WorldWideScience

Sample records for finite particle number

  1. A finite particle number approach to physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, H.P.

    1984-01-01

    Starting from a discrete, self-generating and self-organizing, recursive model and self-consistent interpretive rules the author constructs: the scale constants of physics (3, 10, 137, 1.7x10 38 ); 3+1 Minkowski space with a discrete metric and the algebraic bound ΔepsilonΔtau >= 1; the Einstein-deBroglie relation; algebraic 'double slit' interference; a single time momentum space scattering theory connected to laboratory experience; an approximation to 'wave functions'; 'local' phase severence and hence both distant correlations and separability; baryon number, lepton number, charge and helicity; msub(p)/msub(e); a cosmology not in disagreement with current observations. (Auth.)

  2. Finite-particle-number approach to physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, H.P.

    1982-10-01

    Starting from a discrete, self-generating and self-organizing, recursive model and self-consistent interpretive rules we construct: the scale constants of physics (3,10,137,1.7x10/sup 38/); 3+1 Minkowski space with a discrete metric and the algebraic bound ..delta.. is an element of ..delta.. tau is greater than or equal to 1; the Einstein-deBroglie relation; algebraic double slit interference; a single-time momentum-space scattering theory connected to laboratory experience; an approximation to wave functions; local phase severance and hence both distant correlations and separability; baryon number, lepton number, charge and helicity; m/sub p//m/sub e/; a cosmology not in disagreement with current observations.

  3. Finite-particle-number approach to physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, H.P.

    1982-10-01

    Starting from a discrete, self-generating and self-organizing, recursive model and self-consistent interpretive rules we construct: the scale constants of physics (3,10,137,1.7x10 38 ); 3+1 Minkowski space with a discrete metric and the algebraic bound δ is an element of δ tau is greater than or equal to 1; the Einstein-deBroglie relation; algebraic double slit interference; a single-time momentum-space scattering theory connected to laboratory experience; an approximation to wave functions; local phase severance and hence both distant correlations and separability; baryon number, lepton number, charge and helicity; m/sub p//m/sub e/; a cosmology not in disagreement with current observations

  4. Axial asymmetry, finite particle number and the IBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casten, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Although the IBA-1 contains no solutions corresponding to a rigid triaxial shape, it does contain an effective asymmetry. This arises from zero point motion in a γ-soft potential leading to a non-zero mean or rms γ. Three aspects of this feature will be discussed: (1) The relation between IBA-1 calculations and the corresponding γ. This point is developed in the context of the Consistent Q Formalism (CQF) of the IBA. (2) The dependence of this asymmetry on boson number, N, and the exploitation of this dependence to set limits on both the relative and absolute values of N for deformed nuclei. (3) The relation between this asymmetry and the triaxiality arising from the introduction of cubic terms into the IBA Hamiltonian. Various observables will be inspected in order both to determine their sensitivity to these two structural features and to explore empirical ways of distinguishing which origin of asymmetry applies in any given nucleus. 16 references

  5. A Non-Perturbative, Finite Particle Number Approach to Relativistic Scattering Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindesay, James V

    2001-05-11

    We present integral equations for the scattering amplitudes of three scalar particles, using the Faddeev channel decomposition, which can be readily extended to any finite number of particles of any helicity. The solution of these equations, which have been demonstrated to be calculable, provide a non-perturbative way of obtaining relativistic scattering amplitudes for any finite number of particles that are Lorentz invariant, unitary, cluster decomposable and reduce unambiguously in the non-relativistic limit to the non-relativistic Faddeev equations. The aim of this program is to develop equations which explicitly depend upon physically observable input variables, and do not require ''renormalization'' or ''dressing'' of these parameters to connect them to the boundary states.

  6. Temperature definition for a finite number of classical spin-half particles: A canonical ensemble approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Q.H.; Wang, X.

    2008-01-01

    A canonical ensemble for non-interacting classical spin-half systems containing small number of particles is developed to deal with the definition of temperature based upon the equal a priori probabilities which is the fundamental hypothesis of the statistical mechanics. When the number of spins is finite, the temperature of the system differs from that of bath, and the difference stays almost the same above a turning temperature and gets larger rapidly as the temperature decreases below it

  7. Construction of Non-Perturbative, Unitary Particle-Antiparticle Amplitudes for Finite Particle Number Scattering Formalisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindesay, James V

    2002-01-01

    Starting from a unitary, Lorentz invariant two-particle scattering amplitude, we show how to use an identification and replacement process to construct a unique, unitary particle-antiparticle amplitude. This process differs from conventional on-shell Mandelstam s,t,u crossing in that the input and constructed amplitudes can be off-diagonal and off-energy shell. Further, amplitudes are constructed using the invariant parameters which are appropriate to use as driving terms in the multi-particle, multichannel nonperturbative, cluster decomposable, relativistic scattering equations of the Faddeev-type integral equations recently presented by Alfred, Kwizera, Lindesay and Noyes. It is therefore anticipated that when so employed, the resulting multi-channel solutions will also be unitary. The process preserves the usual particle-antiparticle symmetries. To illustrate this process, we construct a J=0 scattering length model chosen for simplicity. We also exhibit a class of physical models which contain a finite quantum mass parameter and are Lorentz invariant. These are constructed to reduce in the appropriate limits, and with the proper choice of value and sign of the interaction parameter, to the asymptotic solution of the nonrelativistic Coulomb problem, including the forward scattering singularity , the essential singularity in the phase, and the Bohr bound-state spectrum

  8. Phase transitions in ideal and weakly interacting Bose gases with a finite number of particles confined in a box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jianhui; Ma Yongli

    2009-01-01

    We generalize the scheme to characterize phase transitions of finite systems in a complex temperature plane and approach the classifications of phase transitions in ideal and weakly interacting Bose gases of a finite number of particles, confined in a cubic box of volume L 3 with different boundary conditions. For this finite ideal Bose system, by extending the classification parameters to all regions, we predict that the phase transition for periodic boundary conditions is of second order, while the transition in Dirichlet boundary conditions is of first order. For a weakly interacting Bose gas with periodic boundary conditions, we discuss the effects of finite particle numbers and inter-particle interactions on the nature of the phase transitions. We show that this homogenous weakly interacting Bose gas undergoes a second-order phase transition, which is in accordance with universality arguments for infinite systems. We also discuss the dependence of transition temperature on interaction strengths and particle numbers.

  9. Number of revolutions of a particle around a black hole: Is it infinite or finite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Yuri V.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    2018-01-01

    We consider a particle falling into a rotating black hole. Such a particle makes an infinite number of revolutions n from the viewpoint of a remote observer who uses the Boyer-Lindquist type of coordinates. We examine the behavior of n when it is measured with respect to a local reference frame that also rotates due to dragging effect of spacetime. The crucial point consists here in the observation that for a nonextremal black hole, the leading contributions to n from a particle itself and the reference frame have the same form being in fact universal, so that divergences mutually cancel. As a result, the relative number of revolutions turns out to be finite. For the extremal black hole this is not so, n can be infinite. Different choices of the local reference frame are considered, the results turn out to be the same qualitatively. For illustration, we discuss two explicit examples—rotation in the flat spacetime and in the Kerr metric.

  10. Effects of thermal and particle-number fluctuations on the giant isovector dipole modes for the 58Ni nucleus in the finite-temperature random-phase approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Dinhdang; Nguyen Zuythang

    1988-01-01

    Using the realistic single-particle energy spectrum obtained in the Woods-Saxon nucleon mean-field potential, we calculate the BCS pairing gap for 58 Ni as a function of temperature taking into account the thermal and particle-number fluctuations. The strength distributions of the electric dipole transitions and the centroids of the isovector giant dipole resonance (IV-GDR) are computed in the framework of the finite-temperature random-phase approximation (RPA) based on the Hamiltonian of the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model with separate dipole forces. It is shown that the change of the pairing gap at finite temperature can noticeably influence the IV-GDR localisation in realistic nuclei. By taking both thermal and quasiparticle fluctuations in the pairing gap into account the effect of the phase transition from superfluid to normal in the temperature dependence of the IV-GDR centroid is completely smeared out. (author)

  11. Reynolds number and settling velocity influence for finite-release particle-laden gravity currents in a basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, E. P.; Espath, L. F. R.; Laizet, S.; Silvestrini, J. H.

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional highly resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of particle-laden gravity currents are presented for the lock-exchange problem in an original basin configuration, similar to delta formation in lakes. For this numerical study, we focus on gravity currents over a flat bed for which density differences are small enough for the Boussinesq approximation to be valid. The concentration of particles is described in an Eulerian fashion by using a transport equation combined with the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, with the possibility of particles deposition but no erosion nor re-suspension. The focus of this study is on the influence of the Reynolds number and settling velocity on the development of the current which can freely evolve in the streamwise and spanwise direction. It is shown that the settling velocity has a strong influence on the spatial extent of the current, the sedimentation rate, the suspended mass and the shape of the lobe-and-cleft structures while the Reynolds number is mainly affecting the size and number of vortical structures at the front of the current, and the energy budget.

  12. On particle number fluctuations in an interacting pion gas with dynamically fixed number of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskresensky, D. N.; Kolomeitsev, E. E.

    2017-12-01

    We consider a hot isospin-symmetric pion gas with the dynamically fixed number of particles in the model with a λφ 4 interaction. In the thermodynamic limit, for temperature above the critical value for the Bose-Einstein condensation we calculate the effective pion mass, the chemical potential and the normalized variance. In contrast to the ideal gas, the normalized variance remains finite in the critical point of the Bose-Einstein condensation.

  13. The Total Number of Parameters in the Finite Element ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rectangular finite elements are important in Finite Element Method. This paper establishes a general formula for obtaining the total number of parameters associated with any finite element rectangulation of a domain. This number is also the dimension of the trail space as well as the size of the associated linear system.

  14. Approximate particle number projection in hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosov, D.S.; Vdovin, A.I.

    1995-01-01

    Heated finite systems like, e.g., hot atomic nuclei have to be described by the canonical partition function. But this is a quite difficult technical problem and, as a rule, the grand canonical partition function is used in the studies. As a result, some shortcomings of the theoretical description appear because of the thermal fluctuations of the number of particles. Moreover, in nuclei with pairing correlations the quantum number fluctuations are introduced by some approximate methods (e.g., by the standard BCS method). The exact particle number projection is very cumbersome and an approximate number projection method for T ≠ 0 basing on the formalism of thermo field dynamics is proposed. The idea of the Lipkin-Nogami method to perform any operator as a series in the number operator powers is used. The system of equations for the coefficients of this expansion is written and the solution of the system in the next approximation after the BCS one is obtained. The method which is of the 'projection after variation' type is applied to a degenerate single j-shell model. 14 refs., 1 tab

  15. A particle finite element method for machining simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Matthias; Sator, Christian; Müller, Ralf

    2014-07-01

    The particle finite element method (PFEM) appears to be a convenient technique for machining simulations, since the geometry and topology of the problem can undergo severe changes. In this work, a short outline of the PFEM-algorithm is given, which is followed by a detailed description of the involved operations. The -shape method, which is used to track the topology, is explained and tested by a simple example. Also the kinematics and a suitable finite element formulation are introduced. To validate the method simple settings without topological changes are considered and compared to the standard finite element method for large deformations. To examine the performance of the method, when dealing with separating material, a tensile loading is applied to a notched plate. This investigation includes a numerical analysis of the different meshing parameters, and the numerical convergence is studied. With regard to the cutting simulation it is found that only a sufficiently large number of particles (and thus a rather fine finite element discretisation) leads to converged results of process parameters, such as the cutting force.

  16. Number theory arising from finite fields analytic and probabilistic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Knopfmacher, John

    2001-01-01

    ""Number Theory Arising from Finite Fields: Analytic and Probabilistic Theory"" offers a discussion of the advances and developments in the field of number theory arising from finite fields. It emphasizes mean-value theorems of multiplicative functions, the theory of additive formulations, and the normal distribution of values from additive functions. The work explores calculations from classical stages to emerging discoveries in alternative abstract prime number theorems.

  17. Deconfinement phase transition in a finite volume in the presence of massive particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait El Djoudi, A.; Ghenam, L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Particules et Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure - Kouba, B.P. 92, 16050, Vieux Kouba, Algiers (Algeria)

    2012-06-27

    We study the QCD deconfinement phase transition from a hadronic gas to a Quark-Gluon Plasma, in the presence of massive particles. Especially, the influence of some parameters as the finite volume, finite mass, flavors number N{sub f} on the transition point and on the order of the transition is investigated.

  18. Continental anthropogenic primary particle number emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasonen, Pauli; Kupiainen, Kaarle; Klimont, Zbigniew; Visschedijk, Antoon; Denier van der Gon, Hugo A. C.; Amann, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particle number concentrations impact our climate and health in ways different from those of aerosol mass concentrations. However, the global, current and future anthropogenic particle number emissions and their size distributions are so far poorly known. In this article, we present the implementation of particle number emission factors and the related size distributions in the GAINS (Greenhouse Gas-Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies) model. This implementation allows for global estimates of particle number emissions under different future scenarios, consistent with emissions of other pollutants and greenhouse gases. In addition to determining the general particulate number emissions, we also describe a method to estimate the number size distributions of the emitted black carbon particles. The first results show that the sources dominating the particle number emissions are different to those dominating the mass emissions. The major global number source is road traffic, followed by residential combustion of biofuels and coal (especially in China, India and Africa), coke production (Russia and China), and industrial combustion and processes. The size distributions of emitted particles differ across the world, depending on the main sources: in regions dominated by traffic and industry, the number size distribution of emissions peaks in diameters range from 20 to 50 nm, whereas in regions with intensive biofuel combustion and/or agricultural waste burning, the emissions of particles with diameters around 100 nm are dominant. In the baseline (current legislation) scenario, the particle number emissions in Europe, Northern and Southern Americas, Australia, and China decrease until 2030, whereas especially for India, a strong increase is estimated. The results of this study provide input for modelling of the future changes in aerosol-cloud interactions as well as particle number related adverse health effects, e.g. in response to tightening

  19. Continental anthropogenic primary particle number emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Paasonen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosol particle number concentrations impact our climate and health in ways different from those of aerosol mass concentrations. However, the global, current and future anthropogenic particle number emissions and their size distributions are so far poorly known. In this article, we present the implementation of particle number emission factors and the related size distributions in the GAINS (Greenhouse Gas–Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies model. This implementation allows for global estimates of particle number emissions under different future scenarios, consistent with emissions of other pollutants and greenhouse gases. In addition to determining the general particulate number emissions, we also describe a method to estimate the number size distributions of the emitted black carbon particles. The first results show that the sources dominating the particle number emissions are different to those dominating the mass emissions. The major global number source is road traffic, followed by residential combustion of biofuels and coal (especially in China, India and Africa, coke production (Russia and China, and industrial combustion and processes. The size distributions of emitted particles differ across the world, depending on the main sources: in regions dominated by traffic and industry, the number size distribution of emissions peaks in diameters range from 20 to 50 nm, whereas in regions with intensive biofuel combustion and/or agricultural waste burning, the emissions of particles with diameters around 100 nm are dominant. In the baseline (current legislation scenario, the particle number emissions in Europe, Northern and Southern Americas, Australia, and China decrease until 2030, whereas especially for India, a strong increase is estimated. The results of this study provide input for modelling of the future changes in aerosol–cloud interactions as well as particle number related adverse health effects, e.g. in response

  20. A mixed finite element method for particle simulation in lasertron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Meur, G.

    1987-03-01

    A particle simulation code is being developed with the aim to treat the motion of charged particles in electromagnetic devices, such as Lasertron. The paper describes the use of mixed finite element methods in computing the field components, without derivating them from scalar or vector potentials. Graphical results are shown

  1. Signatures of unstable particles in finite volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luescher, M.

    1991-05-01

    Unstable particles (resonances) occur in QCD, the Higgs model and many other quantum field theories of interest. Since they are a dynamical phenomenon, showing up in scattering processes of stable particles, it is not obvious how to extract their masses from numerical simulations of the theory in euclidean space. For resonances in the elastic region, a solution to this problem in proposed here on the basis of a recently established relation between the scattering matrix in infinite volume and the two-particle energy spectrum in a periodic box. (orig.)

  2. A brief introduction to particle number estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorph-Petersen, Karl-Anton; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb

    1998-01-01

    The principle of particle number estimation using the disector is described emphasising the practical similarities and differences in the application of the principle in biomedicine and non-biological sciences....

  3. Quantum walks assisted by particle number fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Hernandez, Rodrigo A.; v Krems, Roman

    2017-04-01

    We consider quantum walks of particles governed by lattice Hamiltonians with particle-number changing interactions. We show that such interactions, even if weak, accelerate quantum walks at short times due to Rabi oscillations between different particle number subspaces. We examine the dynamics of quantum walks governed by Hamiltonians arising in the context of D-wave quantum annealing experiments and experiments with excitations of ultracold molecules in optical lattices. The same Hamiltonians describe excitations in ensembles of highly magnetic atoms, such as Dy.

  4. Rational surfaces having only a finite number of exceptional curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahyane, M.

    2001-10-01

    We characterize the rational surfaces X which have a finite number of (-1)-curves under the assumption that - K X is nef (i.e., the intersection number of K X with any effective divisor on X is less than or equal to zero, where K X is a canonical divisor on X) and having self-intersection zero. A (-1)-curve is a smooth rational curve of self-intersection -1. (author)

  5. Strong coupling QCD at finite baryon-number density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsch, F.; Muetter, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    We present a new representation of the partition function for strong-coupling QCD which is suitable also for finite baryon-number-density simulations. This enables us to study the phase structure in the canonical formulation (with fixed baryon number B) as well as the grand canonical one (with fixed chemical potential μ). We find a clear signal for a first-order chiral phase transition at μ c a=0.63. The critical baryon-number density n c a 3 =0.045 is only slightly higher than the density of nuclear matter. (orig.)

  6. On Using Particle Finite Element for Hydrodynamics Problems Solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Davidova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research is to develop software for the Particle Finite Element Method (PFEM and its verification on the model problem of viscous incompressible flow simulation in a square cavity. The Lagrangian description of the medium motion is used: the nodes of the finite element mesh move together with the fluid that allows to consider them as particles of the medium. Mesh cells deform when in time-stepping procedure, so it is necessary to reconstruct the mesh to provide stability of the finite element numerical procedure.Meshing algorithm allows us to obtain the mesh, which satisfies the Delaunay criteria: it is called \\the possible triangles method". This algorithm is based on the well-known Fortune method of Voronoi diagram constructing for a certain set of points in the plane. The graphical representation of the possible triangles method is shown. It is suitable to use generalization of Delaunay triangulation in order to construct meshes with polygonal cells in case of multiple nodes close to be lying on the same circle.The viscous incompressible fluid flow is described by the Navier | Stokes equations and the mass conservation equation with certain initial and boundary conditions. A fractional steps method, which allows us to avoid non-physical oscillations of the pressure, provides the timestepping procedure. Using the finite element discretization and the Bubnov | Galerkin method allows us to carry out spatial discretization.For form functions calculation of finite element mesh with polygonal cells, \

  7. Diffusion of Finite-Size Particles in Confined Geometries

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, Maria

    2013-05-10

    The diffusion of finite-size hard-core interacting particles in two- or three-dimensional confined domains is considered in the limit that the confinement dimensions become comparable to the particle\\'s dimensions. The result is a nonlinear diffusion equation for the one-particle probability density function, with an overall collective diffusion that depends on both the excluded-volume and the narrow confinement. By including both these effects, the equation is able to interpolate between severe confinement (for example, single-file diffusion) and unconfined diffusion. Numerical solutions of both the effective nonlinear diffusion equation and the stochastic particle system are presented and compared. As an application, the case of diffusion under a ratchet potential is considered, and the change in transport properties due to excluded-volume and confinement effects is examined. © 2013 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  8. Diffusion of finite-size particles in confined geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Maria; Chapman, S Jonathan

    2014-04-01

    The diffusion of finite-size hard-core interacting particles in two- or three-dimensional confined domains is considered in the limit that the confinement dimensions become comparable to the particle's dimensions. The result is a nonlinear diffusion equation for the one-particle probability density function, with an overall collective diffusion that depends on both the excluded-volume and the narrow confinement. By including both these effects, the equation is able to interpolate between severe confinement (for example, single-file diffusion) and unconfined diffusion. Numerical solutions of both the effective nonlinear diffusion equation and the stochastic particle system are presented and compared. As an application, the case of diffusion under a ratchet potential is considered, and the change in transport properties due to excluded-volume and confinement effects is examined.

  9. Charged particles transport in one-dimensional finite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthukrishnan, G.; Santhanam, K.; Gopinath, D.V.

    1977-01-01

    A semi-analytical technique for the charged particle transport in one-dimensional finite media is developed which can be applied to multi-energy multi-region systems with arbitrary degree of anisotropy in scattering. For this purpose the transport equation is cast in the form of coupled integral equations separating spatial and energy-angle transmission. The spatial transmission is evaluated using discrete ordinate representation in space, energy and direction cosine for the particle source and flux. The collision integral is evaluated using discrete ordinate representation in energy and legendre polynomial approximation in the direction cosine. A computer code based on the above formulation is described

  10. Baryon number dissipation at finite temperature in the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottola, E.; Raby, S.; Starkman, G.

    1990-01-01

    We analyze the phenomenon of baryon number violation at finite temperature in the standard model, and derive the relaxation rate for the baryon density in the high temperature electroweak plasma. The relaxation rate, γ is given in terms of real time correlation functions of the operator E·B, and is directly proportional to the sphaleron transition rate, Γ: γ preceq n f Γ/T 3 . Hence it is not instanton suppressed, as claimed by Cohen, Dugan and Manohar (CDM). We show explicitly how this result is consistent with the methods of CDM, once it is recognized that a new anomalous commutator is required in their approach. 19 refs., 2 figs

  11. Conservation of particle-numbers in general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treder, H.J.

    1975-12-01

    If in a special relativistic field theory the particle number is an integral of a conservation law for a particle-current, then the conservation of the particle-number is valid in general relativity, too. (auth)

  12. Dynamic Systems with a Finite Degrees of Freedom Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ładziński Radosław

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Taking as a starting point the law of conservation of the total energy of the system, and introducing two basic state functions - the Lagrangian and the Rayleigh function, the general form of the equation of motion for any dynamic system with a finite number of degrees of freedom is derived. The theory is illustrated by considering the rotating - type electromechanical energy converter with six degrees of freedom being the model of all essentially important types of DC and AC machines, including rotating power amplifiers, induction - and synchronous type motors - all of them discussed from both, the steady-state and the transient point of view. In the next part of the paper there is described a simple electric circuit with its model characterized by the holonomic constraints of the velocity-type. Finally, there is presented the kinematics and dynamics of the interesting mechanical system - the gyroscope placed on the rotating Earth.

  13. Single-particle response function in finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlomo, S.; Texas A and M Univ., College Station

    1982-01-01

    I derive expressions for the single-particle response (structure) function S(E, q) and its sum rule, (Pauli blocking factor) P(q) = ∫ dE S(E, q), in terms of the Wiqner transforms (WTs) of the single-particle wave functions and the scattering probe sigma(q, r) and discuss the semi-classical phase-space interpretation of the results. For sigma(q, r) = esup(iq x r), I derive simple expressions for S(E, q) and P(q) for finite nuclei within the harmonic-oscillator model and compare the results with the well-known results of the Fermi-gas model. (orig.)

  14. Finite groups with the set of the number of subgroups of possible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Finite group; the number of subgroups of possible order. 1. Introduction. Throughout this paper, groups mentioned are finite and p is a prime. An important topic in the group theory is to investigate the number of subgroups of possible order, and con- versely it is also an important subject to determine the structure of a finite ...

  15. A particle-particle collision strategy for arbitrarily shaped particles at low Stokes numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghooghi, Mohsen; Borazjani, Iman

    2016-11-01

    We present a collision strategy for particles with any general shape at low Stokes numbers. Conventional collision strategies rely upon a short -range repulsion force along particles centerline, which is a suitable choice for spherical particles and may not work for complex-shaped particles. In the present method, upon the collision of two particles, kinematics of particles are modified so that particles have zero relative velocity toward each other along the direction in which they have the minimum distance. The advantage of this novel technique is that it guaranties to prevent particles from overlapping without unrealistic bounce back at low Stokes numbers, which may occur if repulsive forces are used. This model is used to simulate sedimentation of many particles in a vertical channel and suspensions of non-spherical particles under simple shear flow. This work was supported by the American Chemical Society (ACS) Petroleum Research Fund (PRF) Grant Number 53099-DNI9. The computational resources were partly provided by the Center for Computational Research (CCR) at the University at Buffalo.

  16. Finite orbit energetic particle linear response to toroidal Alfven eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Ye Huanchun; Breizman, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    The linear response of energetic particles of the TAE modes is calculated taking into account their finite orbit excursion from the flux surfaces. The general expression reproduces the previously derived theory for small banana width; when the banana width Δ b is much larger than the mode thickness Δ m , we obtain a new compact expression for the linear power transfer. When Δ m /Δ b m /Δ b from that predicted by the narrow orbit theory. A comparison is made of the contribution to the TAE growth rate of energetic particles with a slowing-down distribution arising from an isotropic source, and a balanced-injected beam source when the source speed is close to the Alfven speed. For the same stored energy density, the contribution from the principal resonances (vertical strokev parallel vertical stroke=v A ) is substantially enhanced in the beam case compared to the isotropic case, while the contribution at the higher sidebands (vertical strokev parallel vertical stroke=v A /(2l-1) with l≥2) is substantially reduced. (orig.)

  17. Net-baryon number fluctuations in the hybrid quark-meson-nucleon model at finite density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczenko, Michał; Sasaki, Chihiro

    2018-02-01

    We study the mean-field thermodynamics and the characteristics of the net-baryon number fluctuations at the phase boundaries for the chiral and deconfinement transitions in the hybrid quark-meson-nucleon model. The chiral dynamics is described in the linear sigma model, whereas the quark confinement is manipulated by a medium-dependent modification of the particle distribution functions, where an additional scalar field is introduced. At low temperature and finite baryon density, the model predicts a first-, second-order chiral phase transition, or a crossover, depending on the expectation value of the scalar field, and a first-order deconfinement phase transition. We focus on the influence of the confinement over higher-order cumulants of the net-baryon number density. We find that the cumulants show a substantial enhancement around the chiral phase transition; they are not as sensitive to the deconfinement transition.

  18. Elastic collisions of classical point particles on a finite frictionless linear track with perfectly reflecting endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, R.

    2006-03-01

    Repeated elastic collisions of point particles on a finite frictionless linear track with perfectly reflecting endpoints are considered. The problem is analysed by means of an elementary linear algebra approach. It is found that, starting with a state consisting of a projectile particle in motion at constant velocity and a target particle at rest in a fixed known position, the points at which collisions occur on track, when plotted versus progressive numerals, corresponding to the collisions themselves, show periodic patterns for a rather large choice of values of the initial position x(0) and on the mass ratio r. For certain values of these parameters, however, only regular behaviour over a large number of collisions is detected.

  19. Finite groups with the set of the number of subgroups of possible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Throughout this paper, groups mentioned are finite and p is a prime. An important topic in the group theory is to investigate the number of subgroups of possible order, and con- versely it is also an important subject to determine the structure of a finite group by considering the number of its subgroups of possible orders.

  20. On the Number of Rational Points on Prym Varieties over Finite Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aubry, Yves; Haloui, Safia

    2016-01-01

    We give upper and lower bounds for the number of rational points on Prym varieties over finite fields. Moreover, we determine the exact maximum and minimum number of rational points on Prym varieties of dimension 2....

  1. Modelling the dispersion of particle numbers in five European cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kukkonen, J.; Karl, M.; Keuken, M.P.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Denby, B.R.; Singh, V.; Douros, J.; Manders, A.M.M.; Samaras, Z.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Jonkers, S.; Aarnio, M.; Karppinen, A.; Kangas, L.; Lutzenkirchen, S.; Petaja, T.; Vouitsis, I.; Sokhi, R.S.

    2016-01-01

    We present an overview of the modelling of particle number concentrations (PNCs) in five major European cities, namely Helsinki, Oslo, London, Rotterdam and Athens in 2008. Novel emission inventories of particle numbers have been compiled both on urban and European scales. We used atmospheric

  2. Effect of Finite Particle Size on Convergence of Point Particle Models in Euler-Lagrange Multiphase Dispersed Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nili, Samaun; Park, Chanyoung; Haftka, Raphael T.; Kim, Nam H.; Balachandar, S.

    2017-11-01

    Point particle methods are extensively used in simulating Euler-Lagrange multiphase dispersed flow. When particles are much smaller than the Eulerian grid the point particle model is on firm theoretical ground. However, this standard approach of evaluating the gas-particle coupling at the particle center fails to converge as the Eulerian grid is reduced below particle size. We present an approach to model the interaction between particles and fluid for finite size particles that permits convergence. We use the generalized Faxen form to compute the force on a particle and compare the results against traditional point particle method. We apportion the different force components on the particle to fluid cells based on the fraction of particle volume or surface in the cell. The application is to a one-dimensional model of shock propagation through a particle-laden field at moderate volume fraction, where the convergence is achieved for a well-formulated force model and back coupling for finite size particles. Comparison with 3D direct fully resolved numerical simulations will be used to check if the approach also improves accuracy compared to the point particle model. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  3. Neutral gas flows in fusion devices with finite Knudsen numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, C.

    1997-12-01

    The effects of neutral particles on the conditions of the plasma edge play a key role in divertor and limiter physics. In computational models they are usually treated in the linear test particle approximation or in the fluid limit. However, in some divertor concepts a large neutral gas pressure is required in the divertor chamber to provide sufficient neutral-plasma interaction in the plasma fan (momentum removal and energy dissipation) and to permit adequate pumping performance. In such regimes visous effects in the neutral gas may become relevant. The linear Monte Carlo Code for neutral gas transport in fusion plasmas is extended by a non-linear BGK collision integral. The new features of the model are tested against analytical solutions, and are applied to an ITER divertor configuration. This, for the first time, allows to assess the issue of momentum removal from the divertor fan through the gas in the divertor chamber for real configurations. As expected, we find a partial thermalization between atoms and molecules. Momentum sources seem to be redistributed in the plasma fan due to viscous forces in the gas. Possible consequences for the design are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Some Finite Sums Involving Generalized Fibonacci and Lucas Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kılıç

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available By considering Melham's sums (Melham, 2004, we compute various more general nonalternating sums, alternating sums, and sums that alternate according to (−12+1 involving the generalized Fibonacci and Lucas numbers.

  5. Finite-size Lagrangian coherent particle structures in thermocapillary liquid bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Francesco; Kuhlmann, Hendrik

    2017-11-01

    A surprisingly rapid accumulation of small but finite-size particles taking curious shapes is observed in travelling hydrothermal waves in liquid bridges. The phenomenon has been termed particle accumulation structure (PAS) and belongs to the wider class of Lagrangian coherent structures. In PAS, particles are transferred from chaotic to regular regions of the flow by way of collision with the boundaries. Lubrication forces cause a dissipation of kinetic energy of the particle and give rise to particle motion attractors in the incompressible flow. Since the mechanism relies solely on the particle size, PAS is nothing but a finite-size Lagrangian coherent structure. Different theoretical models are investigated to find a minimum model for the simulation of Lagrangian finite-size coherent structures. Corresponding numerical simulations compare very well with experiments on SL-I and SL-II PAS.

  6. Estimating the theoretical semivariogram from finite numbers of measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lingyun; Silliman, S.E.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate from a theoretical basis the impacts of the number, location, and correlation among measurement points on the quality of an estimate of the semivariogram. The unbiased nature of the semivariogram estimator ??/(r) is first established for a general random process Z(x). The variance of ??z(r) is then derived as a function of the sampling parameters (the number of measurements and their locations). In applying this function to the case of estimating the semivariograms of the transmissivity and the hydraulic head field, it is shown that the estimation error depends on the number of the data pairs, the correlation among the data pairs (which, in turn, are determined by the form of the underlying semivariogram ??(r)), the relative locations of the data pairs, and the separation distance at which the semivariogram is to be estimated. Thus design of an optimal sampling program for semivariogram estimation should include consideration of each of these factors. Further, the function derived for the variance of ??z(r) is useful in determining the reliability of a semivariogram developed from a previously established sampling design.

  7. Solving for the particle-number-projected HFB wavefunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, L.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Recently we proposed a particle-number-conserving theory for nuclear pairing (Jia, 2013) [19] through the generalized density matrix formalism. The relevant equations were solved for the case when each single-particle level has a distinct set of quantum numbers and could only pair with its time-reversed partner (BCS-type Hamiltonian). In this work we consider the more general situation when several single-particle levels could have the same set of quantum numbers and pairing among these levels is allowed (HFB-type Hamiltonian). The pair condensate wavefunction (the HFB wavefunction projected onto good particle number) is determined by the equations of motion for density matrix operators instead of the variation principle. The theory is tested in the simple two-level model with factorizable pairing interactions, and semi-realistic models with the zero-range delta interaction and the realistic Bonn-CD interaction

  8. Finite-temperature mobility of a particle coupled to a fermionic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castella, H.; Zotos, X.

    1996-01-01

    We study numerically the finite-temperature and frequency mobility of a particle coupled by a local interaction to a system of spinless fermions in one dimension. We find that when the model is integrable (particle mass equal to the mass of fermions) the static mobility diverges. Further, an enhanced mobility is observed over a finite parameter range away from the integrable point. We present an analysis of the finite-temperature static mobility based on a random matrix theory description of the many-body Hamiltonian. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  9. Frozen density embedding with non-integer subsystems' particle numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiano, Eduardo; Laricchia, Savio; Della Sala, Fabio

    2014-03-21

    We extend the frozen density embedding theory to non-integer subsystems' particles numbers. Different features of this formulation are discussed, with special concern for approximate embedding calculations. In particular, we highlight the relation between the non-integer particle-number partition scheme and the resulting embedding errors. Finally, we provide a discussion of the implications of the present theory for the derivative discontinuity issue and the calculation of chemical reactivity descriptors.

  10. Temperature-dependent particle-number projected moment of inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    Expressions of the parallel and perpendicular temperature-dependent particle-number projected nuclear moment of inertia have been established by means of a discrete projection method. They generalize that of the FTBCS method and are well adapted to numerical computation. The effects of particle-number fluctuations have been numerically studied for some even-even actinide nuclei by using the single-particle energies and eigenstates of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean field. It has been shown that the parallel moment of inertia is practically not modified by the use of the projection method. In contrast, the discrepancy between the projected and FTBCS perpendicular moment of inertia values may reach 5%. Moreover, the particle-number fluctuation effects vary not only as a function of the temperature but also as a function of the deformation for a given temperature. This is not the case for the system energy

  11. The Particle Number Emission Characteristics of the Diesel Engine with a Catalytic Diesel Particle Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jia Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their adverse health effects and their abundance in urban areas, diesel exhaust ultrafine particles caused by the aftertreatment devices have been of great concern in the past years. An experiment of particles number emissions was carried out on a high-pressure, common rail diesel engine with catalytic diesel particle filter (CDPF to investigate the impact of CDPF on the number emission characteristics of particles. The results indicated that the conversion rates of CDPF is over 97%. The size distributions of particles are bimodal lognormal distributions downstream CDPF at 1400 r/min and 2300 r/min. CDPF has a lower conversion rates on the nucleation mode particles. The geometric number mean diameters of particles downstream CDPF is smaller than that upstream CDPF.

  12. Finite-time rotation number: A fast indicator for chaotic dynamical structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szezech, J.D., E-mail: jds98@fisica.ufpr.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 5315-970, São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84033-240, Ponta Grossa, Paraná (Brazil); Schelin, A.B., E-mail: schelin@if.usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 5315-970, São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná, 80230-901, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Caldas, I.L., E-mail: ibere@if.usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 5315-970, São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Lopes, S.R., E-mail: lopes@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Morrison, P.J., E-mail: morrison@physics.utexas.edu [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Viana, R.L., E-mail: rlv640@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil)

    2013-02-04

    Lagrangian coherent structures are effective barriers, sticky regions, that separate chaotic phase space regions of different dynamical behavior. The usual way to detect such structures is by calculating finite-time Lyapunov exponents. We show that similar results can be obtained for time-periodic systems by calculating finite-time rotation numbers, which are faster to compute. We illustrate our claim by considering examples of continuous- and discrete-time dynamical systems of physical interest.

  13. Finiteness of the discrete spectrum of the three-particle Schroedinger operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullaev, Janikul I.; Khalkhujaev, Axmad, M.

    2001-08-01

    We analyse the spectrum of the three-particle Schroedinger operator with pair contact and three-particle interactions on the neighboring nodes on a three-dimensional lattice. We show that the essential spectrum of this operator is the union of two segments, one of which coincides with the spectrum of an unperturbed operator and the other called two-particle branch. We will prove finiteness of the discrete spectrum of the Schroedinger operator at all parameter values of the problem. (author)

  14. First passage times in homogeneous nucleation: Dependence on the total number of particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yvinec, Romain [PRC INRA UMR85, CNRS UMR7247, Université François Rabelais de Tours, IFCE, F-37380 Nouzilly (France); Bernard, Samuel; Pujo-Menjouet, Laurent [Université de Lyon, CNRS, Université Lyon 1, Institut Camille Jordan UMR5208, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); INRIA Team Dracula, Inria Center Grenoble Rhône-Alpes, Grenoble (France); Hingant, Erwan [Departamento de Matemática, Universidad Federal de Campina Grande, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2016-01-21

    Motivated by nucleation and molecular aggregation in physical, chemical, and biological settings, we present an extension to a thorough analysis of the stochastic self-assembly of a fixed number of identical particles in a finite volume. We study the statistics of times required for maximal clusters to be completed, starting from a pure-monomeric particle configuration. For finite volumes, we extend previous analytical approaches to the case of arbitrary size-dependent aggregation and fragmentation kinetic rates. For larger volumes, we develop a scaling framework to study the first assembly time behavior as a function of the total quantity of particles. We find that the mean time to first completion of a maximum-sized cluster may have a surprisingly weak dependence on the total number of particles. We highlight how higher statistics (variance, distribution) of the first passage time may nevertheless help to infer key parameters, such as the size of the maximum cluster. Finally, we present a framework to quantify formation of macroscopic sized clusters, which are (asymptotically) very unlikely and occur as a large deviation phenomenon from the mean-field limit. We argue that this framework is suitable to describe phase transition phenomena, as inherent infrequent stochastic processes, in contrast to classical nucleation theory.

  15. Analyzing logistic map pseudorandom number generators for periodicity induced by finite precision floating-point representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persohn, K.J.; Povinelli, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A chaotic pseudorandom number generator (C-PRNG) poorly explores the key space. ► A C-PRNG is finite and periodic when implemented on a finite precision computer. ► We present a method to determine the period lengths of a C-PRNG. - Abstract: Because of the mixing and aperiodic properties of chaotic maps, such maps have been used as the basis for pseudorandom number generators (PRNGs). However, when implemented on a finite precision computer, chaotic maps have finite and periodic orbits. This manuscript explores the consequences finite precision has on the periodicity of a PRNG based on the logistic map. A comparison is made with conventional methods of generating pseudorandom numbers. The approach used to determine the number, delay, and period of the orbits of the logistic map at varying degrees of precision (3 to 23 bits) is described in detail, including the use of the Condor high-throughput computing environment to parallelize independent tasks of analyzing a large initial seed space. Results demonstrate that in terms of pathological seeds and effective bit length, a PRNG based on the logistic map performs exponentially worse than conventional PRNGs.

  16. Two-colour QCD at finite fundamental quark-number density and related theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hands, S.J.; Kogut, J.B.; Morrison, S.E.; Sinclair, D.K.

    2001-01-01

    We are simulating SU(2) Yang-Mills theory with four flavours of dynamical quarks in the fundamental representation of SU(2) 'colour' at finite chemical potential, μ for quark number, as a model for QCD at finite baryon number density. In particular we observe that for μ large enough this theory undergoes a phase transition to a state with a diquark condensate which breaks quark-number symmetry. In this phase we examine the spectrum of light scalar and pseudoscalar bosons and see evidence for the Goldstone boson associated with this spontaneous symmetry breaking. This theory is closely related to QCD at finite chemical potential for isospin, a theory which we are now studying for SU(3) colour

  17. Two-colour QCD at finite fundamental quark-number density and related theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hands, S. J.; Kogut, J. B.; Morrison, S. E.; Sinclair, D. K.

    2000-01-01

    We are simulating SU(2) Yang-Mills theory with four flavours of dynamical quarks in the fundamental representation of SU(2) colour at finite chemical potential, p for quark number, as a model for QCD at finite baryon number density. In particular we observe that for p large enough this theory undergoes a phase transition to a state with a diquark condensate which breaks quark-number symmetry. In this phase we examine the spectrum of light scalar and pseudoscalar bosons and see evidence for the Goldstone boson associated with this spontaneous symmetry breaking. This theory is closely related to QCD at finite chemical potential for isospin, a theory which we are now studying for SU(3) colour

  18. Design of Finite Word Length Linear-Phase FIR Filters in the Logarithmic Number System Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Asad Alam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Logarithmic number system (LNS is an attractive alternative to realize finite-length impulse response filters because of multiplication in the linear domain being only addition in the logarithmic domain. In the literature, linear coefficients are directly replaced by the logarithmic equivalent. In this paper, an approach to directly optimize the finite word length coefficients in the LNS domain is proposed. This branch and bound algorithm is implemented based on LNS integers and several different branching strategies are proposed and evaluated. Optimal coefficients in the minimax sense are obtained and compared with the traditional finite word length representation in the linear domain as well as using rounding. Results show that the proposed method naturally provides smaller approximation error compared to rounding. Furthermore, they provide insights into finite word length properties of FIR filters coefficients in the LNS domain and show that LNS FIR filters typically provide a better approximation error compared to a standard FIR filter.

  19. Maximum number of common zeros of homogeneous polynomials over finite fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beelen, Peter; Datta, Mrinmoy; Ghorpade, Sudhir Ramakant

    2017-01-01

    About two decades ago, Tsfasman and Boguslavsky conjectured a formula for the the maximum number of common zeros that r linearly independent homogeneous polynomials of degree d in m + 1 variables with coefficients in a finite field with q elements can have in the corresponding m-dimensional proje......About two decades ago, Tsfasman and Boguslavsky conjectured a formula for the the maximum number of common zeros that r linearly independent homogeneous polynomials of degree d in m + 1 variables with coefficients in a finite field with q elements can have in the corresponding m...

  20. Symmetry breaking in occupation number based slave-particle methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Alexandru B.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2017-10-01

    We describe a theoretical approach to finding spontaneously symmetry-broken electronic phases due to strong electronic interactions when using recently developed slave-particle (slave-boson) approaches based on occupation numbers. We describe why, to date, spontaneous symmetry breaking has proven difficult to achieve in such approaches. We then provide a total energy based approach for introducing auxiliary symmetry-breaking fields into the solution of the slave-particle problem that leads to lowered total energies for symmetry-broken phases. We point out that not all slave-particle approaches yield energy lowering: the slave-particle model being used must explicitly describe the degrees of freedom that break symmetry. Finally, our total energy approach permits us to greatly simplify the formalism used to achieve a self-consistent solution between spinon and slave modes while increasing the numerical stability and greatly speeding up the calculations.

  1. Does the flatness of the velocity derivative blow up at a finite Reynolds number?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivasan, K.R.; Bershadskii, A.

    2006-12-01

    A tentative suggestion is made that the flatness of the velocity derivative could reach an infinite value at finite (though very large) Reynolds number, with possible implications for the singularities of the Navier-Stokes equations. A direct test of this suggestion requires measurements at Reynolds numbers presently outside the experimental capacity, so an alternative suggestion that can be tested at accessible Reynolds numbers is also made. (author)

  2. Thermodynamics of quasi-particles at finite chemical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardim, F.G. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica-Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Pamplona 145, 01405-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Steffens, F.M. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica-Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Pamplona 145, 01405-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); NFC-CCH-Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Rua da Consolacao 930, 01302-907, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: fsteffen@ift.unesp.br

    2009-07-01

    We present in this work a generalization of the solution of Gorenstein and Yang to the inconsistency problem of thermodynamics for systems of quasi-particles whose masses depend on both the temperature and the chemical potential. We work out several solutions for an interacting system of quarks and gluons and show that there is only one type of solution that reproduce both perturbative and lattice QCD.

  3. Multi-Particle States in the Finite Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doring, Michael; Agadjanov, Dimitri; Mai, Maxim; Meissner, Ulf-G.; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2017-01-01

    The extraction of hadron-hadron scattering parameters from lattice data by using the Lüscher approach becomes increasingly complicated in the presence of inelastic channels. We propose a method for the direct extraction of the complex hadron-hadron optical potential on the lattice, which does not require the use of the multi-channel Lüscher formalism. Moreover, this method is applicable without modifications if some inelastic channels contain three or more particles. Supported by the National Science Foundation (CAREER Grant No. 1452055, PIF Grant No. 1415459) and U.S. Department of Energy Grant DE-SC0014133, contract DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  4. Mean-field theory of spin-glasses with finite coordination number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, I.; Sompolinsky, H.

    1987-01-01

    The mean-field theory of dilute spin-glasses is studied in the limit where the average coordination number is finite. The zero-temperature phase diagram is calculated and the relationship between the spin-glass phase and the percolation transition is discussed. The present formalism is applicable also to graph optimization problems.

  5. Number of solutions of systems of homogeneous polynomial equations over finite fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta, Mrinmoy; Ghorpade, Sudhir Ramakant

    2017-01-01

    We consider the problem of determining the maximum number of common zeros in a projective space over a finite field for a system of linearly independent multivariate homogeneous polynomials defined over that field. There is an elaborate conjecture of Tsfasman and Boguslavsky that predicts the max...

  6. Finite groups with the set of the number of subgroups of possible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 4. Finite Groups with the Set of the Number of Subgroups of Possible Order Containing Exactly Two Elements. Yanheng Chen Guiyun Chen. Volume 123 Issue 4 November 2013 pp 491-498 ...

  7. Finite-difference time domain solution of light scattering by arbitrarily shaped particles and surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanev, Stoyan; Sun, Wenbo

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews the fundamental methods and some of the applications of the three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique for the modeling of light scattering by arbitrarily shaped dielectric particles and surfaces. The emphasis is on the details of the FDTD algorithm...

  8. Monte Carlo particle simulation and finite-element techniques for tandem mirror transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rognlien, T.D.; Cohen, B.I.; Matsuda, Y.; Stewart, J.J. Jr.

    1985-12-01

    A description is given of numerical methods used in the study of axial transport in tandem mirrors owing to Coulomb collisions and rf diffusion. The methods are Monte Carlo particle simulations and direct solution to the Fokker-Planck equations by finite-element expansion. 11 refs

  9. Common fixed point theorems for finite number of mappings without continuity and compatibility on intuitionistic fuzzy metric spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Sushil; Deshpande, Bhavana

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to prove some common fixed point theorems for finite number of discontinuous, noncompatible mappings on noncomplete intuitionistic fuzzy metric spaces. Our results extend, generalize and intuitionistic fuzzify several known results in fuzzy metric spaces. We give an example and also give formulas for total number of commutativity conditions for finite number of mappings.

  10. An Ellipsoidal Particle-Finite Element Method for Hypervelocity Impact Simulation. Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivarama, Ravishankar; Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2004-01-01

    A number of coupled particle-element and hybrid particle-element methods have been developed for the simulation of hypervelocity impact problems, to avoid certain disadvantages associated with the use of pure continuum based or pure particle based methods. To date these methods have employed spherical particles. In recent work a hybrid formulation has been extended to the ellipsoidal particle case. A model formulation approach based on Lagrange's equations, with particles entropies serving as generalized coordinates, avoids the angular momentum conservation problems which have been reported with ellipsoidal smooth particle hydrodynamics models.

  11. Alfven-wave particle interaction in finite-dimensional self-consistent field model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhye, N.; Horton, W.

    1998-01-01

    A low-dimensional Hamiltonian model is derived for the acceleration of ions in finite amplitude Alfven waves in a finite pressure plasma sheet. The reduced low-dimensional wave-particle Hamiltonian is useful for describing the reaction of the accelerated ions on the wave amplitudes and phases through the self-consistent fields within the envelope approximation. As an example, the authors show for a single Alfven wave in the central plasma sheet of the Earth's geotail, modeled by the linear pinch geometry called the Harris sheet, the time variation of the wave amplitude during the acceleration of fast protons

  12. Multi-particle Anderson Localisation: Induction on the Number of Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chulaevsky, Victor; Suhov, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a follow-up of our recent papers Chulaevsky and Suhov (Commun Math Phys 283:479-489, 2008) and Chulaevsky and Suhov (Commun Math Phys in press, 2009) covering the two-particle Anderson model. Here we establish the phenomenon of Anderson localisation for a quantum N-particle system on a lattice with short-range interaction and in presence of an IID external potential with sufficiently regular marginal cumulative distribution function (CDF). Our main method is an adaptation of the multi-scale analysis (MSA; cf. Froehlich and Spencer, Commun Math Phys 88:151-184, 1983; Froehlich et al., Commun Math Phys 101:21-46, 1985; von Dreifus and Klein, Commun Math Phys 124:285-299, 1989) to multi-particle systems, in combination with an induction on the number of particles, as was proposed in our earlier manuscript (Chulaevsky and Suhov 2007). Recently, Aizenman and Warzel (2008) proved spectral and dynamical localisation for N-particle lattice systems with a short-range interaction, using an extension of the Fractional-Moment Method (FMM) developed earlier for single-particle models in Aizenman and Molchanov (Commun Math Phys 157:245-278, 1993) and Aizenman et al. (Commun Math Phys 224:219-253, 2001) (see also references therein) which is also combined with an induction on the number of particles

  13. The Max-Plus Algebra of the Natural Numbers has no Finite Equational Basis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Esik, Zoltan; Ingolfsdottir, Anna

    2003-01-01

    This paper shows that the collection of identities which hold in the algebra N of the natural numbers with constant zero, and binary operations of sum and maximum is not finitely based. Moreover, it is proven that, for every n, the equations in at most n variables that hold in N do not form...... that hold in N, which also yields that the equational theory of N is decidable in exponential time. Udgivelsesdato: FEB 3...

  14. Inequalities for finite trigonometric sums. An interplay: with some series related to harmonic numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omran Kouba

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An interplay between the sum of certain series related to harmonic numbers and certain finite trigonometric sums is investigated. This allows us to express the sum of these series in terms of the considered trigonometric sums, and permits us to find sharp inequalities bounding these trigonometric sums. In particular, this answers positively an open problem of Chen (Excursions in Classical Analysis, 2010.

  15. The number of self-incompatibility alleles in a finite, subdivided population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H

    1998-01-01

    The actual and effective number of gametophytic self-incompatibility alleles maintained at mutation-drift-selection equilibrium in a finite population subdivided as in the island model is investigated by stochastic simulations. The existing theory founded by Wright predicts that for a given...... population size the number of alleles maintained increases monotonically with decreasing migration as is the case for neutral alleles. The simulation results here show that this is not true. At migration rates above Nm = 0.01-0.1, the actual and effective number of alleles is lower than for an undivided...... population with the same number of individuals, and, contrary to Wright's theoretical expectation, the number of alleles is not much higher than for an undivided population unless Nm

  16. Jacobi forms, finite quadratic modules and Weil representations over number fields

    CERN Document Server

    Boylan, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    The new theory of Jacobi forms over totally real number fields introduced in this monograph is expected to give further insight into the arithmetic theory of Hilbert modular forms, its L-series, and into elliptic curves over number fields. This work is inspired by the classical theory of Jacobi forms over the rational numbers, which is an indispensable tool in the arithmetic theory of elliptic modular forms, elliptic curves, and in many other disciplines in mathematics and physics. Jacobi forms can be viewed as vector valued modular forms which take values in so-called Weil representations. Accordingly, the first two chapters develop the theory of finite quadratic modules and associated Weil representations over number fields. This part might also be interesting for those who are merely interested in the representation theory of Hilbert modular groups. One of the main applications is the complete classification of Jacobi forms of singular weight over an arbitrary totally real number field.

  17. Autophoretic locomotion in weakly viscoelastic fluids at finite Péclet number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Giovanniantonio; Datt, Charu; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G.; Elfring, Gwynn J.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we numerically investigate the dynamics of a self-propelling autophoretic Janus particle in a weakly viscoelastic fluid. The self-propulsion is achieved by an asymmetry in the properties of the surface of the Janus particle that drives a surface slip velocity and bulk flow. Here we investigate the effect of viscoelasticity on this advection-diffusion problem over a range of Péclet and Damköhler numbers. Particles are found to swim faster, or slower, in viscoelastic fluids, and we show how reaction and diffusion rates affect the viscoelastic stresses that lead to changes in propulsion.

  18. Finite Element in Angle Unit Sphere Meshing for Charged Particle Transport.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Mario Ivan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Drumm, Clifton R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Finite element in angle formulations of the charged particle transport equation require the discretization of the unit sphere. In Sceptre, a three-dimensional surface mesh of a sphere is transformed into a two-dimensional mesh. Projection of a sphere onto a two-dimensional surface is well studied with map makers spending the last few centuries attempting to create maps that preserve proportion and area. Using these techniques, various meshing schemes for the unit sphere were investigated.

  19. Multiscale Modeling of Blood Flow: Coupling Finite Elements with Smoothed Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    A variational multi scale approach to model blood flow through arteries is proposed. A finite element discretization to represent the coarse scales (macro size), is coupled to smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that captures the fine scale features (micro scale). Blood is assumed to be incompressible, and flow is described through the Navier Stokes equation. The proposed cou- pling is tested with two benchmark problems, in fully coupled systems. Further refinements of the model can be incorporated in order to explicitly include blood constituents and non-Newtonian behavior. The suggested algorithm can be used with any particle-based method able to solve the Navier-Stokes equation.

  20. Effects of Process Parameters on Copper Powder Compaction Process Using Multi-Particle Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güner, F.; Sofuoğlu, H.

    2018-01-01

    Powder metallurgy (PM) has been widely used in several industries; especially automotive and aerospace industries and powder metallurgy products grow up every year. The mechanical properties of the final product that is obtained by cold compaction and sintering in powder metallurgy are closely related to the final relative density of the process. The distribution of the relative density in the die is affected by parameters such as compaction velocity, friction coefficient and temperature. Moreover, most of the numerical studies utilizing finite element approaches treat the examined environment as a continuous media with uniformly homogeneous porosity whereas Multi-Particle Finite Element Method (MPFEM) treats every particles as an individual body. In MPFEM, each of the particles can be defined as an elastic- plastic deformable body, so the interactions of the particles with each other and the die wall can be investigated. In this study, each particle was modelled and analyzed as individual deformable body with 3D tetrahedral elements by using MPFEM approach. This study, therefore, was performed to investigate the effects of different temperatures and compaction velocities on stress distribution and deformations of copper powders of 200 µm-diameter in compaction process. Furthermore, 3-D MPFEM model utilized von Mises material model and constant coefficient of friction of μ=0.05. In addition to MPFEM approach, continuum modelling approach was also performed for comparison purposes.

  1. Simulasi Aliran Fluida Yang Disertai Pertukaran Panas Menggunakan Metode Finite Volume Particle (FVP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rida SN Mahmudah

    2017-11-01

    FLUID FLOWS SIMULATION WITH HEAT TRANSFER USING FINITE VOLUME PARTICLE (FVP METHOD Heat transfer involving phase change on flowing fluids is an important phenomena in science and engineering. Several methods on computational fluid dynamics has been developed to simulate this phenomena, either with mesh and/or meshless-based methods. This research is aimed to build a simulation code to simulate fluid flows with heat transfer using Finite Volume Particle (FVP method. First, a simulation code simulating heat transfer due to conduction in a square cavity was built, and the results were validated with analytical solution of 1D heat conduction. This validation results showed a reasonably good agreement between simulation result and analytical solution. This validated code then was improved to simulate heat transfer due to fluid flows (convection. Results from this convection simulation was compared qualitatively with reference and showed good agreement. Therefor, this research has resulted in simulation code of heat transfer due to conduction and convection with FVP method and has been fairly validated. Key words: fluid flow simulation, heat transfer, finite volume particle method

  2. 3D finite element modelling of force transmission and particle fracture of sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imseeh, Wadi H.; Alshibli, Khalid A. (Tennessee-K)

    2018-02-01

    Global compressive loading of granular media causes rearrangements of particles into a denser configuration. Under 1D compression, researchers observed that particles initially translate and rotate which lead to more contacts between particles and the development of force chains to resist applied loads. Particles within force chains resist most of the applied loads while neighbor particles provide lateral support to prevent particles within force chains from buckling. Several experimental and numerical models have been proposed in the literature to characterize force chains within granular materials. This paper presents a 3D finite element (FE) model that simulates 1D compression experiment on F-75 Ottawa sand. The FE mesh of particles closely matched 3D physical shape of sand particles that were acquired using 3D synchrotron micro-computed tomography (SMT) technique. The paper presents a quantitative assessment of the model, in which evolution of force chains, fracture modes, and stress-strain relationships showed an excellent agreement with experimental measurements reported by Cil et al. Alshibli (2017).

  3. Quantum correlation properties in Matrix Product States of finite-number spin rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing-Min; He, Qi-Kai

    2018-02-01

    The organization and structure of quantum correlation (QC) of quantum spin-chains are very rich and complex. Hence the depiction and measures about the QC of finite-number spin rings deserved to be investigated intensively by using Matrix Product States(MPSs) in addition to the case with infinite-number. Here the dependencies of the geometric quantum discord(GQD) of two spin blocks on the total spin number, the spacing spin number and the environment parameter are presented in detail. We also compare the GQD with the total correlation(TC) and the classical correlation(CC) and illustrate its characteristics. Predictably, our findings may provide the potential of designing the optimal QC experimental detection proposals and pave the way for the designation of optimal quantum information processing schemes.

  4. Refined Betz limit for rotors with a finite number of blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2008-01-01

    coefficient. Especially, they fail to reproduce the results of the general momentum theory when the number of blades goes to infinity. The present theory is a modification to the original model of Goldstein using a new analytical solution to the wake vortex problem. In contrast to earlier models, the new......The criterion of Betz for optimum rotors with a finite number of blades is revisited and used to determine the performance of wind turbines. The Betz criterion states that ideal efficiency is obtained when the distribution of circulation along the blade produces a rigidly helicoid wake that moves...... model is consistent with the general momentum theory and enables for the first time to determine the theoretical maximum efficiency of rotors with an arbitrary number of blades....

  5. Parallel 3D Finite Element Particle-in-Cell Simulations with Pic3P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; /Brookhaven

    2009-06-19

    SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel 3D Finite Element electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell code Pic3P. Designed for simulations of beam-cavity interactions dominated by space charge effects, Pic3P solves the complete set of Maxwell-Lorentz equations self-consistently and includes space-charge, retardation and boundary effects from first principles. Higher-order Finite Element methods with adaptive refinement on conformal unstructured meshes lead to highly efficient use of computational resources. Massively parallel processing with dynamic load balancing enables large-scale modeling of photoinjectors with unprecedented accuracy, aiding the design and operation of next-generation accelerator facilities. Applications include the LCLS RF gun and the BNL polarized SRF gun.

  6. Finite particle size drives defect-mediated domain structures in strongly confined colloidal liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gârlea, Ioana C; Mulder, Pieter; Alvarado, José; Dammone, Oliver; Aarts, Dirk G A L; Lettinga, M Pavlik; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Mulder, Bela M

    2016-06-29

    When liquid crystals are confined to finite volumes, the competition between the surface anchoring imposed by the boundaries and the intrinsic orientational symmetry-breaking of these materials gives rise to a host of intriguing phenomena involving topological defect structures. For synthetic molecular mesogens, like the ones used in liquid-crystal displays, these defect structures are independent of the size of the molecules and well described by continuum theories. In contrast, colloidal systems such as carbon nanotubes and biopolymers have micron-sized lengths, so continuum descriptions are expected to break down under strong confinement conditions. Here, we show, by a combination of computer simulations and experiments with virus particles in tailor-made disk- and annulus-shaped microchambers, that strong confinement of colloidal liquid crystals leads to novel defect-stabilized symmetrical domain structures. These finite-size effects point to a potential for designing optically active microstructures, exploiting the as yet unexplored regime of highly confined liquid crystals.

  7. From particle cascade simulations (FLUKA) to finite element heat transfer and structural deformation analyses (ANSYS)

    CERN Document Server

    Zazula, J M

    1995-01-01

    Particle cascade simulations coupled with subsequent finite element thermal and mechanical calculations are an advanced, extremely useful, and sometimes the only available and reliable tool for solving practical as well as general engineering problems related to design and construction of accelerator components. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code and the ANSYS Finite Element system are extensively used by us for this purpose. In this paper we discuss physical assumptions made when using these programmes, modes of their applications, and their interface. Successful application of their mainframe for estimating spatial distributions and time evolution of temperatures and stresses in the accelerator domain are shown as examples : for the LHC and SPS beam dumps, and for the neutrino target at the SPS.

  8. Possibilities of the particle finite element method for fluid-soil-structure interaction problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oñate, Eugenio; Celigueta, Miguel Angel; Idelsohn, Sergio R.; Salazar, Fernando; Suárez, Benjamín

    2011-09-01

    We present some developments in the particle finite element method (PFEM) for analysis of complex coupled problems in mechanics involving fluid-soil-structure interaction (FSSI). The PFEM uses an updated Lagrangian description to model the motion of nodes (particles) in both the fluid and the solid domains (the later including soil/rock and structures). A mesh connects the particles (nodes) defining the discretized domain where the governing equations for each of the constituent materials are solved as in the standard FEM. The stabilization for dealing with an incompressibility continuum is introduced via the finite calculus method. An incremental iterative scheme for the solution of the non linear transient coupled FSSI problem is described. The procedure to model frictional contact conditions and material erosion at fluid-solid and solid-solid interfaces is described. We present several examples of application of the PFEM to solve FSSI problems such as the motion of rocks by water streams, the erosion of a river bed adjacent to a bridge foundation, the stability of breakwaters and constructions sea waves and the study of landslides.

  9. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falgari, P. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Spinoza Inst.; Papanastasiou, A.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Signer, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2013-03-15

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of {Gamma}{sub X}/m{sub X}, with {Gamma}{sub X} and m{sub X} the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the q anti q partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the naive counting {proportional_to}{Gamma}{sub t}/m{sub t}{proportional_to}1%. However, they can be sizeable, in excess of 10%, close to edges of certain kinematical distributions. The dependence of the results on the mass renormalization scheme, and its implication for a precise extraction of the top-quark mass, is also discussed.

  10. Finite element approach to global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations using magnetic coordinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fivaz, M.; Brunner, S.; Ridder, G. de; Sauter, O.; Tran, T.M.; Vaclavik, J.; Villard, L.; Appert, K.

    1997-08-01

    We present a fully-global linear gyrokinetic simulation code (GYGLES) aimed at describing the instable spectrum of the ion-temperature-gradient modes in toroidal geometry. We formulate the Particle-In-Cell method with finite elements defined in magnetic coordinates, which provides excellent numerical convergence properties. The poloidal mode structure corresponding to k // =0 is extracted without approximation from the equations, which reduces drastically the numerical resolution needed. The code can simulate routinely modes with both very long and very short toroidal wavelengths, can treat realistic (MHD) equilibria of any size and runs on a massively parallel computer. (author) 10 figs., 28 refs

  11. Electric field relaxing electrodes design using particle swarm optimization and finite elements method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon E. González-Pérez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a methodology for design of electrical field relaxing electrodes is shown. This design methodology is based in an optimization process carried out by particle swarm optimization technique. The objective function of the optimization process, include the electro statics model of the high voltage equipment that is solved by the finite element method. The proposed methodology was implemented using the computational tools Matlab and Comsol. This methodology was validated by designing the electric fields relaxing electrodes in a high voltage resistive divider, which used in measurement of lightning impulse waves.

  12. Particle-phonon coupling effects within theory of finite Fermi systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saperstein, E. E.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    Recent results of the study of the particle-phonon coupling (PC) effects in odd magic and semi-magic nuclei within the self-consistent theory of finite Fermi systems are reviewed. In addition to the usual pole diagrams, the non-pole ones are considered. Their contributions are often of a crucial importance. PC corrections to the single-particle energies for 40Ca and 208Pb are presented. The quadrupole moments of odd In and Sb isotopes, the odd-proton neighbors of even Sn isotopes, are presented also with accounting for the PC corrections. At last, recently announced problem of extremely high values charge radii of heavy Ca isotopes is solved in terms of a consistent consideration of the PC effects. In all the cases, rather good description of the data is obtained.

  13. Charged particle tracking through electrostatic wire meshes using the finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, L. J.; Karamyshev, O.; Welsch, C. P., E-mail: carsten.welsch@cockcroft.ac.uk [The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Wire meshes are used across many disciplines to accelerate and focus charged particles, however, analytical solutions are non-exact and few codes exist which simulate the exact fields around a mesh with physical sizes. A tracking code based in Matlab-Simulink using field maps generated using finite element software has been developed which tracks electrons or ions through electrostatic wire meshes. The fields around such a geometry are presented as an analytical expression using several basic assumptions, however, it is apparent that computational calculations are required to obtain realistic values of electric potential and fields, particularly when multiple wire meshes are deployed. The tracking code is flexible in that any quantitatively describable particle distribution can be used for both electrons and ions as well as other benefits such as ease of export to other programs for analysis. The code is made freely available and physical examples are highlighted where this code could be beneficial for different applications.

  14. Finite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.R. Azzam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the application of using a skirted foundation system to study the behavior of foundations with structural skirts adjacent to a sand slope and subjected to earthquake loading. The effect of the adopted skirts to safeguard foundation and slope from collapse is studied. The skirts effect on controlling horizontal soil movement and decreasing pore water pressure beneath foundations and beside the slopes during earthquake is investigated. This technique is investigated numerically using finite element analysis. A four story reinforced concrete building that rests on a raft foundation is idealized as a two-dimensional model with and without skirts. A two dimensional plain strain program PLAXIS, (dynamic version is adopted. A series of models for the problem under investigation were run under different skirt depths and lactation from the slope crest. The effect of subgrade relative density and skirts thickness is also discussed. Nodal displacement and element strains were analyzed for the foundation with and without skirts and at different studied parameters. The research results showed a great effectiveness in increasing the overall stability of the slope and foundation. The confined soil footing system by such skirts reduced the foundation acceleration therefore it can be tended to damping element and relieved the transmitted disturbance to the adjacent slope. This technique can be considered as a good method to control the slope deformation and decrease the slope acceleration during earthquakes.

  15. Navier--Stokes relaxation to sinh--Poisson states at finite Reynolds numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, D.; Shan, X.; Matthaeus, W.H.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical framework is proposed in which it seems possible to justify the computationally-observed relaxation of a two-dimensional Navier--Stokes fluid to a ''most probable,'' or maximum entropy, state. The relaxation occurs at large but finite Reynolds numbers, and involves substantial decay of higher-order ideal invariants such as enstrophy. A two-fluid formulation, involving interpenetrating positive and negative vorticity fluxes (continuous and square integrable) is developed, and is shown to be intimately related to the passive scalar decay problem. Increasing interpenetration of the two fluids corresponds to the decay of vorticity flux due to viscosity. It is demonstrated numerically that, in two dimensions, passive scalars decay rapidly, relative to mean-square vorticity (enstrophy). This observation provides a basis for assigning initial data to the two-fluid field variables

  16. On the Numerical Dispersion of Electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell Code : Finite Grid Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, Michael David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States) Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Huang, Chengkun [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zeng, Yong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yi, Sunghwan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Albright, Brian James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used in relativistic particle beam and laser plasma modeling. However, the PIC method exhibits numerical instabilities that can render unphysical simulation results or even destroy the simulation. For electromagnetic relativistic beam and plasma modeling, the most relevant numerical instabilities are the finite grid instability and the numerical Cherenkov instability. We review the numerical dispersion relation of the electromagnetic PIC algorithm to analyze the origin of these instabilities. We rigorously derive the faithful 3D numerical dispersion of the PIC algorithm, and then specialize to the Yee FDTD scheme. In particular, we account for the manner in which the PIC algorithm updates and samples the fields and distribution function. Temporal and spatial phase factors from solving Maxwell's equations on the Yee grid with the leapfrog scheme are also explicitly accounted for. Numerical solutions to the electrostatic-like modes in the 1D dispersion relation for a cold drifting plasma are obtained for parameters of interest. In the succeeding analysis, we investigate how the finite grid instability arises from the interaction of the numerical 1D modes admitted in the system and their aliases. The most significant interaction is due critically to the correct representation of the operators in the dispersion relation. We obtain a simple analytic expression for the peak growth rate due to this interaction.

  17. Comment on ''Boltzmann equation and the conservation of particle number''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanette, D.

    1990-09-01

    In a recent paper (Z. Banggu, Phys. Rev. A 42, 761 (1990)) it is argued that some solutions of the Boltzmann equation do not satisfy particle conservation as a consequence of the independence of velocity on position. In this comment, the arguments and conclusions of that paper are discussed. In particular, it is stressed that the temporal series used for solving the kinetic equation are generally divergent. A discussion about the particle conservation in its solutions is also provided. (author). 4 refs

  18. Collision model for fully resolved simulations of flows laden with finite-size particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Pedro; Boersma, Bendiks Jan; Westerweel, Jerry; Breugem, Wim-Paul

    2015-11-01

    We present a collision model for particle-particle and particle-wall interactions in interface-resolved simulations of particle-laden flows. Three types of interparticle interactions are taken into account: (1) long- and (2) short-range hydrodynamic interactions, and (3) solid-solid contact. Long-range interactions are incorporated through an efficient and second-order-accurate immersed boundary method (IBM). Short-range interactions are also partly reproduced by the IBM. However, since the IBM uses a fixed grid, a lubrication model is needed for an interparticle gap width smaller than the grid spacing. The lubrication model is based on asymptotic expansions of analytical solutions for canonical lubrication interactions between spheres in the Stokes regime. Roughness effects are incorporated by making the lubrication correction independent of the gap width for gap widths smaller than ∼1% of the particle radius. This correction is applied until the particles reach solid-solid contact. To model solid-solid contact we use a variant of a linear soft-sphere collision model capable of stretching the collision time. This choice is computationally attractive because it allows us to reduce the number of time steps required for integrating the collision force accurately and is physically realistic, provided that the prescribed collision time is much smaller than the characteristic time scale of particle motion. We verified the numerical implementation of our collision model and validated it against several benchmark cases for immersed head-on particle-wall and particle-particle collisions, and oblique particle-wall collisions. The results show good agreement with experimental data.

  19. On the Longitudinal Dispersion in Conservative Transport Through Heterogeneous Porous Formations at Finite Peclet Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severino, Gerardo; Cuomo, Salvatore; Sommella, Angelo; D'urso, Guido

    2017-10-01

    We consider transport of a conservative solute through an aquifer as determined: (i) by the advective velocity, which depends upon the hydraulic conductivity K and (ii) by the local spreading due to the pore-scale dispersion (PSD). The flow is steady, and it takes place in a porous formation where, owing to its erratic spatial variations, the hydraulic log conductivity Y≡ln⁡K is modeled as a stationary Gaussian random field. The relative effect of the above mechanisms (i)-(ii) is quantified by the Peclet number>(Pe>) which, in most of the previous studies, was considered infinite (i.e., no PSD) due to the overtake of advective heterogeneities upon the PSD. Here we aim at generalizing such studies by accounting for the impact of finite Pe on conservative transport. Previous studies on the topic required extensive numerical computations. In the present note, we remove the computational burden by adopting the rational approximate expression of Dagan and Cvetkovic (1993) for the covariance of the velocity field. This allows one to obtain closed form expressions for the quantities characterizing the longitudinal plume's dispersion. Transport can be straightforwardly investigated by dealing with a modified Peclet number>(Pe>¯>) incorporating both the PSD and the aquifer's anisotropy. The satisfactory match to Cape Cod field data suggests that the present theoretical results lend themselves as a useful tool to assess the impact of the PSD upon conservative transport through heterogeneous porous formations.

  20. Finite volume simulation of 2-D steady square lid driven cavity flow at high reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yapici

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, computer simulation results of steady incompressible flow in a 2-D square lid-driven cavity up to Reynolds number (Re 65000 are presented and compared with those of earlier studies. The governing flow equations are solved by using the finite volume approach. Quadratic upstream interpolation for convective kinematics (QUICK is used for the approximation of the convective terms in the flow equations. In the implementation of QUICK, the deferred correction technique is adopted. A non-uniform staggered grid arrangement of 768x768 is employed to discretize the flow geometry. Algebraic forms of the coupled flow equations are then solved through the iterative SIMPLE (Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equation algorithm. The outlined computational methodology allows one to meet the main objective of this work, which is to address the computational convergence and wiggled flow problems encountered at high Reynolds and Peclet (Pe numbers. Furthermore, after Re > 25000 additional vortexes appear at the bottom left and right corners that have not been observed in earlier studies.

  1. Development of Modeling and Simulation for Magnetic Particle Inspection Using Finite Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun-Youl [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic particle inspection (MPI) is a widely used nondestructive inspection method for aerospace applications essentially limited to experiment-based approaches. The analysis of MPI characteristics that affect sensitivity and reliability contributes not only reductions in inspection design cost and time but also improvement of analysis of experimental data. Magnetic particles are easily attracted toward a high magnetic field gradient. Selection of a magnetic field source, which produces a magnetic field gradient large enough to detect a defect in a test sample or component, is an important factor in magnetic particle inspection. In this work a finite element method (FEM) has been employed for numerical calculation of the MPI simulation technique. The FEM method is known to be suitable for complicated geometries such as defects in samples. This thesis describes the research that is aimed at providing a quantitative scientific basis for magnetic particle inspection. A new FEM solver for MPI simulation has been developed in this research for not only nonlinear reversible permeability materials but also irreversible hysteresis materials that are described by the Jiles-Atherton model. The material is assumed to have isotropic ferromagnetic properties in this research (i.e., the magnetic properties of the material are identical in all directions in a single crystal). In the research, with a direct current field mode, an MPI situation has been simulated to measure the estimated volume of magnetic particles around defect sites before and after removing any external current fields. Currently, this new MPI simulation package is limited to solving problems with the single current source from either a solenoid or an axial directional current rod.

  2. Probabilistic homogenization of random composite with ellipsoidal particle reinforcement by the iterative stochastic finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowski, Damian; Kamiński, Marcin

    2018-01-01

    This study proposes a framework for determination of basic probabilistic characteristics of the orthotropic homogenized elastic properties of the periodic composite reinforced with ellipsoidal particles and a high stiffness contrast between the reinforcement and the matrix. Homogenization problem, solved by the Iterative Stochastic Finite Element Method (ISFEM) is implemented according to the stochastic perturbation, Monte Carlo simulation and semi-analytical techniques with the use of cubic Representative Volume Element (RVE) of this composite containing single particle. The given input Gaussian random variable is Young modulus of the matrix, while 3D homogenization scheme is based on numerical determination of the strain energy of the RVE under uniform unit stretches carried out in the FEM system ABAQUS. The entire series of several deterministic solutions with varying Young modulus of the matrix serves for the Weighted Least Squares Method (WLSM) recovery of polynomial response functions finally used in stochastic Taylor expansions inherent for the ISFEM. A numerical example consists of the High Density Polyurethane (HDPU) reinforced with the Carbon Black particle. It is numerically investigated (1) if the resulting homogenized characteristics are also Gaussian and (2) how the uncertainty in matrix Young modulus affects the effective stiffness tensor components and their PDF (Probability Density Function).

  3. An efficient FSI coupling strategy between Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics and Finite Element methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourey, G.; Hermange, C.; Le Touzé, D.; Oger, G.

    2017-08-01

    An efficient coupling between Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) and Finite Element (FE) methods dedicated to violent fluid-structure interaction (FSI) modeling is proposed in this study. The use of a Lagrangian meshless method for the fluid reduces the complexity of fluid-structure interface handling, especially in presence of complex free surface flows. The paper details the discrete SPH equations and the FSI coupling strategy adopted. Both convergence and robustness of the SPH-FE coupling are performed and discussed. More particularly, the loss and gain in stability is studied according to various coupling parameters, and different coupling algorithms are considered. Investigations are performed on 2D academic and experimental test cases in the order of increasing complexity.

  4. Cayley number and conservation laws for elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollendorf, F.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that the five conservation laws of charge, hyper-charge, barion number and the two lepton numbers lead to the construction of a commutative non-associative 24 dimensional linear algebra. Each element of the algebra is an ordered set of three Cayley numbers. (orig.) [de

  5. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN RIGIDITY OF EXTERNAL FIXATOR AND NUMBER OF PINS: COMPUTER ANALYSIS USING FINITE ELEMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternick, Marcelo Back; Dallacosta, Darlan; Bento, Daniela Águida; do Reis, Marcelo Lemos

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the rigidity of a platform-type external fixator assembly, according to different numbers of pins on each clamp. Computer simulation on a large-sized Cromus dynamic external fixator (Baumer SA) was performed using a finite element method, in accordance with the standard ASTM F1541. The models were generated with approximately 450,000 quadratic tetrahedral elements. Assemblies with two, three and four Schanz pins of 5.5 mm in diameter in each clamp were compared. Every model was subjected to a maximum force of 200 N, divided into 10 sub-steps. For the components, the behavior of the material was assumed to be linear, elastic, isotropic and homogeneous. For each model, the rigidity of the assembly and the Von Mises stress distribution were evaluated. The rigidity of the system was 307.6 N/mm for two pins, 369.0 N/mm for three and 437.9 N/mm for four. The results showed that four Schanz pins in each clamp promoted rigidity that was 19% greater than in the configuration with three pins and 42% greater than with two pins. Higher tension occurred in configurations with fewer pins. In the models analyzed, the maximum tension occurred on the surface of the pin, close to the fixation area.

  6. Nucleon matter equation of state, particle number fluctuations, and shear viscosity within UrQMD box calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motornenko, A.; Bravina, L.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Magner, A. G.; Zabrodin, E.

    2018-03-01

    Properties of equilibrated nucleon system are studied within the ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) transport model. The UrQMD calculations are done within a finite box with periodic boundary conditions. The system achieves thermal equilibrium due to nucleon–nucleon elastic scattering. For the UrQMD-equilibrium state, nucleon energy spectra, equation of state, particle number fluctuations, and shear viscosity η are calculated. The UrQMD results are compared with both, statistical mechanics and Chapman–Enskog kinetic theory, for a classical system of nucleons with hard-core repulsion.

  7. Modeling the progressive axial crushing of foam-filled aluminum tubes using smooth particle hydrodynamics and coupled finite element model/smooth particle hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Aktay, Levent; Johnson, Alastair F.; Toksoy, Ahmet Kaan; Kröplin, Bernd Helmut; Güden, Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    As alternatives to the classical finite element model (FEM), a meshless smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method, in which the discrete particles represent a solid domain, and a coupled FEM/SPH modeling technique were investigated for the numerical simulation of the quasi-static axial crushing of polystyrene foam-filled aluminum thin-walled aluminum tubes. The results of numerical simulations, load-deformation histories, fold lengths and specific absorbed energies, were found to show satisf...

  8. Young's Modulus evaluation using Particle Image Velocimetry and Finite Element Inverse Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, R. R.; Braga, R. A.; Barbosa, B. H. G.

    2015-07-01

    Most of the conventional design solutions using the Finite Element Method (FEM) have the material's properties defined. This is necessary to set those properties from commercial software library to run the simulations. However, some material's properties are not standardized which can provide unreliable results due to wrong input data to the simulations. In this case, non-destructive mechanical tests for measuring deformations can be used to generate displacements values in order to provide the material behavior through FEM inverse analysis methods. This paper is focused on using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) together with the Particle-Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm and the FEM inverse analysis to investigate Young's Modulus of the material ASTM A36 steel. The displacements of a cantilever beam were measured by means of PIV association to the speckle patterns provided by a laser beam. The results indicated Young's Modulus estimation error around 5% compared to the original material properties. It shows the potentiality of PIV associated to PSO in order to determine the mechanical properties of steel via the FEM inverse analysis in a robust and low cost procedure.

  9. Modeling Fragment Simulating Projectile Penetration into Steel Plates Using Finite Elements and Meshfree Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O’Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulating fragment penetration into steel involves complicated modeling of severe behavior of the materials through multiple phases of response. Penetration of a fragment-like projectile was simulated using finite element (FE and meshfree particle formulations. Extreme deformation and failure of the material during the penetration event were modeled with several approaches to evaluate each as to how well it represents the actual physics of the material and structural response. A steel Fragment Simulating Projectile (FSP – designed to simulate a fragment of metal from a weapon casing – was simulated for normal impact into a flat square plate. A range of impact velocities was used to examine levels of exit velocity ranging from relatively small to one on the same level as the impact velocity. The numerical code EPIC, used for all the simulations presented herein, contains the element and particle formulations, as well as the explicit methodology and constitutive models needed to perform these simulations. These simulations were compared against experimental data, evaluating the damage caused to the projectile and the target plates, as well as comparing the residual velocity when the projectile perforated the target.

  10. Long-term cloud condensation nuclei number concentration, particle number size distribution and chemical composition measurements at regionally representative observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, Julia; Henning, Silvia; Decesari, Stefano; Henzing, Bas; Keskinen, Helmi; Sellegri, Karine; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Brito, Joel; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Kristensson, Adam; Kalivitis, Nikos; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Carbone, Samara; Jefferson, Anne; Park, Minsu; Schlag, Patrick; Iwamoto, Yoko; Aalto, Pasi; Äijälä, Mikko; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Ehn, Mikael; Frank, Göran; Fröhlich, Roman; Frumau, Arnoud; Herrmann, Erik; Herrmann, Hartmut; Holzinger, Rupert; Kos, Gerard; Kulmala, Markku; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Nenes, Athanasios; O'Dowd, Colin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Picard, David; Pöhlker, Christopher; Pöschl, Ulrich; Poulain, Laurent; Prévôt, André Stephan Henry; Swietlicki, Erik; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Artaxo, Paulo; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Ogren, John; Matsuki, Atsushi; Yum, Seong Soo; Stratmann, Frank; Baltensperger, Urs; Gysel, Martin

    2018-02-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) constitute the single largest uncertainty in anthropogenic radiative forcing. To reduce the uncertainties and gain more confidence in the simulation of ACI, models need to be evaluated against observations, in particular against measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Here we present a data set - ready to be used for model validation - of long-term observations of CCN number concentrations, particle number size distributions and chemical composition from 12 sites on 3 continents. Studied environments include coastal background, rural background, alpine sites, remote forests and an urban surrounding. Expectedly, CCN characteristics are highly variable across site categories. However, they also vary within them, most strongly in the coastal background group, where CCN number concentrations can vary by up to a factor of 30 within one season. In terms of particle activation behaviour, most continental stations exhibit very similar activation ratios (relative to particles > 20 nm) across the range of 0.1 to 1.0 % supersaturation. At the coastal sites the transition from particles being CCN inactive to becoming CCN active occurs over a wider range of the supersaturation spectrum. Several stations show strong seasonal cycles of CCN number concentrations and particle number size distributions, e.g. at Barrow (Arctic haze in spring), at the alpine stations (stronger influence of polluted boundary layer air masses in summer), the rain forest (wet and dry season) or Finokalia (wildfire influence in autumn). The rural background and urban sites exhibit relatively little variability throughout the year, while short-term variability can be high especially at the urban site. The average hygroscopicity parameter, κ, calculated from the chemical composition of submicron particles was highest at the coastal site of Mace Head (0.6) and lowest at the rain forest station ATTO (0.2-0.3). We performed closure studies based on κ-Köhler theory

  11. Gravitational sedimentation of cloud of solid spherical particles at small Reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkhipov Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental results of study of gravitational sedimentation of highly-concentrated systems of solid spherical particles at small Reynolds numbers Re<1 are presented. Empirical equation for drag coefficient of the particle assembly has been obtained. The influence of initial particle concentration in the cloud on its dynamics and velocity has been analysed.

  12. Stereological Methods for Estimation of Total Number of Particles in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In certain organs, like the brain, it is important to count the number of neurons associated with a particular function or region. The count gives an estimate of the electronic units available for a specific task or are endowed with a quantum of electrical energy. Similar studies can be extended in organs like the kidney, glands ...

  13. Proton Particle Test Fluence: What's the Right Number?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ladbury, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    While we have been utilizing standard fluence levels such as those listed in the JESD57 document, we have begun revisiting what an appropriate test fluence is when it comes to qualifying a device for single events. Instead of a fixed fluence level or until a specific number of events occurs, a different thought process is required.

  14. Visualization of 2-D and 3-D fields from its value in a finite number of points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dari, E.A.; Venere, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    This work describes a method for the visualization of two- and three-dimensional fields, given its value in a finite number of points. These data can be originated in experimental measurements, numerical results, or any other source. For the field interpolation, the space is divided into simplices (triangles or tetrahedrons), using the Watson algorithm to obtain the Delaunay triangulation. Inside each simplex, linear interpolation is assumed. The visualization is accomplished by means of Finite Elements post-processors, capable of handling unstructured meshes, which were also developed by the authors. (Author) [es

  15. Source apportionment of urban fine particle number concentration during summertime in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. R.; Hu, B.; Liu, Q.; Sun, Y.; Wang, Y. S.

    2014-10-01

    Continuous particle number size distributions (15 nm-2.5 μm), particle chemical compositions, gaseous species and meteorological variables were collected at an urban site in Beijing to investigate the source apportionment of ambient fine particle number concentrations. Hourly data sets were analyzed using the positive matrix factorisation (PMF) which identified a total of eight factors: two traffic factors, two combustion factors, secondary nitrate factors, secondary sulfate + secondary organic aerosol (SOA), fugitive dust and regionally transported aerosol. Traffic (47.9%) and combustion (29.7%) aerosol were found to dominate the particle number concentrations, whereas the most important sources for particle volume concentrations were found to be regionally transported aerosol (30.9%) and combustions (30.1%). Although the diurnal pattern of each of the two traffic factors closely followed traffic rush hour for Beijing, their size modes were different suggesting that these factors might represent local and remote emissions. Biomass burning and coal-fired power plant aerosol were distinguished according to their size modes and chemical species associated with them. Secondary compounds showed similar bimodal particle number size distribution, the distinct diurnal pattern distinguished these factors as secondary nitrate and mixed source of secondary sulfate and SOA. Regionally transported material was characterized by accumulation mode particles. Overall, the introduction of combinations of particle number size distributions and chemical composition data in PMF model is successful at separating the components and quantifying relative contributions to the particle number and volume size distributions in the complex urban atmosphere.

  16. Performance of mixed formulations for the particle finite element method in soil mechanics problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monforte, Lluís; Carbonell, Josep Maria; Arroyo, Marcos; Gens, Antonio

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a computational framework for the numerical analysis of fluid-saturated porous media at large strains. The proposal relies, on one hand, on the particle finite element method (PFEM), known for its capability to tackle large deformations and rapid changing boundaries, and, on the other hand, on constitutive descriptions well established in current geotechnical analyses (Darcy's law; Modified Cam Clay; Houlsby hyperelasticity). An important feature of this kind of problem is that incompressibility may arise either from undrained conditions or as a consequence of material behaviour; incompressibility may lead to volumetric locking of the low-order elements that are typically used in PFEM. In this work, two different three-field mixed formulations for the coupled hydromechanical problem are presented, in which either the effective pressure or the Jacobian are considered as nodal variables, in addition to the solid skeleton displacement and water pressure. Additionally, several mixed formulations are described for the simplified single-phase problem due to its formal similitude to the poromechanical case and its relevance in geotechnics, since it may approximate the saturated soil behaviour under undrained conditions. In order to use equal-order interpolants in displacements and scalar fields, stabilization techniques are used in the mass conservation equation of the biphasic medium and in the rest of scalar equations. Finally, all mixed formulations are assessed in some benchmark problems and their performances are compared. It is found that mixed formulations that have the Jacobian as a nodal variable perform better.

  17. Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm Coupled with Finite Element Limit Equilibrium Method for Geotechnical Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjun Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a modified particle swarm optimization algorithm coupled with the finite element limit equilibrium method (FELEM for the minimum factor of safety and the location of associated noncircular critical failure surfaces for various geotechnical practices. During the search process, the stress compatibility constraints coupled with the geometrical and kinematical compatibility constraints are firstly established based on the features of slope geometry and stress distribution to guarantee realistic slip surfaces from being unreasonable. Furthermore, in the FELEM, based on rigorous theoretical analyses and derivation, it is noted that the physical meaning of the factor of safety can be formulated on the basis of strength reserving theory rather than the overloading theory. Consequently, compared with the limit equilibrium method (LEM and the shear strength reduction method (SSRM through several numerical examples, the FELEM in conjunction with the improved search strategy is proved to be an effective and efficient approach to routine analysis and design in geotechnical practices with a high level of confidence.

  18. LDL particle number and size and cardiovascular risk: anything new under the sun?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire, Janie; Vors, Cécile; Couture, Patrick; Lamarche, Benoît

    2017-06-01

    We provide here an up-to-date perspective on the potential use of LDL particle number and size as complementary risk factors to predict and manage cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in the clinical realm. Studies show that a significant proportion of the population has discordant LDL particle number and cholesterol indices [non-HDL cholesterol (HDL-C)]. Data also show that risk prediction may be improved when using information on LDL particle number in patients with discordant particle number and cholesterol data. Yet, most of the current CVD guidelines conclude that LDL particle number is not superior to cholesterol indices, including non-HDL-C concentrations, in predicting CVD risk. LDL particle size, on the other hand, has not been independently associated with CVD risk after adjustment for other risk factors such as LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and HDL-C and that routine use of information pertaining to particle size to determine and manage patients' risk is not yet justified. Additional studies are required to settle the debate on which of cholesterol indices and LDL particle number is the best predictor of CVD risk, and if such measures should be integrated in clinical practice.

  19. [Particle Size and Number Density Online Analysis for Particle Suspension with Polarization-Differentiation Elastic Light Scattering Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-kang; Fang, Hui

    2016-03-01

    The basic principle of polarization-differentiation elastic light scattering spectroscopy based techniques is that under the linear polarized light incidence, the singlely scattered light from the superficial biological tissue and diffusively scattered light from the deep tissue can be separated according to the difference of polarization characteristics. The novel point of the paper is to apply this method to the detection of particle suspension and, to realize the simultaneous measurement of its particle size and number density in its natural status. We design and build a coaxial cage optical system, and measure the backscatter signal at a specified angle from a polystyrene microsphere suspension. By controlling the polarization direction of incident light with a linear polarizer and adjusting the polarization direction of collected light with another linear polarizer, we obtain the parallel polarized elastic light scattering spectrum and cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum. The difference between the two is the differential polarized elastic light scattering spectrum which include only the single scattering information of the particles. We thus compare this spectrum to the Mie scattering calculation and extract the particle size. We then also analyze the cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum by applying the particle size already extracted. The analysis is based on the approximate expressions taking account of light diffusing, from which we are able to obtain the number density of the particle suspension. We compare our experimental outcomes with the manufacturer-provided values and further analyze the influence of the particle diameter standard deviation on the number density extraction, by which we finally verify the experimental method. The potential applications of the method include the on-line particle quality monitoring for particle manufacture as well as the fat and protein density detection of milk products.

  20. An induction-based magnetohydrodynamic 3D code for finite magnetic Reynolds number liquid-metal flows in fusion blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawczynski, Charlie; Smolentsev, Sergey, E-mail: sergey@fusion.ucla.edu; Abdou, Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A new induction-based magnetohydrodynamic code was developed using a finite difference method. • The code was benchmarked against purely hydrodynamic and MHD flows for low and finite magnetic Reynolds number. • Possible applications of the new code include liquid-metal MHD flows in the breeder blanket during unsteady events in the plasma. - Abstract: Most numerical analysis performed in the past for MHD flows in liquid-metal blankets were based on the assumption of low magnetic Reynolds number and involved numerical codes that utilized electric potential as the main electromagnetic variable. One limitation of this approach is that such codes cannot be applied to truly unsteady processes, for example, MHD flows of liquid-metal breeder/coolant during unsteady events in plasma, such as major plasma disruptions, edge-localized modes and vertical displacements, when changes in plasmas occur at millisecond timescales. Our newly developed code MOONS (Magnetohydrodynamic Object-Oriented Numerical Solver) uses the magnetic field as the main electromagnetic variable to relax the limitations of the low magnetic Reynolds number approximation for more realistic fusion reactor environments. The new code, written in Fortran, implements a 3D finite-difference method and is capable of simulating multi-material domains. The constrained transport method was implemented to evolve the magnetic field in time and assure that the magnetic field remains solenoidal within machine accuracy at every time step. Various verification tests have been performed including purely hydrodynamic flows and MHD flows at low and finite magnetic Reynolds numbers. Test results have demonstrated very good accuracy against known analytic solutions and other numerical data.

  1. Novel results in particle physics. AIP conference proceedings number 93; particle and fields subseries No. 27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panvini, R.S.; Alam, M.S.; Csorna, S.E.

    1982-09-01

    Topics include free quark searches, axions, charmed particle lifetimes, a composite model of the weak interactions, e + e - interactions, neutrino and beam dump experiments, grand unified theories, proton decay, neutrino oscillations, and high energy p anti p interactions. Separate entries were made in the data base for the papers presented

  2. A symmetry-conserving description of odd nuclei with the Gogny force. Particle number and angular-momentum projection with self-consistent blocking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrajo, M.; Egido, J.L. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-09-15

    We present an approach for the calculation of odd nuclei with exact self-consistent blocking and particle number and angular-momentum projection with the finite-range density-dependent Gogny force. As an application we calculate the nucleus {sup 31}Mg at the border of the N = 20 inversion island. We evaluate the ground-state properties, the excited states and the transition probabilities. In general we obtain a good description of the measured observables. (orig.)

  3. Fast digital processor for event selection according to particle number difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiladze, S.G.; Gus'kov, B.N.; Li Van Sun; Maksimov, A.N.; Parfenov, A.N.

    1978-01-01

    A fast digital processor for a magnetic spectrometer is described. It is used in experimental searches for charmed particles. The basic purpose of the processor is discriminating events in the difference of numbers of particles passing through two proportional chambers (PC). The processor consists of three units for detecting signals with PC, and a binary coder. The number of inputs of the processor is 32 for the first PC and 64 for the second. The difference in the number of particles discriminated is from 0 to 8. The resolution time is 180 ns. The processor is built in the CAMAC standard

  4. Long-term cloud condensation nuclei number concentration, particle number size distribution and chemical composition measurements at regionally representative observatories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schmale

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol–cloud interactions (ACI constitute the single largest uncertainty in anthropogenic radiative forcing. To reduce the uncertainties and gain more confidence in the simulation of ACI, models need to be evaluated against observations, in particular against measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. Here we present a data set – ready to be used for model validation – of long-term observations of CCN number concentrations, particle number size distributions and chemical composition from 12 sites on 3 continents. Studied environments include coastal background, rural background, alpine sites, remote forests and an urban surrounding. Expectedly, CCN characteristics are highly variable across site categories. However, they also vary within them, most strongly in the coastal background group, where CCN number concentrations can vary by up to a factor of 30 within one season. In terms of particle activation behaviour, most continental stations exhibit very similar activation ratios (relative to particles  > 20 nm across the range of 0.1 to 1.0 % supersaturation. At the coastal sites the transition from particles being CCN inactive to becoming CCN active occurs over a wider range of the supersaturation spectrum. Several stations show strong seasonal cycles of CCN number concentrations and particle number size distributions, e.g. at Barrow (Arctic haze in spring, at the alpine stations (stronger influence of polluted boundary layer air masses in summer, the rain forest (wet and dry season or Finokalia (wildfire influence in autumn. The rural background and urban sites exhibit relatively little variability throughout the year, while short-term variability can be high especially at the urban site. The average hygroscopicity parameter, κ, calculated from the chemical composition of submicron particles was highest at the coastal site of Mace Head (0.6 and lowest at the rain forest station ATTO (0.2–0.3. We performed closure

  5. Power-law correlations and finite-size effects in silica particle aggregates studied by small-angle neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freltoft, T.; Kjems, Jørgen; Sinha, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering from normal, compressed, and water-suspended powders of aggregates of fine silica particles has been studied. The samples possessed average densities ranging from 0.008 to 0.45 g/cm3. Assuming power-law correlations between particles and a finite correlation length ξ......, the authors derive the scattering function S(q) from specific models for particle-particle correlation in these systems. S(q) was found to provide a satisfactory fit to the data for all samples studied. The fractal dimension df corresponding to the power-law correlation was 2.61±0.1 for all dry samples, and 2...

  6. Slave-particle approach to the finite-temperature properties of ultracold Bose gases in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xiancong; Yu Yue; Li Jinbin

    2006-01-01

    By using slave particle (slave boson and slave fermion) techniques on the Bose-Hubbard model, we study the finite temperature properties of ultracold Bose gases in optical lattices. The phase diagrams at finite temperature are depicted by including different types of slave particles and the effect of the finite types of slave particles is estimated. The superfluid density is evaluated using the Landau second order phase transition theory. The atom density, excitation spectrum, and dispersion curve are also computed at various temperatures, and how the Mott-insulator evolves as the temperature increases is demonstrated. For most quantities to be calculated, we find that there are no qualitative differences in using the slave boson or the slave fermion approaches. However, when studying the stability of the mean field state, we find that in contrast to the slave fermion approach, the slave boson mean field state is not stable. Although the slave boson mean field theory gives a qualitatively correct phase boundary, it corresponds to a local maximum of Landau free energy and cannot describe the second order phase transition because the coefficient a 4 of the fourth order term is always negative in the free energy expansion

  7. Transport and deposition of neutral particles in magnetohydrodynamic turbulent channel flows at low magnetic Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dritselis, C.D., E-mail: dritseli@mie.uth.g [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, Athens Avenue, 38334 Volos (Greece); Sarris, I.E.; Fidaros, D.K.; Vlachos, N.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, Athens Avenue, 38334 Volos (Greece)

    2011-04-15

    The effect of Lorentz force on particle transport and deposition is studied by using direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow of electrically conducting fluids combined with discrete particle simulation of the trajectories of uncharged, spherical particles. The magnetohydrodynamic equations for fluid flows at low magnetic Reynolds numbers are adopted. The particle motion is determined by the drag, added mass, and pressure gradient forces. Results are obtained for flows with particle ensembles of various densities and diameters in the presence of streamwise, wall-normal or spanwise magnetic fields. It is found that the particle dispersion in the wall-normal and spanwise directions is decreased due to the changes of the underlying fluid turbulence by the Lorentz force, while it is increased in the streamwise direction. The particle accumulation in the near-wall region is diminished in the magnetohydrodynamic flows. In addition, the tendency of small inertia particles to concentrate preferentially in the low-speed streaks near the walls is strengthened with increasing Hartmann number. The particle transport by turbophoretic drift and turbulent diffusion is damped by the magnetic field and, consequently, particle deposition is reduced.

  8. Number concentrations of solid particles from the spinning top aerosol generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, J.P.

    1983-02-01

    A spinning top aerosol generator has been used to generate monodisperse methylene blue particles in the size range from 0.6 to 6 ..mu..m. The number concentrations of these aerosols have been determined by means of an optical particle counter and compared with the equivalent measurements obtained by filter collection and microscopy.

  9. Effect of high Reynolds number on hydromagnetic peristaltic flow in an inclined channel using finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Tariq; Hamid, A. H.; Ahmed, B.; Ali, N.

    2017-12-01

    An analysis of the peristaltic flow in an inclined channel for different wave forms is carried out in this paper. The developed mathematical model is represented by a set of partial differential equations. The finite element method is implemented to solve the governing equations for stream function and vorticity. The obtained results are valid beyond the long wavelength and low Reynolds number limits. Important features of peristaltic transport are discussed for the variation of magnetic field, Reynolds and wave numbers. The obtained results, when compared with the results available in literature are in good agreement.

  10. On creating macroscopically identical granular systems with different numbers of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Devaraj; Rivas, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    One of the fundamental differences between granular and molecular hydrodynamics is the enormous difference in the total number of constituents. The small number of particles implies that the role of fluctuations in granular dynamics is of paramount importance. To obtain more insight in these fluctuations, we investigate to what extent it is possible to create identical granular hydrodynamic states with different number of particles. A definition is given of macroscopically equivalent systems, and the dependency of the conservation equations on the particle size is studied. We show that, in certain cases, and by appropriately scaling the microscopic variables, we are able to compare systems with significantly different number of particles that present the same macroscopic phenomenology. We apply these scalings in simulations of a vertically vibrated system, namely the density inverted granular Leidenfrost state and its transition to a buoyancy-driven convective state.

  11. Collision model for fully resolved simulations of flows laden with finite-size particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, P.; Boersma, B.J.; Westerweel, J.; Breugem, W.P.

    2015-01-01

    We present a collision model for particle-particle and particle-wall interactions in interface-resolved simulations of particle-laden flows. Three types of interparticle interactions are taken into account: (1) long- and (2) short-range hydrodynamic interactions, and (3) solid-solid contact.

  12. Pseudo-random number generation for Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations on GPU devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Carolyn L.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Molecular Dynamics codes implemented on GPUs have achieved two-order of magnitude computational accelerations. → Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations require a large number of random numbers per time step. → We introduce a method for generating small batches of pseudorandom numbers distributed over many threads of calculations. → With this method, Dissipative Particle Dynamics is implemented on a GPU device without requiring thread-to-thread communication. - Abstract: Brownian Dynamics (BD), also known as Langevin Dynamics, and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) are implicit solvent methods commonly used in models of soft matter and biomolecular systems. The interaction of the numerous solvent particles with larger particles is coarse-grained as a Langevin thermostat is applied to individual particles or to particle pairs. The Langevin thermostat requires a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) to generate the stochastic force applied to each particle or pair of neighboring particles during each time step in the integration of Newton's equations of motion. In a Single-Instruction-Multiple-Thread (SIMT) GPU parallel computing environment, small batches of random numbers must be generated over thousands of threads and millions of kernel calls. In this communication we introduce a one-PRNG-per-kernel-call-per-thread scheme, in which a micro-stream of pseudorandom numbers is generated in each thread and kernel call. These high quality, statistically robust micro-streams require no global memory for state storage, are more computationally efficient than other PRNG schemes in memory-bound kernels, and uniquely enable the DPD simulation method without requiring communication between threads.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann method simulations of Stokes number effects on particle motion in a channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lenan; Jebakumar, Anand Samuel; Abraham, John

    2016-06-01

    In a recent experimental study by Lau and Nathan ["Influence of Stokes number on the velocity and concentration distributions in particle-laden jets," J. Fluid Mech. 757, 432 (2014)], it was found that particles in a turbulent pipe flow tend to migrate preferentially toward the wall or the axis depending on their Stokes number (St). Particles with a higher St (>10) are concentrated near the axis while those with lower St (Magnus lift, and wall repulsion forces acting on the particle. The present work extends the previous work done by Jebakumar et al. and aims to study the behavior of particles at intermediate St ranging from 10 to 20. It is in this range where the equilibrium position of the particle changes from near the wall to the axis and the particle starts oscillating about the axis. The Lattice Boltzmann method is employed to carry out this study. It is shown that the change in mean equilibrium position is related to increasing oscillations of the particle with mean position near the wall which results in the particle moving past the center plane to the opposite side. The responsible mechanisms are explained in detail.

  14. Contribution from indoor sources to particle number and mass concentrations in residential houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Congrong; Morawska, Lidia; Hitchins, Jane; Gilbert, Dale

    As part of a large study investigating indoor air in residential houses in Brisbane, Australia, the purpose of this work was to quantify emission characteristics of indoor particle sources in 15 houses. Submicrometer particle number and approximation of PM 2.5 concentrations were measured simultaneously for more than 48 h in the kitchen of all the houses by using a condensation particle counter (CPC) and a photometer (DustTrak), respectively. In addition, characterizations of particles resulting from cooking conducted in an identical way in all the houses were measured by using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and a DustTrak. All the events of elevated particle concentrations were linked to indoor activities using house occupants diary entries, and catalogued into 21 different types of indoor activities. This enabled quantification of the effect of indoor sources on indoor particle concentrations as well as quantification of emission rates from the sources. For example, the study found that frying, grilling, stove use, toasting, cooking pizza, cooking, candle vaporizing eucalyptus oil and fan heater use, could elevate the indoor submicrometer particle number concentration levels by more than five times, while PM 2.5 concentrations could be up to 3, 30 and 90 times higher than the background levels during smoking, frying and grilling, respectively.

  15. On the number of elementary particles in a resolution dependent fractal spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jihuan

    2007-01-01

    We reconsider the fundamental question regarding the number of elementary particles in a minimally extended standard model. The main conclusion is that since the dimension of E-infinity spacetime is resolution dependent, then the number of elementary particles is also resolution dependent. For D = 10 of superstrings, D = 11 of M theory and D = 12 of F theory one finds N(SM) equal to (6)(10) = 60 (6)(11) = 66 and (6)(12) = 72 particles, respectively. This is in perfect agreement with prediction made previously by Mohamed Saladin El-Naschie and Marek-Crnjac

  16. Factors governing particle number emissions in a waste-to-energy plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgen, Senem; Cernuschi, Stefano; Giugliano, Michele

    2015-05-01

    Particle number concentration and size distribution measurements were performed on the stack gas of a waste-to-energy plant which co-incinerates municipal solid waste, sewage sludge and clinical waste in two lines. Average total number of particles was found to be 4.0·10(5)cm(-3) and 1.9·10(5)cm(-3) for the line equipped with a wet flue gas cleaning process and a dry cleaning system, respectively. Ultrafine particles (dpwaste feed and the municipal solid waste co-incineration with sludge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Seasonal cycle and modal structure of particle number size distribution at Dome C, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Järvinen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied new particle formation and modal behavior of ultrafine aerosol particles on the high East Antarctic plateau at the Concordia station, Dome C (75°06' S, 123°23' E. Aerosol particle number size distributions were measured in the size range 10–600 nm from 14 December 2007 to 7 November 2009. We used an automatic algorithm for fitting up to three modes to the size distribution data. The total particle number concentration was low with the median of 109 cm−3. There was a clear seasonal cycle in the total particle number and the volume concentrations. The concentrations were at their highest during the austral summer with the median values of 260 cm−3 and 0.086 μm3 cm−3, and at their lowest during the austral winter with corresponding values of 15 cm−3 and 0.009 μm3 cm−3. New particle formation events were determined from the size distribution data. During the measurement period, natural new particle formation was observed on 60 days and for 15 of these days the particle growth rates from 10 to 25 nm in size could be determined. The median particle growth rate during all these events was 2.5 nm h−1 and the median formation rate of 10 nm particles was 0.023 cm−3 s−1. Most of the events were similar to those observed at other continental locations, yet also some variability in event types was observed. Exceptional features in Dome C were the winter events that occurred during dark periods, as well as the events for which the growth could be followed during several consecutive days. We called these latter events slowly growing events. This paper is the first one to analyze long-term size distribution data from Dome C, and also the first paper to show that new particle formation events occur in central Antarctica.

  18. A finite element Poisson solver for gyrokinetic particle simulations in a global field aligned mesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Lin, Z.; Lewandowski, J.L.V.; Ethier, S.

    2006-01-01

    A new finite element Poisson solver is developed and applied to a global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) which employs the field aligned mesh and thus a logically non-rectangular grid in a general geometry. Employing test cases where the analytical solutions are known, the finite element solver has been verified. The CPU time scaling versus the matrix size employing portable, extensible toolkit for scientific computation (PETSc) to solve the sparse matrix is promising. Taking the ion temperature gradient modes (ITG) as an example, the solution from the new finite element solver has been compared to the solution from the original GTC's iterative solver which is only efficient for adiabatic electrons. Linear and nonlinear simulation results from the two different forms of the gyrokinetic Poisson equation (integral form and the differential form) coincide each other. The new finite element solver enables the implementation of advanced kinetic electron models for global electromagnetic simulations

  19. Direct numerical simulations of particle-laden density currents with adaptive, discontinuous finite elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Parkinson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs are an important tool for the detailed analysis of turbidity current dynamics. Models that resolve the vertical structure and turbulence of the flow are typically based upon the Navier–Stokes equations. Two-dimensional simulations are known to produce unrealistic cohesive vortices that are not representative of the real three-dimensional physics. The effect of this phenomena is particularly apparent in the later stages of flow propagation. The ideal solution to this problem is to run the simulation in three dimensions but this is computationally expensive. This paper presents a novel finite-element (FE DNS turbidity current model that has been built within Fluidity, an open source, general purpose, computational fluid dynamics code. The model is validated through re-creation of a lock release density current at a Grashof number of 5 × 106 in two and three dimensions. Validation of the model considers the flow energy budget, sedimentation rate, head speed, wall normal velocity profiles and the final deposit. Conservation of energy in particular is found to be a good metric for measuring model performance in capturing the range of dynamics on a range of meshes. FE models scale well over many thousands of processors and do not impose restrictions on domain shape, but they are computationally expensive. The use of adaptive mesh optimisation is shown to reduce the required element count by approximately two orders of magnitude in comparison with fixed, uniform mesh simulations. This leads to a substantial reduction in computational cost. The computational savings and flexibility afforded by adaptivity along with the flexibility of FE methods make this model well suited to simulating turbidity currents in complex domains.

  20. [Particle number size distribution near a major road with different traffic conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Wu, Ye; Song, Shao-Jie; Hao, Ji-Ming

    2012-03-01

    The profiles of number concentration of ambient particles at a roadside site in Beijing were studied with different traffic conditions. A Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) was utilized to measure the number concentrations of fine and ultrafine (10-100 nm) particles in August 2008 and August 2009, which represented the normal and Olympic traffic conditions, respectively. Size distributions of particle number concentration were identified and their temporal variations were also discussed. Results indicated that with normal traffic pattern, the total number concentration of ultrafine and 10-478 nm particles were (1.15 +/- 0.49) x 10(4) cm(-3) and (1.61 +/- 0.57) x 10(4) cm(-3), respectively. While the concentrations were decreased to (0.55 +/- 0.14) x 10(4) cm(-3) and (1.21 +/- 0.24) x 10(4) cm(-3), respectively, with special traffic condition during the Beijing Olympic Games. Largest reduction of 52.2% was observed for ultrafine particles among all size ranges. With normal traffic condition, bimodal distribution was found with two peak values in number concentrations around 22.5 nm and 113.0 nm. During the Olympic period, nucleation mode particles were significantly reduced due to a series of temporal control measures on motor vehicles such as the removal of yellow-labeled vehicles from the roads and travel restrictions based on odd-even license plate numbers. As a result, the peak in particle number concentration at 22.5 nm disappeared. The temporal variation indicated that significantly higher ultrafine particle number concentrations occurred around 00 : 00-04 : 00, 11 : 00-13 : 00 and 17 : 00-20 : 00 with normal traffic situation, which primarily attributed to the contributions of diesel exhaust at night, secondary formation at noon and traffic jam in the evening, respectively. However during the Olympic period, the temporal variation pattern changed significantly. The gap in the number concentrations of ultrafine particle between these three time periods

  1. Pseudo-random number generation for Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations on GPU devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Carolyn L.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2011-08-01

    Brownian Dynamics (BD), also known as Langevin Dynamics, and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) are implicit solvent methods commonly used in models of soft matter and biomolecular systems. The interaction of the numerous solvent particles with larger particles is coarse-grained as a Langevin thermostat is applied to individual particles or to particle pairs. The Langevin thermostat requires a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) to generate the stochastic force applied to each particle or pair of neighboring particles during each time step in the integration of Newton's equations of motion. In a Single-Instruction-Multiple-Thread (SIMT) GPU parallel computing environment, small batches of random numbers must be generated over thousands of threads and millions of kernel calls. In this communication we introduce a one-PRNG-per-kernel-call-per-thread scheme, in which a micro-stream of pseudorandom numbers is generated in each thread and kernel call. These high quality, statistically robust micro-streams require no global memory for state storage, are more computationally efficient than other PRNG schemes in memory-bound kernels, and uniquely enable the DPD simulation method without requiring communication between threads.

  2. Figures of merit for detectors in digital radiography. II. Finite number of secondaries and structured backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineda, Angel R.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2004-01-01

    The current paradigm for evaluating detectors in digital radiography relies on Fourier methods. Fourier methods rely on a shift-invariant and statistically stationary description of the imaging system. The theoretical justification for the use of Fourier methods is based on a uniform background fluence and an infinite detector. In practice, the background fluence is not uniform and detector size is finite. We study the effect of stochastic blurring and structured backgrounds on the correlation between Fourier-based figures of merit and Hotelling detectability. A stochastic model of the blurring leads to behavior similar to what is observed by adding electronic noise to the deterministic blurring model. Background structure does away with the shift invariance. Anatomical variation makes the covariance matrix of the data less amenable to Fourier methods by introducing long-range correlations. It is desirable to have figures of merit that can account for all the sources of variation, some of which are not stationary. For such cases, we show that the commonly used figures of merit based on the discrete Fourier transform can provide an inaccurate estimate of Hotelling detectability

  3. On the Required Number of Antennas in a Point-to-Point Large-but-Finite MIMO System

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2015-11-12

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of the point-to-point multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) systems in the presence of a large but finite numbers of antennas at the transmitters and/or receivers. Considering the cases with and without hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) feedback, we determine the minimum numbers of the transmit/receive antennas which are required to satisfy different outage probability constraints. We study the effect of the spatial correlation between the antennas on the system performance. Also, the required number of antennas are obtained for different fading conditions. Our results show that different outage requirements can be satisfied with relatively few transmit/receive antennas. © 2015 IEEE.

  4. Nano-particle drag prediction at low Reynolds number using a direct Boltzmann-BGK solution approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, B.

    2018-01-01

    This paper outlines a novel approach for solution of the Boltzmann-BGK equation describing molecular gas dynamics applied to the challenging problem of drag prediction of a 2D circular nano-particle at transitional Knudsen number (0.0214) and low Reynolds number (0.25-2.0). The numerical scheme utilises a discontinuous-Galerkin finite element discretisation for the physical space representing the problem particle geometry and a high order discretisation for molecular velocity space describing the molecular distribution function. The paper shows that this method produces drag predictions that are aligned well with the range of drag predictions for this problem generated from the alternative numerical approaches of molecular dynamics codes and a modified continuum scheme. It also demonstrates the sensitivity of flow-field solutions and therefore drag predictions to the wall absorption parameter used to construct the solid wall boundary condition used in the solver algorithm. The results from this work has applications in fields ranging from diagnostics and therapeutics in medicine to the fields of semiconductors and xerographics.

  5. Particle number concentration, size distribution and chemical composition during haze and photochemical smog episodes in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuemei; Chen, Jianmin; Cheng, Tiantao; Zhang, Renyi; Wang, Xinming

    2014-09-01

    The aerosol number concentration and size distribution as well as size-resolved particle chemical composition were measured during haze and photochemical smog episodes in Shanghai in 2009. The number of haze days accounted for 43%, of which 30% was severe (visibilitysmog episodes, about 5.89 times and 4.29 times those of clean days. The particle volume concentration and surface concentration in haze, photochemical smog and clean days were 102, 49, 15μm(3)/cm(3) and 949, 649, 206μm(2)/cm(3), respectively. As haze events got more severe, the number concentration of particles smaller than 50nm decreased, but the particles of 50-200nm and 0.5-1μm increased. The diurnal variation of particle number concentration showed a bimodal pattern in haze days. All soluble ions were increased during haze events, of which NH4(+), SO4(2-) and NO3(-) increased greatly, followed by Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Cl(-). These ions were very different in size-resolved particles during haze and photochemical smog episodes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Primary versus secondary contributions to particle number concentrations in the European boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Reddington

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand the relative contribution of primary and secondary particles to regional and global aerosol so that models can attribute aerosol radiative forcing to different sources. In large-scale models, there is considerable uncertainty associated with treatments of particle formation (nucleation in the boundary layer (BL and in the size distribution of emitted primary particles, leading to uncertainties in predicted cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations. Here we quantify how primary particle emissions and secondary particle formation influence size-resolved particle number concentrations in the BL using a global aerosol microphysics model and aircraft and ground site observations made during the May 2008 campaign of the European Integrated Project on Aerosol Cloud Climate Air Quality Interactions (EUCAARI. We tested four different parameterisations for BL nucleation and two assumptions for the emission size distribution of anthropogenic and wildfire carbonaceous particles. When we emit carbonaceous particles at small sizes (as recommended by the Aerosol Intercomparison project, AEROCOM, the spatial distributions of campaign-mean number concentrations of particles with diameter >50 nm (N50 and >100 nm (N100 were well captured by the model (R2≥0.8 and the normalised mean bias (NMB was also small (−18% for N50 and −1% for N100. Emission of carbonaceous particles at larger sizes, which we consider to be more realistic for low spatial resolution global models, results in equally good correlation but larger bias (R2≥0.8, NMB = −52% and −29%, which could be partly but not entirely compensated by BL nucleation. Within the uncertainty of the observations and accounting for the uncertainty in the size of emitted primary particles, BL nucleation makes a statistically significant contribution to CCN

  7. Particle-particle and hole-hole RPA correlations at finite temperature and the temperature dependence of the level density parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinh Mau, N.

    1989-01-01

    The pp-hh RPA equations obtained by summing the infinite series of ladder, upwards- and backwards-going diagrams in the temperature two-particle Green functions are derived at finite temperature. The contribution to the thermodynamic grand potential due to pp-hh RPA correlations is calculated simultaneously to that of ph RPA correlations. A schematic model is constructed which shows that, as for ph RPA states, the energies of pp and hh RPA states have no temperature dependence at not too high temperature. Within the same model, the temperature dependence of the level density parameter is discussed. (orig.)

  8. Levels of black carbon and their relationship with particle number levels-observation at an urban roadside in Taipei City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Shiu, Ben-Tzung; Lin, Meng-Hsien; Yan, Jhih-Wei

    2013-03-01

    Information on the relationship between black carbon (BC) and particle number levels in urban areas is limited. Therefore, investigating the relationship between BC and particle number levels in different particle size ranges at an urban area is worthwhile. This study used an aethalometer and scanning mobility particle sizer to measure the levels of BC and particle number simultaneously at an urban roadside in Taipei City. Measurement results show that hourly BC levels are 0.62-8.80 μg m(-3) (mean=3.50 μg m(-3)) and hourly particle number levels are 4.21 × 10(3)-4.64 × 10(4) particles cm(-3) (mean=2.00 × 10(4) particles cm(-3)) in Taipei urban area. The BC and particle number levels peak during morning (7:00-9:00) and evening (16:00-18:00) rush hours on weekdays. Low BC and particle number levels exist in the early morning hours. Time variations in BC levels are the same as those of particle number levels in this study, clearly indicating that BC and particles are likely released from the same emission source. Additionally, BC levels in the urban area are more strongly associated with ultrafine particle levels than with total particle number levels, particularly in the size range of 56-180 nm. According to measurement results, most BC in aerosols in urban areas can be in the ultrafine size range.

  9. Particle-number-projected Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov study with effective shell model interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, I.; Sheikh, J. A.; Ganai, P. A.; Ring, P.

    2011-04-01

    We perform the particle-number-projected mean-field study using the recently developed symmetry-projected Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) equations. Realistic calculations have been performed in sd- and fp-shell nuclei using the shell model empirical interactions, USD and GXPFIA. It is demonstrated that the mean-field results for energy surfaces, obtained with these shell model interactions, are quite similar to those obtained using the density functional approaches. Further, it is shown that particle-number-projected results, for neutron-rich isotopes, can lead to different ground-state shapes in comparison to bare HFB calculations.

  10. Exposure to carbon monoxide, fine particle mass, and ultrafine particle number in Jakarta, Indonesia: effect of commute mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both, Adam F; Westerdahl, Dane; Fruin, Scott; Haryanto, Budi; Marshall, Julian D

    2013-01-15

    We measured real-time exposure to PM(2.5), ultrafine PM (particle number) and carbon monoxide (CO) for commuting workers school children, and traffic police, in Jakarta, Indonesia. In total, we measured exposures for 36 individuals covering 93 days. Commuters in private cars experienced mean (st dev) exposures of 22 (9.4) ppm CO, 91 (38) μg/m(3)PM(2.5), and 290 (150)×10(3) particles cm(-3). Mean concentrations were higher in public transport than in private cars for PM(2.5) (difference in means: 22%) and particle counts (54%), but not CO, likely reflecting in-vehicle particle losses in private cars owing to air-conditioning. However, average commute times were longer for private car commuters than public transport commuters (in our sample, 24% longer: 3.0 vs. 2.3 h per day). Commute and traffic-related exposures experienced by Jakarta residents are among the highest in the world, owing to high on-road concentrations and multi-hour commutes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. On the motion of non-spherical particles at high Reynolds number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandø, Matthias; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains a critical review of available methodology for dealing with the motion of non-spherical particles at higher Reynolds numbers in the Eulerian- Lagrangian methodology for dispersed flow. First, an account of the various attempts to classify the various shapes and the efforts...... towards finding a universal shape parameter is given and the details regarding the significant secondary motion associated with non-spherical particles are outlined. Most investigations concerning large non-spherical particles to date have been focused on finding appropriate correlations of the drag...... coefficient for specific shapes either by parameter variation or by using shape parameters. Particular emphasis is here placed on showing the incapability of one-dimensional shape parameters to predict the multifaceted secondary motion associated with non-spherical particles. To properly predict secondary...

  12. Percolation transition in Yang-Mills matter at a finite number of colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lottini, Stefano; Torrieri, Giorgio

    2011-10-07

    We examine baryonic matter at a quark chemical potential of the order of the confinement scale μ(q)∼Λ(QCD). In this regime, quarks are supposed to be confined but baryons are close to the "tightly packed limit" where they nearly overlap in configuration space. We show that this system will exhibit a percolation phase transition when varied in the number of colors N(c): at high N(c), large distance correlations at the quark level are possible even if the quarks are essentially confined. At low N(c), this does not happen. We discuss the relevance of this for dense nuclear matter, and argue that our results suggest a new "phase transition," varying N(c) at constant μ(q).

  13. Large Prandtl number finite-amplitude thermal convection with Maxwell viscoelasticity. [earth mantle rheological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivins, E. R.; Unti, T. W. J.; Phillips, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    It has long been known that the earth behaves viscoelastically. Viscoelasticity may be of importance in two aspects of mantle convection, including time-dependent behavior and local storage of recoverable work. The present investigation makes use of thermal convection in a box as a prototype of mantle flow. It is demonstrated that recoverable work can be important to the local mechanical energy balance in the descending lithosphere. It is shown that, even when assuming large viscoelastic parameters, an inherent time-dependence of viscoelastic convection appears only in local exchanges of mechanical energy. There is no strong exchange between buoyant potential energy and recoverable strain energy in the Rayleigh number range investigated. The investigation is mainly concerned with viscoelastic effects occurring on a buoyant time scale. It is found that viscoelastic effects have a negligible influence on the long term thermal energetics of mantle convection.

  14. Optimization of Sound Absorbers Number and Placement in an Enclosed Room by Finite Element Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, S. F.; Zainulabidin, M. H.; Yahya, M. N.; Zaman, I.; Azmir, N. A.; Madlan, M. A.; Ismon, M.; Kasron, M. Z.; Ismail, A. E.

    2017-10-01

    Giving a room proper acoustic treatment is both art and science. Acoustic design brings comfort in the built environment and reduces noise level by using sound absorbers. There is a need to give a room acoustic treatment by installing absorbers in order to decrease the reverberant sound. However, they are usually high in price which cost much for installation and there is no system to locate the optimum number and placement of sound absorbers. It would be a waste if the room is overly treated with absorbers or cause improper treatment if the room is treated with insufficient absorbers. This study aims to determine the amount of sound absorbers needed and optimum location of sound absorbers placement in order to reduce the overall sound pressure level in specified room by using ANSYS APDL software. The size of sound absorbers needed is found to be 11 m 2 by using Sabine equation and different unit sets of absorbers are applied on walls, each with the same total areas to investigate the best configurations. All three sets (single absorber, 11 absorbers and 44 absorbers) has successfully treating the room by reducing the overall sound pressure level. The greatest reduction in overall sound pressure level is that of 44 absorbers evenly distributed around the walls, which has reduced as much as 24.2 dB and the least effective configuration is single absorber whereby it has reduced the overall sound pressure level by 18.4 dB.

  15. A Coons Patch Spanning a Finite Number of Curves Tested for Variationally Minimizing Its Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daud Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In surface modeling a surface frequently encountered is a Coons patch that is defined only for a boundary composed of four analytical curves. In this paper we extend the range of applicability of a Coons patch by telling how to write it for a boundary composed of an arbitrary number of boundary curves. We partition the curves in a clear and natural way into four groups and then join all the curves in each group into one analytic curve by using representations of the unit step function including one that is fully analytic. Having a well-parameterized surface, we do some calculations on it that are motivated by differential geometry but give a better optimized and possibly more smooth surface. For this, we use an ansatz consisting of the original surface plus a variational parameter multiplying the numerator part of its mean curvature function and minimize with the respect to it the rms mean curvature and decrease the area of the surface we generate. We do a complete numerical implementation for a boundary composed of five straight lines, that can model a string breaking, and get about 0.82 percent decrease of the area. Given the demonstrated ability of our optimization algorithm to reduce area by as much as 23 percent for a spanning surface not close of being a minimal surface, this much smaller fractional decrease suggests that the Coons patch we have been able to write is already close of being a minimal surface.

  16. The successful of finite element to invent particle cleaning system by air jet in hard disk drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jai-Ngam, Nualpun; Tangchaichit, Kaitfa

    2018-02-01

    Hard Disk Drive manufacturing has faced very challenging with the increasing demand of high capacity drives for Cloud-based storage. Particle adhesion has also become increasingly important in HDD to gain more reliability of storage capacity. The ability to clean on surfaces is more complicated in removing such particles without damaging the surface. This research is aim to improve the particle cleaning in HSA by using finite element to develop the air flow model then invent the prototype of air cleaning system to remove particle from surface. Surface cleaning by air pressure can be applied as alternative for the removal of solid particulate contaminants that is adhering on a solid surface. These technical and economic challenges have driven the process development from traditional way that chemical solvent cleaning. The focus of this study is to develop alternative way from scrub, ultrasonic, mega sonic on surface cleaning principles to serve as a foundation for the development of new processes to meet current state-of-the-art process requirements and minimize the waste from chemical cleaning for environment safety.

  17. Determinants of black carbon, particle mass and number concentrations in London transport microenvironments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivas, Ioar; Kumar, Prashant; Hagen-Zanker, Alex; Andrade, Maria de Fatima; Slovic, Anne Dorothee; Pritchard, John P.; Geurs, Karst T.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the determinants of personal exposure concentrations of commuters’ to black carbon (BC), ultrafine particle number concentrations (PNC), and particulate matter (PM1, PM2.5 and PM10) in different travel modes. We quantified the contribution of key factors that explain the variation of

  18. Navier-Stokes simulation with constraint forces: finite-difference method for particle-laden flows and complex geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfler, K; Schwarzer, S

    2000-06-01

    Building on an idea of Fogelson and Peskin [J. Comput. Phys. 79, 50 (1988)] we describe the implementation and verification of a simulation technique for systems of non-Brownian particles in fluids at Reynolds numbers up to about 20 on the particle scale. This direct simulation technique fills a gap between simulations in the viscous regime and high-Reynolds-number modeling. It also combines sufficient computational accuracy with numerical efficiency and allows studies of several thousand, in principle arbitrarily shaped, extended and hydrodynamically interacting particles on regular work stations. We verify the algorithm in two and three dimensions for (i) single falling particles and (ii) a fluid flowing through a bed of fixed spheres. In the context of sedimentation we compute the volume fraction dependence of the mean sedimentation velocity. The results are compared with experimental and other numerical results both in the viscous and inertial regime and we find very satisfactory agreement.

  19. Effects of the irradiation of a finite number of laser beams on the implosion of a cone-guided target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagawa, T; Sakagami, H; Nagatomo, H; Sunahara, A

    2016-01-01

    In direct drive laser fusion, the non-uniformity of the laser absorption on the target surface caused by the irradiation of a finite number of laser beams is a sever problem. GekkoXII laser at Osaka University has twelve laser beams and is irradiated to the target with a dodecahedron orientation, in which the distribution of the laser absorption on the target surface becomes non-uniform. Furthermore, in the case of a cone-guided target, the laser irradiation orientation is more limited. In this paper, we conducted implosion simulations of the cone- guided target based on GekkoXII irradiation orientation and compared the case of using the twelve beams and nine beams where the three beams irradiating the cone region are cut. The implosion simulations were conducted by a three-dimensional pure hydro code. (paper)

  20. Particle Transfer Reactions with the Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock Theory Using a Particle Number Projection Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simenel, Cedric

    2010-01-01

    A particle-number projection technique is used to calculate transfer probabilities in the 16 O+ 208 Pb reaction below the fusion barrier. The time evolution of the many-body wave function is obtained with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) mean-field theory. The agreement with experimental data for the sum of the proton-transfer channels is good, considering that TDHF has no parameter adjusted on the reaction mechanism. Some perspectives for extensions beyond TDHF to include cluster transfers are discussed.

  1. Contribution from the interaction Hamiltonian to the expectation value of particle number with the non-equilibrium quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Ryuuichi; Morozumi, Takuya; Takata, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    We develop the method analyzing particle number non-conserving phenomena with non-equilibrium quantum field-theory. In this study, we consider a CP violating model with interaction Hamiltonian that breaks particle number conservation. To derive the quantum Boltzmann equation for the particle number, we solve Schwinger-Dyson equation, which are obtained from two particle irreducible closed-time-path (2PI CTP) effective action. In this calculation, we show the contribution from interaction Hamiltonian to the time evolution of expectation value of particle number.

  2. On the time-averaging of ultrafine particle number size spectra in vehicular plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Yao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine vehicular particle (<100 nm number size distributions presented in the literature are mostly averages of long scan-time (~30 s or more spectra mainly due to the non-availability of commercial instruments that can measure particle distributions in the <10 nm to 100 nm range faster than 30 s even though individual researchers have built faster (1–2.5 s scanning instruments. With the introduction of the Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer (EEPS in 2004, high time-resolution (1 full 32-channel spectrum per second particle size distribution data become possible and allow atmospheric researchers to study the characteristics of ultrafine vehicular particles in rapidly and perhaps randomly varying high concentration environments such as roadside, on-road and tunnel. In this study, particle size distributions in these environments were found to vary as rapidly as one second frequently. This poses the question on the generality of using averages of long scan-time spectra for dynamic and/or mechanistic studies in rapidly and perhaps randomly varying high concentration environments. One-second EEPS data taken at roadside, on roads and in tunnels by a mobile platform are time-averaged to yield 5, 10, 30 and 120 s distributions to answer this question.

  3. Constraints on the dark matter particle mass from the number of Milky Way satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polisensky, Emil; Ricotti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    We have conducted N-body simulations of the growth of Milky Way-sized halos in cold and warm dark matter cosmologies. The number of dark matter satellites in our simulated Milky Ways decreases with decreasing mass of the dark matter particle. Assuming that the number of dark matter satellites exceeds or equals the number of observed satellites of the Milky Way, we derive lower limits on the dark matter particle mass. We find with 95% confidence m s >13.3 keV for a sterile neutrino produced by the Dodelson and Widrow mechanism, m s >8.9 keV for the Shi and Fuller mechanism, m s >3.0 keV for the Higgs decay mechanism, and m WDM >2.3 keV for a thermal dark matter particle. The recent discovery of many new dark matter dominated satellites of the Milky Way in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey allows us to set lower limits comparable to constraints from the complementary methods of Lyman-α forest modeling and x-ray observations of the unresolved cosmic x-ray background and of dark matter halos from dwarf galaxy to cluster scales. Future surveys like LSST, DES, PanSTARRS, and SkyMapper have the potential to discover many more satellites and further improve constraints on the dark matter particle mass.

  4. Explaining global surface aerosol number concentrations in terms of primary emissions and particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Spracklen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We synthesised observations of total particle number (CN concentration from 36 sites around the world. We found that annual mean CN concentrations are typically 300–2000 cm−3 in the marine boundary layer and free troposphere (FT and 1000–10 000 cm−3 in the continental boundary layer (BL. Many sites exhibit pronounced seasonality with summer time concentrations a factor of 2–10 greater than wintertime concentrations. We used these CN observations to evaluate primary and secondary sources of particle number in a global aerosol microphysics model. We found that emissions of primary particles can reasonably reproduce the spatial pattern of observed CN concentration (R2=0.46 but fail to explain the observed seasonal cycle (R2=0.1. The modeled CN concentration in the FT was biased low (normalised mean bias, NMB=−88% unless a secondary source of particles was included, for example from binary homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid and water (NMB=−25%. Simulated CN concentrations in the continental BL were also biased low (NMB=−74% unless the number emission of anthropogenic primary particles was increased or a mechanism that results in particle formation in the BL was included. We ran a number of simulations where we included an empirical BL nucleation mechanism either using the activation-type mechanism (nucleation rate, J, proportional to gas-phase sulfuric acid concentration to the power one or kinetic-type mechanism (J proportional to sulfuric acid to the power two with a range of nucleation coefficients. We found that the seasonal CN cycle observed at continental BL sites was better simulated by BL particle formation (R2=0.3 than by increasing the number emission from primary anthropogenic sources (R2=0.18. The nucleation constants that resulted in best overall match between model and observed CN concentrations were

  5. Stress Analysis of a TRISO Coated Particle Fuel by Using ABAQUS Finite Element Visco-Elastoplastic Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Moon Sung; Kim, Y. M.; Lee, Y. W.

    2006-01-01

    The fundamental design for a gas-cooled reactor relies on an understanding of the behavior of a coated particle fuel. KAERI, which has been carrying out the Korean VHTR (Very High Temperature modular gas cooled Reactor) Project since 2004, is developing a fuel performance analysis code for a VHTR named COPA (COated Particle fuel Analysis). A validation of COPA was attempted by comparing its benchmark results with the visco-elastic solutions obtained from the ABAQUS code calculations for the IAEA-CRP-6 TRISO coated particle benchmark problems involving a creep, swelling, and pressure. However, the ABAQUS finite element model used for the above-mentioned analysis did not consider the material nonlinearity of the SiC coating layer that showed stress levels higher than the assumed yield point of the material. In this study, a consideration of the material nonlinearity is included in the ABAQUS model to obtain the visco-elastoplastic solutions and the results are compared with the visco-elastic solutions obtained from the previous ABAQUS model

  6. Tight coupling of particle size, number and composition in atmospheric cloud droplet activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Topping

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The substantial uncertainty in the indirect effect of aerosol particles on radiative forcing in large part arises from the influences of atmospheric aerosol particles on (i the brightness of clouds, exerting significant shortwave cooling with no appreciable compensation in the long wave, and on (ii their ability to precipitate, with implications for cloud cover and lifetime.

    Predicting the ambient conditions at which aerosol particles may become cloud droplets is largely reliant on an equilibrium relationship derived by Köhler (1936. However, the theoretical basis of the relationship restricts its application to particles solely comprising involatile compounds and water, whereas a substantial fraction of particles in the real atmosphere will contain potentially thousands of semi-volatile organic compounds in addition to containing semi-volatile inorganic components such as ammonium nitrate.

    We show that equilibration of atmospherically reasonable concentrations of organic compounds with a growing particle as the ambient humidity increases has potentially larger implications on cloud droplet formation than any other equilibrium compositional dependence, owing to inextricable linkage between the aerosol composition, a particles size and concentration under ambient conditions.

    Whilst previous attempts to account for co-condensation of gases other than water vapour have been restricted to one inorganic condensate, our method demonstrates that accounting for the co-condensation of any number of organic compounds substantially decreases the saturation ratio of water vapour required for droplet activation. This effect is far greater than any other compositional dependence; more so even than the unphysical effect of surface tension reduction in aqueous organic mixtures, ignoring differences in bulk and surface surfactant concentrations.

  7. Hygroscopic growth of tropospheric particle number size distributions over the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achtert, P.; Birmili, W.; Nowak, A.; Wehner, B.; Wiedensohler, A.; Takegawa, N.; Kondo, Y.; Miyazaki, Y.; Hu, M.; Zhu, T.

    2009-01-01

    The hygroscopic growth of atmospheric submicrometer particle size distributions (diameter Dp ranging from 22 to 900 nm) was studied at a rural/suburban site in the North China Plain within the framework of the international Campaigns of Air Quality Research in Beijing and Surrounding Region 2006 (CAREBeijing-2006) research project. The goal was to characterize the regional aerosol in the polluted northeastern plain in China. Size descriptive hygroscopic growth factors (DHGFs) were determined as a function of relative humidity (RH) by relating the particle number size distribution at a dry condition ( 100 nm), the DHGF are substantially higher than in the Aitken particle mode (Dp liquid phase processes in convective clouds. Furthermore, all results concerning the DHGF show a significant dependency on meteorological air masses. The hygroscopic growth of accumulation mode particles correlates significantly with the PM1-mass fraction of sulfate ions determined by chemical analysis. Finally, this investigation provides a parameterization of the hygroscopic growth of 250-nm particles, which might be useful when predicting visibility and radiative forcing and performing atmospheric aerosol model validations.

  8. Influence of implant number, length, and tilting degree on stress distribution in atrophic maxilla: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümrükçü, Zeynep; Korkmaz, Yavuz Tolga

    2017-11-09

    This study aims to evaluate the stress values, created in peri-implant region as a consequence of loading on fixed hybrid dentures that was planned with different implant numbers, lengths, or tilting angulations. Thirteen three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis models were generated with four, five, or seven implants (group A, B, and C). Except the distal implants, all implants were modeled at 4.1 mm (diameter) and 11.5 mm (length) in size. Distal implants were configured to be in five different lengths (6, 8, 11.5, 13, and 16 mm) and three different implant inclination degrees (0°, 30°, and 45°). A 150-N load was applied vertically on prosthesis. Released stresses were evaluated comparatively. The lowest von Mises stress values were found in group C, in the 11.5-mm implant model. Tilting the distal implants 30° caused higher stress values. In 45°-tilting implant models, lower stress values were recorded according to the 30°-tilting models. The ideal implant number is seven for an edentulous maxilla. Tilting the implants causes higher stress values. A 45° inclination of implant causes lower stress values according to the 30° models due to a shorter cantilever. The ideal implant length is 11.5 mm.

  9. A multithreaded and GPU-optimized compact finite difference algorithm for turbulent mixing at high Schmidt number using petascale computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, M. P.; Yeung, P. K.; Buaria, D.; Gotoh, T.

    2017-11-01

    Turbulent mixing at high Schmidt number is a multiscale problem which places demanding requirements on direct numerical simulations to resolve fluctuations down the to Batchelor scale. We use a dual-grid, dual-scheme and dual-communicator approach where velocity and scalar fields are computed by separate groups of parallel processes, the latter using a combined compact finite difference (CCD) scheme on finer grid with a static 3-D domain decomposition free of the communication overhead of memory transposes. A high degree of scalability is achieved for a 81923 scalar field at Schmidt number 512 in turbulence with a modest inertial range, by overlapping communication with computation whenever possible. On the Cray XE6 partition of Blue Waters, use of a dedicated thread for communication combined with OpenMP locks and nested parallelism reduces CCD timings by 34% compared to an MPI baseline. The code has been further optimized for the 27-petaflops Cray XK7 machine Titan using GPUs as accelerators with the latest OpenMP 4.5 directives, giving 2.7X speedup compared to CPU-only execution at the largest problem size. Supported by NSF Grant ACI-1036170, the NCSA Blue Waters Project with subaward via UIUC, and a DOE INCITE allocation at ORNL.

  10. Parallel Finite Element Particle-In-Cell Code for Simulations of Space-charge Dominated Beam-Cavity Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Ko, K.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Limborg, C.; Ng, C.; Prudencio, E.; Schussman, G.; Uplenchwar, R.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel finite element (FE) particle-in-cell code Pic3P (Pic2P) for simulations of beam-cavity interactions dominated by space-charge effects. As opposed to standard space-charge dominated beam transport codes, which are based on the electrostatic approximation, Pic3P (Pic2P) includes space-charge, retardation and boundary effects as it self-consistently solves the complete set of Maxwell-Lorentz equations using higher-order FE methods on conformal meshes. Use of efficient, large-scale parallel processing allows for the modeling of photoinjectors with unprecedented accuracy, aiding the design and operation of the next-generation of accelerator facilities. Applications to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) RF gun are presented

  11. Number Size Distributions and Seasonality of Submicron Particles in Europe 2008–2009

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Asmi, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Laj, P.; Fjaeraa, A.-M.; Sellegri, K.; Birmili, W.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Ždímal, Vladimír; Zíková, Naděžda; Putaud, J.-P.; Marioni, A.; Tunved, P.; Hansson, H.-C.; Fiebig, M.; Kivekäs, N.; Lihavainen, H.; Asmi, E.; Ulevicius, V.; Aalto, P.P.; Swietlicki, E.; Kristensson, E.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Kalivitis, N.; Kalapov, I.; Kiss, G.; de Leeuw, G.; Henzig, B.; Harrison, R.M.; Beddows, D.; O´Dowd, C.; Jennings, S.G.; Flentje, H.; Weinhold, K.; Meinhardt, F.; Ries, L.; Kulmala, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2011), s. 5505-5538 ISSN 1680-7316 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) RII3-CT-2006-026140; European Commission(XE) 36833; European Commission(IT) Ev-K2-CNR Grant - others:AFCE(FI) 1118615 Program:FP6 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : aerosol particle number * aerosol concentrations * european submicron Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.520, year: 2011

  12. Influence of medium range transport of particles from nucleation burst on particle number concentration within the urban airshed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Cheung

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An elevated particle number concentration (PNC observed during nucleation events could play a significant contribution to the total particle load and therefore to the air pollution in the urban environments. Therefore, a field measurement study of PNC was commenced to investigate the temporal and spatial variations of PNC within the urban airshed of Brisbane, Australia. PNC was monitored at urban (QUT, roadside (WOO and semi-urban (ROC areas around the Brisbane region during 2009. During the morning traffic peak period, the highest relative fraction of PNC reached about 5% at QUT and WOO on weekdays. PNC peaks were observed around noon, which correlated with the highest solar radiation levels at all three stations, thus suggesting that high PNC levels were likely to be associated with new particle formation caused by photochemical reactions. Wind rose plots showed relatively higher PNC for the NE direction, which was associated with industrial pollution, accounting for 12%, 9% and 14% of overall PNC at QUT, WOO and ROC, respectively. Although there was no significant correlation between PNC at each station, the variation of PNC was well correlated among three stations during regional nucleation events. In addition, PNC at ROC was significantly influenced by upwind urban pollution during the nucleation burst events, with the average enrichment factor of 15.4. This study provides an insight into the influence of regional nucleation events on PNC in the Brisbane region and it the first study to quantify the effect of urban pollution on semi-urban PNC through the nucleation events.

  13. Constraints on the Dark Matter Particle Mass from the Number of Milky Way Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    assuming dark matter only simulations (we do not include the effect of baryons in our simulations). We adopted values for cosmological parameters from the...ar X iv :1 00 4. 14 59 v1 [ as tr o- ph .C O ] 9 A pr 2 01 0 Constraints on the Dark Matter Particle Mass from the Number of Milky Way...simulations of the growth of Milky Way-sized halos in cold and warm dark matter cosmologies. The number of dark matter satellites in our simulated Milky

  14. Particle-pair relative velocity measurement in high-Reynolds-number homogeneous and isotropic turbulence using 4-frame particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Zhongwang; Ireland, Peter J.; Bragg, Andrew D.; Liang, Zach; Collins, Lance R.; Meng, Hui

    2018-02-01

    The radial relative velocity (RV) between particles suspended in turbulent flow plays a critical role in droplet collision and growth. We present a simple and accurate approach to RV measurement in isotropic turbulence—planar 4-frame particle tracking velocimetry—using routine PIV hardware. It improves particle positioning and pairing accuracy over the 2-frame holographic approach by de Jong et al. (Int J Multiphas Flow 36:324-332; de Jong et al., Int J Multiphas Flow 36:324-332, 2010) without using high-speed cameras and lasers as in Saw et al. (Phys Fluids 26:111702, 2014). Homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow ({R_λ }=357) in a new, fan-driven, truncated iscosahedron chamber was laden with either low-Stokes (mean St=0.09, standard deviation 0.05) or high-Stokes aerosols (mean St=3.46, standard deviation 0.57). For comparison, DNS was conducted under similar conditions ({R_λ }=398; St=0.10 and 3.00, respectively). Experimental RV probability density functions (PDF) and mean inward RV agree well with DNS. Mean inward RV increases with St at small particle separations, r, and decreases with St at large r, indicating the dominance of "path-history" and "inertial filtering" effects, respectively. However, at small r, the experimental mean inward RV trends higher than DNS, possibly due to the slight polydispersity of particles and finite light sheet thickness in experiments. To confirm this interpretation, we performed numerical experiments and found that particle polydispersity increases mean inward RV at small r, while finite laser thickness also overestimates mean inward RV at small r, This study demonstrates the feasibility of accurately measuring RV using routine hardware, and verifies, for the first time, the path-history and inertial filtering effects on particle-pair RV at large particle separations experimentally.

  15. Influence of Reynolds number on coalescence of droplets with particle in flow through a tube at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Masahiro; Yatagawa, Yuta; Kumagai, Yuki

    2016-07-01

    The coalescence of droplets in flow through a tube at low Reynolds number is potentially useful for different purposes including the handling of fluids, control of chemical reaction, and in drug delivery systems. The phenomenon is also the basis for analyzing the flow of multiphase fluids through porous media such as in enhanced oil recovery and the breaking of emulsions in porous coalescers. With regard to examples of studies on the creeping motion of droplets in a flow through a tube, Hetsroni G. et al.[1] theoretically examined the motion of a spherical droplet or bubble with small d/D, where d is the undeformed diameter of the droplet or bubble, and D is the tube diameter. Higdon J.J.L. and Muldowney G.P. [2] numerically obtained the resistance functions for a spherical particle, droplet, and bubble. Olbricht, W.L. and Kung D.M.[3] and Aul R.W. and Olbricht, W.L.[4] mainly investigated the coalescence time of droplets. Aul R.W. and Olbricht W.L. proposed a semi-theoretical formula of the coalescence time. Based on the formula by them, Muraoka, M. et al.[5] proposed other semi-theoretical formulas of the coalescence time in terms of the resistance experienced by the liquid droplet in creeping flow through a tube. The latter formulas take the eccentricity of the following droplets into consideration. In the present study, a glass tube of inner diameter 2.0mm, outer diameter 7.0mm, and length 1500 mm was used as the test tube. Silicon oil with a kinematic viscosity of 3000cSt was employed as the test fluid of the droplet. A mixture of glycerol and pure water was used as the surrounding fluid of the creeping flow through a tube. A large volumetric syringe pump was used to maintain steady flow through the tube at a designated average velocity. The test tube was immersed in temperature-controlled water contained in a tank to maintain constant temperature of the system. The droplets were injected into the test tube. The behaviors of the droplets were monitored by a

  16. Influence of Number of Implants and Attachment Type on Stress Distribution in Mandibular Implant-Retained Overdentures: Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Anwar, Mohamed I; El-Taftazany, Eman A; Hamed, Hamdy A; ElHay, Mohamed A Abd

    2017-04-15

    This study aimed to compare the stresses generated by using two or four root form dental implants supporting mandibular overdentures that were retained with ball and locator attachments. Under ANSYS environment, four 3D finite element models were prepared. These models simulated complete overdentures supported by two or four implants with either ball or locator attachments as a connection mechanism. The models' components were created by CAD/CAM package then were imported to ANSYS. Load of 100 N was applied at the right premolar/molar region vertically and at an oblique angle of 110° from lingual direction. Within the conditions of this research, in all cases, it was found that cortical and cancellous bone regions were the least to be stressed. Also, the ball attachment produced higher stresses. Caps deformation and stresses are negligible in cases of using locator attachment in comparison to ball attachments. This may indicate longer lifetime and less repair/maintenance operations in implant overdentures retained by locator attachments. Although the study revealed that bone was insensitive to a number of implants or attachment type, it may be recommended to use two implants in the canine region than using four, where the locator attachments were found to be better.

  17. Gene stacking strategies with doubled haploids derived from biparental crosses: theory and simulations assuming a finite number of loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchinger, Albrecht E; Technow, Frank; Dhillon, Baldev S

    2011-12-01

    Recent progress in genotyping and doubled haploid (DH) techniques has created new opportunities for development of improved selection methods in numerous crops. Assuming a finite number of unlinked loci (ℓ) and a given total number (n) of individuals to be genotyped, we compared, by theory and simulations, three methods of marker-assisted selection (MAS) for gene stacking in DH lines derived from biparental crosses: (1) MAS for high values of the marker score (T, corresponding to the total number of target alleles) in the F(2) generation and subsequently among DH lines derived from the selected F(2) individual (Method 1), (2) MAS for augmented F(2) enrichment and subsequently for T among DH lines from the best carrier F(2) individual (Method 2), and (3) MAS for T among DH lines derived from the F(1) generation (Method 3). Our objectives were to (a) determine the optimum allocation of resources to the F(2) ([Formula: see text]) and DH generations [Formula: see text] for Methods 1 and 2 by simulations, (b) compare the efficiency of all three methods for gene stacking by simulations, and (c) develop theory to explain the general effect of selection on the segregation variance and interpret our simulation results. By theory, we proved that for smaller values of ℓ, the segregation variance of T among DH lines derived from F(2) individuals, selected for high values of T, can be much smaller than expected in the absence of selection. This explained our simulation results, showing that for Method 1, it is best to genotype more F(2) individuals than DH lines ([Formula: see text]), whereas under Method 2, the optimal ratio [Formula: see text] was close to 0.5. However, for ratios deviating moderately from the optimum, the mean [Formula: see text] of T in the finally selected DH line ([Formula: see text]) was hardly reduced. Method 3 had always the lowest mean [Formula: see text] of [Formula: see text] except for small numbers of loci (ℓ = 4) and is favorable only if

  18. Finite magnetic relaxation in x-space magnetic particle imaging: comparison of measurements and ferrohydrodynamic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhavalikar, R.; Hensley, D.; Maldonado-Camargo, L.; Croft, L. R.; Ceron, S.; Goodwill, P. W.; Conolly, S. M.; Rinaldi, C.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging tomographic imaging technology that detects magnetic nanoparticle tracers by exploiting their non-linear magnetization properties. In order to predict the behavior of nanoparticles in an imager, it is possible to use a non-imaging MPI relaxometer or spectrometer to characterize the behavior of nanoparticles in a controlled setting. In this paper we explore the use of ferrohydrodynamic magnetization equations for predicting the response of particles in an MPI relaxometer. These include a magnetization equation developed by Shliomis (Sh) which has a constant relaxation time and a magnetization equation which uses a field-dependent relaxation time developed by Martsenyuk, Raikher and Shliomis (MRSh). We compare the predictions from these models with measurements and with the predictions based on the Langevin function that assumes instantaneous magnetization response of the nanoparticles. The results show good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the ferrohydrodynamic models and the measurements without the use of fitting parameters and provide further evidence of the potential of ferrohydrodynamic modeling in MPI.

  19. Simultaneous 3D measurement of the translation and rotation of finite-size particles and the flow field in a fully developed turbulent water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Simon; Gibert, Mathieu; Bérut, Antoine; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2013-02-01

    We report a novel experimental technique that measures simultaneously in three dimensions the trajectories, the translation and the rotation of finite-size inertial particles together with the turbulent flow. The flow field is analyzed by tracking the temporal evolution of small fluorescent tracer particles. The inertial particles consist of a super-absorbent polymer that renders them index and density matched with water and thus invisible. The particles are marked by inserting at various locations tracer particles into the polymer. Translation and rotation, as well as the flow field around the particle are recovered dynamically from the analysis of the marker and tracer particle trajectories. We apply this technique to study the dynamics of inertial particles much larger in size (Rp/η ≈ 100) than the Kolmogorov length scale η in a von Kármán swirling water flow (Rλ ≈ 400). We show, using the mixed (particle/fluid) Eulerian second-order velocity structure function, that the interaction zone between the particle and the flow develops in a spherical shell of width 2Rp around the particle of radius Rp. This we interpret as an indication of a wake induced by the particle. This measurement technique has many additional advantages that will make it useful to address other problems such as particle collisions, dynamics of non-spherical solid objects, or even of wet granular matter.

  20. Source apportionment of aerosol particles at a European air pollution hot spot using particle number size distributions and chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, Cecilia; Pokorná, Petra; Hovorka, Jan; Masiol, Mauro; Topinka, Jan; Zhao, Yongjing; Křůmal, Kamil; Cliff, Steven; Mikuška, Pavel; Hopke, Philip K

    2018-03-01

    Ostrava in the Moravian-Silesian region (Czech Republic) is a European air pollution hot spot for airborne particulate matter (PM), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and ultrafine particles (UFPs). Air pollution source apportionment is essential for implementation of successful abatement strategies. UFPs or nanoparticles of diameter pollutants, organic markers, and associations between the NSD factors and chemical composition factors were used to identify the pollution sources. The PMF on the NSD reveals two factors in the ultrafine size range: industrial UFPs (28%, number mode diameter - NMD 45 nm), industrial/fresh road traffic nanoparticles (26%, NMD 26 nm); three factors in the accumulation size range: urban background (24%, NMD 93 nm), coal burning (14%, volume mode diameter - VMD 0.5 μm), regional pollution (3%, VMD 0.8 μm) and one factor in the coarse size range: industrial coarse particles/road dust (2%, VMD 5 μm). The PMF analysis of PM 0.09-1.15 revealed four factors: SIA/CC/BB (52%), road dust (18%), sinter/steel (16%), iron production (16%). The factors in the ultrafine size range resolved with NSD have a positive correlation with sinter/steel production and iron production factors resolved with chemical composition. Coal combustion factor resolved with NSD has moderate correlation with SIA/CC/BB factor. The organic markers homohopanes correlate with coal combustion and the levoglucosan correlates with urban background. The PMF applications to NSD and chemical composition datasets are complementary. PAHs in PM 1 were found to be associated with coal combustion factor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mathematical Relationship Between Particle Reynolds Number and Ripple Factor using Tapi River Data, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Yadav

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The computation of bed load allows for the fact that only part of the shear stress is used for transport of sediments and some of the shear stress is wasted in overcoming the resistance due to bed forms therefore the total shear stress developed in the open channel requires correction in the form of correction factor called ripple factor. Different methods have been followed for correcting the actual shear stress in order to compute the sediment load. Correction factors are based on particular characteristics grain size of particle. In the present paper the ripple factor has been obtained for non uniform bed material considering the various variables like discharge, hydraulic mean depth, flow velocity, bed slope, average diameter of particle etc. by collecting the field data of Tapi river for 15 years for a particular gauging station. The ripple factor is obtained using Meyer Peter and Muller formula, Einstein Formula, Kalinske’s formula, Du Boy’s formula, Shield’s formula, Bagnold’s formula, average of six formulae and multiple regression analysis. The variation of ripple factor with particle Reynolds Number is studied. The ripple factor obtained by different approaches are further analyzed using Origin software and carrying out multiple regression on the 15 years of data with more than 10 parameters, ripple factor by multiple regression has been obtained. These values are further analysed and giving statistical mean to the parameters a relationship of power form has been developed. The ripple factor increases with the increase in the value of Particle Reynolds number. The large deviation is observed in case of Kalinske’s approach when compare with other approaches

  2. Estimate of main local sources to ambient ultrafine particle number concentrations in an urban area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Mahmudur; Mazaheri, Mandana; Clifford, Sam; Morawska, Lidia

    2017-09-01

    Quantifying and apportioning the contribution of a range of sources to ultrafine particles (UFPs, D urban environments. Although vehicular emissions have long been considered one of the major sources of ultrafine particles in urban areas, the contribution of other major urban sources is not yet fully understood. This paper aims to determine and quantify the contribution of local ground traffic, nucleated particle (NP) formation and distant non-traffic (e.g. airport, oil refineries, and seaport) sources to the total ambient particle number concentration (PNC) in a busy, inner-city area in Brisbane, Australia using Bayesian statistical modelling and other exploratory tools. The Bayesian model was trained on the PNC data on days where NP formations were known to have not occurred, hourly traffic counts, solar radiation data, and smooth daily trend. The model was applied to apportion and quantify the contribution of NP formations and local traffic and non-traffic sources to UFPs. The data analysis incorporated long-term measured time-series of total PNC (D ≥ 6 nm), particle number size distributions (PSD, D = 8 to 400 nm), PM2.5, PM10, NOx, CO, meteorological parameters and traffic counts at a stationary monitoring site. The developed Bayesian model showed reliable predictive performances in quantifying the contribution of NP formation events to UFPs (up to 4 × 104 particles cm- 3), with a significant day to day variability. The model identified potential NP formation and no-formations days based on PNC data and quantified the sources contribution to UFPs. Exploratory statistical analyses show that total mean PNC during the middle of the day was up to 32% higher than during peak morning and evening traffic periods, which were associated with NP formation events. The majority of UFPs measured during the peak traffic and NP formation periods were between 30-100 nm and smaller than 30 nm, respectively. To date, this is the first application of Bayesian model to

  3. Simultaneous 3D measurement of the translation and rotation of finite size particles and the flow field in a fully developed turbulent water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, Mathieu; Klein, Simon; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2012-11-01

    We report a novel experimental technique that measures simultaneously in three dimensions the trajectories, the translation, and the rotation of finite size inertial particles together with the turbulent flow. The flow field is analyzed by tracking the temporal evolution of small fluorescent tracer particles. The inertial particles consist of a super-absorbent polymer that renders them index and density matched with water and thus invisible. The particles are marked by inserting at various locations tracer particles into the polymer. Translation and rotation, as well as the flow field around the particle are recovered dynamically from the analysis of the marker and tracer particle trajectories. We apply this technique to study the dynamics of inertial particles much larger in size (Rp / η ~ 100) than the Kolmogorov length scale η in a von Kármán swirling water flow (Rλ ~ 400). We show, using the mixed (particle/fluid) Eulerian second order velocity structure function, that the interaction zone between the particle and the flow develops in a spherical shell of width 2Rp around the particle of radius Rp. This we interpret as an indication of a wake induced by the particle. (http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2181) This work was funded generously by the Max Planck Society and the Marie Curie Fellowship, Program PEOPLE - Call FP7-PEOPLE-IEF-2008 Proposal No 237521. Support from COST Action MP0806 is kindly acknowledged.

  4. Seasonal variation of atmospheric particle number concentrations, new particle formation and atmospheric oxidation capacity at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Q. T.; Glasius, Marianne; Sørensen, Lise L.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of the physical properties of sub-micrometer aerosol particles measured at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord (VRS), northeast Greenland, between July 2010 and February 2013. The study focuses on particle number concentrations, particle numbe...... mass origin. A map of event occurrence probability was computed, indicating that southerly air masses from over the Greenland Sea were more likely linked to those events. © Author(s) 2016....

  5. OPTIMIZATION OF A PULTRUSION PROCESS USING FINITE DIFFERENCE AND PARTICLE SWARM ALGORITHMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Santos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPultrusion is one of several manufacturing processes for reinforced polymer composites. In this process fibers are continuously pulled through a resin bath and, after impregnation, the fiber-resin assembly is cured in a heated forming die. In order to obtain a polymeric composite with good properties (high and uniform degree of cure and a process with a minimum of wasted energy, an optimization procedure is necessary to calculate the optimal temperature profile. The present work suggests a new strategy to minimize the energy rate taking into account the final quality of the product. For this purpose the particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm and the computer code DASSL were used to solve the differential algebraic equation that represents the mathematical model. The results of the optimization procedure were compared with results reported in the literature and showed that this strategy may be a good alternative to find the best operational point and to test other heat policies in order to improve the material quality and minimize the energy cost. In addition, the robustness and fast convergence of the algorithm encourage industrial implementation for the inference of the degree of cure and optimization.

  6. Genotoxic effects of daily personal exposure to particle mass and number concentrations on buccal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Daniela S.; da Costa, Silvano César; Ribeiro, Marcos; Moreira, Camila A. B.; Beal, Alexandra; Squizzato, Rafaela; Rudke, Anderson Paulo; Rafee, Sameh Adib Abou; Martins, Jorge A.; Palioto, Graciana Freitas; Kumar, Prashant; Martins, Leila D.

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study is to assess personal exposure to Particle Number Concentrations (PNC) in four size ranges between 0.3 and 10 μm, and particulate matter (PM1; PM2.5; PM4; PM10) in order to evaluate possible genotoxic effects through a comet assay in buccal cells. A convenience cohort of 30 individuals from a Brazilian medium-sized city was selected. These individuals aged between 20 and 61 and worked in typical job categories (i.e., administrative, commerce, education, general services and transport). They were recruited to perform personal exposure measurements during their typical daily routine activities, totaling 240 h of sampling. The 8-h average mass concentrations in air for volunteers ranged from 2.4 to 31.8 μg m-3 for PM1, 4.2-45.1 μg m-3 for PM2.5, 7.9-66.1 μg m-3 for PM4 and from 23.1 to 131.7 μg m-3 for PM10. The highest PNC variation was found for 0.3-0.5 range, between 14 and 181 particles cm-3, 1 to 14 particles cm-3 for the 0.5-1.0 range, 0.2 to 2 particles cm-3 for the 1.0-2.5 range, and 0.06 to 0.7 particles cm-3 for the 2.5-10 range. Volunteers in the 'education' category experienced the lowest inhaled dose of PM2.5, as opposed to those involved in 'commercial' activities with the highest doses for PM10 (1.63 μg kg-1 h-1) and PM2.5 (0.61 μg kg-1 h-1). The predominant cause for these high doses was associated with the proximity of the workplace to the street and vehicle traffic. The comet assay performed in buccal cells indicated that the volunteers in 'commerce' category experienced the highest damage to their DeoxyriboNucleic Acid (DNA) compared with the control category (i.e. 'education'). These results indicate the variability in personal exposure of the volunteers in different groups, and the potential damage to DNA was much higher for those spending time in close proximity to the vehicle sources (e.g. commercial services) leading to exposure to a higher fraction of fine particles. This study builds understanding on the exposure

  7. Fibre bundle varieties and the number of generations of elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    The idea is presented that the number of generations of elementary particles in a gauge theory characterised by a given Lie algebra is the same as the number of topologically distinct principal fibre bundles with a structure group having the same Lie algebra and R 3 -(0) as base space. Two different generations thus have a different global structure or 'twist' to their fibre bundles. It is found that at most three generations are allowed for groups with the same Lie algebra as E 6 , at most four generations for groups with the same Lie algebra as SOsub(41+2) with 1>=2, and at most n generations for groups with the same Lie algebra as SUsub(n). (author)

  8. Primary standard for the number concentration of liquid-borne particles in the 10 to 20 µm diameter range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, T.; Ehara, K.

    2011-02-01

    The national primary standard for the number concentration of liquid-borne particles in the 10 to 20 µm diameter range has been developed at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan. The standard consists of a total number counting type flow cytometer (T-FCM) and an electronic balance. The T-FCM is a commercial flow cytometer modified so that the total number of particles in an aqueous suspension sampled in a test tube can be counted, and the electronic balance is used to determine the mass of the suspension. This standard is intended to be used for calibrating commercial standard suspensions of monodisperse polystyrene latex (PSL) particles. The measurand in the calibration is the mass-based number concentration (the particle number in a unit mass of a suspension), and the calibration capability covers the concentration range from 5 × 102 to 2 × 106 particles g-1. When the concentration of the suspension is higher than 2 × 103 particles g-1, the suspension is first diluted to about 1 × 103 particles g-1 to suppress the coincidence loss in particle counting by the T-FCM. The validity of the calibration with the T-FCM was examined by comparison with an independent method in which a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to determine the number concentration of particles deposited on a silicon wafer. For a suspension of 10 µm PSL particles with a concentration of approximately 1 × 106 particles g-1, the concentration values determined by the T-FCM and SEM methods were 1.042 × 106 and 1.035 × 106 particles g-1, respectively: The difference was less than 0.7%. The relative expanded uncertainty of the measurement by the T-FCM method with the coverage factor k = 2 was 4.4%.

  9. Particle number and probability density functional theory and A-representability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao-Yin; Sahni, Viraht

    2010-04-28

    In Hohenberg-Kohn density functional theory, the energy E is expressed as a unique functional of the ground state density rho(r): E = E[rho] with the internal energy component F(HK)[rho] being universal. Knowledge of the functional F(HK)[rho] by itself, however, is insufficient to obtain the energy: the particle number N is primary. By emphasizing this primacy, the energy E is written as a nonuniversal functional of N and probability density p(r): E = E[N,p]. The set of functions p(r) satisfies the constraints of normalization to unity and non-negativity, exists for each N; N = 1, ..., infinity, and defines the probability density or p-space. A particle number N and probability density p(r) functional theory is constructed. Two examples for which the exact energy functionals E[N,p] are known are provided. The concept of A-representability is introduced, by which it is meant the set of functions Psi(p) that leads to probability densities p(r) obtained as the quantum-mechanical expectation of the probability density operator, and which satisfies the above constraints. We show that the set of functions p(r) of p-space is equivalent to the A-representable probability density set. We also show via the Harriman and Gilbert constructions that the A-representable and N-representable probability density p(r) sets are equivalent.

  10. Number-unconstrained quantum sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2017-12-01

    Quantum sensing is commonly described as a constrained optimization problem: maximize the information gained about an unknown quantity using a limited number of particles. Important sensors including gravitational wave interferometers and some atomic sensors do not appear to fit this description, because there is no external constraint on particle number. Here, we develop the theory of particle-number-unconstrained quantum sensing, and describe how optimal particle numbers emerge from the competition of particle-environment and particle-particle interactions. We apply the theory to optical probing of an atomic medium modeled as a resonant, saturable absorber, and observe the emergence of well-defined finite optima without external constraints. The results contradict some expectations from number-constrained quantum sensing and show that probing with squeezed beams can give a large sensitivity advantage over classical strategies when each is optimized for particle number.

  11. Determination of particle concentration rankings by spatial mapping of particle surface area, number, and mass concentrations in a restaurant and a die casting plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Young; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Raynor, Peter C; Olson, Gregory M

    2010-08-01

    Measurements using several exposure metrics were carried out in a restaurant and a die casting plant to compare the spatial distributions of particle surface area (SA), number, and mass concentrations and rank exposures in different areas by those metrics. The different exposure metrics for incidental nanoparticle and fine particle exposures were compared using the concentration rankings, statistical differences between areas, and concentration ratios between different areas. In the die casting plant, area concentration rankings and spatial distributions differed by the exposure metrics chosen. Surface area and fine particle number concentrations were greatest near incidental nanoparticle sources and were significantly different between three areas. However, mass and coarse particle number concentrations were similar throughout the facility, and rankings of the work areas based on these metrics were different from those of SA and fine number concentrations. In the restaurant, concentrations in the kitchen for all metrics except respirable mass concentration were significantly greater than in the serving area, although SA and fine particle number concentrations showed larger differences between the two areas than either the mass or coarse particle number concentrations. Thus, the choice of appropriate exposure metric has significant implications for exposure groupings in epidemiologic and occupational exposure studies.

  12. Hybrid approach combining dissipative particle dynamics and finite-difference diffusion model: simulation of reactive polymer coupling and interfacial polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezkin, Anatoly V; Kudryavtsev, Yaroslav V

    2013-10-21

    A novel hybrid approach combining dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and finite difference (FD) solution of partial differential equations is proposed to simulate complex reaction-diffusion phenomena in heterogeneous systems. DPD is used for the detailed molecular modeling of mass transfer, chemical reactions, and phase separation near the liquid∕liquid interface, while FD approach is applied to describe the large-scale diffusion of reactants outside the reaction zone. A smooth, self-consistent procedure of matching the solute concentration is performed in the buffer region between the DPD and FD domains. The new model is tested on a simple model system admitting an analytical solution for the diffusion controlled regime and then applied to simulate practically important heterogeneous processes of (i) reactive coupling between immiscible end-functionalized polymers and (ii) interfacial polymerization of two monomers dissolved in immiscible solvents. The results obtained due to extending the space and time scales accessible to modeling provide new insights into the kinetics and mechanism of those processes and demonstrate high robustness and accuracy of the novel technique.

  13. Comparison of experimental and calculated spatial distribution functions of charged particles in extensive air showers with particle number of (1-2)x107 at sea level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedenko, L.G.; Kulikov, G.V.; Solov'eva, V.I.; Sulakov, V.P.; Khristiansen, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    Results of calculations of a spatial distribution function (SDF) of charged particles in extensive air showers (EAS) are given. The calculations have been performed on the basis of a model of quark gluon strings for hadron-hadron interactions. The consideration has been performed for primary protons of cosmic radiation and nuclei with atomic weights A=4, 14, 31, 56 and for three compositions: normal, enriched with protons and enriched with heavy nuclei. When calculating SDF the narrowness of partial showers in electron-photon cascades is taken account of in the case of small finite values of gamma quantum energy, as well as the contributions of muons, decay electrons and delta electrons

  14. Stable source reconstruction from a finite number of measurements in the multi-frequency inverse source problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamehmedovic, Mirza; Kirkeby, Adrian; Knudsen, Kim

    2018-01-01

    setting: From measurements made at a finite set of frequencies we uniquely determine and reconstruct sources in a subspace spanned by finitely many Fourier-Bessel functions. Further, we obtain a constructive criterion for identifying a minimal set of measurement frequencies sufficient for reconstruction......, and under an additional, mild assumption, the reconstruction method is shown to be stable." Our analysis is based on a singular value decomposition of the source-to-measurement forward operators and the distribution of positive zeros of the Bessel functions of the first kind. The reconstruction method...

  15. Source apportionment of ambient particle number concentrations in central Los Angeles using positive matrix factorization (PMF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowlat, Mohammad Hossein; Hasheminassab, Sina; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the positive matrix factorization (PMF) receptor model (version 5.0) was used to identify and quantify major sources contributing to particulate matter (PM) number concentrations, using PM number size distributions in the range of 13 nm to 10 µm combined with several auxiliary variables, including black carbon (BC), elemental and organic carbon (EC/OC), PM mass concentrations, gaseous pollutants, meteorological, and traffic counts data, collected for about 9 months between August 2014 and 2015 in central Los Angeles, CA. Several parameters, including particle number and volume size distribution profiles, profiles of auxiliary variables, contributions of different factors in different seasons to the total number concentrations, diurnal variations of each of the resolved factors in the cold and warm phases, weekday/weekend analysis for each of the resolved factors, and correlation between auxiliary variables and the relative contribution of each of the resolved factors, were used to identify PM sources. A six-factor solution was identified as the optimum for the aforementioned input data. The resolved factors comprised nucleation, traffic 1, traffic 2 (with a larger mode diameter than traffic 1 factor), urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and soil/road dust. Traffic sources (1 and 2) were the major contributor to PM number concentrations, collectively making up to above 60 % (60.8-68.4 %) of the total number concentrations during the study period. Their contribution was also significantly higher in the cold phase compared to the warm phase. Nucleation was another major factor significantly contributing to the total number concentrations (an overall contribution of 17 %, ranging from 11.7 to 24 %), with a larger contribution during the warm phase than in the cold phase. The other identified factors were urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and soil/road dust, with relative contributions of approximately 12 % (7.4-17.1), 2.1 % (1

  16. Mobility particle size spectrometers: harmonization of technical standards and data structure to facilitate high quality long-term observations of atmospheric particle number size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wiedensohler

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mobility particle size spectrometers often referred to as DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizers or SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers have found a wide range of applications in atmospheric aerosol research. However, comparability of measurements conducted world-wide is hampered by lack of generally accepted technical standards and guidelines with respect to the instrumental set-up, measurement mode, data evaluation as well as quality control. Technical standards were developed for a minimum requirement of mobility size spectrometry to perform long-term atmospheric aerosol measurements. Technical recommendations include continuous monitoring of flow rates, temperature, pressure, and relative humidity for the sheath and sample air in the differential mobility analyzer.

    We compared commercial and custom-made inversion routines to calculate the particle number size distributions from the measured electrical mobility distribution. All inversion routines are comparable within few per cent uncertainty for a given set of raw data.

    Furthermore, this work summarizes the results from several instrument intercomparison workshops conducted within the European infrastructure project EUSAAR (European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research and ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network to determine present uncertainties especially of custom-built mobility particle size spectrometers. Under controlled laboratory conditions, the particle number size distributions from 20 to 200 nm determined by mobility particle size spectrometers of different design are within an uncertainty range of around ±10% after correcting internal particle losses, while below and above this size range the discrepancies increased. For particles larger than 200 nm, the uncertainty range increased to 30%, which could not be explained. The network reference mobility spectrometers with identical design agreed within ±4% in the

  17. High-speed analog-digital processor for event sampling by particle-number difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinnikov, V.A.; Nikityuk, N.M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a processor designed for event sampling according to the difference in the numbers of particles passing through two hodoscope planes with 64 and 128 inputs. The signal delay of the process is less than 55 nsec. Data compression is employed to increase economy and speed. Parallel compressors can be implemented by digital as well as analog integrated circuits. A block diagram of the analog-digital processor is shown. The circuit is implemented in the CAMAC standard and occupies a unit of width 3M. To eliminate temperature drift of the logic signals, temperature regulation of the reference voltage is used at the summation point in the analog-digital processor

  18. Finite-span rotating flat-plate wings at low reynolds number and the effects of aspect ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Zakery R.

    In the complex and dangerous environments of the modern warrior and emergency professional, the small size, maneuverability, and stealth of flapping-wing micro air vehicles (MAVs), scaled to the size of large insects or hummingbirds, has the potential to provide previously inaccessible levels of situational awareness, reconnaissance capability, and flexibility directly to the front lines. Although development of such an efficient, autonomous, and capable MAV is years away, there are immediate contributions that can be made to the fundamental science of the flapping-wing-type propulsion that makes MAVs so attractive. This investigation contributes to those fundamentals by considering the unsteady vortex dynamics problem of a rigid, rectangular flat plate at a fixed angle of attack rotating from rest---a simplified hovering half-stroke. Parameters are chosen to be biologically-relevant and relevant to MAVs operating at Reynolds numbers of O (103), and experiments are performed in a 50% by mass glycerin-water mixture. These experiments use novel application of methodologies verified by rigorous uncertainty analysis. The overall objective is to understand the vortex formation and forces as well as aspect ratio ( AR) effects. Of interest is the overall, time-varying, three-dimensional vortex structure obtained qualitatively from dye visualization and quantitatively from volumes reconstructed using planar stereoscopic digital particle image velocimetry (S-DPIV) measurements. The velocity information from S-DPIV also allows statements to be made on leading-edge vortex (LEV) stability, spanwise flow, LEV and tip-vortex (TV) circulation, and numerous circulation scalings. Force measurements are made and the lift coefficient is discussed in the context of the flow structure, the dimensional lift and the ability to relate velocity and force measurements going forward. AR effects is a topic of continued interest to those performing MAV-related research and also a primary

  19. Variability of sub-micrometer particle number size distributions and concentrations in the Western Mediterranean regional background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Cusack

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the daily and seasonal variability of particle number size distributions and concentrations, performed at the Montseny (MSY regional background station in the western Mediterranean from October 2010 to June 2011. Particle number concentrations at MSY were shown to be within range of various other sites across Europe reported in literature, but the seasonality of the particle number size distributions revealed significant differences. The Aitken mode is the dominant particle mode at MSY, with arithmetic mean concentrations of 1698 cm3, followed by the accumulation mode (877 cm−3 and the nucleation mode (246 cm−3. Concentrations showed a strong seasonal variability with large increases in particle number concentrations observed from the colder to warmer months. The modality of median size distributions was typically bimodal, except under polluted conditions when the size distribution was unimodal. During the colder months, the daily variation of particle number size distributions are strongly influenced by a diurnal breeze system, whereby the Aitken and accumulation modes vary similarly to PM1 and BC mass concentrations, with nocturnal minima and sharp day-time increases owing to the development of a diurnal mountain breeze. Under clean air conditions, high levels of nucleation and lower Aitken mode concentrations were measured, highlighting the importance of new particle formation as a source of particles in the absence of a significant condensation sink. During the warmer months, nucleation mode concentrations were observed to be relatively elevated both under polluted and clean conditions due to increased photochemical reactions, with enhanced subsequent growth owing to elevated concentrations of condensable organic vapours produced from biogenic volatile organic compounds, indicating that nucleation at MSY does not exclusively occur under clean air conditions. Finally, mixing of air masses between polluted and non

  20. High pulse number thermal shock tests on tungsten with steady state particle background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, M.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Loewenhoff, Th; Pintsuk, G.; Sergienko, G.; Steudel, I.; Unterberg, B.; Wessel, E.

    2017-12-01

    Thermal fatigue of metallic materials, which will be exposed to severe environmental conditions e.g. plasma facing materials in future fusion reactors, is an important issue in order to predict the life time of complete wall components. Therefore experiments in the linear plasma device PSI-2 were performed to investigate the synergistic effects of high pulse number thermal shock events (L = 0.38 GW m‑2, Δt = 0.5 ms) and stationary D/He (6%) plasma particle background on the thermal fatigue behavior of tungsten. Similar to experiments with pure thermal loads, the induced microstructural and surface modifications such as recrystallization and roughening as well as crack formation become more pronounced with increasing number of thermal shock events. However, the amount of damage significantly increases for synergistic loads showing severe surface roughening, plastic deformation and erosion resulting from the degradation of the mechanical properties caused by bombardment and diffusion of D/He to the surface and the bulk of the material. Additionally, D/He induced blistering and bubble formation were observed for all tested samples, which could change the thermal and mechanical properties of near surface regions.

  1. Number size distribution of fine and ultrafine fume particles from various welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Peter; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Studies in the field of environmental epidemiology indicate that for the adverse effect of inhaled particles not only particle mass is crucial but also particle size is. Ultrafine particles with diameters below 100 nm are of special interest since these particles have high surface area to mass ratio and have properties which differ from those of larger particles. In this paper, particle size distributions of various welding and joining techniques were measured close to the welding process using a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). It turned out that welding processes with high mass emission rates (manual metal arc welding, metal active gas welding, metal inert gas welding, metal inert gas soldering, and laser welding) show mainly agglomerated particles with diameters above 100 nm and only few particles in the size range below 50 nm (10 to 15%). Welding processes with low mass emission rates (tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding) emit predominantly ultrafine particles with diameters well below 100 nm. This finding can be explained by considerably faster agglomeration processes in welding processes with high mass emission rates. Although mass emission is low for tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding, due to the low particle size of the fume, these processes cannot be labeled as toxicologically irrelevant and should be further investigated.

  2. Intercomparison of 15 Aerodynamic Particle Size Spectrometers (APS 3321): Uncertainties in Particle Sizing and Number Size Distribution.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pfeifer, S.; Müller, T.; Weinhold, K.; Zíková, Naděžda; dos Santos, S.M.; Marinoni, A.; Bischof, O.F.; Kykal, C.; Ries, L.; Meinhardt, F.; Aalto, P.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2016), s. 1545-1551 ISSN 1867-1381 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 262254 - ACTRIS Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : counting efficiency * aerodynamic particle size spectrometers * laboratory study Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.089, year: 2016

  3. Source apportionment of ambient particle number concentrations in central Los Angeles using positive matrix factorization (PMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Sowlat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the positive matrix factorization (PMF receptor model (version 5.0 was used to identify and quantify major sources contributing to particulate matter (PM number concentrations, using PM number size distributions in the range of 13 nm to 10 µm combined with several auxiliary variables, including black carbon (BC, elemental and organic carbon (EC/OC, PM mass concentrations, gaseous pollutants, meteorological, and traffic counts data, collected for about 9 months between August 2014 and 2015 in central Los Angeles, CA. Several parameters, including particle number and volume size distribution profiles, profiles of auxiliary variables, contributions of different factors in different seasons to the total number concentrations, diurnal variations of each of the resolved factors in the cold and warm phases, weekday/weekend analysis for each of the resolved factors, and correlation between auxiliary variables and the relative contribution of each of the resolved factors, were used to identify PM sources. A six-factor solution was identified as the optimum for the aforementioned input data. The resolved factors comprised nucleation, traffic 1, traffic 2 (with a larger mode diameter than traffic 1 factor, urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and soil/road dust. Traffic sources (1 and 2 were the major contributor to PM number concentrations, collectively making up to above 60 % (60.8–68.4 % of the total number concentrations during the study period. Their contribution was also significantly higher in the cold phase compared to the warm phase. Nucleation was another major factor significantly contributing to the total number concentrations (an overall contribution of 17 %, ranging from 11.7 to 24 %, with a larger contribution during the warm phase than in the cold phase. The other identified factors were urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and soil/road dust, with relative contributions of approximately 12

  4. Aerosol and NOx emission factors and submicron particle number size distributions in two road tunnels with different traffic regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Imhof

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of aerosol particle number size distributions (18–700 nm, mass concentrations (PM2.5 and PM10 and NOx were performed in the Plabutsch tunnel, Austria, and in the Kingsway tunnel, United Kingdom. These two tunnels show different characteristics regarding the roadway gradient, the composition of the vehicle fleet and the traffic frequency. The submicron particle size distributions contained a soot mode in the diameter range D=80–100 nm and a nucleation mode in the range of D=20–40 nm. In the Kingsway tunnel with a significantly lower particle number and volume concentration level than in the Plabutsch tunnel, a clear diurnal variation of nucleation and soot mode particles correlated to the traffic density was observed. In the Plabutsch tunnel, soot mode particles also revealed a diurnal variation, whereas no substantial variation was found for the nucleation mode particles. During the night a higher number concentration of nucleation mode particles were measured than soot mode particles and vice versa during the day. In this tunnel with very high soot emissions during daytime due to the heavy-duty vehicle (HDV share of 18% and another 40% of diesel driven light-duty vehicles (LDV semivolatile species condense on the pre-existing soot surface area rather than forming new particles by homogeneous nucleation. With the low concentration of soot mode particles in the Kingsway tunnel, also the nucleation mode particles exhibit a diurnal variation. From the measured parameters real-world traffic emission factors were estimated for the whole vehicle fleet as well as differentiated into the two categories LDV and HDV. In the particle size range D=18–700 nm, each vehicle of the mixed fleet emits (1.50±0.08×1014 particles km-1 (Plabutsch and (1.26±0.10×1014 particles km-1 (Kingsway, while particle volume emission factors of 0.209±0.008 cm3 km-1 and 0.036±0.004 cm3 km-1, respectively, were obtained. PM1 emission factors of 104±4 mg

  5. Study of the deconfinement phase transition in a finite volume with massive particles: Hydrodynamics of the system near the transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghenam, L.; Djoudi, A. Ait El [Laboratoire de Physique des Particules et Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure - Kouba, B.P. 92, 16050, Vieux Kouba, Algiers (Algeria)

    2012-06-27

    We study the finite size and finite mass effects for the thermal deconfinement phase transition in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), using a simple model of coexistence of hadronic (H) gas and quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phases in a finite volume. We consider the equations of state of the two phases with the QGP containing two massless u and d quarks and massive s quarks, and a hadronic gas of massive pions, and we probe the system near the transition. For this, we examine the behavior of the most important hydrodynamical quantities describing the system, at a vanishing chemical potential ({mu}= 0), with temperature and energy density.

  6. On the Effect of Dust Particles on Global Cloud Condensation Nuclei and Cloud Droplet Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karydis, V. A.; Kumar, P.; Barahona, D.; Sokolik, I. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-01-01

    Aerosol-cloud interaction studies to date consider aerosol with a substantial fraction of soluble material as the sole source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Emerging evidence suggests that mineral dust can act as good CCN through water adsorption onto the surface of particles. This study provides a first assessment of the contribution of insoluble dust to global CCN and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC). Simulations are carried out with the NASA Global Modeling Initiative chemical transport model with an online aerosol simulation, considering emissions from fossil fuel, biomass burning, marine, and dust sources. CDNC is calculated online and explicitly considers the competition of soluble and insoluble CCN for water vapor. The predicted annual average contribution of insoluble mineral dust to CCN and CDNC in cloud-forming areas is up to 40 and 23.8%, respectively. Sensitivity tests suggest that uncertainties in dust size distribution and water adsorption parameters modulate the contribution of mineral dust to CDNC by 23 and 56%, respectively. Coating of dust by hygroscopic salts during the atmospheric aging causes a twofold enhancement of the dust contribution to CCN; the aged dust, however, can substantially deplete in-cloud supersaturation during the initial stages of cloud formation and can eventually reduce CDNC. Considering the hydrophilicity from adsorption and hygroscopicity from solute is required to comprehensively capture the dust-warm cloud interactions. The framework presented here addresses this need and can be easily integrated in atmospheric models.

  7. Stochastic dynamics of resistive switching: fluctuations lead to optimal particle number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Paul K.; Hazel, Andrew L.; Straube, Arthur V.; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2017-09-01

    Resistive switching (RS) is one of the foremost candidates for building novel types of non-volatile random access memories. Any practical implementation of such a memory cell calls for a strong miniaturization, at which point fluctuations start playing a role that cannot be neglected. A detailed understanding of switching mechanisms and reliability is essential. For this reason, we formulate a particle model based on the stochastic motion of oxygen vacancies. It allows us to investigate fluctuations in the resistance states of a switch with two active zones. The vacancies’ dynamics are governed by a master equation. Upon the application of a voltage pulse, the vacancies travel collectively through the switch. By deriving a generalized Burgers equation we can interpret this collective motion as nonlinear traveling waves, and numerically verify this result. Further, we define binary logical states by means of the underlying vacancy distributions, and establish a framework of writing and reading such memory element with voltage pulses. Considerations about the discriminability of these operations under fluctuations together with the markedness of the RS effect itself lead to the conclusion, that an intermediate vacancy number is optimal for performance.

  8. Aerosol particle mixing state, refractory particle number size distributions and emission factors in a polluted urban environment: Case study of Metro Manila, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecorius, Simonas; Madueño, Leizel; Vallar, Edgar; Alas, Honey; Betito, Grace; Birmili, Wolfram; Cambaliza, Maria Obiminda; Catipay, Grethyl; Gonzaga-Cayetano, Mylene; Galvez, Maria Cecilia; Lorenzo, Genie; Müller, Thomas; Simpas, James B.; Tamayo, Everlyn Gayle; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2017-12-01

    Ultrafine soot particles (black carbon, BC) in urban environments are related to adverse respiratory and cardiovascular effects, increased cases of asthma and premature deaths. These problems are especially pronounced in developing megacities in South-East Asia, Latin America, and Africa, where unsustainable urbanization ant outdated environmental protection legislation resulted in severe degradation of urban air quality in terms of black carbon emission. Since ultrafine soot particles do often not lead to enhanced PM10 and PM2.5 mass concentration, the risks related to ultrafine particle pollution may therefore be significantly underestimated compared to the contribution of secondary aerosol constituents. To increase the awareness of the potential toxicological relevant problems of ultrafine black carbon particles, we conducted a case study in Metro Manila, the capital of the Philippines. Here, we present a part of the results from a detailed field campaign, called Manila Aerosol Characterization Experiment (MACE, 2015). Measurements took place from May to June 2015 with the focus on the state of mixing of aerosol particles. The results were alarming, showing the abundance of externally mixed refractory particles (soot proxy) at street site with a maximum daily number concentration of approximately 15000 #/cm3. That is up to 10 times higher than in cities of Western countries. We also found that the soot particle mass contributed from 55 to 75% of total street site PM2.5. The retrieved refractory particle number size distribution appeared to be a superposition of 2 ultrafine modes at 20 and 80 nm with a corresponding contribution to the total refractory particle number of 45 and 55%, respectively. The particles in the 20 nm mode were most likely ash from metallic additives in lubricating oil, tiny carbonaceous particles and/or nucleated and oxidized organic polymers, while bigger ones (80 nm) were soot agglomerates. To the best of the authors' knowledge, no other

  9. The number of elementary particles in a fractal M-theory of 11.2360667977 dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, J.-H.

    2007-01-01

    It is generally accepted that there are 60 experimentally found particles. The standard model strongly predicts two more hypothetical particles, the Higgs and the graviton. This paper reveals other possible scenario for predicting 69 particles at different energy scales in 11+φ 3 fractal dimensions of a fractal M theory, where φ=(5-1)/2. A modified Newton's law is suggested to experimentally verify our predictions at extremely small quantum scales. The modified Newton's law is in harmony with Heisenberg's uncertainty principle

  10. Comparison of sp-ICP-MS and MDG-ICP-MS for the determination of particle number concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwind, Sabrina; Aja Montes, Maria de Lourdes; Günther, Detlef

    2015-05-01

    In 2011, the European Commission introduced new regulations on how nanomaterials are defined. Since then, researchers have emphasized that more complete characterization of nanoparticles (NPs) includes not just mass and size determinations, but also the determination of the particle number concentrations. In this study, two different sample introduction approaches for the analysis of NP suspensions with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were investigated: pneumatic nebulization (sp-ICP-MS) and microdroplet generation (MDG-ICP-MS). These approaches were compared for the determination of particle number concentrations (PNCs) of gold and silver NP suspensions diluted in either ultra-pure water or citrate solution. For accurate sp-ICP-MS analysis, it is crucial to know the transport efficiency of nebulized sample into the plasma. Here, transport efficiencies, measured by the waste collection method, were 11-14 % for Ag suspensions and 9-11 % for Au. In contrast, the droplet transport efficiency of MDG-ICP-MS was 100 %. Analysis by sp-ICP-MS yielded a lower particle number concentration than expected (only 20-40 % of the expected value), whereas MDG-ICP-MS had NP recoveries up to 80 %. This study indicates that NP reference materials are of major importance for particle number determination and detailed results on particle number concentrations for different suspensions with respect to storage time are discussed.

  11. Trends in black carbon and size-resolved particle number concentrations and vehicle emission factors under real-world conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krecl, Patricia; Johansson, Christer; Targino, Admir Créso; Ström, Johan; Burman, Lars

    2017-09-01

    Kerbside concentrations of NOx, black carbon (BC), total number of particles (diameter > 4 nm) and number size distribution (28-410 nm) were measured at a busy street canyon in Stockholm in 2006 and 2013. Over this period, there was an important change in the vehicle fleet due to a strong dieselisation process of light-duty vehicles and technological improvement of vehicle engines. This study assesses the impact of these changes on ambient concentrations and particle emission factors (EF). EF were calculated by using a novel approach which combines the NOx tracer method with positive matrix factorisation (PMF) applied to particle number size distributions. NOx concentrations remained rather constant between these two years, whereas a large decrease in particle concentrations was observed, being on average 60% for BC, 50% for total particle number, and 53% for particles in the range 28-100 nm. The PMF analysis yielded three factors that were identified as contributions from gasoline vehicles, diesel fleet, and urban background. This separation allowed the calculation of the average vehicle EF for each particle metric per fuel type. In general, gasoline EF were lower than diesel EF, and EF for 2013 were lower than the ones derived for 2006. The EFBC decreased 77% for both gasoline and diesel fleets, whereas the particle number EF reduction was higher for the gasoline (79%) than for the diesel (37%) fleet. Our EF are consistent with results from other on-road studies, which reinforces that the proposed methodology is suitable for EF determination and to assess the effectiveness of policies implemented to reduce vehicle exhaust emissions. However, our EF are much higher than EF simulated with traffic emission models (HBEFA and COPERT) that are based on dynamometer measurements, except for EFBC for diesel vehicles. This finding suggests that the EF from the two leading models in Europe should be revised for BC (gasoline vehicles) and particle number (all vehicles

  12. Spatial variation of particle number concentration in school microscale environments and its impact on exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Farhad; Mazaheri, Mandana; Clifford, Sam; Crilley, Leigh R; Laiman, Rusdin; Morawska, Lidia

    2013-05-21

    It has not yet been established whether the spatial variation of particle number concentration (PNC) within a microscale environment can have an effect on exposure estimation results. In general, the degree of spatial variation within microscale environments remains unclear, since previous studies have only focused on spatial variation within macroscale environments. The aims of this study were to determine the spatial variation of PNC within microscale school environments, in order to assess the importance of the number of monitoring sites on exposure estimation. Furthermore, this paper aims to identify which parameters have the largest influence on spatial variation as well as the relationship between those parameters and spatial variation. Air quality measurements were conducted for two consecutive weeks at each of the 25 schools across Brisbane, Australia. PNC was measured at three sites within the grounds of each school, along with the measurement of meteorological and several other air quality parameters. Traffic density was recorded for the busiest road adjacent to the school. Spatial variation at each school was quantified using coefficient of variation (CV). The portion of CV associated with instrument uncertainty was found to be 0.3, and, therefore, CV was corrected so that only noninstrument uncertainty was analyzed in the data. The median corrected CV (CVc) ranged from 0 to 0.35 across the schools, with 12 schools found to exhibit spatial variation. The study determined the number of required monitoring sites at schools with spatial variability and tested the deviation in exposure estimation arising from using only a single site. Nine schools required two measurement sites and three schools required three sites. Overall, the deviation in exposure estimation from using only one monitoring site was as much as 1 order of magnitude. The study also tested the association of spatial variation with wind speed/direction and traffic density, using partial

  13. QUALITY CONTROL OF SEMI-CONTINUOUS MOBILITY SIZE-FRACTIONATED PARTICLE NUMBER CONCENTRATION DATA. (R827352)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine and ultrafine particles have been postulated to play an important role in the association between ambient particulate matters and adverse health effects. As part of the EPA Supersite Program, the Southern California Particle Center & Supersite has conducted a series o...

  14. Effects of rigid or adaptive confinement on colloidal self-assembly. Fixed vs. fluctuating number of confined particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pȩkalski, J.; Ciach, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Almarza, N. G. [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-28

    The effects of confinement on colloidal self-assembly in the case of fixed number of confined particles are studied in the one dimensional lattice model solved exactly in the grand canonical ensemble (GCE) in Pȩkalski et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 014903 (2015)]. The model considers a pair interaction defined by a short-range attraction plus a longer-range repulsion. We consider thermodynamic states corresponding to self-assembly into clusters. Both fixed and adaptive boundaries are studied. For fixed boundaries, there are particular states in which, for equal average densities, the number of clusters in the GCE is larger than in the canonical ensemble. The dependence of pressure on density has a different form when the system size changes with fixed number of particles and when the number of particles changes with fixed size of the system. In the former case, the pressure has a nonmonotonic dependence on the system size. The anomalous increase of pressure for expanding system is accompanied by formation of a larger number of smaller clusters. In the case of elastic confining surfaces, we observe a bistability, i.e., two significantly different system sizes occur with almost the same probability. The mechanism of the bistability in the closed system is different to that of the case of permeable walls, where the two equilibrium system sizes correspond to a different number of particles.

  15. Evaluation of the β+ decay log ft value with inclusion of the neutron–proton pairing and particle number conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerrouchi, S.; Allal, N.H.; Fellah, M.; Oudih, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    The particle number fluctuation effects, which are inherent to the Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer (BCS) theory, on the beta decay log ft values are studied in the isovector case. Expressions of the transition probabilities, of Fermi as well as Gamow–Teller types, which strictly conserve the particle number are established using a projection method. The probabilities are calculated for some transitions of isobars such as N ≃ Z. The obtained results are compared to values obtained before the projection. The nuclear deformation effect on the log ft values is also studied. (author)

  16. High-Fidelity RF Gun Simulations with the Parallel 3D Finite Element Particle-In-Cell Code Pic3P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, A; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Limborg, C.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the first parallel Finite Element 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code, Pic3P, for simulations of RF guns and other space-charge dominated beam-cavity interactions. Pic3P solves the complete set of Maxwell-Lorentz equations and thus includes space charge, retardation and wakefield effects from first principles. Pic3P uses higher-order Finite Elementmethods on unstructured conformal meshes. A novel scheme for causal adaptive refinement and dynamic load balancing enable unprecedented simulation accuracy, aiding the design and operation of the next generation of accelerator facilities. Application to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) RF gun is presented.

  17. 100 years of elementary particles [Beam Line, vol. 27, number 1, Spring 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pais, Abraham; Weinberg, Steven; Quigg, Chris; Riordan, Michael; Panofsky, Wolfgang K.H.; Trimble, Virginia

    1997-01-01

    This issue of Beam Line commemorates the 100th anniversary of the April 30, 1897 report of the discovery of the electron by J.J. Thomson and the ensuing discovery of other subatomic particles. In the first three articles, theorists Abraham Pais, Steven Weinberg, and Chris Quigg provide their perspectives on the discoveries of elementary particles as well as the implications and future directions resulting from these discoveries. In the following three articles, Michael Riordan, Wolfgang Panofsky, and Virginia Trimble apply our knowledge about elementary particles to high-energy research, electronics technology, and understanding the origin and evolution of our Universe

  18. Three-Dimensional Interaction of a Large Number of Dense DEP Particles on a Plane Perpendicular to an AC Electrical Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanchuan Xie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of dielectrophoresis (DEP particles in an electric field has been observed in many experiments, known as the “particle chains phenomenon”. However, the study in 3D models (spherical particles is rarely reported due to its complexity and significant computational cost. In this paper, we employed the iterative dipole moment (IDM method to study the 3D interaction of a large number of dense DEP particles randomly distributed on a plane perpendicular to a uniform alternating current (AC electric field in a bounded or unbounded space. The numerical results indicated that the particles cannot move out of the initial plane. The similar particles (either all positive or all negative DEP particles always repelled each other, and did not form a chain. The dissimilar particles (a mixture of positive and negative DEP particles always attracted each other, and formed particle chains consisting of alternately arranged positive and negative DEP particles. The particle chain patterns can be randomly multitudinous depending on the initial particle distribution, the electric properties of particles/fluid, the particle sizes and the number of particles. It is also found that the particle chain patterns can be effectively manipulated via tuning the frequency of the AC field and an almost uniform distribution of particles in a bounded plane chip can be achieved when all of the particles are similar, which may have potential applications in the particle manipulation of microfluidics.

  19. Finite-thickness effect on speed of a counter-rotating vortex pair at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibah, Ummu; Nakagawa, Hironori; Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2018-03-01

    We establish a general formula for the translational speed of a counter-rotating vortex pair, valid for thick cores, moving in an incompressible fluid with and without viscosity. We extend to higher order the method of matched asymptotic expansions developed by Ting and Tung (1965 Phys. Fluids 8 1039–51). The solution of the Euler or the Navier–Stokes equations is constructed in the form of a power series in a small parameter, the ratio of the core radius to the distance between the core centers. For a viscous vortex pair, the small parameter should be \\sqrt{ν /{{Γ }}} where ν is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid and Γ is the circulation of each vortex. A correction due to the effect of finite thickness of the vortices to the traveling speed makes its appearance at fifth order. A drastic simplification is achieved of expressing it solely in terms of the strength of the second-order quadrupole field associated with the elliptical deformation of the core. For a viscous vortex pair, we exploit the conservation law for the hydrodynamic impulse to derive the growth of the distance between the vortices, which is cubic in time.

  20. Implication of nonintegral occupation number and Fermi-Dirac statistics in the local-spin-density approximation applied to finite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhar, S.

    1989-01-01

    In electronic-structure calculations for finite systems using the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation, it is assumed that the eigenvalues of the Kohn-Sham equation should obey Fermi-Dirac (FD) statistics. In order to comply with this assumption for some of the transition-metal atoms, a nonintegral occupation number is used which also minimizes the total energy. It is shown here that for finite systems it is not necessary that the eigenvalues of the Kohn-Sham equation obey FD statistics. It is also shown that the Kohn-Sham exchange potential used in all LSD models is correct only for integer occupation number. With a noninteger occupation number the LSD exchange potential will be smaller than that given by the Kohn-Sham potential. Ab initio self-consistent spin-polarized calculations have been performed numerically for the total energy of an iron atom. It is found that the ground state belongs to the 3d 6 4s 2 configuration. The ionization potentials of all the Fe/sup n/ + ions are reported and are in agreement with experiment

  1. On the Required Number of Antennas in a Point-to-Point Large-but-Finite MIMO System: Outage-Limited Scenario

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2016-03-22

    This paper investigates the performance of the point-To-point multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) systems in the presence of a large but finite numbers of antennas at the transmitters and/or receivers. Considering the cases with and without hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) feedback, we determine the minimum numbers of the transmit/receive antennas, which are required to satisfy different outage probability constraints. Our results are obtained for different fading conditions and the effect of the power amplifiers efficiency/feedback error probability on the performance of the MIMO-HARQ systems is analyzed. Then, we use some recent results on the achievable rates of finite block-length codes, to analyze the effect of the codewords lengths on the system performance. Moreover, we derive closed-form expressions for the asymptotic performance of the MIMO-HARQ systems when the number of antennas increases. Our analytical and numerical results show that different outage requirements can be satisfied with relatively few transmit/receive antennas. © 1972-2012 IEEE.

  2. Mechanism of cluster DNA damage repair in response to high-atomic number and energy particles radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., γ- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles is slowly repaired or is irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure.

  3. Mechanism of cluster DNA damage repair in response to high-atomic number and energy particles radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame, E-mail: Aroumougame.Asaithamy@UTsouthwestern.edu [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States); Chen, David J., E-mail: David.Chen@UTsouthwestern.edu [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., {gamma}- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles is slowly repaired or is irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure.

  4. The best accuracy of reconstruction of finitely smooth functions from their values at a given number of points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavtsev, S N

    1998-01-01

    We find the order of the best accuracy of reconstruction of functions in the Nikolskii and Besov classes (along with their derivatives up to a certain order) from their values at a given number of points

  5. The best accuracy of reconstruction of finitely smooth functions from their values at a given number of points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, S. N.

    1998-02-01

    We find the order of the best accuracy of reconstruction of functions in the Nikolskii and Besov classes (along with their derivatives up to a certain order) from their values at a given number of points.

  6. The Pagoda Sequence: a Ramble through Linear Complexity, Number Walls, D0L Sequences, Finite State Automata, and Aperiodic Tilings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Lunnon

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We review the concept of the number wall as an alternative to the traditional linear complexity profile (LCP, and sketch the relationship to other topics such as linear feedback shift-register (LFSR and context-free Lindenmayer (D0L sequences. A remarkable ternary analogue of the Thue-Morse sequence is introduced having deficiency 2 modulo 3, and this property verified via the re-interpretation of the number wall as an aperiodic plane tiling.

  7. Determinants of black carbon, particle mass and number concentrations in London transport microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Ioar; Kumar, Prashant; Hagen-Zanker, Alex; Andrade, Maria de Fatima; Slovic, Anne Dorothee; Pritchard, John P.; Geurs, Karst T.

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the determinants of personal exposure concentrations of commuters' to black carbon (BC), ultrafine particle number concentrations (PNC), and particulate matter (PM1, PM2.5 and PM10) in different travel modes. We quantified the contribution of key factors that explain the variation of the previous pollutants in four commuting routes in London, each covered by four transport modes (car, bus, walk and underground). Models were performed for each pollutant, separately to assess the effect of meteorology (wind speed) or ambient concentrations (with either high spatial or temporal resolution). Concentration variations were mainly explained by wind speed or ambient concentrations and to a lesser extent by route and period of the day. In multivariate models with wind speed, the wind speed was the common significant predictor for all the pollutants in the above-ground modes (i.e., car, bus, walk); and the only predictor variable for the PM fractions. Wind speed had the strongest effect on PM during the bus trips, with an increase in 1 m s-1 leading to a decrease in 2.25, 2.90 and 4.98 μg m-3 of PM1, PM2.5 and PM10, respectively. PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations in car trips were better explained by ambient concentrations with high temporal resolution although from a single monitoring station. On the other hand, ambient concentrations with high spatial coverage but lower temporal resolution predicted better the concentrations in bus trips, due to bus routes passing through streets with a high variability of traffic intensity. In the underground models, wind speed was not significant and line and type of windows on the train explained 42% of the variation of PNC and 90% of all PM fractions. Trains in the district line with openable windows had an increase in concentrations of 1 684 cm-3 for PNC and 40.69 μg m-3 for PM2.5 compared with trains that had non-openable windows. The results from this work can be used to target efforts to reduce personal exposures of

  8. International conference on production of particles with new quantum numbers: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: mechanisms of new particle production; the total cross section for e + e/sup /minus// → hadrons and its associated spectroscopy; recent results on the new particle states below 3.7 GeV produced in e + e/sup /minus// annihilations; new results on J//psi/ and /psi/' decays from DASP; excess muons and new results in /psi/ photoproduction; probing the new particles with hadron beams; properties of prompt leptons; muon production in hadron-hadron collisions; large transverse momentum photons from high energy proton proton collisions; dimuon and trimuon production in deep inelastic muon interactions; streamer chamber search for narrow hadrons with a muon-enriched trigger; threshold effects of new particle production by high energy neutrinos and antineutrinos; the observation of neutrino induced μ/sup /minus//e + events in the Fermilab bubble chamber; search for antineutrino induced μ + e/sup /minus// events; observation of muon-neutrino reactions producing a positron and a strange particle; observation of the reaction ν/sub μ/ + p → ν/sub μ/ + p; search for muonic pairs; strange particle production in neutrino interactions; neutral currents---the structure of the coupling; evidence for parity non-conservation in the weak neutral current; observation of elastic neutrino-proton scattering; threshold and other properties of U particle production in e + e/sup /minus// annihilation; anomalous muon production in e + e/sup /minus// collisions; electron production; strongly interacting heavy lepton; and /psi/'s without charm

  9. A comparative study of the number and mass of fine particles emitted with diesel fuel and marine gas oil (MGO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Md. Nurun; Brown, Richard J.; Ristovski, Zoran; Hustad, Johan Einar

    2012-09-01

    The current investigation reports on diesel particulate matter emissions, with special interest in fine particles from the combustion of two base fuels. The base fuels selected were diesel fuel and marine gas oil (MGO). The experiments were conducted with a four-stroke, six-cylinder, direct injection diesel engine. The results showed that the fine particle number emissions measured by both SMPS and ELPI were higher with MGO compared to diesel fuel. It was observed that the fine particle number emissions with the two base fuels were quantitatively different but qualitatively similar. The gravimetric (mass basis) measurement also showed higher total particulate matter (TPM) emissions with the MGO. The smoke emissions, which were part of TPM, were also higher for the MGO. No significant changes in the mass flow rate of fuel and the brake-specific fuel consumption (BSFC) were observed between the two base fuels.

  10. Total and size-resolved particle number and black carbon concentrations in urban areas near Schiphol airport (the Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuken, M.P.; Moerman, M.; Zandveld, P.; Henzing, J.S.; Hoek, G.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of black carbon, and size-resolved and total particle number concentrations (PNC) were investigated in the vicinity of Schiphol airport in the Netherlands, the fourth busiest airport in Europe. Continuous measurements were conducted between March and May 2014at Adamse Bos, located 7km

  11. Is the Field of Numbers a Real Physical Field? On the Frequent Distribution and Masses of the Elementary Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyakov A. V.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Frequent distributions of the databases of the numerical values obtained by resolving algorithms, which describe physical and other processes, give a possibility for bonding the probability of that results the algorithms get. In the frequent distribution of the fractions of integers (rational numbers, local maxima which meet the ratios of masses of the elementary particles have been found.

  12. Landmarks in particle physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Brookhaven Lecture Series, Number 238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adair, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    Robert Adair's lecture on Landmarks in Particle Physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a commemoration of the 40th Anniversary of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Adair describes ten researches in elementary particle physics at Brookhaven that had a revolutionary impact on the understanding of elementary particles. Two of the discoveries were made in 1952 and 1956 at the Cosmotron, BNL's first proton accelerator. Four were made in 1962 and 1964 at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, the Cosmotron's replacement. Two other discoveries in 1954 and 1956 were theoretical, and strong focusing (1952) is the only technical discovery. One discovery (1958) happened in an old barrack. Four of the discoveries were awarded the Nobel prize in Physics. Adair believes that all of the discoveries are worthy of the Nobel prize. 14 figs

  13. Number of Packages of Information which are processed in a Second by the Fundamental Particles (strings) of a Human Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholibeigian, Hassan; Gholibeigian, Ghasem; Gholibeigian, Kazem

    2016-11-01

    The fundamental particle (string) gets a package of complete information of its quantum state via inside of its sub-particle (sub-string) from dimension of information. This package is processed by sub-particle in each Planck time [Gholibeigian, APS 2015, abstract #L1.027]. On the other hand, a 70 kg human's body would have approximately 7*1027 atoms. Of that, 4.7*1027 would be hydrogen atoms. Another 1.8*1027 would be oxygen and there are 7.0*1026 carbon atoms. If we add that all up, total is 2.3*1028 protons, 1.8*1028 neutrons, and 2.3*1028 electrons. Each proton and neutron has 6 fundamental particles. So the total number of packages of information which are processed by each of us in a second becomes: I = [ 6 × (2 . 3 + 1 . 8) ×1028 + 2 . 3 ×1028 ] ×1044 = 2 . 69 ×1073 The processed information carry by fundamental particles. Based on Shanon equation, I = - S , this number can be equal to the increased entropy of each of us per second too. AmirKabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.

  14. Continuous measurement of number concentrations and elemental composition of aerosol particles for a dust storm event in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Renjian; Han, Zhiwei; Shen, Zhenxing; Cao, Junji

    2008-01-01

    A continuous measurement of number size distributions and chemical composition of aerosol particles was conducted in Beijing in a dust storm event during 21-26 March 2001. The number concentration of coarse particles (>2 μm) increased more significantly than fine particles (dust storm due to dust weather, while the anthropogenic aerosols collected during the non-dust-storm period tended to be associated with fine particles. Elemental compositions were analyzed by using proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The results show that 20 elements in the dust storm were much higher than in the non-dust-storm period. The calculated soil dust concentration during the dust storm was, on average, 251.8 μg m-3, while it was only 52.1 μg m-3 on non-dust-storm days. The enrichment factors for Mg, Al, P, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cl, Cu, Pb, and Zn show small variations between the dust storm and the non-dust-storm period, while those for Ca, Ni and Cr in the dust storm were much lower than those in the non-dust-storm period due to significant local emission sources. A high concentration and enrichment factor for S were observed during the dust storm, which implies that the dust particles were contaminated by aerosol particles from anthropogenic emissions during the long-range transport. A statistical analysis shows that the elemental composition of particles collected during the dust storm in Beijing were better correlated with those of desert soil colleted from desert regions in Inner Mongolia. Air mass back-trajectory analysis further confirmed that this dust storm event could be identified as streaks of dust plumes originating from Inner Mongolia.

  15. Pharmaceutical quality evaluation of lipid emulsions containing PGE1: alteration in the number of large particles in infusion solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Hiroko; Saito, Haruna; Yomota, Chikako; Kawanishi, Toru

    2009-08-13

    There are two generics of a parenteral lipid emulsion of prostaglandin E1 (PGE(1)) (Lipo-PGE(1)) in addition to two innovators. It was reported the change from innovator to generic in clinical practice caused the slowing of drip rate and formation of aggregates in the infusion line. Thus, we investigated the difference of pharmaceutical quality in these Lipo-PGE(1) formulations. After mixing with some infusion solutions, the mean diameter and number of large particles were determined. Although the mean diameter did not change in any infusion solutions, the number of large particles (diameter >1.0 microm) dramatically increased in generics with Hartmann's solution pH 8 or Lactec injection with 7% sodium bicarbonate. Next, we investigated the effect of these infusion solutions on the retention rate of PGE(1) in lipid particles. The retention rate of PGE(1) in these two infusion solutions decreased more quickly than that in normal saline. Nevertheless, there were no significant differences among the formulations tested. Our results suggest that there is no difference between innovators and generics except in mixing with these infusion solutions. Furthermore, that monitoring the number of large particles can be an effective means of evaluating pharmaceutical interactions and/or the stability of lipid emulsions.

  16. The Energy-Momentum Tensor at Finite Temperature in Arbitrary Curved Space-Times : Particles and Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Naohito, NAKAZAWA; Research Institute for Theoretical Physics Hiroshima University

    1985-01-01

    We formulate a field-theoretical method at finite temperature to calculate a thermal energy-momentum tensor in arbitrary curved space-times using a momentum-space representation of the thermal Green's function in terms of Riemann normal coordinates. In particular, the thermal energy-momentum tensor for a massive scalar field is calculated by the high-temperature expansion. A locally observed temperature is obtained by requiring the conservation law of the thermal energy-momentum tensor.

  17. Air mass characteristics, aerosol particle number concentrations, and number size distributions at Macquarie Island during the First Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechtel, Fred J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Swan, Hilton B.

    1998-01-01

    During the First Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 1), continuous measurements were made of the particle number size distribution (between 18 and 540 nm diameter (Dp)) and total particle number concentration (Dp > 3 nm and Dp > 12 nm) on Macquarie Island, Tasmania (54°30'S, 158°57'E, 7 m above sea level). Periodic real-time measurements of dimethyl sulfide were also made. Sampled air masses were separated into clean marine and those influenced by Tasmania or Antarctica. Observations were compared to those from a southern hemisphere midlatitude site (Cape Grim) and to sites on the Antarctic continent. It was found that the average total number concentration observed during clean marine conditions, 675 cm-3, was about 21% higher than values observed at Cape Grim during ACE 1 and was similar to the high end of the historical range of number concentrations reported by Gras [1995] for Cape Grim during the same time of year. During both clean marine and influenced conditions, the Aitken and accumulation modes dominate the number size distribution, with a Young Aitken mode observed less often. The number size distribution between 18 and 540 nm exhibited two and three modes 75% and 25% of the time, respectively, during clean marine conditions, more consistent with previous observations at Cape Grim than with those from coastal Antarctica. The typical bimodal number distribution at Macquarie Island exhibited average modal diameters of 33 and 113 nm during clean marine conditions, corresponding to the smaller Aitken mode and larger accumulation mode, respectively. The 50 to 70 nm diameter range corresponds to the minimum in the bimodal size distribution at Macquarie Island, except for continentally influenced periods when the size distribution exhibits an Aitken mode near 50 nm and an accumulation mode near 128 nm. The Young Aitken mode appeared most often during or immediately after periods of precipitation associated with both warm and cold fronts, when the Aitken

  18. Particle number and particulate mass emissions of heavy duty vehicles in real operating conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymaniak Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the issue of PM emissions from HDV vehicles. The theoretical part discusses the problem of emission of this toxic compound in terms of particle structure taking into account the mass and dimensions of PM. Next, the methodology of the research and the results of the measurements performed under the conditions of actual operation were presented. The test drive routes were chosen in accordance with the operational purpose of the selected test vehicles. Two heavy vehicles were used for the study: a tractor with trailer and an eighteen meter long city bus. The test vehicles complied with the Euro V standard, with the second vehicle additionally complying with the EEV standard and being equipped with a DPF. The analysis of the research results was performed in the aspect of determining the operating time densities of vehicles and their drive systems as well as defining their emission characteristics and ecological indicators. PM and PN emissions were measured in the tests and particle size distribution was determined. It was shown that the exhaust gas after treatment system used in the city bus had a positive influence on the ecological indicators and had contributed to the reduction of PN emissions for heavier particles.

  19. Trends in size classified particle number concentration in subtropical Brisbane, Australia, based on a 5 year study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, J. F.; Wraith, D.; Mengersen, K.; Morawska, L.

    Particle number size distribution data in the range from 0.015 to 0.630 μm were collected over a 5-year period in the central business district (CBD) of Brisbane, Australia. Particle size distribution was summarised by total number concentration and number median diameter (NMD) as well as the number concentration of the 0.015-0.030 ( N15-30), 0.030-0.050 ( N30-50), 0.050-0.100 ( N50-100), 0.100-0.300 ( N100-300) and 0.300-0.630 ( N300-630) μm size classes. Morning (6:00-10:00) and afternoon (16:00-19:00) measurements, the former representing fresh traffic emissions (based on the local meteorological conditions) and the latter well-mixed emissions from the CBD, during weekdays were extracted and the respective monthly mean values were estimated for time series analysis. For all size fractions, average morning concentrations were about 1.5 higher than in the afternoon whereas NMD did not vary between the morning and afternoon. The trend and seasonal components were extracted through weighted linear regression models, using the monthly variance as weights. Only the morning measurements exhibited significant trends. During this time of the day, total particle number increased by 105.7% and the increase was greater for larger particles, resulting in a shift in NMD by 7.9%. Although no seasonal component was detected the evidence against it remained weak due to the limitations of the database.

  20. Effect of the number of implants on stress distribution of anterior implant-supported fixed prostheses combined with a removable partial denture: a finite element analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Mahshid

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study was to evaluate differences in stress distribution relevant to the number of implants under an anterior bridge when combined with a removable partial denture in the posterior region.Four three-dimensional finite element models (3D FEM were designed from a mandible containing an implant-supported bridge extending between canines, and a bilateral distal extension removable partial denture. A nonrigid connection was selected as the attachment method between the partial denture and the anterior implant-supported fixed prosthesis; 2, 3, 4 and 5 implants supporting the bridge all with 10mm length and 3.8 mm diameter were assessed. With the aid of the finite element program ANSYS 8.0, the models were loaded and von Mises stresses were evaluated.In spongy bone, stress forces showed a decrease from 2 implants to 4 implants but showed an increase in the 5-implant model. Stresses on cortical bone of terminal implants were in similar range in the 2-, 3- and 4-implant models. While, in the 5-implant model the amount of stresses on terminal implants increased dramatically. The stresses on implants were nearly similar in all models, with the greatest amount on terminal implants.Within the limitations of this study, 2-, 3- and 4-implant models showed less stress on cortical and spongy bone in comparison with the 5-implant model. The stresses transferred to implants were nearly similar.

  1. Total Particle Number Emissions from Modern Diesel, Natural Gas, and Hybrid Heavy-Duty Vehicles During On-Road Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyang; Quiros, David C; Thiruvengadam, Arvind; Pradhan, Saroj; Hu, Shaohua; Huai, Tao; Lee, Eon S; Zhu, Yifang

    2017-06-20

    Particle emissions from heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) have significant environmental and public health impacts. This study measured total particle number emission factors (PNEFs) from six newly certified HDVs powered by diesel and compressed natural gas totaling over 6800 miles of on-road operation in California. Distance-, fuel- and work-based PNEFs were calculated for each vehicle. Distance-based PNEFs of vehicles equipped with original equipment manufacturer (OEM) diesel particulate filters (DPFs) in this study have decreased by 355-3200 times compared to a previous retrofit DPF dynamometer study. Fuel-based PNEFs were consistent with previous studies measuring plume exhaust in the ambient air. Meanwhile, on-road PNEF shows route and technology dependence. For vehicles with OEM DPFs and Selective Catalytic Reduction Systems, PNEFs under highway driving (i.e., 3.34 × 10 12 to 2.29 × 10 13 particles/mile) were larger than those measured on urban and drayage routes (i.e., 5.06 × 10 11 to 1.31 × 10 13 particles/mile). This is likely because a significant amount of nucleation mode volatile particles were formed when the DPF outlet temperature reached a critical value, usually over 310 °C, which was commonly achieved when vehicle speed sustained over 45 mph. A model year 2013 diesel HDV produced approximately 10 times higher PNEFs during DPF active regeneration events than nonactive regeneration.

  2. Estimation of aerosol particle number distributions with Kalman Filtering – Part 1: Theory, general aspects and statistical validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Viskari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol characteristics can be measured with different instruments providing observations that are not trivially inter-comparable. Extended Kalman Filter (EKF is introduced here as a method to estimate aerosol particle number size distributions from multiple simultaneous observations. The focus here in Part 1 of the work was on general aspects of EKF in the context of Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (DMPS measurements. Additional instruments and their implementations are discussed in Part 2 of the work. University of Helsinki Multi-component Aerosol model (UHMA is used to propagate the size distribution in time. At each observation time (10 min apart, the time evolved state is updated with the raw particle mobility distributions, measured with two DMPS systems. EKF approach was validated by calculating the bias and the standard deviation for the estimated size distributions with respect to the raw measurements. These were compared to corresponding bias and standard deviation values for particle number size distributions obtained from raw measurements by a inversion of the instrument kernel matrix method. Despite the assumptions made in the EKF implementation, EKF was found to be more accurate than the inversion of the instrument kernel matrix in terms of bias, and compatible in terms of standard deviation. Potential further improvements of the EKF implementation are discussed.

  3. Delocalized SYZ mirrors and confronting top-down SU(3)-structure holographic meson masses at finite g and N_c with P(article) D(ata) G(roup) values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vikas; Misra, Aalok; Sil, Karunava

    2017-10-01

    Meson spectroscopy at finite gauge coupling - whereat any perturbative QCD computation would break down - and finite number of colors, from a top-down holographic string model, has thus far been entirely missing in the literature. This paper fills this gap. Using the delocalized type IIA SYZ mirror (with SU(3) structure) of the holographic type IIB dual of large- N thermal QCD of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) as constructed in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at finite coupling and number of colors (N_c = number of D5(\\overline{D5})-branes wrapping a vanishing two-cycle in the top-down holographic construct of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) = O(1) in the IR in the MQGP limit of Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at the end of a Seiberg-duality cascade), we obtain analytical (not just numerical) expressions for the vector and scalar meson spectra and compare our results with previous calculations of Sakai and Sugimoto (Prog Theor Phys 113:843. doi: 10.1143/PTP.113.843 arXiv:hep-th/0412141, 2005) and Dasgupta et al. (JHEP 1507:122. doi: 10.1007/JHEP07(2015)122 arXiv:1409.0559 [hep-th], 2015), and we obtain a closer match with the Particle Data Group (PDG) results of Olive et al. (Particle Data Group) (Chin Phys C 38:090001, 2014). Through explicit computations, we verify that the vector and scalar meson spectra obtained by the gravity dual with a black hole for all temperatures (small and large) are nearly isospectral with the spectra obtained by a thermal gravity dual valid for only low temperatures; the isospectrality is much closer for vector mesons than scalar mesons. The black-hole gravity dual (with a horizon radius smaller than the deconfinement scale) also provides the expected large- N suppressed decrease in vector meson mass with increase of temperature.

  4. Delocalized SYZ mirrors and confronting top-down SU(3)-structure holographic meson masses at finite g and N{sub c} with P(article) D(ata) G(roup) values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Vikas; Sil, Karunava [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Roorkee, Uttarakhand (India); Misra, Aalok [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Roorkee, Uttarakhand (India); McGill University, Physics Department, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2017-10-15

    Meson spectroscopy at finite gauge coupling - whereat any perturbative QCD computation would break down - and finite number of colors, from a top-down holographic string model, has thus far been entirely missing in the literature. This paper fills this gap. Using the delocalized type IIA SYZ mirror (with SU(3) structure) of the holographic type IIB dual of large-N thermal QCD of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) as constructed in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at finite coupling and number of colors (N{sub c} = number of D5(D5)-branes wrapping a vanishing two-cycle in the top-down holographic construct of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) = O(1) in the IR in the MQGP limit of Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at the end of a Seiberg-duality cascade), we obtain analytical (not just numerical) expressions for the vector and scalar meson spectra and compare our results with previous calculations of Sakai and Sugimoto (Prog Theor Phys 113:843. doi:10.1143/PTP.113.843 arXiv:hep-th/0412141, 2005) and Dasgupta et al. (JHEP 1507:122. doi:10.1007/JHEP07(2015)122 arXiv:1409.0559 [hep-th], 2015), and we obtain a closer match with the Particle Data Group (PDG) results of Olive et al. (Particle Data Group) (Chin Phys C 38:090001, 2014). Through explicit computations, we verify that the vector and scalar meson spectra obtained by the gravity dual with a black hole for all temperatures (small and large) are nearly isospectral with the spectra obtained by a thermal gravity dual valid for only low temperatures; the isospectrality is much closer for vector mesons than scalar mesons. The black-hole gravity dual (with a horizon radius smaller than the deconfinement scale) also provides the expected large-N suppressed decrease in vector meson mass with increase of temperature. (orig.)

  5. Particle number and mass exposure concentrations by commuter transport modes in Milan, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senem Ozgen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing awareness amongst the general public about exposure to atmospheric pollution while travelling in urban areas especially when taking active travelling modes such as walking and cycling. This study presents a comparative investigation of ultrafine particles (UFP, PM10, PM2.5, PM1 exposure levels associated with four transport modes (i.e., walking, cycling, car, and subway in the city of Milan measured by means of portable instruments. Significant differences in particle exposure between transport modes were found. The subway mode was characterized by the highest PM mass concentrations: PM10, PM2.5, PM1 subway levels were respectively about 2-4-3 times higher than those of the car and open air active modes (i.e. cycling and walking. Conversely, these latter modes displayed the highest UFP levels about 2 to 3 times higher than the subway and car modes, highlighting the influence of direct traffic emissions. The car mode (closed windows, air conditioning and air recirculation on reported the lowest PM and UFP concentration levels. In particular, the open-air/car average concentration ratio varied from about 2 for UFP up to 4 for PM1 and 6 for PM10 and PM2.5, showing differences that increase with increasing particle size. This work points out that active mode travelling in Milan city centre in summertime results in higher exposure levels than the car mode. Walkers’ and cyclists’ exposure levels is expected to be even higher during wintertime, due to the higher ambient PM and UFP concentration. Interventions intended to re-design the urban mobility should therefore include dedicated routes in order to limit their exposure to PM and UFP by increasing their distance from road traffic.

  6. The Higgs--physical and number theoretical arguments for the necessity of a triple elementary particle in super symmetric spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naschie, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    A careful counting routine of all experimentally confirmed elementary particles plus the theoretically conjectured ones needed for a sound formulation of a mathematically consistent field theory is undertaken within a minimal N=1 super symmetric extension of the standard model of high energy physics. The number arrived at is subsequently linked to certain massless on shell representations connected to the quantized gravity interaction. Finally with the help of number theoretical arguments arising from a rigorous application of the formalism of transfinite Heterotic super string and E-infinity theory, we show that the proposed scheme would lack mathematical consistency and elegant simplicity unless we retain a postulated triplet which is logically identified as the H + , H - and H 0 Higgs particles. Connections to the 11 dimensional M theory and Harari's extended 'sub-quarks' theory is also discussed

  7. Characterisation of sub-micron particle number concentrations and formation events in the western Bushveld Igneous Complex, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hirsikko

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available South Africa holds significant mineral resources, with a substantial fraction of these reserves occurring and being processed in a large geological structure termed the Bushveld Igneous Complex (BIC. The area is also highly populated by informal, semi-formal and formal residential developments. However, knowledge of air quality and research related to the atmosphere is still very limited in the area. In order to investigate the characteristics and processes affecting sub-micron particle number concentrations and formation events, air ion and aerosol particle size distributions and number concentrations, together with meteorological parameters, trace gases and particulate matter (PM were measured for over two years at Marikana in the heart of the western BIC. The observations showed that trace gas (i.e. SO2, NOx, CO and black carbon concentrations were relatively high, but in general within the limits of local air quality standards. The area was characterised by very high condensation sink due to background aerosol particles, PM10 and O3 concentration. The results indicated that high amounts of Aitken and accumulation mode particles originated from domestic burning for heating and cooking in the morning and evening, while during daytime SO2-based nucleation followed by the growth by condensation of vapours from industrial, residential and natural sources was the most probable source for large number concentrations of nucleation and Aitken mode particles. Nucleation event day frequency was extremely high, i.e. 86% of the analysed days, which to the knowledge of the authors is the highest frequency ever reported. The air mass back trajectory and wind direction analyses showed that the secondary particle formation was influenced both by local and regional pollution and vapour sources. Therefore, our observation of the annual cycle and magnitude of the particle formation and growth rates during

  8. Effectiveness of non-noble metal based diesel oxidation catalysts on particle number emissions from diesel and biodiesel exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pravesh Chandra; Gupta, Tarun; Labhasetwar, Nitin Kumar; Khobaragade, Rohini; Gupta, Neeraj K; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Two new formulations of non-noble metal based diesel oxidation catalysts based on CoCe based mixed oxide (DOC 2 ) and perovskite catalysts (DOC 3 ) were prepared and retrofitted in a 4-cylinder diesel engine fueled by diesel and Karanja biodiesel blend (KB20). In this study, their effectiveness in reducing raw exhaust particulate emissions vis-à-vis a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC 1 ) was evaluated. Emission characteristics such as particle number-size distribution, mass-size distribution, and surface area-size distribution, total particle number concentration and count mean diameter as a function of engine load at constant engine speed were evaluated. Variations in total particle number concentration as a function of engine speed were also determined. The prepared DOCs and the commercial DOC showed varying degrees of performance as a function of engine operating conditions. Overall, effectiveness of the prepared DOC's appeared to be more fuel specific. For diesel exhaust, overall performance of DOC 1 was more effective compared to both prepared DOCs, with DOC 2 being superior to DOC 3 . In case of KB20 exhaust, the overall performance of DOC 2 was either more effective or nearly comparable to DOC 1, while DOC 3 being not so effective. This showed that the DOCs based on CoCe based mixed oxide catalysts have potential to replace commercial noble metal based DOC's, especially in engines fueled by biodiesel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of number concentration quantification by single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: microsecond vs. millisecond dwell times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad-Álvaro, Isabel; Peña-Vázquez, Elena; Bolea, Eduardo; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Castillo, Juan R; Laborda, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    The quality of the quantitative information in single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SP-ICP-MS) depends directly on the number concentration of the nanoparticles in the sample analyzed, which is proportional to the flux of nanoparticles through the plasma. Particle number concentrations must be selected in accordance with the data acquisition frequency, to control the precision from counting statistics and the bias, which is produced by the occurrence of multiple-particle events recorded as single-particle events. With quadrupole mass spectrometers, the frequency of data acquisition is directly controlled by the dwell time. The effect of dwell times from milli- to microseconds (10 ms, 5 ms, 100 μs, and 50 μs) on the quality of the quantitative data has been studied. Working with dwell times in the millisecond range, precision figures about 5 % were achieved, whereas using microsecond dwell times, the suitable fluxes of nanoparticles are higher and precision was reduced down to 1 %; this was independent of the dwell time selected. Moreover, due to the lower occurrence of multiple-nanoparticle events, linear ranges are wider when dwell times equal to or shorter than 100 μs are used. A calculation tool is provided to determine the optimal concentration for any instrument or experimental conditions selected. On the other hand, the use of dwell times in the microsecond range reduces significantly the contribution of the background and/or the presence of dissolved species, in comparison with the use of millisecond dwell times. Although the use of dwell times equal to or shorter than 100 μs offers improved performance working in single-particle mode, the use of conventional dwell times (3-10 ms) should not be discarded, once their limitations are known.

  10. Preequilibrium decay in the exciton model for nuclear potential with a finite depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogila, Ye.A.; Kolomiets, V.M.; Sanzhur, A.I.; Shlomo, S.

    1995-01-01

    The spectra of preequilibrium particles, taking into account the energy dependence of the single-particle level density, are calculated using the particle-hole (exciton) level density. We demonstrate the significant effect of the finite depth of the potential well (continuum effect) on partial emission spectra for configurations with a small exciton number

  11. Logarithmic corrections to the uncertainty principle and infinitude of the number of bound states of n-particle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, J.F.; Coutinho, F.A.B.; Malta, C.P.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that critical long distance behaviour for a two-body potential, defining the finiteness or infinitude of the number of negative eigenvalues of Schrodinger operators in ν-dimensions, are given by v sub(k) (r) = - [ν-2/2r] 2 - 1/(2rlnr) 2 + ... - 1/(2rlnr.lnlnr...ln sub(k)r) 2 where k=0,1... for ν not=2 and k=1,2... if ν=2. This result is a consequence of logarithmic corrections to an inequality known as Uncertainty Principle. If the continuum threshold in the N-body problem is defined by a two-cluster break up our results generate corrections to the existing sufficient conditions for the existence of infinitely many bound states. (Author) [pt

  12. Land Use Regression Models of On-Road Particulate Air Pollution (Particle Number, Black Carbon, PM2.5, Particle Size) Using Mobile Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, Steve; Marshall, Julian D

    2015-08-04

    Land Use Regression (LUR) models typically use fixed-site monitoring; here, we employ mobile monitoring as a cost-effective alternative for LUR development. We use bicycle-based, mobile measurements (∼85 h) during rush-hour in Minneapolis, MN to build LUR models for particulate concentrations (particle number [PN], black carbon [BC], fine particulate matter [PM2.5], particle size). We developed and examined 1224 separate LUR models by varying pollutant, time-of-day, and method of spatial and temporal smoothing of the time-series data. Our base-case LUR models had modest goodness-of-fit (adjusted R(2): ∼0.5 [PN], ∼0.4 [PM2.5], 0.35 [BC], ∼0.25 [particle size]), low bias (<4%) and absolute bias (2-18%), and included predictor variables that captured proximity to and density of emission sources. The spatial density of our measurements resulted in a large model-building data set (n = 1101 concentration estimates); ∼25% of buffer variables were selected at spatial scales of <100m, suggesting that on-road particle concentrations change on small spatial scales. LUR model-R(2) improved as sampling runs were completed, with diminishing benefits after ∼40 h of data collection. Spatial autocorrelation of model residuals indicated that models performed poorly where spatiotemporal resolution of emission sources (i.e., traffic congestion) was poor. Our findings suggest that LUR modeling from mobile measurements is possible, but that more work could usefully inform best practices.

  13. Estimating marine aerosol particle volume and number from Maritime Aerosol Network data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Sayer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available As well as spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD, aerosol composition and concentration (number, volume, or mass are of interest for a variety of applications. However, remote sensing of these quantities is more difficult than for AOD, as it is more sensitive to assumptions relating to aerosol composition. This study uses spectral AOD measured on Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN cruises, with the additional constraint of a microphysical model for unpolluted maritime aerosol based on analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET inversions, to estimate these quantities over open ocean. When the MAN data are subset to those likely to be comprised of maritime aerosol, number and volume concentrations obtained are physically reasonable. Attempts to estimate surface concentration from columnar abundance, however, are shown to be limited by uncertainties in vertical distribution. Columnar AOD at 550 nm and aerosol number for unpolluted maritime cases are also compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data, for both the present Collection 5.1 and forthcoming Collection 6. MODIS provides a best-fitting retrieval solution, as well as the average for several different solutions, with different aerosol microphysical models. The "average solution" MODIS dataset agrees more closely with MAN than the "best solution" dataset. Terra tends to retrieve lower aerosol number than MAN, and Aqua higher, linked with differences in the aerosol models commonly chosen. Collection 6 AOD is likely to agree more closely with MAN over open ocean than Collection 5.1. In situations where spectral AOD is measured accurately, and aerosol microphysical properties are reasonably well-constrained, estimates of aerosol number and volume using MAN or similar data would provide for a greater variety of potential comparisons with aerosol properties derived from satellite or chemistry transport model data. However, without accurate AOD data and prior knowledge of

  14. Invariance identities associated with finite gauge transformations and the uniqueness of the equations of motion of a particle in a classical gauge field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rund, H.

    1984-01-01

    A certain class of geometric objects is considered against the background of a classical gauge field associated with an arbitrary structural Lie group. It is shown that the necessary and sufficient conditions for the invariance of the given objects under a finite gauge transformation are embodied in a set of three relations involving the derivatives of their components. As a special case these so-called invariance identities indicate that there cannot exist a gauge-invariant Lagrangian that depends on the gauge potentials, the interaction parameters, and the 4-velocity components of a test particle. However, the requirement that the equations of motion that result from such a lagrangian be gauge-invariant, uniquely determines the structure of these equations. (author)

  15. Effect of attachment types and number of implants supporting mandibular overdentures on stress distribution: a computed tomography-based 3D finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arat Bilhan, Selda; Baykasoglu, Cengiz; Bilhan, Hakan; Kutay, Omer; Mugan, Ata

    2015-01-02

    The objective of this study was to calculate stresses in bone tissue surrounding uncoupled and splinted implants that are induced by a bite force applied to the mandible and to determine whether the number of mandibular overdenture supporting implants in mandibular bone influence the stress distribution. A human adult edentulous mandible retrieved from a formalin fixed cadaver was used to define the geometry of finite element (FE) model and the FE model was verified with experimental measurements. Following the FE model validation, three different biting situations were simulated for the 2-, 3- and 4-implant retentive anchor as well as bar attachment overdentures under vertical loading of 100 N. As a result of the analyses, it was concluded that an increment in implant number and the splinted attachment type tended to cause lower stresses and the use of two single attachments seems to be a safe and sufficient solution for the treatment of mandibular edentulism with overdentures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Comparison of Stress Distribution with Different Implant Numbers and Inclination Angles In All-on-four and Conventional Methods in Maxilla: A Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Saleh Saber

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. All-on-four technique involves the use of tilted implants to allow for shorter cantilevers. This finite element analysis aimed at investigating the amount and distribution of stress in maxillary bone surrounding the implants with all-on-four vs. frequently used method with six implants technique using different numbers and inclination angles. Materials and methods. A 3D edentulous maxillary model was created and implants were virtually placed anterior to the maxillary sinus and splinted with a superstructure. In total, five models were designed. In the first to the fourth models, four implants were placed with distal implants inclined 0, 15, 30, and 45 degrees, respectively. In the fifth model, six vertical implants were placed. 100 N loading was placed in the left most distal region of the superstructure. Maximum von Mises stress values were evaluated in cancellous and cortical bone. Results. The maximum stress values recorded in cancellous and cortical bone were 7.15 MPa and 51.69 MPa, respectively (model I. The reduction in stress values in models II to V 6%, 18%, 54%, and 24% in cancellous bone and 12%, 36%,62%, and 62% in cortical bone, respectively. Conclusion. Increasing the inclination in posterior implants resulted in reduction of cantilever length and maximum stress decline in both cancellous and cortical bone. The effect of cantilever length seems to be a dominant factor which can diminish stress even with less number of implants.

  17. Interaction of a spherical particle with freestream turbulent flow: Effect of microscale Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2008-11-01

    The interaction of an isolated rigid sphere with an isotropic turbulent ambient flow is considered using a direct numerical simulation. The turbulence field is obtained from one realization of a separate DNS calculation (Donzis et al, JFM (2005), vol. 532; Yeung et al, JFM (2007) vol. 582), and used as the inflow condition for the flow around the sphere. This study is an extension of an earlier work (Bagchi and Balachandar, Phys. Fluids (2003), vol. 15; Bagchi and Balachandar, JFM (2004), vol. 518), where the Taylor microscale Reynolds number, Rλ, of the turbulence field was kept constant at 164. In the present study, we consider the effect of varying Rλ as 38, 90, 140 and 240. The sphere Reynolds number (based on the diameter and relative velocity) is in the range 63 to 400, and the sphere diameter varies from 1 to 8 times the Kolmogorov scale, and 0.18 to 0.0042 times the integral length scale, of the ambient turbulent flow. We present DNS results on the drag and lift forces, and added-mass and history forces on the sphere under varying Rλ, and compare them with the analytical results. Mean, RMS and PDF of these forces are analyzed. We also present transition in the sphere wake as Rλ is varied. Mean wake, and the modulation of the freestream turbulence in the wake are also presented under varying Rλ of the ambient flow.

  18. Group-theoretical construction of finite-momentum and multi-particle operators for lattice hadron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, Justina; Jhang, You-Cyuan; Juge, Keisuke J.; Lenkner, David; Morningstar, Colin; Wong, Chik Him

    2012-01-01

    Determining the spectrum of hadronic excitations from Monte Carlo simulations requires the use of interpolating operators that couple to multi-particle states. Recent algorithmic advances have made the inclusion of multi-hadron operators in spectroscopy calculations a practical reality. In this talk, a procedure for constructing a set of multi-hadron interpolators that project onto the states of interest is described. To aid in the interpretation of simulation data, operators are designed to transform irreducibly under the lattice symmetry group. The identification of a set of optimal single-hadron interpolators for states with non-zero momenta is an essential intermediate step in this analysis.

  19. A cell-local finite difference discretization of the low-order quasidiffusion equations for neutral particle transport on unstructured quadrilateral meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieselquist, William A.; Anistratov, Dmitriy Y.; Morel, Jim E.

    2014-09-01

    We present a quasidiffusion (QD) method for solving neutral particle transport problems in Cartesian XY geometry on unstructured quadrilateral meshes, including local refinement capability. Neutral particle transport problems are central to many applications including nuclear reactor design, radiation safety, astrophysics, medical imaging, radiotherapy, nuclear fuel transport/storage, shielding design, and oil well-logging. The primary development is a new discretization of the low-order QD (LOQD) equations based on cell-local finite differences. The accuracy of the LOQD equations depends on proper calculation of special non-linear QD (Eddington) factors from a transport solution. In order to completely define the new QD method, a proper discretization of the transport problem is also presented. The transport equation is discretized by a conservative method of short characteristics with a novel linear approximation of the scattering source term and monotonic, parabolic representation of the angular flux on incoming faces. Analytic and numerical tests are used to test the accuracy and spatial convergence of the non-linear method. All tests exhibit O(h2) convergence of the scalar flux on orthogonal, random, and multi-level meshes.

  20. Solid Particle Number Emission Factors of Euro VI Heavy-Duty Vehicles on the Road and in the Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barouch Giechaskiel

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Particulate matter (PM, and in particular ultrafine particles, have a negative impact on human health. The contribution of vehicle PM emissions to air pollution is typically quantified with emission inventories, which need vehicle emission factors as input. Heavy-duty vehicles, although they represent a small percentage of the vehicle population in nearly every major country, contribute the majority of the on-road PM emissions. However, the published data of modern heavy-duty vehicle emissions are scarce, and for the newest Euro VI technologies, almost non-existent. The main objective of this paper is to present Solid Particle Number (SPN emission factors from Euro VI heavy-duty vehicles using diesel, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG, or Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG. Urban, rural and motorway (highway emissions were determined on the road at various European cities using SPN Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS. Additional tests on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer showed that the solid sub-23 nm fraction, which is not covered at the moment in the European regulation, is high, especially for CNG engines. The significant contribution of regeneration events and the effect of ambient temperature and engine cold-start on particle emissions were also discussed.

  1. Solid Particle Number Emission Factors of Euro VI Heavy-Duty Vehicles on the Road and in the Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giechaskiel, Barouch

    2018-02-09

    Particulate matter (PM), and in particular ultrafine particles, have a negative impact on human health. The contribution of vehicle PM emissions to air pollution is typically quantified with emission inventories, which need vehicle emission factors as input. Heavy-duty vehicles, although they represent a small percentage of the vehicle population in nearly every major country, contribute the majority of the on-road PM emissions. However, the published data of modern heavy-duty vehicle emissions are scarce, and for the newest Euro VI technologies, almost non-existent. The main objective of this paper is to present Solid Particle Number (SPN) emission factors from Euro VI heavy-duty vehicles using diesel, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), or Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). Urban, rural and motorway (highway) emissions were determined on the road at various European cities using SPN Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS). Additional tests on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer showed that the solid sub-23 nm fraction, which is not covered at the moment in the European regulation, is high, especially for CNG engines. The significant contribution of regeneration events and the effect of ambient temperature and engine cold-start on particle emissions were also discussed.

  2. Solid Particle Number Emission Factors of Euro VI Heavy-Duty Vehicles on the Road and in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giechaskiel, Barouch

    2018-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM), and in particular ultrafine particles, have a negative impact on human health. The contribution of vehicle PM emissions to air pollution is typically quantified with emission inventories, which need vehicle emission factors as input. Heavy-duty vehicles, although they represent a small percentage of the vehicle population in nearly every major country, contribute the majority of the on-road PM emissions. However, the published data of modern heavy-duty vehicle emissions are scarce, and for the newest Euro VI technologies, almost non-existent. The main objective of this paper is to present Solid Particle Number (SPN) emission factors from Euro VI heavy-duty vehicles using diesel, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), or Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). Urban, rural and motorway (highway) emissions were determined on the road at various European cities using SPN Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS). Additional tests on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer showed that the solid sub-23 nm fraction, which is not covered at the moment in the European regulation, is high, especially for CNG engines. The significant contribution of regeneration events and the effect of ambient temperature and engine cold-start on particle emissions were also discussed. PMID:29425174

  3. Revision of Calibration Method of CT-Number to Stopping-Power-Ratio Conversion for Treatment Planning of Particle Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Mori, Shinichiro; Inaniwa, Taku

    A calibration method for CT-number to stopping-power-ratio conversion was recently proposed as a revision of the Japanese de facto standard method that has been used at particle therapy centers in Japan for over a decade. The revised method deals with 11 representative tissues of specific elemental composition and density, based on a latest compilation of standard tissue data. We report here how the revision was actually implemented into clinical practice. We applied the revised method to 7 CT-scanning conditions currently in use for treatment planning. For each condition, we derived CT numbers and stopping-power ratios of the representative tissues to constitute a polyline conversion function. We analyzed the change of target water-equivalent depth by the revision for 38 beams in treatment plans for 13 randomly sampled patients. The revision caused a mean change of +0.3 mm with a standard deviation of 0.4 mm. The maximum change was +1.2 mm or +0.5% of the depth, which may be clinically insignificant. The transition to the revised method was straightforward and would slightly improve the accuracy of the beam range in particle therapy.

  4. Parallel Monte Carlo Particle Transport and the Quality of Random Number Generators: How Good is Good Enough?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procassini, R J; Beck, B R

    2004-01-01

    It might be assumed that use of a ''high-quality'' random number generator (RNG), producing a sequence of ''pseudo random'' numbers with a ''long'' repetition period, is crucial for producing unbiased results in Monte Carlo particle transport simulations. While several theoretical and empirical tests have been devised to check the quality (randomness and period) of an RNG, for many applications it is not clear what level of RNG quality is required to produce unbiased results. This paper explores the issue of RNG quality in the context of parallel, Monte Carlo transport simulations in order to determine how ''good'' is ''good enough''. This study employs the MERCURY Monte Carlo code, which incorporates the CNPRNG library for the generation of pseudo-random numbers via linear congruential generator (LCG) algorithms. The paper outlines the usage of random numbers during parallel MERCURY simulations, and then describes the source and criticality transport simulations which comprise the empirical basis of this study. A series of calculations for each test problem in which the quality of the RNG (period of the LCG) is varied provides the empirical basis for determining the minimum repetition period which may be employed without producing a bias in the mean integrated results

  5. Induced self-energy on a static scalar charged particle in the spacetime of a global monopole with finite core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, D; De Freitas, U; De Mello, E R Bezerra, E-mail: denis.barros@ifpb.edu.br, E-mail: umbelino@fisica.ufpb.br, E-mail: emello@fisica.ufpb.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da ParaIba, 58.800-970, Sousa, PB (Brazil)

    2011-03-21

    We analyze the induced self-energy and self-force on a scalar point-like charged test particle placed at rest in the spacetime of a global monopole admitting a general spherically symmetric inner structure to it. In order to develop this analysis we calculate the three-dimensional Green's function associated with this physical system. We explicitly show that for points outside the monopole's core the scalar self-energy presents two distinct contributions. The first one is induced by the non-trivial topology of the global monopole considered as a point-like defect and the second is a correction induced by the non-vanishing inner structure attributed to it. For points inside the monopole, the self-energy also present a similar structure, where now the first contribution depends on the geometry of the spacetime inside. As illustrations of the general procedure adopted, two specific models, namely flower-pot and the ballpoint-pen, are considered for the region inside. For these two different situations, we were able to obtain exact expressions for the self-energies and self-forces in the regions outside and inside the global monopole.

  6. Induced self-energy on a static scalar charged particle in the spacetime of a global monopole with finite core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Denis; Freitas, Umbelino; Mello, Eugenio Bezerra de

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Global monopoles are heavy spherically symmetric topological objects which may have been formed by the vacuum phase transition in the early universe after Planck time. Although the global monopole was first introduced by Sokolov and Starobinsky, its gravitational effects have been analyzed by Barriola and Vilenkin. We analyze the induced self-energy and self-force on a scalar point-like charged test particle placed at rest in the spacetime of a global monopole admitting a general spherically symmetric inner structure to it. In order to develop this analysis we calculate the three-dimensional Green function associated with this physical system. We explicitly show that for points outside the monopoles core the scalar self-energy presents two distinct contributions. The first one is induced by the non-trivial topology of the global monopole considered as a point-like defect and the second is a correction induced by the non-vanishing inner structure attributed to it. For points inside the monopole, the self-energy also present a similar structure, where now the first contribution depends on the geometry of the spacetime inside. As illustrations of the general procedure adopted, two specific models, namely flower-pot and the ball-point pen, are considered for the region inside. For these two different situations, we were able to obtain exact expressions for the self-energies and self-forces in the regions outside and inside the global monopole. (author)

  7. Induced self-energy on a static scalar charged particle in the spacetime of a global monopole with finite core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, D; De Freitas, U; De Mello, E R Bezerra

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the induced self-energy and self-force on a scalar point-like charged test particle placed at rest in the spacetime of a global monopole admitting a general spherically symmetric inner structure to it. In order to develop this analysis we calculate the three-dimensional Green's function associated with this physical system. We explicitly show that for points outside the monopole's core the scalar self-energy presents two distinct contributions. The first one is induced by the non-trivial topology of the global monopole considered as a point-like defect and the second is a correction induced by the non-vanishing inner structure attributed to it. For points inside the monopole, the self-energy also present a similar structure, where now the first contribution depends on the geometry of the spacetime inside. As illustrations of the general procedure adopted, two specific models, namely flower-pot and the ballpoint-pen, are considered for the region inside. For these two different situations, we were able to obtain exact expressions for the self-energies and self-forces in the regions outside and inside the global monopole.

  8. Explicit finite-difference and particle method for the dynamics of mixed Bose-condensate and cold-atom clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignolo, P.; Chiofalo, M.L.; Tosi, M.P.; Succi, Sauro

    2002-01-01

    We present a new numerical method for studying the dynamics of quantum fluids composed of a Bose-Einstein condensate and a cloud of bosonic or fermionic atoms in a mean-field approximation. The method combines an explicit time-marching algorithm, previously developed for Bose-Einstein condensates in a harmonic or optical-lattice potential, with a particle-in-cell approach to the equation of motion for the one-body Wigner distribution function in the cold-atom cloud. The method is tested against known analytical results on the free expansion of a fermion cloud from a cylindrical harmonic trap and is validated by examining how the expansion of the fermionic cloud is affected by the simultaneous expansion of a condensate. We then present original calculations on a condensate and a thermal cloud inside a harmonic well and a superposed optical lattice, by addressing the free expansion of the two components and their oscillations under an applied harmonic force. These results are discussed in the light of relevant theories and experiments

  9. Comparisons of traffic-related ultrafine particle number concentrations measured in two urban areas by central, residential, and mobile monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Matthew C.; Hudda, Neelakshi; Naumova, Elena N.; Levy, Jonathan I.; Brugge, Doug; Durant, John L.

    2017-11-01

    Traffic-related ultrafine particles (UFP; urban air. While studies have shown that UFP are toxic, epidemiological evidence of health effects, which is needed to inform risk assessment at the population scale, is limited due to challenges of accurately estimating UFP exposures. Epidemiologic studies often use empirical models to estimate UFP exposures; however, the monitoring strategies upon which the models are based have varied between studies. Our study compares particle number concentrations (PNC; a proxy for UFP) measured by three different monitoring approaches (central-site, short-term residential-site, and mobile on-road monitoring) in two study areas in metropolitan Boston (MA, USA). Our objectives were to quantify ambient PNC differences between the three monitoring platforms, compare the temporal patterns and the spatial heterogeneity of PNC between the monitoring platforms, and identify factors that affect correlations across the platforms. We collected >12,000 h of measurements at the central sites, 1000 h of measurements at each of 20 residential sites in the two study areas, and >120 h of mobile measurements over the course of ∼1 year in each study area. Our results show differences between the monitoring strategies: mean 1 min PNC on-roads were higher (64,000 and 32,000 particles/cm3 in Boston and Chelsea, respectively) compared to central-site measurements (23,000 and 19,000 particles/cm3) and both were higher than at residences (14,000 and 15,000 particles/cm3). Temporal correlations and spatial heterogeneity also differed between the platforms. Temporal correlations were generally highest between central and residential sites, and lowest between central-site and on-road measurements. We observed the greatest spatial heterogeneity across monitoring platforms during the morning rush hours (06:00-09:00) and the lowest during the overnight hours (18:00-06:00). Longer averaging times (days and hours vs. minutes) increased temporal correlations

  10. Mobility particle size spectrometers : Harmonization of technical standards and data structure to facilitate high quality long-term observations of atmospheric particle number size distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiedensohler, A.; Birmili, W.; Nowak, A.; Sonntag, A.; Weinhold, K.; Merkel, M.; Wehner, B.; Tuch, T.; Pfeifer, S.; Fiebig, M.; Fjäraa, A.M.; Asmi, E.; Sellegri, K.; Depuy, R.; Venzac, H.; Villani, P.; Laj, P.; Aalto, P.; Ogren, J.A.; Swietlicki, E.; Williams, P.; Roldin, P.; Quincey, P.; Hüglin, C.; Fierz-Schmidhauser, R.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, S.; Grüning, C.; Faloon, K.; Beddows, D.; Harrison, R.; Monahan, C.; Jennings, S.G.; O'Dowd, C.D.; Marinoni, A.; Horn, H.-G.; Keck, L.; Jiang, J.; Scheckman, J.; McMurry, P.H.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, C.S.; Moerman, M.; Henzing, B.; Leeuw, G. de; Löschau, G.; Bastian, S.

    2012-01-01

    Mobility particle size spectrometers often referred to as DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizers) or SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers) have found a wide range of applications in atmospheric aerosol research. However, comparability of measurements conducted world-wide is hampered by lack

  11. Transfinite Numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    this is a characteristic difference between finite and infinite sets and created an immensely useful branch of mathematics based on this idea which had a great impact on the whole of mathe- matics. For example, the question of what is a number (finite or infinite) is almost a philosophical one. However Cantor's work turned it ...

  12. Aerosol number size distribution and new particle formation at a rural/coastal site in Pearl River Delta (PRD) of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shang; Hu, Min; Wu, Zhijun; Wehner, Birgit; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Cheng, Yafang

    Continuous measurements of aerosol number size distribution in the range of 3 nm-10 μm were performed in Pearl River Delta (PRD), China. These measurements were made during the period of 3 October to 5 November in 2004 at rural/coastal site, Xinken (22°37'N, 113°35'E, 6 m above sea level), in the south suburb of Guangzhou City (22°37'N, 113°35'E, 6 m above sea level), using a Twin Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS) combined with an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). The aerosol particles at Xinken were divided into four groups according to the observation results: nucleation mode particles (3-30 nm), Aitken mode particles (30-130 nm), accumulation mode particles (130-1000 nm) and coarse mode particles (1-10 μm). Concentrations of nucleation mode, Aitken mode and accumulation mode particles were observed in the same order of magnitude (about 10,000 cm -3), among which the concentration of Aitken mode particle was the highest. The Aitken mode particles usually had two peaks: the morning peak may be caused by the land-sea circulation, which is proven to be important for transporting aged aerosols back to the sampling site, while the noon peak was ascribed to the condensational growth of new particles. New particle formation events were found on 7 days of 27 days, the new particle growth rates ranged from 2.2 to 19.8 nm h -1 and the formation rates ranged from 0.5 to 5.2 cm -3 s -1, both of them were in the range of typical observed formation rates (0.01-10 cm -3 s -1) and typical particle growth rates (1-20 nm h -1). The sustained growth of the new particles for several hours under steady northeast wind indicated that the new particle formation events may occur in a large homogeneous air mass.

  13. Size distribution and total number concentration of ultrafine and accumulation mode particles and hospital admissions in children and the elderly in Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Wåhlin, Peter; Raaschou-Nielsen, O

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the association between short-term exposure to ultrafine particles and morbidity in Copenhagen, Denmark. METHODS: We studied the association between urban background levels of the total number concentration of particles (NC(tot), 6-700 nm in diameter) measured at a single sit...

  14. Diesel Exhaust Exposure Assessment Among Tunnel Construction Workers-Correlations Between Nitrogen Dioxide, Respirable Elemental Carbon, and Particle Number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedmer, Maria; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Li, Huiqi; Albin, Maria; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Broberg, Karin

    2017-06-01

    Occupational exposure to diesel exhaust is common due the widespread use of diesel-powered combustion engines. Diesel exhaust is chemically complex and consists of thousands of compounds present as gases and particulate matter. Both nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and elemental carbon (EC) have been used as markers for diesel exhaust exposure. Currently EC is regarded as the best surrogate of diesel exhaust. The objective was to quantify the occupational exposure to diesel exhaust in underground tunnel construction work using a multi-metric approach, and to investigate the correlations between NO2, respirable EC, respirable organic carbon (OC), respirable total carbon (TC), respirable dust (RD), and particle number. Also, the use of NO2 as a proxy for diesel exhaust was evaluated, how much of the variability in the diesel exhaust exposure was attributed to within and between individual factors and if there was a difference between expert and self-administered measurements of NO2. The personal exposure to diesel exhaust was assessed by expert supervised measurements of NO2, EC, OC, TC, RD and particle number in the breathing zones of underground tunnel workers. Stationary sampling of NO2, EC, OC, TC, RD, size-fractioned mass concentration, and particle number were conducted. The personal and stationary measurements were conducted on three occasions simultaneously. The workers measured their exposure by repeated self-administered measurements of NO2. The self-administered measurements were performed twice for each worker with at least one month lag between the samplings. In the simultaneous sampling of diesel exhaust, the geometric mean (GM) concentration of NO2 and respirable EC were 72 µg m-3 (10th-90th percentile 34-140 µg m-3) and 2.6 µg m-3 (10th-90th percentile 1.6-7.3 µg m-3), respectively. The GM for OC and TC was 28 µg m-3 (10th-90th percentile 20-42 µg m-3) and 31 µg m-3 (10th-90th percentile 20-50 µg m-3), respectively. The GM for RD and particle number was

  15. A particle-number conserving microscopic approach to octupole deformation of normal deformed and superdeformed states in 194Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nhan Hao, T.V.; Phu Dat, D.H.; Hoang Tung, N.; Tran, H.N.

    2015-01-01

    The left–right asymmetric deformation of normal deformed (ND) and superdeformed (SD) states of 194 Pb has been investigated in the framework of the parity-symmetry projection of the highly truncated diagonalization approach (HTDA), which is suited to treat the correlations in an explicitly particle-number conserving microscopic approach. A Skyrme energy density functional using the SIII and SkM* interactions has been considered to treat the particle–hole channel, whereas a density-independent δ force has been adopted for the residual interaction. The obtained results are compared with previous approaches. The calculated octupole phonon excitation energy is found to be in good qualitative agreement with available data in the ND state. (author)

  16. Simultaneous measurements of particle number size distributions at ground level and 260 m on a meteorological tower in urban Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Yuying; Zhang, Yingjie; Wang, Qingqing; Xu, Weiqi; Chen, Chen; Han, Tingting; Zhang, Fang; Li, Zhanqing; Fu, Pingqing; Li, Jie; Wang, Zifa; Sun, Yele

    2017-06-01

    Despite extensive studies into the characterization of particle number size distributions at ground level, real-time measurements above the urban canopy in the megacity of Beijing have never been performed to date. Here we conducted the first simultaneous measurements of size-resolved particle number concentrations at ground level and 260 m in urban Beijing from 22 August to 30 September. Our results showed overall similar temporal variations in number size distributions between ground level and 260 m, yet periods with significant differences were also observed. Particularly, accumulation-mode particles were highly correlated (r2 = 0. 85) at the two heights, while Aitken-mode particles presented more differences. Detailed analysis suggests that the vertical differences in number concentrations strongly depended on particle size, and particles with a mobility diameter between 100 and 200 nm generally showed higher concentrations at higher altitudes. Particle growth rates and condensation sinks were also calculated, which were 3.2 and 3.6 nm h-1, and 2.8 × 10-2 and 2.9 × 10-2 s-1, at ground level and 260 m, respectively. By linking particle growth with aerosol composition, we found that organics appeared to play an important role in the early stage of the growth (09:00-12:00 LT) while sulfate was also important during the later period. Positive matrix factorization of size-resolved number concentrations identified three common sources at ground level and 260 m, including a factor associated with new particle formation and growth events (NPEs), and two secondary factors that represent photochemical processing and regional transport. Cooking emission was found to have a large contribution to small particles and showed much higher concentration at ground level than 260 m in the evening. These results imply that investigation of NPEs at ground level in megacities needs to consider the influences of local cooking emissions. The impacts of regional emission controls on

  17. Effects of DME mixing on number density and size properties of soot particles in counterflow non-premixed ethylene flames

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, J. H.

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the effect of DME mixing on the number density and size of soot particles, DME was mixed in a counter flow non-premixed ethylene flame with mixture ratios of 5%, 14% and 30%. A laser extinction/scattering technique has been adopted to measure the volume fraction, number density, and mean size of soot particles. The experimental results showed that the highest soot concentrations were observed for flames with mixture ratios of 5% and 14%; however, for a mixture ratio of 30% the soot concentration decreased. Numerical results showed that the concentrations of propargyl radicals (C3H3) at the 5% and 14% ratios were higher than those measured in the ethylene-based flame, and the production of benzene (C6H6) in the 5% and 14% DME mixture flames was also increased. This indicates the crucial role of propargyl in benzene ring formation. These reactions generally become stronger with increased DME mixing, except for A1- + H2 → A1 + H (-R554) and n-C4H5 + C2H2 → A1 + H (R542). Therefore, it is indicated that adding DME to ethylene flames promotes benzene ring formation. Note that although the maximum C6H6 concentration is largest in the 30% DME mixing flame, the soot volume fraction is smaller than those for the 5% and 14% mixture ratios. This is because the local C6H6 concentration decreases in the relatively low temperature region in the fuel side where soot growth occurs. © 2015, The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  18. Evaluation of solid particle number and black carbon for very low particulate matter emissions standards in light-duty vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M-C Oliver; Shields, J Erin

    2017-06-01

    To reliably measure at the low particulate matter (PM) levels needed to meet California's Low Emission Vehicle (LEV III) 3- and 1-mg/mile particulate matter (PM) standards, various approaches other than gravimetric measurement have been suggested for testing purposes. In this work, a feasibility study of solid particle number (SPN, d50 = 23 nm) and black carbon (BC) as alternatives to gravimetric PM mass was conducted, based on the relationship of these two metrics to gravimetric PM mass, as well as the variability of each of these metrics. More than 150 Federal Test Procedure (FTP-75) or Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (US06) tests were conducted on 46 light-duty vehicles, including port-fuel-injected and direct-injected gasoline vehicles, as well as several light-duty diesel vehicles equipped with diesel particle filters (LDD/DPF). For FTP tests, emission variability of gravimetric PM mass was found to be slightly less than that of either SPN or BC, whereas the opposite was observed for US06 tests. Emission variability of PM mass for LDD/DPF was higher than that of both SPN and BC, primarily because of higher PM mass measurement uncertainties (background and precision) near or below 0.1 mg/mile. While strong correlations were observed from both SPN and BC to PM mass, the slopes are dependent on engine technologies and driving cycles, and the proportionality between the metrics can vary over the course of the test. Replacement of the LEV III PM mass emission standard with one other measurement metric may imperil the effectiveness of emission reduction, as a correlation-based relationship may evolve over future technologies for meeting stringent greenhouse standards. Solid particle number and black carbon were suggested in place of PM mass for the California LEV III 1-mg/mile FTP standard. Their equivalence, proportionality, and emission variability in comparison to PM mass, based on a large light-duty vehicle fleet examined, are dependent on engine

  19. Particle mobility size spectrometers: harmonization of technical standards and data structure to facilitate high quality long-term observations of atmospheric particle number size distributions

    OpenAIRE

    A. Wiedensohler; W. Birmili; A. Nowak; A. Sonntag; K. Weinhold; M. Merkel; B. Wehner; T. Tuch; S. Pfeifer; M. Fiebig; A. M. Fjäraa; E. Asmi; K. Sellegri; R. Depuy; H. Venzac

    2010-01-01

    Particle mobility size spectrometers often referred to as DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizers) or SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers) have found a wide application in atmospheric aerosol research. However, comparability of measurements conducted world-wide is hampered by lack of generally accepted technical standards with respect to the instrumental set-up, measurement mode, data evaluation as well as quality control. This article results from several instrument intercomp...

  20. Study of the Cumulative Number Distribution of Charged Particles Produced in d12C-Interactions at 4.2 A GeV/c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, S. M.; Suleymanov, M. K.; Wazir, Z.; Gilani, A. R.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper the behavior of the cumulative number and also with maximum values of cumulative number distribution of protons, π + and π --mesons, have been studied, produced in d12C-interctions at 4.2 A GeV/c. The experimental data has been compared with ones coming from the Dubna version of the cascade model. In the analysis we have observed; four different regions in the cumulative number distributions for all charged particle and protons and the last region is corresponding to values of cumulative number greater than 1; for pions number of regions decreased to 2 for π ±-mesons but cumulative area is absent for both mesons. Cascade cannot describe satisfactorily the distributions of the cumulative protons and cumulative π -+-mesons, it gives less number for the all produced particles. In case of particles with maximum values of cumulative number cascade can describe the behavior of cumulative number distribution well. There exist some events with two cumulative particles which could not describe by the cascade dynamics. May be collective nucleon effect could be reasons of the observation two cumulative particles events.

  1. Land use regression models for total particle number concentrations using 2D, 3D and semantic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassoun, Yahya; Löwner, Marc-Oliver

    2017-10-01

    Total particle number concentration (TNC) was studied in a 1 × 2 km area in Berlin, the capital of Germany by three Land Use Regression models (LUR). The estimation of TNC was established and compared using one 2D-LUR and two 3D-LUR models. All models predict total number concentrations TNC by using urban morphological (2D resp. 3D) and additional semantical parameters. 2D and semantical parameters were derived from Open Street Map data (OSM) whereas 3D parameters were derived from a CityGML-based 3D city model. While the models are capable to depict the spatial variation of TNC across the study area, the two 3D-LUR showed better results than the 2D-LUR. The 2D-LUR model explained 74% of the variance of TNC for the full data set with root mean square error (RMSE) of 4014 cm-3 while the 3D-LUR explained 79% of the variance with an RMSE of 3477 cm-3. The further introduction of a new spatial parameter, the Frontal Area Index (FAI) that represents the dynamic factor wind direction enhanced the 3D-LUR to explain 82% of the variance with RMSE of 3389 cm-3. Furthermore, the semantical parameters (e.g. streets type) played a significant role in all models.

  2. Effect of the particle-number symmetry restoration on root mean square radii of even–even neutron-deficient nuclei in the isovector pairing case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douici, M.; Allal, N.H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the particle-number symmetry restoration on the root mean square (rms) proton and neutron radii of neutron-deficient nuclei is studied in the isovector pairing case. As a first step, an expression of the nuclear radii which includes the neutron–proton pairing effects and which strictly conserves the particle-number has been established using the SBCS (Sharp BCS) method. It is shown that this expression generalizes the one obtained in the pairing between like-particles case. As a second step, the proton and neutron rms radii are numerically evaluated for even–even nuclei such as 16⩽Z⩽56 and 0⩽(N-Z)⩽4 using the single-particle energies of a Woods–Saxon mean-field. The results are compared with experimental data when available and with the results obtained when one considers only the pairing between like-particles. (author)

  3. Monte-Carlo calculation and comparison with experimental data of cascade curves and fluctuations of mean number of shower particles initiated by γ-quanta in liquid xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrotnyak, Ya.; Strugal'skij, Z.; Yablonskij, Z.

    1976-01-01

    The cascade curves and corresponding fluctuations of the numbers of shower particles are evaluated, using the Monte-Carlo calculation method, for showers initiated by gamma quanta of energies from 20 to 2000 MeV in liquid xenon. While making the calculation program, processes of electron-positron pair production, the compton effect, bremsstrahlung radiation of secondary photons by electrons and ionization losses of electrons were taken into consideration. The multiple Coulomb scattering and escape angles of particles were not taken into account in the model. The calculation program is performed in a variant providing calculations of shower parameters for any substance. The following values have been calculated: distribution of the number of particles with the depth, distribution of the energy of shower particles with the depth, mean number of particles with the depth, and the standard deviation. The calculation results for electrons are compared with experimental data. The calculation provides a correct position of maxima of particles and that of number of particles at the depth, shower tails exclusive

  4. Impact of relative humidity and particles number size distribution on aerosol light extinction in the urban area of Guangzhou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. J. Lin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the urban area of Guangzhou, observations on aerosol light extinction effect were conducted at a monitoring site of the South China Institute of Environmental Sciences (SCIES during April 2009, July 2009, October 2009 and January 2010. The main goal of these observations is to recognise the impact of relative humidity (RH and particles number distribution on aerosol light extinction. PM2.5 was sampled by Model PQ200 air sampler; ions and OC/EC in PM2.5 were identified by the Dionex ion chromatography and the DRI model 2001 carbon analyser, respectively; particles number size distribution was measured by TSI 3321 APS, while total light scattering coefficient was measured by TSI 3563 Nephelometer. Chemical composition of PM2.5 was reconstructed by the model ISORROPIA II. As a result, possible major components in PM2.5 were (NH42SO4, Na2SO4, K2SO4, NH4NO3, HNO3, water, POM and EC. Regarding ambient RH, mass concentration of PM2.5 ranged from 26.1 to 279.1 μg m−3 and had an average of 94.8, 44.6, 95.4 and 130.8 μg m−3 in April, July, October and January, respectively. With regard to the total mass of PM2.5, inorganic species, water, POM, EC and the Residual accounted for 34–47%, 19–31%, 14–20%, 6–8% and 8–17%, respectively. Under the assumption of "internal mixture", optical properties of PM0.5–20 were estimated following the Mie Model. Optical refractive index, hygroscopic growth factor and the dry aerosol density required by the Mie Model were determined with an understanding of chemical composition of PM2.5. With these three parameters and the validated particles number size distribution of PM0.5–20, the temporal variation trend of optical property of PM0.5–20 was estimated with good

  5. A comparison of strategies for estimation of ultrafine particle number concentrations in urban air pollution monitoring networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reggente, Matteo; Peters, Jan; Theunis, Jan; Van Poppel, Martine; Rademaker, Michael; De Baets, Bernard; Kumar, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    We propose three estimation strategies (local, remote and mixed) for ultrafine particles (UFP) at three sites in an urban air pollution monitoring network. Estimates are obtained through Gaussian process regression based on concentrations of gaseous pollutants (NOx, O 3 , CO) and UFP. As local strategy, we use local measurements of gaseous pollutants (local covariates) to estimate UFP at the same site. As remote strategy, we use measurements of gaseous pollutants and UFP from two independent sites (remote covariates) to estimate UFP at a third site. As mixed strategy, we use local and remote covariates to estimate UFP. The results suggest: UFP can be estimated with good accuracy based on NOx measurements at the same location; it is possible to estimate UFP at one location based on measurements of NOx or UFP at two remote locations; the addition of remote UFP to local NOx, O 3 or CO measurements improves models' performance. - Highlights: • UFP number concentrations are estimated using Gaussian process regression. • The independent variables include local and/or remote gaseous measurements. • Three modelling strategies (local, remote and mixed) used for UFP estimations. • NOx was the most important independent variable. • The best models explained >90% of the variance. - UFP can be estimated with good accuracy at one location based on NOx measurements at the same location and based on measurements of NOx or UFP at two remote locations

  6. Determination of the vertical profile of particle number concentration adjacent to a motorway using an unmanned aerial vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, T F; Jayaratne, E R; Gonzalez, L F; Morawska, L

    2017-11-01

    A quantitative assessment of the vertical profile of traffic pollution, specifically particle number concentration (PNC), in an open space adjacent to a motorway was possible for the first time, to the knowledge of the authors, using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) system. Until now, traffic pollution has only been measured at ground level while the vertical distribution, is limited to studies conducted from buildings or fixed towers and balloons. This new UAV system demonstrated that the PNC sampled during the period form 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., outside the rush hours with a constant traffic flow, increased from a concentration of 2 × 10 4 p/cm 3 near the ground up to 10 m, and then sharply decreased attaining a steady value of 4 × 10 3 p/cm 3 beyond a height of about 40 m. While more comprehensive investigations would be warranted under different conditions, such as topography and vehicle and fuel type, this finding is of great significance, given that it demonstrates the impact of traffic emissions on human exposure, but less so to pollution within the upper part of the boundary layer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Study on Sumbawa gold ore liberation using rod mill: effect of rod-number and rotational speed on particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetya, A.; Mawadati, A.; Putri, A. M. R.; Petrus, H. T. B. M.

    2018-01-01

    Comminution is one of crucial steps in gold ore processing used to liberate the valuable minerals from gaunge mineral. This research is done to find the particle size distribution of gold ore after it has been treated through the comminution process in a rod mill with various number of rod and rotational speed that will results in one optimum milling condition. For the initial step, Sumbawa gold ore was crushed and then sieved to pass the 2.5 mesh and retained on the 5 mesh (this condition was taken to mimic real application in artisanal gold mining). Inserting the prepared sample into the rod mill, the observation on effect of rod-number and rotational speed was then conducted by variating the rod number of 7 and 10 while the rotational speed was varied from 60, 85, and 110 rpm. In order to be able to provide estimation on particle distribution of every condition, the comminution kinetic was applied by taking sample at 15, 30, 60, and 120 minutes for size distribution analysis. The change of particle distribution of top and bottom product as time series was then treated using Rosin-Rammler distribution equation. The result shows that the homogenity of particle size and particle size distribution is affected by rod-number and rotational speed. The particle size distribution is more homogeneous by increasing of milling time, regardless of rod-number and rotational speed. Mean size of particles do not change significantly after 60 minutes milling time. Experimental results showed that the optimum condition was achieved at rotational speed of 85 rpm, using rod-number of 7.

  8. On-board measurement of particle numbers and their size distribution from a light-duty diesel vehicle: Influences of VSP and altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Ge, Yunshan; Wang, Xin; Hao, Lijun; Tan, Jianwei; Peng, Zihang; Zhang, Chuanzhen; Gong, Huiming; Huang, Ying

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the particle size-resolved distribution from a China-3 certificated light-duty diesel vehicle was measured by using a portable emission measurement system (PEMS). In order to examine the influences of vehicle specific power (VSP) and high-altitude operation, measurements were conducted at 8 constant speeds, which ranged from 10 to 80km/hr at 10km/hr intervals, and two different high altitudes, namely 2200 and 3200m. The results demonstrated that the numbers of particles in all size ranges decreased significantly as VSP increased when the test vehicle was running at lower speeds (vehicle resulted in increased particle number emissions at low and high driving speeds; however, particle numbers obtained at moderate speeds decreased as altitude rose. When the test vehicle was running at moderate speeds, particle numbers measured at the two altitudes were very close, except for comparatively higher number concentrations of nanoparticles measured at 2200m. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Evaluation and modelling of the size fractionated aerosol particle number concentration measurements nearby a major road in Helsinki ─ Part I: Modelling results within the LIPIKA project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ketzel

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A field measurement campaign was conducted near a major road "Itäväylä" in an urban area in Helsinki in 17–20 February 2003. Aerosol measurements were conducted using a mobile laboratory "Sniffer" at various distances from the road, and at an urban background location. Measurements included particle size distribution in the size range of 7 nm–10 μm (aerodynamic diameter by the Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI and in the size range of 3–50 nm (mobility diameter by Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS, total number concentration of particles larger than 3 nm detected by an ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC, temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, driving route of the mobile laboratory, and traffic density on the studied road. In this study, we have compared measured concentration data with the predictions of the road network dispersion model CAR-FMI used in combination with an aerosol process model MONO32. For model comparison purposes, one of the cases was additionally computed using the aerosol process model UHMA, combined with the CAR-FMI model. The vehicular exhaust emissions, and atmospheric dispersion and transformation of fine and ultrafine particles was evaluated within the distance scale of 200 m (corresponding to a time scale of a couple of minutes. We computed the temporal evolution of the number concentrations, size distributions and chemical compositions of various particle size classes. The atmospheric dilution rate of particles is obtained from the roadside dispersion model CAR-FMI. Considering the evolution of total number concentration, dilution was shown to be the most important process. The influence of coagulation and condensation on the number concentrations of particle size modes was found to be negligible on this distance scale. Condensation was found to affect the evolution of particle diameter in the two smallest particle modes. The assumed value of the concentration of

  10. Aerosol Number Size Distribution and Type Classification from 4-Year Polarization Optical Particle Counter (POPC) Measurements at Urban-Mountain Site in Seoul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H. J.; Kim, S. W.; Kobayashi, H.; Nishizawa, T.

    2017-12-01

    The Polarization Optical Particle Counter (POPC), unlike general OPCs, has the advantage capable of classifying the aerosol types (e.g., dust, anthropogenic pollution), because it measures particle number, size and depolarization ratio (DPR; the sphericity information of single particle) for 4 size bins with diameter (0.5-1, 1-3, 3-5, 5-10 μm). In this study, we investigate the temporal variations of particle number and volume size distributions with DPR values and classify aerosol types such as dust, anthropogenic pollution, from 4-year (2013-2016) POPC data at Seoul National University campus in Seoul, Korea. Coarse mode particles from 5-10 μm with relatively high DPR values (0.25-0.3) were distinctly appeared in in both spring (March-May) and winter (December-February) due to frequent transport of Asian dust particles. In summer (June -August), however, both aerosol number concentration and DPR value were decreased in all size bins due to the influences of relatively clean maritime airmass and frequent precipitations. In autumn (September - November), the particle number concentration in all size bins was the lowest. To classify the aerosol types, we investigate particle number and volume size distributions and DPR value for clean, dust-dominant and anthropogenic pollution-dominant cases, which were selected by PM10, PM2.5 mass concentrations and its ratio, because those parameters are clearly different among aerosol types (Kobayashi et al., 2014, Pan et al., 2016). Non-spherical coarse mode particles (Dp > 2.5 μm, 0.1 < DPR < 0.6) were dominantly observed during the dust-dominant period, while both spherical fine mode and coarse mode particles (Dp < 1 μm and Dp = 2-4 μm, DPR < 0.1) were dominantly appeared during the pollution event. The aerosol type classifications with these criteria values were successfully applied to the extreme Asian dust event from February 22 to 24, 2015. The results showed that pollution-dominant airmass preceded by the appearance

  11. Reduction in dietary trans fat intake is associated with decreased LDL particle number in a primary prevention population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garshick, M; Mochari-Greenberger, H; Mosca, L

    2014-01-01

    Increased trans fat intake has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). While the effect of trans fat on traditional lipids is known, it's association with LDL particle number (LDL-P), a novel marker of CVD risk, has not been established. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between trans fat intake and LDL-P over 1-year among individuals participating in a lifestyle intervention trial. Family members (N = 400, 33% male, mean age 48 ± 13) of patients hospitalized with CVD who participated in a 1-year randomized controlled primary prevention lifestyle intervention trial and had complete dietary data and LDL-P measures at baseline and 1-year. Change in trans fat as a percentage of total diet and mean absolute change in LDL-P at 1-year was assessed using multivariate adjusted linear regression models. At baseline, there was a significant positive correlation between dietary trans fat intake and LDL-P (Beta = 37, p = 0.04). For every 1 percent change in trans fat intake there was a 27 nmol/L change in LDL-P (Beta = 27, p = 0.04) over 1-year which was independent of baseline predictors and confounders (age, sex, smoking, statin use, waist size and physical activity; Beta = 30, p = 0.03). A reduction in trans fat intake over 1-year was significantly associated with a reduction in LDL-P independent of potential confounders. Healthcare providers should reinforce the beneficial impact of a healthy diet, and in particular modifications in trans fat intake on improving lipid profiles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of isovector pairing and particle-number projection effects on spectroscopic factors for one-pair like-particle transfer reactions in proton-rich even-even nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbouzid, Y.; Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Oudih, M. R.

    2018-04-01

    Isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing and particle-number fluctuation effects on the spectroscopic factors (SF) corresponding to one-pair like-particle transfer reactions in proton-rich even-even nuclei are studied. With this aim, expressions of the SF corresponding to two-neutron stripping and two-proton pick-up reactions, which take into account the isovector np pairing effect, are established within the generalized BCS approach, using a schematic definition proposed by Chasman. Expressions of the same SF which strictly conserve the particle number are also established within the Sharp-BCS (SBCS) discrete projection method. In both cases, it is shown that these expressions generalize those obtained when only the pairing between like particles is considered. First, the formalism is tested within the Richardson schematic model. Second, it is applied to study even-even proton-rich nuclei using the single-particle energies of a Woods-Saxon mean-field. In both cases, it is shown that the np pairing effect and the particle-number projection effect on the SF values are important, particularly in N = Z nuclei, and must then be taken into account.

  13. New considerations for PM, Black Carbon and particle number concentration for air quality monitoring across different European cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Reche

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In many large cities of Europe standard air quality limit values of particulate matter (PM are exceeded. Emissions from road traffic and biomass burning are frequently reported to be the major causes. As a consequence of these exceedances a large number of air quality plans, most of them focusing on traffic emissions reductions, have been implemented in the last decade. In spite of this implementation, a number of cities did not record a decrease of PM levels. Thus, is the efficiency of air quality plans overestimated? Do the road traffic emissions contribute less than expected to ambient air PM levels in urban areas? Or do we need a more specific metric to evaluate the impact of the above emissions on the levels of urban aerosols?

    This study shows the results of the interpretation of the 2009 variability of levels of PM, Black Carbon (BC, aerosol number concentration (N and a number of gaseous pollutants in seven selected urban areas covering road traffic, urban background, urban-industrial, and urban-shipping environments from southern, central and northern Europe.

    The results showed that variations of PM and N levels do not always reflect the variation of the impact of road traffic emissions on urban aerosols. However, BC levels vary proportionally with those of traffic related gaseous pollutants, such as CO, NO2 and NO. Due to this high correlation, one may suppose that monitoring the levels of these gaseous pollutants would be enough to extrapolate exposure to traffic-derived BC levels. However, the BC/CO, BC/NO2 and BC/NO ratios vary widely among the cities studied, as a function of distance to traffic emissions, vehicle fleet composition and the influence of other emission sources such as biomass burning. Thus, levels of BC should be measured at air quality monitoring sites.

    During morning traffic rush hours, a narrow variation in the N/BC ratio was evidenced, but a wide variation of

  14. Monitoring of black carbon and size-segregated particle number concentrations at 9-m and 65-m distances from a major road in Helsinki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakkanen, T.A.; Maekelae, T.; Hillamo, R.E. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland); Virtanen, A.; Roenkkoe, T.; Keskinen, J. [Tampere Univ. of Technology, Inst. of Physics, Aerosol Physics Lab. , Tampere (Finland); Pirjola, L.; Parviainen, H. [Helsinki Polytechnic, Dept. of Technology, Helsinki (Finland); Hussein, T.; Haemeri, K. [Helsinki Univ., Dept. of Physical Sciences, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    In February and August 2003, black carbon (BC) and size-segregated particle number concentrations were monitored simultaneously at 9-m and 65-m distances from a major road in Helsinki, Finland, using aethalometers and electrical low-pressure impactors, respectively. During weekdays in winter, the average total particle number concentrations in the diameter range 0.007-1{mu}m increased during morning rush hours from the nighttime values of 17000 and 12000 cm{sup -3} to 190000 and 130000 cm{sup -3} at the 9-m and 65-m stations, respectively. The corresponding BC concentrations increased from 730 and 430 ng m{sup -3} to 2800 and 1550 ng m{sup -3}. Compared with those in winter, the average rush-hour particle number concentrations were much lower in summer, the likely reason being enhanced nucleation in cold winter conditions. BC concentrations were slightly higher during summer than during winter. Number size distributions measured at the 9-m and 65-m distances and at a background site had similar modal characteristics with the highest peak occurring below 0.03 {mu}m. Despite the different wind conditions in winter and summer, concentrations of total particle number and BC decreased similarly between the 9-m and 65-m stations, the likely principal mechanism being mixing with background air. The strong diurnal variation in concentrations during the weekdays, together with the large concentration difference between the 9-m and 65-m distances, suggests that local traffic was the main source of the measured pollutants, especially during rush hours at the 9-m site. In winter, the decrease in the particle number concentrations from the 9-m site to the 65-m site was most pronounced for the smallest exhaust particles. During an episodic pollution event in winter there were indications of condensational growth of 0.007-0.03 {mu}m particles, which increased the number concentration of 0.03-0.06 {mu}m particles at the 65-m site. (orig.)

  15. Effects of biodiesel, engine load and diesel particulate filter on nonvolatile particle number size distributions in heavy-duty diesel engine exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Li-Hao; Liou, Yi-Jyun; Cheng, Man-Ting; Lu, Jau-Huai; Yang, Hsi-Hsien; Tsai, Ying I; Wang, Lin-Chi; Chen, Chung-Bang; Lai, Jim-Shoung

    2012-01-15

    Diesel engine exhaust contains large numbers of submicrometer particles that degrade air quality and human health. This study examines the number emission characteristics of 10-1000 nm nonvolatile particles from a heavy-duty diesel engine, operating with various waste cooking oil biodiesel blends (B2, B10 and B20), engine loads (0%, 25%, 50% and 75%) and a diesel oxidation catalyst plus diesel particulate filter (DOC+DPF) under steady modes. For a given load, the total particle number concentrations (N(TOT)) decrease slightly, while the mode diameters show negligible changes with increasing biodiesel blends. For a given biodiesel blend, both the N(TOT) and mode diameters increase modestly with increasing load of above 25%. The N(TOT) at idle are highest and their size distributions are strongly affected by condensation and possible nucleation of semivolatile materials. Nonvolatile cores of diameters less than 16 nm are only observed at idle mode. The DOC+DPF shows remarkable filtration efficiency for both the core and soot particles, irrespective of the biodiesel blend and engine load under study. The N(TOT) post the DOC+DPF are comparable to typical ambient levels of ≈ 10(4)cm(-3). This implies that, without concurrent reductions of semivolatile materials, the formation of semivolatile nucleation mode particles post the after treatment is highly favored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Calcination of kaolinite clay particles for cement production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    is developed, which fully addresses the conversion process of raw kaolinite particles suspended in hot gas. Particles are discretized into a number of spherical cells, on each of which mass, momentum, energy and species conservation equations are numerically solved by using the finite volume method. Reactions...

  17. Simulating ultrafine particle formation in Europe using a regional CTM: contribution of primary emissions versus secondary formation to aerosol number concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fountoukis

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional regional chemical transport model (CTM with detailed aerosol microphysics, PMCAMx-UF, was applied to the European domain to simulate the contribution of direct emissions and secondary formation to total particle number concentrations during May 2008. PMCAMx-UF uses the Dynamic Model for Aerosol Nucleation and the Two-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS algorithm to track both aerosol number and mass concentration using a sectional approach. The model predicts nucleation events that occur over scales of hundreds up to thousands of kilometers especially over the Balkans and Southeast Europe. The model predictions were compared against measurements from 7 sites across Europe. The model reproduces more than 70% of the hourly concentrations of particles larger than 10 nm (N10 within a factor of 2. About half of these particles are predicted to originate from nucleation in the lower troposphere. Regional nucleation is predicted to increase the total particle number concentration by approximately a factor of 3. For particles larger than 100 nm the effect varies from an increase of 20% in the eastern Mediterranean to a decrease of 20% in southern Spain and Portugal resulting in a small average increase of around 1% over the whole domain. Nucleation has a significant effect in the predicted N50 levels (up to a factor of 2 increase mainly in areas where there are condensable vapors to grow the particles to larger sizes. A semi-empirical ternary sulfuric acid-ammonia-water parameterization performs better than the activation or the kinetic parameterizations in reproducing the observations. Reducing emissions of ammonia and sulfur dioxide affects certain parts of the number size distribution.

  18. Simulating ultrafine particle formation in Europe using a regional CTM: Contribution of primary emissions versus secondary formation to aerosol number concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fountoukis, C.; Riipinen, I.; Denier Van Der Gon, H.A.C.; Charalampidis, P.E.; Pilinis, C.; Wiedensohler, A.; O'Dowd, C.; Putaud, J.P.; Moerman, M.; Pandis, S.N.

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional regional chemical transport model (CTM) with detailed aerosol microphysics, PMCAMx-UF, was applied to the European domain to simulate the contribution of direct emissions and secondary formation to total particle number concentrations during May 2008. PMCAMx-UF uses the Dynamic

  19. The challenge of measuring sulfuric acid aerosols: number concentration and size evaluation using a condensation particle counter (CPC) and an electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI+)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brachert, L.; Mertens, J.; Khakharia, P.M.; Schaber, K.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, two different methods for the measurement of the sulfuric acid aerosol which is formed in wet flue gas cleaning processes have been investigated. The condensation particle counter (UFCPC, PALAS GmbH) provides information about the number concentration. With the electrical low pressure

  20. Variation of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions at the urban and downwind regional sites in the Pearl River Delta during summertime pollution episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, D. L.; Hu, M.; Wu, Z. J.; Guo, S.; Wen, M. T.; Nowak, A.; Wehner, B.; Wiedensohler, A.; Takegawa, N.; Kondo, Y.; Wang, X. S.; Li, Y. P.; Zeng, L. M.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2010-10-01

    In order to characterize the features of particulate pollution in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) in the summer, continuous measurements of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions were simultaneously performed at Guangzhou urban site (GZ) and Back-garden downwind regional site (BG) in July 2006. Particle number concentration from 20 nm to 10 μm at BG was (1.7±0.8)×104 cm-3, about 40% lower than that at GZ, (2.9±1.1)×104 cm-3. The total particle volume concentration at BG was 94±34 μm3 cm-3, similar to that at GZ, 96±43 μm3 cm-3. More 20-100 nm particles, significantly affected by the traffic emissions, were observed at GZ, while 100-660 nm particle number concentrations were similar at both sites as they are more regional. PM2.5 values were similar at GZ (69±43 μg m-3) and BG (69±58 μg m-3) with R2 of 0.71 for the daily average PM2.5 at these two sites, indicating the fine particulate pollution in the PRD region to be regional. Two kinds of pollution episodes, the accumulation pollution episode and the regional transport pollution episode, were observed. Fine particles over 100 nm dominated both number and volume concentrations of total particles during the late periods of these pollution episodes. Accumulation and secondary transformation are the main reasons for the nighttime accumulation pollution episode. SO42-, NO3- accounted for about 60% in 100-660 nm particle mass and PM2.5 increase. When south or southeast wind prevailed in the PRD region, regional transport of pollutants took place. Regional transport contributed about 30% to fine particulate pollution at BG during a regional transport case. Secondary transformation played an important role during regional transport, causing higher increase rates of secondary ions in PM1.0 than other species and shifting the peaks of sulfate and ammonium mass size distributions to larger sizes. SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+ accounted for about 70% and 40% of PM1.0 and PM2.5, respectively.

  1. A non-conformal finite element/finite volume scheme for the non-structured grid-based approximation of low Mach number flows; Un schema elements finis non-conformes/volumes finis pour l'approximation en maillages non-structures des ecoulements a faible nombre de Mach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansanay-Alex, G.

    2009-06-17

    The development of simulation codes aimed at a precise simulation of fires requires a precise approach of flame front phenomena by using very fine grids. The need to take different spatial scale into consideration leads to a local grid refinement and to a discretization with homogeneous grid for computing time and memory purposes. The author reports the approximation of the non-linear convection term, the scalar advection-diffusion in finite volumes, numerical simulations of a flow in a bent tube, of a three-dimensional laminar flame and of a low Mach number an-isotherm flow. Non conformal finite elements are also presented (Rannacher-Turek and Crouzeix-Raviart elements)

  2. Thickness-shear vibration of AT-cut quartz plates carrying finite-size particles with rotational degree of freedom and rotatory inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunli; Liu, Nan; Yang, Jiashi; Chen, Weiqiu

    2011-03-01

    We study thickness-shear (TSh) vibration of a rotated Y-cut quartz crystal resonator (QCR) carrying finitesize circular particles that have a rotational degree of freedom and rotatory inertia. The particles are elastically attached to the QCR and are allowed to roll without sliding on the QCR surface. An analytical solution for particle-induced frequency shifts in the QCR is obtained. Examination of the frequency shifts shows that although they can be used to measure geometric/physical properties of the particles, the frequency shifts can have relatively complicated behaviors that cause deviations from the Sauerbrey equation and other anomalies in mass sensing. A frequency-dependent effective particle mass is introduced to classify and characterize different aspects of the particle-induced frequency shifts.

  3. Comparison of vortex-element and finite-volume simulations of low Reynolds number flow over a confined backward-facing step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, R.W.; Fonty, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a novel vortex element method for simulating incompressible laminar flow over a two-dimensional backward-facing step. The model employs an operator-splitting technique to compute the evolution of the vorticity field downstream of abrupt changes in flow geometry. During the advective stage of the computation, a semi-Lagrangian scheme is used to update the positions of the vortex elements, whilst an analytical diffusion algorithm employing Oseen vortices is implemented during the diffusive time step. Redistributing the vorticity analytically instead of using the more traditional random-walk method enables the numerical model to simulate steady flows directly and avoids the need to filter the results to remove the oscillations created by the random-walk procedure. Model validation has been achieved by comparing the length of the recirculating eddy behind a confined backward-facing step against data from experimental and alternative numerical investigations. In addition, results from the vortex element method are compared against predictions obtained using the commercial finite-volume computational fluid dynamics code, CFD-ACE+. The results show that the vortex element scheme marginally overpredicts the length of the downstream recirculating eddy, implying that the method may be associated with an artificial reduction in the vorticity diffusion rate. Nevertheless the results demonstrate that the proposed vortex redistribution scheme provides a practical alternative to traditional random-walk discrete vortex algorithms. (author)

  4. An investigation of Newton-Krylov algorithms for solving incompressible and low Mach number compressible fluid flow and heat transfer problems using finite volume discretization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, P.R.

    1995-10-01

    Fully coupled, Newton-Krylov algorithms are investigated for solving strongly coupled, nonlinear systems of partial differential equations arising in the field of computational fluid dynamics. Primitive variable forms of the steady incompressible and compressible Navier-Stokes and energy equations that describe the flow of a laminar Newtonian fluid in two-dimensions are specifically considered. Numerical solutions are obtained by first integrating over discrete finite volumes that compose the computational mesh. The resulting system of nonlinear algebraic equations are linearized using Newton`s method. Preconditioned Krylov subspace based iterative algorithms then solve these linear systems on each Newton iteration. Selected Krylov algorithms include the Arnoldi-based Generalized Minimal RESidual (GMRES) algorithm, and the Lanczos-based Conjugate Gradients Squared (CGS), Bi-CGSTAB, and Transpose-Free Quasi-Minimal Residual (TFQMR) algorithms. Both Incomplete Lower-Upper (ILU) factorization and domain-based additive and multiplicative Schwarz preconditioning strategies are studied. Numerical techniques such as mesh sequencing, adaptive damping, pseudo-transient relaxation, and parameter continuation are used to improve the solution efficiency, while algorithm implementation is simplified using a numerical Jacobian evaluation. The capabilities of standard Newton-Krylov algorithms are demonstrated via solutions to both incompressible and compressible flow problems. Incompressible flow problems include natural convection in an enclosed cavity, and mixed/forced convection past a backward facing step.

  5. Use of a generalized Stokes number to determine the aerodynamic capture efficiency of non-Stokesian particles from a compressible gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, R.; Rosner, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    The aerodynamic capture efficiency of small but nondiffusing particles suspended in a high-speed stream flowing past a target is known to be influenced by parameters governing small particle inertia, departures from the Stokes drag law, and carrier fluid compressibility. By defining an effective Stokes number in terms of the actual (prevailing) particle stopping distance, local fluid viscosity, and inviscid fluid velocity gradient at the target nose, it is shown that these effects are well correlated in terms of a 'standard' (cylindrical collector, Stokes drag, incompressible flow, sq rt Re much greater than 1) capture efficiency curve. Thus, a correlation follows that simplifies aerosol capture calculations in the parameter range already included in previous numerical solutions, allows rational engineering predictions of deposition in situations not previously specifically calculated, and should facilitate the presentation of performance data for gas cleaning equipment and aerosol instruments.

  6. Equivalence between fractional exclusion statistics and self-consistent mean-field theory in interacting-particle systems in any number of dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, D V; Nemnes, G A; Gulminelli, F

    2013-10-01

    We describe a mean field interacting particle system in any number of dimensions and in a generic external potential as an ideal gas with fractional exclusion statistics (FES). We define the FES quasiparticle energies, we calculate the FES parameters of the system and we deduce the equations for the equilibrium particle populations. The FES gas is "ideal," in the sense that the quasiparticle energies do not depend on the other quasiparticle levels' populations and the sum of the quasiparticle energies is equal to the total energy of the system. We prove that the FES formalism is equivalent to the semiclassical or Thomas Fermi limit of the self-consistent mean-field theory and the FES quasiparticle populations may be calculated from the Landau quasiparticle populations by making the correspondence between the FES and the Landau quasiparticle energies. The FES provides a natural semiclassical ideal gas description of the interacting particle gas.

  7. Effects of symmetry breaking in finite quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birman, J.L. [Department of Physics, City College, City University of New York, New York, NY 10031 (United States); Nazmitdinov, R.G. [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca 07122 (Spain); Bogolubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Yukalov, V.I., E-mail: yukalov@theor.jinr.ru [Bogolubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    The review considers the peculiarities of symmetry breaking and symmetry transformations and the related physical effects in finite quantum systems. Some types of symmetry in finite systems can be broken only asymptotically. However, with a sufficiently large number of particles, crossover transitions become sharp, so that symmetry breaking happens similarly to that in macroscopic systems. This concerns, in particular, global gauge symmetry breaking, related to Bose–Einstein condensation and superconductivity, or isotropy breaking, related to the generation of quantum vortices, and the stratification in multicomponent mixtures. A special type of symmetry transformation, characteristic only for finite systems, is the change of shape symmetry. These phenomena are illustrated by the examples of several typical mesoscopic systems, such as trapped atoms, quantum dots, atomic nuclei, and metallic grains. The specific features of the review are: (i) the emphasis on the peculiarities of the symmetry breaking in finite mesoscopic systems; (ii) the analysis of common properties of physically different finite quantum systems; (iii) the manifestations of symmetry breaking in the spectra of collective excitations in finite quantum systems. The analysis of these features allows for the better understanding of the intimate relation between the type of symmetry and other physical properties of quantum systems. This also makes it possible to predict new effects by employing the analogies between finite quantum systems of different physical nature.

  8. Association of Air Pollution Exposures With High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Particle Number: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Griffith; Mora, Samia; Greenland, Philip; Tsai, Michael; Gill, Ed; Kaufman, Joel D

    2017-05-01

    The relationship between air pollution and cardiovascular disease may be explained by changes in high-density lipoprotein (HDL). We examined the cross-sectional relationship between air pollution and both HDL cholesterol and HDL particle number in the MESA Air study (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Air Pollution). Study participants were 6654 white, black, Hispanic, and Chinese men and women aged 45 to 84 years. We estimated individual residential ambient fine particulate pollution exposure (PM 2.5 ) and black carbon concentrations using a fine-scale likelihood-based spatiotemporal model and cohort-specific monitoring. Exposure periods were averaged to 12 months, 3 months, and 2 weeks prior to examination. HDL cholesterol and HDL particle number were measured in the year 2000 using the cholesterol oxidase method and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. We used multivariable linear regression to examine the relationship between air pollution exposure and HDL measures. A 0.7×10 - 6 m - 1 higher exposure to black carbon (a marker of traffic-related pollution) averaged over a 1-year period was significantly associated with a lower HDL cholesterol (-1.68 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval, -2.86 to -0.50) and approached significance with HDL particle number (-0.55 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval, -1.13 to 0.03). In the 3-month averaging time period, a 5 μg/m 3 higher PM 2.5 was associated with lower HDL particle number (-0.64 μmol/L; 95% confidence interval, -1.01 to -0.26), but not HDL cholesterol (-0.05 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval, -0.82 to 0.71). These data are consistent with the hypothesis that exposure to air pollution is adversely associated with measures of HDL. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Peculiarities in atmospheric particle number and size-resolved speciation in an urban area in the western Mediterranean: Results from the DAURE campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reche, C.; Viana, M.; Moreno, T.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; Pey, J.; Pandolfi, M.; Prévôt, A.; Mohr, C.; Richard, A.; Artiñano, B.; Gomez-Moreno, F. J.; Cots, N.

    2011-09-01

    Air quality degradation problems in urban environments are mainly due to road traffic emissions. In northern and central European cities extensive investigations have been carried out on the variability of number of ultrafine particles and black carbon, whereas studies in southern-Europe have traditionally focused on chemical speciation, resulting in insufficient information to characterise urban aerosol processes. Accordingly, sources and processes controlling atmospheric pollutants were evaluated during the international DAURE campaign in Barcelona (Spain), a typical urban environment in the western Mediterranean, by means of continuous measurements of particle number, black carbon, PMx, particulate nitrate and particulate sulphate concentrations. Results provided evidence of the influence of three PM sources of interest: road traffic, construction-demolition works and shipping emissions. Road traffic governs the daily cycle of black carbon, a number of gaseous pollutants and the finer fraction of PM. Evaluation of the coarse aerosol (PM 2.5-10) daily cycle furnished evidence of the influence of construction-demolition works. These activities could increase hourly PM 2.5-10 levels by up to 8 μg m -3 on an annual hourly mean basis. Finally, shipping emissions were traced by means of SO 2 concentrations, which peak at a time different from that of other gaseous pollutants owing to the regular daytime onshore breeze bringing harbour emissions at midday. Moreover, a major local contribution of secondary aerosols was detected with elevated particle number levels at midday when nucleation processes are favoured by photochemistry and lower pollution levels. Particle number data were also analysed in search for the primary emission of vehicle exhaust (N1) and the secondary parts from gaseous precursors, primary parts from non-traffic sources, and/or particles inherited in the air mass (N2). N2 fraction accounted for 40% of number concentrations, ranging from 37% during

  10. Probability Estimates of Solar Particle Event Doses During a Period of Low Sunspot Number for Thinly-Shielded Spacecraft and Short Duration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, William; Tylka, Allan J.; Dietrich, William; Rojdev, Kristina; Matzkind, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    In an earlier paper (Atwell, et al., 2015), we investigated solar particle event (SPE) radiation exposures (absorbed dose) to small, thinly-shielded spacecraft during a period when the sunspot number (SSN) was less than 30. These SPEs contain Ground Level Events (GLE), sub-GLEs, and sub-sub-GLEs (Tylka and Dietrich, 2009, Tylka and Dietrich, 2008, and Atwell, et al., 2008). GLEs are extremely energetic solar particle events having proton energies extending into the several GeV range and producing secondary particles in the atmosphere, mostly neutrons, observed with ground station neutron monitors. Sub-GLE events are less energetic, extending into the several hundred MeV range, but do not produce secondary atmospheric particles. Sub-sub GLEs are even less energetic with an observable increase in protons at energies greater than 30 MeV, but no observable proton flux above 300 MeV. In this paper, we consider those SPEs that occurred during 1973-2010 when the SSN was greater than 30 but less than 50. In addition, we provide probability estimates of absorbed dose based on mission duration with a 95% confidence level (CL). We also discuss the implications of these data and provide some recommendations that may be useful to spacecraft designers of these smaller spacecraft.

  11. Variation of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions at the urban and downwind regional sites in the Pearl River Delta during summertime pollution episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Yue

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to characterize the features of particulate pollution in the Pearl River Delta (PRD in the summer, continuous measurements of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions were simultaneously performed at Guangzhou urban site (GZ and Back-garden downwind regional site (BG in July 2006. Particle number concentration from 20 nm to 10 μm at BG was (1.7±0.8×104 cm−3, about 40% lower than that at GZ, (2.9±1.1×104 cm−3. The total particle volume concentration at BG was 94±34 μm3 cm−3, similar to that at GZ, 96±43 μm3 cm−3. More 20–100 nm particles, significantly affected by the traffic emissions, were observed at GZ, while 100–660 nm particle number concentrations were similar at both sites as they are more regional. PM2.5 values were similar at GZ (69±43 μg m−3 and BG (69±58 μg m−3 with R2 of 0.71 for the daily average PM2.5 at these two sites, indicating the fine particulate pollution in the PRD region to be regional. Two kinds of pollution episodes, the accumulation pollution episode and the regional transport pollution episode, were observed. Fine particles over 100 nm dominated both number and volume concentrations of total particles during the late periods of these pollution episodes. Accumulation and secondary transformation are the main reasons for the nighttime accumulation pollution episode. SO42−, NO3 accounted for about 60% in 100–660 nm particle mass and PM2.5 increase. When south or southeast wind prevailed in the PRD region, regional transport of pollutants took place. Regional transport contributed about 30% to fine particulate pollution at BG during a regional transport case. Secondary transformation played an important role during regional transport, causing higher increase

  12. THE EFFECT OF THE REYNOLDS NUMBER OF AIR FLOW TO THE PARTICLE COLLECTION EFFICIENCY OF A FIBROUS FILTER MEDIUM WITH CYLINDRICAL SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P. Kouropoulos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At this study an attempt for the theoretical approach of the Re ynolds number effect of air flow to the particle collection efficiency of a fibrous fil ter with cylindrical section will be made. Initially, a report of the air filtration models to fibrous filter media will be presented along with an explanation of both the parameters and the physical quantities which govern the air filtration process. Furthermore, the resul ting equation from the mathematical model will be applied to a real filter medium and the characteristic curves of filter efficiency will be drawn. The change of a filter medi um efficiency with regard to the Reynolds number of air flow that passes through the filt er, derived from the curves, will be studied. The general conclusion that we have is that as the Reynolds number of filtered air increases, the collection efficiency of the filter decreases.

  13. Effects of aromatics, olefins and distillation temperatures (T50 & T90) on particle mass and number emissions from gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Rencheng; Hu, Jingnan; Bao, Xiaofeng; He, Liqiang; Zu, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Abstratct: Fuel quality is among the primary reasons for severe vehicle pollution. A limited understanding of the effects of gasoline properties on modern vehicle emissions is one obstacle for the establishment of stricter fuel standards in China. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of aromatic and olefin contents and T50 and T90 (defined as the 50%v and 90%v distillation temperatures) on tailpipe emissions from gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles compliant with China 4 standards. Both gaseous and particle emissions using different types of gasoline were measured. Changing aromatic and olefin contents had relatively small impacts on fuel consumption. Compared with olefins and T90, the regulated gaseous emissions were impacted more by aromatics and T50. Evident decreases of the particle mass (PM) and particle number (PN) emissions were noticed when the aromatic content and T90 decreased. Reducing the olefin content slightly decreased the PM emissions and increased the PN emissions. With decreasing T50, the PM emissions increased and the PN emissions slightly decreased. These results suggest that aromatic content and T90 should be decreased to reduce particle emissions from GDI vehicles. The information presented in this study provides some suggestions for how to improve gasoline quality in China. - Highlights: • Effect of aromatics, olefins, T50 and T90 on GDI vehicle emissions was investigated. • Aromatics and olefins had little impact on fuel consumption and CO 2 emissions. • Reducing the aromatic content and T90 significantly decreased PM and PN emissions. • Changing the olefin content and T50 had a minor impact on particle emissions. • Thresholds of aromatics and T90 should be tightened in future gasoline regulations.

  14. finite induc

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    com. Email: singh_shivaraj@rediffmail.com. In this article we provide a solution to a problem in the famous analysis book [1] by Rudin. It does not use trans- finite induction, and readers may find it more transpar- ent than the treatment in [2]. Here is ...

  15. Maximum-entropy approach to critical phenomena in ground states of finite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, L.; Canosa, N.; Plastino, A.; Portesi, M.; Rossignoli, R.

    1992-05-01

    A scheme for detecting signatures of phase transitions associated with pure quantum states, from the knowledge of a limited set of expectation values, is introduced. An accurate prediction of critical regions in ground states of systems with a finite number of particles is obtained.

  16. Description of Discordance Between LDL Cholesterol, Non-HDL Cholesterol, and LDL Particle Number Among Patients of a Lipid Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua W Gaborcik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: While LDL cholesterol measures the cholesterol content within an LDL particle (LDL-P, it may not reflect LDL-P concentrations. If discordance exists, LDL-P may better predict cardiovascular events compared to LDL-C and non-HDL cholesterol (non-HDL-C. In primary prevention patients, discordance has been associated with diabetes, ethnicity, gender, metabolic syndrome, and smoking history. Objective: To describe discordance in patients of a lipid clinic by exploring associations between patient characteristics and discordance among LDL-C, non-HDL-C, or LDL-P. Secondarily to compare proportion of patients with baseline concordance versus discordance who have ASCVD events, diagnoses of new onset diabetes or death. Methods: A retrospective, single-center cohort study at a large academic medical center was conducted. Patients establishing care from January 2009 through December 2012 with complete initial labs were included. Logistic regression models were used to explore associations between discordance and patient characteristics. Results: Of 603 patients screened, the final cohort included 166 patients with 104 (62.7% discordant. LDL-P was the most common discordant value. Discordance was associated with gender, smoking status, use of lipid lowering medications, and achieving patient specific LDL-C goals. In terms of any event observed after initial measurements, no significant differences were detected between discordant and concordant groups. Conclusion: Within a lipid clinic population, discordance was associated with male gender, smoking status, lipid-lowering therapy, and being at patient specific LDL-C goal. While associations were found in our population, clinicians should consider measuring LDL-P to fully assess presence or extent of discordance. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the

  17. On the regularity of many-particle dynamical systems perturbed by white noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoli V. Skorokhod

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a system of finite number of particles that are moving in Rd under mutual interaction. It is assumed that the particles are subjected to some additional random forces which cause diffusion motion of the particles. The latter is described by a system of stochastic differential equations of the first order for noninertia particles and the second order for inertial particles. The coefficient of the system are unbounded because the interaction force tends to infinity if the distance between two particles tends to zero. The system is called regular if no particle can hit the other. We investigate conditions of regularity.

  18. Comparison of two estimation methods for surface area concentration using number concentration and mass concentration of combustion-related ultrafine particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Young; Raynor, Peter C.; Maynard, Andrew D.; Eberly, Lynn E.; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    Recent research has suggested that the adverse health effects caused by nanoparticles are associated with their surface area (SA) concentrations. In this study, SA was estimated in two ways using number and mass concentrations and compared with SA (SA meas) measured using a diffusion charger (DC). Aerosol measurements were made twice: once starting in October 2002 and again starting in December 2002 in Mysore, India in residences that used kerosene or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) for cooking. Mass, number, and SA concentrations and size distributions by number were measured in each residence. The first estimation method (SA PSD) used the size distribution by number to estimate SA. The second method (SA INV) used a simple inversion scheme that incorporated number and mass concentrations while assuming a lognormal size distribution with a known geometrical standard deviation. SA PSD was, on average, 2.4 times greater (range = 1.6-3.4) than SA meas while SA INV was, on average, 6.0 times greater (range = 4.6-7.7) than SA meas. The logarithms of SA PSD and SA INV were found to be statistically significant predictors of the logarithm of SA meas. The study showed that particle number and mass concentration measurements can be used to estimate SA with a correction factor that ranges between 2 and 6.

  19. Finite Discrete Gabor Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Peter Lempel

    2007-01-01

    on the real line to be well approximated by finite and discrete Gabor frames. This method of approximation is especially attractive because efficient numerical methods exists for doing computations with finite, discrete Gabor systems. This thesis presents new algorithms for the efficient computation of finite......, discrete Gabor coefficients. Reconstruction of a signal from its Gabor coefficients is done by the use of a so-called dual window. This thesis presents a number of iterative algorithms to compute dual and self-dual windows. The Linear Time Frequency Toolbox is a Matlab/Octave/C toolbox for doing basic...... discrete time/frequency and Gabor analysis. It is intended to be both an educational and a computational tool. The toolbox was developed as part of this Ph.D. project to provide a solid foundation for the field of computational Gabor analysis....

  20. Finite-temperature correlation functions of Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izergin, A.G.; Korepin, V.E.; Slavnov, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    The finite-temperature correlation functions in the one-dimensional Heisenberg XXZ magnet are investigated in the framework of the quantum inverse scattering method. On the transition to nonzero temperatures, it is necessary in this case to solve a number of basically new problems. The main one of these is related to the fact that the ground state of the Hamiltonian (physical vacuum) at nonzero temperature (more precisely, the state of thermodynamic equilibrium) includes many species of particles - not only elementary particles but also bound states of them. We give an appropriate generalization of the method

  1. Fluctuations of the number of adsorbed micro/nanoparticles in sensors for measurement of particle concentration in air and liquid environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokić Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model of fluctuations of the number of adsorbed micro/nanoparticles in environmental sensors operating in air and liquids is presented, taking into account the effects of the mass transfer processes of the target particles in a sensor reaction chamber. The expressions for the total power of the corresponding adsorption-desorption noise, and for the corresponding signal-to-noise ratio are also derived. The presented analysis shows that the transfer processes can have a significant influence on the sensors limiting performance. The influence on both the fluctuations spectrum and the signal-to-noise ratio is estimated at different values of target particles concentration, functionalization sites surface density, and adsorption and desorption rate constants (the values are chosen from the ranges corresponding to real conditions. The analysis provides the guidelines for optimization of sensor design and operating conditions for the given target substance and sensor functionalization, in order to decrease the influence of the mass transfer, thus improving the ultimate performance (e.g. minimal detectable signal, signal-to-noise ratio of sensors for particle detection. The calculations we performed show that it is possible to increase the signal-to-noise ratio for as much as two orders of magnitude by using the optimization that eliminates the mass transfer influence. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR32008

  2. Measuring Supersymmetric Particle Masses at the LHC in Scenarios with Baryon-Number R-Parity Violating Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Allanach, B.C.; Drage, L.; Lester, C.G.; Morgan, D.; Parker, Michael Andrew; Webber, B.R.; Richardson, P.

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of sparticle masses in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model at the LHC is analysed, in the scenario where the lightest neutralino decays into three quarks. Such decays, occurring through the baryon-number violating coupling lambda''_ijk, pose a severe challenge to the capability of the LHC detectors since the final state has no missing energy signature and a high jet multiplicity. We focus on the case of non-zero lambda''_212 which is the most difficult experimentally. The proposed method is valid over a wide range of SUGRA parameter space with lambda''_212 between 10^{-5}-0.1. Simulations are performed of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Using the lightest neutralino from the decay chain left-squark to quark + next-to-lightest neutralino to right-slepton + lepton + quark and finally to lightest neutralino + lepton pair + quark, we show that the lightest and next-to-lightest neutralino masses can be measured by 3-jet and 3-jet + lepton pair invariant mass combinations. At ...

  3. A scaling theory for number-flux distributions generated during steady-state coagulation and settling and application to particles in Lake Zurich, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Alexandria B

    2002-10-15

    In this study, we extend the established scaling theory for cluster size distributions generated during unsteady coagulation to number-flux distributions that arise during steady-state coagulation and settling in an unmixed water mass. The scaling theory predicts self-similar number-flux distributions and power-law decay of total number flux with depth. The shape of the number-flux distributions and the power-law exponent describing the decay of the total number flux are shown to depend on the homogeneity and small i/j limit of the coagulation kernel and the exponent kappa, which describes the variation in settling velocity with cluster volume. Particle field measurements from Lake Zurich, collected by U. Weilenmann and co-workers (Limnol. Oceanogr.34, 1 (1989)), are used to illustrate how the scaling predictions can be applied to a natural system. This effort indicates that within the mid-depth region of Lake Zurich, clusters of the same size preferentially interact and large clusters react with one another more quickly than small ones, indicative of clusters coagulating in a reaction-limited regime.

  4. Deriving the largest expected number of elementary particles in the standard model from the maximal compact subgroup H of the exceptional Lie group E7(-5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naschie, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    The maximal number of elementary particles which could be expected to be found within a modestly extended energy scale of the standard model was found using various methods to be N = 69. In particular using E-infinity theory the present Author found the exact transfinite expectation value to be =α-bar o /2≅69 where α-bar o =137.082039325 is the exact inverse fine structure constant. In the present work we show among other things how to derive the exact integer value 69 from the exceptional Lie symmetry groups hierarchy. It is found that the relevant number is given by dim H = 69 where H is the maximal compact subspace of E 7(-5) so that N = dim H = 69 while dim E 7 = 133

  5. Eulerian numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, T Kyle

    2015-01-01

    This text presents the Eulerian numbers in the context of modern enumerative, algebraic, and geometric combinatorics. The book first studies Eulerian numbers from a purely combinatorial point of view, then embarks on a tour of how these numbers arise in the study of hyperplane arrangements, polytopes, and simplicial complexes. Some topics include a thorough discussion of gamma-nonnegativity and real-rootedness for Eulerian polynomials, as well as the weak order and the shard intersection order of the symmetric group. The book also includes a parallel story of Catalan combinatorics, wherein the Eulerian numbers are replaced with Narayana numbers. Again there is a progression from combinatorics to geometry, including discussion of the associahedron and the lattice of noncrossing partitions. The final chapters discuss how both the Eulerian and Narayana numbers have analogues in any finite Coxeter group, with many of the same enumerative and geometric properties. There are four supplemental chapters throughout, ...

  6. The Determining Finite Automata Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Vinogradova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of formal languages widely uses finite state automata both in implementation of automata-based approach to programming, and in synthesis of logical control algorithms.To ensure unambiguous operation of the algorithms, the synthesized finite state automata must be deterministic. Within the approach to the synthesis of the mobile robot controls, for example, based on the theory of formal languages, there are problems concerning the construction of various finite automata, but such finite automata, as a rule, will not be deterministic. The algorithm of determinization can be applied to the finite automata, as specified, in various ways. The basic ideas of the algorithm of determinization can be most simply explained using the representations of a finite automaton in the form of a weighted directed graph.The paper deals with finite automata represented as weighted directed graphs, and discusses in detail the procedure for determining the finite automata represented in this way. Gives a detailed description of the algorithm for determining finite automata. A large number of examples illustrate a capability of the determinization algorithm.

  7. Low speed/low rarefaction flow simulation in micro/nano cavity using DSMC method with small number of particles per cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiri-Jaghargh, Ali; Roohi, Ehsan; Niazmand, Hamid; Stefanov, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to extend the validity of the simplified Bernoulli-trials (SBT)/dual grid algorithm, newly proposed by Stefanov, as a suitable alternative of the standard collision scheme in the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, for solving low speed/low Knudsen number rarefied micro/nano flows. The main advantage of the SBT algorithm is to provide accurate calculations using much smaller number of particles per cell, i.e., ≈ 1. Compared to the original development of SBT [1], we extend the application of the SBT scheme to the near continuum rarefied flows, i.e., Kn = 0.005, where NTC scheme requires a relatively large sample size. Comparing the results of the SBT/dual grid scheme with NTC, it is shown that the SBT/dual grid scheme could successfully predict the thermal pattern and hydrodynamics field as well as surface parameters such as velocity slip and temperature jump. Nonlinear flux-corrected transport algorithm (FCT) is also employed as a filter to extract the smooth solution from the noisy DSMC calculation for low-speed/low-Knudsen number DSMC calculations. The results indicate that combination of SBT/dual grid and FTC filtering can decrease the total sample size needed to reach smooth solution without losing significant accuracy.

  8. Two-flavor lattice QCD with a finite density of heavy quarks: heavy-dense limit and “particle-hole” symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Rindlisbacher, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the half-filling point in lattice QCD (LQCD), in particular the disappearance of the sign problem and the emergence of an apparent particle-hole symmetry, and try to understand where these properties come from by studying the heavy-dense fermion determinant and the corresponding strong-coupling partition function (which can be integrated analytically). We then add in a first step an effective Polyakov loop gauge action (which reproduces the leading terms in the character expansion of the Wilson gauge action) to the heavy-dense partition function and try to analyze how some of the properties of the half-filling point change when leaving the strong coupling limit. In a second step, we take also the leading nearest-neighbor fermion hopping terms into account (including gauge interactions in the fundamental representation) and mention how the method could be improved further to incorporate the full set of nearest-neighbor fermion hoppings. Using our mean-field method, we also obta...

  9. Some Generalized Harmonic Number Identities

    OpenAIRE

    Kronenburg, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    Summation by parts is used to find the sum of a finite series of generalized harmonic numbers involving a specific polynomial or rational function. The Euler-Maclaurin formula for sums of powers is used to find the sums of some finite series of generalized harmonic numbers involving nonnegative integer powers, which can be used to evaluate the sums of the finite series of generalized harmonic numbers involving polynomials. Many examples and a computer program are provided.

  10. Aerosol particle number concentration measurements in five European cities using TSI-3022 condensation particle counter over a three-year period during health effects of air pollution on susceptible subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, Pasi; Hämeri, Kaarle; Paatero, Pentti; Kulmala, Markku; Bellander, Tom; Berglind, Niklas; Bouso, Laura; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Sunyer, Jordi; Cattani, Giorgio; Marconi, Achille; Cyrys, Josef; von Klot, Stephanie; Peters, Annette; Zetzsche, Katrin; Lanki, Timo; Pekkanen, Juha; Nyberg, Fredrik; Sjövall, Billy; Forastiere, Francesco

    2005-08-01

    In this study, long-term aerosol particle total number concentration measurements in five metropolitan areas across Europe are presented. The measurements have been carried out in Augsburg, Barcelona, Helsinki, Rome, and Stockholm using the same instrument, a condensation particle counter (TSI model 3022). The results show that in all of the studied cities, the winter concentrations are higher than the summer concentrations. In Helsinki and in Stockholm, winter concentrations are higher by a factor of two and in Augsburg almost by a factor of three compared with summer months. The winter maximum of the monthly average concentrations in these cities is between 10,000 cm(-3) and 20,000 cm(-3), whereas the summer min is approximately 5000-6000 cm(-3). In Rome and in Barcelona, the winters are more polluted compared with summers by as much as a factor of 4-10. The winter maximum in both Rome and Barcelona is close to 100,000 cm(-3), whereas the summer minimum is > 10,000 cm(-3). During the weekdays the maximum of the hourly average concentrations in all of the cities is detected during the morning hours between 7 and 10 a.m. The evening maxima were present in Barcelona, Rome, and Augsburg, but these were not as pronounced as the morning ones. The daily maxima in Helsinki and Stockholm are close or even lower than the daily minima in the more polluted cities. The concentrations between these two groups of cities are different with a factor of about five during the whole day. The study pointed out the influence of the selection of the measurement site and the configuration of the sampling line on the observed concentrations.

  11. A comparison of the lattice discrete particle method to the finite-element method and the K&C material model for simulating the static and dynamic response of concrete.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jovanca J.; Bishop, Joseph E.

    2013-11-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by the graduate student Jovanca Smith during a summer internship in the summer of 2012 with the aid of mentor Joe Bishop. The projects were a two-part endeavor that focused on the use of the numerical model called the Lattice Discrete Particle Model (LDPM). The LDPM is a discrete meso-scale model currently used at Northwestern University and the ERDC to model the heterogeneous quasi-brittle material, concrete. In the first part of the project, LDPM was compared to the Karagozian and Case Concrete Model (K&C) used in Presto, an explicit dynamics finite-element code, developed at Sandia National Laboratories. In order to make this comparison, a series of quasi-static numerical experiments were performed, namely unconfined uniaxial compression tests on four varied cube specimen sizes, three-point bending notched experiments on three proportional specimen sizes, and six triaxial compression tests on a cylindrical specimen. The second part of this project focused on the application of LDPM to simulate projectile perforation on an ultra high performance concrete called CORTUF. This application illustrates the strengths of LDPM over traditional continuum models.

  12. The Stokes-Einstein relation at moderate Schmidt number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Xie, Xiaoyi; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael; Donev, Aleksandar

    2013-12-07

    The Stokes-Einstein relation for the self-diffusion coefficient of a spherical particle suspended in an incompressible fluid is an asymptotic result in the limit of large Schmidt number, that is, when momentum diffuses much faster than the particle. When the Schmidt number is moderate, which happens in most particle methods for hydrodynamics, deviations from the Stokes-Einstein prediction are expected. We study these corrections computationally using a recently developed minimally resolved method for coupling particles to an incompressible fluctuating fluid in both two and three dimensions. We find that for moderate Schmidt numbers the diffusion coefficient is reduced relative to the Stokes-Einstein prediction by an amount inversely proportional to the Schmidt number in both two and three dimensions. We find, however, that the Einstein formula is obeyed at all Schmidt numbers, consistent with linear response theory. The mismatch arises because thermal fluctuations affect the drag coefficient for a particle due to the nonlinear nature of the fluid-particle coupling. The numerical data are in good agreement with an approximate self-consistent theory, which can be used to estimate finite-Schmidt number corrections in a variety of methods. Our results indicate that the corrections to the Stokes-Einstein formula come primarily from the fact that the particle itself diffuses together with the momentum. Our study separates effects coming from corrections to no-slip hydrodynamics from those of finite separation of time scales, allowing for a better understanding of widely observed deviations from the Stokes-Einstein prediction in particle methods such as molecular dynamics.

  13. Locally Finite Root Supersystems

    OpenAIRE

    Yousofzadeh, Malihe

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of locally finite root supersystems as a generalization of both locally finite root systems and generalized root systems. We classify irreducible locally finite root supersystems.

  14. [Particle numbers in classified sizes of roadside dust caused by studded tires in the air at different heights from the pavement surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Niioka, T; Kurasaki, M; Kojima, Y

    1996-07-01

    Increased use of motor vehicles has produced various risks to human health due to air pollution by noxious gases, heavy metals and roadside dust. Since the late 1970s, the wide spread use of studded tires for cars has caused pavement wear, resulting in not only economic losses, but also roadside air pollution in cold and snowy regions in Japan. The most serious environmental problem in Sapporo, a city with heavy snowfall, in the 1980s, was roadside dust derived from studded tires. The inhabitants suffered from this dust in the early winter and in the early spring when the streets were not covered with snow. To investigate the influence of such roadside dust upon human health, particle numbers in classified sizes of roadside dust were counted after the roadside dust in the air was collected with a device we constructed at 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 cm above the pavement surface. The results indicated that the concentration of roadside dust in the air did not greatly vary according to the height from the pavement surface. The results also suggested that xenogranuloma, reported in lungs of stray dogs, under roadside dust-pollution conditions such as those examined here, may occur in humans in the future.

  15. Phenology of a Vegetation Barrier and Resulting Impacts on Near-Highway Particle Number and Black Carbon Concentrations on a School Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina H. Fuller

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Traffic-related air pollution is a persistent concern especially in urban areas where populations live in close proximity to roadways. Innovative solutions are needed to minimize human exposure and the installation of vegetative barriers shows potential as a method to reduce near-road concentrations. This study investigates the impact of an existing stand of deciduous and evergreen trees on near-road total particle number (PNC and black carbon (BC concentrations across three seasons. Measurements were taken during spring, fall and winter on the campus of a middle school in the Atlanta (GA, USA area at distances of 10 m and 50 m from a major interstate highway. We identified consistent decreases in BC concentrations, but not for PNC, with increased distance from the highway. In multivariable models, hour of day, downwind conditions, distance to highway, temperature and relative humidity significantly predicted pollutant concentrations. The magnitude of effect of these variables differed by season, however, we were not able to show a definitive impact of the vegetative barrier on near-road concentrations. More detailed studies are necessary to further examine the specific configurations and scenarios that may produce pollutant and exposure reductions.

  16. Longitudinal static optical properties of hydrogen chains: finite field extrapolations of matrix product state calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Sebastian; Limacher, Peter A; Van Neck, Dimitri; Ayers, Paul W

    2012-04-07

    We have implemented the sweep algorithm for the variational optimization of SU(2) U(1) (spin and particle number) invariant matrix product states (MPS) for general spin and particle number invariant fermionic Hamiltonians. This class includes non-relativistic quantum chemical systems within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. High-accuracy ab initio finite field results of the longitudinal static polarizabilities and second hyperpolarizabilities of one-dimensional hydrogen chains are presented. This allows to assess the performance of other quantum chemical methods. For small basis sets, MPS calculations in the saturation regime of the optical response properties can be performed. These results are extrapolated to the thermodynamic limit.

  17. Multiphoton microscope measurement-based biphasic multiscale analyses of knee joint articular cartilage and chondrocyte by using visco-anisotropic hyperelastic finite element method and smoothed particle hydrodynamics method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamachi, Eiji; Noma, Tomohiro; Nakahara, Kaito; Tomita, Yoshihiro; Morita, Yusuke

    2017-11-01

    The articular cartilage of a knee joint has a variety of functions including dispersing stress and absorbing shock in the tissue and lubricating the surface region of cartilage. The metabolic activity of chondrocytes under the cyclic mechanical stimulations regenerates the morphology and function of tissues. Hence, the stress evaluation of the chondrocyte is a vital subject to assess the regeneration cycle in the normal walking condition and predict the injury occurrence in the accidents. Further, the threshold determination of stress for the chondrocytes activation is valuable for development of regenerative bioreactor of articular cartilage. In this study, in both macroscale and microscale analyses, the dynamic explicit finite element (FE) method was used for the solid phase and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method was used for the fluid phase. In the homogenization procedure, the representative volume element for the microscale finite element model was derived by using the multiphoton microscope measured 3D structure comprising 3 different layers: surface, middle, and deep layers. The layers had different anisotropic structural and rigidity characteristics because of the collagen fiber orientation. In both macroscale and microscale FE analyses, the visco-anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive law was used. Material properties were identified by experimentally determined stress-strain relationships of 3 layers. With respect to the macroscale and microscale SPH models for non-Newtonian viscous fluid, the previous observation results of interstitial fluid and proteoglycan were used to perform parameter identifications. Biphasic multiscale FE and SPH analyses were conducted under normal walking conditions. Therefore, the hydrostatic and shear stresses occurring in the chondrocytes caused by the compressive load and shear viscous flow were evaluated. These stresses will be used to design an ex-vivo bioreactor to regenerate the damaged articular cartilage

  18. When the number crunchers took on the particle smashers in a race to expose the naked quark, the stakes could hardly have been higher

    CERN Multimedia

    MacKenzie, Dana

    2005-01-01

    It was a true clash of the titans. In the blue corner: a multimilliion-dollar particle accelerator. In the red: one of the world's most powerful supecomputers. Both were battling to pin down the lifetime of an ephemeral subatomic particle known as the D-meson (3 pages)

  19. Dynamics of a self-diffusiophoretic particle in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Alexandra E; Khair, Aditya S

    2014-07-01

    Colloidal particles can achieve autonomous motion by a number of physicochemical mechanisms. For instance, if a spherical particle acts as a catalyst with an asymmetric surface reactivity, a molecular solute concentration gradient will develop in the surrounding fluid that can propel the particle via self-diffusiophoresis. Theoretical analyses of self-diffusiophoresis have mostly been considered in quiescent fluid, where the solute concentration is usually assumed to evolve solely via diffusion. In practical applications, however, self-propelled colloidal particles can be expected to reside in flowing fluids. Here, we examine the role of ambient flow on self-diffusiophoresis by quantifying the dynamics of a model Janus particle in a simple shear flow. The imposed flow can distort the self-generated solute concentration gradient. The extent of this distortion is quantified by a Peclet number, Pe, associated with the shear flow. Utilizing matched asymptotic analysis, we determine the concentration gradient surrounding a Janus particle in shear flow at a small, but finite, Peclet number and the resulting particle motion. For example, when the symmetry axis of the particle is aligned with the imposed flow, the Janus particle experiences an O(Pe) cross-streamline drift and an O(Pe(3/2)) reduction in translational velocity along the flow direction. We then analyze the in-plane trajectory of the Janus particle in shear. We find that the particle performs elliptical orbits around its initial position in the flow, which decrease in size with increasing Pe.

  20. Applicability of a noise-based model to estimate in-traffic exposure to black carbon and particle number concentrations in different cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoninck, Luc; Botteldooren, Dick; Panis, Luc Int; Hankey, Steve; Jain, Grishma; S, Karthik; Marshall, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Several studies show that a significant portion of daily air pollution exposure, in particular black carbon (BC), occurs during transport. In a previous work, a model for the in-traffic exposure of bicyclists to BC was proposed based on spectral evaluation of mobile noise measurements and validated with BC measurements in Ghent, Belgium. In this paper, applicability of this model in a different cultural context with a totally different traffic and mobility situation is presented. In addition, a similar modeling approach is tested for particle number (PN) concentration. Indirectly assessing BC and PN exposure through a model based on noise measurements is advantageous because of the availability of very affordable noise monitoring devices. Our previous work showed that a model including specific spectral components of the noise that relate to engine and rolling emission and basic meteorological data, could be quite accurate. Moreover, including a background concentration adjustment improved the model considerably. To explore whether this model could also be used in a different context, with or without tuning of the model parameters, a study was conducted in Bangalore, India. Noise measurement equipment, data storage, data processing, continent, country, measurement operators, vehicle fleet, driving behavior, biking facilities, background concentration, and meteorology are all very different from the first measurement campaign in Belgium. More than 24h of combined in-traffic noise, BC, and PN measurements were collected. It was shown that the noise-based BC exposure model gives good predictions in Bangalore and that the same approach is also successful for PN. Cross validation of the model parameters was used to compare factors that impact exposure across study sites. A pooled model (combining the measurements of the two locations) results in a correlation of 0.84 when fitting the total trip exposure in Bangalore. Estimating particulate matter exposure with traffic

  1. Comparative study of Monte Carlo particle transport code PHITS and nuclear data processing code NJOY for PKA energy spectra and heating number under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Y.; Ogawa, T.

    2016-01-01

    The modelling of the damage in materials irradiated by neutrons is needed for understanding the mechanism of radiation damage in fission and fusion reactor facilities. The molecular dynamics simulations of damage cascades with full atomic interactions require information about the energy distribution of the Primary Knock on Atoms (PKAs). The most common process to calculate PKA energy spectra under low-energy neutron irradiation is to use the nuclear data processing code NJOY2012. It calculates group-to-group recoil cross section matrices using nuclear data libraries in ENDF data format, which is energy and angular recoil distributions for many reactions. After the NJOY2012 process, SPKA6C is employed to produce PKA energy spectra combining recoil cross section matrices with an incident neutron energy spectrum. However, intercomparison with different processes and nuclear data libraries has not been studied yet. Especially, the higher energy (~5 MeV) of the incident neutrons, compared to fission, leads to many reaction channels, which produces a complex distribution of PKAs in energy and type. Recently, we have developed the event generator mode (EGM) in the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System PHITS for neutron incident reactions in the energy region below 20 MeV. The main feature of EGM is to produce PKA with keeping energy and momentum conservation in a reaction. It is used for event-by-event analysis in application fields such as soft error analysis in semiconductors, micro dosimetry in human body, and estimation of Displacement per Atoms (DPA) value in metals and so on. The purpose of this work is to specify differences of PKA spectra and heating number related with kerma between different calculation method using PHITS-EGM and NJOY2012+SPKA6C with different libraries TENDL-2015, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 for fusion relevant materials

  2. Contrast in air pollution components between major streets and background locations: Particulate matter mass, black carbon, elemental composition, nitrogen oxide and ultrafine particle number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boogaard, Hanna; Kos, Gerard P. A.; Weijers, Ernie P.; Janssen, Nicole A. H.; Fischer, Paul H.; van der Zee, Saskia C.; de Hartog, Jeroen J.; Hoek, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Policies to reduce outdoor air pollution concentrations are often assessed on the basis of the regulated pollutants. Whether these are the most appropriate components to assess the potential health benefits is questionable, as other health-relevant pollutants may be more strongly related to traffic. The aim of this study is to compare the contrast in concentration between major roads and (sub)urban background for a large range of pollutants and to analyze the magnitude of the measured difference in the street - background for major streets with different street configurations. Measurements of PM 10, PM 2.5, particle number concentrations (PNC), black carbon (BC), elemental composition of PM 10 and PM 2.5 and NO x were conducted simultaneously in eight major streets and nine (sub)urban background locations in the Netherlands. Measurements were done six times for a week during a six month period in 2008. High contrasts between busy streets and background locations in the same city were found for chromium, copper and iron (factor 2-3). These elements were especially present in the coarse fraction of PM. In addition, high contrasts were found for BC and NO x (factor 1.8), typically indicators of direct combustion emissions. The contrast for PNC was similar to BC. NO 2 contrast was lower (factor 1.5). The largest contrast was found for two street canyons and two streets with buildings at one side of the street only. The contrast between busy streets and urban background in NO 2 was less than the contrast found for BC, PNC and elements indicative of non-exhaust emissions, adding evidence that NO 2 is not representing (current) traffic well. The study supports a substantial role for non-exhaust emissions including brake- and tyre wear and road dust in addition to direct combustion emissions. Significant underestimation of disease burden may occur when relying too much on the regulated components.

  3. News Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

  4. On finitely strained magnetoelastic solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankanala, Sundeep Venkat

    Magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) are a class of magnetoelastic solids whose mechanical properties can be altered by the application of magnetic fields. MREs, which are particle filled elastomers, have been developed and proposed as unique solutions for a number of engineering applications, such as tunable engine and chassis mounts in automobiles. In this dissertation we present a study of the magnetoelastic coupling in finitely deformable MREs. Two different continuum formulations for these solids are presented: an Eulerian based direct approach using the second law of thermodynamics plus the conservation laws of mechanics and a new, Lagrangian type formulation based on the unconstrained minimization of a potential energy functional. It is shown that both approaches yield the same governing equations and boundary conditions. Following a discussion of general properties of the free energy function of MREs, a particular such function is used to illustrate the magnetoelastic coupling phenomena in a cylinder subjected to traction or torsion under the presence of external magnetic fields. Motivated by the classical magnetoelastic buckling problem, the general theory is then applied to the solution of the stability of a rectangular block subjected to a uniform magnetic field perpendicular to its longitudinal axis. The variational approach employed utilizes an unconstrained energy minimization. The analytical solution for the critical buckling fields for both the anti-symmetric and symmetric modes are obtained for three different constitutive laws. The corresponding result for beams is extracted asymptotically for a special material and the solution is compared to previously published results. The last part of this work delves into the constitutive modeling of MBEs. Uniaxial experiments are conducted to study the effect of particle chain orientation on the magnetostriction and magnetization responses of an MRE for different levels of compressive and tensile

  5. Finite and profinite quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vourdas, Apostolos

    2017-01-01

    This monograph provides an introduction to finite quantum systems, a field at the interface between quantum information and number theory, with applications in quantum computation and condensed matter physics. The first major part of this monograph studies the so-called `qubits' and `qudits', systems with periodic finite lattice as position space. It also discusses the so-called mutually unbiased bases, which have applications in quantum information and quantum cryptography. Quantum logic and its applications to quantum gates is also studied. The second part studies finite quantum systems, where the position takes values in a Galois field. This combines quantum mechanics with Galois theory. The third part extends the discussion to quantum systems with variables in profinite groups, considering the limit where the dimension of the system becomes very large. It uses the concepts of inverse and direct limit and studies quantum mechanics on p-adic numbers. Applications of the formalism include quantum optics and ...

  6. Finite discrete field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Manoelito M. de

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the physical meaning and the geometric interpretation of implementation in classical field theories. The origin of infinities and other inconsistencies in field theories is traced to fields defined with support on the light cone; a finite and consistent field theory requires a light-cone generator as the field support. Then, we introduce a classical field theory with support on the light cone generators. It results on a description of discrete (point-like) interactions in terms of localized particle-like fields. We find the propagators of these particle-like fields and discuss their physical meaning, properties and consequences. They are conformally invariant, singularity-free, and describing a manifestly covariant (1 + 1)-dimensional dynamics in a (3 = 1) spacetime. Remarkably this conformal symmetry remains even for the propagation of a massive field in four spacetime dimensions. We apply this formalism to Classical electrodynamics and to the General Relativity Theory. The standard formalism with its distributed fields is retrieved in terms of spacetime average of the discrete field. Singularities are the by-products of the averaging process. This new formalism enlighten the meaning and the problem of field theory, and may allow a softer transition to a quantum theory. (author)

  7. Hexagon POPE: effective particles and tree level resummation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Córdova, Lucía [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy & Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute,University of Waterloo,Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2017-01-12

    We present the resummation of the full Pentagon Operator Product Expansion series of the hexagon Wilson loop in planar N=4 SYM at tree level. We do so by considering the one effective particle states formed by a fundamental flux tube excitation and an arbitrary number of the so called small fermions which are then integrated out. We derive the one effective particle measures at finite coupling. By evaluating these measures at tree level and summing over all one effective particle states we reproduce the full 6 point tree level amplitude.

  8. Evaluation of unsteady aerodynamic forces and pressure in wings and turbines at low Reynolds number by combining particle image velocimetry and proper orthogonal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas Vaquero, Arturo

    Aerodynamic unsteady forces in stationary and rotating wings are analyzed in this dissertation by using a combination of time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) techniques. Recent progress in experimental measurements has demonstrated the use of TR-PIV to calculate forces by applying the integral conservation of momentum equation in its different forms. However, a more accurate and robust method is needed for unsteady forces calculations. With this in mind, a modified pressure Poisson method is developed and applied in this work, showing its superior behavior compared to other methodologies described in the past. The independence of the calculated forces shows the robustness and stability of the method. Whereas force calculations have been recently considered, the role of flow structures in force fluctuations has not been revealed yet and it is the main focus of this study. To elucidate these relations, a hybrid PIV-POD analysis is applied to reconstruct the velocity field from the most energetic modes of the flow. A model describing the vortex-force relations is proposed in terms of lift and drag variations during the vortex shedding process. A spectral analysis of the calculated forces suggests symmetric periodic lift, drag and circulation variations at the shedding frequency. Moreover, lift, drag and circulation signals are in phase, which supports lift-circulation proportionality. However, non-symmetric drag fluctuations are found at double the shedding frequency within a shedding cycle. For instance, when a positive or negative circulation vortex detaches, different values in the maximum and minimum drag are obtained. The data and physical relations obtained in this work such as main frequencies, vortex-force fluctuations and behavior of reduced-order models can aid in the development of CFD applications at low Re. The methodology described can be applied to any moving or stationary wing at different Reynolds

  9. Ultrafine particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Weschler, Charles J.; Wierzbicka, Aneta

    2013-01-01

    Particle number (PN) concentrations (10-300 nm in size) were continuously measured over a period of ∼45 h in 56 residences of nonsmokers in Copenhagen, Denmark. The highest concentrations were measured when occupants were present and awake (geometric mean, GM: 22.3 × 103 cm-3), the lowest when...... the homes were vacant (GM: 6.1 × 103 cm-3) or the occupants were asleep (GM: 5.1 × 103 cm-3). Diary entries regarding occupancy and particle related activities were used to identify source events and apportion the daily integrated exposure among sources. Source events clearly resulted in increased PN...... concentrations and decreased average particle diameter. For a given event, elevated particle concentrations persisted for several hours after the emission of fresh particles ceased. The residential daily integrated PN exposure in the 56 homes ranged between 37 × 103 and 6.0 × 106 particles per cm3·h/day (GM: 3...

  10. Finite connectivity attractor neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wemmenhove, B; Coolen, A C C

    2003-01-01

    We study a family of diluted attractor neural networks with a finite average number of (symmetric) connections per neuron. As in finite connectivity spin glasses, their equilibrium properties are described by order parameter functions, for which we derive an integral equation in replica symmetric approximation. A bifurcation analysis of this equation reveals the locations of the paramagnetic to recall and paramagnetic to spin-glass transition lines in the phase diagram. The line separating the retrieval phase from the spin-glass phase is calculated at zero temperature. All phase transitions are found to be continuous

  11. Finite connectivity attractor neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemmenhove, B.; Coolen, A. C. C.

    2003-09-01

    We study a family of diluted attractor neural networks with a finite average number of (symmetric) connections per neuron. As in finite connectivity spin glasses, their equilibrium properties are described by order parameter functions, for which we derive an integral equation in replica symmetric approximation. A bifurcation analysis of this equation reveals the locations of the paramagnetic to recall and paramagnetic to spin-glass transition lines in the phase diagram. The line separating the retrieval phase from the spin-glass phase is calculated at zero temperature. All phase transitions are found to be continuous.

  12. Continuum and symmetry-conserving effects in drip-line nuclei using finite-range forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schunck, N.; Egido, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    We report the first calculations of nuclear properties near the drip lines using the spherical Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mean-field theory with a finite-range force supplemented by continuum and particle-number projection effects. Calculations were carried out in a basis made of the eigenstates of a Woods-Saxon potential computed in a box, thereby guaranteeing that continuum effects were properly taken into account. Projection of the self-consistent solutions on good particle number was carried out after variation, and an approximation of the variation after projection result was used. We give the position of the drip lines and examine neutron densities in neutron-rich nuclei. We discuss the sensitivity of nuclear observables upon continuum and particle-number restoration effects

  13. Super-renormalizable or finite Lee–Wick quantum gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Modesto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a class of multidimensional higher derivative theories of gravity without extra real degrees of freedom besides the graviton field. The propagator shows up the usual real graviton pole in k2=0 and extra complex conjugates poles that do not contribute to the absorptive part of the physical scattering amplitudes. Indeed, they may consistently be excluded from the asymptotic observable states of the theory making use of the Lee–Wick and Cutkosky, Landshoff, Olive and Polkinghorne prescription for the construction of a unitary S-matrix. Therefore, the spectrum consists of the graviton and short lived elementary unstable particles that we named “anti-gravitons” because of their repulsive contribution to the gravitational potential at short distance. However, another interpretation of the complex conjugate pairs is proposed based on the Calmet's suggestion, i.e. they could be understood as black hole precursors long established in the classical theory. Since the theory is CPT invariant, the conjugate complex of the micro black hole precursor can be interpreted as a white hole precursor consistently with the 't Hooft complementarity principle. It is proved that the quantum theory is super-renormalizable in even dimension, i.e. only a finite number of divergent diagrams survive, and finite in odd dimension. Furthermore, turning on a local potential of the Riemann tensor we can make the theory finite in any dimension. The singularity-free Newtonian gravitational potential is explicitly computed for a range of higher derivative theories. Finally, we propose a new super-renormalizable or finite Lee–Wick standard model of particle physics.

  14. Suspended particles and the gravitational instability of a rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.C.; Sharma, K.C.

    1980-01-01

    The gravitational instability of an infinite homogeneous self-graviting and finitely conducting, rotating gas-particle medium, in the presence of a uniform vertical magnetic field, is studied to include finite Larmor radius and suspended particles effects. The particular cases of the effects of rotation, finite conductivity, finite Larmor radius and suspended particles on the waves propagated along and perpendicular to magnetic field have been discussed. Jeans's criterion determines the gravitational instability. (orig.)

  15. Nilpotent -local finite groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, José; Scherer, Jérôme; Viruel, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    We provide characterizations of -nilpotency for fusion systems and -local finite groups that are inspired by known result for finite groups. In particular, we generalize criteria by Atiyah, Brunetti, Frobenius, Quillen, Stammbach and Tate.

  16. N-particle effective generators of the Poincare group derived from a field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, A.; Gloeckle, W.

    1999-01-01

    In quantum mechanics the principle of relativity is guaranteed by unitary operators being associated with inhomogeneous Lorentz transformations ensuring that quantum mechanical expectation values remain unchanged. In field theory the ten generators of inhomogeneous Lorentz transformations can be derived from a scalar Lagrangian density describing the physical system of interest. They obey the well known Poincare Lie algebra. For interacting systems some of the generators become operators allowing for particle production or annihilation so that the generators act on the full Fock space. However, given a field theory on the whole Fock space we prove that it is possible to construct generators acting on a subspace with a finite number of particles by one and the same unitary transformation of all generators leaving the Poincare algebra valid. In this manner it is in principle possible to derive a relativistically invariant theory of interacting particles on a Hilbert space with a finite number of particles from a field theoretical Lagrangian. Refs. 3 (author)

  17. Basic Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Hae

    1992-02-01

    This book gives descriptions of basic finite element method, which includes basic finite element method and data, black box, writing of data, definition of VECTOR, definition of matrix, matrix and multiplication of matrix, addition of matrix, and unit matrix, conception of hardness matrix like spring power and displacement, governed equation of an elastic body, finite element method, Fortran method and programming such as composition of computer, order of programming and data card and Fortran card, finite element program and application of nonelastic problem.

  18. Finite-temperature field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapusta, J.I.; Landshoff, P.V.

    1989-01-01

    Particle number is not conserved in relativistic theories although both lepton and baryon number are. Therefore when discussing the thermodynamics of a quantum field theory one uses the grand canonical formalism. The entropy S is maximised, keeping fixed the ensemble averages E and N of energy and lepton number. Two lagrange multipliers are introduced. (author)

  19. Composite Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    In this chapter, we extend the previous results of Chap. 2 to the more general case of composite finite sums. We describe what composite finite sums are and how their analysis can be reduced to the analysis of simple finite sums using the chain rule. We apply these techniques, next, on numerical integration and on some identities of Ramanujan.

  20. Finite Amplitude Ocean Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    plitude waves and finite amplitude waves. This article provides a brief introduction to finite amplitude wave theories. Some of the general characteristics of waves as well as the importance of finite amplitude wave theories are touched upon. 2. Small Amplitude Waves. The topmost and the lowest levels of the waves are re-.

  1. Recent Developments and Applications of Analytic Number Theory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mathematics Subject Classification (1991): 11-02, 11N, 11T55 Keywords: analytic number theory, research exposition, multiplicative number theory, arithmetic theory of polynomial rings over finite fields, arithmetical semigroups, semisimple finite rings, Lie, symmetric Riemannian manifolds, finite topological spaces, finite ...

  2. Statistical finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaji, Iman; Rahemifar, Kaamran; Samani, Abbas

    2008-01-01

    A novel technique is introduced for tissue deformation and stress analysis. Compared to the conventional Finite Element method, this technique is orders of magnitude faster and yet still very accurate. The proposed technique uses preprocessed data obtained from FE analyses of a number of similar objects in a Statistical Shape Model framework as described below. This technique takes advantage of the fact that the body organs have limited variability, especially in terms of their geometry. As such, it is well suited for calculating tissue displacements of body organs. The proposed technique can be applied in many biomedical applications such as image guided surgery, or virtual reality environment development where tissue behavior is simulated for training purposes.

  3. A new variational formulation of kinetic plasma theory and the application of moving finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    A new variational formulation has been developed for the system of equations governing kinetic plasmas and electromagnetic fields. It is used to apply the method of Moving Finite Elements to the electromagnetic fields. The fields are expanded in a basis of linear finite elements on a movable, unstructured grid of triangles in 2D or tetrahedra in 3D, while the plasma distribution function is expanded in a basis of super particles. Minimization of the variational with respect to the time derivatives of the field quantities yields a coupled system of equations for simultaneously advancing the amplitudes and node positions, resulting in adaptive grid motion. The adaptivity of the grid may save a large factor in the size of the grid and the number of particles required in many problems. Minimization of the variational with respect to the time derivatives of the particle positions and velocities gives the equations of motion, providing consistent prescriptions for assigning particles to the grid and fields to the particles. Orthogonality conditions on the particles are derived as conditions for keeping their equations of motion independent. Collisions can be included in a natural way. The relationship between PIC methods and alternative methods of discretizing phase space is clarified

  4. Collective dynamics of particles from viscous to turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The book surveys the state-of-the-art methods that are currently available to model and simulate the presence of rigid particles in a fluid flow. For particles that are very small relative to the characteristic flow scales and move without interaction with other particles, effective equations of motion for particle tracking are formulated and applied (e.g. in gas-solid flows). For larger particles, for particles in liquid-solid flows and for particles that interact with each other or possibly modify the overall flow detailed model are presented. Special attention is given to the description of the approximate force coupling method (FCM) as a more general treatment for small particles, and derivations in the context of low Reynolds numbers for the particle motion as well as application at finite Reynolds numbers are provided. Other topics discussed in the book are the relation to higher resolution immersed boundary methods, possible extensions to non-spherical particles and examples of applications of such met...

  5. Thermodynamics and ergodicity of finite one-dimensional Toda and Morse lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhachev, V.N.; Astakhova, T.Yu.; Vinogradov, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    The thermodynamics of finite one-dimensional lattices of particles interacting via Toda or Morse potentials is considered. An analysis is performed in canonical and microcanonical ensembles in 'temperature-lattice deformation' variables. Analytical results are obtained for thermodynamical values. It is demonstrated that small number of particles, e.g. N=10, is enough to get accurate approximation in the thermodynamical limit N->∼. The problem of the deformation rate is also investigated. It is found that the temperature increases at high deformation rate, and decreases at slow deformations. The Morse lattice was analyzed in numerical MD simulations in both canonical and microcanonical ensembles. The results are in qualitative agreement with the results for the Toda lattice. The finite Morse lattice is ergodic and the Toda lattice is non-ergodic. An excellent agreement between analytical and numerical results is obtained

  6. The theory of finitely generated commutative semigroups

    CERN Document Server

    Rédei, L; Stark, M; Gravett, K A H

    1966-01-01

    The Theory of Finitely Generated Commutative Semigroups describes a theory of finitely generated commutative semigroups which is founded essentially on a single """"fundamental theorem"""" and exhibits resemblance in many respects to the algebraic theory of numbers. The theory primarily involves the investigation of the F-congruences (F is the the free semimodule of the rank n, where n is a given natural number). As applications, several important special cases are given. This volume is comprised of five chapters and begins with preliminaries on finitely generated commutative semigroups before

  7. Evolution of collision numbers for a chaotic gas dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidgop, Alexander Jonathan; Fouxon, Itzhak

    2011-11-01

    We put forward a conjecture of recurrence for a gas of hard spheres that collide elastically in a finite volume. The dynamics consists of a sequence of instantaneous binary collisions. We study how the numbers of collisions of different pairs of particles grow as functions of time. We observe that these numbers can be represented as a time integral of a function on the phase space. Assuming the results of the ergodic theory apply, we describe the evolution of the numbers by an effective Langevin dynamics. We use the facts that hold for these dynamics with probability one, in order to establish properties of a single trajectory of the system. We find that for any triplet of particles there will be an infinite sequence of moments of time, when the numbers of collisions of all three different pairs of the triplet will be equal. Moreover, any value of difference of collision numbers of pairs in the triplet will repeat indefinitely. On the other hand, for larger numbers of pairs there is but a finite number of repetitions. Thus the ergodic theory produces a limitation on the dynamics.

  8. Finite Mathematics and Discrete Mathematics: Is There a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marvin L.

    Discrete mathematics and finite mathematics differ in a number of ways. First, finite mathematics has a longer history and is therefore more stable in terms of course content. Finite mathematics courses emphasize certain particular mathematical tools which are useful in solving the problems of business and the social sciences. Discrete mathematics…

  9. Clifford algebra in finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, M.

    1997-12-01

    We consider the most general power counting renormalizable and gauge invariant Lagrangean density L invariant with respect to some non-Abelian, compact, and semisimple gauge group G. The particle content of this quantum field theory consists of gauge vector bosons, real scalar bosons, fermions, and ghost fields. We assume that the ultimate grand unified theory needs no cutoff. This yields so-called finiteness conditions, resulting from the demand for finite physical quantities calculated by the bare Lagrangean. In lower loop order, necessary conditions for finiteness are thus vanishing beta functions for dimensionless couplings. The complexity of the finiteness conditions for a general quantum field theory makes the discussion of non-supersymmetric theories rather cumbersome. Recently, the F = 1 class of finite quantum field theories has been proposed embracing all supersymmetric theories. A special type of F = 1 theories proposed turns out to have Yukawa couplings which are equivalent to generators of a Clifford algebra representation. These algebraic structures are remarkable all the more than in the context of a well-known conjecture which states that finiteness is maybe related to global symmetries (such as supersymmetry) of the Lagrangean density. We can prove that supersymmetric theories can never be of this Clifford-type. It turns out that these Clifford algebra representations found recently are a consequence of certain invariances of the finiteness conditions resulting from a vanishing of the renormalization group β-function for the Yukawa couplings. We are able to exclude almost all such Clifford-like theories. (author)

  10. Baryon number and strangeness: signals of a deconfinedantecedent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumder, A.; Koch, V.; Randrup, J.

    2005-06-29

    The correlation between baryon number and strangeness is used to discern the nature of the deconfined matter produced at vanishing chemical potential in high-energy nuclear collisions at the BNL RHIC. Comparisons of results of various phenomenological models with correlations extracted from lattice QCD calculations suggest that a quasi-particle picture applies. At finite baryon densities, such as those encountered at the CERN SPS, it is demonstrated that the presence of a first-order phase transition and the accompanying development of spinodal decomposition would significantly enhance the number of strangeness carriers and the associated fluctuations.

  11. Olber's Paradox Revisited in a Static and Finite Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Building a Universe populated by stars identical to our Sun and taking into consideration the wave-particle duality of light, the biological limits of the human eye, the finite size of stars and the finiteness of our Universe, we conclude that the sky could very well be dark at night. Besides the human eye, the dominant parameter is the finite…

  12. Single particle raster image analysis of diffusion for particle mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longfils, M; Röding, M; Altskär, A; Schuster, E; Lorén, N; Särkkä, A; Rudemo, M

    2018-03-01

    Recently we complemented the raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) method of analysing raster images via estimation of the image correlation function with the method single particle raster image analysis (SPRIA). In SPRIA, individual particles are identified and the diffusion coefficient of each particle is estimated by a maximum likelihood method. In this paper, we extend the SPRIA method to analyse mixtures of particles with a finite set of diffusion coefficients in a homogeneous medium. In examples with simulated and experimental data with two and three different diffusion coefficients, we show that SPRIA gives accurate estimates of the diffusion coefficients and their proportions. A simple technique for finding the number of different diffusion coefficients is also suggested. Further, we study the use of RICS for mixtures with two different diffusion coefficents and investigate, by plotting level curves of the correlation function, how large the quotient between diffusion coefficients needs to be in order to allow discrimination between models with one and two diffusion coefficients. We also describe a minor correction (compared to published papers) of the RICS autocorrelation function. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  13. Cholesterol Efflux Capacity, High-Density Lipoprotein Particle Number, and Incident Cardiovascular Events: An Analysis From the JUPITER Trial (Justification for the Use of Statins in Prevention: An Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Amit V; Demler, Olga V; Adelman, Steven J; Collins, Heidi L; Glynn, Robert J; Ridker, Paul M; Rader, Daniel J; Mora, Samia

    2017-06-20

    Recent failures of drugs that raised high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels to reduce cardiovascular events in clinical trials have led to increased interest in alternative indices of HDL quality, such as cholesterol efflux capacity, and HDL quantity, such as HDL particle number. However, no studies have directly compared these metrics in a contemporary population that includes potent statin therapy and low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. HDL cholesterol levels, apolipoprotein A-I, cholesterol efflux capacity, and HDL particle number were assessed at baseline and 12 months in a nested case-control study of the JUPITER trial (Justification for the Use of Statins in Prevention: An Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin), a randomized primary prevention trial that compared rosuvastatin treatment to placebo in individuals with normal low-density lipoprotein cholesterol but increased C-reactive protein levels. In total, 314 cases of incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) (myocardial infarction, unstable angina, arterial revascularization, stroke, or cardiovascular death) were compared to age- and gender-matched controls. Conditional logistic regression models adjusting for risk factors evaluated associations between HDL-related biomarkers and incident CVD. Cholesterol efflux capacity was moderately correlated with HDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein A-I, and HDL particle number (Spearman r = 0.39, 0.48, and 0.39 respectively; P JUPITER, cholesterol efflux capacity was associated with incident CVD in individuals on potent statin therapy but not at baseline. For both baseline and on-statin analyses, HDL particle number was the strongest of 4 HDL-related biomarkers as an inverse predictor of incident events and biomarker of residual risk. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00239681. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. A laboratory comparison of emission factors, number size distributions and morphology of ultrafine particles from eleven different household cookstove-fuel systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset includes all data used to generate figures in the manuscript and supporting information for the publication entitled "Emission factors, number size...

  15. Averaging theorems in finite deformation plasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Nemat-Nasser, S C

    1999-01-01

    The transition from micro- to macro-variables of a representative volume element (RVE) of a finitely deformed aggregate (e.g., a composite or a polycrystal) is explored. A number of exact fundamental results on averaging techniques, $9 valid at finite deformations and rotations of any arbitrary heterogeneous continuum, are obtained. These results depend on the choice of suitable kinematic and dynamic variables. For finite deformations, the deformation gradient and $9 its rate, and the nominal stress and its rate, are optimally suited for the averaging purposes. A set of exact identities is presented in terms of these variables. An exact method for homogenization of an ellipsoidal inclusion in an $9 unbounded finitely deformed homogeneous solid is presented, generalizing Eshelby's method for application to finite deformation problems. In terms of the nominal stress rate and the rate of change of the deformation gradient, $9 measured relative to any arbitrary state, a general phase-transformation problem is con...

  16. On the number of special numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We now apply the theory of the Thue equation to obtain an effective bound on m. Indeed, by Lemma 3.2, we can write m2 = ba3 and m2 − 4 = cd3 with b, c cubefree. By the above, both b, c are bounded since they are cubefree and all their prime factors are less than e63727. Now we have a finite number of. Thue equations:.

  17. A New Approach for the Statistical Thermodynamic Theory of the Nonextensive Systems Confined in Different Finite Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hui-Yi; Wang, Jian-Hui; Ma, Yong-Li

    2014-06-01

    For a small system at a low temperature, thermal fluctuation and quantum effect play important roles in quantum thermodynamics. Starting from micro-canonical ensemble, we generalize the Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical factor from infinite to finite systems, no matter the interactions between particles are considered or not. This generalized factor, similar to Tsallis's q-form as a power-law distribution, has the restriction of finite energy spectrum and includes the nonextensivities of the small systems. We derive the exact expression for distribution of average particle numbers in the interacting classical and quantum nonextensive systems within a generalized canonical ensemble. This expression in the almost independent or elementary excitation quantum finite systems is similar to the corresponding ones obtained from the conventional grand-canonical ensemble. In the reconstruction for the statistical theory of the small systems, we present the entropy of the equilibrium systems and equation of total thermal energy. When we investigate the thermodynamics for the interacting nonextensive systems, we obtain the system-bath heat exchange and "uncompensated heat" which are in the thermodynamical level and independent on the detail of the system-bath coupling. For ideal finite systems, with different traps and boundary conditions, we calculate some thermodynamic quantities, such as the specific heat, entropy, and equation of state, etc. Particularly at low temperatures for the small systems, we predict some novel behaviors in the quantum thermodynamics, including internal entropy production, heat exchanges between the system and its surroundings and finite-size effects on the free energy.

  18. Real-time visualization of dynamic particle contact failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parab, Niranjan D.; Hudspeth, Matthew; Claus, Ben; Guo, Zherui; Sun, Tao; Fezzaa, Kamel; Chen, Weinong W.

    2017-01-01

    Granular materials are widely used to resist impact and blast. Under these dynamic loadings, the constituent particles in the granular system fracture. To study the fracture mechanisms in brittle particles under dynamic compressive loading, a high speed X-ray phase contrast imaging setup was synchronized with a Kolsky bar apparatus. Controlled compressive loading was applied on two contacting particles using the Kolsky bar apparatus and fracture process was captured using the high speed X-ray imaging setup. Five different particles were investigated: soda-lime glass, polycrystalline silica (silicon dioxide), polycrystalline silicon, barium titanate glass, and yttrium stabilized zirconia. For both soda lime glass and polycrystalline silica particles, one of the particles fragmented explosively, thus breaking into many small pieces. For Silicon and barium titanate glass particles, a finite number of cracks were observed in one of the particles causing it to fracture. For yttrium stabilized zirconia particles, a single meridonial crack developed in one of the particles, breaking it into two parts.

  19. Canonical harmonic tracking of charged particles in circular accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvardakov, V.; Levichev, E.

    2006-01-01

    Harmonic tracking is a method used to study non-linear particle dynamics in a circular accelerator. The tracking algorithm is based on numerical solution of the Hamilton equations of motion. An essential feature of the method is the approximation of Hamiltonian perturbation terms by a finite number of azimuthal harmonics, which provides an effective tool for optimization of non-linear particle motion. The equations of motion are solved canonically, with the first-order prediction made using the explicit Lie transformation. The major features of harmonic tracking are presented and examples of its application are discussed

  20. Canonical harmonic tracking of charged particles in circular accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvardakov, V.; Levichev, E.

    2006-03-01

    Harmonic tracking is a method used to study non-linear particle dynamics in a circular accelerator. The tracking algorithm is based on numerical solution of the Hamilton equations of motion. An essential feature of the method is the approximation of Hamiltonian perturbation terms by a finite number of azimuthal harmonics, which provides an effective tool for optimization of non-linear particle motion. The equations of motion are solved canonically, with the first-order prediction made using the explicit Lie transformation. The major features of harmonic tracking are presented and examples of its application are discussed.

  1. A Note on Powers in Finite Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabrandt, Andreas; Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2016-01-01

    , system theory, coding theory and cryptology. In this connection it is of interest to know criteria for the existence of squares and other powers in arbitrary finite fields. Making good use of polynomial division in polynomial rings over finite fields, we have examined a classical criterion of Euler...... for squares in odd prime fields, giving it a formulation which is apt for generalization to arbitrary finite fields and powers. Our proof uses algebra rather than classical number theory, which makes it convenient when presenting basic methods of applied algebra in the classroom....

  2. Charged Particle Optics Theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hawkes, P. W.; Lencová, Bohumila

    -, č. 6 (2006), s. 6-8 Grant - others:EC 5RP(XE) G5RD-CT-2000-00344 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : optics of charged particles * design of ion lithography system * spot profile * the finite element method Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering www.phantomsnet.net

  3. High mobility group protein number17 cross-links primarily to histone H2A in the reconstituted HMG 17 - nucleosome core particle complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, G.R.; Yau, P.; Yasuda, H.; Traut, R.R.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    The neighbor relationship of lamb thymus High Mobility Group (HMG) protein 17 to native HeLa nucleosome core particle histones in the reconstituted complex has been studied. 125 I-labeled HMG 17 was cross-linking to core histones using the protein-protein cross-linking reagent 2-iminothiolane. Specific cross-linked products were separated on a two-dimensional Triton-acid-urea/SDS gel system, located by autoradiography, excised and quantified. Disulfide bonds in the cross links were then cleaved and the protein constituents were identified by SDS gel electrophoresis. HMG 17 cross-linked primarily to histone H2A while lower levels of cross-linking occurred between HMG 17 and the other histones. In contrast, cross-linking between two HMG 17 molecules bound on the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that H2A comprises part of the HMG 17 binding site but that HMG 17 is sufficiently elongated and mobile to permit cross-linking to the other histones and to a second HMG 17 molecule. These results are in agreement with the current model for the structure of the nucleosome and the proposed binding sites for HMG 17

  4. Supersymmetric theories and finiteness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helayel-Neto, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    We attempt here to present a short survey of the all-order finite Lagrangian field theories known at present in four-and two-dimensional space-times. The question of the possible relevance of these ultraviolet finite models in the formulation of consistent unified frameworks for the fundamental forces is also addressed to. (author)

  5. Designs and finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Designs and Finite Geometries brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this important area of mathematics. Designs and Finite Geometries serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most important research issues in the field.

  6. Probing the internal energy structure of a serially coupled double quantum dot system with Rashba spin-orbit coupling through finite-frequency shot noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hai-Bin; Liu, Xu-Ping; Chen, Bin

    2018-01-01

    The finite-frequency shot noise of electron transport through a serially coupled double quantum dot system with Rashba spin-orbit coupling is studied based on an effective particle-number-resolved quantum master equation. We demonstrate that the finite-frequency shot noise displays an obvious dip, and the dip position, which is independent of the spin polarizations of the source and drain electrodes, is determined by the energy difference between the coherent singly-occupied eigenstates of the quantum dot system. These results suggest that the dip position of the finite-frequency shot noise can be used to quantitatively extract the information about the energy difference between the coherent singly-occupied eigenstates and the magnitude of Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The predicted properties of the finite-frequency shot noise are of particular interest for understanding of the internal dynamics of the coupled quantum dot systems.

  7. Finite Optimal Stopping Problems: The Seller's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Mehdi; Smith, J. Cole

    2011-01-01

    We consider a version of an optimal stopping problem, in which a customer is presented with a finite set of items, one by one. The customer is aware of the number of items in the finite set and the minimum and maximum possible value of each item, and must purchase exactly one item. When an item is presented to the customer, she or he observes its…

  8. Finite W-algebras and intermediate statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbarin, F.; Ragoucy, E.; Sorba, P.

    1994-09-01

    New realizations of finite W-algebras are constructed by relaxing the usual conditions. Then finite W-algebras are recognized in the Heisenberg quantization recently proposed by Leinaas and Myrheim, for a system of two identical particles in d dimensions. As the anyonic parameter is directly associated to the W-algebra involved in the d=1 case, it is natural to consider that the W-algebra framework is well adapted for a possible generalization of the anyon statistics. (author). 13 refs

  9. Simple Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    We will begin our treatment of summability calculus by analyzing what will be referred to, throughout this book, as simple finite sums. Even though the results of this chapter are particular cases of the more general results presented in later chapters, they are important to start with for a few reasons. First, this chapter serves as an excellent introduction to what summability calculus can markedly accomplish. Second, simple finite sums are encountered more often and, hence, they deserve special treatment. Third, the results presented in this chapter for simple finite sums will, themselves, be used as building blocks for deriving the most general results in subsequent chapters. Among others, we establish that fractional finite sums are well-defined mathematical objects and show how various identities related to the Euler constant as well as the Riemann zeta function can actually be derived in an elementary manner using fractional finite sums.

  10. Finite-size scaling of survival probability in branching processes

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Millan, Rosalba; Font-Clos, Francesc; Corral, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Branching processes pervade many models in statistical physics. We investigate the survival probability of a Galton-Watson branching process after a finite number of generations. We reveal the finite-size scaling law of the survival probability for a given branching process ruled by a probability distribution of the number of offspring per element whose standard deviation is finite, obtaining the exact scaling function as well as the critical exponents. Our findings prove the universal behavi...

  11. On the incompatibility of parity, baryon number and supersymmetries in hadron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosser, D.

    1976-01-01

    Consider a theory with nontrivial S-matrix, nonvanishing masses and the property that to every mass belongs only a finite number of different types of particles. Suppose that it admits parity, baryon number and supersymmetries. It is shown that, if the theory accommodates a supermultiplet of hadrons and if all physically realizable vectors belonging to the mass of this supermultiplet represent hadrons, then the theory is inconsistent. In the derivation use is made of the experimental fact that hadrons have baryon number zero if they are bosons and baryon number +-1 if they are fermions

  12. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent boundary layer with fully resolved particles at low volume fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kun; Hu, Chenshu; Wu, Fan; Fan, Jianren

    2017-05-01

    In the present work, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of dilute particulate flow in a turbulent boundary layer has been conducted, containing thousands of finite-sized solid rigid particles. The particle surfaces are resolved with the multi-direct forcing immersed-boundary method. This is, to the best of the authors' knowledge, the first DNS study of a turbulent boundary layer laden with finite-sized particles. The particles have a diameter of approximately 11.3 wall units, a density of 3.3 times that of the fluid, and a solid volume fraction of 1/1000. The simulation shows that the onset and the completion of the transition processes are shifted earlier with the inclusion of the solid phase and that the resulting streamwise mean velocity of the boundary layer in the particle-laden case is almost consistent with the results of the single-phase case. At the same time, relatively stronger particle movements are observed in the near-wall regions, due to the driving of the counterrotating streamwise vortexes. As a result, increased levels of dissipation occur on the particle surfaces, and the root mean square of the fluctuating velocities of the fluid in the near-wall regions is decreased. Under the present parameters, including the particle Stokes number St+ = 24 and the particle Reynolds number Rep = 33 based on the maximum instantaneous fluid-solid velocity lag, no vortex shedding behind the particle is observed. Lastly, a trajectory analysis of the particles shows the influence of turbophoresis on particle wall-normal concentration, and the particles that originated between y+ = 60 and 2/3 of the boundary-layer thickness are the most influenced.

  13. Low Reynolds number suspension gravity currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sandeep; Salin, Dominique; Talon, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    The extension of a gravity current in a lock-exchange problem, proceeds as square root of time in the viscous-buoyancy phase, where there is a balance between gravitational and viscous forces. In the presence of particles however, this scenario is drastically altered, because sedimentation reduces the motive gravitational force and introduces a finite distance and time at which the gravity current halts. We investigate the spreading of low Reynolds number suspension gravity currents using a novel approach based on the Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) method. The suspension is modeled as a continuous medium with a concentration-dependent viscosity. The settling of particles is simulated using a drift flux function approach that enables us to capture sudden discontinuities in particle concentration that travel as kinematic shock waves. Thereafter a numerical investigation of lock-exchange flows between pure fluids of unequal viscosity, reveals the existence of wall layers which reduce the spreading rate substantially compared to the lubrication theory prediction. In suspension gravity currents, we observe that the settling of particles leads to the formation of two additional fronts: a horizontal front near the top that descends vertically and a sediment layer at the bottom which aggrandises due to deposition of particles. Three phases are identified in the spreading process: the final corresponding to the mutual approach of the two horizontal fronts while the laterally advancing front halts indicating that the suspension current stops even before all the particles have settled. The first two regimes represent a constant and a decreasing spreading rate respectively. Finally we conduct experiments to substantiate the conclusions of our numerical and theoretical investigation.

  14. Finite elements and approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zienkiewicz, O C

    2006-01-01

    A powerful tool for the approximate solution of differential equations, the finite element is extensively used in industry and research. This book offers students of engineering and physics a comprehensive view of the principles involved, with numerous illustrative examples and exercises.Starting with continuum boundary value problems and the need for numerical discretization, the text examines finite difference methods, weighted residual methods in the context of continuous trial functions, and piecewise defined trial functions and the finite element method. Additional topics include higher o

  15. Monte Carlo reactor calculation with substantially reduced number of cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M. J.; Joo, H. G.; Lee, D.; Smith, K.

    2012-01-01

    A new Monte Carlo (MC) eigenvalue calculation scheme that substantially reduces the number of cycles is introduced with the aid of coarse mesh finite difference (CMFD) formulation. First, it is confirmed in terms of pin power errors that using extremely many particles resulting in short active cycles is beneficial even in the conventional MC scheme although wasted operations in inactive cycles cannot be reduced with more particles. A CMFD-assisted MC scheme is introduced as an effort to reduce the number of inactive cycles and the fast convergence behavior and reduced inter-cycle effect of the CMFD assisted MC calculation is investigated in detail. As a practical means of providing a good initial fission source distribution, an assembly based few-group condensation and homogenization scheme is introduced and it is shown that efficient MC eigenvalue calculations with fewer than 20 total cycles (including inactive cycles) are possible for large power reactor problems. (authors)

  16. Statistics of particle time-temperature histories.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewson, John C.; Lignell, David O.; Sun, Guangyuan

    2014-10-01

    Particles in non - isothermal turbulent flow are subject to a stochastic environment tha t produces a distribution of particle time - temperature histories. This distribution is a function of the dispersion of the non - isothermal (continuous) gas phase and the distribution of particles relative to that gas phase. In this work we extend the one - dimensional turbulence (ODT) model to predict the joint dispersion of a dispersed particle phase and a continuous phase. The ODT model predicts the turbulent evolution of continuous scalar fields with a model for the cascade of fluctuations to smaller sc ales (the 'triplet map') at a rate that is a function of the fully resolved one - dimens ional velocity field . Stochastic triplet maps also drive Lagrangian particle dispersion with finite Stokes number s including inertial and eddy trajectory - crossing effect s included. Two distinct approaches to this coupling between triplet maps and particle dispersion are developed and implemented along with a hybrid approach. An 'instantaneous' particle displacement model matches the tracer particle limit and provide s an accurate description of particle dispersion. A 'continuous' particle displacement m odel translates triplet maps into a continuous velocity field to which particles respond. Particles can alter the turbulence, and modifications to the stochastic rate expr ession are developed for two - way coupling between particles and the continuous phase. Each aspect of model development is evaluated in canonical flows (homogeneous turbulence, free - shear flows and wall - bounded flows) for which quality measurements are ava ilable. ODT simulations of non - isothermal flows provide statistics for particle heating. These simulations show the significance of accurately predicting the joint statistics of particle and fluid dispersion . Inhomogeneous turbulence coupled with the in fluence of the mean flow fields on particles of varying properties

  17. Introduction to finite temperature and finite density QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2014-01-01

    It has been pointed out that QCD (Quantum Chromodynamics) in the circumstances of medium at finite temperature and density shows numbers of phenomena similar to the characteristics of solid state physics, e.g. phase transitions. In the past ten years, the very high temperature and density matter came to be observed experimentally at the heavy ion collisions. At the same time, the numerical QCD analysis at finite temperature and density attained quantitative level analysis possible owing to the remarkable progress of computers. In this summer school lecture, it has been set out to give not only the recent results, but also the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry, the fundamental theory of finite temperature and further expositions as in the following four sections. The first section is titled as 'Introduction to Finite Temperature and Density QCD' with subsections of 1.1 standard model and QCD, 1.2 phase transition and phase structure of QCD, 1.3 lattice QCD and thermodynamic quantity, 1.4 heavy ion collision experiments, and 1.5 neutron stars. The second one is 'Equilibrium State' with subsections of 2.1 chiral symmetry, 2.2 vacuum state: BCS theory, 2.3 NJL (Nambu-Jona-Lasinio) model, and 2.4 color superconductivity. The third one is 'Static fluctuations' with subsections of 3.1 fluctuations, 3.2 moment and cumulant, 3.3 increase of fluctuations at critical points, 3.4 analysis of fluctuations by lattice QCD and Taylor expansion, and 3.5 experimental exploration of QCD phase structure. The fourth one is 'Dynamical Structure' with 4.1 linear response theory, 4.2 spectral functions, 4.3 Matsubara function, and 4.4 analyses of dynamical structure by lattice QCD. (S. Funahashi)

  18. Finite Volumes for Complex Applications VII

    CERN Document Server

    Ohlberger, Mario; Rohde, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The methods considered in the 7th conference on "Finite Volumes for Complex Applications" (Berlin, June 2014) have properties which offer distinct advantages for a number of applications. The second volume of the proceedings covers reviewed contributions reporting successful applications in the fields of fluid dynamics, magnetohydrodynamics, structural analysis, nuclear physics, semiconductor theory and other topics. The finite volume method in its various forms is a space discretization technique for partial differential equations based on the fundamental physical principle of conservation. Recent decades have brought significant success in the theoretical understanding of the method. Many finite volume methods preserve further qualitative or asymptotic properties, including maximum principles, dissipativity, monotone decay of free energy, and asymptotic stability. Due to these properties, finite volume methods belong to the wider class of compatible discretization methods, which preserve qualitative propert...

  19. Inflation with finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellini, M.; Michoacan, Univ. Michoacana de S.Nicola de Hidalgo

    1998-01-01

    In this work the inflationary scenario of the Universe with finite temperature is studied. In this context, thermal equilibrium is closely maintained at the end of inflation. The example of the de Sitter expansion is developed

  20. Tracking Deforming Objects using Particle Filtering for Geometric Active Contours

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rathi, Yogesh; Vaswani, Namrata; Tannenbaum, Allen; Yezzi, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    .... Tracking algorithms using Kalman filters or particle filters have been proposed for finite dimensional representations of shape, but these are dependent on the chosen parametrization and cannot...

  1. Conformal anomaly of generalized form factors and finite loop integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Chicherin, Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    We reveal a new mechanism of conformal symmetry breaking at Born level. It occurs in generalized form factors with several local operators and an on-shell state of massless particles. The effect is due to hidden singularities on collinear configurations of the momenta. This conformal anomaly is different from the holomorphic anomaly of amplitudes. We present a number of examples in four and six dimensions. We find an application of the new conformal anomaly to finite loop momentum integrals with one or more massless legs. The collinear region around a massless leg creates a contact anomaly, made visible by the loop integration. The anomalous conformal Ward identity for an $\\ell-$loop integral is a 2nd-order differential equation whose right-hand side is an $(\\ell-1)-$loop integral. We show several examples, in particular the four-dimensional scalar double box.

  2. The influence of aerosol particle number and hygroscopicity on the evolution of convective cloud systems and their precipitation: A numerical study based on the COPS observations on 12 August 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planche, Céline; Wobrock, Wolfram; Flossmann, Andrea I.; Tridon, Frédéric; Van Baelen, Joël; Pointin, Yves; Hagen, Martin

    2010-10-01

    The 3D cloud model DESCAM-3D with bin resolved microphysics for ice, water and aerosol particles is used to study the role of particles on the evolution of summertime mid-level convective clouds and the subsequent precipitation during the COPS field campaign which occurred at mid-latitude near the French/German border in summer 2007. Using a 3D grid resolution of 250 m, DESCAM-3D, is able to simulate well the dynamical, cloud and precipitation features of the convective cloud system observed during the afternoon of the 12th August. This mid-level convective system was dominated by warm-phase microphysics. The simulated convective system led to a 1.5 h long lasting precipitation event in agreement with the radar observations. The results of the fine numerical scale compare well with the high resolved radar reflectivities of the LaMP X-band radar and the DLR-Poldirad radar. The prediction of the liquid hydrometeor spectra allows a detailed calculation of the cloud radar reflectivity. In order to better understand the role of aerosol particles on cloud evolution and precipitation formation, several sensitivity studies were performed by modifying aerosol number concentration as well as their physico-chemical properties. Drastic changes in the aerosol solubility lead to a variation in precipitation on the order of 10% for the same convective case. In contrast, changes in the aerosol number concentrations can lead to a variation in total precipitation of up to 30%. Hence, the role of changes in aerosol number concentrations is more important than changes in particle solubility for this case of continental mid-level convection at mid-latitude. A subsequent analysis of the in-cloud microphysics revealed that in-cloud properties are modified significantly in all scenarios. Key parameter is the supersaturation whose magnitude influences both cloud microphysics (cloud droplet and rain drop formation) as well as cloud thermodynamics and cloud dynamics. Furthermore

  3. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.E.; Love, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Finite-temperature supersymmetry (SUSY) is characterized by unbroken Ward identities for SUSY variations of ensemble averages of Klein-operator inserted imaginary time-ordered products of fields. Path-integral representations of these products are defined and the Feynman rules in superspace are given. The finite-temperature no-renormalization theorem is derived. Spontaneously broken SUSY at zero temperature is shown not to be restored at high temperature. (orig.)

  4. Elastic particle deformation in rectangular channel flow as a measure of particle stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Margaret Y; Kim, Seo Gyun; Lee, Heon Sang; Muller, Susan J

    2018-01-03

    In this study, we experimentally observed and characterized soft elastic particle deformation in confined flow in a microchannel with a rectangular cross-section. Hydrogel microparticles of pNIPAM were produced using two different concentrations of crosslinker. This resulted in particles with two different shear moduli of 13.3 ± 5.5 Pa and 32.5 ± 15.7 Pa and compressive moduli of 66 ± 10 Pa and 79 ± 15 Pa, respectively, as measured by capillary micromechanics. Under flow, the particle shapes transitioned from circular to egg, triangular, arrowhead, and ultimately parachute shaped with increasing shear rate. The shape changes were reversible, and deformed particles relaxed back to circular/spherical in the absence of flow. The thresholds for each shape transition were quantified using a non-dimensional radius of curvature at the tip, particle deformation, circularity, and the depth of the concave dimple at the trailing edge. Several of the observed shapes were distinct from those previously reported in the literature for vesicles and capsules; the elastic particles had a narrower leading tip and a lower circularity. Due to variations in the shear moduli between particles within a batch of particles, each flow rate corresponded to a small but finite range of capillary number (Ca) and resulted in a series of shapes. By arranging the images on a plot of Ca versus circularity, a direct correlation was developed between shape and Ca and thus between particle deformation and shear modulus. As the shape was very sensitive to differences in shear modulus, particle deformation in confined flow may allow for better differentiation of microparticle shear modulus than other methods.

  5. Particle Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Particle Pollution Public Health Issues Particle Pollution Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Particle pollution — ... see them in the air. Where does particle pollution come from? Particle pollution can come from two ...

  6. Quadrature representation of finite element variational forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølgaard, Kristian Breum; Wells, Garth N.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter addresses the conventional run-time quadrature approach for the numerical integration of local element tensors associated with finite element variational forms, and in particular automated optimizations that can be performed to reduce the number of floating point operations. An alter......This chapter addresses the conventional run-time quadrature approach for the numerical integration of local element tensors associated with finite element variational forms, and in particular automated optimizations that can be performed to reduce the number of floating point operations...

  7. A New Class of Non-Linear, Finite-Volume Methods for Vlasov Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, J W; Hittinger, J A

    2009-11-24

    Methods for the numerical discretization of the Vlasov equation should efficiently use the phase space discretization and should introduce only enough numerical dissipation to promote stability and control oscillations. A new high-order, non-linear, finite-volume algorithm for the Vlasov equation that discretely conserves particle number and controls oscillations is presented. The method is fourth-order in space and time in well-resolved regions, but smoothly reduces to a third-order upwind scheme as features become poorly resolved. The new scheme is applied to several standard problems for the Vlasov-Poisson system, and the results are compared with those from other finite-volume approaches, including an artificial viscosity scheme and the Piecewise Parabolic Method. It is shown that the new scheme is able to control oscillations while preserving a higher degree of fidelity of the solution than the other approaches.

  8. A New Class of Non-Linear, Finite-Volume Methods for Vlasov Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, J.W.; Hittinger, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Methods for the numerical discretization of the Vlasov equation should efficiently use the phase space discretization and should introduce only enough numerical dissipation to promote stability and control oscillations. A new high-order, non-linear, finite-volume algorithm for the Vlasov equation that discretely conserves particle number and controls oscillations is presented. The method is fourth-order in space and time in well-resolved regions, but smoothly reduces to a third-order upwind scheme as features become poorly resolved. The new scheme is applied to several standard problems for the Vlasov-Poisson system, and the results are compared with those from other finite-volume approaches, including an artificial viscosity scheme and the Piecewise Parabolic Method. It is shown that the new scheme is able to control oscillations while preserving a higher degree of fidelity of the solution than the other approaches.

  9. Finite-element-model updating using computational intelligence techniques applications to structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Marwala, Tshilidzi

    2010-01-01

    Finite element models (FEMs) are widely used to understand the dynamic behaviour of various systems. FEM updating allows FEMs to be tuned better to reflect measured data and may be conducted using two different statistical frameworks: the maximum likelihood approach and Bayesian approaches. Finite Element Model Updating Using Computational Intelligence Techniques applies both strategies to the field of structural mechanics, an area vital for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering. Vibration data is used for the updating process. Following an introduction a number of computational intelligence techniques to facilitate the updating process are proposed; they include: • multi-layer perceptron neural networks for real-time FEM updating; • particle swarm and genetic-algorithm-based optimization methods to accommodate the demands of global versus local optimization models; • simulated annealing to put the methodologies into a sound statistical basis; and • response surface methods and expectation m...

  10. Correspondence between imaginary-time and real-time finite-temperature field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobes, R.

    1990-01-01

    It is known that one-particle-irreducible graphs found using the imaginary-time formalism of finite-temperature field theory differ in general with those of the real-time formalism. Here it is shown that within the real-time formalism one can consider a sum of graphs, motivated by causality arguments, which at least in a number of simple examples agree with the corresponding analytically continued imaginary-time result. The occurrence of multiple statistical factors in this sum of graphs is discussed

  11. Inelastic accretion of inertial particles by a towed sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Robin; Henry, Christophe; Hachem, Elie; Bec, Jérémie

    2018-02-01

    The problem of accretion of small particles by a sphere embedded in a mean flow is studied in the case where the particles undergo inelastic collisions with the solid object. The collision efficiency, which gives the flux of particles experiencing at least one bounce on the sphere, is found to depend upon the sphere Reynolds number only through the value of the critical Stokes number below which no collision occurs. In the absence of molecular diffusion, it is demonstrated that multiple bounces do not provide enough energy dissipation for the particles to stick to the surface within a finite time. This excludes the possibility of any kind of inelastic collapse, so that determining an accretion efficiency requires modeling more precisely particle-surface microphysical interactions. A straightforward choice is to assume that the particles stick when their kinetic energy at impact is below a threshold. In this view, numerical simulations are performed to describe the statistics of impact velocities at various values of the Reynolds number. Successive bounces are shown to enhance accretion. These results are put together to provide a general qualitative picture on how the accretion efficiency depends upon the nondimensional parameters of the problem.

  12. Algebraic complexities and algebraic curves over finite fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, D V; Chudnovsky, G V

    1987-04-01

    We consider the problem of minimal (multiplicative) complexity of polynomial multiplication and multiplication in finite extensions of fields. For infinite fields minimal complexities are known [Winograd, S. (1977) Math. Syst. Theory 10, 169-180]. We prove lower and upper bounds on minimal complexities over finite fields, both linear in the number of inputs, using the relationship with linear coding theory and algebraic curves over finite fields.

  13. Impact of new computing systems on finite element computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor, A.K.; Fulton, R.E.; Storaasi, O.O.

    1983-01-01

    Recent advances in computer technology that are likely to impact finite element computations are reviewed. The characteristics of supersystems, highly parallel systems, and small systems (mini and microcomputers) are summarized. The interrelations of numerical algorithms and software with parallel architectures are discussed. A scenario is presented for future hardware/software environment and finite element systems. A number of research areas which have high potential for improving the effectiveness of finite element analysis in the new environment are identified

  14. Finite mixture models for the computation of isotope ratios in mixed isotopic samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffler, Daniel; Laaha, Gregor; Leisch, Friedrich; Kappel, Stefanie; Prohaska, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Finite mixture models have been used for more than 100 years, but have seen a real boost in popularity over the last two decades due to the tremendous increase in available computing power. The areas of application of mixture models range from biology and medicine to physics, economics and marketing. These models can be applied to data where observations originate from various groups and where group affiliations are not known, as is the case for multiple isotope ratios present in mixed isotopic samples. Recently, the potential of finite mixture models for the computation of 235U/238U isotope ratios from transient signals measured in individual (sub-)µm-sized particles by laser ablation - multi-collector - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICPMS) was demonstrated by Kappel et al. [1]. The particles, which were deposited on the same substrate, were certified with respect to their isotopic compositions. Here, we focus on the statistical model and its application to isotope data in ecogeochemistry. Commonly applied evaluation approaches for mixed isotopic samples are time-consuming and are dependent on the judgement of the analyst. Thus, isotopic compositions may be overlooked due to the presence of more dominant constituents. Evaluation using finite mixture models can be accomplished unsupervised and automatically. The models try to fit several linear models (regression lines) to subgroups of data taking the respective slope as estimation for the isotope ratio. The finite mixture models are parameterised by: • The number of different ratios. • Number of points belonging to each ratio-group. • The ratios (i.e. slopes) of each group. Fitting of the parameters is done by maximising the log-likelihood function using an iterative expectation-maximisation (EM) algorithm. In each iteration step, groups of size smaller than a control parameter are dropped; thereby the number of different ratios is determined. The analyst only influences some control

  15. Pulmonary deposition of urban atmospheric aerosol. Assessments of the mass, number and surface of the deposited particles; Deposizione polmonare dell'aerosol atmosferico urbano in termini di massa, numero e superficie delle particelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luciani, A.; Berico, M.; Castellani, C.M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1998-07-01

    Pulmonary deposition of urban atmospheric aerosol has been calculated by means of the data derived from March 1995 measurement campaign of urban aerosol. The human respiratory tract model of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (n. 66) developed for radiation protection purposes has been used. The number and surface of the deposited particles, as well as the mass, have been also evaluated. [Italian] I dati relativi alla campagna di misure effettuata nel marzo 1995 sono stati rielaborati al fine di valutare la deposizione polmonare dell'aerosol atmosferico in area urbana. Le valutazioni di deposizione nel tratto respiratorio umano sono state condotte mediante l'utilizzo del modello del tratto respiratorio umano presentato per fini radioprotezionistici dalla International Commission on Radiological Protection (n. 66). Sono state effettuate valutazioni di deposizione in massa e in termini di numero e superficie delle particelle.

  16. Products of Finite Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ballester-Bolinches, Adolfo; Asaad, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    The study of finite groups factorised as a product of two or more subgroups has become a subject of great interest during the last years with applications not only in group theory, but also in other areas like cryptography and coding theory. It has experienced a big impulse with the introduction of some permutability conditions. The aim of this book is to gather, order, and examine part of this material, including the latest advances made, give some new approach to some topics, and present some new subjects of research in the theory of finite factorised groups.

  17. Polarization particle drift and quasi-particle invariants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosenko, P.P.

    1995-01-01

    The second-order approximation in quasi-particle description of magnetized plasmas is studied. Reduced particle and guiding-centre velocities are derived taking account of the second-order renormalization and polarization drift modified owing to finite-Larmor-radius effects. The second-order adiabatic invariant of quasi-particle motion is found. Global adiabatic invariants for the magnetized plasma are revealed, and their possible role in energy exchange between particles and fields, nonlinear mode cascades and global plasma stability is shown. 49 refs

  18. Finite Algorithms for Robust Linear Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kaj; Nielsen, Hans Bruun

    1990-01-01

    The Huber M-estimator for robust linear regression is analyzed. Newton type methods for solution of the problem are defined and analyzed, and finite convergence is proved. Numerical experiments with a large number of test problems demonstrate efficiency and indicate that this kind of approach may...

  19. Legendre Elliptic Curves over Finite Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auer, Roland; Top, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    We show that every elliptic curve over a finite field of odd characteristic whose number of rational points is divisible by 4 is isogenous to an elliptic curve in Legendre form, with the sole exception of a minimal respectively maximal elliptic curve. We also collect some results concerning the

  20. Particle interactions during sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelides, Efstathios; Xu, Zu-Jia

    2002-11-01

    The confined sedimentation process of two-dimensional particles with several initial configurations is numerically investigated at very low to moderate particle Reynolds numbers. The Lattice Boltzmann Method is used to simulate the hydrodynamic interactions between fluid and particles. We have found that, during the sedimentation process the displacement dispersion of particles in the horizontal direction fluctuates around zero, while the dispersion in the vertical direction increases monotonically and almost linearly. We also found that the increasing dispersion rate heavily depends on the initial layout and any symmetry of the suspension. The simulations for non-cohesive particles show that the process of sedimentation encompasses three stages: In the first stage, the initial particle configuration plays a major role on the average velocity of the particles. A V-shape or W-shape front may be formed by the particles close to that front. During the second stage, the concentration is lower, strong particle interactions dominate and the formation and destruction of particle clusters play a major role in the process. The sedimentation velocity depends to a large extend on the number of clusters formed and the velocity field developed. During the third stage, the suspension stretches, concentration becomes lower and particle clusters appear to be more stable. The wakes generated by individual particles and clusters, especially the wake of the leading cluster becomes very important in the process. Simulations were also performed with cohesive particles and we found out that the sedimentation process is essentially governed by the formation and size of flocs.

  1. On Chudnovsky-Based Arithmetic Algorithms in Finite Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Atighehchi, Kevin; Ballet, Stéphane; Bonnecaze, Alexis; Rolland, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to a new construction of the so-called Chudnovsky-Chudnovsky multiplication algorithm, we design efficient algorithms for both the exponentiation and the multiplication in finite fields. They are tailored to hardware implementation and they allow computations to be parallelized while maintaining a low number of bilinear multiplications. We give an example with the finite field ${\\mathbb F}_{16^{13}}$.

  2. Undecidability and finite automata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endrullis, Jörg; Shallit, Jeffrey; Smith, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Using a novel rewriting problem, we show that several natural decision problems about finite automata are undecidable (i.e., recursively unsolvable). In contrast, we also prove three related problems are decidable. We apply one result to prove the undecidability of a related problem about

  3. Robust RBF Finite Automata

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šorel, Michal; Šíma, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 62, - (2004), s. 93-110 ISSN 0925-2312 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB2030007; GA MŠk LN00A056 Keywords : radial basis function * neural network * finite automaton * Boolean circuit * computational power Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.641, year: 2004

  4. Inside finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Weiser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    All relevant implementation aspects of finite element methods are discussed in this book. The focus is on algorithms and data structures as well as on their concrete implementation. Theory is covered as far as it gives insight into the construction of algorithms. Throughout the exercises a complete FE-solver for scalar 2D problems will be implemented in Matlab/Octave.

  5. Finite unified models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapetanakis, D. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Mondragon, M. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Zoupanos, G. (National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece). Physics Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    We present phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the case of two models with three families the top quark mass is predicted to be 178.8 GeV. (orig.)

  6. Finite unified models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakis, D.; Mondragon, M.; Zoupanos, G.

    1993-01-01

    We present phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the case of two models with three families the top quark mass is predicted to be 178.8 GeV. (orig.)

  7. Finiteness and GUTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakis, D.; Mondragon, M.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown how to obtain phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. A very interesting feature of the models with three families is that they predict the top quark mass to be around 178 GeV. 16 refs

  8. Visualizing higher order finite elements. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David C; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2005-11-01

    This report contains an algorithm for decomposing higher-order finite elements into regions appropriate for isosurfacing and proves the conditions under which the algorithm will terminate. Finite elements are used to create piecewise polynomial approximants to the solution of partial differential equations for which no analytical solution exists. These polynomials represent fields such as pressure, stress, and momentum. In the past, these polynomials have been linear in each parametric coordinate. Each polynomial coefficient must be uniquely determined by a simulation, and these coefficients are called degrees of freedom. When there are not enough degrees of freedom, simulations will typically fail to produce a valid approximation to the solution. Recent work has shown that increasing the number of degrees of freedom by increasing the order of the polynomial approximation (instead of increasing the number of finite elements, each of which has its own set of coefficients) can allow some types of simulations to produce a valid approximation with many fewer degrees of freedom than increasing the number of finite elements alone. However, once the simulation has determined the values of all the coefficients in a higher-order approximant, tools do not exist for visual inspection of the solution. This report focuses on a technique for the visual inspection of higher-order finite element simulation results based on decomposing each finite element into simplicial regions where existing visualization algorithms such as isosurfacing will work. The requirements of the isosurfacing algorithm are enumerated and related to the places where the partial derivatives of the polynomial become zero. The original isosurfacing algorithm is then applied to each of these regions in turn.

  9. Small metal particles and the ideal Fermi gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barma, Mustanpir

    1991-01-01

    Kubo's theoretical model of a small metal particle consists of a number of noninteraction electrons (an ideal Fermi gas) confined to a finite volume. By 'small' it meant that the size of the particle is intermediate between that of a few atoms cluster and the bulk solid, the radius of the particle being 5 to 50 Angstroms. The model is discussed and size dependence of various energy scales is studied. For a fermi gas confined in a sphere or a cube, two size-dependent energy scales are important. The inner scale δ is the mean spacing between successive energy levels. It governs the very low temperature behaviour. The outer scale Δ is associated with the shell structure when δ ≤T<Δ, thermodynamic properties show an oscillatory fluctuations around a smooth background as the size or energy is varied. (M.G.B.) 23 refs

  10. Auxiliary fields in the geometrical relativistic particle dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amador, A; Bagatella, N; Rojas, E; Cordero, R

    2008-01-01

    We describe how to construct the dynamics of relativistic particles, following either timelike or null curves, by means of an auxiliary variables method instead of the standard theory of deformations for curves. There are interesting physical particle models governed by actions that involve higher order derivatives of the embedding functions of the worldline. We point out that the mechanical content of such models can be extracted wisely from a lower order action, which can be performed by implementing in the action a finite number of constraints that involve the geometrical relationship structures inherent to a curve and by using a covariant formalism. We emphasize our approach for null curves. For such systems, the natural time parameter is a pseudo-arclength whose properties resemble those of the standard proper time. We illustrate the formalism by applying it to some models for relativistic particles

  11. Auxiliary fields in the geometrical relativistic particle dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amador, A; Bagatella, N; Rojas, E [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, 91000 Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico); Cordero, R [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del I.P.N, Edificio 9, 07738 Mexico D.F (Mexico)], E-mail: aramador@gmail.com, E-mail: nbagatella@uv.mx, E-mail: cordero@esfm.ipn.mx, E-mail: efrojas@uv.mx

    2008-03-21

    We describe how to construct the dynamics of relativistic particles, following either timelike or null curves, by means of an auxiliary variables method instead of the standard theory of deformations for curves. There are interesting physical particle models governed by actions that involve higher order derivatives of the embedding functions of the worldline. We point out that the mechanical content of such models can be extracted wisely from a lower order action, which can be performed by implementing in the action a finite number of constraints that involve the geometrical relationship structures inherent to a curve and by using a covariant formalism. We emphasize our approach for null curves. For such systems, the natural time parameter is a pseudo-arclength whose properties resemble those of the standard proper time. We illustrate the formalism by applying it to some models for relativistic particles.

  12. Investigation of particle lift off in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Diogo; Tee, Yi Hui; Morse, Nicholas; Hiltbrand, Ben; Longmire, Ellen

    2017-11-01

    Entrainment and suspension of particles within turbulent flows occur widely in environmental and industrial processes. Three-dimensional particle tracking experiments are thus conducted in a water channel to understand the interaction of finite-size particles with a turbulent boundary layer. A neutrally buoyant sphere made of wax and iron oxide is first held in place on the bounding surface by a magnet before being released and tracked. The sphere is marked with dots to monitor rotation as well as translation. By setting up two pairs of cameras in a stereoscopic configuration, the trajectories of the sphere are reconstructed and tracked over a distance of 4 to 6 δ. Sphere diameters ranging from 40 to 130 wall units, initial particle Reynolds numbers of 600 to 2000 and friction Reynolds numbers of 500 to 1800 are considered. For this parameter set, the particle typically lifts off from the wall after release before falling back toward the wall. Aspects of both particle rotation and translation will be discussed. Supported by NSF (CBET-1510154).

  13. Crystalline Ordering and Large Fugacity Expansion for Hard-Core Lattice Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauslin, Ian; Lebowitz, Joel L

    2017-10-30

    Using an extension of Pirogov-Sinai theory, we prove phase transitions, corresponding to sublattice orderings, for a general class of hard-core lattice particle systems with a finite number of perfect coverings. These include many cases for which such transitions have been proven. The proof also shows that for these systems the Gaunt-Fisher expansion of the pressure in powers of the inverse fugacity (aside from an explicit logarithmic term) has a nonzero radius of convergence.

  14. The electric polarizability of a particle bound by a one-dimensional ionic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balderas, Daniel; González, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    We consider the problem of a particle confined to a one-dimensional ionic crystal of finite length modeled by repulsive and attractive delta functions and subject to the application of an external constant electric field. Exact expressions for the electric polarizability of the system via the Dalgarno–Lewis technique are obtained in second order perturbation theory. The study uncovers the behavior of the electric polarizability as a function of the number of ions in the system. (paper)

  15. Virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolynec, E.; Martins, M.N.

    1988-01-01

    The experimental results of an isochromat of the virtual photon spectrum, obtained by measuring the number of ground-state protons emitted by the 16.28 MeV isobaric analogue state in 90 Zr as a function of electron incident energy in the range 17-105 MeV, are compared with the values predicted by a calculation of the E1 DWBA virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei. It is found that the calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The DWBA virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei for E2 and M1 multipoles are also assessed. (author) [pt

  16. Nonlinear, finite deformation, finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhung; Waas, Anthony M.

    2016-06-01

    The roles of the consistent Jacobian matrix and the material tangent moduli, which are used in nonlinear incremental finite deformation mechanics problems solved using the finite element method, are emphasized in this paper, and demonstrated using the commercial software ABAQUS standard. In doing so, the necessity for correctly employing user material subroutines to solve nonlinear problems involving large deformation and/or large rotation is clarified. Starting with the rate form of the principle of virtual work, the derivations of the material tangent moduli, the consistent Jacobian matrix, the stress/strain measures, and the objective stress rates are discussed and clarified. The difference between the consistent Jacobian matrix (which, in the ABAQUS UMAT user material subroutine is referred to as DDSDDE) and the material tangent moduli ( C e ) needed for the stress update is pointed out and emphasized in this paper. While the former is derived based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress, the latter is derived using the Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress. Understanding the difference between these two objective stress rates is crucial for correctly implementing a constitutive model, especially a rate form constitutive relation, and for ensuring fast convergence. Specifically, the implementation requires the stresses to be updated correctly. For this, the strains must be computed directly from the deformation gradient and corresponding strain measure (for a total form model). Alternatively, the material tangent moduli derived from the corresponding Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress of the constitutive relation (for a rate form model) should be used. Given that this requirement is satisfied, the consistent Jacobian matrix only influences the rate of convergence. Its derivation should be based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress to ensure fast convergence; however, the use of a different objective stress rate may also be possible. The error associated

  17. Finite Amplitude Ocean Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    are known as intermediate or transitional water waves and if the depth of the water column is less than 1/20 of wavelength, they are called shallow water waves. In the case of both these waves, the particle motion is elliptical. Particle motions are shown in Figure 1. The velocity of waves is generally referred to as wave.

  18. Biset functors for finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Bouc, Serge

    2010-01-01

    This volume exposes the theory of biset functors for finite groups, which yields a unified framework for operations of induction, restriction, inflation, deflation and transport by isomorphism. The first part recalls the basics on biset categories and biset functors. The second part is concerned with the Burnside functor and the functor of complex characters, together with semisimplicity issues and an overview of Green biset functors. The last part is devoted to biset functors defined over p-groups for a fixed prime number p. This includes the structure of the functor of rational representations and rational p-biset functors. The last two chapters expose three applications of biset functors to long-standing open problems, in particular the structure of the Dade group of an arbitrary finite p-group.This book is intended both to students and researchers, as it gives a didactic exposition of the basics and a rewriting of advanced results in the area, with some new ideas and proofs.

  19. Essentially finitely indecomposable QTAG-Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alveera Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A right module $M$ over an associative ring with unity is a $QTAG$-module if every finitely generated submodule of any homomorphic image of $M$ is a direct sum of uniserial modules. There are many fascinating results related to these modules and essentially indecomposable modules are extensively researched. Motivated by these modules we generalize them as essentially finitely indecomposable modules whose every direct decomposition $M=\\bigoplus\\limits_{k\\in I} M_k$ implies that there exists a positive integer $n$ such that $H_n(M_i=0$ for all $M_i$'s except for a finite number of $M_i$'s. Here we investigate these modules and their relationship with $HT$-modules. The cases when the modules are not $HT$-modules are especially highlighted.

  20. Particle diffusion by magnetic perturbations of axisymmetric geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mynick, H.E.; Krommes, J.A.

    1979-08-01

    The quasilinear theory of collisionless test particle diffusion in stochastic magnetic fields is extended to include the effects of finite gyroradius, particle drifts, and magnetic trapping. Runaway confinement is substantially improved relative to earlier estimates which assumed that particles exactly followed field lines. Trapped particles are not expected to be stochastic.

  1. Elementary particles. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranft, G.; Ranft, J.

    1977-01-01

    In this part the subject is covered under the following headings, methods for producing high-energy particles; interaction of high-energy particles with matter; methods for the detection of high-energy particles; symmetry properties and conservation laws; quantum number and selection rules; theorem of scattering behaviour at asymptotically high energies; statistical methods in elementary particle physics; interaction of high-energy particles with nuclei; relations of high-energy physics to other branches of science and its response to engineering. Intended as information on high-energy physics for graduate students and research workers familiar with the fundamentals of classical and quantum physics

  2. Cycles through all finite vertex sets in infinite graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kundgen, Andre; Li, Binlong; Thomassen, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    that every one-ended planar cubic 3-connected bipartite graph has a Hamiltonian curve. It is also equivalent to the statement that every planar cubic 3-connected bipartite graph with a nowhere-zero 3-flow (with no restriction on the number of ends) has a Hamiltonian curve. However, there are 7-ended planar......A closed curve in the Freudenthal compactification |G| of an infinite locally finite graph G is called a Hamiltonian curve if it meets every vertex of G exactly once (and hence it meets every end at least once). We prove that |G| has a Hamiltonian curve if and only if every finite vertex set of G...... is contained in a cycle of G. We apply this to extend a number of results and conjectures on finite graphs to Hamiltonian curves in infinite locally finite graphs. For example, Barnette’s conjecture (that every finite planar cubic 3-connected bipartite graph is Hamiltonian) is equivalent to the statement...

  3. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.W. de.

    1986-01-01

    The consequences of the incorporation of finite temperature effects in fields theories are investigated. Particularly, we consider the sypersymmetric non-linear sigma model, calculating the effective potencial in the large N limit. Initially, we present the 1/N expantion formalism and, for the O(N) model of scalar field, we show the impossibility of spontaneous symmetry breaking. Next, we study the same model at finite temperature and in the presence of conserved charges (the O(N) symmetry's generator). We conclude that these conserved charges explicitly break the symmetry. We introduce a calculation method for the thermodynamic potential of the theory in the presence of chemical potentials. We present an introduction to Supersymmetry in the aim of describing some important concepts for the treatment at T>0. We show that Suppersymmetry is broken for any T>0, in opposition to what one expects, by the solution of the Hierachy Problem. (author) [pt

  4. Two-Way Communication with a Single Quantum Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Santo, Flavio; Dakić, Borivoje

    2018-02-01

    In this Letter we show that communication when restricted to a single information carrier (i.e., single particle) and finite speed of propagation is fundamentally limited for classical systems. On the other hand, quantum systems can surpass this limitation. We show that communication bounded to the exchange of a single quantum particle (in superposition of different spatial locations) can result in "two-way signaling," which is impossible in classical physics. We quantify the discrepancy between classical and quantum scenarios by the probability of winning a game played by distant players. We generalize our result to an arbitrary number of parties and we show that the probability of success is asymptotically decreasing to zero as the number of parties grows, for all classical strategies. In contrast, quantum strategy allows players to win the game with certainty.

  5. Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.R. Ghoreishy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This research work is devoted to the footprint analysis of a steel-belted radial tyre (185/65R14 under vertical static load using finite element method. Two models have been developed in which in the first model the tread patterns were replaced by simple ribs while the second model was consisted of details of the tread blocks. Linear elastic and hyper elastic (Arruda-Boyce material models were selected to describe the mechanical behavior of the reinforcing and rubbery parts, respectively. The above two finite element models of the tyre were analyzed under inflation pressure and vertical static loads. The second model (with detailed tread patterns was analyzed with and without friction effect between tread and contact surfaces. In every stage of the analysis, the results were compared with the experimental data to confirm the accuracy and applicability of the model. Results showed that neglecting the tread pattern design not only reduces the computational cost and effort but also the differences between computed deformations do not show significant changes. However, more complicated variables such as shape and area of the footprint zone and contact pressure are affected considerably by the finite element model selected for the tread blocks. In addition, inclusion of friction even in static state changes these variables significantly.

  6. Learning Extended Finite State Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Sofia; Howar, Falk; Jonsson, Bengt; Steffen, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    We present an active learning algorithm for inferring extended finite state machines (EFSM)s, combining data flow and control behavior. Key to our learning technique is a novel learning model based on so-called tree queries. The learning algorithm uses the tree queries to infer symbolic data constraints on parameters, e.g., sequence numbers, time stamps, identifiers, or even simple arithmetic. We describe sufficient conditions for the properties that the symbolic constraints provided by a tree query in general must have to be usable in our learning model. We have evaluated our algorithm in a black-box scenario, where tree queries are realized through (black-box) testing. Our case studies include connection establishment in TCP and a priority queue from the Java Class Library.

  7. Exact Solutions of Fragmentation Equations with General Fragmentation Rates and Separable Particles Distribution Kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Oukouomi Noutchie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We make use of Laplace transform techniques and the method of characteristics to solve fragmentation equations explicitly. Our result is a breakthrough in the analysis of pure fragmentation equations as this is the first instance where an exact solution is provided for the fragmentation evolution equation with general fragmentation rates. This paper is the key for resolving most of the open problems in fragmentation theory including “shattering” and the sudden appearance of infinitely many particles in some systems with initial finite particles number.

  8. Sagan numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Mendonça, J. Ricardo G.

    2012-01-01

    We define a new class of numbers based on the first occurrence of certain patterns of zeros and ones in the expansion of irracional numbers in a given basis and call them Sagan numbers, since they were first mentioned, in a special case, by the North-american astronomer Carl E. Sagan in his science-fiction novel "Contact." Sagan numbers hold connections with a wealth of mathematical ideas. We describe some properties of the newly defined numbers and indicate directions for further amusement.

  9. Fibonacci numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Vorob'ev, Nikolai Nikolaevich

    2011-01-01

    Fibonacci numbers date back to an 800-year-old problem concerning the number of offspring born in a single year to a pair of rabbits. This book offers the solution and explores the occurrence of Fibonacci numbers in number theory, continued fractions, and geometry. A discussion of the ""golden section"" rectangle, in which the lengths of the sides can be expressed as a ration of two successive Fibonacci numbers, draws upon attempts by ancient and medieval thinkers to base aesthetic and philosophical principles on the beauty of these figures. Recreational readers as well as students and teacher

  10. Number names and number understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye; Misfeldt, Morten

    2014-01-01

    through using mathematical names for the numbers such as one-ten-one for 11 and five-ten-six for 56. The project combines the renaming of numbers with supporting the teaching with the new number names. Our hypothesis is that Danish children have more difficulties learning and working with numbers, because...... the Danish number names are more complicated than in other languages. Keywords: A research project in grade 0 and 1th in a Danish school, Base-10 system, two-digit number names, semiotic, cognitive perspectives....

  11. Real-Time Simulation of Coaxial Rotor Configurations with Combined Finite State Dynamic Wake and VPM

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jinggen; He, Chengjian

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a first-principle based finite state dynamic rotor wake model that addresses the complex aerodynamic interference inherent to coaxial rotor configurations in support of advanced vertical lift aircraft simulation, design, and analysis. The high fidelity rotor dynamic wake solution combines an enhanced real-time finite state dynamic wake model (DYW) with a first-principle based viscous Vortex Particle Method (VPM). The finite state dynamic wake model provides a state-spa...

  12. A Finite Element Approach to Modeling Abrasive Wear Modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldman, M.; van der Heide, Emile; Tinga, Tiedo; Masen, Marc Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Machine components operating in sandy environments will wear because of the abrasive interaction with sand particles. In this work, a method is derived to predict the amount of wear caused by such abrasive action, in order to improve the maintenance concept of the components. A finite element model

  13. Counting Subspaces of a Finite Vector Space – 1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    counting problem in linear algebra involving finite fields. Vectors with real coordinates arise naturally in our ef- forts to describe nature by mathematics. Space is de- scribed by three real coordinates, space-time by four. Physicists need to keep track of the position and mo- mentum of a particle in space in order to be able to.

  14. User guide for MODPATH version 6 - A particle-tracking model for MODFLOW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, David W.

    2012-01-01

    MODPATH is a particle-tracking post-processing model that computes three-dimensional flow paths using output from groundwater flow simulations based on MODFLOW, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) finite-difference groundwater flow model. This report documents MODPATH version 6. Previous versions were documented in USGS Open-File Reports 89-381 and 94-464. The program uses a semianalytical particle-tracking scheme that allows an analytical expression of a particle's flow path to be obtained within each finite-difference grid cell. A particle's path is computed by tracking the particle from one cell to the next until it reaches a boundary, an internal sink/source, or satisfies another termination criterion. Data input to MODPATH consists of a combination of MODFLOW input data files, MODFLOW head and flow output files, and other input files specific to MODPATH. Output from MODPATH consists of several output files, including a number of particle coordinate output files intended to serve as input data for other programs that process, analyze, and display the results in various ways. MODPATH is written in FORTRAN and can be compiled by any FORTRAN compiler that fully supports FORTRAN-2003 or by most commercially available FORTRAN-95 compilers that support the major FORTRAN-2003 language extensions.

  15. Combinatorics of finite sets

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Coherent treatment provides comprehensive view of basic methods and results of the combinatorial study of finite set systems. The Clements-Lindstrom extension of the Kruskal-Katona theorem to multisets is explored, as is the Greene-Kleitman result concerning k-saturated chain partitions of general partially ordered sets. Connections with Dilworth's theorem, the marriage problem, and probability are also discussed. Each chapter ends with a helpful series of exercises and outline solutions appear at the end. ""An excellent text for a topics course in discrete mathematics."" - Bulletin of the Ame

  16. Optical Finite Element Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, David; Taylor, Bradley K.

    1986-01-01

    A new high-accuracy optical linear algebra processor (OLAP) with many advantageous features is described. It achieves floating point accuracy, handles bipolar data by sign-magnitude representation, performs LU decomposition using only one channel, easily partitions and considers data flow. A new application (finite element (FE) structural analysis) for OLAPs is introduced and the results of a case study presented. Error sources in encoded OLAPs are addressed for the first time. Their modeling and simulation are discussed and quantitative data are presented. Dominant error sources and the effects of composite error sources are analyzed.

  17. Density form factors of the 1D Bose gas for finite entropy states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Nardis, J.; Panfil, M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the Lieb-Liniger model for a gas of bosonic delta-interacting particles. Using Algebraic Bethe Ansatz results we compute the thermodynamic limit of the form factors of the density operator between finite entropy eigenstates such as finite temperature states or generic non-equilibrium

  18. Finite-size scaling of survival probability in branching processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Millan, Rosalba; Font-Clos, Francesc; Corral, Álvaro

    2015-04-01

    Branching processes pervade many models in statistical physics. We investigate the survival probability of a Galton-Watson branching process after a finite number of generations. We derive analytically the existence of finite-size scaling for the survival probability as a function of the control parameter and the maximum number of generations, obtaining the critical exponents as well as the exact scaling function, which is G(y)=2ye(y)/(e(y)-1), with y the rescaled distance to the critical point. Our findings are valid for any branching process of the Galton-Watson type, independently of the distribution of the number of offspring, provided its variance is finite. This proves the universal behavior of the finite-size effects in branching processes, including the universality of the metric factors. The direct relation to mean-field percolation is also discussed.

  19. Light particles in turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagendra Prakash, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with the broad topic of particles in turbulence, which has applications in a diverse number of fields. A vast majority of fluid flows found in nature and in the industry are turbulent and contain dispersed elements. In this thesis, I have focused on light particles (air bubbles in

  20. Transfinite Numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transfinite Numbers. What is Infinity? S M Srivastava. In a series of revolutionary articles written during the last quarter of the nineteenth century, the great Ger- man mathematician Georg Cantor removed the age-old mistrust of infinity and created an exceptionally beau- tiful and useful theory of transfinite numbers. This is.

  1. Algebraic coding theory over finite commutative rings

    CERN Document Server

    Dougherty, Steven T

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a self-contained introduction to algebraic coding theory over finite Frobenius rings. It is the first to offer a comprehensive account on the subject. Coding theory has its origins in the engineering problem of effective electronic communication where the alphabet is generally the binary field. Since its inception, it has grown as a branch of mathematics, and has since been expanded to consider any finite field, and later also Frobenius rings, as its alphabet. This book presents a broad view of the subject as a branch of pure mathematics and relates major results to other fields, including combinatorics, number theory and ring theory. Suitable for graduate students, the book will be of interest to anyone working in the field of coding theory, as well as algebraists and number theorists looking to apply coding theory to their own work.

  2. Role of interparticle friction and particle-scale elasticity in the shear-strength mechanism of three-dimensional granular media (CD ROM E 79 031308 Article Number 031308 part 1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antony, S.J.; Kruyt, Nicolaas P.

    2009-01-01

    The interlink between particle-scale properties and macroscopic behavior of three-dimensional granular media subjected to mechanical loading is studied intensively by scientists and engineers, but not yet well understood. Here we study the role of key particle-scale properties, such as interparticle

  3. Finiteness of corner vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Jiten C.; Biswas, Sougata; Panda, Swapnendu

    2018-04-01

    Till date, the sequence of vortices present in the solid corners of steady internal viscous incompressible flows was thought to be infinite. However, the already existing and most recent geometric theories on incompressible viscous flows that express vortical structures in terms of critical points in bounded domains indicate a strong opposition to this notion of infiniteness. In this study, we endeavor to bridge the gap between the two opposing stream of thoughts by diagnosing the assumptions of the existing theorems on such vortices. We provide our own set of proofs for establishing the finiteness of the sequence of corner vortices by making use of the continuum hypothesis and Kolmogorov scale, which guarantee a nonzero scale for the smallest vortex structure possible in incompressible viscous flows. We point out that the notion of infiniteness resulting from discrete self-similarity of the vortex structures is not physically feasible. Making use of some elementary concepts of mathematical analysis and our own construction of diametric disks, we conclude that the sequence of corner vortices is finite.

  4. Fluctuations, Finite-Size Effects and the Thermodynamic Limit in Computer Simulations: Revisiting the Spatial Block Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Heidari

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The spatial block analysis (SBA method has been introduced to efficiently extrapolate thermodynamic quantities from finite-size computer simulations of a large variety of physical systems. In the particular case of simple liquids and liquid mixtures, by subdividing the simulation box into blocks of increasing size and calculating volume-dependent fluctuations of the number of particles, it is possible to extrapolate the bulk isothermal compressibility and Kirkwood–Buff integrals in the thermodynamic limit. Only by explicitly including finite-size effects, ubiquitous in computer simulations, into the SBA method, the extrapolation to the thermodynamic limit can be achieved. In this review, we discuss two of these finite-size effects in the context of the SBA method due to (i the statistical ensemble and (ii the finite integration domains used in computer simulations. To illustrate the method, we consider prototypical liquids and liquid mixtures described by truncated and shifted Lennard–Jones (TSLJ potentials. Furthermore, we show some of the most recent developments of the SBA method, in particular its use to calculate chemical potentials of liquids in a wide range of density/concentration conditions.

  5. Selfconsistent calculations at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brack, M.; Quentin, P.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations have been done for the spherical nuclei 40 Ca, 208 Pb and the hypothetical superheavy nucleus with Z=114, A=298, as well as for the deformed nucleus 168 Yb. The temperature T was varied from zero up to 5 MeV. For T>3 MeV, some numerical problems arise in connection with the optimization of the basis when calculating deformed nuclei. However, at these high temperatures the occupation numbers in the continuum are sufficiently large so that the nucleus starts evaporating particles and no equilibrium state can be described. Results are obtained for excitation energies and entropies. (Auth.)

  6. Optimal performance of generalized heat engines with finite-size baths of arbitrary multiple conserved quantities beyond independent-and-identical-distribution scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kosuke; Hayashi, Masahito

    2018-01-01

    In quantum thermodynamics, effects of finiteness of the baths have been less considered. In particular, there is no general theory which focuses on finiteness of the baths of multiple conserved quantities. Then, we investigate how the optimal performance of generalized heat engines with multiple conserved quantities alters in response to the size of the baths. In the context of general theories of quantum thermodynamics, the size of the baths has been given in terms of the number of identical copies of a system, which does not cover even such a natural scaling as the volume. In consideration of the asymptotic extensivity, we deal with a generic scaling of the baths to naturally include the volume scaling. Based on it, we derive a bound for the performance of generalized heat engines reflecting finite-size effects of the baths, which we call fine-grained generalized Carnot bound. We also construct a protocol to achieve the optimal performance of the engine given by this bound. Finally, applying the obtained general theory, we deal with simple examples of generalized heat engines. As for an example of non-independent-and-identical-distribution scaling and multiple conserved quantities, we investigate a heat engine with two baths composed of an ideal gas exchanging particles, where the volume scaling is applied. The result implies that the mass of the particle explicitly affects the performance of this engine with finite-size baths.

  7. Bottomonium dissociation in a finite density plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson R.F. Braga

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a holographic description of the thermal behavior of bb¯ heavy vector mesons inside a plasma at finite temperature and density. The meson dissociation in the medium is represented by the decrease in the height of the spectral function peaks. In order to find a description for the evolution of the quasi-states with temperature and chemical potential it is crucial to use a model that is consistent with the decay constant behavior. The reason is that the height of a spectral function peak is related to the value of the zero temperature decay constant of the corresponding particle. AdS/QCD holographic models are in general not consistent with the observation that decay constants of heavy vector mesons decrease with radial excitation level. However, it was recently shown that using a soft wall background and calculating the correlation functions at a finite position of anti-de Sitter space, associated with an ultraviolet energy scale, it is possible to describe the observed behavior. Here we extend this proposal to the case of finite temperature T and chemical potential μ. A clear picture of the dissociation of bottomonium states as a function of μ and T emerges from the spectral function. The energy scales where the change in chemical potential leads to changes in the thermal properties of the mesons is consistent with QCD expectations.

  8. Fluidization of spherocylindrical particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahajan Vinay V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiphase (gas-solid flows are encountered in numerous industrial applications such as pharmaceutical, food, agricultural processing and energy generation. A coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD and discrete element method (DEM approach is a popular way to study such flows at a particle scale. However, most of these studies deal with spherical particles while in reality, the particles are rarely spherical. The particle shape can have significant effect on hydrodynamics in a fluidized bed. Moreover, most studies in literature use inaccurate drag laws because accurate laws are not readily available. The drag force acting on a non-spherical particle can vary considerably with particle shape, orientation with the flow, Reynolds number and packing fraction. In this work, the CFD-DEM approach is extended to model a laboratory scale fluidized bed of spherocylinder (rod-like particles. These rod-like particles can be classified as Geldart D particles and have an aspect ratio of 4. Experiments are performed to study the particle flow behavior in a quasi-2D fluidized bed. Numerically obtained results for pressure drop and bed height are compared with experiments. The capability of CFD-DEM approach to efficiently describe the global bed dynamics for fluidized bed of rod-like particles is demonstrated.

  9. Fluidization of spherocylindrical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Vinay V.; Nijssen, Tim M. J.; Fitzgerald, Barry W.; Hofman, Jeroen; Kuipers, Hans; Padding, Johan T.

    2017-06-01

    Multiphase (gas-solid) flows are encountered in numerous industrial applications such as pharmaceutical, food, agricultural processing and energy generation. A coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and discrete element method (DEM) approach is a popular way to study such flows at a particle scale. However, most of these studies deal with spherical particles while in reality, the particles are rarely spherical. The particle shape can have significant effect on hydrodynamics in a fluidized bed. Moreover, most studies in literature use inaccurate drag laws because accurate laws are not readily available. The drag force acting on a non-spherical particle can vary considerably with particle shape, orientation with the flow, Reynolds number and packing fraction. In this work, the CFD-DEM approach is extended to model a laboratory scale fluidized bed of spherocylinder (rod-like) particles. These rod-like particles can be classified as Geldart D particles and have an aspect ratio of 4. Experiments are performed to study the particle flow behavior in a quasi-2D fluidized bed. Numerically obtained results for pressure drop and bed height are compared with experiments. The capability of CFD-DEM approach to efficiently describe the global bed dynamics for fluidized bed of rod-like particles is demonstrated.

  10. Number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, George E

    1994-01-01

    Although mathematics majors are usually conversant with number theory by the time they have completed a course in abstract algebra, other undergraduates, especially those in education and the liberal arts, often need a more basic introduction to the topic.In this book the author solves the problem of maintaining the interest of students at both levels by offering a combinatorial approach to elementary number theory. In studying number theory from such a perspective, mathematics majors are spared repetition and provided with new insights, while other students benefit from the consequent simpl

  11. The low-energy effective theory of QCD at small quark masses in a finite volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehner, Christoph

    2010-01-15

    At low energies the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) can be described effectively in terms of the lightest particles of the theory, the pions. This approximation is valid for temperatures well below the mass difference of the pions to the next heavier particles. We study the low-energy effective theory at very small quark masses in a finite volume V. The corresponding perturbative expansion in 1/{radical}(V) is called {epsilon} expansion. At each order of this expansion a finite number of low-energy constants completely determine the effective theory. These low-energy constants are of great phenomenological importance. In the leading order of the {epsilon} expansion, called {epsilon} regime, the theory becomes zero-dimensional and is therefore described by random matrix theory (RMT). The dimensionless quantities of RMT are mapped to dimensionful quantities of the low-energy effective theory using the leading-order lowenergy constants {sigma} and F. In this way {sigma} and F can be obtained from lattice QCD simulations in the '' regime by a fit to RMT predictions. For typical volumes of state-of-the-art lattice QCD simulations, finite-volume corrections to the RMT prediction cannot be neglected. These corrections can be calculated in higher orders of the {epsilon} expansion. We calculate the finite-volume corrections to {sigma} and F at next-to-next-to-leading order in the {epsilon} expansion. We also discuss non-universal modifications of the theory due to the finite volume. These results are then applied to lattice QCD simulations, and we extract {sigma} and F from eigenvalue correlation functions of the Dirac operator. As a side result, we provide a proof of equivalence between the parametrization of the partially quenched low-energy effective theory without singlet particle and that of the super-Riemannian manifold used earlier in the literature. Furthermore, we calculate a special version of the massless sunset diagram at finite volume without

  12. Nice numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, John

    2016-01-01

    In this intriguing book, John Barnes takes us on a journey through aspects of numbers much as he took us on a geometrical journey in Gems of Geometry. Similarly originating from a series of lectures for adult students at Reading and Oxford University, this book touches a variety of amusing and fascinating topics regarding numbers and their uses both ancient and modern. The author intrigues and challenges his audience with both fundamental number topics such as prime numbers and cryptography, and themes of daily needs and pleasures such as counting one's assets, keeping track of time, and enjoying music. Puzzles and exercises at the end of each lecture offer additional inspiration, and numerous illustrations accompany the reader. Furthermore, a number of appendices provides in-depth insights into diverse topics such as Pascal’s triangle, the Rubik cube, Mersenne’s curious keyboards, and many others. A theme running through is the thought of what is our favourite number. Written in an engaging and witty sty...

  13. Level-density parameter of nuclei at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, C.; Kuo, T.T.S.; Stout, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    The contribution of particle-particle (hole-hole) and of particle-hole ring diagrams to the nuclear level-density parameter at finite temperature is calculated. We first derive the correlated grand potential with the above ring diagrams included to all orders by way of a finite temperature RPA equation. An expression for the correlated level-density parameter is then obtained by differentiating the grand potential. Results obtained for the 40 Ca nucleus with realistic matrix elements derived from the Paris potential are presented. The contribution of the RPA correlations is found to be important, being significantly larger than typical Hartree-Fock results. The temperature dependence of the level-density parameter derived in the present work is generally similar to that obtained in a schematic model. Comparison with available experimental data is discussed. (orig.)

  14. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 3. The Anti-particle

    CERN Multimedia

    Franck Close

    2008-01-01

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 3. The Anti-particle. It appears to be the stuff of science fiction. Associated with every elementary particle is an antiparticle which has the same mass and opposite charge. Should the two meet and combine, the result is annihilation - and a flash of light. Thanks to mysterious processes that occurred after the Big Bang there are a vastly greater number of particles than anti-particles. So how could their elusive existence be proved? At CERN particle physicists are crashing together subatomic particles at incredibly high speeds to create antimatter, which they hope will finally reveal what happened at the precise moment of the Big Bang to create the repertoire of elementary particles and antiparticles in existence today.

  15. Fuzzy Logic Particle Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    correlation displacement peak even when it is not the maximum peak, hence maximizing the information recovery from the correlation operation, maintaining the number of independent measurements, and minimizing the number of spurious velocity vectors. Correlation peaks are correctly identified in both high and low seed density cases. The correlation velocity vector map can then be used as a guide for the particle-tracking operation. Again fuzzy logic techniques are used, this time to identify the correct particle image pairings between exposures to determine particle displacements, and thus the velocity. Combining these two techniques makes use of the higher spatial resolution available from the particle tracking. Particle tracking alone may not be possible in the high seed density images typically required for achieving good results from the correlation technique. This two-staged velocimetric technique can measure particle velocities with high spatial resolution over a broad range of seeding densities.

  16. Particle Swarm Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Gerhard; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski Jaroslaw

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how the search algorithm known as particle swarm optimization performs. Here, particle swarm optimization is applied to structural design problems, but the method has a much wider range of possible applications. The paper's new contributions are improvements to the particle swarm optimization algorithm and conclusions and recommendations as to the utility of the algorithm, Results of numerical experiments for both continuous and discrete applications are presented in the paper. The results indicate that the particle swarm optimization algorithm does locate the constrained minimum design in continuous applications with very good precision, albeit at a much higher computational cost than that of a typical gradient based optimizer. However, the true potential of particle swarm optimization is primarily in applications with discrete and/or discontinuous functions and variables. Additionally, particle swarm optimization has the potential of efficient computation with very large numbers of concurrently operating processors.

  17. Number names and number understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye; Misfeldt, Morten

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns the results from the first year of a three-year research project involving the relationship between Danish number names and their corresponding digits in the canonical base 10 system. The project aims to develop a system to help the students’ understanding of the base 10 system...... the Danish number names are more complicated than in other languages. Keywords: A research project in grade 0 and 1th in a Danish school, Base-10 system, two-digit number names, semiotic, cognitive perspectives....

  18. Funny Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore M. Porter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The struggle over cure rate measures in nineteenth-century asylums provides an exemplary instance of how, when used for official assessments of institutions, these numbers become sites of contestation. The evasion of goals and corruption of measures tends to make these numbers “funny” in the sense of becoming dis-honest, while the mismatch between boring, technical appearances and cunning backstage manipulations supplies dark humor. The dangers are evident in recent efforts to decentralize the functions of governments and corporations using incen-tives based on quantified targets.

  19. Measuring Communication in Parallel Communicating Finite Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Bordihn

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Systems of deterministic finite automata communicating by sending their states upon request are investigated, when the amount of communication is restricted. The computational power and decidability properties are studied for the case of returning centralized systems, when the number of necessary communications during the computations of the system is bounded by a function depending on the length of the input. It is proved that an infinite hierarchy of language families exists, depending on the number of messages sent during their most economical recognitions. Moreover, several properties are shown to be not semi-decidable for the systems under consideration.

  20. Axial anomaly at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, S.; Gupte, Neelima; Srinivasan, V.

    1985-01-01

    The Jackiw-Bardeen-Adler anomaly for QED 4 and QED 2 are calculated at finite temperature. It is found that the anomaly is independent of temperature. Ishikawa's method [1984, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 53 1615] for calculating the quantised Hall effect is extended to finite temperature. (author)

  1. Solution of Finite Element Equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    An important step in solving any problem by the finite element method is the solution of the global equations. Numerical solution of linear equations is a subject covered in most courses in numerical analysis. However, the equations encountered in most finite element applications have some special...... features that justify the development of specialized solution algorithms....

  2. Finite strain discrete dislocation plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshpande, VS; Needleman, A; Van der Giessen, E

    2003-01-01

    A framework for carrying out finite deformation discrete dislocation plasticity calculations is presented. The discrete dislocations are presumed to be adequately represented by the singular linear elastic fields so that the large deformations near dislocation cores are not modeled. The finite

  3. Number Guessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezin, Fatin

    2009-01-01

    It is instructive and interesting to find hidden numbers by using different positional numeration systems. Most of the present guessing techniques use the binary system expressed as less-than, greater-than or present-absent type information. This article describes how, by employing four cards having integers 1-64 written in different colours, one…

  4. Transfinite Numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 3. Transfinite Numbers - What is Infinity? S M Srivastava. General Article Volume 2 Issue 3 March 1997 pp 58-68. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/03/0058-0068 ...

  5. Solution of Differential Equation by Means of Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Daigoro; 林, 大五郎

    1989-01-01

    The finite element method may be defined as the modern "Method of Weighted Residuals" (MWR). This paper describes how to solve the differential equations which are essential in order to explain quantiatively a number of valuable geological and geodynamic problems.The methods to solve linear differential equation, non-linear equation, non-linear non-steady equation, Laplace equation and incompreeible New tonian flow problem are explained by means of the Galerkin finite element method.

  6. Thermo field dynamics: a quantum field theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancini, F.; Marinaro, M.; Matsumoto, H.

    1988-01-01

    A brief review of the theory of thermo field dynamics (TFD) is presented. TFD is introduced and developed by Umezawa and his coworkers at finite temperature. The most significant concept in TFD is that of a thermal vacuum which satisfies some conditions denoted as thermal state conditions. The TFD permits to reformulate theories at finite temperature. There is no need in an additional principle to determine particle distributions at T ≠ 0. Temperature and other macroscopic parameters are introduced in the definition of the vacuum state. All operator formalisms used in quantum field theory at T=0 are preserved, although the field degrees of freedom are doubled. 8 refs

  7. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Today\\'s large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Can Substorm Particle Acceleration Be Applied to Solar Flares?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birn, J. [Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Battaglia, M. [Institute of 4D Technologies, School of Engineering, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, CH-5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Fletcher, L. [University of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hesse, M. [Birkeland Centre for Space Science, Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, NO-5007 Bergen (Norway); Neukirch, T., E-mail: jbirn@lanl.gov [University of St. Andrews, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-20

    Using test particle studies in the electromagnetic fields of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of magnetic reconnection, we study the energization of charged particles in the context of the standard two-ribbon flare picture in analogy to the standard magnetospheric substorm paradigm. In particular, we investigate the effects of the collapsing field (“collapsing magnetic trap”) below a reconnection site, which has been demonstrated to be the major acceleration mechanism that causes energetic particle acceleration and injections observed in Earth’s magnetotail associated with substorms and other impulsive events. We contrast an initially force-free, high-shear field (low beta) with low and moderate shear, finite-pressure (high-beta) arcade structures, where beta represents the ratio between gas (plasma) and magnetic pressure. We demonstrate that the energization affects large numbers of particles, but the acceleration is modest in the presence of a significant shear field. Without incorporating loss mechanisms, the effect on particles at different energies is similar, akin to adiabatic heating, and thus is not a likely mechanism to generate a power-law tail onto a (heated or not heated) Maxwellian velocity distribution.

  9. Blocks of finite groups and their invariants

    CERN Document Server

    Sambale, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Providing a nearly complete selection of up-to-date methods and results on block invariants with respect to their defect groups, this book covers the classical theory pioneered by Brauer, the modern theory of fusion systems introduced by Puig, the geometry of numbers developed by Minkowski, the classification of finite simple groups, and various computer assisted methods. In a powerful combination, these tools are applied to solve many special cases of famous open conjectures in the representation theory of finite groups. Most of the material is drawn from peer-reviewed journal articles, but there are also new previously unpublished results. In order to make the text self-contained, detailed proofs are given whenever possible. Several tables add to the text's usefulness as a reference. The book is aimed at experts in group theory or representation theory who may wish to make use of the presented ideas in their research.

  10. Multicomplementary operators via finite Fourier transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimov, Andrei B; Sanchez-Soto, Luis L; Guise, Hubert de

    2005-01-01

    A complete set of d + 1 mutually unbiased bases exists in a Hilbert space of dimension d, whenever d is a power of a prime. We discuss a simple construction of d + 1 disjoint classes (each one having d - 1 commuting operators) such that the corresponding eigenstates form sets of unbiased bases. Such a construction works properly for prime dimension. We investigate an alternative construction in which the real numbers that label the classes are replaced by a finite field having d elements. One of these classes is diagonal, and can be mapped to cyclic operators by means of the finite Fourier transform, which allows one to understand complementarity in a similar way as for the position-momentum pair in standard quantum mechanics. The relevant examples of two and three qubits and two qutrits are discussed in detail

  11. Mathematics and computer science: coping with finiteness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, D E

    1976-12-11

    By presenting these examples, I have tried to illustrate four main points. 1) Finite numbers can be really enormous, and the known universe is very small. Therefore the distinction between finite and infinite is not as relevant as the distinction between realistic and unrealistic. 2) In many cases there are subtle ways to solve very large problems quickly, in spite of the fact that they appear at first to require examination of too many possibilities. 3) There are also cases where we can prove that a fairly natural problem is intrinsically hard, far beyond our conceivable capabilities. 4) It takes a good deal of skill to decide whether a given problem is in the easy or hard class; but even if a problem does turn out to be hard there are useful and interesting ways to change it into one that can be done satisfactorily.

  12. The Asymptotic Behavior of Particle Size Distribution Undergoing Brownian Coagulation Based on the Spline-Based Method and TEMOM Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing He

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the particle size distribution is reconstructed using finite moments based on a converted spline-based method, in which the number of linear system of equations to be solved reduced from 4m × 4m to (m + 3 × (m + 3 for (m + 1 nodes by using cubic spline compared to the original method. The results are verified by comparing with the reference firstly. Then coupling with the Taylor-series expansion moment method, the evolution of particle size distribution undergoing Brownian coagulation and its asymptotic behavior are investigated.

  13. Cosmic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritszh, Harald; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Muenchen

    1986-01-01

    The paper on 'Cosmic particles' was presented at the conference on 'The early universe and its evolution', Erice, Italy 1986. The link between ideas in cosmology and in elementary particle physics is examined. The subject is discussed under the following topic headings: cosmic kinetics, cosmic dynamics and general relativity, dynamics of the dust universe, particle physics, unity of quarks and leptons, the hot universe and standard particle physics, creation of matter, and the inflation of the universe. (U.K.)

  14. Finite element and finite difference methods in electromagnetic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, MA

    2013-01-01

    This second volume in the Progress in Electromagnetic Research series examines recent advances in computational electromagnetics, with emphasis on scattering, as brought about by new formulations and algorithms which use finite element or finite difference techniques. Containing contributions by some of the world's leading experts, the papers thoroughly review and analyze this rapidly evolving area of computational electromagnetics. Covering topics ranging from the new finite-element based formulation for representing time-harmonic vector fields in 3-D inhomogeneous media using two coupled sca

  15. Strange particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinowsky, W.

    1989-01-01

    Work done in the mid 1950s at Brookhaven National Laboratory on strange particles is described. Experiments were done on the Cosmotron. The author describes his own and others' work on neutral kaons, lambda and theta particles and points out the theoretical gap between predictions and experimental findings. By the end of the decade, the theory of strange particles was better understood. (UK)

  16. Stirring inertia in time-dependent low Reynolds number flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yecko, Philip; Luchtenburg, Dirk Martin (Mark); Forgoston, Eric; Billings, Lora

    2017-11-01

    Diagnosis of a kinematic flow and its transport using Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) based on finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) neglects dynamical effects, such as pressure, as well as dynamically important constraints, such as potential vorticity conservation. Chaotic advection, on the other hand, often neglects inertial effects, which are prominent in LCS. We present results for very low Reynolds number laboratory flows, including a Stokes double gyre, vertically sheared strain and a four roll mill. Images of tracer (dye) and FTLE fields computed from particle image velocimetry (PIV) reveal complementary sets of flow structures, giving a more complete picture of transport in these flows. We confirm by computing FTLE of an exact time-dependent Stokes flow solution and present implications of these findings for inertial object transport in flows. Support of NSF DMS-1418956 is gratefully acknoweldged.

  17. Fundamentals of gas particle flow

    CERN Document Server

    Rudinger, G

    1980-01-01

    Fundamentals of Gas-Particle Flow is an edited, updated, and expanded version of a number of lectures presented on the "Gas-Solid Suspensions” course organized by the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics. Materials presented in this book are mostly analytical in nature, but some experimental techniques are included. The book focuses on relaxation processes, including the viscous drag of single particles, drag in gas-particles flow, gas-particle heat transfer, equilibrium, and frozen flow. It also discusses the dynamics of single particles, such as particles in an arbitrary flow, in a r

  18. Gyrokinetic simulation of finite-β plasmas on parallel architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynders, J.V.W.

    1993-01-01

    Much research exists on the linear and non-linear properties of plasma microinstabilities induced by density and temperature gradients. There has been an interest in the electromagnetic or finite-β effects on these microinstabilities. This thesis focuses on the finite-β modification of an ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven microinstability in a two-dimensional shearless and sheared-slab geometries. A gyrokinetic model is employed in the numerical and analytic studies of this instability. Chapter 1 introduces the electromagnetic gyrokinetic model employed in the numerical and analytic studies of the ITG instability. Some discussion of the Klimontovich particle representation of the gyrokinetic Vlasov equation and a multiple scale model of the background plasma gradient is presented. Chapter 2 details the computational issues facing an electromagnetic gyrokinetic particle simulation of the ITG mode. An electromagnetic extension of the partially linearized algorithm is presented with a comparison of quiet particle initialization routines. Chapter 3 presents and compares algorithms for the gyrokinetic particle simulation technique on SIMD and MIMD computing platforms. Chapter 4 discusses electromagnetic gyrokinetic fluctuation theory and provides a comparison of analytic and numerical results. Chapter 5 contains a linear and a non-linear three-wave coupling analysis of the finite-β modified ITG mode in a shearless slab geometry. Comparisons are made with linear and partially linearized gyrokinetic simulation results. Chapter 6 presents results from a finite-β modified ITG mode in a sheared slab geometry. The linear dispersion relation is derived and results from an integral eigenvalue code are presented. Comparisons are made with the gyrokinetic particle code in a variety of limits with both adiabatic and non-adiabatic electrons. Evidence of ITG driven microtearing is presented

  19. Stochastic delocalization of finite populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyrhofer, Lukas; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    The localization of populations of replicating bacteria, viruses or autocatalytic chemicals arises in various contexts, such as ecology, evolution, medicine or chemistry. Several deterministic mathematical models have been used to characterize the conditions under which localized states can form, and how they break down due to convective driving forces. It has been repeatedly found that populations remain localized unless the bias exceeds a critical threshold value, and that close to the transition the population is characterized by a diverging length scale. These results, however, have been obtained upon ignoring number fluctuations (‘genetic drift’), which are inevitable given the discreteness of the replicating entities. Here, we study the localization/delocalization of a finite population in the presence of genetic drift. The population is modeled by a linear chain of subpopulations, or demes, which exchange migrants at a constant rate. Individuals in one particular deme, called ‘oasis’, receive a growth rate benefit, and the total population is regulated to have constant size N. In this ecological setting, we find that any finite population delocalizes on sufficiently long time scales. Depending on parameters, however, populations may remain localized for a very long time. The typical waiting time to delocalization increases exponentially with both population size and distance to the critical wind speed of the deterministic approximation. We augment these simulation results by a mathematical analysis that treats the reproduction and migration of individuals as branching random walks subject to global constraints. For a particular constraint, different from a fixed population size constraint, this model yields a solvable first moment equation. We find that this solvable model approximates very well the fixed population size model for large populations, but starts to deviate as population sizes are small. Nevertheless, the qualitative behavior of the

  20. Projection after variation in the finite-temperature Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanto, P.

    2017-11-01

    The finite-temperature Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) approximation often breaks symmetries of the underlying many-body Hamiltonian. Restricting the calculation of the HFB partition function to a subspace with good quantum numbers through projection after variation restores some of the correlations lost in breaking these symmetries, although effects of the broken symmetries such as sharp kinks at phase transitions remain. However, the most general projection after variation formula in the finite-temperature HFB approximation is limited by a sign ambiguity. Here, I extend the Pfaffian formula for the many-body traces of HFB density operators introduced by Robledo [L. M. Robledo, Phys. Rev. C. 79, 021302(R) (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevC.79.021302] to eliminate this sign ambiguity and evaluate the more complicated many-body traces required in projection after variation in the most general HFB case. The method is validated through a proof-of-principle calculation of the particle-number-projected HFB thermal energy in a simple model.