WorldWideScience

Sample records for finite range potentials

  1. Renormalized vacuum polarization for finite range potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewin, J.D.

    1975-10-01

    This report presents computed vacuum polarization effects for leptons in a spherical potential well of radius large compared with the lepton Compton wavelength. These results, together with those previously obtained for small radius wells, show that the total charge generated is independent of well radius and lepton mass; thus the quadratic divergence obtained for the total unrenormalized charge can be removed by the subtraction of the contribution computed for a lepton of mass M(→ infinity) as in the case of the Coulomb potential. Various other problems arising from the earlier study are clarified by the present results. (author)

  2. A study of the angular momentum dependence of the phase shift for finite range and Coulomb potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valluri, S.R.; Romo, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    The dependence of the phase shift δ l (k) on the angular momentum l is investigated. An analytic expression for the derivative of the phase shift with respect to angular momentum is derived for a class of potentials that includes complex and real potentials. The potentials behave like the finite range potential for small r and like a Coulomb potential for large r. Specific examples like the square well, the pure point charge Coulomb and a combination of a square well and the Coulomb potential are analytically treated. Possible applications are briefly indicated. (orig.)

  3. DWBA (d,N) Calculations Including Dirac Phenomenological Potentials and an Exact Treatment of Finite-range Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Eric

    2005-04-01

    An algorithm for the inclusion of both Dirac phenomenological potentials and an exact treatment of finite-range effects within the DWBA is presented. The numerical implementation of this algorithm is used to calculate low-energy deuteron stripping cross sections, analyzing powers, and polarizations. These calculations are compared with experimental data where available. The impact of using several commonly employed nuclear potentials (Reid soft-core, Bonn, Argonne v18) for the internal deuteron wave function is also examined.

  4. One-dimensional "atom" with zero-range potential perturbed by finite sequence of zero-duration laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, A. A.; Chuluunbaatar, O.; Popov, Yu. V.; Vinitsky, S. I.; Derbov, V. L.; Lovetskiy, K. P.

    2018-04-01

    The exactly soluble model of a train of zero-duration electromagnetic pulses interacting with a 1D atom with short-range interaction potential modelled by a δ-function is considered. The model is related to the up-to-date laser techniques providing the duration of pulses as short as a few attoseconds and the intensities higher than 1014 W/cm2.

  5. Finite-Temperature Higgs Potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgopolov, M.V.; Gurskaya, A.V.; Rykova, E.N.

    2016-01-01

    In the present article we consider the short description of the “Finite-Temperature Higgs Potentials” program for calculating loop integrals at vanishing external momenta and applications for extended Higgs potentials reconstructions. Here we collect the analytic forms of the relevant loop integrals for our work in reconstruction of the effective Higgs potential parameters in extended models (MSSM, NMSSM and etc.)

  6. The use of Ixaru's method in locating the poles of the S-matrix in strictly finite-range potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vertse, Tamas; Lovas, R. G.; Racz, A.; Salamon, P. [University of Debrecen, Faculty of Informatics, Chair of Applied Mathematics and Probability, Debrecen, Hungary and Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); University of Debrecen, Faculty of Informatics, Chair of Applied Mathematics and Probability, Debrecen (Hungary); Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2012-09-26

    Energies of the S-matrix poles are calculated by solving the radial Schroedinger equation numerically by using Ixaru's CPM(2) method. The trajectories of the poles in the complex wave number plane are determined for two nuclear potentials that are zero beyond finite distances. These are the Woods-Saxon form with cutoff and the Salamon-Vertse potential, which goes to zero smoothly at a finite distance. Properties of the trajectories are analyzed for real and complex values of the depths of the corresponding potentials.

  7. Finite Range Decomposition of Gaussian Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Brydges, C D; Mitter, P K

    2003-01-01

    Let $D$ be the finite difference Laplacian associated to the lattice $bZ^{d}$. For dimension $dge 3$, $age 0$ and $L$ a sufficiently large positive dyadic integer, we prove that the integral kernel of the resolvent $G^{a}:=(a-D)^{-1}$ can be decomposed as an infinite sum of positive semi-definite functions $ V_{n} $ of finite range, $ V_{n} (x-y) = 0$ for $|x-y|ge O(L)^{n}$. Equivalently, the Gaussian process on the lattice with covariance $G^{a}$ admits a decomposition into independent Gaussian processes with finite range covariances. For $a=0$, $ V_{n} $ has a limiting scaling form $L^{-n(d-2)}Gamma_{ c,ast }{bigl (frac{x-y}{ L^{n}}bigr )}$ as $nrightarrow infty$. As a corollary, such decompositions also exist for fractional powers $(-D)^{-alpha/2}$, $0

  8. Mappings with closed range and finite dimensional linear spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyahen, S.O.

    1984-09-01

    This paper looks at two settings, each of continuous linear mappings of linear topological spaces. In one setting, the domain space is fixed while the range space varies over a class of linear topological spaces. In the second setting, the range space is fixed while the domain space similarly varies. The interest is in when the requirement that the mappings have a closed range implies that the domain or range space is finite dimensional. Positive results are obtained for metrizable spaces. (author)

  9. Quasi-particles at finite chemical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardim, F. G.; Steffens, F. M.

    2010-01-01

    We present in this work the thermodynamic consistent quasi-particle model at finite chemical potential, to describe the Quark Gluon Plasma composed of two light quarks and gluons. The quasi-particle general solution will be discussed, and comparison with perturbative QCD and lattice data will be shown.

  10. A finite range coupled channel Born approximation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, P.; Koshel, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    The computer code OUKID calculates differential cross sections for direct transfer nuclear reactions in which multistep processes, arising from strongly coupled inelastic states in both the target and residual nuclei, are possible. The code is designed for heavy ion reactions where full finite range and recoil effects are important. Distorted wave functions for the elastic and inelastic scattering are calculated by solving sets of coupled differential equations using a Matrix Numerov integration procedure. These wave functions are then expanded into bases of spherical Bessel functions by the plane-wave expansion method. This approach allows the six-dimensional integrals for the transition amplitude to be reduced to products of two one-dimensional integrals. Thus, the inelastic scattering is treated in a coupled channel formalism while the transfer process is treated in a finite range born approximation formalism. (Auth.)

  11. QCD at finite isospin chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Bastian B.; Endrődi, Gergely; Schmalzbauer, Sebastian

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the properties of QCD at finite isospin chemical potential at zero and non-zero temperatures. This theory is not affected by the sign problem and can be simulated using Monte-Carlo techniques. With increasing isospin chemical potential and temperatures below the deconfinement transition the system changes into a phase where charged pions condense, accompanied by an accumulation of low modes of the Dirac operator. The simulations are enabled by the introduction of a pionic source into the action, acting as an infrared regulator for the theory, and physical results are obtained by removing the regulator via an extrapolation. We present an update of our study concerning the associated phase diagram using 2+1 flavours of staggered fermions with physical quark masses and the comparison to Taylor expansion. We also present first results for our determination of the equation of state at finite isospin chemical potential and give an example for a cosmological application. The results can also be used to gain information about QCD at small baryon chemical potentials using reweighting with respect to the pionic source parameter and the chemical potential and we present first steps in this direction.

  12. Analysis of (d,n) reactions via the Dirac DWBA with finite range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Eric; McNeil, J. A.

    2004-10-01

    The Distorted-wave Born Approximation (DWBA) is used to calculate differential cross sections of low-energy deuteron stripping reactions. The implementation makes use of Dirac phenomenological potentials with an exact treatment of finite-range effects. The mutual interaction of these effects upon the resulting calculations will be presented. In addition, we use our finite-range implementation to study the effect on the cross sections due to the model dependence of the internal deuteron wave function. Specifically, we examine this effect using the internal deuteron wave functions generated with the Reid soft-core, Bonn, and Argonne-V18 potentials.

  13. Nuclear dynamics with the (finite range) Gogny force: flow effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebille, F.; Royer, G.; Schuck, P.; Gregoire, C.

    1988-01-01

    We introduce for the first time the effective finite range interaction of Gogny in the semi-classical description of heavy ion reactions based on the Landau-Vlasov equation. The characteristics of the flow for heavy ion collisions are studied as functions of the incident energy, the impact parameter and the mass number. The momentum dependence in the mean field together with the non linearities in the collision kernel decrease the flow in contradiction with other calculations; the origins of this discrepancy are studied in details

  14. Finite temperature CPN-1 model and long range Neel order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, Ikuo; Yamamoto, Hisashi.

    1989-09-01

    We study in d space-dimensions the finite temperature behavior of long range Neel order (LRNO) in CP N-1 model as a low energy effective field theory of the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model. For d≤1, or d≤2 at any nonzero temperature, LRNO disappears, in agreement with Mermin-Wagner-Coleman's theorem. For d=3 in the weak coupling region, LRNO exists below the critical temperature T N (Neel temperature). T N decreases as the interlayer coupling becomes relatively weak compared with that within Cu-O layers. (author)

  15. Coulomb breakup of 31Ne using finite range DWBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shubhchintak; Chatterjee, R.

    2013-01-01

    Coulomb breakup of nuclei away from the valley of stability have been one of the most successful probes to unravel their structure. However, it is only recently that one is venturing into medium mass nuclei like 23 O and 31 Ne. This is a very new and exciting development which has expanded the field of light exotic nuclei to the deformed medium mass region. In this contribution, an extension of the previously proposed theory of Coulomb breakup within the post-form finite range distorted wave Born approximation to include deformation of the projectile is reported

  16. Finite Range Effects in Energies and Recombination Rates of Three Identical Bosons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Peder Klokmose; V. Fedorov, D.; S. Jensen, A.

    2013-01-01

    is large. The models are built on contact potentials which take into account finite range effects; one is a two-channel model and the other is an effective range expansion model implemented through the boundary condition on the three-body wave function when two of the particles are at the same point...... in space. We compare the results with the results of the ubiquitous single-parameter zero-range model where only the scattering length is taken into account. Both finite range models predict variations of the well-known geometric scaling factor 22.7 that arises in Efimov physics. The threshold value...... at negative scattering length for creation of a bound trimer moves to higher or lower values depending on the sign of the effective range compared to the location of the threshold for the single-parameter zero-range model. Large effective ranges, corresponding to narrow resonances, are needed...

  17. Landau parameters for finite range density dependent nuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farine, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Landau parameters represent the effective particle-hole interaction at Fermi level. Since between the physical observables and the Landau parameters there is a direct relation their derivation from an effective interaction is of great interest. The parameter F 0 determines the incompressibility K of the system. The parameter F 1 determines the effective mass (which controls the level density at the Fermi level). In addition, F 0 ' determines the symmetry energy, G 0 the magnetic susceptibility, and G 0 ' the pion condensation threshold in nuclear matter. This paper is devoted to a general derivation of Landau parameters for an interaction with density dependent finite range terms. Particular carefulness is devoted to the inclusion of rearrangement terms. This report is part of a larger project which aims at defining a new nuclear interaction improving the well-known D1 force of Gogny et al. for describing the average nuclear properties and exotic nuclei and satisfying, in addition, the sum rules

  18. Complex fragments from excited actinide nuclei. A new test of the finite range model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarantities, D.G.; Bowman, D.R.; Wozniak, G.J.; Charity, R.J.; Liu, Z.H.; McDonald, R.J.; McMahan, M.A.; Moretto, L.G.

    1989-01-01

    Complex fragments ranging in charge from 7 ≤ Z ≤ 45 have been detected in binary coincidence following the reaction of 8.4 MeV/u 232 Th+ 12 C, and are shown to arise from the binary decay of a 244 Cm compound nucleus. This work confirms earlier radiochemical observations of very light fragments in the fission fragment mass distribution, establishes their binary character, and interprets their yield in terms of finite range potential energy barriers. (orig.)

  19. Complex fragments from excited actinide nuclei: A new test of the finite range model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarantities, D.G.; Bowman, D.R.; Wozniak, G.J.; Charity, R.J.; Liu, Z.H.; McDonald, R.J.; McMahan, M.A.; Moretto, L.G.

    1988-05-01

    Complex fragments ranging in charge from 7≤Z≤45 have been detected in binary coincidence following the reaction of 8.4 MeV/u 232 Th+ 12 C, and are shown to arise from the binary decay of a 244 Cm compound nucleus. This work confirms earlier radiochemical observations of very light fragments in the fission fragment mass distribution, establishes their binary character, and interprets their yield in terms of finite range potential energy barriers. 15 refs., 3 figs

  20. Entanglement Entropy in Quantum Spin Chains with Finite Range Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Its, A. R.; Mezzadri, F.; Mo, M. Y.

    2008-11-01

    We study the entropy of entanglement of the ground state in a wide family of one-dimensional quantum spin chains whose interaction is of finite range and translation invariant. Such systems can be thought of as generalizations of the XY model. The chain is divided in two parts: one containing the first consecutive L spins; the second the remaining ones. In this setting the entropy of entanglement is the von Neumann entropy of either part. At the core of our computation is the explicit evaluation of the leading order term as L → ∞ of the determinant of a block-Toeplitz matrix with symbol Φ(z) = left(begin{array}{cc} iλ & g(z) \\ g^{-1}(z) & i λ right), where g( z) is the square root of a rational function and g(1/ z) = g -1( z). The asymptotics of such determinant is computed in terms of multi-dimensional theta-functions associated to a hyperelliptic curve {mathcal{L}} of genus g ≥ 1, which enter into the solution of a Riemann-Hilbert problem. Phase transitions for these systems are characterized by the branch points of {mathcal{L}} approaching the unit circle. In these circumstances the entropy diverges logarithmically. We also recover, as particular cases, the formulae for the entropy discovered by Jin and Korepin [14] for the XX model and Its, Jin and Korepin [12, 13] for the XY model.

  1. Finite-range-scaling analysis of metastability in an Ising model with long-range interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, B.M.; Rikvold, P.A.; Novotny, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    We apply both a scalar field theory and a recently developed transfer-matrix method to study the stationary properties of metastability in a two-state model with weak, long-range interactions: the Nx∞ quasi-one-dimensional Ising model. Using the field theory, we find the analytic continuation f of the free energy across the first-order transition, assuming that the system escapes the metastable state by the nucleation of noninteracting droplets. We find that corrections to the field dependence are substantial, and, by solving the Euler-Lagrange equation for the model numerically, we have verified the form of the free-energy cost of nucleation, including the first correction. In the transfer-matrix method, we associate with the subdominant eigenvectors of the transfer matrix a complex-valued ''constrained'' free-energy density f α computed directly from the matrix. For the eigenvector with an associated magnetization most strongly opposed to the applied magnetic field, f α exhibits finite-range scaling behavior in agreement with f over a wide range of temperatures and fields, extending nearly to the classical spinodal. Some implications of these results for numerical studies of metastability are discussed

  2. Interquark potential with finite quark mass from lattice QCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanai, Taichi; Sasaki, Shoichi

    2011-08-26

    We present an investigation of the interquark potential determined from the q ̄q Bethe-Salpeter (BS) amplitude for heavy quarkonia in lattice QCD. The q ̄q potential at finite quark mass m(q) can be calculated from the equal-time and Coulomb gauge BS amplitude through the effective Schrödinger equation. The definition of the potential itself requires information about a kinetic mass of the quark. We then propose a self-consistent determination of the quark kinetic mass on the same footing. To verify the proposed method, we perform quenched lattice QCD simulations with a relativistic heavy-quark action at a lattice cutoff of 1/a≈2.1  GeV in a range 1.0≤m(q)≤3.6 GeV. Our numerical results show that the q ̄q potential in the m(q)→∞ limit is fairly consistent with the conventional one obtained from Wilson loops. The quark-mass dependence of the q ̄q potential and the spin-spin potential are also examined. © 2011 American Physical Society

  3. Use of a finite range nucleon-nucleon interaction in the continuum shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faes, Jean-Baptiste

    2007-01-01

    The unification of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions was always a great challenge of nuclear physics. The extreme complexity of finite quantum systems lead in the past to a separate development of the nuclear structure and the nuclear reactions. A unified description of structure and reactions is possible within the continuum shell model. All previous applications of this model used the zero-range residual interaction and the finite depth local potential to generate the single-particle basis. In the thesis, we have presented an extension of the continuum shell model for finite-range nucleon-nucleon interaction and an arbitrary number of nucleons in the scattering continuum. The great advantage of the present formulation is the same two-body interaction used both to generate the single-particle basis and to describe couplings to the continuum states. This formulation opens a possibility for an ab initio continuum shell model studies with the same nucleon-nucleon interaction generating the nuclear mean field, the configuration mixing and the coupling to the scattering continuum. First realistic applications of the above model has been shown for spectra of "1"7F and "1"7O, and elastic phase-shifts in the reaction "1"6O(p, p)"1"6O. (author)

  4. Brownian motion in short range random potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, A.H.; Romero, A.H.; Sancho, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    A numerical study of Brownian motion of noninteracting particles in random potentials is presented. The dynamics are modeled by Langevin equations in the high friction limit. The random potentials are Gaussian distributed and short ranged. The simulations are performed in one and two dimensions. Different dynamical regimes are found and explained. Effective subdiffusive exponents are obtained and commented on. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  5. Gravitational Coleman–Weinberg potential and its finite temperature counterpart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Srijit [Astroparticle Physics and Cosmology Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Discipline of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Gandhinagar, Ahmedabad, Gujarat 382424 (India); Majumdar, Parthasarathi [Department of Physics, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananada University, Belur Math, Howrah 711202 (India)

    2014-08-15

    Coleman–Weinberg (CW) phenomena for the case of gravitons minimally coupled to massless scalar field is studied. The one-loop effect completely vanishes if there is no self-interaction term present in the matter sector. The one-loop effective potential is shown to develop an instability in the form of acquiring an imaginary part, which can be traced to the tachyonic pole in the graviton propagator. The finite temperature counterpart of this CW potential is computed to study the behaviour of the potential in the high and low temperature regimes with respect to the typical energy scale of the theory. Finite temperature contribution to the imaginary part of gravitational CW potential exhibits a damped oscillatory behaviour; all thermal effects are damped out as the temperature vanishes, consistent with the zero-temperature result.

  6. Holographic black hole engineering at finite baryon chemical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rougemont, Romulo

    2017-01-01

    This is a contribution for the Proceedings of the Conference Hot Quarks 2016, held at South Padre Island, Texas, USA, 12-17 September 2016. I briefly review some thermodynamic and baryon transport results obtained from a bottom-up Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton holographic model engineered to describe the physics of the quark-gluon plasma at finite temperature and baryon density. The results for the equation of state, baryon susceptibilities, and the curvature of the crossover band are in quantitative agreement with the corresponding lattice QCD results with 2 + 1 flavors and physical quark masses. Baryon diffusion is predicted to be suppressed by increasing the baryon chemical potential. (paper)

  7. Finite-rank potential that reproduces the Pade approximant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, S.

    1979-01-01

    If a scattering potential is of a finite rank, say N, the exact solution of the problem can be obtained from the Born series, if the potential strength is within the radius of convergence; the exact solution can be obtained from the analytical continuation of the formal Born series outside the radius of convergence. Beyond the first 2N terms of the Born series, an individual term of the Born series depends on the first 2N terms, and the [N/N] Pade approximant and the exact solution agree with each other. The above-mentioned features of a finite-rank problem are relevant to scattering theory in general, because most scattering problems may be handled as an extension of the rank-N problem, in which the rank N tends to infinity. The foregoing aspects of scattering theory will be studied in depth in the present paper, and in so doing we proceed in the opposite direction. Namely, given a potential, we calculate the first 2N terms of the Born series for the K matrix and the first N terms of the Born series for the wave function. Using these data, a special rank-N potential is constructed in such a way that it reproduces the [N/N] Pade approximant of the K matrix of the original scattering problem. One great advantage of obtaining such a rank-N potential is that the wave function of the system may be approximated in the same spirit as done for the K matrix; hence, we can introduce a new approximation method for dealing with an off-shell T matrix. A part of the mathematical work is incomplete, but the physical aspects are thoroughly discussed

  8. Statistics of stationary points of random finite polynomial potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Dhagash; Niemerg, Matthew; Sun, Chuang

    2015-01-01

    The stationary points (SPs) of the potential energy landscapes (PELs) of multivariate random potentials (RPs) have found many applications in many areas of Physics, Chemistry and Mathematical Biology. However, there are few reliable methods available which can find all the SPs accurately. Hence, one has to rely on indirect methods such as Random Matrix theory. With a combination of the numerical polynomial homotopy continuation method and a certification method, we obtain all the certified SPs of the most general polynomial RP for each sample chosen from the Gaussian distribution with mean 0 and variance 1. While obtaining many novel results for the finite size case of the RP, we also discuss the implications of our results on mathematics of random systems and string theory landscapes. (paper)

  9. A finite range pairing force for density functional theory in superfluid nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Y.; Ma, Z.Y.; Ring, P.

    2009-01-01

    The problem of pairing in the 1 S 0 channel of finite nuclei is revisited. In nuclear matter forces of separable form can be adjusted to the bare nuclear force, to any phenomenological pairing interaction such as the Gogny force or to exact solutions of the gap equation. In finite nuclei, because of translational invariance, such forces are no longer separable. Using well-known techniques of Talmi and Moshinsky we expand the matrix elements in a series of separable terms, which converges quickly preserving translational invariance and finite range. In this way the complicated problem of a cut-off at large momenta or energies inherent in other separable or zero range pairing forces is avoided. Applications in the framework of the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov approach show that the pairing properties are depicted on almost the same footing as by the original pairing interaction not only in nuclear matter, but also in finite nuclei. This simple separable force can be easily applied for the investigation of pairing properties in nuclei far from stability as well as for further investigations going beyond mean field theory.

  10. Rescaled Range Analysis and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis: Finite Sample Properties and Confidence Intervals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištoufek, Ladislav

    4/2010, č. 3 (2010), s. 236-250 ISSN 1802-4696 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD402/09/H045; GA ČR GA402/09/0965 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) 118310 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : rescaled range analysis * detrended fluctuation analysis * Hurst exponent * long-range dependence Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/E/kristoufek-rescaled range analysis and detrended fluctuation analysis finite sample properties and confidence intervals.pdf

  11. Numerical analysis for finite-range multitype stochastic contact financial market dynamic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ge; Wang, Jun; Fang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to reproduce and study the dynamics of financial markets, a random agent-based financial price model is developed and investigated by the finite-range multitype contact dynamic system, in which the interaction and dispersal of different types of investment attitudes in a stock market are imitated by viruses spreading. With different parameters of birth rates and finite-range, the normalized return series are simulated by Monte Carlo simulation method and numerical studied by power-law distribution analysis and autocorrelation analysis. To better understand the nonlinear dynamics of the return series, a q-order autocorrelation function and a multi-autocorrelation function are also defined in this work. The comparisons of statistical behaviors of return series from the agent-based model and the daily historical market returns of Shanghai Composite Index and Shenzhen Component Index indicate that the proposed model is a reasonable qualitative explanation for the price formation process of stock market systems

  12. Numerical analysis for finite-range multitype stochastic contact financial market dynamic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ge; Wang, Jun; Fang, Wen

    2015-04-01

    In an attempt to reproduce and study the dynamics of financial markets, a random agent-based financial price model is developed and investigated by the finite-range multitype contact dynamic system, in which the interaction and dispersal of different types of investment attitudes in a stock market are imitated by viruses spreading. With different parameters of birth rates and finite-range, the normalized return series are simulated by Monte Carlo simulation method and numerical studied by power-law distribution analysis and autocorrelation analysis. To better understand the nonlinear dynamics of the return series, a q-order autocorrelation function and a multi-autocorrelation function are also defined in this work. The comparisons of statistical behaviors of return series from the agent-based model and the daily historical market returns of Shanghai Composite Index and Shenzhen Component Index indicate that the proposed model is a reasonable qualitative explanation for the price formation process of stock market systems.

  13. Numerical analysis for finite-range multitype stochastic contact financial market dynamic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ge; Wang, Jun [School of Science, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Fang, Wen, E-mail: fangwen@bjtu.edu.cn [School of Economics and Management, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2015-04-15

    In an attempt to reproduce and study the dynamics of financial markets, a random agent-based financial price model is developed and investigated by the finite-range multitype contact dynamic system, in which the interaction and dispersal of different types of investment attitudes in a stock market are imitated by viruses spreading. With different parameters of birth rates and finite-range, the normalized return series are simulated by Monte Carlo simulation method and numerical studied by power-law distribution analysis and autocorrelation analysis. To better understand the nonlinear dynamics of the return series, a q-order autocorrelation function and a multi-autocorrelation function are also defined in this work. The comparisons of statistical behaviors of return series from the agent-based model and the daily historical market returns of Shanghai Composite Index and Shenzhen Component Index indicate that the proposed model is a reasonable qualitative explanation for the price formation process of stock market systems.

  14. Complex periodic potentials with a finite number of band gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, Avinash; Sukhatme, Uday

    2006-01-01

    We obtain several new results for the complex generalized associated Lame potential V(x)=a(a+1)m sn 2 (y,m)+b(b+1)m sn 2 (y+K(m),m)+f(f+1)m sn 2 (y+K(m)+iK ' (m),m)+g(g+1)m sn 2 (y+iK ' (m),m), where y≡x-K(m)/2-iK ' (m)/2, sn(y,m) is the Jacobi elliptic function with modulus parameter m, and there are four real parameters a,b,f,g. First, we derive two new duality relations which, when coupled with a previously obtained duality relation, permit us to relate the band edge eigenstates of the 24 potentials obtained by permutations of the parameters a,b,f,g. Second, we pose and answer the question: how many independent potentials are there with a finite number 'a' of band gaps when a,b,f,g are integers and a≥b≥f≥g≥0? For these potentials, we clarify the nature of the band edge eigenfunctions. We also obtain several analytic results when at least one of the four parameters is a half-integer. As a by-product, we also obtain new solutions of Heun's differential equation

  15. Single particle level density in a finite depth potential well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlomo, S.; Kolomietz, V.M.; Dejbakhsh, H.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the single particle level density g(ε) of a realistic finite depth potential well, concentrating on the continuum (ε>0) region. We carry out quantum-mechanical calculations of the partial level density g l (ε), associated with a well-defined orbital angular momentum l≤40, using the phase-shift derivative method and the Greens-function method and compare the results with those obtained using the Thomas-Fermi approximation. We also numerically calculate g(ε) as a l sum of g l (ε) up to a certain value of scr(l) max ≤40 and determine the corresponding smooth level densities using the Strutinsky smoothing procedure. We demonstrate, in accordance with Levinson close-quote s theorem, that the partial contribution g l (ε) to the single particle level density from continuum states has positive and negative values. However, g(ε) is nonnegative. We also point out that this is not the case for an energy-dependent potential well. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  16. Approximate Approaches to the One-Dimensional Finite Potential Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shilpi; Pathak, Praveen; Singh, Vijay A.

    2011-01-01

    The one-dimensional finite well is a textbook problem. We propose approximate approaches to obtain the energy levels of the well. The finite well is also encountered in semiconductor heterostructures where the carrier mass inside the well (m[subscript i]) is taken to be distinct from mass outside (m[subscript o]). A relevant parameter is the mass…

  17. Cluster decay half-lives of trans-lead nuclei based on a finite-range nucleon–nucleon interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adel, A., E-mail: aa.ahmed@mu.edu.sa [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Physics Department, College of Science, Majmaah University, Zulfi (Saudi Arabia); Alharbi, T. [Physics Department, College of Science, Majmaah University, Zulfi (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-02-15

    Nuclear cluster radioactivity is investigated using microscopic potentials in the framework of the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin approximation of quantum tunneling by considering the Bohr–Sommerfeld quantization condition. The microscopic cluster–daughter potential is numerically constructed in the well-established double-folding model. A realistic M3Y-Paris NN interaction with the finite-range exchange part as well as the ordinary zero-range exchange NN force is considered in the present work. The influence of nuclear deformations on the cluster decay half-lives is investigated. Based on the available experimental data, the cluster preformation factors are extracted from the calculated and the measured half lives of cluster radioactivity. Some useful predictions of cluster emission half-lives are made for emissions of known clusters from possible candidates, which may guide future experiments.

  18. Finite-range Coulomb gas models of banded random matrices and quantum kicked rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Akhilesh; Kumar, Avanish; Puri, Sanjay

    2017-11-01

    Dyson demonstrated an equivalence between infinite-range Coulomb gas models and classical random matrix ensembles for the study of eigenvalue statistics. We introduce finite-range Coulomb gas (FRCG) models via a Brownian matrix process, and study them analytically and by Monte Carlo simulations. These models yield new universality classes, and provide a theoretical framework for the study of banded random matrices (BRMs) and quantum kicked rotors (QKRs). We demonstrate that, for a BRM of bandwidth b and a QKR of chaos parameter α, the appropriate FRCG model has the effective range d=b^{2}/N=α^{2}/N, for large N matrix dimensionality. As d increases, there is a transition from Poisson to classical random matrix statistics.

  19. Finite element transport methods for criticality calculations - current status and potential applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.R.E. de; Goddard, A.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we review the current status of the finite element method applied to the solution of the neutron transport equation and we discuss its potential role in the field of criticality safety. We show that the method's ability in handling complex, irregular geometry in two- and three-dimensions coupled with its accurate solutions potentially renders it an attractive alternative to the longer-established Monte Carlo method. Details of the most favoured form of the method - that which combines finite elements in space and spherical harmonics in angle - are presented. This form of the method, which has been extensively investigated over the last decade by research groups at the University of London, has been numerically implemented in the finite element code EVENT. The code has among its main features the capability of solving fixed source eigenvalue and time-dependent complex geometry problems in two- and three-dimensions. Other features of the code include anisotropic up- and down-scatter, direct and/or adjoint solutions and access to standard data libraries. Numerical examples, ranging from simple criticality benchmark studies to the analysis of idealised three-dimensional reactor cores, are presented to demonstrate the potential of the method. (author)

  20. Surface and finite size effect on fluctuations dynamics in nanoparticles with long-range order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozovska, A. N.; Eliseev, E. A.

    2010-02-01

    The influence of surface and finite size on the dynamics of the order parameter fluctuations and critical phenomena in the three-dimensional (3D)-confined systems with long-range order was not considered theoretically. In this paper, we study the influence of surface and finite size on the dynamics of the order parameter fluctuations in the particles of arbitrary shape. We consider concrete examples of the spherical and cylindrical ferroic nanoparticles within Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire phenomenological approach. Allowing for the strong surface energy contribution in micro and nanoparticles, the analytical expressions derived for the Ornstein-Zernike correlator of the long-range order parameter spatial-temporal fluctuations, dynamic generalized susceptibility, relaxation times, and correlation radii discrete spectra are different from those known for bulk systems. Obtained analytical expressions for the correlation function of the order parameter spatial-temporal fluctuations in micro and nanosized systems can be useful for the quantitative analysis of the dynamical structural factors determined from magnetic resonance diffraction and scattering spectra. Besides the practical importance of the correlation function for the analysis of the experimental data, derived expressions for the fluctuations strength determine the fundamental limits of phenomenological theories applicability for 3D-confined systems.

  1. Neutron star mergers as a probe of modifications of general relativity with finite-range scalar forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagunski, Laura; Zhang, Jun; Johnson, Matthew C.; Lehner, Luis; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Liebling, Steven L.; Palenzuela, Carlos; Neilsen, David

    2018-03-01

    Observations of gravitational radiation from compact binary systems provide an unprecedented opportunity to test general relativity in the strong field dynamical regime. In this paper, we investigate how future observations of gravitational radiation from binary neutron star mergers might provide constraints on finite-range forces from a universally coupled massive scalar field. Such scalar degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) are a characteristic feature of many extensions of general relativity. For concreteness, we work in the context of metric f (R ) gravity, which is equivalent to general relativity and a universally coupled scalar field with a nonlinear potential whose form is fixed by the choice of f (R ). In theories where neutron stars (or other compact objects) obtain a significant scalar charge, the resulting attractive finite-range scalar force has implications for both the inspiral and merger phases of binary systems. We first present an analysis of the inspiral dynamics in Newtonian limit, and forecast the constraints on the mass of the scalar and charge of the compact objects for the Advanced LIGO gravitational wave observatory. We then perform a comparative study of binary neutron star mergers in general relativity with those of a one-parameter model of f (R ) gravity using fully relativistic hydrodynamical simulations. These simulations elucidate the effects of the scalar on the merger and postmerger dynamics. We comment on the utility of the full waveform (inspiral, merger, postmerger) to probe different regions of parameter space for both the particular model of f (R ) gravity studied here and for finite-range scalar forces more generally.

  2. Shear Viscosity of Hot QED at Finite Chemical Potential from Kubo Formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Hou Defu; Li Jiarong

    2008-01-01

    Within the framework of finite temperature feld theory this paper discusses the shear viscosity of hot QED plasma through Kubo formula at one-loop skeleton diagram level with a finite chemical potential. The effective widths (damping rates) are introduced to regulate the pinch singularities and then gives a reliable estimation of the shear viscous coefficient. The finite chemical potential contributes positively compared to the pure temperature case. The result agrees with that from the kinetics theory qualitatively

  3. Avalanching Systems with Longer Range Connectivity: Occurrence of a Crossover Phenomenon and Multifractal Finite Size Scaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Benella

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many out-of-equilibrium systems respond to external driving with nonlinear and self-similar dynamics. This near scale-invariant behavior of relaxation events has been modeled through sand pile cellular automata. However, a common feature of these models is the assumption of a local connectivity, while in many real systems, we have evidence for longer range connectivity and a complex topology of the interacting structures. Here, we investigate the role that longer range connectivity might play in near scale-invariant systems, by analyzing the results of a sand pile cellular automaton model on a Newman–Watts network. The analysis clearly indicates the occurrence of a crossover phenomenon in the statistics of the relaxation events as a function of the percentage of longer range links and the breaking of the simple Finite Size Scaling (FSS. The more complex nature of the dynamics in the presence of long-range connectivity is investigated in terms of multi-scaling features and analyzed by the Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis (ROMA.

  4. Microscopic kaonic-atom optical potential in finite nuclei with Λ(1405) and Σ(1385) resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Masaki; Hirenzaki, Satoru; Toki, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    We derive kaonic-atom optical potentials in finite nuclei microscopically by taking into account the K - NΛ(1405) and K - NΣ(1385) interactions. Using the microscopic optical potentials we solve kaonic atoms with the Klein-Gordon equation in momentum space and obtain the kaonic-atom level shifts and the widths. The experimental data are reproduced well. We discuss also phenomenological optical potentials and compare them with the microscopic ones. In addition, we derive optical potentials in the local-density approximation with the use of the finite-matter kaon self-energy. We find a similarity with the microscopic optical potential derived with finite geometry. (orig.)

  5. New approach of financial volatility duration dynamics by stochastic finite-range interacting voter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guochao; Wang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    We make an approach on investigating the fluctuation behaviors of financial volatility duration dynamics. A new concept of volatility two-component range intensity (VTRI) is developed, which constitutes the maximal variation range of volatility intensity and shortest passage time of duration, and can quantify the investment risk in financial markets. In an attempt to study and describe the nonlinear complex properties of VTRI, a random agent-based financial price model is developed by the finite-range interacting biased voter system. The autocorrelation behaviors and the power-law scaling behaviors of return time series and VTRI series are investigated. Then, the complexity of VTRI series of the real markets and the proposed model is analyzed by Fuzzy entropy (FuzzyEn) and Lempel-Ziv complexity. In this process, we apply the cross-Fuzzy entropy (C-FuzzyEn) to study the asynchrony of pairs of VTRI series. The empirical results reveal that the proposed model has the similar complex behaviors with the actual markets and indicate that the proposed stock VTRI series analysis and the financial model are meaningful and feasible to some extent.

  6. Finite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.R. Azzam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the application of using a skirted foundation system to study the behavior of foundations with structural skirts adjacent to a sand slope and subjected to earthquake loading. The effect of the adopted skirts to safeguard foundation and slope from collapse is studied. The skirts effect on controlling horizontal soil movement and decreasing pore water pressure beneath foundations and beside the slopes during earthquake is investigated. This technique is investigated numerically using finite element analysis. A four story reinforced concrete building that rests on a raft foundation is idealized as a two-dimensional model with and without skirts. A two dimensional plain strain program PLAXIS, (dynamic version is adopted. A series of models for the problem under investigation were run under different skirt depths and lactation from the slope crest. The effect of subgrade relative density and skirts thickness is also discussed. Nodal displacement and element strains were analyzed for the foundation with and without skirts and at different studied parameters. The research results showed a great effectiveness in increasing the overall stability of the slope and foundation. The confined soil footing system by such skirts reduced the foundation acceleration therefore it can be tended to damping element and relieved the transmitted disturbance to the adjacent slope. This technique can be considered as a good method to control the slope deformation and decrease the slope acceleration during earthquakes.

  7. The finite-temperature Gaussian effective potential from a variational principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugerud, H.; Ravndal, F.

    1990-08-01

    Writing the partition function for a scalar quantum field theory as a functional integral, it follows that the finite-temperature Gaussian effective potential is an upper limit to the free energy of the system. Explicit results are given for the anharmonic oscillator at finite temperature. 5 refs., 2 figs

  8. Approximate approaches to the one-dimensional finite potential well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Shilpi; Pathak, Praveen; Singh, Vijay A

    2011-01-01

    The one-dimensional finite well is a textbook problem. We propose approximate approaches to obtain the energy levels of the well. The finite well is also encountered in semiconductor heterostructures where the carrier mass inside the well (m i ) is taken to be distinct from mass outside (m o ). A relevant parameter is the mass discontinuity ratio β = m i /m o . To correctly account for the mass discontinuity, we apply the BenDaniel-Duke boundary condition. We obtain approximate solutions for two cases: when the well is shallow and when the well is deep. We compare the approximate results with the exact results and find that higher-order approximations are quite robust. For the shallow case, the approximate solution can be expressed in terms of a dimensionless parameter σ l = 2m o V 0 L 2 /ℎ 2 (or σ = β 2 σ l for the deep case). We show that the lowest-order results are related by a duality transform. We also discuss how the energy upscales with L (E∼1/L γ ) and obtain the exponent γ. Exponent γ → 2 when the well is sufficiently deep and β → 1. The ratio of the masses dictates the physics. Our presentation is pedagogical and should be useful to students on a first course on elementary quantum mechanics or low-dimensional semiconductors.

  9. Responses of hadrons to the chemical potential at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, S.; Liu, Y.; Miyamura, O.; Forcrand, Ph. de; Garcia Perez, M.; Hioki, S.; Matsufuru, H.; Nakamura, A.; Stamatescu, I.-O.; Takaishi, T.; Umeda, T.

    2002-01-01

    We present a framework to compute the responses of hadron masses to the chemical potential in lattice QCD simulations. As a first trial, the screening mass of the pseudoscalar meson and its first and second responses are evaluated. We present results on a 16x8 2 x4 lattice with two flavors of staggered quarks below and above T c . The responses to both the isoscalar and isovector chemical potentials are obtained. They show different behavior in the low and the high temperature phases, which may be explained as a consequence of chiral symmetry breaking and restoration, respectively

  10. Pion properties at finite isospin chemical potential with isospin symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zuqing; Ping, Jialun; Zong, Hongshi

    2017-12-01

    Pion properties at finite temperature, finite isospin and baryon chemical potentials are investigated within the SU(2) NJL model. In the mean field approximation for quarks and random phase approximation fpr mesons, we calculate the pion mass, the decay constant and the phase diagram with different quark masses for the u quark and d quark, related to QCD corrections, for the first time. Our results show an asymmetry between μI 0 in the phase diagram, and different values for the charged pion mass (or decay constant) and neutral pion mass (or decay constant) at finite temperature and finite isospin chemical potential. This is caused by the effect of isospin symmetry breaking, which is from different quark masses. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175088, 11475085, 11535005, 11690030) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (020414380074)

  11. Phase transitions at finite chemical potential in grand unified theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailin, D.; Love, A.

    1984-01-01

    We discuss the circumstances in which non-zero chemical potentials might prevent symmetry restoration in phase transitions in the early universe at grand unification or partial unification scales. The general arguments are illustrated by consideration of SO(10) and SU(5) grand unified theories. (orig.)

  12. Higher spin entanglement entropy at finite temperature with chemical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bin [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology,Peking University,Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter,5 Yiheyuan Rd, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for High Energy Physics, Peking University,5 Yiheyuan Rd, Beijing 100871 (China); Beijing Center for Mathematics and Information Interdisciplinary Sciences, Beijing 100048 (China); Wu, Jie-qiang [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology,Peking University,Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-07-11

    It is generally believed that the semiclassical AdS{sub 3} higher spin gravity could be described by a two dimensional conformal field theory with W-algebra symmetry in the large central charge limit. In this paper, we study the single interval entanglement entropy on the torus in the CFT with a W{sub 3} deformation. More generally we develop the monodromy analysis to compute the two-point function of the light operators under a thermal density matrix with a W{sub 3} chemical potential to the leading order. Holographically we compute the probe action of the Wilson line in the background of the spin-3 black hole with a chemical potential. We find exact agreement.

  13. Computational thermo-hydro-mechanics for freezing and thawing multiphase geological media in the finite deformation range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Na, S.

    2017-12-01

    A stabilized thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) finite element model is introduced to investigate the freeze-thaw action of frozen porous media in the finite deformation range. By applying the mixture theory, frozen soil is idealized as a composite consisting of three phases, i.e., solid grain, unfrozen water and ice crystal. A generalized hardening rule at finite strain is adopted to replicate how the elasto-plastic responses and critical state evolve under the influence of phase transitions and heat transfer. The enhanced particle interlocking and ice strengthening during the freezing processes and the thawing-induced consolidation at the geometrical nonlinear regimes are both replicated in numerical examples. The numerical issues due to lack of two-fold inf-sup condition and ill-conditioning of the system of equations are addressed. Numerical examples for engineering applications at cold region are analyzed via the proposed model to predict the impacts of changing climate on infrastructure at cold regions.

  14. Finite post synaptic potentials cause a fast neuronal response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz eHelias

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A generic property of the communication between neurons is the exchange of pulsesat discrete time points, the action potentials. However, the prevalenttheory of spiking neuronal networks of integrate-and-fire model neuronsrelies on two assumptions: the superposition of many afferent synapticimpulses is approximated by Gaussian white noise, equivalent to avanishing magnitude of the synaptic impulses, and the transfer oftime varying signals by neurons is assessable by linearization. Goingbeyond both approximations, we find that in the presence of synapticimpulses the response to transient inputs differs qualitatively fromprevious predictions. It is instantaneous rather than exhibiting low-passcharacteristics, depends non-linearly on the amplitude of the impulse,is asymmetric for excitation and inhibition and is promoted by a characteristiclevel of synaptic background noise. These findings resolve contradictionsbetween the earlier theory and experimental observations. Here wereview the recent theoretical progress that enabled these insights.We explain why the membrane potential near threshold is sensitiveto properties of the afferent noise and show how this shapes the neuralresponse. A further extension of the theory to time evolution in discretesteps quantifies simulation artifacts and yields improved methodsto cross check results.

  15. Singularities of elastic scattering amplitude by long-range potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvitsinsky, A.A.; Komarov, I.V.; Merkuriev, S.P.

    1982-01-01

    The angular peculiarities and the zero energy singularities of the elastic scattering amplitude by a long-range potential are described. The singularities of the elastic (2 → 2) scattering amplitude for a system of three Coulomb particles are considered [ru

  16. Interacting steps with finite-range interactions: Analytical approximation and numerical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Diego Felipe; Téllez, Gabriel; González, Diego Luis; Einstein, T. L.

    2013-05-01

    We calculate an analytical expression for the terrace-width distribution P(s) for an interacting step system with nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor interactions. Our model is derived by mapping the step system onto a statistically equivalent one-dimensional system of classical particles. The validity of the model is tested with several numerical simulations and experimental results. We explore the effect of the range of interactions q on the functional form of the terrace-width distribution and pair correlation functions. For physically plausible interactions, we find modest changes when next-nearest neighbor interactions are included and generally negligible changes when more distant interactions are allowed. We discuss methods for extracting from simulated experimental data the characteristic scale-setting terms in assumed potential forms.

  17. Synchronization of oscillators with long range interaction: Phase transition and anomalous finite size effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marodi, M.; D'ovidio, Francesco; Vicsek, T.

    2002-01-01

    of elements. For large number of oscillators and small coupling constant, numerical simulations and analytical arguments indicate that a phase transition separating synchronization from incoherence appears at a decay exponent value equal to the number of dimensions of the lattice. In contrast with earlier......Synchronization in a lattice of a finite population of phase oscillators with algebraically decaying, non-normalized coupling is studied by numerical simulations. A critical level of decay is found, below which full locking takes place if the population contains a sufficiently large number...

  18. Level shifts induced by a short-range potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnakov, B.M.; Mur, V.D.

    1984-01-01

    Formulas are derived which express the shifts of levels with energies Esub(n)sup((0)) << rsub(c)sup(-2) in a field Vsub(f)(r) induced by a short-range potential U(r) of radius rsub(c) in terms of the low energy scattering parameters (scattering length and effective radius) with a moment l in the potential. If the interaction between the particle and center is nonresonant, the method developed is identical to perturbation theory on the scattering length. The theory is extended to systems with random degeneracy (Vsub(f) is the Coulomb potential). Formulas describing quasi-intersection of terms are obtained for the case of resonance interaction with the center in a partial wave with l not equal to 0 when energetically close levels are present in both U and Vsub(f). Some features of the level shift are mentioned for the case when the level possesses an anomalously small coupling energy and its coresponding wave function becomes delocalized with decrease of the coupling energy to zero. The problem is discussed of the level shift when the potential Vsub(f) is a potential well surrounded by a weaklyt penetrable barrier. Some applications of the theory to a particle in the field of two short-range potentials or in the field of a short-range and Coulomb centers are considered. Formulas are also obtained for the shifts and widths of the Landau levels and of the shallow level with an arbitrary moment which perturbs the Landau levels

  19. POTENTIALS OF IMAGE BASED ACTIVE RANGING TO CAPTURE DYNAMIC SCENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jutzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining a 3D description of man-made and natural environments is a basic task in Computer Vision and Remote Sensing. To this end, laser scanning is currently one of the dominating techniques to gather reliable 3D information. The scanning principle inherently needs a certain time interval to acquire the 3D point cloud. On the other hand, new active sensors provide the possibility of capturing range information by images with a single measurement. With this new technique image-based active ranging is possible which allows capturing dynamic scenes, e.g. like walking pedestrians in a yard or moving vehicles. Unfortunately most of these range imaging sensors have strong technical limitations and are not yet sufficient for airborne data acquisition. It can be seen from the recent development of highly specialized (far-range imaging sensors – so called flash-light lasers – that most of the limitations could be alleviated soon, so that future systems will be equipped with improved image size and potentially expanded operating range. The presented work is a first step towards the development of methods capable for application of range images in outdoor environments. To this end, an experimental setup was set up for investigating these proposed possibilities. With the experimental setup a measurement campaign was carried out and first results will be presented within this paper.

  20. Freely cooling granular gases with short-ranged attractive potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Eric; Subramaniam, Shankar, E-mail: shankar@iastate.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Center for Multiphase Flow Research, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    We treat the case of an undriven gas of inelastic hard-spheres with short-ranged attractive potentials via an extension of the pseudo-Liouville operator formalism. New evolution equations for the granular temperature and coordination number are obtained. The granular temperature exhibits deviation from both Haff’s law and the case of long-ranged potentials. We verify this departure using soft-sphere discrete element method simulations. Excellent agreement is found for the duration of the simulation even beyond where exclusively binary collisions are expected. Simulations show the emergence of strong spatial-velocity correlations on the length scale of the last peak in the pair-correlation function but do not show strong correlations beyond this length scale. We argue that molecular chaos may remain an adequate approximation if the system is modelled as a Smoluchowski type equation with aggregation and break-up processes.

  1. Preequilibrium decay in the exciton model for nuclear potential with a finite depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogila, Ye.A.; Kolomiets, V.M.; Sanzhur, A.I.; Shlomo, S.

    1995-01-01

    The spectra of preequilibrium particles, taking into account the energy dependence of the single-particle level density, are calculated using the particle-hole (exciton) level density. We demonstrate the significant effect of the finite depth of the potential well (continuum effect) on partial emission spectra for configurations with a small exciton number

  2. Dependence of Coulomb Sum Rule on the Short Range Correlation by Using Av18 Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarres, M.; Moeini, H.; Moshfegh, H. R.

    The Coulomb sum rule (CSR) and structure factor are calculated for inelastic electron scattering from nuclear matter at zero and finite temperature in the nonrelativistic limit. The effect of short-range correlation (SRC) is presented by using lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) method and the Argonne Av18 and Δ-Reid soft-core potentials. The effects of different potentials as well as temperature are investigated. It is found that the nonrelativistic version of Bjorken scaling approximately sets in at the momentum transfer of about 1.1 to 1.2 GeV/c and the increase of temperature makes it to decrease. While different potentials do not significantly change CSR, the SRC improves the Coulomb sum rule and we get reasonably close results to both experimental data and others theoretical predictions.

  3. Entropy of finite random binary sequences with weak long-range correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, S S; Usatenko, O V

    2014-11-01

    We study the N-step binary stationary ergodic Markov chain and analyze its differential entropy. Supposing that the correlations are weak we express the conditional probability function of the chain through the pair correlation function and represent the entropy as a functional of the pair correlator. Since the model uses the two-point correlators instead of the block probability, it makes it possible to calculate the entropy of strings at much longer distances than using standard methods. A fluctuation contribution to the entropy due to finiteness of random chains is examined. This contribution can be of the same order as its regular part even at the relatively short lengths of subsequences. A self-similar structure of entropy with respect to the decimation transformations is revealed for some specific forms of the pair correlation function. Application of the theory to the DNA sequence of the R3 chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster is presented.

  4. Three loop HTL perturbation theory at finite temperature and chemical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strickland, Michael [Department of Physics, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242 (United States); Andersen, Jens O. [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Bandyopadhyay, Aritra; Haque, Najmul; Mustafa, Munshi G. [Theory Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Su, Nan [Faculty of Physics, University of Bielefeld, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    In this proceedings contribution we present a recent three-loop hard-thermal-loop perturbation theory (HTLpt) calculation of the thermodynamic potential for a finite temperature and chemical potential system of quarks and gluons. We compare the resulting pressure, trace anomaly, and diagonal/off-diagonal quark susceptibilities with lattice data. We show that there is good agreement between the three-loop HTLpt analytic result and available lattice data.

  5. Potential trophic cascades triggered by the barred owl range expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Samantha R.; Noon, Barry R.; Wiens, David; Ripple, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the barred owl (Strix varia) has expanded its range into the Pacific Northwest of the United States resulting in pronounced effects on the demography and behavior of the northern spotted owl (S. occidentalis caurina). The range expansion has brought together historically allopatric species, creating the potential for significant changes in the avian predator community with possible cascading effects on food-web dynamics. The adverse effects of the barred owl on the behavior and demography of the northern spotted owl are well-documented, but little is known about the immediate and long-term effects changes in the predator community may have on native species composition and ecosystem processes. Based on northern spotted owl and barred owl selection for diet and habitat resources, there is a potential for trophic cascades within the region's predator and prey communities, differing responses by their shared and unique prey species, and possible direct and indirect effects on ecosystem processes. We explored the possible ecological consequences of the barred owl range expansion to wildlife communities of the Pacific Northwest based on the theoretical underpinnings of predator–prey relationships, interspecific competition, intraguild predation, and potential cascading trophic interactions. Negative effects on fitness of northern spotted owls because of interspecific competition with barred owls are strong selection forces that may contribute to the regional extinction of the northern spotted owl. In addition, we posit that shared prey species and those uniquely consumed by barred owls, along with other competing native predators, may experience changes in behavior, abundance, and distribution as a result of increased rates of predation by rapidly expanding populations of barred owls.

  6. A Hybrid Finite Element/Helmholtz-Kirchhoff-Integral Model for Shooting Range Sound Prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, M.J.J.; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    National legislation enforces a limit on the Sound Levels of outdoor military shooting ranges observed in nearby residential areas. These restrictions directly influence the number of shots that may be fired at a specific shooting range, which may conflict with the required/ scheduled training

  7. Cell voltage versus electrode potential range in aqueous supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zengxin; Peng, Chuang; Chae, Jung Hoon; Ng, Kok Chiang; Chen, George Z.

    2015-01-01

    Supercapacitors with aqueous electrolytes and nanostructured composite electrodes are attractive because of their high charging-discharging speed, long cycle life, low environmental impact and wide commercial affordability. However, the energy capacity of aqueous supercapacitors is limited by the electrochemical window of water. In this paper, a recently reported engineering strategy is further developed and demonstrated to correlate the maximum charging voltage of a supercapacitor with the capacitive potential ranges and the capacitance ratio of the two electrodes. Beyond the maximum charging voltage, a supercapacitor may still operate, but at the expense of a reduced cycle life. In addition, it is shown that the supercapacitor performance is strongly affected by the initial and zero charge potentials of the electrodes. Further, the differences are highlighted and elaborated between freshly prepared, aged under open circuit conditions, and cycled electrodes of composites of conducting polymers and carbon nanotubes. The first voltammetric charging-discharging cycle has an electrode conditioning effect to change the electrodes from their initial potentials to the potential of zero voltage, and reduce the irreversibility. PMID:25897670

  8. Finite Element Simulation of Medium-Range Blast Loading Using LS-DYNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzhen Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the Finite Element simulation of blast loading using LS-DYNA. The objective is to identify approaches to reduce the requirement of computation effort while maintaining reasonable accuracy, focusing on blast loading scheme, element size, and its relationship with scale of explosion. The study made use of the recently developed blast loading scheme in LS-DYNA, which removes the necessity to model the explosive in the numerical models but still maintains the advantages of nonlinear fluid-structure interaction. It was found that the blast loading technique could significantly reduce the computation effort. It was also found that the initial density of air in the numerical model could be purposely increased to partially compensate the error induced by the use of relatively large air elements. Using the numerical approach, free air blast above a scaled distance of 0.4 m/kg1/3 was properly simulated, and the fluid-structure interaction at the same location could be properly duplicated using proper Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE coupling scheme. The study also showed that centrifuge technique, which has been successfully employed in model tests to investigate the blast effects, may be used when simulating the effect of medium- to large-scale explosion at small scaled distance.

  9. Finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in thin semiconductor specimens for electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somodi, P.K.; Twitchett-Harrison, A.C.; Midgley, P.A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Kardynał, B.E. [Peter Grünberg Institute 9, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Barnes, C.H.W. [Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E., E-mail: rafaldb@gmail.com [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute 5, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Two-dimensional finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in parallel-sided semiconductor specimens that contain p–n junctions are used to assess the effect of the electrical state of the surface of a thin specimen on projected potentials measured using off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. For a specimen that is constrained to have an equipotential surface, the simulations show that the step in the projected potential across a p–n junction is always lower than would be predicted from the properties of the bulk device, but is relatively insensitive to the value of the surface state energy, especially for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. The depletion width measured from the projected potential, however, has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness. The results of the simulations are of broader interest for understanding the influence of surfaces and interfaces on electrostatic potentials in nanoscale semiconductor devices. - Highlights: • Finite element simulations are performed to calculate electrostatic dopant potentials in TEM specimens that contain p–n junctions. • The effect of the electrical state of the specimen surface on the projected potential is assessed for equipotential specimen surfaces. • The step in projected potential is always found to be lower than the step in potential in the bulk device. • The step in projected potential is least sensitive to surface state energy for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. • The depletion width measured from the projected potential has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness.

  10. Finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in thin semiconductor specimens for electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somodi, P.K.; Twitchett-Harrison, A.C.; Midgley, P.A.; Kardynał, B.E.; Barnes, C.H.W.; Dunin-Borkowski, R.E.

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in parallel-sided semiconductor specimens that contain p–n junctions are used to assess the effect of the electrical state of the surface of a thin specimen on projected potentials measured using off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. For a specimen that is constrained to have an equipotential surface, the simulations show that the step in the projected potential across a p–n junction is always lower than would be predicted from the properties of the bulk device, but is relatively insensitive to the value of the surface state energy, especially for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. The depletion width measured from the projected potential, however, has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness. The results of the simulations are of broader interest for understanding the influence of surfaces and interfaces on electrostatic potentials in nanoscale semiconductor devices. - Highlights: • Finite element simulations are performed to calculate electrostatic dopant potentials in TEM specimens that contain p–n junctions. • The effect of the electrical state of the specimen surface on the projected potential is assessed for equipotential specimen surfaces. • The step in projected potential is always found to be lower than the step in potential in the bulk device. • The step in projected potential is least sensitive to surface state energy for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. • The depletion width measured from the projected potential has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness

  11. Condensation phenomena in two-flavor scalar QED at finite chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Alexander; Gattringer, Christof

    2014-01-01

    We study condensation in two-flavored, scalar QED with non-degenerate masses at finite chemical potential. The conventional formulation of the theory has a sign problem at finite density which can be solved using an exact reformulation of the theory in terms of dual variables. We perform a Monte Carlo simulation in the dual representation and observe a condensation at a critical chemical potential $\\mu_c$. After determining the low-energy spectrum of the theory we try to establish a connection between $\\mu_c$ and the mass of the lightest excitation of the system, which are naively expected to be equal. It turns out, however, that the relation of the critical chemical potential to the mass spectrum in this case is non-trivial: Taking into account the form of the condensate and making some simplifying assumptions we suggest an adequate explanation which is supported by numerical results.

  12. A new variable interval schedule with constant hazard rate and finite time range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugallo, Mehdi; Machado, Armando; Vasconcelos, Marco

    2018-05-27

    We propose a new variable interval (VI) schedule that achieves constant probability of reinforcement in time while using a bounded range of intervals. By sampling each trial duration from a uniform distribution ranging from 0 to 2 T seconds, and then applying a reinforcement rule that depends linearly on trial duration, the schedule alternates reinforced and unreinforced trials, each less than 2 T seconds, while preserving a constant hazard function. © 2018 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  13. Finite energy for a gravitational potential falling slower than 1/r

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comelli, Denis; Crisostomi, Marco; Pilo, Luigi; Nesti, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The total energy of any acceptable self-gravitating physical system has to be finite. In GR, the static gravitational potential of a self-gravitating body goes as 1/r at large distances and any slower decrease leads to infinite energy. In this work we show that in modified gravity theories the situation can be much different. We show that there exist spherically symmetric solutions with finite total energy, featuring an asymptotic behavior slower than 1/r and generically of the form r γ . This suggests that configurations with nonstandard asymptotics may well turn out to be physical. The effect is due to an extra field coupled only gravitationally, which allows for modifications of the static potential generated by matter, while counterbalancing the apparently infinite energy budget.

  14. Resonant tunnelling through short-range singular potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolotaryuk, A V; Christiansen, P L; Iermakova, S V

    2007-01-01

    A three-parameter family of point interactions constructed from sequences of symmetric barrier-well-barrier and well-barrier-well rectangles is studied in the limit, when the rectangles are squeezed to zero width but the barrier height and the well depth become infinite (the zero-range limit). The limiting generalized potentials are referred to as the second derivative of Dirac's delta function ±λδ-prime(x) with a renormalized coupling constant λ > 0 or simply as ±δ-prime-like point interactions. As a result, a whole family of self-adjoint extensions of the one-dimensional Schroedinger operator is shown to exist, which results in full and partial resonant tunnelling through this class of singular potentials. The resonant tunnelling occurs for countable sets of interaction strength values in the λ-space which are the roots of several transcendental equations. The comparison with the previous results for δ'-like point interactions is also discussed

  15. On Finite Interquark Potential in D=3 Driven by a Minimal Length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaete, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    We address the effect of a quantum gravity induced minimal length on a physical observable for three-dimensional Yang-Mills. Our calculation is done within stationary perturbation theory. Interestingly enough, we find an ultraviolet finite interaction energy, which contains a regularized logarithmic function and a linear confining potential. This result highlights the role played by the new quantum of length in our discussion

  16. On the spectrum of the staggered Dirac operator at finite chemical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vink, J.C.; Nationaal Inst. voor Kernfysica en Hoge-Energiefysica

    1988-12-01

    The spectrum of the staggered Dirac operator in two-dimensional QEDF is investigated at finite chemical potential. In the quenced model, it is shown that lattice artefacts cause a spurious scattering of eigenvalues. This scattering disappears when lattice distance is taken to zero. In the unquenced model, a new approach is used to show that similar effects are absent. (author). 17 refs.; 6 figs

  17. Nonextensive thermodynamics with finite chemical potentials and protoneutron starss⋆,⋆⋆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megías Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We derive the nonextensive thermodynamics of an ideal quantum gas composed by bosons and/or fermions with finite chemical potentials. We find agreement with previous works when μ ≤ m, and some inconsistencies are corrected for fermions when μ > m. This formalism is then used to study the thermodynamical properties of hadronic systems based on a Hadron Resonance Gas approach. We apply this result to study the protoneutron star stability under several conditions.

  18. Proper construction of ab initio global potential surfaces with accurate long-range interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel

    2000-01-01

    An efficient procedure based on the reproducing kernel Hilbert space interpolation method is presented for constructing intermolecular potential energy surfaces (PES) using not only calculated ab initio data but also a priori information on long-range interactions. Explicitly, use of the reciprocal power reproducing kernel on the semiinfinite interval [0,∞) yields a set of exact linear relations between dispersion (multipolar) coefficients and PES data points at finite internuclear separations. Consequently, given a combined set of ab initio data and the values of dispersion (multipolar) coefficients, the potential interpolation problem subject to long-range interaction constraints can be solved to render globally smooth, asymptotically accurate ab initio potential energy surfaces. Very good results have been obtained for the one-dimensional He-He potential curve and the two-dimensional Ne-CO PES. The construction of the Ne-CO PES was facilitated by invoking a new reproducing kernel for the angular coordinate based on the optimally stable and shape-preserving Bernstein basis functions. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  19. Distribution of Steps with Finite-Range Interactions: Analytic Approximations and Numerical Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    GonzáLez, Diego Luis; Jaramillo, Diego Felipe; TéLlez, Gabriel; Einstein, T. L.

    2013-03-01

    While most Monte Carlo simulations assume only nearest-neighbor steps interact elastically, most analytic frameworks (especially the generalized Wigner distribution) posit that each step elastically repels all others. In addition to the elastic repulsions, we allow for possible surface-state-mediated interactions. We investigate analytically and numerically how next-nearest neighbor (NNN) interactions and, more generally, interactions out to q'th nearest neighbor alter the form of the terrace-width distribution and of pair correlation functions (i.e. the sum over n'th neighbor distribution functions, which we investigated recently.[2] For physically plausible interactions, we find modest changes when NNN interactions are included and generally negligible changes when more distant interactions are allowed. We discuss methods for extracting from simulated experimental data the characteristic scale-setting terms in assumed potential forms.

  20. Energy dependence of the zero-range DWBA normalization of the /sup 58/Ni(/sup 3/He,. cap alpha. )/sup 57/Ni reaction. [15 to 205 GeV, finite-range and nonlocality corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, J R; Zimmerman, W R; Kraushaar, J J [Colorado Univ., Boulder (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics

    1977-01-04

    Strong transitions in the /sup 58/Ni(/sup 3/He,..cap alpha..)/sup 57/Ni reaction were analyzed using both the zero-range and exact finite-range DWBA. Data considered covered a range of bombarding energies from 15 to 205 MeV. The zero-range DWBA described all data well when finite-range and non-locality corrections were included in the local energy approximation. Comparison of zero-range and exact finite-range calculations showed the local energy approximation correction to be very accurate over the entire energy region. Empirically determined D/sub 0/ values showed no energy dependence. A theoretical D/sub 0/ value calculated using an ..cap alpha.. wave function which reproduced the measured ..cap alpha.. rms charge radius and the elastic electron scattering form factor agreed well the empirical values. Comparison was made between these values and D/sub 0/ values quoted previously in the literature.

  1. Iterative optimized effective potential and exact exchange calculations at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattsson, Ann Elisabet; Modine, Normand Arthur; Muller, Richard Partain; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Lippert, Ross A.; Sears, Mark P.; Wright, Alan Francis

    2006-01-01

    We report the implementation of an iterative scheme for calculating the Optimized Effective Potential (OEP). Given an energy functional that depends explicitly on the Kohn-Sham wave functions, and therefore, implicitly on the local effective potential appearing in the Kohn-Sham equations, a gradient-based minimization is used to find the potential that minimizes the energy. Previous work has shown how to find the gradient of such an energy with respect to the effective potential in the zero-temperature limit. We discuss a density-matrix-based derivation of the gradient that generalizes the previous results to the finite temperature regime, and we describe important optimizations used in our implementation. We have applied our OEP approach to the Hartree-Fock energy expression to perform Exact Exchange (EXX) calculations. We report our EXX results for common semiconductors and ordered phases of hydrogen at zero and finite electronic temperatures. We also discuss issues involved in the implementation of forces within the OEP/EXX approach.

  2. Speeding up the first-passage for subdiffusion by introducing a finite potential barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palyulin, Vladimir V; Metzler, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    We show that for a subdiffusive continuous time random walk with scale-free waiting time distribution the first-passage dynamics on a finite interval can be optimized by introduction of a piecewise linear potential barrier. Analytical results for the survival probability and first-passage density based on the fractional Fokker–Planck equation are shown to agree well with Monte Carlo simulations results. As an application we discuss an improved design for efficient translocation of gradient copolymers compared to homopolymer translocation in a quasi-equilibrium approximation. (fast track communications)

  3. Drag force in strongly coupled, anisotropic plasma at finite chemical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Somdeb; Haque, Najmul [Theory Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics,1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700 064 (India)

    2014-12-30

    We employ methods of gauge/string duality to analyze the drag force on a heavy quark moving through a strongly coupled, anisotropic N=4,SU(N) super Yang-Mills plasma in the presence of a finite U(1) chemical potential. We present numerical results valid for any value of the anisotropy parameter and the U(1) charge density and arbitrary direction of the quark velocity with respect to the direction of anisotropy. In the small anisotropy limit we are also able to furnish analytical results.

  4. The effective potential for composite operator in the scalar model at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananos, G.N.J.; Svaiter, N.F. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). E-mail: nfuxsvai@lafex.cbpf.br; gino@lafex.cbpf.br

    2000-10-01

    We discuss the {phi}{sup 4} and {phi}{sup 6} theory defined in a flat D-dimensional space-time. We assume that the system is in equilibrium with a thermal bath at temperature {beta}{sup -1}. To obtain non-perturbative result, the 1?N expansion is used. The method of the composite operator for summing a large set of Feynman graphs, is developed for the finite temperature system. The resumed effective potential and the analysis of the D=3 and D=4 cases are given .(author)

  5. Finite temperature and chemical potential in lattice QCD and its critical point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fodor, Z.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a method to study lattice QCD at finite temperature (T) and chemical potential (μ). We compare the method with direct results and with the Glasgow method by using n f =4 QCD at Im(μ)≠0. We locate the critical endpoint (E) of QCD on the Re(μ)-T plane. We use n f =2+1 dynamical staggered quarks with semi-realistic masses on L t =4 lattices. Our results are based on O(10 3 - 10 4 ) configurations. (orig.)

  6. The effective potential for composite operator in the scalar model at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananos, G.N.J.; Svaiter, N.F.

    2000-10-01

    We discuss the φ 4 and φ 6 theory defined in a flat D-dimensional space-time. We assume that the system is in equilibrium with a thermal bath at temperature β -1 . To obtain non-perturbative result, the 1?N expansion is used. The method of the composite operator for summing a large set of Feynman graphs, is developed for the finite temperature system. The resumed effective potential and the analysis of the D=3 and D=4 cases are given .(author)

  7. New rational extensions of solvable potentials with finite bound state spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandati, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Using the disconjugacy properties of the Schrödinger equation, we develop a new type of generalized SUSY QM partnership which allows generating new solvable rational extensions for translationally shape invariant potentials having a finite bound state spectrum. For this we prolong the dispersion relation relating the energy to the quantum number out of the physical domain until a disconjugacy sector. By Darboux–Bäcklund Transformations built on these prolonged states we obtain new regular isospectral extensions of the initial potential. We give the spectra of these extensions in terms of new orthogonal polynomials and study their shape invariance properties. -- Highlights: ► New solvable quantum potentials. ► SUSY quantum partnership generalized to excited states. ► Based on disconjugacy theorems and asymptotic behaviour. ► Exact spectrum in terms of new orthogonal polynomials. ► Enlarged shape invariance property.

  8. A study of self-consistent Hartree-Fock plus Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer calculations with finite-range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguiano, M.; Lallena, A. M.; Co', G.; De Donno, V.

    2014-02-01

    In this work we test the validity of a Hartree-Fock plus Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer model in which a finite-range interaction is used in the two steps of the calculation by comparing the results obtained to those found in fully self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations using the same interaction. Specifically, we consider the Gogny-type D1S and D1M forces. We study a wide range of spherical nuclei, far from the stability line, in various regions of the nuclear chart, from oxygen to tin isotopes. We calculate various quantities related to the ground state properties of these nuclei, such as binding energies, radii, charge and density distributions, and elastic electron scattering cross sections. The pairing effects are studied by direct comparison with the Hartree-Fock results. Despite its relative simplicity, in most cases, our model provides results very close to those of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations, and it reproduces the empirical evidence of pairing effects rather well in the nuclei investigated.

  9. A new generic model potential for mesogenic systems: square well line potential of variable range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Szabolcs; Vesely, Franz J

    2009-11-21

    A single-site pair potential is derived to approximate the linear n-site square well interaction. The resulting square well line (SWL) potential is analytical, fairly smooth, and reproduces the distance and orientation dependence of the multisite pair energy. It contains only three control parameters n, L, and s(2), in addition to the units of length s(1) and energy epsilon. The advantages of the new model over the traditional potentials such as Gay-Berne and Kihara are that n, L, and s(2) are physically meaningful quantities and that no additional adjustable parameters are introduced. With the SWL potential even very long square well chain molecules may be treated in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations; moreover the model is well suited for perturbation theory. Using Onsager-like theories we test the effect of molecular elongation, temperature, and the range of the square well potential on the vapor-liquid and nematic-smectic A (NS) phase transitions. We find that the vapor-liquid binodal of the SWL fluid is in good agreement with MC results for square well dumbbells. For repulsive SWL particles, varying the interaction range s(2) results in a similar effect on the NS transition as the change in the ionic strength in a real suspension of fd viruses.

  10. Adsorption of a single polymer chain on a surface: effects of the potential range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klushin, Leonid I; Polotsky, Alexey A; Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Markelov, Denis A; Binder, Kurt; Skvortsov, Alexander M

    2013-02-01

    We investigate the effects of the range of adsorption potential on the equilibrium behavior of a single polymer chain end-attached to a solid surface. The exact analytical theory for ideal lattice chains interacting with a planar surface via a box potential of depth U and width W is presented and compared to continuum model results and to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method for self-avoiding chains on a simple cubic lattice. We show that the critical value U(c) corresponding to the adsorption transition scales as W(-1/ν), where the exponent ν=1/2 for ideal chains and ν≈3/5 for self-avoiding walks. Lattice corrections for finite W are incorporated in the analytical prediction of the ideal chain theory U(c)≈(π(2)/24)(W+1/2)(-2) and in the best-fit equation for the MC simulation data U(c)=0.585(W+1/2)(-5/3). Tail, loop, and train distributions at the critical point are evaluated by MC simulations for 1≤W≤10 and compared to analytical results for ideal chains and with scaling theory predictions. The behavior of a self-avoiding chain is remarkably close to that of an ideal chain in several aspects. We demonstrate that the bound fraction θ and the related properties of finite ideal and self-avoiding chains can be presented in a universal reduced form: θ(N,U,W)=θ(NU(c),U/U(c)). By utilizing precise estimations of the critical points we investigate the chain length dependence of the ratio of the normal and lateral components of the gyration radius. Contrary to common expectations this ratio attains a limiting universal value /=0.320±0.003 only at N~5000. Finite-N corrections for this ratio turn out to be of the opposite sign for W=1 and for W≥2. We also study the N dependence of the apparent crossover exponent φ(eff)(N). Strong corrections to scaling of order N(-0.5) are observed, and the extrapolated value φ=0.483±0.003 is found for all values of W. The strong correction to scaling effects found here explain why

  11. Diffusion and superdiffusion of a particle in a random potential with finite correlation time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, N.; Maass, P.; Feng, S.

    1995-01-01

    We study theoretically the long time asymptotic of a quantum particle moving in a random time-dependent potential with finite correlation time, in d=1. By applying a new unitary numerical scheme we first show the minor importance of quantum interference and then derive an effective Langevin-type equation for the corresponding clasical problem in the limit of weak potential. We find that on intermediate time scales E kin (t)∼t 2/5 , while the true long time asymptotic is determined by a new friction term, which gives rise to a stationary power law velocity distribution, multifractality of the velocity moments, and a slowing down of the superdiffusive behavior

  12. Potential capabilities of lunar laser ranging for geodesy and relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Jurgen; Williams, James G.; Turshev, Slava G.; Shelus, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    Here, we review the LLR technique focusing on its impact on Geodesy and Relativity. We discuss the modem observational accuracy and the level of existing LLR modeling. We present the near-term objectives and emphasize improvements needed to fully utilize the scientific potential of LLR.

  13. Some aspects of thermal inflation: The finite temperature potential and topological defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreiro, T.; Copeland, E.J.; Lyth, D.H.; Prokopec, T.

    1996-01-01

    Currently favored extensions of the standard model typically contain open-quote open-quote flaton fields close-quote close-quote defined as fields with large vacuum expectation values (VEV close-quote s) and almost flat potentials. If a flaton field is trapped at the origin in the early Universe, one expects open-quote open-quote thermal inflation close-quote close-quote to take place before it rolls away to the true vacuum, because the finite-temperature correction to the potential will hold it at the origin until the temperature falls below 1 TeV or so. In the first part of the paper, that expectation is confirmed by an estimate of the finite-temperature corrections and of the tunneling rate to the true vacuum, paying careful attention to the validity of the approximations that are used. The second part of the paper considers topological defects which may be produced at the end of an era of thermal inflation. If the flaton fields associated with the era are grand unified theory (GUT) Higgs fields, then its end corresponds to the GUT phase transition. In that case monopoles (as well as GUT Higgs particles) will have to be diluted by a second era of thermal inflation. Such an era will not affect the cosmology of GUT strings, for which the crucial parameter is the string mass per unit length. Because of the flat Higgs potential, the GUT symmetry-breaking scale required for the strings to be a candidate for the origin of large scale structure and the CMB anisotropy is about three times bigger than usual, but given the uncertainties it is still compatible with the one required by the unification of the standard model gauge couplings. The cosmology of textures and of global monopoles is unaffected by the flatness of the potential. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  14. Heavy-quark potential at finite temperature using the holographic correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albacete, Javier L.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Taliotis, Anastasios

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the calculation of a heavy-quark potential in N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at finite temperature using the AdS/CFT correspondence. As is widely known, the potential calculated in the pioneering works of Rey et al.[Nucl. Phys. B527, 171 (1998)] and Brandhuber et al.[Phys. Lett. B 434, 36 (1998)] is zero for separation distances r between the quark and the antiquark above a certain critical separation, at which the potential has a kink. We point out that by analytically continuing the string configurations into the complex plane, and using a slightly different renormalization subtraction, one obtains a smooth nonzero (negative definite) potential without a kink. The obtained potential also has a nonzero imaginary (absorptive) part for separations r>r c =0.870/πT. Most importantly, at large separations r the real part of the potential does not exhibit the exponential Debye falloff expected from perturbation theory and instead falls off as a power law, proportional to 1/r 4 for r>r 0 =2.702/πT.

  15. Finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in thin semiconductor specimens for electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somodi, P K; Twitchett-Harrison, A C; Midgley, P A; Kardynał, B E; Barnes, C H W; Dunin-Borkowski, R E

    2013-11-01

    Two-dimensional finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in parallel-sided semiconductor specimens that contain p-n junctions are used to assess the effect of the electrical state of the surface of a thin specimen on projected potentials measured using off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. For a specimen that is constrained to have an equipotential surface, the simulations show that the step in the projected potential across a p-n junction is always lower than would be predicted from the properties of the bulk device, but is relatively insensitive to the value of the surface state energy, especially for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. The depletion width measured from the projected potential, however, has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness. The results of the simulations are of broader interest for understanding the influence of surfaces and interfaces on electrostatic potentials in nanoscale semiconductor devices. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Exploiting broad-area surface emitting lasers to manifest the path-length distributions of finite-potential quantum billiards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y T; Tuan, P H; Chang, K C; Hsieh, Y H; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2016-01-11

    Broad-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with different cavity sizes are experimentally exploited to manifest the influence of the finite confinement strength on the path-length distribution of quantum billiards. The subthreshold emission spectra of VCSELs are measured to obtain the path-length distributions by using the Fourier transform. It is verified that the number of the resonant peaks in the path-length distribution decreases with decreasing the confinement strength. Theoretical analyses for finite-potential quantum billiards are numerically performed to confirm that the mesoscopic phenomena of quantum billiards with finite confinement strength can be analogously revealed by using broad-area VCSELs.

  17. Improved simple graphical solution for the eigenvalues of the finite square well potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burge, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    The three principal graphical methods for obtaining the energy eigenvalues of the finite square well potential are presented. The forms of the wavefunctions within the well, and the corresponding linear probability densities, are derived directly from the method. A simple extension of the method allows the energy level spectrum to be obtained directly on a linear energy scale. The variations of the energy eigenvalues with well depth and width are separately and jointly displayed, and explicit corresponding functional relationships are derived. Two universal graphs are deduced which allow the rapid appreciation and calculation of the dependence of the energy levels on the depth and width of the well and on the mass of the particle. (author)

  18. Global, finite energy, weak solutions for the NLS with rough, time-dependent magnetic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Paolo; Michelangeli, Alessandro; Scandone, Raffaele

    2018-04-01

    We prove the existence of weak solutions in the space of energy for a class of nonlinear Schrödinger equations in the presence of a external, rough, time-dependent magnetic potential. Under our assumptions, it is not possible to study the problem by means of usual arguments like resolvent techniques or Fourier integral operators, for example. We use a parabolic regularisation, and we solve the approximating Cauchy problem. This is achieved by obtaining suitable smoothing estimates for the dissipative evolution. The total mass and energy bounds allow to extend the solution globally in time. We then infer sufficient compactness properties in order to produce a global-in-time finite energy weak solution to our original problem.

  19. Finite grid radius and thickness effects on retarding potential analyzer measured suprathermal electron density and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of finite grid radius and thickness on the electron current measured by planar retarding potential analyzers (RPAs) is analyzed numerically. Depending on the plasma environment, the current is significantly reduced below that which is calculated using a theoretical equation derived for an idealized RPA having grids with infinite radius and vanishingly small thickness. A correction factor to the idealized theoretical equation is derived for the Pioneer Venus (PV) orbiter RPA (ORPA) for electron gases consisting of one or more components obeying Maxwell statistics. The error in density and temperature of Maxwellian electron distributions previously derived from ORPA data using the theoretical expression for the idealized ORPA is evaluated by comparing the densities and temperatures derived from a sample of PV ORPA data using the theoretical expression with and without the correction factor

  20. A Semi-Potential for Finite and Infinite Sequential Games (Extended Abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Le Roux

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider a dynamical approach to sequential games. By restricting the convertibility relation over strategy profiles, we obtain a semi-potential (in the sense of Kukushkin, and we show that in finite games the corresponding restriction of better-response dynamics will converge to a Nash equilibrium in quadratic time. Convergence happens on a per-player basis, and even in the presence of players with cyclic preferences, the players with acyclic preferences will stabilize. Thus, we obtain a candidate notion for rationality in the presence of irrational agents. Moreover, the restriction of convertibility can be justified by a conservative updating of beliefs about the other players strategies. For infinite sequential games we can retain convergence to a Nash equilibrium (in some sense, if the preferences are given by continuous payoff functions; or obtain a transfinite convergence if the outcome sets of the game are Delta^0_2 sets.

  1. Dominant two-loop corrections to the MSSM finite temperature effective potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    We show that two-loop corrections to the finite temperature effective potential in the MSSM can have a dramatic effect on the strength of the electroweak phase transition, making it more strongly first order. The change in the order parameter v/Tc can be as large as 75% of the one-loop daisy improved result. This effect can be decisive to widen the region in parameter space where erasure of the created baryons by sphaleron processes after the transition is suppressed and hence, where electroweak baryogenesis might be successful. We find an allowed region with tan β< or∼4.5 and a Higgs boson with standard couplings and mass below 80 GeV within the reach of LEP II. (orig.)

  2. A finite-element visualization of quantum reactive scattering. II. Nonadiabaticity on coupled potential energy surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warehime, Mick [Chemical Physics Program, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-2021 (United States); Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H., E-mail: mha@umd.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Institute of Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-2021 (United States)

    2015-01-21

    This is the second in a series of papers detailing a MATLAB based implementation of the finite element method applied to collinear triatomic reactions. Here, we extend our previous work to reactions on coupled potential energy surfaces. The divergence of the probability current density field associated with the two electronically adiabatic states allows us to visualize in a novel way where and how nonadiabaticity occurs. A two-dimensional investigation gives additional insight into nonadiabaticity beyond standard one-dimensional models. We study the F({sup 2}P) + HCl and F({sup 2}P) + H{sub 2} reactions as model applications. Our publicly available code (http://www2.chem.umd.edu/groups/alexander/FEM) is general and easy to use.

  3. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L.; Ayers, Paul W.; Vela, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μ e ) and chemical hardness (η e ) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μ e . Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (−I), positive (−A), and zero values of the fractional charge (−(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness

  4. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco, E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México D. F. 09340 (Mexico); Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Gázquez, José L., E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México D. F. 09340 (Mexico); Ayers, Paul W. [Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Vela, Alberto [Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México D. F. 07360 (Mexico)

    2015-10-21

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μ{sub e}) and chemical hardness (η{sub e}) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μ{sub e}. Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (−I), positive (−A), and zero values of the fractional charge (−(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness.

  5. Effect of finite chemical potential on QGP-hadron phase transition in a statistical model of fireball formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, R.; Singh, S.S.; Jha, A.K.; Gupta, K.K.

    2011-01-01

    We study the effect of finite chemical potential for the QGP constituents in the Ramanathan et al. statistical model. While the earlier computations using this model with vanishing chemical potentials indicated a weakly first order phase transition for the system in the vicinity of 170 MeV, the introduction of finite values for the chemical potentials of the constituents makes the transition a smooth roll over of the phases, while allowing fireball formation with radius of a few 'fermi' to take place. This seems to be in conformity with the latest consensus on the nature of the QGP-Hadron phase transition. (author)

  6. Inversion of potential field data using the finite element method on parallel computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, L.; Altinay, C.; Shaw, S.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we present a formulation of the joint inversion of potential field anomaly data as an optimization problem with partial differential equation (PDE) constraints. The problem is solved using the iterative Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) method with the Hessian operator of the regularization and cross-gradient component of the cost function as preconditioner. We will show that each iterative step requires the solution of several PDEs namely for the potential fields, for the adjoint defects and for the application of the preconditioner. In extension to the traditional discrete formulation the BFGS method is applied to continuous descriptions of the unknown physical properties in combination with an appropriate integral form of the dot product. The PDEs can easily be solved using standard conforming finite element methods (FEMs) with potentially different resolutions. For two examples we demonstrate that the number of PDE solutions required to reach a given tolerance in the BFGS iteration is controlled by weighting regularization and cross-gradient but is independent of the resolution of PDE discretization and that as a consequence the method is weakly scalable with the number of cells on parallel computers. We also show a comparison with the UBC-GIF GRAV3D code.

  7. Exact finite range DWBA results for the /sup 12/C(p,d)/sup 11/C reaction at 700 MeV. [Differential cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rost, E; Shepard, J R [Colorado Univ., Boulder (USA). Nuclear Physics Lab.

    1975-12-08

    The differential cross sections for the /sup 12/C(p,d)/sup 11/C(g.s.) reaction at 700 MeV have been calculated in a full finite range DWBA approach. The absolute cross sections agree with the data and are dominated by contributions arising from the deuteron D-state.

  8. Calculation of electrical potentials on the surface of a realistic head model by finite differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemieux, L.; McBride, A.; Hand, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    We present a method for the calculation of electrical potentials at the surface of realistic head models from a point dipole generator based on a 3D finite-difference algorithm. The model was validated by comparing calculated values with those obtained algebraically for a three-shell spherical model. For a 1.25 mm cubic grid size, the mean error was 4.9% for a superficial dipole (3.75 mm from the inner surface of the skull) pointing in the radial direction. The effect of generator discretization and node spacing on the accuracy of the model was studied. Three values of the node spacing were considered: 1, 1.25 and 1.5 mm. The mean relative errors were 4.2, 6.3 and 9.3%, respectively. The quality of the approximation of a point dipole by an array of nodes in a spherical neighbourhood did not depend significantly on the number of nodes used. The application of the method to a conduction model derived from MRI data is demonstrated. (author)

  9. Solution of Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau equations for finite and infinite square well potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boztosun, I.; Taskin, F.; Burtebayev, N.

    2002-01-01

    The solution of the Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau relativistic equation for spinless boson in a central field has a long standing problem and the mathematical difficulty in attempting to reach the solution even for simple problems has caused the use this equation to be regarded as quite unattractive among scientists. In this paper we first derive the system of the first-order coupled differential equation which enable the energy eigenvalues to be evaluated and show that these equations can be reduced to the second-order Schroedinger type radial differential equation. We then consider some of the properties of this equation, which are needed for practical calculations, and show that using this the second-order radial equation, the physical observables can be found in a very simple way. As an example, we consider a pionic atoms in the finite and infinite square-well potentials and calculate the eigen-energies as well as the wave functions using the relativistic Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau equation. We show that our findings are in excellent agreement with the results of the Klein-Gordon equation

  10. Theoretical predictions for α -decay chains of 118 290 -298Og isotopes using a finite-range nucleon-nucleon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, M.; Adel, A.

    2018-04-01

    The α -decay half-lives of the recently synthesized superheavy nuclei (SHN) are investigated by employing the density dependent cluster model. A realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN ) interaction with a finite-range exchange part is used to calculate the microscopic α -nucleus potential in the well-established double-folding model. The calculated potential is then implemented to find both the assault frequency and the penetration probability of the α particle by means of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation in combination with the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition. The calculated values of α -decay half-lives of the recently synthesized Og isotopes and its decay products are in good agreement with the experimental data. Moreover, the calculated values of α -decay half-lives have been compared with those values evaluated using other theoretical models, and it was found that our theoretical values match well with their counterparts. The competition between α decay and spontaneous fission is investigated and predictions for possible decay modes for the unknown nuclei 118 290 -298Og are presented. We studied the behavior of the α -decay half-lives of Og isotopes and their decay products as a function of the mass number of the parent nuclei. We found that the behavior of the curves is governed by proton and neutron magic numbers found from previous studies. The proton numbers Z =114 , 116, 108, 106 and the neutron numbers N =172 , 164, 162, 158 show some magic character. We hope that the theoretical prediction of α -decay chains provides a new perspective to experimentalists.

  11. A collocation--Galerkin finite element model of cardiac action potential propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J M; McCulloch, A D

    1994-08-01

    A new computational method was developed for modeling the effects of the geometric complexity, nonuniform muscle fiber orientation, and material inhomogeneity of the ventricular wall on cardiac impulse propagation. The method was used to solve a modification to the FitzHugh-Nagumo system of equations. The geometry, local muscle fiber orientation, and material parameters of the domain were defined using linear Lagrange or cubic Hermite finite element interpolation. Spatial variations of time-dependent excitation and recovery variables were approximated using cubic Hermite finite element interpolation, and the governing finite element equations were assembled using the collocation method. To overcome the deficiencies of conventional collocation methods on irregular domains, Galerkin equations for the no-flux boundary conditions were used instead of collocation equations for the boundary degrees-of-freedom. The resulting system was evolved using an adaptive Runge-Kutta method. Converged two-dimensional simulations of normal propagation showed that this method requires less CPU time than a traditional finite difference discretization. The model also reproduced several other physiologic phenomena known to be important in arrhythmogenesis including: Wenckebach periodicity, slowed propagation and unidirectional block due to wavefront curvature, reentry around a fixed obstacle, and spiral wave reentry. In a new result, we observed wavespeed variations and block due to nonuniform muscle fiber orientation. The findings suggest that the finite element method is suitable for studying normal and pathological cardiac activation and has significant advantages over existing techniques.

  12. Perturbation theory for short-range weakly-attractive potentials in one dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amore, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.amore@gmail.com [Facultad de Ciencias, CUICBAS, Universidad de Colima, Bernal Díaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico); Fernández, Francisco M., E-mail: fernande@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [INIFTA (UNLP, CONICET), Division Química Teórica, Blvd. 113 S/N, Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2017-03-15

    We have obtained the perturbative expressions up to sixth order for the energy of the bound state in a one dimensional, arbitrarily weak, short range finite well, applying a method originally developed by Gat and Rosenstein Ref. [1]. The expressions up to fifth order reproduce the results already known in the literature, while the sixth order had not been calculated before. As an illustration of our formulas we have applied them to two exactly solvable problems and to a nontrivial problem.

  13. Influence of the nuclear matter equation of state on the r-mode instability using the finite-range simple effective interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattnaik, S. P.; Routray, T. R.; Viñas, X.; Basu, D. N.; Centelles, M.; Madhuri, K.; Behera, B.

    2018-05-01

    The characteristic physical properties of rotating neutron stars under the r-mode oscillation are evaluated using the finite-range simple effective interaction. Emphasis is given on examining the influence of the stiffness of both the symmetric and asymmetric parts of the nuclear equation of state on these properties. The amplitude of the r-mode at saturation is calculated using the data of particular neutron stars from the considerations of ‘spin equilibrium’ and ‘thermal equilibrium’. The upper limit of the r-mode saturation amplitude is found to lie in the range 10‑8–10‑6, in agreement with the predictions of earlier work.

  14. Isobar contributions to the imaginary part of the optical-model potential for finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjort-Jensen, M.; Borromeo, M.; Muether, H.; Polls, A.

    1992-03-01

    A recently developed non-relativistic method for calculating the nucleon optical-model potential has been employed to evaluate the contributions from isobaric degrees of freedom to the imaginary part of the nucleon optical-model potential. To evaluate the imaginary part of the optical-model potential, the authors include the contributions from terms to second order in the Brueckner G-matrix with and without the inclusion of isobars Δ. Results for 16 O are presented in this work. The contributions to the imaginary part are given by the two-particle-one-hole (2p1h) and three-particle-two-hole (3p2h) diagrams. The latter contributes at negative energies only and the contribution from isobar intermediate states is rather small. The 2p1h receives significant contributions from isobars at energies near the resonance and above the threshold for the excitation of ΔΔ states. In particular, the importance of ΔΔ configurations is rather sensitive to the treatment of short-range correlations. The parameterization of the self-energy in terms of local potentials is discussed. The depletion of the occupation of the single-particle orbits due to nucleon-nucleon correlations and Δ excitations is evaluated. 49 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Mixed hybrid finite elements and streamline computation for the potential flow problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaasschieter, E.F.; Huijben, A.J.M.

    1992-01-01

    An important class of problems in mathematical physics involves equations of the form -¿ · (A¿¿) = f. In a variety of problems it is desirable to obtain an accurate approximation of the flow quantity u = -A¿¿. Such an accurate approximation can be determined by the mixed finite element method. In

  16. Sensitivity of the elastic scattering matrix elements to the range of the inelastic potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawitscher, G.H.; Rasoanaivo, R.Y.

    1983-01-01

    The solution to a system of coupled equations is examined with regard to the effect of the long range part of the inelastic potentials upon the elastic phase shifts. It is found that those parts of the inelastic potentials which occur beyond the range of the elastic to inelastic transition potentials affect the elastic phase shifts in only a minor way. The proof is given theoretically by means of a Green's function formulation which includes the long range part of the inelastic potentials perturbatively. When applied to the calculation of the effect of breakup on the deuteron-nucleus elastic scattering, the argument confirms the finding that errors in the long range part of the potentials in the breakup channels do not sensitively affect the elastic deuteron scattering cross section. This result explains why the elastic scattering is not very sensitive to the choice of the discretization procedure of the breakup space

  17. Exact effective action for (1+1)-dimensional fermions in an Abelian background at finite temperature and chemical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciel, Soraya G.; Perez, Silvana

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we study the effects of a nonzero chemical potential in (1+1)-dimensional quantum field models at finite temperature. We particularly consider massless fermions in an Abelian gauge field background and calculate the effective action by evaluating the n-point functions. We find that the structure of the amplitudes corresponds to a generalization of the structure noted earlier in a calculation without a chemical potential (the associated integrals carry the dependence on the chemical potential). Our calculation shows that the chiral anomaly is unaffected by the presence of a chemical potential at finite temperature. However, unlike in the absence of a chemical potential, odd point functions do not vanish. We trace this to the fact that in the presence of a chemical potential the generalized charge conjugation symmetry of the theory allows for such amplitudes. In fact, we find that all the even point functions are even functions of μ, while the odd point functions are odd functions of μ which is consistent with this generalized charge conjugation symmetry. We show that the origin of the structure of the amplitudes is best seen from a formulation of the theory in terms of left- and right-handed spinors. The calculations are also much simpler in this formulation and it clarifies many other aspects of the theory.

  18. Finite-size, chemical-potential and magnetic effects on the phase transition in a four-fermion interacting model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, E.B.S. [Universidade Federal do Sul e Sudeste do Para, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Maraba (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCTI, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Linhares, C.A. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Malbouisson, A.P.C. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCTI, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Malbouisson, J.M.C. [Universidade Federal da Bahia, Instituto de Fisica, Salvador (Brazil); Santana, A.E. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2017-04-15

    We study effects coming from finite size, chemical potential and from a magnetic background on a massive version of a four-fermion interacting model. This is performed in four dimensions as an application of recent developments for dealing with field theories defined on toroidal spaces. We study effects of the magnetic field and chemical potential on the size-dependent phase structure of the model, in particular, how the applied magnetic field affects the size-dependent critical temperature. A connection with some aspects of the hadronic phase transition is established. (orig.)

  19. Finite difference method calculations of long-range X-ray absorption fine structure for copper over k{approx}20A{sup -1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourke, J.D. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3010 (Australia); Chantler, C.T., E-mail: chantler@physics.unimelb.edu.a [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3010 (Australia)

    2010-07-21

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) is calculated for copper using the cluster based Finite Difference Method for Near-Edge Structure (FDMNES). This approach is conventionally used to produce high accuracy XAFS theory in the near edge region, however, we demonstrate that it can be readily extended to encompass an energy range of more than 1.5 keV (k{approx}20A{sup -1}) from the K absorption edge. Such calculations require extensions to FDMNES to account for thermal effects, in addition to broadening effects due to inelastic processes. Extended calculations beyond the range of near-edge structure also require consideration of technical constraints such as cluster sizes and densities. We find that with our approach, we are able to produce accurate theory ranging from the absorption edge to the smooth atom-like region at high energies, with a single consistent model that is free from any fitting parameters.

  20. Finite difference method calculations of long-range X-ray absorption fine structure for copper over k∼20A-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, J.D.; Chantler, C.T.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) is calculated for copper using the cluster based Finite Difference Method for Near-Edge Structure (FDMNES). This approach is conventionally used to produce high accuracy XAFS theory in the near edge region, however, we demonstrate that it can be readily extended to encompass an energy range of more than 1.5 keV (k∼20A -1 ) from the K absorption edge. Such calculations require extensions to FDMNES to account for thermal effects, in addition to broadening effects due to inelastic processes. Extended calculations beyond the range of near-edge structure also require consideration of technical constraints such as cluster sizes and densities. We find that with our approach, we are able to produce accurate theory ranging from the absorption edge to the smooth atom-like region at high energies, with a single consistent model that is free from any fitting parameters.

  1. Potential of pedestrian protection systems--a parameter study using finite element models of pedestrian dummy and generic passenger vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Rikard; Shin, Jaeho; Untaroiu, Costin D

    2011-08-01

    To study the potential of active, passive, and integrated (combined active and passive) safety systems in reducing pedestrian upper body loading in typical impact configurations. Finite element simulations using models of generic sedan car fronts and the Polar II pedestrian dummy were performed for 3 impact configurations at 2 impact speeds. Chest contact force, head injury criterion (HIC(15)), head angular acceleration, and the cumulative strain damage measure (CSDM(0.25)) were employed as injury parameters. Further, 3 countermeasures were modeled: an active autonomous braking system, a passive deployable countermeasure, and an integrated system combining the active and passive systems. The auto-brake system was modeled by reducing impact speed by 10 km/h (equivalent to ideal full braking over 0.3 s) and introducing a pitch of 1 degree and in-crash deceleration of 1 g. The deployable system consisted of a deployable hood, lifting 100 mm in the rear, and a lower windshield air bag. All 3 countermeasures showed benefit in a majority of impact configurations in terms of injury prevention. The auto-brake system reduced chest force in a majority of the configurations and decreased HIC(15), head angular acceleration, and CSDM in all configurations. Averaging all impact configurations, the auto-brake system showed reductions of injury predictors from 20 percent (chest force) to 82 percent (HIC). The passive deployable countermeasure reduced chest force and HIC(15) in a majority of configurations and head angular acceleration and CSDM in all configurations, although the CSDM decrease in 2 configurations was minimal. On average a reduction from 20 percent (CSDM) to 58 percent (HIC) was recorded in the passive deployable countermeasures. Finally, the integrated system evaluated in this study reduced all injury assessment parameters in all configurations compared to the reference situations. The average reductions achieved by the integrated system ranged from 56 percent

  2. Kohn-Sham potentials from electron densities using a matrix representation within finite atomic orbital basis sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Carter, Emily A.

    2018-01-01

    We revisit the static response function-based Kohn-Sham (KS) inversion procedure for determining the KS effective potential that corresponds to a given target electron density within finite atomic orbital basis sets. Instead of expanding the potential in an auxiliary basis set, we directly update the potential in its matrix representation. Through numerical examples, we show that the reconstructed density rapidly converges to the target density. Preliminary results are presented to illustrate the possibility of obtaining a local potential in real space from the optimized potential in its matrix representation. We have further applied this matrix-based KS inversion approach to density functional embedding theory. A proof-of-concept study of a solvated proton transfer reaction demonstrates the method's promise.

  3. Lithofacies Architecturing and Hydrocarbon Reservoir Potential of Lumshiwal Formation: Surghar Range, Trans-Indus Ranges, North Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iftikhar Alam

    2015-12-01

    directed Paleo-current system prevailed during deposition of Lumshiwal Formation. Diagenetic and tectonically induced fractures make the formation exceedingly porous and permeable as suitable reservoir horizon for the accumulation of hydrocarbon in the Trans-Indus ranges. The same formation has already been proven as potential reservoir horizon for hydrocarbon in the Kohat Plateau of northwest Pakistan. Secondly, the formation is dominantly comprised of silica/quartz sandstone (quartzarenite which can be used as silica sand, one of the essential raw materials for glass industries. The formation is also comprised of local coal seams which can be mined for production of coal in the region.

  4. Improved ring potential of QED at finite temperature and in the presence of weak and strong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadooghi, N.; Anaraki, K. Sohrabi

    2008-01-01

    Using the general structure of the vacuum polarization tensor Π μν (k 0 ,k) in the infrared (IR) limit, k 0 →0, the ring contribution to the QED effective potential at finite temperature and the nonzero magnetic field is determined beyond the static limit, (k 0 →0, k→0). The resulting ring potential is then studied in weak and strong magnetic field limits. In the weak magnetic field limit, at high temperature and for α→0, the improved ring potential consists of a term proportional to T 4 α 5/2 , in addition to the expected T 4 α 3/2 term arising from the static limit. Here, α is the fine structure constant. In the limit of the strong magnetic field, where QED dynamics is dominated by the lowest Landau level, the ring potential includes a novel term consisting of dilogarithmic function (eB)Li 2 (-(2α/π)(eB/m 2 )). Using the ring improved (one-loop) effective potential including the one-loop effective potential and ring potential in the IR limit, the dynamical chiral symmetry breaking of QED is studied at finite temperature and in the presence of the strong magnetic field. The gap equation, the dynamical mass and the critical temperature of QED in the regime of the lowest Landau level dominance are determined in the improved IR as well as in the static limit. For a given value of the magnetic field, the improved ring potential is shown to be more efficient in decreasing the critical temperature arising from the one-loop effective potential.

  5. Chiral phase transition at finite chemical potential in 2 +1 -flavor soft-wall anti-de Sitter space QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Sean P.; Jacobson, Theodore

    2018-04-01

    The phase transition from hadronic matter to chirally symmetric quark-gluon plasma is expected to be a rapid crossover at zero quark chemical potential (μ ), becoming first order at some finite value of μ , indicating the presence of a critical point. Using a three-flavor soft-wall model of anti-de Sitter/QCD, we investigate the effect of varying the light and strange quark masses on the order of the chiral phase transition. At zero quark chemical potential, we reproduce the Columbia Plot, which summarizes the results of lattice QCD and other holographic models. We then extend this holographic model to examine the effects of finite quark chemical potential. We find that the the chemical potential does not affect the critical line that separates first-order from rapid crossover transitions. This excludes the possibility of a critical point in this model, suggesting that a different setup is necessary to reproduce all the features of the QCD phase diagram.

  6. Investigations of multiphoton excitation and ionization in a short range potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susskind, S.M.; Cowley, S.C.; Valeo, E.J.

    1989-02-01

    We introduce an approach to the study of excitation and ionization for a system with a short range potential. In particular, analytical and numerical results are presented for the multiphoton ionization rate, under strong field conditions, of an electron confined by a δ-function potential. 9 refs., 3 figs

  7. Investigations of multiphoton excitation and ionization in a short range potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susskind, S.M.; Cowley, S.C.; Valeo, E.J.

    1989-02-01

    We introduce an approach to the study of excitation and ionization for a system with a short range potential. In particular, analytical and numerical results are presented for the multiphoton ionization rate, under strong field conditions, of an electron confined by a delta-function potential. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Alternative long-ranged charge optimized many-body potential for aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yunjie; He, Yingyou; Feng, Xiaofang; Jiang, Shaoji

    2017-12-06

    A new COMB3 potential was developed for aluminium, which focuses on long-range interaction and phase transition. The potential was developed by fitting the equilibrium lattice properties of different phases and defects to ensure its transferability to general systems. The quality of the potential was tested in several problems and compared with the EAM potential as well as the published COMB3 potential, the effect of the cutoff method was studied in detail to demonstrate the necessity to extend the cutoff region. Systems of strong deformations along the Bain path, under a trigonal strain and with planar stacking faults were calculated and the present potential performed as well as the EAM potential. At last, a surface process that involves adsorption and diffusion was studied using the present potential.

  9. Finite difference approximation of control via the potential in a 1-D Schrodinger equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kime

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of steering given initial data to given terminal data via a time-dependent potential, the control, in a 1-D Schrodinger equation. We determine a condition for existence of a transferring potential within our approximation. Using Maple, we give equations for the control and also examples in which the potential is restricted to be centralized and to be a step potential.

  10. Highly excited bound-state resonances of short-range inverse power-law potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hod, Shahar [The Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer (Israel); The Hadassah Academic College, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2017-11-15

    We study analytically the radial Schroedinger equation with long-range attractive potentials whose asymptotic behaviors are dominated by inverse power-law tails of the form V(r) = -β{sub n}r{sup -n} with n > 2. In particular, assuming that the effective radial potential is characterized by a short-range infinitely repulsive core of radius R, we derive a compact analytical formula for the threshold energy E{sub l}{sup max} = E{sub l}{sup max}(n, β{sub n}, R), which characterizes the most weakly bound-state resonance (the most excited energy level) of the quantum system. (orig.)

  11. Non local separable interactions in the description of some nuclear properties. Recoil and finite range effects in the CRC formalism for the study of heavy ion transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.

    1976-01-01

    Some simplifications given by the nonlocal separable interactions (NLSI) allowed an exhaustive study of the three body problem to be performed. This work is intended to show that NLSI are also useful in studying the properties of nuclei. Some satisfactory results obtained in the infinite nuclear matter and also in the Hartree-Fock study of some 3s-1d nuclei are then given. A coupled reaction formalism has been developed for the analysis of heavy ion induced reactions. The recoil and finite range effects, which are necessary tools in heavy-ion induced reactions, have been introduced from the work of Coker et al. for the ( 3 He,t) reaction [fr

  12. From the Kirsch-Kress potential method via the range test to the singular sources method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potthast, R; Schulz, J

    2005-01-01

    We review three reconstruction methods for inverse obstacle scattering problems. We will analyse the relation between the Kirsch-Kress potential method 1986, the range test of Kusiak, Potthast and Sylvester (2003) and the singular sources method of Potthast (2000). In particular, we show that the range test is a logical extension of the Kirsch-Kress method into the category of sampling methods employing the tool of domain sampling. Then we will show how a multi-wave version of the range test can be set up and we will work out its relation to the singular sources method. Numerical examples and demonstrations will be provided

  13. Gravity dual corrections to the heavy quark potential at finite-temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryan, Hovhannes R.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.

    2011-01-01

    We apply gauge/gravity duality to compute 1/N c 2 corrections to the heavy quark potentials of a quark-anti-quark pair (QQ-bar) and of a quark-quark pair (QQ) immersed into the strongly coupled N=4 SYM plasma. On the gravity side these corrections come from the exchanges of supergravity modes between two string worldsheets stretching from the UV boundary of AdS space to the black hole horizon in the bulk and smeared over S 5 . We find that the contributions to the QQ-bar potential coming from the exchanges of all of the relevant modes (such as dilaton, massive scalar, 2-form field, and graviton) are all attractive, leading to an attractive net QQ-bar potential. We show that at large separations r and/or high-temperature T the potential is of Yukawa-type, dominated by the graviton exchange, in agreement with earlier findings. On the other hand, at small-rT the QQ-bar potential scales as ∼(1/r)ln(1/rT). In the case of QQ potential the 2-form contribution changes sign and becomes repulsive: however, the net QQ potential remains attractive. At large-rT it is dominated by the graviton exchange, while at small-rT the QQ potential becomes Coulomb-like.

  14. Short range part of the NN interaction: Equivalent local potentials from quark exchange kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuk, Y.; Hecht, K.T.

    1983-01-01

    To focus on the nature of the short range part of the NN interaction, the intrinsically nonlocal interaction among the quark constituents of colorless nucleons is converted to an equivalent local potential using resonating group kernels which can be evaluated in analytic form. The WKB approximation based on the Wigner transform of the nonlocal kernels has been used to construct the equivalent potentials without recourse to the long range part of the NN interaction. The relative importance of the various components of the exchange kernels can be examined: The results indicate the importance of the color magnetic part of the exchange kernel for the repulsive part in the (ST) = (10), (01) channels, in particular since the energy dependence of the effective local potentials seems to be set by this term. Large cancellations of color Coulombic and quark confining contributions, together with the kinetic energy and norm exchange terms, indicate that the exact nature of the equivalent local potential may be sensitive to the details of the parametrization of the underlying quark-quark interaction. The equivalent local potentials show some of the characteristics of the phenomenological short range terms of the Paris potential

  15. Microscopic optical potential calculations of finite nuclei with extended skyrme forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Haiji; Ye Weilei; Gao Qin; Shen Qingbiao

    1986-01-01

    Microscopic optical potential calculations in the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation with Extended Skyrme forces are investigated. The HF equation is derived from the variation principle and the potential formula of spherical nuclei is obtained by two different ways. Then the calculations for symmetrid nuclei 16 O, 40 Ca and asymmetric nucleus 90 Zr with eight sets of Skyrme force parameters are presented. Our results show that the potential form and variating tendency with incident energy are reasonable and there apparently appears a 'wine-bottle-bottom' shape in the intermediate energy region. Furthermore, our calculations reflect shell effects clearly

  16. Finite-temperature effective potential of a system with spontaneously broken symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemskov, E.P. [Yaroslavl State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-01

    A quantum-mechanical system with spontaneously broken symmetry is considered the effective potential is determined, and it is shown that with reduction of temperature the system undergoes a phase transition of the first kind.

  17. Fundamental host range of Leptoypha hospita (Hemiptera: Tingidae), a potential biological control agent of Chinese privet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanzhuo Zhang; James L. Hanula; Scott Horn; Cera Jones; S. Kristine Braman; Jianghua Sun

    2016-01-01

    Chinese privet, Ligustrum sinense Lour., is an invasive shrub within riparian areas of the southeastern United States. Biological control is considered the most suitable management option for Chinese privet. The potential host range of the lace bug, Leptoypha hospita Drake et...

  18. Higher-order glass-transition singularities in systems with short-ranged attractive potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetze, W; Sperl, M

    2003-01-01

    Within the mode-coupling theory for the evolution of structural relaxation, the A 4 -glass-transition singularities are identified for systems of particles interacting with a hard-sphere repulsion complemented by different short-ranged potentials: Baxter's singular potential regularized by a large-wavevector cut-off, a model for the Asakura-Oosawa depletion attraction, a triangular potential, a Yukawa attraction, and a square-well potential. The regular potentials yield critical packing fractions, critical Debye-Waller factors, and critical amplitudes very close to each other. The elastic moduli and the particle localization lengths for corresponding states of the Yukawa system and the square-well system may differ by up to 20 and 10%, respectively

  19. Attractive short-range interatomic potential in the lattice dynamics of niobium and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onwuagba, B.N.; Pal, S.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown in the framework of the pseudopotential approach that there is a sizable attractive short-range component of the interatomic potential due to the s-d interaction which has the same functional form in real space as the Born-Mayer repulsion due to the overlap of core electron wave functions centred on neighbouring ions. The magnitude of this attractive component is such as to completely cancel the conventional Born-Mayer repulsion, making the resultant short-range interatomic potential attractive rather than repulsive. Numerical calculations show that the attractive interatomics potential, which represents the local-field correction, leads to a better understanding of the occurrence of the soft modes in the phonon dispersion curves of niobium and tantalum

  20. Study of the /sup 58/Ni, /sup 90/Zr and /sup 208/Pb(p,d) reactions at 121 MeV. [DWBA, angular distributions, spectroscopic factors, finite range calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R E; Kraushaar, J J; Shepard, J R [Colorado Univ., Boulder (USA). Nuclear Physics Lab.; Comfort, J R [Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA). Dept. of Physics

    1978-01-01

    The (p,d) reaction has been studied on /sup 58/Ni, /sup 90/Zr and /sup 208/Pb at 121 MeV in order to test the applicability of the usual DWBA methods to higher energy data. The calculations describe the angular distribution for the strongly excited low-lying states reasonably well when adiabatic-deuteron optical potentials are used. Some discrepancies in shape persist, however, and some values of the spectroscopic factors differ from lower energy data in spite of many variations in the calculations. By use of exact finite-range calculations a value of D/sup 2//sub 0/ = 1.23 x 10/sup 4/ MeV/sup 2/.fm/sup 3/ was found for use at 121 MeV. Deuteron D-state contributions were negligible at forward angles and two-step contributions do not appear more significant than for data at lower energy.

  1. Structure factor of polymers interacting via a short range repulsive potential: Application to hairy wormlike micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massiera, Gladys; Ramos, Laurence; Ligoure, Christian; Pitard, Estelle

    2003-01-01

    We use the random phase approximation to compute the structure factor S(q) of a solution of chains interacting through a soft and short range repulsive potential V. Above a threshold polymer concentration, whose magnitude is essentially controlled by the range of the potential, S(q) exhibits a peak whose position depends on the concentration. We take advantage of the close analogy between polymers and wormlike micelles and apply our model, using a Gaussian function for V, to quantitatively analyze experimental small angle neutron scattering profiles of solutions of hairy wormlike micelles. These samples, which consist in surfactant self-assembled flexible cylinders decorated by amphiphilic copolymer, provide indeed an appropriate experimental model system to study the structure of sterically interacting polymer solutions

  2. Electron cooling and finite potential drop in a magnetized plasma expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Sanchez, M. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Navarro-Cavallé, J. [Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería Aeronáutica y del Espacio, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Plaza Cardenal Cisneros 3, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Ahedo, E. [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. Universidad 30, Leganés 28911, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The steady, collisionless, slender flow of a magnetized plasma into a surrounding vacuum is considered. The ion component is modeled as mono-energetic, while electrons are assumed Maxwellian upstream. The magnetic field has a convergent-divergent geometry, and attention is restricted to its paraxial region, so that 2D and drift effects are ignored. By using the conservation of energy and magnetic moment of particles and the quasi-neutrality condition, the ambipolar electric field and the distribution functions of both species are calculated self-consistently, paying attention to the existence of effective potential barriers associated to magnetic mirroring. The solution is used to find the total potential drop for a set of upstream conditions, plus the axial evolution of various moments of interest (density, temperatures, and heat fluxes). The results illuminate the behavior of magnetic nozzles, plasma jets, and other configurations of interest, showing, in particular, in the divergent plasma the collisionless cooling of electrons, and the generation of collisionless electron heat fluxes.

  3. Finite-size effects in the dynamics of few bosons in a ring potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, G.; Bengtsson, J.; Karabulut, E. Ö.; Kavoulakis, G. M.; Reimann, S. M.

    2018-02-01

    We study the temporal evolution of a small number N of ultra-cold bosonic atoms confined in a ring potential. Assuming that initially the system is in a solitary-wave solution of the corresponding mean-field problem, we identify significant differences in the time evolution of the density distribution of the atoms when it instead is evaluated with the many-body Schrödinger equation. Three characteristic timescales are derived: the first is the period of rotation of the wave around the ring, the second is associated with a ‘decay’ of the density variation, and the third is associated with periodic ‘collapses’ and ‘revivals’ of the density variations, with a factor of \\sqrt{N} separating each of them. The last two timescales tend to infinity in the appropriate limit of large N, in agreement with the mean-field approximation. These findings are based on the assumption of the initial state being a mean-field state. We confirm this behavior by comparison to the exact solutions for a few-body system stirred by an external potential. We find that the exact solutions of the driven system exhibit similar dynamical features.

  4. An automated method to morph finite element whole-body human models with a wide range of stature and body shape for both men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Cao, Libo; Fanta, Abeselom; Reed, Matthew P; Neal, Mark; Wang, Jenne-Tai; Lin, Chin-Hsu; Hu, Jingwen

    2017-07-26

    Field data analyses have shown that small female, obese, and/or older occupants are at increased risks of death and serious injury in motor-vehicle crashes compared with mid-size young men. The current adult finite element (FE) human models represent occupants in the same three body sizes (large male, mid-size male, and small female) as those for the contemporary adult crash dummies. Further, the time needed to develop an FE human model using the traditional method is measured in months or even years. In the current study, an improved regional mesh morphing method based on landmark-based radial basis function (RBF) interpolation was developed to rapidly morph a mid-size male FE human model into different geometry targets. A total of 100 human models with a wide range of human attributes were generated. A pendulum chest impact condition was applied to each model as an initial assessment of the resulting variability in response. The morphed models demonstrated mesh quality similar to the baseline model. The peak impact forces and chest deflections in the chest pendulum impacts varied substantially with different models, supportive of consideration of population variation in evaluating the occupant injury risks. The method developed in this study will enable future safety design optimizations targeting at various vulnerable populations that cannot be considered with the current models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Potential health impacts from range fires at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willians, G.P.; Hermes, A.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Hartmann, H.M.; Tomasko, D.

    1998-03-01

    This study uses atmospheric dispersion computer models to evaluate the potential for human health impacts from exposure to contaminants that could be dispersed by fires on the testing ranges at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. It was designed as a screening study and does not estimate actual human health risks. Considered are five contaminants possibly present in the soil and vegetation from past human activities at APG--lead, arsenic, trichloroethylene (TCE), depleted uranium (DU), and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT); and two chemical warfare agents that could be released from unexploded ordnance rounds heated in a range fire--mustard and phosgene. For comparison, dispersion of two naturally occurring compounds that could be released by burning of uncontaminated vegetation--vinyl acetate and 2-furaldehyde--is also examined. Data from previous studies on soil contamination at APG are used in conjunction with conservative estimates about plant uptake of contaminants, atmospheric conditions, and size and frequency of range fires at APG to estimate dispersion and possible human exposure. The results are compared with US Environmental Protection Agency action levels. The comparisons indicate that for all of the anthropogenic contaminants except arsenic and mustard, exposure levels would be at least an order of magnitude lower than the corresponding action levels. Because of the compoundingly conservative nature of the assumptions made, they conclude that the potential for significant human health risks from range fires is low. The authors recommend that future efforts be directed at fire management and control, rather than at conducting additional studies to more accurately estimate actual human health risk from range fires

  6. Potential health impacts from range fires at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willians, G.P.; Hermes, A.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Hartmann, H.M.; Tomasko, D.

    1998-03-01

    This study uses atmospheric dispersion computer models to evaluate the potential for human health impacts from exposure to contaminants that could be dispersed by fires on the testing ranges at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. It was designed as a screening study and does not estimate actual human health risks. Considered are five contaminants possibly present in the soil and vegetation from past human activities at APG--lead, arsenic, trichloroethylene (TCE), depleted uranium (DU), and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT); and two chemical warfare agents that could be released from unexploded ordnance rounds heated in a range fire--mustard and phosgene. For comparison, dispersion of two naturally occurring compounds that could be released by burning of uncontaminated vegetation--vinyl acetate and 2-furaldehyde--is also examined. Data from previous studies on soil contamination at APG are used in conjunction with conservative estimates about plant uptake of contaminants, atmospheric conditions, and size and frequency of range fires at APG to estimate dispersion and possible human exposure. The results are compared with US Environmental Protection Agency action levels. The comparisons indicate that for all of the anthropogenic contaminants except arsenic and mustard, exposure levels would be at least an order of magnitude lower than the corresponding action levels. Because of the compoundingly conservative nature of the assumptions made, they conclude that the potential for significant human health risks from range fires is low. The authors recommend that future efforts be directed at fire management and control, rather than at conducting additional studies to more accurately estimate actual human health risk from range fires.

  7. Potential climate change favored expansion of a range limited species, Haematostaphis barteri Hook f.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Koundouonon Moutouama

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding impact of climate change on range breadth of rare species can improve the ability to anticipate their decline or expension and take appropriate conservation measures. Haematatostaphis barteri is an agroforestry species of the Sudanian centre of endemism in Africa. We investigeted impact of climate change on range of suitable habitats for this species in Benin,using the Maximum Entropy algorithm under R software. Five environmental variables were used with the regional climate model under the new Representation Concentration Pathways (RCP. Moisture Index of the Moist Quarter and Slope variability had the greatest predictive importance for the range of suitable habitats for H. barteri. Its Potential breadth was found to be currently limited to the Atacora Mountain Chain (AMC and covers 0.51% of national territory. Climate change was projected to favor expansion of suitable habitats for H. barteri by 0.12% and 0.05%, respectively for the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. These habitats were however mostly out of the local protected areas network. Climate change would extend range of habitats for H. barteri. Observed protection gaps suggest need for integrating this species into formal in situ, on-farm or ex situ conservation schemes.

  8. Range expansion potential of two co-occurring invasive vines to marginal habitats in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Shahid; Tad, Sonnur; Onen, Huseyin; Gunal, Hikmet; Caldiran, Ugur; Ozaslan, Cumali

    2017-10-01

    Niche distribution models accurately predict the potential distribution range of invasive plants into new habitats based on their climatic requirements in the native regions. However, these models usually ignore the marginal habitats which can limit the distribution of exotic plants. We therefore tested the seedling survival, growth and nutrient acquisition capabilities of two co-occurring invasive vines [Persicaria perfoliata (L.) H. Gross and Sicyos angulatus L.] in three different manipulative greenhouse experiments to infer their range expansion potential to marginal habitats in Turkey. First experiment included five different moisture availability regimes (100, 75, 50, 25 and 12.5% available water), second experiment consisted of four different salinity levels (0, 3, 6 and 12 dSm-1 soil salinity) and third experiment had four different soil textures (clay-1, clay-2, sandy loam and silt-clay-loam). Seedling mortality was only observed under extreme moisture deficiency in both plant species, while most of the transplanted seedlings of both species did not survive under 6 and 12 dSm-1 salinity levels. Soil textures had no effect on seedling survival. POLPE better tolerated low moisture availability and high salinity compared to SIYAN. Biomass production in both plant species was linearly reduced with increasing salinity and moisture deficiency. SIYAN invested more resources towards shoot, accumulated higher K and P, whereas POLPE maintained higher root-to-shoot ratio under all experimental conditions. Both plant species employed different strategies to cope with adverse environmental conditions, but failed to persist under high soil salinity and moisture deficiency. Our study suggest that both plant species have limited potential of range expansion to marginal habitats and will be limited to moist and humid areas only. Therefore, further research activities should be concentrated in these regions to develop effective management strategies against both species.

  9. On the accuracy potential of focused plenoptic camera range determination in long distance operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardemann, Hannes; Maas, Hans-Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Plenoptic cameras have found increasing interest in optical 3D measurement techniques in recent years. While their basic principle is 100 years old, the development in digital photography, micro-lens fabrication technology and computer hardware has boosted the development and lead to several commercially available ready-to-use cameras. Beyond their popular option of a posteriori image focusing or total focus image generation, their basic ability of generating 3D information from single camera imagery depicts a very beneficial option for certain applications. The paper will first present some fundamentals on the design and history of plenoptic cameras and will describe depth determination from plenoptic camera image data. It will then present an analysis of the depth determination accuracy potential of plenoptic cameras. While most research on plenoptic camera accuracy so far has focused on close range applications, we will focus on mid and long ranges of up to 100 m. This range is especially relevant, if plenoptic cameras are discussed as potential mono-sensorial range imaging devices in (semi-)autonomous cars or in mobile robotics. The results show the expected deterioration of depth measurement accuracy with depth. At depths of 30-100 m, which may be considered typical in autonomous driving, depth errors in the order of 3% (with peaks up to 10-13 m) were obtained from processing small point clusters on an imaged target. Outliers much higher than these values were observed in single point analysis, stressing the necessity of spatial or spatio-temporal filtering of the plenoptic camera depth measurements. Despite these obviously large errors, a plenoptic camera may nevertheless be considered a valid option for the application fields of real-time robotics like autonomous driving or unmanned aerial and underwater vehicles, where the accuracy requirements decrease with distance.

  10. A Sinusoidal Applied Electric Potential can Induce a Long-Range, Steady Electrophoretic Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrei, Seyyed Hashemi; Ristenpart, William D.; Miller, Greg R.

    2017-11-01

    We use the standard electrokinetic model to numerically investigate the electric field in aqueous solutions between parallel electrodes under AC polarization. In contrast to prior work, we invoke no simplifying assumptions regarding the applied voltage, frequency, or mismatch in ionic mobilities. We find that the nonlinear electromigration terms significantly contribute to the overall shape of the electric potential vs. time, which at sufficiently high applied potentials develops multi-modal peaks. More surprisingly, we find that electrolytes with non-equal mobilities yield an electric field with non-zero time average at large distances from the electrodes. Our calculations indicate this long-range electric field suffices to levitate colloidal particles many microns away from the electrode against the gravitational field, in accord with experimental observations of such behavior (Woehl et al., PRX, 2015). Moreover, the results indicate that particles will aggregate laterally near electrodes in some electrolytes but separate in others, helping explain a longstanding but not well understood phenomenon.

  11. Quantitative assessment of the physical potential of proton beam range verification with PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, A.; Parodi, K.; Paganetti, H.; Cascio, E.; Bonab, A.; Bortfeld, T.

    2008-08-01

    scanner. PET/CT range verification was found to be able to detect small range modifications in the presence of complex tissue inhomogeneities. This study indicates the physical potential of the PET/CT verification method to detect the full-range characteristic of the delivered dose in the patient.

  12. Quantitative assessment of the physical potential of proton beam range verification with PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knopf, A; Paganetti, H; Cascio, E; Bortfeld, T [Department of Radiation Oncology, MGH and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Parodi, K [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Bonab, A [Department of Radiology, MGH and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2008-08-07

    PET scanner. PET/CT range verification was found to be able to detect small range modifications in the presence of complex tissue inhomogeneities. This study indicates the physical potential of the PET/CT verification method to detect the full-range characteristic of the delivered dose in the patient.

  13. Quantitative assessment of the physical potential of proton beam range verification with PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, A; Parodi, K; Paganetti, H; Cascio, E; Bonab, A; Bortfeld, T

    2008-08-07

    PET scanner. PET/CT range verification was found to be able to detect small range modifications in the presence of complex tissue inhomogeneities. This study indicates the physical potential of the PET/CT verification method to detect the full-range characteristic of the delivered dose in the patient.

  14. Mineral resource potential map of the Benton Range Roadless Area, Mono County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoe, James L.; McKee, Edwin D.; Rains, Richard L.; Barnes, Donald J.; Campbell, Harry W.; Denton, David K.; Iverson, Stephen R.; Jeske, Rodney E.; Stebbins, Scott A.

    1983-01-01

    Tungsten-bearing rocks in the Benton Range Roadless Area occur in tactite lenses within the Paleozoic metasedimentary units that surround and are intruded by Triassic granodiorite of the Benton Range. High anomalous tungsten values were found in the southern part of the study area. Quartz-vein deposits with copper, lead, zinc, and silver may occur within the Jurassic granitic rock in the northwestern part of the area. Stream-sediment and panned-concentrate samples from the northwestern part of the roadless area, reveal anomalous values in a number of elements. Some of these elements are indicative of mineral suites that form by hydrothermal alteration and are potential metallic-ore producers. Metals having anomalous values are antimony, copper, lead, molybdenum, tin, and zinc; their presence suggests the potential for deposits of the lead-zinc-silver or copper-molybdenum type. Molybdenum and lead were identified by geochemical sampling as having low to moderate potential in the roadless area. An estimated 190,000 tons (172,000 t) of subeconomic gold and silver resources are inside the roadless area at the Gold Crown, Gold Webb, and Gold Wedge mines; another 60,000 tons (54,000 t) of subeconomic gold and silver resources are just outside the area at the Tower, Gold Webb, and Gold Wedge mines (table 1). Most of the lode gold and silver deposits are in quartz veins and shear zones. Minor amounts of copper, lead, and zinc occur in some gold deposits. About 2,240 oz (70 kg) of gold, 8,450 oz (260 kg) of silver, and 4,600 lb of lead (2,090 kg) have been produced from the roadless area. In addition, 7,257 oz (226 kg) of gold and 350 oz (11 kg) silver were produced at the Tower mine, near the area.

  15. Metabolic Potential and Activity in Fluids of the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, T.; Som, S.; Schrenk, M.; McCollom, T.; Cardace, D.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic potential and activity associated with hydrogen and carbon monoxide were characterized in fluids sampled from the the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO). CROMO consists of two clusters of science-dedicated wells drilled to varying depths up to 35m in the actively serpentinizing, Jurassic-age Coast Range Ophiolite of Northern California, along with a suite of pre-existing monitoring wells at the same site. Consistent with the fluid chemistry observed in other serpentinizing systems, CROMO fluids are highly alkaline, with pH up to 12.5, high in methane, with concentrations up 1600 micromolar, and low in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), with concentrations of 10's to 100's of micromolar. CROMO is conspicuous for fluid H2 concentrations that are consistently sub-micromolar, orders of magnitude lower than is typical of other systems. However, higher H2 concentrations (10's -100's of micromolar) at an earlier stage of fluid chemical evolution are predicted by, or consistent with: thermodynamic models for fluid chemistry based on parent rock composition equivalent to local peridotite and with water:rock ratio constrained by observed pH; the presence of magnetite at several wt% in CROMO drill cores; and concentrations of formate and carbon monoxide that would require elevated H2 if formed in equilibrium with H2 and DIC. Calculated Gibbs energy changes for reaction of H2 and CO in each of several metabolisms, across the range of fluid composition encompassed by the CROMO wells, range from bioenergetically feasible (capable of driving ATP synthesis) to thermodynamically unfavorable. Active consumption relative to killed controls was observed for both CO and H2 during incubation of fluids from the pre-existing monitoring wells; in incubations of freshly cored solids, consumption was only observed in one sample set (corresponding to the lowest pH) out of three. The specific metabolisms by which H2 and CO are consumed remain to be determined.

  16. Modeling the potential area of occupancy at fine resolution may reduce uncertainty in species range estimates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiménez-Alfaro, Borja; Draper, David; Nogues, David Bravo

    2012-01-01

    and maximum entropy modeling to assess whether different sampling (expert versus systematic surveys) may affect AOO estimates based on habitat suitability maps, and the differences between such measurements and traditional coarse-grid methods. Fine-scale models performed robustly and were not influenced...... by survey protocols, providing similar habitat suitability outputs with high spatial agreement. Model-based estimates of potential AOO were significantly smaller than AOO measures obtained from coarse-scale grids, even if the first were obtained from conservative thresholds based on the Minimal Predicted...... permit comparable measures among species. We conclude that estimates of AOO based on fine-resolution distribution models are more robust tools for risk assessment than traditional systems, allowing a better understanding of species ranges at habitat level....

  17. Cubic–quintic long-range interactions with double well potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsilifis, Panagiotis A; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G; Rothos, Vassilis M

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we examine the combined effects of cubic and quintic terms of the long-range type in the dynamics of a double well potential. Employing a two-mode approximation, we systematically develop two cubic–quintic ordinary differential equations and assess the contributions of the long-range interactions in each of the relevant prefactors, gauging how to simplify the ensuing dynamical system. Finally, we obtain a reduced canonical description for the conjugate variables of relative population imbalance and relative phase between the two wells and proceed to a dynamical systems analysis of the resulting pair of ordinary differential equations. While in the case of cubic and quintic interactions of the same kind (e.g. both attractive or both repulsive), only a symmetry-breaking bifurcation can be identified, a remarkable effect that emerges e.g. in the setting of repulsive cubic but attractive quintic interactions is a ‘symmetry-restoring’ bifurcation. Namely, in addition to the supercritical pitchfork that leads to a spontaneous symmetry breaking of the antisymmetric state, there is a subcritical pitchfork that eventually reunites the asymmetric daughter branch with the antisymmetric parent one. The relevant bifurcations, the stability of the branches and their dynamical implications are examined both in the reduced (ODE) and in the full (PDE) setting. The model is argued to be of physical relevance, especially so in the context of optical thermal media. (paper)

  18. Mafic and ultramafic rocks, and platinum mineralisation potential, in the Longwood Range, Southland, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, P.; Craw, D.; Mackenzie, D.; Rombouts, M.; Reay, A.

    2012-01-01

    Intrusive rocks in the Longwood Range represent a component of the Permian Brook Street Terrane. They include diffusely layered, cumulate-textured olivine gabbro, troctolite, and gabbro, and gradations into non-cumulate gabbro and gabbronorite. Volumetrically small ultramafic layers occur (plagioclase wehrlite), and thin veins of felsic rocks ranging from quartz diorite to trondhjemite. Primary olivine, plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and subordinate orthopyroxene and hornblende are commonly altered or metamorphosed to amphiboles, minor spinel, magnetite, chlorite, biotite and clinozoisite, and serpentine in olivine-rich rocks. Accessory primary Ti-bearing magnetite and ilmenite occur, and trace Cr-magnetite is characteristic of olivine-rich rocks. Trace pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, pentlandite, and pyrite could reflect equilibrated late magmatic, and alteration-derived phases. Key petrochemical characteristics of the rock suite are high Mg, Al, Ca, and Sr contents, and low alkali, LILE, and sulfur contents. Platinum and Pd are locally enriched in drill-hole intercepts, but zones appear unrelated to rock type, magnetic properties, or to S, Cu, Ni, Cr, or Au values. Local platinum group element (PGE) enrichment in altered rocks implies metamorphic and/or hydrothermal redistribution. Pervasive PGE enrichment in Longwood rocks is an indicator of potential 'fertility', but evidence is currently lacking for the precipitation of primary stratiform PGE accumulations from a sulfide liquid saturated magma. (author). 41 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. The potential for retreating alpine glaciers to alter alpine ecosystems in the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, E.; Baron, J.

    2013-12-01

    Glaciers are retreating at an unprecedented rate. In mid-latitude alpine ecosystems the presence of glaciers and rock glaciers govern rates and ecology of alpine and sub-alpine ecosystems. Changes in the thermal environment due to the loss of isothermal habitat and inputs from glacier melt chemistry are altering alpine ecosystems in unpredictable ways. In particular, glacier may be a source of nitrogen that is altering alpine ecosystem dynamics. Loch Vale Watershed (LVWS) located within Rocky Mountain National Park. LVWS contains a surface glacier (Andrew's glacier) and a rock glacier (Taylor's glacier) at the headwater of each of the two drainages within the watershed. We collected precipitation from a National Atmospheric Deposition Site and surface water from multiple alpine lakes and streams during a particularly high and low snow year in the Colorado Front Range. We also sampled stream and lake sediments at each site to analyze the associated microbial community. Concentrations of nitrate and ammonium, relative abundance of amoA (the gene responsible for a key step in the microbial nitrification pathway), and the dual isotope signal to nitrate all point to snow melt as a key deliverer of nitrogen to ecosystems along the Colorado Front Range. However, late summer surface water chemistry is isotopically similar to the chemistry of glacial ice. This suggests that retreating glacier may be an additional source of N to alpine ecosystems and have the potential to alter microbial community composition, biogeochemical rate processes, and ecosystem function. These dynamics are most likely not unique to the Colorado Front Range and should be globally distributed as glaciers continue to retreat in high altitude ecosystems around the world.

  20. Potential of satellite-derived ecosystem functional attributes to anticipate species range shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Segura, Domingo; Lomba, Angela; Sousa-Silva, Rita; Nieto-Lugilde, Diego; Alves, Paulo; Georges, Damien; Vicente, Joana R.; Honrado, João P.

    2017-05-01

    In a world facing rapid environmental changes, anticipating their impacts on biodiversity is of utmost relevance. Remotely-sensed Ecosystem Functional Attributes (EFAs) are promising predictors for Species Distribution Models (SDMs) by offering an early and integrative response of vegetation performance to environmental drivers. Species of high conservation concern would benefit the most from a better ability to anticipate changes in habitat suitability. Here we illustrate how yearly projections from SDMs based on EFAs could reveal short-term changes in potential habitat suitability, anticipating mid-term shifts predicted by climate-change-scenario models. We fitted two sets of SDMs for 41 plant species of conservation concern in the Iberian Peninsula: one calibrated with climate variables for baseline conditions and projected under two climate-change-scenarios (future conditions); and the other calibrated with EFAs for 2001 and projected annually from 2001 to 2013. Range shifts predicted by climate-based models for future conditions were compared to the 2001-2013 trends from EFAs-based models. Projections of EFAs-based models estimated changes (mostly contractions) in habitat suitability that anticipated, for the majority (up to 64%) of species, the mid-term shifts projected by traditional climate-change-scenario forecasting, and showed greater agreement with the business-as-usual scenario than with the sustainable-development one. This study shows how satellite-derived EFAs can be used as meaningful essential biodiversity variables in SDMs to provide early-warnings of range shifts and predictions of short-term fluctuations in suitable conditions for multiple species.

  1. Climate-induced seasonal changes in smallmouth bass growth rate potential at the southern range extent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middaugh, Christopher R.; Kessinger, Brin; Magoulick, Daniel D.

    2018-01-01

    Temperature increases due to climate change over the coming century will likely affect smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) growth in lotic systems at the southern extent of their native range. However, the thermal response of a stream to warming climate conditions could be affected by the flow regime of each stream, mitigating the effects on smallmouth bass populations. We developed bioenergetics models to compare change in smallmouth bass growth rate potential (GRP) from present to future projected monthly stream temperatures across two flow regimes: runoff and groundwater-dominated. Seasonal differences in GRP between stream types were then compared. The models were developed for fourteen streams within the Ozark–Ouachita Interior Highlands in Arkansas, Oklahoma and Missouri, USA, which contain smallmouth bass. In our simulations, smallmouth bass mean GRP during summer months decreased by 0.005 g g−1 day−1 in runoff streams and 0.002 g g−1 day−1 in groundwater streams by the end of century. Mean GRP during winter, fall and early spring increased under future climate conditions within both stream types (e.g., 0.00019 g g−1 day−1 in runoff and 0.0014 g g−1 day−1 in groundwater streams in spring months). We found significant differences in change in GRP between runoff and groundwater streams in three seasons in end-of-century simulations (spring, summer and fall). Potential differences in stream temperature across flow regimes could be an important habitat component to consider when investigating effects of climate change as fishes from various flow regimes that are relatively close geographically could be affected differently by warming climate conditions.

  2. Applications of the KKR-DCA: A Finite-Temperature Density Functional Theory to Predict Chemical Short-Range Order Effects in Disordered Metallic Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biava, D. A.; Johnson, D. D.

    2009-03-01

    Short-range order (SRO) is ubiquitous in metallic alloys, affecting changes in their electronic, thermodynamic, mechanical, magnetic, and structural properties. For example, SRO is responsible for the yield-strength anomalies observed in Cu-Al at high temperatures, i.e., the materials is more resistant to dislocation motion at high temperature than it is at room temperature. Within the Korringa-Kohn-Rostorker (KKR) electronic-structure method, we present results using the dynamical cluster approximations (DCA) to obtain the temperature-dependent SRO in disordered alloys. We obtain the KKR-DCA SRO energetics versus local neighbor SRO parameters and minimize it at fixed temperature to predict the SRO. We show that the calculated SRO at fixed temperature compares well with available experimental results, and then correlate the results to the electronic structure. We discuss how an accurate analytic estimate can be made for the SRO in most metals due to the dependence of the grand potential on SRO.

  3. Trapping of a particle in a short-range harmonic potential well

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, L. B.; de Castro, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Eigenstates of a particle in a localized and unconfined harmonic potential well are investigated. Effects due to the variation of the potential parameters as well as certain results from asymptotic expansions are discussed.

  4. Fractional finite Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Kedar; George, Nicholas

    2004-07-01

    We show that a fractional version of the finite Fourier transform may be defined by using prolate spheroidal wave functions of order zero. The transform is linear and additive in its index and asymptotically goes over to Namias's definition of the fractional Fourier transform. As a special case of this definition, it is shown that the finite Fourier transform may be inverted by using information over a finite range of frequencies in Fourier space, the inversion being sensitive to noise. Numerical illustrations for both forward (fractional) and inverse finite transforms are provided.

  5. The potential effects of climate change on amphibian distribution, range fragmentation and turnover in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ren-Yan; Kong, Xiao-Quan; Huang, Min-Yi; Varela, Sara; Ji, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Many studies predict that climate change will cause species movement and turnover, but few have considered the effect of climate change on range fragmentation for current species and/or populations. We used MaxEnt to predict suitable habitat, fragmentation and turnover for 134 amphibian species in China under 40 future climate change scenarios spanning four pathways (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6 and RCP8.5) and two time periods (the 2050s and 2070s). Our results show that climate change may cause a major shift in spatial patterns of amphibian diversity. Amphibians in China would lose 20% of their original ranges on average; the distribution outside current ranges would increase by 15%. Suitable habitats for over 90% of species will be located in the north of their current range, for over 95% of species in higher altitudes (from currently 137-4,124 m to 286-4,396 m in the 2050s or 314-4,448 m in the 2070s), and for over 75% of species in the west of their current range. Also, our results predict two different general responses to the climate change: some species contract their ranges while moving westwards, southwards and to higher altitudes, while others expand their ranges. Finally, our analyses indicate that range dynamics and fragmentation are related, which means that the effects of climate change on Chinese amphibians might be two-folded.

  6. The potential effects of climate change on amphibian distribution, range fragmentation and turnover in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren-Yan Duan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Many studies predict that climate change will cause species movement and turnover, but few have considered the effect of climate change on range fragmentation for current species and/or populations. We used MaxEnt to predict suitable habitat, fragmentation and turnover for 134 amphibian species in China under 40 future climate change scenarios spanning four pathways (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6 and RCP8.5 and two time periods (the 2050s and 2070s. Our results show that climate change may cause a major shift in spatial patterns of amphibian diversity. Amphibians in China would lose 20% of their original ranges on average; the distribution outside current ranges would increase by 15%. Suitable habitats for over 90% of species will be located in the north of their current range, for over 95% of species in higher altitudes (from currently 137–4,124 m to 286–4,396 m in the 2050s or 314–4,448 m in the 2070s, and for over 75% of species in the west of their current range. Also, our results predict two different general responses to the climate change: some species contract their ranges while moving westwards, southwards and to higher altitudes, while others expand their ranges. Finally, our analyses indicate that range dynamics and fragmentation are related, which means that the effects of climate change on Chinese amphibians might be two-folded.

  7. Time evolution of some quantum-mechanical systems. Wavefunction cloning in evolving rotating systems. Finite range boundary conditions for time dependent Schroedinger Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvieu, R.; Carbonell, J.; Gignoux, C.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Rozmej, P.

    1997-01-01

    The time evolution of coherent rotational wave packets associated to a diatomic molecule or to a deformed nucleus has been studied. Assuming a rigid body dynamics the J(J+1) law leads to a mechanism of cloning: the way function is divided into wave packets identical to the initial one at specific time. Applications are studied for a nuclear wave packed formed by Coulomb excitation. Exact boundary conditions at finite distance for the solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation are derived. A numerical scheme based on Crank-Nicholson method is proposed to illustrate its applicability in several examples. (authors)

  8. On the sensitivity of nucleon-nucleon correlations to the form of short-range potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmitro, M.; Kvasil, J.; Lednicky, R.; Lyuboshitz, V.L.

    1986-01-01

    Nucleon-nucleon correlation characteristics are calculated for several phenomenological and realistic strong potentials. The results show that a square-well potential reasonably well approximates the nucleon-nucleon interaction if one calculates the correlations between nucleons generated in a region with an r.m.s. radius larger than 1.5-2 fm. Vice versa, the correlations of nucleons emitted from a smaller generation region are sensitive to the form of the assumed nucleon-nucleon potential. (author)

  9. Detection and zoonotic potential of Trichinella spp. from free-range pig farming in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatsiros, V G; Boutsini, S; Ntousi, D; Stougiou, D; Mintza, D; Bisias, A

    2012-06-01

    Trichinellosis is a serious parasitic zoonosis, which is widely distributed around the world. Pork meat is still the predominant source of outbreaks of human trichinellosis in many countries. The aim of this study is to examine the impact of Trichinella spp. as an important risk factor on the free-range pig farming sector in Greece. In 2009, during routine testing for the detection of Trichinella larvae at slaughterhouses and the National Reference Laboratory for Parasites (NRL), a total of 826,426 pigs were tested with the magnetic stirrer method for Trichinella spp. at slaughterhouses, including 2,892 samples from free-range pigs. Two positive samples were detected: one positive for Trichinella britovi and one positive for Trichinella spp. (unspecified) in the samples from wild farmed free-range pigs. It is alarming that one of these cases was connected with clinical signs of trichinellosis in five persons of the same family in northeastern Greece, who consumed undercooked pork meat from a free-range pig farm. During 2010, a total number of 1,295,034 pigs were tested with same method, including 4,159 samples from free-range pig farms. Five positive samples for Trichinella spp. (unspecified) were detected from 4,159 free-range pigs tested by the Greek NRL. Moreover, 363 serum samples from free-range pigs were serologically tested with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Moreover, 363 serum samples from farmed free-range pigs were serologically tested with ELISA, and 15 samples were found positive. Finally, the present study is the first report of detection of T. britovi in Greece. In conclusion, based on the results of the present study, Trichinella spp. is a high-risk factor for the free-range pig farming in Greece.

  10. Introducing a new family of short-range potentials and their numerical solutions using the asymptotic iteration method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assi, I. A.; Sous, A. J.

    2018-05-01

    The goal of this work is to derive a new class of short-range potentials that could have a wide range of physical applications, specially in molecular physics. The tridiagonal representation approach has been developed beyond its limitations to produce new potentials by requiring the representation of the Schrödinger wave operator to be multidiagonal and symmetric. This produces a family of Hulthén potentials that has a specific structure, as mentioned in the introduction. As an example, we have solved the nonrelativistic wave equation for the new four-parameter short-range screening potential numerically using the asymptotic iteration method, where we tabulated the eigenvalues for both s -wave and arbitrary l -wave cases in tables.

  11. Potential semiochemicals in urine from free ranging wolverines (Gulo gulo Pallas, 1780)

    Science.gov (United States)

    William F. Wood; Jeffrey P. Copeland; Richard E. Yates; Iman K. Horsey; Lynne R. McGreevy

    2009-01-01

    Urine deposition has been observed as an important scent-marking behaviour among wolverines (Gulo gulo, Mustelinae, Mustelidae). Solid phase microextraction (SPME) of headspace volatiles of the urine from free ranging wolverines were examined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Urine samples were collected directly from the bladder of live-trapped animals...

  12. Quantitative assessment of the physical potential of proton beam range verification with PET/CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knopf, A; Parodi, K.; Paganetti, Harald; Lo Cascio, E; Bonab, A; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A recent clinical pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of offline PET/CT range verification for proton therapy treatments. In vivo PET measurements are challenged by blood perfusion, variations of tissue compositions, patient motion and image co-registration uncertainties. Besides these

  13. Wood wastes and residues generated along the Colorado Front Range as a potential fuel source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julie E. Ward; Kurt H. Mackes; Dennis L. Lynch

    2004-01-01

    Throughout the United States there is interest in utilizing renewable fuel sources as an alternative to coal and nat-ural gas. This project was initiated to determine the availability of wood wastes and residues for use as fuel in ce-ment kilns and power plants located along the Colorado Front Range. Research was conducted through literature searches, phone surveys,...

  14. Host range of Secusio extensa (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae), and potential for biological control of Senecio madagascariensis (Asteraceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. M. Ramadan; K. T. Murai; T. Johnson

    2010-01-01

    Secusio extensa (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) was evaluated as a potential biological control agent for Madagascar fireweed, Senecio madagascariensis (Asteraceae), which has invaded over 400 000 acres of rangeland in the Hawaiian Islands and is toxic to cattle and horses. The moth was introduced from southeastern Madagascar...

  15. Release of long-range tertiary interactions potentiates aggregation of natively unstructured α-synuclein

    OpenAIRE

    Bertoncini, Carlos W.; Jung, Young-Sang; Fernandez, Claudio O.; Hoyer, Wolfgang; Griesinger, Christian; Jovin, Thomas M.; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2005-01-01

    In idiopathic Parkinson's disease, intracytoplasmic neuronal inclusions (Lewy bodies) containing aggregates of the protein α-synuclein (αS) are deposited in the pigmented nuclei of the brainstem. The mechanisms underlying the structural transition of innocuous, presumably natively unfolded, αS to neurotoxic forms are largely unknown. Using paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and NMR dipolar couplings, we show that monomeric αS assumes conformations that are stabilized by long-range interactio...

  16. Structure factor of 36Ar and long range pair-potential properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barocchi, F.; Chieux, P.; Fredrikze, H.; Magli, R.

    1992-01-01

    Recent diffraction data on low density Ar have been analyzed with the aim of determining the low k behaviour of the structure factor and from that the long range dipole-dipole interaction strength. The results are compared with the presently best known estimates of the van der Waals C 6 coefficient and with a previous analysis of neutron diffraction data on liquid Ar. (orig.)

  17. Ionization from short-range potential under action of electromagnetic field of complex configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Rodionov, V N; Kravtsova, G A

    2002-01-01

    The transcendental equation for the complex energy is obtained on the basis of the exactly solvable 3D model of the short-acting potential and the Green time function in the intensive electromagnetic field, constituting the combination of the constant magnetic field and the circular-polarization wave field. The electron quasistationary states parameters in the delta-potential with an account of the action of the intensive external field of complex configuration are calculated. The problem on the possibility of stabilizing the bound states decay of the spinor and scalar particles through the intensive magnetic field is clarified. It is established that the obtained results regime the reexamination of the accepted notion on the stabilizing role of the strong magnetic field by the atoms ionization

  18. A Potential Tool for Swift Fox (Vulpes velox) Conservation: Individuality of Long-Range Barking Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darden, Safi-Kirstine Klem; Dabelsteen, Torben; Pedersen, Simon Boel

    2003-01-01

    Vocal individuality has been found in a number canid species. This natural variation can have applications in several aspects of species conservation, from behavioral studies to estimating population density or abundance. The swift fox (Vulpes velox) is a North American canid listed as endangered...... in Canada and extirpated, endangered, or threatened in parts of the United States. The barking sequence is a long-range vocalization in the species' vocal repertoire. It consists of a series of barks and is most common during the mating season. We analyzed barking sequences recorded in a standardized...

  19. A Range Correction for Icesat and Its Potential Impact on Ice-sheet Mass Balance Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsa, A. A.; Moholdt, G.; Fricker, H. A.; Brunt, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a previously undocumented range error in NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) that degrades elevation precision and introduces a small but significant elevation trend over the ICESat mission period. This range error (the Gaussian-Centroid or 'G-C'offset) varies on a shot-to-shot basis and exhibits increasing scatter when laser transmit energies fall below 20 mJ. Although the G-C offset is uncorrelated over periods less than1 day, it evolves over the life of each of ICESat's three lasers in a series of ramps and jumps that give rise to spurious elevation trends of -0.92 to -1.90 cm yr(exp -1), depending on the time period considered. Using ICESat data over the Ross and Filchner-Ronne ice shelves we show that (1) the G-C offset introduces significant biases in ice-shelf mass balance estimates, and (2) the mass balance bias can vary between regions because of different temporal samplings of ICESat.We can reproduce the effect of the G-C offset over these two ice shelves by fitting trends to sample-weighted mean G-C offsets for each campaign, suggesting that it may not be necessary to fully repeat earlier ICESat studies to determine the impact of the G-C offset on ice-sheet mass balance estimates.

  20. The reproductive pattern and potential of free ranging female wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmsten, Anna; Jansson, Gunnar; Lundeheim, Nils; Dalin, Anne-Marie

    2017-08-01

    The number and spatial distribution of wild boars (Sus scrofa) has increased remarkably in Sweden as well as in other European countries. To understand the population dynamics of the wild boar, knowledge of its reproductive period, oestrus cycle and reproductive success is essential. The aim of this study was therefore to describe the seasonal reproductive pattern and reproductive potential of a wild boar population in Sweden. The study was based on findings from macroscopic examinations of the reproductive organs from 575 hunter-harvested female wild boars (>30 kg body weight). Samples were collected between December 2011 and December 2015 in the southern and middle parts of Sweden. The age of the sampled animals was determined and dressed weight was noted. The stage of the reproductive cycle was defined according to ovarian structures and in relation to the appearance of/and findings in the uterus. The crown-rump length (CRL) of the embryos/foetuses was used to calculate the oestrus/mating month and month for the expected farrowing. The macroscopic examination revealed a seasonal variation of reproductive stages, although cyclic and pregnant females were found in all seasons. Moreover, the estimated oestrus/mating and farrowing months based on the CRL showed that mating and farrowing may occur 'off-season'. The average litter size (no. of embryos or foetuses) per pregnant female was 5.4. Sow weight and age had significant effect on both the reproductive potential (ovulation rate and litter size) and pregnancy rate, respectively. The reproductive potential in the studied wild boar population was high compared to studies from other countries and farrowing may occur 'off-season'. This suggests that the environmental conditions in Sweden, including supplemental feeding, are favourable for wild boar reproduction.

  1. Pseudomonad Swarming Motility Is Restricted to a Narrow Range of High Matric Water Potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F.

    2012-01-01

    Using a novel experimental system that allows control of the matric potential of an agar slab, we explored the hydration conditions under which swarming motility is possible. If there is recognition that this physical parameter is a key determinant of swarming, it is usually neither controlled nor...... measured rigorously but only manipulated through proxies, namely, the agar concentration and the drying time of "soft" agar plates (swarming plates). We contend that this not only obscures the biophysical mechanisms underlying swarming but also impedes a full assessment of its clinical and environmental...

  2. Comparison and experimental validation of two potential resonant viscosity sensors in the kilohertz range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, Etienne; Caillard, Benjamin; Dufour, Isabelle; Heinisch, Martin; Jakoby, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Oscillating microstructures are well established and find application in many fields. These include force sensors, e.g. AFM micro-cantilevers or accelerometers based on resonant suspended plates. This contribution presents two vibrating mechanical structures acting as force sensors in liquid media in order to measure hydrodynamic interactions. Rectangular cross section microcantilevers as well as circular cross section wires are investigated. Each structure features specific benefits, which are discussed in detail. Furthermore, their mechanical parameters and their deflection in liquids are characterized. Finally, an inverse analytical model is applied to calculate the complex viscosity near the resonant frequency for both types of structures. With this approach it is possible to determine rheological parameters in the kilohertz range in situ within a few seconds. The monitoring of the complex viscosity of yogurt during the fermentation process is used as a proof of concept to qualify at least one of the two sensors in opaque mixtures. (paper)

  3. Comparison and experimental validation of two potential resonant viscosity sensors in the kilohertz range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, Etienne; Caillard, Benjamin; Dufour, Isabelle [Univ. Bordeaux, IMS, UMR 5218, F-33400 Talence (France); Heinisch, Martin; Jakoby, Bernhard [Institute for Microelectronics and Microsensors, Johannes Kepler University, Linz (Austria)

    2013-08-15

    Oscillating microstructures are well established and find application in many fields. These include force sensors, e.g. AFM micro-cantilevers or accelerometers based on resonant suspended plates. This contribution presents two vibrating mechanical structures acting as force sensors in liquid media in order to measure hydrodynamic interactions. Rectangular cross section microcantilevers as well as circular cross section wires are investigated. Each structure features specific benefits, which are discussed in detail. Furthermore, their mechanical parameters and their deflection in liquids are characterized. Finally, an inverse analytical model is applied to calculate the complex viscosity near the resonant frequency for both types of structures. With this approach it is possible to determine rheological parameters in the kilohertz range in situ within a few seconds. The monitoring of the complex viscosity of yogurt during the fermentation process is used as a proof of concept to qualify at least one of the two sensors in opaque mixtures. (paper)

  4. Comparison and experimental validation of two potential resonant viscosity sensors in the kilohertz range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Etienne; Heinisch, Martin; Caillard, Benjamin; Jakoby, Bernhard; Dufour, Isabelle

    2013-08-01

    Oscillating microstructures are well established and find application in many fields. These include force sensors, e.g. AFM micro-cantilevers or accelerometers based on resonant suspended plates. This contribution presents two vibrating mechanical structures acting as force sensors in liquid media in order to measure hydrodynamic interactions. Rectangular cross section microcantilevers as well as circular cross section wires are investigated. Each structure features specific benefits, which are discussed in detail. Furthermore, their mechanical parameters and their deflection in liquids are characterized. Finally, an inverse analytical model is applied to calculate the complex viscosity near the resonant frequency for both types of structures. With this approach it is possible to determine rheological parameters in the kilohertz range in situ within a few seconds. The monitoring of the complex viscosity of yogurt during the fermentation process is used as a proof of concept to qualify at least one of the two sensors in opaque mixtures.

  5. Broad-Host-Range IncP-1 plasmids and their resistance potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena ePopowska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The plasmids of the incompatibility group IncP-1, also called IncP, as extrachromosomal genetic elements can transfer and replicate virtually in all Gram-negative bacteria. They are composed of backbone genes that encode a variety of essential functions and accessory genes that have implications for human health and environmental bioremediation. Broad-host-range IncP plasmids are known to spread genes between distinct phylogenetic groups of bacteria. These genes often code for resistances to a broad spectrum of antibiotics, heavy metals and quaternary ammonium compounds used as disinfectants. The backbone of these plasmids carries modules that enable them to effectively replicate, move to a new host via conjugative transfer and to be stably maintained in bacterial cells. The adaptive, resistance and virulence genes are mainly located on mobile genetic elements integrated between the functional plasmid backbone modules. Environmental studies have demonstrated the wide distribution of IncP-like replicons in manure, soils and wastewater treatment plants. They also are present in strains of pathogenic or opportunistic bacteria, which can be a cause for concern, because they may encode multiresistance. Their broad distribution suggests that IncP plasmids play a crucial role in bacterial adaptation by utilizing horizontal gene transfer. This review summarizes the variety of genetic information and physiological functions carried by IncP plasmids, which can contribute to the spread of antibiotic and heavy metal resistance while also mediating the process of bioremediation of pollutants. Due to the location of the resistance genes on plasmids with a broad host range and the presence of transposons carrying these genes it seems that the spread of these genes would be possible and quite hazardous in infection control. Future studies are required to determine the level of risk of the spread of resistance genes located on these plasmids.

  6. Towards high dynamic range extensions of HEVC: subjective evaluation of potential coding technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanhart, Philippe; Řeřábek, Martin; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports the details and results of the subjective evaluations conducted at EPFL to evaluate the responses to the Call for Evidence (CfE) for High Dynamic Range (HDR) and Wide Color Gamut (WCG) Video Coding issued by Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG). The CfE on HDR/WCG Video Coding aims to explore whether the coding efficiency and/or the functionality of the current version of HEVC standard can be signi_cantly improved for HDR and WCG content. In total, nine submissions, five for Category 1 and four for Category 3a, were compared to the HEVC Main 10 Profile based Anchor. More particularly, five HDR video contents, compressed at four bit rates by each proponent responding to the CfE, were used in the subjective evaluations. Further, the side-by-side presentation methodology was used for the subjective experiment to discriminate small differences between the Anchor and proponents. Subjective results shows that the proposals provide evidence that the coding efficiency can be improved in a statistically noticeable way over MPEG CfE Anchors in terms of perceived quality within the investigated content. The paper further benchmarks the selected objective metrics based on their correlations with the subjective ratings. It is shown that PSNR-DE1000, HDRVDP- 2, and PSNR-Lx can reliably detect visible differences between the proposed encoding solutions and current HEVC standard.

  7. Modeling the effect of climate change to the potential invasion range of Piper aduncum Linnaeus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Paquit

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential effect of invasive plant species on biodiversity is one of most important subject of inquiry at present. In many parts of the world, the alarming spread of these plants has been documented. Knowing that climate exerts a dominant control over the distribution of plant species, predictions can therefore be made to determine which areas the species would likely spread under a climate change scenario and that is what this study aims to tackle. In the current study, a total of 211 species occurrence points were used to model the current and projected suitability of Piper aduncum in Bukidnon, Philippines using Maxent. Results revealed that the suitability of the species was determined primarily by climatic factors with Bio 18 (precipitation of the warmest quarter as the strongest influencing variable with a mean percent contribution of 22.1%. The resulting model was highly accurate based on its mean test Area Under Curve that is equal to 0.917. Current prediction shows that suitable areas for Piper are concentrated along the southern portion of Bukidnon. Only 9% of the province is suitable for the species at present but is predicted to increase to 27% because of climate change. The central and southwestern parts of the province are the areas of high threat for invasion by Piper.

  8. The potential of selected macroalgal species for treatment of AMD at different pH ranges in temperate regions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oberholster, Paul J

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The metal bioaccumulation potential of selected macroalgae species at different pH ranges was study for usage as part of a possible secondary passive acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment technology in algae ponds. Two separate studies were conducted...

  9. Mapping the Potential Global Range of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys, with Particular Reference to New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Fraser

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Originating from Asia, the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB is a significant pest of horticultural/agricultural crops, grapes, woody ornamental and herbaceous plants, and is also a nuisance to people, due to its overwintering behavior in human habitation. The global range of this pest is steadily increasing and previous predictions of environmental suitability have shown New Zealand to be highly suitable. Due to the economic value of horticultural and agricultural industries to the New Zealand economy, it is vital to understand the range of potential risk within the country. Global and New Zealand potential suitability for BMSB was modeled using three algorithms and the resulting predictions ensembled to predict the potential range under current climatic conditions and under trajectories of future low (Representative Concentration Pathways, RCP, 2.6 and high (RCP 8.5 greenhouse gas emissions for both 2050 and 2070. Under current conditions, models showed a high global suitability within latitudes 25°–50° N, southern South America, southeast and southwest regions of Australia and large areas of New Zealand. Modeling the effect of climate change on BMSB range in New Zealand resulted in a southerly range shift over time, particularly with high emissions trajectory. Currently, BMSB is not established in New Zealand and it is vital that this remains the case.

  10. Microscopic nucleon spectral function for finite nuclei featuring two- and three-nucleon short-range correlations: The model versus ab initio calculations for three-nucleon systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofi degli Atti, Claudio; Mezzetti, Chiara Benedetta; Morita, Hiko

    2017-04-01

    Background: Two-nucleon (2 N ) short-range correlations (SRC) in nuclei have been recently thoroughly investigated, both theoretically and experimentally and the study of three-nucleon (3 N ) SRC, which could provide important information on short-range hadronic structure, is underway. Novel theoretical ideas concerning 2 N and 3 N SRC are put forward in the present paper. Purpose: The general features of a microscopic one-nucleon spectral function which includes the effects of both 2 N and 3 N SRC and its comparison with ab initio spectral functions of the three-nucleon systems are illustrated. Methods: A microscopic and parameter-free one-nucleon spectral function expressed in terms of a convolution integral involving ab initio relative and center-of-mass (c.m.) momentum distributions of a 2 N pair and aimed at describing two- and three-nucleon short-range correlations, is obtained by using: (i) the two-nucleon momentum distributions obtained within ab initio approaches based upon nucleon-nucleon interactions of the Argonne family; (ii) the exact relation between one- and two-nucleon momentum distributions; (iii) the fundamental property of factorization of the nuclear wave function at short internucleon ranges. Results: The comparison between the ab initio spectral function of 3He and the one based upon the convolution integral shows that when the latter contains only two-nucleon short-range correlations the removal energy location of the peaks and the region around them exhibited by the ab initio spectral function are correctly predicted, unlike the case of the high and low removal energy tails; the inclusion of the effects of three-nucleon correlations brings the convolution model spectral function in much better agreement with the ab initio one; it is also found that whereas the three-nucleon short-range correlations dominate the high energy removal energy tail of the spectral function, their effects on the one-nucleon momentum distribution are almost one

  11. Calibration of high-dynamic-range, finite-resolution x-ray pulse-height spectrometers for extracting electron energy distribution data from the PFRC-2 device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, C.; Jandovitz, P.; Cohen, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge of the full x-ray energy distribution function (XEDF) emitted from a plasma over a large dynamic range of energies can yield valuable insights about the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) of that plasma and the dynamic processes that create them. X-ray pulse height detectors such as Amptek's X-123 Fast SDD with Silicon Nitride window can detect x-rays in the range of 200eV to 100s of keV. However, extracting EEDF from this measurement requires precise knowledge of the detector's response function. This response function, including the energy scale calibration, the window transmission function, and the resolution function, can be measured directly. We describe measurements of this function from x-rays from a mono-energetic electron beam in a purpose-built gas-target x-ray tube. Large-Z effects such as line radiation, nuclear charge screening, and polarizational Bremsstrahlung are discussed.

  12. Constructing high-accuracy intermolecular potential energy surface with multi-dimension Morse/Long-Range model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yu; Li, Hui; Le Roy, Robert J.

    2018-04-01

    Spectroscopically accurate Potential Energy Surfaces (PESs) are fundamental for explaining and making predictions of the infrared and microwave spectra of van der Waals (vdW) complexes, and the model used for the potential energy function is critically important for providing accurate, robust and portable analytical PESs. The Morse/Long-Range (MLR) model has proved to be one of the most general, flexible and accurate one-dimensional (1D) model potentials, as it has physically meaningful parameters, is flexible, smooth and differentiable everywhere, to all orders and extrapolates sensibly at both long and short ranges. The Multi-Dimensional Morse/Long-Range (mdMLR) potential energy model described herein is based on that 1D MLR model, and has proved to be effective and accurate in the potentiology of various types of vdW complexes. In this paper, we review the current status of development of the mdMLR model and its application to vdW complexes. The future of the mdMLR model is also discussed. This review can serve as a tutorial for the construction of an mdMLR PES.

  13. Gut microbiomes of free-ranging and captive Namibian cheetahs: Diversity, putative functions and occurrence of potential pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasimuddin; Menke, Sebastian; Melzheimer, Jörg; Thalwitzer, Susanne; Heinrich, Sonja; Wachter, Bettina; Sommer, Simone

    2017-10-01

    Although the significance of the gut microbiome for host health is well acknowledged, the impact of host traits and environmental factors on the interindividual variation of gut microbiomes of wildlife species is not well understood. Such information is essential; however, as changes in the composition of these microbial communities beyond the natural range might cause dysbiosis leading to increased susceptibility to infections. We examined the potential influence of sex, age, genetic relatedness, spatial tactics and the environment on the natural range of the gut microbiome diversity in free-ranging Namibian cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus). We further explored the impact of an altered diet and frequent contact with roaming dogs and cats on the occurrence of potential bacterial pathogens by comparing free-ranging and captive individuals living under the same climatic conditions. Abundance patterns of particular bacterial genera differed between the sexes, and bacterial diversity and richness were higher in older (>3.5 years) than in younger individuals. In contrast, male spatial tactics, which probably influence host exposure to environmental bacteria, had no discernible effect on the gut microbiome. The profound resemblance of the gut microbiome of kin in contrast to nonkin suggests a predominant role of genetics in shaping bacterial community characteristics and functional similarities. We also detected various Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) assigned to potential pathogenic bacteria known to cause diseases in humans and wildlife species, such as Helicobacter spp., and Clostridium perfringens. Captive individuals did not differ in their microbial alpha diversity but exhibited higher abundances of OTUs related to potential pathogenic bacteria and shifts in disease-associated functional pathways. Our study emphasizes the need to integrate ecological, genetic and pathogenic aspects to improve our comprehension of the main drivers of natural variation and shifts in

  14. Simulating QCD at finite density

    CERN Document Server

    de Forcrand, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    In this review, I recall the nature and the inevitability of the "sign problem" which plagues attempts to simulate lattice QCD at finite baryon density. I present the main approaches used to circumvent the sign problem at small chemical potential. I sketch how one can predict analytically the severity of the sign problem, as well as the numerically accessible range of baryon densities. I review progress towards the determination of the pseudo-critical temperature T_c(mu), and towards the identification of a possible QCD critical point. Some promising advances with non-standard approaches are reviewed.

  15. On the chiral perturbation theory for two-flavor two-color QCD at finite chemical potential

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brauner, Tomáš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2006), s. 559-569 ISSN 0217-7323 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD202/05/H003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : two-color QCD * chiral perturbation theory * chemical potential Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.564, year: 2006

  16. Does the optimal position of the acetabular fragment should be within the radiological normal range for all developmental dysplasia of the hip? A patient-specific finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuyi; Peng, Jianping; Li, De; Zhang, Linlin; Wang, Hui; Jiang, Leisheng; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-10-04

    The success of Bernese periacetabular osteotomy depends significantly on how extent the acetabular fragment can be corrected to its optimal position. This study was undertaken to investigate whether correcting the acetabular fragment into the so-called radiological "normal" range is the best choice for all developmental dysplasia of the hip with different severities of dysplasia from the biomechanical view? If not, is there any correlation between the biomechanically optimal position of the acetabular fragment and the severity of dysplasia? Four finite element models with different severities of dysplasia were developed. The virtual periacetabular osteotomy was performed with the acetabular fragment rotated anterolaterally to incremental center-edge angles; then, the contact area and pressure and von Mises stress in the cartilage were calculated at different correction angles. The optimal position of the acetabular fragment for patients 1, 2, and 3 was when the acetabular fragment rotated 17° laterally (with the lateral center-edge angle of 36° and anterior center-edge angle of 58°; both were slightly larger than the "normal" range), 25° laterally following further 5° anterior rotation (with the lateral center-edge angle of 31° and anterior center-edge angle of 51°; both were within the "normal" range), and 30° laterally following further 10° anterior rotation (with the lateral center-edge angle of 25° and anterior center-edge angle of 40°; both were less than the "normal" range), respectively. The optimal corrective position of the acetabular fragment is severity dependent rather than within the radiological "normal" range for developmental dysplasia of the hip. We prudently proposed that the optimal correction center-edge angle of mild, moderate, and severe developmental dysplasia of the hip is slightly larger than the "normal" range, within the "normal" range, and less than the lower limit of the "normal" range, respectively.

  17. Three dimensional magnetic fields in extra high speed modified Lundell alternators computed by a combined vector-scalar magnetic potential finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerdash, N. A.; Wang, R.; Secunde, R.

    1992-01-01

    A 3D finite element (FE) approach was developed and implemented for computation of global magnetic fields in a 14.3 kVA modified Lundell alternator. The essence of the new method is the combined use of magnetic vector and scalar potential formulations in 3D FEs. This approach makes it practical, using state of the art supercomputer resources, to globally analyze magnetic fields and operating performances of rotating machines which have truly 3D magnetic flux patterns. The 3D FE-computed fields and machine inductances as well as various machine performance simulations of the 14.3 kVA machine are presented in this paper and its two companion papers.

  18. Improved loop expansion for the effective potential of coupled boson-fermion systems at finite temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, N.

    1983-01-01

    The effective potential V(phi) of a scalar field theory coupled to fermions is undefined near phi = 0 if the scalar field has a spontaneously broken symmetry. This shows up in a loop expansion as an imaginary part in V(phi) which persists to all temperatures and densities, even when the symmetry is restored. This paper presents a modification of the loop expansion which yields a real V(phi) whenever the one-loop fermion corrections restore the symmetry

  19. Combining Inferential and Deductive Approaches to Estimate the Potential Geographical Range of the Invasive Plant Pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Kylie B.; Hardy, Giles E. St. J.; Kriticos, Darren J.

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum, an invasive plant pathogen of unknown origin, causes considerable and widespread damage in plant industries and natural ecosystems of the USA and Europe. Estimating the potential geographical range of P. ramorum has been complicated by a lack of biological and geographical data with which to calibrate climatic models. Previous attempts to do so, using either invaded range data or surrogate species approaches, have delivered varying results. A simulation model was developed using CLIMEX to estimate the global climate suitability patterns for establishment of P. ramorum. Growth requirements and stress response parameters were derived from ecophysiological laboratory observations and site-level transmission and disease factors related to climate data in the field. Geographical distribution data from the USA (California and Oregon) and Norway were reserved from model-fitting and used to validate the models. The model suggests that the invasion of P. ramorum in both North America and Europe is still in its infancy and that it is presently occupying a small fraction of its potential range. Phytophthora ramorum appears to be climatically suited to large areas of Africa, Australasia and South America, where it could cause biodiversity and economic losses in plant industries and natural ecosystems with susceptible hosts if introduced. PMID:23667628

  20. A Model-Independent Discussion of Quark Number Density and Quark Condensate at Zero Temperature and Finite Quark Chemical Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shu-Sheng; Shi Chao; Cui Zhu-Fang; Zong Hong-Shi; Jiang Yu

    2015-01-01

    Generally speaking, the quark propagator is dependent on the quark chemical potential in the dense quantum chromodynamics (QCD). By means of the generating functional method, we prove that the quark propagator actually depends on p_4 + iμ from the first principle of QCD. The relation between quark number density and quark condensate is discussed by analyzing their singularities. It is concluded that the quark number density has some singularities at certain μ when T = 0, and the variations of the quark number density as well as the quark condensate are located at the same point. In other words, at a certain μ the quark number density turns to nonzero, while the quark condensate begins to decrease from its vacuum value. (paper)

  1. a Tool for Crowdsourced Building Information Modeling Through Low-Cost Range Camera: Preliminary Demonstration and Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capocchiano, F.; Ravanelli, R.; Crespi, M.

    2017-11-01

    Within the construction sector, Building Information Models (BIMs) are more and more used thanks to the several benefits that they offer in the design of new buildings and the management of the existing ones. Frequently, however, BIMs are not available for already built constructions, but, at the same time, the range camera technology provides nowadays a cheap, intuitive and effective tool for automatically collecting the 3D geometry of indoor environments. It is thus essential to find new strategies, able to perform the first step of the scan to BIM process, by extracting the geometrical information contained in the 3D models that are so easily collected through the range cameras. In this work, a new algorithm to extract planimetries from the 3D models of rooms acquired by means of a range camera is therefore presented. The algorithm was tested on two rooms, characterized by different shapes and dimensions, whose 3D models were captured with the Occipital Structure SensorTM. The preliminary results are promising: the developed algorithm is able to model effectively the 2D shape of the investigated rooms, with an accuracy level comprised in the range of 5 - 10 cm. It can be potentially used by non-expert users in the first step of the BIM generation, when the building geometry is reconstructed, for collecting crowdsourced indoor information in the frame of BIMs Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) generation.

  2. The ground state of long-range Schrödinger equations and static qq̄ potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beccaria, Matteo [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica Ennio De Giorgi,Università del Salento, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); INFN, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Metafune, Giorgio [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica Ennio De Giorgi,Università del Salento, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Pallara, Diego [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica Ennio De Giorgi,Università del Salento, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); INFN, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2016-05-06

    Motivated by the recent results in http://arxiv.org/abs/1601.05679 about the quark-antiquark potential in N=4 SYM, we reconsider the problem of computing the asymptotic weak-coupling expansion of the ground state energy of a certain class of 1d Schrödinger operators −((d{sup 2})/(dx{sup 2}))+λ V(x) with long-range potential V(x). In particular, we consider even potentials obeying ∫{sub ℝ}dx V(x)<0 with large x asymptotics V∼−a/x{sup 2}−b/x{sup 3}+⋯. The associated Schrödinger operator is known to admit a bound state for λ→0{sup +}, but the binding energy is rigorously non-analytic at λ=0. Its asymptotic expansion starts at order O(λ), but contains higher corrections λ{sup n} log{sup m} λ with all 0≤m≤n−1 and standard Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory fails order by order in λ. We discuss various analytical tools to tame this problem and provide the general expansion of the binding energy at O(λ{sup 3}) in terms of quadratures. The method is tested on a soluble potential that is fully under control, and on various non-soluble cases as well. A supersymmetric case, arising in the study of the quark-antiquark potential in N=6 ABJ(M) theory, is also exploited to provide a further non-trivial consistency check. Our analytical results confirm at third order a remarkable exponentiation of the leading infrared logarithms, first noticed in N=4 SYM where it may be proved by Renormalization Group arguments. We prove this interesting feature at all orders at the level of the Schrödinger equation for general potentials in the considered class.

  3. Potential change in flaw geometry of an initially shallow finite-length surface flaw during a pressurized-thermal-shock transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shum, D.K.; Bryson, J.W.; Merkle, J.G.

    1993-09-01

    This study presents preliminary estimates on whether an shallow, axially oriented, inner-surface finite-length flaw in a PWR-RPV would tend to elongate in the axial direction and/or deepen into the wall of the vessel during a postulated PTS transient. Analysis results obtained based on the assumptions of (1) linear-elastic material response, and (2) cladding with same toughness as the base metal, indicate that a nearly semicircular flaw would likely propagate in the axial direction followed by propagation into the wall of the vessel. Note that these results correspond to initiation within the lower-shelf fracture toughness temperature range, and that their general validity within the lower-transition temperature range remains to be determined. The sensitivity of the numerical results aid conclusions to the following analysis assumptions are evaluated: (1) reference flaw geometry along the entire crack front and especially within the cladding region; (2) linear-elastic vs elastic-plastic description of material response; and (3) base-material-only vs bimaterial cladding-base vessel-model assumption. The sensitivity evaluation indicates that the analysis results are very sensitive to the above assumptions

  4. Sustaining Biodiversity in the Oregon Coast Range: Potential effects of Forest Policies in a Multi-ownership Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda C. McComb

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available To understand the potential effects of forest policies on sustaining biological diversity at broad scales, we used spatial simulation models to evaluate current and potential future habitat availability over 100 yr for three focal species: Pacific Fisher (Martes pennanti, Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus, and Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus. The habitats of these species represent a broad range of spatial scales and forest types. Area of habitat for fishers and Pileated Woodpeckers is predicted to increase over time under current forest land management policies. Habitat for Warbling Vireos is predicted to decline. These patterns are consistent with past analyses that predicted declines in diverse early successional forests and hardwood forests and increases in late-successional forests under current and two alternative policies. Land ownership influenced the spatial arrangement of habitat for all three focal species. Public lands subsidized habitat for wide-ranging species on adjacent private lands. A land use policy that required greater green tree retention on private lands seemed to result in modest increases in habitat quality over 100 yr for Pileated Woodpeckers. Thinning of plantations on federal lands had little effect on these focal species. Policy analyses such as these highlight incongruities between historic habitat patterns and contemporary spatial and temporal scales of habitat in managed landscapes. This information can be used to assess risks and inform the policy debates surrounding biodiversity conservation.

  5. Identification of long-range transport of air pollutants using a Potential Source Contribution Function in Baengyeong Island, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, J.; Park, T.; Atwood, S. A.; Soo, C. J.; Ahn, J.; Lee, T.

    2017-12-01

    To understand the influence of long-range transport, Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) analysis is widely used in many studies. PSCF is a region containing a source for a particular constituent estimated by looking at the percentage of back-trajectories that pass over that region which contain high concentrations of the constituent. Aerosol concentration, wind direction, wind speed and back trajectory from NOAA HYSPLIT model in Baengyeong Island were used as input data for PSCF to consider the retention time of aerosol. Non-refractory PM1 (NR-PM1) concentrations were measured by an Aerodyne High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and meteorological variables were also measured in Baengnyeong Island, Korea during 2013 to 2015. We will investigate the influence of long-range transport and compare with AMS data from eastern China in November 2013. It will be provided the overview of long-range transport of NR-PM1 including inorganics and organics species to South Korea.

  6. Ice cloud formation potential by free tropospheric particles from long-range transport over the Northern Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    China, Swarup; Alpert, Peter A.; Zhang, Bo; Schum, Simeon; Dzepina, Katja; Wright, Kendra; Owen, R. Chris; Fialho, Paulo; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2017-03-01

    Long-range transported free tropospheric particles can play a significant role on heterogeneous ice nucleation. Using optical and electron microscopy we examine the physicochemical characteristics of ice nucleating particles (INPs). Particles were collected on substrates from the free troposphere at the remote Pico Mountain Observatory in the Azores Islands, after long-range transport and aging over the Atlantic Ocean. We investigate four specific events to study the ice formation potential by the collected particles with different ages and transport patterns. We use single-particle analysis, as well as bulk analysis to characterize particle populations. Both analyses show substantial differences in particle composition between samples from the four events; in addition, single-particle microscopy analysis indicates that most particles are coated by organic material. The identified INPs contained mixtures of dust, aged sea salt and soot, and organic material acquired either at the source or during transport. The temperature and relative humidity (RH) at which ice formed, varied only by 5% between samples, despite differences in particle composition, sources, and transport patterns. We hypothesize that this small variation in the onset RH may be due to the coating material on the particles. This study underscores and motivates the need to further investigate how long-range transported and atmospherically aged free tropospheric particles impact ice cloud formation.

  7. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  8. Comparison of effectiveness between cork-screw and peg-screw electrodes for transcranial motor evoked potential monitoring using the finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomio, Ryosuke; Akiyama, Takenori; Ohira, Takayuki; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of motor evoked potentials by transcranial electric stimulation is popular in neurosurgery for monitoring motor function preservation. Some authors have reported that the peg-screw electrodes screwed into the skull can more effectively conduct current to the brain compared to subdermal cork-screw electrodes screwed into the skin. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of electrode design on transcranial motor evoked potential monitoring. We estimated differences in effectiveness between the cork-screw electrode, peg-screw electrode, and cortical electrode to produce electric fields in the brain. We used the finite element method to visualize electric fields in the brain generated by transcranial electric stimulation using realistic three-dimensional head models developed from T1-weighted images. Surfaces from five layers of the head were separated as accurately as possible. We created the "cork-screws model," "1 peg-screw model," "peg-screws model," and "cortical electrode model". Electric fields in the brain radially diffused from the brain surface at a maximum just below the electrodes in coronal sections. The coronal sections and surface views of the brain showed higher electric field distributions under the peg-screw compared to the cork-screw. An extremely high electric field was observed under cortical electrodes. Our main finding was that the intensity of electric fields in the brain are higher in the peg-screw model than the cork-screw model.

  9. Finite temperature field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ashok

    1997-01-01

    This book discusses all three formalisms used in the study of finite temperature field theory, namely the imaginary time formalism, the closed time formalism and thermofield dynamics. Applications of the formalisms are worked out in detail. Gauge field theories and symmetry restoration at finite temperature are among the practical examples discussed in depth. The question of gauge dependence of the effective potential and the Nielsen identities are explained. The nonrestoration of some symmetries at high temperature (such as supersymmetry) and theories on nonsimply connected space-times are al

  10. Prediction of overall persistence and long-range transport potential with multimedia fate models: robustness and sensitivity of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenner, Kathrin; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbuehler, Konrad

    2004-01-01

    The hazard indicators persistence (P) and long-range transport potential (LRTP) are used in chemicals assessment to characterize chemicals with regard to the temporal and spatial extent of their environmental exposure. They are often calculated based on the results of multimedia fate models. The environmental and substance-specific input parameters of such models are subject to a range of methodological uncertainties and also influenced by natural variability. We employed probabilistic uncertainty analysis to quantify variance in P and LRTP predictions for chemicals with different partitioning and transport behavior. Variance found in the results is so large that it prevents a clear distinction between chemicals. Additionally, only small improvements are observed when evaluating the results relative to a benchmark chemical. This can be explained by the dominance of substance-specific parameters and the only small direct influence of environmental parameters on P and LRTP as model outcomes. The findings underline the importance of learning how environmental conditions cause variability in substance behavior for improved substance ranking and classification. - Environmental conditions cause variability in substance behavior which need to be considered in chemical ranking schemes

  11. Multicore Magnetic Nanoparticles Coated with Oligomeric Micelles: Characterization and Potential for the Extraction of Contaminants over a Wide Polarity Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naous, Mohamed; García-Gómez, Diego; López-Jiménez, Francisco José; Bouanani, Farida; Lunar, María Loreto; Rubio, Soledad

    2017-01-17

    Oligomeric micelles from sodium undecylenate (oSUD) were chemisorbed to magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) through a single-step synthetic route involving the simultaneous nanoparticle formation and functionalization in an aqueous medium. The resulting spherical nanoparticles (MNPs-oSUD) consisted of a concatenation of iron oxide cores, with an average size of 7.7 nm, bound by oSUD micelles (particle average diameter of ca. 200 nm). Micellar coverage was ∼50% of the MNP-oSUD (by weight) and offered multiple retention mechanisms (e.g., dispersion, hydrogen bonding, polar, and ionic) for solute solubilization while keeping it intact during analyte elution. The high density of micelles and variety of interactions provided by this sorbent rendered it highly efficient for the extraction of aromatic amines in a wide polarity range (log K ow values from -0.80 to 4.05) from textiles, urine, and wastewater. Extraction took 5 min, no cleanup or evaporation of the extracts was needed and the method, based on LC-MS/MS quantitation, proved matrix-independent. Recoveries for 17 aromatic amines in samples were in the range of 93%-123% while those with negative log K ow values were in the range of 69%-87%. Detection limits for aromatic amines in textiles (0.007-2 mg kg -1 ) were well below the limits legislated by the European Union (EU) (30 mg kg -1 ) and those in urine and wastewater (0.004-1.5 μg L -1 ) were at the level usually found in real-world applications. All the analyzed samples were positive in aromatic amines. The easy synthesis and excellent extraction properties of MNPs-oSUD anticipate their high potential not only for multiresidue analysis but also in other fields such as water remediation.

  12. Dominant forest tree species are potentially vulnerable to climate change over large portions of their range even at high latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Périé

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Projecting suitable conditions for a species as a function of future climate provides a reasonable, although admittedly imperfect, spatially explicit estimate of species vulnerability associated with climate change. Projections emphasizing range shifts at continental scale, however, can mask contrasting patterns at local or regional scale where management and policy decisions are made. Moreover, models usually show potential for areas to become climatically unsuitable, remain suitable, or become suitable for a particular species with climate change, but each of these outcomes raises markedly different ecological and management issues. Managing forest decline at sites where climatic stress is projected to increase is likely to be the most immediate challenge resulting from climate change. Here we assess habitat suitability with climate change for five dominant tree species of eastern North American forests, focusing on areas of greatest vulnerability (loss of suitability in the baseline range in Quebec (Canada rather than opportunities (increase in suitability. Results show that these species are at risk of maladaptation over a remarkably large proportion of their baseline range. Depending on species, 5–21% of currently climatically suitable habitats are projected to be at risk of becoming unsuitable. This suggests that species that have traditionally defined whole regional vegetation assemblages could become less adapted to these regions, with significant impact on ecosystems and forest economy. In spite of their well-recognised limitations and the uncertainty that remains, regionally-explicit risk assessment approaches remain one of the best options to convey that message and the need for climate policies and forest management adaptation strategies.

  13. Dominant forest tree species are potentially vulnerable to climate change over large portions of their range even at high latitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périé, Catherine; de Blois, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Projecting suitable conditions for a species as a function of future climate provides a reasonable, although admittedly imperfect, spatially explicit estimate of species vulnerability associated with climate change. Projections emphasizing range shifts at continental scale, however, can mask contrasting patterns at local or regional scale where management and policy decisions are made. Moreover, models usually show potential for areas to become climatically unsuitable, remain suitable, or become suitable for a particular species with climate change, but each of these outcomes raises markedly different ecological and management issues. Managing forest decline at sites where climatic stress is projected to increase is likely to be the most immediate challenge resulting from climate change. Here we assess habitat suitability with climate change for five dominant tree species of eastern North American forests, focusing on areas of greatest vulnerability (loss of suitability in the baseline range) in Quebec (Canada) rather than opportunities (increase in suitability). Results show that these species are at risk of maladaptation over a remarkably large proportion of their baseline range. Depending on species, 5-21% of currently climatically suitable habitats are projected to be at risk of becoming unsuitable. This suggests that species that have traditionally defined whole regional vegetation assemblages could become less adapted to these regions, with significant impact on ecosystems and forest economy. In spite of their well-recognised limitations and the uncertainty that remains, regionally-explicit risk assessment approaches remain one of the best options to convey that message and the need for climate policies and forest management adaptation strategies.

  14. Signal sensitivity of alternating current potential drop measurement for crack detection of conductive substrate with tunable coating materials through finite element modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Simha Sandeep; Zhao, Huijuan; Liu, Ming; Peng, Fei; Zhang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We adopt a finite element numerical modeling approach to investigate the electromagnetic coupling effect of two parallel electric conductors with tunable electric conductivity σ and magnetic permeability μ . For two parallel conductors C and S ( μ C   ⋅  σ C   ≤  μ S   ⋅  σ S ), we find that the shape of current density profile of conductor S is dependent on the product of μ C   ⋅  σ C , while the magnitude is determined by the AC current frequency f . On the other hand, the frequency f affects not only the shape but also the magnitude of the current density profile of conductor C. We further adopt a coplanar model to investigate the signal sensitivity of alternating current potential drop (ACPD) measurement for both surface crack and inner crack detection. We find that with modified coating materials (lower electric conductivity and higher magnetic permeability, compared with the substrate material properties), the crack detection signal sensitivity can be greatly enhanced for both the cracks within the coating and at the coating/substrate interface, where cracks are most commonly encountered in real situations. (paper)

  15. Orientation-dependent crystal instability of gamma-TiAl in nanoindentation investigated by a multiscale interatomic potential finite-element model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Kai; Liu, Xiaohui; Gu, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    The anisotropic mechanical behavior of γ-TiAl alloys has been observed and repeatedly reported, but the effect of crystallographic orientations on the crystal instability of γ-TiAl is still unclear. In this paper, the orientation-dependent crystal instability of γ-TiAl single crystals was investigated by performing nanoindentation on different crystal surfaces. All the nanoindentations are simulated using an interatomic potential finite-element model (IPFEM). Simulation results show that the load–displacement curves, critical indentation depth and critical load for crystal instability as well as indentation modulus, are all associated with surface orientations. The active slip systems and the location of crystal instability in five typical nanoindentations are analyzed in detail, i.e. the (0 0 1), (1 0 0), (1 0 1), (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) crystal surfaces. The predicted crystal instability sites and the activated slipping systems in the IPFEM simulations are in good agreement with the dislocation nucleation in molecular dynamics simulations. (paper)

  16. Assessing potential modifications to the activated sludge process to improve simultaneous removal of a diverse range of micropollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Bruce; McAdam, Ewan J; Lester, John N; Cartmell, Elise

    2014-10-01

    It is proposed that wastewater treatment facilities meet legislated discharge limits for a range of micropollutants. However, the heterogeneity of these micropollutants in wastewaters make removal difficult to predict since their chemistry is so diverse. In this study, a range of organic and inorganic micropollutants known to be preferentially removed via different mechanisms were selected to challenge the activated sludge process (ASP) and determine its potential to achieve simultaneous micropollutant removal. At a fixed hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 8 h, the influence of an increase in solids retention time (SRT) on removal was evaluated. Maximum achievable micropollutant removal was recorded for all chemicals (estrogens, nonylphenolics and metals) at the highest SRT studied (27 days). Also, optimisation of HRT by extension to 24 h further augmented organic biodegradation. Most notable was the enhancement in removal of the considerably recalcitrant synthetic estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol which increased to 65 ± 19%. Regression analysis indicates that this enhanced micropollutant behaviour is ostensibly related to the concomitant reduction in food: microorganism ratio. Interestingly, extended HRT also initiated nonylphenol biodegradation which has not been consistently observed previously in real wastewaters. However, extending HRT increased the solubilisation of particulate bound metals, increasing effluent aqueous metals concentrations (i.e., 0.45 μm filtered) by >100%. This is significant as only the aqueous metal phase is to be considered for environmental compliance. Consequently, identification of an optimum process condition for generic micropollutant removal is expected to favour a more integrated approach where upstream process unit optimisation (i.e., primary sedimentation) is demanded to reduce loading of the particle bound metal phase onto the ASP, thereby enabling longer HRT in the ASP to be considered for optimum removal of organic

  17. Biofilm formation and potential for iron cycling in serpentinization-influenced groundwater of the Zambales and Coast Range ophiolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Dombard, D'Arcy R; Casar, Caitlin P; Simon, Alexander G; Cardace, Dawn; Schrenk, Matthew O; Arcilla, Carlo A

    2018-05-01

    Terrestrial serpentinizing systems harbor microbial subsurface life. Passive or active microbially mediated iron transformations at alkaline conditions in deep biosphere serpentinizing ecosystems are understudied. We explore these processes in the Zambales (Philippines) and Coast Range (CA, USA) ophiolites, and associated surface ecosystems by probing the relevance of samples acquired at the surface to in situ, subsurface ecosystems, and the nature of microbe-mineral associations in the subsurface. In this pilot study, we use microcosm experiments and batch culturing directed at iron redox transformations to confirm thermodynamically based predictions that iron transformations may be important in subsurface serpentinizing ecosystems. Biofilms formed on rock cores from the Zambales ophiolite on surface and in-pit associations, confirming that organisms from serpentinizing systems can form biofilms in subsurface environments. Analysis by XPS and FTIR confirmed that enrichment culturing utilizing ferric iron growth substrates produced reduced, magnetic solids containing siderite, spinels, and FeO minerals. Microcosms and enrichment cultures supported organisms whose near relatives participate in iron redox transformations. Further, a potential 'principal' microbial community common to solid samples in serpentinizing systems was identified. These results indicate collectively that iron redox transformations should be more thoroughly and universally considered when assessing the function of terrestrial subsurface ecosystems driven by serpentinization.

  18. Greenhouse gas mitigation potential of biomass energy technologies in Vietnam using the long range energy alternative planning system model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Amit; Bhattacharya, S.C.; Pham, H.L.

    2003-01-01

    The greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potentials of number of selected Biomass Energy Technologies (BETs) have been assessed in Vietnam. These include Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (BIGCC) based on wood and bagasse, direct combustion plants based on wood, co-firing power plants and Stirling engine based on wood and cooking stoves. Using the Long-range Energy Alternative Planning (LEAP) model, different scenarios were considered, namely the base case with no mitigation options, replacement of kerosene and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) by biogas stove, substitution of gasoline by ethanol in transport sector, replacement of coal by wood as fuel in industrial boilers, electricity generation with biomass energy technologies and an integrated scenario including all the options together. Substitution of coal stoves by biogas stove has positive abatement cost, as the cost of wood in Vietnam is higher than coal. Replacement of kerosene and LPG cookstoves by biomass stove also has a positive abatement cost. Replacement of gasoline by ethanol can be realized after a few years, as at present the cost of ethanol is more than the cost of gasoline. The replacement of coal by biomass in industrial boiler is also not an attractive option as wood is more expensive than coal in Vietnam. The substitution of fossil fuel fired plants by packages of BETs has a negative abatement cost. This option, if implemented, would result in mitigation of 10.83 million tonnes (Mt) of CO 2 in 2010

  19. Study of the Thermal Decomposition of PFPEs Lubricants on a Thin DLC Film Using Finitely Extensible Nonlinear Elastic Potential Based Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb Nath, S.K.; Deb Nath, S.K.; Wong, C.H.; Deb Nath, S.K.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluoro polyethers (PFPEs) are widely used as hard disk lubricants for protecting carbon overcoat reducing friction between the hard disk interface and the head during the movement of head during reading and writing data in the hard disk. Due to temperature rise of PFPE Zdol lubricant molecules on a DLC surface, how polar end groups are detached from lubricant molecules during coating is described considering the effect of temperatures on the bond/break density of PFPE Zdol using the coarse-grained bead spring model based on finitely extensible nonlinear elastic potential. As PFPE Z contains no polar end groups, effects of temperature on the bond/break density (number of broken bonds/total number of bonds) are not so significant like PFPE Zdol. Effects of temperature on the bond/break density of PFPE Z on DLC surface are also discussed with the help of graphical results. How bond/break phenomenon affects the end bead density of PFPE Z and PFPE Zdol on DLC surface is discussed elaborately. How the overall bond length of PFPE Zdol increases with the increase of temperature which is responsible for its decomposition is discussed with the help of graphical results. At HAMR condition, as PFPE Z and PFPE Zdol are not suitable lubricant on a hard disk surface, it needs more investigations to obtain suitable lubricant. We study the effect of breaking of bonds of nonfunctional lubricant PFPE Z, functional lubricants such as PFPE Zdol and PFPE Ztetrao, and multi dented functional lubricants such as Ar-DS, ARJ-DD, and OHJ-DS on a DLC substrate with the increase of temperature when heating of all of the lubricants on a DLC substrate is carried out isothermally using the coarse-grained bead spring model by molecular dynamics simulations and suitable lubricant is selected which is suitable on a DLC substrate at high temperature.

  20. Study of the Thermal Decomposition of PFPEs Lubricants on a Thin DLC Film Using Finitely Extensible Nonlinear Elastic Potential Based Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Deb Nath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfluoropolyethers (PFPEs are widely used as hard disk lubricants for protecting carbon overcoat reducing friction between the hard disk interface and the head during the movement of head during reading and writing data in the hard disk. Due to temperature rise of PFPE Zdol lubricant molecules on a DLC surface, how polar end groups are detached from lubricant molecules during coating is described considering the effect of temperatures on the bond/break density of PFPE Zdol using the coarse-grained bead spring model based on finitely extensible nonlinear elastic potential. As PFPE Z contains no polar end groups, effects of temperature on the bond/break density (number of broken bonds/total number of bonds are not so significant like PFPE Zdol. Effects of temperature on the bond/break density of PFPE Z on DLC surface are also discussed with the help of graphical results. How bond/break phenomenonaffects the end bead density of PFPE Z and PFPE Zdol on DLC surface is discussed elaborately. How the overall bond length of PFPE Zdol increases with the increase of temperature which is responsible for its decomposition is discussed with the help of graphical results. At HAMR condition, as PFPE Z and PFPE Zdol are not suitable lubricant on a hard disk surface, it needs more investigations to obtain suitable lubricant. We study the effect of breaking of bonds of nonfunctional lubricant PFPE Z, functional lubricants such as PFPE Zdol and PFPE Ztetrao, and multidented functional lubricants such as ARJ-DS, ARJ-DD, and OHJ-DS on a DLC substrate with the increase of temperature when heating of all of the lubricants on a DLC substrate is carried out isothermally using the coarse-grained bead spring model by molecular dynamics simulations and suitable lubricant is selected which is suitable on a DLC substrate at high temperature.

  1. Finite flavour groups of fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimus, Walter; Ludl, Patrick Otto

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of the theory of finite groups, with regard to their application as flavour symmetries in particle physics. In a general part, we discuss useful theorems concerning group structure, conjugacy classes, representations and character tables. In a specialized part, we attempt to give a fairly comprehensive review of finite subgroups of SO(3) and SU(3), in which we apply and illustrate the general theory. Moreover, we also provide a concise description of the symmetric and alternating groups and comment on the relationship between finite subgroups of U(3) and finite subgroups of SU(3). Although in this review we give a detailed description of a wide range of finite groups, the main focus is on the methods which allow the exploration of their different aspects. (topical review)

  2. On the use of big-bang method to generate low-energy structures of atomic clusters modeled with pair potentials of different ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, J M C; Pais, A A C C; Abreu, P E

    2012-02-05

    The efficiency of the so-called big-bang method for the optimization of atomic clusters is analysed in detail for Morse pair potentials with different ranges; here, we have used Morse potentials with four different ranges, from long- ρ = 3) to short-ranged ρ = 14) interactions. Specifically, we study the efficacy of the method in discovering low-energy structures, including the putative global minimum, as a function of the potential range and the cluster size. A new global minimum structure for long-ranged ρ = 3) Morse potential at the cluster size of n= 240 is reported. The present results are useful to assess the maximum cluster size for each type of interaction where the global minimum can be discovered with a limited number of big-bang trials. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.W. de.

    1986-01-01

    The consequences of the incorporation of finite temperature effects in fields theories are investigated. Particularly, we consider the sypersymmetric non-linear sigma model, calculating the effective potencial in the large N limit. Initially, we present the 1/N expantion formalism and, for the O(N) model of scalar field, we show the impossibility of spontaneous symmetry breaking. Next, we study the same model at finite temperature and in the presence of conserved charges (the O(N) symmetry's generator). We conclude that these conserved charges explicitly break the symmetry. We introduce a calculation method for the thermodynamic potential of the theory in the presence of chemical potentials. We present an introduction to Supersymmetry in the aim of describing some important concepts for the treatment at T>0. We show that Suppersymmetry is broken for any T>0, in opposition to what one expects, by the solution of the Hierachy Problem. (author) [pt

  4. Evaluation of long-range transport potential of selected brominated flame retardants with measured 1-octanol-air partition coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Jeong; Kwon, Jung Hwan [Div. of Environmental Science and Ecological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Various alternative flame retardants are used in many countries since polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were classified as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). However, difficulties in the evaluation of the long-range transport potential (LRTP) of the alternatives are related to the lack of information on their physicochemical properties, which govern their environmental fates and transport. Based on the simulation of LRTP using OECD P{sub OV} and LRTP Screening Tool, five alternative brominated flame retardants (BFRs) (hexabromobenzene [HBB], 2,3,4,5,6-pentabromotoluene [PBT], 2,3,4,5,6-pentabromoethylbenzene [PBEB], 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate [TBB], and 1,2,4,5-tetrabromo-3,6-dimethylbenzene [TBX]), and 3 PBDEs (BDE-28, BDE-47, and BDE-99) were chosen to perform a refined assessment. This was done using an experimentally measured 1-octanol–air partition coefficient (K{sub OA}) for the calculation of the air–water partition coefficient (K{sub AW}) required for the model. The four selected alternative BFRs (HBB, PBT, PBEB, TBX) have K{sub OA} values close to the in silico estimation used in the screening evaluation. On the other hand, the measured K{sub OA} value for TBB was two orders of magnitude lower than the estimated value used in the screening simulation. The refined simulation showed that characteristic travel distance (CTD) and transfer efficiency (TE) for HBB, PBT, PBEB, and TBX were greater than those for BDE-28, whereas CTD and TE for TBB were lower than those for BDE-28. This suggested that TBB has a lower LRTP than BDE-28, considering the refined partition coefficients.

  5. Investigating the Potential Range Expansion of the Vector Mosquito Aedes aegypti in Mexico with NASA Earth Science Remote Sensing Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosson, W. L.; Eisen, L.; Estes, M. G.; Estes, S. M.; Hayden, M.; Lozano-Fuentes, S.; Monaghan, A. J.; Moreno Madriñán, M. J.; Ochoa, C.; Quattrochi, D.; Tapia, B.; Welsh-Rodriguez, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    In tropical and sub-tropical regions, the mosquito Aedes aegypti is the major vector for the virus causing dengue, a serious public health issue in these areas. Through ongoing NSF- and NASA-funded studies, field surveys of Aedes aegypti and an integrated modeling approach are being used to improve our understanding of the potential range of the mosquito to expand toward heavily populated high elevation areas such as Mexico City under various climate change and socio-economic scenarios. This work serves three primary objectives: (1) Employ NASA remotely-sensed data to supplement the environmental monitoring and modeling component of the project. These data -- for example, surface temperature, precipitation, vegetation indices, soil moisture and elevation -- are critical for understanding the habitat necessary for mosquito survival and abundance; (2) Implement training sessions to instruct scientists and students from Mexico and the U.S. on how to use remote sensing and implement the NASA SERVIR Regional Visualization and Monitoring System; (3) Employ the SERVIR framework to optimize the dissemination of key project results in order to increase their societal relevance and benefits in developing climate adaptation strategies. Field surveys of larval, pupal and adult Aedes aegypti, as well as detailed physical and social household characteristics, were conducted in the summers of 2011and 2012 at geographic scales from the household to the community along a transect from sea level to 2400 m ASL. These data are being used in models to estimate Aedes aegypti habitat suitability. In 2011, Aedes aegypti were identified at an elevation of over 2150 m in Puebla, the highest elevation at which this species has been observed.

  6. The potential of selected macroalgal species for treatment of AMD at different pH ranges in temperate regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberholster, Paul J; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Botha, Anna-Maria; Genthe, Bettina

    2014-09-01

    The metal bioaccumulation potential of selected macroalgae species at different pH ranges was study for usage as part of a possible secondary passive acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment technology in algae ponds. Two separate studies were conducted to determine the suitability of macroalgae for passive treatment when metabolic processes in macrophytes and microorganisms in constructed wetlands decrease during winter months. In the field study, the bioconcentration of metals (mg/kg dry weight) measured in the benthic macroalgae mats was in the following order: site 1. Oedogonium crassum Al > Fe > Mn > Zn; site 2. Klebsormidium klebsii, Al > Fe > Mn > Zn; site 3. Microspora tumidula, Fe > Al > Mn > Zn and site 4. M. tumidula, Fe > Mn > Al > Zn. In the laboratory study, cultured macroalgae K. klebsii, O. crassum and M. tumidula isolated from the field sampling sites were exposed to three different pH values (3, 5 and 7), while bioaccumulation of the metals, Al, Fe, Mn and Zn and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity were measured in the different selected algae species at a constant water temperature of 14 °C. Bioaccumulation of Al was the highest for O. crassum followed by K. klebsii and M. tumidula (p macroalgae O. crassum at all three tested pH values under constant low water temperature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Blubber cortisol: a potential tool for assessing stress response in free-ranging dolphins without effects due to sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Kellar

    Full Text Available When paired with dart biopsying, quantifying cortisol in blubber tissue may provide an index of relative stress levels (i.e., activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in free-ranging cetacean populations while minimizing the effects of the act of sampling. To validate this approach, cortisol was extracted from blubber samples collected from beach-stranded and bycaught short-beaked common dolphins using a modified blubber steroid isolation technique and measured via commercially available enzyme immunoassays. The measurements exhibited appropriate quality characteristics when analyzed via a bootstraped stepwise parallelism analysis (observed/expected = 1.03, 95%CI: 99.6 - 1.08 and showed no evidence of matrix interference with increasing sample size across typical biopsy tissue masses (75-150 mg; r(2 = 0.012, p = 0.78, slope = 0.022 ng(cortisol deviation/ul(tissue extract added. The relationships between blubber cortisol and eight potential cofactors namely, 1 fatality type (e.g., stranded or bycaught, 2 specimen condition (state of decomposition, 3 total body length, 4 sex, 5 sexual maturity state, 6 pregnancy status, 7 lactation state, and 8 adrenal mass, were assessed using a Bayesian generalized linear model averaging technique. Fatality type was the only factor correlated with blubber cortisol, and the magnitude of the effect size was substantial: beach-stranded individuals had on average 6.1-fold higher cortisol levels than those of bycaught individuals. Because of the difference in conditions surrounding these two fatality types, we interpret this relationship as evidence that blubber cortisol is indicative of stress response. We found no evidence of seasonal variation or a relationship between cortisol and the remaining cofactors.

  8. Finite element and finite difference methods in electromagnetic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, MA

    2013-01-01

    This second volume in the Progress in Electromagnetic Research series examines recent advances in computational electromagnetics, with emphasis on scattering, as brought about by new formulations and algorithms which use finite element or finite difference techniques. Containing contributions by some of the world's leading experts, the papers thoroughly review and analyze this rapidly evolving area of computational electromagnetics. Covering topics ranging from the new finite-element based formulation for representing time-harmonic vector fields in 3-D inhomogeneous media using two coupled sca

  9. Slags in a Large Variation Range of Oxygen Potential Based on the Ion and Molecule Coexistence Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue-Min; Li, Jin-Yan; Zhang, Meng; Chai, Guo-Min; Zhang, Jian

    2014-12-01

    A thermodynamic model for predicting sulfide capacity of CaO-FeO-Fe2O3-Al2O3-P2O5 slags in a large variation range of oxygen potential corresponding to mass percentage of FetO from 1.88 to 55.50 pct, i.e., IMCT- model, has been developed by coupling with the deduced desulfurization mechanism of the slags based on the ion and molecule coexistence theory (IMCT). The developed IMCT- model has been verified through comparing the determined sulfide capacity after Ban-ya et al.[20] with the calculated by the developed IMCT- model and the calculated by the reported sulfide capacity models such as the KTH model. Mass percentage of FetO as 6.75 pct corresponding to the mass action concentration of FetO as 0.0637 or oxygen partial as 2.27 × 10-6 Pa is the criterion for distinguishing reducing and oxidizing zones for the slags. Sulfide capacity of the slags in reducing zone is controlled by reaction ability of CaO regardless of slag oxidization ability. However, sulfide capacity of the slags in oxidizing zone shows an obvious increase tendency with the increasing of slag oxidization ability. Sulfide capacity of the slags in reducing zone keeps almost constant with variation of the simplified complex basicity (pct CaO)/((pct Al2O3) + (pct P2O5)), or optical basicity, or the mass action concentration ratios of N FeO/ N CaO, , , and . Sulfide capacity of the slags in oxidizing zone shows an obvious increase with the increasing of the simplified complex basicity (pct CaO)/((pct Al2O3) + (pct P2O5)) or optical basicity, or the aforementioned mass action concentration ratios. Thus, the aforementioned mass action concentration ratios and the corresponding mass percentage ratios of various iron oxides to basic oxide CaO are recommended to represent the comprehensive effect of various iron oxides and basic oxide CaO on sulfide capacity of the slags.

  10. Groebner Finite Path Algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Leamer, Micah J.

    2004-01-01

    Let K be a field and Q a finite directed multi-graph. In this paper I classify all path algebras KQ and admissible orders with the property that all of their finitely generated ideals have finite Groebner bases. MS

  11. Locally Finite Root Supersystems

    OpenAIRE

    Yousofzadeh, Malihe

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of locally finite root supersystems as a generalization of both locally finite root systems and generalized root systems. We classify irreducible locally finite root supersystems.

  12. Generation of membrane potential beyond the conceptual range of Donnan theory and Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamagawa, Hirohisa; Ikeda, Kota

    2017-09-01

    Donnan theory and Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation (GHK eq.) state that the nonzero membrane potential is generated by the asymmetric ion distribution between two solutions separated by a semipermeable membrane and/or by the continuous ion transport across the semipermeable membrane. However, there have been a number of reports of the membrane potential generation behaviors in conflict with those theories. The authors of this paper performed the experimental and theoretical investigation of membrane potential and found that (1) Donnan theory is valid only when the macroscopic electroneutrality is sufficed and (2) Potential behavior across a certain type of membrane appears to be inexplicable on the concept of GHK eq. Consequently, the authors derived a conclusion that the existing theories have some limitations for predicting the membrane potential behavior and we need to find a theory to overcome those limitations. The authors suggest that the ion adsorption theory named Ling's adsorption theory, which attributes the membrane potential generation to the mobile ion adsorption onto the adsorption sites, could overcome those problems.

  13. Social monogamy in wild owl monkeys (Aotus azarae) of Argentina: the potential influences of resource distribution and ranging patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Using published and new data from a population of monogamous owl monkeys in the Argentinean Chaco, I examine the hypothesis that social monogamy is a default social system imposed upon males because the spatial and/or temporal distribution of resources and females makes it difficult for a single male to defend access to more than one mate. First, I examine a set of predictions on ranging patterns, use of space, and population density. This first section is followed by a second one considering predictions related to the abundance and distribution of food. Finally, I conclude with a section attempting to link the ranging and ecological data to demographic and life-history parameters as proxies for reproductive success. In support of the hypothesis, owl monkey species do live at densities (7 to 64 ind/km2) that are predicted for monogamous species, but groups occupy home ranges and core areas that vary substantially in size, with pronounced overlap of home ranges, but not of core areas. There are strong indications that the availability of food sources in the core areas during the dry season may be of substantial importance for regulating social monogamy in owl monkeys. Finally, none of the proxies for the success of groups were strongly related to the size of the home range or core area. The results I present do not support conclusively any single explanation for the evolution of social monogamy in owl monkeys, but they help us to better understand how it may function. Moreover, the absence of conclusive answers linking ranging, ecology, and reproductive success with the evolution of social monogamy in primates, offer renewed motivation for continuing to explore the evolution of monogamy in owl monkeys. PMID:25931263

  14. Exact equivalence between one-dimensional Bose gases interacting via hard-sphere and zero-range potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valiente, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    We prove the equivalence between the hard-sphere Bose gas and a system with momentum-dependent zero-range interactions in one spatial dimension, which we call extended hard-sphere Bose gas. The two-body interaction in the latter model has the advantage of being a regular pseudopotential. The most...

  15. Probabilistic finite elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belytschko, Ted; Wing, Kam Liu

    1987-01-01

    In the Probabilistic Finite Element Method (PFEM), finite element methods have been efficiently combined with second-order perturbation techniques to provide an effective method for informing the designer of the range of response which is likely in a given problem. The designer must provide as input the statistical character of the input variables, such as yield strength, load magnitude, and Young's modulus, by specifying their mean values and their variances. The output then consists of the mean response and the variance in the response. Thus the designer is given a much broader picture of the predicted performance than with simply a single response curve. These methods are applicable to a wide class of problems, provided that the scale of randomness is not too large and the probabilistic density functions possess decaying tails. By incorporating the computational techniques we have developed in the past 3 years for efficiency, the probabilistic finite element methods are capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. Sample results for an elastic-plastic ten-bar structure and an elastic-plastic plane continuum with a circular hole subject to cyclic loadings with the yield stress on the random field are given.

  16. Aristotelian Finitism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nawar, Tamer

    2015-01-01

    It is widely known that Aristotle rules out the existence of actual infinities but allows for potential infinities. However, precisely why Aristotle should deny the existence of actual infinities remains somewhat obscure and has received relatively little attention in the secondary literature. In

  17. Adiabatic potential-energy curves of long-range Rydberg molecules: Two-electron R -matrix approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tarana, Michal; Čurík, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 1 (2016), 012515 ISSN 0556-2791 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-15989P Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : adiabatic-potential-energy curves * Rydberg molecules * theoretical chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  18. Adiabatic potential-energy curves of long-range Rydberg molecules: Two-electron R -matrix approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tarana, Michal; Čurík, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 1 (2016), 012515 ISSN 0556-2791 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-15989P Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : adiabatic-potential- energy curves * Rydberg molecules * theoretical chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  19. 4.5 Tesla magnetic field reduces range of high-energy positrons -- Potential implications for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirrwar, A.; Vosberg, H.; Herzog, H.; Halling, H.; Weber, S.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.W.; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH

    1997-01-01

    The authors have theoretically and experimentally investigated the extent to which homogeneous magnetic fields up to 7 Tesla reduce the spatial distance positrons travel before annihilation (positron range). Computer simulations of a noncoincident detector design using a Monte Carlo algorithm calculated the positron range as a function of positron energy and magnetic field strength. The simulation predicted improvements in resolution, defined as full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the line-spread function (LSF) for a magnetic field strength up to 7 Tesla: negligible for F-18, from 3.35 mm to 2.73 mm for Ga-68 and from 3.66 mm to 2.68 mm for Rb-82. Also a substantial noise suppression was observed, described by the full-width at tenth-maximum (FWTM) for higher positron energies. The experimental approach confirmed an improvement in resolution for Ga-68 from 3.54 mm at 0 Tesla to 2.99 mm FWHM at 4.5 Tesla and practically no improvement for F-18 (2.97 mm at 0 Tesla and 2.95 mm at 4.5 Tesla). It is concluded that the simulation model is appropriate and that a homogeneous static magnetic field of 4.5 Tesla reduces the range of high-energy positrons to an extent that may improve spatial resolution in positron emission tomography

  20. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book analyzes finite element theory as applied to computational fluid mechanics. It includes a chapter on using the heat conduction equation to expose the essence of finite element theory, including higher-order accuracy and convergence in a common knowledge framework. Another chapter generalizes the algorithm to extend application to the nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. Other chapters are concerned with the analysis of a specific fluids mechanics problem class, including theory and applications. Some of the topics covered include finite element theory for linear mechanics; potential flow; weighted residuals/galerkin finite element theory; inviscid and convection dominated flows; boundary layers; parabolic three-dimensional flows; and viscous and rotational flows

  1. Gametogenesis of an intertidal population of Mytilus trossulus in NW Greenland: not a limitation for potential Arctic range expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrring, Jakob; Jensen, Kurt Thomas; Sejr, Mikael Kristian

    2017-01-01

    is found in north Greenland, an area characterised by low temperature, prolonged winters and a short productive period. This population, therefore, provides a unique opportunity to study whether a temperate bivalve species can sustain a population near its pole-ward distribution limit through reproduction...... characterized by limited food supply and sub-zero water temperatures for 9 mo of the year. Instead, for this marine invertebrate with a larval life-stage, oceanographic conditions and dispersal barriers, rather than physiological constraints, could be more important in determining the northern range limit....

  2. Modeling Short-Range Soil Variability and its Potential Use in Variable-Rate Treatment of Experimental Plots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Moameni

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Iran, the experimental plots under fertilizer trials are managed in such a way that the whole plot area uniformly receives agricultural inputs. This could lead to biased research results and hence to suppressing of the efforts made by the researchers. This research was conducted in a selected site belonging to the Gonbad Agricultural Research Station, located in the semiarid region, northeastern Iran. The aim was to characterize the short-range spatial variability of the inherent and management-depended soil properties and to determine if this variation is large and can be managed at practical scales. The soils were sampled using a grid 55 m apart. In total, 100 composite soil samples were collected from topsoil (0-30 cm and were analyzed for calcium carbonate equivalent, organic carbon, clay, available phosphorus, available potassium, iron, copper, zinc and manganese. Descriptive statistics were applied to check data trends. Geostatistical analysis was applied to variography, model fitting and contour mapping. Sampling at 55 m made it possible to split the area of the selected experimental plot into relatively uniform areas that allow application of agricultural inputs with variable rates. Keywords: Short-range soil variability, Within-field soil variability, Interpolation, Precision agriculture, Geostatistics

  3. Potential impact of global warming on the range of Spruce, Fir, Beech and sessile Oak in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piedallu, Christian; Perez, Vincent; Gegout, Jean-Claude; Lebourgeois, Francois; Bertrand, Romain

    2009-01-01

    There have been many studies all over the world that forecast the impact of global warming on vegetation but there is little information currently available to assess its consequences on French forests. The authors studied the range of four common species - spruce, fir, beech and sessile oak - so as to determine their ecology as accurately as possible and assess their sensitivity to global warming. Their range over the period from 1961-1990 was modelled and mapped for the whole of France using ecological variables that characterize climate, water supply, and soil nutrition. The models constructed predict effects from temperature, the water resource, water-logging and the trophic level of soils that are consistent with empirical knowledge about these species. Changes in the probabilities of presence during the 21. century investigated by simulating the A2 and B2 scenarios of the HadCM3 climate model. Changes in climate as predicted by this model would lead to a decrease of the probabilities of presence for all four species initially in the first part of the 21. century at the outer limits of their ranges and then a very significant drop in most plains and medium altitude upland areas, even according to the most optimistic forecasts under scenario B2. The reduction in the forest surface areas that are favourable to the species investigated for the period 2070-2100 is estimated, depending on the scenario, to be between 92% and 99% for spruce, 80% and 93% for beech, 63% and 83% for fir and 43% and 83% for sessile oak. These forecasted changes are very significant in comparison with the current conditions that are favourable to the presence of these species for which edaphic variables act as a local filter within the overall climate envelope. The authors conclude by underscoring the value of these tools for identifying and mapping the most vulnerable areas so as to be in a position to track the behaviour of these species in these areas and determine the appropriate

  4. A molecular gram stain using broad range PCR and pyrosequencing technology: a potentially useful tool for diagnosing orthopaedic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naomi; Bauer, Thomas W; Togawa, Daisuke; Lieberman, Isador H; Sakai, Hiroshige; Fujishiro, Takaaki; Tuohy, Marion J; Procop, Gary W

    2005-06-01

    The bacteria associated with orthopaedic infections are usually common gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. This fundamental grouping of bacteria is a necessary first step in the selection of appropriate antibiotics. Since polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is more rapid and may be more sensitive than culture, we developed a postamplification pyrosequencing method to subcategorize bacteria based on a few nucleotide polymorphisms in the 16S rRNA gene. We validated this method using well-characterized strains of bacteria and applied it to specimens from spinal surgery cases with suspected infections. Lysates of 114 bacteria including 75 species were created following standard cultivation to obtain DNA. The DNA was amplified by a broad-range real-time PCR. The amplicons were evaluated by pyrosequencing and were classified as gram-positive, gram-negative, or acid-fast bacilli based on the first three to five nucleotides sequenced. In addition, clinical cases of suspected infection were obtained from spinal surgery. The results of the "molecular Gram stain" were compared with the results of traditional Gram stain and culture. The lysates of 107 (93.9%) of the bacteria extracts tested were appropriately categorized as gram-positive and gram-negative or as acid-fast bacilli on the basis of this assay. The sensitivity and specificity of this assay were 100% and 97.4% for gram-positive and 88.3% and 100% for gram-negative isolates. All of the five clinical samples were appropriately categorized as containing gram-positive or gram-negative bacteria with this assay. This study demonstrates that high sensitivity and specificity of a molecular gram stain may be achieved using broad-range real-time PCR and pyrosequencing.

  5. Potential value of phosphate compounds in enhancing immobilization and reducing bioavailability of mixed heavy metal contaminants in shooting range soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, B; Bolan, N S; Choppala, G; Kunhikrishnan, A; Sanderson, P; Wang, H; Currie, L D; Tsang, Daniel C W; Ok, Y S; Kim, G

    2017-10-01

    Shooting range soils contain mixed heavy metal contaminants including lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and zinc (Zn). Phosphate (P) compounds have been used to immobilize these metals, particularly Pb, thereby reducing their bioavailability. However, research on immobilization of Pb's co-contaminants showed the relative importance of soluble and insoluble P compounds, which is critical in evaluating the overall success of in situ stabilization practice in the sustainable remediation of mixed heavy metal contaminated soils. Soluble synthetic P fertilizer (diammonium phosphate; DAP) and reactive (Sechura; SPR) and unreactive (Christmas Island; CPR) natural phosphate rocks (PR) were tested for Cd, Pb and Zn immobilization and later their mobility and bioavailability in a shooting range soil. The addition of P compounds resulted in the immobilization of Cd, Pb and Zn by 1.56-76.2%, 3.21-83.56%, and 2.31-74.6%, respectively. The reactive SPR significantly reduced Cd, Pb and Zn leaching while soluble DAP increased their leachate concentrations. The SPR reduced the bioaccumulation of Cd, Pb and Zn in earthworms by 7.13-23.4% and 14.3-54.6% in comparison with earthworms in the DAP and control treatment, respectively. Bioaccessible Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations as determined using a simplified bioaccessibility extraction test showed higher long-term stability of P-immobilized Pb and Zn than Cd. The differential effect of P-induced immobilization between P compounds and metals is due to the variation in the solubility characteristics of P compounds and nature of metal phosphate compounds formed. Therefore, Pb and Zn immobilization by P compounds is an effective long-term remediation strategy for mixed heavy metal contaminated soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Density functional study of photoabsorption in metallic clusters using an exchange-correlation potential with correct long-range behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, M.B. [Dpto. de Matematicas y Computacion, Universidad de Burgos, Burgos (Spain); Balbas, L.C. [Dpto. de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain)

    2002-06-17

    The atomic exchange-correlation (xc) potential with the correct -1/r asymptotic behaviour constructed by Parr and Ghosh (Parr R G and Ghosh S K 1995 Phys. Rev. A 51 3564) is adapted here to study, within time density functional theory, the linear response to external fields of (i) neutral and charged sodium clusters, and (ii) doped clusters of the type Na{sub n}Pb (n=4, 6, 16). The resulting photoabsorption cross sections are compared to experimental results, when available, and to results from previous calculations using local and non-local xc functionals. The calculated static polarizabilities and plasmon frequencies are closer to the experimental values than previous results. (author)

  7. Potential Range Expansion of Japanese Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica Thunb. in Southern U.S. Forestlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Rogers

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Japanese honeysuckle is one of the most aggressive invasive vines in forestlands of the southern United States. We analyzed field data collected by the U.S. Forest Service to identify potential determinants of invasion and to predict likelihood of further invasion under a variety of possible management strategies. Results of logistic regression, which classified 74% of the field plots correctly with regard to species presence and absence, indicated probability of invasion is correlated positively with adjacency to water bodies, temperature, site productivity, species diversity, and private land ownership, and is correlated negatively with slope, stand age, artificial regeneration, distance to the nearest road, and fire disturbance. Habitats most at risk to further invasion under current conditions occur throughout Mississippi, stretching northward across western Tennessee and western Kentucky, westward across southern Arkansas, eastward across north-central Alabama, and also occur in several counties scattered within Virginia. Invasion likelihoods could be increased by global climate change and reduced most by conversion to public land ownership, followed by artificial regeneration, and fire disturbance. While conversion of land ownership may not be feasible, this result suggests the opportunity for decreasing the likelihood of invasions on private lands via using selected management practices.

  8. Interaction of an invasive bark beetle with a native forest pathogen: Potential effect of dwarf mistletoe on range expansion of mountain pine beetle in jack pine forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Klutsch; Nadir Erbilgin

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, climate change has facilitated shifts in species ranges that have the potential to significantly affect ecosystem dynamics and resilience. Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) is expanding east from British Columbia, where it has killed millions of pine trees, primarily lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta...

  9. Potential Hydrogen Yields from Ultramafic Rocks of the Coast Range Ophiolite and Zambales Ophiolite: Inferences from Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stander, A.; Nelms, M.; Wilkinson, K.; Dyar, M. D.; Cardace, D.

    2013-12-01

    The reduced status of mantle rocks is a possible controller and indicator of deep life habitat, due to interactions between water and ultramafic (Fe, Mg-rich) minerals, which, under reducing conditions, can yield copious free hydrogen, which is an energy source for rock-hosted chemosynthetic life. In this work, Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to parameterize the redox status of Fe in altering peridotites of the Coast Range Ophiolite (CRO) in California, USA and Zambales Ophiolite (ZO) in the Philippines. Fe-bearing minerals were identified and data were collected for the percentages of Fe(III)and Fe(II)and bulk Fe concentration. Thin section analysis shows that relict primary olivines and spinels generally constitute a small percentage of the ZO and CRO rock, and given satisfactory estimates of the volume of the ultramafic units of the ZO and CRO, a stoichiometric H2 production can be estimated. In addition, ZO serpentinites are ~63,000 ppm Fe in bulk samples; they contain ~41-58% Fe(III)and ~23-34% Fe(II) in serpentine and relict minerals along with ~8-30% of the total Fe as magnetite. CRO serpentinites are ~42,000 ppm Fe in bulk samples; they contain ~15-50% Fe(III), ~22-88% Fe(II) in serpentine and relict minerals, and ~0-52% of total Fe is in magnetite (Fe(II)Fe(III)2O4). Assuming stoichiometric production of H2, and given the following representation of serpentinization 2(FeO)rock + H2O → (Fe2O3)rock +H2, we calculated the maximum quantity of hydrogen released and yet to be released through the oxidation of Fe(II). Given that relatively high Fe(III)/Fetotal values can imply higher water:rock ratios during rock alteration (Andreani et al., 2013), we can deduce that ZO ultramafics in this study have experienced a net higher water:rock ratio than CRO ultramafics. We compare possible H2 yields and contrast the tectonic and alteration histories of the selected ultramafic units. (M. Andreani, M. Muñoz, C. Marcaillou, A. Delacour, 2013, μXANES study of iron

  10. Exposure to febrile-range hyperthermia potentiates Wnt signalling and epithelial-mesenchymal transition gene expression in lung epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potla, Ratnakar; Tulapurkar, Mohan E; Luzina, Irina G; Atamas, Sergei P; Singh, Ishwar S; Hasday, Jeffrey D

    2018-02-01

    As environmental and body temperatures vary, lung epithelial cells experience temperatures significantly different from normal core temperature. Our previous studies in human lung epithelium showed that: (i) heat shock accelerates wound healing and activates profibrotic gene expression through heat shock factor-1 (HSF1); (ii) HSF1 is activated at febrile temperatures (38-41 °C) and (iii) hypothermia (32 °C) activates and hyperthermia (39.5 °C) reduces expression of a subset of miRNAs that target protein kinase-Cα (PKCα) and enhance proliferation. We analysed the effect of hypo- and hyperthermia exposure on Wnt signalling by exposing human small airway epithelial cells (SAECs) and HEK293T cells to 32, 37 or 39.5 °C for 24 h, then analysing Wnt-3a-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) gene expression by qRT-PCR and TOPFlash reporter plasmid activity. Effects of miRNA mimics and inhibitors and the HSF1 inhibitor, KNK437, were evaluated. Exposure to 39.5 °C for 24 h increased subsequent Wnt-3a-induced EMT gene expression in SAECs and Wnt-3a-induced TOPFlash activity in HEK293T cells. Increased Wnt responsiveness was associated with HSF1 activation and blocked by KNK437. Overexpressing temperature-responsive miRNA mimics reduced Wnt responsiveness in 39.5 °C-exposed HEK293T cells, but inhibitors of the same miRNAs failed to restore Wnt responsiveness in 32 °C-exposed HEK293T cells. Wnt responsiveness, including expression of genes associated with EMT, increases after exposure to febrile-range temperature through an HSF1-dependent mechanism that is independent of previously identified temperature-dependent miRNAs. This process may be relevant to febrile fibrosing lung diseases, including the fibroproliferative phase of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).

  11. Flow in potential cascades by means of the finite element method; Flujo en cascadas potenciales mediante el metodo del elemento finito

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosa Cordero, Rodolfo; Fernandez Valencia, Gonzalo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1987-12-31

    This article presents a mathematical model and its solution by means of the finite element method with approximate Garlekin formulation, for the flow analysis in a circular cascade, in a surface of revolution current of a turbo- machine, that can be axial, mixed or radial. To the revolution surface an agreed transformation is applied to obtain a plane, eliminating in this form one term in the equation succeeding in avoiding an iterative solution. Likewise, the finite element method allows to solve the equation in partial derivatives of the elliptical type in its quasi-harmonic form. Additionally, the method followed to introduce the contour conditions is presented; specially, the Kutta-Joukowsky conditions and the one of periodicity, which distinguishes this problem from the classical problems of ideal flows evaluated in the contour. [Espanol] En este articulo se presenta un modelo matematico y su solucion mediante el empleo del metodo del elemento finito con formulacion aproximada de Galerkin, para el analisis del flujo en una cascada circular, en una superficie de corriente de revolucion de una turbomaquina, que puede ser axial, mixta o radial. A la superficie de revolucion se le aplica una transformacion conforme para obtener un plano, eliminando de esta forma un termino en la ecuacion logrando evitar la solucion iterativa. Asimismo, el metodo del elemento finito permite resolver la ecuacion en derivadas parciales del tipo eliptico en su forma cuasiarmonica. Se presenta, ademas, el metodo seguido para introducir las condiciones de contorno; en especial, las condiciones de Kutta-Joukowsky y la de periodicidad, que distinguen a este problema de los problemas clasicos de flujos ideales valuados en el contorno.

  12. Flow in potential cascades by means of the finite element method; Flujo en cascadas potenciales mediante el metodo del elemento finito

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosa Cordero, Rodolfo; Fernandez Valencia, Gonzalo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1986-12-31

    This article presents a mathematical model and its solution by means of the finite element method with approximate Garlekin formulation, for the flow analysis in a circular cascade, in a surface of revolution current of a turbo- machine, that can be axial, mixed or radial. To the revolution surface an agreed transformation is applied to obtain a plane, eliminating in this form one term in the equation succeeding in avoiding an iterative solution. Likewise, the finite element method allows to solve the equation in partial derivatives of the elliptical type in its quasi-harmonic form. Additionally, the method followed to introduce the contour conditions is presented; specially, the Kutta-Joukowsky conditions and the one of periodicity, which distinguishes this problem from the classical problems of ideal flows evaluated in the contour. [Espanol] En este articulo se presenta un modelo matematico y su solucion mediante el empleo del metodo del elemento finito con formulacion aproximada de Galerkin, para el analisis del flujo en una cascada circular, en una superficie de corriente de revolucion de una turbomaquina, que puede ser axial, mixta o radial. A la superficie de revolucion se le aplica una transformacion conforme para obtener un plano, eliminando de esta forma un termino en la ecuacion logrando evitar la solucion iterativa. Asimismo, el metodo del elemento finito permite resolver la ecuacion en derivadas parciales del tipo eliptico en su forma cuasiarmonica. Se presenta, ademas, el metodo seguido para introducir las condiciones de contorno; en especial, las condiciones de Kutta-Joukowsky y la de periodicidad, que distinguen a este problema de los problemas clasicos de flujos ideales valuados en el contorno.

  13. A finite landscape?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, B.S.; Douglas, M.R.

    2006-06-01

    We present evidence that the number of string/M theory vacua consistent with experiments is finite. We do this both by explicit analysis of infinite sequences of vacua and by applying various mathematical finiteness theorems. (author)

  14. Nilpotent -local finite groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, José; Scherer, Jérôme; Viruel, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    We provide characterizations of -nilpotency for fusion systems and -local finite groups that are inspired by known result for finite groups. In particular, we generalize criteria by Atiyah, Brunetti, Frobenius, Quillen, Stammbach and Tate.

  15. Determination of Germination Response to Temperature and Water Potential for a Wide Range of Cover Crop Species and Related Functional Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribouillois, Hélène; Dürr, Carolyne; Demilly, Didier; Wagner, Marie-Hélène; Justes, Eric

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of species can be sown as cover crops during fallow periods to provide various ecosystem services. Plant establishment is a key stage, especially when sowing occurs in summer with high soil temperatures and low water availability. The aim of this study was to determine the response of germination to temperature and water potential for diverse cover crop species. Based on these characteristics, we developed contrasting functional groups that group species with the same germination ability, which may be useful to adapt species choice to climatic sowing conditions. Germination of 36 different species from six botanical families was measured in the laboratory at eight temperatures ranging from 4.5-43°C and at four water potentials. Final germination percentages, germination rate, cardinal temperatures, base temperature and base water potential were calculated for each species. Optimal temperatures varied from 21.3-37.2°C, maximum temperatures at which the species could germinate varied from 27.7-43.0°C and base water potentials varied from -0.1 to -2.6 MPa. Most cover crops were adapted to summer sowing with a relatively high mean optimal temperature for germination, but some Fabaceae species were more sensitive to high temperatures. Species mainly from Poaceae and Brassicaceae were the most resistant to water deficit and germinated under a low base water potential. Species were classified, independent of family, according to their ability to germinate under a range of temperatures and according to their base water potential in order to group species by functional germination groups. These groups may help in choosing the most adapted cover crop species to sow based on climatic conditions in order to favor plant establishment and the services provided by cover crops during fallow periods. Our data can also be useful as germination parameters in crop models to simulate the emergence of cover crops under different pedoclimatic conditions and crop

  16. SU-F-T-221: An Assessment of the Potential for Improved Local Control of Skull- Base Chordomas Via Reduction of the Proton Beam Range Uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, L; Soldner, A; Kirk, M; Fager, M; Solberg, T; Robert, L; Dolney, D [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The beam range uncertainty presents a special challenge for proton therapy. Novel technologies currently under development offer strategies to reduce the range uncertainty [1,2]. This work quantifies the potential advantages that could be realized by such a reduction for dosimetrically challenging chordomas at the base of skull. Therapeutic improvement was assessed by evaluating tumor control probabilities (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Methods: Treatment plans were made for a modulated-scanned proton delivery technique using the Eclipse treatment planning system. The prescription dose was 7920 cGy to the CTV. Three different range uncertainty scenarios were considered: 5 mm (3.5% of the beam range + 1 mm, representing current clinical practice, “Curr”), 2 mm (1.3%), and 1 mm (0.7%). For each of 4 patients, 3 different PTVs were defined via uniform expansion of the CTV by the value of the range uncertainty. Tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for organs-at-risk (OARs) were calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman[3] formalism and published model parameters [ref Terahara[4], quantec S10, Burman Red Journal v21 pp 123]. Our plan optimization strategy was to achieve PTV close to prescription while maintaining OAR NTCP values at or better than the Curr plan. Results: The average TCP values for the 5, 2, and 1 mm range uncertainty scenarios are 51%, 55% and 65%. The improvement in TCP for patients was between 4 and 30%, depending primarily on the proximity of the GTV to OAR. The average NTCPs for the brainstem and cord were about 4% and 1%, respectively, for all target margins. Conclusion: For base of skull chordomas, reduced target margins can substantially increase the TCP without increasing the NTCP. This work demonstrates the potential significance of a reduction in the range uncertainty for proton beams.

  17. Basic Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Hae

    1992-02-01

    This book gives descriptions of basic finite element method, which includes basic finite element method and data, black box, writing of data, definition of VECTOR, definition of matrix, matrix and multiplication of matrix, addition of matrix, and unit matrix, conception of hardness matrix like spring power and displacement, governed equation of an elastic body, finite element method, Fortran method and programming such as composition of computer, order of programming and data card and Fortran card, finite element program and application of nonelastic problem.

  18. Composite Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, we extend the previous results of Chap. 2 to the more general case of composite finite sums. We describe what composite finite sums are and how their analysis can be reduced to the analysis of simple finite sums using the chain rule. We apply these techniques, next, on numerical integration and on some identities of Ramanujan.

  19. Composite Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    In this chapter, we extend the previous results of Chap. 2 to the more general case of composite finite sums. We describe what composite finite sums are and how their analysis can be reduced to the analysis of simple finite sums using the chain rule. We apply these techniques, next, on numerical integration and on some identities of Ramanujan.

  20. Quantum threshold reflection is not a consequence of a region of the long-range attractive potential with rapidly varying de Broglie wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jakob; Pollak, Eli; Miret-Artes, Salvador

    2018-04-01

    Quantum threshold reflection is a well-known quantum phenomenon which prescribes that at threshold, except for special circumstances, a quantum particle scattering from any potential, even if attractive at long range, will be reflected with unit probability. In the past, this property had been associated with the so-called badlands region of the potential, where the semiclassical description of the scattering fails due to a rapid spatial variation of the de Broglie wavelength. This badlands region occurs far from the strong interaction region of the potential and has therefore been used to "explain" the quantum reflection phenomenon. In this paper we show that the badlands region of the interaction potential is immaterial. The extremely long wavelength of the scattered particle at threshold is much longer than the spatial extension of the badlands region, which therefore does not affect the scattering. For this purpose, we review and generalize the proof for the existence of quantum threshold reflection to stress that it is only a consequence of continuity and boundary conditions. The nonlocal character of the scattering implies that the whole interaction potential is involved in the phenomenon. We then provide a detailed numerical study of the threshold scattering of a particle by a Morse potential and an Eckart potential, especially in the time domain. We compare exact quantum computations with incoherent results obtained from a classical Wigner approximation. This study shows that close to threshold the time-dependent amplitude of the scattered particle is negligible in the badlands region and is the same whether the potential has a reflecting wall as in the Morse potential or a steplike structure as in the Eckart smooth step potential. The mean flight time of the particle is not shortened due to a local reflection from the badlands region or due to the lower density of the wave function at short distances. This study should serve to definitely rule out the

  1. Finite element modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonks, M.R.; Williamson, R.; Masson, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Finite Element Method (FEM) is a numerical technique for finding approximate solutions to boundary value problems. While FEM is commonly used to solve solid mechanics equations, it can be applied to a large range of BVPs from many different fields. FEM has been used for reactor fuels modelling for many years. It is most often used for fuel performance modelling at the pellet and pin scale, however, it has also been used to investigate properties of the fuel material, such as thermal conductivity and fission gas release. Recently, the United Stated Department Nuclear Energy Advanced Modelling and Simulation Program has begun using FEM as the basis of the MOOSE-BISON-MARMOT Project that is developing a multi-dimensional, multi-physics fuel performance capability that is massively parallel and will use multi-scale material models to provide a truly predictive modelling capability. (authors)

  2. Preservation theorems on finite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebert, M.

    1994-09-01

    This paper concerns classical Preservation results applied to finite structures. We consider binary relations for which a strong form of preservation theorem (called strong interpolation) exists in the usual case. This includes most classical cases: embeddings, extensions, homomorphisms into and onto, sandwiches, etc. We establish necessary and sufficient syntactic conditions for the preservation theorems for sentences and for theories to hold in the restricted context of finite structures. We deduce that for all relations above, the restricted theorem for theories hold provided the language is finite. For the sentences the restricted version fails in most cases; in fact the ''homomorphism into'' case seems to be the only possible one, but the efforts to show that have failed. We hope our results may help to solve this frustrating problem; in the meantime, they are used to put a lower bound on the level of complexity of potential counterexamples. (author). 8 refs

  3. Mechanical characterization of articular cartilage by combining magnetic resonance imaging and finite-element analysis-a potential functional imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julkunen, P; Korhonen, R K; Nissi, M J; Jurvelin, J S

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a method for non-invasive characterization of cartilage composition and structure. We aimed to see whether T 1 and T 2 relaxation times are related to proteoglycan (PG) and collagen-specific mechanical properties of articular cartilage. Specifically, we analyzed whether variations in the depthwise collagen orientation, as assessed by the laminae obtained from T 2 profiles, affect the mechanical characteristics of cartilage. After MRI and unconfined compression tests of human and bovine patellar cartilage samples, fibril-reinforced poroviscoelastic finite-element models (FEM), with depthwise collagen orientations implemented from quantitative T 2 maps (3 laminae for human, 3-7 laminae for bovine), were constructed to analyze the non-fibrillar matrix modulus (PG specific), fibril modulus (collagen specific) and permeability of the samples. In bovine cartilage, the non-fibrillar matrix modulus (R = -0.64, p 1 . In bovine cartilage, T 2 correlated positively with the initial fibril modulus (R = 0.62, p = 0.05). In human cartilage, the initial fibril modulus correlated negatively (R = -0.61, p 2 . Based on the simulations, cartilage with a complex collagen architecture (5 or 7 laminae), leading to high bulk T 2 due to magic angle effects, provided higher compressive stiffness than tissue with a simple collagen architecture (3 laminae). Our results suggest that T 1 reflects PG-specific mechanical properties of cartilage. High T 2 is characteristic to soft cartilage with a classical collagen architecture. Contradictorily, high bulk T 2 can also be found in stiff cartilage with a multilaminar collagen fibril network. By emerging MRI and FEM, the present study establishes a step toward functional imaging of articular cartilage

  4. Oscillations of the static meson fields at finite baryon density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florkowski, W.; Friman, B.; Technische Hochschule Darmstadt

    1996-04-01

    The spatial dependence of static meson correlation functions at finite baryon density is studied in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. In contrast to the finite temperature case, we find that the correlation functions at finite density are not screened but exhibit long-range oscillations. The observed phenomenon is analogous to the Friedel oscillations in a degenerate electron gas. (orig.)

  5. The potential for extending the spectral range accessible to the european X-ray free electron laser in the direction of longer wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Saldin, E L; Yurkov, M V

    2004-01-01

    The baseline specifications of European XFEL give a range of wavelengths between 0.1 nm and 2 nm. This wavelength range at fixed electron beam energy 17.5 GeV can be covered by operating the SASE FEL with three undulators which have different period and tunable gap. A study of the potential for the extending the spectral range accessible to the XFEL in the direction of longer wavelengths is presented. The extension of the wavelength range to 6 nm would be cover the water window in the VUV region, opening the facility to a new class of experiments. There are at least two possible sources of VUV radiation associated with the X-ray FEL; the "low (2.5 GeV) energy electron beam dedicated" and the " 17.5 GeV spent beam parasitic" (or "after-burner") source modes. The second alternative, "after-burner undulator" is the one we regard as most favorable. It is possible to place an undulator as long as 80 meters after 2 nm undulator. Ultimately, VUV undulator would be able to deliver output power approaching 100 GW. A b...

  6. Assessing the role of Hartree-Fock exchange, correlation energy and long range corrections in evaluating ionization potential, and electron affinity in density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikramaditya, Talapunur; Lin, Shiang-Tai

    2017-06-05

    Accurate determination of ionization potentials (IPs), electron affinities (EAs), fundamental gaps (FGs), and HOMO, LUMO energy levels of organic molecules play an important role in modeling and predicting the efficiencies of organic photovoltaics, OLEDs etc. In this work, we investigate the effects of Hartree Fock (HF) Exchange, correlation energy, and long range corrections in predicting IP and EA in Hybrid Functionals. We observe increase in percentage of HF exchange results in increase of IPs and decrease in EAs. Contrary to the general expectations inclusion of both HF exchange and correlation energy (from the second order perturbation theory MP2) leads to poor prediction. Range separated Hybrid Functionals are found to be more reliable among various DFT Functionals investigated. DFT Functionals predict accurate IPs whereas post HF methods predict accurate EAs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Kinematics of active deformation across the Western Kunlun mountain range (Xinjiang, China), and potential seismic hazards within the southern Tarim Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guilbaud, Christelle; Simoes, Martine; Barrier, Laurie

    2017-01-01

    remains seismic. To quantify the rate of active deformation and the potential for major earthquakes in this region, we combine a structural and quantitative morphological analysis of the Yecheng-Pishan fold, along the topographic mountain front in the epicentral area. Using a seismic profile, we derive......The Western Kunlun mountain range is a slowly converging intra-continental orogen where deformation rates are too low to be properly quantified from geodetic techniques. This region has recorded little seismicity, but the recent July 2015 (Mw 6.4) Pishan earthquake shows that this mountain range...... a structural cross-section in which we identify the fault that broke during the Pishan earthquake, an 8-12 km deep blind ramp beneath the Yecheng-Pishan fold. Combining satellite images and DEMs, we achieve a detailed morphological analysis of the Yecheng-Pishan fold, where we find nine levels of incised...

  8. Translocation, switching and gating: potential roles for ATP in long-range communication on DNA by Type III restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczelkun, Mark D

    2011-04-01

    To cleave DNA, the Type III RM (restriction-modification) enzymes must communicate the relative orientation of two recognition sequences, which may be separated by many thousands of base pairs. This long-range interaction requires ATP hydrolysis by a helicase domain, and both active (DNA translocation) and passive (DNA sliding) modes of motion along DNA have been proposed. Potential roles for ATP binding and hydrolysis by the helicase domains are discussed, with a focus on bipartite ATPases that act as molecular switches.

  9. Finite mathematics models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Carla C

    2015-01-01

    Features step-by-step examples based on actual data and connects fundamental mathematical modeling skills and decision making concepts to everyday applicability Featuring key linear programming, matrix, and probability concepts, Finite Mathematics: Models and Applications emphasizes cross-disciplinary applications that relate mathematics to everyday life. The book provides a unique combination of practical mathematical applications to illustrate the wide use of mathematics in fields ranging from business, economics, finance, management, operations research, and the life and social sciences.

  10. Influence of external magnetic field, finite-size effects and chemical potential on the phase transition of a complex scalar field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcanti, E.; Castro, E.; Malbouisson, A.P.C. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas/MCTI, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Linhares, C.A. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-10-15

    A scalar model is built, as a quantum field theory defined on a toroidal topology, to describe a phase transition in films subjected to periodic boundary conditions and influenced by an external and constant magnetic field. Criticality is studied and the relations between the critical temperature, the film thickness, the magnetic field strength and the chemical potential are investigated. Since the model describes a second-order phase transition a comparison with the Ginzburg-Landau theory is made. (orig.)

  11. Finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucha, W.; Neufeld, H.

    1986-01-01

    We investigate the relation between finiteness of a four-dimensional quantum field theory and global supersymmetry. To this end we consider the most general quantum field theory and analyse the finiteness conditions resulting from the requirement of the absence of divergent contributions to the renormalizations of the parameters of the theory. In addition to the gauge bosons, both fermions and scalar bosons turn out to be a necessary ingredient in a non-trivial finite gauge theory. In all cases discussed, the supersymmetric theory restricted by two well-known constraints on the dimensionless couplings proves to be the unique solution of the finiteness conditions. (Author)

  12. Potential for adaptive evolution at species range margins: contrasting interactions between red coral populations and their environment in a changing ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, Jean-Baptiste; Aurelle, Didier; Bensoussan, Nathaniel; Marschal, Christian; Féral, Jean-Pierre; Garrabou, Joaquim

    2015-03-01

    Studying population-by-environment interactions (PEIs) at species range margins offers the opportunity to characterize the responses of populations facing an extreme regime of selection, as expected due to global change. Nevertheless, the importance of these marginal populations as putative reservoirs of adaptive genetic variation has scarcely been considered in conservation biology. This is particularly true in marine ecosystems for which the deep refugia hypothesis proposes that disturbed shallow and marginal populations of a given species can be replenished by mesophotic ones. This hypothesis therefore assumes that identical PEIs exist between populations, neglecting the potential for adaptation at species range margins. Here, we combine reciprocal transplant and common garden experiments with population genetics analyses to decipher the PEIs in the red coral, Corallium rubrum. Our analyses reveal partially contrasting PEIs between shallow and mesophotic populations separated by approximately one hundred meters, suggesting that red coral populations may potentially be locally adapted to their environment. Based on the effective population size and connectivity analyses, we posit that genetic drift may be more important than gene flow in the adaptation of the red coral. We further investigate how adaptive divergence could impact population viability in the context of warming and demonstrate differential phenotypic buffering capacities against thermal stress. Our study questions the relevance of the deep refugia hypothesis and highlights the conservation value of marginal populations as a putative reservoir of adaptive genetic polymorphism.

  13. The interrelationship between dengue incidence and diurnal ranges of temperature and humidity in a Sri Lankan city and its potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehelepola, N D B; Ariyaratne, Kusalika

    2015-01-01

    Temperature, humidity, and other weather variables influence dengue transmission. Published studies show how the diurnal fluctuations of temperature around different mean temperatures influence dengue transmission. There are no published studies about the correlation between diurnal range of humidity and dengue transmission. The goals of this study were to determine the correlation between dengue incidence and diurnal fluctuations of temperature and humidity in the Sri Lankan city of Kandy and to explore the possibilities of using that information for better control of dengue. We calculated the weekly dengue incidence in Kandy during the period 2003-2012, after collecting data on all of the reported dengue patients and estimated midyear populations. Data on daily maximum and minimum temperatures and night-time and daytime humidity were obtained from two weather stations, averaged, and converted into weekly data. The number of days per week with a diurnal temperature range (DTR) of >10°C and humidity range (DHR) of >20 and humidity. There were negative correlations between dengue incidence and a DTR >10°C and a DHR >20% with 3.3-week and 4-week lag periods, respectively. Additionally, positive correlations between dengue incidence and a DTR humidity in the future. We suggest ways and means to use this information for local dengue control and to mitigate the potential effects of the ongoing global reduction of DTR on dengue incidence.

  14. Spinor pregeometry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Seiji.

    1985-10-01

    We derive the effective action for gravity at finite temperature in spinor pregeometry. The temperature-dependent effective potential for the vierbein which is parametrized as e sub(kμ) = b.diag(1, xi, xi, xi) has the minimum at b = 0 for fixed xi, and behaves as -xi 3 for fixed b. These results indicate that the system of fundamental matters in spinor pregeometry cannot be in equilibrium. (author)

  15. Evaluation of geothermal potential of Rio Grande rift and Basin and Range province, New Mexico. Final technical report, January 1, 1977-May 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callender, J.F.

    1985-04-01

    A study was made of the geological, geochemical and geophysical characteristics of potential geothermal areas in the Rio Grande rift and Basin and Range province of New Mexico. Both regional and site-specific information is presented. Data was collected by: (1) reconnaissance and detailed geologic mapping, emphasizing Neogene stratigraphy and structure; (2) petrologic studies of Neogene igneous rocks; (3) radiometric age-dating; (4) geochemical surveying, including regional and site-specific water chemistry, stable isotopic analyses of thermal waters, whole-rock and mineral isotopic studies, and whole-rock chemical analyses; and (5) detailed geophysical surveys, using electrical, gravity and magnetic techniques, with electrical resistivity playing a major role. Regional geochemical water studies were conducted for the whole state. Integrated site-specific studies included the Animas Valley, Las Cruces area (Radium Springs and Las Alturas Estates), Truth or Consequences region, the Albuquerque basin, the San Ysidro area, and the Abiquiu-Ojo Caliente region. The Animas Valley and Las Cruces areas have the most significant geothermal potential of the areas studied. The Truth or Consequences and Albuquerque areas need further study. The San Ysidro and Abiquiu-Ojo Caliente regions have less significant geothermal potential. 78 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. Antibiotic resistance, phylogenetic grouping and virulence potential of Escherichia coli isolated from the faeces of intensively farmed and free range poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeng, Akua Serwaah; Rickard, Heather; Ndi, Olasumbo; Sexton, Margaret; Barton, Mary

    2012-01-27

    Antibiotic use in poultry production is a risk factor for promoting the emergence of resistant Escherichia coli. To ascertain differences in different classes of chickens, the resistance profile, some virulence genes and phylogenetic grouping on 251 E. coli isolates from intensive meat (free range and indoor commercial) and free range egg layer chickens collected between December 2008 and June 2009 in South Australia were performed. Among the 251 strains, 102 (40.6%) and 67 (26.7%) were found to be resistant to tetracycline and ampicillin respectively. Resistance was also observed to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (12.4%), streptomycin (10.8%), spectinomycin (9.6%), neomycin (6.0%) and florfenicol (2.0%) but no resistance was found to ceftiofur, ciprofloxacin or gentamicin. Amplification of DNA of the isolates by polymerase chain reaction revealed the presence of genes that code for resistant determinants: tetracycline (tet(A), tet(B) and tet(C)), ampicillin (bla(TEM) and bla(SHV)), trimethoprim (dhfrV and dhfrXIII), sulphonamide (sulI and sulII), neomycin (aph(3)-Ia(aphA1)), and spectinomycin-streptinomycin (aadA2). In addition, 32.3-39.4% of the isolates were found to belong to commensal groups (A and B1) and 11.2-17.1% belonged to the virulent groups (B2 and D). Among the 251 E. coli isolates, 25 (10.0%) carried two or more virulence genes typical of Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). Furthermore, 17 of the isolates with multi-resistance were identified to be groups B2 and D. Although no significant difference was observed between isolates from free range and indoor commercial meat chickens (P>0.05), significant differences was observed between the different classes of meat chickens (free range and indoor commercial) and egg layers (Pzoonotic potential of poultry E. coli isolates. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Finite Boltzmann schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    In the special case of relaxation parameter = 1 lattice Boltzmann schemes for (convection) diffusion and fluid flow are equivalent to finite difference/volume (FD) schemes, and are thus coined finite Boltzmann (FB) schemes. We show that the equivalence is inherent to the homology of the

  18. Designs and finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Designs and Finite Geometries brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this important area of mathematics. Designs and Finite Geometries serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most important research issues in the field.

  19. Supersymmetric theories and finiteness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helayel-Neto, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    We attempt here to present a short survey of the all-order finite Lagrangian field theories known at present in four-and two-dimensional space-times. The question of the possible relevance of these ultraviolet finite models in the formulation of consistent unified frameworks for the fundamental forces is also addressed to. (author)

  20. Simple Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    We will begin our treatment of summability calculus by analyzing what will be referred to, throughout this book, as simple finite sums. Even though the results of this chapter are particular cases of the more general results presented in later chapters, they are important to start with for a few reasons. First, this chapter serves as an excellent introduction to what summability calculus can markedly accomplish. Second, simple finite sums are encountered more often and, hence, they deserve special treatment. Third, the results presented in this chapter for simple finite sums will, themselves, be used as building blocks for deriving the most general results in subsequent chapters. Among others, we establish that fractional finite sums are well-defined mathematical objects and show how various identities related to the Euler constant as well as the Riemann zeta function can actually be derived in an elementary manner using fractional finite sums.

  1. Simple Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-01-01

    We will begin our treatment of summability calculus by analyzing what will be referred to, throughout this book, as simple finite sums. Even though the results of this chapter are particular cases of the more general results presented in later chapters, they are important to start with for a few reasons. First, this chapter serves as an excellent introduction to what summability calculus can markedly accomplish. Second, simple finite sums are encountered more often and, hence, they deserve special treatment. Third, the results presented in this chapter for simple finite sums will, themselves, be used as building blocks for deriving the most general results in subsequent chapters. Among others, we establish that fractional finite sums are well-defined mathematical objects and show how various identities related to the Euler constant as well as the Riemann zeta function can actually be derived in an elementary manner using fractional finite sums.

  2. Finite fields and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mullen, Gary L

    2007-01-01

    This book provides a brief and accessible introduction to the theory of finite fields and to some of their many fascinating and practical applications. The first chapter is devoted to the theory of finite fields. After covering their construction and elementary properties, the authors discuss the trace and norm functions, bases for finite fields, and properties of polynomials over finite fields. Each of the remaining chapters details applications. Chapter 2 deals with combinatorial topics such as the construction of sets of orthogonal latin squares, affine and projective planes, block designs, and Hadamard matrices. Chapters 3 and 4 provide a number of constructions and basic properties of error-correcting codes and cryptographic systems using finite fields. Each chapter includes a set of exercises of varying levels of difficulty which help to further explain and motivate the material. Appendix A provides a brief review of the basic number theory and abstract algebra used in the text, as well as exercises rel...

  3. Energy efficiency and CO_2 mitigation potential of the Turkish iron and steel industry using the LEAP (long-range energy alternatives planning) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ates, Seyithan A.

    2015-01-01

    With the assistance of the LEAP (long-range energy alternatives planning) energy modeling tool, this study explores the energy efficiency and CO_2 emission reduction potential of the iron and steel industry in Turkey. With a share of 35%, the steel and iron industry is considered as the most energy-consuming sector in Turkey. The study explores that the energy intensity rate can be lowered by 13%, 38% and 51% in SEI (slow-speed energy efficiency improvement), AEI (accelerating energy efficiency improvement) and CPT (cleaner production and technology scenario) scenarios, respectively. Particularly the projected aggregated energy savings of the scenarios CPT and AES are very promising with saving rates of 33.7% and 23% respectively. Compared to baseline scenarios, energy efficiency improvements correspond to economic potential of 0.1 billion dollars for SEI, 1.25 dollars for AEI and 1.8 billion dollars for CPT scenarios annually. Concerning GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions, in 2030 the iron and steel industry in Turkey is estimated to produce 34.9 MtCO_2 in BAU (business-as-usual scenario), 32.5 MtCO_2 in SEI, 24.6 MtCO_2 in AEI and 14.5 MtCO_2 in CPT a scenario which corresponds to savings of 9%–39%. The study reveals that energy consumption and GHG emissions of the iron and steel industry can be lowered significantly if the necessary measures are implemented. It is expected that this study will fill knowledge gaps pertaining to energy efficiency potential in Turkish energy intensive industries and help stakeholders in energy intensive industries to realize the potential for energy efficiency and GHG mitigation. - Highlights: • This paper explores energy efficiency potential of iron and Steel industry in Turkey. • We applied the LEAP modeling to forecast future developments. • Four different scenarios have been developed for the LEAP modeling. • There is a huge potential for energy efficiency and mitigation of GHG emissions.

  4. Climate-change-induced range shifts of three allergenic ragweeds (Ambrosia L.) in Europe and their potential impact on human health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karen; Thyrring, Jakob; Borchsenius, Finn

    2017-01-01

    Invasive allergenic plant species may have severe health-related impacts. In this study we aim to predict the effects of climate change on the distribution of three allergenic ragweed species (Ambrosia spp.) in Europe and discuss the potential associated health impact. We built species distribution...... models based on presence-only data for three ragweed species, using MAXENT software. Future climatic habitat suitability was modeled under two IPCC climate change scenarios (RCP 6.0 and RCP 8.5). We quantify the extent of the increase in ‘high allergy risk’ (HAR) areas, i.e., parts of Europe...... with climatic conditions corresponding to the highest quartile (25%) of present day habitat suitability for each of the three species. We estimate that by year 2100, the distribution range of all three ragweed species increases towards Northern and Eastern Europe under all climate scenarios. HAR areas...

  5. Automation of finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Korelc, Jože

    2016-01-01

    New finite elements are needed as well in research as in industry environments for the development of virtual prediction techniques. The design and implementation of novel finite elements for specific purposes is a tedious and time consuming task, especially for nonlinear formulations. The automation of this process can help to speed up this process considerably since the generation of the final computer code can be accelerated by order of several magnitudes. This book provides the reader with the required knowledge needed to employ modern automatic tools like AceGen within solid mechanics in a successful way. It covers the range from the theoretical background, algorithmic treatments to many different applications. The book is written for advanced students in the engineering field and for researchers in educational and industrial environments.

  6. Representation theory of finite monoids

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberg, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This first text on the subject provides a comprehensive introduction to the representation theory of finite monoids. Carefully worked examples and exercises provide the bells and whistles for graduate accessibility, bringing a broad range of advanced readers to the forefront of research in the area. Highlights of the text include applications to probability theory, symbolic dynamics, and automata theory. Comfort with module theory, a familiarity with ordinary group representation theory, and the basics of Wedderburn theory, are prerequisites for advanced graduate level study. Researchers in algebra, algebraic combinatorics, automata theory, and probability theory, will find this text enriching with its thorough presentation of applications of the theory to these fields. Prior knowledge of semigroup theory is not expected for the diverse readership that may benefit from this exposition. The approach taken in this book is highly module-theoretic and follows the modern flavor of the theory of finite dimensional ...

  7. Isolation and Host Range of Bacteriophage with Lytic Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Potential Use as a Fomite Decontaminant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle C Jensen

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (SA is a commensal bacterium and opportunistic pathogen commonly associated with humans and is capable of causing serious disease and death including sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis. Methicillin-resistant SA (MRSA isolates are typically resistant to many available antibiotics with the common exception of vancomycin. The presence of vancomycin resistance in some SA isolates combined with the current heavy use of vancomycin to treat MRSA infections indicates that MRSA may achieve broad resistance to vancomycin in the near future. New MRSA treatments are clearly needed. Bacteriophages (phages are viruses that infect bacteria, commonly resulting in death of the host bacterial cell. Phage therapy entails the use of phage to treat or prevent bacterial infections. In this study, 12 phages were isolated that can replicate in human SA and/or MRSA isolates as a potential way to control these infections. 5 phage were discovered through mitomycin C induction of prophage and 7 others as extracellular viruses. Primary SA strains were also isolated from environmental sources to be used as tools for phage discovery and isolation as well as to examine the target cell host range of the phage isolates by spot testing. Primary isolates were tested for susceptibility to oxacillin in order to determine which were MRSA. Experiments were performed to assess the host range and killing potential of newly discovered phage, and significant reductions in bacterial load were detected. We explored the utility of some phage to decontaminate fomites (glass and cloth and found a significant reduction in colony forming units of MRSA following phage treatment, including tests of a phage cocktail against a cocktail of MRSA isolates. Our findings suggest that phage treatment can be used as an effective tool to decontaminate human MRSA from both hard surfaces and fabrics.

  8. Semiclassical calculations of the imaginary part of the nucleon-nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasse, R.W.; Schuck, P.

    1984-03-01

    We calculate for finite nuclei the imaginary part of the nucleus-nucleon optical potential on and off shell by using the local Fermi gas approximation and a finite range two-body exchange force. Results are compared with those obtained by infinite nuclear matter calculations as well as using the local density or Glauber approximation

  9. Nuclear interaction potential in a folded-Yukawa model with diffuse densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randrup, J.

    1975-09-01

    The folded-Yukawa model for the nuclear interaction potential is generalized to diffuse density distributions which are generated by folding a Yukawa function into sharp generating distributions. The effect of a finite density diffuseness or of a finite interaction range is studied. The Proximity Formula corresponding to the generalized model is derived and numerical comparison is made with the exact results. (8 figures)

  10. Finite-size polyelectrolyte bundles at thermodynamic equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, M.; Holm, C.

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of extensive computer simulations performed on solutions of monodisperse charged rod-like polyelectrolytes in the presence of trivalent counterions. To overcome energy barriers we used a combination of parallel tempering and hybrid Monte Carlo techniques. Our results show that for small values of the electrostatic interaction the solution mostly consists of dispersed single rods. The potential of mean force between the polyelectrolyte monomers yields an attractive interaction at short distances. For a range of larger values of the Bjerrum length, we find finite-size polyelectrolyte bundles at thermodynamic equilibrium. Further increase of the Bjerrum length eventually leads to phase separation and precipitation. We discuss the origin of the observed thermodynamic stability of the finite-size aggregates.

  11. Replication and pathogenic potential of influenza A virus subtypes H3, H7, and H15 from free-range ducks in Bangladesh in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Krauss, Scott; Vogel, Peter; McKenzie, Pamela; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2018-04-25

    Surveillance of wild aquatic birds and free-range domestic ducks in the Tanguar Haor wetlands in Bangladesh has identified influenza virus subtypes H3N6, H7N1, H7N5, H7N9, and H15N9. Molecular characterization of these viruses indicates their contribution to the genesis of new genotypes of H5N1 influenza viruses from clade 2.3.2.1a that are dominant in poultry markets in Bangladesh as well as to the genesis of the highly pathogenic H5N8 virus currently causing disease outbreaks in domestic poultry in Europe and the Middle East. Therefore, we studied the antigenicity, replication, and pathogenicity of influenza viruses isolated from Tanguar Haor in the DBA/2J mouse model. All viruses replicated in the lung without prior mammalian adaptation, and H7N1 and H7N9 viruses caused 100% and 60% mortality, respectively. H7N5 viruses replicated only in the lungs, whereas H7N1 and H7N9 viruses also replicated in the heart, liver, and brain. Replication and transmission studies in mallard ducks showed that H7N1 and H7N9 viruses replicated in ducks without clinical signs of disease and shed at high titers from the cloaca of infected and contact ducks, which could facilitate virus transmission and spread. Our results indicate that H7 avian influenza viruses from free-range ducks can replicate in mammals, cause severe disease, and be efficiently transmitted to contact ducks. Our study highlights the role of free-range ducks in the spread of influenza viruses to other species in live poultry markets and the potential for these viruses to infect and cause disease in mammals.

  12. Projecting the range of potential future climate change as an aid in the assessment of the effectiveness of the Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, K.L.

    1993-10-01

    The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program was organized to develop an in-place disposal capability for low-level nuclear waste for the US Department of Energy at the Hanford Site in south-eastern Washington. Layered earthen and engineered barriers are being developed by Westinghouse Hanford Company and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory that will function in what is presently a semiarid environment (annual precipitation 150 mm) for at least 1,000 yr by limiting the infiltration of water through the waste. The Long-Term Climate Change Task is one of several key barrier tasks. Based on the recommendation of a panel of internationally recognized climate and modeling experts, climatic data for this task is being acquired in a step-wise and multi-disciplinary manner. The specific research strategy includes literature review and specialized studies to obtain pollen-derived climatic reconstruction, documented historic weather patterns, and Global Circulation Model output of potential future climate changes related to both the greenhouse effect and the cycling into the next ice age. The specific goals of the task are to: (1) obtain defensible probabilistic projections of the long-term climate variability in the Hanford Site region at many different time scales into the future, (2) develop several test case climate scenarios that bracket the range of potential future climate, and (3) use the climate scenarios both to test and to model protective barrier performance.

  13. Potential spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 by wildfowl: dispersal ranges and rates determined from large-scale satellite telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidet, Nicolas; Cappelle, Julien; Takekawa, John Y.; Prosser, Diann J.; Iverson, Samuel A.; Douglas, David C.; Perry, William M.; Mundkur, Taej; Newman, Scott H.

    2010-01-01

    1. Migratory birds are major candidates for long-distance dispersal of zoonotic pathogens. In recent years, wildfowl have been suspected of contributing to the rapid geographic spread of the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus. Experimental infection studies reveal that some wild ducks, geese and swans shed this virus asymptomatically and hence have the potential to spread it as they move. 2. We evaluate the dispersive potential of HPAI H5N1 viruses by wildfowl through an analysis of the movement range and movement rate of birds monitored by satellite telemetry in relation to the apparent asymptomatic infection duration (AID) measured in experimental studies. We analysed the first large-scale data set of wildfowl movements, including 228 birds from 19 species monitored by satellite telemetry in 2006–2009, over HPAI H5N1 affected regions of Asia, Europe and Africa. 3. Our results indicate that individual migratory wildfowl have the potential to disperse HPAI H5N1 over extensive distances, being able to perform movements of up to 2900 km within timeframes compatible with the duration of asymptomatic infection. 4. However, the likelihood of such virus dispersal over long distances by individual wildfowl is low: we estimate that for an individual migratory bird there are, on average, only 5–15 days per year when infection could result in the dispersal of HPAI H5N1 virus over 500 km. 5. Staging at stopover sites during migration is typically longer than the period of infection and viral shedding, preventing birds from dispersing a virus over several consecutive but interrupted long-distance movements. Intercontinental virus dispersion would therefore probably require relay transmission between a series of successively infected migratory birds. 6. Synthesis and applications. Our results provide a detailed quantitative assessment of the dispersive potential of HPAI H5N1 virus by selected migratory birds. Such dispersive potential rests on the

  14. Dense QCD in a Finite Volume

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Kanazawa, Takuya

    2009-01-01

    We study the properties of QCD at high baryon density in a finite volume where color superconductivity occurs. We derive exact sum rules for complex eigenvalues of the Dirac operator at finite chemical potential, and show that the Dirac spectrum is directly related to the color superconducting gap $\\Delta$. Also, we find a characteristic signature of color superconductivity: an X-shaped spectrum of partition function zeros in the complex quark mass plane near the origin, reflecting the $Z(2)_...

  15. Finite elements and approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zienkiewicz, O C

    2006-01-01

    A powerful tool for the approximate solution of differential equations, the finite element is extensively used in industry and research. This book offers students of engineering and physics a comprehensive view of the principles involved, with numerous illustrative examples and exercises.Starting with continuum boundary value problems and the need for numerical discretization, the text examines finite difference methods, weighted residual methods in the context of continuous trial functions, and piecewise defined trial functions and the finite element method. Additional topics include higher o

  16. Comparative phylogeography of two related plant species with overlapping ranges in Europe, and the potential effects of climate change on their intraspecific genetic diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Provan Jim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to use a combined phylogeographic and species distribution modelling approach to compare the glacial histories of two plant species with overlapping distributions, Orthilia secunda (one-sided wintergreen and Monotropa hypopitys (yellow bird's nest. Phylogeographic analysis was carried out to determine the distribution of genetic variation across the range of each species and to test whether both correspond to the "classic" model of high diversity in the south, with decreasing diversity at higher latitudes, or whether the cold-adapted O. secunda might retain more genetic variation in northern populations. In addition, projected species distributions based on a future climate scenario were modelled to assess how changes in the species ranges might impact on total intraspecific diversity in both cases. Results Palaeodistribution modelling and phylogeographic analysis using multiple genetic markers (chloroplast trnS-trnG region, nuclear ITS and microsatellites for O. secunda; chloroplast rps2, nuclear ITS and microsatellites for M. hypopitys indicated that both species persisted throughout the Last Glacial Maximum in southern refugia. For both species, the majority of the genetic diversity was concentrated in these southerly populations, whereas those in recolonized areas generally exhibited lower levels of diversity, particularly in M. hypopitys. Species distribution modelling based on projected future climate indicated substantial changes in the ranges of both species, with a loss of southern and central populations, and a potential northward expansion for the temperate M. hypopitys. Conclusions Both Orthilia secunda and Monotropa hypopitys appear to have persisted through the LGM in Europe in southern refugia. The boreal O. secunda, however, has retained a larger proportion of its genetic diversity in more northerly populations outside these refugial areas than the temperate M. hypopitys. Given

  17. Spatial bandwidth enlargement and field enhancement of shear horizontal waves in finite graded piezoelectric layered media

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-09-01

    Shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. Different from the previous studies on SH wave propagation in completely periodic layered media, calculations on band structure and transmission in this paper show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. Harmonic wave simulation by finite element method (FEM) confirms that the reason of bandwidth enlargement is that waves within the band gap ranges are spatially enhanced and stopped by the corresponding graded units. The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially, which shows potential applications in strengthening energy trapping and harvesting. © 2015.

  18. Finite Amplitude Ocean Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    wavelength, they are called shallow water waves. In the ... Deep and intermediate water waves are dispersive as the velocity of these depends on wavelength. This is not the ..... generation processes, the finite amplitude wave theories are very ...

  19. Finite Discrete Gabor Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Peter Lempel

    2007-01-01

    frequency bands at certain times. Gabor theory can be formulated for both functions on the real line and for discrete signals of finite length. The two theories are largely the same because many aspects come from the same underlying theory of locally compact Abelian groups. The two types of Gabor systems...... can also be related by sampling and periodization. This thesis extends on this theory by showing new results for window construction. It also provides a discussion of the problems associated to discrete Gabor bases. The sampling and periodization connection is handy because it allows Gabor systems...... on the real line to be well approximated by finite and discrete Gabor frames. This method of approximation is especially attractive because efficient numerical methods exists for doing computations with finite, discrete Gabor systems. This thesis presents new algorithms for the efficient computation of finite...

  20. Finite size scaling theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittenberg, V.

    1983-01-01

    Fischer's finite-size scaling describes the cross over from the singular behaviour of thermodynamic quantities at the critical point to the analytic behaviour of the finite system. Recent extensions of the method--transfer matrix technique, and the Hamiltonian formalism--are discussed in this paper. The method is presented, with equations deriving scaling function, critical temperature, and exponent v. As an application of the method, a 3-states Hamiltonian with Z 3 global symmetry is studied. Diagonalization of the Hamiltonian for finite chains allows one to estimate the critical exponents, and also to discover new phase transitions at lower temperatures. The critical points lambda, and indices v estimated for finite-scaling are given

  1. Super-renormalizable or finite Lee–Wick quantum gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Modesto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a class of multidimensional higher derivative theories of gravity without extra real degrees of freedom besides the graviton field. The propagator shows up the usual real graviton pole in k2=0 and extra complex conjugates poles that do not contribute to the absorptive part of the physical scattering amplitudes. Indeed, they may consistently be excluded from the asymptotic observable states of the theory making use of the Lee–Wick and Cutkosky, Landshoff, Olive and Polkinghorne prescription for the construction of a unitary S-matrix. Therefore, the spectrum consists of the graviton and short lived elementary unstable particles that we named “anti-gravitons” because of their repulsive contribution to the gravitational potential at short distance. However, another interpretation of the complex conjugate pairs is proposed based on the Calmet's suggestion, i.e. they could be understood as black hole precursors long established in the classical theory. Since the theory is CPT invariant, the conjugate complex of the micro black hole precursor can be interpreted as a white hole precursor consistently with the 't Hooft complementarity principle. It is proved that the quantum theory is super-renormalizable in even dimension, i.e. only a finite number of divergent diagrams survive, and finite in odd dimension. Furthermore, turning on a local potential of the Riemann tensor we can make the theory finite in any dimension. The singularity-free Newtonian gravitational potential is explicitly computed for a range of higher derivative theories. Finally, we propose a new super-renormalizable or finite Lee–Wick standard model of particle physics.

  2. PT Symmetry and QCD: Finite Temperature and Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Ogilvie

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of PT symmetry to quantum chromodynamics (QCD, the gauge theory of the strong interactions, is explored in the context of finite temperature and density. Two significant problems in QCD are studied: the sign problem of finite-density QCD, and the problem of confinement. It is proven that the effective action for heavy quarks at finite density is PT-symmetric. For the case of 1+1 dimensions, the PT-symmetric Hamiltonian, although not Hermitian, has real eigenvalues for a range of values of the chemical potential μ, solving the sign problem for this model. The effective action for heavy quarks is part of a potentially large class of generalized sine-Gordon models which are non-Hermitian but are PT-symmetric. Generalized sine-Gordon models also occur naturally in gauge theories in which magnetic monopoles lead to confinement. We explore gauge theories where monopoles cause confinement at arbitrarily high temperatures. Several different classes of monopole gases exist, with each class leading to different string tension scaling laws. For one class of monopole gas models, the PT-symmetric affine Toda field theory emerges naturally as the effective theory. This in turn leads to sine-law scaling for string tensions, a behavior consistent with lattice simulations.

  3. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.E.; Love, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Finite-temperature supersymmetry (SUSY) is characterized by unbroken Ward identities for SUSY variations of ensemble averages of Klein-operator inserted imaginary time-ordered products of fields. Path-integral representations of these products are defined and the Feynman rules in superspace are given. The finite-temperature no-renormalization theorem is derived. Spontaneously broken SUSY at zero temperature is shown not to be restored at high temperature. (orig.)

  4. Finite energy sum rules in potential scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, N.; Jaffe, R.L.; Quandt, M.; Weige, H.

    2001-01-01

    We study scattering theory identities previously obtained as consistency conditions in the context of one-loop quantum field theory calculations. We prove the identities using Jost function techniques and study applications

  5. Climate and pH predict the potential range of the invasive apple snail (Pomacea insularum in the southeastern United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E Byers

    Full Text Available Predicting the potential range of invasive species is essential for risk assessment, monitoring, and management, and it can also inform us about a species' overall potential invasiveness. However, modeling the distribution of invasive species that have not reached their equilibrium distribution can be problematic for many predictive approaches. We apply the modeling approach of maximum entropy (MaxEnt that is effective with incomplete, presence-only datasets to predict the distribution of the invasive island apple snail, Pomacea insularum. This freshwater snail is native to South America and has been spreading in the USA over the last decade from its initial introductions in Texas and Florida. It has now been documented throughout eight southeastern states. The snail's extensive consumption of aquatic vegetation and ability to accumulate and transmit algal toxins through the food web heighten concerns about its spread. Our model shows that under current climate conditions the snail should remain mostly confined to the coastal plain of the southeastern USA where it is limited by minimum temperature in the coldest month and precipitation in the warmest quarter. Furthermore, low pH waters (pH <5.5 are detrimental to the snail's survival and persistence. Of particular note are low-pH blackwater swamps, especially Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia (with a pH below 4 in many areas, which are predicted to preclude the snail's establishment even though many of these areas are well matched climatically. Our results elucidate the factors that affect the regional distribution of P. insularum, while simultaneously presenting a spatial basis for the prediction of its future spread. Furthermore, the model for this species exemplifies that combining climatic and habitat variables is a powerful way to model distributions of invasive species.

  6. Application of a renormalization-group treatment to the statistical associating fluid theory for potentials of variable range (SAFT-VR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Esther; Llovell, Felix; Vega, Lourdes F; Trusler, J P Martin; Galindo, Amparo

    2011-04-21

    An accurate prediction of phase behavior at conditions far and close to criticality cannot be accomplished by mean-field based theories that do not incorporate long-range density fluctuations. A treatment based on renormalization-group (RG) theory as developed by White and co-workers has proven to be very successful in improving the predictions of the critical region with different equations of state. The basis of the method is an iterative procedure to account for contributions to the free energy of density fluctuations of increasing wavelengths. The RG method has been combined with a number of versions of the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT), by implementing White's earliest ideas with the improvements of Prausnitz and co-workers. Typically, this treatment involves two adjustable parameters: a cutoff wavelength L for density fluctuations and an average gradient of the wavelet function Φ. In this work, the SAFT-VR (variable range) equation of state is extended with a similar crossover treatment which, however, follows closely the most recent improvements introduced by White. The interpretation of White's latter developments allows us to establish a straightforward method which enables Φ to be evaluated; only the cutoff wavelength L then needs to be adjusted. The approach used here begins with an initial free energy incorporating only contributions from short-wavelength fluctuations, which are treated locally. The contribution from long-wavelength fluctuations is incorporated through an iterative procedure based on attractive interactions which incorporate the structure of the fluid following the ideas of perturbation theories and using a mapping that allows integration of the radial distribution function. Good agreement close and far from the critical region is obtained using a unique fitted parameter L that can be easily related to the range of the potential. In this way the thermodynamic properties of a square-well (SW) fluid are given by the same

  7. A potential recovery of a population of the sand lizard Liolaemus lutzae Mertens, 1938 in an area within its range: a lizard endemic and threatened with extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CFD. Rocha

    Full Text Available The endemic and threatened lizard Liolaemus lutzae has a relatively small geographic range restricted to only 200 km of along the coast of Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, which are habitats under intensive anthropic disturbance. At the Barra da Tijuca beach, in Rio de Janeiro city an estimate of the population abundance made in 1991, compared to a previous estimate made in 1984, showed a considerable decrease (about 65%. Most of the decrease was attributed to anthropic disturbances that locally affected the beach vegetation, the species habitat. In this study we present estimates made in 2002 and in 2006 at the same area and compare them with the estimates of 1984 and 1991, using the same methodology in order to make comparable the data from different samplings years and to evaluate the present status of the local population. The estimated indexes of L. lutzae abundance in 2002 and in 2006 were higher than that of 1991. There was a significant increase in the mean number of recorded lizards in 2002 compared to 1991, but the mean number of lizards sighted in 2006 remained stable when compared with that of 2002. Our data based on the index of abundance recorded suggested that the number of L. lutzae at Barra da Tijuca beach recorded increased, which can be indicative of a potential recovery of the local population.

  8. Broad-range (pan) Salmonella and Salmonella serotype typhi-specific real-time PCR assays: potential tools for the clinical microbiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, John J; Doyle, Laura J; Addison, Rachel M; Reller, L Barth; Hall, Geraldine S; Procop, Gary W

    2005-03-01

    We describe broad-range salmonellae (ie, Salmonella) and Salmonella serotype Typhi-specific LightCycler (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN) real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. We validated these with a battery of 280 bacteria, 108 of which were salmonellae representing 20 serotypes. In addition, 298 isolates from 170 clinical specimens that were suspected to possibly represent Salmonella were tested with the pan- Salmonella assay. Finally, the pan-Salmonella assay also was used to test DNA extracts from 101 archived, frozen stool specimens, 55 of which were culture-positive for salmonellae. Both assays were 100% sensitive and specific when cultured isolates of the battery were tested. The pan- Salmonella assay also characterized correctly all salmonellae on the primary isolation agar and was 96% sensitive (53/55) and 96% specific (49/51) when nucleic acid extracts from direct stool specimens were tested. These assays represent potential tools the clinical microbiologist could use to screen suspect isolates or stool specimens for Salmonella.

  9. Field theoretical finite element method to provide theoretical calibration curves for the electrical direct-current potential crack-monitoring system as applied to a three-dimensional fracture mechanics specimen with surface crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, R.

    1984-01-01

    The basic concepts of the finite element method are explained. The results are compared to existing calibration curves for such test piece geometries derived using experimental procedures. (orig./HP) [de

  10. The Environmental Acinetobacter baumannii Isolate DSM30011 Reveals Clues into the Preantibiotic Era Genome Diversity, Virulence Potential, and Niche Range of a Predominant Nosocomial Pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viale, Alejandro M.; Borges, Vítor; Cameranesi, María M.; Taib, Najwa; Espariz, Martín; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Gomes, João Paulo; Salcedo, Suzana P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Acinetobacter baumannii represents nowadays an important nosocomial opportunistic pathogen whose reservoirs outside the clinical setting are obscure. Here, we traced the origins of the collection strain A. baumannii DSM30011 to an isolate first reported in 1944, obtained from the enriched microbiota responsible of the aerobic decomposition of the resinous desert shrub guayule. Whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis based on core genes confirmed DSM30011 affiliation to A. baumannii. Comparative studies with 32 complete A. baumannii genomes revealed the presence of 12 unique accessory chromosomal regions in DSM30011 including five encompassing phage-related genes, five containing toxin genes of the type-6 secretion system, and one with an atypical CRISPRs/cas cluster. No antimicrobial resistance islands were identified in DSM30011 agreeing with a general antimicrobial susceptibility phenotype including folate synthesis inhibitors. The marginal ampicillin resistance of DSM30011 most likely derived from chromosomal ADC-type ampC and blaOXA-51-type genes. Searching for catabolic pathways genes revealed several clusters involved in the degradation of plant defenses including woody tissues and a previously unreported atu locus responsible of aliphatic terpenes degradation, thus suggesting that resinous plants may provide an effective niche for this organism. DSM30011 also harbored most genes and regulatory mechanisms linked to persistence and virulence in pathogenic Acinetobacter species. This strain thus revealed important clues into the genomic diversity, virulence potential, and niche ranges of the preantibiotic era A. baumannii population, and may provide an useful tool for our understanding of the processes that led to the recent evolution of this species toward an opportunistic pathogen of humans. PMID:28934377

  11. Climate-change-induced range shifts of three allergenic ragweeds (Ambrosia L. in Europe and their potential impact on human health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Rasmussen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Invasive allergenic plant species may have severe health-related impacts. In this study we aim to predict the effects of climate change on the distribution of three allergenic ragweed species (Ambrosia spp. in Europe and discuss the potential associated health impact. We built species distribution models based on presence-only data for three ragweed species, using MAXENT software. Future climatic habitat suitability was modeled under two IPCC climate change scenarios (RCP 6.0 and RCP 8.5. We quantify the extent of the increase in ‘high allergy risk’ (HAR areas, i.e., parts of Europe with climatic conditions corresponding to the highest quartile (25% of present day habitat suitability for each of the three species. We estimate that by year 2100, the distribution range of all three ragweed species increases towards Northern and Eastern Europe under all climate scenarios. HAR areas will expand in Europe by 27–100%, depending on species and climate scenario. Novel HAR areas will occur mostly in Denmark, France, Germany, Russia and the Baltic countries, and overlap with densely populated cities such as Paris and St. Petersburg. We conclude that areas in Europe affected by severe ragweed associated allergy problems are likely to increase substantially by year 2100, affecting millions of people. To avoid this, management strategies must be developed that restrict ragweed dispersal and establishment of new populations. Precautionary efforts should limit the spread of ragweed seeds and reduce existing populations. Only by applying cross-countries management plans can managers mitigate future health risks and economical consequences of a ragweed expansion in Europe.

  12. Climate-change-induced range shifts of three allergenic ragweeds (Ambrosia L.) in Europe and their potential impact on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Karen; Thyrring, Jakob; Muscarella, Robert; Borchsenius, Finn

    2017-01-01

    Invasive allergenic plant species may have severe health-related impacts. In this study we aim to predict the effects of climate change on the distribution of three allergenic ragweed species ( Ambrosia spp.) in Europe and discuss the potential associated health impact. We built species distribution models based on presence-only data for three ragweed species, using MAXENT software. Future climatic habitat suitability was modeled under two IPCC climate change scenarios (RCP 6.0 and RCP 8.5). We quantify the extent of the increase in 'high allergy risk' (HAR) areas, i.e., parts of Europe with climatic conditions corresponding to the highest quartile (25%) of present day habitat suitability for each of the three species. We estimate that by year 2100, the distribution range of all three ragweed species increases towards Northern and Eastern Europe under all climate scenarios. HAR areas will expand in Europe by 27-100%, depending on species and climate scenario. Novel HAR areas will occur mostly in Denmark, France, Germany, Russia and the Baltic countries, and overlap with densely populated cities such as Paris and St. Petersburg. We conclude that areas in Europe affected by severe ragweed associated allergy problems are likely to increase substantially by year 2100, affecting millions of people. To avoid this, management strategies must be developed that restrict ragweed dispersal and establishment of new populations. Precautionary efforts should limit the spread of ragweed seeds and reduce existing populations. Only by applying cross-countries management plans can managers mitigate future health risks and economical consequences of a ragweed expansion in Europe.

  13. Finite-dimensional calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinsilver, Philip; Schott, Rene

    2009-01-01

    We discuss topics related to finite-dimensional calculus in the context of finite-dimensional quantum mechanics. The truncated Heisenberg-Weyl algebra is called a TAA algebra after Tekin, Aydin and Arik who formulated it in terms of orthofermions. It is shown how to use a matrix approach to implement analytic representations of the Heisenberg-Weyl algebra in univariate and multivariate settings. We provide examples for the univariate case. Krawtchouk polynomials are presented in detail, including a review of Krawtchouk polynomials that illustrates some curious properties of the Heisenberg-Weyl algebra, as well as presenting an approach to computing Krawtchouk expansions. From a mathematical perspective, we are providing indications as to how to implement infinite terms Rota's 'finite operator calculus'.

  14. Chiral-symmetry restoration at finite densities in Coulomb-gauge QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocic, A.

    1986-01-01

    Using the Schwinger-Dyson equation in the Hartree-Fock approximation, we show that, within a potential model motivated by the QCD Hamiltonian in the Coulomb gauge, chiral symmetry is restored at finite densities. Two cases are studied: a delta-function potential and a linear confining potential. For the former case the phase diagram is obtained analytically, whereas for the latter case numerical techniques are used. The values of physical quantities calculated for the linear confining model are consistently smaller than the experimental ones indicating that a potential with additional short-range attraction is needed to describe the quark interaction in the high-density regime

  15. Coulomb systems seen as critical systems: Finite-size effects in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jancovici, B.; Manificat, G.; Pisani, C.

    1994-01-01

    It is known that the free energy at criticality of a finite two-dimensional system of characteristic size L has in general a term which behaves like log L as L → ∞; the coefficient of this term is universal. There are solvable models of two-dimensional classical Coulomb systems which exhibit the same finite-size correction (except for its sign) although the particle correlations are short-ranged, i.e., noncritical. Actually, the electrical potential and electrical field correlations are critical at all temperatures (as long as the Coulomb system is a conductor), as a consequence of the perfect screening property of Coulomb systems. This is why Coulomb systems have to exhibit critical finite-size effects

  16. Oscillations of the static meson fields at finite baryon density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florkowski, W.; Friman, B.; Technische Hochschule Darmstadt

    1996-04-01

    The spatial dependence of static meson correlation functions at finite baryon density is studied in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. In contrast to the finite temperature case, we find that the correlation functions at finite density are not screened but exhibit long-range oscillations. The observed phenomenon is analogous to the Friedel oscillations in a degenerate electron gas. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs

  17. Generalized finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachspress, E.

    2009-01-01

    Triangles and rectangles are the ubiquitous elements in finite element studies. Only these elements admit polynomial basis functions. Rational functions provide a basis for elements having any number of straight and curved sides. Numerical complexities initially associated with rational bases precluded extensive use. Recent analysis has reduced these difficulties and programs have been written to illustrate effectiveness. Although incorporation in major finite element software requires considerable effort, there are advantages in some applications which warrant implementation. An outline of the basic theory and of recent innovations is presented here. (authors)

  18. A Dyson-Schwinger approach to finite temperature QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Jens Andreas

    2011-10-26

    at vanishing chemical potential. Interestingly, besides good agreement of the transition temperatures with lattice QCD calculations, the different deconfinement criteria of the dual condensate and of the Schwinger-function yield similar results. In the following, the effects of a finite quark chemical potential are studied. These calculations allow for a first insight on the dual condensate at finite chemical potential beyond mean-field calculations in phenomenological models. In addition, a possibility to include the back-reaction of long-range fluctuations in the vicinity of a second order phase transition is elaborated. In the scaling region constraints for a self-consistent solution arise from an analytic investigation. (orig.)

  19. A Dyson-Schwinger approach to finite temperature QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Jens Andreas

    2011-01-01

    at vanishing chemical potential. Interestingly, besides good agreement of the transition temperatures with lattice QCD calculations, the different deconfinement criteria of the dual condensate and of the Schwinger-function yield similar results. In the following, the effects of a finite quark chemical potential are studied. These calculations allow for a first insight on the dual condensate at finite chemical potential beyond mean-field calculations in phenomenological models. In addition, a possibility to include the back-reaction of long-range fluctuations in the vicinity of a second order phase transition is elaborated. In the scaling region constraints for a self-consistent solution arise from an analytic investigation. (orig.)

  20. Truthful approximations to range voting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filos-Ratsika, Aris; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    We consider the fundamental mechanism design problem of approximate social welfare maximization under general cardinal preferences on a finite number of alternatives and without money. The well-known range voting scheme can be thought of as a non-truthful mechanism for exact social welfare...

  1. A finite quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meszaros, A.

    1984-05-01

    In case the graviton has a very small non-zero mass, the existence of six additional massive gravitons with very big masses leads to a finite quantum gravity. There is an acausal behaviour on the scales that is determined by the masses of additional gravitons. (author)

  2. Finite lattice extrapolation algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henkel, M.; Schuetz, G.

    1987-08-01

    Two algorithms for sequence extrapolation, due to von den Broeck and Schwartz and Bulirsch and Stoer are reviewed and critically compared. Applications to three states and six states quantum chains and to the (2+1)D Ising model show that the algorithm of Bulirsch and Stoer is superior, in particular if only very few finite lattice data are available. (orig.)

  3. Finite unified models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapetanakis, D. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Mondragon, M. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Zoupanos, G. (National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece). Physics Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    We present phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the case of two models with three families the top quark mass is predicted to be 178.8 GeV. (orig.)

  4. Finite unified models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakis, D.; Mondragon, M.; Zoupanos, G.

    1993-01-01

    We present phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the case of two models with three families the top quark mass is predicted to be 178.8 GeV. (orig.)

  5. Finiteness and GUTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakis, D.; Mondragon, M.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown how to obtain phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. A very interesting feature of the models with three families is that they predict the top quark mass to be around 178 GeV. 16 refs

  6. Robust RBF Finite Automata

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šorel, Michal; Šíma, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 62, - (2004), s. 93-110 ISSN 0925-2312 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB2030007; GA MŠk LN00A056 Keywords : radial basis function * neural network * finite automaton * Boolean circuit * computational power Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.641, year: 2004

  7. Inside finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Weiser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    All relevant implementation aspects of finite element methods are discussed in this book. The focus is on algorithms and data structures as well as on their concrete implementation. Theory is covered as far as it gives insight into the construction of algorithms. Throughout the exercises a complete FE-solver for scalar 2D problems will be implemented in Matlab/Octave.

  8. A finite element for plates and shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, A.; Feijoo, R.A.; Bevilacqua, L.

    1981-08-01

    A simple triangular finite element for plates and shells, is presented. Since the rotation fields are assumed independent of the displacement fields, the element allows one to solve thick shells problems. In the limit for thin shell, the Kirchoff-Love hypothesis is automatically satisfied, thus enlarging its range of application. (Author) [pt

  9. Impact of new computing systems on finite element computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor, A.K.; Fulton, R.E.; Storaasi, O.O.

    1983-01-01

    Recent advances in computer technology that are likely to impact finite element computations are reviewed. The characteristics of supersystems, highly parallel systems, and small systems (mini and microcomputers) are summarized. The interrelations of numerical algorithms and software with parallel architectures are discussed. A scenario is presented for future hardware/software environment and finite element systems. A number of research areas which have high potential for improving the effectiveness of finite element analysis in the new environment are identified

  10. Underwater Ranging

    OpenAIRE

    S. P. Gaba

    1984-01-01

    The paper deals with underwater laser ranging system, its principle of operation and maximum depth capability. The sources of external noise and methods to improve signal-to-noise ratio are also discussed.

  11. Virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolynec, E.; Martins, M.N.

    1988-01-01

    The experimental results of an isochromat of the virtual photon spectrum, obtained by measuring the number of ground-state protons emitted by the 16.28 MeV isobaric analogue state in 90 Zr as a function of electron incident energy in the range 17-105 MeV, are compared with the values predicted by a calculation of the E1 DWBA virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei. It is found that the calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The DWBA virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei for E2 and M1 multipoles are also assessed. (author) [pt

  12. Chiral symmetry breaking in finite quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero, J.C.; Pleitez, V.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamical breakdown of chiral symmetry in a finite Abelian gauge theory using a variational approach for the effective potential for composite operators is discussed. It is shown that, at least in a variational approach, the fermion either remains massless or gets a dynamical mass for every non-zero coupling constant. (Author) [pt

  13. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantum chromodynamics; finite temperature; chiral perturbation theory; QCD sum rules. PACS Nos 11.10. ..... at finite temperature. The self-energy diagrams of figure 2 modify it to ..... method of determination at present. Acknowledgement.

  14. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bond, Stephen D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Littlewood, David John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, Stan Gerald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  15. Phase transitions in finite systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, Ph. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), DSM-CEA / IN2P3-CNRS, 14 - Caen (France); Gulminelli, F. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire

    2002-07-01

    In this series of lectures we will first review the general theory of phase transition in the framework of information theory and briefly address some of the well known mean field solutions of three dimensional problems. The theory of phase transitions in finite systems will then be discussed, with a special emphasis to the conceptual problems linked to a thermodynamical description for small, short-lived, open systems as metal clusters and data samples coming from nuclear collisions. The concept of negative heat capacity developed in the early seventies in the context of self-gravitating systems will be reinterpreted in the general framework of convexity anomalies of thermo-statistical potentials. The connection with the distribution of the order parameter will lead us to a definition of first order phase transitions in finite systems based on topology anomalies of the event distribution in the space of observations. Finally a careful study of the thermodynamical limit will provide a bridge with the standard theory of phase transitions and show that in a wide class of physical situations the different statistical ensembles are irreducibly inequivalent. (authors)

  16. Phase transitions in finite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.; Gulminelli, F.

    2002-01-01

    In this series of lectures we will first review the general theory of phase transition in the framework of information theory and briefly address some of the well known mean field solutions of three dimensional problems. The theory of phase transitions in finite systems will then be discussed, with a special emphasis to the conceptual problems linked to a thermodynamical description for small, short-lived, open systems as metal clusters and data samples coming from nuclear collisions. The concept of negative heat capacity developed in the early seventies in the context of self-gravitating systems will be reinterpreted in the general framework of convexity anomalies of thermo-statistical potentials. The connection with the distribution of the order parameter will lead us to a definition of first order phase transitions in finite systems based on topology anomalies of the event distribution in the space of observations. Finally a careful study of the thermodynamical limit will provide a bridge with the standard theory of phase transitions and show that in a wide class of physical situations the different statistical ensembles are irreducibly inequivalent. (authors)

  17. Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.R. Ghoreishy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This research work is devoted to the footprint analysis of a steel-belted radial tyre (185/65R14 under vertical static load using finite element method. Two models have been developed in which in the first model the tread patterns were replaced by simple ribs while the second model was consisted of details of the tread blocks. Linear elastic and hyper elastic (Arruda-Boyce material models were selected to describe the mechanical behavior of the reinforcing and rubbery parts, respectively. The above two finite element models of the tyre were analyzed under inflation pressure and vertical static loads. The second model (with detailed tread patterns was analyzed with and without friction effect between tread and contact surfaces. In every stage of the analysis, the results were compared with the experimental data to confirm the accuracy and applicability of the model. Results showed that neglecting the tread pattern design not only reduces the computational cost and effort but also the differences between computed deformations do not show significant changes. However, more complicated variables such as shape and area of the footprint zone and contact pressure are affected considerably by the finite element model selected for the tread blocks. In addition, inclusion of friction even in static state changes these variables significantly.

  18. Kinematics of active deformation across the Western Kunlun mountain range (Xinjiang, China), and potential seismic hazards within the southern Tarim Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guilbaud, Christelle; Simoes, Martine; Barrier, Laurie

    2017-01-01

    remains seismic. To quantify the rate of active deformation and the potential for major earthquakes in this region, we combine a structural and quantitative morphological analysis of the Yecheng-Pishan fold, along the topographic mountain front in the epicentral area. Using a seismic profile, we derive...

  19. Multi-locus genotypes of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in captive Asiatic black bears in southwestern China: High genetic diversity, broad host range, and zoonotic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lei; Li, Wei; Zhong, Zhijun; Gong, Chao; Cao, Xuefeng; Song, Yuan; Wang, Wuyou; Huang, Xiangming; Liu, Xuehan; Hu, Yanchun; Fu, Hualin; He, Min; Wang, Ya; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Kongju; Peng, Guangneng

    2017-01-01

    Enterocytozoon bieneusi is an obligate eukaryotic intracellular parasite that infects a wide variety of vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. Although considerable research has been conducted on this organism, relatively little information is available on the occurrence of E. bieneusi in captive Asiatic black bears. The present study was performed to determine the prevalence, genetic diversity, and zoonotic potential of E. bieneusi in captive Asiatic black bears in zoos in southwestern China. Fecal specimens from Asiatic black bears in four zoos, located in four different cities, were collected and analyzed for the prevalence of E. bieneusi. The average prevalence of E. bieneusi was 27.4% (29/106), with the highest prevalence in Guiyang Zoo (36.4%, 16/44). Altogether, five genotypes of E. bieneusi were identified among the 29 E. bieneusi-positive samples, including three known genotypes (CHB1, SC02, and horse2) and two novel genotypes named ABB1 and ABB2. Multi-locus sequence typing using three microsatellites (MS1, MS3, and MS7) and one minisatellite (MS4) revealed V, III, V, and IV genotypes at these four loci, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the genotypes SC02 and ABB2 were clustered into group 1 of zoonotic potential, the genotypes CHB1 and ABB1 were clustered into a new group, and the genotype horse2 was clustered into group 6 of unclear zoonotic potential. In conclusion, this study identified two novel E. bieneusi genotypes in captive Asiatic black bears, and used microsatellite and minisatellite markers to reveal E. bieneusi genetic diversity. Moreover, our findings show that genotypes SC02 (identified in humans) and ABB2 belong to group 1 with zoonotic potential, suggesting the risk of transmission of E. bieneusi from Asiatic black bears to humans and other animals.

  20. Multi-locus genotypes of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in captive Asiatic black bears in southwestern China: High genetic diversity, broad host range, and zoonotic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Deng

    Full Text Available Enterocytozoon bieneusi is an obligate eukaryotic intracellular parasite that infects a wide variety of vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. Although considerable research has been conducted on this organism, relatively little information is available on the occurrence of E. bieneusi in captive Asiatic black bears. The present study was performed to determine the prevalence, genetic diversity, and zoonotic potential of E. bieneusi in captive Asiatic black bears in zoos in southwestern China. Fecal specimens from Asiatic black bears in four zoos, located in four different cities, were collected and analyzed for the prevalence of E. bieneusi. The average prevalence of E. bieneusi was 27.4% (29/106, with the highest prevalence in Guiyang Zoo (36.4%, 16/44. Altogether, five genotypes of E. bieneusi were identified among the 29 E. bieneusi-positive samples, including three known genotypes (CHB1, SC02, and horse2 and two novel genotypes named ABB1 and ABB2. Multi-locus sequence typing using three microsatellites (MS1, MS3, and MS7 and one minisatellite (MS4 revealed V, III, V, and IV genotypes at these four loci, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the genotypes SC02 and ABB2 were clustered into group 1 of zoonotic potential, the genotypes CHB1 and ABB1 were clustered into a new group, and the genotype horse2 was clustered into group 6 of unclear zoonotic potential. In conclusion, this study identified two novel E. bieneusi genotypes in captive Asiatic black bears, and used microsatellite and minisatellite markers to reveal E. bieneusi genetic diversity. Moreover, our findings show that genotypes SC02 (identified in humans and ABB2 belong to group 1 with zoonotic potential, suggesting the risk of transmission of E. bieneusi from Asiatic black bears to humans and other animals.

  1. Potential for waist-to-height ratio to detect overfat adolescents from a Pacific Island, even those within the normal BMI range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayon, Stéphane; Cavaloc, Yolande; Wattelez, Guillaume; Cherrier, Sophie; Lerrant, Yannick; Ashwell, Margaret; Galy, Olivier

    2017-12-15

    Waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) is a simple anthropometric proxy for central body fat; it is easy to use from a health education perspective. A WHtR value >0.5 has been proposed as a first level indicator of health risk. The first aim of this study was to compare WHtR with values based on body mass index (BMI) in their prediction of the percentage of body fat (%BF) in a multi-ethnic population of adolescents from New-Caledonia (age 11-16year). Secondly, to see whether WHtR >0.5 could be used to detect overfat subjects whose BMI was in the normal range. Body fat percentage (%BF, based on skinfold measurements), BMI and WHtR were calculated for New Caledonian adolescents from different ethnic backgrounds. The relationship between %BF, BMI and WHtR was determined using quadratic models and from linear regression equations. The sensitivity and specificity of WHtR for detecting overfat adolescents (%BF >25% in boys and >30% in girls) were assessed and compared with those from the BMI-based classification. WHtR showed better correlation with %BF than BMI-based measurements. WHtR >0.5 was also more accurate than BMI in detecting overfat adolescents. Moreover, using this boundary value, 8% of adolescents in the normal BMI range were shown to be over-fat. WHtR is a good anthropometric proxy to detect overfat adolescents. Detecting overfat adolescents within the normal BMI range is particularly important for preventing non communicable diseases. We therefore recommend using WHtR for health education programs in the Pacific area and more generally. Copyright © 2017 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment and Calibration of a RGB-D Camera (Kinect v2 Sensor Towards a Potential Use for Close-Range 3D Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Lachat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, RGB-D cameras - also called range imaging cameras - have known a permanent evolution. Because of their limited cost and their ability to measure distances at a high frame rate, such sensors are especially appreciated for applications in robotics or computer vision. The Kinect v1 (Microsoft release in November 2010 promoted the use of RGB-D cameras, so that a second version of the sensor arrived on the market in July 2014. Since it is possible to obtain point clouds of an observed scene with a high frequency, one could imagine applying this type of sensors to answer to the need for 3D acquisition. However, due to the technology involved, some questions have to be considered such as, for example, the suitability and accuracy of RGB-D cameras for close range 3D modeling. In that way, the quality of the acquired data represents a major axis. In this paper, the use of a recent Kinect v2 sensor to reconstruct small objects in three dimensions has been investigated. To achieve this goal, a survey of the sensor characteristics as well as a calibration approach are relevant. After an accuracy assessment of the produced models, the benefits and drawbacks of Kinect v2 compared to the first version of the sensor and then to photogrammetry are discussed.

  3. Optical Finite Element Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, David; Taylor, Bradley K.

    1986-01-01

    A new high-accuracy optical linear algebra processor (OLAP) with many advantageous features is described. It achieves floating point accuracy, handles bipolar data by sign-magnitude representation, performs LU decomposition using only one channel, easily partitions and considers data flow. A new application (finite element (FE) structural analysis) for OLAPs is introduced and the results of a case study presented. Error sources in encoded OLAPs are addressed for the first time. Their modeling and simulation are discussed and quantitative data are presented. Dominant error sources and the effects of composite error sources are analyzed.

  4. Combinatorics of finite sets

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Coherent treatment provides comprehensive view of basic methods and results of the combinatorial study of finite set systems. The Clements-Lindstrom extension of the Kruskal-Katona theorem to multisets is explored, as is the Greene-Kleitman result concerning k-saturated chain partitions of general partially ordered sets. Connections with Dilworth's theorem, the marriage problem, and probability are also discussed. Each chapter ends with a helpful series of exercises and outline solutions appear at the end. ""An excellent text for a topics course in discrete mathematics."" - Bulletin of the Ame

  5. Finite Cycle Gibbs Measures on Permutations of

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armendáriz, Inés; Ferrari, Pablo A.; Groisman, Pablo; Leonardi, Florencia

    2015-03-01

    We consider Gibbs distributions on the set of permutations of associated to the Hamiltonian , where is a permutation and is a strictly convex potential. Call finite-cycle those permutations composed by finite cycles only. We give conditions on ensuring that for large enough temperature there exists a unique infinite volume ergodic Gibbs measure concentrating mass on finite-cycle permutations; this measure is equal to the thermodynamic limit of the specifications with identity boundary conditions. We construct as the unique invariant measure of a Markov process on the set of finite-cycle permutations that can be seen as a loss-network, a continuous-time birth and death process of cycles interacting by exclusion, an approach proposed by Fernández, Ferrari and Garcia. Define as the shift permutation . In the Gaussian case , we show that for each , given by is an ergodic Gibbs measure equal to the thermodynamic limit of the specifications with boundary conditions. For a general potential , we prove the existence of Gibbs measures when is bigger than some -dependent value.

  6. Hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide metabolites in the blood of free-ranging brown bears and their potential roles in hibernation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbech, Inge G; Shen, Xinggui; Chakravarti, Ritu

    2014-01-01

    inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO), in winter-hibernating and summer-active free-ranging Scandinavian brown bears. We found that levels of sulfide metabolites were overall similar in summer-active and hibernating bears but their composition in the plasma...... differed significantly, with a decrease in bound sulfane sulfur in hibernation. High levels of unbound free sulfide correlated with high levels of cysteine (Cys) and with low levels of bound sulfane sulfur, indicating that during hibernation H2S, in addition to being formed enzymatically from the substrate...... Cys, may also be regenerated from its oxidation products, including thiosulfate and polysulfides. In the absence of any dietary intake, this shift in the mode of H2S synthesis would help preserve free Cys for synthesis of glutathione (GSH), a major antioxidant found at high levels in the red blood...

  7. Finiteness of corner vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Jiten C.; Biswas, Sougata; Panda, Swapnendu

    2018-04-01

    Till date, the sequence of vortices present in the solid corners of steady internal viscous incompressible flows was thought to be infinite. However, the already existing and most recent geometric theories on incompressible viscous flows that express vortical structures in terms of critical points in bounded domains indicate a strong opposition to this notion of infiniteness. In this study, we endeavor to bridge the gap between the two opposing stream of thoughts by diagnosing the assumptions of the existing theorems on such vortices. We provide our own set of proofs for establishing the finiteness of the sequence of corner vortices by making use of the continuum hypothesis and Kolmogorov scale, which guarantee a nonzero scale for the smallest vortex structure possible in incompressible viscous flows. We point out that the notion of infiniteness resulting from discrete self-similarity of the vortex structures is not physically feasible. Making use of some elementary concepts of mathematical analysis and our own construction of diametric disks, we conclude that the sequence of corner vortices is finite.

  8. Status and development potential of proven reactor types and fuel cycles, and their role in a medium-to-long range energy supply strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerkl, H.

    1982-01-01

    After a general review of the present world-wide energy situation (with particular reference to those of the Federal Republic of Germany and of Argentina) the possible contribution of nuclear energy in general, and of proven light water and heavy water reactor types in particular, to meeting the energy demand is discussed. The technical and economic development potential of those reactors is evaluated, both regarding plant components technology as well as fuel and fuel cycle improvement, with special emphasis on the Pressure Vessel Heavy Water Reactor type. The last section presents some results of nuclear reactor strategy calculations made for a scenario similar to that of Argentina over the period from 1970 through 2040 and involving the use of: A) heavy water reactors (HWR's) only, with and without plutonium recycling, and B) the use of HWR's plus fast breeder reactors. (M.E.L.) [es

  9. Lung tumors and radon inhalation in over 2000 rats: Approximate linearity across a wide range of doses and potentiation by tobacco smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.G.; Lafuma, J.; Parish, S.E.; Peto, R.; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses

    1986-01-01

    More than 2000 rats were exposed to cumulative doses of up to 28,000 WLMs of radon gas. More than 300 pulmonary tumors were induced by this exposure, most being nonfatal lesions detected only at autopsy of animals that had died of unrelated causes. Above 6000 WLMs rats suffered increasingly from life shortening due to radiation-induced nonneoplastic causes and so had less time in which to develop tumors. When adjusted for these competing causes of death, the hazard function for the excess risk of developing pulmonary tumors was approximately linearly related to dose throughout the range of doses studied. This suggests that some previously reported high-dose ''reductions'' in radiogenic tumor-induction rates may chiefly have involved the killing of rats rather than the killing of precursor cells. Rats exposed to radon and then to six months of inhalation of tobacco smoke had a four times greater age-specific prevalence of pulmonary tumors than rats exposed to an identical radon dose either alone or preceded by tobacco smoke inhalation. This suggests that tobacco smoke may accelerate the carcinogenic process by acting as a promoter of radiation-induced somatic damage. These data suggest that, for assessing human risk from exposure to radon, the linear model should be assumed, but that the WLM is not on its own an adequate index of carcinogenic insult. 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Robust weak measurements on finite samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tollaksen, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    A new weak measurement procedure is introduced for finite samples which yields accurate weak values that are outside the range of eigenvalues and which do not require an exponentially rare ensemble. This procedure provides a unique advantage in the amplification of small nonrandom signals by minimizing uncertainties in determining the weak value and by minimizing sample size. This procedure can also extend the strength of the coupling between the system and measuring device to a new regime

  11. Uinta Arch Project: investigations of uranium potential in Precambrian X and older metasedimentary rocks in the Unita and Wasatch ranges, Utah and Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graff, P.J.; Sears, J.W.; Holden, G.S.

    1980-06-01

    This study is part of the United States Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program to understand the geologic setting, amount, and availability of uranium resources within the boundaries of the United States. The systematic study of Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates and areas that may contain such conglomerates is an integral part of DOE's resource evaluation program, because deposits of world-wide importance occur in such terrains in Canada and South Africa, and because terrains similar to those producing uranium from quartz-pebble conglomerates exist elsewhere in the United States. Because of the ready availability of Tertiary sandstone and Colorado Plateau-type uranium deposits, large areas of Precambrian rocks in the US have not been fully assessed for uranium potential. Thus, the Uinta Arch Project was undertaken to assess the favorability of Precambrian metasedimentary rocks in northern Utah for deposits of uranium in Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates. Rocks of interest to this study are the thick, clastic sequences within the Uinta Arch that are considered to be of Early Proterozoic age. The Uinta Arch area is known to contain rocks which generally fit the lithologic characteristics that are understood to limit the occurrence of Precambrian fossil placers. However, detailed geology of these rocks and their exact fit to the model described for uraniferous conglomerates was not known. The primary goal of the Uinta Arch Project was to determine how well these Precambrian rocks resemble known deposits and to describe the favorability of placer uranium deposits

  12. Effect of pairwise additivity on finite-temperature behavior of classical ideal gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekaari, Ashkan; Jafari, Mahmoud

    2018-05-01

    Finite-temperature molecular dynamics simulations have been applied to inquire into the effect of pairwise additivity on the behavior of classical ideal gas within the temperature range of T = 250-4000 K via applying a variety of pair potentials and then examining the temperature dependence of a number of thermodynamical properties. Examining the compressibility factor reveals the most deviation from ideal-gas behavior for the Lennard-Jones system mainly due to the presence of both the attractive and repulsive terms. The systems with either attractive or repulsive intermolecular potentials are found to present no resemblance to real gases, but the most similarity to the ideal one as temperature rises.

  13. Uinta Arch Project: investigations of uranium potential in Precambrian X and older metasedimentary rocks in the Unita and Wasatch ranges, Utah and Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graff, P.J.; Sears, J.W.; Holden, G.S.

    1980-06-01

    This study is part of the United States Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program to understand the geologic setting, amount, and availability of uranium resources within the boundaries of the United States. The systematic study of Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates and areas that may contain such conglomerates is an integral part of DOE's resource evaluation program, because deposits of world-wide importance occur in such terrains in Canada and South Africa, and because terrains similar to those producing uranium from quartz-pebble conglomerates exist elsewhere in the United States. Because of the ready availability of Tertiary sandstone and Colorado Plateau-type uranium deposits, large areas of Precambrian rocks in the US have not been fully assessed for uranium potential. Thus, the Uinta Arch Project was undertaken to assess the favorability of Precambrian metasedimentary rocks in northern Utah for deposits of uranium in Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates. Rocks of interest to this study are the thick, clastic sequences within the Uinta Arch that are considered to be of Early Proterozoic age. The Uinta Arch area is known to contain rocks which generally fit the lithologic characteristics that are understood to limit the occurrence of Precambrian fossil placers. However, detailed geology of these rocks and their exact fit to the model described for uraniferous conglomerates was not known. The primary goal of the Uinta Arch Project was to determine how well these Precambrian rocks resemble known deposits and to describe the favorability of placer uranium deposits.

  14. Initial results from dissolution rate testing of N-Reactor spent fuel over a range of potential geologic repository aqueous conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, W.J.; Einziger, R.E.

    1998-04-01

    Hanford N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (HSNF) may ultimately be placed in a geologic repository for permanent disposal. To determine whether the engineered barrier system that will be designed for emplacement of light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuel will also suffice for HSNF, aqueous dissolution rate measurements were conducted on the HSNF. The purpose of these tests was to determine whether HSNF dissolves faster or slower than LWR spent fuel under some limited repository-relevant water chemistry conditions. The tests were conducted using a flowthrough method that allows the dissolution rate of the uranium matrix to be measured without interference by secondary precipitation reactions that would confuse interpretation of the results. Similar tests had been conducted earlier with LWR spent fuel, thereby allowing direct comparisons. Two distinct corrosion modes were observed during the course of these 12 tests. The first, Stage 1, involved no visible corrosion of the test specimen and produced no undissolved corrosion products. The second, Stage 2, resulted in both visible corrosion of the test specimen and left behind undissolved corrosion products. During Stage 1, the rate of dissolution could be readily determined because the dissolved uranium and associated fission products remained in solution where they could be quantitatively analyzed. The measured rates were much faster than has been observed for LWR spent fuel under all conditions tested to date when normalized to the exposed test specimen surface areas. Application of these results to repository conditions, however, requires some comparison of the physical conditions of the different fuels. The surface area of LWR fuel that could potentially be exposed to repository groundwater is estimated to be approximately 100 times greater than HSNF. Therefore, when compared on the basis of mass, which is more relevant to repository conditions, the HSNF and LWR spent fuel dissolve at similar rates

  15. Tunnel superpenetrability of potential barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakhariev, B N.

    1982-01-01

    The transmission of two particles through the same barrier is considered. The limiting cases are compared when the particles are joined together in a single particle with double mass-energy and potential and when they pass the barrier independently. As an intermediate case a pair of particles bound in a quasideuteron of a finite size is considered. It is shown that long-range collective correlations of particles (of the superfluidity type and others) simplify very much for them passing through high potential barriers. This happens due to the transfer of the additional energy from the particles outside the barriers to those inside it

  16. The Determining Finite Automata Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Vinogradova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of formal languages widely uses finite state automata both in implementation of automata-based approach to programming, and in synthesis of logical control algorithms.To ensure unambiguous operation of the algorithms, the synthesized finite state automata must be deterministic. Within the approach to the synthesis of the mobile robot controls, for example, based on the theory of formal languages, there are problems concerning the construction of various finite automata, but such finite automata, as a rule, will not be deterministic. The algorithm of determinization can be applied to the finite automata, as specified, in various ways. The basic ideas of the algorithm of determinization can be most simply explained using the representations of a finite automaton in the form of a weighted directed graph.The paper deals with finite automata represented as weighted directed graphs, and discusses in detail the procedure for determining the finite automata represented in this way. Gives a detailed description of the algorithm for determining finite automata. A large number of examples illustrate a capability of the determinization algorithm.

  17. Finite energy electroweak dyon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimm, Kyoungtae [Seoul National University, Faculty of Liberal Education, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J.H. [Konkuk University, Department of Physics, College of Natural Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Y.M. [Konkuk University, Administration Building 310-4, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    The latest MoEDAL experiment at LHC to detect the electroweak monopole makes the theoretical prediction of the monopole mass an urgent issue. We discuss three different ways to estimate the mass of the electroweak monopole. We first present the dimensional and scaling arguments which indicate the monopole mass to be around 4 to 10 TeV. To justify this we construct finite energy analytic dyon solutions which could be viewed as the regularized Cho-Maison dyon, modifying the coupling strength at short distance. Our result demonstrates that a genuine electroweak monopole whose mass scale is much smaller than the grand unification scale can exist, which can actually be detected at the present LHC. (orig.)

  18. Probabilistic fracture finite elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. K.; Belytschko, T.; Lua, Y. J.

    1991-05-01

    The Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics (PFM) is a promising method for estimating the fatigue life and inspection cycles for mechanical and structural components. The Probability Finite Element Method (PFEM), which is based on second moment analysis, has proved to be a promising, practical approach to handle problems with uncertainties. As the PFEM provides a powerful computational tool to determine first and second moment of random parameters, the second moment reliability method can be easily combined with PFEM to obtain measures of the reliability of the structural system. The method is also being applied to fatigue crack growth. Uncertainties in the material properties of advanced materials such as polycrystalline alloys, ceramics, and composites are commonly observed from experimental tests. This is mainly attributed to intrinsic microcracks, which are randomly distributed as a result of the applied load and the residual stress.

  19. Axial anomaly at finite temperature and finite density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Zhixin; Su Rukeng; Yu, P.K.N.

    1994-01-01

    The U(1) axial anomaly in a hot fermion medium is investigated by using the real time Green's function method. After calculating the lowest order triangle diagrams, we find that finite temperature as well as finite fermion density does not affect the axial anomaly. The higher order corrections for the axial anomaly are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Finite approximations in fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschel, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains twenty papers on work which was conducted between 1983 and 1985 in the Priority Research Program ''Finite Approximations in Fluid Mechanics'' of the German Research Society (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft). Scientists from numerical mathematics, fluid mechanics, and aerodynamics present their research on boundary-element methods, factorization methods, higher-order panel methods, multigrid methods for elliptical and parabolic problems, two-step schemes for the Euler equations, etc. Applications are made to channel flows, gas dynamical problems, large eddy simulation of turbulence, non-Newtonian flow, turbomachine flow, zonal solutions for viscous flow problems, etc. The contents include: multigrid methods for problems from fluid dynamics, development of a 2D-Transonic Potential Flow Solver; a boundary element spectral method for nonstationary viscous flows in 3 dimensions; navier-stokes computations of two-dimensional laminar flows in a channel with a backward facing step; calculations and experimental investigations of the laminar unsteady flow in a pipe expansion; calculation of the flow-field caused by shock wave and deflagration interaction; a multi-level discretization and solution method for potential flow problems in three dimensions; solutions of the conservation equations with the approximate factorization method; inviscid and viscous flow through rotating meridional contours; zonal solutions for viscous flow problems

  1. Behavior of supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midorikawa, Shoichi.

    1984-11-01

    Supersymmetry breaking at finite temperature is investigated by using the real-time formalism. We derive the Ward-Takahashi identities of the composite fields by using the path integral formalism. We also calculate the one-loop correction to fermion and boson masses, and discuss the connection of the perturbative result with that obtained from the effective potential. Our result shows that supersymmetry is broken explicitly even in the real-time formalism. (author)

  2. Thermal operator representation of finite temperature graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, F.T.; Frenkel, J.; Das, Ashok; Espinosa, Olivier; Perez, Silvana

    2005-01-01

    Using the mixed space representation (t,p→) in the context of scalar field theories, we prove in a simple manner that the Feynman graphs at finite temperature are related to the corresponding zero temperature diagrams through a simple thermal operator, both in the imaginary time as well as in the real time formalisms. This result is generalized to the case when there is a nontrivial chemical potential present. Several interesting properties of the thermal operator are also discussed

  3. Spatial bandwidth enlargement and field enhancement of shear horizontal waves in finite graded piezoelectric layered media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-01-01

    Shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. Different from the previous studies on SH wave propagation in completely periodic layered media, calculations on band structure and transmission in this paper show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. Harmonic wave simulation by finite element method (FEM) confirms that the reason of bandwidth enlargement is that waves within the band gap ranges are spatially enhanced and stopped by the corresponding graded units. The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially, which shows potential applications in strengthening energy trapping and harvesting. - Highlights: • Shear horizontal wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. • Calculations on band structure and transmission show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. • Finite element method confirms that waves in band gaps are spatially enhanced and stopped by the graded units. • The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially

  4. Hollow cylindrical plasma filament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan

    2013-01-01

    We have explored here a hollow cylindrical laser plasma multifilament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding, in which the separation between individual filaments is in the range of several millimeters and the waveguide cladding thickness is in the order of the microwave penetration depth. Such parameters give a closer representation of a realistic laser filament waveguide sustained by a long stable propagation of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. We report how the waveguide losses depend on structural parameters like normalized plasma filament spacing, filament to filament distance or pitch, normal spatial frequency, and radius of the plasma filament. We found that for typical plasma parameters, the proposed waveguide can support guided modes of microwaves in extremely high frequency even with a cladding consisting of only one ring of plasma filaments. The loss of the microwave radiation is mainly caused by tunneling through the discontinuous finite cladding, i.e., confinement loss, and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In addition, the analysis indicates that the propagation loss is fairly large compared with the loss of a plasma waveguide with a continuous infinite thickness cladding, while they are comparable when using a cladding contains more than one ring. Compared to free space propagation, this waveguide still presents a superior microwave transmission to some distance in the order of the filamentation length; thus, the laser plasma filaments waveguide may be a potential channel for transporting pulsed-modulated microwaves if ensuring a long and stable propagation of fs laser pulses.

  5. Axial anomaly at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, S.; Gupte, Neelima; Srinivasan, V.

    1985-01-01

    The Jackiw-Bardeen-Adler anomaly for QED 4 and QED 2 are calculated at finite temperature. It is found that the anomaly is independent of temperature. Ishikawa's method [1984, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 53 1615] for calculating the quantised Hall effect is extended to finite temperature. (author)

  6. Range Process Simulation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Dave; Haas, William; Barth, Tim; Benjamin, Perakath; Graul, Michael; Bagatourova, Olga

    2005-01-01

    Range Process Simulation Tool (RPST) is a computer program that assists managers in rapidly predicting and quantitatively assessing the operational effects of proposed technological additions to, and/or upgrades of, complex facilities and engineering systems such as the Eastern Test Range. Originally designed for application to space transportation systems, RPST is also suitable for assessing effects of proposed changes in industrial facilities and large organizations. RPST follows a model-based approach that includes finite-capacity schedule analysis and discrete-event process simulation. A component-based, scalable, open architecture makes RPST easily and rapidly tailorable for diverse applications. Specific RPST functions include: (1) definition of analysis objectives and performance metrics; (2) selection of process templates from a processtemplate library; (3) configuration of process models for detailed simulation and schedule analysis; (4) design of operations- analysis experiments; (5) schedule and simulation-based process analysis; and (6) optimization of performance by use of genetic algorithms and simulated annealing. The main benefits afforded by RPST are provision of information that can be used to reduce costs of operation and maintenance, and the capability for affordable, accurate, and reliable prediction and exploration of the consequences of many alternative proposed decisions.

  7. Improving the Calculation of The Potential Between Spherical and Deformed Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, M.; Ramadan, Kh.A.

    2000-01-01

    The Heavy Ion (HI) interaction potential between spherical and deformed nuclei is improved by calculating its exchange part using finite range nucleon-nucleon (NN) force. We considered U 238 as a target nucleus and seven projectile nuclei to show the dependence of the HI potential on both the energy and orientation of the deformed target nucleus. The effect of finite range NN force has been found to produce significant changes in the HI potential. The variation of the barrier height V B , its thickness and its position R B due to the use of finite range NN force are significant. Such variation enhance the fusion cross-section at energy values just below the Coulomb barrier by a factor increasing with the mass number of projectile nucleus. (author)

  8. On finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajpoot, S.; Taylor, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    The properties that make massless versions of N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory and a class of N = 2 supersymmetric theories finite are: (I) a universal coupling for the gauge and matter interactions, (II) anomaly-free representations to which the bosonic and fermionic matter belong, and (III) no charge renormalisation, i.e. β(g) = 0. It was conjectured that field theories constructed out of N = 1 matter multiplets are also finite if they too share the above properties. Explicit calculations have verified these theories to be finite up to two loops. The implications of the finiteness conditions for N = 1 finite field theories with SU(M) gauge symmetry are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Today\\'s large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Timo; Kronbichler, Martin; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Today's large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  11. A Timoshenko Piezoelectric Beam Finite Element with Consistent Performance Irrespective of Geometric and Material Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litesh N. Sulbhewar

    Full Text Available Abstract The conventional Timoshenko piezoelectric beam finite elements based on First-order Shear Deformation Theory (FSDT do not maintain the accuracy and convergence consistently over the applicable range of material and geometric properties. In these elements, the inaccuracy arises due to the induced potential effects in the transverse direction and inefficiency arises due to the use of independently assumed linear polynomial interpolation of the field variables in the longitudinal direction. In this work, a novel FSDT-based piezoelectric beam finite element is proposed which is devoid of these deficiencies. A variational formulation with consistent through-thickness potential is developed. The governing equilibrium equations are used to derive the coupled field relations. These relations are used to develop a polynomial interpolation scheme which properly accommodates the bending-extension, bending-shear and induced potential couplings to produce accurate results in an efficient manner. It is noteworthy that this consistently accurate and efficient beam finite element uses the same nodal variables as of conventional FSDT formulations available in the literature. Comparison of numerical results proves the consistent accuracy and efficiency of the proposed formulation irrespective of geometric and material configurations, unlike the conventional formulations.

  12. Evaluation of Callable Bonds: Finite Difference Methods, Stability and Accuracy.

    OpenAIRE

    Buttler, Hans-Jurg

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate numerically the semi-American callable bond by means of finite difference methods. This study implies three results. First, the numerical error is greater for the callable bond price than for the straight bond price, and too large for real applications Secondly, the numerical accuracy of the callable bond price computed for the relevant range of interest rates depends entirely on the finite difference scheme which is chosen for the boundary points. Thi...

  13. Aging: Learning to Live a Finite Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Although biodemographic research informs us that life expectancies have risen impressively during the last century, this has not led to much interest in these new horizons of aging. The instrumentalist culture of late modern societies, including its health cure system, has clearly difficulties to relate to the elusive but inevitable limitations of finite life. Moreover, as most people can be expected to survive into old age, thinking about finitude is easily postponed and reserved for those who are "really old." Indeed, a meaningful and realistic understanding of aging needs to include a confrontation with the finitude of life. Instead of reducing aging to the opposite or continuation of vital adulthood, it should be seen as something with a potentially broad and deep significance: a process of learning to live a finite life. As a contribution to this cultural repositioning of aging, the article presents a philosophical exploration of finitude and finite life. Among the discussed topics are the Stoic and Epicurean ways of living with death but also the necessity to expand the meaning of "finitude" beyond mortality. Aging is foremost a process of living through changes that are largely beyond our control although they require active responding. Next, individualistic or existentialist interpretations are criticized because finite lives presuppose a social world in which they emerge and on which they depend. Unfortunately, aging, the most important experiential source of knowledge about what it is to live a finite life, is neglected by the same culture that needs its wisdom. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Finite discrete field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Manoelito M. de

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the physical meaning and the geometric interpretation of implementation in classical field theories. The origin of infinities and other inconsistencies in field theories is traced to fields defined with support on the light cone; a finite and consistent field theory requires a light-cone generator as the field support. Then, we introduce a classical field theory with support on the light cone generators. It results on a description of discrete (point-like) interactions in terms of localized particle-like fields. We find the propagators of these particle-like fields and discuss their physical meaning, properties and consequences. They are conformally invariant, singularity-free, and describing a manifestly covariant (1 + 1)-dimensional dynamics in a (3 = 1) spacetime. Remarkably this conformal symmetry remains even for the propagation of a massive field in four spacetime dimensions. We apply this formalism to Classical electrodynamics and to the General Relativity Theory. The standard formalism with its distributed fields is retrieved in terms of spacetime average of the discrete field. Singularities are the by-products of the averaging process. This new formalism enlighten the meaning and the problem of field theory, and may allow a softer transition to a quantum theory. (author)

  15. Mimetic finite difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipnikov, Konstantin; Manzini, Gianmarco; Shashkov, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    The mimetic finite difference (MFD) method mimics fundamental properties of mathematical and physical systems including conservation laws, symmetry and positivity of solutions, duality and self-adjointness of differential operators, and exact mathematical identities of the vector and tensor calculus. This article is the first comprehensive review of the 50-year long history of the mimetic methodology and describes in a systematic way the major mimetic ideas and their relevance to academic and real-life problems. The supporting applications include diffusion, electromagnetics, fluid flow, and Lagrangian hydrodynamics problems. The article provides enough details to build various discrete operators on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes and summarizes the major convergence results for the mimetic approximations. Most of these theoretical results, which are presented here as lemmas, propositions and theorems, are either original or an extension of existing results to a more general formulation using polyhedral meshes. Finally, flexibility and extensibility of the mimetic methodology are shown by deriving higher-order approximations, enforcing discrete maximum principles for diffusion problems, and ensuring the numerical stability for saddle-point systems.

  16. Effect of finite β on stellarator transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynick, H.E.

    1984-04-01

    A theory of the modification of stellarator transport due to the presence of finite plasma pressure is developed, and applied to a range of stellarator configurations. For many configurations of interest, plasma transport can change by more than an order of magnitude in the progression from zero pressure to the equilibrium β limit of the device. Thus, a stellarator with transport-optimized vacuum fields can have poor confinement at the desired operating β. Without an external compensating field, increasing β tends to degrade confinement, unless the initial field structure is very carefully chosen. The theory permits one to correctly determine this vacuum structure, in terms of the desired structure of the field at a prescribed operating β. With a compensating external field, the deleterious effect of finite β on transport can be partially eliminated

  17. Finite Blaschke products and their connections

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, Stephan Ramon; Ross, William T

    2018-01-01

    This monograph offers an introduction to finite Blaschke products and their connections to complex analysis, linear algebra, operator theory, matrix analysis, and other fields. Old favorites such as the Carathéodory approximation and the Pick interpolation theorems are featured, as are many topics that have never received a modern treatment, such as the Bohr radius and Ritt's theorem on decomposability. Deep connections to hyperbolic geometry are explored, as are the mapping properties, zeros, residues, and critical points of finite Blaschke products. In addition, model spaces, rational functions with real boundary values, spectral mapping properties of the numerical range, and the Darlington synthesis problem from electrical engineering are also covered. Topics are carefully discussed, and numerous examples and illustrations highlight crucial ideas. While thorough explanations allow the reader to appreciate the beauty of the subject, relevant exercises following each chapter improve technical fluency with t...

  18. Thermoelectric properties of finite graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2011-01-01

    We present calculations of the electronic and thermal transport properties of graphene antidot lattices with a finite length along the transport direction. The calculations are based on the π-tight-binding model and the Brenner potential. We show that both electronic and thermal transport...... properties converge fast toward the bulk limit with increasing length of the lattice: only a few repetitions (≃6) of the fundamental unit cell are required to recover the electronic band gap of the infinite lattice as a transport gap for the finite lattice. We investigate how different antidot shapes...... and sizes affect the thermoelectric properties. The resulting thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, can exceed 0.25, and it is highly sensitive to the atomic arrangement of the antidot edges. Specifically, hexagonal holes with pure armchair edges lead to an order-of-magnitude larger ZT as compared to pure...

  19. Finite element analysis of human joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossart, P.L.; Hollerbach, K.

    1996-09-01

    Our work focuses on the development of finite element models (FEMs) that describe the biomechanics of human joints. Finite element modeling is becoming a standard tool in industrial applications. In highly complex problems such as those found in biomechanics research, however, the full potential of FEMs is just beginning to be explored, due to the absence of precise, high resolution medical data and the difficulties encountered in converting these enormous datasets into a form that is usable in FEMs. With increasing computing speed and memory available, it is now feasible to address these challenges. We address the first by acquiring data with a high resolution C-ray CT scanner and the latter by developing semi-automated method for generating the volumetric meshes used in the FEM. Issues related to tomographic reconstruction, volume segmentation, the use of extracted surfaces to generate volumetric hexahedral meshes, and applications of the FEM are described.

  20. Dense QCD in a Finite Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Kanazawa, Takuya

    2009-01-01

    We study the properties of QCD at high baryon density in a finite volume where color superconductivity occurs. We derive exact sum rules for complex eigenvalues of the Dirac operator at a finite chemical potential, and show that the Dirac spectrum is directly related to the color superconducting gap Δ. Also, we find a characteristic signature of color superconductivity: an X-shaped spectrum of partition function zeros in the complex quark mass plane near the origin, reflecting the Z(2) L xZ(2) R symmetry of the diquark pairing. Our results are universal in the domain Δ -1 π -1 where L is the linear size of the system and m π is the pion mass at high density.

  1. Finite element analysis of human joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, P.L.; Hollerbach, K.

    1996-09-01

    Our work focuses on the development of finite element models (FEMs) that describe the biomechanics of human joints. Finite element modeling is becoming a standard tool in industrial applications. In highly complex problems such as those found in biomechanics research, however, the full potential of FEMs is just beginning to be explored, due to the absence of precise, high resolution medical data and the difficulties encountered in converting these enormous datasets into a form that is usable in FEMs. With increasing computing speed and memory available, it is now feasible to address these challenges. We address the first by acquiring data with a high resolution C-ray CT scanner and the latter by developing semi-automated method for generating the volumetric meshes used in the FEM. Issues related to tomographic reconstruction, volume segmentation, the use of extracted surfaces to generate volumetric hexahedral meshes, and applications of the FEM are described

  2. The Mars Astrobiology Explorer-Cacher (MAX-C): a potential rover mission for 2018. Final report of the Mars Mid-Range Rover Science Analysis Group (MRR-SAG) October 14, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    This report documents the work of the Mid-Range Rover Science Analysis Group (MRR-SAG), which was assigned to formulate a concept for a potential rover mission that could be launched to Mars in 2018. Based on programmatic and engineering considerations as of April 2009, our deliberations assumed that the potential mission would use the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) sky-crane landing system and include a single solar-powered rover. The mission would also have a targeting accuracy of approximately 7 km (semimajor axis landing ellipse), a mobility range of at least 10 km, and a lifetime on the martian surface of at least 1 Earth year. An additional key consideration, given recently declining budgets and cost growth issues with MSL, is that the proposed rover must have lower cost and cost risk than those of MSL--this is an essential consideration for the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG). The MRR-SAG was asked to formulate a mission concept that would address two general objectives: (1) conduct high priority in situ science and (2) make concrete steps toward the potential return of samples to Earth. The proposed means of achieving these two goals while balancing the trade-offs between them are described here in detail. We propose the name Mars Astrobiology Explorer-Cacher(MAX-C) to reflect the dual purpose of this potential 2018 rover mission.

  3. Finite spatial volume approach to finite temperature field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Nathan

    1981-01-01

    A relativistic quantum field theory at finite temperature T=β -1 is equivalent to the same field theory at zero temperature but with one spatial dimension of finite length β. This equivalence is discussed for scalars, for fermions, and for gauge theories. The relationship is checked for free field theory. The translation of correlation functions between the two formulations is described with special emphasis on the nonlocal order parameters of gauge theories. Possible applications are mentioned. (auth)

  4. Automatic Construction of Finite Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with model generation for equational theories,i.e.,automatically generating (finite)models of a given set of (logical) equations.Our method of finite model generation and a tool for automatic construction of finite algebras is described.Some examples are given to show the applications of our program.We argue that,the combination of model generators and theorem provers enables us to get a better understanding of logical theories.A brief comparison betwween our tool and other similar tools is also presented.

  5. Photon propagators at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, J.H.

    1982-07-01

    We have used the real time formalism to compute the one-loop finite temperature corrections to the photon self energies in spinor and scalar QED. We show that, for a real photon, only the transverse components develop the temperature-dependent masses, while, for an external static electromagnetic field applied to the finite temperature system, only the static electric field is screened by thermal fluctuations. After showing how to compute systematically the imaginary parts of the finite temperature Green functions, we have attempted to give a microscopic interpretation of the imaginary parts of the self energies. (author)

  6. Sound radiation from finite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    A method to account for the effect of finite size in acoustic power radiation problem of planar surfaces using spatial windowing is developed. Cremer and Heckl presents a very useful formula for the power radiating from a structure using the spatially Fourier transformed velocity, which combined...... with spatially windowing of a plane waves can be used to take into account the finite size. In the present paper, this is developed by means of a radiation impedance for finite surfaces, that is used instead of the radiation impedance for infinite surfaces. In this way, the spatial windowing is included...

  7. Observations on finite quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, R.; Itzykson, C.

    1986-01-01

    We study the canonical transformations of the quantum mechanics on a finite phase space. For simplicity we assume that the configuration variable takes an odd prime number 4 K±1 of distinct values. We show that the canonical group is unitarily implemented. It admits a maximal abelian subgroup of order 4 K, commuting with the finite Fourier transform F, a finite analogue of the harmonic oscillator group. This provides a natural construction of F 1/K and of an orthogonal basis of eigenstates of F [fr

  8. Programming the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, I M; Margetts, L

    2013-01-01

    Many students, engineers, scientists and researchers have benefited from the practical, programming-oriented style of the previous editions of Programming the Finite Element Method, learning how to develop computer programs to solve specific engineering problems using the finite element method. This new fifth edition offers timely revisions that include programs and subroutine libraries fully updated to Fortran 2003, which are freely available online, and provides updated material on advances in parallel computing, thermal stress analysis, plasticity return algorithms, convection boundary c

  9. Finite Size Scaling of Perceptron

    OpenAIRE

    Korutcheva, Elka; Tonchev, N.

    2000-01-01

    We study the first-order transition in the model of a simple perceptron with continuous weights and large, bit finite value of the inputs. Making the analogy with the usual finite-size physical systems, we calculate the shift and the rounding exponents near the transition point. In the case of a general perceptron with larger variety of inputs, the analysis only gives bounds for the exponents.

  10. Incompleteness in the finite domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2017), s. 405-441 ISSN 1079-8986 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : finite domain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bulletin-of-symbolic-logic/article/incompleteness-in-the-finite-domain/D239B1761A73DCA534A4805A76D81C76

  11. Symbolic computation with finite biquandles

    OpenAIRE

    Creel, Conrad; Nelson, Sam

    2007-01-01

    A method of computing a basis for the second Yang-Baxter cohomology of a finite biquandle with coefficients in Q and Z_p from a matrix presentation of the finite biquandle is described. We also describe a method for computing the Yang-Baxter cocycle invariants of an oriented knot or link represented as a signed Gauss code. We provide a URL for our Maple implementations of these algorithms.

  12. Effective quantum theories with short- and long-range forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    At low energies, nonrelativistic quantum systems are essentially governed by their wave functions at large distances. For this reason, it is possible to describe a wide range of phenomena with short- or even finite-range interactions. In this thesis, we discuss several topics in connection with such an effective description and consider, in particular, modifications introduced by the presence of additional long-range potentials. In the first part we derive general results for the mass (binding energy) shift of bound states with angular momentum L ≥ 1 in a periodic cubic box in two and three spatial dimensions. Our results have applications to lattice simulations of hadronic molecules, halo nuclei, and Feshbach molecules. The sign of the mass shift can be related to the symmetry properties of the state under consideration. We verify our analytical results with explicit numerical calculations. Moreover, we discuss the case of twisted boundary conditions that arise when one considers moving bound states in finite boxes. The corresponding finite-volume shifts in the binding energies play an important role in the study of composite-particle scattering on the lattice, where they give rise to topological correction factors. While the above results are derived under the assumption of a pure finite-range interaction - and are still true up to exponentially small correction in the short-range case - in the second part we consider primarily systems of charged particles, where the Coulomb force determines the long-range part of the potential. In quantum systems with short-range interactions, causality imposes nontrivial constraints on low-energy scattering parameters. We investigate these causality constraints for systems where a long-range Coulomb potential is present in addition to a short-range interaction. The main result is an upper bound for the Coulomb-modified effective range parameter. We discuss the implications of this bound to the effective feld theory (EFT) for

  13. Density of states and magnetotransport in Weyl semimetals with long-range disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesin, D. A.; Mishchenko, E. G.; Levchenko, A.

    2015-11-01

    We study the density of states and magnetotransport properties of disordered Weyl semimetals, focusing on the case of a strong long-range disorder. To calculate the disorder-averaged density of states close to nodal points, we treat exactly the long-range random potential fluctuations produced by charged impurities, while the short-range component of disorder potential is included systematically and controllably with the help of a diagram technique. We find that, for energies close to the degeneracy point, long-range potential fluctuations lead to a finite density of states. In the context of transport, we discuss that a self-consistent theory of screening in magnetic field may conceivably lead to nonmonotonic low-field magnetoresistance.

  14. Fluctuations, Finite-Size Effects and the Thermodynamic Limit in Computer Simulations: Revisiting the Spatial Block Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Heidari

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The spatial block analysis (SBA method has been introduced to efficiently extrapolate thermodynamic quantities from finite-size computer simulations of a large variety of physical systems. In the particular case of simple liquids and liquid mixtures, by subdividing the simulation box into blocks of increasing size and calculating volume-dependent fluctuations of the number of particles, it is possible to extrapolate the bulk isothermal compressibility and Kirkwood–Buff integrals in the thermodynamic limit. Only by explicitly including finite-size effects, ubiquitous in computer simulations, into the SBA method, the extrapolation to the thermodynamic limit can be achieved. In this review, we discuss two of these finite-size effects in the context of the SBA method due to (i the statistical ensemble and (ii the finite integration domains used in computer simulations. To illustrate the method, we consider prototypical liquids and liquid mixtures described by truncated and shifted Lennard–Jones (TSLJ potentials. Furthermore, we show some of the most recent developments of the SBA method, in particular its use to calculate chemical potentials of liquids in a wide range of density/concentration conditions.

  15. A mean field theory of study of lattice gauge theory with finite temperature and with finite fermion density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, S.

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a mean field theory technique to study the confinement-deconfinement phase transition and chiral symmetry restoring phase transition with dynamical fermions and with finite chemical potential and finite temperature. The approximation scheme concerns the saddle point scenario and large space dimension. The static quark-antiquark potentials are identified from the Wilson loop correlation functions in both the fundamental and the adjoint representation of the gauge group with different temperatures. The difference between the responses of the chemical potential to the fermion number with singlet and non-singlet isospin configuration is found. We compare our results with recent Monte Carlo data. (orig.)

  16. Field emission from finite barrier quantum structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas Sett, Shubhasree, E-mail: shubhasree24@gmail.com [The Institution of Engineers - India, 8, Gokhale Road, Kolkata 700 020 (India); Bose, Chayanika, E-mail: chayanikab@ieee.org [Electronics and Telecommunication Engg. Dept., Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2014-10-01

    We study field emission from various finite barrier quasi-low dimensional structures, taking image force into account. To proceed, we first formulate an expression for field emission current density from a quantum dot. Transverse dimensions of the dot are then increased in turn, to obtain current densities respectively from quantum wire and quantum well with infinite potential energy barriers. To find out field emission from finite barrier structures, the above analysis is followed with a correction in the energy eigen values. In course, variations of field emission current density with strength of the applied electric field and structure dimensions are computed considering n-GaAs and n-GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As as the semiconductor materials. In each case, the current density is found to increase exponentially with the applied field, while it oscillates with structure dimensions. The magnitude of the emission current is less when the image force is not considered, but retains the similar field dependence. In all cases, the field emission from infinite barrier structures exceeds those from respective finite barrier ones.

  17. General renormalized statistical approach with finite cross-field correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakulenko, M.O.

    1992-01-01

    The renormalized statistical approach is proposed, accounting for finite correlations of potential and magnetic fluctuations. It may be used for analysis of a wide class of nonlinear model equations describing the cross-correlated plasma states. The influence of a cross spectrum on stationary potential and magnetic ones is investigated. 10 refs. (author)

  18. Nuclear collective states at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milian, A.; Barranco, M.; Mas, D.; Lombard, R.J.

    1987-04-01

    The Energy Density Method (EDM) has been used to study low-lying nuclear collective states as well as isoscalar giant resonances at finite temperature (T). Giant states have been studied by computing the corresponding strength function moments (sum rules) in the Random-Phase Approximation (RPA). For the description of the low lying states we have resorted to a variety of models from the rather sophisticated RPA method to liquid drop and schematic models. It has been found that low lying states are most affected by thermal effects, giant resonances being little affected in the range of temperatures here studied

  19. Finiteness of quantum field theories and supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucha, W.; Neufeld, H.

    1986-01-01

    We study the consequences of finiteness for a general renormalizable quantum field theory by analysing the finiteness conditions resulting from the requirement of absence of divergent contributions to the renormalizations of the parameters of an arbitrary gauge theory. In all cases considered, the well-known two-loop finite supersymmetric theories prove to be the unique solution of the finiteness criterion. (Author)

  20. Towards finite density QCD with Taylor expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsch, F.; Schaefer, B.-J.; Wagner, M.; Wambach, J.

    2011-01-01

    Convergence properties of Taylor expansions of observables, which are also used in lattice QCD calculations at non-zero chemical potential, are analyzed in an effective N f =2+1 flavor Polyakov quark-meson model. A recently developed algorithmic technique allows the calculation of higher-order Taylor expansion coefficients in functional approaches. This novel technique is for the first time applied to an effective N f =2+1 flavor Polyakov quark-meson model and the findings are compared with the full model solution at finite densities. The results are used to discuss prospects for locating the QCD phase boundary and a possible critical endpoint in the phase diagram.

  1. Quantum fields at finite temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaizot, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    These lectures are an elementary introduction to standard many-body techniques applied to the study of quantum fields at finite temperature and density: perturbative expansion, linear response theory, quasiparticles and their interactions, etc... We emphasize the usefulness of the imaginary time formalism in a wide class of problems, as opposed to many recent approaches based on real time. Properties of elementary excitations in an ultrarelativistic plasma at high temperature or chemical potential are discussed, and recent progresses in the study of the quark-gluon plasma are briefly reviewed

  2. Toward finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajpoot, S.; Taylor, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The properties that make the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory free from ultraviolet divergences are (i) a universal coupling for gauge and matter interactions, (ii) anomaly-free representations, (iii) no charge renormalization, and (iv) if masses are explicitly introduced into the theory, then these are required to satisfy the mass-squared supertrace sum rule Σsub(s=0.1/2)(-1)sup(2s+1)(2s+1)M 2 sub(s)=O. Finite N=2 theories are found to satisfy the above criteria. The missing member in this class of field theories are finite field theories consisting of N=1 superfields. These theories are discussed in the light of the above finiteness properties. In particular, the representations of all simple classical groups satisfying the anomaly-free and no-charge renormalization conditions for finite N=1 field theories are discussed. A consequence of these restrictions on the allowed representations is that an N=1 finite SU(5)-based model of strong and electroweak interactions can contain at most five conventional families of quarks and leptons, a constraint almost compatible with the one deduced from cosmological arguments. (author)

  3. On characters of finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Broué, Michel

    2017-01-01

    This book explores the classical and beautiful character theory of finite groups. It does it by using some rudiments of the language of categories. Originally emerging from two courses offered at Peking University (PKU), primarily for third-year students, it is now better suited for graduate courses, and provides broader coverage than books that focus almost exclusively on groups. The book presents the basic tools, notions and theorems of character theory (including a new treatment of the control of fusion and isometries), and introduces readers to the categorical language at several levels. It includes and proves the major results on characteristic zero representations without any assumptions about the base field. The book includes a dedicated chapter on graded representations and applications of polynomial invariants of finite groups, and its closing chapter addresses the more recent notion of the Drinfeld double of a finite group and the corresponding representation of GL_2(Z).

  4. Finite and profinite quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vourdas, Apostolos

    2017-01-01

    This monograph provides an introduction to finite quantum systems, a field at the interface between quantum information and number theory, with applications in quantum computation and condensed matter physics. The first major part of this monograph studies the so-called `qubits' and `qudits', systems with periodic finite lattice as position space. It also discusses the so-called mutually unbiased bases, which have applications in quantum information and quantum cryptography. Quantum logic and its applications to quantum gates is also studied. The second part studies finite quantum systems, where the position takes values in a Galois field. This combines quantum mechanics with Galois theory. The third part extends the discussion to quantum systems with variables in profinite groups, considering the limit where the dimension of the system becomes very large. It uses the concepts of inverse and direct limit and studies quantum mechanics on p-adic numbers. Applications of the formalism include quantum optics and ...

  5. Complex finite element sensitivity method for creep analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Farias, Armando; Montoya, Arturo; Millwater, Harry

    2015-01-01

    The complex finite element method (ZFEM) has been extended to perform sensitivity analysis for mechanical and structural systems undergoing creep deformation. ZFEM uses a complex finite element formulation to provide shape, material, and loading derivatives of the system response, providing an insight into the essential factors which control the behavior of the system as a function of time. A complex variable-based quadrilateral user element (UEL) subroutine implementing the power law creep constitutive formulation was incorporated within the Abaqus commercial finite element software. The results of the complex finite element computations were verified by comparing them to the reference solution for the steady-state creep problem of a thick-walled cylinder in the power law creep range. A practical application of the ZFEM implementation to creep deformation analysis is the calculation of the skeletal point of a notched bar test from a single ZFEM run. In contrast, the standard finite element procedure requires multiple runs. The value of the skeletal point is that it identifies the location where the stress state is accurate, regardless of the certainty of the creep material properties. - Highlights: • A novel finite element sensitivity method (ZFEM) for creep was introduced. • ZFEM has the capability to calculate accurate partial derivatives. • ZFEM can be used for identification of the skeletal point of creep structures. • ZFEM can be easily implemented in a commercial software, e.g. Abaqus. • ZFEM results were shown to be in excellent agreement with analytical solutions

  6. Finite element analysis of a finite-strain plasticity problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crose, J.G.; Fong, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    A finite-strain plasticity analysis was performed of an engraving process in a plastic rotating band during the firing of a gun projectile. The aim was to verify a nonlinear feature of the NIFDI/RB code: plastic large deformation analysis of nearly incompressible materials using a deformation theory of plasticity approach and a total Lagrangian scheme. (orig.)

  7. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PECINGINA OLIMPIA-MIOARA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The application of finite element method is analytical when solutions can not be applied for deeper study analyzes static, dynamic or other types of requirements in different points of the structures .In practice it is necessary to know the behavior of the structure or certain parts components of the machine under the influence of certain factors static and dynamic . The application of finite element in the optimization of components leads to economic growth , to increase reliability and durability organs studied, thus the machine itself.

  8. Variational collocation on finite intervals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amore, Paolo; Cervantes, Mayra; Fernandez, Francisco M

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we study a set of functions, defined on an interval of finite width, which are orthogonal and which reduce to the sinc functions when the appropriate limit is taken. We show that these functions can be used within a variational approach to obtain accurate results for a variety of problems. We have applied them to the interpolation of functions on finite domains and to the solution of the Schroedinger equation, and we have compared the performance of the present approach with others

  9. Finite elements of nonlinear continua

    CERN Document Server

    Oden, John Tinsley

    1972-01-01

    Geared toward undergraduate and graduate students, this text extends applications of the finite element method from linear problems in elastic structures to a broad class of practical, nonlinear problems in continuum mechanics. It treats both theory and applications from a general and unifying point of view.The text reviews the thermomechanical principles of continuous media and the properties of the finite element method, and then brings them together to produce discrete physical models of nonlinear continua. The mathematical properties of these models are analyzed, along with the numerical s

  10. Finite connectivity attractor neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wemmenhove, B; Coolen, A C C

    2003-01-01

    We study a family of diluted attractor neural networks with a finite average number of (symmetric) connections per neuron. As in finite connectivity spin glasses, their equilibrium properties are described by order parameter functions, for which we derive an integral equation in replica symmetric approximation. A bifurcation analysis of this equation reveals the locations of the paramagnetic to recall and paramagnetic to spin-glass transition lines in the phase diagram. The line separating the retrieval phase from the spin-glass phase is calculated at zero temperature. All phase transitions are found to be continuous

  11. Analytic Morse/long-range potential energy surfaces and "adiabatic-hindered-rotor" treatment for a symmetric top-linear molecule dimer: A case study of CH3F-H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Long; Ma, Yong-Tao; Zhai, Yu; Li, Hui

    2018-03-01

    A first effective six-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for CH3F-H2 which explicitly includes the intramolecular Q3 stretching normal mode of the CH3F monomer is presented. The electronic structure computations have been carried out at the explicitly correlated coupled cluster level of theory [CCSD(T)-F12a] with an augmented correlation-consistent triple zeta basis set. Five-dimensional analytical intermolecular PESs for ν3(CH3F) = 0 and 1 are then obtained by fitting the vibrationally averaged potentials to the Morse/Long-Range (MLR) potential function form. The MLR function form is applied to the nonlinear molecule-linear molecule case for the first time. These fits to 25 015 points have root-mean-square deviations of 0.74 cm-1 and 0.082 cm-1 for interaction energies less than 0.0 cm-1. Using the adiabatic hindered-rotor approximation, three-dimensional PESs for CH3F-paraH2 are generated from the 5D PESs over all possible orientations of the hydrogen monomer. The infrared and microwave spectra for CH3F-paraH2 dimer are predicted for the first time. These analytic PESs can be used for modeling the dynamical behavior in CH3F-(H2)N clusters, including the possible appearance of microscopic superfluidity.

  12. A legacy of low-impact logging does not elevate prevalence of potentially pathogenic protozoa in free-ranging gorillas and chimpanzees in the Republic of Congo: logging and parasitism in African apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Thomas R; Morgan, David; Deutsch, J Charlie; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Salzer, Johanna S; Cameron, Kenneth; Reed, Trish; Sanz, Crickette

    2009-12-01

    Many studies have examined the long-term effects of selective logging on the abundance and diversity of free-ranging primates. Logging is known to reduce the abundance of some primate species through associated hunting and the loss of food trees for frugivores; however, the potential role of pathogens in such primate population declines is largely unexplored. Selective logging results in a suite of alterations in host ecology and forest structure that may alter pathogen dynamics in resident wildlife populations. In addition, environmental pollution with human fecal material may present a risk for wildlife infections with zoonotic protozoa, such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia. To better understand this interplay, we compared patterns of infection with these potentially pathogenic protozoa in sympatric western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) in the undisturbed Goualougo Triangle of Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park and the adjacent previously logged Kabo Concession in northern Republic of Congo. No Cryptosporidium infections were detected in any of the apes examined and prevalence of infection with Giardia was low (3.73% overall) and did not differ between logged and undisturbed forest for chimpanzees or gorillas. These results provide a baseline for prevalence of these protozoa in forest-dwelling African apes and suggest that low-intensity logging may not result in long-term elevated prevalence of potentially pathogenic protozoa.

  13. Neutron and proton optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.F.

    1985-11-01

    The neutron and proton optical model potentials (OMP) are discussed in terms of microscopic (MOMP) and phenomenological (POMP) models. For the MOMP, two approaches are discussed, the nucleus matter approach [Jeukenne-Lejeune-Mahaux (JLM) and Brieva-Rook-von Geramb (BRVG), potentials] and the finite nuclei approach (Osterfeld and Madsen). For the POMP, the Lane charge-exchange potential and its validity over a wide mass range is reviewed. In addition to the Lane symmetry term, the Coulomb correction to both the real and imaginary parts of the OMP is discussed for the above models. The use of the OMP to calculate collective inelastic scattering and observed differences between the neutron- and proton-deformation parameters is also illustrated. 25 refs., 3 figs

  14. On the spectral properties of random finite difference operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, H.; Souillard, B.

    1980-01-01

    We study a class of random finite difference operators, a typical example of which is the finite difference Schroedinger operator with a random potential which arises in solid state physics in the tight binding approximation. We obtain with probability one, in various situations, the exact location of the spectrum, and criterions for a given part in the spectrum to be pure point or purely continuous, or for the static electric conductivity to vanish. A general formalism is developped which transforms the study of these random operators into that of the asymptotics of a multiple integral constructed from a given recipe. Finally we apply our criterions and formalism to prove that, with probability one, the one-dimensional finite difference Schroedinger operator with a random potential has pure point spectrum and developps no static conductivity. (orig.)

  15. Analytical and finite element modeling of grounding systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luz, Mauricio Valencia Ferreira da [University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)], E-mail: mauricio@grucad.ufsc.br; Dular, Patrick [University of Liege (Belgium). Institut Montefiore], E-mail: Patrick.Dular@ulg.ac.be

    2007-07-01

    Grounding is the art of making an electrical connection to the earth. This paper deals with the analytical and finite element modeling of grounding systems. An electrokinetic formulation using a scalar potential can benefit from floating potentials to define global quantities such as electric voltages and currents. The application concerns a single vertical grounding with one, two and three-layer soil, where the superior extremity stays in the surface of the soil. This problem has been modeled using a 2D axi-symmetric electrokinetic formulation. The grounding resistance obtained by finite element method is compared with the analytical one for one-layer soil. With the results of this paper it is possible to show that finite element method is a powerful tool in the analysis of the grounding systems in low frequencies. (author)

  16. Differential equations and finite groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Put, Marius van der; Ulmer, Felix

    2000-01-01

    The classical solution of the Riemann-Hilbert problem attaches to a given representation of the fundamental group a regular singular linear differential equation. We present a method to compute this differential equation in the case of a representation with finite image. The approach uses Galois

  17. Symmetric relations of finite negativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaltenbaeck, M.; Winkler, H.; Woracek, H.; Forster, KH; Jonas, P; Langer, H

    2006-01-01

    We construct and investigate a space which is related to a symmetric linear relation S of finite negativity on an almost Pontryagin space. This space is the indefinite generalization of the completion of dom S with respect to (S.,.) for a strictly positive S on a Hilbert space.

  18. Finite subgroups of SU(3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovier, A.; Lueling, M.; Wyler, D.

    1980-12-01

    We present a new class of finite subgroups of SU(3) of the form Zsub(m) s zsub(n) (semidirect product). We also apply the methods used to investigate semidirect products to the known SU(3) subgroups Δ(3n 2 ) and Δ(6n 2 ) and give analytic formulae for representations (characters) and Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. (orig.)

  19. On symmetric pyramidal finite elements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liu, L.; Davies, K. B.; Yuan, K.; Křížek, Michal

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 11, 1-2 (2004), s. 213-227 ISSN 1492-8760 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1019201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : mesh generation * finite element method * composite elements Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.108, year: 2004

  20. Finite length Taylor Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streett, C. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Axisymmetric numerical solutions of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for flow between concentric rotating cylinders of finite length are obtained by a spectral collocation method. These representative results pertain to two-cell/one-cell exchange process, and are compared with recent experiments.

  1. Finite-temperature confinement transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svetitsky, B.

    1984-01-01

    The formalism of lattice gauge theory at finite temperature is introduced. The framework of universality predictions for critical behavior is outlined, and recent analytic work in this direction is reviewed. New Monte Carlo information for the SU(4) theory are represented, and possible results of the inclusion of fermions in the SU(3) theory are listed

  2. Ward identities at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOlivo, J.C.; Torres, M.; Tututi, E.

    1996-01-01

    The Ward identities for QED at finite temperature are derived using the functional real-time formalism. They are verified by an explicit one-loop calculation. An effective causal vertex is constructed which satisfy the Ward identity with the associated retarded self-energy. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  3. On the completeness of the natural modes for quantum mechanical potential scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenders, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    The set of natural modes, associated with quantum mechanical scattering from a central potential of finite-range is shown to be complete. The natural modes satisfy a non-Hermitian homogeneous integral equation, or alternatively, are solutions of the time independent Schrödinger equation subject to a

  4. A new DFT approach to model small polarons in oxides with proper account for long-range polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokott, Sebastian; Levchenko, Sergey V.; Scheffler, Matthias; Theory Department Team

    In this work, we address two important challenges in the DFT description of small polarons (excess charges localized within one unit cell): sensitivity to the errors in exchange-correlation (XC) treatment and finite-size effects in supercell calculations. The polaron properties are obtained using a modified neutral potential-energy surface (PES). Using the hybrid HSE functional and considering the whole range 0 Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft).

  5. Finite density lattice gauge theories with positive fermion determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, D.K.; Kogut, J.B.; Toublan, D.

    2004-01-01

    We perform simulations of (3-colour) QCD with 2 quark flavours at a finite chemical potential μ I for isospin (I 3 ), and of 2-colour QCD at a finite chemical potential μ for quark number. At zero temperature, QCD at finite μ I has a mean-field phase transition at μ I = m π to a superfluid state with a charged pion condensate which spontaneously breaks I 3 . We study the finite temperature transition as a function of μ I . For μ I π , where this is closely related to the transition at finite μ, this appears to be a crossover independent of quark mass, with no sign of the proposed critical endpoint. For μ I > m π this becomes a true phase transition where the pion condensate evaporates. For μ I just above m π the transition seems to be second order, while for larger μ I it appears to become first order. At zero temperature, 2-colour QCD also possesses a superfluid state with a diquark condensate. We study its spectrum of Goldstone and pseudo-Goldstone bosons associated with chiral and quark-number symmetry breaking. (author)

  6. Temperature-dependent optical potential and mean free path based on Skyrme interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Lingxiao; Zhuo Yizhong; Noerenberg, W.; Technische Hochschule Darmstadt

    1986-03-01

    Optical potentials and mean free paths of nucleons at finite temperatures are studied by utilizing effective Skyrme interactions which yield 'good' optical potentials at zero temperature. The results for nuclear matter (symmetric and asymmetric) are applied within the local density approximation of finite nuclei at various temperatures. Because of the limitation due to zero-range forces used and the assumptions of temperature independent nuclear densities and effective Skyrme interactions made, the calculations are expected to be limited to nucleon energies between 10 and 50 MeV above the Fermi energy and to nuclear temperatures of less than 8 MeV. (orig.)

  7. Introduction to finite temperature and finite density QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2014-01-01

    It has been pointed out that QCD (Quantum Chromodynamics) in the circumstances of medium at finite temperature and density shows numbers of phenomena similar to the characteristics of solid state physics, e.g. phase transitions. In the past ten years, the very high temperature and density matter came to be observed experimentally at the heavy ion collisions. At the same time, the numerical QCD analysis at finite temperature and density attained quantitative level analysis possible owing to the remarkable progress of computers. In this summer school lecture, it has been set out to give not only the recent results, but also the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry, the fundamental theory of finite temperature and further expositions as in the following four sections. The first section is titled as 'Introduction to Finite Temperature and Density QCD' with subsections of 1.1 standard model and QCD, 1.2 phase transition and phase structure of QCD, 1.3 lattice QCD and thermodynamic quantity, 1.4 heavy ion collision experiments, and 1.5 neutron stars. The second one is 'Equilibrium State' with subsections of 2.1 chiral symmetry, 2.2 vacuum state: BCS theory, 2.3 NJL (Nambu-Jona-Lasinio) model, and 2.4 color superconductivity. The third one is 'Static fluctuations' with subsections of 3.1 fluctuations, 3.2 moment and cumulant, 3.3 increase of fluctuations at critical points, 3.4 analysis of fluctuations by lattice QCD and Taylor expansion, and 3.5 experimental exploration of QCD phase structure. The fourth one is 'Dynamical Structure' with 4.1 linear response theory, 4.2 spectral functions, 4.3 Matsubara function, and 4.4 analyses of dynamical structure by lattice QCD. (S. Funahashi)

  8. Noncommutative solitons: moduli spaces, quantization, finite θ effects and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadasz, Leszek; Rocek, Martin; Lindström, Ulf; von Unge, Rikard

    2001-06-01

    We find the N-soliton solution at infinite θ, as well as the metric on the moduli space corresponding to spatial displacements of the solitons. We use a perturbative expansion to incorporate the leading θ-1 corrections, and find an effective short range attraction between solitons. We study the stability of various solutions. We discuss the finite θ corrections to scattering, and find metastable orbits. Upon quantization of the two-soliton moduli space, for any finite θ, we find an s-wave bound state.

  9. Experimental validation of finite element analysis of human vertebral collapse under large compressive strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Hadi S; Clouthier, Allison L; Zysset, Philippe K

    2014-04-01

    Osteoporosis-related vertebral fractures represent a major health problem in elderly populations. Such fractures can often only be diagnosed after a substantial deformation history of the vertebral body. Therefore, it remains a challenge for clinicians to distinguish between stable and progressive potentially harmful fractures. Accordingly, novel criteria for selection of the appropriate conservative or surgical treatment are urgently needed. Computer tomography-based finite element analysis is an increasingly accepted method to predict the quasi-static vertebral strength and to follow up this small strain property longitudinally in time. A recent development in constitutive modeling allows us to simulate strain localization and densification in trabecular bone under large compressive strains without mesh dependence. The aim of this work was to validate this recently developed constitutive model of trabecular bone for the prediction of strain localization and densification in the human vertebral body subjected to large compressive deformation. A custom-made stepwise loading device mounted in a high resolution peripheral computer tomography system was used to describe the progressive collapse of 13 human vertebrae under axial compression. Continuum finite element analyses of the 13 compression tests were realized and the zones of high volumetric strain were compared with the experiments. A fair qualitative correspondence of the strain localization zone between the experiment and finite element analysis was achieved in 9 out of 13 tests and significant correlations of the volumetric strains were obtained throughout the range of applied axial compression. Interestingly, the stepwise propagating localization zones in trabecular bone converged to the buckling locations in the cortical shell. While the adopted continuum finite element approach still suffers from several limitations, these encouraging preliminary results towards the prediction of extended vertebral

  10. A mixed finite element method for particle simulation in lasertron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Meur, G.

    1987-03-01

    A particle simulation code is being developed with the aim to treat the motion of charged particles in electromagnetic devices, such as Lasertron. The paper describes the use of mixed finite element methods in computing the field components, without derivating them from scalar or vector potentials. Graphical results are shown

  11. A mixed finite element method for particle simulation in Lasertron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Meur, G.

    1987-01-01

    A particle simulation code is being developed with the aim to treat the motion of charged particles in electromagnetic devices, such as Lasertron. The paper describes the use of mixed finite element methods in computing the field components, without derivating them from scalar or vector potentials. Graphical results are shown

  12. Finite element investigation of the prestressed jointed concrete ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Precast prestressed concrete pavement (PCP) technology is of recent origin, and the information on PCP performance is not available in literature. This research presents a finite-element analysis of the potential benefits of prestressing on the jointed concrete pavements (JCP). With using a 3-dimensional (3D) ...

  13. FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR PREDICTING RESIDUAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR PREDICTING RESIDUAL STRESSES IN ... the transverse residual stress in the x-direction (σx) had a maximum value of 375MPa ... the finite element method are in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Finite elements methods in mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Eslami, M Reza

    2014-01-01

    This book covers all basic areas of mechanical engineering, such as fluid mechanics, heat conduction, beams, and elasticity with detailed derivations for the mass, stiffness, and force matrices. It is especially designed to give physical feeling to the reader for finite element approximation by the introduction of finite elements to the elevation of elastic membrane. A detailed treatment of computer methods with numerical examples are provided. In the fluid mechanics chapter, the conventional and vorticity transport formulations for viscous incompressible fluid flow with discussion on the method of solution are presented. The variational and Galerkin formulations of the heat conduction, beams, and elasticity problems are also discussed in detail. Three computer codes are provided to solve the elastic membrane problem. One of them solves the Poisson’s equation. The second computer program handles the two dimensional elasticity problems, and the third one presents the three dimensional transient heat conducti...

  15. Structural modeling techniques by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yeong Jin; Kim, Geung Hwan; Ju, Gwan Jeong

    1991-01-01

    This book includes introduction table of contents chapter 1 finite element idealization introduction summary of the finite element method equilibrium and compatibility in the finite element solution degrees of freedom symmetry and anti symmetry modeling guidelines local analysis example references chapter 2 static analysis structural geometry finite element models analysis procedure modeling guidelines references chapter 3 dynamic analysis models for dynamic analysis dynamic analysis procedures modeling guidelines and modeling guidelines.

  16. $\\delta$-Expansion at Finite Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Rudnei O.

    1996-01-01

    We apply the $\\delta$-expansion perturbation scheme to the $\\lambda \\phi^{4}$ self-interacting scalar field theory in 3+1 D at finite temperature. In the $\\delta$-expansion the interaction term is written as $\\lambda (\\phi^{2})^{ 1 + \\delta}$ and $\\delta$ is considered as the perturbation parameter. We compute within this perturbative approach the renormalized mass at finite temperature at a finite order in $\\delta$. The results are compared with the usual loop-expansion at finite temperature.

  17. Radiative charge transfer in He{sup +}+ H{sub 2} collisions in the milli- to nano-electron-volt range: A theoretical study within state-to-state and optical potential approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrugala, Felicja [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, PL 87-100 Torun (Poland); Kraemer, Wolfgang P. [Max-Planck-Institute of Astrophysics, Postfach 1317, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

    2013-03-14

    The paper presents a theoretical study of the low-energy dynamics of the radiative charge transfer (RCT) reaction He{sup +}({sup 2}S)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}){yields}He({sup 1}S)+H{sub 2}{sup +}(X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +})+h{nu} extending our previous studies on radiative association of HeH{sub 2}{sup +} [F. Mrugala, V. Spirko, and W. P. Kraemer, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 10547 (2003); F. Mrugala and W. P. Kraemer, ibid. 122, 224321 (2005)]. The calculations account for the vibrational and rotational motions of the H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}{sup +} diatomics and for the atom-diatom complex formation in the reactant and the product channels of the RCT reaction. Continuum states of He{sup +}+ H{sub 2}(v= 0, j= 0) in the collision energy range {approx}10{sup -7}-18.6 meV and all quasi-bound states of the He{sup +}- H{sub 2}(para;v= 0) complex formed in this range are taken into account. Close-coupling calculations are performed to determine rates of radiative transitions from these states to the continuum and quasi-bound states of the He +H{sub 2}{sup +} system in the energy range extending up to {approx}0.16 eV above the opening of the HeH{sup +}+ H arrangement channel. From the detailed state-to-state calculated characteristics global functions of the RCT reaction, such as cross-section {sigma}(E), emission intensity I({nu}, T), and rate constant k(T) are derived, and are presented together with their counterparts for the radiative association (RA) reaction He{sup +}({sup 2}S) +H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}){yields} HeH{sub 2}{sup +}(X{sup 2}A{sup Prime })+h{nu}. The rate constant k{sup RCT} is approximately 20 times larger than k{sup RA} at the considered temperatures, 0.1 {mu}K-50 K. Formation of rotational Feshbach resonances in the reactant channel plays an important role in both reactions. Transitions mediated by these resonances contribute more than 70% to the respective rates. An extension of the one-dimensional optical potential model is

  18. Finite temperature instability for compactification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accetta, F.S.; Kolb, E.W.

    1986-03-01

    We consider finite temperature effects upon theories with extra dimensions compactified via vacuum stress energy (Casimir) effects. For sufficiently high temperature, a static configuration for the internal space is impossible. At somewhat lower temperatures, there is an instability due to thermal fluctuations of radius of the compact dimensions. For both cases, the Universe can evolve to a de Sitter-like expansion of all dimensions. Stability to late times constrains the initial entropy of the universe. 28 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  19. Quantum Chromodynamic at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, N.S.

    1987-01-01

    A formal expression to the Gibbs free energy of topological defects of quantum chromodynamics (QCD)by using the semiclassical approach in the context of field theory at finite temperature and in the high temperature limit is determined. This expression is used to calculate the free energy of magnetic monopoles. Applying the obtained results to a method in which the free energy of topological defects of a theory may indicate its different phases, its searched for informations about phases of QCD. (author) [pt

  20. Perturbative QCD at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altherr, T.

    1989-03-01

    We discuss an application of finite temperature QCD to lepton-pair production in a quark-gluon plasma. The perturbative calculation is performed within the realtime formalism. After cancellation of infrared and mass singularities, the corrections at O (α s ) are found to be very small in the region where the mass of the Drell-Yan pair is much larger than the temperature of the plasma. Interesting effects, however, appear at the annihilation threshold of the thermalized quarks

  1. Matlab and C programming for Trefftz finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Qing-Hua

    2008-01-01

    Although the Trefftz finite element method (FEM) has become a powerful computational tool in the analysis of plane elasticity, thin and thick plate bending, Poisson's equation, heat conduction, and piezoelectric materials, there are few books that offer a comprehensive computer programming treatment of the subject. Collecting results scattered in the literature, MATLAB® and C Programming for Trefftz Finite Element Methods provides the detailed MATLAB® and C programming processes in applications of the Trefftz FEM to potential and elastic problems. The book begins with an introduction to th

  2. Finite-density transition line for QCD with 695 MeV dynamical fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greensite, Jeff; Höllwieser, Roman

    2018-06-01

    We apply the relative weights method to SU(3) gauge theory with staggered fermions of mass 695 MeV at a set of temperatures in the range 151 ≤T ≤267 MeV , to obtain an effective Polyakov line action at each temperature. We then apply a mean field method to search for phase transitions in the effective theory at finite densities. The result is a transition line in the plane of temperature and chemical potential, with an end point at high temperature, as expected, but also a second end point at a lower temperature. We cannot rule out the possibilities that a transition line reappears at temperatures lower than the range investigated, or that the second end point is absent for light quarks.

  3. Finite Metric Spaces of Strictly negative Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    If a finite metric space is of strictly negative type then its transfinite diameter is uniquely realized by an infinite extent (“load vector''). Finite metric spaces that have this property include all trees, and all finite subspaces of Euclidean and Hyperbolic spaces. We prove that if the distance...

  4. Characterization of finite spaces having dispersion points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Bsoul, A. T

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we shall characterize the finite spaces having dispersion points. Also, we prove that the dispersion point of a finite space with a dispersion points fixed under all non constant continuous functions which answers the question raised by J. C obb and W. Voxman in 1980 affirmatively for finite space. Some open problems are given. (author). 16 refs

  5. Finite Unified Theories and the Higgs boson

    CERN Document Server

    Heinemeyer, Sven; Zoupanos, George

    2012-01-01

    All-loop Finite Unified Theories (FUTs) are very interesting N = 1 supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) realising an old field theory dream, and moreover have a remarkable predictive power due to the required reduction of couplings. Based on this theoretical framework phenomenologically consistent FUTs have been constructed. Here we review two FUT models based on the SU(5) gauge group, which can be seen as special, restricted and thus very predictive versions of the MSSM. We show that from the requirement of correct prediction of quark masses and other experimental constraints a light Higgs-boson mass in the range M_h ~ 121 - 126 GeV is predicted, in striking agreement with recent experimental results from ATLAS and CMS. The model furthermore naturally predicts a relatively heavy spectrum with colored supersymmetric particles above ~ 1.5 TeV in agreement with the non-observation of those particles at the LHC.

  6. Finite-amplitude, pulsed, ultrasonic beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulouvrat, François; Frøysa, Kjell-Eivind

    An analytical, approximate solution of the inviscid KZK equation for a nonlinear pulsed sound beam radiated by an acoustic source with a Gaussian velocity distribution, is obtained by means of the renormalization method. This method involves two steps. First, the transient, weakly nonlinear field is computed. However, because of cumulative nonlinear effects, that expansion is non-uniform and breaks down at some distance away from the source. So, in order to extend its validity, it is re-written in a new frame of co-ordinates, better suited to following the nonlinear distorsion of the wave profile. Basically, the nonlinear coordinate transform introduces additional terms in the expansion, which are chosen so as to counterbalance the non-uniform ones. Special care is devoted to the treatment of shock waves. Finally, comparisons with the results of a finite-difference scheme turn out favorable, and show the efficiency of the method for a rather large range of parameters.

  7. Flow Applications of the Least Squares Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1998-01-01

    The main thrust of the effort has been towards the development, analysis and implementation of the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) for fluid dynamics and electromagnetics applications. In the past year, there were four major accomplishments: 1) special treatments in computational fluid dynamics and computational electromagnetics, such as upwinding, numerical dissipation, staggered grid, non-equal order elements, operator splitting and preconditioning, edge elements, and vector potential are unnecessary; 2) the analysis of the LSFEM for most partial differential equations can be based on the bounded inverse theorem; 3) the finite difference and finite volume algorithms solve only two Maxwell equations and ignore the divergence equations; and 4) the first numerical simulation of three-dimensional Marangoni-Benard convection was performed using the LSFEM.

  8. Atom-surface potentials and atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babb, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Long-range atom-surface potentials characterize the physics of many actual systems and are now measurable spectroscopically in deflection of atomic beams in cavities or in reflection of atoms in atomic fountains. For a ground state, spherically symmetric atom the potential varies as -1/R 3 near the wall, where R is the atom-surface distance. For asymptotically large distances the potential is weaker and goes as -1/R 4 due to retardation arising from the finite speed of light. This diminished interaction can also be interpreted as a Casimir effect. The possibility of measuring atom-surface potentials using atomic interferometry is explored. The particular cases studied are the interactions of a ground-state alkali-metal atom and a dielectric or a conducting wall. Accurate descriptions of atom-surface potentials in theories of evanescent-wave atomic mirrors and evanescent wave-guided atoms are also discussed. (author)

  9. Deconstructing scalar QED at zero and finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, N.; Sakamoto, K.; Shiraishi, K.

    2003-01-01

    We calculate the effective potential for the WLPNGB in a world with a circular latticized extra dimension. The mass of the Wilson line pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson (WLPNGB) is calculated from the one-loop quantum effect of scalar fields at zero and finite temperature. We show that a series expansion by the modified Bessel functions is useful to calculate the one-loop effective potentials. (orig.)

  10. The finite body triangulation: algorithms, subgraphs, homogeneity estimation and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Cantwell G; Levine, Jonathan S

    2016-09-01

    The concept of a finite body Dirichlet tessellation has been extended to that of a finite body Delaunay 'triangulation' to provide a more meaningful description of the spatial distribution of nonspherical secondary phase bodies in 2- and 3-dimensional images. A finite body triangulation (FBT) consists of a network of minimum edge-to-edge distances between adjacent objects in a microstructure. From this is also obtained the characteristic object chords formed by the intersection of the object boundary with the finite body tessellation. These two sets of distances form the basis of a parsimonious homogeneity estimation. The characteristics of the spatial distribution are then evaluated with respect to the distances between objects and the distances within them. Quantitative analysis shows that more physically representative distributions can be obtained by selecting subgraphs, such as the relative neighbourhood graph and the minimum spanning tree, from the finite body tessellation. To demonstrate their potential, we apply these methods to 3-dimensional X-ray computed tomographic images of foamed cement and their 2-dimensional cross sections. The Python computer code used to estimate the FBT is made available. Other applications for the algorithm - such as porous media transport and crack-tip propagation - are also discussed. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Spatial bandwidth enlargement and field enhancement of shear horizontal waves in finite graded piezoelectric layered media

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-01-01

    structure and transmission in this paper show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. Harmonic wave simulation by finite element method (FEM) confirms that the reason of bandwidth enlargement is that waves within the band gap ranges

  12. Short-range correlations in quark and nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froemel, Frank

    2007-06-15

    In the first part of this thesis, the role of short-range correlations in quark matter is explored within the framework of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. Starting from a next-to-leading order expansion in the inverse number of the quark colors, a fully self-consistent model constructed that employs the close relations between spectral functions and self-energies. In contrast to the usual quasiparticle approximations, this approach allows the investigation of the collisional broadening of the quark spectral function. Numerical calculations at various chemical potentials and zero temperature show that the short-range correlations do not only induce a finite width of the spectral function but also have some influence on the structure of the chiral phase transition. In the second part of this thesis, the temperature and density dependence of the nucleon spectral function in symmetric nuclear matter is investigated. The short-range correlations can be well described by a simple, self-consistent model on the one-particle-two-hole and two-particle-one-hole level (1p2h, 2p1h). The thermodynamically consistent description of the mean-field properties of the nucleons is ensured by incorporating a Skyrme-type potential. Calculations at temperatures and densities that can also be found in heavy-ion collisions or supernova explosions and the formation of neutron stars show that the correlations saturate at high temperatures and densities. (orig.)

  13. Nonequilibrum behaviour of finite gravitating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heggie, Douglas C

    2006-01-01

    The behaviour of N equal point masses with an inverse square law of attraction is one of the fundamental problems of statistical physics, because of its numerous applications in astrophysics, and its simplicity. But the simplicity is deceptive. From a theoretical point of view this problem is one of the hardest because it is scale-free, the interaction is long-range, and the interaction exhibits a short-range divergence. Therefore theoretical information is best developed for systems with artificial cutoffs at large and small distances. From the point of view of simulations, the problem is hard because the computational effort grows roughly as N 3 , and because of fundamental problems in simulating a chaotic system. This talk reviews the relationship between these two approaches, with particular emphasis on simulations of isolated systems (i.e. with no boundary). We emphasise the range of time scales on which different non-equilibrium phenomena operate, and focus on those which are driven by relaxation. We discuss the characteristics of core collapse and gravothermal oscillations, where both basic results of statistical mechanics and phenomenological toy models are particularly instructive. We also review the long-term fate of finite isolated systems

  14. Calculation of projected ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biersack, J.P.

    1980-09-01

    The concept of multiple scattering is reconsidered for obtaining the directional spreading of ion motion as a function of energy loss. From this the mean projection of each pathlength element of the ion trajectory is derived which - upon summation or integration - leads to the desired mean projected range. In special cases, the calculation can be carried out analytically, otherwise a simple general algorithm is derived which is suitable even for the smallest programmable calculators. Necessary input for the present treatment consists only of generally accessable stopping power and straggling formulas. The procedure does not rely on scattering cross sections, e.g. power potential or f(t 1 sup(/) 2 ) approximations. The present approach lends itself easily to include electronic straggling or to treat composed target materials, or even to account for the so-called time integral. (orig.)

  15. Functionals of finite Riemann surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Schiffer, Menahem

    1954-01-01

    This advanced monograph on finite Riemann surfaces, based on the authors' 1949-50 lectures at Princeton University, remains a fundamental book for graduate students. The Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society hailed the self-contained treatment as the source of ""a plethora of ideas, each interesting in its own right,"" noting that ""the patient reader will be richly rewarded."" Suitable for graduate-level courses, the text begins with three chapters that offer a development of the classical theory along historical lines, examining geometrical and physical considerations, existence theo

  16. Remarks on finite W algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbarin, F.; Sorba, P.; Ragoucy, E.

    1996-01-01

    The property of some finite W algebras to be the commutant of a particular subalgebra of a simple Lie algebra G is used to construct realizations of G. When G ≅ so (4,2), unitary representations of the conformal and Poincare algebras are recognized in this approach, which can be compared to the usual induced representation technique. When G approx=(2, R), the anyonic parameter can be seen as the eigenvalue of a W generator in such W representations of G. The generalization of such properties to the affine case is also discussed in the conclusion, where an alternative of the Wakimoto construction for sl(2) k is briefly presented. (authors)

  17. Finite temperature approach to confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gave, E.; Jengo, R.; Omero, C.

    1980-06-01

    The finite temperature treatment of gauge theories, formulated in terms of a gauge invariant variable as in a Polyakov method, is used as a device for obtaining an effective theory where the confinement test takes the form of a correlation function. The formalism is discussed for the abelian CPsup(n-1) model in various dimensionalities and for the pure Yang-Mills theory in the limit of zero temperature. In the latter case a class of vortex like configurations of the effective theory which induce confinement correspond in particular to the instanton solutions. (author)

  18. Linear and Nonlinear Finite Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    Metzler. Con/ ugte rapdent solution of a finite element elastic problem with high Poson rato without scaling and once with the global stiffness matrix K...nonzero c, that makes u(0) = 1. According to the linear, small deflection theory of the membrane the central displacement given to the membrane is not... theory is possible based on the approximations (l-y 2 )t = +y’ 2 +y𔃾 , (1-y𔃼)’ 1-y’ 2 - y" (6) that change eq. (5) to V𔃺) = , [yŖ(1 + y") - Qy𔃼

  19. Covariant gauges at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Landshoff, Peter V

    1992-01-01

    A prescription is presented for real-time finite-temperature perturbation theory in covariant gauges, in which only the two physical degrees of freedom of the gauge-field propagator acquire thermal parts. The propagators for the unphysical degrees of freedom of the gauge field, and for the Faddeev-Popov ghost field, are independent of temperature. This prescription is applied to the calculation of the one-loop gluon self-energy and the two-loop interaction pressure, and is found to be simpler to use than the conventional one.

  20. Analytic behavior of the QED polarizability function at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, A.; Perez, A.

    2012-01-01

    We revisit the analytical properties of the static quasi-photon polarizability function for an electron gas at finite temperature, in connection with the existence of Friedel oscillations in the potential created by an impurity. In contrast with the zero temperature case, where the polarizability is an analytical function, except for the two branch cuts which are responsible for Friedel oscillations, at finite temperature the corresponding function is non analytical, in spite of becoming continuous everywhere on the complex plane. This effect produces, as a result, the survival of the oscillatory behavior of the potential. We calculate the potential at large distances, and relate the calculation to the non-analytical properties of the polarizability.

  1. Level-density parameter of nuclei at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, C.; Kuo, T.T.S.; Stout, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    The contribution of particle-particle (hole-hole) and of particle-hole ring diagrams to the nuclear level-density parameter at finite temperature is calculated. We first derive the correlated grand potential with the above ring diagrams included to all orders by way of a finite temperature RPA equation. An expression for the correlated level-density parameter is then obtained by differentiating the grand potential. Results obtained for the 40 Ca nucleus with realistic matrix elements derived from the Paris potential are presented. The contribution of the RPA correlations is found to be important, being significantly larger than typical Hartree-Fock results. The temperature dependence of the level-density parameter derived in the present work is generally similar to that obtained in a schematic model. Comparison with available experimental data is discussed. (orig.)

  2. Solving optimisation problems in metal forming using Finite Element simulation and metamodelling techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonte, M.H.A.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Huetink, Han

    2005-01-01

    During the last decades, Finite Element (FEM) simulations of metal forming processes have become important tools for designing feasible production processes. In more recent years, several authors recognised the potential of coupling FEM simulations to mathematical optimisation algorithms to design

  3. A (Dis)continuous finite element model for generalized 2D vorticity dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernsen, E.; Bokhove, Onno; van der Vegt, Jacobus J.W.

    2005-01-01

    A mixed continuous and discontinuous Galerkin finite element discretization is constructed for a generalized vorticity streamfunction formulation in two spatial dimensions. This formulation consists of a hyperbolic (potential) vorticity equation and a linear elliptic equation for a (transport)

  4. Multi-flavor massless QED{sub 2} at finite densities via Lefschetz thimbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanizaki, Yuya [RIKEN BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory,Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Tachibana, Motoi [Department of Physics, Saga University,Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    We consider multi-flavor massless (1+1)-dimensional QED with chemical potentials at finite spatial length and the zero-temperature limit. Its sign problem is solved using the mean-field calculation with complex saddle points.

  5. Biset functors for finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Bouc, Serge

    2010-01-01

    This volume exposes the theory of biset functors for finite groups, which yields a unified framework for operations of induction, restriction, inflation, deflation and transport by isomorphism. The first part recalls the basics on biset categories and biset functors. The second part is concerned with the Burnside functor and the functor of complex characters, together with semisimplicity issues and an overview of Green biset functors. The last part is devoted to biset functors defined over p-groups for a fixed prime number p. This includes the structure of the functor of rational representations and rational p-biset functors. The last two chapters expose three applications of biset functors to long-standing open problems, in particular the structure of the Dade group of an arbitrary finite p-group.This book is intended both to students and researchers, as it gives a didactic exposition of the basics and a rewriting of advanced results in the area, with some new ideas and proofs.

  6. Supersymmetry breaking at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratzert, K.

    2002-11-01

    The mechanism of supersymmetry breaking at finite temperature is still only partly understood. Though it has been proven that temperature always breaks supersymmetry, the spontaneous nature of this breaking remains unclear, in particular the role of the Goldstone fermion. The aim of this work is to unify two existing approaches to the subject. From a hydrodynamic point of view, it has been argued under very general assumptions that in any supersymmetric quantum field theory at finite temperature there should exist a massless fermionic collective excitation, named phonino because of the analogy to the phonon. In the framework of a self-consistent resummed perturbation theory, it is shown for the example of the Wess-Zumino model that this mode fits very well into the quantum field theoretical framework pursued by earlier works. Interpreted as a bound state of boson and fermion, it contributes to the supersymmetric Ward-Takahashi identities in a way showing that supersymmetry is indeed broken spontaneously with the phonino playing the role of the Goldstone fermion. The second part of the work addresses the case of supersymmetric quantum electrodynamics. It is shown that also here the phonino exists and must be interpreted as the Goldstone mode. This knowledge allows a generalization to a wider class of models. (orig.)

  7. Finite groups and quantum physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornyak, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    Concepts of quantum theory are considered from the constructive “finite” point of view. The introduction of a continuum or other actual infinities in physics destroys constructiveness without any need for them in describing empirical observations. It is shown that quantum behavior is a natural consequence of symmetries of dynamical systems. The underlying reason is that it is impossible in principle to trace the identity of indistinguishable objects in their evolution—only information about invariant statements and values concerning such objects is available. General mathematical arguments indicate that any quantum dynamics is reducible to a sequence of permutations. Quantum phenomena, such as interference, arise in invariant subspaces of permutation representations of the symmetry group of a dynamical system. Observable quantities can be expressed in terms of permutation invariants. It is shown that nonconstructive number systems, such as complex numbers, are not needed for describing quantum phenomena. It is sufficient to employ cyclotomic numbers—a minimal extension of natural numbers that is appropriate for quantum mechanics. The use of finite groups in physics, which underlies the present approach, has an additional motivation. Numerous experiments and observations in the particle physics suggest the importance of finite groups of relatively small orders in some fundamental processes. The origin of these groups is unclear within the currently accepted theories—in particular, within the Standard Model.

  8. Hadronic electroweak processes in a finite volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agadjanov, Andria

    2017-01-01

    In the present thesis, we study a number of hadronic electroweak processes in a finite volume. Our work is motivated by the ongoing and future lattice simulations of the strong interaction theory called quantum chromodynamics. According to the available computational resources, the numerical calculations are necessarily performed on lattices with a finite spatial extension. The first part of the thesis is based on the finite volume formalism which is a standard method to investigate the processes with the final state interactions, and in particular, the elastic hadron resonances, on the lattice. Throughout the work, we systematically apply the non-relativistic effective field theory. The great merit of this approach is that it encodes the low-energy dynamics directly in terms of the effective range expansion parameters. After a brief introduction into the subject, we formulate a framework for the extraction of the ΔNγ * as well as the B→K * transition form factors from lattice data. Both processes are of substantial phenomenological interest, including the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Moreover, we provide a proper field-theoretical definition of the resonance matrix elements, and advocate it in comparison to the one based on the infinitely narrow width approximation. In the second part we consider certain aspects of the doubly virtual nucleon Compton scattering. The main objective of the work is to answer the question whether there is, in the Regge language, a so-called fixed pole in the process. To answer this question, the unknown subtraction function, which enters one of the dispersion relations for the invariant amplitudes, has to be determined. The external field method provides a feasible approach to tackle this problem on the lattice. Considering the nucleon in a periodic magnetic field, we derive a simple relation for the ground state energy shift up to a second order in the field strength. The obtained result encodes the value of the

  9. Hadronic electroweak processes in a finite volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agadjanov, Andria

    2017-11-07

    In the present thesis, we study a number of hadronic electroweak processes in a finite volume. Our work is motivated by the ongoing and future lattice simulations of the strong interaction theory called quantum chromodynamics. According to the available computational resources, the numerical calculations are necessarily performed on lattices with a finite spatial extension. The first part of the thesis is based on the finite volume formalism which is a standard method to investigate the processes with the final state interactions, and in particular, the elastic hadron resonances, on the lattice. Throughout the work, we systematically apply the non-relativistic effective field theory. The great merit of this approach is that it encodes the low-energy dynamics directly in terms of the effective range expansion parameters. After a brief introduction into the subject, we formulate a framework for the extraction of the ΔNγ{sup *} as well as the B→K{sup *} transition form factors from lattice data. Both processes are of substantial phenomenological interest, including the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Moreover, we provide a proper field-theoretical definition of the resonance matrix elements, and advocate it in comparison to the one based on the infinitely narrow width approximation. In the second part we consider certain aspects of the doubly virtual nucleon Compton scattering. The main objective of the work is to answer the question whether there is, in the Regge language, a so-called fixed pole in the process. To answer this question, the unknown subtraction function, which enters one of the dispersion relations for the invariant amplitudes, has to be determined. The external field method provides a feasible approach to tackle this problem on the lattice. Considering the nucleon in a periodic magnetic field, we derive a simple relation for the ground state energy shift up to a second order in the field strength. The obtained result encodes the

  10. Dynamics and Melting of Finite Plasma Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Patrick; K"Ahlert, Hanno; Baumgartner, Henning; Thomsen, Hauke; Bonitz, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Interacting few-particle systems in external trapping potentials are of strong current interest since they allow to realize and control strong correlation and quantum effects [1]. Here, we present our recent results on the structural and thermodynamic properties of the crystal-like Wigner phase of complex plasma confined in a 3D harmonic potential. We discuss the linear response of the strongly correlated system to external excitations, which can be described in terms of normal modes [2]. By means of first-principle simulations the details of the melting phase transitions of these mesoscopic systems are systematically analysed with the melting temperatures being determined by a modified Lindemann parameter for the pair distance fluctuations [3]. The critical temperatures turn out to be utmost sensitive to finite size effects (i.e., the exact particle number), and form of the (screened) interaction potential.[4pt] [1] PhD Thesis, P. Ludwig, U Rostock (2008)[0pt] [2] C. Henning et al., J. Phys. A 42, 214023 (2009)[0pt] [3] B"oning et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 113401 (2008)

  11. Finite mixture models for the computation of isotope ratios in mixed isotopic samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffler, Daniel; Laaha, Gregor; Leisch, Friedrich; Kappel, Stefanie; Prohaska, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Finite mixture models have been used for more than 100 years, but have seen a real boost in popularity over the last two decades due to the tremendous increase in available computing power. The areas of application of mixture models range from biology and medicine to physics, economics and marketing. These models can be applied to data where observations originate from various groups and where group affiliations are not known, as is the case for multiple isotope ratios present in mixed isotopic samples. Recently, the potential of finite mixture models for the computation of 235U/238U isotope ratios from transient signals measured in individual (sub-)µm-sized particles by laser ablation - multi-collector - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICPMS) was demonstrated by Kappel et al. [1]. The particles, which were deposited on the same substrate, were certified with respect to their isotopic compositions. Here, we focus on the statistical model and its application to isotope data in ecogeochemistry. Commonly applied evaluation approaches for mixed isotopic samples are time-consuming and are dependent on the judgement of the analyst. Thus, isotopic compositions may be overlooked due to the presence of more dominant constituents. Evaluation using finite mixture models can be accomplished unsupervised and automatically. The models try to fit several linear models (regression lines) to subgroups of data taking the respective slope as estimation for the isotope ratio. The finite mixture models are parameterised by: • The number of different ratios. • Number of points belonging to each ratio-group. • The ratios (i.e. slopes) of each group. Fitting of the parameters is done by maximising the log-likelihood function using an iterative expectation-maximisation (EM) algorithm. In each iteration step, groups of size smaller than a control parameter are dropped; thereby the number of different ratios is determined. The analyst only influences some control

  12. Evaluation of Concrete Cylinder Tests Using Finite Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saabye Ottosen, Niels

    1984-01-01

    Nonlinear axisymmetric finite element analyses are performed on the uniaxial compressive test of concrete cylinders. The models include thick steel loading plates, and cylinders with height‐to‐diameter ratios (h/d) ranging from 1‐3 are treated. A simple constitutive model of the concrete is emplo......Nonlinear axisymmetric finite element analyses are performed on the uniaxial compressive test of concrete cylinders. The models include thick steel loading plates, and cylinders with height‐to‐diameter ratios (h/d) ranging from 1‐3 are treated. A simple constitutive model of the concrete...... uniaxial strength the use of geometrically matched loading plates seems to be advantageous. Finally, it is observed that for variations of the element size within limits otherwise required to obtain a realistic analysis, the results are insensitive to the element size....

  13. Confining dyon gas with finite-volume effects under control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruckmann, Falk [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik; Dinter, Simon [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Ilgenfritz, Ernst-Michael [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, VBLHEP, Dubna (Russian Federation); Maier, Benjamin; Mueller-Preussker, Michael [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Wagner, Marc [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2011-11-15

    As an approach to describe the long-range properties of non-Abelian gauge theories at non-zero temperature Trange tails of the dyon fields cause severe finite-volume effects. Therefore, we demonstrate the application of Ewald's summation method to this system. Finite-volume effects are shown to be under control, which is a crucial requirement for numerical studies of interacting dyon ensembles. (orig.)

  14. Confining dyon gas with finite-volume effects under control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruckmann, Falk; Maier, Benjamin; Mueller-Preussker, Michael; Wagner, Marc; Frankfurt Univ.

    2011-11-01

    As an approach to describe the long-range properties of non-Abelian gauge theories at non-zero temperature T c , we consider a non-interacting ensemble of dyons (magnetic monopoles) with non-trivial holonomy. We show analytically, that the quark-antiquark free energy from the Polyakov loop correlator grows linearly with the distance, and how the string tension scales with the dyon density. In numerical treatments, the long-range tails of the dyon fields cause severe finite-volume effects. Therefore, we demonstrate the application of Ewald's summation method to this system. Finite-volume effects are shown to be under control, which is a crucial requirement for numerical studies of interacting dyon ensembles. (orig.)

  15. Hybrid finite difference/finite element immersed boundary method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Griffith, Boyce; Luo, Xiaoyu

    2017-12-01

    The immersed boundary method is an approach to fluid-structure interaction that uses a Lagrangian description of the structural deformations, stresses, and forces along with an Eulerian description of the momentum, viscosity, and incompressibility of the fluid-structure system. The original immersed boundary methods described immersed elastic structures using systems of flexible fibers, and even now, most immersed boundary methods still require Lagrangian meshes that are finer than the Eulerian grid. This work introduces a coupling scheme for the immersed boundary method to link the Lagrangian and Eulerian variables that facilitates independent spatial discretizations for the structure and background grid. This approach uses a finite element discretization of the structure while retaining a finite difference scheme for the Eulerian variables. We apply this method to benchmark problems involving elastic, rigid, and actively contracting structures, including an idealized model of the left ventricle of the heart. Our tests include cases in which, for a fixed Eulerian grid spacing, coarser Lagrangian structural meshes yield discretization errors that are as much as several orders of magnitude smaller than errors obtained using finer structural meshes. The Lagrangian-Eulerian coupling approach developed in this work enables the effective use of these coarse structural meshes with the immersed boundary method. This work also contrasts two different weak forms of the equations, one of which is demonstrated to be more effective for the coarse structural discretizations facilitated by our coupling approach. © 2017 The Authors International  Journal  for  Numerical  Methods  in  Biomedical  Engineering Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Exact solution of finite parabolic potential disc-like quantum dot with and without electric field R. Djelti, S. Bentata and Z. Aziz: Trimer barrier hight effect oh the nature of the electronic state of the superlatice GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs Bibhas K. Dutta and Prasanta K. Mahapatra: Study of velocity-dependent collision effects on Lamb dip and crossover resonances in three-level system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanien, H. H.; Abdelmoly, S. S.; Elmeshad, N.

    The exact series solutions of finite parabolic potential disc-like quantum dot are given in the absence and presence of uniform applied electric field. We define some normalized parameters. From the complex eigenenergy E=E0 - i G/2, due to the electric field, we calculate the resonance width G of a bounded state. The ground and the first excited state of the electron and the hole are obtained with and without the electric field. The corresponding envelope functions are presented as a function of the disc dimensionality, radius R and half-width L.

  17. Characterization of resonances using finite size effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozsgay, B.; Takacs, G.

    2006-01-01

    We develop methods to extract resonance widths from finite volume spectra of (1+1)-dimensional quantum field theories. Our two methods are based on Luscher's description of finite size corrections, and are dubbed the Breit-Wigner and the improved ''mini-Hamiltonian'' method, respectively. We establish a consistent framework for the finite volume description of sufficiently narrow resonances that takes into account the finite size corrections and mass shifts properly. Using predictions from form factor perturbation theory, we test the two methods against finite size data from truncated conformal space approach, and find excellent agreement which confirms both the theoretical framework and the numerical validity of the methods. Although our investigation is carried out in 1+1 dimensions, the extension to physical 3+1 space-time dimensions appears straightforward, given sufficiently accurate finite volume spectra

  18. A finite difference method for free boundary problems

    KAUST Repository

    Fornberg, Bengt

    2010-04-01

    Fornberg and Meyer-Spasche proposed some time ago a simple strategy to correct finite difference schemes in the presence of a free boundary that cuts across a Cartesian grid. We show here how this procedure can be combined with a minimax-based optimization procedure to rapidly solve a wide range of elliptic-type free boundary value problems. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Diffusion of heat from a finite, rectangular, plane heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreri, J.C.; Caballero, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    Non-dimensional results for the temperature field originating in a rectangular, finite, plane heat source with infinitesimal thickness are introduced. The source decays in time, zero decay being a particular case. Results are useful for obtaining an aproximation of the maximum temperature of a system holding an internal heat source. The range selected for the parameters is specially useful in the case of a nuclear waste repository. The application to the case of mass diffussion arises from analogy. (Author) [es

  20. Finite difference computation of Casimir forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    In this Invited paper, we begin by a historical introduction to provide a motivation for the classical problems of interatomic force computation and associated challenges. This analysis will lead us from early theoretical and experimental accomplishments to the integration of these fascinating interactions into the operation of realistic, next-generation micro- and nanodevices both for the advanced metrology of fundamental physical processes and in breakthrough industrial applications. Among several powerful strategies enabling vastly enhanced performance and entirely novel technological capabilities, we shall specifically consider Casimir force time-modulation and the adoption of non-trivial geometries. As to the former, the ability to alter the magnitude and sign of the Casimir force will be recognized as a crucial principle to implement thermodynamical nano-engines. As to the latter, we shall first briefly review various reported computational approaches. We shall then discuss the game-changing discovery, in the last decade, that standard methods of numerical classical electromagnetism can be retooled to formulate the problem of Casimir force computation in arbitrary geometries. This remarkable development will be practically illustrated by showing that such an apparently elementary method as standard finite-differencing can be successfully employed to numerically recover results known from the Lifshitz theory of dispersion forces in the case of interacting parallel-plane slabs. Other geometries will be also be explored and consideration given to the potential of non-standard finite-difference methods. Finally, we shall introduce problems at the computational frontier, such as those including membranes deformed by Casimir forces and the effects of anisotropic materials. Conclusions will highlight the dramatic transition from the enduring perception of this field as an exotic application of quantum electrodynamics to the recent demonstration of a human climbing

  1. Finite size scaling and lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Finite size (Fisher) scaling is investigated for four dimensional SU(2) and SU(3) lattice gauge theories without quarks. It allows to disentangle violations of (asymptotic) scaling and finite volume corrections. Mass spectrum, string tension, deconfinement temperature and lattice β-function are considered. For appropriate volumes, Monte Carlo investigations seem to be able to control the finite volume continuum limit. Contact is made with Luescher's small volume expansion and possibly also with the asymptotic large volume behavior. 41 refs., 19 figs

  2. Finite element application to global reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, F.A.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Finite Element Method is described as a Coarse Mesh Method with general basis and trial functions. Various consequences concerning programming and application of Finite Element Methods in reactor physics are drawn. One of the conclusions is that the Finite Element Method is a valuable tool in solving global reactor analysis problems. However, problems which can be described by rectangular boxes still can be solved with special coarse mesh programs more efficiently. (orig.) [de

  3. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  4. A first course in finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Fish, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Developed from the authors, combined total of 50 years undergraduate and graduate teaching experience, this book presents the finite element method formulated as a general-purpose numerical procedure for solving engineering problems governed by partial differential equations.  Focusing on the formulation and application of the finite element method through the integration of finite element theory, code development, and software application, the book is both introductory and self-contained, as well as being a hands-on experience for any student. This authoritative text on Finite Elements:Adopts

  5. Features of finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, M.; Denner, A.

    1987-01-01

    We analyse general features of finite quantum field theories. A quantum field theory is considered to be finite, if the corresponding renormalization constants evaluated in the dimensional regularization scheme are free from divergences in all orders of perturbation theory. We conclude that every finite renormalizable quantum field theory with fields of spin one or less must contain both scalar fields and fermion fields and nonabelian gauge fields. Some secific nonsupersymmetric models are found to be finite at the one- and two-loop level. (orig.)

  6. Finite size effects in simulations of protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Pawar

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that the soluble protofibrillar species that proceed amyloid fibril formation are associated with a range of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases. Computer simulations of the processes that lead to the formation of these oligomeric species are starting to make significant contributions to our understanding of the determinants of protein aggregation. We simulate different systems at constant concentration but with a different number of peptides and we study the how the finite number of proteins affects the underlying free energy of the system and therefore the relative stability of the species involved in the process. If not taken into account, this finite size effect can undermine the validity of theoretical predictions regarding the relative stability of the species involved and the rates of conversion from one to the other. We discuss the reasons that give rise to this finite size effect form both a probabilistic and energy fluctuations point of view and also how this problem can be dealt by a finite size scaling analysis.

  7. Finite element simulations of two rock mechanics tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlke, H.J.; Lott, S.A.

    1986-04-01

    Rock mechanics tests are performed to determine in situ stress conditions and material properties of an underground rock mass. To design stable underground facilities for the permanent storage of high-level nuclear waste, determination of these properties and conditions is a necessary first step. However, before a test and its associated equipment can be designed, the engineer needs to know the range of expected values to be measured by the instruments. Sensitivity studies by means of finite element simulations are employed in this preliminary design phase to evaluate the pertinent parameters and their effects on the proposed measurements. The simulations, of two typical rock mechanics tests, the plate bearing test and the flat-jack test, by means of the finite element analysis, are described. The plate bearing test is used to determine the rock mass deformation modulus. The flat-jack test is used to determine the in situ stress conditions of the host rock. For the plate bearing test, two finite element models are used to simulate the classic problem of a load on an elastic half space and the actual problem of a plate bearing test in an underground tunnel of circular cross section. For the flat-jack simulation, a single finite element model is used to simulate both horizontal and vertical slots. Results will be compared to closed-form solutions available in the literature

  8. Burnside structures of finite subgroups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysenok, I G

    2007-01-01

    We establish conditions guaranteeing that a group B possesses the following property: there is a number l such that if elements w, x -1 wx,...,x -l+1 wx l-1 of B generate a finite subgroup G then x lies in the normalizer of G. These conditions are of a quite special form. They hold for groups with relations of the form x n =1 which appear as approximating groups for the free Burnside groups B(m,n) of sufficiently large even exponent n. We extract an algebraic assertion which plays an important role in all known approaches to substantial results on the groups B(m,n) of large even exponent, in particular, to proving their infiniteness. The main theorem asserts that when n is divisible by 16, B has the above property with l=6

  9. Learning Extended Finite State Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Sofia; Howar, Falk; Jonsson, Bengt; Steffen, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    We present an active learning algorithm for inferring extended finite state machines (EFSM)s, combining data flow and control behavior. Key to our learning technique is a novel learning model based on so-called tree queries. The learning algorithm uses the tree queries to infer symbolic data constraints on parameters, e.g., sequence numbers, time stamps, identifiers, or even simple arithmetic. We describe sufficient conditions for the properties that the symbolic constraints provided by a tree query in general must have to be usable in our learning model. We have evaluated our algorithm in a black-box scenario, where tree queries are realized through (black-box) testing. Our case studies include connection establishment in TCP and a priority queue from the Java Class Library.

  10. Phase transition in finite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.; Duflot, V.; Duflot, V.; Gulminelli, F.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present a review of selected aspects of Phase transitions in finite systems applied in particular to the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei. We show that the problem of the non existence of boundary conditions can be solved by introducing a statistical ensemble with an averaged constrained volume. In such an ensemble the microcanonical heat capacity becomes negative in the transition region. We show that the caloric curve explicitly depends on the considered transformation of the volume with the excitation energy and so does not bear direct informations on the characteristics of the phase transition. Conversely, partial energy fluctuations are demonstrated to be a direct measure of the equation of state. Since the heat capacity has a negative branch in the phase transition region, the presence of abnormally large kinetic energy fluctuations is a signal of the liquid gas phase transition. (author)

  11. Tonopah Test Range - Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capabilities Test Operations Center Test Director Range Control Track Control Communications Tracking Radars Photos Header Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Tonopah Test Range Top TTR_TOC Tonopah is the testing range of choice for all national security missions. Tonopah Test Range (TTR) provides research and

  12. Finite-time braiding exponents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budišić, Marko; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc

    2015-08-01

    Topological entropy of a dynamical system is an upper bound for the sum of positive Lyapunov exponents; in practice, it is strongly indicative of the presence of mixing in a subset of the domain. Topological entropy can be computed by partition methods, by estimating the maximal growth rate of material lines or other material elements, or by counting the unstable periodic orbits of the flow. All these methods require detailed knowledge of the velocity field that is not always available, for example, when ocean flows are measured using a small number of floating sensors. We propose an alternative calculation, applicable to two-dimensional flows, that uses only a sparse set of flow trajectories as its input. To represent the sparse set of trajectories, we use braids, algebraic objects that record how trajectories exchange positions with respect to a projection axis. Material curves advected by the flow are represented as simplified loop coordinates. The exponential rate at which a braid stretches loops over a finite time interval is the Finite-Time Braiding Exponent (FTBE). We study FTBEs through numerical simulations of the Aref Blinking Vortex flow, as a representative of a general class of flows having a single invariant component with positive topological entropy. The FTBEs approach the value of the topological entropy from below as the length and number of trajectories is increased; we conjecture that this result holds for a general class of ergodic, mixing systems. Furthermore, FTBEs are computed robustly with respect to the numerical time step, details of braid representation, and choice of initial conditions. We find that, in the class of systems we describe, trajectories can be re-used to form different braids, which greatly reduces the amount of data needed to assess the complexity of the flow.

  13. Finite rotation shells basic equations and finite elements for Reissner kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wisniewski, K

    2010-01-01

    This book covers theoretical and computational aspects of non-linear shells. Several advanced topics of shell equations and finite elements - not included in standard textbooks on finite elements - are addressed, and the book includes an extensive bibliography.

  14. Geometry-invariant GRIN lens: finite ray tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Mehdi; Goncharov, Alexander V

    2014-11-17

    The refractive index distribution of the geometry-invariant gradient refractive index lens (GIGL) model is derived as a function of Cartesian coordinates. The adjustable external geometry of the GIGL model aims to mimic the shape of the human and animal crystalline lens. The refractive index distribution is based on an adjustable power-law profile, which provides additional flexibility of the model. An analytical method for layer-by-layer finite ray tracing through the GIGL model is developed and used to calculate aberrations of the GIGL model. The result of the finite ray tracing aberrations of the GIGL model are compared to those obtained with paraxial ray tracing. The derived analytical expression for the refractive index distribution can be employed in the reconstruction processes of the eye using the conventional ray tracing methods. The layer-by-layer finite ray tracing approach would be an asset in ray tracing through a modified GIGL model, where the refractive index distribution cannot be described analytically. Using the layer-by-layer finite ray-tracing method, the potential of the GIGL model in representing continuous as well as shell-like layered structures is illustrated and the results for both cases are presented and analysed.

  15. Coupling of smooth particle hydrodynamics with the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaway, S.W.; Heinstein, M.W.; Swegle, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    A gridless technique called smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) has been coupled with the transient dynamics finite element code ppercase[pronto]. In this paper, a new weighted residual derivation for the SPH method will be presented, and the methods used to embed SPH within ppercase[pronto] will be outlined. Example SPH ppercase[pronto] calculations will also be presented. One major difficulty associated with the Lagrangian finite element method is modeling materials with no shear strength; for example, gases, fluids and explosive biproducts. Typically, these materials can be modeled for only a short time with a Lagrangian finite element code. Large distortions cause tangling of the mesh, which will eventually lead to numerical difficulties, such as negative element area or ''bow tie'' elements. Remeshing will allow the problem to continue for a short while, but the large distortions can prevent a complete analysis. SPH is a gridless Lagrangian technique. Requiring no mesh, SPH has the potential to model material fracture, large shear flows and penetration. SPH computes the strain rate and the stress divergence based on the nearest neighbors of a particle, which are determined using an efficient particle-sorting technique. Embedding the SPH method within ppercase[pronto] allows part of the problem to be modeled with quadrilateral finite elements, while other parts are modeled with the gridless SPH method. SPH elements are coupled to the quadrilateral elements through a contact-like algorithm. ((orig.))

  16. Exotic quantum states for charmed baryons at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxing Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The significantly screened heavy-quark potential in hot medium provides the possibility to study exotic quantum states of three-heavy-quark systems. By solving the Schrödinger equation for a three-charm-quark system at finite temperature, we found that, there exist Borromean states which might be realized in high energy nuclear collisions, and the binding energies of the system satisfy precisely the scaling law for Efimov states in the resonance limit.

  17. Transmission of electrons with flat passbands in finite superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barajas-Aguilar, A H; Rodríguez-Magdaleno, K A; Martínez-Orozco, J C; Enciso-Muñoz, A; Contreras-Solorio, D A

    2013-01-01

    Using the transfer matrix method and the Ben Daniel-Duke equation for variable mass electrons propagation, we calculate the transmittance for symmetric finite superlattices where the width and the height of the potential barriers follow a linear dependence. The width and height of the barriers decreases from the center to the ends of the superlattice. The transmittance presents intervals of stopbands and quite flat passbands.

  18. Two-dimensional isostatic meshes in the finite element method

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Marín, Rubén; Samartín, Avelino

    2002-01-01

    In a Finite Element (FE) analysis of elastic solids several items are usually considered, namely, type and shape of the elements, number of nodes per element, node positions, FE mesh, total number of degrees of freedom (dot) among others. In this paper a method to improve a given FE mesh used for a particular analysis is described. For the improvement criterion different objective functions have been chosen (Total potential energy and Average quadratic error) and the number of nodes and dof's...

  19. Analytic regularization of the Yukawa model at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malbouisson, A.P.C.; Svaiter, N.F.; Svaiter, B.F.

    1996-07-01

    It is analysed the one-loop fermionic contribution for the scalar effective potential in the temperature dependent Yukawa model. Ir order to regularize the model a mix between dimensional and analytic regularization procedures is used. It is found a general expression for the fermionic contribution in arbitrary spacetime dimension. It is also found that in D = 3 this contribution is finite. (author). 19 refs

  20. Parallel iterative procedures for approximate solutions of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Parallel iterative procedures based on domain decomposition techniques are defined and analyzed for the numerical solution of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods. For finite element methods, in a Lagrangian framework, an efficient way for choosing the algorithm parameter as well as the algorithm convergence are indicated. Some heuristic arguments for finding the algorithm parameter for finite difference schemes are addressed. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effectiveness of the methods.