtained from h = 0 in the literature. However, there are no works for h ≠ 0 in the literature. The value of the field critical exponent (δ = 3.0136(3)) is in good agreement with δ = 3 which is obtained from scaling law of Widom. In spite of the finite-size scaling relations of | M L ( t ) | and χ L ( t ) for 0 ≤ h ≤ 0.001 are verified; however, in the cases of 0.0025 ≤ h ≤ 0.1 they are not verified.

  6. DNS of horizontal open channel flow with finite-size, heavy particles at low solid volume fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Kidanemariam, Aman G; Doychev, Todor; Uhlmann, Markus

    2013-01-01

    We have performed direct numerical simulation of turbulent open channel flow over a smooth horizontal wall in the presence of finite-size, heavy particles. The spherical particles have a diameter of approximately 7 wall units, a density of 1.7 times the fluid density and a solid volume fraction of 0.0005. The value of the Galileo number is set to 16.5, while the Shields parameter measures approximately 0.2. Under these conditions, the particles are predominantly located in the vicinity of the bottom wall, where they exhibit strong preferential concentration which we quantify by means of Voronoi analysis and by computing the particle-conditioned concentration field. As observed in previous studies with similar parameter values, the mean streamwise particle velocity is smaller than that of the fluid. We propose a new definition of the fluid velocity "seen" by finite-size particles based on an average over a spherical surface segment, from which we deduce in the present case that the particles are instantaneousl...

  7. Particle motion in a periodic driving flow. The role of added mass force and the finite size of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Chavarria, Gerardo; Lopez Sanchez, Erick Javier

    2016-11-01

    The motion of particles in a fluid is an open problem. The main difficulty arises from the fact that hydrodynamical forces acting on a particle depend on the flow properties. In addition, the form and the size of particles must be taken into account. In this work we present numerical results of the particle transport in a periodic driving flow in a channel flushing into an open domain. To study the transport of particles we solve the equation of motion for a spherical particle in which we include the drag, the gravity, the buoyancy, the added mass and the history force. Additionally we include the corrections for a particle of finite size. For solving this equation a knowledge of the velocity field is required. To obtain the velocity field we solve the Navier Stokes and the continuity equations with a finite volume method. In the flow under study a vorticity dipole and a spanwise vortex are present, both have an important influence on the motion of particles. The dipole enhances displacement of particles because flow between vortices behaves like a jet and the spanwise vortex produces the lifting and deposition of particles from/to the bottom. We observe clustering of particles both into the channel and in the open domain as observed in coastal systems. The authors acknowledge DGAPA-UNAM by support under project PAPIIT IN115315 "Ondas y estructuras coherentes en dinámica de fluidos".

  8. Main transition in the Pink membrane model: finite-size scaling and the influence of surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Sina; Vink, R L C

    2012-06-01

    We consider the main transition in single-component membranes using computer simulations of the Pink model [D. A. Pink et al., Biochemistry 19, 349 (1980)]. We first show that the accepted parameters of the Pink model yield a main transition temperature that is systematically below experimental values. This resolves an issue that was first pointed out by Corvera and co-workers [Phys. Rev. E 47, 696 (1993)]. In order to yield the correct transition temperature, the strength of the van der Waals coupling in the Pink model must be increased; by using finite-size scaling, a set of optimal values is proposed. We also provide finite-size scaling evidence that the Pink model belongs to the universality class of the two-dimensional Ising model. This finding holds irrespective of the number of conformational states. Finally, we address the main transition in the presence of quenched disorder, which may arise in situations where the membrane is deposited on a rough support. In this case, we observe a stable multidomain structure of gel and fluid domains, and the absence of a sharp transition in the thermodynamic limit.

  9. Numerical simulation of temperature distribution using finite difference equations and estimation of the grain size during friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, H.S. [School of Mechanical, Material and Energy Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar, Punjab 140001 (India); Singh, H., E-mail: harpreetsingh@iitrpr.ac.in [School of Mechanical, Material and Energy Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar, Punjab 140001 (India); Dhindaw, B.K. [School of Materials and Mineral Resources, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, Nibong Tebal, Pulau Penang 14300 (Malaysia)

    2012-05-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnesium alloy AE42 was friction stir processed under different cooling conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat flow model was developed using finite difference heat equations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Generalized MATLAB code was developed for solving heat flow model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regression equation for estimation of grain size was developed. - Abstract: The present investigation is aimed at developing a heat flow model to simulate temperature history during friction stir processing (FSP). A new approach of developing implicit form of finite difference heat equations solved using MATLAB code was used. A magnesium based alloy AE42 was friction stir processed (FSPed) at different FSP parameters and cooling conditions. Temperature history was continuously recorded in the nugget zone during FSP using data acquisition system and k type thermocouples. The developed code was validated at different FSP parameters and cooling conditions during FSP experimentation. The temperature history at different locations in the nugget zone at different instants of time was further utilized for the estimation of grain growth rate and final average grain size of the FSPed specimen. A regression equation relating the final grain size, maximum temperature during FSP and the cooling rate was developed. The metallurgical characterization was done using optical microscopy, SEM, and FIB-SIM analysis. The simulated temperature profiles and final average grain size were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The presence of fine precipitate particles generated in situ in the investigated magnesium alloy also contributed in the evolution of fine grain structure through Zener pining effect at the grain boundaries.

  10. Distribution of the two-sample t-test statistic following blinded sample size re-estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kaifeng

    2016-05-01

    We consider the blinded sample size re-estimation based on the simple one-sample variance estimator at an interim analysis. We characterize the exact distribution of the standard two-sample t-test statistic at the final analysis. We describe a simulation algorithm for the evaluation of the probability of rejecting the null hypothesis at given treatment effect. We compare the blinded sample size re-estimation method with two unblinded methods with respect to the empirical type I error, the empirical power, and the empirical distribution of the standard deviation estimator and final sample size. We characterize the type I error inflation across the range of standardized non-inferiority margin for non-inferiority trials, and derive the adjusted significance level to ensure type I error control for given sample size of the internal pilot study. We show that the adjusted significance level increases as the sample size of the internal pilot study increases. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. CT dose survey in adults: what sample size for what precision?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Stephen [Hopital Ambroise Pare, Department of Radiology, Mons (Belgium); Muylem, Alain van [Hopital Erasme, Department of Pneumology, Brussels (Belgium); Howarth, Nigel [Clinique des Grangettes, Department of Radiology, Chene-Bougeries (Switzerland); Gevenois, Pierre Alain [Hopital Erasme, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Tack, Denis [EpiCURA, Clinique Louis Caty, Department of Radiology, Baudour (Belgium)

    2017-01-15

    To determine variability of volume computed tomographic dose index (CTDIvol) and dose-length product (DLP) data, and propose a minimum sample size to achieve an expected precision. CTDIvol and DLP values of 19,875 consecutive CT acquisitions of abdomen (7268), thorax (3805), lumbar spine (3161), cervical spine (1515) and head (4106) were collected in two centers. Their variabilities were investigated according to sample size (10 to 1000 acquisitions) and patient body weight categories (no weight selection, 67-73 kg and 60-80 kg). The 95 % confidence interval in percentage of their median (CI95/med) value was calculated for increasing sample sizes. We deduced the sample size that set a 95 % CI lower than 10 % of the median (CI95/med ≤ 10 %). Sample size ensuring CI95/med ≤ 10 %, ranged from 15 to 900 depending on the body region and the dose descriptor considered. In sample sizes recommended by regulatory authorities (i.e., from 10-20 patients), mean CTDIvol and DLP of one sample ranged from 0.50 to 2.00 times its actual value extracted from 2000 samples. The sampling error in CTDIvol and DLP means is high in dose surveys based on small samples of patients. Sample size should be increased at least tenfold to decrease this variability. (orig.)

  12. Laser spectroscopy of finite size and covering effects in magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, V. N.; Ignatenko, A. N.; Ivanov, A. V.; Irkhin, V. Yu

    2016-02-01

    Experiments on the impact of the size of magnetite clusters on various magnetic properties (magnetic moment, Curie temperature, blocking temperature etc) have been carried out. The methods of magnetic separation and centrifugation of water suspensions of biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) allow one to produce fractions with diameters of nanoparticles in the range of 4-22 nm. The size of the NPs is controlled by the methods of dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). For the first time the DLS method is applied in real time to control the size during the process of the separation of the NPs in aqueous suspensions. The changes of the size of NPs cause a shift in the Curie temperature and changes in the specific magnetic properties of the iron NPs. The experimental data is interpreted on the basis of Monte Carlo simulations for the classical Heisenberg model with different bulk and surface magnetic moments. It is demonstrated experimentally and by theoretical modeling that the magnetic properties of magnetite NPs are determined not only by their sizes, but also by their surface spin states, while both growing and falling dependences of the magnetic moment (per Fe3O4 formula unit) are possible, depending on the number of magnetic atoms in the nanoparticle. NPs that are both clean and covered with bioresorbable layer clusters have been investigated.

  13. Finite size effects and spin transition in ball-milled {gamma}-(FeMn){sub 30}Cu{sub 70} nanostructured alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Restrepo, J. [Grupo de Estado Solido, Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, A. A. 1226, Medellin (Colombia)]. E-mail: jrestre@fisica.udea.edu.co; Greneche, J.M. [Laboratoire de Physique de l' Etat Condense, UMR CNRS 6087, Universite du Maine, 72085 Le Mans, Cedex 9 (France); Gonzalez, J.M. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, P.O. Box 155. 28230 Las Rozas, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-12-31

    Fe{sub 15}Mn{sub 15}Cu{sub 70} alloys were prepared by high-energy ball milling over a wide range of grinding times from 15 min to 72 h. The corresponding magnetic properties were followed by means of vibrating sample magnetometry, magnetic susceptibility and Moessbauer spectroscopy. By using a Rietveld structural analysis of high-resolution X-ray diffraction data, lattice parameter and grain size correlations with magnetization and coercive force were carried out. Results revealed a strong microstructural dependence of the magnetic properties with the grain size, resembling a finite size-driven magnetic transition at a critical crystallite value of around 8.5 nm. This behavior is endorsed by a partial low- to high-spin transition according to isomer shift results, at a critical unit-cell volume of around 50 A{sup 3} at 77 K attributed to strong local variations of the interatomic spacing as a consequence of the employed ball-milling procedure. Finally, as concerns to temperature behavior, samples exhibited a freezing temperature at around 61 K and a wide distribution of relaxation times ascribed to the presence of interacting CuMn and FeMnCu clusters.

  14. Finite-size effects in a model for plasticity of amorphous composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyukodi, Botond; Lemarchand, Claire; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the plastic behavior of an amorphous matrix reinforced by hard particles. A mesoscopic depinning-like model accounting for Eshelby elastic interactions is implemented. Only the effect of a plastic disorder is considered. Numerical results show a complex size dependence of the effective...... flow stress of the amorphous composite. In particular, the departure from the mixing law shows opposite trends associated to the competing effects of the matrix and the reinforcing particles, respectively. The reinforcing mechanisms and their effects on localization are discussed. Plastic strain...... is shown to gradually concentrate on the weakest band of the system. This correlation of the plastic behavior with the material structure is used to design a simple analytical model. The latter nicely captures reinforcement size effects in (logN/N)1/2, where N is the linear size of the system, observed...

  15. Simultaneous Topology, Shape, and Sizing Optimisation of Plane Trusses with Adaptive Ground Finite Elements Using MOEAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norapat Noilublao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel integrated design strategy to accomplish simultaneous topology shape and sizing optimisation of a two-dimensional (2D truss. An optimisation problem is posed to find a structural topology, shape, and element sizes of the truss such that two objective functions, mass and compliance, are minimised. Design constraints include stress, buckling, and compliance. The procedure for an adaptive ground elements approach is proposed and its encoding/decoding process is detailed. Two sets of design variables defining truss layout, shape, and element sizes at the same time are applied. A number of multiobjective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs are implemented to solve the design problem. Comparative performance based on a hypervolume indicator shows that multiobjective population-based incremental learning (PBIL is the best performer. Optimising three design variable types simultaneously is more efficient and effective.

  16. Effects of anisotropic diffusion and finite island sizes in homoepitaxial growth Pt on Pt(100)-hex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jens Jørgen; Linderoth, T.R.; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    1998-01-01

    size is i=1 and that the mobility of dimers is negligible. Furthermore, an early onset of island coalescence is revealed. From the scaling of the measured saturation island density, N-x similar to(R/h)(chi), where h = v exp(-E-d/k(B)T) is the adatom hopping rate, an effective barrier for diffusion of E......The diffusion, nucleation, and growth of Pt on the hexagonally reconstructed Pt(100)-hex surface are investigated. By means of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), the positions, sizes, and number densities of monoatomically high, rectangular. reconstructed Pt islands, formed in the submonolayer...... of the determined island positions, it is revealed that the islands are distributed with long/short correlation lengths along, perpendicular to the reconstruction channels. The autocorrelation analysis allows us to quantify the degree of anisotropy in adatom diffusion. Island size distributions obtained...

  17. Sample size calculation in cost-effectiveness cluster randomized trials: optimal and maximin approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manju, Md Abu; Candel, Math J J M; Berger, Martijn P F

    2014-07-10

    In this paper, the optimal sample sizes at the cluster and person levels for each of two treatment arms are obtained for cluster randomized trials where the cost-effectiveness of treatments on a continuous scale is studied. The optimal sample sizes maximize the efficiency or power for a given budget or minimize the budget for a given efficiency or power. Optimal sample sizes require information on the intra-cluster correlations (ICCs) for effects and costs, the correlations between costs and effects at individual and cluster levels, the ratio of the variance of effects translated into costs to the variance of the costs (the variance ratio), sampling and measuring costs, and the budget. When planning, a study information on the model parameters usually is not available. To overcome this local optimality problem, the current paper also presents maximin sample sizes. The maximin sample sizes turn out to be rather robust against misspecifying the correlation between costs and effects at the cluster and individual levels but may lose much efficiency when misspecifying the variance ratio. The robustness of the maximin sample sizes against misspecifying the ICCs depends on the variance ratio. The maximin sample sizes are robust under misspecification of the ICC for costs for realistic values of the variance ratio greater than one but not robust under misspecification of the ICC for effects. Finally, we show how to calculate optimal or maximin sample sizes that yield sufficient power for a test on the cost-effectiveness of an intervention.

  18. Variance Estimation, Design Effects, and Sample Size Calculations for Respondent-Driven Sampling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salganik, Matthew J

    2006-01-01

    .... A recently developed statistical approach called respondent-driven sampling improves our ability to study hidden populations by allowing researchers to make unbiased estimates of the prevalence...

  19. Investigation of Catalytic Finite-Size-Effects of Platinum Metal Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lin; Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Romero, Nichols A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we use density functional theory (DFT) calculations on highly parallel computing resources to study size-dependent changes in the chemical and electronic properties of platinum (Pt) for a number of fixed freestanding clusters ranging from 13 to 1415 atoms, or 0.7–3.5 nm in diameter...

  20. Martensitic transformations in nanostructured nitinol: Finite element modeling of grain size and distribution effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hong-Sheng; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2013-01-01

    A computational model of martensitic phase transformation in nanostructured nitinol is developed which takes into account the grain size effect. On the basis of the theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic transformation criterion and the energy barrier for phase transformation, it was demonstra...... between the coarse and fine grained regions, and expand inside the region with small grains along the shear band direction....

  1. Implications of sampling design and sample size for national carbon accounting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Köhl; Andrew Lister; Charles T. Scott; Thomas Baldauf; Daniel. Plugge

    2011-01-01

    Countries willing to adopt a REDD regime need to establish a national Measurement, Reporting and Verification (MRV) system that provides information on forest carbon stocks and carbon stock changes. Due to the extensive areas covered by forests the information is generally obtained by sample based surveys. Most operational sampling approaches utilize a combination of...

  2. Finite-size and correlation-induced effects in Mean-field Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Touboul, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    The brain's activity is characterized by the interaction of a very large number of neurons that are strongly affected by noise. However, signals often arise at macroscopic scales integrating the effect of many neurons into a reliable pattern of activity. In order to study such large neuronal assemblies, one is often led to derive mean-field limits summarizing the effect of the interaction of a large number of neurons into an effective signal. Classical mean-field approaches consider the evolution of a deterministic variable, the mean activity, thus neglecting the stochastic nature of neural behavior. In this article, we build upon a recent approach that includes correlations and higher order moments in mean-field equations, and study how these stochastic effects influence the solutions of the mean-field equations, both in the limit of an infinite number of neurons and for large yet finite networks. We show that, though the solutions of the deterministic mean-field equation constitute uncorrelated solutions of...

  3. Electric near-field enhancing properties of a finite-size metal conical nano-tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharenko, A V; Chang, Hung-Chih; Wang, Juen-Kai

    2007-01-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique simulations are performed to study the near-field resonance properties of a silver conical nano-tip with a rounded end. Varying the tip geometry, we have computed the electric field distribution, as well as the electric field enhancement factor in the immediate vicinity of the tip apex. The aim of this study is to find optimal geometric parameters of the conical tip, such as its angle and length, in order to maximize the electric field enhancement factor. The increase of the tip length is shown to result in a redshift of the tip resonance wavelength. In addition, some subsidiary (non-dipole) peaks appear for relatively long tips. The peak enhancement values for the small-angle tips increase with the tip length while those for the large-angle ones decrease with it. At the same time, the dependencies of the field enhancement on the cone angle exhibit non-monotonic behavior. In other words, an optimal angle exists allowing one to maximize the electric near field. Finally, the effect of the supporting dielectric medium on the electric field near the tip apex is discussed. In the approximation used, the effect is shown to leave the main conclusions unchanged.

  4. Implications of sampling design and sample size for national carbon accounting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhl, Michael; Lister, Andrew; Scott, Charles T; Baldauf, Thomas; Plugge, Daniel

    2011-11-08

    Countries willing to adopt a REDD regime need to establish a national Measurement, Reporting and Verification (MRV) system that provides information on forest carbon stocks and carbon stock changes. Due to the extensive areas covered by forests the information is generally obtained by sample based surveys. Most operational sampling approaches utilize a combination of earth-observation data and in-situ field assessments as data sources. We compared the cost-efficiency of four different sampling design alternatives (simple random sampling, regression estimators, stratified sampling, 2-phase sampling with regression estimators) that have been proposed in the scope of REDD. Three of the design alternatives provide for a combination of in-situ and earth-observation data. Under different settings of remote sensing coverage, cost per field plot, cost of remote sensing imagery, correlation between attributes quantified in remote sensing and field data, as well as population variability and the percent standard error over total survey cost was calculated. The cost-efficiency of forest carbon stock assessments is driven by the sampling design chosen. Our results indicate that the cost of remote sensing imagery is decisive for the cost-efficiency of a sampling design. The variability of the sample population impairs cost-efficiency, but does not reverse the pattern of cost-efficiency of the individual design alternatives. Our results clearly indicate that it is important to consider cost-efficiency in the development of forest carbon stock assessments and the selection of remote sensing techniques. The development of MRV-systems for REDD need to be based on a sound optimization process that compares different data sources and sampling designs with respect to their cost-efficiency. This helps to reduce the uncertainties related with the quantification of carbon stocks and to increase the financial benefits from adopting a REDD regime.

  5. Developing Criteria for Sample Sizes in Jet Engine Analytical Component Inspections and the Associated Confidence Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    5 Sample The samples taken from each population will not be random samples . They will be nonprobability , purposive samples . More specifically, they...section will justify why statistical techniques based on the assumption of a random sample , will be used. First, this is the only possible method of...w lu 88 12 21 029 AFIT/GSM/LSM/88S-22 DEVELOPING CRITERIA FOR SAMPLE SIZES IN JET ENGINE ANALYTICAL COMPONENT INSPECTIONS AND THE ASSOCIATED

  6. Dynamic finite element modeling of the effects of size on the upper shelf energy of ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidener, S.E.; Kumar, A.S.; Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1996-04-01

    Both the fusion and light water reactor program require the use of the subsize specimens to obtain sufficient irradiation data on neutron-induced embrittlement of ferritic steels. While the development of fusion-relevant size effects correlations can proceed analytically, it is more cost-effective at this time to use data currently being obtained on embrittlement of pressure vessel steels to test and expand the correlations developed earlier using fusion relevant steels. Dynamic finite elements modeling of the fracture behavior of fatigue-precracked Charpy Specimens was performed to determine the effect of single variable changes in ligament size, width, span, and thickness on the upper shelf energy. A method based on tensile fracture strain was used for modeling crack initiation and propagation. It was found that the upper shelf energy of precracked specimens (USE{sub p}) is proportional to b{sup n}, where b is ligament size and n varies from about 1.6 for subsize to 1.9 for full size specimens. The USE{sub p} was found to be proportional to width according to W{sup 25}. The dependence on thickness was found to be linear for all cases studied. Some of the data from the FEM analysis were compared with experimental data and were found to be in reasonable agreement.

  7. 3D finite element and experimental study of the size requirements for measuring toughness on tempered martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, P. [Fusion Technology-Materials, CRPP-EPFL, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)], E-mail: pablo.mueller@psi.ch; Spaetig, P. [Fusion Technology-Materials, CRPP-EPFL, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2009-06-01

    The fracture properties of the tempered martensitic steel Eurofer97, which is among the main candidates for fusion power plant structural applications, were studied with two sizes of pre-cracked compact specimens (0.35T C(T) and 0.87T C(T)). The fracture toughness behavior was characterized within the temperature range -80 to -40 deg. C. The ductile-to-brittle transition reference temperature, as defined in the ASTM standard E1921, was around T{sub 0} {approx} -75 deg. C. At -60 deg. C, it was found that two sets of toughness data obtained with 0.35T and 0.87T C(T) specimens are not consistent with the size adjustments recommended in the ASTM standard. It was then shown that the underlying reason of this inconsistency is an inappropriate specimen size limit of the ASTM standard for this type of steel. From published fracture toughness data on the tempered martensitic steel F82H steel, similar results were also highlighted. 3D finite elements simulations of the compact specimens were performed to compare the stresses and deformations at the onset of fracture. A local approach model based on the attainment of a critical stress and a critical volume was used to study the constraint loss phenomenon. Within the framework of this model, the strong toughness increase by reducing the specimen size could be satisfactorily explained.

  8. 3D finite element and experimental study of the size requirements for measuring toughness on tempered martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, P.; Spätig, P.

    2009-06-01

    The fracture properties of the tempered martensitic steel Eurofer97, which is among the main candidates for fusion power plant structural applications, were studied with two sizes of pre-cracked compact specimens (0.35T C(T) and 0.87T C(T)). The fracture toughness behavior was characterized within the temperature range -80 to -40 °C. The ductile-to-brittle transition reference temperature, as defined in the ASTM standard E1921, was around T0 ≈ -75 °C. At -60 °C, it was found that two sets of toughness data obtained with 0.35T and 0.87T C(T) specimens are not consistent with the size adjustments recommended in the ASTM standard. It was then shown that the underlying reason of this inconsistency is an inappropriate specimen size limit of the ASTM standard for this type of steel. From published fracture toughness data on the tempered martensitic steel F82H steel, similar results were also highlighted. 3D finite elements simulations of the compact specimens were performed to compare the stresses and deformations at the onset of fracture. A local approach model based on the attainment of a critical stress and a critical volume was used to study the constraint loss phenomenon. Within the framework of this model, the strong toughness increase by reducing the specimen size could be satisfactorily explained.

  9. A Comparative Study of Power and Sample Size Calculations for Multivariate General Linear Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2003-01-01

    Repeated measures and longitudinal studies arise often in social and behavioral science research. During the planning stage of such studies, the calculations of sample size are of particular interest to the investigators and should be an integral part of the research projects. In this article, we consider the power and sample size calculations for…

  10. Optimal adaptive group sequential design with flexible timing of sample size determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lu; Zhang, Lanju; Yang, Bo

    2017-04-26

    Flexible sample size designs, including group sequential and sample size re-estimation designs, have been used as alternatives to fixed sample size designs to achieve more robust statistical power and better trial efficiency. In this work, a new representation of sample size re-estimation design suggested by Cui et al. [5,6] is introduced as an adaptive group sequential design with flexible timing of sample size determination. This generalized adaptive group sequential design allows one time sample size determination either before the start of or in the mid-course of a clinical study. The new approach leads to possible design optimization on an expanded space of design parameters. Its equivalence to sample size re-estimation design proposed by Cui et al. provides further insight on re-estimation design and helps to address common confusions and misunderstanding. Issues in designing flexible sample size trial, including design objective, performance evaluation and implementation are touched upon with an example to illustrate. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. A review of finite size effects in quasi-zero dimensional superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sangita; Ayyub, Pushan

    2014-11-01

    Quantum confinement and surface effects (SEs) dramatically modify most solid state phenomena as one approaches the nanometer scale, and superconductivity is no exception. Though we may expect significant modifications from bulk superconducting properties when the system dimensions become smaller than the characteristic length scales for bulk superconductors-such as the coherence length or the penetration depth-it is now established that there is a third length scale which ultimately determines the critical size at which Cooper pairing is destroyed. In quasi-zero-dimensional (0D) superconductors (e.g. nanocrystalline materials, isolated or embedded nanoparticles), one may define a critical particle diameter below which the mean energy level spacing arising from quantum confinement becomes equal to the bulk superconducting energy gap. The so-called Anderson criterion provides a remarkably accurate estimate of the limiting size for the destabilization of superconductivity in nanosystems. This review of size effects in quasi-0D superconductors is organized as follows. A general summary of size effects in nanostructured superconductors (section 1) is followed by a brief overview of their synthesis (section 2) and characterization using a variety of techniques (section 3). Section 4 reviews the size-evolution of important superconducting parameters-the transition temperature, critical fields and critical current-as the Anderson limit is approached from above. We then discuss the effect of thermodynamic fluctuations (section 5), which become significant in confined systems. Improvements in fabrication methods and the increasing feasibility of addressing individual nanoparticles using scanning probe techniques have lately opened up new directions in the study of nanoscale superconductivity. Section 6 reviews both experimental and theoretical aspects of the recently discovered phenomena of 'parity effect' and 'shell effect' that lead to a strong, non-monotonic size

  12. Thermomagnetic behavior of magnetic susceptibility – heating rate and sample size effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eJordanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermomagnetic analysis of magnetic susceptibility k(T was carried out for a number of natural powder materials from soils, baked clay and anthropogenic dust samples using fast (11oC/min and slow (6.5oC/min heating rates available in the furnace of Kappabridge KLY2 (Agico. Based on the additional data for mineralogy, grain size and magnetic properties of the studied samples, behaviour of k(T cycles and the observed differences in the curves for fast and slow heating rate are interpreted in terms of mineralogical transformations and Curie temperatures (Tc. The effect of different sample size is also explored, using large volume and small volume of powder material. It is found that soil samples show enhanced information on mineralogical transformations and appearance of new strongly magnetic phases when using fast heating rate and large sample size. This approach moves the transformation at higher temperature, but enhances the amplitude of the signal of newly created phase. Large sample size gives prevalence of the local micro- environment, created by evolving gases, released during transformations. The example from archeological brick reveals the effect of different sample sizes on the observed Curie temperatures on heating and cooling curves, when the magnetic carrier is substituted magnetite (Mn0.2Fe2.70O4. Large sample size leads to bigger differences in Tcs on heating and cooling, while small sample size results in similar Tcs for both heating rates.

  13. Nonlinear dynamics of a vapor bubble expanding in a superheated region of finite size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenkova, E. A.; Kreider, W.; Sapozhnikov, O. A.

    2015-10-01

    Growth of a vapor bubble in a superheated liquid is studied theoretically. Contrary to the typical situation of boiling, when bubbles grow in a uniformly heated liquid, here the superheated region is considered in the form of a millimeter-sized spherical hot spot. An initial micron-sized bubble is positioned at the hot spot center and a theoretical model is developed that is capable of studying bubble growth caused by vapor pressure inside the bubble and corresponding hydrodynamic and thermal processes in the surrounding liquid. Such a situation is relevant to the dynamics of vapor cavities that are created in soft biological tissue in the focal region of a high-intensity focused ultrasound beam with a shocked pressure waveform. Such beams are used in the recently proposed treatment called boiling histotripsy. Knowing the typical behavior of vapor cavities during boiling histotripsy could help to optimize the therapeutic procedure.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics of a vapor bubble expanding in a superheated region of finite size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annenkova, E. A., E-mail: a-a-annenkova@yandex.ru [Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kreider, W. [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th St., Seattle, WA 98105 (United States); Sapozhnikov, O. A. [Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th St., Seattle, WA 98105 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Growth of a vapor bubble in a superheated liquid is studied theoretically. Contrary to the typical situation of boiling, when bubbles grow in a uniformly heated liquid, here the superheated region is considered in the form of a millimeter-sized spherical hot spot. An initial micron-sized bubble is positioned at the hot spot center and a theoretical model is developed that is capable of studying bubble growth caused by vapor pressure inside the bubble and corresponding hydrodynamic and thermal processes in the surrounding liquid. Such a situation is relevant to the dynamics of vapor cavities that are created in soft biological tissue in the focal region of a high-intensity focused ultrasound beam with a shocked pressure waveform. Such beams are used in the recently proposed treatment called boiling histotripsy. Knowing the typical behavior of vapor cavities during boiling histotripsy could help to optimize the therapeutic procedure.

  15. Finite-size effects on the lattice dynamics in spin crossover nanomaterials. II. Molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasek, Mirko; Nicolazzi, William; Terki, Férial; Molnár, Gábor; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2017-07-01

    In the first part of this work, an experimental study of the lattice dynamics of spin crossover nanoparticles was performed using the nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS). A size dependence of low energy phonon modes appears under 10 nm, but its origin is not well understood. In this paper, we investigate the phonon confinement effects in the framework of molecular dynamics simulations by modeling three-dimensional nanoparticles considering a cubic lattice with an octahedral pattern. The vibrational density of states is computed and compared to the experiment. The simulations allow one to highlight both the role of the phonon quantification and the role of the size and shape distributions of particles on the extracted parameters leading to a better understanding of the experimental results.

  16. On limitation of quality factor of single mode resonators with finite size

    CERN Document Server

    Ferdous, Fahmida; Vyatchanin, Sergey P; Matsko, Andrey B; Maleki, Lute

    2014-01-01

    Using realistic numerical models we analyze radiative loss of bound and unbound modes of specially designed high-Q whispering gallery and Fabry-Perot cavities of similar size and shape, and find a set of parameters when they can be treated as single mode structures. We show that these cavities have similar properties in spite of their different loss mechanisms. The cavity morphology engineering does not lead to reduction of the resonator quality factor.

  17. Synchronization in scale-free networks: The role of finite-size effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, D.; Di Muro, M. A.; La Rocca, C. E.; Braunstein, L. A.

    2015-06-01

    Synchronization problems in complex networks are very often studied by researchers due to their many applications to various fields such as neurobiology, e-commerce and completion of tasks. In particular, scale-free networks with degree distribution P(k)∼ k-λ , are widely used in research since they are ubiquitous in Nature and other real systems. In this paper we focus on the surface relaxation growth model in scale-free networks with 2.5system size N. We find a novel behavior of the fluctuations characterized by a crossover between two regimes at a value of N=N* that depends on λ: a logarithmic regime, found in previous research, and a constant regime. We propose a function that describes this crossover, which is in very good agreement with the simulations. We also find that, for a system size above N* , the fluctuations decrease with λ, which means that the synchronization of the system improves as λ increases. We explain this crossover analyzing the role of the network's heterogeneity produced by the system size N and the exponent of the degree distribution.

  18. Reliable calculation in probabilistic logic: Accounting for small sample size and model uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferson, S. [Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A variety of practical computational problems arise in risk and safety assessments, forensic statistics and decision analyses in which the probability of some event or proposition E is to be estimated from the probabilities of a finite list of related subevents or propositions F,G,H,.... In practice, the analyst`s knowledge may be incomplete in two ways. First, the probabilities of the subevents may be imprecisely known from statistical estimations, perhaps based on very small sample sizes. Second, relationships among the subevents may be known imprecisely. For instance, there may be only limited information about their stochastic dependencies. Representing probability estimates as interval ranges on has been suggested as a way to address the first source of imprecision. A suite of AND, OR and NOT operators defined with reference to the classical Frochet inequalities permit these probability intervals to be used in calculations that address the second source of imprecision, in many cases, in a best possible way. Using statistical confidence intervals as inputs unravels the closure properties of this approach however, requiring that probability estimates be characterized by a nested stack of intervals for all possible levels of statistical confidence, from a point estimate (0% confidence) to the entire unit interval (100% confidence). The corresponding logical operations implied by convolutive application of the logical operators for every possible pair of confidence intervals reduces by symmetry to a manageably simple level-wise iteration. The resulting calculus can be implemented in software that allows users to compute comprehensive and often level-wise best possible bounds on probabilities for logical functions of events.

  19. Sample Size Estimation for Non-Inferiority Trials: Frequentist Approach versus Decision Theory Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A C Bouman

    Full Text Available Non-inferiority trials are performed when the main therapeutic effect of the new therapy is expected to be not unacceptably worse than that of the standard therapy, and the new therapy is expected to have advantages over the standard therapy in costs or other (health consequences. These advantages however are not included in the classic frequentist approach of sample size calculation for non-inferiority trials. In contrast, the decision theory approach of sample size calculation does include these factors. The objective of this study is to compare the conceptual and practical aspects of the frequentist approach and decision theory approach of sample size calculation for non-inferiority trials, thereby demonstrating that the decision theory approach is more appropriate for sample size calculation of non-inferiority trials.The frequentist approach and decision theory approach of sample size calculation for non-inferiority trials are compared and applied to a case of a non-inferiority trial on individually tailored duration of elastic compression stocking therapy compared to two years elastic compression stocking therapy for the prevention of post thrombotic syndrome after deep vein thrombosis.The two approaches differ substantially in conceptual background, analytical approach, and input requirements. The sample size calculated according to the frequentist approach yielded 788 patients, using a power of 80% and a one-sided significance level of 5%. The decision theory approach indicated that the optimal sample size was 500 patients, with a net value of €92 million.This study demonstrates and explains the differences between the classic frequentist approach and the decision theory approach of sample size calculation for non-inferiority trials. We argue that the decision theory approach of sample size estimation is most suitable for sample size calculation of non-inferiority trials.

  20. Are sample sizes clear and justified in RCTs published in dental journals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despina Koletsi

    Full Text Available Sample size calculations are advocated by the CONSORT group to justify sample sizes in randomized controlled trials (RCTs. The aim of this study was primarily to evaluate the reporting of sample size calculations, to establish the accuracy of these calculations in dental RCTs and to explore potential predictors associated with adequate reporting. Electronic searching was undertaken in eight leading specific and general dental journals. Replication of sample size calculations was undertaken where possible. Assumed variances or odds for control and intervention groups were also compared against those observed. The relationship between parameters including journal type, number of authors, trial design, involvement of methodologist, single-/multi-center study and region and year of publication, and the accuracy of sample size reporting was assessed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression. Of 413 RCTs identified, sufficient information to allow replication of sample size calculations was provided in only 121 studies (29.3%. Recalculations demonstrated an overall median overestimation of sample size of 15.2% after provisions for losses to follow-up. There was evidence that journal, methodologist involvement (OR = 1.97, CI: 1.10, 3.53, multi-center settings (OR = 1.86, CI: 1.01, 3.43 and time since publication (OR = 1.24, CI: 1.12, 1.38 were significant predictors of adequate description of sample size assumptions. Among journals JCP had the highest odds of adequately reporting sufficient data to permit sample size recalculation, followed by AJODO and JDR, with 61% (OR = 0.39, CI: 0.19, 0.80 and 66% (OR = 0.34, CI: 0.15, 0.75 lower odds, respectively. Both assumed variances and odds were found to underestimate the observed values. Presentation of sample size calculations in the dental literature is suboptimal; incorrect assumptions may have a bearing on the power of RCTs.

  1. Are sample sizes clear and justified in RCTs published in dental journals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koletsi, Despina; Fleming, Padhraig S; Seehra, Jadbinder; Bagos, Pantelis G; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Sample size calculations are advocated by the CONSORT group to justify sample sizes in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The aim of this study was primarily to evaluate the reporting of sample size calculations, to establish the accuracy of these calculations in dental RCTs and to explore potential predictors associated with adequate reporting. Electronic searching was undertaken in eight leading specific and general dental journals. Replication of sample size calculations was undertaken where possible. Assumed variances or odds for control and intervention groups were also compared against those observed. The relationship between parameters including journal type, number of authors, trial design, involvement of methodologist, single-/multi-center study and region and year of publication, and the accuracy of sample size reporting was assessed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression. Of 413 RCTs identified, sufficient information to allow replication of sample size calculations was provided in only 121 studies (29.3%). Recalculations demonstrated an overall median overestimation of sample size of 15.2% after provisions for losses to follow-up. There was evidence that journal, methodologist involvement (OR = 1.97, CI: 1.10, 3.53), multi-center settings (OR = 1.86, CI: 1.01, 3.43) and time since publication (OR = 1.24, CI: 1.12, 1.38) were significant predictors of adequate description of sample size assumptions. Among journals JCP had the highest odds of adequately reporting sufficient data to permit sample size recalculation, followed by AJODO and JDR, with 61% (OR = 0.39, CI: 0.19, 0.80) and 66% (OR = 0.34, CI: 0.15, 0.75) lower odds, respectively. Both assumed variances and odds were found to underestimate the observed values. Presentation of sample size calculations in the dental literature is suboptimal; incorrect assumptions may have a bearing on the power of RCTs.

  2. Sample Size Estimation for Non-Inferiority Trials: Frequentist Approach versus Decision Theory Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouman, A C; ten Cate-Hoek, A J; Ramaekers, B L T; Joore, M A

    2015-01-01

    Non-inferiority trials are performed when the main therapeutic effect of the new therapy is expected to be not unacceptably worse than that of the standard therapy, and the new therapy is expected to have advantages over the standard therapy in costs or other (health) consequences. These advantages however are not included in the classic frequentist approach of sample size calculation for non-inferiority trials. In contrast, the decision theory approach of sample size calculation does include these factors. The objective of this study is to compare the conceptual and practical aspects of the frequentist approach and decision theory approach of sample size calculation for non-inferiority trials, thereby demonstrating that the decision theory approach is more appropriate for sample size calculation of non-inferiority trials. The frequentist approach and decision theory approach of sample size calculation for non-inferiority trials are compared and applied to a case of a non-inferiority trial on individually tailored duration of elastic compression stocking therapy compared to two years elastic compression stocking therapy for the prevention of post thrombotic syndrome after deep vein thrombosis. The two approaches differ substantially in conceptual background, analytical approach, and input requirements. The sample size calculated according to the frequentist approach yielded 788 patients, using a power of 80% and a one-sided significance level of 5%. The decision theory approach indicated that the optimal sample size was 500 patients, with a net value of €92 million. This study demonstrates and explains the differences between the classic frequentist approach and the decision theory approach of sample size calculation for non-inferiority trials. We argue that the decision theory approach of sample size estimation is most suitable for sample size calculation of non-inferiority trials.

  3. Detecting spatial structures in throughfall data: The effect of extent, sample size, sampling design, and variogram estimation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Beate; Zimmermann, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    In the last decades, an increasing number of studies analyzed spatial patterns in throughfall by means of variograms. The estimation of the variogram from sample data requires an appropriate sampling scheme: most importantly, a large sample and a layout of sampling locations that often has to serve both variogram estimation and geostatistical prediction. While some recommendations on these aspects exist, they focus on Gaussian data and high ratios of the variogram range to the extent of the study area. However, many hydrological data, and throughfall data in particular, do not follow a Gaussian distribution. In this study, we examined the effect of extent, sample size, sampling design, and calculation method on variogram estimation of throughfall data. For our investigation, we first generated non-Gaussian random fields based on throughfall data with large outliers. Subsequently, we sampled the fields with three extents (plots with edge lengths of 25 m, 50 m, and 100 m), four common sampling designs (two grid-based layouts, transect and random sampling) and five sample sizes (50, 100, 150, 200, 400). We then estimated the variogram parameters by method-of-moments (non-robust and robust estimators) and residual maximum likelihood. Our key findings are threefold. First, the choice of the extent has a substantial influence on the estimation of the variogram. A comparatively small ratio of the extent to the correlation length is beneficial for variogram estimation. Second, a combination of a minimum sample size of 150, a design that ensures the sampling of small distances and variogram estimation by residual maximum likelihood offers a good compromise between accuracy and efficiency. Third, studies relying on method-of-moments based variogram estimation may have to employ at least 200 sampling points for reliable variogram estimates. These suggested sample sizes exceed the number recommended by studies dealing with Gaussian data by up to 100 %. Given that most previous

  4. Optimal and maximin sample sizes for multicentre cost-effectiveness trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manju, Md Abu; Candel, Math J J M; Berger, Martijn P F

    2015-10-01

    This paper deals with the optimal sample sizes for a multicentre trial in which the cost-effectiveness of two treatments in terms of net monetary benefit is studied. A bivariate random-effects model, with the treatment-by-centre interaction effect being random and the main effect of centres fixed or random, is assumed to describe both costs and effects. The optimal sample sizes concern the number of centres and the number of individuals per centre in each of the treatment conditions. These numbers maximize the efficiency or power for given research costs or minimize the research costs at a desired level of efficiency or power. Information on model parameters and sampling costs are required to calculate these optimal sample sizes. In case of limited information on relevant model parameters, sample size formulas are derived for so-called maximin sample sizes which guarantee a power level at the lowest study costs. Four different maximin sample sizes are derived based on the signs of the lower bounds of two model parameters, with one case being worst compared to others. We numerically evaluate the efficiency of the worst case instead of using others. Finally, an expression is derived for calculating optimal and maximin sample sizes that yield sufficient power to test the cost-effectiveness of two treatments. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Finite size effect on spread of resonance frequencies in arrays of coupled vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Andreas; Drews, André; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido

    2011-01-25

    Dynamical properties of magnetic vortices in arrays of magnetostatically coupled ferromagnetic disks are studied by means of a broadband ferromagnetic-resonance (FMR) setup. Magnetic force microscopy and magnetic transmission soft X-ray microscopy are used to image the core polarizations and the chiralities which are both found to be randomly distributed. The resonance frequency of vortex-core motion strongly depends on the magnetostatic coupling between the disks. The parameter describing the relative broadening of the absorption peak observed in the FMR transmission spectra for a given normalized center-to-center distance between the elements is shown to depend on the size of the array.

  6. Finite-size scaling of entanglement entropy in one-dimensional topological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuting; Gulden, Tobias; Kamenev, Alex

    2017-02-01

    We consider scaling of the entanglement entropy across a topological quantum phase transition for the Kitaev chain model. The change of the topology manifests itself in a subleading term, which scales as L-1 /α with the size of the subsystem L , here α is the Rényi index. This term reveals the scaling function hα(L /ξ ) , where ξ is the correlation length, which is sensitive to the topological index. The scaling function hα(L /ξ ) is independent of model parameters, suggesting some degree of its universality.

  7. The Effects of Sample Size on Expected Value, Variance and Fraser Efficiency for Nonparametric Independent Two Sample Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismet DOGAN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Choosing the most efficient statistical test is one of the essential problems of statistics. Asymptotic relative efficiency is a notion which enables to implement in large samples the quantitative comparison of two different tests used for testing of the same statistical hypothesis. The notion of the asymptotic efficiency of tests is more complicated than that of asymptotic efficiency of estimates. This paper discusses the effect of sample size on expected values and variances of non-parametric tests for independent two samples and determines the most effective test for different sample sizes using Fraser efficiency value. Material and Methods: Since calculating the power value in comparison of the tests is not practical most of the time, using the asymptotic relative efficiency value is favorable. Asymptotic relative efficiency is an indispensable technique for comparing and ordering statistical test in large samples. It is especially useful in nonparametric statistics where there exist numerous heuristic tests such as the linear rank tests. In this study, the sample size is determined as 2 ≤ n ≤ 50. Results: In both balanced and unbalanced cases, it is found that, as the sample size increases expected values and variances of all the tests discussed in this paper increase as well. Additionally, considering the Fraser efficiency, Mann-Whitney U test is found as the most efficient test among the non-parametric tests that are used in comparison of independent two samples regardless of their sizes. Conclusion: According to Fraser efficiency, Mann-Whitney U test is found as the most efficient test.

  8. Synchronization in Scale Free networks: The role of finite size effects

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, Débora; La Rocca, Cristian E; Braunstein, Lidia A

    2015-01-01

    Synchronization problems in complex networks are very often studied by researchers due to its many applications to various fields such as neurobiology, e-commerce and completion of tasks. In particular, Scale Free networks with degree distribution $P(k)\\sim k^{-\\lambda}$, are widely used in research since they are ubiquitous in nature and other real systems. In this paper we focus on the surface relaxation growth model in Scale Free networks with $2.5< \\lambda <3$, and study the scaling behavior of the fluctuations, in the steady state, with the system size $N$. We find a novel behavior of the fluctuations characterized by a crossover between two regimes at a value of $N=N^*$ that depends on $\\lambda$: a logarithmic regime, found in previous research, and a constant regime. We propose a function that describes this crossover, which is in very good agreement with the simulations. We also find that, for a system size above $N^{*}$, the fluctuations decrease with $\\lambda$, which means that the synchroniza...

  9. Linked Gauss-Diffusion processes for modeling a finite-size neuronal network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carfora, M F; Pirozzi, E

    2017-08-02

    A Leaky Integrate-and-Fire (LIF) model with stochastic current-based linkages is considered to describe the firing activity of neurons interacting in a (2×2)-size feed-forward network. In the subthreshold regime and under the assumption that no more than one spike is exchanged between coupled neurons, the stochastic evolution of the neuronal membrane voltage is subject to random jumps due to interactions in the network. Linked Gauss-Diffusion processes are proposed to describe this dynamics and to provide estimates of the firing probability density of each neuron. To this end, an iterated integral equation-based approach is applied to evaluate numerically the first passage time density of such processes through the firing threshold. Asymptotic approximations of the firing densities of surrounding neurons are used to obtain closed-form expressions for the mean of the involved processes and to simplify the numerical procedure. An extension of the model to an (N×N)-size network is also given. Histograms of firing times obtained by simulations of the LIF dynamics and numerical firings estimates are compared. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Spectral statistics, finite-size scaling and multifractal analysis of quasiperiodic chain with p-wave pairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yucheng; Wang, Yancheng; Chen, Shu

    2016-11-01

    We study the spectral and wavefunction properties of a one-dimensional incommensurate system with p-wave pairing and unveil that the system demonstrates a series of particular properties in its ciritical region. By studying the spectral statistics, we show that the bandwidth distribution and level spacing distribution in the critical region follow inverse power laws, which however break down in the extended and localized regions. By performing a finite-size scaling analysis, we can obtain some critical exponents of the system and find these exponents fulfilling a hyperscaling law in the whole critical region. We also carry out a multifractal analysis on system's wavefuntions by using a box-counting method and unveil the wavefuntions displaying different behaviors in the critical, extended and localized regions.

  11. Photonic band gap in an imperfect atomic diamond lattice: Penetration depth and effects of finite size and vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antezza, Mauro; Castin, Yvan

    2013-09-01

    We study the effects of finite size and of vacancies on the photonic band gap recently predicted for an atomic diamond lattice. Close to a Jg=0→Je=1 atomic transition, and for atomic lattices containing up to N≈3×104 atoms, we show how the density of states can be affected by both the shape of the system and the possible presence of a fraction of unoccupied lattice sites. We numerically predict and theoretically explain the presence of shape-induced border states and of vacancy-induced localized states appearing in the gap. We also investigate the penetration depth of the electromagnetic field which we compare to the case of an infinite system.

  12. Proton form-factor dependence of the finite-size correction to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, J D; Rafelski, J; Miller, G A

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of the 2P^{F=2}_{3/2} to 2S^{F=1}_{1/2} transition in muonic hydrogen by Pohl et al. and subsequent analysis has led to the conclusion that the rms radius of the proton differs from the accepted (CODATA) value by approximately 4%, corresponding to a 4.9 sigma discrepancy. We investigate the finite-size effects - in particular the dependence on the shape of the proton electric form-factor - relevant to this transition using bound-state QED with nonperturbative, relativistic Dirac wave-functions for a wide range of idealised charge-distributions and a parameterization of experimental data in order to comment on the extent to which the perturbation-theory analysis which leads to the above conclusion can be confirmed. We find no statistically significant dependence of this correction on the shape of the proton form-factor.

  13. Capacitance of graphene in aqueous electrolytes: The effects of dielectric saturation of water and finite size of ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P.; Mišković, Z. L.

    2014-09-01

    We present a theoretical model for electrolytically top-gated graphene, in which we analyze the effects of dielectric saturation of water due to possibly strong electric fields near the surface of a highly charged graphene, as well as the steric effects due to the finite size of salt ions in an aqueous electrolyte. By combining two well-established analytical models for those two effects, we show that the total capacitance of the solution-gated graphene is dominated by its quantum capacitance for gating potentials ≲1V, which is the range of primary interest for most sensor applications of graphene. On the other hand, at the potentials ≳1V the total capacitance is dominated by a universal capacitance of the electric double layer in the electrolyte, which exhibits a dramatic decrease of capacitance with increasing gating potential due to the interplay of a fully saturated dielectric constant of water and ion crowding near graphene.

  14. Energy landscape of the finite-size mean-field 2-spin spherical model and topology trivialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Dhagash; Hauenstein, Jonathan D.; Niemerg, Matthew; Simm, Nicholas J.; Stariolo, Daniel A.

    2015-02-01

    Motivated by the recently observed phenomenon of topology trivialization of potential energy landscapes (PELs) for several statistical mechanics models, we perform a numerical study of the finite-size 2-spin spherical model using both numerical polynomial homotopy continuation and a reformulation via non-Hermitian matrices. The continuation approach computes all of the complex stationary points of this model while the matrix approach computes the real stationary points. Using these methods, we compute the average number of stationary points while changing the topology of the PEL as well as the variance. Histograms of these stationary points are presented along with an analysis regarding the complex stationary points. This work connects topology trivialization to two different branches of mathematics: algebraic geometry and catastrophe theory, which is fertile ground for further interdisciplinary research.

  15. An Ising iron(ii) chain exhibits a large finite-size energy barrier and "hard" magnetic behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi-Fei; Han, Tian; Xue, Wei; Hayashi, Naoaki; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Zheng, Yan-Zhen

    2017-01-31

    One-dimensional spin chains featuring strong axial anisotropic magnetism are promising candidates for isolatable and miniatured information storage materials, the so-called single-chain magnets (SCMs). Here we show a mixed azido/carboxylato bridged metamagnetic iron(ii) chain [Fe(N3)2(4-mpc)]n (4-mpc = N-methylpyridinium-4-carboxylate) with a large energy barrier of 150 K, a large remnant magnetization (1.55Nβ) and coercivity (1.7 T at 2 K) for homo-spin SCMs. Heat capacity and Mössbauer spectroscopy studies corroborate the intrinsic nature of SCM behavior regardless of weak interchain magnetic interactions, which lead to the coexistence of metamagnetism but not long-range magnetic ordering. Moreover, detailed magnetic investigations indicate that the system is not only within the "Ising limit" but also in the "finite-size" regime.

  16. Blinded sample size reestimation in non-inferiority trials with binary endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friede, Tim; Mitchell, Charles; Müller-Velten, Günther

    2007-12-01

    Sample size calculations in the planning of clinical trials depend on good estimates of the model parameters involved. When the estimates of these parameters have a high degree of uncertainty attached to them, it is advantageous to reestimate the sample size after an internal pilot study. For non-inferiority trials with binary outcome we compare the performance of Type I error rate and power between fixed-size designs and designs with sample size reestimation. The latter design shows itself to be effective in correcting sample size and power of the tests when misspecification of nuisance parameters occurs with the former design. (c) 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  17. Finite size effect of proton-conductivity of amorphous silicate thin films based on mesoscopic fluctuation of glass network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Yoshitaka; Habazaki, Hiroki; Nagata, Shinji; Nakao, Aiko; Kunitake, Toyoki; Yamaguchi, Shu

    2011-03-16

    The finite size effect of proton conductivity of amorphous silicate thin films, a-M(0.1)Si(0.9)O(x) (M = Al, Ga, Hf, Ti, Ta, and La), was investigated. The proton conductivity across films, σ, was measured in dry air by changing the thickness in the range of 10-1000 nm. σ of the films with M = Al, Ga, and Ta was elevated in a power law by decreasing thickness into less than a few hundred nanometers, and the increment was saturated at a thickness of several 10's of nanometers. On the other hand, σ of the films with M = Hf, Ti, and La was not related to the decrease of the thickness in the range of >10 nm. Thickness-dependent conductivity of the former could be numerically simulated by a percolative resistor network model that involves the randomly distributed array of two kinds of resistors R(1) and R(2) (R(1) > R(2)) in the form of a simple cubic-type lattice. High-resolution TEM clarified that a-M(0.1)Si(0.9)O(x) films involved heterogeneous microstructures made of the condensed domain and the surrounding uncondensed matrix due to the fluctuation of glass networks on the nanometer scale. The condensed domain had a wormlike shape with an average length of several 10's of nanometers and performed the role of the proton conduction pathway penetrating through the poorly conducting matrix. It was concluded that the thickness-dependent conductivity could be identical to finite-size scaling of the percolative network of the interconnected domains in the nanometer range.

  18. A model to predict modal radiation by finite-sized sources in semi-infinite isotropic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stévenin, M.; Lhémery, A.; Grondel, S.

    2017-01-01

    Elastic guided wave (GW) propagation is involved in various non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques of plate-like structures. The present paper aims at describing an efficient model to predict the GW field radiated by various sources attached at a distance of the straight boundary of an isotropic plate, a configuration often encountered in typical examinations. Since the interpretation of GW propagation and scattering in plates is made easier by the use of modal description, the model is derived in the classical theoretical framework of modal solutions. Direct radiation by a uniform source of finite size in an isotropic plate can be efficiently modelled by deriving Fraunhofer-like approximation. A rigorous treatment is proposed based upon i) the stationary phase method to describe the field after reflection at a plate edge, ii) on the computation of modal reflection coefficients for an arbitrary incidence relative to the edge and iii) on the Fraunhofer approximation to account for the finite size of the source. The stationary phase method allows us to easily express the amplitude of reflected modes, that is to say, the way waves spread, including reflections involving mode conversions. The computation of modal reflection coefficients for plane GW at oblique incidence was recently treated in the literature and our work for this very problem simply consisted in adapting it to the SAFE calculation we use to compute modal solutions. The overall computation of the direct and reflected contributions is numerically very efficient. Once the total field is computed at a given frequency, the time-dependent field is obtained by simple Fourier synthesis.

  19. Finite size effects on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy in Fe magnetic nanowires from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, F. [Max-Planck-Institute fuer Mikrostrukturphysik (Germany); Romero, A. H. [CINVESTAV, Unidad Queretaro (Mexico); Mejia-Lopez, J., E-mail: jmejia@puc.cl [Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile (Chile); Moran-Lopez, J. L. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Laboratorio Interdisciplinario, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    The geometric and the electronic structures, the magnetic moments, and the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy of bcc-Fe nanowires with z-axis along the (110) direction are calculated in the framework of ab initio theories. In particular, we report a systematic study of free standing nanowires with geometries and sizes ranging from diatomic to 1 nm wide with 31 atoms per unit cell. We found that for nanowires with less than 14 atoms per unit cell, the ground-state structure is body-centered tetragonal. We also calculated the contributions of the dipolar magnetic energy to the magnetic anisotropy energy and found that in some cases, this contribution overcomes the magnetocrystalline part, determining thereby the easy axis direction. These results emphasize the importance and competition between both contributions in low dimensional systems.

  20. The PowerAtlas: a power and sample size atlas for microarray experimental design and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jelai

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays permit biologists to simultaneously measure the mRNA abundance of thousands of genes. An important issue facing investigators planning microarray experiments is how to estimate the sample size required for good statistical power. What is the projected sample size or number of replicate chips needed to address the multiple hypotheses with acceptable accuracy? Statistical methods exist for calculating power based upon a single hypothesis, using estimates of the variability in data from pilot studies. There is, however, a need for methods to estimate power and/or required sample sizes in situations where multiple hypotheses are being tested, such as in microarray experiments. In addition, investigators frequently do not have pilot data to estimate the sample sizes required for microarray studies. Results To address this challenge, we have developed a Microrarray PowerAtlas 1. The atlas enables estimation of statistical power by allowing investigators to appropriately plan studies by building upon previous studies that have similar experimental characteristics. Currently, there are sample sizes and power estimates based on 632 experiments from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO. The PowerAtlas also permits investigators to upload their own pilot data and derive power and sample size estimates from these data. This resource will be updated regularly with new datasets from GEO and other databases such as The Nottingham Arabidopsis Stock Center (NASC. Conclusion This resource provides a valuable tool for investigators who are planning efficient microarray studies and estimating required sample sizes.

  1. GIFFT: A Fast Solver for Modeling Sources in a Metamaterial Environment of Finite Size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capolino, F; Basilio, L; Fasenfest, B J; Wilton, D R

    2006-01-23

    Due to the recent explosion of interest in studying the electromagnetic behavior of large (truncated) periodic structures such as phased arrays, frequency-selective surfaces, and metamaterials, there has been a renewed interest in efficiently modeling such structures. Since straightforward numerical analyses of large, finite structures (i.e., explicitly meshing and computing interactions between all mesh elements of the entire structure) involve significant memory storage and computation times, much effort is currently being expended on developing techniques that minimize the high demand on computer resources. One such technique that belongs to the class of fast solvers for large periodic structures is the GIFFT algorithm (Green's function interpolation and FFT), which is first discussed in [1]. This method is a modification of the adaptive integral method (AIM) [2], a technique based on the projection of subdomain basis functions onto a rectangular grid. Like the methods presented in [3]-[4], the GIFFT algorithm is an extension of the AIM method in that it uses basis-function projections onto a rectangular grid through Lagrange interpolating polynomials. The use of a rectangular grid results in a matrix-vector product that is convolutional in form and can thus be evaluated using FFTs. Although our method differs from [3]-[6] in various respects, the primary differences between the AIM approach [2] and the GIFFT method [1] is the latter's use of interpolation to represent the Green's function (GF) and its specialization to periodic structures by taking into account the reusability properties of matrices that arise from interactions between identical cell elements. The present work extends the GIFFT algorithm to allow for a complete numerical analysis of a periodic structure excited by dipole source, as shown in Fig 1. Although GIFFT [1] was originally developed to handle strictly periodic structures, the technique has now been extended to efficiently

  2. Optimal designs of the median run length based double sampling X chart for minimizing the average sample size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Lin Teoh

    Full Text Available Designs of the double sampling (DS X chart are traditionally based on the average run length (ARL criterion. However, the shape of the run length distribution changes with the process mean shifts, ranging from highly skewed when the process is in-control to almost symmetric when the mean shift is large. Therefore, we show that the ARL is a complicated performance measure and that the median run length (MRL is a more meaningful measure to depend on. This is because the MRL provides an intuitive and a fair representation of the central tendency, especially for the rightly skewed run length distribution. Since the DS X chart can effectively reduce the sample size without reducing the statistical efficiency, this paper proposes two optimal designs of the MRL-based DS X chart, for minimizing (i the in-control average sample size (ASS and (ii both the in-control and out-of-control ASSs. Comparisons with the optimal MRL-based EWMA X and Shewhart X charts demonstrate the superiority of the proposed optimal MRL-based DS X chart, as the latter requires a smaller sample size on the average while maintaining the same detection speed as the two former charts. An example involving the added potassium sorbate in a yoghurt manufacturing process is used to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed MRL-based DS X chart in reducing the sample size needed.

  3. New method to estimate the sample size for calculation of a proportion assuming binomial distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Adriana; Muniesa, Ana; Ferreira, Chelo; de Blas, Ignacio

    2013-10-01

    Nowadays the formula to calculate the sample size for estimate a proportion (as prevalence) is based on the Normal distribution, however it would be based on a Binomial distribution which confidence interval was possible to be calculated using the Wilson Score method. By comparing the two formulae (Normal and Binomial distributions), the variation of the amplitude of the confidence intervals is relevant in the tails and the center of the curves. In order to calculate the needed sample size we have simulated an iterative sampling procedure, which shows an underestimation of the sample size for values of prevalence closed to 0 or 1, and also an overestimation for values closed to 0.5. Attending to these results we proposed an algorithm based on Wilson Score method that provides similar values for the sample size than empirically obtained by simulation.

  4. PIXE-PIGE analysis of size-segregated aerosol samples from remote areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Taccetti, F.; Becagli, S.; Frosini, D.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical characterization of size-segregated samples is helpful to study the aerosol effects on both human health and environment. The sampling with multi-stage cascade impactors (e.g., Small Deposit area Impactor, SDI) produces inhomogeneous samples, with a multi-spot geometry and a non-negligible particle stratification.

  5. Sample size adjustment designs with time-to-event outcomes: A caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidlin, Boris; Korn, Edward L

    2017-08-01

    Sample size adjustment designs, which allow increasing the study sample size based on interim analysis of outcome data from a randomized clinical trial, have been increasingly promoted in the biostatistical literature. Although it is recognized that group sequential designs can be at least as efficient as sample size adjustment designs, many authors argue that a key advantage of these designs is their flexibility; interim sample size adjustment decisions can incorporate information and business interests external to the trial. Recently, Chen et al. (Clinical Trials 2015) considered sample size adjustment applications in the time-to-event setting using a design (CDL) that limits adjustments to situations where the interim results are promising. The authors demonstrated that while CDL provides little gain in unconditional power (versus fixed-sample-size designs), there is a considerable increase in conditional power for trials in which the sample size is adjusted. In time-to-event settings, sample size adjustment allows an increase in the number of events required for the final analysis. This can be achieved by either (a) following the original study population until the additional events are observed thus focusing on the tail of the survival curves or (b) enrolling a potentially large number of additional patients thus focusing on the early differences in survival curves. We use the CDL approach to investigate performance of sample size adjustment designs in time-to-event trials. Through simulations, we demonstrate that when the magnitude of the true treatment effect changes over time, interim information on the shape of the survival curves can be used to enrich the final analysis with events from the time period with the strongest treatment effect. In particular, interested parties have the ability to make the end-of-trial treatment effect larger (on average) based on decisions using interim outcome data. Furthermore, in "clinical null" cases where there is no

  6. A NONPARAMETRIC PROCEDURE OF THE SAMPLE SIZE DETERMINATION FOR SURVIVAL RATE TEST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective This paper proposes a nonparametric procedure of the sample size determination for survival rate test. Methods Using the classical asymptotic normal procedure yields the required homogenetic effective sample size and using the inverse operation with the prespecified value of the survival function of censoring times yields the required sample size. Results It is matched with the rate test for censored data, does not involve survival distributions, and reduces to its classical counterpart when there is no censoring. The observed power of the test coincides with the prescribed power under usual clinical conditions. Conclusion It can be used for planning survival studies of chronic diseases.

  7. Clustering and preferential concentration of finite-size particles in forced homogeneous-isotropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Uhlmann, Markus

    2016-01-01

    We have performed interface-resolved direct numerical simulations of forced homogeneous-isotropic turbulence in a dilute suspension of spherical particles in the Reynolds number range Re-lambda=115-140. The solid-fluid density ratio was set to 1.5, gravity was set to zero, and two particle diameters were investigated corresponding to approximately 5 and 11 Kolmogorov lengths. Note that these particle sizes are clearly outside the range of validity of the point-particle approximation, as has been shown by Homann & Bec (2010). At the present parameter points the global effect of the particles upon the fluid flow is weak. We observe that the dispersed phase exhibits clustering with moderate intensity. The tendency to cluster, which was quantified in terms of the standard deviation of Voronoi cell volumes, decreases with the particle diameter. We have analyzed the relation between particle locations and the location of intense vortical flow structures. The results do not reveal any significant statistical cor...

  8. Adaptive beamlet-based finite-size pencil beam dose calculation for independent verification of IMRT and VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Justin C.; Li, Jonathan G.; Arhjoul, Lahcen; Yan, Guanghua; Lu, Bo; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray, E-mail: liucr@ufl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The use of sophisticated dose calculation procedure in modern radiation therapy treatment planning is inevitable in order to account for complex treatment fields created by multileaf collimators (MLCs). As a consequence, independent volumetric dose verification is time consuming, which affects the efficiency of clinical workflow. In this study, the authors present an efficient adaptive beamlet-based finite-size pencil beam (AB-FSPB) dose calculation algorithm that minimizes the computational procedure while preserving the accuracy. Methods: The computational time of finite-size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm is proportional to the number of infinitesimal and identical beamlets that constitute an arbitrary field shape. In AB-FSPB, dose distribution from each beamlet is mathematically modeled such that the sizes of beamlets to represent an arbitrary field shape no longer need to be infinitesimal nor identical. As a result, it is possible to represent an arbitrary field shape with combinations of different sized and minimal number of beamlets. In addition, the authors included the model parameters to consider MLC for its rounded edge and transmission. Results: Root mean square error (RMSE) between treatment planning system and conventional FSPB on a 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} square field using 10 × 10, 2.5 × 2.5, and 0.5 × 0.5 cm{sup 2} beamlet sizes were 4.90%, 3.19%, and 2.87%, respectively, compared with RMSE of 1.10%, 1.11%, and 1.14% for AB-FSPB. This finding holds true for a larger square field size of 25 × 25 cm{sup 2}, where RMSE for 25 × 25, 2.5 × 2.5, and 0.5 × 0.5 cm{sup 2} beamlet sizes were 5.41%, 4.76%, and 3.54% in FSPB, respectively, compared with RMSE of 0.86%, 0.83%, and 0.88% for AB-FSPB. It was found that AB-FSPB could successfully account for the MLC transmissions without major discrepancy. The algorithm was also graphical processing unit (GPU) compatible to maximize its computational speed. For an intensity modulated radiation therapy (

  9. Pore-scale simulations of drainage in granular materials: Finite size effects and the representative elementary volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chao; Chareyre, Bruno; Darve, Félix

    2016-09-01

    A pore-scale model is introduced for two-phase flow in dense packings of polydisperse spheres. The model is developed as a component of a more general hydromechanical coupling framework based on the discrete element method, which will be elaborated in future papers and will apply to various processes of interest in soil science, in geomechanics and in oil and gas production. Here the emphasis is on the generation of a network of pores mapping the void space between spherical grains, and the definition of local criteria governing the primary drainage process. The pore space is decomposed by Regular Triangulation, from which a set of pores connected by throats are identified. A local entry capillary pressure is evaluated for each throat, based on the balance of capillary pressure and surface tension at equilibrium. The model reflects the possible entrapment of disconnected patches of the receding wetting phase. It is validated by a comparison with drainage experiments. In the last part of the paper, a series of simulations are reported to illustrate size and boundary effects, key questions when studying small samples made of spherical particles be it in simulations or experiments. Repeated tests on samples of different sizes give evolution of water content which are not only scattered but also strongly biased for small sample sizes. More than 20,000 spheres are needed to reduce the bias on saturation below 0.02. Additional statistics are generated by subsampling a large sample of 64,000 spheres. They suggest that the minimal sampling volume for evaluating saturation is one hundred times greater that the sampling volume needed for measuring porosity with the same accuracy. This requirement in terms of sample size induces a need for efficient computer codes. The method described herein has a low algorithmic complexity in order to satisfy this requirement. It will be well suited to further developments toward coupled flow-deformation problems in which evolution of the

  10. Mineralogical, optical, geochemical, and particle size properties of four sediment samples for optical physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bice, K.; Clement, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy were used to investigate the mineralogical and chemical properties of the Calvert, Ball Old Mine, Ball Martin, and Jordan Sediments. The particle size distribution and index of refraction of each sample were determined. The samples are composed primarily of quartz, kaolinite, and illite. The clay minerals are most abundant in the finer particle size fractions. The chemical properties of the four samples are similar. The Calvert sample is most notably different in that it contains a relatively high amount of iron. The dominant particle size fraction in each sample is silt, with lesser amounts of clay and sand. The indices of refraction of the sediments are the same with the exception of the Calvert sample which has a slightly higher value.

  11. Probabilistic finite element stiffness of a laterally loaded monopile based on an improved asymptotic sampling method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vahdatirad, Mohammadjavad; Bayat, Mehdi; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2015-01-01

    shear strength of clay. Normal and Sobol sampling are employed to provide the asymptotic sampling method to generate the probability distribution of the foundation stiffnesses. Monte Carlo simulation is used as a benchmark. Asymptotic sampling accompanied with Sobol quasi random sampling demonstrates...... an efficient method for estimating the probability distribution of stiffnesses for the offshore monopile foundation....

  12. The attention-weighted sample-size model of visual short-term memory: Attention capture predicts resource allocation and memory load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip L; Lilburn, Simon D; Corbett, Elaine A; Sewell, David K; Kyllingsbæk, Søren

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the capacity of visual short-term memory (VSTM) in a phase discrimination task that required judgments about the configural relations between pairs of black and white features. Sewell et al. (2014) previously showed that VSTM capacity in an orientation discrimination task was well described by a sample-size model, which views VSTM as a resource comprised of a finite number of noisy stimulus samples. The model predicts the invariance of [Formula: see text] , the sum of squared sensitivities across items, for displays of different sizes. For phase discrimination, the set-size effect significantly exceeded that predicted by the sample-size model for both simultaneously and sequentially presented stimuli. Instead, the set-size effect and the serial position curves with sequential presentation were predicted by an attention-weighted version of the sample-size model, which assumes that one of the items in the display captures attention and receives a disproportionate share of resources. The choice probabilities and response time distributions from the task were well described by a diffusion decision model in which the drift rates embodied the assumptions of the attention-weighted sample-size model.

  13. A study of dynamic finite size scaling behavior of the scaling functions—calculation of dynamic critical index of Wolff algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüç, Semra; Dilaver, Mehmet; Aydın, Meral; Gündüç, Yiğit

    2005-02-01

    In this work we have studied the dynamic scaling behavior of two scaling functions and we have shown that scaling functions obey the dynamic finite size scaling rules. Dynamic finite size scaling of scaling functions opens possibilities for a wide range of applications. As an application we have calculated the dynamic critical exponent (z) of Wolff's cluster algorithm for 2-, 3- and 4-dimensional Ising models. Configurations with vanishing initial magnetization are chosen in order to avoid complications due to initial magnetization. The observed dynamic finite size scaling behavior during early stages of the Monte Carlo simulation yields z for Wolff's cluster algorithm for 2-, 3- and 4-dimensional Ising models with vanishing values which are consistent with the values obtained from the autocorrelations. Especially, the vanishing dynamic critical exponent we obtained for d=3 implies that the Wolff algorithm is more efficient in eliminating critical slowing down in Monte Carlo simulations than previously reported.

  14. The impact of finite size effects on spin waves in CoO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Teng, Xiaowei; Du, Wenxin; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Niedziela, Jennifer; Hagen, Mark; Aronson, Meigan

    2010-03-01

    We studied the spin waves in nanoscaled CoO using inelastic neutron scattering. The zero-field measurements were carried out on Co/CoO nanoparticles, CoO nanoparticles, and the bulk powder of CoO in the temperature range of 15 -- 300 K. The temperature-dependent inelastic intensity at 2.5 meV, found in all samples, was ascribed to CoO spin waves. We observed an increase at least of factor of 100 in the inelastic intensity for Co/CoO as compared to the CoO bulk, and shift of intensity towards larger scattering vectors. We suggest that new boundary conditions imposed by the nanoparticle surface and the breaking of the symmetry are mainly responsible for this effect. Similar enhancement of the spin wave spectrum was also predicted in thin films [1,2]. [1] S. Reshetnyak et al PMC Physics B 2008 [2] Y.Gorobets et al, Tech. Phys. 1998

  15. Procedures manual for the recommended ARB (Air Resources Board) sized chemical sample method (cascade cyclones)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCain, J.D.; Dawes, S.S.; Farthing, W.E.

    1986-05-01

    The report is Attachment No. 2 to the Final Report of ARB Contract A3-092-32 and provides a tutorial on the use of Cascade (Series) Cyclones to obtain size-fractionated particulate samples from industrial flue gases at stationary sources. The instrumentation and procedures described are designed to protect the purity of the collected samples so that post-test chemical analysis may be performed for organic and inorganic compounds, including instrumental analysis for trace elements. The instrumentation described collects bulk quantities for each of six size fractions over the range 10 to 0.4 micrometer diameter. The report describes the operating principles, calibration, and empirical modeling of small cyclone performance. It also discusses the preliminary calculations, operation, sample retrieval, and data analysis associated with the use of cyclones to obtain size-segregated samples and to measure particle-size distributions.

  16. Sample size determination for logistic regression on a logit-normal distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seongho; Heath, Elisabeth; Heilbrun, Lance

    2017-06-01

    Although the sample size for simple logistic regression can be readily determined using currently available methods, the sample size calculation for multiple logistic regression requires some additional information, such as the coefficient of determination ([Formula: see text]) of a covariate of interest with other covariates, which is often unavailable in practice. The response variable of logistic regression follows a logit-normal distribution which can be generated from a logistic transformation of a normal distribution. Using this property of logistic regression, we propose new methods of determining the sample size for simple and multiple logistic regressions using a normal transformation of outcome measures. Simulation studies and a motivating example show several advantages of the proposed methods over the existing methods: (i) no need for [Formula: see text] for multiple logistic regression, (ii) available interim or group-sequential designs, and (iii) much smaller required sample size.

  17. Monotonicity in the Sample Size of the Length of Classical Confidence Intervals

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Abram M

    2012-01-01

    It is proved that the average length of standard confidence intervals for parameters of gamma and normal distributions monotonically decrease with the sample size. The proofs are based on fine properties of the classical gamma function.

  18. Finite-size scaling as a tool in the search for the QCD critical point in heavy ion data

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, Eduardo S; Sorensen, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Given the short lifetime and the reduced volume of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formed in high-energy heavy ion collisions, a possible critical endpoint (CEP) will be blurred in a region and the effects from criticality severely smoothened. Nevertheless, the non-monotonic behavior of correlation functions near criticality for systems of different sizes, given by different centralities in heavy ion collisions, must obey finite-size scaling. We apply the predicting power of scaling plots to the search for the CEP of strong interactions in heavy ion collisions using data from RHIC and SPS. The results of our data analysis exclude a critical point below chemical potentials $\\mu\\sim 450 $MeV. Extrapolating the analysis, we speculate that criticality could appear slightly above $\\mu\\sim 500 $MeV. Using available data we extrapolate our scaling curves to predict the behavior of new data at lower center-of-mass energy, currently being investigated in the Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC. If it turns out that the QGP ...

  19. Simulations of Pore Formation in Lipid Membranes: Reaction Coordinates, Convergence, Hysteresis, and Finite-Size Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Neha; Hub, Jochen S

    2016-07-12

    Transmembrane pores play an important role in various biophysical processes such as membrane permeation, membrane fusion, and antimicrobial peptide activity. In principal, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide an accurate model of pore formation in lipid membranes. However, the free energy landscape of transmembrane pore formation remains poorly understood, partly because potential of mean force (PMF) calculations of pore formation strongly depend on the choice of the reaction coordinate. In this study, we used umbrella sampling to compute PMFs for pore formation using three different reaction coordinates, namely, (i) a coordinate that steers the lipids in the lateral direction away from the pore center, (ii) the distance of a single lipid phosphate group from the membrane center, and (iii) the average water density inside a membrane-spanning cylinder. Our results show that while the three reaction coordinates efficiently form pores in membranes, they suffer from strong hysteresis between pore-opening and pore-closing simulations, suggesting that they do not restrain the systems close to the transition state for pore formation. The two reaction coordinates that act via restraining the lipids lead to more pronounced hysteresis compared with the coordinate acting on the water molecules. By comparing PMFs computed from membranes with different numbers of lipids, we observed significant artifacts from the periodic boundary conditions in small simulation systems. Further analysis suggests that the formation and disruption of a continuous hydrogen-bonding network across the membrane corresponds to the transition state for pore formation. Our study provides molecular insights into the critical steps of transmembrane pore formation, and it may guide the development of efficient reaction coordinates for pore formation.

  20. RNAseqPS: A Web Tool for Estimating Sample Size and Power for RNAseq Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Zhao, Shilin; Li, Chung-I; Sheng, Quanhu; Shyr, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Sample size and power determination is the first step in the experimental design of a successful study. Sample size and power calculation is required for applications for National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding. Sample size and power calculation is well established for traditional biological studies such as mouse model, genome wide association study (GWAS), and microarray studies. Recent developments in high-throughput sequencing technology have allowed RNAseq to replace microarray as the technology of choice for high-throughput gene expression profiling. However, the sample size and power analysis of RNAseq technology is an underdeveloped area. Here, we present RNAseqPS, an advanced online RNAseq power and sample size calculation tool based on the Poisson and negative binomial distributions. RNAseqPS was built using the Shiny package in R. It provides an interactive graphical user interface that allows the users to easily conduct sample size and power analysis for RNAseq experimental design. RNAseqPS can be accessed directly at http://cqs.mc.vanderbilt.edu/shiny/RNAseqPS/.

  1. Sample size choices for XRCT scanning of highly unsaturated soil mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Jonathan C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly unsaturated soil mixtures (clay, sand and gravel are used as building materials in many parts of the world, and there is increasing interest in understanding their mechanical and hydraulic behaviour. In the laboratory, x-ray computed tomography (XRCT is becoming more widely used to investigate the microstructures of soils, however a crucial issue for such investigations is the choice of sample size, especially concerning the scanning of soil mixtures where there will be a range of particle and void sizes. In this paper we present a discussion (centred around a new set of XRCT scans on sample sizing for scanning of samples comprising soil mixtures, where a balance has to be made between realistic representation of the soil components and the desire for high resolution scanning, We also comment on the appropriateness of differing sample sizes in comparison to sample sizes used for other geotechnical testing. Void size distributions for the samples are presented and from these some hypotheses are made as to the roles of inter- and intra-aggregate voids in the mechanical behaviour of highly unsaturated soils.

  2. Sample size planning with the cost constraint for testing superiority and equivalence of two independent groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiin-Huarng; Chen, Hubert J; Luh, Wei-Ming

    2011-11-01

    The allocation of sufficient participants into different experimental groups for various research purposes under given constraints is an important practical problem faced by researchers. We address the problem of sample size determination between two independent groups for unequal and/or unknown variances when both the power and the differential cost are taken into consideration. We apply the well-known Welch approximate test to derive various sample size allocation ratios by minimizing the total cost or, equivalently, maximizing the statistical power. Two types of hypotheses including superiority/non-inferiority and equivalence of two means are each considered in the process of sample size planning. A simulation study is carried out and the proposed method is validated in terms of Type I error rate and statistical power. As a result, the simulation study reveals that the proposed sample size formulas are very satisfactory under various variances and sample size allocation ratios. Finally, a flowchart, tables, and figures of several sample size allocations are presented for practical reference.

  3. A margin based approach to determining sample sizes via tolerance bounds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newcomer, Justin T.; Freeland, Katherine Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    This paper proposes a tolerance bound approach for determining sample sizes. With this new methodology we begin to think of sample size in the context of uncertainty exceeding margin. As the sample size decreases the uncertainty in the estimate of margin increases. This can be problematic when the margin is small and only a few units are available for testing. In this case there may be a true underlying positive margin to requirements but the uncertainty may be too large to conclude we have sufficient margin to those requirements with a high level of statistical confidence. Therefore, we provide a methodology for choosing a sample size large enough such that an estimated QMU uncertainty based on the tolerance bound approach will be smaller than the estimated margin (assuming there is positive margin). This ensures that the estimated tolerance bound will be within performance requirements and the tolerance ratio will be greater than one, supporting a conclusion that we have sufficient margin to the performance requirements. In addition, this paper explores the relationship between margin, uncertainty, and sample size and provides an approach and recommendations for quantifying risk when sample sizes are limited.

  4. Species sensitivity distribution for chlorpyrifos to aquatic organisms: Model choice and sample size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinsong; Chen, Boyu

    2016-03-01

    Species sensitivity distribution (SSD) is a widely used model that extrapolates the ecological risk to ecosystem levels from the ecotoxicity of a chemical to individual organisms. However, model choice and sample size significantly affect the development of the SSD model and the estimation of hazardous concentrations at the 5th centile (HC5). To interpret their effects, the SSD model for chlorpyrifos, a widely used organophosphate pesticide, to aquatic organisms is presented with emphases on model choice and sample size. Three subsets of median effective concentration (EC50) with different sample sizes were obtained from ECOTOX and used to build SSD models based on parametric distribution (normal, logistic, and triangle distribution) and nonparametric bootstrap. The SSD models based on the triangle distribution are superior to the normal and logistic distributions according to several goodness-of-fit techniques. Among all parametric SSD models, the one with the largest sample size based on the triangle distribution gives the most strict HC5 with 0.141μmolL(-1). The HC5 derived from the nonparametric bootstrap is 0.159μmol L(-1). The minimum sample size required to build a stable SSD model is 11 based on parametric distribution and 23 based on nonparametric bootstrap. The study suggests that model choice and sample size are important sources of uncertainty for application of the SSD model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Shrinkage anisotropy characteristics from soil structure and initial sample/layer size

    CERN Document Server

    Chertkov, V Y

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is a physical prediction of such soil shrinkage anisotropy characteristics as variation with drying of (i) different sample/layer sizes and (ii) the shrinkage geometry factor. With that, a new presentation of the shrinkage anisotropy concept is suggested through the sample/layer size ratios. The work objective is reached in two steps. First, the relations are derived between the indicated soil shrinkage anisotropy characteristics and three different shrinkage curves of a soil relating to: small samples (without cracking at shrinkage), sufficiently large samples (with internal cracking), and layers of similar thickness. Then, the results of a recent work with respect to the physical prediction of the three shrinkage curves are used. These results connect the shrinkage curves with the initial sample size/layer thickness as well as characteristics of soil texture and structure (both inter- and intra-aggregate) as physical parameters. The parameters determining the reference shrinkage c...

  6. An Improved Asymptotic Sampling Approach For Stochastic Finite Element Stiffness of a Laterally Loaded Monopile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vahdatirad, Mohammadjavad; Bayat, Mehdi; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2012-01-01

    undrained shear strength. The random field is applied to represent the spatial variation of the soil properties. Monte Carlo simulation associate with an improved asymptotic sampling using normal and sobol sampling is utilized to generate the probability distribution of the foundation stiffness. It is shown...... that asymptotic sampling associated with sobol quasi random sampling is an efficient method to estimation of probability distribution in presented problems....

  7. A normative inference approach for optimal sample sizes in decisions from experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostwald, Dirk; Starke, Ludger; Hertwig, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    "Decisions from experience" (DFE) refers to a body of work that emerged in research on behavioral decision making over the last decade. One of the major experimental paradigms employed to study experience-based choice is the "sampling paradigm," which serves as a model of decision making under limited knowledge about the statistical structure of the world. In this paradigm respondents are presented with two payoff distributions, which, in contrast to standard approaches in behavioral economics, are specified not in terms of explicit outcome-probability information, but by the opportunity to sample outcomes from each distribution without economic consequences. Participants are encouraged to explore the distributions until they feel confident enough to decide from which they would prefer to draw from in a final trial involving real monetary payoffs. One commonly employed measure to characterize the behavior of participants in the sampling paradigm is the sample size, that is, the number of outcome draws which participants choose to obtain from each distribution prior to terminating sampling. A natural question that arises in this context concerns the "optimal" sample size, which could be used as a normative benchmark to evaluate human sampling behavior in DFE. In this theoretical study, we relate the DFE sampling paradigm to the classical statistical decision theoretic literature and, under a probabilistic inference assumption, evaluate optimal sample sizes for DFE. In our treatment we go beyond analytically established results by showing how the classical statistical decision theoretic framework can be used to derive optimal sample sizes under arbitrary, but numerically evaluable, constraints. Finally, we critically evaluate the value of deriving optimal sample sizes under this framework as testable predictions for the experimental study of sampling behavior in DFE.

  8. A normative inference approach for optimal sample sizes in decisions from experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk eOstwald

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Decisions from experience (DFE refers to a body of work that emerged in research on behavioral decision making over the last decade. One of the major experimental paradigms employed to study experienced-based choice is the sampling paradigm, which serves as a model of decision making under limited knowledge about the statistical structure of the world. In this paradigm respondents are presented with two payoff distributions, which, in contrast to standard approaches in behavioral economics, are specified not in terms of explicit outcome-probability information, but by the opportunity to sample outcomes from each distribution without economic consequences. Participants are encouraged to explore the distributions until they feel confident enough to decide from which they would prefer to draw from in a final trial involving real monetary payoffs. One commonly employed measure to characterize the behavior of participants in the sampling paradigm is the sample size, that is, the number of outcome draws which participants choose to obtain from each distribution prior to terminating sampling. A natural question that arises in this context concerns the optimal sample size, which could be used as a normative benchmark to evaluate human sampling behavior in DFE. In this theoretical manuscript, we relate the DFE sampling paradigm to the classical statistical decision theoretic literature and, under a probabilistic inference assumption, evaluate optimal sample sizes for decisions from experience. In our treatment we go beyond analytically established results by showing how the classical statistical decision theoretic framework can be used to derive optimal sample sizes under arbitrary, but numerically evaluable, constraints. Finally, we critically evaluate the value of deriving optimal sample sizes under this framework as testable predictions for the experimental study of sampling behavior in DFE.

  9. Exact solution of the thermodynamics and size parameters of a polymer confined to a lattice of finite size: Large chain limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Chad R., E-mail: chad.snyder@nist.gov; Guttman, Charles M., E-mail: charles.guttman@nist.gov [Materials Science and Engineering Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Di Marzio, Edmund A., E-mail: edmund.dimarzio@nist.gov [Materials Science and Engineering Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Bio-Poly-Phase, 14205 Parkvale Road, Rockville, Maryland 20853 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    We extend the exact solutions of the Di Marzio-Rubin matrix method for the thermodynamic properties, including chain density, of a linear polymer molecule confined to walk on a lattice of finite size. Our extensions enable (a) the use of higher dimensions (explicit 2D and 3D lattices), (b) lattice boundaries of arbitrary shape, and (c) the flexibility to allow each monomer to have its own energy of attraction for each lattice site. In the case of the large chain limit, we demonstrate how periodic boundary conditions can also be employed to reduce computation time. Advantages to this method include easy definition of chemical and physical structure (or surface roughness) of the lattice and site-specific monomer-specific energetics, and straightforward relatively fast computations. We show the usefulness and ease of implementation of this extension by examining the effect of energy variation along the lattice walls of an infinite rectangular cylinder with the idea of studying the changes in properties caused by chemical inhomogeneities on the surface of the box. Herein, we look particularly at the polymer density profile as a function of temperature in the confined region for very long polymers. One particularly striking result is the shift in the critical condition for adsorption due to surface energy inhomogeneities and the length scale of the inhomogeneities; an observation that could have important implications for polymer chromatography. Our method should have applications to both copolymers and biopolymers of arbitrary molar mass.

  10. Effect of sample volume size and sampling method on feline longitudinal myocardial velocity profiles from color tissue Doppler imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granström, Sara; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Møgelvang, Rasmus; Sogaard, Peter; Willesen, Jakob Lundgren; Koch, Jørgen

    2012-12-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the effect of sample volume (SV) size settings and sampling method on measurement variability and peak systolic (s'), and early (e') and late (a') diastolic longitudinal myocardial velocities using color tissue Doppler imaging (cTDI) in cats. Twenty cats with normal echocardiograms and 20 cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We quantified and compared empirical variance and average absolute values of s', e' and a' for three cardiac cycles using eight different SV settings (length 1,2,3 and 5 mm; width 1 and 2 mm) and three methods of sampling (end-diastolic sampling with manual tracking of the SV, end-systolic sampling without tracking, and random-frame sampling without tracking). No significant difference in empirical variance could be demonstrated between most of the tested SVs. However, the two settings with a length of 1 mm resulted in a significantly higher variance compared with all settings where the SV length exceeded 2 mm (p sampling method on the variability of measurements (p = 0.003) and manual tracking obtained the lowest variance. No difference in average values of s', e' or a' could be found between any of the SV settings or sampling methods. Within the tested range of SV settings, an SV length of 1 mm resulted in higher measurement variability compared with an SV length of 3 and 5 mm, and should therefore be avoided. Manual tracking of the sample volume is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Blinded sample size re-estimation in three-arm trials with 'gold standard' design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mütze, Tobias; Friede, Tim

    2017-10-15

    In this article, we study blinded sample size re-estimation in the 'gold standard' design with internal pilot study for normally distributed outcomes. The 'gold standard' design is a three-arm clinical trial design that includes an active and a placebo control in addition to an experimental treatment. We focus on the absolute margin approach to hypothesis testing in three-arm trials at which the non-inferiority of the experimental treatment and the assay sensitivity are assessed by pairwise comparisons. We compare several blinded sample size re-estimation procedures in a simulation study assessing operating characteristics including power and type I error. We find that sample size re-estimation based on the popular one-sample variance estimator results in overpowered trials. Moreover, sample size re-estimation based on unbiased variance estimators such as the Xing-Ganju variance estimator results in underpowered trials, as it is expected because an overestimation of the variance and thus the sample size is in general required for the re-estimation procedure to eventually meet the target power. To overcome this problem, we propose an inflation factor for the sample size re-estimation with the Xing-Ganju variance estimator and show that this approach results in adequately powered trials. Because of favorable features of the Xing-Ganju variance estimator such as unbiasedness and a distribution independent of the group means, the inflation factor does not depend on the nuisance parameter and, therefore, can be calculated prior to a trial. Moreover, we prove that the sample size re-estimation based on the Xing-Ganju variance estimator does not bias the effect estimate. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. SMALL SAMPLE SIZE IN 2X2 CROSS OVER DESIGNS: CONDITIONS OF DETERMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B SOLEYMANI

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Determination of small sample size in some clinical trials is a matter of importance. In cross-over studies which are one types of clinical trials, the matter is more significant. In this article, the conditions in which determination of small sample size in cross-over studies are possible were considered, and the effect of deviation from normality on the matter has been shown. Methods. The present study has been done on such 2x2 cross-over studies that variable of interest is quantitative one and is measurable by ratio or interval scale. The method of consideration is based on use of variable and sample mean"s distributions, central limit theorem, method of sample size determination in two groups, and cumulant or moment generating function. Results. In normal variables or transferable to normal variables, there is no restricting factors other than significant level and power of the test for determination of sample size, but in the case of non-normal variables, it should be determined such large that guarantee the normality of sample mean"s distribution. Discussion. In such cross over studies that because of existence of theoretical base, few samples can be computed, one should not do it without taking applied worth of results into consideration. While determining sample size, in addition to variance, it is necessary to consider distribution of variable, particularly through its skewness and kurtosis coefficients. the more deviation from normality, the more need of samples. Since in medical studies most of the continuous variables are closed to normal distribution, a few number of samples often seems to be adequate for convergence of sample mean to normal distribution.

  13. Age differences in body size stereotyping in a sample of preschool girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriger, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated that societal concerns about dieting and body size have led to an increase in negative attitudes toward obese people and that girls as young as 3 years old endorse similar body size stereotypes as have been previously found with adults. Few studies, however, have examined age differences in their participants. A sample of 102 girls (3-5-years-old) completed measures of body size stereotyping. Results indicate that while body-size stereotyping is present by age 3, pro-thin beliefs may develop prior to anti-fat beliefs. Implications and future directions for research with preschool children are discussed.

  14. The effect of in situ/in vitro three-dimensional quantitative computed tomography image voxel size on the finite element model of human vertebral cancellous bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yongtao; Engelke, Klaus; Glueer, Claus-C; Morlock, Michael M; Huber, Gerd

    2014-11-01

    Quantitative computed tomography-based finite element modeling technique is a promising clinical tool for the prediction of bone strength. However, quantitative computed tomography-based finite element models were created from image datasets with different image voxel sizes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is an influence of image voxel size on the finite element models. In all 12 thoracolumbar vertebrae were scanned prior to autopsy (in situ) using two different quantitative computed tomography scan protocols, which resulted in image datasets with two different voxel sizes (0.29 × 0.29 × 1.3 mm(3) vs 0.18 × 0.18 × 0.6 mm(3)). Eight of them were scanned after autopsy (in vitro) and the datasets were reconstructed with two voxel sizes (0.32 × 0.32 × 0.6 mm(3) vs. 0.18 × 0.18 × 0.3 mm(3)). Finite element models with cuboid volume of interest extracted from the vertebral cancellous part were created and inhomogeneous bilinear bone properties were defined. Axial compression was simulated. No effect of voxel size was detected on the apparent bone mineral density for both the in situ and in vitro cases. However, the apparent modulus and yield strength showed significant differences in the two voxel size group pairs (in situ and in vitro). In conclusion, the image voxel size may have to be considered when the finite element voxel modeling technique is used in clinical applications.

  15. Norm Block Sample Sizes: A Review of 17 Individually Administered Intelligence Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norfolk, Philip A.; Farmer, Ryan L.; Floyd, Randy G.; Woods, Isaac L.; Hawkins, Haley K.; Irby, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    The representativeness, recency, and size of norm samples strongly influence the accuracy of inferences drawn from their scores. Inadequate norm samples may lead to inflated or deflated scores for individuals and poorer prediction of developmental and academic outcomes. The purpose of this study was to apply Kranzler and Floyd's method for…

  16. Page sample size in web accessibility testing: how many pages is enough?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velleman, Eric; Geest, van der Thea

    2013-01-01

    Various countries and organizations use a different sampling approach and sample size of web pages in accessibility conformance tests. We are conducting a systematic analysis to determine how many pages is enough for testing whether a website is compliant with standard accessibility guidelines. This

  17. Regularization Methods for Fitting Linear Models with Small Sample Sizes: Fitting the Lasso Estimator Using R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, W. Holmes; Finch, Maria E. Hernandez

    2016-01-01

    Researchers and data analysts are sometimes faced with the problem of very small samples, where the number of variables approaches or exceeds the overall sample size; i.e. high dimensional data. In such cases, standard statistical models such as regression or analysis of variance cannot be used, either because the resulting parameter estimates…

  18. A Class of Estimators for Finite Population Mean in Double Sampling under Nonresponse Using Fractional Raw Moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzoor Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents new classes of estimators in estimating the finite population mean under double sampling in the presence of nonresponse when using information on fractional raw moments. The expressions for mean square error of the proposed classes of estimators are derived up to the first degree of approximation. It is shown that a proposed class of estimators performs better than the usual mean estimator, ratio type estimators, and Singh and Kumar (2009 estimator. An empirical study is carried out to demonstrate the performance of a proposed class of estimators.

  19. Assessing terpene content variability of whitebark pine in order to estimate representative sample size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Milena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In studies of population variability, particular attention has to be paid to the selection of a representative sample. The aim of this study was to assess the size of the new representative sample on the basis of the variability of chemical content of the initial sample on the example of a whitebark pine population. Statistical analysis included the content of 19 characteristics (terpene hydrocarbons and their derivates of the initial sample of 10 elements (trees. It was determined that the new sample should contain 20 trees so that the mean value calculated from it represents a basic set with a probability higher than 95 %. Determination of the lower limit of the representative sample size that guarantees a satisfactory reliability of generalization proved to be very important in order to achieve cost efficiency of the research. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI-173011, br. TR-37002 i br. III-43007

  20. Developing optimum sample size and multistage sampling plans for Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) larval infestation and injury in northern Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifoulis, A A; Savopoulou-Soultani, M

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to quantify the spatial pattern and develop a sampling program for larvae of Lobesia botrana Denis and Schiffermüller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), an important vineyard pest in northern Greece. Taylor's power law and Iwao's patchiness regression were used to model the relationship between the mean and the variance of larval counts. Analysis of covariance was carried out, separately for infestation and injury, with combined second and third generation data, for vine and half-vine sample units. Common regression coefficients were estimated to permit use of the sampling plan over a wide range of conditions. Optimum sample sizes for infestation and injury, at three levels of precision, were developed. An investigation of a multistage sampling plan with a nested analysis of variance showed that if the goal of sampling is focusing on larval infestation, three grape clusters should be sampled in a half-vine; if the goal of sampling is focusing on injury, then two grape clusters per half-vine are recommended.