WorldWideScience

Sample records for finite reflection groups

  1. Reflection groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggermont, G.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, PISA organised proactive meetings of reflection groups on involvement in decision making, expert culture and ethical aspects of radiation protection.All reflection group meetings address particular targeted audiences while the output publication in book form is put forward

  2. Nilpotent -local finite groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, José; Scherer, Jérôme; Viruel, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    We provide characterizations of -nilpotency for fusion systems and -local finite groups that are inspired by known result for finite groups. In particular, we generalize criteria by Atiyah, Brunetti, Frobenius, Quillen, Stammbach and Tate.

  3. Products of Finite Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ballester-Bolinches, Adolfo; Asaad, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    The study of finite groups factorised as a product of two or more subgroups has become a subject of great interest during the last years with applications not only in group theory, but also in other areas like cryptography and coding theory. It has experienced a big impulse with the introduction of some permutability conditions. The aim of this book is to gather, order, and examine part of this material, including the latest advances made, give some new approach to some topics, and present some new subjects of research in the theory of finite factorised groups.

  4. Which finite simple groups are unit groups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher James; Occhipinti, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    We prove that if G is a finite simple group which is the unit group of a ring, then G is isomorphic to either (a) a cyclic group of order 2; (b) a cyclic group of prime order 2^k −1 for some k; or (c) a projective special linear group PSLn(F2) for some n ≥ 3. Moreover, these groups do all occur...

  5. On characters of finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Broué, Michel

    2017-01-01

    This book explores the classical and beautiful character theory of finite groups. It does it by using some rudiments of the language of categories. Originally emerging from two courses offered at Peking University (PKU), primarily for third-year students, it is now better suited for graduate courses, and provides broader coverage than books that focus almost exclusively on groups. The book presents the basic tools, notions and theorems of character theory (including a new treatment of the control of fusion and isometries), and introduces readers to the categorical language at several levels. It includes and proves the major results on characteristic zero representations without any assumptions about the base field. The book includes a dedicated chapter on graded representations and applications of polynomial invariants of finite groups, and its closing chapter addresses the more recent notion of the Drinfeld double of a finite group and the corresponding representation of GL_2(Z).

  6. Biset functors for finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Bouc, Serge

    2010-01-01

    This volume exposes the theory of biset functors for finite groups, which yields a unified framework for operations of induction, restriction, inflation, deflation and transport by isomorphism. The first part recalls the basics on biset categories and biset functors. The second part is concerned with the Burnside functor and the functor of complex characters, together with semisimplicity issues and an overview of Green biset functors. The last part is devoted to biset functors defined over p-groups for a fixed prime number p. This includes the structure of the functor of rational representations and rational p-biset functors. The last two chapters expose three applications of biset functors to long-standing open problems, in particular the structure of the Dade group of an arbitrary finite p-group.This book is intended both to students and researchers, as it gives a didactic exposition of the basics and a rewriting of advanced results in the area, with some new ideas and proofs.

  7. The construction of finite solvable groups revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Eick, Bettina; Horn, Max

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new approach towards the systematic construction of finite groups up to isomorphism. This approach yields a practical algorithm for the construction of finite solvable groups up to isomorphism. We report on a GAP implementation of this method for finite solvable groups and exhibit some sample applications.

  8. Extension of p-local finite groups

    OpenAIRE

    Broto, Carles; Castellana, Natalia; Grodal, Jesper; Levi, Ran; Oliver, Bob

    2005-01-01

    A p-local finite group consists of a finite p-group S, together with a pair of categories which encode ``conjugacy'' relations among subgroups of S, and which are modelled on the fusion in a Sylow p-subgroup of a finite group. It contains enough information to define a classifying space which has many of the same properties as p-completed classifying spaces of finite groups. In this paper, we study and classify extensions of p-local finite groups, and also compute the fundamental group of the...

  9. On p-supersolvability of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [2] Ballester-Bolinches A, Ezquerro L M and Skiba A N, On second maximal subgroups of. Sylow subgroups of finite groups, J. Pure Appl. Algebra 215 (2011) 705–714. [3] Ballester-Bolinches A and Pedraza-Aguilera M C, On minimal subgroups of finite groups,. Acta Math. Hungar. 73 (1996) 335–342. [4] Chen X and Guo W ...

  10. On the orders of finite semisimple groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 115; Issue 4 ... The aim of this paper is to investigate the order coincidences among the finite semisimple groups and to give a reasoning of such order coincidences through the transitive ... We investigate the situation for finite semisimple groups of Lie type.

  11. The Finite Lamplighter Groups: A Guided Tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siehler, Jacob A.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present a family of finite groups, which provide excellent examples of the basic concepts of group theory. To work out the center, conjuagacy classes, and commutators of these groups, all that's required is a bit of linear algebra.

  12. Centralizers in simple locally finite groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Kuzucuoğlu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This is a survey article on centralizers of finitesubgroups in locally finite, simple groups or LFS-groups as wewill call them. We mention some of the open problems aboutcentralizers of subgroups in LFS-groups and applications of theknown information about the centralizers of subgroups to thestructure of the locally finite group. We also prove thefollowing: Let $G$ be a countably infinite non-linear LFS-groupwith a Kegel sequence $mathcal{K}={(G_i,N_i | iinmathbf{N} }$. If there exists an upper bound for ${ |N_i| |iin mathbf{N} }$, then for any finite semisimplesubgroup $F$ in $G$ the subgroup $C_G(F$ has elements oforder $p_i$ for infinitely many distinct prime $p_i$. Inparticular $C_G(F$ is an infinite group. This answers Hartley'squestion provided that there exists a bound on ${ |N_i| | iin mathbf{N}$.

  13. On p-supersolvability of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supersolvability; p-nilpotency; weakly τ-embedded subgroups. 2010 Mathematics Subject Classification. 20D10, 20D20. 1. Introduction. Throughout the paper, all groups are finite. Recall that a subgroup H of a group G is said to permute with a subgroup ...

  14. ∗-supplemented subgroups of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    complemented in G. In 1998, Ballester-Bolinches and Pedraza-Aguilera [2] introduced. S-quasinormally embedded ... concept of M-supplemented subgroups and characterized the structure of finite groups by ... A subgroup H of a group G is said to be M∗-supplemented in G if there exists a subgroup. K of G such that G = HK ...

  15. Reflection group on 'Expert Culture'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggermont, G.

    2000-01-01

    As part of SCK-CEN's social sciences and humanities programme, a reflection group on 'Expert Culture' was established. The objectives of the reflection group are: (1) to clarify the role of SCK-CEN experts; (2) to clarify the new role of expertise in the evolving context of risk society; (3) to confront external views and internal SCK-CEN experiences on expert culture; (4) to improve trust building of experts and credibility of SCK-CEN as a nuclear actor in society; (5) to develop a draft for a deontological code; (6) to integrate the approach in training on assertivity and communication; (7) to create an output for a topical day on the subject of expert culture. The programme, achievements and perspectives of the refection group are summarised

  16. On partially saturated formations of finite groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballester-Bolinches, Adolfo; Calvo, Clara; Shemetkov, L A

    2007-01-01

    Various types of partially saturated formations and connections between them are considered. It is shown that partially saturated formations can be characterized as classes of finite groups with generalized central series. A theorem on the decomposition of an FG-module into a sum of two submodules with special properties is proved. Bibliography: 26 titles.

  17. Blocks of finite groups and their invariants

    CERN Document Server

    Sambale, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Providing a nearly complete selection of up-to-date methods and results on block invariants with respect to their defect groups, this book covers the classical theory pioneered by Brauer, the modern theory of fusion systems introduced by Puig, the geometry of numbers developed by Minkowski, the classification of finite simple groups, and various computer assisted methods. In a powerful combination, these tools are applied to solve many special cases of famous open conjectures in the representation theory of finite groups. Most of the material is drawn from peer-reviewed journal articles, but there are also new previously unpublished results. In order to make the text self-contained, detailed proofs are given whenever possible. Several tables add to the text's usefulness as a reference. The book is aimed at experts in group theory or representation theory who may wish to make use of the presented ideas in their research.

  18. On polynormality in finite solvable groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamadou Sadialiou Bah

    2003-05-01

    In the study of the arrangement of intermediate subgroups a wide use has been made of certain properties describing the way conjugacy classes of subgroups are embedded in the groups: abnormality, pronormality, paranormality, and their weak analogues. It was proved that pronormality and abnormality coincide with their weak analogues for solvable groups. This was a generalisation of known results of Peng and Taunt for finite solvable groups. In this paper we prove a conjecture of Borevich asserting a similar result for paranormality and polynormality (which is a sort of weak paranormality). Further we show that we get a stronger result when the given subgroup is nilpotent: In a finite solvable group any nilpotent polynormal subgroup is pronormal. (author)

  19. On the total character of finite groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Prajapati

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available For a finite group $G$, we study the total character $tau_G$ afforded by the direct sum of all the non-isomorphic irreducible complex representations of $G$. We resolve for several classes of groups (the Camina $p$-groups, the generalized Camina $p$-groups, the groups which admit $(G,Z(G$ as a generalized Camina pair, the problem of existence of a polynomial $f(x in mathbb{Q}[x]$ such that $f(chi = tau_G$ for some irreducible character $chi$ of $G$. As a consequence, we completely determine the $p$-groups of order at most $p^5$ (with $p$ odd which admit such a polynomial. We deduce the characterization that these are the groups $G$ for which $Z(G$ is cyclic and $(G,Z(G$ is a generalized Camina pair and, we conjecture that this holds good for $p$-groups of any order.

  20. Propagator for finite range potentials: The case of reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Moretti, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Following a previous study on the transmission propagator for a finite range potential, the problem of reflection is considered. It is found that the Laplace transform of the reflection propagator can be expressed in terms of the usual Fredholm determinant Δ and of a new similar determinant Γ, containing the peculiar characteristics of reflection. As an example, an array of delta potentials is considered. Moreover, a possible application to the calculation of quantum traversal time is shown

  1. On the orders of finite semisimple groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since the Galois group, Gal(Fq/Fq), is procyclic and A is a finite Galois-module, its Her- brand quotient is 1, i.e., |H0(Fq, A)|=|H1(Fq, A)|. ..... These pairs are quite special, in the sense that they admit a geometric reasoning for the coincidence of orders. We describe it in the last section. If we do not restrict ourselves to the ...

  2. ∗-supplemented subgroups of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As we all know, the study of groups in which some primary subgroups satisfy a certain embedding property is one of the .... G ∈ F. The converse also holds, in the case where F = U. Lemma 2.10 Let G be a finite ..... Case I. F = U. If every Sylow 2-subgroup of G is cyclic, then G is 2-nilpotent by Burn- side theorem. Hence G is ...

  3. On the orders of finite semisimple groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    brand quotient is 1, i.e., |H0(Fq, A)|=|H1(Fq, A)|. It follows that | ˜H(Fq)|=|H(Fq)|. 2. 3. Determining the finite field. The first natural step in determining the ..... The equivalence class [(H,H)] acts as the identity and [(H1,H2)]. −1 = [(H2,H1)]. ThusG is an abelian, torsion-free group. Since the first two infinite families described in ...

  4. Group-invariant finite Fourier transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenefelt, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    The computation of the finite Fourier transform of functions is one of the most used computations in crystallography. Since the Fourier transform involved in 3-dimensional, the size of the computation becomes very large even for relatively few sample points along each edge. In this thesis, there is a family of algorithms that reduce the computation of Fourier transform of functions respecting the symmetries. Some properties of these algorithms are: (1) The algorithms make full use of the group of symmetries of a crystal. (2) The algorithms can be factored and combined according to the prime factorization of the number of points in the sample space. (3) The algorithms are organized into a family using the group structure of the crystallographic groups to make iterative procedures possible

  5. A course in finite group representation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This graduate-level text provides a thorough grounding in the representation theory of finite groups over fields and rings. The book provides a balanced and comprehensive account of the subject, detailing the methods needed to analyze representations that arise in many areas of mathematics. Key topics include the construction and use of character tables, the role of induction and restriction, projective and simple modules for group algebras, indecomposable representations, Brauer characters, and block theory. This classroom-tested text provides motivation through a large number of worked examples, with exercises at the end of each chapter that test the reader's knowledge, provide further examples and practice, and include results not proven in the text. Prerequisites include a graduate course in abstract algebra, and familiarity with the properties of groups, rings, field extensions, and linear algebra.

  6. Two inquiries about finite groups and well-behaved quotients

    OpenAIRE

    Blum-Smith, Ben

    2018-01-01

    This thesis addresses questions in representation and invariant theory of finite groups. The first concerns singularities of quotient spaces under actions of finite groups. We introduce a class of finite groups such that the quotients have at worst abelian quotient singularities. We prove that supersolvable groups belong to this class and show that nonabelian finite simple groups do not belong to it. The second question concerns the Cohen-Macaulayness of the invariant ring $\\mathbb{Z}[x_1,\\do...

  7. Finite groups whose abelian subgroups of equal order are conjugate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sezer, S.; van der Waall, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    (Abstract of results (paraphrased): The paper classifies the finite groups mentioned in the title. It turns out that the class of all finite solvable groups satifying the condition in the title, coincides with the class of all finite solvable groups satisfying the condition in the title without the

  8. A Note on TI-Subgroups of Finite Groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A subgroup of a finite group is called a TI-subgroup if H ∩ H x = 1 or for any x ∈ G . In this short note, the finite groups all of whose nonabelian subgroups are TI-subgroups are classified. Author Affiliations. Jiakuan Lu1 Linna Pang1. Department of Mathematics, Guangxi Normal University, Guangxi, Guilin 541004, ...

  9. A note on TI-subgroups of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A subgroup of a finite group is called a TI-subgroup if H ∩ H x = 1 or for any x ∈ G . In this short note, the finite groups all of whose nonabelian subgroups are TI-subgroups are classified. Author Affiliations. Jiakuan Lu1 Linna Pang1. Department of Mathematics, Guangxi Normal University, Guangxi, Guilin 541004, ...

  10. Finite Groups with Given Quantitative Non-Nilpotent Subgroups II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Jiangtao; Zhang, Cui

    2014-01-01

    As an extension of Shi and Zhang's 2011 article [4], we prove that any finite group having at most 23 non-normal non-nilpotent proper subgroups is solvable except for G ≅ A 5 or SL(2, 5), and any finite group having at most three conjugacy classes of non-normal non-nilpotent proper subgroups...

  11. Group Journaling: A Tool for Reflection, Fun and Group Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfeldt, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Personal journaling is common practice in outdoor programs and is an important means of reflection and meaning-making. For over 20 years the author has used group journals to promote reflection and understanding, raise important questions, explore difficult issues, develop writing and speaking skills, and enhance group development. In this…

  12. Theory of groups of finite order

    CERN Document Server

    Burnside, W S

    1955-01-01

    After introducing permutation notation and defining group, the author discusses the simpler properties of group that are independent of their modes of representation; composition-series of groups; isomorphism of a group with itself; Abelian groups; groups whose orders are the powers of primes; Sylow's theorem; more. 18 illustrations. A classic introduction.

  13. A note on 2-nilpotence of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JIANGTAO SHI1 and CUI ZHANG1,2,∗. 1School of Mathematics and Information Science, Yantai University, ... Keywords. Finite group; 2-nilpotent group; quaternion-free. 1. Introduction. Let G be a finite group and P a Sylow 2-subgroup of G. Recall that G is said to be 2- nilpotent if there exists a normal subgroup K of G such ...

  14. Finite groups all of whose minimal subgroups are NE∗ -subgroups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    subgroups are classified. Keywords. NE-subgroup; NE∗-subgroup; the generalized fitting subgroup; saturated formation. 2010 Mathematics Subject Classification. 20D10, 20D20. 1. Introduction. All groups considered will be finite. We use conventional ...

  15. Architects of symmetry in finite nonabelian groups

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížek, Michal; Somer, L.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 4 (2010), s. 307-319 ISSN 0865-4824 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100190803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Abel Prize * sporadic groups * monster Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  16. Introduction to orthogonal, symplectic and unitary representations of finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Riehm, Carl R

    2011-01-01

    Orthogonal, symplectic and unitary representations of finite groups lie at the crossroads of two more traditional subjects of mathematics-linear representations of finite groups, and the theory of quadratic, skew symmetric and Hermitian forms-and thus inherit some of the characteristics of both. This book is written as an introduction to the subject and not as an encyclopaedic reference text. The principal goal is an exposition of the known results on the equivalence theory, and related matters such as the Witt and Witt-Grothendieck groups, over the "classical" fields-algebraically closed, rea

  17. The Polytopic-k-Step Fibonacci Sequences in Finite Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömür Deveci

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the polytopic-k-step Fibonacci sequences, the polytopic-k-step Fibonacci sequences modulo m, and the polytopic-k-step Fibonacci sequences in finite groups. Also, we examine the periods of the polytopic-k-step Fibonacci sequences in semidihedral group SD2m.

  18. A note on conjugacy classes of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 124; Issue 1. A Note on Conjugacy Classes of Finite Groups. Hemant Kalra Deepak Gumber. Volume 124 ... Author Affiliations. Hemant Kalra1 Deepak Gumber1. School of Mathematics and Computer Applications, Thapar University, Patiala 147 004, India ...

  19. Conjugacy class sizes and solvability of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Let be a finite group and * be the set of primary, biprimary and triprimary elements of . We prove that if the conjugacy class sizes of * are {1,,,} with positive coprime integers and ,then is solvable. This extends a recent result of Kong (Manatsh. Math. 168(2)(2012) 267–271).

  20. A note on TI-subgroups of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and LINNA PANG. Department of Mathematics, Guangxi Normal University, Guangxi, Guilin 541004,. People's Republic of China. ∗Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: jklu@mailbox.gxnu.edu.cn. MS received 27 November 2010; revised 29 August 2011. Abstract. A subgroup H of a finite group G ...

  1. Quantum mechanics on spaces with finite fundamental group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giulini, D.

    1995-01-01

    We consider in general terms dynamical systems with finite-dimensional, non-simply connected configuration-spaces. The fundamental group is assumed to be finite. We analyze in full detail those ambiguities in the quantization procedure that arise from the non-simply connectedness of the classical configuration space. We define the quantum theory on the universal cover but restrict the algebra of observables O to the commutant of the algebra generated by deck-transformations. We apply standard superselection principles and construct the corresponding sectors. We emphasize the relevance of all sectors and not just the abelian ones. (orig.)

  2. Irreducible quantum group modules with finite dimensional weight spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dennis Hasselstrøm

    a finitely generated U q -module which has finite dimensional weight spaces and is a sum of those. Our approach follows the procedures used by S. Fernando and O. Mathieu to solve the corresponding problem for semisimple complex Lie algebra modules. To achieve this we have to overcome a number of obstacles...... not present in the classical case. In the process we also construct twisting functors rigerously for quantum group modules, study twisted Verma modules and show that these admit a Jantzen filtration with corresponding Jantzen sum formula....

  3. On automorphisms of some finite p-groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    automorphisms of G, is a normal subgroup of Autc(G). Let Outc(G) denote the group. Autc(G)/ Inn(G). In 1911, Burnside (p. 463 of [2]) posed the following question: Does there exist any finite group G such that G has a non-inner class preserving automorphism? In 1913, Burnside. [3] himself gave an affirmative answer to this ...

  4. Finite groups with three conjugacy class sizes of some elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Let G be a finite group. We prove as follows: Let G be a p-solvable group for a fixed prime p. If the conjugacy class sizes of all elements of primary and biprimary orders of G are {1, pa, n} with a and n two positive integers and (p, n) = 1, then G is p-nilpotent or G has abelian Sylow p-subgroups. Keywords. Conjugacy ...

  5. A generalized Frattini subgroup of a finite group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabir Bhattacharya

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available For a finite group G and an arbitrary prime p, let SP(G denote the intersection of all maximal subgroups M of G such that [G:M] is both composite and not divisible by p; if no such M exists we set SP(G = G. Some properties of G are considered involving SP(G. In particular, we obtain a characterization of G when each M in the definition of SP(G is nilpotent.

  6. On automorphisms of some finite p-groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since |Hom(〈 ¯xi〉, [xi,G])|≤|〈¯xi〉|, it follows from Proposition 3.4 that. |Autc(G)| ≤ d i=1|〈 ¯xi〉|. Now. |Inn(G)|≤|Autc(G)| ≤ d i=1|〈 ¯xi〉| = |G/Z(G)|=| Inn(G)|. Thus | Autc(G)|=| Inn(G)| and therefore Outc(G) = 1. 2. COROLLARY 3.6. Let G be a finite p-group of class 2 such that γ2(G) is cyclic. Then Outc(G) = 1. 4. Isoclinic groups.

  7. Simulation of Lamb wave reflections at plate edges using the semi-analytical finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Z A B; Gabbert, U

    2012-09-01

    In typical Lamb wave simulation practices, effects of plate edge reflections are often not considered in order to simplify the wave signal interpretations. Methods that are based on infinite plates such as the semi-analytical finite element method is effective in simulating Lamb waves as it excludes the effect of plate edges. However, the inclusion of plate edges in a finite plate could render this method inapplicable, especially for transient response simulations. Here, by applying the ratio of Lamb mode reflections at plate edges, and representing the reflection at plate edges using infinite plate solutions, the semi-analytical finite element method can be applied for transient response simulation, even when the plate is no longer infinite. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Reflection of sound from finite-size plane and curved surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    The author’s research on reflectors over nearly 25 years is summarized. The influence of curvature was analyzed by a geometrical model in order to quantify the attenuation by a simple expression. Reflection from a finite size plate was studied using the Kirchhoff-Fresnel approximation and the des......The author’s research on reflectors over nearly 25 years is summarized. The influence of curvature was analyzed by a geometrical model in order to quantify the attenuation by a simple expression. Reflection from a finite size plate was studied using the Kirchhoff-Fresnel approximation...... in the refurbishment of the concert hall of the Danish Radio in Copenhagen 1989, and later in many other halls. In order to describe the scattering due to edge diffraction the directional characteristic of reflections from a finite-size plate has been studied and a simple approximation valid for octave bands has been...

  9. Expansion in finite simple groups of Lie type

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Terence

    2015-01-01

    Expander graphs are an important tool in theoretical computer science, geometric group theory, probability, and number theory. Furthermore, the techniques used to rigorously establish the expansion property of a graph draw from such diverse areas of mathematics as representation theory, algebraic geometry, and arithmetic combinatorics. This text focuses on the latter topic in the important case of Cayley graphs on finite groups of Lie type, developing tools such as Kazhdan's property (T), quasirandomness, product estimates, escape from subvarieties, and the Balog-Szemerédi-Gowers lemma. Applications to the affine sieve of Bourgain, Gamburd, and Sarnak are also given. The material is largely self-contained, with additional sections on the general theory of expanders, spectral theory, Lie theory, and the Lang-Weil bound, as well as numerous exercises and other optional material.

  10. On Azumaya algebras with a finite automorphism group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Szeto

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Let B be a ring with 1, C the center of B, and G a finite automorphism group of B. It is shown that if B is an Azumaya algebra such that B=⊕∑g∈GJg where Jg={b∈B|bx=g(xb   for all   x∈B}, then there exist orthogonal central idempotents {fi∈C|i=1,2,…,m   for some integer   m} and subgroups Hi of G such that B=(⊕∑i=1mBfi⊕D where Bfi is a central Galois algebra with Galois group Hi|Bfi≅Hi for each i=1,2,…,m and D is contained in C.

  11. [Group process: reflections of a nursing team].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Adriana Serdotte Freitas; Dall'Agnol, Clarice Maria

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this qualitative, exploratory-descriptive study was to analyze the group process of a nursing team at Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA), under the light of Pichon-Rivière's Operative Group Theory. Data collection took place in 2008, using a semi-structured questionnaire and focal group. The group work concept is one of the four categories that resulted from the study, and is the object of approach in the present article. It was found that the knowledge about the group process must be shared, disseminated and discussed since the undergraduate studies and developed across the professional career. As the team learns and is able to identify the main indicators of the group process, it becomes possible to improve operatively, considering not only the outcomes but mainly the course covered until achieving the goal, aiming at group learning.

  12. Finite groups with the set of the number of subgroups of possible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Finite group; the number of subgroups of possible order. 1. Introduction. Throughout this paper, groups mentioned are finite and p is a prime. An important topic in the group theory is to investigate the number of subgroups of possible order, and con- versely it is also an important subject to determine the structure of a finite ...

  13. n-th Roots in finite polyhedral and centro-polyhedral groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The probability that a randomly chosen element in a non-abelian finite group has a square root, has been investigated by certain authors in recent years. In this paper, this probability will be generalized for the -th roots when ≥ 2 and it will be computed for every finite polyhedral group and all of the finite ...

  14. Mapping Spaces, Centralizers, and p-Local Finite Groups of Lie Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laude, Isabelle

    We study the space of maps from the classifying space of a finite p-group to theBorel construction of a finite group of Lie type G in characteristic p acting on itsbuilding. The first main result is a description of the homology with Fp-coefficients,showing that the mapping space, up to p...... between a finite p-group and theuncompleted classifying space of the p-local finite group coming from a finite groupof Lie type in characteristic p, providing some of the first results in this uncompletedsetting....

  15. REFLECTING TOGETHER: REFLECTIVE FUNCTIONING AS A FOCUS FOR DEEPENING GROUP SUPERVISION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffron, Mary Claire; Reynolds, Diane; Talbot, Bronwyn

    2016-11-01

    This article proposes how group reflective supervision, informed by the theory of reflective functioning, may provide a powerful method for developing reflective capacity of staff serving families, infants, and young children in multidisciplinary settings. An explanation of reflective functioning, related research, and its relevance to relational treatment and preventive intervention are discussed. Other approaches to reflective practice are referenced. We describe the necessary tension and encounters with distressing affect that mark reflective supervision groups using this focus. In addition, we identify areas of heightened difficulty in infant family work and describe how a group supervision process that enables use of self alongside perspectives of others may address these challenges while leading to increased reflective capacity among participants. Finally, we touch on relevant research on group supervision and parameters of size and focus, and highlight facilitation skills needed to create group safety and coherence. Areas for further study are proposed. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  16. Practicing What We Preach: Teacher Reflection Groups on Cooperative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.; Jacobs, George M.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the use of teacher reflection groups to aid teachers in their efforts to facilitate cooperative learning among their students. It is argued that these teacher reflection groups function best when they are organized with reference to eight cooperative learning principles. Furthermore, it is suggested that these reflective…

  17. Finitely limited group contribution correlations for boiling temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emami, Fateme Sadat; Vahid, Amir [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3906 (United States); Richard Elliott, J. [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3906 (United States)], E-mail: elliotl@uakron.edu

    2009-04-15

    Group contribution correlations are presented for the boiling temperatures at (101.33 and 1.33) kPa and for critical temperature applicable to a broad range of organic compounds. The group contributions are based on UNIFAC groups to facilitate simultaneous group identification for estimation of activity coefficients. These correlations recognize a finite limit in boiling temperature and critical temperature as infinite molar mass is approached. The existence of this limit is suggested by: extrapolation of the experimentally measured boiling temperatures, by critical behavior polymer solutions, by engineering equations of state, and by molecular simulation results. The availability of two vapor pressures enables straightforward application of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to estimate boiling temperatures at other points. In the presented approach, there are three parameters for the boiling temperature correlations and one parameter for the critical temperature plus 72 functional groups. The parameters are regressed through a database consisting of 336 hydrocarbons and 642 non-hydrocarbons. The database consists of various chemical families including aliphatics, olefinics, naphthenics, aromatics, alcohols, amines, nitriles, thiols, sulfides, aldehydes, ketones, esters, ethers, halocarbons, silicones, and acids. The average absolute percent deviations (AAD%) between the correlated and experimental temperatures are calculated in comparison with the Joback-Reid and Gani approaches. For the enthalpy of vaporization at T = 298 K, the Joback model makes calculations possible at 1.33 kPa by assuming that Hvap is constant over this range. Also, Kolska and Gani have reported a correlation for heat of vaporization at the normal boiling point which is used in this study. We obtain (3.5, 4.7, and 4.1) AAD% in temperature for the present work using the Joback-Reid and Gani methods, respectively. Additionally, the accuracy of the present work is evaluated by calculating the

  18. Finitely limited group contribution correlations for boiling temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emami, Fateme Sadat; Vahid, Amir; Richard Elliott, J.

    2009-01-01

    Group contribution correlations are presented for the boiling temperatures at (101.33 and 1.33) kPa and for critical temperature applicable to a broad range of organic compounds. The group contributions are based on UNIFAC groups to facilitate simultaneous group identification for estimation of activity coefficients. These correlations recognize a finite limit in boiling temperature and critical temperature as infinite molar mass is approached. The existence of this limit is suggested by: extrapolation of the experimentally measured boiling temperatures, by critical behavior polymer solutions, by engineering equations of state, and by molecular simulation results. The availability of two vapor pressures enables straightforward application of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to estimate boiling temperatures at other points. In the presented approach, there are three parameters for the boiling temperature correlations and one parameter for the critical temperature plus 72 functional groups. The parameters are regressed through a database consisting of 336 hydrocarbons and 642 non-hydrocarbons. The database consists of various chemical families including aliphatics, olefinics, naphthenics, aromatics, alcohols, amines, nitriles, thiols, sulfides, aldehydes, ketones, esters, ethers, halocarbons, silicones, and acids. The average absolute percent deviations (AAD%) between the correlated and experimental temperatures are calculated in comparison with the Joback-Reid and Gani approaches. For the enthalpy of vaporization at T = 298 K, the Joback model makes calculations possible at 1.33 kPa by assuming that Hvap is constant over this range. Also, Kolska and Gani have reported a correlation for heat of vaporization at the normal boiling point which is used in this study. We obtain (3.5, 4.7, and 4.1) AAD% in temperature for the present work using the Joback-Reid and Gani methods, respectively. Additionally, the accuracy of the present work is evaluated by calculating the

  19. The swamplands of reflection : using conversation analysis to reveal the architecture of group reflection sessions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Mario; de la Croix, Anne

    CONTEXT: Many medical schools include group reflection in their curriculum, and many researchers have considered both the concept and the outcomes of reflection. However, no research has been carried out on how 'reflective talk' is structured in the classroom. This paper describes how tutors and

  20. Neutron transport for pure-triplet scattering in finite planar media with reflective boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallah, M.; Degheidy, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    Pure-triplet scattering in neutron transport through a finite plane-parallel medium with internal source of energy is considered. The medium is assumed to have specular- and diffusely-reflecting boundaries. The neutron partial heat fluxes for this problem are computed in terms of the albedos of the source-free problem. Pomraning-Eddington approximation is used to solve the source free problem. A weight function is introduced to force the boundary conditions to be fulfilled

  1. Finite groups with the set of the number of subgroups of possible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Throughout this paper, groups mentioned are finite and p is a prime. An important topic in the group theory is to investigate the number of subgroups of possible order, and con- versely it is also an important subject to determine the structure of a finite group by considering the number of its subgroups of possible orders.

  2. The effects of core-reflected waves on finite fault inversions with teleseismic body wave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yunyi; Ni, Sidao; Wei, Shengji; Almeida, Rafael; Zhang, Han

    2017-11-01

    Teleseismic body waves are essential for imaging rupture processes of large earthquakes. Earthquake source parameters are usually characterized by waveform analyses such as finite fault inversions using only turning (direct) P and SH waves without considering the reflected phases from the core-mantle boundary (CMB). However, core-reflected waves such as ScS usually have amplitudes comparable to direct S waves due to the total reflection from the CMB and might interfere with the S waves used for inversion, especially at large epicentral distances for long duration earthquakes. In order to understand how core-reflected waves affect teleseismic body wave inversion results, we develop a procedure named Multitel3 to compute Green's functions that contain turning waves (direct P, pP, sP, direct S, sS and reverberations in the crust) and core-reflected waves (PcP, pPcP, sPcP, ScS, sScS and associated reflected phases from the CMB). This ray-based method can efficiently generate synthetic seismograms for turning and core-reflected waves independently, with the flexibility to take into account the 3-D Earth structure effect on the timing between these phases. The performance of this approach is assessed through a series of numerical inversion tests on synthetic waveforms of the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake and the 2015 Mw7.8 Nepal earthquake. We also compare this improved method with the turning-wave only inversions and explore the stability of the new procedure when there are uncertainties in a priori information (such as fault geometry and epicentre location) or arrival time of core-reflected phases. Finally, a finite fault inversion of the 2005 Mw8.7 Nias-Simeulue earthquake is carried out using the improved Green's functions. Using enhanced Green's functions yields better inversion results as expected. While the finite source inversion with conventional P and SH waves is able to recover large-scale characteristics of the earthquake source, by adding PcP and ScS phases

  3. Finite groups all of whose minimal subgroups are NE∗ -subgroups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    subgroup of G if there exists a subnormal subgroup T of G such that G = HT and H ∩ T is a. NE-subgroup of G. In this article, we investigate the structure of G under the assump- tion that subgroups of prime order are NE∗-subgroups of G. The finite ...

  4. z-CLASSES IN FINITE GROUPS OF CONJUGATE TYPE (n,1) 1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    37

    relation on G, it yields a partition of G into disjoint equivalence classes. It is coarser than the conjugacy relation. An infinite group may have infinitely many conjugacy classes, but in many groups the number of z-classes is finite. This finiteness of the z-classes gives a rough idea about “dynamical types” in a homogeneous ...

  5. On Lie Group-Lie Algebra Correspondences of Unitary Groups in Finite Von Neumann Algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Hiroshi; Ojima, Izumi; Matsuzawa, Yasumichi

    2011-01-01

    This article is a summary of our talk in QBIC2010. We give an affirmative answer to the question whether there exist Lie algebras for suitable closed subgroups of the unitary group U( {H}) in a Hilbert space {H} with U( {H}) equipped with the strong operator topology. More precisely, for any strongly closed subgroup G of the unitary group U( {M}) in a finite von Neumann algebra {M}, we show that the set of all generators of strongly continuous one-parameter subgroups of G forms a complete topological Lie algebra with respect to the strong resolvent topology. We also characterize the algebra /line {M} of all densely defined closed operators affiliated with {M} from the viewpoint of a tensor category.

  6. n-th Roots in finite polyhedral and centro-polyhedral groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Probability in finite groups; roots of elements; polyhedral groups; centro- polyhedral groups. 2010 Mathematics ... An element g of a finite group G is said to have an n-th root if there exists an element h ∈ G such that g = hn (n is a ..... For the proof of the fourth part, we must consider two cases: (i) m is odd and 4|d,. (ii) m, d are ...

  7. Ethics reflection groups in community health services: an evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillemoen, Lillian; Pedersen, Reidar

    2015-04-17

    Systematic ethics support in community health services in Norway is in the initial phase. There are few evaluation studies about the significance of ethics reflection on care. The aim of this study was to evaluate systematic ethics reflection in groups in community health (including nursing homes and residency), - from the perspectives of employees participating in the groups, the group facilitators and the service managers. The reflection groups were implemented as part of a research and development project. A mixed-methods design with qualitative focus group interviews, observations and written reports were used to evaluate. The study was conducted at two nursing homes, two home care districts and a residence for people with learning disabilities. Participants were employees, facilitators and service managers. The study was guided by ethical standard principles and was approved by the Norwegian Social Science Data Services. We found support for ethics reflection as a valuable measure to strengthen clinical practice. New and improved solutions, more cooperation between employees, and improved collaboration with patients and their families are some of the results. No negative experiences were found. Instead, the ethics reflection based on experiences and challenges in the workplace, was described as a win-win situation. The evaluation also revealed what is needed to succeed and useful tips for further development of ethics support in community health services. Ethics reflection groups focusing on ethical challenges from the participants' daily work were found to be significant for improved practice, collegial support and cooperation, personal and professional development among staff, facilitators and managers. Resources needed to succeed were managerial support, and anchoring ethics sessions in the routine of daily work.

  8. Irreducible decomposition and calculating of multiplicity of the symmetric and exterior powers representation of finite groups

    OpenAIRE

    Tamura, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider symmetric powers representation and exterior powers representation of finite groups, which generated by the representation which has finite dimension over the complex field. We calculate the multiplicity of irreducible component of two representations of some representation by using a character theory of representation and a pre-lambda-ring, for example, the regular representation.

  9. Psychosocial issues discovered through reflective group dialogue between medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shao-Yin; Lin, Chi-Wei; Lin, Meei-Ju; Wen, Chin-Chen

    2018-01-10

    The biopsychosocial model is a comprehensive approach emphasizing holistic medical care. However, medical curricula that incorporate narrative reflective writing and group dynamic discussion of psychosocial issues among patients and their family members in reflective dialogue groups are currently underutilized. The aim of this study was to determine psychosocial issues among patients and their family members through medical students' reflective dialogue groups. This study was completed as part of a pediatric clerkship. Fifty medical students were rotated to the department of Pediatrics. They completed a narrative writing assignment concerning patients' psychosocial issues and participated in a reflective group discussion during the rotation. The recordings of the six reflective group sessions were transcribed for thematic analysis. A six-step theme generation process was conducted in the first reading stage of all transcripts by four researchers. Subsequently, initial codes were generated and potential themes sought before possible themes were reviewed and thematic maps generated. Names for each theme were defined and a scholarly report of the analysis was presented through a consensus-based approach. A total of 108 psychosocial issues were coded and categorized as the following six main themes: medical communication, the intricate medical ecological system, role and function of a family, development of medical professionalism, ethical dilemmas, and various patient perspectives from diverse cultural backgrounds. All these themes underlie the complexity of clinical encounters. Clinical care is an extremely complex interactive ecological network involving human behavior, family, and public health care systems. The discovery of psychosocial problems by medical students as narrators in this study illustrates that medical care should focus not only on illnesses but also patients' psychosocial narratives.

  10. Conjugacy class sizes and solvability of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the notations and terminologies are standard and readers may refer to [6]. A well-known problem in group theory is to study the influence of conjugacy class sizes on the structure of a group. For instance, as regards to groups with conjugacy class sizes. {1, m}, Itô [3] proved that G is nilpotent, m = pa for some prime p, and ...

  11. A note on TI-subgroups of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A kernel and a complement of a quasi-Frobenius group G are the preimages of a kernel and a complement of the Frobenius group G/Z(G), respectively. Lemma 1.2 [1]. A group G is quasi-Frobenius if and only if G possesses a noncentral subgroup H such that H ∩ Hg ≤ Z(G) for all g ∈ G − H. In this case, H is a comple-.

  12. A projective variety with discrete, non-finitely generated automorphism group

    OpenAIRE

    Lesieutre, John

    2016-01-01

    We construct a projective variety with discrete, non-finitely generated automorphism group. As an application, we show that there exists a complex projective variety with infinitely many non-isomorphic real forms.

  13. One of the most important theorems in finite group the-ory is the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    Classroom” is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. A Note on the Converse of Lagrange's Theorem. Keywords. Finite group, subgroup,.

  14. Elastic collisions of classical point particles on a finite frictionless linear track with perfectly reflecting endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, R.

    2006-03-01

    Repeated elastic collisions of point particles on a finite frictionless linear track with perfectly reflecting endpoints are considered. The problem is analysed by means of an elementary linear algebra approach. It is found that, starting with a state consisting of a projectile particle in motion at constant velocity and a target particle at rest in a fixed known position, the points at which collisions occur on track, when plotted versus progressive numerals, corresponding to the collisions themselves, show periodic patterns for a rather large choice of values of the initial position x(0) and on the mass ratio r. For certain values of these parameters, however, only regular behaviour over a large number of collisions is detected.

  15. Transmission and reflection properties of two-dimensional finite metal crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkiewicz, Agata; Nasalski, Wojciech

    2017-07-01

    Optical characteristics of a finite two-dimensional silver stripe photonic crystal of a square lattice are numerically analysed with use of multilayer Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis. Qualitative changes in optical response of the crystal originated from modifications of the thickness and filling factors of each layer and the polarization direction of the incident wave are shown. The crystal manifests its various characteristics in wideband or narrowband reflection and transmission, while absorption remains low. The behaviour of the crystal is determined by its structure geometry yielding excitation of localized plasmons and collective modes together with interactions between them. The optical response of the square lattice structure is also compared with the response of a triangular lattice crystal.

  16. Reflection group on 'Expert Culture'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggermont, G

    2000-07-01

    As part of SCK-CEN's social sciences and humanities programme, a reflection group on 'Expert Culture' was established. The objectives of the reflection group are: (1) to clarify the role of SCK-CEN experts; (2) to clarify the new role of expertise in the evolving context of risk society; (3) to confront external views and internal SCK-CEN experiences on expert culture; (4) to improve trust building of experts and credibility of SCK-CEN as a nuclear actor in society; (5) to develop a draft for a deontological code; (6) to integrate the approach in training on assertivity and communication; (7) to create an output for a topical day on the subject of expert culture. The programme, achievements and perspectives of the refection group are summarised.

  17. Reflection Group on 'Ethical Choices in Radiation Protection'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggermont, G.

    2000-01-01

    As part of SCK-CEN's social sciences and humanities programme, a reflection group on 'Ethical Choices in Radiation Protection' was created. The objectives of the reflection group are (1) to brainstorm on critical issues of radiation protection; (2) to create a discussion forum with a variety os SCK-CEN researchers and external experts; (3) to make value judgements and open questions in radiation protection explicit; (4) to create an output for a topical day or workshop by editing a 'cahier' of contributed articles and discussion reports; (5) to complement the output of the SCK-CEN contribution in international ALARA workshops. The programme, achievements and perspectives of the refection group are summarised

  18. A CHARACTERIZATION OF FINITE p -GROUPS BY THEIR SCHUR ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    22

    This integer t(G) is called corank of G defined in [13]. It is an interesting problem to classify the structure of all non-abelian p-groups G by the order of the Schur multiplier M(G), i.e., when t(G) is known. Several authors studied this problem for various values of t(G). First Berkovich [3] and Zhou [4] classified all groups G for ...

  19. A note on conjugacy classes of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A group G is called a rational group if every element x of G is conjugate to xm, where m is a natural number coprime to |x|. By Re(G) we denote the set of all real elements of G and by (G) we denote the set of all the primes dividing the order of G. By F(G) we denote the fitting subgroup of G and Op(G) denotes the unique ...

  20. A note on conjugacy classes of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    By F(G) we denote the fitting subgroup of G and Op(G) denotes the unique maximal normal p-subgroup of G. All other unexplained notations, if any, are standard. 2. Classifications. It is not very hard to see that an abelian group G satisfies (1) if and only if G is an elementary abelian 2-group. The restriction (1) is of course ...

  1. Finite groups with three conjugacy class sizes of some elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (G)). Hence the Sylow p-subgroup of G is abelian as required. Now by the hypothesis we suppose that x is a p-element of G such that [G : CG(x)] = pa. By Lemma 2.1, we know that the normal closure of x will be a p-group, say H. Let Z = CG(H).

  2. Finite cluster renormalization group for disordered two-dimensional systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Kenz, A.

    1987-09-01

    A new type of renormalization group theory using the generalized Callen identities is exploited in the study of the disordered systems. Bond diluted and frustrated Ising systems on a square lattice are analyzed with this new scheme. (author). 9 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  3. Modeling the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of mixed finite plant canopies and soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluessel, G.; Dickinson, R. E.; Privette, J. L.; Emery, W. J.; Kokaly, R.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical model of the bidirectional reflectance for optically semi-infinite plant canopies has been extended to describe the reflectance of finite depth canopies contributions from the underlying soil. The model depends on 10 independent parameters describing vegetation and soil optical and structural properties. The model is inverted with a nonlinear minimization routine using directional reflectance data for lawn (leaf area index (LAI) is equal to 9.9), soybeans (LAI, 2.9) and simulated reflectance data (LAI, 1.0) from a numerical bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model (Myneni et al., 1988). While the ten-parameter model results in relatively low rms differences for the BRDF, most of the retrieved parameters exhibit poor stability. The most stable parameter was the single-scattering albedo of the vegetation. Canopy albedo could be derived with an accuracy of less than 5% relative error in the visible and less than 1% in the near-infrared. Sensitivity were performed to determine which of the 10 parameters were most important and to assess the effects of Gaussian noise on the parameter retrievals. Out of the 10 parameters, three were identified which described most of the BRDF variability. At low LAI values the most influential parameters were the single-scattering albedos (both soil and vegetation) and LAI, while at higher LAI values (greater than 2.5) these shifted to the two scattering phase function parameters for vegetation and the single-scattering albedo of the vegetation. The three-parameter model, formed by fixing the seven least significant parameters, gave higher rms values but was less sensitive to noise in the BRDF than the full ten-parameter model. A full hemispherical reflectance data set for lawn was then interpolated to yield BRDF values corresponding to advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) scan geometries collected over a period of nine days. The resulting parameters and BRDFs are similar to those for the

  4. The analysis of crystallographic symmetry types in finite groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Atikah Mohd; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Adam, Nooraishikin; Zamri, Siti Norziahidayu Amzee

    2014-06-01

    Undeniably, it is human nature to prefer objects which are considered beautiful. Most consider beautiful as perfection, hence they try to create objects which are perfectly balance in shape and patterns. This creates a whole different kind of art, the kind that requires an object to be symmetrical. This leads to the study of symmetrical objects and pattern. Even mathematicians and ethnomathematicians are very interested with the essence of symmetry. One of these studies were conducted on the Malay traditional triaxial weaving culture. The patterns derived from this technique are symmetrical and this allows for further research. In this paper, the 17 symmetry types in a plane, known as the wallpaper groups, are studied and discussed. The wallpaper groups will then be applied to the triaxial patterns of food cover in Malaysia.

  5. On the index complex of a maximal subgroup and the group-theoretic properties of a finite group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Lining

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Let G be a finite group, S^p(G, phi'(G and phi_1(G be generalizations of the Frattini subgroup of G. Based on these characteristic subgroups and using Deskins index complex, this paper gets some necessary and suffcient conditions for G to be a p solvable, pi-solvable, solvable, super-solvable and nilpotent group.

  6. Real Elements and p-Nilpotence of Finite Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Ballester-Bolinches

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Our first main result proves that every element of order 4 of a Sylow 2-subgroup S of a minimal non-2-nilpotent group G, is a real element of S. This allows to give a character-free proof of a theorem due to Isaacs and Navarro (see [9, Theorem B]. As an application, the authors show a common extension of the p-nilpotence criteria proved in [3] and [9].

  7. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Work Groups and Teams: A Reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Steve W J

    2017-12-01

    Teamwork has been at the core of human accomplishment across the millennia, and it was a focus of social psychological inquiry on small group behavior for nearly half a century. However, as organizations world-wide reorganized work around teams over the past two decades, the nature of teamwork and factors influencing it became a central focus of research in organizational psychology and management. In this article, I reflect on the impetus, strategy, key features, and scientific contribution of "Enhancing the Effectiveness of Work Groups and Teams," by Kozlowski and Ilgen, a review monograph published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest in 2006.

  8. A gap theorem for the ZL-amenability constant of a finite group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yemon Choi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It was shown in [A. Azimifard, E. Samei, N. Spronk, JFA 256 (2009] that the ZL-amenability constant of a finite group is always at least~$1$, with equality if and only if the group is abelian. It was also shown in [A. Azimifard, E. Samei, N. Spronk, op cit.] that for any finite non-abelian group this invariant is at least $301/300$, but the proof relies crucially on a deep result of D. A. Rider on norms of central idempotents in group algebras.Here we show that if $G$ is finite and non-abelian then its ZL-amenability constant is at least $7/4$, which is known to be best possible. We avoid use of Rider's reslt, by analyzing the cases where $G$ is just non-abelian, using calculations from [M. Alaghmandan, Y. Choi, E. Samei, CMB 57 (2014], and establishing a new estimate for groups with trivial centre.

  9. Decision Making and Finite-Time Motion Control for a Group of Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiang; Liu, Shirong; Xie, Xiaogao; Wang, Jian

    2013-04-01

    This paper deals with the problem of odor source localization by designing and analyzing a decision-control system (DCS) for a group of robots. In the decision level, concentration magnitude information and wind information detected by robots are used to predict a probable position of the odor source. Specifically, the idea of particle swarm optimization is introduced to give a probable position of the odor source in terms of concentration magnitude information. Moreover, an observation model of the position of the odor source is built according to wind information, and a Kalman filter is used to estimate the position of the odor source, which is combined with the position obtained by using concentration magnitude information in order to make a decision on the position of the odor source. In the control level, two types of the finite-time motion control algorithms are designed; one is a finite-time parallel motion control algorithm, while the other is a finite-time circular motion control algorithm. Precisely, a nonlinear finite-time consensus algorithm is first proposed, and a Lyapunov approach is used to analyze the finite-time convergence of the proposed consensus algorithm. Then, on the basis of the proposed finite-time consensus algorithm, a finite-time parallel motion control algorithm, which can control the group of robots to trace the plume and move toward the probable position of odor source, is derived. Next, a finite-time circular motion control algorithm, which can enable the robot group to circle the probable position of the odor source in order to search for odor clues, is also developed. Finally, the performance capabilities of the proposed DCS are illustrated through the problem of odor source localization.

  10. Quasirecognition by prime graph of finite simple groups ${}^2D_n(3$

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Khosravi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Let $G$ be a finite group. In [Ghasemabadi et al., characterizations of the simple group ${}^2D_n(3$ by prime graph and spectrum, Monatsh Math., 2011] it is proved that if $n$ is odd, then ${}^2D _n(3$ is recognizable by prime graph and also by element orders. In this paper we prove that if $n$ is even, then $D={}^2D_{n}(3$ is quasirecognizable by prime graph, i.e. every finite group $G$ with $Gamma(G=Gamma(D$ has a unique nonabelian composition factor and this factor is isomorphic to $D$.

  11. A diagram approach to character formulae for finite and compact groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibler, M.; Elbaz, E.

    1978-06-01

    Some basic relations for the representation theory and the Wigner-Racah algebra of a finite or compact continuous group are discussed and transcribed in terms of diagrams. Special emphasis is placed on the case of a simply reducible group and all the diagrams are applicable to SU 2 without any change

  12. Fourier transform and the Verlinde formula for the quantum double of a finite group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornwinder, T.H.; Schroers, B.J.; Slingerland, J.K.; Bais, F.A.

    1999-01-01

    We define a Fourier transform $S$ for the quantum double $D(G)$ of a finite group $G$. Acting on characters of $D(G)$, $S$ and the central ribbon element of $D(G)$ generate a unitary matrix representation of the group $SL(2,Z)$. The characters form a ring over the integers under both the algebra

  13. Multivariate stability of force-reflecting teleoperation: Structures of finite and infinite zeros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, R.W.; McAree, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a stability analysis of force-position teleoperation under general end-effector contact. The analysis is based on the finite and infinite zero structure of the multivariable root-locus resulting from modulation of the environment stiffness. The starting point is an analysis of the stability of robot force control, motivated by the observation that the human-operator in a force reflection loop acts as a force servo, generating position commands in response to reflected force. Asymptotic root loci properties are used to establish passivity conditions on force feedback to give root locus interpretations of the well-known results that (1) feedback via the inverse joint Jacobian can lead to (kinematic) instability and that (2) passivity is preserved by kinematically proper force feedback through the transpose of the joint angle Jacobian. It is demonstrated that a fully constrained force-position teleoperation loop has an identical infinite zero structure to that of a slave manipulation under kinematically proper force control and that the dominant vibration modes of a force-position loop are fully described by a multivariable analogue of the single-input single-output pseudo-system investigated in a study by Daniel and McAree. Extension of the analysis to cover partial end-effector constraint provides a design tool for teleoperation control and serves to aid selection of teleoperation slate-arms. The paper concludes by giving a passivity condition for multiple-input multiple-output force-position teleoperation for stable contact against all environments

  14. On s-semipermutable subgroups of finite groups and p-nilpotency

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. All groups considered in this paper are finite groups. Most of the notations are standard and can be found in [4] and [3]. Recall that a group H is said to be s-permutable (s-quasinormal) [6] in G if HP = PH for all Sylow subgroups P of G. A subgroup H of a group G is called s-semipermutable [2]. inGif it is ...

  15. Finite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.R. Azzam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the application of using a skirted foundation system to study the behavior of foundations with structural skirts adjacent to a sand slope and subjected to earthquake loading. The effect of the adopted skirts to safeguard foundation and slope from collapse is studied. The skirts effect on controlling horizontal soil movement and decreasing pore water pressure beneath foundations and beside the slopes during earthquake is investigated. This technique is investigated numerically using finite element analysis. A four story reinforced concrete building that rests on a raft foundation is idealized as a two-dimensional model with and without skirts. A two dimensional plain strain program PLAXIS, (dynamic version is adopted. A series of models for the problem under investigation were run under different skirt depths and lactation from the slope crest. The effect of subgrade relative density and skirts thickness is also discussed. Nodal displacement and element strains were analyzed for the foundation with and without skirts and at different studied parameters. The research results showed a great effectiveness in increasing the overall stability of the slope and foundation. The confined soil footing system by such skirts reduced the foundation acceleration therefore it can be tended to damping element and relieved the transmitted disturbance to the adjacent slope. This technique can be considered as a good method to control the slope deformation and decrease the slope acceleration during earthquakes.

  16. Sensitivity in forward modeled hyperspectral reflectance due to phytoplankton groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Ciro; Bassani, Cristiana; Pinardi, Monica; Giardino, Claudia; Bresciani, Mariano

    2016-04-01

    Phytoplankton is an integral part of the ecosystem, affecting trophic dynamics, nutrient cycling, habitat condition, and fisheries resources. The types of phytoplankton and their concentrations are used to describe the status of water and the processes inside of this. This study investigates bio-optical modeling of phytoplankton functional types (PFT) in terms of pigment composition demonstrating the capability of remote sensing to recognize freshwater phytoplankton. In particular, a sensitivity analysis of simulated hyperspectral water reflectance (with band setting of HICO, APEX, EnMAP, PRISMA and Sentinel-3) of productive eutrophic waters of Mantua lakes (Italy) environment is presented. The bio-optical model adopted for simulating the hyperspectral water reflectance takes into account the reflectance dependency on geometric conditions of light field, on inherent optical properties (backscattering and absorption coefficients) and on concentrations of water quality parameters (WQPs). The model works in the 400-750nm wavelength range, while the model parametrization is based on a comprehensive dataset of WQP concentrations and specific inherent optical properties of the study area, collected in field surveys carried out from May to September of 2011 and 2014. The following phytoplankton groups, with their specific absorption coefficients, a*Φi(λ), were used during the simulation: Chlorophyta, Cyanobacteria with phycocyanin, Cyanobacteria and Cryptophytes with phycoerythrin, Diatoms with carotenoids and mixed phytoplankton. The phytoplankton absorption coefficient aΦ(λ) is modelled by multiplying the weighted sum of the PFTs, Σpia*Φi(λ), with the chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a). To highlight the variability of water reflectance due to variation of phytoplankton pigments, the sensitivity analysis was performed by keeping constant the WQPs (i.e., Chl-a=80mg/l, total suspended matter=12.58g/l and yellow substances=0.27m-1). The sensitivity analysis was

  17. On finite groups whose every proper normal subgroup is a union of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences Foundation, St. Stephen's. College, Delhi 110 007, India. E-mail: ashrafi@kashanu.ac.ir; geetha venkat@ststephens.edu. MS received 19 June 2002; revised 26 March 2004. Abstract. Let G be a finite group and A be a normal subgroup of G. We denote by ncc(A) the ...

  18. Finite groups with the set of the number of subgroups of possible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 4. Finite Groups with the Set of the Number of Subgroups of Possible Order Containing Exactly Two Elements. Yanheng Chen Guiyun Chen. Volume 123 Issue 4 November 2013 pp 491-498 ...

  19. On non-Frattini chief factors and solvability of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indian Acad. Sci. (Math. Sci.) Vol. 122, No. 2, May 2012, pp. 163–173. c Indian Academy of Sciences. On non-Frattini chief factors and solvability of finite groups. JIANJUN LIU1,∗. , XIUYUN GUO2 and QIANLU LI3. 1School of Mathematics and Statistics, Southwest University,. Chongqing 400715, People's Republic of China.

  20. On the Steinhaus and Bergman properties for infinite products of finite groups

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thomas, S.; Zapletal, Jindřich

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2012), s. 1250002 ISSN 1793-7442 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : ultrafilters * products of finite groups * automatic continuity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S1793744212500028

  1. Finite groups all of whose minimal subgroups are NE-subgroups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences. Indian Academy of Sciences ... In this article, we investigate the structure of under the assumption that subgroups of prime order are *-subgroups of . The finite groups, all of whose minimal subgroups of the generalized Fitting subgroup are *-subgroups are classified.

  2. On Non-Frattini Chief Factors and Solvability of Finite Groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A subgroup of a group is said to be a semi C A P ∗ -subgroup of if there is a chief series 1 = G 0 < G 1 < ⋯ < G m = G of such that for every non-Frattini chief factor G i / G i − 1 , H either covers G i / G i − 1 or avoids G i / G i − 1 . In this paper, some sufficient conditions for a normal subgroup of a finite group to be ...

  3. Reflective practice in ESL teacher development groups from practices to principles

    CERN Document Server

    Farrell, T

    2013-01-01

    Reflective Practise in ESL Teacher Development Groups  discusses the concept of reflective practice in ESL teachers using data from a 3-year collaborative partnership in which three ESL teachers in Canada explored their professional development through reflective practice.

  4. Value of Online Group Reflection After International Service-Learning Experiences: I Never Thought of That.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Eileen M; Tremethick, Mary Jane

    Reflection is a widely accepted learning tool and a component of competent professional practice. An exploratory descriptive study was conducted to compare the breadth and level of reflection between students engaged in individual reflection papers and students engaged in an online group reflection discussion after an international cultural immersion service-learning program. Results indicated that students participating in the online group discussion had a higher level of reflective thinking and discussed more topics in their written reflections.

  5. Representation theory of finite abelian groups applied to a linear diatomic crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Boyd

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available After a brief review of matrix representations of finite abelian groups, projection operators are defined and used to compute symmetry coordinates for systems of coupled harmonic oscillators. The Lagrangian for such systems is discussed in the event that the displacements along the symmetry coordinates are complex. Lastly, the natural frequencies of a linear, diatomic crystal are determined through application of the Born cyclic condition and the determination of the symmetry coordinates.

  6. Solution of the diffusion equations for several groups by the finite elements method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arredondo S, C.

    1975-01-01

    The code DELFIN has been implemented for the solution of the neutrons diffusion equations in two dimensions obtained by applying the approximation of several groups of energy. The code works with any number of groups and regions, and can be applied to thermal reactors as well as fast reactor. Providing it with the diffusion coefficients, the effective sections and the fission spectrum we obtain the results for the systems multiplying constant and the flows of each groups. The code was established using the method of finite elements, which is a form of resolution of the variational formulation of the equations applying the Ritz-Galerkin method with continuous polynomial functions by parts, in one case of the Lagrange type with rectangular geometry and up to the third grade. The obtained results and the comparison with the results in the literature, permit to reach the conclusion that it is convenient, to use the rectangular elements in all the cases where the geometry permits it, and demonstrate also that the finite elements method is better than the finite differences method. (author)

  7. Generating finite cyclic and dihedral groups using sequential insertion systems with interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Turaev, Sherzod; Yosman, Ahmad Firdaus

    2017-04-01

    The operation of insertion has been studied extensively throughout the years for its impact in many areas of theoretical computer science such as DNA computing. First introduced as a generalization of the concatenation operation, many variants of insertion have been introduced, each with their own computational properties. In this paper, we introduce a new variant that enables the generation of some special types of groups called sequential insertion systems with interactions. We show that these new systems are able to generate all finite cyclic and dihedral groups.

  8. Identifying long cycles in finite alternating and symmetric groups acting on subsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Linton

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Let $H$ be a permutation group on a set $\\Lambda$, which is permutationally isomorphic to a finite alternating or symmetric group $A_n$ or $S_n$ acting on the $k$-element subsets of points from $\\{1,\\ldots,n\\}$, for some arbitrary but fixed $k$. Suppose moreover that no isomorphism with this action is known. We show that key elements of $H$ needed to construct such an isomorphism $\\varphi$, such as those whose image under $\\varphi$ is an $n$-cycle or $(n-1$-cycle, can be recognised with high probability by the lengths of just four of their cycles in $\\Lambda$.

  9. A finite capacity queue with Markovian arrivals and two servers with group services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chakravarthy

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider a finite capacity queuing system in which arrivals are governed by a Markovian arrival process. The system is attended by two exponential servers, who offer services in groups of varying sizes. The service rates may depend on the number of customers in service. Using Markov theory, we study this finite capacity queuing model in detail by obtaining numerically stable expressions for (a the steady-state queue length densities at arrivals and at arbitrary time points; (b the Laplace-Stieltjes transform of the stationary waiting time distribution of an admitted customer at points of arrivals. The stationary waiting time distribution is shown to be of phase type when the interarrival times are of phase type. Efficient algorithmic procedures for computing the steady-state queue length densities and other system performance measures are discussed. A conjecture on the nature of the mean waiting time is proposed. Some illustrative numerical examples are presented.

  10. Online Reflective Group Discussion--Connecting First Year Undergraduate Students with Their Third Year Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Annetta K. L.

    2011-01-01

    University professional programs seek to develop students as reflective practitioners. The ability to critically reflect is often assumed to occur along the way. The explicit development of critical reflective skills among students is challenging. This study describes the utilization of online group discussion for critical reflection and provides…

  11. Working Group on Gender and Mathematics: Gathering Reflective Voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erchick, Diana B.; Condron, Linda

    This paper reviews the history of the work of the PME-NA Gender and Mathematics Working Group, and the progress made toward the intended end product of the Working Group. The first section, Introduction and Review, outlines the history and work to date of the group. The second section, PME-NA XXIV Session Goals, delineates the plans of the group…

  12. Quantum channels irreducibly covariant with respect to the finite group generated by the Weyl operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siudzińska, Katarzyna; Chruściński, Dariusz

    2018-03-01

    In matrix algebras, we introduce a class of linear maps that are irreducibly covariant with respect to the finite group generated by the Weyl operators. In particular, we analyze the irreducibly covariant quantum channels, that is, the completely positive and trace-preserving linear maps. Interestingly, imposing additional symmetries leads to the so-called generalized Pauli channels, which were recently considered in the context of the non-Markovian quantum evolution. Finally, we provide examples of irreducibly covariant positive but not necessarily completely positive maps.

  13. A non-reflecting boundary condition for the finite element modeling of infinite reservoir with layered sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Indrani; Maity, Damodar

    2006-10-01

    The design of seismic resistant concrete gravity dam necessitates accurate determination of hydrodynamic pressure developed in the adjacent reservoir. The hydrodynamic pressure developed on structure is dependent on the physical characteristics of the boundaries surrounding the reservoir including reservoir bottom. The sedimentary material in the reservoir bottom absorbs energy at the bottom, which will affect the hydrodynamic pressure at the upstream face of the dam. The fundamental parameter characterizing the effect of absorption of hydrodynamic pressure waves at the reservoir bottom due to sediment is the reflection coefficient. The wave reflection coefficient is determined from parameters based on sediment layer thickness, its material properties and excitation frequencies. An analytical or a closed-form solution cannot account for the arbitrary geometry of the dam or reservoir bed profile. This problem can be efficiently tackled with finite element technique. The need for an accurate truncation boundary is felt to reduce the computational domain of the unbounded reservoir system. An efficient truncation boundary condition (TBC) which accounts for the reservoir bottom effect is proposed for the finite element analysis of infinite reservoir. The results show the efficiency of the proposed truncation boundary condition.

  14. A non-reflecting boundary for use in a finite element beam model of a railway track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiannan; Thompson, David J.

    2015-02-01

    Some beam-like structures such as a railway track are effectively infinite in nature. Analytical solutions exist for simple structures but numerical methods like the finite element (FE) method are often employed to study more complicated problems. However, when the FE method is used for structures of infinite extent it is essential to introduce artificial boundaries to limit the area of computation. Here, a non-reflecting boundary is developed using a damped tapered tip for application in a finite element model representing an infinite supported beam. The FE model of the tapered tip is validated against an analytical model based on Bessel functions. The reflection characteristics of the FE tapered tip are quantified using a wave/FE superposition method. It is shown that the damped tapered tip is much more effective than its constant counterpart and achieves reduction of the model size. The damped tapered tip is applied to a simple FE railway track model and good agreement is found when its point mobility is compared with an analytical infinite track model.

  15. Developing Deep Group Reflection within a Critical Reflection Action Learning Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Gary

    2016-01-01

    This account of practice describes how a manufacturing company in the North of England transformed their approach to problem-solving and action through the use of a Critical Reflection Action Learning (CRAL) methodology. The company, who had been in business for over 25 years, experienced problems due to a diminishing customer base and substantial…

  16. Doing synchronous online focus groups with young people: methodological reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Fiona E; Morris, Marianne; Rumsey, Nichola

    2007-04-01

    Although online focus groups are emerging as a worthwhile methodological approach for qualitative researchers, reporting has been constrained in several ways. The majority of studies report asynchronous groups, whereas others employ synchronous exchanges, the efficacy of which with young people has seldom been explored. Considering the popularity of the Internet as a communication tool for young people, this missed opportunity is surprising. Based on a series of synchronous online focus groups with young people, the authors explore why this approach might be an effective way of engaging young people with appearance-related concerns in research. In this article, they discuss the process of hosting and moderating synchronous online focus groups, highlighting some of the ethical, pragmatic, and personal challenges that might face researchers using this method. Through a reflexive approach, they intend to inform and encourage qualitative researchers to consider alternative ways of engaging young people in research.

  17. Reflections: Returning as a Group Leader after a Severe Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    Complicated issues arise when a group leader resumes practice after suffering a disability. The author, a nurse psychotherapist/researcher with a doctoral degree, director of nursing research at a veterans' hospital, and a psychodynamic practitioner in private practice, suffered a major stroke. The author felt extremely vulnerable and struggled as…

  18. Getting published: reflections of a collaborative writing group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Valerie; Duffy, Kathleen; McCallum, Jacqueline; Price, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    Writing for publication, in the nursing profession, is considered essential for the development of the profession and individual career advancement. In education there is also the increasing pressure to produce University research output. To develop a collaborative writing group to develop and write articles relating to our teaching practice. The idea of forming a writing group was discussed at a module team meeting where five academics expressed an interest. The process of forming the group involved an initial meeting to discuss and agree to the aims, interests, expertise and areas of responsibility for each member. Regular meetings are held and each member takes on responsibility for an aspect of work towards completing the articles. Three articles and one editorial have been published and another is under peer review. We have endeavoured to develop and maintain a theme, this being supporting nursing students' development with an emphasis on an aspect of their decision making skills. Also, importantly, we have created a supportive environment and friendships. The demands made upon the nurse educator to be clinically, educationally and research active can be difficult to meet. Collaborative writing groups may be one way to fulfil the scholarly activity element. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. How to succeed with ethics reflection groups in community healthcare? Professionals' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Heidi; Lillemoen, Lillian; Magelssen, Morten; Førde, Reidun; Pedersen, Reidar; Gjerberg, Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    Healthcare personnel in the municipal healthcare systems experience many ethical challenges in their everyday work. In Norway, 243 municipalities participated in a national ethics project, aimed to increase ethical competence in municipal healthcare services. In this study, we wanted to map out what participants in ethics reflection groups experienced as promoters or as barriers to successful reflection. To examine what the staff experience as promoters or as barriers to successful ethics reflection. The study has a qualitative design, where 56 participants in municipal healthcare participated in 10 different focus-group interviews. Ethical considerations: The data collection was based on the participants' informed consent and approved by the Data Protection Official of the Norwegian Centre for Research Data. The informants had different experiences from ethics reflection group. Nevertheless, we found that there were several factors that were consistently mentioned: competence, facilitator's role, ethics reflection groups organizing, and organizational support were all experienced as promoters and as a significant effect on ethics reflection groups. The absence of such factors would constitute important barriers to successful ethics reflection. The results are coincident with other studies, and indicate some conditions that may increase the possibility to succeed with ethics reflection groups. A systematic approach seems to be important, the systematics of the actual reflections, but also in the organization of ethics reflection group at the workplace. Community healthcare is characterized by organizational instabilities as many vacancies, high workloads, and lack of predictability. This can be a hinder for ethics reflection group. Both internal and external factors seem to influence the organization of ethics reflection group. The municipalities' instabilities challenging this work, and perceived as a clear inhibitor for the development. The participants

  20. Prediction of transmission, reflection and absorption coefficients of periodic structures using a hybrid Wave Based - Finite Element unit cell method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Elke; Jonckheere, Stijn; Van Belle, Lucas; Claeys, Claus; Desmet, Wim

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a hybrid Wave Based Method - Finite Element unit cell method to predict the absorption, reflection and transmission properties of arbitrary, two-dimensional periodic structures. The planar periodic structure, represented by its unit cell combined with Bloch-Floquet periodicity boundary conditions, is modelled within the Finite Element Method, allowing to represent complex geometries and to include any type of physics. The planar periodic structure is coupled to semi-infinite acoustic domains above and/or below, in which the dynamic pressure field is modelled with the Wave Based Method, applying a wave function set that fulfills the Helmholtz equation and satisfies the Sommerfeld radiation condition and the Bloch-Floquet periodicity conditions inherently. The dynamic fields described within both frameworks are coupled using a direct coupling strategy, accounting for the mutual dynamic interactions via a weighted residual formulation. The method explicitly accounts for the interaction between the unit cell and the surrounding acoustic domain, also accounting for higher order periodic waves. The convergence of the method is analysed and its applicability is shown for a variety of problems, proving it to be a useful tool combining the strengths of two methods.

  1. Using discussion groups as a strategy for postgraduate implant dentistry students to reflect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, S; Fine, P; De Bruyn, H

    2016-02-01

    More than undergraduates, postgraduate students have the day-to-day clinical experience to reflect upon. Nevertheless, reflection in postgraduate dental education is less well studied. Hence, the purpose was to investigate the attitude towards reflection and the content of reflections in postgraduate implant dentistry education in the UK and Belgium. To investigate the attitude towards reflection, a questionnaire was administered to the 10 postgraduates at UCL Eastman Dental Institute (EDI) and 6 postgraduates at Ghent University (UGent). Additionally, students were invited to attend two reflective sessions (60-90 minutes). The sessions' audio recordings were transcribed and analysed using a thematic approach. In total, 16 postgraduate implant dentistry students participated. Although the majority reported prior experience with reflection, there was variation in the provided definitions of reflection. EDI students agreed with reflection being beneficial for professional development/clinical reasoning and were positive about discussing clinical experiences in groups, but were divided about individual/group reflections. Their UGent counterparts were more indecisive (=neutral), but were positive about discussing clinical experiences. Thematic analysis identified recurring themes as individual learning process, learning and clinical experiences, attitude towards implant dentistry and course programme. EDI postgraduates' reflections focussed on specific clinical situations, while UGent postgraduates' reflections described general considerations. Although students/professionals often report to reflect, it is not clear whether/how they actually reflect, due to the all-purpose word reflection has become. A strategy, using group discussions along with supervision/guidance in how to reflect, demonstrated to expand clinical reasoning into reflections about postgraduate students' clinical actions and professional growth. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley

  2. Structure of some relative relation modules of finite p-groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamin, M.

    1990-06-01

    Let G be a finite p-group generated by (g i , 1 ≤ i ≤ d), G i the cyclic subgroup generated by g i , E the free product of the G i , 1 ≤ i ≤ d, and S the kernel of the natural epimorphism of E onto G. The largest elementary abelian p-quotient S-circumflex = S/S'S p , regarded as an IF p G-module via conjugation in E, is called a relative relation module of G. If d is the minimum number of generaters for G, the author has proved that S-circumflex is nonprojective and indecomposable. The aim of this paper is to give an alternative proof for the indecomposability of S-circumflex; the proof here is more informative as it deals with Loewy structure and generating sets of S-circumflex and other associated modules. (author). 9 refs

  3. Item Construction Using Reflective, Formative, or Rasch Measurement Models: Implications for Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christina Hamme; Gischlar, Karen L.; Peterson, N. Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Measures that accurately capture the phenomenon are critical to research and practice in group work. The vast majority of group-related measures were developed using the reflective measurement model rooted in classical test theory (CTT). Depending on the construct definition and the measure's purpose, the reflective model may not always be the…

  4. A novel QC-LDPC code based on the finite field multiplicative group for optical communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jian-guo; Xu, Liang; Tong, Qing-zhen

    2013-09-01

    A novel construction method of quasi-cyclic low-density parity-check (QC-LDPC) code is proposed based on the finite field multiplicative group, which has easier construction, more flexible code-length code-rate adjustment and lower encoding/decoding complexity. Moreover, a regular QC-LDPC(5334,4962) code is constructed. The simulation results show that the constructed QC-LDPC(5334,4962) code can gain better error correction performance under the condition of the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel with iterative decoding sum-product algorithm (SPA). At the bit error rate (BER) of 10-6, the net coding gain (NCG) of the constructed QC-LDPC(5334,4962) code is 1.8 dB, 0.9 dB and 0.2 dB more than that of the classic RS(255,239) code in ITU-T G.975, the LDPC(32640,30592) code in ITU-T G.975.1 and the SCG-LDPC(3969,3720) code constructed by the random method, respectively. So it is more suitable for optical communication systems.

  5. Developing Reflective Dispositions through Collaborative Knowledge-Building during Small Group Bible Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Tze Keong; Koh, Joyce Hwee Ling; Chai, Ching Sing

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the use of a constructivist pedagogical approach to cultivate reflective dispositions during small group Bible study. Conducted in a local church Bible class setting (n = 12), the instructional design emulated the reflective thinking process, while adopting collaborative knowledge-building as its pedagogical framework.…

  6. Developing critical awareness : the consequences of action and reflection for perceptions of group injustices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner-Zwinkels, Felicity M.; Postmes, Tom; van Zomeren, Martijn

    Individuals often cannot address (objective) group injustices until they develop a (subjective) critical awareness of them. In three studies, we tested two potential psychological pathways toward critical awareness: Reflection (deductive, knowledge driven) and action (inductive, action driven)

  7. Tagclouds and Group Cognition: Effect of Tagging Support on Students' Reflective Learning in Team Blogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ying; Lin, Shu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of supported tagging (a prompting mechanism for students to stop and think about their writing) for team blogging on undergraduate students' reflective learning and the relationship between tagclouds and group cognition. Thirty-nine students were randomly assigned to six groups and blogged for 5 weeks. Three groups were…

  8. Enhancing medical students' reflectivity in mentoring groups for professional development - a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Gabriele; Pankoke, Nina; Goldblatt, Hadass; Hofmann, Marzellus; Zupanic, Michaela

    2017-07-14

    Professional competence is important in delivering high quality patient care, and it can be enhanced by reflection and reflective discourse e.g. in mentoring groups. However, students are often reluctant though to engage in this discourse. A group mentoring program involving all preclinical students as well as faculty members and co-mentoring clinical students was initiated at Witten-Herdecke University. This study explores both the attitudes of those students towards such a program and factors that might hinder or enhance how students engage in reflective discourse. A qualitative design was applied using semi-structured focus group interviews with preclinical students and semi-structured individual interviews with mentors and co-mentors. The interview data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. Students' attitudes towards reflective discourse on professional challenges were diverse. Some students valued the new program and named positive outcomes regarding several features of professional development. Enriching experiences were described. Others expressed aversive attitudes. Three reasons for these were given: unclear goals and benefits, interpersonal problems within the groups hindering development and intrapersonal issues such as insecurity and traditional views of medical education. Participants mentioned several program setup factors that could enhance how students engage in such groups: explaining the program thoroughly, setting expectations and integrating the reflective discourse in a meaningful way into the curriculum, obliging participation without coercion, developing a sense of security, trust and interest in each other within the groups, randomizing group composition and facilitating group moderators as positive peer and faculty role models and as learning group members. A well-designed and empathetic setup of group mentoring programs can help raise openness towards engaging in meaningful reflective discourse. Reflection on and communication of

  9. Construction d'enquête et définition des groupes sociaux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyprien Tasset

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Dans ce texte, nous abordons le livre de Jerrold Seigel à travers le problème du rapport entre la construction de l'objet et celle de l'enquête. En effet, comment peut-on étudier méthodiquement un groupe tel que la bohème littéraire ? À partir d'une discussion quant à la pertinence, dans ce cas, de recourir à la méthode de la définition provisoire, nous nous interrogerons sur le genre de collectif constitué, au xixe siècle, par la bohème littéraire. À l'heure où le travail symbolique accompli au xixe siècle pour faire de la bohème un lieu social largement visible est réactivé par plusieurs entrepreneurs de groupes sociaux, cette réflexion méthodologique aura également l'intérêt de porter, indirectement, sur des efforts de regroupement contemporains.Inquiry’s construction and definition of social grouping. Reflexions from Bohemian Paris by Jerrold SeigelIn this paper, we study Jerrold Seigel's book through the prism of the issue of the relation between the way the author constructs his object and that of the inquiry. As a matter of fact, how is it possible to study methodologically a group such as literary bohemia ? After discussing the relevance, in this case, of the provisional definition method, we will ask ourselves which kind of collective literary bohemia constituted in the 19th century. At a time when several entrepreneurs of social grouping are re-activating the symbolical work carried in the 19th century to turn bohemia into a visible social area, the interest of such methodological exploration also lies in its bearing, indirectly, on contemporary grouping efforts.Construcción de la investigación y definición de grupo social. Reflexión a partir deBohemian Paris de Jerrold SeigelEn este artículo, abordamos el libro de Jerrold Seigel enfocando la relación entre la manera cómo el autor construye su objeto y la manera cómo dirige su investigación. ¿De hecho, de qué modo se puede estudiar con m

  10. Reflections on Focus Group Sessions Regarding Inclusive Education: Reconsidering Focus Group Research Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Norma M.; Romm, Norma R. A.; Tlale, L. D. N.

    2015-01-01

    In this article we deliberate upon our way of facilitating focus group sessions with teachers concerning their views on inclusive education, by referring also to feedback that we received from the participants when they commented upon their experiences of the sessions. (The teacher participants were from three separate primary schools in South…

  11. Case Study: Improving Laboratory Learning through Group Working and Structured Reflection and Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes how student learning from a series of laboratory practicals was improved using small group methods and a structured learning cycle that encouraged reflection on group performance and investigative techniques. Discussion includes evaluation of learning benefits by means of written records, a questionnaire, observation, and the role of…

  12. The Use of Technology in Group-Work: A Situational Analysis of Students' Reflective Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Pamela; Sen, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Group work is a powerful constructivist pedagogy for facilitating students' personal and professional development, but it can be difficult for students to work together in an academic context. The assessed reflective writings of undergraduate students studying Information Management are used as data in this exploration of the group work situation…

  13. Reflective practice groups for nurses: a consultation liaison psychiatry nursing initiative: part 1--The model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawber, Chris

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, we outline the evolution of a process-focused reflective practice group (RPG) model for nurses working in clinical settings. The groups were initiated at Redcliffe and Caboolture hospitals by the consultation liaison psychiatry nurse and author. An associated article provides an evaluation of these RPG. The literature review identifies the key themes and theories on which the model is based, and the article outlines the process and practicalities of facilitating RPG in critical care, midwifery, and oncology specialties over a 3-year period. The model proposes that the effectiveness and sustainability of RPG arises from adequate preparation and engagement with prospective participants. Group rules, based on principles of confidentially, supportiveness, and diversity, were collaboratively developed for each group. Facilitation utilized a group-as-a-whole approach to manage process and stimulate reflection. While the purpose of RPG was a reflection on interpersonal aspects of nursing, contextual workplace issues were frequently raised in groups. Acknowledgement and containment of such issues were necessary to maintain clinical focus. The literature highlights facilitator credibility and style as crucial factors in the overall success of RPG, and it is proposed that reflective practice as a process-focused model for groups succeeds when nurse facilitators are trained in group process and receive concurrent supervision. © 2012 The Author; International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  14. Exploring reflective teaching through informed journal keeping and blog group discussion in the teaching practicum

    OpenAIRE

    Insuasty, Edgar Alirio; Zambrano Castillo, Liliana Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study which examined how student teachers could be empowered as more reflective practitioners through journal keeping and blog group discussions. It was carried out with six student teachers who developed their practicum over six months. Data were collected through journals, blogs, metaphors, conferences and a questionnaire. The results demonstrated that student teachers enriched their perceptions about what reflective teaching implied. Furthermore, jour...

  15. n-th Roots in finite polyhedral and centro-polyhedral groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Department of Mathematics, Tabriz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tabriz, Iran. *Corresponding author. E-mail: sadeghieh@iauyazd.ac.ir; kdelir@gmail.com; k_ahmadi@iaut.ac.ir. MS received 25 November 2013; revised 7 July 2014. Abstract. The probability that a randomly chosen element in a non-abelian finite.

  16. Lecturers' experiences of facilitating guided group reflection with pre-registration BSc Nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Carthy, Jane; Cassidy, Irene; Tuohy, Dympna

    2013-01-01

    The development of reflective practitioners is integral to undergraduate nursing degree programmes. This study reports on lecturers' experiences of facilitating guided group reflection with pre-registration BSc Nursing students.The research purposively sampled lecturers (n=7) working in a department of nursing and midwifery at a third level institute in Ireland, all of whom were registered nurses. Using a qualitative research approach, data was collected through audio-taped semi-structured individual interviews. The data were thematically analysed using guidelines developed by Braun and Clarke (2006). Tripartite researcher discussion and further analysis of these initial individual analyses led to consensus regarding the three themes arising from the study. These were: Being a facilitator; Facilitating reflective learning and Creating structure. The discussion centred on: having knowledge and experience to effectively facilitate guided group reflection; the influence of the facilitator's personal philosophy on reflection and adult learning on group facilitation; and finally concerns regarding professional responsibility in response to students' reflective practice accounts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Computer simulation of small-angle X-ray reflection from finite size samples with accounting for the instrumental errors of a diffractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorina, M.V.; Mironov, V.L.; Mironov, S.V.

    2005-01-01

    A model is developed, which enables computation of the the angular dependences of X-ray reflection, with taking into account the finiteness of sample sizes and the diffractometer alignment errors. It is shown that the angular dependences of refraction for glass and quartz wafers calculated with account of possible errors of the diffractometer optical system alignment are in good agreement with the experimental curves in the entire range of angles [ru

  18. Reflective practice groups for nurses: a consultation liaison psychiatry nursing initiative: part 2--the evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawber, Chris

    2013-06-01

    This paper outlines an evaluation of reflective practice groups (RPG) involving nurses and midwives from three clinical nursing specialties at Redcliffe and Caboolture Hospitals, Queensland, Australia. The groups were facilitated by the consultation liaison psychiatry nurse and author using a process-focused, whole-of-group approach to explore clinical narrative in a supportive group setting. This was a preliminary evaluation utilizing a recently-developed tool, the Clinical Supervision Evaluation Questionnaire, along with externally-facilitated focus groups. Nurses and midwives responded favourably to RPG, reporting a positive impact on clinical practice, self-awareness, and resilience. The majority of participants considered RPG had positive implications for team functioning. The focus groups identified the importance of facilitation style and the need to address aspects of workplace culture to enable group development and enhance the capacity for reflection. Evaluation of the data indicates this style of RPG can improve reflective thinking, promote team cohesion, and provide support for nurses and midwives working in clinical settings. Following on from this study, a second phase of research has commenced, providing more detailed, longitudinal evaluation across a larger, more diverse group of nurses. © 2012 The Author; International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  19. Galilei invariant theories: I. Constructions of indecomposable finite-dimensional representations of the homogeneous Galilei group: directly and via contractions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de Montigny, M.; Niederle, Jiří; Nikitin, A. G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 39, - (2006), s. 9365-9385 ISSN 0305-4470 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P04LA211 Grant - others:NSF PHY-0244261 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : indecomposable finite dimensional representations * homogeneous Galilei group * Pauli anomalous interaction * Darwin and spin-orbit couplings Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.577, year: 2006

  20. Evaluation of reflective learning in a psychodynamic group of nurses caring for terminally ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Klitzing, W

    1999-11-01

    The development of a psychodynamic group comprising seven female nurses was studied for 1 year (31 sessions). The group was part of a 1-year postgraduate training in patient-centred nursing. The members of the group all worked on the same unit; none of them left the unit or the group during the study. As the nurse-patient relationship is considered to be crucial for patient-centred nursing, the group sessions focused on the problems which the nurses experienced in their relationships with the patients. The objective of the group-work was to improve the nurses' ability to reflect on these relationships. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the group sessions, concentrating on the characteristics of patients selected for discussions, group process over time, and impact of specific patient characteristics on the group-work. Transcriptions of the tape-recorded group sessions were made for systematic analysis. A category system was developed and validated to rate reflection about the patient, the nurses themselves and the nurse-patient relationship. The results showed that the nurses over-proportionally selected terminally ill patients, as well as patients who were female and within a similar age range as themselves. These results could be due to an identification with these patients, causing increased psychological stress on the nurses. Throughout the year, the nurses' verbal activity and their reflections about their patients increased, whereas their reflections about themselves decreased. The need to withdraw and protect oneself by focusing more on the patient than on oneself might have been a strategy the nurses used to cope with growing stress.

  1. A remark on the unitary group of a tensor product of n finite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    By using the method of quantum circuits in the theory of quantum computing as outlined in Nielsen and Chuang [2] and using a key lemma of Jaikumar [1] we show that every unitary operator on the tensor product H = H 1 ⊗ H 2 ⊗ … ⊗ H n can be expressed as a composition of a finite number of unitary operators living on ...

  2. Reflection and self-directed and group learning improve OSCE scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, Masami; Imanaka, Hiroyuki

    2010-12-01

    Reflection and self-directed learning have been emphasised as important in the process of learning, and are inevitably applied in medical education. The effectiveness of reflection on learning outcomes and its application in medical education must be investigated. In 2009, 86 fourth-year medical students at Kagoshima University took a course in basic clinical skills that included introductory lectures and small group training sessions. As part of these new educational interventions, the students received a lecture on reflective learning, wrote down their own reflections on skills training during the course, and voluntary participation in self- and group practice was promoted. Two weeks after the course, the students took six stations of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) via the Common Achievement Test. Each station and total score of the OSCE were compared with those from 2006-2008, and with national mean scores of the same station scenario in 2008. Students wrote 966 reflection reports (11.2 reports per student), and actively used rooms and materials for self- and group practice. All station and total scores of the OSCE in 2009 were higher than those in 2008: the total scores of the OSCE, the physical examination (PE) station and suturing skills were significantly improved, but the scores for 'Interview' and 'Head and Neck' PE were not. Our new educational intervention enabled students to experience some reflection on skills training, and facilitated students' experiential learning. We conclude that it was effective at least in the initial phase of basic clinical skills training. The students' reflection on communication skills needs to be improved. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  3. Reflecting on our practice: an evaluation of Balint groups for medical students in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Stephen D; Leggett, Andrew

    2014-04-01

    This paper qualitatively evaluates a one-year trial of Balint clinical reflection groups for medical students in psychiatry at a large Australian tertiary referral hospital. The trial considered whether clinical reflection groups following the Balint process would be perceived as useful and relevant to the learning needs of the student participants. A grounded theory approach was undertaken. This included survey data, thematic analysis of written feedback, and facilitator reflection on the process. Facilitators adapted the group process in response to participants' needs. These modifications included: increased education regarding the Balint process; the introduction of co-presenters; and the inclusion of a didactic summary following each session. The evaluation suggested that fidelity of the Balint group experience was achieved and that student attitudes were neutral to mildly positive regarding the educational experience. Balint groups are potentially useful to medical students in the Australian context. We suggest that Balint groups may be more useful when applied in less alienating learning environments, such as during general practice rotations. Emphasis is placed on the need to maintain a dynamic approach by adapting the group and the educational processes as the work unfolds.

  4. Creating a Space for Acknowledgment and Generativity in Reflective Group Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré, David

    2016-06-01

    Small group supervision is a powerful venue for generative conversations because of the multiplicity of perspectives available and the potential for an appreciative audience to a practitioner's work. At the same time, the well-intentioned reflections by a few practitioners in a room can inadvertently duplicate normative discourses that circulate in the wider culture and the profession. This article explores the use of narrative practices for benefiting from the advantages of group supervision while mindful of the vulnerability that comes with sharing one's work among colleagues. The reflective group supervision processes described were modified from the work of Tom Andersen and Michael White to provide a venue that encourages the creative multiplicity of group conversation while discouraging unhelpful discourses which constrain generative conversation. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  5. Reflective Practice: Using Focus Groups to Determine Family Priorities and Guide Social Pragmatic Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theadore, Geraldine; Laurent, Amy; Kovarsky, Dana; Weiss, Amy L.

    2011-01-01

    Reflective practice requires that professionals carefully examine and integrate multiple sources of information when designing intervention and evaluating its effectiveness. This article describes the use of focus group discussion as a form of qualitative research for understanding parents' perspectives of a university-based intervention program…

  6. Awareness of group performance in a CSCL-environment: Effects of peer feedback and reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phielix, Chris; Prins, Frans; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Phielix, C., Prins, F. J., & Kirschner, P. A. (2010). Awareness of group performance in a CSCL-environment: Effects of peer feedback and reflection. Computers in Human Behavior, 26(2), 151-161. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2009.10.011

  7. Using a Smartphone App and Coaching Group Sessions to Promote Residents' Reflection in the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könings, Karen D; van Berlo, Jean; Koopmans, Richard; Hoogland, Henk; Spanjers, Ingrid A E; ten Haaf, Jeroen A; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J G

    2016-03-01

    Reflecting on workplace-based experiences is necessary for professional development. However, residents need support to raise their awareness of valuable moments for learning and to thoughtfully analyze those learning moments afterwards. From October to December 2012, the authors held a multidisciplinary six-week postgraduate training module focused on general competencies. Residents were randomly assigned to one of four conditions with varying degrees of reflection support; they were offered (1) a smartphone app, (2) coaching group sessions, (3) a combination of both, or (4) neither type of support. The app allowed participants to capture in real time learning moments as a text note, audio recording, picture, or video. Coaching sessions held every two weeks aimed to deepen participants' reflection on captured learning moments. Questionnaire responses and reflection data were compared between conditions to assess the effects of the app and coaching sessions on intensity and frequency of reflection. Sixty-four residents participated. App users reflected more often, captured more learning moments, and reported greater learning progress than nonapp users. Participants who attended coaching sessions were more alert to learning moments and pursued more follow-up learning activities to improve on the general competencies. Those who received both types of support were most alert to these learning moments. A simple mobile app for capturing learning moments shows promise as a tool to support workplace-based learning, especially when combined with coaching sessions. Future research should evaluate these tools on a broader scale and in conjunction with residents' and students' personal digital portfolios.

  8. Reflection Group on 'Ethical Choices in Radiation Protection'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggermont, G

    2000-07-01

    As part of SCK-CEN's social sciences and humanities programme, a reflection group on 'Ethical Choices in Radiation Protection' was created. The objectives of the reflection group are (1) to brainstorm on critical issues of radiation protection; (2) to create a discussion forum with a variety os SCK-CEN researchers and external experts; (3) to make value judgements and open questions in radiation protection explicit; (4) to create an output for a topical day or workshop by editing a 'cahier' of contributed articles and discussion reports; (5) to complement the output of the SCK-CEN contribution in international ALARA workshops. The programme, achievements and perspectives of the refection group are summarised.

  9. Exploring Reflective Teaching through Informed Journal Keeping and Blog Group Discussion in the Teaching Practicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Alirio Insuasty

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the findings of a study which examined how student teachers could be empowered as more reflective practitioners through journal keeping and blog group discussions. It was carried out with six student teachers who developed their practicum over six months. Data were collected through journals, blogs, metaphors, conferences and a questionnaire. The results demonstrated that student teachers enriched their perceptions about what reflective teaching implied. Furthermore, journal keeping was approached as an informed process by virtue of which student-teachers could go beyond the descriptive documentation of what happened in their classes. Their journal entries also revealed reflective references, most of which were mainly focused on evaluating teaching, diagnosing and solving problems.

  10. Transcultural issues in the dynamics of a Balint clinical reflection group for community mental health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, Andrew

    2012-04-01

    The author presents transcultural issues in the content, process, and group dynamics of consecutive meetings of a Balint clinical reflection group for community mental health workers at Inala, Australia. Balint work and the context and evolution of the group process are briefly described, as is the consultative research methodology. The process of a Balint group meeting is reported in detail, following the author's consultation with group members. The collaborative work of a culturally diverse team of mental health professionals is examined in the context of discussion of a practitioner-patient relationship in which transcultural, gender, and family conflicts were the focus of affective and cognitive dissonance. For mental health workers engaging with communities of cultural diversity, Balint reflection groups can facilitate insight into cultural countertransferences that adversely affect clinical work. The group served to support the caseworkers' engagement with patients of different cultures, and provided a safe environment for the creative consideration and exploration in fantasy of the emotional pressures and complex ethical dilemmas related to boundaries in transcultural client-practitioner relationships, including those in which open discussion would otherwise be avoided.

  11. Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Embree

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ideally, editorials are written one to two months before publication in the Journal. It was my turn to write this one. I had planned to write the first draft the evening after my clinic on Tuesday, September 11. It didn't get done that night or during the next week. Somehow, the topic that I had originally chosen just didn't seem that important anymore as I, along my friends and colleagues, reflected on the changes that the events of that day were likely to have on our lives.

  12. Finite difference solution of the time dependent neutron group diffusion equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.S.; Henry, A.F.

    1975-08-01

    In this thesis two unrelated topics of reactor physics are examined: the prompt jump approximation and alternating direction checkerboard methods. In the prompt jump approximation it is assumed that the prompt and delayed neutrons in a nuclear reactor may be described mathematically as being instantaneously in equilibrium with each other. This approximation is applied to the spatially dependent neutron diffusion theory reactor kinetics model. Alternating direction checkerboard methods are a family of finite difference alternating direction methods which may be used to solve the multigroup, multidimension, time-dependent neutron diffusion equations. The reactor mesh grid is not swept line by line or point by point as in implicit or explicit alternating direction methods; instead, the reactor mesh grid may be thought of as a checkerboard in which all the ''red squares'' and '' black squares'' are treated successively. Two members of this family of methods, the ADC and NSADC methods, are at least as good as other alternating direction methods. It has been found that the accuracy of implicit and explicit alternating direction methods can be greatly improved by the application of an exponential transformation. This transformation is incompatible with checkerboard methods. Therefore, a new formulation of the exponential transformation has been developed which is compatible with checkerboard methods and at least as good as the former transformation for other alternating direction methods

  13. On s-semipermutable subgroups of finite groups and p-nilpotency

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srinivasan [10] showed that a group. G is supersolvable if all maximal subgroups of every Sylow subgroup of G are normal. Later, several authors obtain the same conclusion if normality is replaced by some weaker normality (see [8]). In this paper, we obtain some new characterizations of p-nilpotent groups and generalize.

  14. Reflections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    responsibility of updating the various chapters of the book to incorporate the latest developments. I was also given a task in .... time for all of us in his group, and we used to go out and attend to some of our personal work. However, we all used to be ... Roger was of the same age as me, but much superior in his knowledge of ...

  15. Do seedling functional groups reflect ecological strategies of woody plant species in Caatinga?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Gomes Calaça Menezes

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT It is assumed that morphological traits of seedlings reflect different strategies in response to environmental conditions. The ecological significance of this has been widely documented in rainforests, where habitat structure and species interactions play an important role in community assembly. However, in seasonally dry ecosystems, where environmental filtering is expected to strongly influence community structure, this relationship is poorly understood. We investigated this relationship between functional groups of seedlings and life history traits and tested whether functional group predicts the ecological strategies employed by woody species to deal with the stressful conditions in seasonally dry ecosystems. Seedling functional groups, life history traits and traits that reflect ecological strategies for occupying seasonally dry environments were described for twenty-six plant species. Seedlings of species from the Caatinga vegetation exhibited a functional profile different from that observed in rainforests ecosystems. Phanerocotylar-epigeal seedlings were the most frequently observed groups, and had the largest range of ecological strategies related to dealing with seasonally dry environments, while phanerocotylar-hypogeal-reserve seedlings exhibited an increase in frequency with seasonality. We discuss these results in relation to those observed in other tropical forests and their ecological significance in seasonally dry environments.

  16. Avoiding Pitfalls and Realising Opportunities: Reflecting on Issues of Sampling and Recruitment for Online Focus Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, Nicola; Fergie, Gillian; McDaid, Lisa; Hilton, Shona

    2017-01-01

    The increasing prominence of the Internet in everyday life has prompted methodological innovations in qualitative research, particularly the adaptation of established methods of data collection for use online. The alternative online context brings with it both opportunities and challenges. To date the literature on online focus groups has focused mainly on the suitability of the method for qualitative data collection, and the development of approaches to facilitation that maximise interaction. By reflecting on our experiences of designing and attempting to recruit participants to online focus groups for two exploratory research projects, we aim to contribute some novel reflections around the less articulated issues of sampling and recruitment for online focus groups. In particular, we highlight potentially problematic issues around offline recruitment for an online method of data collection; the potential of using social media for recruitment; and the uncertainties around offering incentives in online recruitment, issues which have received little attention in the growing literature around online focus groups. More broadly, we recommend continued examination of online social practices and the social media environment to develop appropriate and timely online recruitment strategies and suggest further areas for future research and innovation. PMID:28127272

  17. Medical Students' Empathy for Vulnerable Groups: Results From a Survey and Reflective Writing Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellbery, Caroline; Saunders, Pamela A; Kureshi, Sarah; Visconti, Adam

    2017-12-01

    As medical education curricula increasingly acknowledge the contributions of the social determinants of health to individual health, new methods of engaging students in the care of vulnerable groups are needed. Empathy is one way to connect students with patients, but little is known about how to nurture students' empathy on behalf of populations. This study examined the relationship between individual and social empathy as groundwork for cultivating students' empathy for vulnerable groups. In 2014-2015, first-year medical students completed the Social Empathy Index at the start and end of a two-semester population health course, and they completed a reflective writing assignment exploring the challenges of caring for vulnerable patients. Pre- and posttest mean survey scores were compared, and reflective writing assignments were analyzed for themes concerning social empathy. Data from 130 students were analyzed. Scores for the contextual understanding of systemic barriers domain increased significantly. There was a trend toward increased cumulative social empathy scores that did not reach statistical significance. Students' essays revealed three themes relating to individual empathy as the foundation for social empathy; civic and moral obligations; and the role of institutional practices in caring for vulnerable groups. This study extends understanding of empathy beyond care for the individual to include care for vulnerable groups. Thus, social empathy may function as a valuable concept in developing curricula to support students' commitment to care for the underserved. Educators first need to address the many barriers students cited that impede both individual and social empathy.

  18. Reflections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    du Gay, Paul; Vikkelsø, Signe

    2012-01-01

    -readings of two classic, but partially forgotten contributions within organization theory – the work of Wilfred R. Bion on group assumptions and the work of Elliott Jaques on ‘requisite organisation’ – we suggest that contemporary discussion of organizational change could benefit considerably from regaining...... be theorized, categorized, evaluated and acted upon without further specification. In this article, we argue that this combination of absolutism and abstraction has some unfortunate consequences for the precise assessment and practical management of particular organizational changes. Based on re...

  19. Enhanced Group Delay of the Pulse Reflection with Graphene Surface Plasmon via Modified Otto Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the group delay of the transverse magnetic (TM polarized wave reflected from a modified Otto configuration with graphene surface plasmon is investigated theoretically. The findings show that the optical group delay in this structure can be enhanced negatively and can be switched from negative to positive due to the excitation of surface plasmon by graphene. It is clear that the negative group delay can be actively tuned through the Fermi energy of the graphene. Furthermore, the delay properties can also be manipulated by changing either the relaxation time of graphene or the distance between the coupling prism and the graphene. These tunable delay characteristics are promising for fabricating grapheme-based optical delay devices and other applications in the terahertz regime.

  20. The criticality problem in reflected slab type reactor in the two-group transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, R.D.M.

    1978-01-01

    The criticality problem in reflected slab type reactor is solved for the first time in the two group neutron transport theory, by singular eingenfunctions expansion, the singular integrals obtained through continuity conditions of angular distributions at the interface are regularized by a recently proposed method. The result is a coupled system of regular integral equations for the expansion coefficients, this system is solved by an ordinary interactive method. Numerical results that can be utilized as a comparative standard for aproximation methods, are presented [pt

  1. Metric Characterizations of Superreflexivity in Terms of Word Hyperbolic Groups and Finite Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostrovskii Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We show that superreflexivity can be characterized in terms of bilipschitz embeddability of word hyperbolic groups.We compare characterizations of superrefiexivity in terms of diamond graphs and binary trees.We show that there exist sequences of series-parallel graphs of increasing topological complexitywhich admit uniformly bilipschitz embeddings into a Hilbert space, and thus do not characterize superrefiexivity.

  2. Solution of the neutron diffusion equation at two groups of energy by method of triangular finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correia Filho, A.

    1981-04-01

    The Neutron Diffusion Equation at two groups of energy is solved with the use of the Finite - Element Method with first order triangular elements. The program EFTDN (Triangular Finite Elements on Neutron Diffusion) was developed using the language FORTRAN IV. The discrete formulation of the Diffusion Equation is obtained with the application of the Galerkin's Method. In order to solve the eigenvalue - problem, the Method of the Power is applied and, with the purpose of the convergence of the results, Chebshev's polynomial expressions are applied. On the solution of the systems of equations Gauss' Method is applied, divided in two different parts: triangularization of the matrix of coeficients and retrosubstitution taking in account the sparsity of the system. Several test - problems are solved, among then two P.W.R. type reactors, the ZION-1 with 1300 MWe and the 2D-IAEA - Benchmark. Comparision of results with standard solutions show the validity of application of the EFM and precision of the results. (Author) [pt

  3. On finite groups whose every proper normal subgroup is a union of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Moreover, if N is a minimal normal subgroup of G, then. N ⊆ Z(Op(G)), where p is a prime factor of |G|. If N is not a minimal normal subgroup of G, then N contains a complete normal subgroup N1, where N1 is an elementary abelian group with order pa and we have: (a) N = N1Q has order paq and every element of N has ...

  4. Topics in quantum groups and finite-type invariants mathematics at the independent University of Moscow

    CERN Document Server

    Arkhipov, S M; Odesskii, A V; Feigin, B; Vassiliev, V

    1998-01-01

    This volume presents the first collection of articles consisting entirely of work by faculty and students of the Higher Mathematics College of the Independent University of Moscow (IUM). This unique institution was established to train elite students to become research scientists. Covered in the book are two main topics: quantum groups and low-dimensional topology. The articles were written by participants of the Feigin and Vassiliev seminars, two of the most active seminars at the IUM.

  5. Zero character heights and Abelian defect groups of blocks in finite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Let G be a group, Irr(G) be the set of all the irreducible ordinary characters of G, B ∈ Bl(G) be a block of G and Irr(B) be the set of all the irreducible ordinary characters of G which are in the block B. In this paper the object is to study the ordinary irreducible characters of height zero in relation to the Abelian defect ...

  6. The application of heterogeneous cluster grouping to reflective writing for medical humanities literature study to enhance students' empathy, critical thinking, and reflective writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hung-Chang; Wang, Ya-Huei

    2016-09-02

    To facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration and to make connections between patients' diseases and their social/cultural contexts, the study examined whether the use of heterogeneous cluster grouping in reflective writing for medical humanities literature acquisition could have positive effects on medical university students in terms of empathy, critical thinking, and reflective writing. A 15-week quasi-experimental design was conducted to investigate the learning outcomes. After conducting cluster algorithms, heterogeneous learning clusters (experimental group; n = 43) and non-heterogeneous learning clusters (control group; n = 43) were derived for a medical humanities literature study. Before and after the intervention, an Empathy Scale in Patient Care (ES-PC), a critical thinking disposition assessment (CTDA-R), and a reflective writing test were administered to both groups. The findings showed that on the empathy scale, significant differences in the "behavioral empathy," "affective empathy," and overall sections existed between the post-test mean scores of the experimental group and those of the control group, but such differences did not exist in "intelligent empathy." Regarding critical thinking, there were significant differences in "systematicity and analyticity," "skepticism and well-informed," "maturity and skepticism," and overall sections. As for reflective writing, significant differences existed in "ideas," "voice and point of view," "critical thinking and representation," "depth of reflection on personal growth," and overall sections, but not in "focus and context structure" and "language and conventions." This study outlined an alternative for using heterogeneous cluster grouping in reflective writing about medical humanities literature to facilitate interdisciplinary cooperation to provide more humanizing medical care.

  7. Sensitivity of Ocean Reflectance Inversion Models for Identifying and Discriminating Between Phytoplankton Functional Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdell, P. Jeremy; Ooesler, Collin S.

    2012-01-01

    The daily, synoptic images provided by satellite ocean color instruments provide viable data streams for observing changes in the biogeochemistrY of marine ecosystems. Ocean reflectance inversion models (ORMs) provide a common mechanism for inverting the "color" of the water observed a satellite into marine inherent optical properties (lOPs) through a combination of empiricism and radiative transfer theory. lOPs, namely the spectral absorption and scattering characteristics of ocean water and its dissolved and particulate constituents, describe the contents of the upper ocean, information critical for furthering scientific understanding of biogeochemical oceanic processes. Many recent studies inferred marine particle sizes and discriminated between phytoplankton functional groups using remotely-sensed lOPs. While all demonstrated the viability of their approaches, few described the vertical distributions of the water column constituents under consideration and, thus, failed to report the biophysical conditions under which their model performed (e.g., the depth and thickness of the phytoplankton bloom(s)). We developed an ORM to remotely identifY Noctiluca miliaris and other phytoplankton functional types using satellite ocean color data records collected in the northern Arabian Sea. Here, we present results from analyses designed to evaluate the applicability and sensitivity of the ORM to varied biophysical conditions. Specifically, we: (1) synthesized a series of vertical profiles of spectral inherent optical properties that represent a wide variety of bio-optical conditions for the northern Arabian Sea under aN Miliaris bloom; (2) generated spectral remote-sensing reflectances from these profiles using Hydrolight; and, (3) applied the ORM to the synthesized reflectances to estimate the relative concentrations of diatoms and N Miliaris for each example. By comparing the estimates from the inversion model to those from synthesized vertical profiles, we were able to

  8. A Reflection about Finite Induction: reporting an experience Uma Reflexão sobre a Indução Finita: relato de uma experiência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Marta Pereira das Dores Savioli

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to reflect on finite induction and present a proposal for teaching this subject in a course for future mathematics teachers. Using investigative activities in the classroom, a mathematics experiment is proposed for the students in which they pose problems, experiment and conjecture. In doing so, we hope to contribute to the education of future mathematic teachers. Keywords: Finite induction. Experience. Investigation.Pretende-se neste trabalho fazer uma reflexão sobre a indução finita e apresentar uma proposta para o ensino da mesma num curso de formação de professores de matemática. Utilizando-se de uma atividade de investigação em sala de aula, propõe-se realizar uma experiência matemática com os alunos, fazendo-os experimentar, conjecturar e formalizar um problema. Espera-se assim, contribuir para a formação do futuro professor de matemática. Palavras-chave: Indução finita. Experiência. Investigação.

  9. Phytoplankton Group Identification Using Simulated and In situ Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Reflectance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Xi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigate the bio-geo-optical boundaries for the possibility to identify dominant phytoplankton groups from hyperspectral ocean color data. A large dataset of simulated remote sensing reflectance spectra, Rrs(λ, was used. The simulation was based on measured inherent optical properties of natural water and measurements of five phytoplankton light absorption spectra representing five major phytoplankton spectral groups. These simulated data, named as C2X data, contain more than 105 different water cases, including cases typical for clearest natural waters as well as for extreme absorbing and extreme scattering waters. For the simulation the used concentrations of chlorophyll a (representing phytoplankton abundance, Chl, are ranging from 0 to 200 mg m−3, concentrations of non-algal particles, NAP, from 0 to 1,500 g m−3, and absorption coefficients of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM at 440 nm from 0 to 20 m−1. A second, independent, smaller dataset of simulated Rrs(λ used light absorption spectra of 128 cultures from six phytoplankton taxonomic groups to represent natural variability. Spectra of this test dataset are compared with spectra from the C2X data in order to evaluate to which extent the five spectral groups can be correctly identified as dominant under different optical conditions. The results showed that the identification accuracy is highly subject to the water optical conditions, i.e., contribution of and covariance in Chl, NAP, and CDOM. The identification in the simulated data is generally effective, except for waters with very low contribution by phytoplankton and for waters dominated by NAP, whereas contribution by CDOM plays only a minor role. To verify the applicability of the presented approach for natural waters, a test using in situ Rrs(λ dataset collected during a cyanobacterial bloom in Lake Taihu (China is carried out and the approach predicts blue cyanobacteria to be dominant

  10. Three-dimensional finite element nonlinear dynamic analysis of pile groups for lateral transient and seismic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maheshwari, B.K.; Truman, K.Z.; El Naggar, M.H.; Gould, P.L.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of material nonlinearity of soil and separation at the soil-pile interface on the dynamic behaviour of a single pile and pile groups are investigated. An advanced plasticity-based soil model, hierarchical single surface (HiSS), is incorporated in the finite element formulation. To simulate radiation effects, proper boundary conditions are used. The model and algorithm are verified with analytical results that are available for elastic and elastoplastic soil models. Analyses are performed for seismic excitation and for the load applied on the pile cap. For seismic analysis, both harmonic and transient excitations are considered. For loading on the pile cap, dynamic stiffness of the soil-pile system is derived and the effect of nonlinearity is investigated. The effects of spacing between piles are investigated, and it was found that the effect of soil nonlinearity on the seismic response is very much dependent on the frequency of excitation. For the loading on a pile cap, the nonlinearity increases the response for most of the frequencies of excitation while decreasing the dynamic stiffness of the soil-pile system. (author)

  11. Ethnic Groups Differ in How Poor Self-Rated Mental Health Reflects Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin

    2017-09-14

    This study aimed to explore cross-ethnic variation in the pattern of the associations between psychiatric disorders and self-rated mental health (SRMH) in the USA. This cross-sectional study used data from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES), 2001-2003, a national household probability sample. The study enrolled 18,237 individuals who were either Non-Hispanic White (n = 7587), African American (n = 4746), Mexican (n = 1442), Cuban (n = 577), Puerto Rican (n = 495), Other Hispanic (n = 1106), Vietnamese (n = 520), Filipino (n = 508), Chinese (n = 600) or Other Asian (n = 656). SRMH was the outcome. Independent variables were psychiatric disorders including major depressive disorder [MDD], general anxiety disorder [GAD], social phobia, alcohol abuse, binge eating disorders, panic disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD], measured by the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Demographic (age and gender) and socioeconomic (education and income) factors were covariates. The only psychiatric disorder which was universally associated with SRMH across all ethnic groups was MDD. More psychiatric disorders were associated with poor SRMH in Non-Hispanic Whites than any other ethnic groups. Among African Americans, demographic and socioeconomic factors could fully explain the associations between psychiatric disorders and SRMH. Among Mexican and Other Hispanics, demographic and socioeconomic factors could only explain the association between some but not all psychiatric disorders and SRMH. In all other ethnic groups, demographic and socioeconomic factors did not explain the link between psychiatric disorders and SRMH. Although SRMH is a useful tool for estimation of mental health needs of populations, poor SRMH may not have universal meanings across ethnically diverse populations. Ethnic groups differ in how their poor SRMH reflects psychiatric conditions and the role of demographic and socioeconomic factors

  12. Teachers Talking about Teaching and School: Collaboration and Reflective Practice via Critical Friends Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuh, Lisa P.

    2016-01-01

    Reflective practice has potentially positive effects on an organization's capacity to focus on student learning and teaching practices. In an effort to comply with policy and provide teachers with opportunities to reflect on their practice, districts, schools, and teachers have turned to various models that feature collaborative experiences. One…

  13. Reflections of a Group of South African Teenage Mothers: Sexual Health Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shakila; Hamid, Alvi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: In the context of women's vulnerability to sexual violence, HIV infection and unintended pregnancy in South Africa, this paper explores the ways in which teenage mothers who are in school reflect on their experiences of pregnancy and motherhood. We attempt to understand how teenage mothers reflect on their experiences within the…

  14. Observing Engineering Student Teams from the Organization Behavior Perspective Using Linguistic Analysis of Student Reflections and Focus Group Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Kerri S.; Damron, Rebecca; Sohoni, Sohum

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates group/team development in computer engineering courses at a University in the Central USA from the perspective of organization behavior theory, specifically Tuckman's model of the stages of group development. The investigation, conducted through linguistic analysis of student reflection essays, and through focus group…

  15. Using a Smartphone App and Coaching Group Sessions to Promote Residents' Reflection in the Workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, K.D.; Berlo, J. van; Koopmans, R.; Hoogland, H.; Spanjers, I.A.; Haaf, J.A. Ten; Vleuten, C.P. van der; Merrienboer, J.J. Van

    2016-01-01

    PROBLEM: Reflecting on workplace-based experiences is necessary for professional development. However, residents need support to raise their awareness of valuable moments for learning and to thoughtfully analyze those learning moments afterwards. APPROACH: From October to December 2012, the authors

  16. Other Teachers' Teaching: Understanding the Roles of Peer Group Collaboration in Teacher Reflection and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielowich, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Although most innovative professional development encourages reflective dialogue among teachers, we still know very little about how such dialogue enables teacher learning. This study describes how teachers make sense of the conflicts among their intended goals and actual practices by responding to their peers' teaching. Four teachers in a large…

  17. Effectively Teaching Diverse Student Groups: A Reflection on Teaching and Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trees, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses facilitating student collegiality within diverse student groups. It argues that diverse student groups of international, domestic, mature age and Gen Y students often have similar difficulties and strengths although they may occur for quite different reasons and understanding this is useful when deciding on teaching and…

  18. Eroticism in group psychotherapy: psychoanalytic reflections on desire, agony, and ecstasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylim, Isaac

    2003-10-01

    To fully understand the complexities of eroticism in groups, it may be necessary to review a conceptual differentiation of desire and its allies: agony and ecstasy. This article suggests that psychoanalytic group psychotherapy is made for neither agony nor ecstasy. Sexual excitement maybe; eroticism and desire, yes; agony and ecstasy, no. While agony or ecstasy imply a threat to the survival of the group, eroticism and desire reaffirm its existence. In this manner the group may be converted into a theater where desire may be celebrated, while the threat of being dissolved in the depths or exaltation of agony and ecstasy is elaborated and worked through: "Desire is desire only if it succeeds in postponing something".

  19. Sonar sound groups and increased terminal buzz duration reflect task complexity in hunting bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulgard, Katrine; Ratcliffe, John M

    2016-02-09

    More difficult tasks are generally regarded as such because they demand greater attention. Echolocators provide rare insight into this relationship because biosonar signals can be monitored. Here we show that bats produce longer terminal buzzes and more sonar sound groups during their approach to prey under presumably more difficult conditions. Specifically, we found Daubenton's bats, Myotis daubentonii, produced longer buzzes when aerial-hawking versus water-trawling prey, but that bats taking revolving air- and water-borne prey produced more sonar sound groups than did the bats when taking stationary prey. Buzz duration and sonar sound groups have been suggested to be independent means by which bats attend to would-be targets and other objects of interest. We suggest that for attacking bats both should be considered as indicators of task difficulty and that the buzz is, essentially, an extended sonar sound group.

  20. Reflections and conclusions of the work developed by the electronics teaching innovation group at the university of Valladolid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos Herrero de Lucas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the main conclusions and reflections obtained by the Electronics Teaching Innovation Group (Grupo de Innovación Docente en Electrónica, GIDEN in the University of Valladolid (UVa about its main working topics. This group is composed of teachers from the Industrial Engineering Degree, major speciality in Industrial Electronics, and Electronic and Automatic Industrial Engineering Degree, at the School of Industrial Engineering, who are interested in the introduction of active methodologies. Sharing ideas, reflections and conclusions in such a cooperative environment between teachers with common interests has driven the success of the different teaching activities carried out by the members of the GIDEN, which forms the work presented in this paper.

  1. Sonar sound groups and increased terminal buzz duration reflect task complexity in hunting bats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgard, K.; Ratcliffe, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    More difficult tasks are generally regarded as such because they demand greater attention. Echolocators provide rare insight into this relationship because biosonar signals can be monitored. Here we show that bats produce longer terminal buzzes and more sonar sound groups during their approach...... to prey under presumably more difficult conditions. Specifically, we found Daubenton's bats, Myotis daubentonii, produced longer buzzes when aerial-hawking versus water-trawling prey, but that bats taking revolving air- and water-borne prey produced more sonar sound groups than did the bats when taking...... stationary prey. Buzz duration and sonar sound groups have been suggested to be independent means by which bats attend to would-be targets and other objects of interest. We suggest that for attacking bats both should be considered as indicators of task difficulty and that the buzz is, essentially...

  2. An approximate solution of the two-group critical problem for reflected slabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Y.; Garcia, R.D.M.

    1977-01-01

    A new approximation is developed to solve two group slab problems involving two media where one of the media is infinite. The method consists in combining the P sub(L) approximation with invariance principles. Several numerical results are reported for the critical slab problem [pt

  3. A lay prescription for tailor-made drugs--focus group reflections on pharmacogenomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Björnsdóttir, Ingunn; Traulsen, Janine Morgall

    2005-01-01

    the consequences of the Human Genome Project over the next 40 years, and asked to give advice to politicians and the pharmaceutical industry. A dominating theme in the focus groups was the expectation that drugs developed based on pharmacogenomics will be more expensive than conventional mass produced drugs...

  4. Do the Groups to Which I Belong Make Me "Me"?: Reflections on Community and Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splitter, Laurance J.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the implications of some current philosophical thinking about groups, culture and the politics of identity (exploring the views of Anthony Appiah, Amartya Sen and Nel Noddings, among others) for education generally, and for issues of classroom organization in particular. My basic thesis is that, when we understand the…

  5. Building Interdisciplinary Qualitative Research Networks: Reflections on Qualitative Research Group (QRG) at the University of Manitoba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Kerstin Stieber; Halas, Gayle

    2012-01-01

    As qualitative research methodologies continue to evolve and develop, both students and experienced researchers are showing greater interest in learning about and developing new approaches. To meet this need, faculty at the University of Manitoba created the Qualitative Research Group (QRG), a community of practice that utilizes experiential…

  6. University Students’ Reflections on Representations in Genetics and Stereochemistry Revealed by a Focus Group Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Edfors

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetics and organic chemistry are areas of science that students regard as difficult to learn. Part of this difficulty is derived from the disciplines having representations as part of their discourses. In order to optimally support students’ meaning-making, teachers need to use representations to structure the meaning-making experience in thoughtful ways that consider the variation in students’ prior knowledge. Using a focus group setting, we explored 43 university students’ reasoning on representations in introductory chemistry and genetics courses. Our analysis of eight focus group discussions revealed how students can construct somewhat bewildered relations with disciplinary-specific representations. The students stated that they preferred familiar representations, but without asserting the meaning-making affordances of those representations. Also, the students were highly aware of the affordances of certain representations, but nonetheless chose not to use those representations in their problem solving. We suggest that an effective representation is one that, to some degree, is familiar to the students, but at the same time is challenging and not too closely related to “the usual one”. The focus group discussions led the students to become more aware of their own and others ways of interpreting different representations. Furthermore, feedback from the students’ focus group discussions enhanced the teachers’ awareness of the students’ prior knowledge and limitations in students’ representational literacy. Consequently, we posit that a focus group setting can be used in a university context to promote both student meaning-making and teacher professional development in a fruitful way.

  7. Genetic affinity among five different population groups in India reflecting a Y-chromosome gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Anjana; Sharma, Swarkar; Bhat, Audesh; Pandit, Awadesh; Bamezai, Ramesh

    2005-01-01

    Four binary polymorphisms and four multiallelic short tandem repeat (STR) loci from the nonrecombining region of the human Y-chromosome were typed in different Indian population groups from Uttar Pradeh (UP), Bihar (BI), Punjab (PUNJ), and Bengal (WB) speaking the Indo-Aryan dialects and from South India (SI) with the root in the Dravidian language. We identified four major haplogroups [(P) 1+, (C and F) 2+, (R1a) 3, (K) 26+] and 114 combinations of Y-STR haplotypes. Analyses of the haplogroups indicated no single origin from any lineage but a result of a conglomeration of different lineages from time to time. The phylogenetic analyses indicate a high degree of population admixture and a greater genetic proximity for the studied population groups when compared with other world populations.

  8. Differential methylation between ethnic sub-groups reflects the effect of genetic ancestry and environmental exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanter, Joshua M; Gignoux, Christopher R; Oh, Sam S; Torgerson, Dara; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Thakur, Neeta; Eng, Celeste; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Farber, Harold J; Avila, Pedro C; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; LeNoir, Michael A; Meade, Kelly; Serebrisky, Denise; Rodríguez-Cintrón, William; Kumar, Rajesh; Rodríguez-Santana, Jose R; Seibold, Max A; Borrell, Luisa N; Burchard, Esteban G; Zaitlen, Noah

    2017-01-01

    Populations are often divided categorically into distinct racial/ethnic groups based on social rather than biological constructs. Genetic ancestry has been suggested as an alternative to this categorization. Herein, we typed over 450,000 CpG sites in whole blood of 573 individuals of diverse Hispanic origin who also had high-density genotype data. We found that both self-identified ethnicity and genetically determined ancestry were each significantly associated with methylation levels at 916 and 194 CpGs, respectively, and that shared genomic ancestry accounted for a median of 75.7% (IQR 45.8% to 92%) of the variance in methylation associated with ethnicity. There was a significant enrichment (p=4.2×10-64) of ethnicity-associated sites amongst loci previously associated environmental exposures, particularly maternal smoking during pregnancy. We conclude that differential methylation between ethnic groups is partially explained by the shared genetic ancestry but that environmental factors not captured by ancestry significantly contribute to variation in methylation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20532.001 PMID:28044981

  9. 'No entry', an invitation to intrude, or both? Reflections on a group of anorexic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Julian M

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the twice-weekly psychoanalytic psychotherapy of a young woman who had undergone major bowel surgery in her early 20s, with no clear medical indication for the surgery. Whilst the concept of 'No Entry' described by Williams (, b) aptly describes many features of more 'typical' anorexic patients, this paper describes a particular group of anorexic patients, referred by their physicians for multiple medical procedures; and proposes there is a group of anorexic patients, repeatedly referred for medical investigations, into whom particular types of entries occur. These are entries into the body 'legitimized' as medical, with a trajectory towards multiple procedures, examinations and surgical operations. Other entries (outside the medical setting) may occur in a state of altered consciousness, under the influence of alcohol or drugs, such that any wish for intrusion is disowned and denied. In both sets of events, intrusion is both invited, and consciously denied. The case example illuminates some of these features, and aspects of the countertransference are also described. Attention is drawn to relevant research focusing on surgical intrusion. Finally, there is an exploration as to how such patients may invite intrusions into the body through surgery and medical procedures. Copyright © 2013 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  10. Actions and reflections on the use of a WhatsApp group for foreign language learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Marques-Schäfer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The potential of mobile technology is being increasingly investigated. The advantages of these technologies go beyond the low-cost, high connectivity and portability. These are devices that can be accessed and used by students anywhere at any time, regardless of permissions teachers and educational institutions. Given this new situation, the purpose of this work is to report on an E-Mentoring Project which had the support of the WhatsApp application. By forming a group, students of Portuguese and German could practice language skills acquired in the classroom, interact about their daily lives in a foreign language and send messages and images files. In addition, students could count on the support of a virtual tutor and a teacher to be able to express in the target language, ask questions of grammar and vocabulary and still receive corrective feedback when requested.

  11. General practitioners' strategies in consultations with immigrants in Norway-practice-based shared reflections among participants in focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjörleifsson, Stefán; Hammer, Elise; Díaz, Esperanza

    2018-03-27

    Immigrants comprise 16.8% of the population in Norway and meet General Practitioners (GPs) as their first point of contact with most health care services as do others in Norway. While Norwegian GPs are not trained in cultural competence, little is known about the extent to which they see good care for immigrants as relying on specific strategies. To explore the thoughts of GPs in Norway about strategies they might use with immigrant patients. We performed focus groups posing the question 'What strategies do you use when meeting immigrant patients?' to three groups of GPs working in Norway. Two groups comprised 10 trainee GPs each; the final group comprised eight certified GPs. Verbatim transcripts were analysed by systematic text condensation. Strategies for consultations with immigrants emerged gradually throughout the focus groups, coalescing around (i) Respect and learn about immigrant culture. (ii) Particularize diagnosis and care, accommodating epidemiological and cultural knowledge for a given group, while keeping a keen eye on the individual. (iii) Inform about Norwegian health care. (iv) Organize resources such as time, translators and interdisciplinary teams. Other core elements of cultural competence, including reflections on the GP's own cultural background, were conspicuously absent, however. Given the growing numbers of immigrants and the early transfer of refugees to general practice, our study points to the urgent need of supplementing teaching in patient-centred clinical method with cultural competence. Our study also highlights the potential of educational GP groups to develop strategies for cross-cultural consultations.

  12. Evaluating a nursing erasmus exchange experience: Reflections on the use and value of the Nominal Group Technique for evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Sheila

    2017-09-01

    This paper discusses the use of Nominal Group Technique (NGT) for European nursing exchange evaluation at one university. The NGT is a semi-quantitative evaluation method derived from the Delphi method popular in the 1970s and 1980s. The NGT was modified from the traditional version retaining the structured cycles and but adding a broader group discussion. The NGT had been used for 2 successive years but required analysis and evaluation itself for credibility and 'fit' for purpose which is presented here. It aimed to explore nursing students' exchange experiences and aid programme development futures exchanges and closure from exchange. Results varied for the cohorts and students as participants enthusiastically engaged generating ample data which they ranked and categorised collectively. Evaluation of the NGT itself was two fold: by the programme team who considered purpose, audience, inclusivity, context and expertise. Secondly, students were asked for their thoughts using a graffiti board. Students avidly engaged with NGT but importantly also reported an effect from the process itself as an opportunity to reflect and share their experiences. The programme team concluded the NGT offered a credible evaluation tool which made use of authentic student voice and offered interactive group processes. Pedagogially, it enabled active reflection thus aiding reorientation back to the United Kingdom and awareness of 'transformative' consequences of their exchange experiences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Media Memories in Focus Group Discussions - Methodological Reflections Instancing the Global Media Generations Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo Hug

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Medienereignisse wie auch die Einführung und Verbreitung neuer Medientechnologien und Formate bringen mannigfaltige Wege des „Eintretens von Medien ins Leben“ mit sich. Im Projekt Globale Mediengenerationen (GMG wurden Medienerinnerungen aus der Kindheit im Kontext von Gruppendiskussionen am Beispiel dreier Generationen aus verschiedenen Ländern aller Kontinente untersucht. Dabei wurden medienbezogene Wissensbestände von drei Alterskohorten globaler Generationen analysiert. Der Artikel diskutiert methodologische Aspekte des Projekts und komplexe und selektive Prozesse des Erinnerns vergangener Ereignisse. Er untersucht Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschiede des GMG-Ansatzes mit dem dokumentarischen Ansatz von Ralf Bohnsack, die beide in der Wissenssoziologie von Karl Mannheim verwurzelt sind. Darüber hinaus wird Medialität als basale methodologische Kategorie in Erwägung gezogen, nicht nur im Hinblick auf die Klärung begrifflicher Grundlagen, sondern auch als inhärente Dimension von Forschungsprozessen. Media events in general and the introduction and divulgence of new media technologies and formats in particular implicate various (new ways of “media entering life.” In the Global Media Generations (GMG research project, articulation of individuals’ memories of childhood experiences with the media was afforded by context of focus groups of three generations in different countries of six continents. In this project media related knowledge segments of different age cohorts have been analyzed and interpreted. The article deals with methodological questions of the project and complex processes of ‘remembering’ past events. It explores commonalities and differences of the GMG approach with Ralf Bohnsack’s documentary approach, both rooted in the sociology of knowledge of Karl Mannheim. Furthermore, mediality is taken into consideration as a basic methodological category, which means that it is perceived not only as subject matter to

  14. Ultra-broadband optical parametric amplification by tailoring the group-velocity dispersion of Bragg reflection waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Ritwick

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of extending the signal-acceptance bandwidth for a non-degenerate optical parametric amplification process using a non-linear Bragg reflection waveguide (BRW) is explored. The strongly dispersive features of BRWs made up of semiconductors, such as GaN/Al x Ga 1-x N, are employed to maintain the phase-matching condition over a broad range of signal wavelengths. It is found that the signal-acceptance bandwidth could extend over 20 THz in the optical communication band (∼193 THz) which could facilitate simultaneous parametric amplification and wavelength conversion across the entire S-C-L band. Moreover, this idea could also find important applications in optical communication schemes involving ultra-short pulses. The broad bandwidth is essentially a direct consequence of appropriate phase- and group-velocity dispersion compensation by the idler mode in order to preserve the phase-matching condition over a broad spectral range. Since the idea exploits the dispersive features of Bragg reflection based geometries, the scheme could be implemented to realize broadband frequency conversion in any desired spectral region within the constraints imposed by the transparency of non-linear materials and the possibility of periodic poling.

  15. Group-theoretical construction of finite-momentum and multi-particle operators for lattice hadron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, Justina; Jhang, You-Cyuan; Juge, Keisuke J.; Lenkner, David; Morningstar, Colin; Wong, Chik Him

    2012-01-01

    Determining the spectrum of hadronic excitations from Monte Carlo simulations requires the use of interpolating operators that couple to multi-particle states. Recent algorithmic advances have made the inclusion of multi-hadron operators in spectroscopy calculations a practical reality. In this talk, a procedure for constructing a set of multi-hadron interpolators that project onto the states of interest is described. To aid in the interpretation of simulation data, operators are designed to transform irreducibly under the lattice symmetry group. The identification of a set of optimal single-hadron interpolators for states with non-zero momenta is an essential intermediate step in this analysis.

  16. Reflecting reflection in supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    Reflection has moved from the margins to the mainstream in supervision. Notions of reflection have become well established since the late 1980s. These notions have provided useful framing devices to help conceptualize some important processes in guidance and counseling. However, some applications...... of these notions have distorted their original connotations and taken an excessively instrumentalistic and individualistic approach to their use. This paper will argue that we are, in the 2000s, seeing a questioning of an overly instrumentalistic and individualistic view of learning and development previously...... associated with reflection and an exploration of alternative conceptions that view reflection within the context of settings which have a more group- and team-based orientation. Drawing on an action research project on health care supervision, the paper questions whether we should reject earlier views...

  17. Determination of platinum group metal catalyst residues in active pharmaceutical ingredients by means of total reflection X-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguí, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi; Hidalgo, Manuela

    2013-08-01

    The control of metal catalyst residues (i.e., platinum group metals (PGMs)) in different stages of the manufacturing processes of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and, especially, in the final product is crucial. For API specimens, there are strict guidelines to limit the levels of metal residues based on their individual levels of safety concern. For PGMs the concentration limit has been established at 10 mg/kg in the API. Therefore great effort is currently being devoted to the development of new and simple procedures to control metals in pharmaceuticals. In the present work, an analytical methodology based on benchtop total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) has been developed for the rapid and simple determination of some PGM catalyst impurities (Rh, Pd, Ir and Pt) in different types of API samples. An evaluation of different sample treatments (dissolution and digestion of the solid pharmaceutical samples) has been carried out and the developed methodologies have been validated according to the analytical parameters to be considered and acceptance criteria for PGM determination according to the United States Pharmacopeia (USP). Limits of quantification obtained for PGM metals were in the range of 2-4 mg/kg which are satisfactory according to current legislation. From the obtained results it is shown that the developed TXRF method can be implemented in the pharmaceutical industries to increase productivity of the laboratory; offering an interesting and complementary analytical tool to other atomic spectroscopic methods.

  18. Preservice World Language Teachers' Reflection on Classroom Language Use: An Application of Video Study Groups Focused on Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Within a framework of reflective practice, this dissertation examines the ways in which preservice K-12 world language teachers discuss classroom language use when reflecting with peers on videos of their teaching. Twelve preservice language teachers at a large public university in the United States participated in four meetings of video study…

  19. The Learning Process of Supervisees Who Engage in the Reflecting Team Model within Group Supervision: A Grounded Theory Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pender, Rebecca Lynn

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, counselor educators have begun to incorporate the use of the reflecting team process with the training of counselors. Specifically, the reflecting team has been used in didactic courses (Cox, 2003; Landis & Young, 1994; Harrawood, Wilde & Parmanand, 2011) and in supervision (Cox, 1997; Prest, Darden, & Keller, 1990;…

  20. Crustal structure beneath discovery bank in the South Scotia Sea from group velocity tomography and seismic reflection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuan, A.; Lodolo, E.; Panza, G.F.

    2003-09-01

    Bruce, Discovery, Herdman and Jane Banks, all located along the central-eastern part of the South Scotia Ridge (i.e., the Antarctica-Scotia plate boundary), represent isolated topographic reliefs surrounded by relatively young oceanic crust, whose petrological and structural nature is still the subject of speculations due to the lack of resolving data. In the Scotia Sea and surrounding regions negative anomalies of about 34% are reported in large-scale group velocity tomography maps. The spatial resolution (∼500 km) of these maps does not warrant any reliable interpretation of such anomalies. A recent surface wave tomography in the same area, performed using broad band seismic stations and 300 regional events, shows that in the period range from 15 s to 50 s the central-eastern part of the South Scotia Ridge is characterized by negative anomalies of the group velocities as large as 6. The resolution of our data set (∼300 km) makes it possible to distinguish an area (centered at 61 deg S and 36 deg W) with a crust thicker than 25 km, and a shear wave velocity vs. depth profile similar to that found beneath the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula and southern South America. Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves are inverted in the period range from 15 s to 80 s to obtain shear wave velocity profiles that suggest a continental nature of Discovery Bank. The continental-type crust of this topographic relief is in agreement with the interpretation of a multi-channel seismic reflection profile acquired across this rise. Peculiar acoustic facies are observed in this profile and are interpreted as thinned and faulted continental plateau. The boundaries of the negative group velocity anomalies are marked by a high seismicity rate. Historical normal faulting earthquakes with magnitude around 7 are localised between the low velocity anomaly region in the eastern South Scotia Ridge and the high velocity anomaly region associated with the surrounding oceanic crust

  1. High-resolution wave-theory-based ultrasound reflection imaging using the split-step fourier and globally optimized fourier finite-difference methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lianjie

    2013-10-29

    Methods for enhancing ultrasonic reflection imaging are taught utilizing a split-step Fourier propagator in which the reconstruction is based on recursive inward continuation of ultrasonic wavefields in the frequency-space and frequency-wave number domains. The inward continuation within each extrapolation interval consists of two steps. In the first step, a phase-shift term is applied to the data in the frequency-wave number domain for propagation in a reference medium. The second step consists of applying another phase-shift term to data in the frequency-space domain to approximately compensate for ultrasonic scattering effects of heterogeneities within the tissue being imaged (e.g., breast tissue). Results from various data input to the method indicate significant improvements are provided in both image quality and resolution.

  2. Determination of platinum group metal catalyst residues in active pharmaceutical ingredients by means of total reflection X-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marguí, Eva, E-mail: eva.margui@udg.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Queralt, Ignasi, E-mail: iqueralt@ictja.csic.es [Laboratory of X-ray Analytical Applications, Institute of Earth Sciences “Jaume Almera”, CSIC, Solé Sabarís s/n, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hidalgo, Manuela, E-mail: manuela.hidalgo@udg.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain)

    2013-08-01

    The control of metal catalyst residues (i.e., platinum group metals (PGMs)) in different stages of the manufacturing processes of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and, especially, in the final product is crucial. For API specimens, there are strict guidelines to limit the levels of metal residues based on their individual levels of safety concern. For PGMs the concentration limit has been established at 10 mg/kg in the API. Therefore great effort is currently being devoted to the development of new and simple procedures to control metals in pharmaceuticals. In the present work, an analytical methodology based on benchtop total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) has been developed for the rapid and simple determination of some PGM catalyst impurities (Rh, Pd, Ir and Pt) in different types of API samples. An evaluation of different sample treatments (dissolution and digestion of the solid pharmaceutical samples) has been carried out and the developed methodologies have been validated according to the analytical parameters to be considered and acceptance criteria for PGM determination according to the United States Pharmacopeia (USP). Limits of quantification obtained for PGM metals were in the range of 2–4 mg/kg which are satisfactory according to current legislation. From the obtained results it is shown that the developed TXRF method can be implemented in the pharmaceutical industries to increase productivity of the laboratory; offering an interesting and complementary analytical tool to other atomic spectroscopic methods. - Highlights: • A TXRF method for PGM catalyst residue determination in API samples is presented. • Analysis can be performed using 10 μL of the internal standardized dissolved API. • The method is rapid, simple and suitable according to the USP requirements.

  3. Psychiatric nursing staff members' reflections on participating in group-based clinical supervision: a semistructured interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Angel, Sanne; Traynor, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a report of an interview study exploring psychiatric hospital nursing staff members' reflections on participating in supervision. Clinical supervision is a pedagogical process designed to direct, develop, and support clinical nurses. Participation rates in clinical supervision...... limited impact on their clinical practice. Neither management nor the staff effectively prioritized clinical supervision, which added to a downward spiral where low levels of participation undermined the potential benefits of clinical supervision. The respondents embraced and used alternative forums...... for getting emotional support among peers, but maintained that formalized supervision was the only forum for reflection that could solve the most difficult situations....

  4. Influence of particle and surface quality on the vitrinite reflectance of dispersed organic matter: Comparative exercise using data from the qualifying system for reflectance analysis working group of ICCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, A.G.; Araujo, C.V.; Balke, A.; Cardott, B.; Cook, A.C.; David, P.; Flores, D.; Hamor-Vido, M.; Hiltmann, W.; Kalkreuth, W.; Koch, J.; Kommeren, C.J.; Kus, J.; Ligouis, B.; Marques, M.; Mendonca, Filho J.G.; Misz, M.; Oliveira, L.; Pickel, W.; Reimer, K.; Ranasinghe, P.; Suarez-Ruiz, I.; Vieth, A.

    2006-01-01

    The development of a qualifying system for reflectance analysis has been the scope of a working group within the International Committee for Coal and Organic Petrology (ICCP) since 1999, when J. Koch presented a system to qualify vitrinite particles according to their size, proximity to bright components and homogeneity of the surface. After some years of work aimed at improving the classification system using photomicrographs, it was decided to run a round robin exercise on microscopy samples. The classification system tested consists of three qualifiers ranging from excellent to low quality vitrinites with an additional option for unsuitable vitrinites. This paper reports on the results obtained by 22 analysts who were asked to measure random reflectance readings on vitrinite particles assigning to each reading a qualifier. Four samples containing different organic matter types and a variety of vitrinite occurrences have been analysed. Results indicated that the reflectance of particles classified as excellent, good or poor compared to the total average reflectance did not show trends to be systematically lower or higher for the four samples analysed. The differences in reflectance between the qualifiers for any given sample were lower than the scatter of vitrinite reflectance among participants. Overall, satisfactory results were obtained in determining the reflectance of vitrinite in the four samples analysed. This was so for samples having abundant and easy to identify vitrinites (higher plant-derived organic matter) as well as for samples with scarce and difficult to identify particles (samples with dominant marine-derived organic matter). The highest discrepancies were found for the organic-rich oil shales where the selection of the vitrinite population to measure proved to be particularly difficult. Special instructions should be provided for the analysis of this sort of samples. The certainty of identification of the vitrinite associated with the vitrinite

  5. Exploring the personal and professional impact of reflective practice groups: a survey of 18 cohorts from a UK clinical psychology training course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Katherine; Sperlinger, David; Maltby, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Given the importance of reflective practice within clinical psychology and a lack of empirical research, this study aimed to investigate the personal and professional impact of reflective practice groups (RPGs) for former trainees. This study followed an analytic survey design utilizing a convenience sample of qualified clinical psychologists from a UK training programme. A RPG questionnaire (RPGQ) was developed for the purposes of the study. Following initial pilot work, 297 qualified psychologists were invited to complete the RPGQ. One hundred and twenty-four psychologists (42%) completed the RPGQ. Factor analysis yielded two underlying constructs labelled 'value' and 'distress'. The RPGQ demonstrated significant internal and test-retest reliability. The majority rated the RPGs as valuable for personal and professional development and learning about group processes. Just under half however reported distress as a result of the groups. Whilst some trainees, who reported distress, were able to view the challenges positively, one-sixth were not. Potency of facilitation and group size significantly predicted levels of perceived value and distress. In view of the ethical issues raised by compulsory RPGs, recommendations were made to keep group sizes within an average of 10-13, utilize facilitators with sufficient training in group processes and ensure additional methods of reflective practice development are available. Further suggestions and recommendations for future research in relation to coping and personal learning style were also made.  © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. finite induc

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    com. Email: singh_shivaraj@rediffmail.com. In this article we provide a solution to a problem in the famous analysis book [1] by Rudin. It does not use trans- finite induction, and readers may find it more transpar- ent than the treatment in [2]. Here is ...

  7. Updated Army Cook Staffing Model to Reflect Workloads Generated by Current Field Feeding Operations, Group Rations, and Kitchens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kirejczyk, Harry J

    2006-01-01

    ...: the Unitized Group Ration-A (UGR-A) and the Unitized Group Ration-Heat/Serve (UGR-H/S). These fieldings were designed to increase the frequency and quality of group hot meals and reduce the cook workloads generated by field feeding operations...

  8. MSW Foundation Students in the Field: Reflections on the Nature and Quality of Group Work Assignments and Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPorte, Heidi Heft; Sweifach, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Commentators find that education in social group work has diminished over the past three decades, creating a shortage in group work-trained field instructors. The role of instructing group work students may appear relatively easy; however, quality instruction requires careful planning, time, energy, and specialized knowledge. Without knowledge and…

  9. Reflections on the public inquiry system; Address to the Parliamentary Group for Energy Studies, 13th February 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cokayne, C.B.M.rd

    1991-04-01

    The Piper Alpha Inquiry was an example of the so-called discretionary or ad hoc public inquiry. Such an inquiry is quite distinct in its purpose and organisation from the mandatory type of public inquiry which is often used in fields such as that of planning control. Topics discussed include the nature of the inquiry, some aspects of the organisation of the inquiry, how the subject matter for investigation was approached, and some reflections on the role of the inquiry. (author).

  10. ‘Our Breadcrumb Trail through the Woods’: Reflections on the Use of a Secret Facebook Group as a Strategy for Surviving and Thriving on the Doctoral Journey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candice Satchwell

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the value of attending to the emotional side of the doctoral journey by focusing on the use of a ‘secret’ Facebook group amongst a cohort of EdD (Professional Doctorate in Education students at one English university. Presented as a piece of action research in which the participants created an intervention to address a perceived problem and then reflected on its effectiveness, it is co-authored by the cohort of six students and their tutor. The stresses and loneliness of the doctoral journey have been well documented and constitute the ‘problem’ addressed by this cohort of students. Their inception and use of a Facebook group was a response to challenges experienced in their studies, with the expectation of facilitating peer support. As will be shown this aim was successfully met with enhancements in academic, social, and emotional support. However, unexpected benefits arose from the interactions within the group including a normalization of the challenges of the doctoral quest and the advantage of being able to follow the ‘breadcrumb trail’ found in the group postings as group journal and aid to reflection. Further, both tutors and students have noted the development of a strong sense of ‘cohortness’ and inclination to work collaboratively. Through a process of individual and group reflection on experiences of the intervention, combined with analysis of the content of the postings, this article examines the characteristics of the Facebook intervention and considers some ethical implications. We suggest that key characteristics that have contributed to its success include the student ownership, the protection of the secret format, and the combination of emotionally supportive, academic, and irreverent exchanges between group members. It is hoped that these insights may be useful to future doctoral candidates and their tutors as they negotiate their own way through the doctoral woods.

  11. Suicide in Illinois, 2005-2010: A reflection of patterns and risks by age groups and opportunities for targeted prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLone, Suzanne G; Loharikar, Anagha; Sheehan, Karen; Mason, Maryann

    2016-10-01

    Suicide accounts for two thirds of all deaths from intentional or violence-related injury and is a leading cause of death in the United States. Patterns of suicide have been well described among high-risk groups, but few studies have compared the circumstances related to suicides across all age groups. We sought to understand the epidemiology of suicide cases in Illinois and to characterize the risks and patterns for suicide among different age groups. We used suicide data collected from the Illinois Violent Death Reporting System to assess demographics, method of suicide, circumstances, and mental health status among different age groups. Between 2005 and 2010, 3,016 suicides were reported; 692 (23%) were female, and the median age (n = 3,013) was 45 years (range, 10-98 years). The most common method/weapon types were hanging/strangulation (33%), firearm (32%) and poisoning (21%). Hanging was more common (74%) among young people aged 10 to 19 years, while firearm use was more common among elderly persons age 65 years and older (55%). The percentage of victims within an age group experiencing a crisis within two weeks before committing suicide was highest among 10- to 14-year-olds, while the risk factor of having a family member or friend die in the past 5 years was highest among older victims. The final analysis demonstrated age-related trends in suicide in Illinois, suggesting prevention programs should tailor services by age. Epidemiologic study, level IV.

  12. Quantifying Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcock, Gordon Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    This paper documents 1st semester student reflections on “learning to learn” in a team-based PBL environment with quantitative and qualitative student reflective feedback on the learning gains of 60 Architectural Technology and Construction Management students at VIA University College, Denmark....... It contrasts the students’ self-assessment in a range of ‘product’ skills such as Revit, Structural Design, Mathematics of construction, Technical Installations; as well as ‘process’ competencies such as ‘Working in a team’, Sharing knowledge, Maintaining a portfolio and Reflecting ON learning and FOR learning......´ These are all based on Blooms taxonomy and levels of competence and form a major part of individual student and group learning portfolios. Key Words :Project-Based learning, Reflective Portfolios, Self assessment, Defining learning gains, Developing learning strategies , Reflections on and for learning...

  13. The Role of Reflection and Collaboration in the Evolution of a Group of Novice Secondary Education Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Josefa; Azcárate, Pilar; Cardeñoso, José Maria

    2016-01-01

    The present article analyses the changes in practices, ideas, and attitudes proposed by a group of novice science teachers during a further education teacher training program. The research on which it is based is focused on monitoring the training program and its impact on the participating teachers. The training program has as its starting point…

  14. "Understanding my ALS". Experiences and reflections of persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and relatives on participation in peer group rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Louise Sofia; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Handberg, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    with joint inclusion of persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and relatives. Implications for Rehabilitation Peer group rehabilitation may facilitate an increased and personalised understanding of what it means to live with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A programme design with six months of sequential...

  15. Expressions of discomfort in adolescents. Clinical reflections resulting from an exploratory study of a group of students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Grutta, S; Guarneri, M; Nastri, L; Schiera, G; Lo Baido, R; Sarno, L; Roccella, M

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore some fundamental dimensions of adolescent discomfort relating to food, the body, sexuality, relationships in general and health care. We recruited 206 students (66 males, 140 females; average age=19.4+/-2) and we administered 4 questionnaires: the first two to examine their relationship with food, the third to explore adolescents' attitudes to their social context, sexuality and first sexual experiences; the fourth to measure their ability to look after their health. The results show the different role that sexual styles have in the expression of juvenile discomfort. Girls tend to live the discomfort by mentalizing it in relationships and sexuality and contextualizing it in their bodies; boys direct their discomfort towards occasional drug taking or drug addiction, or alcohol abuse, the excitement of speed, or dangerous driving. In clinical work with adolescents it seems appropriate to refer to the relational gradient of risk behaviours, that is their linking function within their peer group. Behaviours with a high relational gradient, which develop within the group or are related to the group, in most cases are normal modalities for facing the important challenges of adolescence. These behaviours are symptoms of the normal process of adolescent development. We should pay particular attention to behaviours with a low relational gradient because they indicate a possible interruption in their development.

  16. Focus group reflections on the current and future state of cognitive assessment tools in geriatric health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitehead JC

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jocelyne C Whitehead,1 Sara A Gambino,1 Jeffrey D Richter,2 Jennifer D Ryan1,3,41Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest, 2Independent Human Factors Consultant, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Department of Psychology, 4Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaObjective: This study provides insight into the thoughts and opinions of geriatric health-care professionals toward cognitive assessments and the use of emerging technologies, such as eye-tracking, to supplement current tools.Methods: Two focus group sessions were conducted with nurses and physicians who routinely administer neurocognitive assessments to geriatric populations. Video recordings of the focus group sessions were transcribed and a thematic analysis was performed.Results: Participants reported the need for assessment and diagnostic tools that are accessible and efficient, and that are capable of accommodating the rapid growth in the aging population. The prevalence of more complex ailments experienced by older adults has had repercussions in the quality of care that the clients receive, and has contributed to lengthy wait times and resource shortages. Health-care professionals stated that they are hampered by the disjointed structure of the health-care system and that they would benefit from a more efficient allocation of responsibilities made possible through tools that did not require extensive training or certification. Eyetracking-based cognitive assessments were thought to strongly complement this system, yet it was thought that difficulty would be faced in gaining the support and increased uptake by health-care professionals due to the nonintuitive relationship between eyetracking and cognition.Conclusion: The findings suggest that health-care professionals are receptive to the use of eyetracking technology to assess for cognitive health as it would conserve resources by allowing frontline staff to administer assessments with minimal training

  17. Temperature-reflection I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGady, David A.

    2017-01-01

    that T-reflection is unrelated to time-reversal. Finally, we study the interplay between T-reflection and perturbation theory in the anharmonic harmonic oscillator in quantum mechanics and in Yang-Mills in four-dimensions. This is the first in a series of papers on temperature-reflections.......In this paper, we revisit the claim that many partition functions are invariant under reflecting temperatures to negative values (T-reflection). The goal of this paper is to demarcate which partition functions should be invariant under T-reflection, and why. Our main claim is that finite......-temperature path integrals for quantum field theories (QFTs) should be T-reflection invariant. Because multi-particle partition functions are equal to Euclidean path integrals for QFTs, we expect them to be T-reflection invariant. Single-particle partition functions though are often not invariant under T...

  18. Locally Finite Root Supersystems

    OpenAIRE

    Yousofzadeh, Malihe

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of locally finite root supersystems as a generalization of both locally finite root systems and generalized root systems. We classify irreducible locally finite root supersystems.

  19. Low Group Delay Dispersion Optical Coating for Broad Bandwidth High Reflection at 45° Incidence, P Polarization of Femtosecond Pulses with 900 nm Center Wavelength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Bellum

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe an optical coating design suitable for broad bandwidth high reflection (BBHR at 45° angle of incidence (AOI, P polarization (Ppol of femtosecond (fs laser pulses whose wavelengths range from 800 to 1000 nm. Our design process is guided by quarter-wave HR coating properties. The design must afford low group delay dispersion (GDD for reflected light over the broad, 200 nm bandwidth in order to minimize temporal broadening of the fs pulses due to dispersive alteration of relative phases between their frequency components. The design should also be favorable to high laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT. We base the coating on TiO2/SiO2 layer pairs produced by means of e-beam evaporation with ion-assisted deposition, and use OptiLayer Thin Film Software to explore designs starting with TiO2/SiO2 layers having thicknesses in a reverse chirped arrangement. This approach led to a design with R > 99% from 800 to 1000 nm and GDD < 20 fs2 from 843 to 949 nm (45° AOI, Ppol. The design’s GDD behaves in a smooth way, suitable for GDD compensation techniques, and its electric field intensities show promise for high LIDTs. Reflectivity and GDD measurements for the initial test coating indicate good performance of the BBHR design. Subsequent coating runs with improved process calibration produced two coatings whose HR bands satisfactorily meet the design goals. For the sake of completeness, we summarize our previously reported transmission spectra and LIDT test results with 800 ps, 8 ps and 675 fs pulses for these two coatings, and present a table of the LIDT results we have for all of our TiO2/SiO2 BBHR coatings, showing the trends with test laser pulse duration from the ns to sub-ps regimes.

  20. The classification of p-compact groups for p odd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, K.K.S.; Grodal, J.; Møller, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    A p-compact group, as defined by Dwyer and Wilkerson, is a purely homotopically defined p-local analog of a compact Lie group. It has long been the hope, and later the conjecture, that these objects should have a classification similar to the classification of compact Lie groups. In this paper we...... finish the proof of this conjecture, for p an odd prime, proving that there is a one-to-one correspondence between connected p-compact groups and finite reflection groups over the p-adic integers. We do this by providing the last, and rather intricate, piece, namely that the exceptional compact Lie...... groups are uniquely determined as p-compact groups by their Weyl groups seen as finite reflection groups over the p-adic integers. Our approach in fact gives a largely self-contained proof of the entire classification theorem for p odd....

  1. Finite element analysis of the lateral load test on battered pile group at I-10 twin span bridge : research project capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this research study are to develop a three-dimensional FE : model for simulating the behavior of a battered pile group foundation subjected : to lateral loading, and to verify the model using results from a unique static : lateral l...

  2. Cook-Levin Theorem Algorithmic-Reducibility/Completeness = Wilson Renormalization-(Semi)-Group Fixed-Points; ``Noise''-Induced Phase-Transitions (NITs) to Accelerate Algorithmics (``NIT-Picking'') REPLACING CRUTCHES!!!: Models: Turing-machine, finite-state-models, finite-automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Frederic; Siegel, Edward

    Cook-Levin theorem theorem algorithmic computational-complexity(C-C) algorithmic-equivalence reducibility/completeness equivalence to renormalization-(semi)-group phase-transitions critical-phenomena statistical-physics universality-classes fixed-points, is exploited via Siegel FUZZYICS =CATEGORYICS = ANALOGYICS =PRAGMATYICS/CATEGORY-SEMANTICS ONTOLOGY COGNITION ANALYTICS-Aristotle ``square-of-opposition'' tabular list-format truth-table matrix analytics predicts and implements ''noise''-induced phase-transitions (NITs) to accelerate versus to decelerate Harel [Algorithmics (1987)]-Sipser[Intro.Thy. Computation(`97)] algorithmic C-C: ''NIT-picking''(!!!), to optimize optimization-problems optimally(OOPO). Versus iso-''noise'' power-spectrum quantitative-only amplitude/magnitude-only variation stochastic-resonance, ''NIT-picking'' is ''noise'' power-spectrum QUALitative-type variation via quantitative critical-exponents variation. Computer-''science''/SEANCE algorithmic C-C models: Turing-machine, finite-state-models, finite-automata,..., discrete-maths graph-theory equivalence to physics Feynman-diagrams are identified as early-days once-workable valid but limiting IMPEDING CRUTCHES(!!!), ONLY IMPEDE latter-days new-insights!!!

  3. Dutch Adolescents' Motives, Perceptions, and Reflections Toward Sex-Related Internet Use: Results of a Web-Based Focus-Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doornwaard, Suzan M; den Boer, Fedde; Vanwesenbeeck, Ine; van Nijnatten, Carol H C J; Ter Bogt, Tom F M; van den Eijnden, Regina J J M

    2017-10-01

    The Internet offers adolescents unique opportunities to actively shape their own sexual media environment. The aim of this study was to gain in-depth insight into Dutch adolescents' motives, perceptions, and reflections toward Internet use for (a) finding information or advice related to romance and sexuality; (b) searching for and viewing pornographic or erotic material; and (c) romantic and sexual communication (i.e., cybersex/sexting). Data were collected through 12 Web-based focus groups (36 adolescents aged 16 to 19 years, 72.2% girls) and analyzed through three stages of open, axial, and selective coding. The themes that emerged from the focus-group discussions suggest that sex-related Internet use is a complex and ambivalent experience for adolescents. Sex-related Internet use seems an increasingly normalized and common phenomenon. Participants perceived the Internet as a useful source of sexual information, stimulation, inspiration, and communication. Yet they discussed a range of negative consequences and risks related to sex-related online behaviors, particularly concerning pornography's potential to create unrealistic expectations about sex and sexual attractiveness. Participants generally believed they had the necessary skills to navigate through the online sexual landscape in a responsible way, although they believed other young people could be influenced inadvertently and adversely by sex-related online content.

  4. Hercules and Barbie? Reflections on the influence of pornography and its spread in the media and society in groups of adolescents in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattebo, Magdalena; Larsson, Margareta; Tydén, Tanja; Olsson, Tove; Häggström-Nordin, Elisabet

    2012-02-01

    To describe and get a deeper understanding of how groups of young women and men reflect on and discuss pornography and its spread in the media and society, and its possible influence on sexual behaviour and relationships. Six focus group interviews were conducted with teenagers, three with women (n = 17) and three with men (n = 18). Open questions about pornography and its spread in the media and society were discussed. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed according to Grounded Theory. The core category 'A discriminatory sexuality' illustrates how participants felt regarding the messages conveyed by pornography portraying a man's role as dominant and a woman's role as subordinate. Pornographic messages were described as 'Fiction' depicting a distorted reality. Feelings of ambivalence towards pornography were expressed: anxiety and fear, but also inspiration. Participants said pornography occurred everywhere in the media and society, and felt pressured by messages relating to looks and sexual techniques. Pornography and its spread in the media and society were considered as presenting a discriminatory image of body ideals, sexuality and relationships. Despite this awareness, both men and women considered pornography as sources of knowledge and inspiration: an apparent paradox.

  5. Delocalized SYZ mirrors and confronting top-down SU(3)-structure holographic meson masses at finite g and N_c with P(article) D(ata) G(roup) values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vikas; Misra, Aalok; Sil, Karunava

    2017-10-01

    Meson spectroscopy at finite gauge coupling - whereat any perturbative QCD computation would break down - and finite number of colors, from a top-down holographic string model, has thus far been entirely missing in the literature. This paper fills this gap. Using the delocalized type IIA SYZ mirror (with SU(3) structure) of the holographic type IIB dual of large- N thermal QCD of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) as constructed in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at finite coupling and number of colors (N_c = number of D5(\\overline{D5})-branes wrapping a vanishing two-cycle in the top-down holographic construct of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) = O(1) in the IR in the MQGP limit of Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at the end of a Seiberg-duality cascade), we obtain analytical (not just numerical) expressions for the vector and scalar meson spectra and compare our results with previous calculations of Sakai and Sugimoto (Prog Theor Phys 113:843. doi: 10.1143/PTP.113.843 arXiv:hep-th/0412141, 2005) and Dasgupta et al. (JHEP 1507:122. doi: 10.1007/JHEP07(2015)122 arXiv:1409.0559 [hep-th], 2015), and we obtain a closer match with the Particle Data Group (PDG) results of Olive et al. (Particle Data Group) (Chin Phys C 38:090001, 2014). Through explicit computations, we verify that the vector and scalar meson spectra obtained by the gravity dual with a black hole for all temperatures (small and large) are nearly isospectral with the spectra obtained by a thermal gravity dual valid for only low temperatures; the isospectrality is much closer for vector mesons than scalar mesons. The black-hole gravity dual (with a horizon radius smaller than the deconfinement scale) also provides the expected large- N suppressed decrease in vector meson mass with increase of temperature.

  6. Delocalized SYZ mirrors and confronting top-down SU(3)-structure holographic meson masses at finite g and N{sub c} with P(article) D(ata) G(roup) values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Vikas; Sil, Karunava [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Roorkee, Uttarakhand (India); Misra, Aalok [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Roorkee, Uttarakhand (India); McGill University, Physics Department, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2017-10-15

    Meson spectroscopy at finite gauge coupling - whereat any perturbative QCD computation would break down - and finite number of colors, from a top-down holographic string model, has thus far been entirely missing in the literature. This paper fills this gap. Using the delocalized type IIA SYZ mirror (with SU(3) structure) of the holographic type IIB dual of large-N thermal QCD of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) as constructed in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at finite coupling and number of colors (N{sub c} = number of D5(D5)-branes wrapping a vanishing two-cycle in the top-down holographic construct of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) = O(1) in the IR in the MQGP limit of Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at the end of a Seiberg-duality cascade), we obtain analytical (not just numerical) expressions for the vector and scalar meson spectra and compare our results with previous calculations of Sakai and Sugimoto (Prog Theor Phys 113:843. doi:10.1143/PTP.113.843 arXiv:hep-th/0412141, 2005) and Dasgupta et al. (JHEP 1507:122. doi:10.1007/JHEP07(2015)122 arXiv:1409.0559 [hep-th], 2015), and we obtain a closer match with the Particle Data Group (PDG) results of Olive et al. (Particle Data Group) (Chin Phys C 38:090001, 2014). Through explicit computations, we verify that the vector and scalar meson spectra obtained by the gravity dual with a black hole for all temperatures (small and large) are nearly isospectral with the spectra obtained by a thermal gravity dual valid for only low temperatures; the isospectrality is much closer for vector mesons than scalar mesons. The black-hole gravity dual (with a horizon radius smaller than the deconfinement scale) also provides the expected large-N suppressed decrease in vector meson mass with increase of temperature. (orig.)

  7. Evolution of topological features in finite antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changfeng

    2003-01-01

    We examine the behavior of nonlocal topological order in finite antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains using the density matrix renormalization group techniques. We find that chains with even and odd site parity show very different behavior in the topological string order parameter, reflecting interesting interplay of the intrinsic magnetic correlation and the topological term in the chains. Analysis of the calculated string order parameter as a function of the chain length and the topological angle indicates that S=1/2 and S=1 chains show special behavior while all S>1 chains have similar topological structure. This result supports an earlier conjecture on the classification of quantum spin chains based on an analysis of their phase diagrams. Implications of the topological behavior in finite quantum spin chains are discussed

  8. Density matrix renormalization group simulations of SU(N ) Heisenberg chains using standard Young tableaus: Fundamental representation and comparison with a finite-size Bethe ansatz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, Pierre; Mila, Frédéric

    2018-04-01

    We develop an efficient method to perform density matrix renormalization group simulations of the SU(N ) Heisenberg chain with open boundary conditions taking full advantage of the SU(N ) symmetry of the problem. This method is an extension of the method previously developed for exact diagonalizations and relies on a systematic use of the basis of standard Young tableaux. Concentrating on the model with the fundamental representation at each site (i.e., one particle per site in the fermionic formulation), we have benchmarked our results for the ground-state energy up to N =8 and up to 420 sites by comparing them with Bethe ansatz results on open chains, for which we have derived and solved the Bethe ansatz equations. The agreement for the ground-state energy is excellent for SU(3) (12 digits). It decreases with N , but it is still satisfactory for N =8 (six digits). Central charges c are also extracted from the entanglement entropy using the Calabrese-Cardy formula and agree with the theoretical values expected from the SU (N) 1 Wess-Zumino-Witten conformal field theories.

  9. Basic Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Hae

    1992-02-01

    This book gives descriptions of basic finite element method, which includes basic finite element method and data, black box, writing of data, definition of VECTOR, definition of matrix, matrix and multiplication of matrix, addition of matrix, and unit matrix, conception of hardness matrix like spring power and displacement, governed equation of an elastic body, finite element method, Fortran method and programming such as composition of computer, order of programming and data card and Fortran card, finite element program and application of nonelastic problem.

  10. Invisibility via reflecting coating

    OpenAIRE

    Burdzy, Krzysztof; Kulczycki, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    We construct a subset $A$ of the unit disc with the following properties. (i) The set $A$ is the finite union of disjoint line segments. (ii) The shadow of $A$ is arbitrarily close to the shadow of the unit disc in "most" directions. (iii) If the line segments are considered to be mirrors reflecting light according to the classical law of specular reflection then most light rays hitting the set emerge on the other side of the disc moving along a parallel line and shifted by an arbitrarily sma...

  11. "Does the Mirror Speak My Language?" A Comparison of L1 and L2 Student Reflections on Their Experiences in a Small-Group Writing Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Lauren J.

    2016-01-01

    Reflection has often been considered a powerful tool for students in composition, helping them develop rhetorical awareness and the ability to transfer their knowledge to future writing tasks. However, the methods that promote reflection have often been debated, and students have considered the process both puzzling and difficult. Furthermore, few…

  12. Composite Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    In this chapter, we extend the previous results of Chap. 2 to the more general case of composite finite sums. We describe what composite finite sums are and how their analysis can be reduced to the analysis of simple finite sums using the chain rule. We apply these techniques, next, on numerical integration and on some identities of Ramanujan.

  13. Finite Amplitude Ocean Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    plitude waves and finite amplitude waves. This article provides a brief introduction to finite amplitude wave theories. Some of the general characteristics of waves as well as the importance of finite amplitude wave theories are touched upon. 2. Small Amplitude Waves. The topmost and the lowest levels of the waves are re-.

  14. Finite and profinite quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vourdas, Apostolos

    2017-01-01

    This monograph provides an introduction to finite quantum systems, a field at the interface between quantum information and number theory, with applications in quantum computation and condensed matter physics. The first major part of this monograph studies the so-called `qubits' and `qudits', systems with periodic finite lattice as position space. It also discusses the so-called mutually unbiased bases, which have applications in quantum information and quantum cryptography. Quantum logic and its applications to quantum gates is also studied. The second part studies finite quantum systems, where the position takes values in a Galois field. This combines quantum mechanics with Galois theory. The third part extends the discussion to quantum systems with variables in profinite groups, considering the limit where the dimension of the system becomes very large. It uses the concepts of inverse and direct limit and studies quantum mechanics on p-adic numbers. Applications of the formalism include quantum optics and ...

  15. M-supplemented subgroups of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Jia Zhang1 Long Miao1 Juping Tang2. School of Mathematical Sciences, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002, People's Republic of China; Wuxi Institute of Technology, Wuxi 214121, People's Republic of China ...

  16. CLASSES IN FINITE GROUPS OF CONJUGATE TYPE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    37

    Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Mohali. Corresponding Author's Secondary. Institution: First Author: Krishnendu Gongopadhyay. First Author Secondary Information: Order of Authors: Krishnendu Gongopadhyay. Shivam Arora. Order of Authors Secondary Information: Funding Information: Abstract:.

  17. On p-supersolvability of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 125; Issue 2 ... The domain part of the email address of all email addresses used by the office of Indian Academy of Sciences, including those of the staff, the journals, various programmes, and Current Science, has changed from 'ias.ernet.in' ...

  18. Quantum isometry groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyotishman Bhowmick

    2015-11-07

    Nov 7, 2015 ... NONcommutative spaces. 2. Banica and Bichon defined quantum symmetry groups for finite metric spaces, finite graphs, etc. 3. Lots of examples computed leading to discovery of completely new kinds of quantum groups. Jyotishman Bhowmick (Indian Statistical Institute). Quantum isometry groups. 07.11.

  19. The Reflective Learning Continuum: Reflecting on Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, James W.; Hay, Amanda; Drago, William

    2005-01-01

    The importance of reflection to marketing educators is increasingly recognized. However, there is a lack of empirical research that considers reflection within the context of both the marketing and general business education literature. This article describes the use of an instrument that can be used to measure four identified levels of a…

  20. Dutch adolescents' motives, perceptions and reflections toward sex-related Internet use : Results of a web-based focus-group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doornwaard, S.M.; den Boer, Fedde; Vanwesenbeeck, W.M.A.; van Nijnatten, C.H.C.J.; ter Bogt, T.F.M.; van den Eijnden, R.J.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    The Internet offers adolescents unique opportunities to actively shape their own sexual media environment. The aim of this study was to gain in-depth insight into Dutch adolescents’ motives, perceptions, and reflections toward Internet use for (a) finding information or advice related to romance and

  1. Reflections on Ethical Dilemmas in Working with So-Called "Vulnerable" and "Hard-to-Reach" Groups: Experiences from the Foodways and Futures Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombert, Karolina; Douglas, Flora; McArdle, Karen; Carlisle, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    This article reflects on ethical limitations and dilemmas encountered during fieldwork of the Foodways and Futures project (2013-2016). Foodways and Futures is a qualitative action research project aimed at exploring the food choices of former homeless young people (aged 16-25) in Aberdeenshire. In Scotland, where over 13,000 young people become…

  2. Supersymmetric theories and finiteness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helayel-Neto, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    We attempt here to present a short survey of the all-order finite Lagrangian field theories known at present in four-and two-dimensional space-times. The question of the possible relevance of these ultraviolet finite models in the formulation of consistent unified frameworks for the fundamental forces is also addressed to. (author)

  3. Designs and finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Designs and Finite Geometries brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this important area of mathematics. Designs and Finite Geometries serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most important research issues in the field.

  4. Reflective photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Goeke, Ronald S.

    2018-03-06

    A photovoltaic module includes colorized reflective photovoltaic cells that act as pixels. The colorized reflective photovoltaic cells are arranged so that reflections from the photovoltaic cells or pixels visually combine into an image on the photovoltaic module. The colorized photovoltaic cell or pixel is composed of a set of 100 to 256 base color sub-pixel reflective segments or sub-pixels. The color of each pixel is determined by the combination of base color sub-pixels forming the pixel. As a result, each pixel can have a wide variety of colors using a set of base colors, which are created, from sub-pixel reflective segments having standard film thicknesses.

  5. Simple Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    We will begin our treatment of summability calculus by analyzing what will be referred to, throughout this book, as simple finite sums. Even though the results of this chapter are particular cases of the more general results presented in later chapters, they are important to start with for a few reasons. First, this chapter serves as an excellent introduction to what summability calculus can markedly accomplish. Second, simple finite sums are encountered more often and, hence, they deserve special treatment. Third, the results presented in this chapter for simple finite sums will, themselves, be used as building blocks for deriving the most general results in subsequent chapters. Among others, we establish that fractional finite sums are well-defined mathematical objects and show how various identities related to the Euler constant as well as the Riemann zeta function can actually be derived in an elementary manner using fractional finite sums.

  6. Clifford algebra in finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, M.

    1997-12-01

    We consider the most general power counting renormalizable and gauge invariant Lagrangean density L invariant with respect to some non-Abelian, compact, and semisimple gauge group G. The particle content of this quantum field theory consists of gauge vector bosons, real scalar bosons, fermions, and ghost fields. We assume that the ultimate grand unified theory needs no cutoff. This yields so-called finiteness conditions, resulting from the demand for finite physical quantities calculated by the bare Lagrangean. In lower loop order, necessary conditions for finiteness are thus vanishing beta functions for dimensionless couplings. The complexity of the finiteness conditions for a general quantum field theory makes the discussion of non-supersymmetric theories rather cumbersome. Recently, the F = 1 class of finite quantum field theories has been proposed embracing all supersymmetric theories. A special type of F = 1 theories proposed turns out to have Yukawa couplings which are equivalent to generators of a Clifford algebra representation. These algebraic structures are remarkable all the more than in the context of a well-known conjecture which states that finiteness is maybe related to global symmetries (such as supersymmetry) of the Lagrangean density. We can prove that supersymmetric theories can never be of this Clifford-type. It turns out that these Clifford algebra representations found recently are a consequence of certain invariances of the finiteness conditions resulting from a vanishing of the renormalization group β-function for the Yukawa couplings. We are able to exclude almost all such Clifford-like theories. (author)

  7. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Boya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the 1+1+16=18 families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated ''pariah'' groups. The (old five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group M, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the 5+7+8+6=26 sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  8. Finite-dimensional division algebras over fields

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobson, Nathan

    2009-01-01

    Finite-Dimensional Division Algebras over fields determine, by the Wedderburn Theorem, the semi-simple finite-dimensional algebras over a field. They lead to the definition of the Brauer group and to certain geometric objects, the Brauer-Severi varieties. The book concentrates on those algebras that have an involution. Algebras with involution appear in many contexts; they arose first in the study of the so-called 'multiplication algebras of Riemann matrices'. The largest part of the book is the fifth chapter, dealing with involutorial simple algebras of finite dimension over a field. Of parti

  9. A modified finite element procedure for underwater shock analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Using the regular finite element method for analyzing wave propagation problems presents difficulties: (a) The finite element mesh gives spurious reflection of the traveling wave and (b) Since a finite element model has to have a finite boundary, the wave is reflected by the outside boundary. However, for underwater shock problems, only the response of the structure is of major interest, not the behavior of the wave itself, and the shock wave can be assumed to be spherical. By taking advantage of the limited scope of the underwater shock problem, a finite element procedure can be developed that eliminates the above difficulties. This procedure not only can give very accurate solutions but it may also include structural nonlinearities and effect of cavitation

  10. Representation theory of finite monoids

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberg, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This first text on the subject provides a comprehensive introduction to the representation theory of finite monoids. Carefully worked examples and exercises provide the bells and whistles for graduate accessibility, bringing a broad range of advanced readers to the forefront of research in the area. Highlights of the text include applications to probability theory, symbolic dynamics, and automata theory. Comfort with module theory, a familiarity with ordinary group representation theory, and the basics of Wedderburn theory, are prerequisites for advanced graduate level study. Researchers in algebra, algebraic combinatorics, automata theory, and probability theory, will find this text enriching with its thorough presentation of applications of the theory to these fields. Prior knowledge of semigroup theory is not expected for the diverse readership that may benefit from this exposition. The approach taken in this book is highly module-theoretic and follows the modern flavor of the theory of finite dimensional ...

  11. A1 and A2 Sub-Types of Blood Group 'A': A Reflection of their Prevalence in North Karnataka Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giriyan, Sujata S; Agrawal, Akanksha; Bajpai, Richa; Nirala, Niraj Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Landsteiner ABO system of blood groups is most important for transfusion medicine and has subtypes of A Antigen, A1 and A2, upon which further groups of A and AB have been classified. Of individuals with A antigen, approximately 20% belong to A2 while rest 80% belong to A1. Anti-A1 Lectin, a cold agglutinin which destroys A1 cells is clinically significant when they react at 37°C, causing transfusion reactions. To assess the prevalence of A1 and A2 subgroups in the population. This was two year retrospective analysis of blood groups of donors coming to the blood bank of Karnataka Institute of Medical Science, Hubli, Karnataka, India. The data of the subgroups A and AB was analysed. 20,864 donors were analysed. Of 5466 (26.20%) of A group, 5406 (98.90%) belonged to A1 subgroup and only 60 (1.10%) belonged to A2 subgroup. Of 1708 donors with blood group AB, 1532 (89.70%) belonged to A1B subgroup and 176 (10.30%) belonged to A2B. It was noted that A2 in AB blood-group, as A2B, was more frequent in occurrence than presence of A2 as an A blood group. Rhesus negative frequency in these subgroups was also reported. Having known the prevalence of A1 and A2 subgroups and incorporating them into the ABO grouping system can limit these minor, yet dangerous, transfusion incompatibilities.

  12. Finite elements and approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zienkiewicz, O C

    2006-01-01

    A powerful tool for the approximate solution of differential equations, the finite element is extensively used in industry and research. This book offers students of engineering and physics a comprehensive view of the principles involved, with numerous illustrative examples and exercises.Starting with continuum boundary value problems and the need for numerical discretization, the text examines finite difference methods, weighted residual methods in the context of continuous trial functions, and piecewise defined trial functions and the finite element method. Additional topics include higher o

  13. Reflections on Miniature Golf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Nancy Norem; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes a transformational geometry project in which groups of students explore symmetry, reflections, translations, rotations, and dilations to design and create one hole of miniature golf large enough to play on. Includes unit plan for transformational geometry. (MKR)

  14. A1 and A2 Sub-Types of Blood Group ‘A’: A Reflection of their Prevalence in North Karnataka Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giriyan, Sujata S; Bajpai, Richa; Nirala, Niraj Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Landsteiner ABO system of blood groups is most important for transfusion medicine and has subtypes of A Antigen, A1 and A2, upon which further groups of A and AB have been classified. Of individuals with A antigen, approximately 20% belong to A2 while rest 80% belong to A1. Anti-A1 Lectin, a cold agglutinin which destroys A1 cells is clinically significant when they react at 37°C, causing transfusion reactions. Aim To assess the prevalence of A1 and A2 subgroups in the population. Materials and Methods This was two year retrospective analysis of blood groups of donors coming to the blood bank of Karnataka Institute of Medical Science, Hubli, Karnataka, India. The data of the subgroups A and AB was analysed. Results 20,864 donors were analysed. Of 5466 (26.20%) of A group, 5406 (98.90%) belonged to A1 subgroup and only 60 (1.10%) belonged to A2 subgroup. Of 1708 donors with blood group AB, 1532 (89.70%) belonged to A1B subgroup and 176 (10.30%) belonged to A2B. It was noted that A2 in AB blood-group, as A2B, was more frequent in occurrence than presence of A2 as an A blood group. Rhesus negative frequency in these subgroups was also reported. Conclusion Having known the prevalence of A1 and A2 subgroups and incorporating them into the ABO grouping system can limit these minor, yet dangerous, transfusion incompatibilities. PMID:28658771

  15. Inflation with finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellini, M.; Michoacan, Univ. Michoacana de S.Nicola de Hidalgo

    1998-01-01

    In this work the inflationary scenario of the Universe with finite temperature is studied. In this context, thermal equilibrium is closely maintained at the end of inflation. The example of the de Sitter expansion is developed

  16. Personal Reflections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Personal Reflections. Articles in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 6 Issue 3 March 2001 pp 90-93 Personal Reflections. Why did I opt for Career in Science? Jayant V Narlikar · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 9 Issue 8 August 2004 pp 89-89 ...

  17. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.E.; Love, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Finite-temperature supersymmetry (SUSY) is characterized by unbroken Ward identities for SUSY variations of ensemble averages of Klein-operator inserted imaginary time-ordered products of fields. Path-integral representations of these products are defined and the Feynman rules in superspace are given. The finite-temperature no-renormalization theorem is derived. Spontaneously broken SUSY at zero temperature is shown not to be restored at high temperature. (orig.)

  18. 'Singing for the brain': reflections on the human capacity for music arising from a pilot study of group singing with Alzheimer's patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannan, Nicholas; Montgomery-Smith, Chreanne

    2008-03-01

    The paper reports the activities of a pilot study of group singing for people with Alzheimer's and their carers, and presents data arising from the study. The project aimed to answer the following questions: Would people with Alzheimer's be able to participate in group singing? Would progress be identifiable in participants' singing? Would responses to the activity be positive? Would participating carers find the activity worthwhile? Additionally, the following question was posed: Within the supportive environment of group singing, might people with Alzheimer's be able to participate in a song that they had to learn? Songs were selected that would be familiar to participants aged over 40 years, and one original song was introduced by the group leader following a successful session. The group leader did not know which of the participants were patients with Alzheimer's and which were carers. Participants sat in a circle in a resonant hall. Sessions were filmed and a separate audio recording made and subsequently analysed, and questionnaires were completed by carers after sessions. Nine hours of video recording, three hours of audio recording and three collated questionnaires (one for each session) were collected. Confidence grew over the three sessions, with a traceable development in the alertness of many of the people with Alzheimer's. It proved possible to divide the group so as to sing two songs simultaneously, and also so as to perform three- and four-part rounds. It proved possible to teach an unknown song. Carers generally felt that the sessions were of value. People with Alzheimer's are able to participate in group singing and some longer-term benefits are perceived by their carers. In a group activity such as Singing for the Brain it is difficult to be certain how the overall effect arises from the interaction of individuals. The data assembled is difficult to submit to clinical testing, relying as it does on the judgement of participants regarding reported

  19. A critical reflection on the use of focus groups as a research method: lessons from trying to hear the voices of NGO beneficiaries in Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyemang, G.; Awumbila, M.; O'Dwyer, B.

    2009-01-01

    The focus group method has been used extensively in social science research in order to gain a deep understanding of participant perceptions of specific topics of interest. However, the method has rarely been used in the social accounting and accountability literature. This paper reviews and

  20. Variable multilayer reflection together with long-pass filtering pigment determines the wing coloration of papilionid butterflies of the nireus group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trzeciak, Tomasz M.; Wilts, Bodo D.; Stavenga, Doekele G.; Vukusic, Peter; Sterke, C. Martijn de

    2012-01-01

    The dorsal wing surfaces of papilionid butterflies of the nireus group are marked by bands of brilliant blue-green-colored cover scales. The thin, cuticular lower lamina of the scales acts as a blue reflector. The thick upper lamina forms a dense two-dimensional cuticular lattice of air cavities

  1. Reflection ciphers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boura, Christina; Canteaut, Anne; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde

    2017-01-01

    study the necessary properties for this coupling permutation. Special care has to be taken of some related-key distinguishers since, in the context of reflection ciphers, they may provide attacks in the single-key setting.We then derive some criteria for constructing secure reflection ciphers...... and analyze the security properties of different families of coupling permutations. Finally, we concentrate on the case of reflection block ciphers and, as an illustration, we provide concrete examples of key schedules corresponding to several coupling permutations, which lead to new variants of the block...

  2. Functional invertebrate prey groups reflect dietary responses to phenology and farming activity and pest control services in three sympatric species of aerially foraging insectivorous birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Orłowski

    Full Text Available Farming activity severely impacts the invertebrate food resources of farmland birds, with direct mortality to populations of above-ground arthropods thorough mechanical damage during crop harvests. In this study we assessed the effects of phenological periods, including the timing of harvest, on the composition and biomass of prey consumed by three species of aerial insectivorous birds. Common Swifts Apus apus, Barn Swallows Hirundo rustica and House Martins Delichon urbica breed sympatrically and most of their diet is obtained from agricultural sources of invertebrate prey, especially from oil-seed rape crops. We categorized invertebrate prey into six functional groups, including oil-seed rape pests; pests of other arable crops; other crop-provisioned taxa; coprophilous taxa; and taxa living in non-crop and mixed crop/non-crop habitats. Seasonality impacted functional groups differently, but the general direction of change (increase/decrease of all groups was consistent as indexed by prey composition of the three aerial insectivores studied here. After the oil-seed rape crop harvest (mid July, all three species exhibited a dietary shift from oil-seed rape insect pests to other aerial invertebrate prey groups. However, Common Switfts also consumed a relative large quantity of oil-seed rape insect pests in the late summer (August, suggesting that they could reduce pest insect emigration beyond the host plant/crop. Since these aerially foraging insectivorous birds operate in specific conditions and feed on specific pest resources unavailable to foliage/ground foraging avian predators, our results suggest that in some crops like oil-seed rape cultivations, the potential integration of the insectivory of aerial foraging birds into pest management schemes might provide economic benefits. We advise further research into the origin of airborne insects and the role of aerial insectivores as agents of the biological control of crop insect pests

  3. Fully reflective photon sieve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenbo; Hu, Yongxiang; MacDonnell, David G.; Kim, Hyun Jung; Weimer, Carl; Baize, Rosemary R.

    2018-02-01

    Photon sieves (PS) have many applications and various designs in focusing light. However, a traditional PS only has a light transmissivity up to ∼25% and a focusing efficiency up to ∼7%, which hinder the application of them in many fields, especially for satellite remote sensing. To overcome these inherent drawbacks of traditional PSs, a concept of reflective photon sieve is developed in this work. This reflective photon sieve is based on a transparent membrane backed by a mirror. The transparent membrane is optimally a fully transparent material sheet with given refractive index and designed geometric thickness which has an optical thickness of a quarter incident wavelength (i.e. an anti-reflective coating). The PS-patterned pinholes are made on the transparent membrane. The design makes the light reflected from pinholes and that from zones of membrane material have 180° phase difference. Thus, light incident on this optical device is reflected and focused on its focal point. This device can have a reflectivity of ∼100% and a focusing efficiency of ∼50% based on numerical simulation. This device functions similar to a concave focusing mirror but can preserve the phase feature of light (such as that for the light with orbital angular momentum). It also has excellent wavelength-dependent property, which can exclude most of the undesired light from the focal point. A thin sheet of this component can perform the joint function of lenses and gratings/etalons in the optical path of a remote sensing system, thus is suitable for controling/filtering light in compact instruments such as satellite sensors. This concept is validated by the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) modeling and a lab prototype in this study.

  4. Finite Higgs mass without Supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Quirós, Mariano

    2001-01-01

    We identify a class of chiral models where the one-loop effective potential for Higgs scalar fields is finite without any requirement of supersymmetry. It corresponds to the case where the Higgs fields are identified with the components of a gauge field along compactified extra dimensions. We present a six dimensional model with gauge group U(3)xU(3) and quarks and leptons accomodated in fundamental and bi-fundamental representations. The model can be embedded in a D-brane configuration of type I string theory and, upon compactification on a T^2/Z_2 orbifold, it gives rise to the standard model with two Higgs doublets.

  5. Finite Discrete Gabor Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Peter Lempel

    2007-01-01

    on the real line to be well approximated by finite and discrete Gabor frames. This method of approximation is especially attractive because efficient numerical methods exists for doing computations with finite, discrete Gabor systems. This thesis presents new algorithms for the efficient computation of finite......, discrete Gabor coefficients. Reconstruction of a signal from its Gabor coefficients is done by the use of a so-called dual window. This thesis presents a number of iterative algorithms to compute dual and self-dual windows. The Linear Time Frequency Toolbox is a Matlab/Octave/C toolbox for doing basic...... discrete time/frequency and Gabor analysis. It is intended to be both an educational and a computational tool. The toolbox was developed as part of this Ph.D. project to provide a solid foundation for the field of computational Gabor analysis....

  6. Theory of reflection reflection and transmission of electromagnetic, particle and acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lekner, John

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with the reflection of electromagnetic and particle waves by interfaces. The interfaces can be sharp or diffuse. The topics of the book contain absorption, inverse problems, anisotropy, pulses and finite beams, rough surfaces, matrix methods, numerical methods,  reflection of particle waves and neutron reflection. Exact general results are presented, followed by long wave reflection, variational theory, reflection amplitude equations of the Riccati type, and reflection of short waves. The Second Edition of the Theory of Reflection is an updated and much enlarged revision of the 1987 monograph. There are new chapters on periodically stratified media, ellipsometry, chiral media, neutron reflection and reflection of acoustic waves. The chapter on anisotropy is much extended, with a complete treatment of the reflection and transmission properties of arbitrarily oriented uniaxial crystals. The book gives a systematic and unified treatment reflection and transmission of electromagnetic and particle...

  7. Finite elements simulation of reflective cracking in asphaltic overlays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scarpas, A.; De Bondt, A.H.

    1996-01-01

    Overlaying is one of the most popular and cost effective techniques of rehabilitation of cracked pavements. The placing of reinforcement between the overlay and the top layer of the cracked pavement is currently being utilised as a possible technique for delaying the development of cracks into the

  8. Reflectance Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Cooper, K.; Randolph, M.

    1984-01-01

    A classical description of the one dimensional radiative transfer treatment of vegetation canopies was completed and the results were tested against measured prairie (blue grama) and agricultural canopies (soybean). Phase functions are calculated in terms of directly measurable biophysical characteristics of the canopy medium. While the phase functions tend to exhibit backscattering anisotropy, their exact behavior is somewhat more complex and wavelength dependent. A Monte Carlo model was developed that treats soil surfaces with large periodic variations in three dimensions. A photon-ray tracing technology is used. Currently, the rough soil surface is described by analytic functions and appropriate geometric calculations performed. A bidirectional reflectance distribution function is calculated and, hence, available for other atmospheric or canopy reflectance models as a lower boundary condition. This technique is used together with an adding model to calculate several cases where Lambertian leaves possessing anisotropic leaf angle distributions yield non-Lambertian reflectance; similar behavior is exhibited for simulated soil surfaces.

  9. Reflections on the international climate change negotiations: A synthesis of a working group on carbon emission policy and regulation in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucon, Oswaldo; Romeiro, Viviane; Pacca, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    This short communication presents a synthesis of a Working Group on Carbon Emission Policy and Regulation held at the University of Sao Paulo, in Brazil. The document looked at the problems with the international negotiations, the options for Brazil as it attempts to control emissions, and ways to leverage the mitigation process. Several options are currently being proposed, but these are neither clear in order to support a solid polycentric approach with adequate metrics, nor a robust international coordination and a sound scientific communication. Brazil has a central role in this process, for having successful initiatives on renewable energy and deforestation control. Its leadership can demonstrate how such policies might take shape. However, the country´s future is uncertain in terms of low carbon development. Although the country is still well positioned among BRICS to find practical solutions to the stalemate in international cooperation, several internal challenges need to be harmonized. - Highlights: • The work presents results of a recent climate change mitigation policies workshop. • It assesses Brazil's potential role in shaping future policies and negotiations. • Policies are evaluated based on domestic and international effects. • Suggests how Brazil's national effort could leverage the international processes

  10. Reflective optics

    CERN Document Server

    Korsch, Dietrich

    1991-01-01

    This is the first book dedicated exclusively to all-reflective imaging systems. It is a teaching tool as well as a practical design tool for anyone who specializes in optics, particularly for those interested in telescopes, infrared, and grazing-incidence systems. The first part of the book describes a unified geometric optical theory of all-reflective imaging systems (from near-normal to grazing incidence) developed from basic principles. The second part discusses correction methods and a multitude of closed-form solutions of well-corrected systems, supplemented with many conventional and unc

  11. Finite Unification: Theory and Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Heinemeyer, S; Zoupanos, G

    2010-01-01

    All-loop Finite Unified Theories (FUTs) are very interesting N=1 supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) which not only realise an old field theoretic dream but also have a remarkable predictive power due to the required reduction of couplings. The reduction of the dimensionless couplings in N=1 GUTs is achieved by searching for renormalization group invariant (RGI) relations among them holding beyond the unification scale. Finiteness results from the fact that there exist RGI relations among dimensionless couplings that guarantee the vanishing of all beta-functions in certain N=1 GUTs even to all orders. Furthermore developments in the soft supersymmetry breaking sector of N=1 GUTs and FUTs lead to exact RGI relations, i.e. reduction of couplings, in this dimensionful sector of the theory too. Based on the above theoretical framework phenomenologically consistent FUTS have been constructed. Here we present FUT models based on the SU(5) and SU(3)^3 gauge groups and their predictions. Of particular intere...

  12. Undecidability and finite automata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endrullis, Jörg; Shallit, Jeffrey; Smith, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Using a novel rewriting problem, we show that several natural decision problems about finite automata are undecidable (i.e., recursively unsolvable). In contrast, we also prove three related problems are decidable. We apply one result to prove the undecidability of a related problem about

  13. Robust RBF Finite Automata

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šorel, Michal; Šíma, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 62, - (2004), s. 93-110 ISSN 0925-2312 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB2030007; GA MŠk LN00A056 Keywords : radial basis function * neural network * finite automaton * Boolean circuit * computational power Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.641, year: 2004

  14. Inside finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Weiser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    All relevant implementation aspects of finite element methods are discussed in this book. The focus is on algorithms and data structures as well as on their concrete implementation. Theory is covered as far as it gives insight into the construction of algorithms. Throughout the exercises a complete FE-solver for scalar 2D problems will be implemented in Matlab/Octave.

  15. Finite unified models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapetanakis, D. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Mondragon, M. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Zoupanos, G. (National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece). Physics Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    We present phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the case of two models with three families the top quark mass is predicted to be 178.8 GeV. (orig.)

  16. Finite unified models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakis, D.; Mondragon, M.; Zoupanos, G.

    1993-01-01

    We present phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the case of two models with three families the top quark mass is predicted to be 178.8 GeV. (orig.)

  17. Finiteness and GUTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakis, D.; Mondragon, M.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown how to obtain phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. A very interesting feature of the models with three families is that they predict the top quark mass to be around 178 GeV. 16 refs

  18. Personal Reflections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 1. Jochen and Werner Heisenberg. Personal Reflections Volume 10 Issue 1 January 2005 pp 93-96. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/010/01/0093-0096. Resonance – Journal of ...

  19. PERSONAL REFLECTIONS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Resonance journal of science education. April 2015 Volume 20 Number 4. GENERALARTICLES ... Development of. Probability Theory. K B Athreya. Classroom. Tutorial on Phyloge- netic Inference –1. Felix Bast. 360. 346. 286. PERSONAL REFLECTIONS. 368 The Road to IISc. M L Munjal (Transcribed by Maneesh Kunte).

  20. Reflections on Conformal Spectra

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    We use modular invariance and crossing symmetry of conformal field theory to reveal approximate reflection symmetries in the spectral decompositions of the partition function in two dimensions in the limit of large central charge and of the four-point function in any dimension in the limit of large scaling dimensions Δ0 of external operators. We use these symmetries to motivate universal upper bounds on the spectrum and the operator product expansion coefficients, which we then derive by independent techniques. Some of the bounds for four-point functions are valid for finite Δ0 as well as for large Δ0. We discuss a similar symmetry in a large spacetime dimension limit. Finally, we comment on the analogue of the Cardy formula and sparse light spectrum condition for the four-point function. (based on 1510.08772 with Kim & Ooguri). This seminar will be given via videolink

  1. Nonlinear, finite deformation, finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhung; Waas, Anthony M.

    2016-06-01

    The roles of the consistent Jacobian matrix and the material tangent moduli, which are used in nonlinear incremental finite deformation mechanics problems solved using the finite element method, are emphasized in this paper, and demonstrated using the commercial software ABAQUS standard. In doing so, the necessity for correctly employing user material subroutines to solve nonlinear problems involving large deformation and/or large rotation is clarified. Starting with the rate form of the principle of virtual work, the derivations of the material tangent moduli, the consistent Jacobian matrix, the stress/strain measures, and the objective stress rates are discussed and clarified. The difference between the consistent Jacobian matrix (which, in the ABAQUS UMAT user material subroutine is referred to as DDSDDE) and the material tangent moduli ( C e ) needed for the stress update is pointed out and emphasized in this paper. While the former is derived based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress, the latter is derived using the Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress. Understanding the difference between these two objective stress rates is crucial for correctly implementing a constitutive model, especially a rate form constitutive relation, and for ensuring fast convergence. Specifically, the implementation requires the stresses to be updated correctly. For this, the strains must be computed directly from the deformation gradient and corresponding strain measure (for a total form model). Alternatively, the material tangent moduli derived from the corresponding Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress of the constitutive relation (for a rate form model) should be used. Given that this requirement is satisfied, the consistent Jacobian matrix only influences the rate of convergence. Its derivation should be based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress to ensure fast convergence; however, the use of a different objective stress rate may also be possible. The error associated

  2. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.W. de.

    1986-01-01

    The consequences of the incorporation of finite temperature effects in fields theories are investigated. Particularly, we consider the sypersymmetric non-linear sigma model, calculating the effective potencial in the large N limit. Initially, we present the 1/N expantion formalism and, for the O(N) model of scalar field, we show the impossibility of spontaneous symmetry breaking. Next, we study the same model at finite temperature and in the presence of conserved charges (the O(N) symmetry's generator). We conclude that these conserved charges explicitly break the symmetry. We introduce a calculation method for the thermodynamic potential of the theory in the presence of chemical potentials. We present an introduction to Supersymmetry in the aim of describing some important concepts for the treatment at T>0. We show that Suppersymmetry is broken for any T>0, in opposition to what one expects, by the solution of the Hierachy Problem. (author) [pt

  3. Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.R. Ghoreishy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This research work is devoted to the footprint analysis of a steel-belted radial tyre (185/65R14 under vertical static load using finite element method. Two models have been developed in which in the first model the tread patterns were replaced by simple ribs while the second model was consisted of details of the tread blocks. Linear elastic and hyper elastic (Arruda-Boyce material models were selected to describe the mechanical behavior of the reinforcing and rubbery parts, respectively. The above two finite element models of the tyre were analyzed under inflation pressure and vertical static loads. The second model (with detailed tread patterns was analyzed with and without friction effect between tread and contact surfaces. In every stage of the analysis, the results were compared with the experimental data to confirm the accuracy and applicability of the model. Results showed that neglecting the tread pattern design not only reduces the computational cost and effort but also the differences between computed deformations do not show significant changes. However, more complicated variables such as shape and area of the footprint zone and contact pressure are affected considerably by the finite element model selected for the tread blocks. In addition, inclusion of friction even in static state changes these variables significantly.

  4. Reflection: A Casualty of Modularisation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadman, Kate; Clack, Elaine; Lethbridge, Zena; Millward, Jennifer; Morris, Jenny; Redwood, Rachel

    2003-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey of 54 nursing lecturers and 244 students using modularized curriculum and analysis of curriculum documentation indicated that only 3 of 13 modules refer explicitly to reflective practice. Students identified lectures and group work as strategies for learning reflection; lecturers cited tutorials, groups, and cases. Most…

  5. Reflection and absorption coefficients for use in room acoustic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Two ideas to improve the boundary conditions for room acoustic simulations are presented. First, all rooms have finite boundary surfaces, thereby a reflection coefficient for finite surfaces should be physically more suitable than that for infinitely large surfaces. Second, absorption coefficients...

  6. Finite element reliability analysis of fatigue life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, H.H.; Belytschko, T.; Liu, W.K.

    1992-01-01

    Fatigue reliability is addressed by the first-order reliability method combined with a finite element method. Two-dimensional finite element models of components with cracks in mode I are considered with crack growth treated by the Paris law. Probability density functions of the variables affecting fatigue are proposed to reflect a setting where nondestructive evaluation is used, and the Rosenblatt transformation is employed to treat non-Gaussian random variables. Comparisons of the first-order reliability results and Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the accuracy of the first-order reliability method is quite good in this setting. Results show that the upper portion of the initial crack length probability density function is crucial to reliability, which suggests that if nondestructive evaluation is used, the probability of detection curve plays a key role in reliability. (orig.)

  7. Reflective Writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenkiel Jørgensen, Andriette

    2016-01-01

    In Breve fra min Have (Letters from my Garden), the Swedish landscape architect, Sven-Ingvar Andersson, produces dialogues about his garden to a wide circle of friends, colleagues, deceased and still living acquaintances such as Karen Blixen, Gertrude Stein, C. Th. Sørensen, Albrecht Dürer, Peter...... Høeg etetera. The dialogues work as a tool of reflection in terms of providing opportunity to examine his own beliefs, to explore the possible reasons for engaging in a particular activity. On the basis of Sven-Ingvar Andersson’s book a teaching program at the Aarhus School of Architecture provides...

  8. Inspiring Reflections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchie, Mammo

    2011-01-01

    A numberof Chris Freeman's colleagues were asked to reflect on what they thought describes his life and work in a few words. Some of the colleagues replied including former SPRU students that were taught or supervised by Chris Freeman. Their views on what they thought were Chris Freeman's defining...... life is not free from fluctuations, cycles, disruptions, crises and destructions both human and ecological. Innovation research ought to position itself to address environmental, financial and economic crises. The third is innovation research for development by addressing not only poverty erdaication...

  9. Reflective Questioning in Management Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge C. M. van Seggelen-Damen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Reflective questioning is a critical activity in management learning and education. This article describes research on the nature of reflective questioning in groups of management students working on final MSc projects. Drawing on content analysis of recorded meetings, we identify the following key dimensions of reflective questioning: provocation, need for cognition, epistemology, locus of cognition, logic, heuristics, level of abstraction, and cognitive complexity. The data suggest that individual reflection by students and collective reflection in group meetings are highly complementary in management education. In particular, individual reflection by students combined with meetings that support and provoke collective reflection may create substantial synergies between individual and collective learning. We also discuss the implications of these findings for management education.

  10. Profinite graphs and groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ribes, Luis

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a detailed introduction to graph theoretic methods in profinite groups and applications to abstract groups. It is the first to provide a comprehensive treatment of the subject. The author begins by carefully developing relevant notions in topology, profinite groups and homology, including free products of profinite groups, cohomological methods in profinite groups, and fixed points of automorphisms of free pro-p groups. The final part of the book is dedicated to applications of the profinite theory to abstract groups, with sections on finitely generated subgroups of free groups, separability conditions in free and amalgamated products, and algorithms in free groups and finite monoids. Profinite Graphs and Groups will appeal to students and researchers interested in profinite groups, geometric group theory, graphs and connections with the theory of formal languages. A complete reference on the subject, the book includes historical and bibliographical notes as well as a discussion of open quest...

  11. Free Fermions and the Classical Compact Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunden, Fabio Deelan; Mezzadri, Francesco; O'Connell, Neil

    2018-04-01

    There is a close connection between the ground state of non-interacting fermions in a box with classical (absorbing, reflecting, and periodic) boundary conditions and the eigenvalue statistics of the classical compact groups. The associated determinantal point processes can be extended in two natural directions: (i) we consider the full family of admissible quantum boundary conditions (i.e., self-adjoint extensions) for the Laplacian on a bounded interval, and the corresponding projection correlation kernels; (ii) we construct the grand canonical extensions at finite temperature of the projection kernels, interpolating from Poisson to random matrix eigenvalue statistics. The scaling limits in the bulk and at the edges are studied in a unified framework, and the question of universality is addressed. Whether the finite temperature determinantal processes correspond to the eigenvalue statistics of some matrix models is, a priori, not obvious. We complete the picture by constructing a finite temperature extension of the Haar measure on the classical compact groups. The eigenvalue statistics of the resulting grand canonical matrix models (of random size) corresponds exactly to the grand canonical measure of free fermions with classical boundary conditions.

  12. Combinatorics of finite sets

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Coherent treatment provides comprehensive view of basic methods and results of the combinatorial study of finite set systems. The Clements-Lindstrom extension of the Kruskal-Katona theorem to multisets is explored, as is the Greene-Kleitman result concerning k-saturated chain partitions of general partially ordered sets. Connections with Dilworth's theorem, the marriage problem, and probability are also discussed. Each chapter ends with a helpful series of exercises and outline solutions appear at the end. ""An excellent text for a topics course in discrete mathematics."" - Bulletin of the Ame

  13. Optical Finite Element Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, David; Taylor, Bradley K.

    1986-01-01

    A new high-accuracy optical linear algebra processor (OLAP) with many advantageous features is described. It achieves floating point accuracy, handles bipolar data by sign-magnitude representation, performs LU decomposition using only one channel, easily partitions and considers data flow. A new application (finite element (FE) structural analysis) for OLAPs is introduced and the results of a case study presented. Error sources in encoded OLAPs are addressed for the first time. Their modeling and simulation are discussed and quantitative data are presented. Dominant error sources and the effects of composite error sources are analyzed.

  14. Wave grouping measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansard, E.; Sand, S.E.; Klinting, P.

    1989-02-01

    There are recent indications that distinct wave groupings can be found even in deep water. The main objective has been to give a statistical description suitable for the design of coastal and offshore structures and it is undertaken to make further investigations in this field by analyzing some prototype records using the concepts of run length of high waves and spectrum of squared elevation, the limitations and performances of which in nonlinear waves will be highlighted in this study. An attempt has been made to relate this wave grouping to the surge motion of a floating structure with a simple mooring arrangement and thereby to propose a motion-based grouping measure. It appears that the observed run length statistics can be suitably described by Kimura's predictions if the records are sufficiently long. Records whose duration are equal to, or less than, 0.6 h reflect a large statistical variability in the various wave grouping measures. The filter cut-off proposed in the concept of SIWEH for the estimation of Groupiness Factor appears to be too high to give meaningful contrasts with respect to prototype values of the peakedness factors. It is therefore proposed to use the Hilbert Transform of the time series and a cut-off which is relevant to the natural period of the test structure. In the absence of information about this natural period a cut-off fc less than or equal to f/sub p//15 may work better. The motion equivalent groupiness factor concept could be used effectively to determine the critical sea state conditions to be used for testing of floating structures. The directional resolution of the sea state and theoretical formulations defining statistical variabilities caused by finite record lengths could be useful in evaluating whether the wave grouping is a linear process. (AB) 49 refs.

  15. Finiteness of corner vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Jiten C.; Biswas, Sougata; Panda, Swapnendu

    2018-04-01

    Till date, the sequence of vortices present in the solid corners of steady internal viscous incompressible flows was thought to be infinite. However, the already existing and most recent geometric theories on incompressible viscous flows that express vortical structures in terms of critical points in bounded domains indicate a strong opposition to this notion of infiniteness. In this study, we endeavor to bridge the gap between the two opposing stream of thoughts by diagnosing the assumptions of the existing theorems on such vortices. We provide our own set of proofs for establishing the finiteness of the sequence of corner vortices by making use of the continuum hypothesis and Kolmogorov scale, which guarantee a nonzero scale for the smallest vortex structure possible in incompressible viscous flows. We point out that the notion of infiniteness resulting from discrete self-similarity of the vortex structures is not physically feasible. Making use of some elementary concepts of mathematical analysis and our own construction of diametric disks, we conclude that the sequence of corner vortices is finite.

  16. Reflected Glory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The nebula Messier 78 takes centre stage in this image taken with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, while the stars powering the bright display take a backseat. The brilliant starlight ricochets off dust particles in the nebula, illuminating it with scattered blue light. Igor Chekalin was the overall winner of ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition with his image of this stunning object. Messier 78 is a fine example of a reflection nebula. The ultraviolet radiation from the stars that illuminate it is not intense enough to ionise the gas to make it glow - its dust particles simply reflect the starlight that falls on them. Despite this, Messier 78 can easily be observed with a small telescope, being one of the brightest reflection nebulae in the sky. It lies about 1350 light-years away in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter) and can be found northeast of the easternmost star of Orion's belt. This new image of Messier 78 from the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory is based on data selected by Igor Chekalin in his winning entry to the Hidden Treasures competition [1]. The pale blue tint seen in the nebula in this picture is an accurate representation of its dominant colour. Blue hues are commonly seen in reflection nebulae because of the way the starlight is scattered by the tiny dust particles that they contain: the shorter wavelength of blue light is scattered more efficiently than the longer wavelength red light. This image contains many other striking features apart from the glowing nebula. A thick band of obscuring dust stretches across the image from the upper left to the lower right, blocking the light from background stars. In the bottom right corner, many curious pink structures are also visible, which are created by jets of material being ejected from stars that have recently formed and are still buried deep in dust clouds. Two bright stars, HD 38563A and

  17. Probability groups as orbits of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattarai, H.N.

    2003-11-01

    The set of double cosets of a group with respect to a subgroup and the set of orbits of a group with respect to a group of automorphisms have structures which can be studied as multigroups, hypergroups or Pasch geometries. When the subgroup or the group of automorphisms are finite, the multivalued products can be provided with some weightages forming so-called Probability Groups. It is shown in this paper that some abstract probability groups can be realized as orbit spaces of groups. (author)

  18. The chainable continua are the spaces approximated by finite COTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy A. Kennedy

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available We show that the chainable continua (also called snake-like or arc-likecontinua, are precisely the Hausdorff reflections of inverse limits of sequences of finite COTS under maps which are continuous and are separating.

  19. Uniqueness in inverse elastic scattering with finitely many incident waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elschner, Johannes; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    We consider the third and fourth exterior boundary value problems of linear isotropic elasticity and present uniqueness results for the corresponding inverse scattering problems with polyhedral-type obstacles and a finite number of incident plane elastic waves. Our approach is based on a reflection principle for the Navier equation. (orig.)

  20. The Determining Finite Automata Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Vinogradova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of formal languages widely uses finite state automata both in implementation of automata-based approach to programming, and in synthesis of logical control algorithms.To ensure unambiguous operation of the algorithms, the synthesized finite state automata must be deterministic. Within the approach to the synthesis of the mobile robot controls, for example, based on the theory of formal languages, there are problems concerning the construction of various finite automata, but such finite automata, as a rule, will not be deterministic. The algorithm of determinization can be applied to the finite automata, as specified, in various ways. The basic ideas of the algorithm of determinization can be most simply explained using the representations of a finite automaton in the form of a weighted directed graph.The paper deals with finite automata represented as weighted directed graphs, and discusses in detail the procedure for determining the finite automata represented in this way. Gives a detailed description of the algorithm for determining finite automata. A large number of examples illustrate a capability of the determinization algorithm.

  1. Alternating groups as a quotient of

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qaiser Mushtaq

    2018-03-19

    Mar 19, 2018 ... Abstract. In this study, we developed an algorithm to find the homomorphisms of the Picard group PSL(2, Z[i]) into a finite group G. This algorithm is helpful to find a homomorphism (if it is possible) of the Picard group to any finite group of order less than. 15! because of the limitations of the GAP and ...

  2. Permutation representations of the orbits of the automorphism group ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Finite Abelian groups; finite group actions; automorphism orbits; modules over discrete valuation rings; endomorphism algebras; permutation representations; ... Manuscript revised: 28 January 2016; Accepted: 29 January 2016; Early published: Unedited version published online: Final version published online: 15 April ...

  3. Statistical finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaji, Iman; Rahemifar, Kaamran; Samani, Abbas

    2008-01-01

    A novel technique is introduced for tissue deformation and stress analysis. Compared to the conventional Finite Element method, this technique is orders of magnitude faster and yet still very accurate. The proposed technique uses preprocessed data obtained from FE analyses of a number of similar objects in a Statistical Shape Model framework as described below. This technique takes advantage of the fact that the body organs have limited variability, especially in terms of their geometry. As such, it is well suited for calculating tissue displacements of body organs. The proposed technique can be applied in many biomedical applications such as image guided surgery, or virtual reality environment development where tissue behavior is simulated for training purposes.

  4. Planar Reflection of Gaseous Detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damazo, Jason Scott

    Pipes containing flammable gaseous mixtures may be subjected to internal detonation. When the detonation normally impinges on a closed end, a reflected shock wave is created to bring the flow back to rest. This study built on the work of Karnesky (2010) and examined deformation of thin-walled stainless steel tubes subjected to internal reflected gaseous detonations. A ripple pattern was observed in the tube wall for certain fill pressures, and a criterion was developed that predicted when the ripple pattern would form. A two-dimensional finite element analysis was performed using Johnson-Cook material properties; the pressure loading created by reflected gaseous detonations was accounted for with a previously developed pressure model. The residual plastic strain between experiments and computations was in good agreement. During the examination of detonation-driven deformation, discrepancies were discovered in our understanding of reflected gaseous detonation behavior. Previous models did not accurately describe the nature of the reflected shock wave, which motivated further experiments in a detonation tube with optical access. Pressure sensors and schlieren images were used to examine reflected shock behavior, and it was determined that the discrepancies were related to the reaction zone thickness extant behind the detonation front. During these experiments reflected shock bifurcation did not appear to occur, but the unfocused visualization system made certainty impossible. This prompted construction of a focused schlieren system that investigated possible shock wave-boundary layer interaction, and heat-flux gauges analyzed the boundary layer behind the detonation front. Using these data with an analytical boundary layer solution, it was determined that the strong thermal boundary layer present behind the detonation front inhibits the development of reflected shock wave bifurcation.

  5. Graded associative conformal algebras of finite type

    OpenAIRE

    Kolesnikov, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider graded associative conformal algebras. The class of these objects includes pseudo-algebras over non-cocommutative Hopf algebras of regular functions on some linear algebraic groups. In particular, an associative conformal algebra which is graded by a finite group $\\Gamma $ is a pseudo-algebra over the coordinate Hopf algebra of a linear algebraic group $G$ such that the identity component $G^0$ is the affine line and $G/G^0\\simeq \\Gamma $. A classification of simple...

  6. Axial anomaly at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, S.; Gupte, Neelima; Srinivasan, V.

    1985-01-01

    The Jackiw-Bardeen-Adler anomaly for QED 4 and QED 2 are calculated at finite temperature. It is found that the anomaly is independent of temperature. Ishikawa's method [1984, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 53 1615] for calculating the quantised Hall effect is extended to finite temperature. (author)

  7. Solution of Finite Element Equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    An important step in solving any problem by the finite element method is the solution of the global equations. Numerical solution of linear equations is a subject covered in most courses in numerical analysis. However, the equations encountered in most finite element applications have some special...... features that justify the development of specialized solution algorithms....

  8. Finite strain discrete dislocation plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshpande, VS; Needleman, A; Van der Giessen, E

    2003-01-01

    A framework for carrying out finite deformation discrete dislocation plasticity calculations is presented. The discrete dislocations are presumed to be adequately represented by the singular linear elastic fields so that the large deformations near dislocation cores are not modeled. The finite

  9. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Today\\'s large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Bragg Reflection Waveguide: Anti-Mirror Reflection and Light Slowdown

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlov, G. G.; Zapasskii, V. S.; Kapitonov, Yu. V.; Ovsyankin, V. V.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the light group velocity reduction in dielectric Bragg reflection waveguide structures (SiO$_2$/TiO$_2$) in the vicinity of the cutoff frequency is studied experimentally. The effect of anti-mirror reflection, specific for the Bragg reflection waveguides, is described and employed for detection of "slow light". The experiments were performed with the use of the Ti:sapphire laser pulses ~ 100 fs in length. The group index $n_g \\sim$ 30 with a fractional pulse delay (normalized to...

  11. A Reflective Look at Reflecting Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pender, Rebecca L.; Stinchfield, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    This article reviewed existing literature and research on the reflecting team process. There is a dearth of empirical research that explores the reflecting team process and the outcome of counseling that uses reflecting teams. Implications of using reflecting teams for counselors, counselor educators, and clients will be discussed. A call for…

  12. Finite element and finite difference methods in electromagnetic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, MA

    2013-01-01

    This second volume in the Progress in Electromagnetic Research series examines recent advances in computational electromagnetics, with emphasis on scattering, as brought about by new formulations and algorithms which use finite element or finite difference techniques. Containing contributions by some of the world's leading experts, the papers thoroughly review and analyze this rapidly evolving area of computational electromagnetics. Covering topics ranging from the new finite-element based formulation for representing time-harmonic vector fields in 3-D inhomogeneous media using two coupled sca

  13. Dynamical Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paldus, Josef

    The well known symmetry (invariance, degeneracy) dynamical groups or algebras of quantum mechanical Hamiltonians provide quantum numbers (conservation laws, integrals of motion) for state labeling and the associated selection rules. In addition, it is often advantageous to employ much larger groups, referred to as the dynamical groups (noninvariance groups, dynamical algebras, spectrum generating algebras), which may or may not be the invariance groups of the studied system [4.1,2,3,4,5,6,7]. In all known cases, they are Lie groups (LGs), or rather corresponding Lie algebras (LAs), and one usually requires that all states of interest of a system be contained in a single irreducible representation (irrep). Likewise, one may require that the Hamiltonian be expressible in terms of the Casimir operators of the corresponding universal enveloping algebra [4.8,9]. In a weaker sense, one regards any group (or corresponding algebra) as a dynamical group if the Hamiltonian can be expressed in terms of its generators [4.10,11,12]. In nuclear physics, one sometimes distinguishes exact (baryon number preserving), almost exact (e.g., total isospin), approximate (e.g., SU(3) of the "eightfold way") and model (e.g., nuclear shell model) dynamical symmetries [4.13]. The dynamical groups of interest in atomic and molecular physics can be conveniently classified by their topological characteristic of compactness. Noncompact LGs (LAs) generally arise in simple problems involving an infinite number of bound states, while those involving a finite number of bound states (e.g., molecular vibrations or ab initio models of electronic structure) exploit compact LG's.

  14. Finite discrete field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Manoelito M. de

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the physical meaning and the geometric interpretation of implementation in classical field theories. The origin of infinities and other inconsistencies in field theories is traced to fields defined with support on the light cone; a finite and consistent field theory requires a light-cone generator as the field support. Then, we introduce a classical field theory with support on the light cone generators. It results on a description of discrete (point-like) interactions in terms of localized particle-like fields. We find the propagators of these particle-like fields and discuss their physical meaning, properties and consequences. They are conformally invariant, singularity-free, and describing a manifestly covariant (1 + 1)-dimensional dynamics in a (3 = 1) spacetime. Remarkably this conformal symmetry remains even for the propagation of a massive field in four spacetime dimensions. We apply this formalism to Classical electrodynamics and to the General Relativity Theory. The standard formalism with its distributed fields is retrieved in terms of spacetime average of the discrete field. Singularities are the by-products of the averaging process. This new formalism enlighten the meaning and the problem of field theory, and may allow a softer transition to a quantum theory. (author)

  15. Social exclusion in finite populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Cong, Rui; Wu, Te; Wang, Long

    2015-04-01

    Social exclusion, keeping free riders from benefit sharing, plays an important role in sustaining cooperation in our world. Here we propose two different exclusion regimes, namely, peer exclusion and pool exclusion, to investigate the evolution of social exclusion in finite populations. In the peer exclusion regime, each excluder expels all the defectors independently, and thus bears the total cost on his own, while in the pool exclusion regime, excluders spontaneously form an institution to carry out rejection of the free riders, and each excluder shares the cost equally. In a public goods game containing only excluders and defectors, it is found that peer excluders outperform pool excluders if the exclusion costs are small, and the situation is converse once the exclusion costs exceed some critical points, which holds true for all the selection intensities and different update rules. Moreover, excluders can dominate the whole population under a suitable parameters range in the presence of second-order free riders (cooperators), showing that exclusion has prominent advantages over common costly punishment. More importantly, our finding indicates that the group exclusion mechanism helps the cooperative union to survive under unfavorable conditions. Our results may give some insights into better understanding the prevalence of such a strategy in the real world and its significance in sustaining cooperation.

  16. On some homological functors of Bieberbach group of dimension four with dihedral point group of order eight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Siti Afiqah; Ali, Nor Muhainiah Mohd; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Idrus, Nor'ashiqin Mohd; Masri, Rohaidah

    2014-06-01

    A Bieberbach group is a torsion free crystallographic group, which is an extension of a free abelian group of finite rank by a finite point group, while homological functors of a group include nonabelian tensor square, exterior square and Schur Multiplier. In this paper, some homological functors of a Bieberbach group of dimension four with dihedral point group of order eight are computed.

  17. Finite Element Analysis of Honeycomb Impact Attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seung-Yong; Choi, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Nohyu

    To participate in Student Formula Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) competitions, it is necessary to build an impact attenuator that would give an average deceleration not to exceed 20g when it runs into a rigid wall. Students can use numerical simulations or experimental test data to show that their car satisfies this safety requirement. A student group to study formula cars at the Korea University of Technology and Education has designed a vehicle to take part in a SAE competition, and a honeycomb structure was adopted as the impact attenuator. In this paper, finite element calculations were carried out to investigate the dynamic behavior of the honeycomb attenuator. Deceleration and deformation behaviors were studied. Effect of the yield strength was checked by comparing the numerical results. ABAQUS/Explicit finite element code was used.

  18. quadratic spline finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bahadir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of heat transfer in a Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC thermistor, which may form one element of an electric circuit, is solved numerically by a finite element method. The approach used is based on Galerkin finite element using quadratic splines as shape functions. The resulting system of ordinary differential equations is solved by the finite difference method. Comparison is made with numerical and analytical solutions and the accuracy of the computed solutions indicates that the method is well suited for the solution of the PTC thermistor problem.

  19. Finite Size Scaling of Perceptron

    OpenAIRE

    Korutcheva, Elka; Tonchev, N.

    2000-01-01

    We study the first-order transition in the model of a simple perceptron with continuous weights and large, bit finite value of the inputs. Making the analogy with the usual finite-size physical systems, we calculate the shift and the rounding exponents near the transition point. In the case of a general perceptron with larger variety of inputs, the analysis only gives bounds for the exponents.

  20. Incompleteness in the finite domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2017), s. 405-441 ISSN 1079-8986 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : finite domain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bulletin-of-symbolic-logic/article/incompleteness-in-the-finite-domain/D239B1761A73DCA534A4805A76D81C76

  1. Programming the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, I M; Margetts, L

    2013-01-01

    Many students, engineers, scientists and researchers have benefited from the practical, programming-oriented style of the previous editions of Programming the Finite Element Method, learning how to develop computer programs to solve specific engineering problems using the finite element method. This new fifth edition offers timely revisions that include programs and subroutine libraries fully updated to Fortran 2003, which are freely available online, and provides updated material on advances in parallel computing, thermal stress analysis, plasticity return algorithms, convection boundary c

  2. Incompleteness in the finite domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2017), s. 405-441 ISSN 1079-8986 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : finite domain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/ journals /bulletin-of-symbolic-logic/article/incompleteness-in-the-finite-domain/D239B1761A73DCA534A4805A76D81C76

  3. Storytelling: A Guided Reflection Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Pamela L; Butell, Sue S; Epeneter, Beverly Jean; Langford, Cheryl Anne; Taylor, Jana Doughty

    2016-03-01

    Reflective practice is a mode of inquiry in the authors' baccalaureate nursing program. To increase students' ability to "think like a nurse," the Reflective Practice Storytelling Guide was developed to facilitate discussion during weekly clinical seminars in the students' final clinical course. To evaluate the effectiveness of this guided activity, students were asked to provide feedback to specific questions following each seminar when the reflective presence activity was utilized. Common themes emerged from the storytellers and the members of the group. Themes identified in the responses of the storytellers included role development and formation and the value of team support. Learning themes that emerged from the participants included communication, teamwork, clinical judgment, patient-centered care, use of resources, ethical and legal parameters in practice, and patient safety. Utilizing a guided reflection activity resulted in the students experiencing a broader, deeper understanding of reflective professional practice. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Algebraic topology of finite topological spaces and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Barmak, Jonathan A

    2011-01-01

    This volume deals with the theory of finite topological spaces and its relationship with the homotopy and simple homotopy theory of polyhedra. The interaction between their intrinsic combinatorial and topological structures makes finite spaces a useful tool for studying problems in Topology, Algebra and Geometry from a new perspective. In particular, the methods developed in this manuscript are used to study Quillen’s conjecture on the poset of p-subgroups of a finite group and the Andrews-Curtis conjecture on the 3-deformability of contractible two-dimensional complexes. This self-contained work constitutes the first detailed exposition on the algebraic topology of finite spaces. It is intended for topologists and combinatorialists, but it is also recommended for advanced undergraduate students and graduate students with a modest knowledge of Algebraic Topology.

  5. Introduction to quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Marco A.R.

    1994-01-01

    An elementary introduction to quantum groups is presented. The example of Universal Enveloping Algebra of deformed SU(2) is analysed in detail. It is also discussed systems made up of bosonic q-oscillators at finite temperature within the formalism of Thermo-Field Dynamics. (author). 39 refs

  6. Electrostatic stability of plasmas of finite length. General theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotsaftis, M.

    1967-02-01

    With the simple model of a plane geometry, taking into account the finite extension of the plasma along the magnetic field and the existence of a cold plasma between the hot plasma and exterior conducting plates, as well as the reflection of the particles at the mirrors, the curvature of the field lines and the density gradient, the equation for electrostatic perturbations, supposing β [fr

  7. A non-LEA sofic group

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We describe elementary examples of finitely presented sofic groups which are not residually amenable (and thus not initially subamenable or LEA, for short). We ask if an amalgam of two amenable groups over a finite subgroup is residually amenable and answer this positively for some special cases, including countable ...

  8. On Non-Commutative Rhotrix Groups over Finite Fields ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 30 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  9. Class-preserving automorphisms of some finite p-groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Deepak Gumber1 Mahak Sharma2. School of Mathematics and Computer Applications, Thapar University, Patiala 147 004, India; Department of Applied Sciences and Humanities, Baddi University of Emerging Sciences and Technology, Baddi 173 205, India ...

  10. Renormalization group analysis of quantum chromodynamics at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hirofumi.

    1988-03-01

    We re-investigate the behaviour of the effective coupling constant using the gauge invariant Wilson loop in Minkowsky space-time. The result tells us that the interaction of static q-q-bar pair becomes weak at high temperatures and at large distances. (author)

  11. Class-preserving automorphisms of some finite p-groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... We give necessary and sufficient conditions on such that has a non-inner class-preserving automorphism. ... office of Indian Academy of Sciences, including those of the staff, the journals, various programmes, and Current Science, has changed from 'ias.ernet.in' (or 'academy.ias.ernet.in') to 'ias.ac.in'.

  12. A note on 2-nilpotence of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Jiangtao Shi1 Cui Zhang1 2. School of Mathematics and Information Science, Yantai University, Yantai 264005, China; University of Primorska, IAM, Muzejski trg 2, 6000 Koper, Slovenia ...

  13. The Morava E-theories of finite general linear groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattafirri, Sara

    The feasibility of producing an image of radioactivity distribution within a patient or confined region of space using information carried by the gamma-rays emitted from the source is investigated. The imaging approach makes use of parameters related to the gamma-rays which undergo Compton scattering within a detection system, it does not involve the use of pin-holes, and it employs gamma-rays of energy ranging from a few hundreds of keVs to MeVs. Energy range of the photons and absence of pin-holes aim to provide larger pool of radioisotopes and larger efficiency than other emission imaging modalities, such as single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography, making it possible to investigate larger pool of functions and smaller radioactivity doses. The observables available to produce the image are the gamma-ray position of interaction and energy deposition during Compton scattering within the detection systems. Image reconstruction methodologies such as backprojection and list-mode maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm are characterized and applied to produce images of simulated and experimental sources on the basis of the observed parameters. Given the observables and image reconstruction methodologies, imaging systems based on minimizing the variation of the impulse response with position within the field of view are developed. The approach allows imaging of three-dimensional sources when an imaging system which provides full 4 pi view of the object is used and imaging of two-dimensional sources when a single block-type detector which provides one view of the object is used. Geometrical resolution of few millimeters is obtained at few centimeters from the detection system if employing gamma-rays of energy in the order of few hundreds of keVs and current state of the art semi-conductor detectors; At this level of resolution, detection efficiency is in the order of 10-3 at few centimeters from the detector when a single block detector few centimeters in size is used. The resolution significantly improves with increasing energy of the photons and it degrades roughly linearly with increasing distance from the detector; Larger detection efficiency can be obtained at the expenses of resolution or via targeted configurations of the detector. Results pave the way for image reconstruction of practical gamma-ray emitting sources.

  14. Solid finite elements through three decades

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesh, DN; Shrinivasa, U

    1994-01-01

    conventionally, solid finite elements have been looked upon as just generalizations of two-dimensional finite elements. In this article we trace their development starting from the days of their inception. Keeping in tune with our perceptions on developing finite elements, without taking recourse to any extra variational techniques, we discuss a few of the techniques which have been applied to solid finite elements. Finally we critically examine our own work on formulating solid finite elemen...

  15. Group theory I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Emil G

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Group Theory I includes sets and mapping, groupoids and semi-groups, groups, isomorphisms and homomorphisms, cyclic groups, the Sylow theorems, and finite p-groups.

  16. Finite element methods for engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Fenner, Roger T

    2013-01-01

    This book is intended as a textbook providing a deliberately simple introduction to finite element methods in a way that should be readily understandable to engineers, both students and practising professionals. Only the very simplest elements are considered, mainly two dimensional three-noded “constant strain triangles”, with simple linear variation of the relevant variables. Chapters of the book deal with structural problems (beams), classification of a broad range of engineering into harmonic and biharmonic types, finite element analysis of harmonic problems, and finite element analysis of biharmonic problems (plane stress and plane strain). Full Fortran programs are listed and explained in detail, and a range of practical problems solved in the text. Despite being somewhat unfashionable for general programming purposes, the Fortran language remains very widely used in engineering. The programs listed, which were originally developed for use on mainframe computers, have been thoroughly updated for use ...

  17. Sound radiation from finite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    A method to account for the effect of finite size in acoustic power radiation problem of planar surfaces using spatial windowing is developed. Cremer and Heckl presents a very useful formula for the power radiating from a structure using the spatially Fourier transformed velocity, which combined...... with spatially windowing of a plane waves can be used to take into account the finite size. In the present paper, this is developed by means of a radiation impedance for finite surfaces, that is used instead of the radiation impedance for infinite surfaces. In this way, the spatial windowing is included...... in the radiation formula directly, and no pre-windowing is needed. Examples are given for the radiation efficiency, and the results are compared with results found in the literature....

  18. Do writing and storytelling skill influence assessment of reflective ability in medical students' written reflections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Louise; Niehaus, Brian; DeVries, Charlie D; Siegel, Jennifer R; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2010-10-01

    Increasingly, students are asked to write reflections as part of their medical education, but some question the influence of other factors on the evaluation of these reflections. In this pilot study, the investigators determined whether scores from a validated rubric to measure reflective ability were affected by irrelevant variance resulting from writing or storytelling ability. Students in clerkships wrote reflections on professionalism. All were given identical prompts, with half receiving additional structured guidelines on reflection. Sixty reflections, 30 from each group, were randomly chosen and scored for reflection, writing, and storytelling by trained raters using validated rubrics. There was no correlation between reflection and either writing (r = 0.049, P = .35) or storytelling (r = 0.14, P = .13). The guidelines increased reflection, but not writing or storytelling scores. Reflection is a distinct construct unaffected by learners' writing or storytelling skills. These findings support reflective ability as a distinct skill.

  19. Finite connectivity attractor neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wemmenhove, B; Coolen, A C C

    2003-01-01

    We study a family of diluted attractor neural networks with a finite average number of (symmetric) connections per neuron. As in finite connectivity spin glasses, their equilibrium properties are described by order parameter functions, for which we derive an integral equation in replica symmetric approximation. A bifurcation analysis of this equation reveals the locations of the paramagnetic to recall and paramagnetic to spin-glass transition lines in the phase diagram. The line separating the retrieval phase from the spin-glass phase is calculated at zero temperature. All phase transitions are found to be continuous

  20. Finite connectivity attractor neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemmenhove, B.; Coolen, A. C. C.

    2003-09-01

    We study a family of diluted attractor neural networks with a finite average number of (symmetric) connections per neuron. As in finite connectivity spin glasses, their equilibrium properties are described by order parameter functions, for which we derive an integral equation in replica symmetric approximation. A bifurcation analysis of this equation reveals the locations of the paramagnetic to recall and paramagnetic to spin-glass transition lines in the phase diagram. The line separating the retrieval phase from the spin-glass phase is calculated at zero temperature. All phase transitions are found to be continuous.

  1. Variational collocation on finite intervals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amore, Paolo; Cervantes, Mayra; Fernandez, Francisco M

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we study a set of functions, defined on an interval of finite width, which are orthogonal and which reduce to the sinc functions when the appropriate limit is taken. We show that these functions can be used within a variational approach to obtain accurate results for a variety of problems. We have applied them to the interpolation of functions on finite domains and to the solution of the Schroedinger equation, and we have compared the performance of the present approach with others

  2. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PECINGINA OLIMPIA-MIOARA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The application of finite element method is analytical when solutions can not be applied for deeper study analyzes static, dynamic or other types of requirements in different points of the structures .In practice it is necessary to know the behavior of the structure or certain parts components of the machine under the influence of certain factors static and dynamic . The application of finite element in the optimization of components leads to economic growth , to increase reliability and durability organs studied, thus the machine itself.

  3. Exploring Reflective Teaching through Informed Journal Keeping and Blog Group Discussion in the Teaching Practicum (Exploración de la enseñanza reflexiva en la práctica docente a través de la escritura informada de diarios y de discusiones grupales mediante "blogs")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insuasty, Edgar Alirio; Zambrano Castillo, Lilian Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study which examined how student teachers could be empowered as more reflective practitioners through journal keeping and blog group discussions. It was carried out with six student teachers who developed their practicum over six months. Data were collected through journals, blogs, metaphors, conferences and…

  4. Reflectivity, Reflexivity and Situated Reflective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malthouse, Richard; Roffey-Barentsen, Jodi; Watts, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an aspect of reflective practice referred to as situated reflective practice. The overarching theory is derived from social theories of structuration and reflexivity. In particular, from Giddens' theory of structuration, which sees social life as an interplay of agency and structure. Discussion of the research reported here…

  5. Lattice QCD at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeTar, C.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the numerical simulation of QCD at finite temperature is reviewed. Eight topics are treated briefly: (1) T c scaling, (2) Equation of state, (3) Baryon susceptibility, (4) The QCD Phase Diagram, (5) J/Ψ Binding in the Plasma, (6) The Screening Spectrum of the Plasma, (7) Gauge Symmetry Breaking at High T, (8) Progress in Computing Power. (author)

  6. Linguistics, Logic, and Finite Trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blackburn, P.; Meyer-Viol, W.

    1993-01-01

    A modal logic is developed to deal with finite ordered binary trees as they are used in (computational) linguistics. A modal language is introduced with operators for the 'mother of', 'first daughter of' and 'second daughter of' relations together with their transitive reflexive closures.

  7. On symmetric pyramidal finite elements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liu, L.; Davies, K. B.; Yuan, K.; Křížek, Michal

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 11, 1-2 (2004), s. 213-227 ISSN 1492-8760 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1019201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : mesh generation * finite element method * composite elements Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.108, year: 2004

  8. Ward identities at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOlivo, J.C.; Torres, M.; Tututi, E.

    1996-01-01

    The Ward identities for QED at finite temperature are derived using the functional real-time formalism. They are verified by an explicit one-loop calculation. An effective causal vertex is constructed which satisfy the Ward identity with the associated retarded self-energy. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  9. Finite-temperature confinement transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svetitsky, B.

    1984-01-01

    The formalism of lattice gauge theory at finite temperature is introduced. The framework of universality predictions for critical behavior is outlined, and recent analytic work in this direction is reviewed. New Monte Carlo information for the SU(4) theory are represented, and possible results of the inclusion of fermions in the SU(3) theory are listed

  10. Reflection Positive Doubles

    OpenAIRE

    Jaffe, Arthur; Janssens, Bas

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce reflection positive doubles, a general framework for reflection positivity, covering a wide variety of systems in statistical physics and quantum field theory. These systems may be bosonic, fermionic, or parafermionic in nature. Within the framework of reflection positive doubles, we give necessary and sufficient conditions for reflection positivity. We use a reflection-invariant cone to implement our construction. Our characterization allows for a direct interpretation in t...

  11. Developing the reflective teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, J M; Chernomas, W M

    1997-06-01

    The conceptual issues and research findings surrounding the meaning and use of reflection are examined in this paper and serve as a foundation for discussing significant assumptions and beliefs regarding the use of reflection in nursing education. The strengths and limitations of reflection are discussed. The paper links current knowledge about reflection to the development of reflective thinking and its use by nurse educators and suggests strategies to enhance this development.

  12. Analysis of Smith-Purcell BWO with end reflections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.; Kim, K.-J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a one-dimensional time-dependent analysis and simulation of Smith-Purcell (SP) backward wave oscillator (BWO) taking end reflections and attenuation into account. In the linear regime, we obtain an analytic solution and calculate the start current. The dependence of start current on end reflections is studied taking the attenuation due to finite conductivity into account. In this paper, we have set up Maxwell-Lorentz equations for the one-dimensional time-dependent analysis of SP-BWO including end reflection and attenuation due to finite conductivity. We have obtained a solution in the linear regime and extended the analysis to the nonlinear regime by solving the Maxwell-Lorentz equations numerically. Our analysis can be used for detailed optimization of outcoupled power and start current in SP-BWO taking end reflection and attenuation into account.

  13. Introduction to finite temperature and finite density QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2014-01-01

    It has been pointed out that QCD (Quantum Chromodynamics) in the circumstances of medium at finite temperature and density shows numbers of phenomena similar to the characteristics of solid state physics, e.g. phase transitions. In the past ten years, the very high temperature and density matter came to be observed experimentally at the heavy ion collisions. At the same time, the numerical QCD analysis at finite temperature and density attained quantitative level analysis possible owing to the remarkable progress of computers. In this summer school lecture, it has been set out to give not only the recent results, but also the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry, the fundamental theory of finite temperature and further expositions as in the following four sections. The first section is titled as 'Introduction to Finite Temperature and Density QCD' with subsections of 1.1 standard model and QCD, 1.2 phase transition and phase structure of QCD, 1.3 lattice QCD and thermodynamic quantity, 1.4 heavy ion collision experiments, and 1.5 neutron stars. The second one is 'Equilibrium State' with subsections of 2.1 chiral symmetry, 2.2 vacuum state: BCS theory, 2.3 NJL (Nambu-Jona-Lasinio) model, and 2.4 color superconductivity. The third one is 'Static fluctuations' with subsections of 3.1 fluctuations, 3.2 moment and cumulant, 3.3 increase of fluctuations at critical points, 3.4 analysis of fluctuations by lattice QCD and Taylor expansion, and 3.5 experimental exploration of QCD phase structure. The fourth one is 'Dynamical Structure' with 4.1 linear response theory, 4.2 spectral functions, 4.3 Matsubara function, and 4.4 analyses of dynamical structure by lattice QCD. (S. Funahashi)

  14. Finiteness Marking in Boys with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Audra M.; Rice, Mabel L.; Warren, Steven F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The current study investigated finiteness marking (e.g., he walk "s", he walk "ed") in boys with fragile X syndrome (FXS); the boys were grouped based on receptive vocabulary (i.e., borderline, impaired). Method: Twenty-one boys with the full mutation of fragile X, between the ages of 8 and 16 years participated. The…

  15. Derived equivalences for group rings

    CERN Document Server

    König, Steffen

    1998-01-01

    A self-contained introduction is given to J. Rickard's Morita theory for derived module categories and its recent applications in representation theory of finite groups. In particular, Broué's conjecture is discussed, giving a structural explanation for relations between the p-modular character table of a finite group and that of its "p-local structure". The book is addressed to researchers or graduate students and can serve as material for a seminar. It surveys the current state of the field, and it also provides a "user's guide" to derived equivalences and tilting complexes. Results and proofs are presented in the generality needed for group theoretic applications.

  16. Nonperturbative finite-temperature Yang-Mills theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyrol, Anton K.; Mitter, Mario; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Strodthoff, Nils

    2018-03-01

    We present nonperturbative correlation functions in Landau-gauge Yang-Mills theory at finite temperature. The results are obtained from the functional renormalisation group within a self-consistent approximation scheme. In particular, we compute the magnetic and electric components of the gluon propagator, and the three- and four-gluon vertices. We also show the ghost propagator and the ghost-gluon vertex at finite temperature. Our results for the propagators are confronted with lattice simulations and our Debye mass is compared to hard thermal loop perturbation theory.

  17. Finite elements methods in mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Eslami, M Reza

    2014-01-01

    This book covers all basic areas of mechanical engineering, such as fluid mechanics, heat conduction, beams, and elasticity with detailed derivations for the mass, stiffness, and force matrices. It is especially designed to give physical feeling to the reader for finite element approximation by the introduction of finite elements to the elevation of elastic membrane. A detailed treatment of computer methods with numerical examples are provided. In the fluid mechanics chapter, the conventional and vorticity transport formulations for viscous incompressible fluid flow with discussion on the method of solution are presented. The variational and Galerkin formulations of the heat conduction, beams, and elasticity problems are also discussed in detail. Three computer codes are provided to solve the elastic membrane problem. One of them solves the Poisson’s equation. The second computer program handles the two dimensional elasticity problems, and the third one presents the three dimensional transient heat conducti...

  18. Automation of finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Korelc, Jože

    2016-01-01

    New finite elements are needed as well in research as in industry environments for the development of virtual prediction techniques. The design and implementation of novel finite elements for specific purposes is a tedious and time consuming task, especially for nonlinear formulations. The automation of this process can help to speed up this process considerably since the generation of the final computer code can be accelerated by order of several magnitudes. This book provides the reader with the required knowledge needed to employ modern automatic tools like AceGen within solid mechanics in a successful way. It covers the range from the theoretical background, algorithmic treatments to many different applications. The book is written for advanced students in the engineering field and for researchers in educational and industrial environments.

  19. Factorization properties of finite spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simkhovich, B; Mann, A; Zak, J, E-mail: boriskas@tx.technion.ac.i, E-mail: ady@physics.technion.ac.i, E-mail: zak@physics.technion.ac.i [Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2010-01-29

    In 1960 Schwinger (J Schwinger 1960 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. 46 570-9) proposed the algorithm for factorization of unitary operators in the finite M-dimensional Hilbert space according to a coprime decomposition of M. Using a special permutation operator A we generalize the Schwinger factorization to every decomposition of M. We obtain the factorized pairs of unitary operators and show that they obey the same commutation relations as Schwinger's. We apply the new factorization to two problems. First, we show how to generate two kq-like mutually unbiased bases for any composite dimension. Then, using a Harper-like Hamiltonian model in the finite dimension M = M{sub 1}M{sub 2}, we show how to design a physical system with M{sub 1} energy levels, each having degeneracy M{sub 2}.

  20. Finite Metric Spaces of Strictly Negative Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul; Lisonek, P.; Markvorsen, Steen

    1998-01-01

    We prove that, if a finite metric space is of strictly negative type, then its transfinite diameter is uniquely realized by the infinite extender (load vector). Finite metric spaces that have this property include all spaces on two, three, or four points, all trees, and all finite subspaces of Eu...

  1. Proving Finite Satisfiability of Deductive Databases

    OpenAIRE

    Bry, François; Manthey, Rainer

    1987-01-01

    It is shown how certain refutation methods can be extended into semi-decision procedures that are complete for both unsatisfiability and finite satisfiability. The proposed extension is justified by a new characterization of finite satisfiability. This research was motivated by a database design problem: Deduction rules and integrity constraints in definite databases have to be finitely satisfiable

  2. Characterization of finite spaces having dispersion points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Bsoul, A. T

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we shall characterize the finite spaces having dispersion points. Also, we prove that the dispersion point of a finite space with a dispersion points fixed under all non constant continuous functions which answers the question raised by J. C obb and W. Voxman in 1980 affirmatively for finite space. Some open problems are given. (author). 16 refs

  3. Quantum statistical metastability for a finite spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garanin, D. A.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2001-01-01

    We study quantum-classical escape-rate transitions for uniaxial and biaxial models with finite spins S=10 (such as Mn12Ac and Fe8) and S=100 by a direct numerical approach. At second-order transitions the level making a dominant contribution into thermally assisted tunneling changes gradually with temperature whereas at first-order transitions a group of levels is skipped. For finite spins, the quasiclassical boundaries between first- and second-order transitions are shifted, favoring a second-order transition: For Fe8 in zero field the transition should be first order according to a theory with S-->∞, but we show that there are no skipped levels at the transition. Applying a field along the hard axis in Fe8 makes transition the strongest first order. For the same model with S=100 we confirmed the existence of a region where a second-order transition is followed by a first-order transition [X. Martínes Hidalgo and E. M. Chudnovsky, J. Phys.: Condensed Matter 12, 4243 (2000)].

  4. Reflection Positivity for Parafermions

    OpenAIRE

    Jaffe, Arthur; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.

    2014-01-01

    We establish reflection positivity for Gibbs trace states for a class of gauge-invariant, reflection-invariant Hamiltonians describing parafermion interactions on a lattice. We relate these results to recent work in the condensed-matter physics literature.

  5. Quantum Chromodynamic at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, N.S.

    1987-01-01

    A formal expression to the Gibbs free energy of topological defects of quantum chromodynamics (QCD)by using the semiclassical approach in the context of field theory at finite temperature and in the high temperature limit is determined. This expression is used to calculate the free energy of magnetic monopoles. Applying the obtained results to a method in which the free energy of topological defects of a theory may indicate its different phases, its searched for informations about phases of QCD. (author) [pt

  6. Spinor pregeometry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Seiji.

    1985-10-01

    We derive the effective action for gravity at finite temperature in spinor pregeometry. The temperature-dependent effective potential for the vierbein which is parametrized as e sub(kμ) = b.diag(1, xi, xi, xi) has the minimum at b = 0 for fixed xi, and behaves as -xi 3 for fixed b. These results indicate that the system of fundamental matters in spinor pregeometry cannot be in equilibrium. (author)

  7. Strange matter at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, H.; Dang, B.V.

    1987-12-01

    The properties of strange quark matter at finite temperatures and in equilibrium with respect to weak interaction are explored on the basis of the MIT bag model picture of QCD. Furthermore, to determine the stability of strange quark matter analogous investigations are also performed for nuclear matter within Walecka's model field theory. It is found that strange quark matter can be stable at zero external pressure only for temperatures below 20 MeV. (orig.)

  8. Finite mathematics models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Carla C

    2015-01-01

    Features step-by-step examples based on actual data and connects fundamental mathematical modeling skills and decision making concepts to everyday applicability Featuring key linear programming, matrix, and probability concepts, Finite Mathematics: Models and Applications emphasizes cross-disciplinary applications that relate mathematics to everyday life. The book provides a unique combination of practical mathematical applications to illustrate the wide use of mathematics in fields ranging from business, economics, finance, management, operations research, and the life and social sciences.

  9. Propagator for finite range potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Moretti, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    The Schroedinger equation in integral form is applied to the one-dimensional scattering problem in the case of a general finite range, nonsingular potential. A simple expression for the Laplace transform of the transmission propagator is obtained in terms of the associated Fredholm determinant, by means of matrix methods; the particular form of the kernel and the peculiar aspects of the transmission problem play an important role. The application to an array of delta potentials is shown

  10. Perturbative QCD at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altherr, T.

    1989-03-01

    We discuss an application of finite temperature QCD to lepton-pair production in a quark-gluon plasma. The perturbative calculation is performed within the realtime formalism. After cancellation of infrared and mass singularities, the corrections at O (α s ) are found to be very small in the region where the mass of the Drell-Yan pair is much larger than the temperature of the plasma. Interesting effects, however, appear at the annihilation threshold of the thermalized quarks

  11. Generalized quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leivo, H.P.

    1992-01-01

    The algebraic approach to quantum groups is generalized to include what may be called an anyonic symmetry, reflecting the appearance of phases more general than ±1 under transposition. (author). 6 refs

  12. Dissenting in Reflective Conversations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Boulus, Nina

    2011-01-01

    a methodological reflective approach that provides space for taking seriously uncertainties experienced in the field as these can be a catalyst for learning and sharpening our theoretical and empirical skills as action researchers. Through first-person inquiry, we investigate how our reflective conversations...... gradually evolved into second-person inquiry. We argue that enacting second-person reflective conversations renders alternative strategies for handling uncertainties through articulation of the tacit assumptions within particular empirical situations. Finally, we argue that reflective conversations should...

  13. Photonic crystal waveguides based on an antiresonant reflecting platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Fage-Pedersen, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    We apply the antiresonant reflecting layers arrangement to silicon-on-insulator based photonic crystal waveguides. Several layered structures with different combinations of materials (Si-SiO2, Si3N4-SiO2) and layer topology have been analysed. Numerical modelling using 3D Finite-Difference Time...

  14. Quantum propagator in the presence of a perfectly reflecting wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Lantieri, Marco; Moretti, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    The transmission propagator for an arbitrary, finite range one-dimensional potential in the presence of a perfectly reflecting wall is calculated starting from the integral form of the Schroedinger equation. After a Laplace transform, the solution is obtained in a new and simple form by using matrix methods; we apply the results to an array of delta potentials

  15. Benefit of textured CIGS cells for low reflecting nanogrid application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Tezsevin, Y.; Omar, A.; Barink, M.

    2017-01-01

    We show the results of nanotextured device designs combined with carefully placed nanogrids in order to minimize optical losses. Finite element method (FEM) based optical modeling indicates that the reflection of both the layer stack and the metal is diminished by the proposed configuration in which

  16. Liberating Moral Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horell, Harold D.

    2013-01-01

    The author argues that if we are to foster life-giving and liberating moral reflection, we must first liberate moral reflection from distortions; specifically, from the distorting effects of moral insensitivity, destructive moral relativism, and confusions resulting from a failure to understand the dynamics of moral reflection. The author proposes…

  17. Reflecting on Masters Dissertations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I reflect on my own practice as a supervisor of taught postgraduate students. By outlining my own process of reflection I demonstrate that, despite some minor issues, Brew & Peseta's (2004) ten criteria for good supervisory practice of research postgraduates can be used as tool with which to reflect upon and improve one's…

  18. Realistic finite temperature simulations of magnetic systems using quantum statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, Lars; Bergman, Anders

    2018-01-01

    We have performed realistic atomistic simulations at finite temperatures using Monte Carlo and atomistic spin dynamics simulations incorporating quantum (Bose-Einstein) statistics. The description is much improved at low temperatures compared to classical (Boltzmann) statistics normally used in these kind of simulations, while at higher temperatures the classical statistics are recovered. This corrected low-temperature description is reflected in both magnetization and the magnetic specific heat, the latter allowing for improved modeling of the magnetic contribution to free energies. A central property in the method is the magnon density of states at finite temperatures, and we have compared several different implementations for obtaining it. The method has no restrictions regarding chemical and magnetic order of the considered materials. This is demonstrated by applying the method to elemental ferromagnetic systems, including Fe and Ni, as well as Fe-Co random alloys and the ferrimagnetic system GdFe3.

  19. Asymmetric bistable reflection and polarization switching in a magnetic nonlinear multilayer structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuz, Vladimir R.; Novitsky, Denis V.; Prosvirnin, Sergey L.

    2014-01-01

    , while light reflected from the other side has its polarization unchanged. Using the nonlinear transfer matrix calculations in the frequency domain, it is demonstrated that defect resonances in the nonlinear reflection spectra undergo bending, resulting in polarization bistability of reflected light....... This bistability is shown to result in abrupt switching between linear polarization of the output reflected light when the input intensity is varied. This switching is confirmed in finite-difference time-domain simulations, and its hysteresis character is established....

  20. Employing finite-state machines in data integrity problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malikov Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the issue of group integrity of tuple subsets regarding corporate integrity constraints in relational databases. A solution may be found by applying the finite-state machine theory to guarantee group integrity of data. We present a practical guide to coding such an automaton. After creating SQL queries to manipulate data and control its integrity for real data domains, we study the issue of query performance, determine the level of transaction isolation, and generate query plans.

  1. Finite Metric Spaces of Strictly negative Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    If a finite metric space is of strictly negative type then its transfinite diameter is uniquely realized by an infinite extent (“load vector''). Finite metric spaces that have this property include all trees, and all finite subspaces of Euclidean and Hyperbolic spaces. We prove that if the distance...... matrix of a finite metric space is both hypermetric and regular, then it is of strictly negative type. We show that the strictly negative type finite subspaces of spheres are precisely those which do not contain two pairs of antipodal points....

  2. Lectures on Chevalley groups

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberg, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Robert Steinberg's Lectures on Chevalley Groups were delivered and written during the author's sabbatical visit to Yale University in the 1967-1968 academic year. The work presents the status of the theory of Chevalley groups as it was in the mid-1960s. Much of this material was instrumental in many areas of mathematics, in particular in the theory of algebraic groups and in the subsequent classification of finite groups. This posthumous edition incorporates additions and corrections prepared by the author during his retirement, including a new introductory chapter. A bibliography and editorial notes have also been added. This is a great unsurpassed introduction to the subject of Chevalley groups that influenced generations of mathematicians. I would recommend it to anybody whose interests include group theory. -Efim Zelmanov, University of California, San Diego Robert Steinberg's lectures on Chevalley groups were given at Yale University in 1967. The notes for the lectures contain a wonderful exposition of ...

  3. Improving Inquiry Teaching through Reflection on Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotter, Christine R.; Miller, Cory

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we explore middle school science teachers' learning of inquiry-based instructional strategies through reflection on practice teaching sessions during a summer enrichment program with middle level students. The reflection sessions were part of a larger year-long inquiry professional development program in which teachers learned science content and inquiry pedagogy. The program included a 2-week summer institute in which teachers participated in science content sessions, practice teaching to middle level students, and small group-facilitated reflection sessions on their teaching. For this study, data collection focused on teachers' recorded dialogue during the facilitator - run reflection sessions, the teachers' daily written reflections, a final written reflection, and a written reflection on a videotaped teaching session. We investigated the teachers' reflection levels and the themes teachers focused on during their reflection sessions. Teachers were found to reflect at various reflection levels, from simple description to a more sophisticated focus on how to improve student learning. Recurrent themes point to the importance of providing situated learning environments, such as the practice teaching with immediate reflection for teachers to have time to practice new instructional strategies and gain insight from peers and science educators on how to handle student learning issues.

  4. Faithful group actions and Schreier graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fedorova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Each action of a finitely generated group on a set uniquely defines a labelled directed graph called the Schreier graph of the action. Schreier graphs are used mainly as a tool to establish geometrical and dynamical properties of corresponding group actions. In particilar, they are widely used in order to check amenability of different classed of groups. In the present paper Schreier graphs are utilized to construct new examples of faithful actions of free products of groups. Using Schreier graphs of group actions a sufficient condition for a group action to be faithful is presented. This result is applied to finite automaton actions on spaces of words i.e. actions defined by finite automata over finite alphabets. It is shown how to construct new faithful automaton presentations of groups upon given such a presentation. As an example a new countable series of faithful finite automaton presentations of free products of finite groups is constructed. The obtained results can be regarded as another way to construct new faithful actions of  groups  as soon as at least one such an action is provided.

  5. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bond, Stephen D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Littlewood, David John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, Stan Gerald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  6. Global Explorers Journaling and Reflection Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Bennion

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Research suggests that journaling will increase reflection and improve program outcomes (Bain, et al, 1999; Duerden, et al, 2012 This study involved a partnership with a non-profit, Global Explorers (GEx, which provides international immersion experiences for youth. Their programs are designed to teach youth participants principles of leadership, environmental awareness, service, and science. This study, which tested whether teaching journaling techniques to youth program facilitators would have a positive impact on participant outcomes, addressed the following hypotheses: 1 Greater training in reflective thinking among participants would be associated with higher outcome scores, and 2 Participants in the intervention group (facilitators trained in journaling pedagogy would show greater increases in reflective thinking than comparison group members. Results based on participant self-assessment were significant in testing the first hypothesis; reflective thinking is positively associated with outcome measures, but the intervention group did not show increases in reflective thinking.

  7. Flexoelectric effect in finite samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagantsev, Alexander K.; Yurkov, Alexander S.

    2012-08-01

    Static flexoelectric effect in a finite sample of a solid is addressed in terms of phenomenological theory for the case of a thin plate subjected to bending. It has been shown that despite an explicit asymmetry inherent to the bulk constitutive electromechanical equations which take into account the flexoelectric coupling, there exists a situation where electromechanical response for a finite sample is "symmetric." "Symmetric" means that if a sensor and an actuator are made of a flexoelectric element, performance of such devices can be characterized by the same effective piezoelectric coefficient. This behavior is consistent with the thermodynamic arguments offered earlier, being in conflict with the current point of view on the matter in literature. This result was obtained using standard mechanical boundary conditions valid for the case where the polarization vanishes at the surface. It was shown that, for the case where the polarization at the surface is not zero, the aforementioned symmetry of electromechanical response may be violated if standard mechanical boundary conditions are used, leading to a conflict with the thermodynamic arguments. It is suggested that this conflict may be resolved when using modified mechanical boundary conditions. It is also shown that the contribution of surface piezoelectricity to the flexoelectric response of a finite sample is expected to be comparable to that of the static bulk contribution (including materials with high values of the dielectric constant) and to scale as the bulk value of the dielectric constant (similar to the bulk contribution). This finding implies that if the experimentally measured flexoelectric coefficient scales as the dielectric constant of the material, this does not imply that the measured flexoelectric response is controlled by the static bulk contribution to the flexoelectric effect.

  8. Entropy conservative finite element schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadmor, E.

    1986-01-01

    The question of entropy stability for discrete approximations to hyperbolic systems of conservation laws is studied. The amount of numerical viscosity present in such schemes is quantified and related to their entropy stability by means of comparison. To this end, two main ingredients are used: entropy variables and the construction of certain entropy conservative schemes in terms of piecewise-linear finite element approximations. It is then shown that conservative schemes are entropy stable, if and (for three-point schemes) only if, they contain more numerical viscosity than the abovementioned entropy conservation ones.

  9. Functionals of finite Riemann surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Schiffer, Menahem

    1954-01-01

    This advanced monograph on finite Riemann surfaces, based on the authors' 1949-50 lectures at Princeton University, remains a fundamental book for graduate students. The Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society hailed the self-contained treatment as the source of ""a plethora of ideas, each interesting in its own right,"" noting that ""the patient reader will be richly rewarded."" Suitable for graduate-level courses, the text begins with three chapters that offer a development of the classical theory along historical lines, examining geometrical and physical considerations, existence theo

  10. Reflections of a Latino Associate Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguero, Anthony A.

    2018-01-01

    The following reflection essay is about my experiences as a Latino Associate Professor who focuses on criminology, youth violence, juvenile justice, and the associated disparities with race, ethnicity, and immigration. I reflect about the "race and justice" job market, pursuing and establishing a Latina/o Criminology working group, often…

  11. Pomarning-eddington approximation for time-dependent radiation transfer in finite slab media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Wakil, S.A.; Degheidy, A.R.; Sallah, M.

    2005-01-01

    The time-dependent monoenergetic radiation transfer equation with linear anisotropic scattering is proposed. Pomraning-Eddington approximation is used to calculate the radiation intensity in finite plane-parallel media. Numerical results are done for the isotropic media. Shielding calculations are shown for reflectivity and transmissivity at different times. The medium is assumed to have specular-reflecting boundaries. Two different weight functions are introduced to force the boundary conditions to be fulfilled

  12. Self-Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2016-01-01

    and physical bodies are constantly broken with technology. Perception and reflection are in synergy. Reflection means etymologically to bend back, to mirror, and to think. My presentation will take its point of departure in this etymology and make perspectives to modern use of refection in digital media. I......Human experience is based on everything that surrounds us. Not the physical reality, but our perception of and reflection on it. This perception and reflection - presence, intimacy and materiality - are transformed by telematics: Separate rooms can be merged, and the boundaries between our virtual...... will take a look at the establishing of the modern self and possibilities of self-reflection, too. My examples will be from the so-called dark-selfies and from a new selfie form, which merge the present with the previous progressing into the future. I will discuss the media reflections as loos and/or gain...

  13. Self-Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2016-01-01

    Human experience is based on everything that surrounds us. Not the physical reality, but our perception of and reflection on it. This perception and reflection - presence, intimacy and materiality - are transformed by telematics: Separate rooms can be merged, and the boundaries between our virtua....... As another but short viewpoint telepresence, Skype, will be discussed, where new screen types, presence and reflections are established. In a perspective, I debate my term sore-society in relation to my topic and especially the dark selfies....

  14. The simulation of Lamb waves in a cracked plate using the scaled boundary finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravenkamp, Hauke; Prager, Jens; Saputra, Albert A; Song, Chongmin

    2012-09-01

    The scaled boundary finite element method is applied to the simulation of Lamb waves for ultrasonic testing applications. With this method, the general elastodynamic problem is solved, while only the boundary of the domain under consideration has to be discretized. The reflection of the fundamental Lamb wave modes from cracks of different geometry in a steel plate is modeled. A test problem is compared with commercial finite element software, showing the efficiency and convergence of the scaled boundary finite element method. A special formulation of this method is utilized to calculate dispersion relations for plate structures. For the discretization of the boundary, higher-order elements are employed to improve the efficiency of the simulations. The simplicity of mesh generation of a cracked plate for a scaled boundary finite element analysis is illustrated.

  15. Group Psychotherapy in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Rainer; Strauss, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    This article gives an overview of the development of group psychotherapies in Germany originating from a psychodynamic tradition. The German health system provides access to inpatient and outpatient psychotherapy for all of its citizens. Whereas groups are common in inpatient settings, the provision of outpatient group treatment still could be improved, as it is the case for the general training of group psychotherapists. Group research in Germany largely reflects clinical practice, with more studies coming from the inpatient field. It is stated that the general image of group treatment seems to be largely positive, which could provide a basis for political initiatives to improve the dissemination of group therapy in this country.

  16. Supersymmetry breaking at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratzert, K.

    2002-11-01

    The mechanism of supersymmetry breaking at finite temperature is still only partly understood. Though it has been proven that temperature always breaks supersymmetry, the spontaneous nature of this breaking remains unclear, in particular the role of the Goldstone fermion. The aim of this work is to unify two existing approaches to the subject. From a hydrodynamic point of view, it has been argued under very general assumptions that in any supersymmetric quantum field theory at finite temperature there should exist a massless fermionic collective excitation, named phonino because of the analogy to the phonon. In the framework of a self-consistent resummed perturbation theory, it is shown for the example of the Wess-Zumino model that this mode fits very well into the quantum field theoretical framework pursued by earlier works. Interpreted as a bound state of boson and fermion, it contributes to the supersymmetric Ward-Takahashi identities in a way showing that supersymmetry is indeed broken spontaneously with the phonino playing the role of the Goldstone fermion. The second part of the work addresses the case of supersymmetric quantum electrodynamics. It is shown that also here the phonino exists and must be interpreted as the Goldstone mode. This knowledge allows a generalization to a wider class of models. (orig.)

  17. Investigation of the reflection of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, Christian; Hasselin, Gilbert

    1964-10-01

    The authors report the study of the reflection of fast neutrons on a plane plate having a finite and varying thickness and an infinite width. Calculations are performed by using a Monte-Carlo method which allows the number, the energy, the direction, the emergence point of neutrons reflected on a plate, to be computed with respect to the energy and direction of incident neutrons. The author present how paths, elastic and inelastic shocks, direction after shock are calculated. Different information are calculated: the numbers of elastic shocks, inelastic shocks and transmitted neutrons, the number, energy and dose albedo, the spectrum and angular distribution, the distribution of neutron in terms of energy and direction

  18. The price of drugs for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a reflection of the unsustainable prices of cancer drugs: from the perspective of a large group of CML experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Camille; Berman, Ellin; Cohen, Adam; Cortes, Jorge; DeAngelo, Daniel; Deininger, Michael; Devine, Steven; Druker, Brian; Fathi, Amir; Jabbour, Elias; Jagasia, Madan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Khoury, Jean; Laneuville, Pierre; Larson, Richard; Lipton, Jeffrey; Moore, Joseph O.; Mughal, Tariq; O’Brien, Susan; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Quintas-Cardama, Alfonso; Radich, Jerald; Reddy, Vishnu; Schiffer, Charles; Shah, Neil; Shami, Paul; Silver, Richard T.; Snyder, David; Stone, Richard; Talpaz, Moshe; Tefferi, Ayalew; Van Etten, Richard A.; Wetzler, Meir; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Apperley, Jane; Breccia, Massimo; Byrne, Jenny; Cervantes, Francisco; Chelysheva, Ekaterina; Clark, R. E.; de Lavallade, Hugues; Dyagil, Iryna; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Goldman, John; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim; Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik; Holyoake, Tessa; Huntly, Brian; le Coutre, Philipp; Lomaia, Elza; Mahon, Francois-Xavier; Marin-Costa, David; Martinelli, Giovanni; Mayer, Jiri; Milojkovic, Dragana; Olavarria, Eduardo; Porkka, Kimmo; Richter, Johan; Rousselot, Philippe; Saglio, Giuseppe; Saydam, Guray; Stentoft, Jesper; Turkina, Anna; Vigneri, Paolo; Zaritskey, Andrey; Aguayo, Alvaro; Ayala, Manuel; Bendit, Israel; Maria Bengio, Raquel; Best, Carlos; Bullorsky, Eduardo; Cervera, Eduardo; DeSouza, Carmino; Fanilla, Ernesto; Gomez-Almaguer, David; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Lopez, Jose; Magarinos, Alicia; Meillon, Luis; Milone, Jorge; Moiraghi, Beatriz; Pasquini, Ricardo; Pavlovsky, Carolina; Ruiz-Arguelles, Guillermo J.; Spector, Nelson; Arthur, Christopher; Browett, Peter; Grigg, Andrew; Hu, Jianda; Huang, Xiao-jun; Hughes, Tim; Jiang, Qian; Jootar, Saengsuree; Kim, Dong-Wook; Malhotra, Hemant; Malhotra, Pankaj; Matsumura, Itaru; Melo, Junia; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Ohno, Ryuzo; Saikia, Tapan; Schwarer, Anthony P.; Takahashi, Naoto; Tam, Constantine; Tauchi, Tetsuzo; Usuki, Kensuke; Wang, Jianxiang; Abdel-Rahman, Fawzi; Deeb Saeed Aljurf, Mahmoud; Bazarbachi, Ali; Ben Yehuda, Dina; Chaudhri, Naeem; Durosinmi, Muheez; Kamel, Hossam; Louw, Vernon; Francis Matti, Bassam; Nagler, Arnon; Raanani, Pia; Salem, Ziad

    2013-01-01

    As a group of more than 100 experts in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), we draw attention to the high prices of cancer drugs, with the particular focus on the prices of approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of CML. This editorial addresses the multiple factors involved in cancer drug pricing and their impact on individual patients and health care policies, and argues for the need to (1) lower the prices of cancer drugs to allow more patients to afford them and (2) maintain sound long-term health care policies. PMID:23620577

  19. Finite size scaling and lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Finite size (Fisher) scaling is investigated for four dimensional SU(2) and SU(3) lattice gauge theories without quarks. It allows to disentangle violations of (asymptotic) scaling and finite volume corrections. Mass spectrum, string tension, deconfinement temperature and lattice β-function are considered. For appropriate volumes, Monte Carlo investigations seem to be able to control the finite volume continuum limit. Contact is made with Luescher's small volume expansion and possibly also with the asymptotic large volume behavior. 41 refs., 19 figs

  20. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  1. Reflection Positivity and Monotonicity

    OpenAIRE

    Ritter, Gordon; Jaffe, Arthur Michael

    2008-01-01

    We prove general reflection positivity results for both scalar fields and Dirac fields on a Riemannian manifold, and comment on applications to quantum field theory. As another application, we prove the inequality \\(C_D \\leq C_N\\) between Dirichlet and Neumann covariance operators on a manifold with a reflection.

  2. Media for Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    This article develops the concept media for reflection in the interest of conceptualizing the interpretative frames that enable and limit reflection in management and leadership education. The concept ‘media for reflection’ allows us to conceptualize the social and cultural mediation of reflectio...

  3. Finite element analysis of the cyclic indentation of bilayer enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yunfei; Xuan, Fu-zhen; Chen, Xiaoping; Yang, Fuqian

    2014-04-01

    Tooth enamel is often subjected to repeated contact and often experiences contact deformation in daily life. The mechanical strength of the enamel determines the biofunctionality of the tooth. Considering the variation of the rod arrangement in outer and inner enamel, we approximate enamel as a bilayer structure and perform finite element analysis of the cyclic indentation of the bilayer structure, to mimic the repeated contact of enamel during mastication. The dynamic deformation behaviour of both the inner enamel and the bilayer enamel is examined. The material parameters of the inner and outer enamel used in the analysis are obtained by fitting the finite element results with the experimental nanoindentation results. The penetration depth per cycle at the quasi-steady state is used to describe the depth propagation speed, which exhibits a two-stage power-law dependence on the maximum indentation load and the amplitude of the cyclic load, respectively. The continuous penetration of the indenter reflects the propagation of the plastic zone during cyclic indentation, which is related to the energy dissipation. The outer enamel serves as a protective layer due to its great resistance to contact deformation in comparison to the inner enamel. The larger equivalent plastic strain and lower stresses in the inner enamel during cyclic indentation, as calculated from the finite element analysis, indicate better crack/fracture resistance of the inner enamel.

  4. ANSYS duplicate finite-element checker routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, R.

    1995-01-01

    An ANSYS finite-element code routine to check for duplicated elements within the volume of a three-dimensional (3D) finite-element mesh was developed. The routine developed is used for checking floating elements within a mesh, identically duplicated elements, and intersecting elements with a common face. A space shuttle main engine alternate turbopump development high pressure oxidizer turbopump finite-element model check using the developed subroutine is discussed. Finally, recommendations are provided for duplicate element checking of 3D finite-element models.

  5. A first course in finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Fish, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Developed from the authors, combined total of 50 years undergraduate and graduate teaching experience, this book presents the finite element method formulated as a general-purpose numerical procedure for solving engineering problems governed by partial differential equations.  Focusing on the formulation and application of the finite element method through the integration of finite element theory, code development, and software application, the book is both introductory and self-contained, as well as being a hands-on experience for any student. This authoritative text on Finite Elements:Adopts

  6. Reflection: A Socratic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Seggelen-Damen, Inge C M; Van Hezewijk, René; Helsdingen, Anne S; Wopereis, Iwan G J H

    2017-12-01

    Reflection is a fuzzy concept. In this article we reveal the paradoxes involved in studying the nature of reflection. Whereas some scholars emphasize its discursive nature, we go further and underline its resemblance to the self-biased dialogue Socrates had with the slave in Plato's Meno . The individual and internal nature of the reflection process creates difficulty for studying it validly and reliably. We focus on methodological issues and use Hans Linschoten's view of coupled systems to identify, analyze, and interpret empirical research on reflection. We argue that researchers and research participants can take on roles in several possible system couplings. Depending on who controls the manipulation of the stimulus, who controls the measuring instrument, who interprets the measurement and the response, different types of research questions can be answered. We conclude that reflection may be validly studied by combining different couplings of experimenter, manipulation, stimulus, participant, measurement, and response.

  7. A three-step method of self-reflection using reflective journal writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley-Doucet, C; Wilson, S

    1997-05-01

    Fiscal and financial constraints present a challenge for nurse educators to broaden the diversity and scope of teaching/learning methodologies. One method designed to promote autonomy and self-direction of nursing students is self-reflection combined with reflective journal writing. This paper describes a three-step process of self-reflection encompassing critical appraisal, peer group discussion and self-awareness. This process of self-reflection was initiated with one group of clinical nursing students. Using student and teacher feedback, implications for employing this teaching/learning strategy in clinical practice are suggested.

  8. Learning Extended Finite State Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Sofia; Howar, Falk; Jonsson, Bengt; Steffen, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    We present an active learning algorithm for inferring extended finite state machines (EFSM)s, combining data flow and control behavior. Key to our learning technique is a novel learning model based on so-called tree queries. The learning algorithm uses the tree queries to infer symbolic data constraints on parameters, e.g., sequence numbers, time stamps, identifiers, or even simple arithmetic. We describe sufficient conditions for the properties that the symbolic constraints provided by a tree query in general must have to be usable in our learning model. We have evaluated our algorithm in a black-box scenario, where tree queries are realized through (black-box) testing. Our case studies include connection establishment in TCP and a priority queue from the Java Class Library.

  9. Axisymmetric finite deformation membrane problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, W.W.

    1980-12-12

    Many biomechanic problems involve the analysis of finite deformation axisymmetric membranes. This paper presents the general formulation for solving a class of axisymmetric membrane problems. The material nonlinearity, as well as the geometric nonlinearity, is considered. Two methods are presented to solve these problems. The first method is solving a set of differential equilibrium equations. The governing equations are reduced to three first-order ordinary-differential equations with explicit derivatives. The second method is the Ritz method where a general potential energy functional valid for all axisymmetric deformed positions is presented. The geometric admissible functions that govern the deformed configuration are written in terms of a series with unknown coefficients. These unknown coefficients are determined by the minimum potential energy principle that of all geometric admissible deformed configurations, the equilibrium configuration minimizes the potential energy. Some examples are presented. A comparison between these two methods is mentioned.

  10. Finite volume schemes for Vlasov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crouseilles Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present finite volume schemes for the numerical approximation of the one-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson equation (FOV CEMRACS 2011 project. Stability analysis is performed for the linear advection and links with semi-Lagrangian schemes are made. Finally, numerical results enable to compare the different methods using classical plasma test cases. Des schémas de type volumes finis sont étudiés ici pour l’approximation de l’équation de Vlasov-Poisson (projet FOV, CEMRACS 2011. Une analyse de stabilité est effectuée dans le cas de l’advection linéaire et plusieurs liens sont faits entre les méthodes volumes finis et semi-Lagrangiennes. Enfin, les méthodes sont comparées sur des cas tests académiques de la physique des plasmas.

  11. Phase transition in finite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.; Duflot, V.; Duflot, V.; Gulminelli, F.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present a review of selected aspects of Phase transitions in finite systems applied in particular to the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei. We show that the problem of the non existence of boundary conditions can be solved by introducing a statistical ensemble with an averaged constrained volume. In such an ensemble the microcanonical heat capacity becomes negative in the transition region. We show that the caloric curve explicitly depends on the considered transformation of the volume with the excitation energy and so does not bear direct informations on the characteristics of the phase transition. Conversely, partial energy fluctuations are demonstrated to be a direct measure of the equation of state. Since the heat capacity has a negative branch in the phase transition region, the presence of abnormally large kinetic energy fluctuations is a signal of the liquid gas phase transition. (author)

  12. Nuclear deformation at finite temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassid, Y; Gilbreth, C N; Bertsch, G F

    2014-12-31

    Deformation, a key concept in our understanding of heavy nuclei, is based on a mean-field description that breaks the rotational invariance of the nuclear many-body Hamiltonian. We present a method to analyze nuclear deformations at finite temperature in a framework that preserves rotational invariance. The auxiliary-field Monte Carlo method is used to generate a statistical ensemble and calculate the probability distribution associated with the quadrupole operator. Applying the technique to nuclei in the rare-earth region, we identify model-independent signatures of deformation and find that deformation effects persist to temperatures higher than the spherical-to-deformed shape phase-transition temperature of mean-field theory.

  13. Nuclear Deformation at Finite Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassid, Y.; Gilbreth, C. N.; Bertsch, G. F.

    2014-12-01

    Deformation, a key concept in our understanding of heavy nuclei, is based on a mean-field description that breaks the rotational invariance of the nuclear many-body Hamiltonian. We present a method to analyze nuclear deformations at finite temperature in a framework that preserves rotational invariance. The auxiliary-field Monte Carlo method is used to generate a statistical ensemble and calculate the probability distribution associated with the quadrupole operator. Applying the technique to nuclei in the rare-earth region, we identify model-independent signatures of deformation and find that deformation effects persist to temperatures higher than the spherical-to-deformed shape phase-transition temperature of mean-field theory.

  14. Finite rotation shells basic equations and finite elements for Reissner kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wisniewski, K

    2010-01-01

    This book covers theoretical and computational aspects of non-linear shells. Several advanced topics of shell equations and finite elements - not included in standard textbooks on finite elements - are addressed, and the book includes an extensive bibliography.

  15. Groups and Geometries : Siena Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Kantor, William; Lunardon, Guglielmo; Pasini, Antonio; Tamburini, Maria

    1998-01-01

    On September 1-7, 1996 a conference on Groups and Geometries took place in lovely Siena, Italy. It brought together experts and interested mathematicians from numerous countries. The scientific program centered around invited exposi­ tory lectures; there also were shorter research announcements, including talks by younger researchers. The conference concerned a broad range of topics in group theory and geometry, with emphasis on recent results and open problems. Special attention was drawn to the interplay between group-theoretic methods and geometric and combinatorial ones. Expanded versions of many of the talks appear in these Proceedings. This volume is intended to provide a stimulating collection of themes for a broad range of algebraists and geometers. Among those themes, represented within the conference or these Proceedings, are aspects of the following: 1. the classification of finite simple groups, 2. the structure and properties of groups of Lie type over finite and algebraically closed fields of f...

  16. Parallel iterative procedures for approximate solutions of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Parallel iterative procedures based on domain decomposition techniques are defined and analyzed for the numerical solution of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods. For finite element methods, in a Lagrangian framework, an efficient way for choosing the algorithm parameter as well as the algorithm convergence are indicated. Some heuristic arguments for finding the algorithm parameter for finite difference schemes are addressed. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effectiveness of the methods.

  17. Storage array reflection considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C.; Taylor, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    The assumptions used for reflection conditions of single containers are fairly well established and consistently applied throughout the industry in nuclear criticality safety evaluations. Containers are usually considered to be either fully water reflected (i.e., surrounded by 6 to 12 in. of water) for safety calculations or reflected by 1 in. of water for nominal (structural material and air) conditions. Tables and figures are usually available for performing comparative evaluations of containers under various loading conditions. Reflection considerations used for evaluating the safety of storage arrays of fissile material are not as well established. When evaluating arrays, it has become more common for analysts to use calculations to demonstrate the safety of the array configuration. In performing these calculations, the analyst has considerable freedom concerning the assumptions made for modeling the reflection of the array. Considerations are given for the physical layout of the array with little or no discussion (or demonstration) of what conditions are bounded by the assumed reflection conditions. For example, an array may be generically evaluated by placing it in a corner of a room in which the opposing walls are far away. Typically, it is believed that complete flooding of the room is incredible, so the array is evaluated for various levels of water mist interspersed among array containers. This paper discusses some assumptions that are made regarding storage array reflection

  18. Finite moments approach to the time-dependent neutron transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Hyun

    1994-02-01

    Currently, nodal techniques are widely used in solving the multidimensional diffusion equation because of savings in computing time and storage. Thanks to the development of computer technology, one can now solve the transport equation instead of the diffusion equation to obtain more accurate solution. The finite moments method, one of the nodal methods, attempts to represent the fluxes in the cell and on cell surfaces more rigorously by retaining additional spatial moments. Generally, there are two finite moments schemes to solve the time-dependent transport equation. In one, the time variable is treated implicitly with finite moments method in space variable (implicit finite moments method), the other method uses finite moments method in both space and time (space-time finite moments method). In this study, these two schemes are applied to two types of time-dependent neutron transport problems. One is a fixed source problem, the other a heterogeneous fast reactor problem with delayed neutrons. From the results, it is observed that the two finite moments methods give almost the same solutions in both benchmark problems. However, the space-time finite moments method requires a little longer computing time than that of the implicit finite moments method. In order to reduce the longer computing time in the space-time finite moments method, a new iteration strategy is exploited, where a few time-stepwise calculation, in which original time steps are grouped into several coarse time divisions, is performed sequentially instead of performing iterations over the entire time steps. This strategy results in significant reduction of the computing time and we observe that 2-or 3-stepwise calculation is preferable. In addition, we propose a new finite moments method which is called mixed finite moments method in this thesis. Asymptotic analysis for the finite moments method shows that accuracy of the solution in a heterogeneous problem mainly depends on the accuracy of the

  19. La infertilidad como evento de frustración personal. Reflexiones de un grupo de varones de parejas infértiles Infertility as an event of personal frustration. Reflections of a group of males from infertile couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Calero

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta una parte de los resultados que se obtuvieron en el estudio realizado en el Instituto Nacional de Endocrinología (INEN, el cual se propuso comprender los significados y las percepciones sobre la infertilidad que tiene un grupo de varones atendidos por este padecimiento. Se realizaron 14 entrevistas en profundidad, con varones de parejas infértiles atendidos en el INEN. La información fue grabada, transcrita, codificada, triangulada e interpretada, como corresponde a la metodología cualitativa de investigación. Se encontró que la infertilidad es interpretada por los varones como elemento de pérdida y frustración personal, donde la imposibilidad para consagrarse como padre da lugar a fuertes consecuencias que ponen en riesgo su identificación como varón pleno. La negatividad en los significados que los varones construyen sobre la infertilidad está relacionada con quien presente el factor de infertilidad y con la presencia de hijos previos.This article presents a part of the results obtained in the study conducted at the National Institute of Endocrinology (NIE aimed at understanding the meanings and perceptions of infertility of a group of males that receive medical attention due to this ailment. Fourteen males from infertile couples attended at the NIE were interviewed. The information was recorded, transcribed, coded and triangulated, according to the qualitative research methodology. It was found that infertility is interpreted by males as an element of loss and personal frustration, where the impossibility to be father gives rise to strong consequences that endanger his identification as a full male. The negativity in the meanings of infertility constructed by males is in correspondance with the person who presents the infertility factor and with the presence of previous children.

  20. Linear deformations of discrete groups and constructions of multivalued groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagodovskii, Petr V

    2000-01-01

    We construct deformations of discrete multivalued groups described as special deformations of their group algebras in the class of finite-dimensional associative algebras. We show that the deformations of ordinary groups producing multivalued groups are defined by cocycles with coefficients in the group algebra of the original group and obtain classification theorems on these deformations. We indicate a connection between the linear deformations of discrete groups introduced in this paper and the well-known constructions of multivalued groups. We describe the manifold of three-dimensional associative commutative algebras with identity element, fixed basis, and a constant number of values. The group algebras of n-valued groups of order three (three-dimensional n-group algebras) form a discrete set in this manifold

  1. A Finite Model Property for Intersection Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Statman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We show that the relational theory of intersection types known as BCD has the finite model property; that is, BCD is complete for its finite models. Our proof uses rewriting techniques which have as an immediate by-product the polynomial time decidability of the preorder <= (although this also follows from the so called beta soundness of BCD.

  2. Finite-Element Software for Conceptual Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemann, J.; Sandberg, G.; Damkilde, Lars

    2010-01-01

    and research. Forcepad is an effort to provide a conceptual design and teaching tool in a finite-element software package. Forcepad is a two-dimensional finite-element application based on the same conceptual model as image editing applications such as Adobe Photoshop or Microsoft Paint. Instead of using...

  3. Non-linear finite element modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    The note is written for courses in "Non-linear finite element method". The note has been used by the author teaching non-linear finite element modeling at Civil Engineering at Aalborg University, Computational Mechanics at Aalborg University Esbjerg, Structural Engineering at the University...

  4. Nonlinear finite element modeling of corrugated board

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. C. Gilchrist; J. C. Suhling; T. J. Urbanik

    1999-01-01

    In this research, an investigation on the mechanical behavior of corrugated board has been performed using finite element analysis. Numerical finite element models for corrugated board geometries have been created and executed. Both geometric (large deformation) and material nonlinearities were included in the models. The analyses were performed using the commercial...

  5. Finite Topological Spaces as a Pedagogical Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmstutler, Randall D.; Higginbottom, Ryan S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose the use of finite topological spaces as examples in a point-set topology class especially suited to help students transition into abstract mathematics. We describe how carefully chosen examples involving finite spaces may be used to reinforce concepts, highlight pathologies, and develop students' non-Euclidean intuition. We end with a…

  6. Extracting excited mesons from the finite volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doring, Michael [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    As quark masses come closer to their physical values in lattice simulations, finite volume effects dominate the level spectrum. Methods to extract excited mesons from the finite volume are discussed, like moving frames in the presence of coupled channels. Effective field theory can be used to stabilize the determination of the resonance spectrum.

  7. Interpretability degrees of finitely axiomatized sequential theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Albert

    In this paper we show that the degrees of interpretability of finitely axiomatized extensions-in-the-same-language of a finitely axiomatized sequential theory-like Elementary Arithmetic EA, IΣ1, or the Gödel-Bernays theory of sets and classes GB-have suprema. This partially answers a question posed

  8. Interpretability Degrees of Finitely Axiomatized Sequential Theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Albert

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we show that the degrees of interpretability of finitely axiomatized extensions-in-the-same-language of a finitely axiomatized sequential theory —like Elementary Arithmetic EA, IΣ1, or the Gödel-Bernays theory of sets and classes GB— have suprema. This partially answers a question

  9. On Finite $J$-Hermitian Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sungwook

    2014-01-01

    In his recent paper arXiv:1312.7738, the author discussed $J$-Hermitian quantum mechanics and showed that $PT$-symmetric quantum mechanics is essentially $J$-Hermitian quantum mechanics. In this paper, the author discusses finite $J$-Hermitian quantum mechanics which is derived naturally from its continuum one and its relationship with finite $PT$-symmetric quantum mechanics.

  10. Least-squares finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Bochev, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Since their emergence, finite element methods have taken a place as one of the most versatile and powerful methodologies for the approximate numerical solution of Partial Differential Equations. This book presents the theory and practice of least-square finite element methods, their strengths and weaknesses, successes, and open problems

  11. Continuous Time Random Walks in finite domains and general boundary conditions: some formal considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Milligen, B. Ph. [Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT; Calvo, Ivan [CIEMAT, Madrid; Sanchez, Raul [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    The present work studies continuous time random walks (CTRWs) in a finite domain. A broad class of boundary conditions, of which absorbing and reflecting boundaries are particular cases, is considered. It is shown how any CTRW in this class can be mapped to a CTRW in an infinite domain. This may allow applying well-known techniques for infinite CTRWs to the problem of obtaining the fluid limit for finite domain CTRWs, where the fluid limit (or hydrodynamic limit) refers to the partial differential equation describing the long time and large distance behavior of the system. As an illustration, the fluid limit equation and its propagator are obtained explicitly in the case of purely reflecting boundaries. We also derive the modification of the Riemann-Liouville fractional differential operators implementing the reflecting boundary conditions.

  12. Continuous time random walks in finite domains and general boundary conditions: some formal considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligen, B Ph van; Calvo, I [Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT para Fusion, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, R [Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)], E-mail: boudewijn.vanmilligen@ciemat.es

    2008-05-30

    The present work studies continuous time random walks (CTRWs) in a finite domain. A broad class of boundary conditions, of which absorbing and reflecting boundaries are particular cases, is considered. It is shown how any CTRW in this class can be mapped to a CTRW in an infinite domain. This may allow applying well-known techniques for infinite CTRWs to the problem of obtaining the fluid limit for finite domain CTRWs, where the fluid limit (or hydrodynamic limit) refers to the partial differential equation describing the long time and large distance behaviour of the system. As an illustration, the fluid limit equation and its propagator are obtained explicitly in the case of purely reflecting boundaries. We also derive the modification of the Riemann-Liouville fractional differential operators implementing the reflecting boundary conditions.

  13. Seasonal soybean crop reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaster, E. W. (Principal Investigator); Chance, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Data are presented from field measurements of 1980 including 5 acquisitions of handheld radiometer reflectance measurements, 7 complete sets of parameters for implementing the Suits mode, and other biophysical parameters to characterize the soybean canopy. LANDSAT calculations on the simulated Brazilian soybean reflectance are included along with data collected during the summer and fall on 1981 on soybean single leaf optical parameters for three irrigation treatments. Tests of the Suits vegetative canopy reflectance model for the full hemisphere of observer directions as well as the nadir direction show moderate agreement for the visible channels of the MSS and poor agreement in the near infrared channel. Temporal changes in the spectral characteristics of the single leaves were seen to occur as a function of maturity which demonstrates that the absorptance of a soybean single leaf is more a function of thetransmittancee characteristics than the seasonally consistent single leaf reflectance.

  14. Reflectance Reference Targets (OTTER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Spectral reflectance measurements of flat field targets as reference points representative of pseudo-invariant targets as measured by Spectron SE590...

  15. Reflectance Reference Targets (OTTER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spectral reflectance measurements of flat field targets as reference points representative of pseudo-invariant targets as measured by Spectron SE590 spectrophotometer

  16. Topology optimization using the finite volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Allan; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Sigmund, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Computational procedures for topology optimization of continuum problems using a material distribution method are typically based on the application of the finite element method (FEM) (see, e.g. [1]). In the present work we study a computational framework based on the finite volume method (FVM, s......: the Finite Volume Method. London: Longman Scientific Technical......Computational procedures for topology optimization of continuum problems using a material distribution method are typically based on the application of the finite element method (FEM) (see, e.g. [1]). In the present work we study a computational framework based on the finite volume method (FVM, see......, e.g. [2]) in order to develop methods for topology design for applications where conservation laws are critical such that element--wise conservation in the discretized models has a high priority. This encompasses problems involving for example mass and heat transport. The work described...

  17. Averaging theorems in finite deformation plasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Nemat-Nasser, S C

    1999-01-01

    The transition from micro- to macro-variables of a representative volume element (RVE) of a finitely deformed aggregate (e.g., a composite or a polycrystal) is explored. A number of exact fundamental results on averaging techniques, $9 valid at finite deformations and rotations of any arbitrary heterogeneous continuum, are obtained. These results depend on the choice of suitable kinematic and dynamic variables. For finite deformations, the deformation gradient and $9 its rate, and the nominal stress and its rate, are optimally suited for the averaging purposes. A set of exact identities is presented in terms of these variables. An exact method for homogenization of an ellipsoidal inclusion in an $9 unbounded finitely deformed homogeneous solid is presented, generalizing Eshelby's method for application to finite deformation problems. In terms of the nominal stress rate and the rate of change of the deformation gradient, $9 measured relative to any arbitrary state, a general phase-transformation problem is con...

  18. An introduction to finite tight frames

    CERN Document Server

    Waldron, Shayne F D

    2018-01-01

    This textbook is an introduction to the theory and applications of finite tight frames, an area that has developed rapidly in the last decade. Stimulating much of this growth are the applications of finite frames to diverse fields such as signal processing, quantum information theory, multivariate orthogonal polynomials, and remote sensing. Key features and topics: * First book entirely devoted to finite frames * Extensive exercises and MATLAB examples for classroom use * Important examples, such as harmonic and Heisenberg frames, are presented in preliminary chapters, encouraging readers to explore and develop an intuitive feeling for tight frames * Later chapters delve into general theory details and recent research results * Many illustrations showing the special aspects of the geometry of finite frames * Provides an overview of the field of finite tight frames * Discusses future research directions in the field Featuring exercises and MATLAB examples in each chapter, the book is well suited as a textbook ...

  19. Thoughts on Reflection (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been some acknowledgement in the published literature that reflection is a crucial element of the evidence based library and information practice (EBLIP model we have adopted (Booth 2004, 2006; Grant 2007; Helliwell 2007. As we work through a problem and try to incorporate the best available evidence into our decision making, reflection is required at several stages, including the very identification of the problem through to our assessment of the process itself and what we have learned in order to inform future practice. However, reflection and reflective writing have not fully been integrated into the process we espouse, and very little has been done to look more closely at this element of the model and how it can be integrated into professional learning.In a recently published research article, Sen (2010 confirms the relationship between reflection and several aspects of professional practice. These include critical review and decision making, two aspects that are tied closely to the evidence based process. Sen notes: Students were more likely to show evidence of learning, self‐development, the ability to review issues crucially, awareness of their own mental functions, ability to make decision [sic] and being empowered when they had mastered the art of reflective practice and the more deeply analytical reflective writing. (p.84 EBLIP (the journal tries to incorporate elements of reflection within the articles we publish. While we clearly believe in the need for our profession to do quality research and publish that research so that it can be accessible to practitioners, we also know that research cannot be looked at in isolation. Our evidence summaries are one way of reflecting critically on previously published research, and in the same vein, our classics bring older research studies back to the foreground. This work needs to continue to be discussed and looked at for its impact on our profession.More directly, the Using

  20. On the reflection of solitons of the cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    KAUST Repository

    Katsaounis, Theodoros

    2016-07-05

    In this paper, we perform a numerical study on the interesting phenomenon of soliton reflection of solid walls. We consider the 2D cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation as the underlying mathematical model, and we use an implicit-explicit type Crank-Nicolson finite element scheme for its numerical solution. After verifying the perfect reflection of the solitons on a vertical wall, we present the imperfect reflection of a dark soliton on a diagonal wall.

  1. Optimization of finite-size errors in finite-temperature calculations of unordered phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Deepak; Srednicki, Mark; Rigol, Marcos

    2015-06-01

    It is common knowledge that the microcanonical, canonical, and grand-canonical ensembles are equivalent in thermodynamically large systems. Here, we study finite-size effects in the latter two ensembles. We show that contrary to naive expectations, finite-size errors are exponentially small in grand canonical ensemble calculations of translationally invariant systems in unordered phases at finite temperature. Open boundary conditions and canonical ensemble calculations suffer from finite-size errors that are only polynomially small in the system size. We further show that finite-size effects are generally smallest in numerical linked cluster expansions. Our conclusions are supported by analytical and numerical analyses of classical and quantum systems.

  2. Stochastic delocalization of finite populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyrhofer, Lukas; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    The localization of populations of replicating bacteria, viruses or autocatalytic chemicals arises in various contexts, such as ecology, evolution, medicine or chemistry. Several deterministic mathematical models have been used to characterize the conditions under which localized states can form, and how they break down due to convective driving forces. It has been repeatedly found that populations remain localized unless the bias exceeds a critical threshold value, and that close to the transition the population is characterized by a diverging length scale. These results, however, have been obtained upon ignoring number fluctuations (‘genetic drift’), which are inevitable given the discreteness of the replicating entities. Here, we study the localization/delocalization of a finite population in the presence of genetic drift. The population is modeled by a linear chain of subpopulations, or demes, which exchange migrants at a constant rate. Individuals in one particular deme, called ‘oasis’, receive a growth rate benefit, and the total population is regulated to have constant size N. In this ecological setting, we find that any finite population delocalizes on sufficiently long time scales. Depending on parameters, however, populations may remain localized for a very long time. The typical waiting time to delocalization increases exponentially with both population size and distance to the critical wind speed of the deterministic approximation. We augment these simulation results by a mathematical analysis that treats the reproduction and migration of individuals as branching random walks subject to global constraints. For a particular constraint, different from a fixed population size constraint, this model yields a solvable first moment equation. We find that this solvable model approximates very well the fixed population size model for large populations, but starts to deviate as population sizes are small. Nevertheless, the qualitative behavior of the

  3. What is finiteness? (Abhishek Banerjee) (Indian Institute of Science)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Do finites get enough respect? • Finiteness is easy, no? • Just count whether 1, 2, 3,... • But then we miss out on the true richness of the concept of finitness. • There's more finiteness around. In fact, finiteness is what helps us really understand things. 5 ...

  4. THE PROBLEMS AND ECONOMIC REFLECTIONS OF ENTERPRISES IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana (BĂDULESCU ANASTASE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the problems and reflections of Romania,in the period after the aderation to EU, this being a period when all the economic activities will be tested according to their level of efficiency and productivity of work. Maintining the traditional form of organization of work, of investments of structure of the finite products may transform the country into a colony, into an exporter of raw materials and workforce in the EU. We can notice the same thing, based on our research, in the case of the Moldavian Republic: the exports and investments influence very little the economic growth. This is due to the reduced performances of Moldavian exporters, and, even more, to the uncompetitive structure on groups of products. Half of the Moldavian exports is assured by the agro-alimentary market, without noticing some obvious trends of specialization in other new branches. The cause of this trend is the weak productive potential of national agriculture and industry (Anastase.I 2010.

  5. Convolution and Equidistribution Sato-Tate Theorems for Finite-Field Mellin Transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Nicholas M

    2012-01-01

    Convolution and Equidistribution explores an important aspect of number theory--the theory of exponential sums over finite fields and their Mellin transforms--from a new, categorical point of view. The book presents fundamentally important results and a plethora of examples, opening up new directions in the subject. The finite-field Mellin transform (of a function on the multiplicative group of a finite field) is defined by summing that function against variable multiplicative characters. The basic question considered in the book is how the values of the Mellin transform are distributed (in

  6. FEBio: finite elements for biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Steve A; Ellis, Benjamin J; Ateshian, Gerard A; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    In the field of computational biomechanics, investigators have primarily used commercial software that is neither geared toward biological applications nor sufficiently flexible to follow the latest developments in the field. This lack of a tailored software environment has hampered research progress, as well as dissemination of models and results. To address these issues, we developed the FEBio software suite (http://mrl.sci.utah.edu/software/febio), a nonlinear implicit finite element (FE) framework, designed specifically for analysis in computational solid biomechanics. This paper provides an overview of the theoretical basis of FEBio and its main features. FEBio offers modeling scenarios, constitutive models, and boundary conditions, which are relevant to numerous applications in biomechanics. The open-source FEBio software is written in C++, with particular attention to scalar and parallel performance on modern computer architectures. Software verification is a large part of the development and maintenance of FEBio, and to demonstrate the general approach, the description and results of several problems from the FEBio Verification Suite are presented and compared to analytical solutions or results from other established and verified FE codes. An additional simulation is described that illustrates the application of FEBio to a research problem in biomechanics. Together with the pre- and postprocessing software PREVIEW and POSTVIEW, FEBio provides a tailored solution for research and development in computational biomechanics.

  7. Finite element coiled cochlea model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isailovic, Velibor; Nikolic, Milica; Milosevic, Zarko; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Radovic, Milos; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Cochlea is important part of the hearing system, and thanks to special structure converts external sound waves into neural impulses which go to the brain. Shape of the cochlea is like snail, so geometry of the cochlea model is complex. The simplified cochlea coiled model was developed using finite element method inside SIFEM FP7 project. Software application is created on the way that user can prescribe set of the parameters for spiral cochlea, as well as material properties and boundary conditions to the model. Several mathematical models were tested. The acoustic wave equation for describing fluid in the cochlea chambers - scala vestibuli and scala timpani, and Newtonian dynamics for describing vibrations of the basilar membrane are used. The mechanical behavior of the coiled cochlea was analyzed and the third chamber, scala media, was not modeled because it does not have a significant impact on the mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Future work is needed for more realistic geometry model. Coiled model of the cochlea was created and results are compared with initial simplified coiled model of the cochlea.

  8. Stabilized Finite Elements in FUN3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, W. Kyle; Newman, James C.; Karman, Steve L.

    2017-01-01

    A Streamlined Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) stabilized finite-element discretization has been implemented as a library into the FUN3D unstructured-grid flow solver. Motivation for the selection of this methodology is given, details of the implementation are provided, and the discretization for the interior scheme is verified for linear and quadratic elements by using the method of manufactured solutions. A methodology is also described for capturing shocks, and simulation results are compared to the finite-volume formulation that is currently the primary method employed for routine engineering applications. The finite-element methodology is demonstrated to be more accurate than the finite-volume technology, particularly on tetrahedral meshes where the solutions obtained using the finite-volume scheme can suffer from adverse effects caused by bias in the grid. Although no effort has been made to date to optimize computational efficiency, the finite-element scheme is competitive with the finite-volume scheme in terms of computer time to reach convergence.

  9. Iterative solutions of finite difference diffusion equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, S.V.G.; Khandekar, D.C.; Trasi, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The heterogeneous arrangement of materials and the three-dimensional character of the reactor physics problems encountered in the design and operation of nuclear reactors makes it necessary to use numerical methods for solution of the neutron diffusion equations which are based on the linear Boltzmann equation. The commonly used numerical method for this purpose is the finite difference method. It converts the diffusion equations to a system of algebraic equations. In practice, the size of this resulting algebraic system is so large that the iterative methods have to be used. Most frequently used iterative methods are discussed. They include : (1) basic iterative methods for one-group problems, (2) iterative methods for eigenvalue problems, and (3) iterative methods which use variable acceleration parameters. Application of Chebyshev theorem to iterative methods is discussed. The extension of the above iterative methods to multigroup neutron diffusion equations is also considered. These methods are applicable to elliptic boundary value problems in reactor design studies in particular, and to elliptic partial differential equations in general. Solution of sample problems is included to illustrate their applications. The subject matter is presented in as simple a manner as possible. However, a working knowledge of matrix theory is presupposed. (M.G.B.)

  10. Symmetry an introduction to group theory and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    McWeeny, Roy

    2002-01-01

    Well-organized volume develops ideas of group and representation theory in progressive fashion. Emphasis on finite groups describing symmetry of regular polyhedra and of repeating patterns, plus geometric illustrations.

  11. Computing nilpotent quotients in finitely presented Lie rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csaba Schneider

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available A nilpotent quotient algorithm for finitely presented Lie rings over Z (and Q is described. The paper studies the graded and non-graded cases separately. The algorithm computes the so-called nilpotent presentation for a finitely presented, nilpotent Lie ring. A nilpotent presentation consists of generators for the abelian group and the products expressed as linear combinations for pairs formed by generators. Using that presentation the word problem is decidable in L. Provided that the Lie ring L is graded, it is possible to determine the canonical presentation for a lower central factor of L. Complexity is studied and it is shown that optimising the presentation is NP-hard. Computational details are provided with examples, timing and some structure theorems obtained from computations. Implementation in C and GAP interface are available.

  12. Relaxation and correlations in time in a finite volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinn-Justin, J.

    1986-01-01

    To describe relaxation towards equilibrium and correlating in time in stochastic numerical simulations, it is necessary to examine dynamical stochastic evolution equations from the renormalization group (R.G.) point of view, and then finite volume effects since all numerical simulations take place of course in a finite volume. The stochastic evolution equation which describes in the continuum space and time limit the time behavior of numerical simulations is the Langevin equation and in a first part we shall discuss briefly its algebraic properties. We shall show how it is possible to associate with the Langevin equation a conventional effective action in such a way that its renomalization and R.G. properties can be discussed in the language of standard field theory. However in this discussion it is essential to recognize that this effective action has a B.R.S. type symmetry of the form encountered in the quantization of gauge theories

  13. The Reflective Foundation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde Jørgensen, Ida

    Private foundations and cultural philanthropy by élites is viewed with increasing skepticism in recent years, begging the question of the extent to which foundations reflect on their role vis a vis wider societal norms. Through the prism of the New Carlsberg Foundation, financed by the brewery...... Carlsberg A/S, the paper seeks to elucidate the way in which one culturally significant foundation from Denmark has reflected on - and legitimated - its work and investments at critical moments in the past decades. The paper indicates a foundation with a high degree of reflection on the wider societal...... pressures, and position as a mediator between culture and capital. The paper draws inspiration from the institutional logics perspective and Boltanski and Thévenot’s convention theoretical work, to analyse the legitimations pursued by the foundation....

  14. Finite Markov processes and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Iosifescu, Marius

    2007-01-01

    A self-contained treatment of finite Markov chains and processes, this text covers both theory and applications. Author Marius Iosifescu, vice president of the Romanian Academy and director of its Center for Mathematical Statistics, begins with a review of relevant aspects of probability theory and linear algebra. Experienced readers may start with the second chapter, a treatment of fundamental concepts of homogeneous finite Markov chain theory that offers examples of applicable models.The text advances to studies of two basic types of homogeneous finite Markov chains: absorbing and ergodic ch

  15. Finite element analysis of piezoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowrie, F.; Stewart, M.; Cain, M.; Gee, M.

    1999-01-01

    This guide is intended to help people wanting to do finite element analysis of piezoelectric materials by answering some of the questions that are peculiar to piezoelectric materials. The document is not intended as a complete beginners guide for finite element analysis in general as this is better dealt with by the individual software producers. The guide is based around the commercial package ANSYS as this is a popular package amongst piezoelectric material users, however much of the information will still be useful to users of other finite element codes. (author)

  16. A Note on Powers in Finite Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabrandt, Andreas; Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2016-01-01

    , system theory, coding theory and cryptology. In this connection it is of interest to know criteria for the existence of squares and other powers in arbitrary finite fields. Making good use of polynomial division in polynomial rings over finite fields, we have examined a classical criterion of Euler...... for squares in odd prime fields, giving it a formulation which is apt for generalization to arbitrary finite fields and powers. Our proof uses algebra rather than classical number theory, which makes it convenient when presenting basic methods of applied algebra in the classroom....

  17. Finite-volume scheme for anisotropic diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es, Bram van, E-mail: bramiozo@gmail.com [Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica, P.O. Box 94079, 1090GB Amsterdam (Netherlands); FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, The Netherlands" 1 (Netherlands); Koren, Barry [Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Blank, Hugo J. de [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, The Netherlands" 1 (Netherlands)

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we apply a special finite-volume scheme, limited to smooth temperature distributions and Cartesian grids, to test the importance of connectivity of the finite volumes. The area of application is nuclear fusion plasma with field line aligned temperature gradients and extreme anisotropy. We apply the scheme to the anisotropic heat-conduction equation, and compare its results with those of existing finite-volume schemes for anisotropic diffusion. Also, we introduce a general model adaptation of the steady diffusion equation for extremely anisotropic diffusion problems with closed field lines.

  18. An introduction to finite projective planes

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, Abraham Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Geared toward both beginning and advanced undergraduate and graduate students, this self-contained treatment offers an elementary approach to finite projective planes. Following a review of the basics of projective geometry, the text examines finite planes, field planes, and coordinates in an arbitrary plane. Additional topics include central collineations and the little Desargues' property, the fundamental theorem, and examples of finite non-Desarguesian planes.Virtually no knowledge or sophistication on the part of the student is assumed, and every algebraic system that arises is defined and

  19. Electrical machine analysis using finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Nicola

    2005-01-01

    OUTLINE OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDSVector AnalysisElectromagnetic FieldsFundamental Equations SummaryReferencesBASIC PRINCIPLES OF FINITE ELEMENT METHODSIntroductionField Problems with Boundary ConditionsClassical Method for the Field Problem SolutionThe Classical Residual Method (Galerkin's Method)The Classical Variational Method (Rayleigh-Ritz's Method)The Finite Element MethodReferencesAPPLICATIONS OF THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD TO TWO-DIMENSIONAL FIELDSIntroductionLinear Interpolation of the Function fApplication of the Variational MethodSimple Descriptions of Electromagnetic FieldsAppendix: I

  20. The theory of finitely generated commutative semigroups

    CERN Document Server

    Rédei, L; Stark, M; Gravett, K A H

    1966-01-01

    The Theory of Finitely Generated Commutative Semigroups describes a theory of finitely generated commutative semigroups which is founded essentially on a single """"fundamental theorem"""" and exhibits resemblance in many respects to the algebraic theory of numbers. The theory primarily involves the investigation of the F-congruences (F is the the free semimodule of the rank n, where n is a given natural number). As applications, several important special cases are given. This volume is comprised of five chapters and begins with preliminaries on finitely generated commutative semigroups before

  1. Books and monographs on finite element technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper proviees a listing of all of the English books and some of the foreign books on finite element technology, taking into account also a list of the conference proceedings devoted solely to finite elements. The references are divided into categories. Attention is given to fundamentals, mathematical foundations, structural and solid mechanics applications, fluid mechanics applications, other applied science and engineering applications, computer implementation and software systems, computational and modeling aspects, special topics, boundary element methods, proceedings of symmposia and conferences on finite element technology, bibliographies, handbooks, and historical accounts.

  2. Topology optimization problems for reflection and dissipation of elastic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2007-01-01

    This paper is devoted to topology optimization problems for elastic wave propagation. The objective of the study is to maximize the reflection or the dissipation in a finite slab of material for pressure and shear waves in a range of frequencies. The optimized designs consist of two or three...... material phases: a host material and scattering and/or absorbing inclusions. The capabilities of the optimization algorithm are demonstrated with two numerical examples in which the reflection and dissipation of ground-borne wave pulses are maximized....

  3. Reflections and Interpretations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reflections and Interpretations is an anthology on The Freedom Writers’ methodology. It is an anthology for all those with a professional need for texts explaining, not only how The Freedom Writers’ tools are being used, but also why they work so convincingly well. It is not an anthology of guide......Reflections and Interpretations is an anthology on The Freedom Writers’ methodology. It is an anthology for all those with a professional need for texts explaining, not only how The Freedom Writers’ tools are being used, but also why they work so convincingly well. It is not an anthology...

  4. Reflecting telescope optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Raymond N

    2004-01-01

    R.N. Wilson's two-volume treatise on reflecting telescope optics has become a classic in its own right. It is intended to give a complete treatment of the subject, addressing professionals in research and industry as well as students of astronomy and amateur astronomers. This first volume, Basic Design Theory and its Historical Development, is devoted to the theory of reflecting telescope optics and systematically recounts the historical progress. The author's approach is morphological, with strong emphasis on the historical development. The book is richly illustrated including spot-diagrams a

  5. Postscript: Delving into Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Noffke

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Although, the authors presented an earlier version of the paper, "The Dimensions of Reflection: A Conceptual and Contextual Analysis", at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, April, 1988, they did not have a chance to publish the paper till today. This postscript is about why the paper stayed as an “unpublished” conference paper for so long. Editors believe that the authors’ reflection on their academic journey with the paper in the postscript could be seen as an outstanding practical exemplar, a moral-political narrative of how to shape and create well-formed academic lives and identities.

  6. Self-Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2018-01-01

    Reflecting has a double meaning, mirroring and thinking. The seminar will investigate how these two meanings intervene in each other. As we perceive we are already in pre-refectory state, and thinking involves a lot of not only thoughts, but also of senses and sensing, wherefrom our thoughts starts...... and where our thoughts ends. How are our reflections in the digital age? Human experience is based on everything that surrounds us. Not only the physical reality, but also our perception of it. This perception, which consists of presence, intimacy and materiality, is being transformed by digital technology...

  7. Optimized Finite-Difference Coefficients for Hydroacoustic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Responsible utilization of marine renewable energy sources through the use of current energy converter (CEC) and wave energy converter (WEC) devices requires an understanding of the noise generation and propagation from these systems in the marine environment. Acoustic noise produced by rotating turbines, for example, could adversely affect marine animals and human-related marine activities if not properly understood and mitigated. We are utilizing a 3-D finite-difference acoustic simulation code developed at Sandia that can accurately propagate noise in the complex bathymetry in the near-shore to open ocean environment. As part of our efforts to improve computation efficiency in the large, high-resolution domains required in this project, we investigate the effects of using optimized finite-difference coefficients on the accuracy of the simulations. We compare accuracy and runtime of various finite-difference coefficients optimized via criteria such as maximum numerical phase speed error, maximum numerical group speed error, and L-1 and L-2 norms of weighted numerical group and phase speed errors over a given spectral bandwidth. We find that those coefficients optimized for L-1 and L-2 norms are superior in accuracy to those based on maximal error and can produce runtimes of 10% of the baseline case, which uses Taylor Series finite-difference coefficients at the Courant time step limit. We will present comparisons of the results for the various cases evaluated as well as recommendations for utilization of the cases studied. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Mach reflection of a ZND detonation wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Ning, J.; Lee, J. H. S.

    2015-05-01

    The Mach reflection of a ZND detonation wave on a wedge is investigated numerically. A two-step chain-branching reaction model is used giving a thermally neutral induction zone followed by a chemical reaction zone for the detonation wave. The presence of a finite reaction zone thickness renders the Mach reflection process non-self-similar. The variation of the height of the Mach stem with distance of propagation does not correspond to a straight curve from the wedge apex as governed by self-similar three-shock theory. However, the present results indicate that in the near field around the wedge apex, and in the far field where the reaction zone thickness is small compared to the distance of travel of the Mach stem, the behavior appears to be self-similar. This corresponds to the so-called frozen and equilibrium limit pointed out by Hornung and Sanderman for strong discontinuity shock waves and by Shepherd et al. for cellular detonations. The critical wedge angle for the transition from regular to Mach reflection is found to correspond to the value determined by self-similar three-shock theory, but not by reactive three-shock theory for a discontinuous detonation front.

  9. Reflective Writing through the Use of Guiding Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa-Inaty, Jase

    2015-01-01

    Reflections can be seen as powerful tools for growth and intellectual development. It is no surprise that the writing of reflections is common practice at a Federal Institute in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The research presented sought to explore possible differences in reflective writing once guidelines were presented to a group of interns in…

  10. Reflections on Software Research

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 8. Reflections on Software Research. Dennis M Ritchie. Classics Volume 17 Issue 8 August 2012 pp 810-816. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/017/08/0810-0816. Author Affiliations.

  11. Lights, Camera, Reflection!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourlam, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    There are many ways to critique teaching, but few are more effective than video. Personal reflection through the use of video allows one to see what really happens in the classrooms--good and bad--and provides a visual path forward for improvement, whether it be in one's teaching, work with a particular student, or learning environment. This…

  12. Onward: Reflections on Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kimberley Buster

    2018-01-01

    The author has been blessed with great mentors throughout her career. When she was invited to participate in the Leadership University of Mary Washington (UMW), a mentoring program at her institution, she did not hesitate to say yes. In this article, the author shares her reflections on mentoring.

  13. Aluminum: Reflective Aluminum Chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recca, L.

    1999-01-29

    This fact sheet reveals how the use of reflective aluminum chips on rooftops cuts down significantly on heat absorption, thus decreasing the need for air conditioning. The benefits, including energy savings that could reach the equivalent of 1.3 million barrels of oil annually for approximately 100,000 warehouses, are substantial.

  14. Wave Reflection Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Larsen, Brian Juul

    The investigation concerns the design of a new internal breakwater in the main port of Ibiza. The objective of the model tests was in the first hand to optimize the cross section to make the wave reflection low enough to ensure that unacceptable wave agitation will not occur in the port. Secondly...

  15. Reflective Abstraction and Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Philip

    Piaget's theory of reflective abstraction can supplement cognitive science models of representation by specifying both the act of construction and the component steps through which knowers pass as they acquire knowledge. But, while approaches suggested by cognitive science supplement Piaget by awakening researchers to the role of auxiliary factors…

  16. Value reflected health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen; Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the impact of a value-reflected approach in health education by demonstrating the nature of professional competence development connected to this approach. It is based on findings from two three-year health educational development projects carried out by school health nurses...... develop pedagogical competences in health education improving school childrens’ health....

  17. Reflecting Contemporary Design Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Ida

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, design research has been the object of growing attention in universities and academies throughout the world. The present paper addresses the heterogeneous character of design research and the current need for reflection on the various approaches and interests. For this purpose, t...

  18. Reflections on the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, James M.

    2003-01-01

    Reflections on the field of special education offer six ideas: (1) the value of science; (2) the continuing value of separate and special education for some students; (3) the continuing importance of prevention; (4) the importance of academic instruction; (5) the importance of social justice for the poor; and (6) a renewed emphasis on human…

  19. Finite element methods a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Whiteley, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    This book presents practical applications of the finite element method to general differential equations. The underlying strategy of deriving the finite element solution is introduced using linear ordinary differential equations, thus allowing the basic concepts of the finite element solution to be introduced without being obscured by the additional mathematical detail required when applying this technique to partial differential equations. The author generalizes the presented approach to partial differential equations which include nonlinearities. The book also includes variations of the finite element method such as different classes of meshes and basic functions. Practical application of the theory is emphasised, with development of all concepts leading ultimately to a description of their computational implementation illustrated using Matlab functions. The target audience primarily comprises applied researchers and practitioners in engineering, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  20. A finite element solution of transonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, K. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of finite elements is explored in a field in which its use has previously not been deemed very feasible, that of transonic flow. The specific problem chosen is that of steady small-disturbance transonic flow. The nonlinear equations are formulated with an artificial viscosity term added to yield the proper domain of dependence and directional bias in supersonic regions and across imbedded shock waves. Justification is given for the problem and means of solution chosen, and the potential advantages of the finite element procedure over standard finite difference procedures are discussed. Several possible improvements on the method as presently derived are stated. Computational mesh requirements and certain mesh variations are described. Some results equivalent to finite difference calculations are given as a sample solution.

  1. Advanced finite element method in structural engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Yu-Qiu; Long, Zhi-Fei

    2009-01-01

    This book systematically introduces the research work on the Finite Element Method completed over the past 25 years. Original theoretical achievements and their applications in the fields of structural engineering and computational mechanics are discussed.

  2. Multigrid methods for mortar finite elements

    OpenAIRE

    Wohlmuth, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    Multigrid methods for mortar finite elements / R. Krause ; B. Wohlmuth. - In: Multigrid methods VI / Erik Dick ... (ed.). - Berlin u.a. : Springer, 2000. - S. 136-142 (Lecture notes in computational science and engineering ; 14)

  3. Jauch-Piron logics with finiteness conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalewicz, Vladimír

    1991-04-01

    We show that there are no non-Boolean block-finite orthomodular posets possessing a unital set of Jauch-Piron states. Thus, an orthomodular poset representing a quantum physical system must have infinitely many blocks.

  4. Finite Volumes for Complex Applications VII

    CERN Document Server

    Ohlberger, Mario; Rohde, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The methods considered in the 7th conference on "Finite Volumes for Complex Applications" (Berlin, June 2014) have properties which offer distinct advantages for a number of applications. The second volume of the proceedings covers reviewed contributions reporting successful applications in the fields of fluid dynamics, magnetohydrodynamics, structural analysis, nuclear physics, semiconductor theory and other topics. The finite volume method in its various forms is a space discretization technique for partial differential equations based on the fundamental physical principle of conservation. Recent decades have brought significant success in the theoretical understanding of the method. Many finite volume methods preserve further qualitative or asymptotic properties, including maximum principles, dissipativity, monotone decay of free energy, and asymptotic stability. Due to these properties, finite volume methods belong to the wider class of compatible discretization methods, which preserve qualitative propert...

  5. Deterministic equation solving over finite fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woestijne, Christiaan Evert van de

    2006-01-01

    It is shown how to solve diagonal forms in many variables over finite fields by means of a deterministic efficient algorithm. Applications to norm equations, quadratic forms, and elliptic curves are given.

  6. Gravity-induced stresses in finite slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, W.Z.

    1994-01-01

    An exact solution for gravity-induced stresses in finite elastic slopes is presented. This solution, which is applied for gravity-induced stresses in 15, 30, 45 and 90?? finite slopes, has application in pit-slope design, compares favorably with published finite element results for this problem and satisfies the conditions that shear and normal stresses vanish on the ground surface. The solution predicts that horizontal stresses are compressive along the top of the slopes (zero in the case of the 90?? slope) and tensile away from the bottom of the slopes, effects which are caused by downward movement and near-surface horizontal extension in front of the slope in response to gravity loading caused by the additional material associated with the finite slope. ?? 1994.

  7. Super-renormalizable and finite gravitational theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Modesto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We hereby introduce and extensively study a class of non-polynomial higher derivative theories of gravity that realize a ultraviolet (UV completion of Einstein general relativity. These theories are unitary (ghost free and at most only one-loop divergences survive. The outcome is a class of theories super-renormalizable in even dimension and finite in odd dimension. Moreover, we explicitly prove in D=4 that there exists an extension of the theory that is completely finite and all the beta functions vanish even at one-loop. These results can be easily extended in extra dimensions and it is likely that the higher dimensional theory can be made finite, too. Therefore we have the possibility for “finite quantum gravity” in any dimension.

  8. FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR PREDICTING RESIDUAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    direction (σx) had a maximum value of 375MPa (tensile) and minimum value of ... These results shows that the residual stresses obtained by prediction from the finite element method are in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Chiral crossover transition in a finite volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chao; Jia, Wenbao; Sun, An; Zhang, Liping; Zong, Hongshi

    2018-02-01

    Finite volume effects on the chiral crossover transition of strong interactions at finite temperature are studied by solving the quark gap equation within a cubic volume of finite size L. With the anti-periodic boundary condition, our calculation shows the chiral quark condensate, which characterizes the strength of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, decreases as L decreases below 2.5 fm. We further study the finite volume effects on the pseudo-transition temperature {T}{{c}} of the crossover, showing a significant decrease in {T}{{c}} as L decreases below 3 fm. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475085, 11535005, 11690030, 51405027), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (020414380074), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2016M591808) and Open Research Foundation of State Key Lab. of Digital Manufacturing Equipment & Technology in Huazhong University of Science & Technology (DMETKF2015015)

  10. Discrete mechanics Based on Finite Element Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jing-bo; Guo, Han-Ying; Wu, Ke

    2002-01-01

    Discrete Mechanics based on finite element methods is presented in this paper. We also explore the relationship between this discrete mechanics and Veselov discrete mechanics. High order discretizations are constructed in terms of high order interpolations.

  11. Critical-Point Structure in Finite Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.

    2006-01-01

    Properties of quantum shape-phase transitions in finite nuclei are considered in the framework of the interacting boson model. Special emphasis is paid to the dynamics at the critical-point of a general first-order phase transition

  12. Quantiles for Finite Mixtures of Normal Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mezbahur; Rahman, Rumanur; Pearson, Larry M.

    2006-01-01

    Quantiles for finite mixtures of normal distributions are computed. The difference between a linear combination of independent normal random variables and a linear combination of independent normal densities is emphasized. (Contains 3 tables and 1 figure.)

  13. ANSYS mechanical APDL for finite element analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    ANSYS Mechanical APDL for Finite Element Analysis provides a hands-on introduction to engineering analysis using one of the most powerful commercial general purposes finite element programs on the market. Students will find a practical and integrated approach that combines finite element theory with best practices for developing, verifying, validating and interpreting the results of finite element models, while engineering professionals will appreciate the deep insight presented on the program's structure and behavior. Additional topics covered include an introduction to commands, input files, batch processing, and other advanced features in ANSYS. The book is written in a lecture/lab style, and each topic is supported by examples, exercises and suggestions for additional readings in the program documentation. Exercises gradually increase in difficulty and complexity, helping readers quickly gain confidence to independently use the program. This provides a solid foundation on which to build, preparing readers...

  14. Mean field canonical treatments at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossignoli, R.

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed to make mean field and higher order canonical treatments at finite temperature. Definite improvements are made over the usual Hartree-Fock thermal (great canonical) treatment. (Author). 10 refs., 3 figs

  15. Finite elements in CAD and ADINA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathe, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    The use of finite element methods in computer-aided-design - CAD - is discussed. Some current capabilities are presented and important future developments are outlined. The discussion focusses on the use of the ADINA program in CAD applications. (orig.)

  16. Reflection in learning at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steen Høyrup

    2006-01-01

    Three domains and approaches of learning - adult learning, problem-solving and cirtical reflection theory are used as different lenses through which the question: what is reflection and how is reflection related to learning, - are interpreted.......Three domains and approaches of learning - adult learning, problem-solving and cirtical reflection theory are used as different lenses through which the question: what is reflection and how is reflection related to learning, - are interpreted....

  17. The finite-difference and finite-element modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moszo, P.; Kristek, J.; Galis, M.; Pazak, P.; Balazovijech, M.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion is an irreplaceable tool in investigation of the Earth's structure, processes in the Earth, and particularly earthquake phenomena. Among various numerical methods, the finite-difference method is the dominant method in the modeling of earthquake motion. Moreover, it is becoming more important in the seismic exploration and structural modeling. At the same time we are convinced that the best time of the finite-difference method in seismology is in the future. This monograph provides tutorial and detailed introduction to the application of the finite-difference, finite-element, and hybrid finite-difference-finite-element methods to the modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion. The text does not cover all topics and aspects of the methods. We focus on those to which we have contributed. (Author)

  18. Finite element approximation of the Isaacs equation

    OpenAIRE

    Salgado, Abner J.; Zhang, Wujun

    2015-01-01

    We propose and analyze a two-scale finite element method for the Isaacs equation. The fine scale is given by the mesh size $h$ whereas the coarse scale $\\varepsilon$ is dictated by an integro-differential approximation of the partial differential equation. We show that the method satisfies the discrete maximum principle provided that the mesh is weakly acute. This, in conjunction with weak operator consistency of the finite element method, allows us to establish convergence of the numerical s...

  19. Finite Element Model of Gear Induction Hardening

    OpenAIRE

    Hodek, J; Zemko, M; Shykula, P

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a finite element model of a gear induction hardening process. The gear was surface-heated by an induction coil and quickly cooled by spraying water. The finite element model was developed as a three-dimensional model. The electromagnetic field, temperature field, stress distribution and microstructure distribution were examined. Temperature and microstructural characteristics were measured and used. The gear material data was obtained in part by mea...

  20. Generators for finite depth subfactor planar algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The main result of Kodiyalam and Tupurani [3] shows that a subfactor planar algebra of finite depth is singly generated with a finite presentation. If P is a subfactor planar algebra of depth k, it is shown there that a single 2k-box generates P. It is natural to ask what the smallest s is such that a single s-box generates P. While ...