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Sample records for finite pressure effects

  1. Finite element analysis for normal pressure hydrocephalus: The effects of the integration of sulci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hakseung; Park, Dae-Hyeon; Yi, Seong; Jeong, Eun-Jin; Yoon, Byung C; Czosnyka, Marek; Sutcliffe, Michael P F; Kim, Dong-Joo

    2015-08-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) is increasingly used to investigate the brain under various pathological changes. Although FEA has been used to study hydrocephalus for decades, previous studies have primarily focused on ventriculomegaly. The present study aimed to investigate the pathologic changes regarding sulcal deformation in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Two finite element (FE) models-an anatomical brain geometric (ABG) model and the conventional simplified brain geometric (SBG) model-of NPH were constructed. The models were constructed with identical boundary conditions but with different geometries. The ABG model contained details of the sulci geometry, whereas these details were omitted from the SBG model. The resulting pathologic changes were assessed via four biomechanical parameters: pore pressure, von Mises stress, pressure, and void ratio. NPH was induced by increasing the transmantle pressure gradient (TPG) from 0 to a maximum of 2.0 mmHg. Both models successfully simulated the major features of NPH (i.e., ventriculomegaly and periventricular lucency). The changes in the biomechanical parameters with increasing TPG were similar between the models. However, the SBG model underestimated the degree of stress across the cerebral mantle by 150% compared with the ABG model. The SBG model also overestimates the degree of ventriculomegaly (increases of 194.5% and 154.1% at TPG = 2.0 mmHg for the SBG and ABG models, respectively). Including the sulci geometry in a FEA for NPH clearly affects the overall results. The conventional SBG model is inferior to the ABG model, which accurately simulated sulcal deformation and the consequent effects on cortical or subcortical structures. The inclusion of sulci in future FEA for the brain is strongly advised, especially for models used to investigate space-occupying lesions.

  2. Two Dimensional Finite Element Analysis for the Effect of a Pressure Wave in the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce L., Ernesto; Ponce S., Daniel

    2008-11-01

    Brain injuries in people of all ages is a serious, world-wide health problem, with consequences as varied as attention or memory deficits, difficulties in problem-solving, aggressive social behavior, and neuro degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Brain injuries can be the result of a direct impact, but also pressure waves and direct impulses. The aim of this work is to develop a predictive method to calculate the stress generated in the human brain by pressure waves such as high power sounds. The finite element method is used, combined with elastic wave theory. The predictions of the generated stress levels are compared with the resistance of the arterioles that pervade the brain. The problem was focused to the Chilean mining where there are some accidents happen by detonations and high sound level. There are not formal medical investigation, however these pressure waves could produce human brain damage.

  3. Dynamic finite element modeling of the effects of size on the upper shelf energy of pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidener, S.E. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States); Kumar, A.S. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States); Oglesby, D.B. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States); Schubert, L.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hamilton, M.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rosinski, S.T. [Electric Power Research Inst., Inc. (EPRI), Charlotte, NC (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Dynamic finite element modeling (FEM) of the fracture behavior of fatigue-precracked Charpy specimens was performed to determine the effect of single variable changes in ligament size, width, span, and thickness on the upper shelf energy. A tensile fracture-strain based method for modeling crack initiation and propagation was used. It was found that the upper shelf energy of precracked specimens (USE{sub p}) is proportional to b{sup n}, where b is ligament size and n varies from about 1.6 for subsize to 1.9 for full size specimens. The USE{sub p} was found to be proportional to (width){sup 2.5}. The dependence on span was found to be non-linear. The dependence on thickness was found to be linear for all cases studied. Some of the data from the FEM analysis were compared with experimental data and were found to be in reasonable agreement. (orig.).

  4. Stresses Analysis of Petroleum Pipe Finite Element under Internal Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Ragbe.M.Abdusslam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper described the results of a nonlinear static mode within ANSYS of elastic and elastic-plastic behaviour of thin petroleum pipe that is subjected to an internal pressure and therefore a linear stress analysis performed using ANSYS 9.0 finite element software Such an analysis is important because the shape of most structures under internal pressure is cylindrical[1]. In this paper is considered only. Elastic and elastic-plastic finite element analysis is used to predict the principle stresses, effective stress results are compared with those obtained from theatrical equations in order to predict the limit and failure loads for this type of loading also the relationships between redial, hoop stresses and displacement has been used to develop a through understanding. The analysis was completed using ANAYS Version 9.0. (a finite element program for Microsoft Windows NT. The program allows pre-processing, analysis and post-processing stages to be completed within a single application. The program can be used to model a large number of situations including buckling, plastic deformation, forming and stress analysis problems. r mm (In this study ,a thin pipe of internal radiu ri 596 .9 mmand of externalo 609 .6objected to aninternal pressure 2 i  4 .83  / mm which is gradually increased to near the ultimate load that may be sustained by the pipe. The pipe is modelled as an elasto-plastic material using the Von Mises yield criterion which is normally used for metallic materials[2]. The specification of the load in several increments enables the spread of the plasticity to occur gradually and its effect on the stress distribution to be assessed. Key words: finite element analysis, elastic-plastic behavior, thin walled pipe equivalent stress, TWT.

  5. Pressure distribution in a quasi-hydrostatic pressure medium: A finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempere, Jacques; Silvera, Isaac F.

    2011-12-01

    The highest quality pressures on samples in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) at high pressures are produced using quasi-hydrostatic pressurization media such as helium or hydrogen. In this paper we carry out a finite element analysis of pressure distributions in a DAC using helium and non-hydrostatic argon pressurization media. We find that samples and ruby chips are at substantially higher pressures than the pressurization media, although this is sharply reduced by using helium, which has a low yield strength for the shear modulus. The deviations in pressure of the different samples (and ruby) from the pressurization media differ and depend on their elastic constants. Our observations may account for the distribution of pressures in metallic markers found in a recent calibration of the ruby scale to high pressures.

  6. Fracture behaviour of finite length flaws in pressure tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, D.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Shek, G.; Ho, E. [Kinectrics, Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Flaws encountered in nuclear pressure tubes must be evaluated to ensure that a hydride induced cracking mechanism, called delayed hydride cracking (DHC), is not initiated. The stress concentration at a flaw tip causes diffusion of hydrogen and precipitation of zirconium hydride at the flaw tip. Typically, assessment is done based on experimental data obtained from two-dimensional flaws. However, realistic lengths of flaws make the two-dimensional approach overly conservative in many cases, and costly remedial action may be prescribed unnecessarily. A fracture initiation model for DHC involves a type of process zone description to account for the interaction of hydride precipitation with the flaw tip stress distribution. Analytical techniques for this model based on weight functions are practical and accurate for two-dimensional geometry, but cannot be easily applied to the three-dimensional features of finite length flaws. Recently, a numerical rendition of the model has been incorporated into a finite element program so that arbitrary geometry and material properties can be managed. The process zone is automatically generated as hydride formation progresses, and a displacement parameter derived from the finite element distributions quantifies the response relative to an experimentally established fracture initiation threshold. The three-dimensional finite length model is applied to specific flaw geometries used in an experimental program. Comparison with corresponding two-dimensional tests demonstrates that the finite length flaw has a significantly higher threshold load than that predicted on the basis of a two-dimensional model. (author)

  7. Effects of Repair Weld of Reactor Pressure Vessel Upper Head Control Rod Drive Mechanism Penetration Nozzle on J-Groove Weldment Using Finite Element Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju Hee; Yoo, Sam Hyeon [Korea Military Academy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    In pressurized water reactors, the upper head of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) contains numerous control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles. These nozzles are fabricated by welding after being inserted into the RPV head with a room temperature shrink fit. The tensile residual stresses caused by this welding are a major factor in primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Over the last 15 years, the incidences of cracking in alloy 600 CRDM nozzles have increased significantly. These cracks are caused by PWSCC and have been shown to be driven by the welding residual stresses and operational stresses in the weld region. Various measures are being sought to overcome these problems. The defects resulting from the welding process are often the cause of PWSCC acceleration. Therefore, any weld defects found in the RPV manufacturing process are immediately repaired by repair welding. Detailed finite element simulations for the Korea Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel were conducted in order to predict the magnitudes of the repair weld residual stresses in the tube materials.

  8. OXYGEN PRESSURE REGULATOR DESIGN AND ANALYSIS THROUGH FINITE ELEMENT MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asterios KOSMARAS

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen production centers produce oxygen in high pressure that needs to be defused. A regulator is designed and analyzed in the current paper for medical use in oxygen production centers. This study aims to design a new oxygen pressure regulator and perform an analysis using Finite Element Modeling in order to evaluate its working principle. In the design procedure,the main elements and the operating principles of a pressure regulator are taking into account. The regulator is designed and simulations take place in order to assessthe proposed design. Stress analysis results are presented for the main body of the regulator, as well as, flow analysis to determine some important flow characteristics in the inlet and outlet of the regulator.

  9. Finite element discretization of Darcy's equations with pressure dependent porosity

    KAUST Repository

    Girault, Vivette

    2010-02-23

    We consider the flow of a viscous incompressible fluid through a rigid homogeneous porous medium. The permeability of the medium depends on the pressure, so that the model is nonlinear. We propose a finite element discretization of this problem and, in the case where the dependence on the pressure is bounded from above and below, we prove its convergence to the solution and propose an algorithm to solve the discrete system. In the case where the dependence on the pressure is exponential, we propose a splitting scheme which involves solving two linear systems, but parts of the analysis of this method are still heuristic. Numerical tests are presented, which illustrate the introduced methods. © 2010 EDP Sciences, SMAI.

  10. Neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity with effects of finite banana width for finite aspect ratio tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaing, K. C.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Theory for neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity has been developed to model transport phenomena, especially, toroidal plasma rotation for tokamaks with broken symmetry. Theoretical predictions are in agreement with the results of the numerical codes in the large aspect ratio limit. The theory has since been extended to include effects of finite aspect ratio and finite plasma β. Here, β is the ratio of the plasma thermal pressure to the magnetic field pressure. However, there are cases where the radial wavelength of the self-consistent perturbed magnetic field strength B on the perturbed magnetic surface is comparable to the width of the trapped particles, i.e., bananas. To accommodate those cases, the theory for neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity is further extended here to include the effects of the finite banana width. The extended theory is developed using the orbit averaged drift kinetic equation in the low collisionality regimes. The results of the theory can now be used to model plasma transport, including toroidal plasma rotation, in real finite aspect ratio, and finite plasma β tokamaks with the radial wavelength of the perturbed symmetry breaking magnetic field strength comparable to or longer than the banana width.

  11. Finite Element Simulation of Photoacoustic Pressure in a Resonant Photoacoustic Cell Using Lossy Boundary Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duggen, Lars; Lopes, Natasha; Willatzen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The finite-element method (FEM) is used to simulate the photoacoustic signal in a cylindrical resonant photoacoustic cell. Simulations include loss effects near the cell walls that appear in the boundary conditions for the inhomogeneous Helmholtz equation governing the acoustic pressure. Reasonably...... the photoacoustic signal was demonstrated and good agreement with experiments for the actual resonance frequency and the quality factor of the cell was obtained despite its complicated geometry....

  12. Finite Span Effects on Flap Heating and Effectiveness in a Turbulent Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    Flap Span on Centerline Heating Distribution(15 Deflection) ........ ......................... 46 35 Span Edge Effect on Centerline Heat Transfer...Pressure Distributions at 87.5% Chord Station ....... ...................... 50 39 Span Edge Effect on Spanwise Pressure Distribution ........... 52 40...Distribution at 87.5% Chord Station ..... ............... 55 43 Span Edge Effect on Spanwise Heat Transfer Distribution ..... 56 44 Finite Span Effects

  13. FDTD simulation of finite-amplitude pressure and temperature fields for biomedical ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallaj, I M; Cleveland, R O

    1999-05-01

    Full wave simulations provide a valuable tool for studying the spatial and temporal nature of an acoustic field. One method for producing such simulations is the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. This method uses discrete differences to approximate derivatives in the governing partial differential equations. We used the FDTD method to model the propagation of finite-amplitude sound in a homogeneous thermoviscous fluid. The calculated acoustic pressure field was then used to compute the transient temperature rise in the fluid; the heating results from absorption of acoustic energy by the fluid. As an example, the transient temperature field was calculated in biological tissue in response to a pulse of focused ultrasound. Enhanced heating of the tissue from finite-amplitude effects was observed. The excess heating was attributed to the nonlinear generation of higher-frequency harmonics which are absorbed more readily than the fundamental. The effect of nonlinear distortion on temperature rise in tissue was observed to range from negligible at 1 MPa source pressure to an 80% increase in temperature elevation at 10 MPa source pressure.

  14. Analysis of noncoplanar pressurized laminations in X2 steel pipes by non-linear finite element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, Alfredo [Instituto Tecnologico de Puebla (Mexico). Dept. de Posgrado; Gonzalez, Jorge L.; Hallen, Jose M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (Mexico). Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Quimica e Industrias Extractivas (ESIQIE). Dept. de Ingenieria Metalurgica

    2005-07-01

    Hydrogen induced cracking is of great interest in the mechanical integrity assessment of sour gas pipelines. Multiple stepwise cracks with internal pressure called laminations are often observed in pipelines and their interaction and coalescence may significantly affect the residual strength of the pipes. In this work, the interacting fields of non coplanar pressurized laminations in the wall of a pipe under pressure are analyzed by non-lineal finite element, considering an isotropic hardening law and the real tensile properties of the X52 steel. The results are presented as the evolution of the stress fields in the interlaminar region as a function of the pressure inside the laminations. It is found that for two approaching stepwise laminations the critical pressure follows a hyperbolic type law, thus the effect of the lamination length is principal for greater lengths and for shorter lengths the effect is minimum. The critical pressure is defined as pressure inside the lamination that causes plastification of the interlaminar region. (author)

  15. Analysis for pressure transient of coalbed methane reservoir based on Laplace transform finite difference method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on fractal geometry, fractal medium of coalbed methane mathematical model is established by Langmuir isotherm adsorption formula, Fick's diffusion law, Laplace transform formula, considering the well bore storage effect and skin effect. The Laplace transform finite difference method is used to solve the mathematical model. With Stehfest numerical inversion, the distribution of dimensionless well bore flowing pressure and its derivative was obtained in real space. According to compare with the results from the analytical method, the result from Laplace transform finite difference method turns out to be accurate. The influence factors are analyzed, including fractal dimension, fractal index, skin factor, well bore storage coefficient, energy storage ratio, interporosity flow coefficient and the adsorption factor. The calculating error of Laplace transform difference method is small. Laplace transform difference method has advantages in well-test application since any moment simulation does not rely on other moment results and space grid.

  16. Finite Temperature Casimir Effect for Corrugated Plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan; SHAO Cheng-Gang; LUO Jun

    2006-01-01

    @@ Using the path-integral method, the corrections to the Casimir energy due to the combined effect of surface roughness and the finite temperature are calculated. For the specific case of two sinusoidally corrugated plates,the lateral Casimir force at finite temperature is obtained. The amplitude of the lateral Casimir force has a maximum at an optimal wavelength of λ≈ 2H with the mean plate distance H. This optimal parameter relation is almost independent of temperature.

  17. A Calculation Approach to Elastic Constants of Crystallines at High Pressure and Finite Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向士凯; 蔡灵仓; 张林; 经福谦

    2002-01-01

    Elastic constants of Na and Li metals are calculated successfully for temperatures up to 350K and pressures up to 30 GPa using a scheme without involving any adjustable parameter. Elastic constants are assumed to depend only on an effective pair potential that is only determined by the average interatomic distance. Temperature has an effect on elastic constants by way of charging the equilibrium. The elastic constants can be obtained by fitting the relationship between total energy and strain tensor using the new set of lattice parameters obtained by calculating displacement of atoms at the finite temperature and at a fixed pressure. The relationship between the effective pair potential and the interatomic distance is fitted by using a series of data of cohesive energy corresponding to lattice parameters.

  18. Validation of a Finite Element Humeroradial Joint Model of Contact Pressure Using Fuji Pressure Sensitive Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghwan; Carl Miller, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A finite element (FE) elbow model was developed to predict the contact stress and contact area of the native humeroradial joint. The model was validated using Fuji pressure sensitive film with cadaveric elbows for which axial loads of 50, 100, and 200 N were applied through the radial head. Maximum contact stresses ranged from 1.7 to 4.32 MPa by FE predictions and from 1.34 to 3.84 MPa by pressure sensitive film measurement while contact areas extended from 39.33 to 77.86 mm2 and 29.73 to 83.34 mm2 by FE prediction and experimental measurement, respectively. Measurements from cadaveric testing and FE predictions showed the same patterns in both the maximum contact stress and contact area, as another demonstration of agreement. While measured contact pressures and contact areas validated the FE predictions, computed maximum stresses and contact area tended to overestimate the maximum contact stress and contact area.

  19. Effective permittivity of finite inhomogeneous objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghunathan, S.B.; Budko, N.V.

    2010-01-01

    A generalization of the S-parameter retrieval method for finite three-dimensional inhomogeneous objects under arbitrary illumination and observation conditions is presented. The effective permittivity of such objects may be rigorously defined as a solution of a nonlinear inverse scattering problem.

  20. A displacement-pressure finite element formulation for analyzing the sound transmission in ducted shear flows with finite poroelastic lining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nennig, Benoit; Tahar, Mabrouk Ben; Perrey-Debain, Emmanuel

    2011-07-01

    In the present work, the propagation of sound in a lined duct containing sheared mean flow is studied. Walls of the duct are acoustically treated with absorbent poroelastic foams. The propagation of elasto-acoustic waves in the liner is described by Biot's model. In the fluid domain, the propagation of sound in a sheared mean flow is governed by the Galbrun's equation. The problem is solved using a mixed displacement-pressure finite element formulation in both domains. A 3D implementation of the model has been performed and is illustrated on axisymmetric examples. Convergence and accuracy of the numerical model are shown for the particular case of the modal propagation in a infinite duct containing a uniform flow. Practical examples concerning the sound attenuation through dissipative silencers are discussed. In particular, effects of the refraction effects in the shear layer as well as the mounting conditions of the foam on the transmission loss are shown. The presence of a perforate screen at the air-porous interface is also considered and included in the model.

  1. Parametric Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of Strain Ratcheting in Pressurized Elbows Based on Random Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhao

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The large strain ratcheting in cyclic plasticity of a typical pressurized pipe elbow in a realistic nuclear piping system was investigated in a more quantitative manner than previously. The elbow was modeled using a fine mesh of shell elements that can provide the completed information of detailed time varying strain distributions in the whole elbow area. The nonlinear time history stress analyses performed were based on a pseudostatic concept using the vector-valued stochastic displacement response time series loaded at the elbow ends. The response time series were synthesized using a simulation approach based on the random vibration analyses of the piping system and its supporting building. After a finite element mesh convergence study, parametric analyses were conducted that included the effects due to the magnitude changes in excitation level, internal pressure, material yield stress, and material strain hardening.

  2. Numerical simulation of pressure therapy glove by using Finite Element Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Annie; Yick, Kit Lun; Ng, Sun Pui; Yip, Joanne; Chan, Ying Fan

    2016-02-01

    Pressure therapy garments apply pressure to suppress the growth and flatten hypertrophic scars caused by serious burns. The amount of pressure given by the pressure garments is critical to the treatment adherence and outcomes. In the present study, a biomechanical model for simulating the pressure magnitudes and distribution over hand dorsum given by a pressure glove was developed by using finite element method. In this model, the shape geometry of the hand, the mechanical properties of the glove and human body tissues were incorporated in the numerical stress analyses. The geometry of the hand was obtained by a 3D laser scanner. The material properties of two warp knitted fabrics were considered in the glove fabric model that developed from the glove production pattern with 10% size reduction in circumferential dimensions. The glove was regarded an isotropic elastic shell and the hand was assumed to be a homogeneous, isotropic and linearly elastic body. A glove wearing process was carried in the finite element analysis and the surface-to-surface contact pressure between hand and glove fabric was hence obtained. Through validation, the simulated contact pressure showed a good agreement with the experimental interface pressure measurement. The simulation model can be used to predict and visualise the pressure distribution exerted by a pressure therapy glove onto hand dorsum. It can provide information for optimising the material mechanical properties in pressure garment design and development, give a clue to understand the mechanisms of pressure action on hypertrophic scars and ultimately improve the medical functions of pressure garment.

  3. Finite-size effects from giant magnons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arutyunov, Gleb [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)]. E-mail: g.arutyunov@phys.uu.nl; Frolov, Sergey [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)]. E-mail: frolovs@aei.mpg.de; Zamaklar, Marija [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)]. E-mail: marzam@aei.mpg.de

    2007-08-27

    In order to analyze finite-size effects for the gauge-fixed string sigma model on AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}, we construct one-soliton solutions carrying finite angular momentum J. In the infinite J limit the solutions reduce to the recently constructed one-magnon configuration of Hofman and Maldacena. The solutions do not satisfy the level-matching condition and hence exhibit a dependence on the gauge choice, which however disappears as the size J is taken to infinity. Interestingly, the solutions do not conserve all the global charges of the psu(2,2-vertical bar4) algebra of the sigma model, implying that the symmetry algebra of the gauge-fixed string sigma model is different from psu(2,2-vertical bar4) for finite J, once one gives up the level-matching condition. The magnon dispersion relation exhibits exponential corrections with respect to the infinite J solution. We also find a generalisation of our one-magnon configuration to a solution carrying two charges on the sphere. We comment on the possible implications of our findings for the existence of the Bethe ansatz describing the spectrum of strings carrying finite charges.

  4. Finite heat-capacity effects in regenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waele, A. T. A. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence the finite heat capacity of the matrix of regenerators on the performance of cryocoolers. The dynamics of the various parameters is treated in the harmonic approximation focussing on the finite heat-capacity effects, real-gas effects, and heat conduction. It is assumed that the flow resistance is zero, that the heat contact between the gas and the matrix is perfect, and that there is no mass storage in the matrix. Based on an energy-flow analysis, the limiting temperature, temperature profiles in the regenerator, and cooling powers are calculated. The discussion refers to pulse-tube refrigerators, but it is equally relevant for Stirling coolers and GM-coolers.

  5. EFFECTIVE STRESS AND STRAIN IN FINITE DEFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周喆; 秦伶俐; 黄文彬; 王红卫

    2004-01-01

    Whether the concept of effective stress and strain in elastic-plastic theory is still valid under the condition of finite deformation was mainly discussed. The uni-axial compression experiments in plane stress and plane strain states were chosen for study. In the two kinds of stress states, the stress- strain curve described by logarithm strain and rotated Kirchhoff stress matches the experiments data better than the curves defined by other stressstrain description.

  6. Effects of simulation parameters on residual stresses for laser shock peening finite element analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju Hee [Korea Military Academy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joung Soo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    By using finite element analysis, we proposed an applicable finite element method of laser shock peening (LSP) and discussed various parameters, such as solution time, stability limit, dynamic yield stress, peak pressure, pressure pulse duration, laser spot size, and multiple LSP. The effects of parameters related to the finite element simulation of the LSP process on the residual stresses of 35CD4 30HRC steel alloy are discussed. Parametric sensitivity analyses were performed to establish the optimum processing variables of the LSP process. In addition, we evaluated the effects of initial residual stress, such as welding-induced residual stress field.

  7. Finite temperature effects on CP violating asymmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Covi, L; Roulet, Esteban; Vissani, F; Covi, Laura; Rius, Nuria; Roulet, Esteban; Vissani, Francesco

    1998-01-01

    We compute the CP violating decay asymmetries relevant for baryogenesis scenarios involving the out of equilibrium decays of heavy particles, including the finite temperature effects arising from the background of light thermal particles which are present during the decay epoch. Thermal effects can modify the size of CP violation by a sizeable fraction in the decay of scalar particles, but we find interesting cancellations in the thermal corrections affecting the asymmetries in the decays of fermions, as well as in the decay of scalars in supersymmetric theories. We also estimate the effects which arise from the motion of the decaying particles with respect to the background plasma.

  8. The Efimov effect with finite range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platter, Lucas

    2017-01-01

    Systems of strongly interacting atoms are receiving a lot of attention because of their interesting features in the few- and many-body sector. Strong interactions are frequently obtained in experiment by using a Feshbach resonance to tune the scattering to large values. A striking feature of three-body systems with a large scattering is the emergence of a discrete scaling symmetry that is also known as the Efimov effect. The Efimov effect has been observed through the measurement of loss rates in experiments with ultracold atoms. It is, however, also relevant to nuclear physics where the three-nucleon bound state and some halo nuclei are considered to be examples of Efimov states. Such systems can be modeled conveniently with the zero-range limit, however, in many of such experiments the finite range of the interaction leads to significant corrections that need to be taken into account. I will discuss how a finite effective range can be included in calculations for three-body systems that display the Efimov effect and how this leads to novel universal relations. Applications to experiments with homonuclear and heteronuclear ultracold atomic gases are discussed. National Science Foundation PHY-1516077, PHY-1555030.

  9. Effective Stiffness: Generalizing Effective Resistance Sampling to Finite Element Matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Avron, Haim

    2011-01-01

    We define the notion of effective stiffness and show that it can used to build sparsifiers, algorithms that sparsify linear systems arising from finite-element discretizations of PDEs. In particular, we show that sampling $O(n\\log n)$ elements according to probabilities derived from effective stiffnesses yields an high quality preconditioner that can be used to solve the linear system in a small number of iterations. Effective stiffness generalizes the notion of effective resistance, a key ingredient of recent progress in developing nearly linear symmetric diagonally dominant (SDD) linear solvers. Solving finite elements problems is of considerably more interest than the solution of SDD linear systems, since the finite element method is frequently used to numerically solve PDEs arising in scientific and engineering applications. Unlike SDD systems, which are relatively easy to precondition, there has been limited success in designing fast solvers for finite element systems, and previous algorithms usually tar...

  10. Simulation of pore pressure accumulation under cyclic loading using Finite Volume Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Tian; Hededal, Ole

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a finite volume implementation of a porous, nonlinear soil model capable of simulating pore pressure accumulation under cyclic loading. The mathematical formulations are based on modified Biot’s coupled theory by substituting the original elastic constitutive model with an adv...... mapping algorithm is used to calculate the stress and strain relation in each control volume level. Test cases show very good performance of the model.......This paper presents a finite volume implementation of a porous, nonlinear soil model capable of simulating pore pressure accumulation under cyclic loading. The mathematical formulations are based on modified Biot’s coupled theory by substituting the original elastic constitutive model...... with an advanced elastoplastic model suitable for describing monotonic as well as cyclic loading conditions. The finite volume method is applied to discretize these formulations. The resulting set of coupled nonlinear algebraic equations are then solved by a ’segregated’ solution procedure. An efficient return...

  11. Pressure Effect on Entrance Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Horslund; Couch, Mark

    1997-01-01

    The paper reports on experimentally determined pressure drops associated with orifice and capillary dies, where the exit pressure is elevated. The effect of hydrostatic pressure up to 70 MPa is reported for PS, LDPE and PP melts.......The paper reports on experimentally determined pressure drops associated with orifice and capillary dies, where the exit pressure is elevated. The effect of hydrostatic pressure up to 70 MPa is reported for PS, LDPE and PP melts....

  12. Pressure Effect on Entrance Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Horslund; Couch, Mark

    1997-01-01

    The paper reports on experimentally determined pressure drops associated with orifice and capillary dies, where the exit pressure is elevated. The effect of hydrostatic pressure up to 70 MPa is reported for PS, LDPE and PP melts.......The paper reports on experimentally determined pressure drops associated with orifice and capillary dies, where the exit pressure is elevated. The effect of hydrostatic pressure up to 70 MPa is reported for PS, LDPE and PP melts....

  13. Thermal effects on seeded finite ion temperature, high amplitude plasma blobs

    CERN Document Server

    Held, M; Madsen, J; Kendl, A

    2016-01-01

    Thermal effects on the perpendicular convection of seeded pressure blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetised fusion plasmas are investigated. Our numerical study is based on a four field full-F gyrofluid model, which entails the consistent description of high fluctuation amplitudes and dynamic finite Larmor radius effects. We find that a temperature perturbation increases the maximal blob velocity and that a finite Larmor radius contributes to highly compact blob structures with finite poloidal motion. An extensive parameter study reveals that a smooth transition to this compact blob regime occurs when the finite Larmor radius effect strength, defined by the ratio of the ion diamagnetic to the perpendicular vorticity, exceeds unity. The maximal blob velocities excellently agree with the inertial velocity scaling law over more than an order of magnitude. We show that the finite Larmor radius effect strength affects the radial transport and verify the here presented empirical scaling law for the maximal radia...

  14. Finite Element Modeling and Analysis of Powder Stream in Low Pressure Cold Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Tarun; Walia, Ravinderjit Singh; Sharma, Prince; Sidhu, Tejinder Singh

    2016-07-01

    Low pressure cold gas dynamic spray (LPCGDS) is a coating process that utilize low pressure gas (5-10 bars instead of 25-30 bars) and the radial injection of powder instead of axial injection with the particle range (1-50 μm). In the LPCGDS process, pressurized compressed gas is accelerated to the critical velocity, which depends on length of the divergent section of nozzle, the propellant gas and particle characteristics, and the diameters ratio of the inlet and outer diameters. This paper presents finite element modeling (FEM) of powder stream in supersonic nozzle wherein adiabatic gas flow and expansion of gas occurs in uniform manner and the same is used to evaluate the resultant temperature and velocity contours during coating process. FEM analyses were performed using commercial finite volume package, ANSYS CFD FLUENT. The results are helpful to predict the characteristics of powder stream at the exit of the supersonic nozzle.

  15. Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Pressurized Aircraft Fuselage Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.; Shaw, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aims to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration are not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One of the airframe concepts that might dramatically improve aircraft performance is a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presents inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses a nonlinear finite element analysis of a large-scale test article being developed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. There are specific reasons why geometrically nonlinear analysis may be warranted for the hybrid wing body flat panel structure. In general, for sufficiently high internal pressure and/or mechanical loading, energy related to the in-plane strain may become significant relative to the bending strain energy, particularly in thin-walled areas such as the minimum gage skin extensively used in the structure under analysis. To account for this effect, a geometrically nonlinear strain-displacement relationship is needed to properly couple large out-of-plane and in-plane deformations. Depending on the loading, this nonlinear coupling mechanism manifests itself in a distinct manner in compression- and tension-dominated sections of the structure. Under significant compression, nonlinear analysis is needed to accurately predict loss of stability and postbuckled deformation. Under significant tension, the nonlinear effects account for suppression of the out-of-plane deformation due to in-plane stretching. By comparing the present results with the previously

  16. Finite element modeling for predicting the contact pressure between a foam mattress and the human body in a supine position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wookjin; Won, Byeong Hee; Cho, Seong Wook

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we generated finite element (FE) models to predict the contact pressure between a foam mattress and the human body in a supine position. Twenty-year-old males were used for three-dimensional scanning to produce the FE human models, which was composed of skin and muscle tissue. A linear elastic isotropic material model was used for the skin, and the Mooney-Rivlin model was used for the muscle tissue because it can effectively represent the nonlinear behavior of muscle. The contact pressure between the human model and the mattress was predicted by numerical simulation. The human models were validated by comparing the body pressure distribution obtained from the same human subject when he was lying on two different mattress types. The experimental results showed that the slope of the lower part of the mattress caused a decrease in the contact pressure at the heels, and the effect of bone structure was most pronounced in the scapula. After inserting a simple structure to function as the scapula, the contact pressure predicted by the FE human models was consistent with the experimental body pressure distribution for all body parts. These results suggest that the models proposed in this paper will be useful to researchers and designers of products related to the prevention of pressure ulcers.

  17. Effective condition number for finite difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Cai; Chien, Cheng-Sheng; Huang, Hung-Tsai

    2007-01-01

    For solving the linear algebraic equations Ax=b with the symmetric and positive definite matrix A, from elliptic equations, the traditional condition number in the 2-norm is defined by Cond.=[lambda]1/[lambda]n, where [lambda]1 and [lambda]n are the maximal and minimal eigenvalues of the matrix A, respectively. The condition number is used to provide the bounds of the relative errors from the perturbation of both A and b. Such a Cond. can only be reached by the worst situation of all rounding errors and all b. For the given b, the true relative errors may be smaller, or even much smaller than the Cond., which is called the effective condition number in Chan and Foulser [Effectively well-conditioned linear systems, SIAM J. Sci. Statist. Comput. 9 (1988) 963-969] and Christiansen and Hansen [The effective condition number applied to error analysis of certain boundary collocation methods, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 54(1) (1994) 15-36]. In this paper, we propose the new computational formulas for effective condition number Cond_eff, and define the new simplified effective condition number Cond_E. For the latter, we only need the eigenvector corresponding to the minimal eigenvalue of A, which can be easily obtained by the inverse power method. In this paper, we also apply the effective condition number for the finite difference method for Poisson's equation. The difference grids are not supposed to be quasiuniform. Under a non-orthogonality assumption, the effective condition number is proven to be O(1) for the homogeneous boundary conditions. Such a result is extraordinary, compared with the traditional , where hmin is the minimal meshspacing of the difference grids used. For the non-homogeneous Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, the effective condition number is proven to be O(h-1/2) and , respectively, where h is the maximal meshspacing of the difference grids. Numerical experiments are carried out to verify the analysis made.

  18. Edge effects in finite elongated carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Hod, O; Scuseria, G E; Hod, Oded; Peralta, Juan E.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2006-01-01

    The importance of finite-size effects for the electronic structure of long zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes is studied. We analyze the electronic structure of capped (6,6), (8,0), and (9,0) single walled carbon nanotubes as a function of their length up to 60 nm, using a divide and conquer density functional theory approach. For the metallic nanotubes studied, most of the physical features appearing in the density of states of an infinite carbon nanotube are recovered at a length of 40 nm. The (8,0) semi-conducting nanotube studied exhibits pronounced edge effects within the energy gap that scale as the inverse of the length of the nanotube. As a result, the energy gap reduces from the value of ~1 eV calculated for the periodic system to a value of ~0.25 eV calculated for a capped 62 nm long CNT. These edge effects are expected to become negligible only at tube lengths exceeding 6 micrometers. Our results indicate that careful tailoring of the nature of the system and its capping units should be applied w...

  19. A finite element model of the human buttocks for prediction of seat pressure distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verver, M M; van Hoof, J; Oomens, C W J; Wismans, J S H M; Baaijens, F P T

    2004-08-01

    Seating comfort is becoming increasingly important for the automotive industry. Car manufacturers use seating comfort to distinguish their products from those of competitors. However, the development and design of a new, more comfortable seat is time consuming and costly. The introduction of computer models of human and seat will accelerate this process. The contact interaction between human and seat is an important factor in the comfort sensation of subjects. This paper presents a finite element (FE) model of the human buttocks, able to predict the pressure distribution between human and seating surface by its detailed and realistic geometric description. A validation study based on volunteer experiments shows reasonable correlation in pressure distributions between the buttocks model and the volunteers. Both for simulations on a rigid and a soft cushion, the model predicts realistic seat pressure distributions. A parameter study shows that a pressure distribution at the interface between human and seat strongly depends on variations in human flesh and seat cushion properties.

  20. Experimental study of finite Larmor radius effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struve, K.W.

    1980-08-01

    Linear Z-pinches in Ar, Kr, Xe, N/sub 2/, and He are experimentally studied in regimes where strong finite Larmor radius effects could provide a significant stabilizing effect. Scaling arguments show that for deuterium such a pinch has an electron line density of order 2 x 10/sup 15//cm. For higher Z plasmas a higher line density is allowed, the exact value of which depends on the average ion charge. The pinch is formed by puffing gas axially through the cathode towards the anode of an evacuated pinch chamber. When the gas reaches the anode, the pinch bank is fired. The pinch current rises in 2 to 3 ..mu..sec to a maximum of 100 to 200 kA. The pinch bank capacitance is 900 ..mu..F, and the external inductance is 100 nH. Additionally, the bank is fused to increase dI/dt. The primary diagnostics are a framing camera, a spatially resolved Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and X-ray absorption.

  1. Remedy for fictive negative pressures in biphasic finite element models of the intervertebral disc during unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hendrik; Galbusera, Fabio; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl

    2011-03-01

    Previous biphasic finite element studies investigated the temporal response of a spinal segment under rather simplified loading conditions with no attention to unloading and recovery phases. Employment of existing constitutive relations in porous media yields rather large suction-type pore pressures in the disc as the load suddenly disappears. Such negative pressures are absent in vivo and are hence fictive. The aim of this study was to search for remedies to avoid the computation of negative pressures upon unloading. Partial saturation for the disc or a rest load (RL) higher than 400 N totally eliminated the negative pressures. Decreasing the voids ratio (VR) also led to a reduced negative pressure. When defining a partial saturated disc or using a lower VR in combination with a boundary pressure of 0.25 MPa and a RL of 350 N, no negative pressure was calculated. It appears that the constraint of full saturation and a high mobile fluid fraction of the disc tissues along with inadequate tissue properties are the likely causes of negative pressures during unloading.

  2. Finite element analysis of high-pressure hose for radial horizontal wells in coalbed methane extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Dong ZHOU; Wei SHI; Luo-Peng LI; Jing-Shuang WANG; Jun SUN

    2013-01-01

    Based on the serial-parallel model of single-layer board and the lamination theory,the forces exerted on different layers of the high-pressure hose and the resulting deformations were analyzed when the hose was radially stretched.An equation was proposed to calculate the anisotropic elastic constant of the composite layer with the wound steel wires.Furthermore,the finite element analysis (FEA) model of the high-pressure hose was established,followed by a simulation of the forces that act on different layers,and their deformations.The simulation results show that the stress imposed on the inner reinforced layer and external reinforced layer of the high-pressure hose are approximately 150 MPa and l 15 MPa,respectively,in the presence of inner pressure.The stress of the rubber coating and polyethylene coating is lower.The lowest stress occurs on the inner surface of the high-pressure hose and the rubber coating between the two composite layers.The deformation of the rubber layer in the inner surface of the high-pressure hose decreases gradually along the radial direction from the inner surface to the external surface.The deformation of the reinforced composite layer is less than that of the external surface of the rubber coating.The equivalent stress of the reinforced composite layer is higher than that caused by the inner pressure,due to the presence of both inner pressure and axial tension.

  3. A Finite Element Modeling Study on the Fingertip Deformation under Pressure Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Huiling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure stimulus causes skin deformation and tactile sensation on the fingertip. Both theoretical approach and experimental technique may be used to investigate the relationship between the deformation and the sensation. Building an appropriate skin model is the most important step for further theoretical and experimental analysis. In this paper, a two dimensional (2D fingertip biomechanical model employing finite element (FE method is proposed based on the physiological structure of skin. With biomechanical and electrophysiological simulations, the predicted distributions of the strain energy density (SED and the stress/strain are obtained. The relation between the predicted biomechanical responses of the subcutaneous tissue and the discharged rate reported in the literatures are investigated. The results show that the soft tissues of fingertips are very sensitive to the external stimulus, and the spatial distribution characteristics of SED within soft tissues can explain the evoked charging rate of mechanoreceptors effectively. The simulation data of the proposed FE model is highly consistent with the verified data.

  4. Detailed finite element analysis of Darlington NGS feeder pipes with locally thinned regions below pressure minimum thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haq, I.; Stojakovic, M.; Li, M. [Ontario Power Generation Inc., Pickering, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Feeder Pipes in CANDU nuclear stations are experiencing wall thinning due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) resulting in locally thinned regions in addition to general thinning. In Darlington NGS these locally thinned regions can be below pressure based minimum thickness (t{sub min}), required as per ASME Code Section III NB-3600 Equation (1). A methodology is presented to qualify the locally thinned regions under NB-3200 (NB-3213 and NB-3221) for internal pressure loading only. Detailed finite element models are used for internal pressure analysis using ANSYS v11.0. All other loadings such as deadweight, thermal and seismic loadings are qualified under NB-3600 using a general purpose piping stress analysis software. The piping stress analysis is based on average thickness equal to t{sub min} along with maximum values of ASME Code stress indices (Table NB-3681(a)-1). The requirement for the use of this methodology is that the average thickness of each cross-section with the locally thinned region shall be at least t{sub min}. The finite element analysis models are thinned to 0.75 t{sub min} (in increments of 0.05 t{sub min}) all-around the circumference in the straight section region allowing for flexible inspection requirements. Two different thicknesses of 1.10 t{sub min} and 1.30 t{sub min} are assigned to the bends. Thickness vs the allowable axial extent curves were developed for different types of feeder pipes in service. Feeders differ in pipe size, straight section length, bend angle and orientation. The stress analysis results show that all Darlington NGS outlet feeder pipes are fit for service with locally thinned regions up to 75% of the pressure based minimum thickness. This paper demonstrates the effectiveness of finite element analysis in extending the useful life of degraded piping components. (author)

  5. Effect of Superimposed Hydrostatic Pressure on Bendability of Sheet Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. X.; Wu, P. D.; Lloyd, D. J.

    2010-06-01

    The effect of superimposed hydrostatic pressure on fracture under three-point bending is studied numerically using the finite element method based on the Gurson damage model. It is demonstrated that superimposed hydrostatic pressure significantly increases the bendability and bending fracture strain due to the fact that a superimposed pressure delays or completely eliminates the nucleation, growth and coalescence of microvoids or microcracks. Numerical results are found to be in good agreement with experimental observations.

  6. Probabilistic Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Effects on Optic Nerve Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, Andrew J.; Raykin, Julia; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Altered intracranial pressure (ICP) is involved/implicated in several ocular conditions: papilledema, glaucoma and Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. The biomechanical effects of altered ICP on optic nerve head (ONH) tissues in these conditions are uncertain but likely important. We have quantified ICP-induced deformations of ONH tissues, using finite element (FE) and probabilistic modeling (Latin Hypercube Simulations (LHS)) to consider a range of tissue properties and relevant pressures.

  7. Plantar pressure relief under the metatarsal heads: therapeutic insole design using three-dimensional finite element model of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Lee, Sung-Jae; Lee, Peter Vee Sin

    2015-02-26

    Therapeutic footwear with specially-made insoles is often used in people with diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis to relieve ulcer risks and pain due to high pressures from areas beneath bony prominences of the foot, in particular to the metatarsal heads (MTHs). In a three-dimensional finite element study of the foot and footwear with sensitivity analysis, effects of geometrical variations of a therapeutic insole, in terms of insole thicknesses and metatarsal pad (MP) placements, on local peak plantar pressure under MTHs and stress/strain states within various forefoot tissues, were determined. A validated musculoskeletal finite element model of the human foot was employed. Analyses were performed in a simulated muscle-demanding instant in gait. For many design combinations, increasing insole thicknesses consistently reduce peak pressures and internal tissue strain under MTHs, but the effects reach a plateau when insole becomes very thick (e.g., a value of 12.7mm or greater). Altering MP placements, however, showed a proximally- and a distally-placed MP could result in reverse effects on MTH pressure-relief. The unsuccessful outcome due to a distally-placed MP may attribute to the way it interacts with plantar tissue (e.g., plantar fascia) adjacent to the MTH. A uniform pattern of tissue compression under metatarsal shaft is necessary for a most favorable pressure-relief under MTHs. The designated functions of an insole design can best be achieved when the insole is very thick, and when the MP can achieve a uniform tissue compression pattern adjacent to the MTH.

  8. Pressure Effect on Extensional Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Horslund; Kjær, Erik Michael

    1999-01-01

    The primary object of these experiments was to investigate the influence of hydrostatic pressure on entrance flow. The effect of pressure on shear and extensional viscosity was evaluated using an axis symmetric capillary and a slit die where the hydrostatic pressure was raised with valves...

  9. Finite element analysis to characterize how varying patellar loading influences pressure applied to cartilage: model evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kushal S; Saranathan, Archana; Koya, Bharath; Elias, John J

    2015-01-01

    A finite element analysis (FEA) modeling technique has been developed to characterize how varying the orientation of the patellar tendon influences the patellofemoral pressure distribution. To evaluate the accuracy of the technique, models were created from MRI images to represent five knees that were previously tested in vitro to determine the influence of hamstrings loading on patellofemoral contact pressures. Hamstrings loading increased the lateral and posterior orientation of the patellar tendon. Each model was loaded at 40°, 60°, and 80° of flexion with quadriceps force vectors representing the experimental loading conditions. The orientation of the patellar tendon was represented for the loaded and unloaded hamstrings conditions based on experimental measures of tibiofemoral alignment. Similar to the experimental data, simulated loading of the hamstrings within the FEA models shifted the center of pressure laterally and increased the maximum lateral pressure. Significant (p pressure and maximum lateral pressure from paired t-tests carried out at the individual flexion angles. The ability to replicate experimental trends indicates that the FEA models can be used for future studies focused on determining how variations in the orientation of the patellar tendon related to anatomical or loading variations or surgical procedures influence the patellofemoral pressure distribution.

  10. Finite-size effects in the spherical model of finite thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamati, H.

    2008-09-01

    A detailed analysis of the finite-size effects on the bulk critical behaviour of the d-dimensional mean spherical model confined to a film geometry with finite thickness L is reported. Along the finite direction different kinds of boundary conditions are applied: periodic (p), antiperiodic (a) and free surfaces with Dirichlet (D), Neumann (N) and a combination of Neumann and Dirichlet (ND) on both surfaces. A systematic method for the evaluation of the finite-size corrections to the free energy for the different types of boundary conditions is proposed. The free energy density and the equation for the spherical field are computed for arbitrary d. It is found, for 2 finite-size scaling form at the bulk critical temperature only for (p) and (a). For the remaining boundary conditions the standard finite-size scaling hypothesis is not valid. At d = 3, the critical amplitude of the singular part of the free energy (related to the so-called Casimir amplitude) is estimated. We obtain Δ(p) = -2ζ(3)/(5π) = -0.153 051..., Δ(a) = 0.274 543... and Δ(ND) = 0.019 22..., implying a fluctuation-induced attraction between the surfaces for (p) and repulsion in the other two cases. For (D) and (N) we find a logarithmic dependence on L.

  11. Exponential reduction of finite volume effects with twisted boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Cherman, Aleksey; Wagman, Michael L; Yaffe, Laurence G

    2016-01-01

    Flavor-twisted boundary conditions can be used for exponential reduction of finite volume artifacts in flavor-averaged observables in lattice QCD calculations with $SU(N_f)$ light quark flavor symmetry. Finite volume artifact reduction arises from destructive interference effects in a manner closely related to the phase averaging which leads to large $N_c$ volume independence. With a particular choice of flavor-twisted boundary conditions, finite volume artifacts for flavor-singlet observables in a hypercubic spacetime volume are reduced to the size of finite volume artifacts in a spacetime volume with periodic boundary conditions that is four times larger.

  12. Finite Larmor Radius Effects to Arbitrary Order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knorr, G.; Hansen, F.R.; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    1988-01-01

    A representation of a finite Larmor radius plasma is proposed, which permits the transition rL → ∞ without becoming mathematically ill-posed. It is being used in a two-dimensional guiding center plasma spectral code and may have useful analytical applications. The ions are represented as guiding...... centers and the Larmor radius is averaged analytically for every Fourier-mode. Finite Larmor radius densities and velocities are thus obtained from guiding center quantities by application of a filter in wave vector space....

  13. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, Z; Katz, S D; Lellouch, L; Portelli, A; Szabo, K K; Toth, B C

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  14. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fodor, Z. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52428 Jülich (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Eötvös University, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Hoelbling, C. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Katz, S.D. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Eötvös University, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); MTA-ELTE Lendület Lattice Gauge Theory Research Group, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Lellouch, L., E-mail: lellouch@cpt.univ-mrs.fr [CNRS, Aix-Marseille U., U. de Toulon, CPT, UMR 7332, F-13288, Marseille (France); Portelli, A. [School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Szabo, K.K. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52428 Jülich (Germany); Toth, B.C. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2016-04-10

    Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  15. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Fodor

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  16. Optimal Control Problems in Finite-Strain Elasticity by Inner Pressure and Fiber Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eGünnel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Optimal control problems for finite-strain elasticity are considered.An inner pressure or an inner fiber tension are acting as driving forces.Such internal forces are typical, for instance, for the motion of heliotropic plants, and for muscle tissue.Non-standard objective functions relevant for elasticity problems are introduced.Optimality conditions are derived on a formal basis, and a limited-memory quasi-Newton algorithm for their solution is formulated in function space.Numerical experiments confirm the expected mesh-independent performance.

  17. Finite element modelling of high air pressure forming processes for polymer sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, W.-G.; Warby, M. K.; Whiteman, J. R.; Abbott, S.; Shorter, W.; Warwick, P.; Wright, T.; Munro, A.; Munro, B.

    In this paper we describe the mathematical modelling and computational simulation of the high air pressure (HAP) thermoforming process which is used in the creation of thin walled polymeric structures. This involves, using data from material tests, an elastic-plastic constitutive equation valid for large deformations and a constrained deformation in which there is frictional contact between the polymeric sheet and a constraining surface (the mould surface). Despite a number of simplifying assumptions and some uncertainities in the mathematical model the finite element computations presented predict quite well the actual shape and thickness distribution which are found on sample products.

  18. A velocity-pressure integrated, mixed interpolation, Galerkin finite element method for high Reynolds number laminar flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1988-01-01

    A velocity-pressure integrated, mixed interpolation, Galerkin finite element method for the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. In the method, the velocity variables were interpolated using complete quadratic shape functions and the pressure was interpolated using linear shape functions. For the two dimensional case, the pressure is defined on a triangular element which is contained inside the complete biquadratic element for velocity variables; and for the three dimensional case, the pressure is defined on a tetrahedral element which is again contained inside the complete tri-quadratic element. Thus the pressure is discontinuous across the element boundaries. Example problems considered include: a cavity flow for Reynolds number of 400 through 10,000; a laminar backward facing step flow; and a laminar flow in a square duct of strong curvature. The computational results compared favorable with those of the finite difference methods as well as experimental data available. A finite elememt computer program for incompressible, laminar flows is presented.

  19. Effects of Finite-time Singularities on Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kleidis, K

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the impact of finite-time singularities on gravitational waves, in the context of $F(R)$ gravity. We investigate which singularities are allowed to occur during the inflationary era, when gravitational waves are considered, and we discuss the quantitative implications of each allowed singularity. As we show, only a pressure singularity, the so-called Type II and also a Type IV singularity are allowed to occur during the inflationary era. In the case of a Type II, the resulting amplitude of the gravitational wave is zero or almost zero, hence this pressure singularity has a significant impact on the primordial gravitational waves. The case of a Type IV singularity is more interesting since as we show, the singularity has no effect on the amplitude of the gravitational waves. Therefore, this result combined with the fact that the Type IV singularity affects only the dynamics of inflation, leads to the conclusion that the Universe passes smoothly through a Type IV singularity.

  20. Fully Consistent Finite-Strain Landau Theory for High-Pressure Phase Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröster, A.; Schranz, W.; Karsai, F.; Blaha, P.

    2014-07-01

    Landau theory (LT) is an indispensable cornerstone in the thermodynamic description of phase transitions. As with structural transitions, most applications require one to consistently take into account the role of strain. If temperature drives the transition, the relevant strains are, as a rule, small enough to be treated as infinitesimal, and therefore one can get away with linearized elasticity theory. However, for transitions driven by high pressure, strains may become so large that it is absolutely mandatory to treat them as finite and deal with the nonlinear nature of the accompanying elastic energy. In this paper, we explain how to set up and apply what is, in fact, the only possible consistent Landau theory of high-pressure phase transitions that systematically allows us to take these geometrical and physical nonlinearities into account. We also show how to incorporate available information on the pressure dependence of elastic constants taken from experiment or simulation. We apply our new theory to the example of the high-pressure cubic-tetragonal phase transition in strontium titanate, a model perovskite that has played a central role in the development of the theory of structural phase transitions. Armed with pressure-dependent elastic constants calculated by density-functional theory, we give an accurate description of recent high-precision experimental data and predict a number of elastic transition anomalies accessible to experiments.

  1. Measurements of Finite Dust Temperature Effects in the Dispersion Relation of the Dust Acoustic Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipes, Erica; Williams, Jeremiah

    2009-04-01

    A dusty plasma is a four-component system composed of ions, electrons, neutral particles and charged microparticles. The presence of these charged microparticles gives rise to new plasma wave modes, including the dust acoustic wave. Recent measurements [1, 2] of the dispersion relationship for the dust acoustic wave in a glow discharge have shown that finite temperature effects are observed at higher values of neutral pressure. Other work [3] has shown that these effects are not observed at lower values of neutral pressure. We present the results of ongoing work examining finite temperature effects in the dispersion relation as a function of neutral pressure. [4pt] [1] E. Thomas, Jr., R. Fisher, and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007). [0pt] [2] J. D. Williams, E. Thomas Jr., and L. Marcus, Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008). [0pt] [3] T. Trottenberg, D. Block, and A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 13, 042105 (2006).

  2. Evanescent pressure gradient response in the upper ocean to subinertial wind stress forcing of finite wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Warren B.; Mcnally, Gerard

    1987-01-01

    A schematic model is used to interpret field observations related to the mixed layer response to wind stress at subinertial frequencies. It is shown that subinertial density and pressure fluctuations can arise locally from the finite wavelength character of the wind stress forcing as a fundamental part of the upper ocean transient, wind-driven response on time scales of 2-10 pendulum days. Evanescent vertical motions arise which alter the density field of the pycnocline, and hence the pressure field over the entire upper ocean. It is thus found that in the real ocean driven by wind stress, a transient geostrophic response exists which can be as large or larger than the transient Eckman response.

  3. Finite-size effects in silica: a landscape perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saksaengwijit, A; Heuer, A [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie and International Graduate School of Chemistry, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2007-05-23

    Finite-size effects are analysed for the well-known BKS model of silica. Results are presented for thermodynamic as well as dynamic observables which play a key role in the analysis of the potential energy landscape. It turns out that, for the analysed temperature range (T{>=}3000 K), a system with only N = 99 particles does not display significant finite-size effects in thermodynamic observables. In agreement with previous work, one observes finite-size effects for the dynamics. However, after rescaling of time the finite-size effects nearly disappear. These results suggest that for BKS-silica a system with only N = 99 particles is sufficiently large to study important properties of structural relaxation in the temperature range considered.

  4. Effects of symmetry breaking in finite quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birman, J.L. [Department of Physics, City College, City University of New York, New York, NY 10031 (United States); Nazmitdinov, R.G. [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca 07122 (Spain); Bogolubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Yukalov, V.I., E-mail: yukalov@theor.jinr.ru [Bogolubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    The review considers the peculiarities of symmetry breaking and symmetry transformations and the related physical effects in finite quantum systems. Some types of symmetry in finite systems can be broken only asymptotically. However, with a sufficiently large number of particles, crossover transitions become sharp, so that symmetry breaking happens similarly to that in macroscopic systems. This concerns, in particular, global gauge symmetry breaking, related to Bose–Einstein condensation and superconductivity, or isotropy breaking, related to the generation of quantum vortices, and the stratification in multicomponent mixtures. A special type of symmetry transformation, characteristic only for finite systems, is the change of shape symmetry. These phenomena are illustrated by the examples of several typical mesoscopic systems, such as trapped atoms, quantum dots, atomic nuclei, and metallic grains. The specific features of the review are: (i) the emphasis on the peculiarities of the symmetry breaking in finite mesoscopic systems; (ii) the analysis of common properties of physically different finite quantum systems; (iii) the manifestations of symmetry breaking in the spectra of collective excitations in finite quantum systems. The analysis of these features allows for the better understanding of the intimate relation between the type of symmetry and other physical properties of quantum systems. This also makes it possible to predict new effects by employing the analogies between finite quantum systems of different physical nature.

  5. Finite temperature Casimir effect for graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Fialkovsky, Ignat V; Vassilevich, Dmitri V

    2011-01-01

    We adopt the Dirac model for quasiparticles in graphene and calculate the finite temperature Casimir interaction between a suspended graphene layer and a parallel conducting surface. We find that at high temperature the Casimir interaction in such system is just one half of that for two ideal conductors separated by the same distance. In this limit single graphene layer behaves exactly as a Drude metal. In particular, the contribution of the TE mode is suppressed, while one of the TM mode saturates the ideal metal value. Behaviour of the Casimir interaction for intermediate temperatures and separations accessible for an experiment is studied in some detail. We also find an interesting interplay between two fundamental constants of graphene physics: the fine structure constant and the Fermi velocity.

  6. The application of super wavelet finite element on temperature-pressure coupled field simulation of LPG tank under jet fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin

    2015-02-01

    Temperature-pressure coupled field analysis of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) tank under jet fire can offer theoretical guidance for preventing the fire accidents of LPG tank, the application of super wavelet finite element on it is studied in depth. First, review of related researches on heat transfer analysis of LPG tank under fire and super wavelet are carried out. Second, basic theory of super wavelet transform is studied. Third, the temperature-pressure coupled model of gas phase and liquid LPG under jet fire is established based on the equation of state, the VOF model and the RNG k-ɛ model. Then the super wavelet finite element formulation is constructed using the super wavelet scale function as interpolating function. Finally, the simulation is carried out, and results show that the super wavelet finite element method has higher computing precision than wavelet finite element method.

  7. Finite element analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure fuel turbopump turbine blade (HPFTP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. M.; Faile, G. C.; Perkins, L. B.; Yaksh, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    Cracking of the turbine blades of the SSME HPFTP is studied using two- and three-dimensional finite element analysis. The development and composition of the two- and three-dimensional models are described. Analyses are conducted under the speed, pressure, and thermal load conditions that occur during the full power level of the engine. The effects of friction on the two-dimensional model are examined. The strain and life cycle data reveal that the LCF cracking in the first stage is not probable unless the effects of fit-up tolerance between the blade and rotor are present, and for the second stage it is predicted that hydrogen assisted LCF cracking will occur under the present thermal environment. Design modifications to alleviate this cracking are discussed.

  8. Effective results for unit equations over finitely generated domains

    CERN Document Server

    Evertse, Jan-Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    Let A be a commutative domain containing Z which is finitely generated as a Z-algebra, and let a,b,c be non-zero elements of A. It follows from work of Siegel, Mahler, Parry and Lang that the equation (*) ax+by=c has only finitely many solutions in elements x,y of the unit group A* of A, but the proof following from their arguments is ineffective. Using linear forms in logarithms estimates of Baker and Coates, in 1979 Gy\\H{o}ry gave an effective proof of this finiteness result, in the special case that A is the ring of S-integers of an algebraic number field. Some years later, Gy\\H{o}ry extended this to a restricted class of finitely generated domains A, containing transcendental elements. In the present paper, we give an effective finiteness proof for the number of solutions of (*) for arbitrary domains A finitely generated over Z. In fact, we give an explicit upper bound for the `sizes' of the solutions x,y, in terms of defining parameters for A,a,b,c. In our proof, we use already existing effective finiten...

  9. Bone geometry on the contact stress in the shoulder for evaluation of pressure ulcers: finite element modeling and experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ying; Wang, Yancheng; Tai, Bruce L; Chen, Roland K; Shih, Albert J

    2015-02-01

    This research presents the finite element modeling (FEM) of human-specific computed tomography (CT) data to study the effect of bone prominences on contact stress in the shoulder for prevention of pressure ulcers. The 3D geometry of scapula, skin, and surrounding soft tissues in the shoulder was reconstructed based on the anonymous CT data of a human subject in a prone posture (without loading on the shoulder) for FEM analysis of the contact stress. FEM analysis results show that the maximum stress is located at the prominence of the scapula with sharp bone geometry. This demonstrates that stress concentration at the bone prominence is a significant factor to cause the high contact stress, which is a source for pressure ulcers. For experimental validation, a physical shoulder model manufactured by 3D printing of the bone geometry and the mold for molding of tissue-mimicking silicone was developed. Compression tests of the mattress foam and silicone were conducted to find the nonlinear stress-strain relations as inputs for FEM. Experiments of compressing the shoulder model against the foam were carried out. Three flexible force sensors were embedded inside the model to measure the contact forces and compared to the FEM predictions. Results show that the FEM predicted forces match well with the experimental measurements and demonstrate that FEM can accurately predict the stress distributions in the shoulder to study the effect of bone geometry on the inception of pressure ulcers.

  10. Finite Number and Finite Size Effects in Relativistic Bose-Einstein Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Shiokawa, K

    1999-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation of a relativistic ideal Bose gas in a rectangular cavity is studied. Finite size corrections to the critical temperature are obtained by the heat kernel method. Using zeta-function regularization of one-loop effective potential, lower dimensional critical temperatures are calculated. In the presence of strong anisotropy, the condensation is shown to occur in multisteps. The criteria of this behavior is that critical temperatures corresponding to lower dimensional systems are smaller than the three dimensional critical temperature.

  11. Theory of azimuthally small-scale hydromagnetic waves in the axisymmetric magnetosphere with finite plasma pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Y. Klimushkin

    Full Text Available The structure of monochromatic MHD-waves with large azimuthal wave number m≫1 in a two-dimensional model of the magnetosphere has been investigated. A joint action of the field line curvature, finite plasma pressure, and transversal equilibrium current leads to the phenomenon that waves, standing along the field lines, are travelling across the magnetic shells. The wave propagation region, the transparency region, is bounded by the poloidal magnetic surface on one side and by the resonance surface on the other. In their meaning these surfaces correspond to the usual and singular turning points in the WKB-approximation, respectively. The wave is excited near the poloidal surface and propagates toward the resonance surface where it is totally absorbed due to the ionospheric dissipation. There are two transparency regions in a finite-beta magnetosphere, one of them corresponds to the Alfvén mode and the other to the slow magnetosound mode.

    Key words. Magnetosphere · Azimuthally small-scale waves · MHD waves

  12. Adjoint complement to viscous finite-volume pressure-correction methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stück, Arthur; Rung, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    A hybrid-adjoint Navier-Stokes method for the pressure-based computation of hydrodynamic objective functional derivatives with respect to the shape is systematically derived in three steps: The underlying adjoint partial differential equations and boundary conditions for the frozen-turbulence Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are considered in the first step. In step two, the adjoint discretisation is developed from the primal, unstructured finite-volume discretisation, such that adjoint-consistent approximations to the adjoint partial differential equations are obtained following a so-called hybrid-adjoint approach. A unified, discrete boundary description is outlined that supports high- and low-Reynolds number turbulent wall-boundary treatments for both the adjoint boundary condition and the boundary-based gradient formula. The third component focused in the development of the industrial adjoint CFD method is the adjoint counterpart to the primal pressure-correction algorithm. The approach is verified against the direct-differentiation method and an application to internal flow problems is presented.

  13. Finite Volume Effect of Baryons in Strange Hadronic Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Bao-Xi; LI Lei; NING Ping-Zhi; ZHAO En-Guang

    2001-01-01

    The finite volume effect of baryons in strange hadronic matter (SHM) is studied within the framework of relativistic mean-field theory. As this effect is concerned, the saturation density of SHM turns lower, and the binding energy per baryon decreases. Its influence to the compression modulus of SHM is also discussed.

  14. Partial wave decomposition of finite-range effective tensor interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Davesne, D; Pastore, A; Navarro, J

    2016-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the properties of the finite-range tensor term associated with the Gogny and M3Y effective interactions. In particular, by using a partial wave decomposition of the equation of state of symmetric nuclear matter, we show how we can extract their tensor parameters directly from microscopic results based on bare nucleon-nucleon interactions. Furthermore, we show that the zero-range limit of both finite-range interactions has the form of the N3LO Skyrme pseudo-potential, which thus constitutes a reliable approximation in the density range relevant for finite nuclei. Finally, we use Brueckner-Hartree-Fock results to fix the tensor parameters for the three effective interactions.

  15. An acoustic finite element including viscothermal effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, M.J.J.; Wijnant, Y.H.; Boer, de A.

    2007-01-01

    In acoustics it is generally assumed that viscous- en thermal boundary layer effects play a minor role in the propagation of sound waves. Hence, these effects are neglected in the basic set of equations describing the sound field. However, for geometries that include small confinements of air or thi

  16. Hydro-mechanical pressure response to fluid injection into finite aquifers highlights the non-local behavior of storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Silvia; Carrera, Jesus

    2017-04-01

    Specific storage reflects the volumetric deformation capacity of permeable media. Classical groundwater hydrology equals elastic storage to medium compressibility, which is a constant-in-time and locally-defined parameter. This allows simplifying the flow equation into a linear diffusion equation that is relatively easy to solve. However, the hydraulic gradients, generated by fluid injection or pumping, act as forces that push the medium in the direction of flow causing it to deform, even in regions where pressure has not changed. Actual deformation depends on the elastic properties of the medium, but also on aquifer geometry and on surrounding strata, which act like constraints to displacements. Therefore the storage results to be non-local (i.e., the volume of water released at a point depends on the poroelastic response over the whole aquifer) and the proper evaluation of transient pressure requires acknowledging the hydro-mechanical (HM) coupling, which is generally disregarded by conventional hydrogeology. Here we discuss whether HM coupling effects are relevant, which is of special interest for the activities of enhanced geothermics, waste disposal, CO2 storage or shale gas extraction. We propose analytic solutions to the HM problem of fluid injection (or extraction) into finite aquifers with one-dimensional or cylindrical geometries. We find that the deviation respect to traditional purely hydraulic solutions is significant when the aquifer has limited capacity to deform. The most relevant implications are that the response time is faster and the pressure variation greater than expected, which may be relevant for aquifer characterization and for the evaluation of pressure build-up due to fluid injection.

  17. Finite-size effects for anisotropic bootstrap percolation : Logarithmic corrections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Enter, Aernout C. D.; Hulshof, Tim

    2007-01-01

    In this note we analyse an anisotropic, two-dimensional bootstrap percolation model introduced by Gravner and Griffeath. We present upper and lower bounds on the finite-size effects. We discuss the similarities with the semi-oriented model introduced by Duarte.

  18. Analytical theory of finite-size effects in mechanical desorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skvortsov, A.M.; Klushin, L.I.; Fleer, G.J.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a unique system that allows exact analytical investigation of first- and second-order transitions with finite-size effects: mechanical desorption of an ideal lattice polymer chain grafted with one end to a solid substrate with a pulling force applied to the other end. We exploit the analo

  19. Simplified versus geometrically accurate models of forefoot anatomy to predict plantar pressures: A finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telfer, Scott; Erdemir, Ahmet; Woodburn, James; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2016-01-25

    Integration of patient-specific biomechanical measurements into the design of therapeutic footwear has been shown to improve clinical outcomes in patients with diabetic foot disease. The addition of numerical simulations intended to optimise intervention design may help to build on these advances, however at present the time and labour required to generate and run personalised models of foot anatomy restrict their routine clinical utility. In this study we developed second-generation personalised simple finite element (FE) models of the forefoot with varying geometric fidelities. Plantar pressure predictions from barefoot, shod, and shod with insole simulations using simplified models were compared to those obtained from CT-based FE models incorporating more detailed representations of bone and tissue geometry. A simplified model including representations of metatarsals based on simple geometric shapes, embedded within a contoured soft tissue block with outer geometry acquired from a 3D surface scan was found to provide pressure predictions closest to the more complex model, with mean differences of 13.3kPa (SD 13.4), 12.52kPa (SD 11.9) and 9.6kPa (SD 9.3) for barefoot, shod, and insole conditions respectively. The simplified model design could be produced in 3h in the case of the more detailed model, and solved on average 24% faster. FE models of the forefoot based on simplified geometric representations of the metatarsal bones and soft tissue surface geometry from 3D surface scans may potentially provide a simulation approach with improved clinical utility, however further validity testing around a range of therapeutic footwear types is required.

  20. Fluid pressurization and tractional forces during TMJ disc loading: A biphasic finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y; Cisewski, S E; Wei, F; She, X; Gonzales, T S; Iwasaki, L R; Nickel, J C; Yao, H

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the ploughing mechanism associated with tractional force formation on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc surface. Ten left TMJ discs were harvested from 6- to 8-month-old male Yorkshire pigs. Confined compression tests characterized mechanical TMJ disc properties, which were incorporated into a biphasic finite element model (FEM). The FEM was established to investigate load carriage within the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the ploughing mechanism during tractional force formation by simulating previous in vitro plough experiments. Biphasic mechanical properties were determined in five TMJ disc regions (average±standard deviation for aggregate modulus: 0.077±0.040 MPa; hydraulic permeability: 0.88±0.37×10(-3) mm(4) /Ns). FE simulation results demonstrated that interstitial fluid pressurization is a dominant loading support mechanism in the TMJ disc. Increased contact load and duration led to increased solid ECM strain and stress within, and increased ploughing force on the surface of the disc. Sustained mechanical loading may play a role in load carriage within the ECM and ploughing force formation during stress-field translation at the condyle-disc interface. This study further elucidated the mechanism of ploughing on tractional force formation and provided a baseline for future analysis of TMJ mechanics, cartilage fatigue and early TMJ degeneration. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Finite size effects in simulations of protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Pawar

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that the soluble protofibrillar species that proceed amyloid fibril formation are associated with a range of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases. Computer simulations of the processes that lead to the formation of these oligomeric species are starting to make significant contributions to our understanding of the determinants of protein aggregation. We simulate different systems at constant concentration but with a different number of peptides and we study the how the finite number of proteins affects the underlying free energy of the system and therefore the relative stability of the species involved in the process. If not taken into account, this finite size effect can undermine the validity of theoretical predictions regarding the relative stability of the species involved and the rates of conversion from one to the other. We discuss the reasons that give rise to this finite size effect form both a probabilistic and energy fluctuations point of view and also how this problem can be dealt by a finite size scaling analysis.

  2. A quasi-positive family of continuous Darcy-flux finite-volume schemes with full pressure support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael G.; Zheng, Hongwen

    2008-11-01

    A new family of flux-continuous, locally conservative, finite-volume schemes is presented for solving the general tensor pressure equation of subsurface flow in porous media. The new schemes have full pressure continuity imposed across control-volume faces. Previous families of flux-continuous schemes are point-wise continuous in pressure and flux. When applying the earlier point-wise flux-continuous schemes to strongly anisotropic full-tensor fields their failure to satisfy a maximum principle (as with other FEM and finite-volume methods) can result in loss of local stability for high anisotropy ratios which can cause strong spurious oscillations in the numerical pressure solution. An M-matrix analysis reveals the upper limits for guaranteeing a maximum principle for general 9-point schemes and aids in the design of schemes that minimize the occurrence of spurious oscillations in the discrete pressure field. The full pressure continuity schemes are shown to possess a larger range of flux-continuous schemes, than the previous point-wise counter parts. For strongly anisotropic full-tensor cases it is shown that the full quadrature range possessed by the new schemes permits these schemes to exploit quadrature points (previously out of range) that are shown to minimize spurious oscillations in discrete pressure solutions. The new formulation leads to a more robust quasi-positive family of flux-continuous schemes applicable to general discontinuous full-tensor fields.

  3. Suppression of Dielectronic Recombination Due to Finite Density Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolić, D; Korista, K T; Ferland, G J; Badnell, N R

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a general model for determining density-dependent effective dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients in order to explore finite-density effects on the ionization balance of plasmas. Our model consists of multiplying by a suppression factor those highly-accurate total zero-density DR rate coefficients which have been produced from state-of-the-art theoretical calculations and which have been benchmarked by experiment. The suppression factor is based-upon earlier detailed collision-radiative calculations which were made for a wide range of ions at various densities and temperatures, but used a simplified treatment of DR. A general suppression formula is then developed as a function of isoelectronic sequence, charge, density, and temperature. These density-dependent effective DR rate coefficients are then used in the plasma simulation code Cloudy to compute ionization balance curves for both collisionally ionized and photoionized plasmas at very low (ne = 1 cm^-3) and finite (ne=10^10 ...

  4. A Unified View of Finite Range Effects in Efimov Trimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platter, Lucas; Ji, Chen; Braaten, Eric; Phillips, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Three-body recombination in ultracold atoms is a process that can demonstrate the appearance of discrete scale invariance due to the Efimov effect. Different features in the scattering length dependent recombination rate are related by universal relations in the so-called zero-range limit. However, experiments are usually carried out with systems that display non-neglible corrections due to the finite range of interatomic interaction. We explain the origin of recently constructed universal relations for systems of three identical bosons interacting through a large scattering length. Range corrected universal relations are calculated using first order perturbation theory and are benchmarked against microcopic calculations that by construction contain finite range effects. We relate our results to work done in other frameworks and explain differences and similarities. We present also relations that are crucial for analyzing experiments in the future.

  5. Implicit Finite-Size Effects in Computer Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Denton, A. R.; EGELSTAFF, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of periodic boundary conditions (implicit finite-size effects) on the anisotropy of pair correlations in computer simulations is studied for a dense classical fluid of pair-wise interacting krypton atoms near the triple point. Molecular dynamics simulation data for the pair distribution function of N-particle systems, as a function of radial distance, polar angle, and azimuthal angle are compared directly with corresponding theoretical predictions [L. R. Pratt and S. W. Haan, J....

  6. Finite element analysis of stiffness and static dent resistance of aluminum alloy double-curved panel in viscous pressure forming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yi; WANG Zhong-Jin

    2009-01-01

    The static dent resistance performance of the aluminum alloy double-curved panel formed using viscous pressure forming (VPF) was studied by finite element analysis, which mainly considers the forming process conditions. The whole simulation consisting of three stages, i.e., forming, spring-back and static dent resistance, was carried out continuously using the finite element code ANSYS. The influence of blank holder pressure (BHP) and the drawbead on the stiffness and the static dent resistance of the panels formed using VPF was analyzed. The results show that the adequate setting of the drawbead can increase the plastic deformation of the double-curved panel, which is beneficial to the initial stiffness and the static dent resistance. There is an optimum BHP range for the stiffness and the static dent resistance.

  7. Partially implicit finite difference scheme for calculating dynamic pressure in a terrain-following coordinate non-hydrostatic ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Lin, Lei; Xie, Lian; Gao, Huiwang

    2016-10-01

    To improve the efficiency of the terrain-following σ-coordinate non-hydrostatic ocean model, a partially implicit finite difference (PIFD) scheme is proposed. By using explicit terms instead of implicit terms to discretize the parts of the vertical dynamic pressure gradient derived from the σ-coordinate transformation, the coefficient matrix of the discrete Poisson equation that the dynamic pressure satisfies can be simplified from 15 diagonals to 7 diagonals. The PIFD scheme is shown to run stably when it is applied to simulate five benchmark cases, namely, a standing wave in a basin, a surface solitary wave, a lock-exchange problem, a periodic wave over a bar and a tidally induced internal wave. Compared with the conventional fully implicit finite difference (FIFD) scheme, the PIFD scheme produces simulation results of equivalent accuracy at only 40-60% of the computational cost. The PIFD scheme demonstrates strong applicability and can be easily implemented in σ-coordinate ocean models.

  8. Holographic fluid with bulk viscosity, perturbation of pressure and energy density at finite cutoff surface in the Einstein gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Ya-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Ning

    2014-01-01

    Using the gravity/fluid correspondence in our paper, we investigate the holographic fluid at finite cutoff surface in the Einstein gravity. After constructing the first order perturbative solution of the Schwarzschild-AdS black brane solution in the Einstein gravity, we focus on the stress-energy tensor of the dual fluid with transport coefficients at the finite cutoff surface. Besides the pressure and energy density of dual fluid are obtained, the shear viscosity is also obtained. The most important results are that we find that if we adopt different conditions to fix the undetermined parameters contained in the stress-energy tensor of the dual fluid, the pressure and energy density of the dual fluid can be perturbed. Particularly, the bulk viscosity of the dual fluid can also be given in this case.

  9. A two-step finite volume method to discretize heterogeneous and anisotropic pressure equation on general grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Al Kobaisi, Mohammed

    2017-10-01

    A novel Two-Step cell-centered Finite Volume Method (TSFVM) is developed in this work to discretize the heterogeneous and anisotropic pressure equation on triangular and quadrilateral grids in 2D and hexahedral and tetrahedral grids in 3D. Physical properties such as permeability and porosity are piece-wise constant on each grid cell. In the first step, the Galerkin Finite Element Method (FEM) is utilized to compute pressure solutions at all cell vertices. In the second step, pressure values at cell vertices are used to derive continuous two-point flux stencils for cell faces. Mass conservation equations are then written for each cell to obtain a system of linear equations that can be solved for pressure at cell centers. Extensive numerical experiments are carried out to test the performance of our TSFVM. In particular, we compare TSFVM with the classical Multipoint Flux Approximation (MPFA-O) method as well as a more recently developed MPFA method with full pressure support called enhanced MPFA (eMPFA). The results show that the TSFVM compares well with eMPFA for challenging test cases for which MPFA-O breaks down. Specifically, and as a significant step forward, our TSFVM is quite robust for challenging problems involving heterogeneous and highly anisotropic permeability tensors when both MPFA-O and eMPFA suffer from unphysical oscillations. Finally, the numerical convergence study demonstrates that TSFVM has comparable convergence behavior to MPFA-O method for both homogeneous and discontinuous permeability fields.

  10. Finite-size effects for percolation on Apollonian networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auto, Daniel M; Moreira, André A; Herrmann, Hans J; Andrade, José S

    2008-12-01

    We study the percolation problem on the Apollonian network model. The Apollonian networks display many interesting properties commonly observed in real network systems, such as small-world behavior, scale-free distribution, and a hierarchical structure. By taking advantage of the deterministic hierarchical construction of these networks, we use the real-space renormalization-group technique to write exact iterative equations that relate percolation network properties at different scales. More precisely, our results indicate that the percolation probability and average mass of the percolating cluster approach the thermodynamic limit logarithmically. We suggest that such ultraslow convergence might be a property of hierarchical networks. Since real complex systems are certainly finite and very commonly hierarchical, we believe that taking into account finite-size effects in real-network systems is of fundamental importance.

  11. Finite volume effects in SU(2) with two adjoint fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Patella, Agostino; Lucini, Biagio; Pica, Claudio; Rago, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Many evidences from lattice simulations support the idea that SU(2) with two Dirac flavors in the adjoint representation (also called Minimal Walking Technicolor) is IR conformal. A possible way to see this is through the behavior of the spectrum of the mass-deformed theory. When fermions are massive, a mass-gap is generated and the theory is confined. IR-conformality is recovered in the chiral limit: masses of particles vanish in the chiral limit, while their ratios stay finite. In order to trust this analysis one has to relay on the infinite volume extrapolation. We will discuss the finite volume effects on the mesonic spectrum, investigated by varying the size of the lattice and by changing the boundary conditions for the fields.

  12. The influence of temperature dynamics and dynamic finite ion Larmor radius effects on seeded high amplitude plasma blobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, M.; Wiesenberger, M.; Madsen, J.; Kendl, A.

    2016-12-01

    Thermal effects on the perpendicular convection of seeded pressure blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetised fusion plasmas are investigated. Our numerical study is based on a four field full-F gyrofluid model, which entails the consistent description of high fluctuation amplitudes and dynamic finite Larmor radius effects. We find that the maximal radial blob velocity increases with the square root of the initial pressure perturbation and that a finite Larmor radius contributes to highly compact blob structures that propagate in the poloidal direction. An extensive parameter study reveals that a smooth transition to this compact blob regime occurs when the finite Larmor radius effect strength, defined by the ratio of the magnetic field aligned component of the ion diamagnetic to the \\boldsymbol{E}× \\boldsymbol{B} vorticity, exceeds unity. The maximal radial blob velocities agree excellently with the inertial velocity scaling law over more than an order of magnitude. We show that the finite Larmor radius effect strength affects the poloidal and total particle transport and present an empirical scaling law for the poloidal and total blob velocities. Distinctions to the blob behaviour in the isothermal limit with constant finite Larmor radius effects are highlighted.

  13. Effect of pressure on nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Uma D. [Department of Physics, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar-263145 (India); Kumar, M., E-mail: munish_dixit@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar-263145 (India)

    2010-07-01

    A simple theory is proposed to predict the effect of pressure on nanomaterials, which gets support from the Mie-Gruneisen theory of thermal expansivity as formulated by Born and Huang. We considered LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} to study the effect of pressure in the light of other formulations, viz. Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet and Kumar. The results obtained are found to present a good agreement with the experimental data as well as other formulations. To confirm the validity of the formulation, we applied the method to study the compression behaviour of a number of nanomaterials, viz. CdSe, Rb{sub 3}C{sub 60}, Ni(20 nm), carbon nanotube, {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {epsilon}-Fe (Hexagonal iron), MgO, CuO, {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (67 nm), {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {alpha}-Fe (filled nanotube), TiO{sub 2} (anatase), 3C-SiC (30 nm), TiO{sub 2} (rutile phase), Zr{sub 0.1}Ti{sub 0.9}O{sub 2}, AlN (hexagonal), {gamma}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, Ni-filled MWCNT and Fe-filled MWCNT. The results obtained are compared with the experimental data. A good agreement between theory and experiment demonstrates the validity of the present approach.

  14. Finite Size Effect in Path Integral Monte Carlo Simulations of 4He Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xing-Wen; CHENG Xin-Lu

    2008-01-01

    Path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations are a powerful computational method to study interacting quantum systems at finite temperatures. In this work, PIMC has been applied to study the finite size effect of the simulated systems of 4He. We determine the energy as a function of temperature at saturated-vapor-pressure (SVP) conditions in the temperature range of T ∈ [1.0 K,4.0 K], and the equation of state (EOS) in the ground state for systems consisted of 32, 64 and 128 4He atoms, respectively. We find that the energy at SVP is influenced significantly by the size of the simulated system in the temperature range of T ∈ [2.1 K, 3.0 K] and the larger the system is, the better results are obtained in comparison with the experimental values; while the EOS appeared to be unrelated to it.

  15. Wave Transformation Modeling with Effective Higher-Order Finite Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hwa Jung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces a finite element method using a higher-order interpolation function for effective simulations of wave transformation. Finite element methods with a higher-order interpolation function usually employ a Lagrangian interpolation function that gives accurate solutions with a lesser number of elements compared to lower order interpolation function. At the same time, it takes a lot of time to get a solution because the size of the local matrix increases resulting in the increase of band width of a global matrix as the order of the interpolation function increases. Mass lumping can reduce computation time by making the local matrix a diagonal form. However, the efficiency is not satisfactory because it requires more elements to get results. In this study, the Legendre cardinal interpolation function, a modified Lagrangian interpolation function, is used for efficient calculation. Diagonal matrix generation by applying direct numerical integration to the Legendre cardinal interpolation function like conducting mass lumping can reduce calculation time with favorable accuracy. Numerical simulations of regular, irregular and solitary waves using the Boussinesq equations through applying the interpolation approaches are carried out to compare the higher-order finite element models on wave transformation and examine the efficiency of calculation.

  16. Huge Casimir effect at finite temperature in electromagnetic Rindler space

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Tian-Ming

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the Casimir effect at finite temperature in electromagnetic Rindler space, and find the Casimir energy is proportional to $\\frac{T^4}{d^2}$ in the high temperature limit, where $T\\approx 27 ^\\circ\\mathrm{C}$ is the temperature and $d\\approx 100nm$ is a small cutoff. We propose to make metamaterials to mimic Rindler space and measure the predicted Casimir effect. Since the parameters of metamaterials we proposed are quite simple, this experiment would be easily implemented in laboratory.

  17. Huge Casimir effect at finite temperature in electromagnetic Rindler space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tian-Ming; Miao, Rong-Xin

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the Casimir effect at finite temperature in electromagnetic Rindler space, and find the Casimir energy is proportional to $\\frac{T^4}{d^2}$ in the high temperature limit, where $T\\approx 27 ^\\circ\\mathrm{C}$ is the temperature and $d\\approx 100nm$ is a small cutoff. We propose to make metamaterials to mimic Rindler space and measure the predicted Casimir effect. Since the parameters of metamaterials we proposed are quite simple, this experiment would be easily implemented in laboratory.

  18. Huge Casimir effect at finite temperature in electromagnetic Rindler space

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Tian-Ming; Miao, Rong-Xin

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the Casimir effect at finite temperature in electromagnetic Rindler space, and find the Casimir energy is proportional to $\\frac{T^4}{d^2}$ in the high temperature limit, where $T\\approx 27 ^\\circ\\mathrm{C}$ is the temperature and $d\\approx 100nm$ is a small cutoff. We propose to make metamaterials to mimic Rindler space and measure the predicted Casimir effect. Since the parameters of metamaterials we proposed are quite simple, this experiment would be easily implemented in la...

  19. Finite baryon density effects on gauge field dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bödeker, Dietrich

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the effective action for QCD gauge fields at finite temperatures and densities, obtained after integrating out the hardest momentum scales from the system. We show that a non-vanishing baryon density induces a charge conjugation (C) odd operator to the gauge field action, proportional to the chemical potential. Even though it is parametrically smaller than the leading C even operator, it could have an important effect on C odd observables. The same operator appears to be produced by classical kinetic theory, allowing in principle for a non-perturbative study of such processes.

  20. Casimir Effect at finite temperature for the CPT-even extension of QED

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, L M; Helayël-Neto, J A

    2016-01-01

    By the thermofield dynamics (TFD) formalism we obtain the energy-momentum tensor for the Electromagnetism with Lorentz Breaking Even term of the Standard Model Extended (SME) Sector in a topology $S^{1}\\times S^{1}\\times R^{2}$. We carry out the compactification by a generalized TFD-Bogoliubov transformation that is used to define a renormalized energy-momentum tensor, and the Casimir energy and pressure at finite temperature are then derived. A comparative analysis with the electromagnetic case is developed, and we remark the influence of the background in the traditional Casimir effect.

  1. Characteristics of surface sound pressure and absorption of a finite impedance strip for a grazing incident plane wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sum, K S; Pan, J

    2007-07-01

    Distributions of sound pressure and intensity on the surface of a flat impedance strip flush-mounted on a rigid baffle are studied for a grazing incident plane wave. The distributions are obtained by superimposing the unperturbed wave (the specularly reflected wave as if the strip is rigid plus the incident wave) with the radiated wave from the surface vibration of the strip excited by the unperturbed pressure. The radiated pressure interferes with the unperturbed pressure and distorts the propagating plane wave. When the plane wave propagates in the baffle-strip-baffle direction, it encounters discontinuities in acoustical impedance at the baffle-strip and strip-baffle interfaces. The radiated pressure is highest around the baffle-strip interface, but decreases toward the strip-baffle interface where the plane wave distortion reduces accordingly. As the unperturbed and radiated waves have different magnitudes and superimpose out of phase, the surface pressure and intensity increase across the strip in the plane wave propagation direction. Therefore, the surface absorption of the strip is nonzero and nonuniform. This paper provides an understanding of the surface pressure and intensity behaviors of a finite impedance strip for a grazing incident plane wave, and of how the distributed intensity determines the sound absorption coefficient of the strip.

  2. Effects of Shock Pressure on Transition Pressure in Zr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying-Hua; ZHANG Lin; CAI Ling-Cang

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of free surface velocity profiles of high-purity Zr samples under shock-wave loading are performed to study the dynamic strength and phase transition parameters. The peak pressure of the compression waves is within the range from 9 to 14 GPa, and the Hugoniot elastic limit is 0.5 GPa. An anomalous structure of shock waves is observed due to the α - ω phase transition in Zr. Shock pressure has effects on transition pressure which increases with increasing compression strength, and the stronger shocks have a lower transit time.

  3. Finite temperature Casimir effect in spacetime with extra compactified dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teo, L.P. [Faculty of Information Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, Cyberjaya 63100, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)], E-mail: lpteo@mmu.edu.my

    2009-02-16

    In this Letter, we derive the explicit exact formulas for the finite temperature Casimir force acting on a pair of parallel plates in the presence of extra compactified dimensions within the framework of Kaluza-Klein theory. Using the piston analysis, we show that at any temperature, the Casimir force due to massless scalar field with Dirichlet boundary conditions on the plates is always attractive and the effect of extra dimensions becomes stronger when the size or number of the extra dimensions increases. These properties are not affected by the explicit geometry and topology of the Kaluza-Klein space.

  4. Effects of finite system-size and finite inhomogeneity on the conductivity of broadly distributed resistor networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaggs, T.H

    2003-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is used to investigate the critical path calculation of the conductivity of a random resistor network that has a logarithmically broad distribution of bond conductances. It has been argued that in three dimensions the conductivity prefactor exponent y is equal to the percolation correlation length exponent {nu}, but past numerical computations have always found y<{nu}. Finite-size effects are usually blamed but have never been documented. Our analysis of Monte Carlo data also finds y<{nu}, but we show that the result is not due to finite-size effects. Instead, the observed y<{nu} is due to the effects of finite inhomogeneity. The conductivity is controlled by critical conductors, but the distance between current carrying pathways is less than presumed in the theoretical arguments that lead to y={nu}. The shorter separation distance results in y<{nu}.

  5. A finite element model and electronic analogue of pipeline pressure transients with frequency-dependent friction

    CERN Document Server

    Shu, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    A finite element model and its equivalent electronic analogue circuit of hydraulic transmission lines have been developed. Basic equations are approximated to be a set of ordinary differential equations that can be represented in state space form. The accuracy of the model is demonstrated by comparison with the method of characteristics.

  6. Pressure effects on dynamics behavior of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talebian, Taha [Faculty of Engineering, Neyshabur Branch, Islamic Azad University, Neyshabur (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The dynamic behavior of Multiwall boron nitride nanotubes (MWBNNTs) is investigated by employing multiple elastic shells model. The influences of van der Waals interactions on layers are shown as nonlinear functions of the interlayer distance of MWBNNTs. Governing equations are solved by using the developed finite element method and by employing time history diagrams. The radial wave speed from the outermost layer to the innermost layer is computed. The effects of geometrical factors such as diameter-to-thickness ratio on dynamic behavior of MWBNNTs are determined. The magnification aspects of MWBNNTs are computed, and the effects of surrounding pressures on wave speed and magnification aspect of MWBNNTs are discussed.

  7. Effective Polyakov Loop Dynamics for Finite Temperature G(2) Gluodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wellegehausen, Bjoern H; Wozar, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Based on the strong coupling expansion we obtain effective 3-dimensional models for the Polyakov loop in finite-temperature G_2 gluodynamics. The Svetitsky-Jaffe conjecture relates the resulting continuous spin models with G_2 gluodynamics near phase transition points. In the present work we analyse the effective theory in leading order with the help of a generalised mean field approximation and with detailed Monte-Carlo simulations. In addition we derive a Potts-type discrete spin model by restricting the characters of the Polyakov loops to the three extremal points of the fundamental domain of G_2. Both the continuous and discrete effective models show a rich phase structure with a ferromagnetic, symmetric and several anti-ferromagnetic phases. The phase diagram contains first and second order transition lines and tricritical points. The modified mean field predictions compare very well with the results of our simulations.

  8. Finite temperature Casimir effect for massive scalars in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Erdas, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The finite temperature Casimir effect for a charged, massive scalar field confined between very large, perfectly conducting parallel plates is studied using the zeta function regularization technique. The scalar field satisfies Dirichlet boundary conditions at the plates and a magnetic field perpendicular to the plates is present. Four equivalent expressions for the zeta function are obtained, which are exact to all orders in the magnetic field strength, temperature, scalar field mass, and plate distance. The zeta function is used to calculate the Helmholtz free energy of the scalar field and the Casimir pressure on the plates, in the case of high temperature, small plate distance, strong magnetic field and large scalar mass. In all cases, simple analytic expressions of the zeta function, free energy and pressure are obtained, which are very accurate and valid for practically all values of temperature, plate distance, magnetic field and mass.

  9. Finite temperature Casimir effect for charged massless scalars in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Erdas, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The zeta function regularization technique is used to study the finite temperature Casimir effect for a charged and massless scalar field confined between parallel plates and satisfying Dirichlet boundary conditions at the plates. A magnetic field perpendicular to the plates is included. Three equivalent expressions for the zeta function are obtained, which are exact to all orders in the magnetic field strength, temperature and plate distance. These expressions of the zeta function are used to calculate the Helmholtz free energy of the scalar field and the pressure on the plates, in the case of high temperature, small plate distance and strong magnetic field. In all cases, simple analytic expressions are obtained for the free energy and pressure which are accurate and valid for practically all values of temperature, plate distance and magnetic field.

  10. [Effect of dopamine on the portal pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benko, H; Peschl, L; Schüller, J; Neumayr, A

    1975-01-01

    1. An infusion of 3 gamma/kg/min dopamine causes a significant increase in the renal plasma flow and the glomerulum filtration rate. This dosage does not cause a change of the mean systolic and arterial pressure. This effect may also be observed in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. 2. The wedged hepatic vein pressure, an indicator for the portal pressure, only shows a slight increase (9,46 +/- 9,41%) as compared to the initial pressure produced by the mentioned dose. Measurements of the spleen pulpa pressure, which likewise indicates the portal pressure, showed an increase of pressure up to 100% due to pressing or coughing. 3. If in the case of bleeding oesophageal varices acute renal failure might develop, the advantage of the effect of dopamine in stimulating the blood flow through the kidneys may be considered more important than the minute danger of a slight increase of the portal pressure, which might provoke haemorrhage.

  11. The Effect of a Finite Measurement Volume on Power Spectra from a Burst Type LDA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara Marika; K. George, William

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the effects of a finite size measurement volume on the power spectrum computed fromdata acquired with a burst-type laser Doppler anemometer. The finite measurement volume causes temporal distortions in acquisition of the data resulting in phenomena such as finite processing time and de...

  12. Finite size effects in neutron star and nuclear matter simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giménez Molinelli, P.A., E-mail: pagm@df.uba.ar; Dorso, C.O.

    2015-01-15

    single structure per cell while the cubic and truncated octahedron show consistent results, with more than one structure per cell. For systems of the size studied in this work these effects are still noticeable, but we find evidence to support that the dependence of the results on the cell geometry becomes smaller as the system size is increased. When the Coulomb interaction is present, the competition between opposing interactions of different range results in a proper, physically meaningful length scale that is independent of the system size and periodic cell of choice. Only under these conditions “finite size effects” will vanish for large enough systems (i.e. cells much larger than this characteristic length). Larger simulations are in order, but our computational capabilities forbid it for the time being.

  13. Finite amplitude effects on drop levitation for material properties measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari Hosseinzadeh, Vahideh; Holt, R. Glynn

    2017-05-01

    The method of exciting shape oscillation of drops to extract material properties has a long history, which is most often coupled with the technique of acoustic levitation to achieve non-contact manipulation of the drop sample. We revisit this method with application to the inference of bulk shear viscosity and surface tension. The literature is replete with references to a "10% oscillation amplitude" as a sufficient condition for the application of Lamb's analytical expressions for the shape oscillations of viscous liquids. Our results show that even a 10% oscillation amplitude leads to dynamic effects which render Lamb's results inapplicable. By comparison with samples of known viscosity and surface tension, we illustrate the complicating finite-amplitude effects (mode-splitting and excess dissipation associated with vorticity) that can occur and then show that sufficiently small oscillations allow us to recover the correct material properties using Lamb's formula.

  14. High-order accurate finite-volume formulations for the pressure gradient force in layered ocean models

    CERN Document Server

    Engwirda, Darren; Marshall, John

    2016-01-01

    The development of a set of high-order accurate finite-volume formulations for evaluation of the pressure gradient force in layered ocean models is described. A pair of new schemes are presented, both based on an integration of the contact pressure force about the perimeter of an associated momentum control-volume. The two proposed methods differ in their choice of control-volume geometries. High-order accurate numerical integration techniques are employed in both schemes to account for non-linearities in the underlying equation-of-state definitions and thermodynamic profiles, and details of an associated vertical interpolation and quadrature scheme are discussed in detail. Numerical experiments are used to confirm the consistency of the two formulations, and it is demonstrated that the new methods maintain hydrostatic and thermobaric equilibrium in the presence of strongly-sloping layer-wise geometry, non-linear equation-of-state definitions and non-uniform vertical stratification profiles. Additionally, one...

  15. Polymorphism of iron at high pressure: A 3D phase-field model for displacive transitions with finite elastoplastic deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattré, A.; Denoual, C.

    2016-07-01

    A thermodynamically consistent framework for combining nonlinear elastoplasticity and multivariant phase-field theory is formulated at large strains. In accordance with the Clausius-Duhem inequality, the Helmholtz free energy and time-dependent constitutive relations give rise to displacive driving forces for pressure-induced martensitic phase transitions in materials. Inelastic forces are obtained by using a representation of the energy landscape that involves the concept of reaction pathways with respect to the point group symmetry operations of crystal lattices. On the other hand, additional elastic forces are derived for the most general case of large strains and rotations, as well as nonlinear, anisotropic, and different elastic pressure-dependent properties of phases. The phase-field formalism coupled with finite elastoplastic deformations is implemented into a three-dimensional Lagrangian finite element approach and is applied to analyze the iron body-centered cubic (α-Fe) into hexagonal close-packed (ɛ-Fe) phase transitions under high hydrostatic compression. The simulations exhibit the major role played by the plastic deformation in the morphological and microstructure evolution processes. Due to the strong long-range elastic interactions between variants without plasticity, a forward α → ɛ transition is energetically unfavorable and remains incomplete. However, plastic dissipation releases considerably the stored strain energy, leading to the α ↔ ɛ ↔α‧ (forward and reverse) polymorphic phase transformations with an unexpected selection of variants.

  16. Skin stiffness determined from occlusion of a horizontally running microvessel in response to skin surface pressure: a finite element study of sacral pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Inoue, Yoshiaki; Shimokawa, Yuki; Sakata, Keisuke

    2017-01-01

    Pressure ulcers occur following sustained occlusion of microvessels at bony prominences under skin surface pressure (SSP). However, the mechanical conditions of the surrounding soft tissue leading to microvascular occlusion are not fully understood. This study determined the stiffness of homogenized skin with microvasculature at the sacrum that occludes microvessels at an SSP of 10 kPa (consistent with a standard mattress) and recovers from occlusion at 5 kPa (consistent with a pressure-redistribution mattress). We conducted two-dimensional finite element analyses under plane stress and plane strain conditions to determine the stiffness of the skin. The results for plane stress conditions show that the microvessel was occluded with a Young's modulus of 23 kPa in response to an SSP of 10 kPa at the center of the sacrum and that the circulation recovered following a reduction in the SSP to 5 kPa. The resulting Young's modulus is consistent with reported data. Our study indicates that the critical value of the SSP for microvascular occlusion is determined not only by the stiffness of homogenized skin with microvasculature but also by the intraluminal pressure, microvascular wall stiffness, and body support conditions.

  17. Thinking outside the box: fluctuations and finite size effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamaina, Dario; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    The isothermal compressibility of an interacting or non-interacting system may be extracted from the fluctuations of the number of particles in a well-chosen control volume. Finite size effects are prevalent and should be accounted for to obtain a meaningful, thermodynamic compressibility. In the traditional computational setup, where a given simulation box is replicated with periodic boundary conditions, we study particle number fluctuations outside the box (i.e. when the control volume exceeds the box itself), which bear relevant thermodynamic information. We also investigate the related problem of extracting the compressibility from the structure factor in the small wave-vector limit (k → 0). The calculation should be restricted to the discrete set of wave-vectors k that are compatible with the periodicity of the system, and we assess the consequences of considering other k values, a widespread error among beginners.

  18. Finite size effects in Neutron Star and Nuclear matter simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Molinelli, P A Giménez

    2014-01-01

    In this work we study molecular dynamics simulations of symmetric nuclear matter using a semi-classical nucleon interaction model. We show that, at sub-saturation densities and low temperatures, the solutions are non-homogeneous structures reminiscent of the ``nuclear pasta'' phases expected in Neutron Star Matter simulations, but shaped by artificial aspects of the simulations. We explore different geometries for the periodic boundary conditions imposed on the simulation cell: cube, hexagonal prism and truncated octahedron. We find that different cells may yield different solutions for the same physical conditions (i.e. density and temperature). The particular shape of the solution at a given density can be predicted analytically by energy minimization. We also show that even if this behavior is due to finite size effects, it does not mean that it vanishes for very large systems and it actually is independent of the system size: The system size sets the only characteristic length scale for the inhomogeneitie...

  19. Finite Temperature Casimir Effect in Randall-Sundrum Models

    CERN Document Server

    Rypestøl, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    The finite temperature Casimir effect for a scalar field in the bulk region of the two Randall-Sundrum models, RSI and RSII, is studied. We calculate the Casimir energy and the Casimir force for two parallel plates with separation $a$ on the visible brane in the RSI model. High-temperature and low-temperature cases are covered. Attractiveness versus repulsiveness of the temperature correction to the force is discussed in the typical special cases of Dirichlet-Dirichlet, Neumann-Neumann, and Dirichlet-Neumann boundary conditions at low temperature. The Abel-Plana summation formula is made use of, as this turns out to be most convenient. Some comments are made on the related contemporary literature.

  20. Pressure-induced Mott transition in an organic superconductor with a finite doping level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oike, H; Miyagawa, K; Taniguchi, H; Kanoda, K

    2015-02-13

    We report the pressure study of a doped organic superconductor with a Hall coefficient and conductivity measurements. We find that maximally enhanced superconductivity and a marginal-Fermi liquid appear around a certain pressure where mobile carriers increase critically, suggesting a possible quantum phase transition between strongly and weakly correlated regimes. This observation points to the presence of a criticality in Mottness for a doped Mott insulator with tunable correlation.

  1. High-order accurate finite-volume formulations for the pressure gradient force in layered ocean models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engwirda, Darren; Kelley, Maxwell; Marshall, John

    2017-08-01

    Discretisation of the horizontal pressure gradient force in layered ocean models is a challenging task, with non-trivial interactions between the thermodynamics of the fluid and the geometry of the layers often leading to numerical difficulties. We present two new finite-volume schemes for the pressure gradient operator designed to address these issues. In each case, the horizontal acceleration is computed as an integration of the contact pressure force that acts along the perimeter of an associated momentum control-volume. A pair of new schemes are developed by exploring different control-volume geometries. Non-linearities in the underlying equation-of-state definitions and thermodynamic profiles are treated using a high-order accurate numerical integration framework, designed to preserve hydrostatic balance in a non-linear manner. Numerical experiments show that the new methods achieve high levels of consistency, maintaining hydrostatic and thermobaric equilibrium in the presence of strongly-sloping layer geometries, non-linear equations-of-state and non-uniform vertical stratification profiles. These results suggest that the new pressure gradient formulations may be appropriate for general circulation models that employ hybrid vertical coordinates and/or terrain-following representations.

  2. Pressure moderation and effective pressure in Navier-Stokes flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Chuong V.; Yu, Xinwei

    2016-10-01

    We study the Cauchy problem of the Navier-Stokes equations by both semi-analytic and classical energy methods. The former approach provides a physical picture of how viscous effects may or may not be able to suppress singularity development. In the latter approach, we examine the pressure term that drives the dynamics of the velocity norms \\parallel u{{\\parallel}{{Lq}}} , for q≥slant 3 . A key idea behind this investigation is due to the fact that the pressure p in this term is determined up to a function of both space and |u| , say P(x,|u|) , which may assume relatively broad forms. This allows us to use P as a pressure moderator in the evolution equation for \\parallel u{{\\parallel}{{Lq}}} , whereby optimal regularity criteria can be sought by varying P within its admissible classes. New regularity criteria are derived with and without making use of the moderator. The results obtained in the absence of the moderator feature some improvement over existing criteria in the literature. Several criteria are derived in terms of the moderated (effective) pressure p+P . A simple moderation scheme and the plausibility of the present approach to the problem of Navier-Stokes regularity are discussed.

  3. Effect of pressure on biogas production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet ERYAŞAR

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In facilities in which biogas systems are installed biogas is not produced and consumed simultaneously. Therefore, biogas produced when there is no consumption should be stored. Low pressure gasometers with 1- 1,5 kPa value are preferred in the rural area and when needed pressurizer is added to the system. When the pressure which gas production and usage require is provided by natural ways without usage of an added pressurizer, a respectively high pressure atmosphere can be seen. In this study, the effects of different low pressures on anaerobic fermentation of cattle manure were experimentally analyzed. Fermentation experiment which was carried out with 9 reactors with fed-batch type, 3 parallels in pressures of 19.6 kPa, 9.5 kPa and 1.5 kPa continued 60 days at 35 ºC. The acquired experimental data was subjected to LSD test in P

  4. A mimetic finite difference method for two-phase flow models with dynamic capillary pressure and hysteresis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Saturation overshoot and pressure overshoot are studied by incorporating dynamic capillary pressure, capillary pressure hysteresis and hysteretic dynamic coefficient with a traditional fractional flow equation. Using the method of lines, the discretizations are constructed by applying Castillo-Grone's mimetic operators in the space direction and explicit trapezoidal integrator in the time direction. Convergence tests and conservation property of the schemes are presented. Computed profiles capture both the saturation overshoot and pressure overshoot phenomena. Comparisons between numerical results and experiments illustrate the effectiveness and different features of the models.

  5. Pressure effect on dissimilatory sulfate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, A. J.; Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Biosouring is the production of H2S by sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) in-situ or in the produced fluids of oil reservoirs. Sulfide is explosive, toxic and corrosive which can trigger equipment and transportation failure, leading to environmental catastrophe. As oil exploration and reservoir development continue, subsequent enhanced recovery is occurring in progressively deeper formations and typical oil reservoir pressures range from 10-50 MPa. Therefore, an understanding of souring control effects will require an accurate understanding of the influence of pressure on SRM metabolism and the efficacy of souring control treatments at high pressure. Considerable work to date has focussed on souring control at ambient pressure; however, the influence of pressure on biogeochemical processes and souring treatments in oil reservoirs is poorly understood. To explore the impact of pressure on SRM, wild type Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 (isolated from a producing oil well in Ventura County, California) was grown under a range of pressures (0.1-14 MPa) at 30 °C. Complete sulfate reduction occurred in all pressures tested within 3 days, but microbial growth was inhibited with increasing pressure. Bar-seq identified several genes associated with flagella biosynthesis (including FlhB) and assembly as important for survival at elevated pressure and fitness was confirmed using individual transposon mutants. Flagellar genes have previously been implicated with biofilm formation and confocal microscopy on glass slides incubated with wild type D. alaskensis G20 showed more biomass associated with surfaces under pressure, highlighting the link between pressure, flagellar and biofilm formation. To determine the effect of pressure on the efficacy of SRM inhibitors, IC50 experiments were conducted and D. alaskensis G20 showed a greater resistance to nitrate and the antibiotic chloramphenicol, but a lower resistance to perchlorate. These results will be discussed in the context of

  6. Finite-size effects in amorphous indium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sreemanta; Tewari, Girish C.; Mahalu, Diana; Shahar, Dan

    2016-04-01

    We study the low-temperature magnetotransport properties of several highly disordered amorphous indium oxide (a:InO) samples. Simultaneously fabricated devices comprising a two-dimensional (2D) film and 10 -μ m -long wires of different widths were measured to investigate the effect of size as we approach the 1D limit, which is around 4 times the correlation length, and happens to be around 100 nm for a:InO. The film and the wires showed magnetic field (B )-induced superconductor to insulator transition (SIT). In the superconducting side, the resistance increased with decrease in wire width, whereas an opposite trend is observed in the insulating side. We find that this effect can be explained in light of charge-vortex duality picture of the SIT. Resistance of the 2D film follows an activated behavior over the temperature (T ), whereas, the wires show a crossover from the high-T -activated to a T -independent behavior. At high-temperature regime the wires' resistance follow the film's until they deviate and became independent of T . We find that the temperature at which this deviation occurs evolves with the magnetic field and the width of the wire, which show the effect of finite size on the transport.

  7. Current-vortex filament model of nonlinear Alfven perturbations in a finite-pressure plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakhin, V. P.; Schep, T. J.; Westerhof, E.

    1998-01-01

    A low-beta, two-fluid model is shown to possess solutions in the form of current-vortex filaments. The model can be viewed as that of reduced magnetohydrodynamics, extended with electron inertia, the Hall term and parallel electron pressure. These drift-Alfven filaments are the plasma analogs of poi

  8. The effect of concrete floor roughness on bovine claws using finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, A; Verhegghe, B; De Belie, N

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between bovine claws and a concrete floor with defined roughness and friction coefficients is described using a finite element model. The model was built by using x-ray tomography scanner images of an unloaded fore and hind bovine claw. These images were used to reproduce the geometry of the claw horn capsule, which was used to create a finite element model. Young's moduli of 382, 261, and 13.6 MPa were attributed to the dorsal wall horn, abaxial and axial wall horn, and bulb horn, respectively. Poisson's ratio was set at 0.38. The horn was considered an isotropic elastic material. The model was completed by introducing a rigid support that simulated a concrete floor. The floor was moved to establish contact with the claw and was loaded with a force of 2 or 6 kN. The top border area of the horn capsule was fixed, but angular rotations were allowed. With this model, the effect of varying floor roughness and claw-floor friction on contact pressures and von Mises stresses in the claw horn could be evaluated. This was demonstrated by simulating the contact between the claw models and a smooth and rough floor with a center-line roughness value R(a) of 0 or 0.175 mm, respectively, either without friction or with a static coefficient of friction of 0.75 and a dynamic coefficient of friction of 0.65. Contact pressures ranged from 2.14 to 27.55 MPa. The roughness of the floor was the main determinant in subsequent contact pressures. Maximum von Mises stresses were registered in the claw sole and were mostly between 5.04 and 16.44 MPa, but could be higher in specific situations. The variables claw (fore or hind) and floor (smooth or rough) had significant effects on the contact pressures; in addition, the floor resulted in significantly different von Mises stresses in the claw horn. The variable friction (frictionless or with friction) had a significant effect on the von Mises stresses. The load did not result in significantly different contact pressures and

  9. Small scale turbulence and the finite Reynolds number effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonia, R. A.; Djenidi, L.; Danaila, L.; Tang, S. L.

    2017-02-01

    Failure to recognize the importance of the finite Reynolds number effect on small scale turbulence has, by and large, resulted in misguided assessments of the first two hypotheses of Kolmogorov ["Local structure of turbulence in an incompressible fluid for very large Reynolds numbers," Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 30, 299-303 (1941)] or K41 as well as his third hypothesis [A. N. Kolmogorov, "A refinement of previous hypotheses concerning the local structure of turbulence in a viscous incompressible fluid at high Reynolds number," J. Fluid Mech. 13, 82-85 (1962)] or K62. As formulated by Kolmogorov, all three hypotheses require local isotropy to be valid and the Reynolds number to be very large. In the context of the first hypothesis, there is now strong evidence to suggest that this requirement can be significantly relaxed, at least for dissipative scales and relatively low order moments of the velocity structure function. As the scale increases, the effect of the large scale motion on these moments becomes more prominent and higher Reynolds numbers are needed before K41 and K62 can be tested unambiguously.

  10. Crystallographic effects during micromachining — A finite-element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shin-Hyung; Choi, Woo Chun

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical micromachining is a powerful and effective way for manufacturing small sized machine parts. Even though the micromachining process is similar to the traditional machining, the material behavior during the process is much different. In particular, many researchers report that the basic mechanics of the work material is affected by microstructures and their crystallographic orientations. For example, crystallographic orientations of the work material have significant influence on force response, chip formation and surface finish. In order to thoroughly understand the effect of crystallographic orientations on the micromachining process, finite-element model (FEM) simulating orthogonal cutting process of single crystallographic material was presented. For modeling the work material, rate sensitive single crystal plasticity of face-centered cubic (FCC) crystal was implemented. For the chip formation during the simulation, element deletion technique was used. The simulation model is developed using ABAQUS/explicit with user material subroutine via user material subroutine (VUMAT). Simulations showed that variation of the specific cutting energy at different crystallographic orientations of work material shows significant anisotropy. The developed FEM model can be a useful prediction tool of micromachining of crystalline materials.

  11. Finite element analysis and measurement for residual stress of dissimilar metal weld in pressurizer safety nozzle mockup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Soo; Kim, W.; Lee, Jeong Geun; Park, Chi Yong; Yang, Jun Seok; Kim, Tae Ryong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jai Hak [Chungbuk University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-11-15

    Finite element (FE) analysis and experiment for weld residual stress (WRS) in the pressurizer safety nozzle mockup is described in various processes and results. Foremost of which is the dissimilar simulation metal welding (DMW) between carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel. Thermal and structural analyses were compared with actual residual stress, and actual measurements of. Magnitude and distribution of WRS in the nozzle mockup were assessed. Two measurement methods were used: hole-drilling method (HDM) with strain gauge for residual stress on the surface of the mockup, and block removal and splitting layer (BRSL) method for through-thickness. FE analysis and measurement data showed good agreement. In conclusion, the characteristics of weld residual stress of DMW could be well understood and the simplified FE analysis was verified as acceptable for estimating WRS

  12. An effective model for dynamic finite difference calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, T.N.

    1996-01-01

    An effective stress model, which simulates the mechanical effects of pore fluids on deformation and strength of porous materials, is described. The model can directly use SESAME table equations-of-state (EOSs) for the solid and fluid components. the model assumes that undrained (no fluid flow) conditions occur. Elastic and crushing behavior of the pore space can be specified from the results of simple laboratory tests. The model fully couples deviatoric and volumetric behavior in the sense that deviatoric and tensile failure depend on the effective pressure, while volumetric changes caused by deviatoric failure are coupled back to the volumetric behavior of the material. Strain hardening and softening of the yield surface, together with a number of flow rules, can be modeled. This model has been implemented into the SMC123 and CTH codes.

  13. Separation of finite electron temperature effect on plasma polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imazawa, Ryota; Kawano, Yasunori; Kusama, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    This study demonstrates the separation of the finite electron temperature on the plasma polarimetry in the magnetic confined fusion plasma for the first time. Approximate solutions of the transformed Stokes equation, including the relativistic effect, suggest that the orientation angle, {theta}, and ellipticity angle, {epsilon}, of polarization state have different dependency on the electron density, n{sub e}, and the electron temperature, T{sub e}, and that the separation of n{sub e} and T{sub e} from {theta} and {epsilon} is possible in principle. We carry out the equilibrium and kinetic reconstruction of tokamak plasma when the central electron density was 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}, and the central electron temperatures were 5, 10, 20, and 30 keV. For both cases when a total plasma current, I{sub p}, is known and when I{sub p} is unknown, the profiles of plasma current density, j{sub {phi}}, n{sub e}, and T{sub e} are successfully reconstructed. The reconstruction of j{sub {phi}} without the information of I{sub p} indicates the new method of I{sub p} measurement applicable to steady state operation of tokamak.

  14. Separation of finite electron temperature effect on plasma polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazawa, Ryota; Kawano, Yasunori; Kusama, Yoshinori

    2012-12-01

    This study demonstrates the separation of the finite electron temperature on the plasma polarimetry in the magnetic confined fusion plasma for the first time. Approximate solutions of the transformed Stokes equation, including the relativistic effect, suggest that the orientation angle, θ, and ellipticity angle, ε, of polarization state have different dependency on the electron density, n(e), and the electron temperature, T(e), and that the separation of n(e) and T(e) from θ and ε is possible in principle. We carry out the equilibrium and kinetic reconstruction of tokamak plasma when the central electron density was 10(20) m(-3), and the central electron temperatures were 5, 10, 20, and 30 keV. For both cases when a total plasma current, I(p), is known and when I(p) is unknown, the profiles of plasma current density, j(φ), n(e), and T(e) are successfully reconstructed. The reconstruction of j(φ) without the information of I(p) indicates the new method of I(p) measurement applicable to steady state operation of tokamak.

  15. Finite-Size Scaling Effects in Chromia thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echtenkamp, Will; He, Xi; Binek, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Controlling magnetism by electrical means remains a key challenge in the area of spintronics. The use of magnetoelectrically active materials is one of the most promising approaches to this problem. Utilizing Cr2O3 as the magnetoelectric pinning layer in a magnetic heterostructure both temperature assisted and isothermal electrical control of exchange bias have been achieved [1,2]. Interestingly, this ME switching of exchange bias has only been achieved using bulk Cr2O3 crystals, isothermal switching of exchange bias using thin film chromia remains elusive. We investigate the origin of unusually pronounced finite-size scaling effects on the properties of Cr2O3 grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy; in particular we focus on the different temperature dependencies of the magnetic susceptibility of bulk vs. thin film chromia, the change in Nèel temperatures, and the implications for the magneto electric properties of chromia thin films. [4pt] [1] P. Borisov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 117203 (2005).[0pt] [2] X. He et al., Nature Mater. 9, 579 (2010).

  16. Finite temperature Casimir effect in Kaluza-Klein spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teo, L.P. [Faculty of Information Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, Cyberjaya, 63100 Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)], E-mail: lpteo@mmu.edu.my

    2009-10-01

    In this article, we consider the finite temperature Casimir effect in Kaluza-Klein spacetime due the vacuum fluctuation of massless scalar field with Dirichlet boundary conditions. We consider the general case where the extra dimensions (internal space) can be any compact connected manifold or orbifold without boundaries. Using piston analysis, we show that the Casimir force is always attractive at any temperature, regardless of the geometry of the internal space. Moreover, the magnitude of the Casimir force increases as the size of the internal space increases and it reduces to the Casimir force in (3+1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime when the size of the internal space shrinks to zero. In the other extreme where the internal space is large, the Casimir force can increase beyond all bound. Asymptotic behaviors of the Casimir force in the low and high temperature regimes are derived and it is observed that the magnitude of the Casimir force grows linearly with temperature in the high temperature regime.

  17. Finite element analysis of hysteresis effects in piezoelectric transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkovics, Reinhard; Landes, Hermann; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Hoffelner, Johann; Lerch, Reinhard

    2000-06-01

    The design of ultrasonic transducers for high power applications, e.g. in medical therapy or production engineering, asks for effective computer aided design tools to analyze the occurring nonlinear effects. In this paper the finite-element-boundary-element package CAPA is presented that allows to model different types of electromechanical sensors and actuators. These transducers are based on various physical coupling effects, such as piezoelectricity or magneto- mechanical interactions. Their computer modeling requires the numerical solution of a multifield problem, such as coupled electric-mechanical fields or magnetic-mechanical fields as well as coupled mechanical-acoustic fields. With the reported software environment we are able to compute the dynamic behavior of electromechanical sensors and actuators by taking into account geometric nonlinearities, nonlinear wave propagation and ferroelectric as well as magnetic material nonlinearities. After a short introduction to the basic theory of the numerical calculation schemes, two practical examples will demonstrate the applicability of the numerical simulation tool. As a first example an ultrasonic thickness mode transducer consisting of a piezoceramic material used for high power ultrasound production is examined. Due to ferroelectric hysteresis, higher order harmonics can be detected in the actuators input current. Also in case of electrical and mechanical prestressing a resonance frequency shift occurs, caused by ferroelectric hysteresis and nonlinear dependencies of the material coefficients on electric field and mechanical stresses. As a second example, a power ultrasound transducer used in HIFU-therapy (high intensity focused ultrasound) is presented. Due to the compressibility and losses in the propagating fluid a nonlinear shock wave generation can be observed. For both examples a good agreement between numerical simulation and experimental data has been achieved.

  18. Finite element analysis and experiment research on aluminum alloy ladder bowl with viscous pressure forming(VPF)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The process parameters of aluminum alloy ladder bowl with viscous pressure forming and solid metal punch forming were numerically simulated by commercial finite element software DEFORM.The influence of blank holder pressure(BHP)on the formability of sheet metal was investigated.It was found that lower BHP does benefit to the distribution of thickness both with VPF and with solid punch forming.The forming force needed in VPF is bigger than that of with solid punch forming at the same stroke.The distribution of thickness with VPF is more uniform than that of with solid punch forming.Compared with solid punch forming,the damage values of workpiece at the top convex comer are lower by VPF.It was also shown that fracture tendency could be reduced with VPF,so that means the formability is improved.At the same time,aluminum alloy ladder bowl was manufactured with VPF.The results show that the simulation results are in agreement with the experimental data very well.

  19. Finite element analysis of free expansion of aluminum alloy tube under magnetic pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hai-ping; LI Chun-feng

    2005-01-01

    A link between the electromagnetic code, ANSYS/Emag and the structural code, Ls-dyna was developed, and the numerical modeling of electromagnetic forming for aluminum alloy tube expansion was performed by means of them (discharge energy 0.75 kJ). A realistic distribution of magnetic pressure was calculated. The calculated values of displacement along the tube axis and versus time are in very good agreement with the measured ones.The maximum strain rate is 1 122 s-1, which is not large enough to change the constitutive equations of aluminum alloy. With the augment of discharge energy (0. 5 - 1.0 kJ), the relative errors of the maximum deformation increase from 2.93% to 11.4%. Therefore, coupled numerical modeling of the electromagnetic field and the structural field should be performed to investigate the electromagnetic forming with larger deformation.

  20. Effects of Ambient Pressure on Bubble Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢新培; 刘明海; 江中和; 潘垣

    2002-01-01

    The effects of the ambient pressure Pambient on the bubble characteristics of pulsed discharge in water are investigated. The simulation results show that, when Pambient increases from 1 atm to 100 atm, the bubble radius R decreases from 4cma to 7mm, and its pulsation period decreases frown 8ms to 0.2ms. The results also show that the peak pressure of the first shock wave is independent of Pambient, but the peak pressure of the second shock wave caused by the bubble re-expansion decreases when Pambient increases. On the other hand, the larger the ambient pressure, the larger the peak pressure of the plasma in the bubble, while the plasma temperature is independent of Pambient.

  1. Finite-size effects in parametric subharmonic instability

    CERN Document Server

    Bourget, Baptiste; Dauxois, Thierry; Bars, Michaël Le; Odier, Philippe; Joubaud, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The parametric subharmonic instability in stratified fluids depends on the frequency and the amplitude of the primary plane wave. In this paper, we present experimental and numerical results emphasizing that the finite width of the beam also plays an important role on this triadic instability. A new theoretical approach based on a simple energy balance is developed and compared to numerical and experimental results. Because of the finite width of the primary wave beam, the secondary pair of waves can leave the interaction zone which affects the transfer of energy. Experimental and numerical results are in good agreement with the prediction of this theory, which brings new insights on energy transfers in the ocean where internal waves with finite-width beams are dominant.

  2. Modeling of high pressure arc-discharge with a fully-implicit Navier-Stokes stabilized finite element flow solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, A.; Mansour, N. N.; Lopez, B.; Panesi, M.

    2017-05-01

    This work addresses the modeling of high pressure electric discharge in an arc-heated wind tunnel. The combined numerical solution of Poisson’s equation, radiative transfer equations, and the set of Favre-averaged thermochemical nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes equations allows for the determination of the electric, radiation, and flow fields, accounting for their mutual interaction. Semi-classical statistical thermodynamics is used to determine the plasma thermodynamic properties, while transport properties are obtained from kinetic principles with the Chapman-Enskog method. A multi-temperature formulation is used to account for thermal non-equilibrium. Finally, the turbulence closure of the flow equations is obtained by means of the Spalart-Allmaras model, which requires the solution of an additional scalar transport equation. A Streamline upwind Petrov-Galerkin stabilized finite element formulation is employed to solve the Navier-Stokes equation. The electric field equation is solved using the standard Galerkin formulation. A stable formulation for the radiative transfer equations is obtained using the least-squares finite element method. The developed simulation framework has been applied to investigate turbulent plasma flows in the 20 MW Aerodynamic Heating Facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The current model is able to predict the process of energy addition and re-distribution due to Joule heating and thermal radiation, resulting in a hot central core surrounded by colder flow. The use of an unsteady three-dimensional treatment also allows the asymmetry due to a dynamic electric arc attachment point in the cathode chamber to be captured accurately. The current work paves the way for detailed estimation of operating characteristics for arc-heated wind tunnels which are critical in testing thermal protection systems.

  3. Meson Effects on the Chiral Condensate at Finite Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Mei; ZHUANG Peng-Fei; ZHAO Wei-Qin

    2002-01-01

    Meson corrections on the chiral condensate up to next-to-leading order in a 1/Nc expansion at finite densityare investigated in the NJL model with explicit chiral symmetry breaking. Compared with mean-field results, the chiralphase transition is still of the first order while the properties near the critical density for chiral phase transition are foundto change significantly.

  4. Finite temperature Casimir effect in the presence of nonlinear dielectrics

    CERN Document Server

    Kheirandish, Fardin; Soltani, Morteza

    2010-01-01

    Starting from a Lagrangian, electromagnetic field in the presence of a nonlinear dielectric medium is quantized using path-integral techniques and correlation functions of different fields are calculated. The susceptibilities of the nonlinear medium are obtained and their relation to coupling functions are determined. Finally, the Casimir energy and force in the presence of a nonlinear medium at finite temperature is calculated.

  5. Probing finite size effects in $(\\lambda \\Phi^{4})_4$ MonteCarlo calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Agodi, A

    1999-01-01

    The Constrained Effective Potential (CEP) is known to be equivalent to the usual Effective Potential (EP) in the infinite volume limit. We have carried out MonteCarlo calculations based on the two different definitions to get informations on finite size effects. We also compared these calculations with those based on an Improved CEP (ICEP) which takes into account the finite size of the lattice. It turns out that ICEP actually reduces the finite size effects which are more visible near the vanishing of the external source.

  6. Fast Sausage Modes in Magnetic Tubes with Continuous Transverse Profiles: Effects of a Finite Plasma Beta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xiong, Ming; Yu, Hui; Guo, Ming-Zhe

    2016-12-01

    While standing fast sausage modes in flare loops are often invoked to interpret quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in solar flares, it is unclear as to how they are influenced by the combined effects of a continuous transverse structuring and a finite internal plasma beta ({β }{{i}}). We derive a generic dispersion relation governing linear sausage waves in straight magnetic tubes for which plasma pressure is not negligible, and the density and temperature inhomogeneities of essentially arbitrary form take place in a layer of arbitrary width. Focusing on fast modes, we find that {β }{{i}} only weakly influences {k}{{c}}, the critical longitudinal wavenumber separating the leaky from trapped modes. Likewise, for both trapped and leaky modes, the periods P in units of the transverse fast time depend only weakly on {β }{{i}}, which is compatible with the fact that the effective wave vectors of fast sausage modes are largely perpendicular to the background magnetic field. However, a weak {β }{{i}} dependence of the damping times τ is seen only when the length-to-radius ratio L/R is ∼50% larger than some critical value π /({k}{{c}}R), which itself rather sensitively depends on the density contrast, profile steepness, as well as on how the transverse structuring is described. In the context of QPPs, we conclude that the much simpler zero-beta theory can be employed for trapped modes, as long as one sees the deduced internal Alfvén speed as actually being the fast speed. In contrast, effects due to a finite beta in flare loops should be considered when leaky modes are exploited.

  7. High pressure effects in anaesthesia and narcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; McMillan, Paul F; Greenfield, Susan A

    2006-10-01

    There is growing interest in determining the effects of high pressure on biological functions. Studies of brain processes under hyperbaric conditions can give a unique insight into phenomena such as nitrogen narcosis, inert gas anaesthesia, and pressure reversal of the effects of anaesthetic and narcotic agents. Such research may shed light on the action of anaesthetics, which remains poorly understood, and on the nature of consciousness itself. Various studies have established the behavioural response of organisms to hyperbaric conditions, in the presence or absence of anaesthetic agents. At the molecular level, X-ray crystallography has been used to investigate the incorporation of species like Xe in hydrophobic pockets within model ion channels that may account for pressure effects on neuronal transmission. New magnetic resonance imaging techniques are providing tomographic three-dimensional images that detail brain structure and function, and that can be correlated with behavioural studies and psychological test results. Such whole organ techniques are linked to the molecular scale via voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging studies on brain slices that provide time-resolved images of the dynamic formation and interconnection of inter-neuronal complexes. The VSD experiments are readily adapted to in situ studies under high pressure conditions. In this tutorial review we review the current state of knowledge of hyperbaric effects on brain processes: anaesthesia and narcosis, recent studies at the molecular level via protein crystallography at high pressure in a Xe atmosphere, and we also present some preliminary results of VSD imaging of brain slices under hyperbaric conditions.

  8. Nonuniversal Finite-Size Effects Near Critical Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohm, V.

    2008-11-01

    We study the finite-size critical behavior of the anisotropic φ4 lattice model with periodic boundary conditions in a d-dimensional hypercubic geometry above, at, and below Tc. Our perturbation approach at fixed d = 3 yields excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo (MC) data for the finite-size amplitude of the free energy of the three-dimensional Ising model at Tc by Mon [Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 2671 (1985)]. Below Tc a minimum of the scaling function of the excess free energy is found. We predict a measurable dependence of this minimum on the anisotropy parameters. Our theory agrees quantitatively with the non-monotonic dependence of the Binder cumulant on the ferromagnetic next-nearest neighbor (NNN) coupling of the two-dimensional Ising model found by MC simulations of Selke and Shchur [J. Phys. A 38, L739 (2005)]. Our theory also predicts a non-monotonic dependence for small values of the anti-ferromagnetic NNN coupling and the existence of a Lifshitz point at a larger value of this coupling. The tails of the large-L behavior at T ≠ Tc violate both finite-size scaling and universality even for isotropic systems as they depend on the bare four-point coupling of the φ4 theory, on the cutoff procedure, and on subleading long-range interactions.

  9. Exploring the Utilization of Low-Pressure, Piston-Cylinder Experiments to Determine the Bulk Compositions of Finite, Precious Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, K. E.; McCubbin, F. M.; Harrington, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Determining the bulk composition of precious materials with a finite mass (e.g., meteorite samples) is extremely important in the fields of Earth and Planetary Science. From meteorite studies we are able to place constraints on large scale planetary processes like global differentiation and subsequent volcanism, as well as smaller scale processes like crystallization in a magma chamber or sedimentary compaction at the surface. However, with meteorite samples in particular, far too often we are limited by how precious the sample is as well as its limited mass. In this study, we have utilized aliquots of samples previously studied for toxicological hazards, including both the fresh samples (lunar mare basalt NWA 4734, lunar regolith breccia NWA 7611, martian basalt Tissint, martian regolith breccia NWA 7034, a vestian basalt Berthoud, a vestian regolith breccia NWA 2060, and a terrestrial mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)), and those that underwent iron leaching (Tissint, NWA 7034, NWA 4734, MORB). With these small masses of material, we performed low pressure (approx. 0.75 GPa), high temperature (greater than 1600 degrees Celsius) melting experiments. Each sample was analyzed using a JEOL 8530F electron microprobe to determine the bulk composition of the materials that were previously examined. When available, the results of our microprobe data were compared with bulk rock compositions in the literature. The results of this study show that with this technique, only approx. 50 mg of sample is required to accurately determine the bulk composition of the materials of interest.

  10. Electrohydrodynamics within electrical double layer in a pressure-driven flow in presence of finite temperature gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Ghonge, Tanmay; Chakraborty, Jeevanjyoti; Chakraborty, Suman

    2012-01-01

    A wide spectrum of electrokinetic studies is modelled as isothermal ones to expedite analysis even when such conditions may be extremely difficult to realize in practice. As a clear and novel departure from this trend, we address the case of flow-induced electrohydrodynamics, commonly referred to as streaming potential, in a situation where finite temperature gradients do indeed exit. By way of analysing a model problem of flow through a narrow parallel plate channel, we show that the temperature gradients have a significant effect on the streaming potential, and, consequently, on the flow itself. We incorporate thermoelectic effects in our model by a full-fledged coupling among the electric potential, the ionic species distribution, the fluid velocity and the local fluid temperature fields without resorting to ad hoc simplifications. We expect this expository study to contribute towards more sophisticated future inquiries into practical micro-/nano-fluidic applications coupling thermal field focusing with el...

  11. Calculating the Finite-Speed-of-Light Effect in Atom Gravimeters with General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Yu-Jie

    2016-01-01

    This work mainly presents a relativistic analytical calculating method for the finite speed-of-light effect in atom gravimeters, which can simplify the deriva- tion and give a more complete expression for the associated correction.

  12. Combining ordinary and topological finite volume effects for fixed topology simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Dromard, Arthur; Gerber, Urs; Mejía-Díaz, Héctor; Wagner, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In lattice quantum field theories with topological sectors, simulations at fine lattice spacings --- with typical algorithms --- tend to freeze topologically. In such cases, specific topological finite size effects have to be taken into account to obtain physical results, which correspond to infinite volume or unfixed topology. Moreover, when a theory like QCD is simulated in a moderate volume, one also has to overcome ordinary finite volume effects (not related to topology freezing). To extract physical results from simulations affected by both types of finite volume effects, we extend a known relation between hadron masses at fixed and unfixed topology by additionally incorporating ordinary finite volume effects. We present numerical results for SU(2) Yang-Mills theory.

  13. Mitigation Effect of Finite Larmor Radius on Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Z-Pinch Implosions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱孝明; 黄林; 简广德

    2002-01-01

    Based on the framework of magnetohydrodynamic theory, a simple model is proposed to study the mitigation effect of finite Larmor radius on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions. In this model, taking account of Ti ≥ Te in Z-pinch implosions we believe that the magnetohydrodynamic plasma responds to a perturbation (~ exp [i (k. x - ωt)]) at frequency (ω + ik2⊥ρ2iΩi) instead of frequency ω, where k2⊥ρ2i is due to the finite Larmor radius effects expressed from the generalkinetic theory of magnetized plasma. Therefore the linearized continuity and momentum equations for the perturbed mass-density and velocity include the finite Larmor radius effects. The calculations indicate that, in the wavenumber region of interest, the finite Larmor radius effects can mitigate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions.

  14. RANDOM MICROSTRUCTURE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD AND ITS VERIFICATION FOR EFFECTIVE PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The present study aims at developing a new method-Random M icrostructure Finite Element Method (RMFEM)for the effective properties of composite materials . In this method, a random microstructure model is used to simulate the microstructure of the real composite materials. The physical fields in such a randm microstructure model under specified boundary and initial conditions are analyzed by finite element method. The effective properties of composite materials can be obtained from the analysis results. As verification, some effective properties of composite materials, such as elastic module,thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity and elastoplastic properties, are investigated by random microstructure finite element method. The numerical results are given together with the experimental data. It i- revealed that the random microstructure finite element method is a very valid method for the determination of the effective properties of composite materials.

  15. Lorentz Invariance at Finite Temperature and Its Effect on Production Rate and Equation of State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Lian-Yi; ZHUANG Peng-Fei

    2004-01-01

    The effect of Lorentz invariance breaking on the production rate and the equation of state at finite temperature is investigated in the frame of φ3 theory. The invariance breaking significantly changes the off-shell degree at high temperatures.

  16. Effects of finite element formulation on optimal plate and shell structural topologies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Long, CS

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of selected membrane, plate and flat shell finite element formulations on optimal topologies are numerically investigated. Two different membrane components are considered. The first is a standard 4-node bilinear quadrilateral...

  17. Zeeman Effect in Ruby at High Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Ioana

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a versatile fiber-coupled system for magneto-optical spectroscopy measurements at high pressure. The system is based on a miniature Cu-alloy Diamond Anvil Cell (from D'Anvils, Ltd) fitted with a custom-designed He gas-actuated membrane for in-situ pressure control, and coupled with a He transfer cryostat incorporating a superconducting magnet (from Quantum Designs). This system allows optical measurements (Raman, photoluminescence, reflectivity) within wide ranges of pressures (up to 100GPa), temperatures (4.2-300K) and magnetic fields (0-9T). We employ this system to examine the effect of pressure and non-hydrostatic stress on the Zeeman split d-d transitions of Cr^3+ in ruby (Al2O3: Cr^3+). We determine the effect of pressure and non-hydrostaticity on the trigonal crystal field in this material, and discuss the use of the Zeman-split ruby fluorescence as a possible probe for deviatoric stresses in diamond anvil cell experiments.

  18. Unraveling the "pressure effect" in nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedekind, Jan; Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Brus, David; Reguera, David

    2008-09-19

    The influence of the pressure of a chemically inert carrier gas on the nucleation rate is one of the biggest puzzles in the research of gas-liquid nucleation. Experiments can show a positive effect, a negative effect, or no effect at all. The same experiment may show both trends for the same substance depending on temperature, or for different substances at the same temperature. We show how this ambiguous effect naturally arises from the competition of two contributions: nonisothermal effects and pressure-volume work. Our model clarifies seemingly contradictory experimental results and quantifies the variation of the nucleation ability of a substance in the presence of an ambient gas. Our findings are corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations and might have important implications since nucleation in experiments, technical applications, and nature practically always occurs in the presence of an ambient gas.

  19. Effect of the Finite Ion Larmor Radius on the Kelvin‐Helmholtz Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchior, Henning; Popovich, M.

    1968-01-01

    The Kelvin‐Helmholtz instability is described with the effects of the finite ion Larmor radius included. The growth rate is computed for several values of the velocity shear and different density profiles. © 1968 American Institute of Physics......The Kelvin‐Helmholtz instability is described with the effects of the finite ion Larmor radius included. The growth rate is computed for several values of the velocity shear and different density profiles. © 1968 American Institute of Physics...

  20. Finite-size effects on semi-directed Barabási-Albert networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, M. A.; Sumour, Muneer A.; Elbitar, A. M.; Shabat, M. M.; Lima, F. W. S.

    2016-04-01

    In scale-free Barabási-Albert (BA) networks, we study the finite-size effect at different number m of neighbors. So, we investigate the effects of finite network size N for the recently developed semi-directed BA networks (SDBA1 and SDBA2) at fixed 2≤m≤300) and show and explain the gap in the distribution of the number k(i) of neighbors of the nodes i.

  1. Modeling of Pressure Effects in HVDC Cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Peter; Hassager, Ole; Strøbech, Esben

    1999-01-01

    A model is developed for the prediction of pressure effects in HVDC mass impregnatedcables as a result of temperature changes.To test the model assumptions, experiments were performed in cable like geometries.It is concluded that the model may predict the formation of gas cavities....

  2. CGC beyond eikonal accuracy: finite width target effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altinoluk Tolga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a method to systematically include the corrections to the eikonal approximation that are associated with the finite width of the target. The retarded gluon propagator in background field is calculated at next-to-next-to-eikonal (NNE accuracy by using this method. The corrections to the strict eikonal limit of the gluon propagator are found to be Wilson lines decorated by gradients of the background field of the target. The result is then applied to single inclusive gluon production and to single transverse spin asymmetry for a polarized target in pA collisions.

  3. CGC beyond eikonal accuracy: finite width target effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinoluk, Tolga; Armesto, Nestor; Beuf, Guillaume; Moscoso, Alexis

    2016-03-01

    We present a method to systematically include the corrections to the eikonal approximation that are associated with the finite width of the target. The retarded gluon propagator in background field is calculated at next-to-next-to-eikonal (NNE) accuracy by using this method. The corrections to the strict eikonal limit of the gluon propagator are found to be Wilson lines decorated by gradients of the background field of the target. The result is then applied to single inclusive gluon production and to single transverse spin asymmetry for a polarized target in pA collisions.

  4. Aerodynamic effects of simulated ice shapes on two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alansatan, Sait

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of simulated glaze ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance characteristics of two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail. The two dimensional tests involved two NACA 0011 airfoils with chords of 24 and 12 inches. Glaze ice shapes computed with the LEWICE code that were representative of 22.5-min and 45-min ice accretions were simulated with spoilers, which were sized to approximate the horn heights of the LEWICE ice shapes. Lift, drag, pitching moment, and surface pressure coefficients were obtained for a range of test conditions. Test variables included Reynolds number, geometric scaling, control deflection and the key glaze ice features, which were horn height, horn angle, and horn location. For the three-dimensional tests, a 25%-scale business jet empennage (BJE) with a T-tail configuration was used to study the effect of ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance of a swept horizontal tail. Simulated glaze ice shapes included the LEWICE and spoiler ice shapes to represent 9-min and 22.5-min ice accretions. Additional test variables included Reynolds number and elevator deflection. Lift, drag, hinge moment coefficients as well as boundary layer velocity profiles were obtained. The experimental results showed substantial degradation in aerodynamic performance of the airfoils and the swept horizontal tail due to the simulated ice shapes. For the two-dimensional airfoils, the largest aerodynamic penalties were obtained when the 3-in spoiler-ice, which was representative of 45-min glaze ice accretions, was set normal to the chord. Scale and Reynolds effects were not significant for lift and drag. However, pitching moments and pressure distributions showed great sensitivity to Reynolds number and geometric scaling. For the threedimensional study with the swept finite tail, the 22.5-min ice shapes resulted in greater aerodynamic performance degradation than the 9-min ice shapes. The addition of 24

  5. Effect of Large Finite-Size Wind Farms and Their Wakes on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ka Ling; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Through the use of large-eddy simulation, the effect of large finite-size wind farms and their wakes on conventionally-neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics and power extraction is investigated. Specifically, this study focuses on a wind farm that comprises 25 rows of wind turbines, spanning a distance of 10 km. It is shown that large wind farms have a significant effect on internal boundary layer growth both inside and downwind of the wind farms. If the wind farm is large enough, the internal boundary layer interacts with the thermally-stratified free atmosphere above, leading to a modification of the ABL height and power extraction. In addition, it is shown that large wind farms create extensive wakes, which could have an effect on potential downwind wind farms. Specifically, for the case considered here, a power deficit as large as 8% is found at a distance of 10 km downwind from the wind farm. Furthermore, this study compares the wind farm wake dynamics for cases in which the conventionally neutral ABLs are driven by a unidirectional pressure gradient and Coriolis forces.

  6. Estimation of the Young's modulus of the human pars tensa using in-situ pressurization and inverse finite-element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohani, S Alireza; Ghomashchi, Soroush; Agrawal, Sumit K; Ladak, Hanif M

    2017-03-01

    Finite-element models of the tympanic membrane are sensitive to the Young's modulus of the pars tensa. The aim of this work is to estimate the Young's modulus under a different experimental paradigm than currently used on the human tympanic membrane. These additional values could potentially be used by the auditory biomechanics community for building consensus. The Young's modulus of the human pars tensa was estimated through inverse finite-element modelling of an in-situ pressurization experiment. The experiments were performed on three specimens with a custom-built pressurization unit at a quasi-static pressure of 500 Pa. The shape of each tympanic membrane before and after pressurization was recorded using a Fourier transform profilometer. The samples were also imaged using micro-computed tomography to create sample-specific finite-element models. For each sample, the Young's modulus was then estimated by numerically optimizing its value in the finite-element model so simulated pressurized shapes matched experimental data. The estimated Young's modulus values were 2.2 MPa, 2.4 MPa and 2.0 MPa, and are similar to estimates obtained using in-situ single-point indentation testing. The estimates were obtained under the assumptions that the pars tensa is linearly elastic, uniform, isotropic with a thickness of 110 μm, and the estimates are limited to quasi-static loading. Estimates of pars tensa Young's modulus are sensitive to its thickness and inclusion of the manubrial fold. However, they do not appear to be sensitive to optimization initialization, height measurement error, pars flaccida Young's modulus, and tympanic membrane element type (shell versus solid).

  7. Effect of finite phosphor thickness on detective quantum efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, R.M.; Yaffe, M.J.; Holmes, R.B. (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    1989-09-01

    In this paper we describe theoretically the relationship between the finite thickness of a phosphor screen and its spatial-frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency DQE(f-). The finite thickness of the screen causes a variation in both the total number of light quanta emitted from the screen in a burst from a given x-ray interaction and in the spatial distribution of the quanta within the light burst (i.e., shape or point spread function (PSF) of the light burst). The variation in magnitude of the burst gives rise to a spatial-frequency-independent reduction in DQE, characterized by the scintillation efficiency As. The variation in PSF causes a roll off in DQE with increasing spatial frequency which we have characterized by the function Rc(f). Both As and Rc(f) can be determined from the moments of the distribution of the spatial Fourier spectrum of light bursts emitted from the phosphor and thus they are related: As is a scaling factor for Rc(f). Our theory predicts that it is necessary for all light bursts which appear at the output to have the same magnitude to maximize As and the same shape to maximize Rc(f). These requirements can lead to the result that the fluorescent screen with the highest modulation transfer function will not necessarily have the highest DQE(f) even at high spatial frequencies.

  8. Theory of Finite Size Effects for Electronic Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Liquids and Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Holzmann, Markus; Morales, Miguel A; Tubmann, Norm M; Ceperley, David M; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Concentrating on zero temperature Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electronic systems, we give a general description of the theory of finite size extrapolations of energies to the thermodynamic limit based on one and two-body correlation functions. We introduce new effective procedures, such as using the potential and wavefunction split-up into long and short range functions to simplify the method and we discuss how to treat backflow wavefunctions. Then we explicitly test the accuracy of our method to correct finite size errors on example hydrogen and helium many-body systems and show that the finite size bias can be drastically reduced for even small systems.

  9. Analysis of optical fibers with arbitrary refractive index profiles: accuracy, convergence, and effects of finite cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamil, Lakshman S.; Aicklen, Gregory H.

    1993-06-01

    We have formulated a matrix eigenvalue problem for cylindrical optical fibers from a set of finite difference equations. Numerical solution of this problem yields the propagation constants for propagating modes. The method can be used for arbitrary index profiles, does not require the explicit evaluation of Bessel or modified Bessel functions, and does not use iterative methods to search for the propagation constants as was the case in earlier proposed methods using finite differences. The method is accurate, fast, and simple. We have established the convergence and stability of this method, and explored the effects of finite cladding width on the dispersion characteristics.

  10. The Effects of Narrowband Interference on Finite-Resolution IR-UWB Digital Receiver

    CERN Document Server

    zhang, chao; Ren, Pinyi

    2010-01-01

    Finite-resolution digital receiver is recently considered as a potential way to Ultra Wide Band (UWB) communication systems due to its ability of mitigating the challenge of Analog-Digital Converter (ADC). In this paper, the effects of narrowband interference (NBI) are investigated when finite-resolution digital receiver is used for Impulse Radio-UWB (IR-UWB) system. It is shown that finite-resolution receiver enlarges the impact of NBI. The lower resolution of the UWB receiver is, the more degradations NBI causes.

  11. Finite size effects on the phase diagram of the thermodynamical cluster model

    CERN Document Server

    Mallik, S; Chaudhuri, G

    2016-01-01

    The thermodynamical cluster model is known to present a first-order liquid-gas phase transition in the idealized case of an uncharged, infinitely extended medium. However, in most practical applications of this model, the system is finite and charged. In this paper we study how the phase diagram is modified by finite size and Coulomb effects. We show that the thermodynamic anomalies which are associated to the finite system counterpart of first order phase transitions, are correctly reproduced by this effective model. However, approximations in the calculation of the grandcanonical partition sum prevent obtaining the exact mapping between statistical ensembles which should be associated to finite systems. The ensemble inequivalence associated to the transition persists in the presence of Coulomb, but the phase diagram is deeply modified with respect to the simple liquid-gas phase transition characteristic of the neutral system.

  12. Fast sausage modes in magnetic tubes with continuous transverse profiles: effects of a finite plasma beta

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shao-Xia; Xiong, Ming; Yu, Hui; Guo, Ming-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    While standing fast sausage modes in flare loops are often invoked to interpret quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in solar flares, it is unclear as to how they are influenced by the combined effects of a continuous transverse structuring and a finite internal plasma beta ($\\beta_{\\rm i}$). We derive a generic dispersion relation (DR) governing linear sausage waves in straight magnetic tubes for which plasma pressure is not negligible and the density and temperature inhomogeneities of essentially arbitrary form take place in a layer of arbitrary width. Focusing on fast modes, we find that $\\beta_{\\rm i}$ only weakly influences $k_{\\rm c}$, the critical longitudinal wavenumber separating the leaky from trapped modes. Likewise, for both trapped and leaky modes, the periods $P$ in units of the transverse fast time depend only weakly on $\\beta_{\\rm i}$, which is compatible with the fact that the effective wavevectors of fast sausage modes are largely perpendicular to the background magnetic field. However, a weak $...

  13. Estimation of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of soft tissue from indentation using two different-sized indentors: finite element analysis of the finite deformation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, A P C; Zheng, Y P

    2005-03-01

    Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of a tissue can be simultaneously obtained using two indentation tests with two different sized indentors in two indentations. Owing to the assumption of infinitesimal deformation of the indentation, the finite deformation effect of indentation on the calculated material parameters was not fully understood in the double indentation approach. However, indentation tests with infinitesimal deformation are not practical for the measurement of real tissues. Accordingly, finite element models were developed to simulate the indentation with different indentor diameters and different deformation ratios to investigate the finite deformation effect of indentation. The results indicated that Young's modulus E increased with the increase in the indentation deformation w, if the finite deformation effect of indentation was not considered. This phenomenon became obvious when Poisson's ratio v approached 0.5 and/or the ratio of indentor radius and tissue thickness a/h increased. The calculated Young's modulus could be different by 23% at 10% deformation in comparison with its real value. The results also demonstrated that the finite deformation effect to indentation on the calculation of Poisson's ratio v was much smaller. After the finite deformation effect of indentation was considered, the error of the calculated Young's modulus could be controlled within 5% (a/h = 1) and 2% (a/h = 2) for deformation up to 10%.

  14. Finite size effects in the dynamics of opinion formation

    CERN Document Server

    Toral, R; Tessone, Claudio J.; Toral, Raul

    2006-01-01

    For some models of relevance in the social sciences we review some examples in which system size plays an important role in the final outcome of the dynamics. We discuss the conditions under which changes of behavior can appear only when the number of agents in the model takes a finite value. Those changes of behavior can be related to the apparent phase transitions that appear in some physical models. We show examples in the Galam's model of opinion transmission and the Axelrod's model of culture formation stressing the role that the network of interactions has on the main results of both models. Finally, we present the phenomenon of system-size stochastic resonance by which a forcing signal (identified as an advertising agent) is optimally amplified by a population of the right (intermediate) size. Our work stresses the role that the system size has in the dynamics of social systems and the inappropriateness of taking the thermodynamic limit for these systems.

  15. Finite-temperature effective boundary theory of the quantized thermal Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Ryota; Ryu, Shinsei; Nomura, Kentaro

    2016-02-01

    A finite-temperature effective free energy of the boundary of a quantized thermal Hall system is derived microscopically from the bulk two-dimensional Dirac fermion coupled with a gravitational field. In two spatial dimensions, the thermal Hall conductivity of fully gapped insulators and superconductors is quantized and given by the bulk Chern number, in analogy to the quantized electric Hall conductivity in quantum Hall systems. From the perspective of effective action functionals, two distinct types of the field theory have been proposed to describe the quantized thermal Hall effect. One of these, known as the gravitational Chern-Simons action, is a kind of topological field theory, and the other is a phenomenological theory relevant to the Strěda formula. In order to solve this problem, we derive microscopically an effective theory that accounts for the quantized thermal Hall effect. In this paper, the two-dimensional Dirac fermion under a static background gravitational field is considered in equilibrium at a finite temperature, from which an effective boundary free energy functional of the gravitational field is derived. This boundary theory is shown to explain the quantized thermal Hall conductivity and thermal Hall current in the bulk by assuming the Lorentz symmetry. The bulk effective theory is consistently determined via the boundary effective theory.

  16. Nonlinear effects of the finite amplitude ultrasound wave in biological tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Nonlinear effects will occur during the transmission of the finite amplitude wave in biological tissues.The theoretical prediction and experimental demonstration of the nonlinear effects on the propagation of the finite amplitude wave at the range of biomedical ultrasound frequency and intensity are studied.Results show that the efficiency factor and effective propagation distance will decrease while the attenuation coefficient increases due to the existence of nonlinear effects.The experimental results coincided quite well with the theory.This shows that the effective propagation distance and efficiency factor can be used to describe quantitatively the influence of nonlinear effects on the propagation of the finite amplitude sound wave in biological tissues.

  17. Effect of pressure gradients on Gortler instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, S. A.; Nayfeh, A. H.

    1980-01-01

    Gortler instability for boundary-layer flows over generally curved walls is considered. The full linearized disturbance equations are obtained in an orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. A perturbation procedure to account for second-order effects is used to determine the effects of the displacement thickness and the variation of the streamline curvature on the neutral stability of the Blasius flow. The pressure gradient in the mean flow is accounted for by solving the nonsimilar boundary-layer equations. Growth rates are obtained for the actual mean flow and the Falkner-Skan flows. The results demonstrate the strong influence of the pressure gradient and the nonsimilarity of the basic flow on the stability characteristics.

  18. Quantification of Processing Effects on Filament Wound Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Robert A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1999-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is described which is designed specifically for the modeling and analysis of filament wound pressure vessels. Cylindrical vessels with spherical or elliptical end caps can be generated automatically. End caps other than spherical or elliptical may be modeled by varying circular sections along the x-axis according to the C C! end cap shape. The finite element model generated is composed of plate type quadrilateral shell elements on the entire vessel surface. This computational procedure can also be sued to generate grid, connectivity and material cards (bulk data) for component parts of a larger model. These bulk data are assigned to a user designated file for finite element structural/stress analysis of composite pressure vessels. The procedure accommodates filament would pressure vessels of all types of shells-of-revolution. It has provisions to readily evaluate initial stresses due to pretension in the winding filaments and residual stresses due to cure temperature.

  19. Quantification of Processing Effects on Filament Wound Pressure Vessels. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Robert A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2002-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is described which is designed specifically for the modeling and analysis of filament wound pressure vessels. Cylindrical vessels with spherical or elliptical end caps can be generated automatically. End caps other than spherical or elliptical may be modeled by varying circular sections along the x-axis according to the end cap shape. The finite element model generated is composed of plate type quadrilateral shell elements on the entire vessel surface. This computational procedure can also be used to generate grid, connectivity and material cards (bulk data) for component parts of a larger model. These bulk data are assigned to a user designated file for finite element structural/stress analysis of composite pressure vessels. The procedure accommodates filament wound pressure vessels of all types of shells-of -revolution. It has provisions to readily evaluate initial stresses due to pretension in the winding filaments and residual stresses due to cure temperature.

  20. Finite size effects and symmetry breaking in the evolution of networks of competing Boolean nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, M; Bassler, K E, E-mail: bassler@uh.edu [Department of Physics, University of Houston, 617 Science and Research 1, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States)

    2011-01-28

    Finite size effects on the evolutionary dynamics of Boolean networks are analyzed. In the model considered, Boolean networks evolve via a competition between nodes that punishes those in the majority. Previous studies have found that large networks evolve to a statistical steady state that is both critical and highly canalized, and that the evolution of canalization, which is a form of robustness found in genetic regulatory networks, is associated with a particular symmetry of the evolutionary dynamics. Here, it is found that finite size networks evolve in a fundamentally different way than infinitely large networks do. The symmetry of the evolutionary dynamics of infinitely large networks that selects for canalizing Boolean functions is broken in the evolutionary dynamics of finite size networks. In finite size networks, there is an additional selection for input-inverting Boolean functions that output a value opposite to the majority of input values. The reason for the symmetry breaking in the evolutionary dynamics is found to be due to the need for nodes in finite size networks to behave differently in order to cooperate so that the system collectively performs as efficiently as possible. The results suggest that both finite size effects and symmetry are fundamental for understanding the evolution of real-world complex networks, including genetic regulatory networks.

  1. Effect of Stent Radial Force on Stress Pattern After Deployment: A Finite Element Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Alessandro; Murphy, Olive; Bahmanyar, Reza; McLeod, Chris

    2014-07-01

    The present article presents a method for assessing the radial stiffness of nitinol stents. An idealized stent model was created, and its radial stiffness was calculated by means of finite element modeling. The calculations were validated against experimental measurements. The variation of radial stiffness with geometrical dimensions was calculated, and the effect of increasing radial stiffness on endovascular deployment was analyzed. Peak tensile and compressive stresses as well as stent penetration were calculated in the case of an idealized pulmonary artery model having realistic dimensions as well as stiffness. The results of stress calculations were compared with a second set of simulations, where an idealized behavior of the stent (uniform expansion to a theoretical contact diameter) was modeled. The results show how in reality nitinol stents behave in a non-ideal way, having a non-uniform expansion and exerting non-uniform pressure on the contact areas with the artery. Such non-ideality decreases though with the increase in radial stiffness. The radial force alone may be insufficient in describing the stent-artery interaction, and numerical modeling proves to be necessary for capturing such complexity.

  2. High pressure effects on fruits and vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, R.A.H.; Matser, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter provides an overview on different high pressure based treatments (high pressure pasteurization, blanching, pressure-assisted thermal processing, pressure-shift freezing and thawing) available for the preservation of fruits and vegetable products and extending their shelf life. Pressure t

  3. High pressure effects on fruits and vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, R.A.H.; Matser, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter provides an overview on different high pressure based treatments (high pressure pasteurization, blanching, pressure-assisted thermal processing, pressure-shift freezing and thawing) available for the preservation of fruits and vegetable products and extending their shelf life. Pressure

  4. Finite beta effects on low- and high-frequency magnetosonic waves in a two-ion-species plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toida, Mieko; Aota, Yukio [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    A magnetosonic wave propagating perpendicular to a magnetic field in a two-ion-species plasma has two branches, high-frequency and low-frequency modes. The finite beta effects on these modes are analyzed theoretically on the basis of the three-fluid model with finite ion and electron pressures. First, it is shown that the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for the low-frequency mode is valid for amplitudes ε<ε{sub max}, where the upper limit of the amplitude ε{sub max} is given as a function of β (β is the ratio of the kinetic and magnetic energy densities), the density ratio, and the cyclotron frequency ratio of two ion species. Next, the linear dispersion relation and KdV equation for the high-frequency mode are derived, including β as a factor. In addition, the theory for heavy ion acceleration by the high-frequency mode pulse and the pulse damping due to this energy transfer in a finite beta plasma are presented.

  5. Finite beta and compressibility effects on stability of resistive modes in toroidal geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leboeuf, J.-N.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kurita, Gen-ichi

    1998-03-01

    Linear resistive stability results obtained from the toroidal magnetohydrodynamic codes FAR developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in United States of America and AEOLUS developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are compared for carefully constructed benchmark profiles and parameters. These are unstable to a tearing mode with toroidal mode number n=1. The eigenvalues and eigenfunctions calculated with both codes are in close agreement and show that the effect of compressibility is weak for these modes. The effect of finite plasma beta is considered, and the eigenvalues calculated by the FAR and AEOLUS codes also show good agreement. It is shown that the finite beta has a stabilizing effect on the toroidal tearing mode, but that the compressibility also has little effect on finite beta tearing modes. (author)

  6. Practical security of continuous-variable quantum key distribution with finite sampling bandwidth effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Huang, Peng; Huang, Duan; Lin, Dakai; Zeng, Guihua

    2016-02-01

    Practical security of the continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CVQKD) system with finite sampling bandwidth of analog-to-digital converter (ADC) at the receiver's side is investigated. We find that the finite sampling bandwidth effects may decrease the lower bound of secret key rate without awareness of the legitimate communicators. This leaves security loopholes for Eve to attack the system. In addition, this effect may restrains the linear relationship of secret key bit rate with repetition rate of the system; subsequently, there is a saturation value for the secret key bit rate with the repetition rate. To resist such kind of effects, we propose a dual sampling detection approach in which two ADCs are employed so that the finite sampling bandwidth effects are removed.

  7. Stress categorization in nozzle to pressure vessel connections finite elements models; Categorizacao de tensoes em modelos de elementos finitos de conexoes bocal-vaso de pressao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque, Levi Barcelos de

    1999-07-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III , is the most important code for nuclear pressure vessels design. Its design criteria were developed to preclude the various pressure vessel failure modes throughout the so-called 'Design by Analysis', some of them by imposing stress limits. Thus, failure modes such as plastic collapse, excessive plastic deformation and incremental plastic deformation under cyclic loading (ratchetting) may be avoided by limiting the so-called primary and secondary stresses. At the time 'Design by Analysis' was developed (early 60's) the main tool for pressure vessel design was the shell discontinuity analysis, in which the results were given in membrane and bending stress distributions along shell sections. From that time, the Finite Element Method (FEM) has had a growing use in pressure vessels design. In this case, the stress results are neither normally separated in membrane and bending stress nor classified in primary and secondary stresses. This process of stress separation and classification in Finite Element (FE) results is what is called stress categorization. In order to perform the stress categorization to check results from FE models against the ASME Code stress limits, mainly from 3D solid FE models, several research works have been conducted. This work is included in this effort. First, a description of the ASME Code design criteria is presented. After that, a brief description of how the FEM can be used in pressure vessel design is showed. Several studies found in the literature on stress categorization for pressure vessel FE models are reviewed and commented. Then, the analyses done in this work are presented in which some typical nozzle to pressure vessel connections subjected to internal pressure and concentrated loads were modeled with solid finite elements. The results from linear elastic and limit load analyses are compared to each other and also with the results obtained by formulae

  8. Standard Model Extension and Casimir effect for fermions at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.

    2016-11-01

    Lorentz and CPT symmetries are foundations for important processes in particle physics. Recent studies in Standard Model Extension (SME) at high energy indicate that these symmetries may be violated. Modifications in the lagrangian are necessary to achieve a hermitian hamiltonian. The fermion sector of the standard model extension is used to calculate the effects of the Lorentz and CPT violation on the Casimir effect at zero and finite temperature. The Casimir effect and Stefan-Boltzmann law at finite temperature are calculated using the thermo field dynamics formalism.

  9. Effect of an artificial disc on lumbar spine biomechanics: a probabilistic finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlmann, Antonius; Mann, Anke; Zander, Thomas; Bergmann, Georg

    2009-01-01

    The effects of different parameters on the mechanical behaviour of the lumbar spine were in most cases determined deterministically with only one uncertain parameter varied at a time while the others were kept fixed. Thus most parameter combinations were disregarded. The aim of the study was to determine in a probabilistic finite element study how intervertebral rotation, intradiscal pressure, and contact force in the facet joints are affected by the input parameters implant position, implant ball radius, presence of scar tissue, and gap size in the facet joints. An osseoligamentous finite element model of the lumbar spine ranging from L3 vertebra to L5/S1 intervertebral disc was used. An artificial disc with a fixed center of rotation was inserted at level L4/L5. The model was loaded with pure moments of 7.5 Nm to simulate flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion. In a probabilistic study the implant position in anterior-posterior (ap) and in lateral direction, the radius of the implant ball, and the gap size of the facet joint were varied. After implanting an artificial disc, scar tissue may develop, replacing the anterior longitudinal ligament. Thus presence and absence of scar tissue were also simulated. For each loading case studied, intervertebral rotations, intradiscal pressures and contact forces in the facet joints were calculated for 1,000 randomized input parameter combinations in order to determine the probable range of these output parameters. Intervertebral rotation at implant level varies strongly for different combinations of the input parameters. It is mainly affected by gap size, ap-position and implant ball radius for flexion, by scar tissue and implant ball radius for extension and lateral bending, and by gap size and implant ball radius for axial torsion. For extension, intervertebral rotation at implant level varied between 1.4 degrees and 7.5 degrees . Intradiscal pressure in the adjacent discs is only slightly affected by all

  10. Finite element analysis of inclusion effects on high strength steel cord wire drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-liang; Zhao, Tian-Zhang; Zhang, Shi-hong

    2013-05-01

    In wire drawing of high strength steel wire for the application in tier cords, the inclusion plays the key role resulting in wire fractures. The effects of inclusion size, position and shape on wire drawing is investigated via finite element analysis in this paper. A 3D finite element model is developed to analyze the effect of inclusion position on the risk of fracture, and a 2D axisymmetrical finite element model for an inclusion at the wire center is established to investigate the effects of inclusion size and shape on wire fracture. A damage model with the consideration of stress status and plastic strain increment is used to characterize the risk of wire fracture. Finite element analysis results indicate that wire fracture is very critical to the inclusion located at wire core, and inclusion with an elliptical shape and its long axis lining well with the wire axis. Finite element analysis also proves that with the use of 7 degree die instead of 9 degree die is able to reduce the risk of fractures by about 28%.

  11. On the exploitation of Armstrong-Frederik type nonlinear kinematic hardening in the numerical integration and finite-element implementation of pressure dependent plasticity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Mario; Seifert, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, an unconditionally stable algorithm for the numerical integration and finite-element implementation of a class of pressure dependent plasticity models with nonlinear isotropic and kinematic hardening is presented. Existing algorithms are improved in the sense that the number of equations to be solved iteratively is significantly reduced. This is achieved by exploitation of the structure of Armstrong-Frederik-type kinematic hardening laws. The consistent material tangent is derived analytically and compared to the numerically computed tangent in order to validate the implementation. The performance of the new algorithm is compared to an existing one that does not consider the possibility of reducing the number of unknowns to be iterated. The algorithm is used to implement a time and temperature dependent cast iron plasticity model, which is based on the pressure dependent Gurson model, in the finite-element program ABAQUS. The implementation is applied to compute stresses and strains in a large-scale finite-element model of a three cylinder engine block. This computation proofs the applicability of the algorithm in industrial practice that is of interest in applied sciences.

  12. Defining Effectiveness Using Finite Sets A Study on Computability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macedo, Hugo Daniel dos Santos; Haeusler, Edward H.; Garcia, Alex

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies effectiveness in the domain of computability. In the context of model-theoretical approaches to effectiveness, where a function is considered effective if there is a model containing a representation of such function, our definition relies on a model provided by functions betwe...

  13. Effect of high pressure on mesophilic lactic fermentation streptococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reps, A.; Kuźmicka, M.; Wiśniewska, K.

    2008-07-01

    The research concerned the effect of high pressure on mesophilic lactic fermentation streptococci, present in two cheese-making commercial inocula produced by Christian-Hansen. Water solutions of inocula were pressurized at 50-800 MPa, at room temperature, for 30-120 min. Pressurization at 50-100 MPa slightly increased or reduced the number of lactic streptococci, depending on the inoculum and pressurization time. Pressurization at 200 MPa caused a reduction in the number of streptococci by over 99.9%, whereas the pressure of 400 MPa and above almost completely inactivated streptococci. Pressurization also reduced the dynamics of microorganism growth and acidification, to the degree depending on the pressure.

  14. Finite Element Analysis of High Pressure Storage Tank%高压储气罐有限元分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡毅; 田东兴; 马秋生

    2012-01-01

    本文以ANSYS软件为基础,对高压长圆柱形天然气储运罐进行变形分析、应力分析,得到了储气罐的应力分布状态,分析了在壁厚方向及沿着罐壁方向上的应力变化。所得结果和理论结果吻合。此基础上,完成了气罐模态分析,得到了气罐的各阶固有频率及振型。计算结果表明计算方法有效,为进一步设计高压气罐提供了理论依据。%In this paper, based on Ansys the deformation and stress for high pressure long cylindrical natural gas storage tank are anal- ysed. And obtain the stress distribution of the storage tank. The changes of stress are analysed in thickness direction and along the rigid wall. The results and theoretical results are accordance. On this basis, the modal analysis of tank is completed too. Obtained the tank various order natural frequency and vibration mode. The calculation results show that the method is effective and provide the theoreti- cal basis for high pressure tank design.

  15. Electromagnetic corrections to leptonic decay rates of charged pseudoscalar mesons: finite-volume effects

    CERN Document Server

    Tantalo, N; Martinelli, G; Sachrajda, C T; Sanfilippo, F; Simula, S

    2016-01-01

    In Carrasco et al. we have recently proposed a method to calculate $O(e^2)$ electromagnetic corrections to leptonic decay widths of pseudoscalar mesons. The method is based on the observation that the infrared divergent contributions (that appear at intermediate stages of the calculation and that cancel in physical quantities thanks to the Bloch-Nordsieck mechanism) are universal, i.e. depend on the charge and the mass of the meson but not on its internal structure. In this talk we perform a detailed analysis of the finite-volume effects associated with our method. In particular we show that also the leading $1/L$ finite-volume effects are universal and perform an analytical calculation of the finite-volume leptonic decay rate for a point-like meson.

  16. Effects of Lingual Effort on Swallow Pressures Following Radiation Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenius, Kerry; Stierwalt, Julie; LaPointe, Leonard L.; Bourgeois, Michelle; Carnaby, Giselle; Crary, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article investigated the effects of increased oral lingual pressure on pharyngeal pressures during swallowing in patients who have undergone radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. It was hypothesized that increased oral lingual pressure would result in increased pharyngeal pressures. Method: A within-subject experimental design was…

  17. Thermoelectric Conductivities at Finite Magnetic Field and the Nernst Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Keun-Young; Seo, Yunseok; Sin, Sang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    We study electric, thermoelectric, and thermal conductivities of a strongly correlated system in the presence of magnetic field by gauge/gravity duality. We consider a general class of Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theory with axion fields imposing momentum relaxation. Analytic general formulas for DC conductivities and the Nernst signal are derived in terms of the black hole horizon data. For an explicit model study we analyse in detail the Dyonic black hole modified by momentum relaxation effect. In this model, the Nernst signal shows a typical vortex-liquid effect when momentum relaxation effect is comparable to chemical potential. We compute all AC electric, thermal, and thermal conductivities by numerical analysis and confirms that their zero frequency limits precisely reproduce our analytic formulas, which is a non-trivial consistency check of our methods. We discuss the momentum relaxation effect on conductivities including cyclotron frequencies.

  18. Finite-duration Seeding Effects in Powerful Backward Raman Amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.A. Yampolsky; V.M. Malkin; N.J. Fisch

    2003-07-14

    In the process of backward Raman amplification (BRA), the leading layers of the seed laser pulse can shadow the rear layers, thus weakening the effective seeding power and affecting parameters of output pulses in BRA. We study this effect numerically and also analytically by approximating the pumped pulse by the ''*-pulse'' manifold of self-similar solutions. We determine how the pumped pulse projection moves within the *-pulse manifold, and describe quantitatively the effective seeding power evolution. Our results extend the quantitative theory of BRA to regimes where the effective seeding power varies substantially during the amplification. These results might be of broader interest, since the basic equations, are general equations for resonant 3-wave interactions.

  19. Roughness and Finite Size Effect in the NYSE Stock-Price Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Alfi, V; Petri, A; Pietronero, L

    2006-01-01

    We consider the roughness properties of NYSE (New York Stock Exchange) stock-price fluctuations. The statistical properties of the data are relatively homogeneous within the same day but the large jumps between different days prevent the extension of the analysis to large times. This leads to intrinsic finite size effects which alter the apparent Hurst (H) exponent. We show, by analytical methods, that finite size effects always lead to an enhancement of H. We then consider the effect of fat tails on the analysis of the roughness and show that the finite size effects are strongly enhanced by the fat tails. The non stationarity of the stock price dynamics also enhances the finite size effects which, in principle, can become important even in the asymptotic regime. We then compute the Hurst exponent for a set of stocks of the NYSE and argue that the interpretation of the value of H is highly ambiguous in view of the above results. Finally we propose an alternative determination of the roughness in terms of the ...

  20. Finite size effects in stimulated laser pair production

    CERN Document Server

    Heinzl, Thomas; Marklund, Mattias

    2010-01-01

    We consider stimulated pair production in a strong laser background, using the language of lightcone field theory. In an infinite plane wave, we show that the lightcone momentum transfer to the pair must be a multiple of the laser frequency, which results in the usual interpretation of multi-photon production of pairs with an effective mass. In a pulse, the momentum transfer is continuous, exhibiting resonant behaviour for effective mass pair production. We show that this is completely analogous to a diffraction process, and that the fine structure of the emission rate is that of a diffraction pattern resulting from interference of the produced pairs' wavefunctions.

  1. Finite population size effects in quasispecies models with single-peak fitness landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saakian, David B.; Deem, Michael W.; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2012-04-01

    We consider finite population size effects for Crow-Kimura and Eigen quasispecies models with single-peak fitness landscape. We formulate accurately the iteration procedure for the finite population models, then derive the Hamilton-Jacobi equation (HJE) to describe the dynamic of the probability distribution. The steady-state solution of HJE gives the variance of the mean fitness. Our results are useful for understanding the population sizes of viruses in which the infinite population models can give reliable results for biological evolution problems.

  2. Inhomogeneous condensation in effective models for QCD using the finite-mode approach

    CERN Document Server

    Heinz, Achim; Wagner, Marc; Rischke, Dirk H

    2016-01-01

    We use a numerical method, the finite-mode approach, to study inhomogeneous condensation in effective models for QCD in a general framework. Former limitations of considering a specific ansatz for the spatial dependence of the condensate are overcome. Different error sources are analyzed and strategies to minimize or eliminate them are outlined. The analytically known results for $1+1$ dimensional models (such as the Gross-Neveu model and extensions of it) are correctly reproduced using the finite-mode approach. Moreover, the NJL model in $3+1$ dimensions is investigated and its phase diagram is determined with particular focus on the inhomogeneous phase at high density.

  3. Effects of a continuous lateral turning device on pressure relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Nam Ho; Kim, Deog Young; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Choi, Jong Hyun; Joo, So Young; Kang, Na Kyung; Baek, Yoon Su

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the pressure-relieving effects of a continuous lateral turning device on common pressure ulcer sites. [Subjects] Twenty-four healthy adults participated. [Methods] The design of our continuous lateral turning device was motivated by the need for an adequate pressure-relieving device for immobile and/or elderly people. The procedure of manual repositioning is embodied in our continuous lateral turning device. The interface pressure and time were measured, and comfort grade was evaluated during sessions of continuous lateral turning at 0°, 15°, 30°, and 45°. We quantified the pressure-relieving effect using peak pressure, mean pressure, and pressure time integration. [Results] Participants demonstrated pressure time integration values below the pressure-time threshold at 15°, 30°, and 45° at all the common pressure ulcer sites. Moreover, the most effective angles for pressure relief at the common pressure ulcer sites were 30° at the occiput, 15° at the left scapula, 45° at the right scapula, 45° at the sacrum, 15° at the right heel, and 30° at the left heel. However, angles greater than 30° induced discomfort. [Conclusion] Continuous lateral turning with our specially designed device effectively relieved the pressure of targeted sites. Moreover, the suggested angles of continuous lateral turning can be used to relieve pressure at targeted sites.

  4. RANDOM MICROSTRUCTURE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR EFFECTIVE NONLINEAR PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Some theoretical methods have been reported to deal with nonlinear problems of composite materials but the accuracy is not so good. In the meantime, a lot of nonlinear problems are difficult to be managed by the theoretical methods. The present study aims to use the developed method, the random microstructure finite element method, to deal with these nonlinear problems. In this paper, the random microstructure finite element method is used to deal with all three kinds of nonlinear property problems of composite materials. The analyzed results suggest that the influences of the nonlinear phenomena on the effective properties of composite materials are significant and the random microstructure finite element method is an efficient tool to investigate the nonlinear problems.

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of Material Microstructure Effects on Predicted Crack Paths Using Finite Element Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Anaïs; Mehmanparast, Ali

    2016-07-01

    The effects of microstructure, grain and grain boundary (GB) properties on predicted damage paths and indicative crack propagation direction have been examined for a polycrystalline material using mesoscale finite element simulations. Numerical analyses were carried out on a compact tension specimen geometry containing granular mesh structures with random grain shapes and sizes of average diameter 100μm. Nanoindentation tests were performed to investigate the dependency of mesoscale hardness measurements on the indentation location with respect to grain and GB regions. Finite element results have shown that under tensile loading conditions, the predicted damage paths are very sensitive to the granular mesh structure, GB properties and individual grain properties. Furthermore, finite element results have revealed that the cracking mode (i.e., transgranular/intergranular) and maximum crack deviation angle are strongly dependent on the material microstructures employed in simulations.

  6. Effects of vegetarian diets on blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama Y

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Yoko Yokoyama,1,2 Kazuo Tsubota,2,3 Mitsuhiro Watanabe1,2,4,5 1Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, 2Health Science Laboratory, 3Department of Ophthalmology, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 5Faculty of Environment and Information Studies, Keio University, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan Abstract: Hypertension is a major independent risk factor for coronary artery diseases, and the prevalence of hypertension is continuously increasing. Diet is an important factor that can be modified to prevent hypertension. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, dietary patterns are defined as the quantities, proportions, and variety or combinations of different foods and beverages in diets and the frequency with which they are habitually consumed. In this review, the vegetarian dietary pattern is introduced with a focus on the effect on blood pressure (BP. Although the available evidence is limited, according to a previous meta-analysis of controlled trials, vegetarian dietary patterns significantly reduced systolic and diastolic BPs. One of the common features of a vegetarian diet is weight loss, which might, at least partially, explain the effect on BP. Other possible factors such as sodium, potassium, protein, amino acids, vitamin B-12, antioxidants, fiber, and the microbiome are introduced as possible mechanisms. Further studies are needed with non-Western populations to determine the most effective vegetarian dietary pattern and to explore the exact mechanisms by which these dietary patterns affect BP. Keywords: vegetarian diet, plant-based diet, blood pressure, hypertension, meta-analysis

  7. Light Fermion Finite Mass Effects in Non-relativistic Bound States

    CERN Document Server

    Eiras, D; Eiras, Dolors; Soto, Joan

    2000-01-01

    We present analytic expressions for the vacuum polarization effects due to a light fermion with finite mass in the binding energy and in the wave function at the origin of QED and (weak coupling) QCD non-relativistic bound states. Applications to exotic atoms, \\Upsilon (1s) and t\\bar{t} production near threshold are briefly discussed.

  8. THE EFFECT OF NUMERICAL INTEGRATION IN FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR NONLINEAR PARABOLIC EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N'guimbi; Germain

    2001-01-01

    Abstract. The effect of numerical integration in finite element methods applied to a class of nonlinear parabolic equations is considered and some sufficient conditions on the quadrature scheme to ensure that the order of convergence is unaltered in the presence of numerical integration are given. Optimal Lz and H1 estimates for the error and its time derivative are established.

  9. ACCEPT: a three-dimensional finite element program for large deformation elastic-plastic-creep analysis of pressurized tubes (LWBR/AWBA Development Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutula, D.N.; Wiancko, B.E.

    1980-03-01

    ACCEPT is a three-dimensional finite element computer program for analysis of large-deformation elastic-plastic-creep response of Zircaloy tubes subjected to temperature, surface pressures, and axial force. A twenty-mode, tri-quadratic, isoparametric element is used along with a Zircaloy materials model. A linear time-incremental procedure with residual force correction is used to solve for the time-dependent response. The program features an algorithm which automatically chooses the time step sizes to control the accuracy and numerical stability of the solution. A contact-separation capability allows modeling of interaction of reactor fuel rod cladding with fuel pellets or external supports.

  10. Reviewing the Literature on the Effectiveness of Pressure Relieving Movements

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel Schofield; Alison Porter-Armstrong; May Stinson

    2013-01-01

    Sitting for prolonged periods of time increases seating interface pressures, which is known to increase the risk of developing pressure ulcers. Those at risk of developing pressure ulcers are advised to perform pressure relieving movements such as “pushups” or “forward leans” in order to reduce the duration and magnitude of pressure acting on the vulnerable ischial tuberosity region. The aim of this review was to synthesize and critique the existing literature investigating the effectiveness ...

  11. Inertial Effects on Finite Length Pipe Seismic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Corrado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A seismic analysis for soil-pipe interaction which accounts for length and constraining conditions at the ends of a continuous pipe is developed. The Winkler model is used to schematize the soil-structure interaction. The approach is focused on axial strains, since bending strains in a buried pipe due to the wave propagation are typically a second-order effect. Unlike many works, the inertial terms are considered in solving equations. Accurate numerical simulations are carried out to show the influence of pipe length and constraint conditions on the pipe seismic strain. The obtained results are compared with results inferred from other models present in the literature. For free-end pipelines, inertial effects have significant influence only for short length. On the contrary, their influence is always important for pinned pipes. Numerical simulations show that a simple rigid model can be used for free-end pipes, whereas pinned pipes need more accurate models.

  12. Analysis on effect of surface fault to site ground motion using finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹炳政; 罗奇峰

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic contact theory is applied to simulate the sliding of surface fault. Finite element method is used to analyze the effect of surface fault to site ground motions. Calculated results indicate that amplification effect is obvious in the area near surface fault, especially on the site that is in the downside fault. The results show that the effect of surface fault should be considered when important structure is constructed in the site with surface fault.

  13. Effective viscoelastic behavior of particulate polymer composites at finite concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dan; HU Geng-kai

    2007-01-01

    Polymeric materials usually present some viscoelastic behavior. To improve the mechanical behavior of these materials, ceramics materials are often filled into the polymeric materials in form of fiber or particle. A micromechanical model was proposed to estimate the overall viscoelastic behavior for particulate polymer composites, especially for high volume concentration of filled particles. The method is based on Laplace transform technique and an elastic model including two-particle interaction. The effective creep compliance and the stress and strainrelation at a constant loading rate are analyzed. The results show that the proposed method predicts a significant stiffer response than those based on Mori-Tanaka's method at high volume concentration of particles.

  14. Effect of Residual Stress on Divergence Instability of Rectangular Microplate Subjected to Nonlinear Electrostatic Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghader Rezazadeh

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of residual stress on divergence instability of a rectangular microplate subjected to a nonlinear electrostatic pressure for different geometrical properties has been presented. After deriving the governing equation and using of Step-by-Step Linearization Method (SSLM, the governing nonlinear equation has been linearized. By applying the finite difference method (FDM to a rectangular mesh, the linearized equation has been discretized. The results show, residual stresses have considerable effects on Pull-in phenomena. Tensile residual stresses increase pull-in voltage and compressive decrease it. The effect of different geometrical properties on divergence instability has also been studied.

  15. Analysis and numerical simulation of dynamic effect on rock under high pressure water jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-hong; SI Hu; WANG Dan-dan

    2008-01-01

    Based on continuum mechanics and rock dynamics, analyzed the micro-structure damage of rock and the impulsive effect under high pressure water jet and developed the dynamic model. Further, on the assumption of that rock was homogeneous and isotropic, a computational model was established based on nonlinear finite element and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian(ALE) method. The dynamic effect impacted on rock under high pressure water jet was simulated by the dynamic contact method. The propagation of stress wave in rock was numerically simulated at different impacting velocity. The results show that the propagation velocity of stress wave is proportional to the impacting velocity of high pressure water jet. The faster the impacting velocity is, the quicker the comedown of stress wave.

  16. Stress-analysis calculation for high-pressure GRP power-plant piping using the Finite Element Method; Statische Berechnungen von GFK-Druckleitungen von Kraftwerken mittels Finite-Elemente-Methode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, R. [LGA Bautechnik GmbH, Nuernberg (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    This article deals with the structural analysis of embedded pipes with the help of numerical calculations by the finite element method (FEM). It focuses on the calculation of high pressure pipes made by glasfiber reinforced plastics (GRP), as there is an increasing use also for power plants in Germany. This article goes into details concerning the often used load cases and shows the characteristics using FEM for the dimensioning of embedded pipes. Furthermore a special application of FEM is presented which was used for finding a rehabilitation concept for a main cooling pipe. The quasi-static analysis of pipes, on which dynamic loads like earth quake or cyclic loads are applied, is shown. The experiences of the Institute of Structural Analysis of the LGA Bautechnik GmbH Nuremberg presented in this paper were collected on several construction sites of power plants all over the world. (orig.)

  17. Effect of stocking pressure on selected diet quality, intake and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABUBAKER

    Peer-reviewed paper: Proc. 42nd Congress of the ... Effect of different grazing pressures by lambs grazing Lolium perenne and. Dactylis ... determine the influence of pasture availability or grazing pressure on intake and growth performance of.

  18. Short Term Effect of Exercise on Intraocular Pressure of Ocular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Short Term Effect of Exercise on Intraocular Pressure of Ocular Hypertensive Subjects. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search ... Keywords: Intraocular pressure; short term exercise; ocular hypertension.

  19. Finite Element Analysis of Denosumab Treatment Effects on Vertebral Strength in Ovariectomized Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David C; Varela, Aurore; Kostenuik, Paul J; Ominsky, Michael S; Keaveny, Tony M

    2016-08-01

    Finite element analysis has not yet been validated for measuring changes in whole-bone strength at the hip or spine in people after treatment with an osteoporosis agent. Toward that end, we assessed the ability of a clinically approved implementation of finite element analysis to correctly quantify treatment effects on vertebral strength, comparing against direct mechanical testing, in cynomolgus monkeys randomly assigned to one of three 16-month-long treatments: sham surgery with vehicle (Sham-Vehicle), ovariectomy with vehicle (OVX-Vehicle), or ovariectomy with denosumab (OVX-DMAb). After treatment, T12 vertebrae were retrieved, scanned with micro-CT, and mechanically tested to measure compressive strength. Blinded to the strength data and treatment codes, the micro-CT images were coarsened and homogenized to create continuum-type finite element models, without explicit porosity. With clinical translation in mind, these models were then analyzed for strength using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared VirtuOst software application (O.N. Diagnostics, Berkeley, CA, USA), developed for analysis of human bones. We found that vertebral strength by finite element analysis was highly correlated (R(2)  = 0.97; n = 52) with mechanical testing, independent of treatment (p = 0.12). Further, the size of the treatment effect on strength (ratio of mean OVX-DMAb to mean OVX-Vehicle, as a percentage) was large and did not differ (p = 0.79) between mechanical testing (+57%; 95% CI [26%, 95%]) and finite element analysis (+51% [20%, 88%]). The micro-CT analysis revealed increases in cortical thickness (+45% [19%, 73%]) and trabecular bone volume fraction (+24% [8%, 42%]). These results show that a preestablished clinical finite element analysis implementation-developed for human bone and clinically validated in fracture-outcome studies-correctly quantified the observed treatment effects of denosumab on vertebral strength in cynomolgus monkeys. One

  20. Finite Range Effects in Energies and Recombination Rates of Three Identical Bosons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Peder Klokmose; V. Fedorov, D.; S. Jensen, A.;

    2013-01-01

    is large. The models are built on contact potentials which take into account finite range effects; one is a two-channel model and the other is an effective range expansion model implemented through the boundary condition on the three-body wave function when two of the particles are at the same point...... in space. We compare the results with the results of the ubiquitous single-parameter zero-range model where only the scattering length is taken into account. Both finite range models predict variations of the well-known geometric scaling factor 22.7 that arises in Efimov physics. The threshold value...... at negative scattering length for creation of a bound trimer moves to higher or lower values depending on the sign of the effective range compared to the location of the threshold for the single-parameter zero-range model. Large effective ranges, corresponding to narrow resonances, are needed...

  1. Numerical Simulation to Finite Soil Pressure under Slope Condition%放坡条件下有限土体土压力数值分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘鑫; 孙治国; 韩亚明

    2014-01-01

    This article processed a numerical simulation to the finite soil slope under GeoStudio-SIGMA/W module. With a given angle 75 °,soil pressures of three cases, which the top width of finite soil slope are 7.5m, 12m and 15m, were compared. The result is that the distribution of soil pressure strength increases with the increasing of soil top width, meanwhile, it presents a nonlinear distribution along the wal in trends of increasing to decreasing.%通过GeoStudio-SIGMA/W模块对放坡条件下有限土体进行数值模拟,对比分析了在坡度为75°,有限土体顶部宽度分别为7.5m,12m,15m时三种情况下的土压力,认为土压力强度分布随着土体顶部宽度的增加而增加,且土压力强度随着墙高的分布为非线性分布,呈先增大后减小的趋势。

  2. An effective finite element model for the prediction of hydrogen induced cracking in steel pipelines

    KAUST Repository

    Traidia, Abderrazak

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive finite element model for the numerical simulation of Hydrogen Induced Cracking (HIC) in steel pipelines exposed to sulphurous compounds, such as hydrogen sulphide (H2S). The model is able to mimic the pressure build-up mechanism related to the recombination of atomic hydrogen into hydrogen gas within the crack cavity. In addition, the strong couplings between non-Fickian hydrogen diffusion, pressure build-up and crack extension are accounted for. In order to enhance the predictive capabilities of the proposed model, problem boundary conditions are based on actual in-field operating parameters, such as pH and partial pressure of H 2S. The computational results reported herein show that, during the extension phase, the propagating crack behaves like a trap attracting more hydrogen, and that the hydrostatic stress field at the crack tip speed-up HIC related crack initiation and growth. In addition, HIC is reduced when the pH increases and the partial pressure of H2S decreases. Furthermore, the relation between the crack growth rate and (i) the initial crack radius and position, (ii) the pipe wall thickness and (iii) the fracture toughness, is also evaluated. Numerical results agree well with experimental data retrieved from the literature. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of atmospheric pressure on ventricular assist device output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Masaharu; Yamazaki, Akio; Fukuda, Wakako; Watanabe, Ken-Ichi; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukui, Kozo; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2012-03-01

    The effect of cabin pressure change on the respiratory system during flight is well documented in the literature, but how the change in atmospheric pressure affects ventricular assist device (VAD) output flow has not been studied yet. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the change in VAD output using a mock circulatory system in a low-pressure chamber mimicking high altitude. Changes in output and driving pressure were measured during decompression from 1.0 to 0.7 atm and pressurization from 0.7 to 1.0 atm. Two driving systems were evaluated: the VCT system and the Mobart system. In the VCT system, output and driving pressure remained the same during decompression and pressurization. In the Mobart system, the output decreased as the atmospheric pressure dropped and recovered during pressurization. The lowest output was observed at 0.7 atm, which was 80% of the baseline driven by the Mobart system. Under a practical cabin pressure of 0.8 atm, the output driven by the Mobart system was 90% of the baseline. In the Mobart system, the output decreased as the atmospheric pressure dropped, and recovered during pressurization. However, the decrease in output was slight. In an environment where the atmospheric pressure changes, it is necessary to monitor the diaphragmatic motion of the blood pump and the driving air pressure, and to adjust the systolic:diastolic ratio as well as the positive and negative pressures in a VAD system.

  4. Dimensionality and Finite Number Effect on BCS Transition of Atomic Fermi Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Hai-Tao; WANG Lin-Cheng; YI Xue-Xi

    2005-01-01

    The effect of finite number and dimensionality has been discussed in this paper. The finite number effect has a negative correction to final temperature for 2D or 3D atomic Fermi gases. The changing of final temperature obtained by scanning from BEC region to BCS region are 10% or so with N ≤ 103 and can be negligible when N > 103.However, in 1D atomic Fermi gas, the effect gives a positive correction which greatly changes the final temperature in Fermi gas. This behavior is completely opposed to the 2D and 3D cases and a proper explanation is still to be found.Dimensionality also has a positive correction, in which the more tightly trapping, the higher final temperature one gets with the same particle number. A discussion is also presented.

  5. The influence of finite Larmor radius effects on the radial interchange motions of plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Garcia, Odd E.; Larsen, Jeppe Stærk

    2011-01-01

    The influence of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on the perpendicular convection of isolated particle density filaments driven by interchange motions in magnetized plasmas is investigated using a two-moment gyrofluid model. By means of numerical simulations on a two-dimensional, bi-periodic do......The influence of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on the perpendicular convection of isolated particle density filaments driven by interchange motions in magnetized plasmas is investigated using a two-moment gyrofluid model. By means of numerical simulations on a two-dimensional, bi....... Due to FLR effects, the poloidal up-down symmetry in the particle density field observed in the zero Larmor radius limit is broken. The symmetry breaking implies a poloidal motion of the blobs in the BrB direction. At later times, the direction of the poloidal motion is reversed when the blob...

  6. Simulation of Effective Slip and Drag in Pressure-Driven Flow on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanding Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow on superhydrophobic surfaces was investigated using finite element modeling (FEM. Surfaces with different textures like grooves, square pillars, and cylinders immersed in liquid forming Cassie state were modeled. Nonslip boundary condition was assumed at solid-liquid interface while slip boundary condition was supposed at gas-liquid interface. It was found that the flow rate can be affected by the shape of the texture, the fraction of the gas-liquid area, the height of the channel, and the driving pressure gradient. By extracting the effective boundary slip from the flow rate based on a model, it was found that the shape of the textures and the fraction of the gas-liquid area affect the effective slip significantly while the height of the channel and the driving pressure gradient have no obvious effect on effective slip.

  7. Finite-temperature effects on a triatomic Efimov resonance in ultracold cesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B.; Sidorenkov, L. A.; Grimm, R.

    2015-06-01

    We report a thorough investigation of finite-temperature effects on three-body recombination near a triatomic Efimov resonance in an ultracold gas of cesium atoms. Our measurements cover a wide range from a near-ideal realization of the zero-temperature limit to a strongly temperature-dominated regime. The experimental results are analyzed within a recently introduced theoretical model based on a universal zero-range theory. The temperature-induced shift of the resonance reveals a contribution that points to an energy dependence of the three-body parameter. We interpret this contribution in terms of the finite range of the van der Waals interaction in real atomic systems and we quantify it in an empirical way based on length scale arguments. A universal character of the corresponding resonance shift is suggested by observations related to other Efimov resonances and the comparison with a theoretical finite-temperature approach that explicitly takes the van der Waals interaction into account. Our findings are of importance for the precise determination of Efimov resonance positions from experiments at finite temperatures.

  8. Seed disinfection effect of atmospheric pressure plasma and low pressure plasma on Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Terumi; Takai, Yuichiro; Kawaradani, Mitsuo; Okada, Kiyotsugu; Tanimoto, Hideo; Misawa, Tatsuya; Kusakari, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Gas plasma generated and applied under two different systems, atmospheric pressure plasma and low pressure plasma, was used to investigate the inactivation efficacy on the seedborne pathogenic fungus, Rhizoctonia solani, which had been artificially introduced to brassicaceous seeds. Treatment with atmospheric plasma for 10 min markedly reduced the R. solani survival rate from 100% to 3% but delayed seed germination. The low pressure plasma treatment reduced the fungal survival rate from 83% to 1.7% after 10 min and the inactivation effect was dependent on the treatment time. The seed germination rate after treatment with the low pressure plasma was not significantly different from that of untreated seeds. The air temperature around the seeds in the low pressure system was lower than that of the atmospheric system. These results suggested that gas plasma treatment under low pressure could be effective in disinfecting the seeds without damaging them.

  9. Assembling Stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability by the Effects of Finite Larmor Radius and Sheared Axial Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Guangde; Huang Lin; Qiu Xiaoming

    2005-01-01

    The assembling stabilizing effect of the finite Larmor radius (FLR) and the sheared axial flow (SAF) on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions is studied by means of the incompressible finite Larmor radius magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The finite Larmor radius effects are introduced in the momentum equation with the sheared axial flow through an anisotropic ion stress tensor. In this paper a linear mode equation is derived that is valid for arbitrary kL, where k is the wave number and L is the plasma shell thickness. Numerical solutions are presented. The results indicate that the short-wavelength modes of the RayleighTaylor instability are easily stabilized by the individual effect of the finite Larmor radius or the sheared axial flow. The assembling effects of the finite Larmor radius and sheared axial flow can heavily mitigate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and the unstable region can be compressed considerably.

  10. Finite water depth effect on wave-body problems solved by Rankine source method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Aichun; Tang, Peng; You, Yunxiang; Liu, Kaizhou

    2017-04-01

    Finite water depth effect for wave-body problems are studied by continuous Rankine source method and non- desingularized technique. Free surface and seabed surface profiles are represented by continuous panels rather than a discretization by isolated points. These panels are positioned exactly on the fluid boundary surfaces and therefore no desingularization technique is required. Space increment method is applied for both free surface source and seabed source arrangements to reduce computational cost and improve numerical efficiency. Fourth order Runge-Kutta iteration scheme is adopted on the free surface updating at every time step. The finite water depth effect is studied quantitatively for a series of cylinders with different B/T ratios. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed model are validated by comparison with published numerical results and experimental data. Numerical results show that hydrodynamic coefficients vary for cylinder bodies with different ratios of B/T. For certain set of B/T ratios the effect of finite water depth increases quickly with the increase of motion frequency and becomes stable when frequency is relatively large. It also shows that water depths have larger hydrodynamic effects on cylinder with larger breadth to draft ratios. Both the heave added mass and damping coefficients increase across the frequency range with the water depths decrease for forced heave motion. The water depths have smaller effects on sway motion response than on heave motion response.

  11. Competition between finite-size effects and dipole-dipole interactions in few-atom systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damanet, François; Martin, John

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study the competition between finite-size effects (i.e. discernibility of particles) and dipole-dipole interactions in few-atom systems coupled to the electromagnetic field in vacuum. We consider two hallmarks of cooperative effects, superradiance and subradiance, and compute for each the rate of energy radiated by the atoms and the coherence of the atomic state during the time evolution. We adopt a statistical approach in order to extract the typical behaviour of the atomic dynamics and average over random atomic distributions in spherical containers with prescribed {k}0R with k 0 the radiation wavenumber and R the average interatomic distance. Our approach allows us to highlight the tradeoff between finite-size effects and dipole-dipole interactions in superradiance/subradiance. In particular, we show the existence of an optimal value of {k}0R for which the superradiant intensity and coherence pulses are the less affected by dephasing effects induced by dipole-dipole interactions and finite-size effects.

  12. Pressure ratio effects on self-similar scalar mixing of high-pressure turbulent jets in a pressurized volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Adam; Pickett, Lyle; Frank, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    Many real world combustion devices model fuel scalar mixing by assuming the self-similar argument established in atmospheric free jets. This allows simple prediction of the mean and rms fuel scalar fields to describe the mixing. This approach has been adopted in super critical liquid injections found in diesel engines where the liquid behaves as a dense fluid. The effect of pressure ratio (injection to ambient) when the ambient is greater than atmospheric pressure, upon the self-similar collapse has not been well characterized, particularly the effect upon mixing constants, jet spreading rates, and virtual origins. Changes in these self-similar parameters control the reproduction of the scalar mixing statistics. This experiment investigates the steady state mixing of high pressure ethylene jets in a pressurized pure nitrogen environment for various pressure ratios and jet orifice diameters. Quantitative laser Rayleigh scattering imaging was performed utilizing a calibration procedure to account for the pressure effects upon scattering interference within the high-pressure vessel.

  13. Hydrostatic pressure effects on the state density and optical transitions in quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindez-Ramirez, G; Perez-Merchancano, S T [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Cauca, calle 5 4-70, Popayan (Colombia); Paredes Gutierrez, H [Escuela de Fisica, Universidad Industrial de Santander, A. A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Gonzalez, J D, E-mail: jdavid0831@gmail.co [Grupo de Investigacion en teorIa de la Materia Condensada, Universidad del Magdalena, A.A. 731, Santa Marta (Colombia)

    2010-09-01

    Using the effective mass approximation and variational method we have computed the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the absorption and photoluminescence spectra in spherical quantum dot GaAs-(Ga, Al) As, considering a finite confinement potential of this particular work we show the optical transitions in quantum of various sizes in the presence of hydrogenic impurities and hydrostatic pressure effects. Our first result describes the spectrum of optical absorption of 500 A QD for different values of hydrostatic pressure P = 0, 20 and 40 Kbar. The absorption peaks are sensitive to the displacement of the impurity center to the edge of the quantum dot and even more when the hydrostatic pressure changes in both cases showing that to the extent that these two effects are stronger quantum dots respond more efficiently. Also this result can be seen in the study of the photoluminescence spectrum as in the case of acceptor impurities consider them more efficiently capture carriers or electrons that pass from the conduction band to the valence band. Density states with randomly distributed impurity show that the additional peaks in the curves of the density of impurity states appear due to the presence of the additional hydrostatic pressure effects.

  14. Effect of temperature and pressure on stress of impeller in axial-centrifugal combined compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinqian Zheng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Axial-centrifugal combined compressors are commonly used, and the stresses of their impeller are important and influenced by temperature and pressure. The effects of temperature and pressure on the stresses of the impeller with different inlet conditions are investigated. Conjugate heat transfer analysis and three-dimensional structural finite element analysis are used to get the stresses of the impeller. The effects of temperature and pressure are obtained by comparing the equivalent (Von-Mises stresses between cases taking and not taking them into account. From the result, the temperature effect is surprisingly large for low inlet temperature, reaching 57% of the total equivalent stress, and should be carefully considered. The effect strongly relates with the inlet conditions and the disk thermal boundary conditions. Thus, the later can’t be treated as adiabatic as usual. For certain inlet conditions, the stress of the impeller can be improved by adjusting the disk thermal boundary conditions. In addition, the temperature mainly affects the stress on the disk and the root of the blade. The pressure effect is small for low inlet temperature and can be sufficiently large for high inlet temperature. Furthermore, the pressure mainly influences the stress on the blade part and can reduce the stresses at the inducer of a negative-lean impeller.

  15. blood pressure reducing effect of bitter kola in wistar rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DEAN'S OFFICE

    ABSTRACT: In this study the effect of Garcinia kola (GK) on blood pressure was ... and for blood pressure measurements on a recording device (Ugo Basile ... doses produced statistically significiant (P<0.05) fall in mean arterial pressure and ...

  16. Study on pressure at top part of man's socks using finite element method%男短袜袜口压力的有限元研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃蕊; 范雪荣; 陈东生; 王强

    2011-01-01

    The key for optimal designing of a garment lies in understanding the pressure which has been brought about by the garment on the human body. 3-D body scanning instrument is used to scan the morphology of the inside part of the leg 6 cm above the ankle, and the relationship between the pressure brought about on the leg by the top of socks and the displacement is investigated using finite element method. In this study, the human body is regarded as an elastomer and the contact between the lower leg and the top part of socks is elastic contact. After using finite element analysis and fitting curves, the pressure-displacement quadratic equation can be obtained. Meanwhile, we divide the lower leg cross section into four equal regions according to the angle, and the area shrinkage of each region under pressure can be calculated. And finally, we analyze the relationship between factors that affect pressure levels, and then obtain a function formula between pressure and impact factors by principal component analysis.%人体与服装之间的压力研究是服装优化设计的关键.通过三维人体扫描仪对人体内侧脚踝点水平向上6 cm处腿部形态进行扫描,并运用有限元模拟男短袜袜口对腿部施压后压力与位移的关系.研究中,人体视为弹性体.腿部与袜口之间的接触视为弹性接触,通过有限元分析及曲线拟合,可得到压力与位移间的函数关系,同时按照角度将腿截面等分为4个区域,并计算出各区域受压后的总面积缩量.此外,还分析了影响压力水平的各因素之间关系,并通过主成分分析得到压力与各因素之间的函数关系式.

  17. Pressure Effects on the Thermal De-NOx Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Karsten; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1996-01-01

    The effect of pressure on the thermal de-NOx process has been investigated in flow reactor experiments. The experiments were performed at pressures from 1 to 10 bar and temperatures ranging from 925 to 1375 K. The inlet O-2 level was varied from 1000 ppm to 10%, while NH3 and NO were maintained...... at 1000 and 500 ppm, respectively At the highest pressure, CO was added to shift the regime for NO reduction to lower temperatures. The results show that the pressure affects the location and the width of the temperature window for NO reduction. As the pressure is increased, both the lower and the higher...... effect of the pressure but also cause a slight decrease in the NO reduction potential. The results are consistent with recent atmospheric pressure experiments of thermal de-NOx covering a wide range of reactant partial pressures. Comparisons of the experimental data with the recent chemical kinetic model...

  18. Impact of the carbon pore size and topology on the equilibrium quantum sieving of hydrogen isotopes at zero coverage and finite pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Gauden, Piotr A; Terzyk, Artur P; Furmaniak, Sylwester

    2009-04-08

    Carbonaceous slit-shaped and square-shaped pores efficiently differentiate adsorbed hydrogen isotopes at 77 and 33 K. Extensive path integral Monte Carlo simulations revealed that the square-shaped carbon pores enhanced the selectivity of deuterium over hydrogen in comparison to equivalent slit-shaped carbon pores at zero coverage as well as at finite pressures (i.e. quantum sieving of hydrogen isotopes is pore-topology-dependent). We show that this enhancement of the D(2)/H(2) equilibrium selectivity results from larger localization of hydrogen isotopes in square-shaped pores. The operating pressures for efficient quantum sieving of hydrogen isotopes are strongly dependent on the topology as well as on the size of the carbon pores. However, for both considered carbon pore topologies the highest D(2)/H(2) separation factor is observed at zero-coverage limit. Depending on carbon pore size and topology we predicted monotonic decreasing and non-monotonic shape of the D(2)/H(2) equilibrium selectivity at finite pressures. For both kinds of carbonaceous pores of molecular sizes we predict high compression of hydrogen isotopes at 77 and 33 K (for example, the pore density of compressed hydrogen isotopes at 77 K and 0.25 MPa in a square-shaped carbon pore of size 2.6 Å exceeds 60 mmol cm(-3); for comparison, the liquid density of para-H(2) at 30 K and 30 MPa is 42 mmol cm(-3)). Finally, by direct comparison of simulation results with experimental data it is explained why 'ordinary' carbonaceous materials are not efficient quantum sieves.

  19. Finite element study of contact pressure distribution on inner and outer liner in the bipolar hip prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputra, Eko; Anwar, Iwan Budiwan; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.; van der Heide, Emile

    2016-04-01

    Wear in the hip prosthesis due to sliding contact as a product of human activity is a phenomenon which cannot be avoided. In general, there are two modelof hip prostheses which are widely used in total hip replacement, i.e. unipolar and bipolar models. Wear in the bipolar model is more complex than the unipolar model due to its contact motion. The bipolar model has two contact mechanisms while the unipolar model has only one contact mechanism. It means that the bipolar model has two wear positions, i.e. wear on inner and outer liner surface. Fortunately, wear phenomena in the hip prosthesis can be predicted by analytical or numerical method. Wear on the inner and outer liner surface in the bipolar model itself can be early predicted by contact pressure distribution that is obtained from contact mechanic analysis.The contact pressure distribution itself is an essential variable in wear equations. This paper is aimed to studythe difference of the contact pressure distribution on the inner and outer liner surface in the bipolar model. To obtain the contact pressure distribution at each surface, contact mechanic analysis on the inner and outer liner surface by analytical and numerical method were performed. Results showedthat there was significant difference of the contact pressure distribution on the inner and outer liner surface in the bipolar model. Therefore, it is expected that there is significant wear difference on the inner and outer liner in the bipolar model.

  20. Effects of a continuous lateral turning device on pressure relief

    OpenAIRE

    Do, Nam Ho; Kim, Deog Young; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Choi, Jong Hyun; Joo, So Young; Kang, Na Kyung; Baek, Yoon Su

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the pressure-relieving effects of a continuous lateral turning device on common pressure ulcer sites. [Subjects] Twenty-four healthy adults participated. [Methods] The design of our continuous lateral turning device was motivated by the need for an adequate pressure-relieving device for immobile and/or elderly people. The procedure of manual repositioning is embodied in our continuous lateral turning device. The interface pressure and time we...

  1. Effect of Pressure on Minimum Fluidization Velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Zhiping; Na Yongjie; Lu Qinggang

    2007-01-01

    Minimum fluidization velocity of quartz sand and glass bead under different pressures of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 Mpa were investigated. The minimum fluidization velocity decreases with the increasing of pressure. The influence of pressure to the minimum fluidization velocities is stronger for larger particles than for smaller ones.Based on the test results and Ergun equation, an experience equation of minimum fluidization velocity is proposed and the calculation results are comparable to other researchers' results.

  2. Finite element simulation of texture evolution and Swift effect in NiAl under torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, Thomas; Glüge, Rainer; Klöden, Burghardt; Skrotzki, Werner; Bertram, Albrecht

    2007-09-01

    The texture evolution and the Swift effect in NiAl under torsion at 727 °C are studied by finite element simulations for two different initial textures. The material behaviour is modelled by an elastic-viscoplastic Taylor model. In order to overcome the well-known shortcomings of Taylor's approach, the texture evolution is also investigated by a representative volume element (RVE) with periodic boundary conditions and a compatible microstructure at the opposite faces of the RVE. Such a representative volume element takes into account the grain morphology and the grain interaction. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. It is shown that the modelling of a finite element based RVE leads to a better prediction of the final textures. However, the texture evolution path is not accounted for correctly. The simulated Swift effect depends much more on the initial orientation distribution than observed in experiment. Deviations between simulation and experiment may be due to continuous dynamic recrystallization.

  3. Finite-size effects in quasi-one-dimensional conductors with a charge-density wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitsev-Zotov, Sergei V [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-06-30

    Recent studies of finite-size effects in charge-density wave conductors are reviewed. Various manifestations of finite-size effects, including the transverse-size dependence of the nonlinear-conduction threshold field, the Peierls transition temperature, high-frequency conduction, and the relaxation rates of metastable states, are discussed. Resistivity jumps in thin samples, the smeared threshold field for nonlinear conduction, and threshold conduction above the Peierls transition temperature are considered, as are mesoscopic oscillations of the threshold field, one-dimensional conduction in thin crystals, absolute negative conductivity of quasi-one-dimensional conductors, the length dependence of the phase-slip voltage, and the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in sliding CDWs. Problems yet to be solved are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  4. Chiral selective effects of doxazosin enantiomers on blood pressure and urinary bladder pressure in anesthetized rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-ping MA; Lei-ming REN; Ding ZHAO; Zhong-ning ZHU; Miao WANG; Hai-gang LU; Li-hua DUAN

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study chiral selective effects of doxazosin enantiomers on blood pressure and urinary bladder pressure in anesthetized rats. Methods: In anesthetized rats, the carotid blood pressure, left ventricular pressure of the heart and the urinary bladder pressure were recorded. Results: Administration of S-doxazosin at 0.25, 2.5, 25, and 250 nmol/kg iv produced a dose-dependent decrease in blood pressure, but its depressor effect was significantly weaker than that induced by R-doxazosin and racemic-doxazosin (rac-doxazosin), and the ED30 values (producing a 30% decrease in mean arterial pressure) of R-doxazosin, rac-doxazosin and S-doxazosin were 15.64,45.93, and 128.81, respectively. Rac-doxazosin and its enantiomers administered cumulatively in anesthetized rats induced a dose-dependent decrease in the left ventricular systolic pressure and ±dp/dtmax, and the potency order of the 3 agents was R-doxazosin >rac-doxazosin >S-doxazosin. Rac-doxazosin and its enantiomers decreased the vesical micturition pressure dose-dependently at 2.5,25, and 250 nmol/kg, and the inhibitory potency among the 3 agents was not significantly different. Conclusion: S-doxazosin decreases the carotid blood pressure and left ventricular pressure of the heart less than R-doxazosin and rac-doxazosin, but its effect on the vesical micturition pressure is similar to R-doxazosin and rac-doxazosin, indicating that S-doxazosin has chiral selectivity between cardiovascular system and urinary system in anesthetized rats.

  5. Wave effects on a pressure sensor

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; DeSa, E.J.; Desa, E.; McKeown, J.; Peshwe, V.B.

    Wave flume experiments indicated that for waves propagating on quiescent waters the sensor's performance improved (i.e. the difference Delta P between the average hydrostatic and measured pressures was small and positive) when the inlet...

  6. Effect of Finite Larmor Radius on the Cosmic Ray Penetration into an Interplanetary Magnetic Flux Rope

    OpenAIRE

    Kubo, Yuki; Shimazu, Hironori

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a mechanism for cosmic ray penetration into an interplanetary magnetic flux rope, particularly the effect of the finite Larmor radius and magnetic field irregularities. First, we derive analytical solutions for cosmic ray behavior inside a magnetic flux rope, on the basis of the Newton-Lorentz equation of a particle, to investigate how cosmic rays penetrate magnetic flux ropes under an assumption of there being no scattering by small-scale magnetic field irregularities. Next, we pe...

  7. Finite element analysis of the stress-concentrating effect of fraenal notches in complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, J S; Huggett, R; Harrison, A

    1990-01-01

    Based on clinical experience and empiricism, it was postulated that fraenal notches and midline diastemas lead to fracture of complete dentures. This study used finite element stress analysis to investigate the stress-concentrating effect of a fraenal notch with and without a midline diastema. It was found that a large fraenal notch resulted in high stress levels and that these stresses were augmented more by a narrow median diastema than its wider counterpart.

  8. Effects of Linear Induction Motor Parameters in Its Optimum Design Based on Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrdad JafarBoland; AbdolAmir Nekoubin

    2009-01-01

    Effective parameters in performance of linear induction motors such as air gap, number of poles and the thickness of secondary must be selected and optimized to increase power coefficients and motor performance significantly. In this paper a double sided linear induction motor in different conditions is designed and next by finite element method analyzed. Then for comparing analytical model and numerical model a linear motor using Matlab software is simulated in different condition. It is cle...

  9. Boundary states and finite size effects in sine-Gordon model with Neumann boundary condition

    CERN Document Server

    Bajnok, Z; Takács, G

    2001-01-01

    The sine-Gordon model with Neumann boundary condition is investigated. Using the bootstrap principle the spectrum of boundary bound states is established. Somewhat surprisingly it is found that Coleman-Thun diagrams and bound state creation may coexist. A framework to describe finite size effects in boundary integrable theories is developed and used together with the truncated conformal space approach to confirm the bound states and reflection factors derived by bootstrap.

  10. Calculating the Finite-Tempuerature Effective Potential with the theory Renormalized at Zero-Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we apply the renormalization-group (RG) inspired resummation method to the one-loop effective potential at finite temperature evaluated in the massive scalar 04 model renormalized at zero-temperature, and study whether ourresummation procedure a la RG uccessfully resum the dominant correction terms apperaed in the perturbative caluculation in the T = 0 renormalization scheme or not.Our findings are i) that if we start from the theory renormalized at T = 0, then the condition tha...

  11. Method transfer from high-pressure liquid chromatography to ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography. II. Temperature and pressure effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åsberg, Dennis; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Leśko, Marek; Cavazzini, Alberto; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2015-07-03

    The importance of the generated temperature and pressure gradients in ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) are investigated and compared to high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The drug Omeprazole, together with three other model compounds (with different chemical characteristics, namely uncharged, positively and negatively charged) were used. Calculations of the complete temperature profile in the column at UHPLC conditions showed, in our experiments, a temperature difference between the inlet and outlet of 16 °C and a difference of 2 °C between the column center and the wall. Through van't Hoff plots, this information was used to single out the decrease in retention factor (k) solely due to the temperature gradient. The uncharged solute was least affected by temperature with a decrease in k of about 5% while for charged solutes the effect was more pronounced, with k decreases up to 14%. A pressure increase of 500 bar gave roughly 5% increase in k for the uncharged solute, while omeprazole and the other two charged solutes gave about 25, 20 and 15% increases in k, respectively. The stochastic model of chromatography was applied to estimate the dependence of the average number of adsorption/desorption events (n) and the average time spent by a molecule in the stationary phase (τs) on temperature and pressure on peak shape for the tailing, basic solute. Increasing the temperature yielded an increase in n and decrease in τs which resulted in less skew at high temperatures. With increasing pressure, the stochastic modeling gave interesting results for the basic solute showing that the skew of the peak increased with pressure. The conclusion is that pressure effects are more pronounced for both retention and peak shape than the temperature effects for the polar or charged compounds in our study.

  12. High pressure effects on allergen food proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somkuti, Judit; Smeller, László

    2013-12-15

    There are several proteins, which can cause allergic reaction if they are inhaled or ingested. Our everyday food can also contain such proteins. Food allergy is an IgE-mediated immune disorder, a growing health problem of great public concern. High pressure is known to affect the structure of proteins; typically few hundred MPa pressure can lead to denaturation. That is why several trials have been performed to alter the structure of the allergen proteins by high pressure, in order to reduce its allergenicity. Studies have been performed both on simple protein solutions and on complex food systems. Here we review those allergens which have been investigated under or after high pressure treatment by methods capable of detecting changes in the secondary and tertiary structure of the proteins. We focus on those allergenic proteins, whose structural changes were investigated by spectroscopic methods under pressure in correlation with the observed allergenicity (IgE binding) changes. According to this criterion we selected the following allergen proteins: Mal d 1 and Mal d 3 (apple), Bos d 5 (milk), Dau c 1 (carrot), Gal d 2 (egg), Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 (peanut), and Gad m 1 (cod).

  13. Finite nuclear size corrections to the recoil effect in hydrogenlike ions

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksandrov, I A; Glazov, D A; Shabaev, V M

    2014-01-01

    The finite nuclear size corrections to the relativistic recoil effect in H-like ions are calculated within the Breit approximation. The calculations are performed for the $1s$, $2s$, and $2p_{1/2}$ states in the range $Z =$ 1-110. The obtained results are compared with previous evaluations of this effect. It is found that for heavy ions the previously neglected corrections amount to about 20% of the total nuclear size contribution to the recoil effect calculated within the Breit approximation.

  14. Hybrid Finite Element Analysis of Free Edge Effect in Symmetric Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    ANALYSIS OF FREE EDGE EFFECT IN L AUTHOR(S 61102F S.W. Lee237B J.J. Rhiu S.C. Won,, I ~ 7. PENOAMnG ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORES4 S) L. PERFORMING...ANALYSIS OF FREE EDGE EFFECT IN SYMMETRIC COMPOSITE LAMINATES S. W. Lee I 3. Phi S. C. Wong Department of Aerospace Engineering University of Maryland...collocation method. In this report, we present an efficient hybrid finite element method for analysis of interlaminar stress or free edge effect in

  15. Including Finite Surface Span Effects in Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of finite span on the jet-surface interaction noise source and the jet mixing noise shielding and reflection effects is considered using recently acquired experimental data. First, the experimental setup and resulting data are presented with particular attention to the role of surface span on far-field noise. These effects are then included in existing empirical models that have previously assumed that all surfaces are semi-infinite. This extended abstract briefly describes the experimental setup and data leaving the empirical modeling aspects for the final paper.

  16. Finite-size effects, pseudocritical quantities and signatures of the chiral critical endpoint of QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Palhares, L F; Kodama, T

    2009-01-01

    We investigate finite-size effects on the phase diagram of strong interactions, and discuss their influence (and utility) on experimental signatures in high-energy heavy ion collisions. We calculate the modification of the pseudocritical transition line and isentropic trajectories, and discuss how this affects proposed signatures of the chiral critical endpoint. We argue that a finite-size scaling analysis may be crucial in the process of data analysis in the Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC and in future experiments at FAIR-GSI. We propose the use of extrapolations, full scaling plots and a chi-squared method as tools for searching the critical endpoint of QCD and determining its universality class.

  17. Homoclinic snaking in plane Couette flow: bending, skewing, and finite-size effects

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, John F

    2015-01-01

    Invariant solutions of shear flows have recently been extended from spatially periodic solutions in minimal flow units to spatially localized solutions on extended domains. One set of spanwise-localized solutions of plane Couette flow exhibits homoclinic snaking, a process by which steady-state solutions grow additional structure smoothly at their fronts when continued parametrically. Homoclinic snaking is well understood mathematically in the context of the one-dimensional Swift-Hohenberg equation. Consequently, the snaking solutions of plane Couette flow form a promising connection between the largely phenomenological study of laminar-turbulent patterns in viscous shear flows and the mathematically well-developed field of pattern-formation theory. In this paper we present a numerical study of the snaking solutions, generalizing beyond the fixed streamwise wavelength of previous studies. We find a number of new solution features, including bending, skewing, and finite-size effects. We show that the finite-si...

  18. The Study of Optically Induced Effects due to Bending and Twisting using Vector Finite Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacles-Mariani, J; Rodrigue, G

    2005-05-11

    We study the effects of macroscopic bends and twists in an optical waveguide and how they influence the transmission capabilities of a waveguide. These mechanical stresses and strains distort the optical indicatrix of the medium producing optical anisotropy. The spatially varying refractive indices are incorporated into the full-wave Maxwell's equations. The governing equations are discretized using a vector finite element method cast in a high-order finite element approximation. This approach allows us to study the complexities of the mechanical deformation within a framework of a high-order formulation which can in turn, reduce the computational requirement without degrading its performance. The optical activities generated, total energy produced and power loss due to the mechanical stresses and strains are reported and discussed.

  19. Finite-size effects in the Nagel-Schreckenberg traffic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balouchi, Ashkan; Browne, Dana A.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the Nagel-Schreckenberg traffic model for a variety of maximum speeds. We show that the low-density limit can be described as a dilute gas of vehicles with a repulsive core. At the transition to jamming, we observe finite-size effects in a variety of quantities describing the flow and the density correlations, but only if the maximum speed Vmax is larger than a certain value. A finite-size scaling analysis of several order parameters shows universal behavior, with scaling exponents that depend on Vmax. The jamming transition at large Vmax can be viewed as the nucleation of jams in a background of freely flowing vehicles. For small Vmax no such clean separation into jammed and free vehicles is possible.

  20. Gauge invariance and finite temperature effective actions of Chern-Simons gauge theories with fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Cabra, D C; Rossini, L; Schaposnik, F A; Fradkin, Eduardo

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the behavior of theories of fermions coupled to Chern-Simons gauge fields with a non-abelian gauge group in three dimensions and at finite temperature. Using non-perturbative arguments and gauge invariance, and in contradiction with perturbative results, we show that the coefficient of the Chern-Simons term of the effective actions for the gauge fields at finite temperature can be {\\it at most} an integer function of the temperature. This is in a sense a generalized no-renormalization theorem. We also discuss the case of abelian theories and give indications that a similar condition should hold there too. We discuss consequences of our results to the thermodynamics of anyon superfluids and fractional quantum Hall systems.

  1. Finite boundary effects in problem of a crack perpendicular to and terminating at a bimaterial interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaohua Chen; Tzuchiang Wang; Sharon Kao-Walter

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of a crack perpendicular to and terminating at an interface in bimaterial structure with finite boundaries is investigated. The dislocation simulation method and boundary collocation approach are used to derive and solve the basic equations. Two kinds of loading form are considered when the crack lies in a softer or a stiffer material, one is an ideal loading and the other one fits to the practical experiment loading. Complete solutions of the stress field including the T stress are obtained as well as the stress intensity factors. Influences of T stress on the stress field ahead of the crack tip are studied. Finite boundary effects on the stress intensity factors are emphasized. Comparisons with the problem presented by Chen et al. (Int. J.Solids and Structure, 2003, 40, 2731-2755) are discussed also.

  2. Effects of interactions on dynamic correlations of hard-core bosons at finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauseweh, Benedikt; Uhrig, Götz S.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate how dynamic correlations of hard-core bosonic excitation at finite temperature are affected by additional interactions besides the hard-core repulsion which prevents them from occupying the same site. We focus especially on dimerized spin systems, where these additional interactions between the elementary excitations, triplons, lead to the formation of bound states, relevant for the correct description of scattering processes. In order to include these effects quantitatively, we extend the previously developed Brückner approach to include also nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest neighbor (NNN) interactions correctly in a low-temperature expansion. This leads to the extension of the scalar Bethe-Salpeter equation to a matrix-valued equation. As an example, we consider the Heisenberg spin ladder to illustrate the significance of the additional interactions on the spectral functions at finite temperature, which are proportional to inelastic neutron scattering rates.

  3. Double-crossover phenomena in Laplacian growth: Effects of sticking probability and finite viscosity ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Takashi; Stanley, H. Eugene

    1990-03-01

    A combined effect of sticking probability and finite viscosity ratio is studied on the pattern formation in Laplacian growth. A renormalization-group theory is developed to study the crossover phenomena between the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) and nonfractal structure. A two-stage crossover phenomenon is analyzed by using a three-parameter position-space renormalization-group method. A global flow diagram in three-parameter space is obtained. It is found that there are three nontrivial fixed points, the first Eden point, the DLA point and the second Eden point. The second Eden point corresponding to the dense structure is stable in all directions, while the first Eden point and the DLA point are saddle points. When the sticking probability P is small and the viscosity ratio is finite, the aggregate must cross over from the dense structure, through the DLA fractal, finally to the dense aggregate.

  4. Finite-size effects lead to supercritical bifurcations in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Stephan; Zhong, Jin-Qiang; Clercx, Herman J H; Lohse, Detlef; Ahlers, Guenter; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.224501

    2011-01-01

    In turbulent thermal convection in cylindrical samples of aspect ratio \\Gamma = D/L (D is the diameter and L the height) the Nusselt number Nu is enhanced when the sample is rotated about its vertical axis, because of the formation of Ekman vortices that extract additional fluid out of thermal boundary layers at the top and bottom. We show from experiments and direct numerical simulations that the enhancement occurs only above a bifurcation point at a critical inverse Rossby number $1/\\Ro_c$, with $1/\\Ro_c \\propto 1/\\Gamma$. We present a Ginzburg-Landau like model that explains the existence of a bifurcation at finite $1/\\Ro_c$ as a finite-size effect. The model yields the proportionality between $1/\\Ro_c$ and $1/\\Gamma$ and is consistent with several other measured or computed system properties.

  5. Configurational Variations and Finite-Beta Effects on Neoclassical Viscosities and Flows in Stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breyfogle, M.; Marine, T.; Ware, A. S.; Spong, D. A.

    2008-11-01

    The impact of magnetic geometry on neoclassical flows and viscosities for the Helically Symmetric Experiment (HSX) is investigated using the PENTA code [1,2]. Specifically, two topics are investigated: (1) finite-beta effects and (2) configurational variations. The PENTA code is used to calculate flows in HSX with the vacuum magnetic geometry and with finite-beta magnetic surfaces from the VMEC equilibrium code. This is done for the standard quasi-helically symmetric configuration of HSX, a symmetry-breaking mirror configuration and a hill configuration. The impact of these changes in the magnetic geometry on neoclassical viscosities and flows in HSX will be discussed.[0pt] [1] D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005). [0pt] [2] D. A. Spong, Fusion Sci. Technology 50, 343 (2006).

  6. Polarization effects on spectra of spherical core/shell nanostructures: Perturbation theory against finite difference approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibral, Asmaa [Equipe d' Optique et Electronique du Solide, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida principale, El Jadida, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); Laboratoire d' Instrumentation, Mesure et Contrôle, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida principale, El Jadida, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); Zouitine, Asmaa [Département de Physique, Ecole Nationale Supérieure d' Enseignement Technique, Université Mohammed V Souissi, B. P. 6207 Rabat-Instituts, Rabat, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); Assaid, El Mahdi, E-mail: eassaid@yahoo.fr [Equipe d' Optique et Electronique du Solide, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida principale, El Jadida, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); Laboratoire d' Instrumentation, Mesure et Contrôle, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida principale, El Jadida, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); and others

    2015-02-01

    Poisson equation is solved analytically in the case of a point charge placed anywhere in a spherical core/shell nanostructure, immersed in aqueous or organic solution or embedded in semiconducting or insulating matrix. Conduction and valence band-edge alignments between core and shell are described by finite height barriers. Influence of polarization charges induced at the surfaces where two adjacent materials meet is taken into account. Original expressions of electrostatic potential created everywhere in the space by a source point charge are derived. Expressions of self-polarization potential describing the interaction of a point charge with its own image–charge are deduced. Contributions of double dielectric constant mismatch to electron and hole ground state energies as well as nanostructure effective gap are calculated via first order perturbation theory and also by finite difference approach. Dependencies of electron, hole and gap energies against core to shell radii ratio are determined in the case of ZnS/CdSe core/shell nanostructure immersed in water or in toluene. It appears that finite difference approach is more efficient than first order perturbation method and that the effect of polarization charge may in no case be neglected as its contribution can reach a significant proportion of the value of nanostructure gap.

  7. Finite size effects on the helical edge states on the Lieb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Chen; Bin, Zhou

    2016-06-01

    For a two-dimensional Lieb lattice, that is, a line-centered square lattice, the inclusion of the intrinsic spin-orbit (ISO) coupling opens a topologically nontrivial gap, and gives rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect characterized by two pairs of gapless helical edge states within the bulk gap. Generally, due to the finite size effect in QSH systems, the edge states on the two sides of a strip of finite width can couple together to open a gap in the spectrum. In this paper, we investigate the finite size effect of helical edge states on the Lieb lattice with ISO coupling under three different kinds of boundary conditions, i.e., the straight, bearded and asymmetry edges. The spectrum and wave function of edge modes are derived analytically for a tight-binding model on the Lieb lattice. For a strip Lieb lattice with two straight edges, the ISO coupling induces the Dirac-like bulk states to localize at the edges to become the helical edge states with the same Dirac-like spectrum. Moreover, it is found that in the case with two straight edges the gapless Dirac-like spectrum remains unchanged with decreasing the width of the strip Lieb lattice, and no gap is opened in the edge band. It is concluded that the finite size effect of QSH states is absent in the case with the straight edges. However, in the other two cases with the bearded and asymmetry edges, the energy gap induced by the finite size effect is still opened with decreasing the width of the strip. It is also proposed that the edge band dispersion can be controlled by applying an on-site potential energy on the outermost atoms. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274102), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University of the Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. NCET-11-0960), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of the Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20134208110001).

  8. Collective effects in the radiation pressure force

    CERN Document Server

    Bachelard, R; Guerin, W; Kaiser, R

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the role of diffuse, Mie and cooperative scattering on the radiation pressure force acting on the center of mass of a cloud of cold atoms. Even though a mean-field Ansatz (the `timed Dicke state'), previously derived from a cooperative scattering approach, has been shown to agree satisfactorily with experiments, diffuse scattering also describes very well most features of the radiation pressure force on large atomic clouds. We compare in detail an incoherent, random walk model for photons and a diffraction approach to the more complete description based on coherently coupled dipoles. We show that a cooperative scattering approach, although it provides a quite complete description of the scattering process, is not necessary to explain the previous experiments on the radiation pressure force.

  9. High-pressure effects on intramolecular electron transfer compounds

    CERN Document Server

    He Li Ming; Li Hong; Zhang Bao Wen; Li Yi; Yang Guo Qiang

    2002-01-01

    We explore the effect of pressure on the fluorescence spectra of the intramolecular electron transfer compound N-(1-pyrenylmethyl), N-methyl-4-methoxyaniline (Py-Am) and its model version, with poly(methyl methacrylate) blended in, at high pressure up to 7 GPa. The emission properties of Py-Am and pyrene show distinct difference with the increase of pressure. This difference indicates the strength of the charge transfer interaction resulting from the adjusting of the conformation of Py-Am with increase of pressure. The relationship between the electronic state of the molecule and pressure is discussed.

  10. Blood pressure monitor with a position sensor for wrist placement to eliminate hydrostatic pressure effect on blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hironori; Koshimizu, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Shingo; Ogura, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Accurate measurement of blood pressure at wrist requires the heart and wrist to be kept at the same level to avoid the effects of hydrostatic pressure. Although a blood pressure monitor with a position sensor that guides appropriate forearm angle without use of a chair and desk has already been proposed, a similar functioning device for measuring upper arm blood pressure with a chair and desk is needed. In this study, a calculation model was first used to explore design of such a system. The findings were then implemented into design of a new blood pressure monitor. Results of various methods were compared. The calculation model of the wrist level from arthrosis angles and interarticulars lengths was developed and considered using published anthropometric dimensions. It is compared with 33 volunteer persons' experimental results. The calculated difference of level was -4.1 to 7.9 (cm) with a fixed chair and desk. The experimental result was -3.0 to 5.5 (cm) at left wrist and -2.1 to 6.3(cm) at right wrist. The absolute difference level equals ±4.8 (mmHg) of blood pressure readings according to the calculated result. This meets the AAMI requirements for a blood pressure monitor. In the conclusion, the calculation model is able to effectively evaluate the difference between the heart and wrist level. Improving the method for maintaining wrist to heart level will improve wrist blood pressure measurement accuracy when also sitting in the chair at a desk. The leading angle of user's forearm using a position sensor is shown to work for this purpose.

  11. Influence of gas pressure on the effective thermal conductivity of ceramic breeder pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Weijing [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Pupeschi, Simone [Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Hanaor, Dorian [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Institute for Materials Science and Technologies, Technical University of Berlin (Germany); Gan, Yixiang, E-mail: yixiang.gan@sydney.edu.au [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • This study explicitly demonstrates the influence of the gas pressure on the effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds. • The gas pressure influence is shown to correlated to the pebble size. • The effective thermal conductivity is linked to thermal-mechanical properties of pebbles and packing structure. - Abstract: Lithium ceramics have been considered as tritium breeder materials in many proposed designs of fusion breeding blankets. Heat generated in breeder pebble beds due to nuclear breeding reaction must be removed by means of actively cooled plates while generated tritiums is recovered by purge gas slowly flowing through beds. Therefore, the effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds that is one of the governing parameters determining heat transport phenomenon needs to be addressed with respect to mechanical status of beds and purge gas pressure. In this study, a numerical framework combining finite element simulation and a semi-empirical correlation of gas gap conduction is proposed to predict the effective thermal conductivity. The purge gas pressure is found to vary the effective thermal conductivity, in particular with the presence of various sized gaps in pebble beds. Random packing of pebble beds is taken into account by an approximated correlation considering the packing factor and coordination number of pebble beds. The model prediction is compared with experimental observation from different sources showing a quantitative agreement with the measurement.

  12. Students' Pressure, Time Management and Effective Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hechuan; Yang, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to survey the status quo of the student pressure and the relationship between their daily time management and their learning outcomes in three different types of higher secondary schools at Shenyang, the capital city of Liaoning Province in mainland China. Design/methodology/approach: An investigation was carried out in 14…

  13. Students' Pressure, Time Management and Effective Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hechuan; Yang, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to survey the status quo of the student pressure and the relationship between their daily time management and their learning outcomes in three different types of higher secondary schools at Shenyang, the capital city of Liaoning Province in mainland China. Design/methodology/approach: An investigation was carried out in 14…

  14. Acute effects of consumption of energy drinks on intraocular pressure and blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilechie AA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A Alex Ilechie, Sandra TettehDepartment of Optometry, University of Cape Coast, GhanaBackground: Energy drinks contain a wide variety of ingredients including caffeine, for which there have been conflicting reports regarding its effects on intraocular pressure (IOP and blood pressure. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of an energy drink (Red Bull® on the IOP and blood pressure of healthy young adults.Methods: Thirty healthy university students of either gender, aged 18–30 (mean 23.20 ± 2.81 years were randomly selected to participate in this study. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups (experimental and control and were asked to abstain from caffeine for 48 hours prior to and during the study. Baseline IOP and blood pressure were measured. The experimental group (n = 15 consumed one can of the energy drink (containing 85 mg of caffeine in 250 mL and measurements were repeated at 30, 60, and 90 minutes, while the control group drank 250 mL of water and were tested over the same time period.Results: When compared with baseline, a significant decrease (P < 0.05 in mean IOP at 60 and 90 minutes was observed in the experimental group. There was no corresponding change in systolic or diastolic blood pressure.Conclusion: Our results suggest that energy drinks (ie, Red Bull produce a significant reduction in IOP but have no effect on blood pressure. These findings may be interpreted as reflecting the effect of the combination of caffeine and taurine in the Red Bull energy drink. This effect may result from the known hypotensive effect of taurine, and warrants further study.Keywords: acute effect, intraocular pressure, blood pressure, glaucoma, caffeine, taurine

  15. The low-energy effective theory of QCD at small quark masses in a finite volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehner, Christoph

    2010-01-15

    At low energies the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) can be described effectively in terms of the lightest particles of the theory, the pions. This approximation is valid for temperatures well below the mass difference of the pions to the next heavier particles. We study the low-energy effective theory at very small quark masses in a finite volume V. The corresponding perturbative expansion in 1/{radical}(V) is called {epsilon} expansion. At each order of this expansion a finite number of low-energy constants completely determine the effective theory. These low-energy constants are of great phenomenological importance. In the leading order of the {epsilon} expansion, called {epsilon} regime, the theory becomes zero-dimensional and is therefore described by random matrix theory (RMT). The dimensionless quantities of RMT are mapped to dimensionful quantities of the low-energy effective theory using the leading-order lowenergy constants {sigma} and F. In this way {sigma} and F can be obtained from lattice QCD simulations in the '' regime by a fit to RMT predictions. For typical volumes of state-of-the-art lattice QCD simulations, finite-volume corrections to the RMT prediction cannot be neglected. These corrections can be calculated in higher orders of the {epsilon} expansion. We calculate the finite-volume corrections to {sigma} and F at next-to-next-to-leading order in the {epsilon} expansion. We also discuss non-universal modifications of the theory due to the finite volume. These results are then applied to lattice QCD simulations, and we extract {sigma} and F from eigenvalue correlation functions of the Dirac operator. As a side result, we provide a proof of equivalence between the parametrization of the partially quenched low-energy effective theory without singlet particle and that of the super-Riemannian manifold used earlier in the literature. Furthermore, we calculate a special version of the massless sunset diagram at finite volume without

  16. Finite temperature effect on mechanical properties of graphene sheets with various grain boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Ge; Hong-Xiang, Sun; Yi-Jun, Guan; Gan-He, Zeng

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical properties of graphene sheets with various grain boundaries are studied by molecular dynamics method at finite temperatures. The finite temperature reduces the ultimate strengths of the graphenes with different types of grain boundaries. More interestingly, at high temperatures, the ultimate strengths of the graphene with the zigzag-orientation grain boundaries at low tilt angles exhibit different behaviors from those at lower temperatures, which is determined by inner initial stress in grain boundaries. The results indicate that the finite temperature, especially the high one, has a significant effect on the ultimate strength of graphene with grain boundaries, which gives a more in-depth understanding of their mechanical properties and could be useful for potential graphene applications. Project supported by the Nation Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11347219 and 11404147), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK20140519), the Training Project of Young Backbone Teacher of Jiangsu University, the Advanced Talents of Jiangsu University, China (Grant No. 11JDG118), the Practice Innovation Training Program Projects for Industrial Center of Jiangsu University, China, and the State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. SKLOA201308).

  17. Finite-temperature effects on a triatomic Efimov resonance in ultracold cesium

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Bo; Grimm, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    We report a thorough investigation of finite-temperature effects on three-body recombination near a triatomic Efimov resonance in an ultracold gas of cesium atoms. Our measurements cover a wide range from a near-ideal realization of the zero-temperature limit to a strongly temperature-dominated regime. The experimental results are analyzed within a recently introduced theoretical model based on a universal zero-range theory. The temperature-induced shift of the resonance reveals a contribution that points to an energy-dependence of the three-body parameter. We interpret this contribution in terms of the finite range of the van der Waals interaction in real atomic systems and we quantify it in an empirical way based on length scale arguments. A universal character of the corresponding resonance shift is suggested by observations related to other Efimov resonances and the comparison with a theoretical finite-temperature approach that explicitly takes the van der Waals interaction into account. Our findings are ...

  18. The effect of finite pore length on ion structure and charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitsprecher, Konrad; Abele, Manuel; Kondrat, Svyatoslav; Holm, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Nanoporous supercapacitors play an important role in modern energy storage systems, and their modeling is essential to predict and optimize the charging behaviour. Two classes of models have been developed that consist of finite and infinitely long pores. Here, we show that although both types of models predict qualitatively consistent results, there are important differences emerging due to the finite pore length. In particular, we find that the ion density inside a finite pore is not constant, but increases linearly from the pore entrance to the pore end, where the ions form a strongly layered structure. This hinders a direct quantitative comparison between the two models. In addition, we show that although the ion density between the electrodes changes appreciably with the applied potential, this change has a minor effect on charging. Our simulations also reveal a complex charging behaviour, which is adsorption-driven at high voltages, but it is dominated either by co-ion desorption or by adsorption of both types of ions at low voltages, depending on the ion concentration.

  19. Yang-Mills theory as bimetrical gravity: Polarization effects and finite-energy gluon clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlovsky, Oleg V

    2002-01-01

    In this report a gravity representation of Yang-Mills theory is given. Using this approach, one obtains new information on solutions of classical YM theory. Singular solutions (black-hole-like solutions) of the YM equations are discussed in connection with bimetrical gravity. The behaviour of these solutions in a theory with a 'cosmological' Lambda-part is also investigated. A physical interpretation of such solutions is given. Using an effective field theory approach we try to show that quantum fluctuations and vacuum polarization effects lead to the generation of finite-energy objects in QCD.

  20. Finite line-source model for borehole heat exchangers. Effect of vertical temperature variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandos, Tatyana V.; Fernandez, Esther; Santander, Juan Luis G.; Isidro, Jose Maria; Perez, Jezabel; Cordoba, Pedro J. Fernandez de [Instituto Universitario de Matematica Pura y Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Montero, Alvaro; Urchueguia, Javier F. [Instituto de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    A solution to the three-dimensional finite line-source (FLS) model for borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) that takes into account the prevailing geothermal gradient and allows arbitrary ground surface temperature changes is presented. Analytical expressions for the average ground temperature are derived by integrating the exact solution over the line-source depth. A self-consistent procedure to evaluate the in situ thermal response test (TRT) data is outlined. The effective thermal conductivity and the effective borehole thermal resistance can be determined by fitting the TRT data to the time-series expansion obtained for the average temperature. (author)

  1. Effects of Linear Induction Motor Parameters in Its Optimum Design Based on Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad JafarBoland

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Effective parameters in performance of linear induction motors such as air gap, number of poles and the thickness of secondary must be selected and optimized to increase power coefficients and motor performance significantly. In this paper a double sided linear induction motor in different conditions is designed and next by finite element method analyzed. Then for comparing analytical model and numerical model a linear motor using Matlab software is simulated in different condition. It is clear from the results that with optimal value of effective parameters, power losses decreased the performance of motor is improved and efficiency of linear motor is increased.

  2. Jeans instability of magnetized quantum plasma: Effect of viscosity, rotation and finite Larmor radius corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Shweta, E-mail: jshweta09@gmail.com; Sharma, Prerana [Department of Physics, Ujjain Engineering College, Ujjain, M.P.456010 (India); Chhajlani, R. K. [School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University Ujjain, M. P. - 456010 (India)

    2015-07-31

    The Jeans instability of self-gravitating quantum plasma is examined considering the effects of viscosity, finite Larmor radius (FLR) corrections and rotation. The analysis is done by normal mode analysis theory with the help of relevant linearized perturbation equations of the problem. The general dispersion relation is obtained using the quantum magneto hydrodynamic model. The modified condition of Jeans instability is obtained and the numerical calculations have been performed to show the effects of various parameters on the growth rate of Jeans instability.

  3. Effect of platform switching on the peri-implant bone: A finite element study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, Amparo; Peiró, Germán; Ródenas, Juan-José; López-Mollá, María-Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Background There exists a relation between the presence and location of the micro-gap and the loss of peri implant bone. Several authors have shown that the treatments based on the use of platform switching result in less peri-implant bone loss and an increased tissue stability. The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of the platform switching on the distribution of stresses on the peri-implant bone using the finite element method. Material and Methods A realistic 3D full-mandible finite element model representing cortical bone and trabecular bone was used to study the distribution of the stress on the bone induced by an implant of diameter 4.1 mm. Two abutments were modelled. The first one, of diameter 4.1 mm, was used in the reference model to represent a conventional implant. The second one, of diameter 3.2 mm, was used to represent the implant with platform switching. Both models were subjected to axial and oblique masticatory loads. Results The analyses showed that, although no relevant differences can be found for the trabecular bone, the use of platform switching reduces the maximum stress level in the cortical bone by almost 36% with axial loads and by 40% with oblique loads. Conclusions The full 3D Finite Element model, that can be used to investigate the influence of other parameters (implant diameter, connexion type, …) on the biomechanical behaviour of the implant, showed that this stress reduction can be a biomechanical reasons to explain why the platform switching seems to reduce or eliminate crestal bone resorption after the prosthetic restoration. Key words:Dental implant, platform switching, finite element method. PMID:26535094

  4. Effect of pressurization on antibacterial properties of Lactobacillus strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Agnieszka; Grześkiewicz, Aleksandra; Wiśniewska, Krystyna; Reps, Arnold

    2010-03-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of high pressures on antibacterial properties of selected strains of the Lactobacillus species. Cultures of 22 strains were subjected to high-pressure treatment at 30, 60, 90, and 300 MPa/1 min/18 °C. The susceptibility of the bacteria pressurized at 30-90 MPa was diversified and depended on the strain and not on its species affiliation. When compared with pressures of 30-90 MPa, the pressure treatment at 300 MPa caused the inhibition of the acidifying activity of the strains analyzed. In turn, the pressures applied had no impact on the quantity of hydrogen peroxide synthesized. An increase in pressure was accompanied by a diminishing antibacterial activity of the investigated Lactobacillus strains.

  5. Comments on Evanescent Pressure Gradient Response in the Upper Ocean to Subinertial Wind Stress Forcing of Finite Wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    IIl/r’ (b). The dashed curve is the solution presented by response in the upper ocean to subinertial wind stress forcing Codes WM and the solid curve...especially as c hand side of Eq. (3). approaches the inertial frequency f,. h nd s re is 0 With pressure terms included, the expression for The wind ... stress is mixed layer velocities are [Eq. (3.1) in WM], in the 7 = [0, r’ Re(e""’ C)] (6) usual fluid mechanical notation. and following WM. we are

  6. Control rod drop analysis by finite element method using fluid-structure interaction for a pressurized water reactor power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, K.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedukdaero 1045 Dukjin-Dong, Yusong-Ku, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: khyoon@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, J.Y.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, Y.H.; Kim, H.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedukdaero 1045 Dukjin-Dong, Yusong-Ku, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The control rod drop analysis is very important for safety analysis. For seismic and loss of coolant accident event, the control rod assemblies shall be capable of traveling from a fully withdrawn position to 90% insertion without any blockage and within specified time and displacement limits. The analysis has been executed by analytical method using in-house code. In this method, several field data are needed. These data are obtained from nuclear, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical design groups, peculiar codes, those work groups need to cooperate together. Following the enhancement of a computer and development of the multi-physics analysis code, a new method for the control rod drop analysis is proposed by finite element method. This analysis model incorporates the structure and fluid parts, termed as a fluid and structure interaction (FSI). Because a control rod is submerged inside a guide tube of a fuel assembly, the FSI boundary condition is applied. In this model, it is assumed that the fluid is incompressible laminar flow. The structures are modeled with the solid elements because there is no deformation due to the fluid flow. The analysis two-dimensional plane model is created in the analysis with considering an axi-symmetric geometry. Therefore, the proposed analysis model will be very simple and the design data from other fields will be unnecessary. The analysis results are compared with those of the in-house code, which have been used for a commercial design. After validation, it is found that the present analysis gives a useful tool in the design of the control rod and fuel assembly.

  7. Pressure effects in multiple resonant multiphoton transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maïnos, C.; Le Duff, Y.; Castex, M. C.; Boursey, E.

    1989-02-01

    Although the rotational structure of a multiphoton process generally remains unaltered over a large range of gas pressure, this is not the case when multiple resonances are present. The rotational structure observed through intermediate rotational levels in a multiphoton process depends strongly on the resonance conditions. We show, for the NO molecule, that this structure changes drastically when the resonance conditions are modified by intermolecular collisions.

  8. Effect of aeration on fast gas pressure tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yu-jia; JIANG Cheng-lin; LI Xiao-wei; TANG Jun; WANG Chen; YANG Fei-long; WANG Fa-kai; ZHANG Chao-jie; DENG Shu-hua

    2009-01-01

    Given the problem of the long time required for testing gas pressure, we propose a fast-test method in which we used a technique of fast borehole sealing and air replenishing. Based on the characteristics of gas emission from boreholes to be tested, we built a theoretical model for calculating parameters during the process of increasing natural pressure and aeration. Using this model, we investigated the effect of different aeration conditions on velocity of pressure tests. The result shows that: 1) aerating air into boreholes can speed up gas pressure tests and 2) the more similar the pressure of the aerated air to the original gas pressure, the smaller the gas volume absorbed by coal and the shorter the time needed in pressure test. A case study in the Lu'an mining area shows that the time needed for gas pressure test is only 4 h using our method of aeration and 29 h under conditions of increasing natural pressure, saving time by 86.2%. This case study also indicates that, by using the aeration method, only one hour is needed for gas pressure to reach a stable state, which breaks the record of the shortest time needed for gas pressure tests in China.

  9. Finite element modelling for the investigation of edge effect in acoustic micro imaging of microelectronic packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen Lee, Chean; Zhang, Guang-Ming; Harvey, David M.; Ma, Hong-Wei; Braden, Derek R.

    2016-02-01

    In acoustic micro imaging of microelectronic packages, edge effect is often presented as artifacts of C-scan images, which may potentially obscure the detection of defects such as cracks and voids in the solder joints. The cause of edge effect is debatable. In this paper, a 2D finite element model is developed on the basis of acoustic micro imaging of a flip-chip package using a 230 MHz focused transducer to investigate acoustic propagation inside the package in attempt to elucidate the fundamental mechanism that causes the edge effect. A virtual transducer is designed in the finite element model to reduce the coupling fluid domain, and its performance is characterised against the physical transducer specification. The numerical results showed that the under bump metallization (UBM) structure inside the package has a significant impact on the edge effect. Simulated wavefields also showed that the edge effect is mainly attributed to the horizontal scatter, which is observed in the interface of silicon die-to-the outer radius of solder bump. The horizontal scatter occurs even for a flip-chip package without the UBM structure.

  10. Evaluating Topographic Effects on Ground Deformation: Insights from Finite Element Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchin, Erika; Geyer, Adelina; Martí, Joan

    2015-07-01

    Ground deformation has been demonstrated to be one of the most common signals of volcanic unrest. Although volcanoes are commonly associated with significant topographic relief, most analytical models assume the Earth's surface as flat. However, it has been confirmed that this approximation can lead to important misinterpretations of the recorded surface deformation data. Here we perform a systematic and quantitative analysis of how topography may influence ground deformation signals generated by a spherical pressure source embedded in an elastic homogeneous media and how these variations correlate with the different topographic parameters characterizing the terrain form (e.g., slope, aspect, curvature). For this, we bring together the results presented in previous published papers and complement them with new axisymmetric and 3D finite element (FE) model results. First, we study, in a parametric way, the influence of a volcanic edifice centered above the pressure source axis. Second, we carry out new 3D FE models simulating the real topography of three different volcanic areas representative of topographic scenarios common in volcanic regions: Rabaul caldera (Papua New Guinea) and the volcanic islands of Tenerife and El Hierro (Canary Islands). The calculated differences are then correlated with a series of topographic parameters. The final aim is to investigate the artifacts that might arise from the use of half-space models at volcanic areas due to diverse topographic features (e.g., collapse caldera structures, prominent central edifices, large landslide scars).

  11. A hybrid pressure-density-based Mach uniform algorithm for 2D Euler equations on unstructured grids by using multi-moment finite volume method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bin; Deng, Xi; Sun, Ziyao; Xiao, Feng

    2017-04-01

    We propose a novel Mach-uniform numerical model for 2D Euler equations on unstructured grids by using multi-moment finite volume method. The model integrates two key components newly developed to solve compressible flows on unstructured grids with improved accuracy and robustness. A new variant of AUSM scheme, so-called AUSM+-pcp (AUSM+ with pressure-correction projection), has been devised including a pressure-correction projection to the AUSM+ flux splitting, which maintains the exact numerical conservativeness and works well for all Mach numbers. A novel 3th-order, non-oscillatory and less-dissipative reconstruction has been proposed by introducing a multi-dimensional limiting and a BVD (boundary variation diminishing) treatment to the VPM (volume integrated average (VIA) and point value (PV) based multi-moment) reconstruction. The resulting reconstruction scheme, the limited VPM-BVD formulation, is able to resolve both smooth and non-smooth solutions with high fidelity. Benchmark tests have been used to verify the present model. The numerical results substantiate the present model as an accurate and robust unstructured-grid formulation for flows of all Mach numbers.

  12. The effect of pressure on annular flow pressure drop in a small pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Bertodano, M.A.L.; Beus, S.G.; Shi, Jian-Feng

    1996-09-01

    New experimental data was obtained for pressure drop and entrainment for annular up-flow in a vertical pipe. The 9.5 mm. pipe has an L/D ratio of 440 to insure fully developed annular flow. The pressure ranged from 140 kPa to 660 kPa. Therefore the density ratio was varied by a factor of four approximately. This allows the investigation of the effect of pressure on the interfacial shear models. Gas superficial velocities between 25 and 126 m/s were tested. This extends the range of previous data to higher gas velocities. The data were compared with well known models for interfacial shear that represent the state of the art. Good results were obtained when the model by Asali, Hanratty and Andreussi was modified for the effect of pressure. Furthermore an equivalent model was obtained based on the mixing length theory for rough pipes. It correlates the equivalent roughness to the film thickness.

  13. Dynamic finite element modeling of the effects of size on the upper shelf energy of ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidener, S.E.; Kumar, A.S.; Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1996-04-01

    Both the fusion and light water reactor program require the use of the subsize specimens to obtain sufficient irradiation data on neutron-induced embrittlement of ferritic steels. While the development of fusion-relevant size effects correlations can proceed analytically, it is more cost-effective at this time to use data currently being obtained on embrittlement of pressure vessel steels to test and expand the correlations developed earlier using fusion relevant steels. Dynamic finite elements modeling of the fracture behavior of fatigue-precracked Charpy Specimens was performed to determine the effect of single variable changes in ligament size, width, span, and thickness on the upper shelf energy. A method based on tensile fracture strain was used for modeling crack initiation and propagation. It was found that the upper shelf energy of precracked specimens (USE{sub p}) is proportional to b{sup n}, where b is ligament size and n varies from about 1.6 for subsize to 1.9 for full size specimens. The USE{sub p} was found to be proportional to width according to W{sup 25}. The dependence on thickness was found to be linear for all cases studied. Some of the data from the FEM analysis were compared with experimental data and were found to be in reasonable agreement.

  14. Wall mass transfer and pressure gradient effects on turbulent skin friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, R. D.; Balasubramanian, R.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of mass injection and pressure gradients on the drag of surfaces were studied theoretically with the aid of boundary-layer and Navier-Stokes codes. The present investigation is concerned with the effects of spatially varying the injection in the case of flat-plate drag. Effects of suction and injection on wavy wall surfaces are also explored. Calculations were performed for 1.2 m long surfaces, one flat and the other sinusoidal with a wavelength of 30.5 cm. Attention is given to the study of the effect of various spatial blowing variations on flat-plate skin friction reduction, local skin friction coefficient calculated by finite difference boundary-layer code and Navier-Stokes code, and the effect of phase-shifting sinusoidal mass transfer on the drag of a sinusoidal surface.

  15. A finite-element approach to evaluating the size effects of complex nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dingjie; Xie, Yi Min; Li, Qing; Huang, Xiaodong; Li, Yang Fan; Zhou, Shiwei

    2016-12-01

    The size effects that reveal the dramatic changes of mechanical behaviour at nanoscales have traditionally been analysed for regular beam systems. Here, the method of using finite-element analysis is explored with the intention of evaluating the size effects for complex nanostructures. The surface elasticity theory and generalized Young-Laplace equation are integrated into a beam element to account for the size effects in classical Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam theories. Computational results match well with the theoretical predictions on the size effect for a cantilever beam and a cubic unit cell containing 24 horizontal/vertical ligaments. For a simply supported nanowire, it is found that the results are very close to the experimental data. With the assumption that nanoporous gold is composed of many randomly connected beams, for the first time, the size effect of such a complex structure is numerically determined.

  16. Finite volume effects in low-energy neutron-deuteron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Rokash, Alexander; Krebs, Hermann; Lee, Dean; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2013-01-01

    We present a lattice calculation of neutron-deuteron scattering at very low energies and investigate in detail the impact of the topological finite-volume corrections. Our calculations are carried out in the framework of pionless effective field theory at leading order in the low-energy expansion. Using lattice sizes and a lattice spacing comparable to those employed in nuclear lattice simulations, we find that the topological volume corrections must be taken into account in order to obtain correct results for the neutron-proton S-wave scattering lengths.

  17. Effective optical response of silicon to sunlight in the finite-difference time-domain method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deinega, Alexei; John, Sajeev

    2012-01-01

    The frequency dependent dielectric permittivity of dispersive materials is commonly modeled as a rational polynomial based on multiple Debye, Drude, or Lorentz terms in the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. We identify a simple effective model in which dielectric polarization depends both on the electric field and its first time derivative. This enables nearly exact FDTD simulation of light propagation and absorption in silicon in the spectral range of 300-1000 nm. Numerical precision of our model is demonstrated for Mie scattering from a silicon sphere and solar absorption in a silicon nanowire photonic crystal.

  18. Numerical Effectiveness of Different Formulations of the Rigid Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamiec-Wójcik I.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an application of different formulations of the rigid finite element method (RFEM to dynamic analysis of flexible beams. We discuss numerical effectiveness of the classical RFEM and an alternative approach in which continuity of displacements is preserved by means of constraint equations. The analysis is carried out for a benchmark problem of the spin-up motion in planar and spatial cases. Torsion is omitted for numerical simulations and two cases of the new approach are considered. The results obtained by means of these methods are compared with the results obtained using a nonlinear two-node superelement

  19. Aether field in extra dimensions: Stefan-Boltzmann law and Casimir effect at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.

    2017-01-01

    The Lorentz and C P T symmetries are not violated at the highest laboratory energies available. However these symmetries may be violated at Planck scale. A particular development is to investigate the breakdown of Lorentz and C P T symmetries by introducing an aether field that exhibits nonzero vacuum expectation value along the fifth dimension. The interactions of the aether field with scalar, electromagnetic, and fermions fields are analyzed. The Stefan-Boltzmann law and Casimir effect at finite temperature are calculated using the Thermo Field Dynamics formalism.

  20. Casimir effect at finite temperature for pure-photon sector of the minimal Standard Model Extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, A.F., E-mail: alesandroferreira@fisica.ufmt.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, 78060-900, Cuiabá, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road Victoria, BC (Canada); Khanna, Faqir C., E-mail: khannaf@uvic.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2016-12-15

    Dynamics between particles is governed by Lorentz and CPT symmetry. There is a violation of Parity (P) and CP symmetry at low levels. The unified theory, that includes particle physics and quantum gravity, may be expected to be covariant with Lorentz and CPT symmetry. At high enough energies, will the unified theory display violation of any symmetry? The Standard Model Extension (SME), with Lorentz and CPT violating terms, has been suggested to include particle dynamics. The minimal SME in the pure photon sector is considered in order to calculate the Casimir effect at finite temperature.

  1. Finite-volume effects and the electromagnetic contributions to kaon and pion masses

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, S; Bernard, C; DeTar, C; Freeland, E; Foley, J; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Komijani, J; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Osborn, J; Sugar, R L; Torok, A; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, R

    2014-01-01

    We report on the MILC Collaboration calculation of electromagnetic effects on light pseudoscalar mesons. The simulations employ asqtad staggered dynamical quarks in QCD plus quenched photons, with lattice spacings varying from 0.12 to 0.06 fm. Finite volume corrections for the MILC realization of lattice electrodynamics have been calculated in chiral perturbation theory and applied to the lattice data. These corrections differ from those calculated by Hayakawa and Uno because our treatment of zero modes differs from theirs. Updated results for the corrections to "Dashen's theorem" are presented.

  2. Finite-volume effects and the electromagnetic contributions to kaon and pion masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basak, Subhasish [Bhubaneswar, NISER; Bazavov, Alexei [Iowa U.; Bernard, Claude [Washington U., St. Louis; Detar, Carleton [Utah U.; Freeland, Elizabeth [Art Inst. of Chicago; Foley, Justin [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven [Indiana U.; Heller, Urs M. [APS, New York; Komijani, Javad [Washington U., St. Louis; Laiho, Jack [Syracuse U.; Levkova, Ludmila [Utah U.; Osborn, James [Argonne; Sugar, Robert [UC, Santa Barbara; Torok, Aaron [Indiana U.; Toussaint, Doug [Arizona U.; Van de Water, Ruth S. [Fermilab; Zhou, Ran [Fermilab

    2014-09-25

    We report on the MILC Collaboration calculation of electromagnetic effects on light pseudoscalar mesons. The simulations employ asqtad staggered dynamical quarks in QCD plus quenched photons, with lattice spacings varying from 0.12 to 0.06 fm. Finite volume corrections for the MILC realization of lattice electrodynamics have been calculated in chiral perturbation theory and applied to the lattice data. These corrections differ from those calculated by Hayakawa and Uno because our treatment of zero modes differs from theirs. Updated results for the corrections to "Dashen's theorem" are presented.

  3. Finite-volume effects and the electromagnetic contributions to kaon and pion masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basak, Subhasish [Bhubaneswar, NISER; Bazavov, Alexei [Iowa U.; Bernard, Claude [Washington U., St. Louis; Detar, Carleton [Utah U.; Freeland, Elizabeth [Art Inst. of Chicago; Foley, Justin [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven [Indiana U.; Heller, Urs M. [APS, New York; Komijani, Javad [Washington U., St. Louis; Laiho, Jack [Syracuse U.; Levkova, Ludmila [Utah U.; Osborn, James [Argonne; Sugar, Robert [UC, Santa Barbara; Torok, Aaron [Indiana U.; Toussaint, Doug [Arizona U.; Van de Water, Ruth S. [Fermilab; Zhou, Ran [Fermilab

    2014-09-25

    We report on the MILC Collaboration calculation of electromagnetic effects on light pseudoscalar mesons. The simulations employ asqtad staggered dynamical quarks in QCD plus quenched photons, with lattice spacings varying from 0.12 to 0.06 fm. Finite volume corrections for the MILC realization of lattice electrodynamics have been calculated in chiral perturbation theory and applied to the lattice data. These corrections differ from those calculated by Hayakawa and Uno because our treatment of zero modes differs from theirs. Updated results for the corrections to "Dashen's theorem" are presented.

  4. Stability and Convergence of an Effective Finite Element Method for Multiterm Fractional Partial Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjun Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A finite element method (FEM for multiterm fractional partial differential equations (MT-FPDEs is studied for obtaining a numerical solution effectively. The weak formulation for MT-FPDEs and the existence and uniqueness of the weak solutions are obtained by the well-known Lax-Milgram theorem. The Diethelm fractional backward difference method (DFBDM, based on quadrature for the time discretization, and FEM for the spatial discretization have been applied to MT-FPDEs. The stability and convergence for numerical methods are discussed. The numerical examples are given to match well with the main conclusions.

  5. Casimir effect at finite temperature for pure-photon sector of the minimal Standard Model Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.

    2016-12-01

    Dynamics between particles is governed by Lorentz and CPT symmetry. There is a violation of Parity (P) and CP symmetry at low levels. The unified theory, that includes particle physics and quantum gravity, may be expected to be covariant with Lorentz and CPT symmetry. At high enough energies, will the unified theory display violation of any symmetry? The Standard Model Extension (SME), with Lorentz and CPT violating terms, has been suggested to include particle dynamics. The minimal SME in the pure photon sector is considered in order to calculate the Casimir effect at finite temperature.

  6. Finite-orbit-width effects on the geodesic acoustic mode in the toroidally rotating tokamak plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    The Landau damping of geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in a torodial rotating tokamak plasma is analytically investigated by taking into account the finite-orbit-width (FOW) resonance effect to the 3rd order. The analytical result is shown to agree well with the numerical solution. The dependence of the damping rate on the toroidal Mach number $M$ relies on $k_r \\rho_i$. For sufficiently small $k_r \\rho_i$, the damping rate monotonically decreases with $M$. For relatively large $k_r \\rho_i$, the damping rate increases with $M$ until approaching the maximum and then decreases with $M$.

  7. Finite size effects in the static structure factor of dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davletov, A. E., E-mail: askar@physics.kz; Yerimbetova, L. T.; Mukhametkarimov, Ye. S.; Ospanova, A. K. [Department of Physics and Technology, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Al-Farabi av. 71, 050040 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2014-07-15

    Based on the previously developed pseudopotential model of the dust particles interaction, which takes into account both the finite size and screening effects, the equilibrium distribution functions are investigated in a broad range of plasma parameters. The treatment stems entirely from the renormalization theory of plasma particles interactions which leads to the so-called generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. In particular, an analytical expression for the static structure factor of the dust particles is proposed and its non-monotonic behavior in the hyper-netted chain approximation is found in a specified domain of plasma parameters to indicate the formation of short- or even long-range order in the system.

  8. Effects of Crimping on Mechanical Performance of Nitinol Stent Designed for Femoral Artery: Finite Element Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematzadeh, F.; Sadrnezhaad, S. K.

    2013-11-01

    Nitinol stents are used to minimize improper dynamic behavior, low twistability, and inadequate radial mechanical strength of femoral artery stents. In this study, finite element method is used to investigate the effect of crimping and Austenite finish temperature ( A f) of Nitinol on mechanical performance of Z-shaped open-cell femoral stent under crimping conditions. Results show that low A f Nitinol has better mechanical and clinical performance due to small chronic outward force, large radial resistive force, and appropriate superelastic behavior.

  9. Dynamic Stability of Viscoelastic Plates with Finite Deformation and Shear Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶晶; 程昌钧; 等

    2002-01-01

    Based on Reddy's theory of plates with higher-order shear deformations and the Boltzmann superposition principles,the governing equations were established for dynamic stability of viscoelastic plates with finite deformations taking account of shear effects,The Galerkin method was applied to simplify the set of equations.The numerical methods in nonlinear dynamics were used to solve the simplified system.It could e seen that there are plenty of dynamic properties for this kind of viscoelastic plates under transverse harmonic loads.The influences of the transverse shear deformations and material parameter on the dynamic behavior of nonlinear viscoelatic plates were investigated.

  10. Effects of Bone Young’s Modulus on Finite Element Analysis in the Lateral Ankle Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, W. X.; Wang, L J; Feng, T. N.; Jiang, C.H.; Fan, Y. B.; M. Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) is a powerful tool in biomechanics. The mechanical properties of biological tissue used in FEA modeling are mainly from experimental data, which vary greatly and are sometimes uncertain. The purpose of this study was to research how Young’s modulus affects the computations of a foot-ankle FEA model. A computer simulation and an in-vitro experiment were carried out to investigate the effects of incremental Young’s modulus of bone on the stress and strain outcomes ...

  11. Splinting effect on posterior implants under various loading modes: a 3D finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauchard, Erwan; Fournier, Benjamin Philippe; Jacq, Romain; Bouton, Antoine; Pierrisnard, Laurent; Naveau, Adrien

    2011-09-01

    This three-dimensional finite element study compared stresses, intensities and displacements of three mandibular posterior implants restored with cemented crowns (two molars and a premolar in straight line), splinted versus non-splinted. Hundred newton occlusal loads were vertically or horizontally applied, either on one single crown or on all of them. Maximal stresses and implants displacements were higher under horizontal loading. Splinting major effects appeared under single horizontal load with a decrease in stresses (34-49%) and displacements (16-19%) of the loaded crown. Splinting seems more appropriate for implant-supported restorations submitted to frequent single horizontal or oblique loads than vertical ones.

  12. Unusual finite size effects on critical temperature in fcc Ising antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, J.; Diep, H. T.; Ghazali, A.; Lallemand, P.

    1988-04-01

    A new multispin coding technique is presented for Monte Carlo simulation of antiferromagnetic Ising spin systems on an fcc lattice. The nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor interactions J1 and J2 are included. This technique allows a considerable gain in CPU time and computer memory. As a first application, we have studied samples of 4L3 spins with L up to 48. An unusual behavior of the critical temperature with increasing L is found in the case of nearest-neighbor interaction in zero field. Finite size effects on the locations of tricrical points in the (T,J2/J1) plane are discussed.

  13. Interacting spins in a cavity: Finite-size effects and symmetry-breaking dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, Søren; Mølmer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    , and for small chains, we find significant and nontrivial finite-size effects. Below the first-order phase transition, even quite large spin chains of 30–40 spins give rise to a mean photon number and number fluctuations significantly above the mean-field vacuum result. Near the second-order phase critical point......-transition the random character of the measurement process causes a measurement-induced symmetry breaking in the system. This symmetry breaking occurs on the time scale needed for an observer to gather sufficient information to distinguish between the two possible (mean-field) symmetry-broken states....

  14. Numerical Study of Nonperturbative Corrections to the Chiral Separation Effect in Quenched Finite-Density QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhr, Matthias; Buividovich, P. V.

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate the nonrenormalization of the chiral separation effect (CSE) in quenched finite-density QCD in both confinement and deconfinement phases using a recently developed numerical method which allows us, for the first time, to address the transport properties of exactly chiral, dense lattice fermions. This finding suggests that CSE can be used to fix renormalization constants for axial current density. Explaining the suppression of the CSE which we observe for topologically nontrivial gauge field configurations on small lattices, we also argue that CSE vanishes for self-dual non-Abelian fields inside instanton cores.

  15. Effect of High Pressure and Heat on Bacterial Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Margosch

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though the inactivation of microorganisms by high pressure treatment is a subject of intense investigations, the effect of high pressure on bacterial toxins has not been studied so far. In this study, the influence of combined pressure/temperature treatment (0.1 to 800 MPa and 5 to 121 °C on bacterial enterotoxins was determined. Therefore, heat-stable enterotoxin (STa of cholera toxin (CT from Vibrio cholerae, staphylococcal enterotoxins A-E, haemolysin BL (HBL from Bacillus cereus, and Escherichia coli (STa were subjected to different treatment schemes. Structural alterations were monitored in enzyme immunoassays (EIAs. Cytotoxicity of the pressure treated supernatant of toxigenic B. cereus DSM 4384 was investigated with Vero cells. High pressure of 200 to 800 MPa at 5 °C leads to a slight increase of the reactivity of the STa of E. coli. However, reactivity decreased at 800 MPa and 80 °C to (66±21 % after 30 min and to (44±0.3 % after 128 min. At ambient pressure no decrease in EIA reactivity could be observed after 128 min. Pressurization (0.1 to 800 MPa of heat stable monomeric staphylococcal toxins at 5 and 20 °C showed no effect. A combined heat (80 °C and pressure (0.1 to 800 MPa treatment lead to a decrease in the immuno-reactivity to 20 % of its maximum. For cholera toxin a significant loss in latex agglutination was observable only at 80 °C and 800 MPa for holding times higher than 20 min. Interestingly, the immuno-reactivity of B. cereus HBL toxin increased with the increase of pressure (182 % at 800 MPa, 30 °C, and high pressure showed only minor effects on cytotoxicity to Vero cells. Our results indicate that pressurization can increase inactivation observed by heat treatment, and combined treatments may be effective at lower temperatures and/or shorter incubation time.

  16. Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Engineering Technology; Lipinski, R.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue.

  17. "Deflategate": Time, Temperature, and Moisture Effects on Football Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Jack; Beljak, Lauren; Macatangay, Dahlia-Marie; Helmuth-Malone, Lilly; McWilliams, Catharina; Raptis, Sofia

    2016-09-01

    In a recent paper in TPT, DiLisi and Rarick used the National Football League "Deflategate" controversy to introduce to physics students the physics of a bouncing ball. In this paper, we measure and analyze the environmental effects of time, ambient temperature, and moisture on the internal pressure of an NFL football. We focus on the rate of pressure recovery that occurs when a cold football (either wet or dry) is returned to the warm locker room environment where the pressure was initially measured. Both studies stem from the so-called NFL "Deflategate" controversy in which footballs that initially met a minimum internal pressure requirement were rechecked at halftime of the AFC Championship game, and in some cases were reported to have fallen below the minimum pressure requirement. The question is whether the pressure changes were due to environmental exposure or rather to some air being released from the balls, or both.

  18. Effects of pressure and temperature on gate valve unwedging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damerell, P.S.; Harrison, D.H.; Hayes, P.W.; Simons, J.W.; Walker, T.A.

    1996-12-01

    The stem thrust required to unwedge a gate valve is influenced by the pressure and temperature when the valve is closed and by the changes in these conditions between closure and opening. {open_quotes}Pressure locking{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}thermal binding{close_quotes} refer to situations where pressure and temperature effects cause the unwedging load to be much higher than normal. A model of these phenomena has been developed. Wedging (closure) is modeled as developing an {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes} between the disk and its seat rings in the valve. The effects of pressure and temperature are analyzed to determine the change in this disk-to-seat {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes}. Flexibilities, of the disk, body, stem and yoke strongly influence the unwedging thrust. Calculations and limited comparisons to data have been performed for a range of valve designs and scenarios. Pressure changes can increase the unwedging load when there is either a uniform pressure decrease, or a situation where the bonnet pressure exceeds the pressures in the adjacent piping. Temperature changes can increase the unwedging load when: (1) valve closure at elevated system temperature produces a delayed stem expansion, (2) a temperature increase after closure produces a bonnet pressure increase, or (3) a temperature change after closure produces an increase in the disk-to-seat {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes} or disk-to-seat friction.

  19. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Falgari, P; Signer, A

    2013-01-01

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of $\\Gamma_X/m_X$, with $\\Gamma_X$ and $m_X$ the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the $q \\bar{q}$ partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the na\\" ive counting $\\sim \\Gamma_t/m_t \\sim 1%$. However, they can be si...

  20. QCD effective potential with strong magnetic fields at zero and finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Sho; Arai, Takashi; Hattori, Koichi; Itakura, Kazunori

    2014-09-01

    In this contribution, we will discuss QCD vacuum in strong magnetic fields. As a first step towards understanding the effects of magnetic fields on QCD vacuum properties, we analytically derive the Euler-Heisenberg action for QCD + QED at zero and finite temperatures. From the action, at zero temperature, we found that the chromo-magnetic field prefers to be parallel to the external magnetic field, and thus the QCD vacuum with strong magnetic fields is spatially anisotropic. This result is consistent with recent lattice data. Furthermore, the chromo-magnetic condensate increases with an increasing magnetic field, which supports the ``gluonic magnetic catalysis'' as observed in current lattice data. Next, we will discuss the effective potential with strong magnetic fields at finite temperatures. In particular, we focus on the influence of the magnetic field on the center symmetry in QCD. The pure Yang-Mills theory has the center symmetry (being spontaneously broken at high temperature), but dynamical quarks explicitly break it. We will show how the magnetic fields affect the explicit symmetry breaking, by using the effective potential for the Polyakov loop. We will also discuss the confinement-deconfinement phase transition in strong magnetic fields in terms of nonperturbative approaches such as functional renormalization group.

  1. Kinetic-Scale Magnetic Turbulence and Finite Larmor Radius Effects at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Khazanov, G. V.; Donovan, E. F.; Boardsen, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2011-01-01

    We use a nonstationary generalization of the higher-order structure function technique to investigate statistical properties of the magnetic field fluctuations recorded by MESSENGER spacecraft during its first flyby (01/14/2008) through the near-Mercury space environment, with the emphasis on key boundary regions participating in the solar wind - magnetosphere interaction. Our analysis shows, for the first time, that kinetic-scale fluctuations play a significant role in the Mercury's magnetosphere up to the largest resolvable timescale (approx.20 s) imposed by the signal nonstationariry, suggesting that turbulence at this plane I is largely controlled by finite Larmor radius effects. In particular, we report the presence of a highly turbulent and extended foreshock system filled with packets of ULF oscillations, broad-band intermittent fluctuations in the magnetosheath, ion-kinetic turbulence in the central plasma sheet of Mercury's magnetotail, and kinetic-scale fluctuations in the inner current sheet encountered at the outbound (dawn-side) magnetopause. Overall, our measurements indicate that the Hermean magnetosphere, as well as the surrounding region, are strongly affected by non-MHD effects introduced by finite sizes of cyclotron orbits of the constituting ion species. Physical mechanisms of these effects and their potentially critical impact on the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetic field remain to be understood.

  2. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falgari, P. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Spinoza Inst.; Papanastasiou, A.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Signer, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2013-03-15

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of {Gamma}{sub X}/m{sub X}, with {Gamma}{sub X} and m{sub X} the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the q anti q partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the naive counting {proportional_to}{Gamma}{sub t}/m{sub t}{proportional_to}1%. However, they can be sizeable, in excess of 10%, close to edges of certain kinematical distributions. The dependence of the results on the mass renormalization scheme, and its implication for a precise extraction of the top-quark mass, is also discussed.

  3. Transducer finite aperture effects in sound transmission near leaky Lamb modes in elastic plates at normal incidence

    CERN Document Server

    Aanes, Magne; Lunde, Per; Vestrheim, Magne

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of ultrasonic waves with fluid-embedded viscoelastic plates, pipes, and shells, have been subject to extensive theoretical and experimental studies over several decades. In normal-incidence through-transmission measurements of a water-embedded solid plate using ultrasonic piezoelectric transducer sound fields, significant deviations from plane wave theory have recently been observed. To quantitatively describe such measured phenomena, finite element modeling (FEM), also combined with an angular spectrum method (ASM), have been used for three-dimensional (3D) simulation of the voltage-to-sound-pressure signal propagation through the electro-acoustic measurement system consisting of the piezoelectric transducer, the water-embedded steel plate, and the fluid regions at both sides of the plate. The observed phenomena of frequency downshift of the plate resonance, increased sound pressure level through the plate, and beam narrowing / widening, are ascribed to the finite angular spectrum of the beam...

  4. An asperity-deformation model for effective pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangi, Anthony F.; Carlson, Richard L.

    1996-05-01

    Variations of the mechanical and transport properties of cracked and/or porous rocks under isotropic stress depend on both the confining pressure ( Pc) and the pore-fluid pressure ( Pp). To a first approximation, these rock properties are functions of the differential pressure, Pd = Pc - Pp; at least for low differential pressures. However, at higher differential pressures, the properties depend in a more complicated way upon the two pressures. The concept of effective pressure, Pe, is used to denote this variation and it is defined as Pe( Pc, Pp) = Pc - n( Pc, Pp) Pp. If n = 1 (and therefore, is independent of Pc and Pp), the effective pressure is just the differential pressure. We have used an asperity-deformation model and a force-balance equation to derive expressions for the effective pressure. We equate the total external force (in one direction), Fc, to the total force on the asperities, Fa, and the force of the fluid, Fp, acting in that same direction. The fluid force, Fp, acts only on the parts of the crack (or pore-volume) faces which are not in contact. Then, the asperity pressure, Pa, is the average force per unit area acting on the crack (or grain) contacts P a = {F a}/{A} = {F c}/{A} - {F p}/{A} = P c - (1 - {A c}/{A})P p, where A is the total area over which Fc acts and Ac is the area of contact of the crack asperities or the grains. Thus, the asperity pressure, Pa, is greater than the differential pressure, Pd, because Pp acts on a smaller area, A- Ac, than the total area, A. For elastic asperities, the area of contact Ac and the strain (e.g., crack and pore openings) remain the same, to a high degree of approximation, at constant asperity pressure. Therefore, transport properties such as permeability, resistivity, thermal conductivity, etc. are constant, to the same degree of approximation, at constant asperity pressure. For these properties, the asperity pressure is, very accurately, the effective pressure, Pc. Using this model, we find that the

  5. Effect of blank holder pressure on viscous pressure forming aluminum alloy ladder parts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王忠金; 王新云; 王仲仁

    2002-01-01

    Viscous pressure forming (VPF), is suitable for forming difficult-to-form sheet metal parts. An investigation in the effect of blank holder pressure (BHP) on VPF aluminum alloy ladder parts was conducted. Based on experimental and numerical simulation results of the effect of BHP on dimensional accuracy, wall-thickness reduction, forming pressure, material flow and defects (such as wrinkling and fracture) of specimens, the effect patterns of BHP load path on VPF ladder parts were explained. The limits of BHP corresponding to specimens with no defect and with wrinkling or fracture defect were determined. In the limits of formable BHP, the variable load path of BHP was beneficial to drawing blank into the die and decreasing wall-thickness reduction of specimens. The experimental results show that the ladder parts of good surface fineness and high dimensional accuracy can be obtained by variable load paths of BHP.

  6. Effect of pressure on combustion of char in fluidised beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbull, E.; Blackshaw, H.W.; Davidson, J.F.; Goodyer, P.T.Y.; Hopes, R.B.; Kossakowski, E.R.

    1984-07-01

    Measurements of burn-out time are reported, for 0.25-1.7 mm carbon particles in an air-fluidised 100 mm dia bed of sand at pressures up to 17 bar absolute and bed temperatures of 1023-1173 K. A variety of carbons was used including (i) coke (ii) chars formed from coals of different ranks: thus the carbons had various porosities and surface areas. The effect of increased pressure is to increase the combustion rate, because of the higher oxygen concentration which accelerates the chemical reactions of combustion. On the other hand, pressure has virtually no influence on diffusion of oxygen towards a burning particle, because the higher oxygen concentration is offset by a proportionately lower diffusion coefficient. The overall effect is that as pressure increases, the chemical rate controlling steps become less important, so at very high pressure, combustion is diffusion controlled.

  7. Pipeline's natural frequency response due to internal pressure effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massa, Andre L.L.; Guevara Junior, Nestor O. [Suporte - Consultoria e Projetos Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Galgoul, Nelson S. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Fernandes, Antonio C.; Coelho, Fabio M. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia

    2009-12-19

    A few years ago, a discussion about how internal pressure is treated in submarine pipelines has taken place. Galgoul et al (2004) have pointed out the conservatism of the latest recommendations for pipeline free-span evaluations associated to the way the axial force is considered in the determination of the pipeline natural frequency. Fyrileiv and Collberg (2005) have also discussed this point in defense of the effective axial force concept and its use in the natural frequency determination. In order to contribute to this aspect, an experimental test has been performed with a fully embedded pipeline which was pressurized. The main object consists in showing that the pipe is under tension (and not under compression) and, as a consequence, it is the authors' intention to prove that the natural frequency increases instead of reducing when the internal pressure is incremented. In addition to the test, a finite element model has been presented where this internal pressure effect is taken into account as it actually is (and not as an axial force) in order to show the real behavior of the wall stresses. Static analyses, as well as modal and transient analysis have been performed in order to compare theoretical results with the experimental test conducted. (author)

  8. Effect of the hydrostatic pressure on the electron mobility in delta-doped systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oubram, O; Mora-Ramos, M E; Gaggero-Sager, L M, E-mail: 1gaggero@uaem.m [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, CP 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure on the electron states and low-temperature mobility in n-type GaAs delta-doped single quantum wells is studied. Values of hydrostatic pressure consider are below the so-called GAMMA-X crossover, keeping all attention in the electronic properties at the Brillouin zone center. The effect of the pressure on the electron mobility is described via a relative quantity that is proportional to the ratio between P not = 0 and zero pressure results. Calculation is performed using an analytical description of the potential energy function profile, based on the Thomas-Fermi approach, taking explicitly into account the dependence upon P of the main input parameters: effective masses and dielectric constant. The relative mobility increases for higher values of P. The cases of zero and finite -although small- temperature are studied, showing that the influence of T is mainly to lower the values of the relative mobility in the entire range of P considered. Numerical results are reported for a two-dimensional density of ionized impurities equals to 7.5 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}.

  9. Thermal Effects on Vibration and Control of Piezocomposite Kirchhoff Plate Modeled by Finite Elements Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sanbi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and numerical results of the modeling of a smart plate are presented for optimal active vibration control. The smart plate consists of a rectangular aluminum piezocomposite plate modeled in cantilever configuration with surface bonded thermopiezoelectric patches. The patches are symmetrically bonded on top and bottom surfaces. A generic thermopiezoelastic theory for piezocomposite plate is derived, using linear thermopiezoelastic theory and Kirchhoff assumptions. Finite element equations for the thermopiezoelastic medium are obtained by using the linear constitutive equations in Hamilton’s principle together with the finite element approximations. The structure is modelled analytically and then numerically and the results of simulations are presented in order to visualize the states of their dynamics and the state of control. The optimal control LQG-Kalman filter is applied. By using this model, the study first gives the influences of the actuator/sensor pair placement and size on the response of the smart plate. Second, the effects of thermoelastic and pyroelectric couplings on the dynamics of the structure and on the control procedure are studied and discussed. It is shown that the effectiveness of the control is not affected by the applied thermal gradient and can be applied with or without this gradient at any time of plate vibrations.

  10. Capacity Scaling of Wireless Ad Hoc Networks: Effect of Finite Wavelength

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Si-Hyeon

    2010-01-01

    We study the capacity scaling of wireless ad hoc networks considering the effect of finite wavelength. $n$ source--destination pairs are assumed to be randomly placed in areas of 1 (dense network) and $n$ (extended network). \\"{O}zg\\"{u}r \\emph{et al.} showed that the linear capacity scaling is possible for the dense network and the extended network with path-loss exponent equal to 2, which is achieved by hierarchical cooperation (HC). However, such a linear capacity scaling was shown to violate the physical limit on degrees of freedom by Franceschetti \\emph{et al}. The cause of the contradiction is the idealized channel model used in the analysis of the HC, in which the channel correlation due to the finite wavelength is ignored. In this paper, we use a channel model that captures the channel correlation correctly, modify the HC accordingly, and analyze its throughput scaling in terms of both $n$ and the wavelength. Our result shows exactly how the throughput scaling of HC is degraded due to the effect of fi...

  11. Effective spectral density functions from finite cut-off frequencies of baths

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Xian-Ting

    2009-01-01

    Firstly, we obtain the effective spectral density functions of baths for two basic open quantum systems by setting cut-off frequencies of the baths finite. By using the spectral density functions and the conventional ones from infinite cut-off frequency of the baths we investigate the dynamics of open qubits. When the cut-off frequencies of the baths are smaller than about 5 times of the Rabi frequency of the qubits, the two kinds of spectral density functions result in different qubits' dynamics. Secondly, we obtain the effective spectral density functions of the baths for another two complex models from finite cut-off frequencies of the baths and through which we investigate the dynamics of open qubits in these models. One of these models is a quantum system couple to an intermediate harmonic oscillator and both of them couple to their independent baths respectively, and the other is both of them couple to a common bath. The qubit in the later model has longer decoherence and relaxation times. In the invest...

  12. Finite volume effects in pion-kaon scattering and reconstruction of the kappa(800) resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Döring, M

    2011-01-01

    Simulating the kappa(800) on the lattice is a challenging task that starts to become feasible due to the rapid progress in recent-years lattice QCD calculations. As the resonance is broad, special attention to finite-volume effects has to be paid, because no sharp resonance signal as from avoided level crossing can be expected. In the present article, we investigate the finite volume effects in the framework of unitarized chiral perturbation theory using next-to-leading order terms. After a fit to meson-meson partial wave data, lattice levels for piK scattering are predicted. In addition, levels are shown for the quantum numbers in which the sigma(600), f_0(980), a_0(980), phi(1020), K*(892), and rho(770) appear, as well as the repulsive channels. Methods to extract the kappa(800) signal from the lattice spectrum are presented. Using pseudo-data, we estimate the precision that lattice data should have to allow for a clear-cut extraction of this resonance. To put the results into context, in particular the req...

  13. Effects of Bone Young’s Modulus on Finite Element Analysis in the Lateral Ankle Biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. X. Niu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element analysis (FEA is a powerful tool in biomechanics. The mechanical properties of biological tissue used in FEA modeling are mainly from experimental data, which vary greatly and are sometimes uncertain. The purpose of this study was to research how Young’s modulus affects the computations of a foot-ankle FEA model. A computer simulation and an in-vitro experiment were carried out to investigate the effects of incremental Young’s modulus of bone on the stress and strain outcomes in the computational simulation. A precise 3-dimensional finite element model was constructed based on an in-vitro specimen of human foot and ankle. Young’s moduli were assigned as four levels of 7.3, 14.6, 21.9 and 29.2 GPa respectively. The proximal tibia and fibula were completely limited to six degrees of freedom, and the ankle was loaded to inversion 10° and 20° through the calcaneus. Six cadaveric foot-ankle specimens were loaded as same as the finite element model, and strain was measured at two positions of the distal fibula. The bone stress was less affected by assignment of Young’s modulus. With increasing of Young’s modulus, the bone strain decreased linearly. Young’s modulus of 29.2 GPa was advisable to get the satisfactory surface strain results. In the future study, more ideal model should be constructed to represent the nonlinearity, anisotropy and inhomogeneity, as the same time to provide reasonable outputs of the interested parameters.

  14. Loss of acoustic black hole effect in a structure of finite size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liling; Cheng, Li

    2016-07-01

    The Acoustic Black Hole (ABH) effect takes place in thin-walled structures with diminishing thickness as a result of the reduction in the bending wave speed. It was shown to exist as a broadband phenomenon, based on wave propagation theory in structures of semi-infinite size. The ABH effect exhibits appealing features for various applications, such as passive vibration control, energy harvesting, and sound radiation control. In this paper, we demonstrate the disappearance of the ABH effect in a finite beam at specific frequency ranges above the cut-on frequency, both experimentally and theoretically. Analyses show that the phenomenon takes place at frequencies which are close to the low order local resonant frequencies of the portion of the beam demarcated by the position of the excitation force. These frequencies can be predicted so that the phenomenon can be avoided for the targeted frequency ranges in ABH applications.

  15. QCD Dirac Spectrum at Finite Chemical Potential: Anomalous Effective Action, Berry Phase and Composite Fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yizhuang

    2015-01-01

    We show that the QCD Dirac spectrum at finite chemical potential using a 2-matrix model in the spontaneously broken phase, is amenable to a generic 2-dimensional effective action on a curved eigenvalue manifold. The eigenvalues form a droplet with strong screening and non-linear plasmons. The droplet is threaded by a magnetic vortex which is at the origin of a Berry phase. The adiabatic transport in the droplet maps onto the one in the fractional quantum Hall effect, suggesting that composite fermions at half filling are Dirac particles. We use this observation to argue for two novel anomalous effects in the edge transport of composite fermions, and conversely on a novel contribution to the QCD quark condensate in a rotating frame.

  16. Continuum and Symmetry-Conserving Effects in Drip-line Nuclei Using Finite-range Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Schunck, N

    2007-01-01

    We report the first calculations of nuclear properties near the drip-lines using the spherical Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mean-field theory with a finite-range force supplemented by continuum and particle number projection effects. Calculations were carried out in a basis made of the eigenstates of a Woods-Saxon potential computed in a box, thereby garanteeing that continuum effects were properly taken into account. Projection of the self-consistent solutions on good particle number was carried out after variation, and an approximation of the variation after projection result was used. We give the position of the drip-lines and examine neutron densities in neutron-rich nuclei. We discuss the sensitivity of nuclear observables upon continuum and particle-number restoration effects.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of Intensive Blood Pressure Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richman, Ilana B; Fairley, Michael; Jørgensen, Mads Emil

    2016-01-01

    . Objective: To evaluate the incremental cost-effectiveness of intensive blood pressure management compared with standard management. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cost-effectiveness analysis conducted from September 2015 to August 2016 used a Markov cohort model to estimate cost-effectiveness...... of intensive blood pressure management among 68-year-old high-risk adults with hypertension but not diabetes. We used the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) to estimate treatment effects and adverse event rates. We used Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Life Tables to project age....... Interventions: Treatment of hypertension to a systolic blood pressure goal of 120 mm Hg (intensive management) or 140 mm Hg (standard management). Main Outcomes and Measures: Lifetime costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), discounted at 3% annually. Results: Standard management yielded 9.6 QALYs...

  18. Morphine in ventilated neonates: Its effects on arterial blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.H. Simons (Sinno); D.W.E. Roofthooft (Daniella); M. van Dijk (Monique); R.A. Lingen (Richard); H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); J.N. van den Anker (John); D. Tibboel (Dick)

    2006-01-01

    markdownabstractObjective: To study the effects of continuous morphine infusion on arterial blood pressure in ventilatedneonates. Design: Blinded randomised placebo controlled trial. Setting: Level III neonatal intensive care unit in two centres. Patients: A total of 144 ventilated

  19. SCALE EFFECT OF IMPINGING PRESSURE CAUSED BY SUBMERGED JET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Zhong; XU Wei-lin; WANG Wei; LIU Shan-jun; DONG Jian-wei

    2005-01-01

    The characteristics of the impinging pressure at the jet equipment where the maximum jet velocity can reach 50m/s were studied. By comparing the impinging pressure with the one measured at the low velocity conditions, two conclusions of the scale effect are drawn: firstly, the velocity attenuation degree is smaller than that of low-velocity jet, and secondly, the relative impinging width is narrower than that of low-velocity jet. The reasons of the scale effect of the impinging pressure were elucidated through numerical simulation.

  20. Normalization effect of sports training on blood pressure in hypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Liang; Liu, Yuh-Feng; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Shin-Da; Chan, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Chiu-Chou; Harris, Brennan; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2010-02-01

    Exercise is recommended as a lifestyle intervention in preventing hypertension based on epidemiological findings. However, previous intervention studies have presented mixed results. This discrepancy could be associated with shortcomings related to sample sizes or the inclusion of normotensive participants. The aim of this prospective cohort study (N = 463) was to compare the chronic effect of increasing sports training time on resting blood pressure for normotensives and hypertensives. We assessed systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) for 69 untreated hypertensive patients (age 20.6 +/- 0.1 years, systolic blood pressure >140 mmHg) and 394 normotensive controls (age 20.6 +/- 0.1 years) before training and at follow-up visits at 12 months. All participants enrolled in various sports training lessons for 8 hours a week. The baseline BMI and HOMA-IR in the hypertensive group were significantly higher than those in the control group. For the normotensive control group, no significant changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure were observed after training. However, for the hypertensives, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly reduced after training by approximately 15 mmHg and approximately 4 mmHg, respectively, and HOMA-IR was reduced by approximately 25%. In conclusion, the effect of sports training to lower blood pressure was confined to the group of hypertensives, which may account for the overall minimal reduction in blood pressure observed in previous intervention studies.

  1. Effects of finite-{beta} and radial electric fields on neoclassical transport in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, R.; Nakajima, N.; Sugama, H.; Okamoto, M.; Ogawa, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Effects of finite-{beta} and radial electric fields on the neoclassical transport in the Large Helical Device are investigated with the DKES (Drift Kinetic Equation Solver) code. In the finite-{beta} configuration, even orbits of deeply trapped particles deviate significantly from magnetic flux surfaces. Thus, neoclassical ripple transport coefficients in the finite-{beta} configuration are several times larger than those in the vacuum configuration under the same condition of temperatures and radial electric fields. When the plasma temperature is several keV, a bifurcation of the electric fields appears under the ambipolarity condition, and sufficient large radial electric fields can be generated. As a result, the ExB drift rectifies orbits of particles and improves significantly the transport coefficients in the finite-{beta} configuration. (author)

  2. The effect of geometry and abduction angle on the stresses in cemented UHMWPE acetabular cups – finite element simulations and experimental tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santavirta Seppo S

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contact pressure of UHMWPE acetabular cup has been shown to correlate with wear in total hip replacement (THR. The aim of the present study was to test the hypotheses that the cup geometry, abduction angle, thickness and clearance can modify the stresses in cemented polyethylene cups. Methods Acetabular cups with different geometries (Link®: IP and Lubinus eccentric were tested cyclically in a simulator at 45° and 60° abduction angles. Finite element (FE meshes were generated and two additional designs were reconstructed to test the effects of the cup clearance and thickness. Contact pressures at cup-head and cup-cement interfaces were calculated as a function of loading force at 45°, 60° and 80° abduction angles. Results At the cup-head interface, IP experienced lower contact pressures than the Lubinus eccentric at low loading forces. However, at higher loading forces, much higher contact pressures were produced on the surface of IP cup. An increase in the abduction angle increased contact pressure in the IP model, but this did not occur to any major extent with the Lubinus eccentric model. At the cup-cement interface, IP experienced lower contact pressures. Increased clearance between cup and head increased contact pressure both at cup-head and cup-cement interfaces, whereas a decreased thickness of polyethylene layer increased contact pressure only at the cup-cement interface. FE results were consistent with experimental tests and acetabular cup deformations. Conclusion FE analyses showed that geometrical design, thickness and abduction angle of the acetabular cup, as well as the clearance between the cup and head do change significantly the mechanical stresses experienced by a cemented UHMWPE acetabular cup. These factors should be taken into account in future development of THR prostheses. FE technique is a useful tool with which to address these issues.

  3. Finite source effects in microlensing: A precise, easy to implement, fast and numerical stable formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, C -H; Seitz, S; Bender, R

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide a numerically fast and stable description for the microlensing magnification of an extended source (either uniform or limb darkened) that holds in any magnification regime. We show that our method of evaluating the magnification can be implemented into a light curve fitting routine using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. We compare the accuracy and computation times to previous methods that either work in the high magnification regime only, or have a numerical instability problem due to the evaluation of an elliptic integral. In addition we also provide the equations including finite lens effects in microlensing light curves. We apply our methods to the MACHO-1995-BLG-30 and the OGLE-2003-BLG-262 events and obtain results consistent to former studies. We derive an upper limit for the OGLE-2003-BLG-262 event lens size. We conclude that our method allows to simultaneously search for point-source and finite source microlensing events in future large area microlensing surveys...

  4. Mesh locking effects in the finite volume solution of 2-D anisotropic diffusion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzini, Gianmarco; Putti, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Strongly anisotropic diffusion equations require special techniques to overcome or reduce the mesh locking phenomenon. We present a finite volume scheme that tries to approximate with the best possible accuracy the quantities that are of importance in discretizing anisotropic fluxes. In particular, we discuss the crucial role of accurate evaluations of the tangential components of the gradient acting tangentially to the control volume boundaries, that are called into play by anisotropic diffusion tensors. To obtain the sought characteristics from the proposed finite volume method, we employ a second-order accurate reconstruction scheme which is used to evaluate both normal and tangential cell-interface gradients. The experimental results on a number of different meshes show that the scheme maintains optimal convergence rates in both L2 and H1 norms except for the benchmark test considering full Neumann boundary conditions on non-uniform grids. In such a case, a severe locking effect is experienced and documented. However, within the range of practical values of the anisotropy ratio, the scheme is robust and efficient. We postulate and verify experimentally the existence of a quadratic relationship between the anisotropy ratio and the mesh size parameter that guarantees optimal and sub-optimal convergence rates.

  5. Investigation of finite-size effects in chemical bonding of AuPd nanoalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Beien [Division of Interfacial Water and Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Oğuz, Ismail Can; Guesmi, Hazar, E-mail: hazar.guesmi@enscm.fr [CNRS-ICG UMR 5253, équipe MACS, 8 rue de l’Ecole Normale, 34296 Montpellier (France)

    2015-10-14

    In this paper, the size-dependent changes in energetic, vibrational, and electronic properties of C–O gas molecule interacting with surface Pd atom of a variety of AuPd nanoalloy structures are investigated by means of first principles calculations. The variation in C–O adsorption energies, C–O vibration frequencies (ν{sub C−O}), and Pd d-bond centers (ε{sub d}) on a series of non-supported Au{sub n−1}–Pd{sub 1} nanoparticles (with n varying from 13 to 147) and on two semi-finite surfaces are inspected with cluster size. We demonstrate for the first time that, with small AuPd bimetallic three-dimensional clusters as TOh{sub 38}, one can reach cluster size convergence even for such a sensitive observable as the adsorption energy on a metal surface. Indeed, the results show that the adsorbate-induced perturbation is extremely local and it only concerns the isolated Pd interacting with the reactive gas molecule. Except for 13 atom clusters, in which molecular behaviour is predominant, no finite-size effects are observed for surface Pd atom substituted in AuPd free nanoclusters above 38 atoms.

  6. Effect of intrusive and retraction forces in labial and lingual orthodontics: A finite element study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Mascarenhas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Lingual orthodontics differs in biomechanics as compared to labial system and has biomechanical advantages. Although theoretical approaches have explained the differences between labial and lingual orthodontics, the finite element method (FEM may be better suited to analyze these differences. This study analyzes the effect of vertical and horizontal forces together on the tooth using FEM. Materials and Methods: An extracted right maxillary central incisor was radiographed and was used to create a solid model using ANSYS. The geometric model was converted into a finite element model with the help of ANSYS software. The model consists of 27,000 elements and 30,000 nodes. Two force vectors (vertical and horizontal were applied labially and lingually at 3 different heights- 4 mm, 5 mm and 6 mm from the incisal edge. Results: In the labial system, the net force vector passes through the center of resistance (CR and brings about intrusion. The net force vector in lingual orthodontics does not pass through the center of resistance and produces lingual tipping of the incisors. Conclusion: Intrusion and retraction forces bring about tipping of incisors in lingual orthodontics. The same amount of intrusion and retraction forces brings about intrusion of incisors in labial orthodontics. Therefore, direction and amount of forces should be carefully and judiciously applied after taking into consideration the resultant biomechanical differences.

  7. The effects of sinusoidal initial conditions on finite-thickness, HED shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Stefano, Carlos; Merritt, Elizabeth; Doss, Forrest; Desjardins, Tiffany; Flippo, Kirk; Kline, John; Loomis, Eric; Rasmus, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Hydrodynamic shear instability plays a role in any system in which shear flow across materials can be found, including in high-energy-density examples such as fusion plasmas and many astrophysical systems. In this work we describe experiments, performed on the OMEGA laser, exploring shear instability through the use of carefully-controlled, single-mode initial conditions. A novel aspect of these experiments is that they employ counter-propagating shocks separated by a collimating layer. This produces a region of shear flow in which the pressure is balanced across flow, simplifying theoretical analysis and modeling. We discuss two interesting behaviors seen in these experiments. First, at early times, radiographs show the expansion of the collimator and the spectral evolution of the initial perturbation features from laser-drive heating of the material. The evolved features then couple to the primary shear instability we seek to probe. Second, at late times, we observe the persistence of a coherent long-wavelength mode in the mixing layer, driven by the imposed surface perturbation, which resonates with and the length scale introduced by the finite thickness of the collimator.

  8. Pressures and Energies in Magnetized Vacuum and in Casimir effect

    CERN Document Server

    Rojas, H P

    2004-01-01

    We study vacuum pressures and energies for electron-positron vacuum zero point energy in a strong magnetic field $B$ and for photon vacuum in Casimir effect, by a common method. Vacuum becomes magnetized, and due to it, the pressure transversal to $B$ is negative, whereas along $B$ an usual positive pressure arises. Similarly, in addition to the usual negative Casimir pressure perpendicular to the plates, the existence of a positive pressure along the plates is predicted. Both vacua bear the property of leading to a negative energy-momentum tensor trace ${\\cal T}_{\\mu}^{\\mu}<0$, which may lead to a repulsive gravity typical of dark energy. By assuming a space distribution of magnetic and/or Casimir domains, cosmological implications are also discussed.

  9. Effect of ambient-pressure reduction on multibubble sonochemiluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuziuti, Toru; Hatanaka, Shin-ichi; Yasui, Kyuichi; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Mitome, Hideto

    2002-04-01

    The effect of ambient-pressure reduction on multibubble sonochemiluminescence (MBSCL) is studied experimentally with a luminol solution through measurements of MBSCL intensity as a function of ultrasound irradiation time, applied voltage to a transducer and ultrasonic frequencies to accomplish high efficiency in chemical reactions. From the measurement of ambient-pressure dependence, it is shown that there is an ambient pressure that produces the maximum intensity of the MBSCL and the maximum intensity appears at higher ambient pressure as the applied voltage to the transducer increases. The highest intensity of MBSCL is obtained by appropriate reduction of ambient pressure both for various applied voltages and frequencies. This is caused by both the number of bubbles induced with supersaturation of the gas in a luminol solution and the variation in bubble dynamics.

  10. Breakup and finite-range effects on the 8B(d,n)9C reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fukui, Tokuro; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    The astrophysical factor of 8B(p,{\\gamma})9C at zero energy, S18(0), is determined by a three-body coupled-channels analysis of the transfer reaction 8B(d,n)9C at 14.4 MeV/nucleon. Effects of the breakup channels of deuteron are investigated with the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC). It is found that the transfer process through the deuteron breakup states, its interference with that through the deuteron ground state in particular, gives a large increase in the transfer cross section. The finite-range effects with respect to the proton- neutron relative coordinate are found to be less than 5%. As a result of the present analysis, S18(0) = 33 +/- 10 eVb is obtained that is smaller than the result of the previous DWBA analysis by about 26%.

  11. Extramuscular myofascial force transmission alters substantially the acute effects of surgical aponeurotomy: assessment by finite element modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yucesoy, Can; Koopman, Bart; Grootenboer, Henk; Huijing, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Effects of extramuscular myofascial force transmission on the acute effects of aponeurotomy were studied using finite element modeling and implications of such effects on surgery were discussed. Aponeurotomized EDL muscle of the rat was modeled in two conditions: (1) fully isolated (2) with intact

  12. Evaluation of intraperitoneal pressure and the effect of different osmotic agents on intraperitoneal pressure in children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusthoven, E.; Vlugt, M.E. van der; Lingen-van Bueren, L.J. van; Schaijk, T.C. van; Willems, H.L.; Monnens, L.A.H.; Schroder, C.H.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish intraperitoneal pressure (IPP) in a relatively large pediatric study group and to study the effects of a 3.86% glucose solution and a 7.5% icodextrin solution on IPP during a 4-hour dwell. DESIGN: IPP was measured with the patient in a supine position. The intraperitoneal vo

  13. Finite-element method for calculation of the effective permittivity of random inhomogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myroshnychenko, Viktor; Brosseau, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The challenge of designing new solid-state materials from calculations performed with the help of computers applied to models of spatial randomness has attracted an increasing amount of interest in recent years. In particular, dispersions of particles in a host matrix are scientifically and technologically important for a variety of reasons. Herein, we report our development of an efficient computer code to calculate the effective (bulk) permittivity of two-phase disordered composite media consisting of hard circular disks made of a lossless dielectric (permittivity ɛ2 ) randomly placed in a plane made of a lossless homogeneous dielectric (permittivity ɛ1 ) at different surface fractions. Specifically, the method is based on (i) a finite-element description of composites in which both the host and the randomly distributed inclusions are isotropic phases, and (ii) an ordinary Monte Carlo sampling. Periodic boundary conditions are employed throughout the simulation and various numbers of disks have been considered in the calculations. From this systematic study, we show how the number of Monte Carlo steps needed to achieve equilibrated distributions of disks increases monotonically with the surface fraction. Furthermore, a detailed study is made of the dependence of the results on a minimum separation distance between disks. Numerical examples are presented to connect the macroscopic property such as the effective permittivity to microstructural characteristics such as the mean coordination number and radial distribution function. In addition, several approximate effective medium theories, exact bounds, exact results for two-dimensional regular arrays, and the exact dilute limit are used to test and validate the finite-element algorithm. Numerical results indicate that the fourth-order bounds provide an excellent estimate of the effective permittivity for a wide range of surface fractions, in accordance with the fact that the bounds become progressively narrower as

  14. A study of finite volume effect on the multiple-frequencies coherence of VHF radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsai-Yuan; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    1993-08-01

    In the past few years, the technique of frequency domain interferometry (FDI) has been developed on VHF radar. By using this technique, the characteristics of a very thin atmospheric lay structure, which is embedded in the radar volume and cannot be solved by conventional VHF radar with only one operational frequency, can be determined through the calculation of the coherence and the phase from the two echo signals with different operational frequencies. According to FDI theory, assuming that the range and antenna beam weighting effect can be ignored, the coherence will approach zero if the layer thickness is fairly greater than the radar volume. However, in this study, it will be shown that if a rectangular pulse is transmitted and the atmospheric refractivity irregularities are distributed uniformly in the radar volume, that is, there is no narrow layer structure existing in the scattering volume, the coherence of two signals with different operational frequencies is still high and its behavior can be described by the equation C is approximately equal to Sinc((Delta)k L)/(l + N/S), where C is the coherence, Delta K is the wavenumber difference between two carrier frequencies, L is the effective scale of scattering volume, and N/S is the noise-to-signal power ratio. This feature can be interpreted physically by the finite volume filtering effect on the turbulent wavenumber spectrum. This theoretical prediction has been compared with the FDI experiments carried out by the Chung-Li VHF radar, and the results are quite reasonable. Thus, it is suggested that when the FDI technique is applied to estimate the thickness and the position of a thin layer, the finite volume filtering effect should be taken into account.

  15. Effects of shifting time on pressure impact in hydraulic systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhen-cai; CHEN Guo-an

    2005-01-01

    The limitations in existing measures for absorbing pressure impact in hydraulic systems were summarized in this paper. Based on the forming principle of the oil in a hydrostatic closed pressure chamber, the underlying reasons of the pressure impact were analyzed theoretically, the intrinsic laws that the extent of the pressure impact in hydraulic oil lines are affected by some factors, such as oil elastic modulus, oil line's geometrical volume, and changing rate of oil volume versus time etc, were discussed. Experimental investigations into pressure impact in all pressure chambers because of shifting were conducted under different working conditions by employing a special experimental system. The effects of shifting time on pressure impact were studied. A new concept with universal meaning, i.e. optimal shifting time, and its characterizing parameter and the methods of shifting at optimal shifting time were also proposed. The results show that shifting time lag △t is of rationality and maneuverablility. The higher the working pressure, the shorter the shifting time.

  16. Effect of citicoline on blood pressure variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Ostroumova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors give the results of their investigation dealing with citicoline therapy in patients with hypertension and cognitive impairments.Objective: to determine the efficiency of citicoline therapy on the level and variability of both systolic and diastolic blood pressures (BP (SBP and DBP.Patients and methods. The investigation covered 60 patients with Stage II hypertension and a goal BP of < 140/90 mm Hg within ≥3 months before their inclusion. The patients were randomized into 2 groups: 30 patients in the study group were assigned to receive a cycle of 10 injections of citicoline in a daily dose of 1000 mg dropwise intravenously, then 1000 mg/day orally for as long as 3 months. 30 patients comprised the control group.Results and discussion. 24-hour BP monitoring indicated that during 4-week citicoline therapy there were significant (p<0.05 reductions in average nocturnal SBP (by 4.1±2.24 mm Hg, average daytime (-1.5±0.39 mm Hg and average nighttime (-1.5±0.37 mm Hg BP variabilities; such changes were not found in the control group. In the study group, normal daytime SBP variability at baseline (≤15 mm Hg was seen in 15 (50% patients; that after citicoline treatment was in 21 (70%; in the control group, this was in 15 (50% and 14 (46.7% patients before and after 4-week therapy, respectively. In the study group, normal nocturnal SBP variability at baseline (≤ 15 mm Hg was seen in 15 (50% patients; that after citicoline treatment was in 23 (76.7%; in the control group, this was in 15 (50% and 16 (53.3% patients, respectively.Twenty-one (70% patients in each group had baseline normal daytime DBP variability (<14 mm Hg; following 4 weeks of treatment, the number of patients with normal daytime DBP variability remained unchanged in the control group and that increased by one patient (n = 22 (73.3% in the citicoline group. Normal nocturnal DBP variability at baseline (<12 mm Hg was observed in 19 (63.3% patients in each group

  17. Finite Automation

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This self-paced narrated tutorial covers the following about Finite Automata: Uses, Examples, Alphabet, strings, concatenation, powers of an alphabet, Languages (automata and formal languages), Deterministic finite automata (DFA) SW4600 Automata, Formal Specification and Run-time Verification

  18. Effect of humidity on the filter pressure drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendel, J.; Letourneau, P. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1995-02-01

    The effects of humidity on the filter pressure drop have been reported in some previous studies in which it is difficult to draw definite conclusions. These studies show contradictory effects of humidity on the pressure drop probably due to differences in the hygroscopicity of the test aerosols. The objective of this paper is to present experimental results on the evolution of the filter pressure drop versus mass loading, for different test aerosols and relative humidities. Present results are compared to those found in various publication. An experimental device has been designed to measure filter pressure drop as the function of the areal density for relative humidity varying in the range of 9 % to 85 %. Experiments have been conducted with hygroscopic: (CsOH) and nonhygroscopic aerosols (TiO{sub 2}). Cesium hydroxyde (CsOH) of size of 2 {mu} M AMMD has been generated by an ultrasonic generator and the 0.7 {mu}m AMMD titanium oxyde has been dispersed by a {open_quotes}turn-table{close_quotes} generator. As it is noted in the BISWAS`publication [3], present results show, in the case of nonhygroscopic aerosols, a linear relationship of pressure drop to mass loading. For hygroscopic aerosols two cases must be considered: for relative humidity below the deliquescent point of the aerosol, the relationship of pressure drop to mass loading remains linear; above the deliquescent point, the results show a sudden increase in the pressure drop and the mass capacity of the filter is drastically reduced.

  19. Effect of high pressure on physicochemical properties of meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckow, Roman; Sikes, Anita; Tume, Ron

    2013-01-01

    The application of high pressure offers some interesting opportunities in the processing of muscle-based food products. It is well known that high-pressure processing can prolong the shelf life of meat products in addition to chilling but the pressure-labile nature of protein systems limits the commercial range of applications. High pressure can affect the texture and gel-forming properties of myofibrillar proteins and, hence, has been suggested as a physical and additive-free alternative to tenderize and soften or restructure meat and fish products. However, the rate and magnitude at which pressure and temperature effects take place in muscles are variable and depend on a number of circumstances and conditions that are still not precisely known. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of the effects of high pressure on muscle tissue over a range of temperatures as it relates to meat texture, microstructure, color, enzymes, lipid oxidation, and pressure-induced gelation of myofibrillar proteins.

  20. Dilation effect on 3D Passive Earth Pressure Coefficients for Retaining Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Khelifa, Tarek; Benmebarek, Sadok

    2015-01-01

    The 2D passive earth pressures acting on rigid retaining walls problem has been widely treated in the literature using different approaches (limit equilibrium, limit analysis, slip line and numerical computation), however, the 3D passive earth pressures problem has received less attention. This paper is concerned with the numerical study of 3D passive earth pressures induced by the translation of a rigid rough retaining wall for associated and non-associated soils. Using the explicit finite d...

  1. Dilation effect on 3D Passive Earth Pressure Coefficients for Retaining Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Khelifa, Tarek; Benmebarek, Sadok

    2014-01-01

    The 2D passive earth pressures acting on rigid retaining walls problem has been widely treated in the literature using different approaches (limit equilibrium, limit analysis, slip line and numerical computation), however, the 3D passive earth pressures problem has received less attention. This paper is concerned with the numerical study of 3D passive earth pressures induced by the translation of a rigid rough retaining wall for associated and non-associated soils. Using the explicit finite d...

  2. Study and modeling of finite rate chemistry effects in turbulent non-premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervisch, Luc

    1993-01-01

    The development of numerical models that reflect some of the most important features of turbulent reacting flows requires information about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between turbulent and chemical processes is so strong that it is extremely difficult to isolate the role played by one individual physical phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (hereafter DNS) allows us to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interaction in some restricted but completely defined situations. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting regimes: the fast chemistry case, where the turbulent flame can be pictured as a random distribution of local chemical equilibrium problems; and the slow chemistry case, where the chemistry integrates in time the turbulent fluctuations. The Damkoehler number, ratio of a mechanical time scale to chemical time scale, is used to distinguish between these regimes. Today most of the industrial computer codes are able to perform predictions in the hypothesis of local equilibrium chemistry using a presumed shape for the probability density function (pdt) of the conserved scalar. However, the finite rate chemistry situation is of great interest because industrial burners usually generate regimes in which, at some points, the flame is undergoing local extinction or at least non-equilibrium situations. Moreover, this variety of situations strongly influences the production of pollutants. To quantify finite rate chemistry effect, the interaction between a non-premixed flame and a free decaying turbulence is studied using DNS. The attention is focused on the dynamic of extinction, and an attempt is made to quantify the effect of the reaction on the small scale mixing process. The unequal diffusivity effect is also addressed. Finally, a simple turbulent combustion model based on the DNS observations and tractable in real flow configurations is proposed.

  3. Pressure effects on lipids and bio-membrane assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Brooks

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Membranes are amongst the most important biological structures; they maintain the fundamental integrity of cells, compartmentalize regions within them and play an active role in a wide range of cellular processes. Pressure can play a key role in probing the structure and dynamics of membrane assemblies, and is also critical to the biology and adaptation of deep-sea organisms. This article presents an overview of the effect of pressure on the mesostructure of lipid membranes, bilayer organization and lipid–protein assemblies. It also summarizes recent developments in high-pressure structural instrumentation suitable for experiments on membranes.

  4. Pressure sensing by flexible, organic, field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manunza, I.; Sulis, A.; Bonfiglio, A.

    2006-10-01

    A mechanical sensor based on a pentacene field effect transistor has been fabricated. The pressure dependence of the output current has been investigated by applying a mechanical stimulus by means of a pressurized air flow. Experimental results show a reversible current dependence on pressure. Data analysis suggests that variations of threshold voltage, mobility and contact resistance are responsible for current variations. Thanks to the flexibility of the substrate and the low cost of the technology, this device opens the way for flexible mechanical sensors that can be used in a variety of innovative applications such as e-textiles and robotic interfaces.

  5. Calculation of the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects in nanowires using a decoupled finite element analysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Geng, Dalong; Wang, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    A simple and effective decoupled finite element analysis method was developed for simulating both the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects of zinc oxide (ZnO) and barium titanate (BTO) nanowires (NWs). The piezoelectric potential distribution on a ZnO NW was calculated under three deformation conditions (cantilever, three-point, and four-point bending) and compared to the conventional fully coupled method. The discrepancies of the electric potential maximums from these two methods were found very small, validating the accuracy and effectiveness of the decoupled method. Both ZnO and BTO NWs yielded very similar potential distributions. Comparing the potential distributions induced by the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects, we identified that the middle segment of a four-point bending NW beam is the ideal place for measuring the flexoelectric coefficient, because the uniform parallel plate capacitor-like potential distribution in this region is exclusively induced by the flexoelectric effect. This decoupled method could provide a valuable guideline for experimental measurements of the piezoelectric effects and flexoelectric effects in the nanometer scale.

  6. Effects of finiteness on the thermo-fluid-dynamics of natural convection above horizontal plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Abhijit; Sengupta, Sayantan

    2016-06-01

    A rigorous and systematic computational and theoretical study, the first of its kind, for the laminar natural convective flow above rectangular horizontal surfaces of various aspect ratios ϕ (from 1 to ∞) is presented. Two-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations (for ϕ → ∞) and three-dimensional CFD simulations (for 1 ≤ ϕ cases, with the complex three-dimensional solutions revealed here. The present computational study establishes the region of a high-aspect-ratio planform over which the results of the similarity theory are approximately valid, the extent of this region depending on the Grashof number. There is, however, a region near the edge of the plate and another region near the centre of the plate (where a plume forms) in which the similarity theory results do not apply. The sizes of these non-compliance zones decrease as the Grashof number is increased. The present study also shows that the similarity velocity profile is not strictly obtained at any location over the plate because of the entrainment effect of the central plume. The 3-D CFD simulations of the present paper are coordinated to clearly reveal the separate and combined effects of three important aspects of finiteness: the presence of leading edges, the presence of planform centre, and the presence of physical corners in the planform. It is realised that the finiteness due to the presence of physical corners in the planform arises only for a finite value of ϕ in the case of 3-D CFD simulations (and not in 2-D CFD simulations or similarity theory). The presence of physical corners is related here to several significant aspects of the solution - the conversion of in-plane velocity to out-of-plane velocity near the diagonals, the star-like non-uniform distribution of surface heat flux on heated planforms, the three-dimensionality of the temperature field, and the complex spatial structure of the velocity iso-surfaces. A generic theoretical correlation for the Nusselt

  7. Reply to ``Comment on `Nonanalyticity of the optimized effective potential with finite basis sets' ''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidopoulos, Nikitas I.; Lathiotakis, Nektarios N.

    2013-10-01

    The Comment by Friedrich does not dispute the central result of our paper [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.85.052508 85, 052508 (2012)] that nonanalytic behavior is present in long-established mathematical pathologies arising in the solution of finite basis optimized effective potential (OEP) equations. In the Comment, the terms “balancing of basis sets” and “basis-set convergence” imply a particular order towards the limit of a large orbital basis sets where the large-orbital-base limit is always taken first, before the large-auxiliary-base limit, until overall convergence is achieved, at a high computational cost. The authors claim that, on physical grounds, this order of limits is not only sufficient, but also necessary in order to avoid the mathematical pathologies. In response to the Comment, we remark that it is already written in our paper that the nonanalyticity trivially disappears with large orbital basis sets. We point out that the authors of the Comment give an incorrect proof of this statement. We also show that the order of limits towards convergence of the potential is immaterial. A recent paper by the authors of the Comment proposes a partial correction for the incomplete orbital basis error in the full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave method. Similar to the correction developed in our paper, this correction also benefits from an effectively complete orbital basis, even though only a finite orbital basis is employed in the calculation. This shows that it is unnecessary to take, in practice, the limit of an infinite orbital basis in order to avoid mathematical pathologies in the OEP. Our paper is a significant contribution in that direction with general applicability to any choice of basis sets. Finally, contrary to an allusion in the abstract and assertions in the main text of the Comment that unphysical oscillations of the OEP are supposedly attributed to the common energy denominator approximation, in fact, such

  8. Disk flexibility effects on the rotordynamics of the SSME high pressure turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, George T.

    1990-01-01

    Rotordynamical analyses are typically performed using rigid disk models. Studies of rotor models in which the effects of disk flexibility were included indicate that it may be an important effect for many systems. This issue is addressed with respect to the Space Shuttle Main Engine high pressure turbopumps. Finite element analyses were performed for a simplified free-free flexible disk rotor models and the modes and frequencies compared to those of a rigid disk model. Equations were developed to account for disk flexibility in rotordynamical analysis. Simulation studies were conducted to assess the influence of disk flexibility on the HPOTP. Some recommendations are given as to the importance of disk flexibility and for how this project should proceed.

  9. Anomalous finite-size effects in the Battle of the Sexes

    CERN Document Server

    Cremer, Jonas; Frey, Erwin

    2007-01-01

    The Battle of the Sexes describes asymmetric conflicts in mating behavior of males and females. Males can be philanderer or faithful, while females are either fast or coy, leading to a cyclic dynamics. The adjusted replicator equation predicts stable coexistence of all four strategies. In this situation, we consider the effects of fluctuations stemming from a finite population size. We show that they unavoidably lead to extinction of two strategies in the population. However, the typical time until extinction occurs strongly prolongs with increasing system size. In the meantime, a quasi-stationary probability distribution forms that is anomalously flat in the vicinity of the coexistence state. This behavior originates in a vanishing linear deterministic drift near the fixed point. We provide numerical data as well as an analytical approach to the mean extinction time and the quasi-stationary probability distribution.

  10. DIFFERENTIAL QUADRATURE METHOD FOR BENDING OF ORTHOTROPIC PLATES WITH FINITE DEFORMATION AND TRANSVERSE SHEAR EFFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶晶; 程昌钧

    2004-01-01

    Based on the Reddy' s theory of plates with the effect of higher-order shear deformations, the governing equations for bending of orthotropic plates with finite deformations were established. The differential quadrature ( DQ ) method of nonlinear analysis to the problem was presented. New DQ approach, presented by Wang and Bert (DQWB), is extended to handle the multiple boundary conditions of plates. The techniques were also further extended to simplify nonlinear computations. The numerical convergence and comparison of solutions were studied. The results show that the DQ method presented is very reliable and valid. Moreover, the influences of geometric and material parameters as well as the transverse shear deformations on nonlinear bending were investigated.Numerical results show the influence of the shear deformation on the static bending of orthotropic moderately thick plate is significant.

  11. Finite size effects on the electromagnetic field enhancement from low-dimensional silver nanoshell dimer arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Youlin [Zhengzhou University, China; Zhao, Ke [ORNL; Jia, Yu [Zhengzhou University, China; Hu, Xing [Zhengzhou University, China; Zhang, Zhenyu [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Finite size effects on the optical properties of one-dimensional 1D and two-dimensional 2D nanoshell dimer arrays are investigated using generalized Mie theory and coupled dipole approximation within the context of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy SERS. It is shown that the huge enhancement in the electromagnetic EM field at the center of a given dimer oscillates with the length of the 1D array. For an array of fixed length, the EM enhancement also oscillates along the array, but with a different period. Both types of oscillations can be attributed to the interference of the dynamic dipole fields from different dimers in the array. When generalized to 2D arrays, EM enhancement higher than that of the 1D arrays can be gained with a constant magnitude, a salient feature advantageous to experimental realization of single-molecule SERS. 2008 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.3009293

  12. Finite Size Effects on the Electromagnetic Field Enhancement from Low-dimensional Silver Nanoshell Dimer Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Youlin; Zhao, Ke; Jia, Yu; Hu, Xing; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2009-03-01

    Finite size effects on the optical properties of one-dimensional (1D) and 2D nanoshell dimer arrays are investigated using generalized Mie theory and coupled dipole approximation within the context of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). It is shown that the huge enhancement in the electromagnetic (EM) field at the center of a given dimer oscillates with the length of the 1D array. For an array of fixed length, the EM enhancement also oscillates along the array, but with a different period. Both types of oscillations can be attributed to the interference of the dynamic dipole fields from different dimers in the array. When generalized to 2D arrays, EM enhancement higher than that of the 1D arrays can be gained with a constant magnitude, a salient feature advantageous to experimental realization of single-molecule SERS. [K. Zhao et al, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 081102 (2005); Y. L. Song et al, accepted by J. Chem. Phys.

  13. Finite Size Effects in Adsorption of Helium Mixtures by Alkali Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, M.; Guilleumas, M.; Hernández, E. S.; Mayol, R.; Pi, M.; Szybisz, L.

    2004-08-01

    We investigate the behavior of mixed 3He-4He droplets on alkali surfaces at zero temperature, within the frame of Finite Range Density Functional theory. The properties of one single 3He atom on 4He_N4 droplets on different alkali surfaces are addressed, and the energetics and structure of 4He_N4+3He_N3 systems on Cs surfaces, for nanoscopic 4He drops, are analyzed through the solutions of the mean field equations for varying number N3 of 3He atoms. We discuss the size effects on the single particle spectrum of 3He atoms and on the shapes of both helium distributions.

  14. Boundary effects in finite size plasmonic crystals: focusing and routing of plasmonic beams for optical communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetou, M I; Bouillard, J-S; Segovia, P; Dickson, W; Thomsen, B C; Bayvel, P; Zayats, A V

    2015-11-06

    Plasmonic crystals, which consist of periodic arrangements of surface features at a metal-dielectric interface, allow the manipulation of optical information in the form of surface plasmon polaritons. Here we investigate the excitation and propagation of plasmonic beams in and around finite size plasmonic crystals at telecom wavelengths, highlighting the effects of the crystal boundary shape and illumination conditions. Significant differences in broad plasmonic beam generation by crystals of different shapes are demonstrated, while for narrow beams, the propagation from a crystal onto the smooth metal film is less sensitive to the crystal boundary shape. We show that by controlling the boundary shape, the size and the excitation beam parameters, directional control of propagating plasmonic modes and their behaviour such as angular beam splitting, focusing power and beam width can be efficiently achieved. This provides a promising route for robust and alignment-independent integration of plasmonic crystals with optical communication components.

  15. Finite size effects on textured surfaces: recovering contact angles from vagarious drop edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Anaïs; Rivetti, Marco; Teisseire, Jérémie; Barthel, Etienne

    2014-02-18

    A clue to understand wetting hysteresis on superhydrophobic surfaces is the relation between receding contact angle and surface textures. When the surface textures are large, there is a significant distribution of local contact angles around the drop. As seen from the cross section, the apparent contact angle oscillates as the triple line recedes. Our experiments demonstrate that the origin of these oscillations is a finite size effect. Combining side and bottom views of the drop, we take into account the 3D conformation of the surface near the edge to evaluate an intrinsic contact angle from the oscillations of the apparent contact angle. We find that for drops receding on axisymmetric textures the intrinsic receding contact angle is the minimum value of the oscillation while for a square lattice it is the maximum.

  16. Kinetic-scale magnetic turbulence and finite Larmor radius effects at Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Uritsky, V M; Khazanov, G V; Donovan, E F; Boardsen, S A; Anderson, B J; Korth, H

    2011-01-01

    We use a nonstationary generalization of the higher-order structure function technique to investigate statistical properties of the magnetic field fluctuations recorded by MESSENGER spacecraft during its first flyby (01/14/2008) through the near Mercury's space environment, with the emphasis on key boundary regions participating in the solar wind -- magnetosphere interaction. Our analysis shows, for the first time, that kinetic-scale fluctuations play a significant role in the Mercury's magnetosphere up to the largest resolvable time scale ~20 s imposed by the signal nonstationarity, suggesting that turbulence at this planet is largely controlled by finite Larmor radius effects. In particular, we report the presence of a highly turbulent and extended foreshock system filled with packets of ULF oscillations, broad-band intermittent fluctuations in the magnetosheath, ion-kinetic turbulence in the central plasma sheet of Mercury's magnetotail, and kinetic-scale fluctuations in the inner current sheet encountered...

  17. Defect Formation in Superconducting Rings: External Fields and Finite-Size Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, D. J.; Monaco, R.; Rivers, R. J.

    2013-06-01

    Consistent with the predictions of Kibble and Zurek, scaling behaviour has been seen in the production of fluxoids during temperature quenches of superconducting rings. However, deviations from the canonical behaviour arise because of finite-size effects and stray external fields. Technical developments, including laser heating and the use of long Josephson tunnel junctions, have improved the quality of data that can be obtained. With new experiments in mind we perform large-scale 3D simulations of quenches of small, thin rings of various geometries with fully dynamical electromagnetic fields, at nonzero externally applied magnetic flux. We find that the outcomes are, in practise, indistinguishable from those of much simpler Gaussian analytical approximations in which the rings are treated as one-dimensional systems and the magnetic field fluctuation-free.

  18. Simple rules govern finite-size effects in scale-free networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cuenda, Sara

    2011-01-01

    We give an intuitive though general explanation of the finite-size effect in scale-free networks in terms of the degree distribution of the starting network. This result clarifies the relevance of the starting network in the final degree distribution. We use two different approaches: the deterministic mean-field approximation used by Barab\\'asi and Albert (but taking into account the nodes of the starting network), and the probability distribution of the degree of each node, which considers the stochastic process. Numerical simulations show that the accuracy of the predictions of the mean-field approximation depend on the contribution of the dispersion in the final distribution. The results in terms of the probability distribution of the degree of each node are very accurate when compared to numerical simulations. The analysis of the standard deviation of the degree distribution allows us to assess the influence of the starting core when fitting the model to real data.

  19. Quantum Otto cycle with inner friction: finite-time and disorder effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alecce, A.; Galve, F.; Lo Gullo, N.; Dell'Anna, L.; Plastina, F.; Zambrini, R.

    2015-07-01

    The concept of inner friction, by which a quantum heat engine is unable to follow adiabatically its strokes and thus dissipates useful energy, is illustrated in an exact physical model where the working substance consists of an ensemble of misaligned spins interacting with a magnetic field and performing the Otto cycle. The effect of this static disorder under a finite-time cycle gives a new perspective of the concept of inner friction under realistic settings. We investigate the efficiency and power of this engine and relate its performance to the amount of friction from misalignment and to the temperature difference between heat baths. Finally we propose an alternative experimental implementation of the cycle where the spin is encoded in the degree of polarization of photons.

  20. Thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic: Effects of finite cooling rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihe Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a semi-analytical model to explore the effects of cooling rate on the thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic (FGC plate with a periodic array of edge cracks. The FGC is assumed to be a thermally heterogeneous material with constant elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio. The cooling rate applied at the FGC surface is modeled using a linear ramp function. An integral equation method and a closed form asymptotic temperature solution are employed to compute the thermal stress intensity factor (TSIF. The thermal shock residual strength and critical thermal shock of the FGC plate are obtained using the SIF criterion. Thermal shock simulations for an Al2O3/Si3N4 FGC indicate that a finite cooling rate leads to a significantly higher critical thermal shock than that under the sudden cooling condition. The residual strength, however, is relatively insensitive to the cooling rate.

  1. Pressure effects on crystal and electronic structure of bismuth tellurohalides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinov, I. P.; Menshchikova, T. V.; Sklyadneva, I. Yu; Heid, R.; Bohnen, K.-P.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2016-11-01

    We study the possibility of pressure-induced transitions from a normal semiconductor to a topological insulator (TI) in bismuth tellurohalides using density functional theory and tight-binding method. In BiTeI this transition is realized through the formation of an intermediate phase, a Weyl semimetal, that leads to modification of surface state dispersions. In the topologically trivial phase, the surface states exhibit a Bychkov-Rashba type dispersion. The Weyl semimetal phase exists in a narrow pressure interval of 0.2 GPa. After the Weyl semimetal-TI transition occurs, the surface electronic structure is characterized by gapless states with linear dispersion. The peculiarities of the surface states modification under pressure depend on the band-bending effect. We have also calculated the frequencies of Raman active modes for BiTeI in the proposed high-pressure crystal phases in order to compare them with available experimental data. Unlike BiTeI, in BiTeBr and BiTeCl the topological phase transition does not occur. In BiTeBr, the crystal structure changes with pressure but the phase remains a trivial one. However, the transition appears to be possible if the low-pressure crystal structure is retained. In BiTeCl under pressure, the topological phase does not appear up to 18 GPa due to a relatively large band gap width in this compound.

  2. Effect of pressure fluctuations on Richtmyer-Meshkov coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Aklant K.; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of Richtmyer Meshkov bubbles after the passage of a shock wave across a two fluid interface in the presence of pressure fluctuations. The fluids are ideal and incompressible and the pressure fluctuations are scale invariant in space and time, and are modeled by a power law time dependent acceleration field with exponent -2. Solutions indicate sensitivity to pressure fluctuations. In the linear regime, the growth of curvature and bubble velocity is linear. The growth rate is dominated by the initial velocity for weak pressure fluctuations, and by the acceleration term for strong pressure fluctuations. In the non-linear regime, the bubble curvature is constant and the solutions form a one parameter family (parametrized by the bubble curvature). The solutions are shown to be convergent and asymptotically stable. The physical solution (stable fastest growing) is a flat bubble for small pressure fluctuations and a curved bubble for large pressure fluctuations. The velocity field (in the frame of references accounting for the background motion) involves intense motion of the fluids in a vicinity of the interface, effectively no motion of the fluids away from the interfaces, and formation of vortical structures at the interface. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  3. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  4. Effect of pressurization on helical guided wave energy velocity in fluid-filled pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuc, Brennan; Ebrahimkhanlou, Arvin; Salamone, Salvatore

    2017-03-01

    The effect of pressurization stresses on helical guided waves in a thin-walled fluid-filled pipe is studied by modeling leaky Lamb waves in a stressed plate bordered by fluid. Fluid pressurization produces hoop and longitudinal stresses in a thin-walled pipe, which corresponds to biaxial in-plane stress in a plate waveguide model. The effect of stress on guided wave propagation is accounted for through nonlinear elasticity and finite deformation theory. Emphasis is placed on the stress dependence of the energy velocity of the guided wave modes. For this purpose, an expression for the energy velocity of leaky Lamb waves in a stressed plate is derived. Theoretical results are presented for the mode, frequency, and directional dependent variations in energy velocity with respect to stress. An experimental setup is designed for measuring variations in helical wave energy velocity in a thin-walled water-filled steel pipe at different levels of pressure. Good agreement is achieved between the experimental variations in energy velocity for the helical guided waves and the theoretical leaky Lamb wave solutions.

  5. Effect of pressure on secondary structure of proteins under ultra high pressure liquid chromatographic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Alexey; LoBrutto, Rosario; Karpinski, Paul

    2013-11-29

    There are several spectroscopic techniques such as IR and CD, that allow for analyzing protein secondary structure in solution. However, a majority of these techniques require using purified protein, concentrated enough in the solution, to produce a relevant spectrum. Fundamental principles for the usage of reversed-phase ultra high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) as an alternative technique to study protein secondary structures in solution were investigated. Several "model" proteins, as well as several small ionizable and neutral molecules, were used for these studies. The studies were conducted with UHPLC in isocratic mode, using premixed mobile phases at constant flow rate and temperature. The pressure was modified by a backpressure regulator from about 6000psi to about 12,000psi. It was found that when using a mobile phase composition at which proteins were fully denatured (loss of alpha-helix secondary structure), the retention factors of the proteins increased upon pressure increase in the same manner as non-proteins. When using a mobile phase composition in which proteins were not fully denatured, it was observed that the retention factors of the proteins displayed a much steeper (by one order of magnitude) increase in retention upon pressure increase. It was concluded that in a mobile phase in which the protein is not initially fully denatured, the increase of pressure may facilitate the folding back of the protein to its native state (alpha-helix secondary structure). The impact of different mobile phase compositions on the denaturation of the proteins was studied using CD (Circular Dichroism). Moreover, the effect of flow rate on retention of proteins and small molecules was studied at constant pressure on the different pore size silicas and the impact of internal frictional heating was evaluated.

  6. Effect of stocking pressure on selected diet quality, intake and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABUBAKER

    Effect of different grazing pressure by lambs grazing Lolium perenne and ... and animal performance through its direct and indirect effect on leaf area development, photosynthetic ... Conversely, lower stocking rate increases individual animal performance .... Factors affecting forage intake by range ruminants: A review.

  7. The effect of taste and palatability on lingual swallowing pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Cathy A; Dhanaraj, Glory E

    2006-04-01

    There is evidence that a strong, unpalatable, sour bolus improves swallowing in neurogenic dysphagia. It is not known whether other tastes may alter swallowing physiology. This study investigated the effect of moderate versus high taste concentrations (sweet, sour, salty, bitter) and barium taste samples on lingual swallowing pressure in ten healthy young adults, using a three-bulb lingual pressure array secured to the hard palate. Palatability of the samples was analyzed using the nine-point hedonic scale. Results showed that moderate sucrose, high salt, and high citric acid elicited significantly higher lingual swallowing pressures compared with the pressures generated by water. Pressures in the anterior bulb were significantly higher than those recorded from the middle or posterior bulb. There was no significant effect of palatability on lingual swallowing pressures. High salt and citric acid are known to elicit chemesthesis mediated by the trigeminal nerve. These results suggest that chemesthesis may play a crucial role in swallowing physiology. If true, dysphagia diet recommendations that include trigeminal irritants such as carbonation may be beneficial to individuals with dysphagia. However, before this recommendation more research is needed to examine how food properties and their perception affect swallowing in individuals with and without dysphagia.

  8. On the permanent hip-stabilizing effect of atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prietzel, Torsten; Hammer, Niels; Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Kaßebaum, Eric; Farag, Mohamed; von Salis-Soglio, Georg

    2014-08-22

    Hip joint dislocations related to total hip arthroplasty (THA) are a common complication especially in the early postoperative course. The surgical approach, the alignment of the prosthetic components, the range of motion and the muscle tone are known factors influencing the risk of dislocation. A further factor that is discussed until today is atmospheric pressure which is not taken into account in the present THA concepts. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of atmospheric pressure on hip joint stability. Five joint models (Ø 28-44 mm), consisting of THA components were hermetically sealed with a rubber capsule, filled with a defined amount of fluid and exposed to varying ambient pressure. Displacement and pressure sensors were used to record the extent of dislocation related to intraarticular and ambient pressure. In 200 experiments spontaneous dislocations of the different sized joint models were reliably observed once the ambient pressure was lower than 6.0 kPa. Increasing the ambient pressure above 6.0 kPa immediately and persistently reduced the joint models until the ambient pressure was lowered again. Displacement always exceeded half the diameter of the joint model and was independent of gravity effects. This experimental study gives strong evidence that the hip joint is permanently stabilized by atmospheric pressure, confirming the theories of Weber and Weber (1836). On basis of these findings the use of larger prosthetic heads, capsular repair and the deployment of an intracapsular Redon drain are proposed to substantially decrease the risk of dislocation after THA.

  9. Effect of pressure on the phonon properties of europium chalcogenides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U K Sakalle; P K Jha; S P Sanyal

    2000-06-01

    Lattice vibrational properties of europium chalcogenides have been investigated at high pressure by using a simple lattice dynamical model theory viz. the three-body force rigid ion model (TRIM) which includes long range three-body interaction arising due to charge transfer effects. The dispersion curves for the four Eu-chalcogenides agree reasonably well with the available experimental data. Variation of LO, TO, LA and TA phonons with pressure have also been studied at the symmetry points of the brillouin zone (BZ) for Euchalcogenides for the first time by using a lattice dynamical model theory. We have also calculated the one phonon density of states and compared them with the first order Raman scattering results. The calculation of one phonon density of states for Eu-chalcogenides has also been extended up to the phase transition pressure. We observed a pronounced shift in phonon spectrum as pressure is increased.

  10. Effects of temperature and pressure on Rhizomucor miehei lipase stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Marilyne; Combes, Didier

    2003-04-10

    Both high temperature and high hydrostatic pressure induce irreversible deactivation of enzymes. They enable the enzyme's thermodynamic parameters to be determined and are used to study the mechanisms involved in biochemical systems. The effect of these two factors on the stability of Rhizomucor miehei lipase have been investigated. The stability criterion used was residual hydrolytic activity of the lipase. Experimental and theoretical parameters, obtained by linear regression analysis, were compared with theoretical kinetics in order to validate the series-type inactivation model. The lipase of R. miehei was deactivated by either thermal or pressure treatment. Moreover conformational studies made by fluorescence spectroscopy suggest that the conformational changes induced by pressure were different from those induced by temperature. In addition they show that after thermal deactivation there were less intermolecular hydrogen bonded structures formed than was the case for deactivation by high pressure.

  11. Effects of high pressure on unsaturated fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povedano, Isabel; Guignon, Bérengère; Montoro, Óscar R.; Sanz, Pedro D.; Taravillo, Mercedes; Baonza, Valentín G.

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of high pressure processing on the molecular structure of some unsaturated fatty acids. Samples of elaidic acid, linoleic acid, ZE and EE conjugated linoleic acid are treated at 293 or 333 K at pressures up to 700 MPa. It is observed that the adiabatic heat generated from compression is able to bring the sample temperature above 373 K after 700 MPa. These relatively extreme conditions are of great interest for food sterilization, but they may induce undesirable change in fatty acid quality characteristics. To check for structural changes, Raman spectra of the samples are analysed after treatments. The comparison with Raman spectra of samples kept at atmospheric pressure shows that pressure induces some conformational changes at the hydrocarbon skeleton in solid samples, while the liquid ones remain unchanged. No cis/trans isomerization occurs, but gauche conformers are likely to be present.

  12. Influence of residual stresses on failure pressure of cylindrical pressure vessels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Jeyakumar; T. Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The utilization of pressure vessels in aerospace applications is manifold. In this work, finite element analysis (FEA) has been carried out using ANSYS software package with 2D axisym-metric model to access the failure pressure of cylindrical pressure vessel made of ASTM A36 carbon steel having weld-induced residual stresses. To find out the effect of residual stresses on failure pressure, first an elasto-plastic analysis is performed to find out the failure pressure of pressure vessel not having residual stresses. Then a thermo-mechanical finite element analysis is performed to assess the residual stresses developed in the pressure vessel during welding. Finally one more elasto-plastic analysis is performed to assess the effect of residual stresses on failure pressure of the pressure vessel having residual stresses. This analysis indicates reduction in the failure pressure due to unfavorable residual stresses.

  13. Finite element method calculations of GMI in thin films and sandwiched structures: Size and edge effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Arribas, A. [Departamento de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)], E-mail: alf@we.lc.ehu.es; Barandiaran, J.M.; Cos, D. de [Departamento de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    The impedance values of magnetic thin films and magnetic/conductor/magnetic sandwiched structures with different widths are computed using the finite element method (FEM). The giant magneto-impedance (GMI) is calculated from the difference of the impedance values obtained with high and low permeability of the magnetic material. The results depend considerably on the width of the sample, demonstrating that edge effects are decisive for the GMI performance. It is shown that, besides the usual skin effect that is responsible for GMI, an 'unexpected' increase of the current density takes place at the lateral edge of the sample. In magnetic thin films this effect is dominant when the permeability is low. In the trilayers, it is combined with the lack of shielding of the central conductor at the edge. The resulting effects on GMI are shown to be large for both kinds of samples. The conclusions of this study are of great importance for the successful design of miniaturized GMI devices.

  14. Finite-size and correlation-induced effects in Mean-field Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Touboul, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    The brain's activity is characterized by the interaction of a very large number of neurons that are strongly affected by noise. However, signals often arise at macroscopic scales integrating the effect of many neurons into a reliable pattern of activity. In order to study such large neuronal assemblies, one is often led to derive mean-field limits summarizing the effect of the interaction of a large number of neurons into an effective signal. Classical mean-field approaches consider the evolution of a deterministic variable, the mean activity, thus neglecting the stochastic nature of neural behavior. In this article, we build upon a recent approach that includes correlations and higher order moments in mean-field equations, and study how these stochastic effects influence the solutions of the mean-field equations, both in the limit of an infinite number of neurons and for large yet finite networks. We show that, though the solutions of the deterministic mean-field equation constitute uncorrelated solutions of...

  15. Finite Larmor radius effects in the nonlinear dynamics of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Sarto, D [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS-Nancy University, Campus Victor Grignard - BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Marchetto, C [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, IFP-CNR, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Pegoraro, F; Califano, F, E-mail: daniele.delsarto@ijl.nancy-universite.fr, E-mail: marchetto@ifp.cnr.it, E-mail: pegoraro@df.unipi.it, E-mail: califano@df.unipi.it [Physics Department and CNISM, Pisa University, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    We provide numerical evidence of the role of finite Larmor radius effects in the nonlinear dynamics of magnetic field line reconnection in high-temperature, strong guide field plasmas in a slab configuration, in the large {Delta}' regime. Both ion and electron temperature effects introduce internal energy variations related to mechanical compression terms in the energy balance, thus contributing to regularize the gradients of the ion density with respect to the cold regimes. For values of the Larmor radii that are not asymptotically small, the two temperature effects are no longer interchangeable, in contrast to what is expected from linear theory, and the differences are measurable in the numerical growth rates and in the nonlinear evolution of the density layers. We interpret such differences in terms of the change, due to ion temperature effects, of the Lagrangian advection of the 'plasma invariants' that are encountered in the cold-ion, warm-electron regime. The different roles of the ion and ion-sound Larmor radii in the reconnection dynamics near the X- and O-points are evidenced by means of a local quadratic expansion of the fields.

  16. Influence of effective stress on swelling pressure of expansive soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baille Wiebke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The volume change and shear strength behaviour of soils are controlled by the effective stress. Recent advances in unsaturated soil mechanics have shown that the effective stress as applicable to unsaturated soils is equal to the difference between the externally applied stress and the suction stress. The latter can be established based on the soil-water characteristic curve (SWCC of the soil. In the present study, the evolution of swelling pressure in compacted bentonite-sand mixtures was investigated. Comparisons were made between magnitudes of applied suction, suction stress, and swelling pressure.

  17. Finite element procedures

    CERN Document Server

    Bathe, Klaus-Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Finite element procedures are now an important and frequently indispensable part of engineering analyses and scientific investigations. This book focuses on finite element procedures that are very useful and are widely employed. Formulations for the linear and nonlinear analyses of solids and structures, fluids, and multiphysics problems are presented, appropriate finite elements are discussed, and solution techniques for the governing finite element equations are given. The book presents general, reliable, and effective procedures that are fundamental and can be expected to be in use for a long time. The given procedures form also the foundations of recent developments in the field.

  18. Effective theory for heavy quark QCD at finite temperature and density with stochastic quantization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuman, Mathias

    2015-07-01

    In this thesis we presented the derivation as well as the numerical and analytical treatment of an effective theory for lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD). We derived the effective theory directly from LQCD, which allows us to systematically introduce further improvements. The derivation was performed by means of an expansion around the limit of infinite quark masses and infinite gauge coupling. Using this theory we were able to derive results in the region of large densities. This region is, due to the sign problem, inaccessible to standard LQCD approaches. Although LQCD simulations at large densities have been performed recently by applying stochastic quantization, those are still limited to lattice with low numbers of timeslices and therefor can not reach the low temperature region. Furthermore, they can not be crosschecked with Monte-Carlo simulations. Since the equivalence between stochastic quantization and Monte-Carlo is unproven for the case of finite density systems, new approaches to access the cold dense region of the QCD phase diagram are desirable. The effective theory presented in this thesis provides such an approach. We introduced continuum QCD in chapter 2. In chapter 3 we presented how LQCD, i.e. QCD in a discretized space-time, can be formulated and used as a tool to explore the non-perturbative regions of the QCD phase diagram. Special emphasis was placed on simulations at finite baryon densities and the numerical problems that arise in this region. These problems are caused by the complexification of the action and are known as the sign problem. We gave a detailed presentation of the derivation of our effective theory in chapter 4. For this we performed expansions around the limit of strong coupling and static quarks, κ=β=0, introducing corrections order by order in the expansion parameters κ and β. Truncating the theory at different orders allowed us to determine the parameter region where the convergence to full LQCD is good. The gauge

  19. The effect of external pressure on the magnetocaloric effect of Ni-Mn-In alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V K; Chattopadhyay, M K; Roy, S B

    2011-09-14

    The martensitic transition in Ni(50)Mn(34)In(16) alloy has been studied by measuring the magnetization of the alloy as a function of temperature, magnetic field and pressure. Magnetic field and pressure have opposite effects on the martensitic transition in this alloy; the martensitic transition temperature decreases with increasing magnetic field but it increases with increasing pressure. The effect of pressure on the magnetocaloric properties of this large magnetocaloric effect alloy has been investigated in detail. The magnitude of the peak in the isothermal magnetic entropy change in Ni(50)Mn(34)In(16) increases with pressure. The temperature at which the magnetocaloric effect reaches the peak value in this alloy increases from near 240 K under ambient pressure to near 280 K under an external pressure of 9.5 kbar. The temperature corresponding to the peak in the isothermal magnetic entropy change increases with increasing pressure at a rate which matches the rate of increase of the martensite start temperature with increasing pressure. The temperature dependence of the isothermal magnetic entropy change under different pressures is found to follow a universal curve for a particular magnetic field change. These results show that pressure as a control parameter can be used to tune the temperature regime of the magnetocaloric effect in the alloy. The effect of pressure on the martensitic transition also gives a clue as regards the possibility of tuning this temperature regime with elemental substitution.

  20. Effect of Laser Annealing of Common Solid Pressure Media on Pressure Gradients in a Diamond Anvil Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uts, I.; Glazyrin, K.; Lee, K. K.

    2012-12-01

    Advances in experimental techniques allow for the studying of geophysics and planetary science related materials under high pressure and high temperature conditions. With the intrinsic limits of the multianvil apparatus, compression in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) has become the preferred method for creating the extreme conditions of planetary interiors. High pressures up to 1 Mbar can be routinely obtained in laboratories with the use of DACs. Additionally, as in situ laser heating is becoming progressively more affordable for DACs, it is becoming more common to find laser heating setups in many large scale facilities. After the sample material, the pressure medium is the second most important ingredient for a successful high pressure DAC experiment. Not every pressure medium is equally suitable for every experiment. For example, solid pressure media are more persistent than gaseous pressure media if high temperature heating is required. The melting point of the former is much higher, and melting of pressure media may induce undesirable sample shift in the pressure chamber. However, the most important characteristic of a pressure medium is its ability to maintain hydrostaticity in the DAC. The media, particularly solid pressure media, become less effective with increasing pressure. One of the most popular ways of alleviating pressure gradients is through laser annealing of the sample. We explore the effectiveness of this technique in relation to common pressure media, namely, alkali metal halides NaCl, CsCl, KCl, LiF, and oxide MgO. The samples were laser annealed at temperatures above 2000 K. Pressure gradients were determined through the analysis of diamond Raman and ruby fluorescence peaks before and after annealing the sample with a near-infrared laser. We find that the effect of annealing varies for different materials. For some (NaCl and KCl), it reduces pressure gradients considerably, but for the others (MgO), the effect of annealing is less profound.

  1. Analysis of the effects of weak floor strata on longwall face stability using finite element modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jin-rong; Debasis Deb; Y. P. Chugh

    2001-01-01

    Higher production, better safety standard, and potential for automation are some of the benefits of longwall mining. Today, longwall face advances at a faster rate exposing many diversified rock layers in a short period of time. It is now a serious challenge to cope with ground control problems such as roof falls, face and floor failure, and excessive shield loading as fast as possible to minimize production and monetary losses. In Illinois Coal Mines, the existence of week floor strata blow the coal seam may pose additional problems related to floor heaving,shield base punching, and associated roof and face falls. In this study, the effects of week floor on longwall grouJd control are analyzed using two-dimensional finite element models. A two-leg 635.6 ton (700-short-ton) yielding capacity shield is included in the models to evaluate the effects of different thicknees and material properties of the weak floor. The study indicates that the thickness and material properties of weak floor have significant effects on shield loading, the distribution and intensity of front abutment stress, failure zones in the surrounding strata, roof-to-floor convergence, and floor punching by the shield base.

  2. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Asuka; Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998). It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  3. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi Asuka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998. It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  4. The effects of strong magnetic fields and rotation on soliton stars at finite temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We study the effects of strong magnetic fields and uniform rotation on the properties of soliton stars in Lee-Wick model when a temperature dependence is introduced into this model. We first recall the properties of the Lee-Wick model and study the properties of soliton solutions, in particular, the stability condition, in terms of the parameters of the model and in terms of the number of fermions N inside the soliton (for very large N) in the presence of strong magnetic fields and uniform rotation. We also calculate the effects of gravity on the stability properties of the soliton stars in the simple approximation of coupling the Newtonian gravitational field to the energy density inside the soliton, treating this as constant throughout. Following Cottingham and Vinh Mau, we also make an analysis at finite temperature and show the possibility of a phase transition which leads to a model with parameters similar to those considered by Lee and his colleagues but in the presence of magnetic fields and rotation. More specifically, the effects of magnetic fields and rotation on the soliton mass and transition temperature are computed explicitly. We finally study the evolution on these magnetized and rotating soliton stars with the temperature from the early universe to the present time.

  5. The effects of cycling shoe stiffness on forefoot pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboe, Nathan Edward; Quesada, Peter M

    2003-10-01

    Plantar pressure data were recorded in two different shoe types to determine the effect of cycling shoe stiffness on peak plantar forefoot pressure in cyclists. Two pairs of shoes of the same size and manufacturer, identical except for outsole material and stiffness, were tested. Shoe stiffness measurements were collected under controlled conditions and in two different configurations using a dynamic hydraulic tensile testing machine. Measurements of plantar pressure were done using Pedar capacitive-based sensor insoles while subjects pedaled in a seated position at a controlled power output. Power output was set at a constant value of 400 W across all subjects by a magnetic resistance trainer unit. The pressure distribution in carbon-fiber-composite shoes during cycling was compared to cycling shoes made with plastic soles. Carbon fiber shoes presented stiffness values 42% and 550% higher than plastic shoes in longitudinal bending and three-point bending, respectively. The shoes made with carbon fiber produced peak plantar pressures 18% higher than those of plastic design (121 kPa vs. 103 kPa, p = .005). Competitive or professional cyclists suffering from metatarsalgia or ischemia should be especially careful when using carbon fiber cycling shoes because the shoes increase peak plantar pressure, which may aggravate these foot conditions.

  6. Effects of fasting on Blood pressure in normotensive males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Samad

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Muslims all over the world fast in the holy month of Ramadan. Fasting means abstinence from drinking any liquids, eating, smoking and taking anything parenterally.  It is intermittent in nature from the start of dawn to end at dusk. Fasting has various physiological effects on different biological parameters of the human body. Previous studies that look at effect of Ramadan fasting on blood pressure have focused mainly on hypertensive patients and patients with already established heart disease.(1,2There is very limited data regarding the effect of fasting on the normal population. (3,4 A few previous studies have advocated a hypotensive role of fasting.(5 In our study published in Journal of Ayub Medical College Abbottabad (JAMC in 2015, “Effects of Ramadan Fasting on Blood pressure in normotensive males”, we investigated the effect of Ramadan fasting on blood pressure of normotensive men. We conducted a repeated measure observational study in Karachi, Pakistan on 70 individuals who were normotensive, non-smokers between the ages of 18–50 years. . Blood pressure, pulse, BMI of each participant was recorded one week before the start of Ramadan and in the first, second and third week of Ramadan. The results of our study show that intermittent fasting has a hypotensive effect in normotensive males as proven in animal models and certain human population. There was an average drop of 8/3 mmHg and while the results are significant, their clinical relevance needs to be analysed. Studies on animal models have suggested atrial natriuretic peptide, catecholamines, opiates and body mass index as possible reasons for the decrease in blood pressure due to fasting.(3, 6  Dewanti et al suggested that the cause of drop in blood pressure was the drop in BMI however in our study we found that a drop in BMI only occurred before Iftar towards the end of the fast. There was no significant drop in post-Iftar BMI although there was a significant drop in blood

  7. Numerically Studying the Effect of Stiffening Rings on Reducing the Thickness of Torospherical Heads under Pressure on Their Concave Side

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sa'id Golabi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The high thickness of heads used in pressure vessels is always one of the main concerns of designers and manufacturers. A thorough study has been conducted on all types of heads including torospherical heads, with external and internal pressure to reduce their thickness using stiffening rings by finite element technique. Here the result of analysis on heads with pressure on their concave side is presented. The results include a method for determining the dimensions of the most suitable ring and its location on heads from one hand and its effect on reduction of the head thickness from the other hand. The result of analysis showed that using suitable stiffening ring may reduce up to 30% of the head thickness.

  8. The effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durović, Aleksandar; Marić, Dragan; Brdareski, Zorica; Jevtić, Miodrag; Durdević, Slavisa

    2008-12-01

    Neglecting polarized light as an adjuvant therapy for pressure ulcers and methodology distinctions in the trials engaging polarized light are the reasons for many dilemmas and contradictions. The aim of this study was to establish the effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing. This prospective randomized single-blind study involved 40 patients with stage I-III of pressure ulcer. The patients in the experimental group (E) were subjected, besides polarized light therapy, to standard wound cleaning and dressing. Standard wound cleaning and dressing were the only treatment used in the control group (C). A polarized light source was a Bioptron lamp. Polarized light therapy was applied for six min daily, five times a week, four weeks. The Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) was used in the assessment of outcome. Statistic analysis included Mann Whitney Test, Fisher Exact Test, Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. There were significant differences between the groups at the end of the treatment regarding the surface of pressure ulcer (E: 10.80 +/- 19.18; C: 22,97 +/- 25,47; p = 0.0005), rank of pressure ulcer (E: 5.90 +/- 2.48; C: 8.6 +/- 1.05; p = 0.0005) and total PUSH score (E: 7.35 +/- 3.17; C: 11.85 +/- 2.35; p = 0,0003). The patients in the experimental group had significantly better values of the parameters monitored than the patients in the control group. After a four-week polarized light therapy 20 patients with stage I-III ulcer had significant improvement in pressure ulcer healing, so it could be useful to apply polarized light in the treatment of pressure ulcers.

  9. The effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Neglecting polarized light as an adjuvant therapy for pressure ulcers and methodology distinctions in the trials engaging polarized light are the reasons for many dilemmas and contradictions. The aim of this study was to establish the effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing. Methods. This prospective randomized single-blind study involved 40 patients with stage I-III of pressure ulcer. The patients in the experimental group (E were subjected, besides polarized light therapy, to standard wound cleaning and dressing. Standard wound cleaning and dressing were the only treatment used in the control group (C. A polarized light source was a Bioptron lamp. Polarized light therapy was applied for six min daily, five times a week, four weeks. The Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH was used in the assessment of outcome. Statistic analysis included Mann Whitney Test, Fisher Exact Test, Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. Results. There were significant differences between the groups at the end of the treatment regarding the surface of pressure ulcer (E: 10.80±19.18; C: 22,97±25,47; p = 0.0005, rank of pressure ulcer (E: 5.90±2.48; C: 8.6±1.05; p = 0.0005 and total PUSH score (E: 7.35±3.17; C: 11.85±2.35; p = 0,0003. The patients in the experimental group had significantly better values of the parameters monitored than the patients in the control group. Conclusion. After a four-week polarized light therapy 20 patients with stage I-III ulcer had significant improvement in pressure ulcer healing, so it could be useful to apply polarized light in the treatment of pressure ulcers.

  10. Effect of Residual Noncondensables on Pressurization and Pressure Control of a Zero-Boil-Off Tank in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Hylton, Sonya; Kartizova, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiment is a small-scale experiment that uses a transparent ventless Dewar and a transparent simulant phase-change fluid to study sealed tank pressurization and pressure control with applications to on-surface and in-orbit storage of propellant cryogens. The experiment will be carried out under microgravity conditions aboard the International Space Station in the 2014 timeframe. This paper presents preliminary results from ZBOT's ground-based research that focuses on the effects of residual noncondensable gases in the ullage on both pressurization and pressure reduction trends in the sealed Dewar. Tank pressurization is accomplished through heating of the test cell wall in the wetted and un-wetted regions simultaneously or separately. Pressure control is established through mixing and destratification of the bulk liquid using a temperature controlled forced jet flow with different degrees of liquid jet subcooling. A Two-Dimensional axisymmetric two-phase CFD model for tank pressurization and pressure control is also presented. Numerical prediction of the model are compared to experimental 1g results to both validate the model and also indicate the effect of the noncondensable gas on evolution of pressure and temperature distributions in the ullage during pressurization and pressure control. Microgravity simulations case studies are also performed using the validated model to underscore and delineate the profound effect of the noncondensables on condensation rates and interfacial temperature distributions with serious implications for tank pressure control in reduced gravity.

  11. Effective theory for heavy quark QCD at finite temperature and density with stochastic quantization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuman, Mathias

    2015-07-01

    In this thesis we presented the derivation as well as the numerical and analytical treatment of an effective theory for lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD). We derived the effective theory directly from LQCD, which allows us to systematically introduce further improvements. The derivation was performed by means of an expansion around the limit of infinite quark masses and infinite gauge coupling. Using this theory we were able to derive results in the region of large densities. This region is, due to the sign problem, inaccessible to standard LQCD approaches. Although LQCD simulations at large densities have been performed recently by applying stochastic quantization, those are still limited to lattice with low numbers of timeslices and therefor can not reach the low temperature region. Furthermore, they can not be crosschecked with Monte-Carlo simulations. Since the equivalence between stochastic quantization and Monte-Carlo is unproven for the case of finite density systems, new approaches to access the cold dense region of the QCD phase diagram are desirable. The effective theory presented in this thesis provides such an approach. We introduced continuum QCD in chapter 2. In chapter 3 we presented how LQCD, i.e. QCD in a discretized space-time, can be formulated and used as a tool to explore the non-perturbative regions of the QCD phase diagram. Special emphasis was placed on simulations at finite baryon densities and the numerical problems that arise in this region. These problems are caused by the complexification of the action and are known as the sign problem. We gave a detailed presentation of the derivation of our effective theory in chapter 4. For this we performed expansions around the limit of strong coupling and static quarks, κ=β=0, introducing corrections order by order in the expansion parameters κ and β. Truncating the theory at different orders allowed us to determine the parameter region where the convergence to full LQCD is good. The gauge

  12. Radial energy transport by magnetospheric ULF waves: Effects of magnetic curvature and plasma pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouznetsov, Igor; Lotko, William

    1995-01-01

    The 'radial' transport of energy by internal ULF waves, stimulated by dayside magnetospheric boundary oscillations, is analyzed in the framework of one-fluid magnetohydrodynamics. (the term radial is used here to denote the direction orthogonal to geomagnetic flux surfaces.) The model for the inhomogeneous magnetospheric plasma and background magnetic field is axisymmetric and includes radial and parallel variations in the magnetic field, magnetic curvature, plasma density, and low but finite plasma pressure. The radial mode structure of the coupled fast and intermediate MHD waves is determined by numerical solution of the inhomogeneous wave equation; the parallel mode structure is characterized by a Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. Ionospheric dissipation is modeled by allowing the parallel wave number to be complex. For boudnary oscillations with frequencies in the range from 10 to 48 mHz, and using a dipole model for the background magnetic field, the combined effects of magnetic curvature and finite plasma pressure are shown to (1) enhance the amplitude of field line resonances by as much as a factor of 2 relative to values obtained in a cold plasma or box-model approximation for the dayside magnetosphere; (2) increase the energy flux delivered to a given resonance by a factor of 2-4; and (3) broaden the spectral width of the resonance by a factor of 2-3. The effects are attributed to the existence of an 'Alfven buoyancy oscillation,' which approaches the usual shear mode Alfven wave at resonance, but unlike the shear Alfven mode, it is dispersive at short perpendicular wavelengths. The form of dispersion is analogous to that of an internal atmospheric gravity wave, with the magnetic tension of the curved background field providing the restoring force and allowing radial propagation of the mode. For nominal dayside parameters, the propagation band of the Alfven buoyancy wave occurs between the location of its (field line) resonance and that of the

  13. Atmospheric pressure loading effects on Global Positioning System coordinate determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandam, Tonie M.; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Heflin, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Earth deformation signals caused by atmospheric pressure loading are detected in vertical position estimates at Global Positioning System (GPS) stations. Surface displacements due to changes in atmospheric pressure account for up to 24% of the total variance in the GPS height estimates. The detected loading signals are larger at higher latitudes where pressure variations are greatest; the largest effect is observed at Fairbanks, Alaska (latitude 65 deg), with a signal root mean square (RMS) of 5 mm. Out of 19 continuously operating GPS sites (with a mean of 281 daily solutions per site), 18 show a positive correlation between the GPS vertical estimates and the modeled loading displacements. Accounting for loading reduces the variance of the vertical station positions on 12 of the 19 sites investigated. Removing the modeled pressure loading from GPS determinations of baseline length for baselines longer than 6000 km reduces the variance on 73 of the 117 baselines investigated. The slight increase in variance for some of the sites and baselines is consistent with expected statistical fluctuations. The results from most stations are consistent with approximately 65% of the modeled pressure load being found in the GPS vertical position measurements. Removing an annual signal from both the measured heights and the modeled load time series leaves this value unchanged. The source of the remaining discrepancy between the modeled and observed loading signal may be the result of (1) anisotropic effects in the Earth's loading response, (2) errors in GPS estimates of tropospheric delay, (3) errors in the surface pressure data, or (4) annual signals in the time series of loading and station heights. In addition, we find that using site dependent coefficients, determined by fitting local pressure to the modeled radial displacements, reduces the variance of the measured station heights as well as or better than using the global convolution sum.

  14. Pressure effects in Debye-Waller factors and in EXAFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen Van Hung, E-mail: hungnv@vnu.edu.v [University of Science, VNU Hanoi, 334 Nguyen Trai, Thanh Xuan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Vu Van Hung [Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Ho Khac Hieu [University of Science, VNU Hanoi, 334 Nguyen Trai, Thanh Xuan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); National University of Civil Engineering, 55 Giai Phong, Hai Ba Trung, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Frahm, Ronald R. [Bergische Universitaet-Gesamthochschule Wuppertal, FB: 8-Physik, Gauss Strasse 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2011-02-01

    Anharmonic correlated Einstein model (ACEM) and statistical moment method (SMM) have been developed to derive analytical expressions for pressure dependence of the lattice bond length, effective spring constant, correlated Einstein frequency and temperature, Debye-Waller factors (DWF) or second cumulant, first and third cumulants in Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) at a given temperature. Numerical results for pressure-dependent DWF of Kr and Cu agree well with experiment and other theoretical values. Simulated EXAFS of Cu and its Fourier transform magnitude using our calculated pressure-induced change in the 1st shell are found to be in a reasonable agreement with those using X-ray diffraction (XRD) experimental results. -- Research Highlights: {yields} We have developed anharmonic correlated Einstein model and statistical moment method. {yields} The pressure effects in cumulants including DWF and in EXAFS has been investigated. {yields} Calculated pressure-dependent DWF for Kr, Cu agree with experiment and other results. {yields} Simulated EXAFS and Fourier transform magnitude of Cu agree with those using XRD data.

  15. Effect on Blood Pressure of Daily Lemon Ingestion and Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoji Kato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent studies suggest that the daily intake of lemon (Citrus limon has a good effect on health, but this has not been confirmed in humans. In our previous studies, it was observed that people who are conscious of their health performed more lemon intake and exercise. An analysis that took this into account was required. Methodology. For 101 middle-aged women in an island area in Hiroshima, Japan, a record of lemon ingestion efforts and the number of steps walked was carried out for five months. The change rates (Δ% of the physical measurements, blood test, blood pressure, and pulse wave measured value during the observation period were calculated, and correlations with lemon intake and the number of steps walked were considered. As a result, it was suggested that daily lemon intake and walking are effective for high blood pressure because both showed significant negative correlation to systolic blood pressure Δ%. Conclusions. As a result of multiple linear regression analysis, it was possible that lemon ingestion is involved more greatly with the blood citric acid concentration Δ% and the number of steps with blood pressure Δ%, and it was surmised that the number of steps and lemon ingestion are related to blood pressure improvement by different action mechanisms.

  16. Finite element modeling of aponeurotomy: altered intramuscular myofascial force transmission yields complex sarcomere length distributions determining acute effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yucesoy, Can A.; Koopman, Bart H.F.J.M.; Grootenboer, Henk J.; Huijing, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    Finite element modeling of aponeurotomized rat extensor digitorium longus muscle was performed to investigate the acute effects of proximal aponeurotomy. The specific goal was to assess the changes in lengths of sarcomeres within aponeurotomized muscle and to explain how the intervention leads to al

  17. Finite size effects in the presence of a chemical potential: A study in the classical nonlinear O(2) sigma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Debasish; Chandrasekharan, Shailesh

    2010-06-01

    In the presence of a chemical potential, the physics of level crossings leads to singularities at zero temperature, even when the spatial volume is finite. These singularities are smoothed out at a finite temperature but leave behind nontrivial finite size effects which must be understood in order to extract thermodynamic quantities using Monte Carlo methods, particularly close to critical points. We illustrate some of these issues using the classical nonlinear O(2) sigma model with a coupling β and chemical potential μ on a 2+1-dimensional Euclidean lattice. In the conventional formulation this model suffers from a sign problem at nonzero chemical potential and hence cannot be studied with the Wolff cluster algorithm. However, when formulated in terms of the worldline of particles, the sign problem is absent, and the model can be studied efficiently with the “worm algorithm.” Using this method we study the finite size effects that arise due to the chemical potential and develop an effective quantum mechanical approach to capture the effects. As a side result we obtain energy levels of up to four particles as a function of the box size and uncover a part of the phase diagram in the (β,μ) plane.

  18. Finite element modeling of aponeurotomy: altered intramuscular myofascial force transmission yields complex sarcomere length distributions determining acute effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yucesoy, C.A.; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; Grootenboer, H.J.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2007-01-01

    Finite element modeling of aponeurotomized rat extensor digitorium longus muscle was performed to investigate the acute effects of proximal aponeurotomy. The specific goal was to assess the changes in lengths of sarcomeres within aponeurotomized muscle and to explain how the intervention leads to

  19. The finite size effect of galaxies on the cosmic virial theorem and the pairwise peculiar velocity dispersions

    CERN Document Server

    Suto, Y; Suto, Yasushi; Jing, Yi-Peng

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the effect of the finite size of galaxies on estimating small-scale relative pairwise peculiar velocity dispersions from the cosmic virial theorem (CVT). Specifically we evaluate the effect by incorporating the finite core radius $r_c$ in the two-point correlation function of mass, i.e. softening $r_s$ on small scales. We analytically obtain the lowest-order correction term for $\\gamma 2$. Compared with the idealistic point-mass approximation ($r_s=r_c=0$), the finite size effect can significantly reduce the small-scale velocity dispersions of galaxies at scales much larger than $r_s$ and $r_c$. Even without considering the finite size of galaxies, nonzero values for $r_c$ are generally expected, for instance, for cold dark matter (CDM) models with a scale-invariant primordial spectrum. For these CDM models, a reasonable force softening $r_s\\le 100 \\hikpc$ would have rather tiny effect. We present the CVT predictions for the small-scale pairwise velocity dispersion in the CDM models normalized by t...

  20. Finite-size effects for the gap in the excitation spectrum of the one-dimensional Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colomé-Tatché, M.; Matveenko, S.I.; Shlyapnikov, G.V.

    2010-01-01

    We study finite-size effects for the gap of the quasiparticle excitation spectrum in the weakly interacting regime one-dimensional Hubbard model with on-site attraction. Two types of corrections to the result of the thermodynamic limit are obtained. Aside from a power law (conformal) correction due

  1. Finite-size effects for the gap in the excitation spectrum of the one-dimensional Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colomé-Tatché, M.; Matveenko, S.I.; Shlyapnikov, G.V.

    2010-01-01

    We study finite-size effects for the gap of the quasiparticle excitation spectrum in the weakly interacting regime one-dimensional Hubbard model with on-site attraction. Two types of corrections to the result of the thermodynamic limit are obtained. Aside from a power law (conformal) correction due

  2. Magnetic field effects on the static quark potential at zero and finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonati, Claudio; D'Elia, Massimo; Mariti, Marco; Mesiti, Michele; Negro, Francesco; Rucci, Andrea; Sanfilippo, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the static Q Q ¯ potential at zero and finite temperature in the presence of a constant and uniform external magnetic field B →, for several values of the lattice spacing and for different orientations with respect to B →. As a byproduct, we provide continuum limit extrapolated results for the string tension, the Coulomb coupling and the Sommer parameter at T =0 and B =0 . We confirm the presence in the continuum of a B -induced anisotropy, regarding essentially the string tension, for which it is of the order of 15% at |e |B ˜1 GeV2 and would suggest, if extrapolated to larger fields, a vanishing string tension along the magnetic field for |e |B ≳4 GeV2. The angular dependence for |e |B ≲1 GeV2 can be nicely parametrized by the first allowed term in an angular Fourier expansion, corresponding to a quadrupole deformation. Finally, for T ≠0 , the main effect of the magnetic field is a general suppression of the string tension, leading to a early loss of the confining properties: this happens even before the appearance of inverse magnetic catalysis in the chiral condensate, supporting the idea that the influence of the magnetic field on the confining properties is the leading effect originating the decrease of Tc as a function of B .

  3. Finite Element Analysis of the Effect of Crack Depth and Crack Opening On the Girder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Kamrul Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the effect of crack depth and opening on the girder, finite element method (FEM has been used in this paper. In FE analysis, six nodded two dimensional plane elements (PLANE-2 are considered. Each node has two degree of freedom such as UX and UY. For the plane elements, a plane stress width/thickness option is chosen. For analytical model of crack of the concrete bridge girder, crack opening was increased from 0.2 mm to 1mm at an interval 0.2 mm and crack depth also increased from 30 mm to 150 mm at an interval 30 mm. The models were discreatized by a triangular mesh and convergence test was executed to obtain satisfactory results from the Plane-2 element. From the numerical result, it is seen that the principal stress become a higher with increased the crack depth and also crack opening with respect to load increasing. But the crack depth at 90 mm and crack opening at 0.6 mm, it has more effect on the girder because the stress concentration is higher than other crack depth and opening.

  4. Unconditionally stable finite-difference time-domain methods for modeling the Sagnac effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitski, Roman; Scheuer, Jacob; Steinberg, Ben Z

    2013-02-01

    We present two unconditionally stable finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods for modeling the Sagnac effect in rotating optical microsensors. The methods are based on the implicit Crank-Nicolson scheme, adapted to hold in the rotating system reference frame-the rotating Crank-Nicolson (RCN) methods. The first method (RCN-2) is second order accurate in space whereas the second method (RCN-4) is fourth order accurate. Both methods are second order accurate in time. We show that the RCN-4 scheme is more accurate and has better dispersion isotropy. The numerical results show good correspondence with the expression for the classical Sagnac resonant frequency splitting when using group refractive indices of the resonant modes of a microresonator. Also we show that the numerical results are consistent with the perturbation theory for the rotating degenerate microcavities. We apply our method to simulate the effect of rotation on an entire Coupled Resonator Optical Waveguide (CROW) consisting of a set of coupled microresonators. Preliminary results validate the formation of a rotation-induced gap at the center of a transfer function of a CROW.

  5. Finite cell-size effects on protein variability in Turing patterned tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buceta, Javier

    2017-08-01

    Herein we present a framework to characterize different sources of protein expression variability in Turing patterned tissues. In this context, we introduce the concept of granular noise to account for the unavoidable fluctuations due to finite cell-size effects and show that the nearest-neighbours autocorrelation function provides the means to measure it. To test our findings, we perform in silico experiments of growing tissues driven by a generic activator-inhibitor dynamics. Our results show that the relative importance of different sources of noise depends on the ratio between the characteristic size of cells and that of the pattern domains and on the ratio between the pattern amplitude and the effective intensity of the biochemical fluctuations. Importantly, our framework provides the tools to measure and distinguish different stochastic contributions during patterning: granularity versus biochemical noise. In addition, our analysis identifies the protein species that buffer the stochasticity the best and, consequently, it can help to determine key instructive signals in systems driven by a Turing instability. Altogether, we expect our study to be relevant in developmental processes leading to the formation of periodic patterns in tissues. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Effects of Frequency and Acceleration Amplitude on Osteoblast Mechanical Vibration Responses: A Finite Element Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone cells are deformed according to mechanical stimulation they receive and their mechanical characteristics. However, how osteoblasts are affected by mechanical vibration frequency and acceleration amplitude remains unclear. By developing 3D osteoblast finite element (FE models, this study investigated the effect of cell shapes on vibration characteristics and effect of acceleration (vibration intensity on vibrational responses of cultured osteoblasts. Firstly, the developed FE models predicted natural frequencies of osteoblasts within 6.85–48.69 Hz. Then, three different levels of acceleration of base excitation were selected (0.5, 1, and 2 g to simulate vibrational responses, and acceleration of base excitation was found to have no influence on natural frequencies of osteoblasts. However, vibration response values of displacement, stress, and strain increased with the increase of acceleration. Finally, stress and stress distributions of osteoblast models under 0.5 g acceleration in Z-direction were investigated further. It was revealed that resonance frequencies can be a monotonic function of cell height or bottom area when cell volumes and material properties were assumed as constants. These findings will be useful in understanding how forces are transferred and influence osteoblast mechanical responses during vibrations and in providing guidance for cell culture and external vibration loading in experimental and clinical osteogenesis studies.

  7. Effect of ambient flow inhomogeneity on drag forces on a sphere at finite Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungwoo; Balachandar, S.; Lee, Hyungoo

    2013-11-01

    For studies on particle-laden flows involving particle transport and dispersion, the prediction capability of hydrodynamic forces on the particle in a non-uniform flow is one of the central issues. However, existing analytical expressions and empirical correlations are mainly made based on the homogeneous flow conditions such as uniform or uniform shear flows. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the effect of flow inhomogeneity on drag forces on a sphere at finite Reynolds numbers. To do so, we perform direct numerical simulations of flow over a sphere in an inhomogeneous flow. In this study, we consider three different kinds of the inhomogeneous flows: cosine, hyperbolic cosine and hyperbolic secant profiles. The Reynolds number of the sphere based on the freestream velocity and sphere diameter is 100. The present simulations show that the quasi-steady drag forces in inhomogeneous flows are reasonably estimated by standard drag law based on the relative velocity if the fluid velocity seen by the particle is evaluated by surface average. The results support Loth and Dorgan (2009)'s proposed formula. In the final presentation, the effect of ambient flow inhomogeneity on drag forces would be presented in more detail.

  8. Finite Size Effects in Chemical Bonding: From Small Clusters to Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleis, Jesper; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Romero, N. A.

    2011-01-01

    We address the fundamental question of which size a metallic nano-particle needs to have before its surface chemical properties can be considered to be those of a solid, rather than those of a large molecule. Calculations of adsorption energies for carbon monoxide and oxygen on a series of gold n......). Below that critical size, finite-size effects can be observed, and we show those to be related to variations in the local atomic structure augmented by quantum size effects for the smallest clusters.......We address the fundamental question of which size a metallic nano-particle needs to have before its surface chemical properties can be considered to be those of a solid, rather than those of a large molecule. Calculations of adsorption energies for carbon monoxide and oxygen on a series of gold...... nanoparticles ranging from 13 to 1,415 atoms, or 0.8–3.7 nm, have been made possible by exploiting massively parallel computing on up to 32,768 cores on the Blue Gene/P computer at Argonne National Laboratory. We show that bulk surface properties are obtained for clusters larger than ca. 560 atoms (2.7 nm...

  9. Low-energy effective field theory for finite-temperature relativistic superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolis, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    We derive the low-energy effective action governing the infrared dynamics of relativistic superfluids at finite temperature. We organize our derivation in an effective field theory fashion-purely in terms of infrared degrees of freedom and symmetries. Our degrees of freedom are the superfluid phase \\psi, and the comoving coordinates for the volume elements of the normal fluid component. The presence of two sound modes follows straightforwardly from Taylor-expanding the action at second order in small perturbations. We match our description to more conventional hydrodynamical ones, thus linking the functional form of our Lagrangian to the equation of state, which we assume as an input. We re-derive in our language some standard properties of relativistic superfluids in the high-temperature and low-temperature limits. As an illustration of the efficiency of our methods, we compute the cross-section for a sound wave (of either type) scattering off a superfluid vortex at temperatures right beneath the critical on...

  10. Finite-size effect and Kondo screening effect in an A-B ring with a quantum dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Shao-Quan; Wang Shun-Jin; Sun Wei-Li; Yu Wan-Lun

    2004-01-01

    The properties of the ground state of a closed dot-ring system with a magnetic flux in the Kondo regime are studied theoretically by means of a one-impurity Anderson Hamiltonian. The Hamiltonian is solved by means of the slave-boson mean-field theory. It is shown that at T=0, a suppressed Kondo effect exists in this system even when the mean level spacing of electrons in the ring is larger than the bulk Kondo temperature. The physical quantities depend sensitively on both the parity of the system and the size of the ring; the rich physical behaviour can be attributed to the coexistence of both the finite-size effect and the Kondo screening effect. It is also possible to detect the Kondo screening cloud by measuring the persistent current or the zero field impurity susceptibility Ximp directly in future experiments.

  11. Effects of pressure-shift freezing and pressure-assisted thawing on sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tironi, V; LeBail, A; de Lamballerie, M

    2007-09-01

    Effects of pressure-shift freezing and/or pressure-assisted thawing on the quality of sea bass muscle were evaluated and compared with conventional (air-blast) frozen and thawed samples. Microstructural analysis showed a marked decrease of muscle cell damage for pressure-assisted frozen samples. According to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), protein extractability, and SDS-PAGE results, high-pressure treatment (200 MPa) produced a partial denaturation with aggregation and insolubilization of the myosin, as well as alterations of the sarcoplasmic proteins. Only small differences between high-pressure processes (freezing or/and thawing) were registered. High-pressure-treated systems led to a decrease of water holding capacity but differences between high-pressure and conventional methods disappeared after cooking. Muscle color showed important alterations due to high-pressure treatments (increasing L* and b*).

  12. "Deflategate": Time, Temperature, and Moisture Effects on Football Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Jack; Beljak, Lauren; Macatangay, Dahlia-Marie; Helmuth-Malone, Lilly; McWilliams, Catharina; Raptis, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper in "The Physics Teacher (TPT)", DiLisi and Rarick used the National Football League "Deflategate" controversy to introduce to physics students the physics of a bouncing ball. In this paper, we measure and analyze the environmental effects of time, ambient temperature, and moisture on the internal pressure of…

  13. "Deflategate": Time, Temperature, and Moisture Effects on Football Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Jack; Beljak, Lauren; Macatangay, Dahlia-Marie; Helmuth-Malone, Lilly; McWilliams, Catharina; Raptis, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper in "The Physics Teacher (TPT)", DiLisi and Rarick used the National Football League "Deflategate" controversy to introduce to physics students the physics of a bouncing ball. In this paper, we measure and analyze the environmental effects of time, ambient temperature, and moisture on the internal pressure of…

  14. Morphine in ventilated neonates: Its effects on arterial blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.H. Simons (Sinno); D.W.E. Roofthooft (Daniella); M. van Dijk (Monique); R.A. Lingen (Richard); H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); J.N. van den Anker (John); D. Tibboel (Dick)

    2006-01-01

    markdownabstractObjective: To study the effects of continuous morphine infusion on arterial blood pressure in ventilatedneonates. Design: Blinded randomised placebo controlled trial. Setting: Level III neonatal intensive care unit in two centres. Patients: A total of 144 ventilated neonates. I

  15. Effect of elevated pressure on fluidization phenomena. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, W. C.; Keairns, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    This program consists of five tasks: (1) review of literature on fluidization velocities; (2) extension of existing fluidization correlations; (3) state-of-the-art review concerning flow regime transitions; (4) flow regime data analysis; and (5) identification of data gaps. This report summarizes the results obtained during the contract period. A critical review of the literature concerning the effect of elevated pressure and particle characteristics on minimum fluidization velocity, beginning fluidization velocity, minimum bubbling velocity, total fluidization velocity, and complete fluidization velocity was performed. Fluidization data from various sources were compiled and compared. A fundamental correlation with improved methodology was developed for estimating the minimum fluidization velocity at elevated pressure with good agreement. The developed correlation was found to be applicable at elevated temperature as well. The state-of-the-art of the effect of pressure and particle characteristics on flow regime transitions from bubbling to turbulent fluidization and from turbulent to fast fluidization were reviewed. Available data on the effect of elevated pressure and particle characteristics on flow regime transitions were analyzed, however, the information available in the literature was meager at best. The critical fluidization development areas were identified as the instrumentation development and the experiments carried out with reactive systems, under elevated temperature and pressure, and in large scale fluidization units. Potential research areas which are within the capability of the existing PETC high pressure test facility were also summarized. This was compiled on the basis of a literature survey on currently available literature information in those areas. 54 references, 10 figures, 7 tables.

  16. Effects of electrical stimulation of acupuncture points on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, John; Ng, Derek; Sau, Amy

    2009-03-01

    Arterial hypertension is considered a major contributor to coronary arterial disease. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of Hans electrical stimulation of acupuncture points on blood pressure. Subjects with normal and elevated blood pressure were recruited and randomly assigned into control and experimental groups. Only the experimental subjects received active Hans electrical stimulation on 2 acupuncture points for 30 minutes each session, twice a week for 5 weeks. Twenty-seven subjects (17 male) were recruited and completed the study. The average age of the subjects was 25 +/- 5 years. The youngest subject was 20 years old and the oldest was 36 years old. After using the Hans electrical stimulation on acupuncture points for 5 weeks, the systolic blood pressure decreased significantly in the experimental group with active treatment. The mean systolic blood pressure was 117.8 +/- 4.2 mm Hg before the treatment and was reduced to 110.8 +/- 5.5 mm Hg (P .05) in the third week and to 74.8 +/- 4.3 mm Hg (P > .05) in the fifth week, but both did not reach statistically significant levels. The systolic and diastolic blood pressures in the control group did not show statistically significant changes. The mean systolic blood pressure was 115.6 +/- 13.3 mm Hg before the treatment and was reduced to 113.0 +/- 12.6 mm Hg (P > 0.05) in the third week and to 112.2 +/- 10.3 mm Hg in the fifth week (P > .05). The mean diastolic blood pressure was 76.4 +/- 7.9 mm Hg before treatment and was reduced to 76.5 +/- 6.9 mm Hg (P > .05) in the third week and to 73.9 +/- 5.4 mm Hg (P > .05) in the fifth week. It was concluded that Hans electrical stimulation of acupuncture points reduced systolic blood pressure but not the diastolic blood pressure in the current subject population with normal and elevated blood pressure.

  17. New pressure and temperature effects on bacterial spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathys, A; Knorr, D [Berlin University of Technology, Department of Food Biotechnology and Food Process Engineering, Koenigin-Luise-Str. 22, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Heinz, V [German Institute of Food Technology, p. o. box 1165, D-49601, Quackenbrueck (Germany)], E-mail: alexander.mathys@tu-berlin.de

    2008-07-15

    with 37 deg. C, and then dual stained with the fluorescent dyes SYTO 16 and propidium iodide. For pressure treated spores four distinct populations were detected by flow cytometry, and for these we suggest a three step model of inactivation involving a germination step following hydrolysis of the spore cortex, an unknown step, and finally an inactivation step with physical compromise of the spore inner membrane. An understanding of these effects and mechanisms will aid the safety assessment of pressure assisted thermal sterilisation, in turn facilitating the adoption by industry and commercialisation of such processes.

  18. New pressure and temperature effects on bacterial spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathys, A.; Heinz, V.; Knorr, D.

    2008-07-01

    C, and then dual stained with the fluorescent dyes SYTO 16 and propidium iodide. For pressure treated spores four distinct populations were detected by flow cytometry, and for these we suggest a three step model of inactivation involving a germination step following hydrolysis of the spore cortex, an unknown step, and finally an inactivation step with physical compromise of the spore inner membrane. An understanding of these effects and mechanisms will aid the safety assessment of pressure assisted thermal sterilisation, in turn facilitating the adoption by industry and commercialisation of such processes.

  19. Effect of pressurized steam on AA1050 aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jariyaboon, Manthana; Møller, Per; Ambat, Rajan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to understand the effect of pressurized steam on surface changes, structures of intermetallic particles and corrosion behavior of AA1050 aluminium. Design/methodology/approach - Industrially pure aluminium (AA1050, 99.5 per cent) surfaces were exposed...... reactivities was observed due to the formation of the compact oxide layer. Originality/value - This paper reveals a detailed investigation of how pressurized steam can affect the corrosion behaviour of AA1050 aluminium and the structure of Fe-containing intermetallic particles....

  20. A study on the optimization of finite volume effects of B K in lattice QCD by using the CUDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangho; Cho, Kihyeon

    2015-07-01

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the non-perturbative implementation of field theory to solve the QCD theory of quarks and gluons by using the Feynman path integral approach. We calculate the kaon CP (charge-parity) violation parameter B K generally arising in theories of physics beyond the Standard Model. Because lattice simulations are performed on finite volume lattices, the finite volume effects must be considered to exactly estimate the systematic error. The computational cost of numerical simulations may increase dramatically as the lattice spacing is decreased. Therefore, lattice QCD calculations must be optimized to account for the finite volume effects. The methodology used in this study was to develop an algorithm to parallelize the code by using a graphic processing unit (GPU) and to optimize the code to achieve as close to the theoretical peak performance as possible. The results revealed that the calculation speed of the newly-developed algorithm is significantly improved compared with that of the current algorithm for the finite volume effects.

  1. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Metz, Joannah M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from 1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems.

  2. Finite-size effects and the search for the critical endpoint in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Palhares, Leticia F; Kodama, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    We discuss how the finiteness of the system created in a heavy-ion collision affects possible signatures of the QCD critical endpoint. We show sizable results for the modifications of the chiral phase diagram at volume scales typically encountered in current heavy-ion collisions and address the applicability of finite-size scaling as a tool in the experimental search for the critical endpoint.

  3. Some Finite Difference Solutions of the Laminar Compressible Boundary Layer Showing the Effects of Upstream Transpiration Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, John T.

    1959-01-01

    Three numerical solutions of the partial differential equations describing the compressible laminar boundary layer are obtained by the finite difference method described in reports by I. Flugge-Lotz, D.C. Baxter, and this author. The solutions apply to steady-state supersonic flow without pressure gradient, over a cold wall and over an adiabatic wall, both having transpiration cooling upstream, and over an adiabatic wall with upstream cooling but without upstream transpiration. It is shown that for a given upstream wall temperature, upstream transpiration cooling affords much better protection to the adiabatic solid wall than does upstream cooling without transpiration. The results of the numerical solutions are compared with those of approximate solutions. The thermal results of the finite difference solution lie between the results of Rubesin and Inouye, and those of Libby and Pallone. When the skin-friction results of one finite difference solution are used in the thermal analysis of Rubesin and Inouye, improved agreement between the thermal results of the two methods of solution is obtained.

  4. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on elastic properties of ZDTP tribofilms

    CERN Document Server

    Demmou, Karim; Loubet, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the elastic properties of Zinc Dialkyl-dithiophosphate (ZDTP) tribofilms measured by nanoindentation increase versus applied pressure (Anvil effect) [1, 2]. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that, up to 8 GPa, this increase is a reversible phenomenon. A ZDTP tribofilm has been produced on "AISI 52100" steel substrate using a Cameron-Plint tribometer. After its formation, a hydrostatic pressure of about 8 GPa was applied during one minute on the tribofilm using a large radius steel ball ("Brinell-like" test). Nanoindentation tests were performed with a Berkovich tip on pads in order to measure and compare the mechanical properties of the tribofilm inside and outside the macroscopic plastically deformed area. Careful AFM observations have been carried out on each indent in order to take into account actual contact area. No difference in elastic properties was observed between the two areas: tribofilm modulus and pressure sensitivity are the same inside and outside the resi...

  5. Effects of sterilization on the Tekscan digital pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agins, Howard J; Harder, Valerie S; Lautenschlager, Eugene P; Kudrna, James C

    2003-11-01

    Investigations into the effects of sterilization on a new biomechanical pressure sensor are necessary before contemplating in vivo use. Ten, designated Experimental, "K-Scan" digital pressure sensor arrays were sterilized with ethylene oxide gas (EtO), and their ability to accurately and reproducibly measure an applied load of 2225 N (500 lb) was assessed. Simultaneously, 10 un-sterilized sensor arrays, designated Control, were assessed. Each array was loaded 10 times inside a two-dimensional curved surface, and all arrays exhibited high reproducibility (coefficients of variation0.05, beta0.05, beta<0.05). Results suggest that, following EtO sterilization, accurate and reproducible pressure measurements can be obtained from K-Scan sensors when calibration is performed at time of use.

  6. Accuracy in Blood Pressure Monitoring: The Effect of Noninvasive Blood Pressure Cuff Inflation on Intra-arterial Blood Pressure Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshadri, Veena; Tiwari, Akhilesh Kumar; Nagappa, Mahesh; Venkatraghavan, Lashmi

    2017-01-01

    Both invasive and noninvasive blood pressure (invasive arterial blood pressure [IABP] and noninvasive BP [NIBP]) monitors are used perioperatively; however, they often produce different values. The reason for this discrepancy is not clear, and it is possible that the act of cuff inflation itself might affect the IABP values, especially with the recurrent cycling of NIBP cuff. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ipsilateral NIBP cuff inflation on the contralateral IABP values. Prospective, observational study. One hundred consecutive patients were studied. The NIBP device was set to cycle every 5 min for a total of 6 times. During each cuff inflation cycle, changes in IABP values from the arterial line in the contralateral arm were recorded. A total of 582 measurements were included for data analysis. Chi-square, paired t-test, analysis of variance. Mean (± standard deviation) changes in systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP, and mean BP with cuff inflation were 6.7 ± 5.9, 2.6 ± 4.0, and 4.0 ± 3.9 mmHg, respectively. We observed an increase of 0-10 mmHg in SBP in majority (73.4%) of cuff inflations. The changes in IABP did not differ between the patients with or without hypertension or with the baseline SBP. This study showed that there is a transient reactive rise in IABP values with NIBP cuff inflation. This is important information in the perioperative and intensive care settings, where both these measurement techniques are routinely used. The exact mechanism for this effect is not known but may be attributed to the pain and discomfort from cuff inflation.

  7. Effects of fasting on Blood pressure in normotensive males

    OpenAIRE

    Fatima Samad

    2016-01-01

    Muslims all over the world fast in the holy month of Ramadan. Fasting means abstinence from drinking any liquids, eating, smoking and taking anything parenterally.  It is intermittent in nature from the start of dawn to end at dusk. Fasting has various physiological effects on different biological parameters of the human body. Previous studies that look at effect of Ramadan fasting on blood pressure have focused mainly on hypertensive patients and patients with already established heart disea...

  8. Effects of Temperature and Pressure on a Novel 1,3,4-Oxadiazole Derivative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Ji-Feng; HAN Yong-Hao; TANG Ben-Chen; GAO Chun-Xiao; LI Min; ZOU Guang-Tian

    2005-01-01

    @@ The electrical resistivity variation of 1,4-bis[(4-methylphenyl)- 1,3, 4-oxadiazolyl]phenylene ( OXD- 1 ) microcrystal is studied under variable pressure and temperature conditions by a quasi four-probe method in a diamond anvil cell.The sample resistivity is calculated with a finite element analysis method.The temperature and pressure dependencies of resistivity of OXD-1 microcrystal are measured up to 150 ℃ and 15 GPa.The resistivity decrease with temperature increasing indicates that OXD-1 exhibits an organic-semiconductor transport property in the experimental pressure region.With pressure increasing, the resistivity of OXD-1 increases firstly and reaches the maximum at about 6.2 GPa, and then begins to decrease as the pressure increases continuously.In situ x-ray diffraction data under pressure provide obvious prove that the anomaly of resistivity variation at 6.2 GPa is caused by the pressure-induced amorphism of OXD-1.

  9. THE EFFECT OF CORE EXERCISES ON TRANSDIAPHRAGMATIC PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Strongoli

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal exercises, such as sit ups and leg lifts, are used to enhance strength of the core muscles. An overlooked aspect of abdominal exercises is the compression the abdomen, leading to increased diaphragmatic work. We hypothesized that core exercises would produce a variety of transdiaphragmatic pressures. We also sought to determine if some of the easy exercises would produce pressures sufficient for a training stimulus to the diaphragm. We evaluated the effect of 13 different abdominal exercises, ranging in difficulty, on transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi, an index of diaphragmatic activity. Six healthy subjects, aged 22 to 53, participated. Each subject was instrumented with two balloon-tipped catheters to obtain gastric and esophageal pressures, from which Pdi was calculated. Prior to initiating the exercises, each subject performed a maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP maneuver. Resting Pdi was also measured. The exercises were performed from least to most difficult, with five repetitions each. There was a significant difference between the exercises and the MIP Pdi, as well as between the exercises and resting Pdi (p 50% of the Pdi during the MIP maneuver, which may provide a training stimulus to the diaphragm if used as a regular exercise. The Pdi measurements also provide insight into diaphragm recruitment during different core exercises, and may aid in the design of exercises to improve diaphragm strength and endurance

  10. The effect of velocity filtering in pressure estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavazzi, D. E.; Nemes, A.; Schmitter, S.; Coletti, F.

    2017-05-01

    Velocity field measurements allow, in principle, the evaluation of the pressure field by integrating the equations of fluid motion. Unavoidable experimental uncertainty, however, may result in unreliable estimates. In this study, we use the Poisson pressure equation to estimate the relative pressure from experimental velocities, and investigate how pre-processing with smoothing and solenoidal filters affects this estimate. For diffusion dominated laminar flow or for turbulent flow modeled through an eddy viscosity, measurement noise significantly affects the results. In this case, solenoidal filtering provides superior performance over other smoothing approaches, as it preserves the second spatial derivatives of the velocity field. For laminar flows dominated by advection or acceleration components of the pressure gradient, the choice of the filter appears to have little effect under limited noise, while smoothing produces improved relative pressure estimates for higher noise intensities. The above statements are verified using idealized flow conditions, numerical fluid dynamics simulations, and velocity fields from in-vivo and in-vitro magnetic resonance velocimetry.

  11. Effects of 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives on intraocular pressure in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Takashi; Ohnuma, Shin-ya; Uemoto, Kazuhiro; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Endo, Kazuki; Hosokawa, Tomokazu; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2004-02-23

    We evaluated the activities of 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives, relatively selective adenosine A2 receptor agonists, in the intraocular pressure regulation in rabbits. An adenosine A2 receptor agonist 2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS-21680) decreased intraocular pressure, while another A2 receptor agonist 2-(phenylamino)adenosine transiently increased it. The first group of 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives (1-hexyn-1-yl derivatives) caused a transient increase followed by decrease in intraocular pressure, while the second group (1-octyn-1-yl and 6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl derivatives) only decreased it. The second group is also effective in the ocular hypertensive models induced by water-loading and alpha-chymotrypsin. The outflow facility was increased by a 1-octyn-1-yl derivative. Both increase and decrease in intraocular pressure induced by 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives were inhibited by an adenosine A2 receptor antagonist 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine, but not by an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropyl xanthine. These findings suggest that 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives may affect intraocular pressure via adenosine A2 receptor, and 2-alkynyladenosine derivative-induced ocular hypotension is due to the increase of outflow facility.

  12. Effect of pressure on the physical properties of magnetorheological fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Spaggiari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, several applications of magnetorheological (MR fluids are present in the industrial world, nonetheless system requirements often needs better material properties. In technical literature a previous work shows that MR fluids exhibit a pressure dependency called squeeze strengthen effect. Since a lot of MR fluid based devices are rotary devices, this paper investigates the behaviour of MR fluids under pressure when a rotation is applied to shear the fluid. The system is designed in order to apply both the magnetic field and the pressure and follows a Design of Experiment approach. The experimental apparatus comprises a cylinder in which a piston is used both to apply the pressure and to shear the fluid. The magnetic circuit is designed to provide a nearly constant induction field in the MR fluid. The experimental apparatus measures the torque as a function of the variables considered and the yield shear stress is computed. The analysis of the results shows that there is a positive interaction between magnetic field and pressure, which enhances the MR fluid performances more than twice.

  13. Evaluation of the Heading Confinement Pressure Effect on Ground Settlement for EPBTBM Using Full 3D Numerical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Haghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ground settlement is often the most serious concern when tunneling under an old city with numerous historic monuments. A successful engineering design under these conditions would require getting the most out of the ground strength parameters and avoiding any weakening maneuver throughout the operation. Knowing that surface settlement is highly affected by tunneling parameters in EPB shield tunneling lead us to estimate the optimum values for the machine heading pressure with the lower amount of the ground settlement in fragile structure of the old city for the Esfahan Subway Project. Tunnels were dug underneath some of the most prominent historical sites along the path of the project. To improve precision and efficiency in tunneling operation, at the first step, tunnel heading confinement pressure is calculated by using an advanced 3D mathematical approach based on the limit equilibrium theory. Then, a promoted 3D finite element model is developed, taking into account the tunneling procedures and the designed heading confinement pressure from the first step. Settlements were pre-calculated and the surface displacement was checked at all sensitive locations. At the third step, settlement is estimated by exerting executed face supporting pressure to the tunnel face and the concluded amounts for displacement are compared with the outputs of extensometers. This comparison leads us to check the reliability of calculated settlements and the accuracy of the designed tunnel heading confinement pressure. Furthermore, evaluating the relation between extensometer outputs and executed tunnel face pressure at the points of extensometers stations validates the assumption that the safe face supporting pressure causes least surface displacement. Although the minimum pressure occurred in short term fluctuations, this approach confirms the sensibility of settlement with the least executed face supporting pressure.. It is also found that higher executed face

  14. Finite-size effects and scaling for the thermal QCD deconfinementphase transition within the exact color-singlet partition function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladrem, M.; Ait-El-Djoudi, A. [Ecole Normale Superieure-Kouba, Laboratoire de Physique des Particules et Physique Statistique, B.P. 92, Vieux-Kouba, Algiers (Algeria)

    2005-10-01

    We study the finite-size effects for the thermal quantum chromodynamics (QCD) deconfinement phase transition, and use a numerical finite-size scaling analysis to extract the scaling exponents characterizing its scaling behavior when approaching the thermodynamic limit (V{yields}{infinity}). For this, we use a simple model of coexistence of hadronic gas and color-singlet quark gluon plasma (QGP) phases in a finite volume. The color-singlet partition function of the QGP cannot be exactly calculated and is usually derived within the saddle-point approximation. When we try to do calculations with such an approximate color-singlet partition function, a problem arises in the limit of small temperatures and/or volumes VT{sup 3}<<1, requiring additional approximations if we want to carry out calculations. We propose in this work a method for an accurate calculation of any quantity of the finite system, without any approximation. By probing the behavior of some useful thermodynamic response functions on the whole range of temperature, it turns out that, in a finite-size system, all singularities in the thermodynamic limit are smeared out and the transition point is shifted away. A numerical finite-size scaling (FSS) analysis of the obtained data allows us to determine the scaling exponents of the QCD deconfinement phase transition. Our results expressing the equality between their values and the space dimensionality is a consequence of the singularity characterizing a first-order phase transition and agree very well with the predictions of other FSS theoretical approaches to a first-order phase transition and with the results of calculations using Monte Carlo methods in both lattice QCD and statistical physics models. (orig.)

  15. Measurement of thermoelectric, galvanomagnetic, and thermomagnetic effects at ultrahigh pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikov, Sergey V.; Shchennikov, Vladimir V.

    2003-04-01

    Lead chalcogenides are successfully applied at sensors of infrared radiation, thermoelectrical devices, thermogenerator, photoresistances, photodiodes, lasers, tensometers etc. Under high pressures above 2.5 - 6 GPa lead chaclogenides are known to suffer phase transitions, but up to now the thermoelectric properties of these materials at high pressure were unknown. In recent papers it was shown that heterophase state of material, which is being forming in the vicinity of semiconductor-metal phase transformations may be considered as a model of layer fabricated systems. As the most properties being dependent on the concentration and configuration of phases inclusions these materials may be used in engineering. For example, semiconductor-metal phase transitions induced by nanosecond heating and cooling of small regions of the memory cell are known to be using for nonvolatile memory develop. Recently the new technique of thermomagnetic measurements allowing to test a micro-samples of semiconductors have been developed at high pressure up to 30 GPa. The technique was applied for determination of scattering mechanisms and mobilities of charge carriers of direct-gap semiconductors Te, Se at ultrahigh pressure up to 30 GPa. The above measurements seems to be perspective for implementation to microelectronic manufacturing and MEMS technologies, for example, in modeling, quality control or testing of integrated circuit (IC). In present paper the thermo- and galvanomagnetic properties of micro-samples ~ 200×200×20 mkm of lead chalcogenides (PbS, PbSe, PbTe) at high pressure are investigated. The data of transverse magnetoresistance (MR) and also transverse and longitudinal Nernst-Ettingshausen (N-E) effects of lead chalcogenides both for initial and new phases, and also for heterophase states in the vicinity of phase transformations at high pressure are presented. One may suppose that the effects observed will find an interesting applications in thermosense industry. The

  16. The effect of anharmonicity in epitaxial interfaces. I. Substrate-induced dissociation of finite epitaxial islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milchev, Andrey; Markov, Ivan

    1984-01-01

    The behaviour of finite epitaxial islands in the periodic field of the substrate is theoretically investigated whereby the role of anharmonicity in the interatomic forces of the deposit is examined. The harmonic potential, traditionally adopted in the model of Frank and van der Merwe, is replaced by Toda and Morse potentials and sets of difference recursion equations, governing the static properties of such a system, are derived and solved numerically. Thus a new effect of substrate-induced rupture of anharmonic chains migrating on the surface, is found. It is shown that dissociation of migrating clusters is enhanced, if: (i) The substrate potential becomes increasingly modulated, (ii) the natural misfit between deposit and substrate is decreased (in absolute value), (iii) the misfit is negative, rather than positive (with the same absolute value) and (iv) the size of the cluster increases. A relation between dislocations in the chain and rupture appears to exist, suggesting dilatons (enormously stretched interatomic bonds) as the origin for destruction. The influence of anharmonicity on the equilibrium structure of the overgrowth is considered in Part II.

  17. Finite temperature effective action, AdS_5 black holes, and 1/N expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís; Liu, H; Wadia, S; Alvarez-Gaume, Luis; Gomez, Cesar; Liu, Hong; Wadia, Spenta

    2005-01-01

    We propose a phenomenological matrix model to study string theory in AdS_5 \\times S_5 in the canonical ensemble. The model reproduces all the known qualitative features of the theory. In particular, it gives a simple effective potential description of Euclidean black hole nucleation and the tunnelling between thermal AdS and the big black hole. It also has some interesting predictions. We find that there exists a critical temperature at which the Euclidean small black hole undergoes a Gross-Witten phase transition. We identify the phase transition with the Horowitz-Polchinski point where the black hole horizon size becomes comparable to the string scale. The appearance of the Hagedorn divergence of thermal AdS is due to the merger of saddle points corresponding to the Euclidean small black hole and thermal AdS. The merger can be described in terms of a cusp (A_3) catastrophe and divergences at the perturbative string level are smoothed out at finite string coupling using standard techniques of catastrophe the...

  18. Finite-size effects in Luther-Emery phases of Holstein and Hubbard models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greitemann, J.; Hesselmann, S.; Wessel, S.; Assaad, F. F.; Hohenadler, M.

    2015-12-01

    The one-dimensional Holstein model and its generalizations have been studied extensively to understand the effects of electron-phonon interaction. The half-filled case is of particular interest, as it describes a transition from a metallic phase with a spin gap due to attractive backscattering to a Peierls insulator with charge-density-wave order. Our quantum Monte Carlo results support the existence of a metallic phase with dominant power-law charge correlations, as described by the Luther-Emery fixed point. We demonstrate that for Holstein and also for purely fermionic models the spin gap significantly complicates finite-size numerical studies, and explains inconsistent previous results for Luttinger parameters and phase boundaries. On the other hand, no such complications arise in spinless models. The correct low-energy theory of the spinful Holstein model is argued to be that of singlet bipolarons with a repulsive, mutual interaction. This picture naturally explains the existence of a metallic phase, but also implies that gapless Luttinger liquid theory is not applicable.

  19. Logarithmic finite-size effects on interfacial free energies: Phenomenological theory and Monte Carlo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2014-07-01

    The computation of interfacial free energies between coexisting phases (e.g., saturated vapor and liquid) by computer simulation methods is still a challenging problem due to the difficulty of an atomistic identification of an interface and interfacial fluctuations on all length scales. The approach to estimate the interfacial tension from the free-energy excess of a system with interfaces relative to corresponding single-phase systems does not suffer from the first problem but still suffers from the latter. Considering d-dimensional systems with interfacial area Ld -1 and linear dimension Lz in the direction perpendicular to the interface, it is argued that the interfacial fluctuations cause logarithmic finite-size effects of order ln(L)/Ld -1 and order ln(Lz)/Ld -1, in addition to regular corrections (with leading-order const/Ld -1). A phenomenological theory predicts that the prefactors of the logarithmic terms are universal (but depend on the applied boundary conditions and the considered statistical ensemble). The physical origin of these corrections are the translational entropy of the interface as a whole, "domain breathing" (coupling of interfacial fluctuations to the bulk order parameter fluctuations of the coexisting domains), and capillary waves. Using a new variant of the ensemble switch method, interfacial tensions are found from Monte Carlo simulations of d =2 and d =3 Ising models and a Lennard-Jones fluid. The simulation results are fully consistent with the theoretical predictions.

  20. Finite-size effects in a metallic multichannel ring with Kondo impurity: Persistent currents and magnetoresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zvyagin, A.A. [B. I. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, 47, Lenin Avenue, 310164, Kharkov (Ukraine); Schlottmann, P. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States)

    1996-12-01

    We consider a spin-1/2 impurity interacting with conduction electrons in two different orbital channels via an isotropic spin exchange. The exchange is the same for both channels, but a crystalline field breaks the symmetry between the orbital channels. This corresponds to a splitting of the conduction electron {Gamma}{sub 8} into two doublets in the quadrupolar Kondo effect, or to the electron-assisted tunneling of an atom in a double-well potential in an external magnetic field. Another possible realization could be a quantum dot coupled to two equal rings of the same length subject to an electrostatic potential difference. We consider the Bethe ansatz equations for this model and derive the tower structure of the finite-size corrections to the ground-state energy. These results are used to discuss the Aharonov-Bohm-Casher interference pattern in the persistent charge and spin currents, and the magnetoresistivity due to the scattering of electrons off the impurity. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. Effects of cerium on Sn-Ag-Cu alloys based on finite element simulation and experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Liang; XUE Songbai; CHEN Yan; HAN Zongjie; WANG Jianxin; YU Shenglin; LU Fangyan

    2009-01-01

    Effect of small addition of rare earth on Sn-Ag-Cu solder was investigated by finite element method based on creep model of low stress and high stress and experiments respectively. It was found that addition of rare earths evidently improved the resistance to creep deformation of the solder, so that the reliability of Sn-Ag-Cu-Ce solder joint could be improved remarkably. Mechanical testing and microstructural analysis results showed that, mechanical properties of alloys bearing Ce were better than that of the original alloy, and the optimum content of Ce was about 0.03wt.%. After aging intermetallic compound between solder joint and Cu substrate was observed and analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron micrographs (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (EDX). Results showed that the thickness of intermetallic compound layer would became thinner when the addition of Ce was about 0.03wt.%, and the grains of intermetallic compound became finer, and the microstructure was more homogeneous than that in the original Sn-Ag-Cu/Cu interface.

  2. Effect of finite magnetic film thickness on Néel coupling in spin valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kools, J. C. S.; Kula, W.; Mauri, Daniele; Lin, Tsann

    1999-04-01

    Spin valves are widely studied due to their application as magnetoresistive material in magnetic recording heads and other magnetic field sensors. An important film property is the interlayer coupling field (called offset field Ho or ferromagnetic coupling field Hf). It has been shown that the Néel model for orange-peel coupling can be applied successfully to describe this interlayer coupling. The waviness associated with the developing granular structure is thereby taken as the relevant waviness. The original Néel model describes the ferromagnetic magnetostatic interaction between two ferromagnetic layers, of infinite thickness, separated by a nonmagnetic spacer with a correlated interface waviness. In this article, this physical picture is refined to account for the effect of the finite thickness of the magnetic films in a spin valve. Magnetic poles created at the outer surfaces of the magnetic layers result in an antiferromagnetic interaction with the poles at the inner surface of the opposite layer. A simple model is presented for the different interactions in a top spin valve (columnar structure with cumulative waviness on a flat substrate) and for a bottom spin valve (columnar structure with conformal waviness on a way substrate). Comparison to experimental data, shows that the free and pinned layer thickness dependence can be understood from this refined picture.

  3. Axial anomaly effects in finite isospin $\\chi$PT in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Adhikari, Prabal

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider finite isospin chiral perturbation theory including the effects of the axial anomaly (through the Wess-Zumino-Witten term) in a strong magnetic field. We firstly prove that in a strong external magnetic field ($H_{\\rm ext}$) or more precisely the Schwinger limit, where photon back-reactions are suppressed, only neutral pions can condense and the condensation of charged pions is forbidden. Secondly, we find that the $\\pi^{0}$ domain wall is an example of a phase that can exist in a strong magnetic field and suggest the existence of a new phase transition line from the normal vacuum state to the $\\pi^{0}$ domain wall state. This phase transition exists for non-zero pion masses if the baryon chemical potential exceeds a critical value $16\\pi f_{\\pi}^{2}m_{\\pi}/eH_{\\rm ext}$. The phase transition line persists away from the Schwinger limit when the photons can back-react to the external magnetic field.

  4. Effects of dose reduction on bone strength prediction using finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, D.; Subburaj, Karupppasamy; Mei, Kai; Kopp, Felix K.; Foehr, Peter; Noel, Peter B.; Kirschke, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of dose reduction, by means of tube exposure reduction, on bone strength prediction from finite-element (FE) analysis. Fresh thoracic mid-vertebrae specimens (n = 11) were imaged, using multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), at different intensities of X-ray tube exposures (80, 150, 220 and 500 mAs). Bone mineral density (BMD) was estimated from the mid-slice of each specimen from MDCT images. Differences in image quality and geometry of each specimen were measured. FE analysis was performed on all specimens to predict fracture load. Paired t-tests were used to compare the results obtained, using the highest CT dose (500 mAs) as reference. Dose reduction had no significant impact on FE-predicted fracture loads, with significant correlations obtained with reference to 500 mAs, for 80 mAs (R2  = 0.997, p analysis. Reduced CT dose will enable early diagnosis and advanced monitoring of osteoporosis and associated fracture risk.

  5. [Finite Element Analysis of Effect of Key Dimension of Nitinol Stent on Its Fatigue Behaviour].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianjun; Wang, Shengzhang

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the fatigue behavior of nitinol stents, we used the finite element method to simulate the manufacture processes of nitinol stents, including expanding, annealing, crimping, and releasing procedure in applications of the clinical treatments. Meanwhile, we also studied the effect of the crown area dimension of stent on strain distribution. We then applied a fatigue diagram to investigate the fatigue characteristics of nitinol stents. The results showed that the maximum strain of all three stent structures, which had different crown area dimensions under vessel loads, located at the transition area between the crown and the strut, but comparable deformation appeared at the inner side of the crown area center. The cause, of these results was that the difference of the area moment of inertia determined by the crown dimension induced the difference of strain distribution in stent structure. Moreover, it can be drawn from the fatigue diagrams that the fatigue performance got the best result when the crown area dimension equaled to the intermediate value. The above results proved that the fatigue property of nitinol stent had a close relationship with the dimension of stent crown area, but there was no positive correlation.

  6. Tuning surface reactivity by finite size effects: role of orbital symmetry in the d - band model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Paul; Yin, Xiangshi; Cooper, Valentino; Weitering, Hanno

    Catalytic activity depends sensitively on the strength of the interactions between reactant molecules and catalyst surface: too weak and the catalyst cannot capture enough molecules to react; too strong and the reaction products do not desorb, blocking further reactions. The ability to control the binding strength of molecules to metal surfaces is thus fundamental to the design of efficient and selective catalysts. Catalyst design often relies on increasing the interaction strength on relatively non-reactive materials by introducing active sites. Here, we present a complementary approach: we exploit finite size effects in the electronic structure of ultrathin Pd(111) films grown on Ru(0001) to tune their reactivity by changing the film thickness one atom layer at a time. While bulk Pd(111) is reactive toward oxygen, we find that Pd films thinner than 6 atom layers are surprisingly inert to oxidation. This observation can be explained with the d-band model only when it is applied to the orbitals directly involved in the bonding. The insight into orbital specific contributions to surface reactivity could be useful in the design of catalysts. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  7. The effects of fillet formation on the strength of braze pressure welded joint with high frequency induction heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzumura, A.; Inagaki, Y.; Ikeshoji, T.T.; Yamazaki, T. [Graduate School of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Braze Pressure Welding (BPW) with high frequency induction heating had been invented as the new joining method for bonding general steel pipes for on-site piping without danger of fire and the dispersion in joint properties due to welder's skill. In the BPW, brazing filler is interlaid between the mating surfaces to be joined. The filler melts by heating up to joining temperature, then the welding pressure discharges it from the joining interface. At the same time, the base metals are pressure-welded to each other, and that the discharged liquid filler forms fillets around the joining area. The fillets have the effects both on relaxing the stress concentration at the joint and on increasing the joining area, which contributes to the strengthening of joint. And the pressure is comparatively low, so the deformation of joint is little. In this paper, in order to investigate the effects of fillet on strengthening the joint, the stress state around the joint area and the degree of the effect of stress concentration relaxation were analyzed by finite element analysis. So it was revealed that the fillets reduced the stress concentration and separated the maximum stress site from the edge of the joining interface. Experimentally, the fillet formation was confirmed around the BPW joining area and that BPW joint had the superior tensile strength to brazed or pressure-welded joints by tensile test of joints. (orig.)

  8. Effect of the Plasma Pressure on Magnetohydrodynamic Kink Instability in a Cylindrical Geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Yujie; LIU Jinyuan; WANG Xuehui

    2009-01-01

    A semi-analytical method is introduced to study kink instability in cylindrical plasma with line-tied boundary conditions. The method is based on an expansion for magne-tohydrodynamics (MHD) equations in one-dimensional (1D) radial eigenvalue problems by using Fourier transforms. The MHD equations then become an ordinary differential equation. This method is applicable to both ideal and non-ideal MHD problem. The effect of plasma pressure (P0) on kink instability is studied in a cylindrical geometry. Complex discrete spectra are pre-sented. Two-dimensional (2D) eigenfunctions with the line-tied boundary conditions are obtained. The growth rate and radial eigenfunctions are different in the two cases of P0 = 0 and P0 ≠ 0, which indicate that the effect of plasma pressure can not be ignored if it is large enough. This method allows us to understand the role of individual radial eigenfunctions, and is also compu-tationally efficient compared to direct solutions of the MHD equations by the finite difference method.

  9. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-15

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8{approx}2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4{approx}2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure.

  10. Pressure effects on thermal conductivity and expansion of geologic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, J.N.

    1979-02-01

    Through analysis of existing data, an estimate is made of the effect of pressure or depth on the thermal conductivity and expansion of geologic materials which could be present in radioactive waste repositories. In the case of homogeneous dense materials, only small shifts are predicted to occur at depths less than or equal to 3 km, and these shifts will be insignificant as compared with those caused by temperature variations. As the porosity of the medium increases, the variation of conductivity and expansion with pressure becomes greater, with conductivity increasing and expansion decreasing as pressure increases. The pressure dependence of expansion can be found from data on the temperature variation of the isobaric compressibility. In a worst case estimate, a decrease in expansion of approx. 25% is predicted for 5% porous sandstone at a depth of 3 km. The thermal conductivity of a medium with gaseous inclusions increases as the porosity decreases, with the magnitude of the increase being dependent on the details of the porosity collapse. Based on analysis of existing data on tuff and sandstone, a weighted geometric mean formula is recommended for use in calculating the conductivity of porous rock. As a result of this study, it is recommended that measurement of rock porosity versus depth receive increased attention in exploration studies and that the effect of porosity on thermal conductivity and expansion should be examined in more detail.

  11. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF BURST PRESSURE FOR CARBON FIBER WRAPPED COMPOSITE CYLINDERS%碳纤维缠绕复合气瓶爆破压力的有限元分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段成红; 吴祥; 罗翔鹏

    2012-01-01

    本文主要采用有限元法分析复合气瓶的爆破,按最大应力准则和最大应变准则预测爆破压力,并与《DOT CFFC》标准规定的最小爆破压力进行比较,计算误差百分比,由误差百分比分析得出,按最大应变准则预测爆破压力较为接近最小爆破压力,对工程实践有较大的指导意义.%In this paper, the bursting of composite cylinders is analyzed with the finite element method. The burst pressure is predicted according to the maximum stress criterion and the maximum strain criterion. The predicted results are compared with the minimum burst pressure regulated by the DOT CFFC standard, and the percentage error is calculated. By analyzing the percentage error, it can be concluded that the burst pressure predicted with maximum strain criterion is more approximate to the minimum burst pressure. The finite element analysis results in this paper are conducive to the engineering practice.

  12. Modeling plasma pressure anisotropy's effect on Saturn's global magnetospheric dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, M.; Harnett, E. M.; Winglee, R.

    2014-12-01

    A 3D multi-fluid, multi-scale plasma model with a complete treatment of plasma pressure anisotropy is employed to study global magnetospheric dynamics at Saturn. Cassini has observed anisotropies in the Saturnian magnetosphere, and analyses have showed correlations between anisotropy and plasma convection, ring current structure and intensity, confinement of plasma to the equatorial plane, as well as mass transport to the outer magnetosphere. The energization and transport of plasma within Saturn's magnetosphere is impactful upon the induced magnetic environments and atmospheres of potentially habitable satellites such as Enceladus and Titan. Recent efforts to couple pressure anisotropy with 3D multi-fluid plasma modeling have shown a significant move towards matching observations for simulations of Earth's magnetosphere. Our approach is used to study the effects of plasma pressure anisotropy on global processes of the Saturnian magnetosphere such as identifying the effect of pressure anisotropy on the centrifugal interchange instability. Previous simulation results have not completely replicated all aspects of the structure and formation of the interchange 'fingers' measured by Cassini at Saturn. The related effects of anisotropy, in addition to those mentioned above, include contribution to formation of MHD waves (e.g. reduction of Alfvén wave speed) and formation of firehose and mirror instabilities. An accurate understanding of processes such as the interchange instability is required if a complete picture of mass and energy transport at Saturn is to be realized. The results presented here will detail how the inclusion of a full treatment of pressure anisotropy for idealized solar wind conditions modifies the interchange structure and shape of the tail current sheet. Simulation results are compared to observations made by Cassini.

  13. Effects of smoking on central blood pressure and pressure amplification in hypertension of the young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladini, Francesca; Benetti, Elisabetta; Fania, Claudio; Mos, Lucio; Casiglia, Edoardo; Palatini, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cigarette smoking on peripheral and central blood pressure (BP) in a group of young stage I hypertensives. A total of 344 untreated subjects from the HARVEST study were examined (mean age 37±10 years). Patients were divided into three groups based on smoking status: non-smokers, light smokers (⩽5 cigarettes/day) and moderate-to-heavy smokers (>5 cigarettes/day); and into three groups by age: 18-29, 30-39 and ⩾40 years. Central BP measurements and augmentation index (AIx) were calculated from brachial pressure waveform, with applanation tonometry, by means of the Specaway DAT System plus a Millar tonometer. The central waveform was derived from peripheral BP using the same software system of the SphygmoCor System pulse wave analysis. In addition, two indirect measurements of arterial stiffness were calculated: pulse pressure (PP) and systolic BP amplification. Central systolic BP and PP were higher in smokers than in non-smokers (systolic BP: 121.9±13.1 mmHg in non-smokers, 127.2±16.5 mmHg in light smokers, 126.7±15.3 mmHg in those who smoked >5 cigarettes/day, p=0.009; PP: 37.7±9.8 mmHg, 41.5±13.1 mmHg, 41.9±10.5 mmHg, respectively, p=0.005). Lower systolic BP amplification (psmoking and age group (p=0.05). The AIx was higher in smokers compared to non-smokers (p=0.024). In young hypertensives, smoking has a detrimental effect on central BP, accelerating the age-related decline in BP amplification. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Pressure to kill or pressure to boost: a review on the various effects and applications of hydrostatic pressure in bacterial biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follonier, Stéphanie; Panke, Sven; Zinn, Manfred

    2012-03-01

    Much knowledge has been gained for the last 30 years about the effects of pressure on bacteria, and various pressure-based technologies have been designed. The development of modern molecular biology techniques (e.g., DNA microarrays) as well as the technological advances realized in the manufacturing of robust sampling and high-pressure devices has allowed these advances. Not only the direct effects on cell components (membranes, proteins, and nucleic acids) have been unraveled, but also the cellular response to pressure has been investigated by means of transcriptome and proteome analyses. Initially, research was performed by marine biologists who studied the microorganisms living in the deep sea at pressures of 1,000 bar. In parallel, food technologists developed pressure-based methods for inactivating microorganisms without altering the food properties as much as with temperature treatment. The preservation of specific product properties is also the rationale for pressure-based methods for the disinfection of biomaterials and for vaccine production. Therefore, attention was first focused on the “killing” potential of high pressure. On the other hand, there has been a growing interest in using elevated pressures (up to ~10 bar) for enhancing the productivity of bioprocesses. In this case, no killing effect was sought, but pressure was applied to “boost” the process by enhancing the oxygen transfer to the cell culture. This paper gives an overview on the effects of pressures in the range of 1 bar to 10 kbar on bacteria and presents the major and most recent achievements realized in the development of pressure-based biotechnological applications.

  15. Effects of fluid inertia and bearing flexibility on the performance of finite length journal bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javorova, Juliana; Alexandrov, Vassil

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes the theoretical study concerning the effect of lubricant inertia forces and deformability of the bearing elastic layer on the performance of a plane journal bearing. The problem is investigated for a Newtonian lubricant under isothermal and isoviscous conditions. The analysis considers the generalized Reynolds equation governing the flow of lubricant in the clearance space and the linear elasticity equation governing the displacement field in the bearing shell. An iterative numerical procedure with successive over relaxation is used to pressure distribution within the lubricated conjunction. Bearing performance characteristics have been presented for typically selected values of generalized Reynolds number Re* and elasticity parameters of the elastic liner. It has been observed that the combined effect of fluid inertia forces and bearing flexibility affects the performance characteristics of dynamically loaded journal bearing.

  16. Effect of non-uniform basic temperature gradients on Marangoni convection with a boundary slab of finite conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivakumara I S,

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The linear stability analysis of Marangoni convection in a fluid layer with a boundary slab of finite conductivity is considered. The effects of various non uniform temperature gradients are investigated. The lower boundary is a considered to be a thin slab of finite conductivity instead of a regular rigid surface. At the contact surface between the thin slab and the fluid layer the thermalboundary conditions are used and the upper surface is considered to be free and insulating to temperature perturbation and also surface tension effects are allowed. The resulting eigen value problem is solved exactly. The critical values of the Marangoni numbers for the onset of Marangoni convection are calculated for different temperature profile and the latter is found to be critically dependent on the depth ratio and conductivity ratio. The effects of the thermal conductivity and the thickness of the solid plate on the onset of convective instability with different temperature profile arestudied in detail.

  17. Fast finite element calculation of effective conductivity of random continuum microstructures: The recursive Poincaré-Steklov operator method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Thomas J.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2017-08-01

    The effective conductivity of a block of composite can be extracted from the Dirichlet-to-Neumann Poincaré-Steklov operator (PSO) for that block. In this paper, a domain decomposition method for computing the PSO over a finite element mesh is discussed. A new numerical strategy is introduced to accelerate the computation of this operator, using the Schur complement to calculate the PSO for the smallest subdomains, then recursively merging subdomain PSOs up to the full domain. At each step of the algorithm, information extraneous to the PSO is discarded. The effective conductivity values computed by this method are identical to those obtained from a basic Finite Element Method, an order of magnitude faster and with much less computer memory consumed. As proof of concept, effective conductivity measurements are presented for a percolating random fractal-like microstructure across a range of phase fractions.

  18. Effect of crack on the impact response of plates by the extended finite element method (X-FEM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiberkak, Rachid [University of Blida, Soumaa (Algeria); Bachene, Mourad [University of Medea, Medea (Algeria); Rechak, Said [Ecole Nationale Polytechnique, Algiers (Algeria)

    2014-06-15

    The dynamic response of cracked isotropic plates subjected to impact loading is studied in this paper. The impact properties of cracked plate are compared with the virgin ones to predict the eventual presence of discontinuities in plates. The extended finite element method (X-FEM) is employed in the mathematical modeling of the impact problem, wherein the effects of shear deformation is considered. Conventional finite element without any discontinuity is initially conducted in the numerical implementation. Enriched functions are then added to the nodal displacement field for element nodes that contain cracks. The effects of crack length and crack position on contact force and on plate deflection are analyzed. Results show that the maximal contact force decreases as the deflection increases with increasing crack length a . The effect of crack position on the dynamic response is less pronounced when the crack is near the fixed end.

  19. Effect of finite Coulomb interaction on full counting statistics of electronic transport through single-molecule magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Haibin, E-mail: xhb98326110@163.co [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China); Nie, Y.-H., E-mail: nieyh@sxu.edu.c [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China); Li, Z.-J.; Liang, J.-Q. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China)

    2011-01-17

    We study the full counting statistics (FCS) in a single-molecule magnet (SMM) with finite Coulomb interaction U. For finite U the FCS, differing from U{yields}{infinity}, shows a symmetric gate-voltage-dependence when the coupling strengths with two electrodes are interchanged, which can be observed experimentally just by reversing the bias-voltage. Moreover, we find that the effect of finite U on shot noise depends on the internal level structure of the SMM and the coupling asymmetry of the SMM with two electrodes as well. When the coupling of the SMM with the incident-electrode is stronger than that with the outgoing-electrode, the super-Poissonian shot noise in the sequential tunneling regime appears under relatively small gate-voltage and relatively large finite U, and dose not for U{yields}{infinity}; while it occurs at relatively large gate-voltage for the opposite coupling case. The formation mechanism of super-Poissonian shot noise can be qualitatively attributed to the competition between fast and slow transport channels.

  20. General finite-size effects for zero-entropy states in one-dimensional quantum integrable models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliëns, Sebas; Caux, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-12-01

    We present a general derivation of the spectrum of excitations for gapless states of zero entropy density in Bethe ansatz solvable models. Our formalism is valid for an arbitrary choice of bare energy function which is relevant to situations where the Hamiltonian for time evolution differs from the Hamiltonian in a (generalized) Gibbs ensemble, i.e. out of equilibrium. The energy of particle and hole excitations, as measured with the time-evolution Hamiltonian, is shown to include additional contributions stemming from the shifts of the Fermi points that may now have finite energy. The finite-size effects are also derived and the connection with conformal field theory discussed. The critical exponents can still be obtained from the finite-size spectrum, however the velocity occurring here differs from the one in the constant Casimir term. The derivation highlights the importance of the phase shifts at the Fermi points for the critical exponents of asymptotes of correlations. We generalize certain results known for the ground state and discuss the relation to the dressed charge (matrix). Finally, we discuss the finite-size corrections in the presence of an additional particle or hole, which are important for dynamical correlation functions.

  1. The effects of stereotypes and observer pressure on athletic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krendl, Anne; Gainsburg, Izzy; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-02-01

    Although the effects of negative stereotypes and observer pressure on athletic performance have been well researched, the effects of positive stereotypes on performance, particularly in the presence of observers, is not known. In the current study, White males watched a video either depicting Whites basketball players as the best free throwers in the NBA (positive stereotype), Black basketball players as the best free throwers in the NBA (negative stereotype), or a neutral sports video (control). Participants then shot a set of free throws, during which half the participants were also videotaped (observer condition), whereas the other half were not (no observer condition). Results demonstrated that positive stereotypes improved free throw performance, but only in the no observer condition. Interestingly, observer pressure interacted with the positive stereotype to lead to performance decrements. In the negative stereotype condition, performance decrements were observed both in the observer and no observer conditions.

  2. Finite-size effects and the search for the critical endpoint of QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, Eduardo S; Palhares, Letícia F; Sorensen, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Taking into account the finiteness of the system created in heavy ion collisions, we show sizable results for the modifications of the chiral phase diagram at volume scales typically encountered in current experiments and demonstrate the applicability of finite-size scaling as a tool in the experimental search for the critical endpoint. Using data from RHIC and SPS and assuming finite-size scaling, we find that RHIC data from 200 GeV down to 19.6 GeV is only consistent with a critical point at \\mu \\gtrsim 510 MeV. We also present predictions for the fluctuations at lower energies currently being investigated in the Beam Energy Scan program.

  3. Effect of chymase on intraocular pressure in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Takashi; Maruichi, Midori; Takai, Shinji; Oku, Hidehiro; Sugiyama, Tetsuya; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Ikeda, Tsunehiko; Miyazaki, Mizuo

    2005-11-01

    Chymase is a chymotrypsin-like serine protease that is stored exclusively in the secretory granules of mast cells and converts big endothelins to endothelin-1 (1-31). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chymase on intraocular pressure in rabbits. Chymase injection (3 and 10 mU) resulted in a trend toward increased intraocular pressure and a significant increase in intraocular pressure at a dose of 10 mU compared with the control. A specific chymase inhibitor, Suc-Val-Pro-Phe(P)(OPh)(2), attenuated the ocular hypertension induced by chymase. Endothelin-1 (1-31) also caused ocular hypertension, which was inhibited by a selective endothelin ET(A) receptor antagonist, cyclo(D-Asp-Pro-D-Val-Leu-D-Trp) (BQ-123). Moreover, chymase-induced ocular hypertension was inhibited by BQ-123. These results suggest that chymase influences the regulation of intraocular pressure, and it is likely that the formation of endothelin-1 (1-31) and subsequent activation of endothelin ET(A) receptors are involved in the development of ocular hypertension induced by chymase.

  4. Recent neurochemical basis of inert gas narcosis and pressure effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostain, J C; Balon, N

    2006-01-01

    Compressed air or a nitrogen-oxygen mixture produces from 0.3 MPa nitrogen narcosis. The traditional view was that anaesthesia or narcosis occurs when the volume of a hydrophobic site is caused to expand beyond a critical amount by the absorption of molecules of a narcotic gas. The observation of the pressure reversal effect on general anaesthesia has for a long time supported the lipid theory. However, recently, protein theories are in increasing consideration since results have been interpreted as evidence for a direct anaesthetic-protein interaction. The question is to know whether inert gases act by binding processes on proteins of neurotransmitter receptors. Compression with breathing mixtures where nitrogen is replaced by helium which has a low narcotic potency induces from 1 MPa, the high pressure nervous syndrome which is related to neurochemical disturbances including changes of the amino-acid and monoamine neurotransmissions. The use of narcotic gas (nitrogen or hydrogen) added to a helium-oxygen mixture, reduced some symptoms of the HPNS but also had some effects due to an additional effect of the narcotic potency of the gas. The researches performed at the level of basal ganglia of the rat brain and particularly the nigro-striatal pathway involved in the control of the motor, locomotor and cognitive functions, disrupted by narcosis or pressure, have indicated that GABAergic neurotransmission is implicated via GABAa receptors.

  5. A finite element model on effects of impact load and cavitation on fatigue crack propagation in mechanical bileaflet aortic heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, H; Klassen, R J; Wan, W-K

    2008-10-01

    Pyrolytic carbon mechanical heart valves (MHVs) are widely used to replace dysfunctional and failed heart valves. As the human heart beats around 40 million times per year, fatigue is the prime mechanism of mechanical failure. In this study, a finite element approach is implemented to develop a model for fatigue analysis of MHVs due to the impact force between the leaflet and the stent and cavitation in the aortic position. A two-step method to predict crack propagation in the leaflets of MHVs has been developed. Stress intensity factors (SIFs) are computed at a small initiated crack located on the leaflet edge (the worst case) using the boundary element method (BEM). Static analysis of the crack is performed to analyse the stress distribution around the front crack zone when the crack is opened; this is followed by a dynamic crack analysis to consider crack propagation using the finite element approach. Two factors are taken into account in the calculation of the SIFs: first, the effect of microjet formation due to cavitation in the vicinity of leaflets, resulting in water hammer pressure; second, the effect of the impact force between the leaflet and the stent of the MHVs, both in the closing phase. The critical initial crack length, the SIFs, the water hammer pressure, and the maximum jet velocity due to cavitation have been calculated. With an initial crack length of 35 microm, the fatigue life of the heart valve is greater than 60 years (i.e. about 2.2 x 10(9) cycles) and, with an initial crack length of 170 microm, the fatigue life of the heart valve would be around 2.5 years (i.e. about 9.1 x 10(7) cycles). For an initial crack length greater than 170 microm, there is catastrophic failure and fatigue cracking no longer occurs. A finite element model of fatigue analysis using Patran command language (PCL custom code) in MSC software can be used to evaluate the useful lifespan of MHVs. Similar methodologies can be extended to other medical devices under cyclic

  6. Discontinuous finite element formulation for bodies of revolution with application in the prevention of fragile fracture in pressure vessel of PWR reactors; Formulacao de elementos finitos descontinuos para corpos de revolucao com aplicacao na prevencao de fratura fragil em vaso de pressao de reatores PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitez Alvarez, Gustavo

    1999-08-15

    In this work, a hybrid formulation is established for bodies of revolution, based on the equation of Fourier series for the discontinuous finite element method, analogous to the one that exists in the classical finite element method. Furthermore, a methodology to analyse the prevention of fragile fracture in pressure vessel of pressurized water reactors is presented. The results obtained suggest that careful analysis must be made for non symmetric refrigeration. (author)

  7. Behaviour of Lagrangian triangular mixed fluid finite elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Gopalakrishnan; G Devi

    2000-02-01

    The behaviour of mixed fluid finite elements, formulated based on the Lagrangian frame of reference, is investigated to understand the effects of locking due to incompressibility and irrotational constraints. For this purpose, both linear and quadratic mixed triangular fluid elements are formulated. It is found that there exists a close relationship between the penalty finite element approach that uses reduced/selective numerical integration to alleviate locking, and the mixed finite element approach. That is, performing reduced/selective integration in the penalty approach amounts to reducing the order of pressure interpolation in the mixed finite element approach for obtaining similar results. A number of numerical experiments are performed to determine the optimum degree of interpolation of both the mean pressure and the rotational pressure in order that the twin constraints are satisfied exactly. For this purpose, the benchmark solution of the rigid rectangular tank is used. It is found that, irrespective of the degree of mean and the rotational pressure interpolation, the linear triangle mesh, with or without central bubble function (incompatible mode), locks when both the constraints are enforced simultaneously. However, for quadratic triangle, linear interpolation of the mean pressure and constant rotational pressure ensures exact satisfaction of the constraints and the mesh does not lock. Based on the results obtained from the numerical experiments, a number of important conclusions are arrived at.

  8. Note: A method for correction of finite pulse time effects in flash diffusivity measurements of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Yang, Liping; Zhong, Qiu; Xu, Zijun; Luo, Caiyun

    2016-08-01

    A data correction method that can reduce finite pulse time effects in the flash method is presented in this article. Based on the physical model of the classical flash method, the present method uses the cutoff time moment of laser heating as zero point. This article investigated the case of constant heat flux heating by using the theoretical method and obtained a new calculation formula. The formula was tested in the case where half temperature rise time is less than the pulse time (i.e., τ0/t0.5 > 1), and the result was satisfactory. Theoretically, this method can correct the effect of any finite pulse time and significantly expand the scope of application of the flash method.

  9. 3-D FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF WELDING RESIDUAL STRESS ON HYDROGEN DIFFUSION IN HYDROGEN CONTAINED ENVIRONMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The hydrogen distribution of 16MnR steel weldment in hydrogen contained environment was calculated using the finite element method (FEM). The effect of welding residual stress on hydrogen diffusion has been discussed using a 3-D sequential coupling finite element analysis procedure complied by Abaqus code. The hydrogen diffusion coefficient in weld metal, the heat affected zone (HAZ), and the base metal of the 16MnR steel weldment were measured using the electrochemical permeation technique. The hydrogen diffusion without the effect of stress was also calculated and compared. Owing to the existence of welding residual stress, the hydrogen concentration was obviously increased and the hydrogen would diffuse and accumulate in the higher stress region.

  10. Spin-orbit interaction and asymmetry effects on Kondo ridges at finite magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grap, Stephan; Andergassen, Sabine; Paaske, Jens

    2011-01-01

    ridges, which are robust against SOI as time-reversal symmetry is preserved. As a result of the crossing of a spin-up and a spin-down level at vanishing SOI, two additional Kondo plateaus appear at finite B. They are not protected by symmetry and rapidly vanish if the SOI is turned on. Left...

  11. Synchronization of oscillators with long range interaction: Phase transition and anomalous finite size effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marodi, M.; D'ovidio, Francesco; Vicsek, T.

    2002-01-01

    Synchronization in a lattice of a finite population of phase oscillators with algebraically decaying, non-normalized coupling is studied by numerical simulations. A critical level of decay is found, below which full locking takes place if the population contains a sufficiently large number of ele...

  12. Numerical analysis of finite Debye-length effects in induced-charge electro-osmosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Misha Marie; Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Soni, G.;

    2009-01-01

    to the electrode size, i.e., for nanofluidic systems. However, even for electrode dimensions in the micrometer range, the discrepancies in velocity due to the finite Debye length can be more than 10% for an electrode of zero height and more than 100% for electrode heights comparable to the Debye length....

  13. Purcell effect for finite-length metal-coated and metal nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filonenko, Konstantin V.; Willatzen, Morten; Bordo, Vladimir G.

    2014-01-01

    as functions of the cylinder radius, the emitter position, and the transition frequency for both configurations. We contrast the results for finite-length nanowires with those obtained in the infinite-length approximation and find considerable differences in the Purcell factor magnitude....

  14. Simulation of wind effects on tall structures by finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Masood

    2016-06-01

    In the present study finite element method is used to predict the wind forces on a tall structure. The governing equations of mass and momentum with boundary conditions are solved. The κ- ɛ turbulence model is utilized to calculate the turbulence viscosity. The results are independent from the generated mesh. The numerical results are validated with American Society of Civil Engineering standards.

  15. Finite-size effect on the dynamic and sensing performances of graphene resonators: the role of edge stress

    OpenAIRE

    Chang-Wan Kim; Mai Duc Dai; Kilho Eom

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the finite-size effect on the dynamic behavior of graphene resonators and their applications in atomic mass detection using a continuum elastic model such as modified plate theory. In particular, we developed a model based on von Karman plate theory with including the edge stress, which arises from the imbalance between the coordination numbers of bulk atoms and edge atoms of graphene. It is shown that as the size of a graphene resonator decreases, the edge stress depending on...

  16. Finite width and irreducible background effects to t$\\overline{t}$ production at $\\gamma\\gamma$ next linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Moretti, S

    1995-01-01

    We study the complete process \\phphbbww\\ using exact matrix element computations at tree-level, at a \\sqrt s=500 GeV \\eeb\\ linear collider of the next generation. Incoming photons produced via back-scattering of laser light are considered. Sizable effects due to the finite width of the top quark as well as to the irreducible background to t\\bar t production and decay are predicted.

  17. Effect of impurity particles on the finite-aspect ratio neoclassical ion thermal conductivity in a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.S.; Hinton, F.L.

    1986-10-01

    The effect of finite-aspect ratio on the impurity contribution to neoclassical ion thermal conductivity is studied. A simple modification to the pure-ion case is obtained with the assumption that the single heavy impurity species is in the Pfirsch-Schlueter regime. It is found that the impurity contribution is larger than the usual approximation: Z/sub eff/ times the pure ion thermal conductivity.

  18. A finite element analysis of the effects of geometrical shape on the elastic properties of chemical vapor deposited diamond nanowire

    OpenAIRE

    Garuma Abdisa Denu; Zongchen Liu; Jiao Fu; Hongxing Wang

    2017-01-01

    We report the effect of geometrical shape of diamond nanowire on its mechanical properties. Finite element modeling using COMSOL Multiphysics software is used to simulate various diamond nanowire with circular, square, rectangular, hexagonal and triangular cross-sections. A bending test under concentrated load applied at one of the free ends is simulated using FEM. The force response of the nanowire under different loading is studied for the various cross-sections. The dimensions of each cros...

  19. Fermion mass and the pressure of dense matter

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, Eduardo S; 10.1063/1.2714447

    2008-01-01

    We consider a simple toy model to study the effects of finite fermion masses on the pressure of cold and dense matter, with possible applications in the physics of condensates in the core of neutron stars and color superconductivity.

  20. Blood pressure lowering effect of Pennisetum glaucum in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Naveed Mushtaq

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to evaluate the seeds of Pennisetum glaucum for its blood pressure lowering effect in rats. Aqueous-methanolic extract of P. glaucum seeds in 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg doses was studied in normotensive, egg-feed diet and glucose-induced hypertensive rats using non-invasive technique. The extract significantly (p˂0.5 - p˂0.001 decreased blood pressure and heart rate with maximum effect at 1,000 mg/kg dose. The extract was found to prevent rise in blood pressure of egg and glucose fed rats as compared to control group in 21 days study. The extract was safe in mice up to dose of 4 g/kg and sub-chronic toxicity study showed that there was no significant alterations in blood chemistry of extract treated rats. It is conceivable, therefore, that aqueous-methanolic extract of P. glaucum seeds has exerted considerable antihypertensive activity which may be due to the presence of phytochemical constituents.