WorldWideScience

Sample records for finite particle number

  1. A finite particle number approach to physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, H.P.

    1984-01-01

    Starting from a discrete, self-generating and self-organizing, recursive model and self-consistent interpretive rules the author constructs: the scale constants of physics (3, 10, 137, 1.7x10 38 ); 3+1 Minkowski space with a discrete metric and the algebraic bound ΔepsilonΔtau >= 1; the Einstein-deBroglie relation; algebraic 'double slit' interference; a single time momentum space scattering theory connected to laboratory experience; an approximation to 'wave functions'; 'local' phase severence and hence both distant correlations and separability; baryon number, lepton number, charge and helicity; msub(p)/msub(e); a cosmology not in disagreement with current observations. (Auth.)

  2. Finite-particle-number approach to physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, H.P.

    1982-10-01

    Starting from a discrete, self-generating and self-organizing, recursive model and self-consistent interpretive rules we construct: the scale constants of physics (3,10,137,1.7x10/sup 38/); 3+1 Minkowski space with a discrete metric and the algebraic bound ..delta.. is an element of ..delta.. tau is greater than or equal to 1; the Einstein-deBroglie relation; algebraic double slit interference; a single-time momentum-space scattering theory connected to laboratory experience; an approximation to wave functions; local phase severance and hence both distant correlations and separability; baryon number, lepton number, charge and helicity; m/sub p//m/sub e/; a cosmology not in disagreement with current observations.

  3. Finite-particle-number approach to physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, H.P.

    1982-10-01

    Starting from a discrete, self-generating and self-organizing, recursive model and self-consistent interpretive rules we construct: the scale constants of physics (3,10,137,1.7x10 38 ); 3+1 Minkowski space with a discrete metric and the algebraic bound δ is an element of δ tau is greater than or equal to 1; the Einstein-deBroglie relation; algebraic double slit interference; a single-time momentum-space scattering theory connected to laboratory experience; an approximation to wave functions; local phase severance and hence both distant correlations and separability; baryon number, lepton number, charge and helicity; m/sub p//m/sub e/; a cosmology not in disagreement with current observations

  4. Axial asymmetry, finite particle number and the IBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casten, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Although the IBA-1 contains no solutions corresponding to a rigid triaxial shape, it does contain an effective asymmetry. This arises from zero point motion in a γ-soft potential leading to a non-zero mean or rms γ. Three aspects of this feature will be discussed: (1) The relation between IBA-1 calculations and the corresponding γ. This point is developed in the context of the Consistent Q Formalism (CQF) of the IBA. (2) The dependence of this asymmetry on boson number, N, and the exploitation of this dependence to set limits on both the relative and absolute values of N for deformed nuclei. (3) The relation between this asymmetry and the triaxiality arising from the introduction of cubic terms into the IBA Hamiltonian. Various observables will be inspected in order both to determine their sensitivity to these two structural features and to explore empirical ways of distinguishing which origin of asymmetry applies in any given nucleus. 16 references

  5. On quantum statistics for ensembles with a finite number of particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifonov, Evgenii D

    2011-01-01

    The well-known Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac quantum distributions can be considered as stationary solutions of kinetic equations for the mean occupation numbers in an ideal gas of an arbitrary finite number of identical particles. (methodological notes)

  6. Hydrodynamic interaction of two particles in confined linear shear flow at finite Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yiguang; Morris, Jeffrey F.; Koplik, Joel

    2007-11-01

    We discuss the hydrodynamic interactions of two solid bodies placed in linear shear flow between parallel plane walls in a periodic geometry at finite Reynolds number. The computations are based on the lattice Boltzmann method for particulate flow, validated here by comparison to previous results for a single particle. Most of our results pertain to cylinders in two dimensions but some examples are given for spheres in three dimensions. Either one mobile and one fixed particle or else two mobile particles are studied. The motion of a mobile particle is qualitatively similar in both cases at early times, exhibiting either trajectory reversal or bypass, depending upon the initial vector separation of the pair. At longer times, if a mobile particle does not approach a periodic image of the second, its trajectory tends to a stable limit point on the symmetry axis. The effect of interactions with periodic images is to produce nonconstant asymptotic long-time trajectories. For one free particle interacting with a fixed second particle within the unit cell, the free particle may either move to a fixed point or take up a limit cycle. Pairs of mobile particles starting from symmetric initial conditions are shown to asymptotically reach either fixed points, or mirror image limit cycles within the unit cell, or to bypass one another (and periodic images) indefinitely on a streamwise periodic trajectory. The limit cycle possibility requires finite Reynolds number and arises as a consequence of streamwise periodicity when the system length is sufficiently short.

  7. A Non-Perturbative, Finite Particle Number Approach to Relativistic Scattering Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindesay, James V

    2001-05-11

    We present integral equations for the scattering amplitudes of three scalar particles, using the Faddeev channel decomposition, which can be readily extended to any finite number of particles of any helicity. The solution of these equations, which have been demonstrated to be calculable, provide a non-perturbative way of obtaining relativistic scattering amplitudes for any finite number of particles that are Lorentz invariant, unitary, cluster decomposable and reduce unambiguously in the non-relativistic limit to the non-relativistic Faddeev equations. The aim of this program is to develop equations which explicitly depend upon physically observable input variables, and do not require ''renormalization'' or ''dressing'' of these parameters to connect them to the boundary states.

  8. Construction of Non-Perturbative, Unitary Particle-Antiparticle Amplitudes for Finite Particle Number Scattering Formalisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindesay, James V

    2002-01-01

    Starting from a unitary, Lorentz invariant two-particle scattering amplitude, we show how to use an identification and replacement process to construct a unique, unitary particle-antiparticle amplitude. This process differs from conventional on-shell Mandelstam s,t,u crossing in that the input and constructed amplitudes can be off-diagonal and off-energy shell. Further, amplitudes are constructed using the invariant parameters which are appropriate to use as driving terms in the multi-particle, multichannel nonperturbative, cluster decomposable, relativistic scattering equations of the Faddeev-type integral equations recently presented by Alfred, Kwizera, Lindesay and Noyes. It is therefore anticipated that when so employed, the resulting multi-channel solutions will also be unitary. The process preserves the usual particle-antiparticle symmetries. To illustrate this process, we construct a J=0 scattering length model chosen for simplicity. We also exhibit a class of physical models which contain a finite quantum mass parameter and are Lorentz invariant. These are constructed to reduce in the appropriate limits, and with the proper choice of value and sign of the interaction parameter, to the asymptotic solution of the nonrelativistic Coulomb problem, including the forward scattering singularity , the essential singularity in the phase, and the Bohr bound-state spectrum

  9. Phase transitions in ideal and weakly interacting Bose gases with a finite number of particles confined in a box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jianhui; Ma Yongli

    2009-01-01

    We generalize the scheme to characterize phase transitions of finite systems in a complex temperature plane and approach the classifications of phase transitions in ideal and weakly interacting Bose gases of a finite number of particles, confined in a cubic box of volume L 3 with different boundary conditions. For this finite ideal Bose system, by extending the classification parameters to all regions, we predict that the phase transition for periodic boundary conditions is of second order, while the transition in Dirichlet boundary conditions is of first order. For a weakly interacting Bose gas with periodic boundary conditions, we discuss the effects of finite particle numbers and inter-particle interactions on the nature of the phase transitions. We show that this homogenous weakly interacting Bose gas undergoes a second-order phase transition, which is in accordance with universality arguments for infinite systems. We also discuss the dependence of transition temperature on interaction strengths and particle numbers.

  10. Migration of finite sized particles in a laminar square channel flow from low to high Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, M., E-mail: micheline.abbas@ensiacet.fr [Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, Université de Toulouse INPT-UPS, 31030, Toulouse (France); CNRS, Fédération de recherche FERMaT, CNRS, 31400, Toulouse (France); Magaud, P. [CNRS, Fédération de recherche FERMaT, CNRS, 31400, Toulouse (France); Institut Clément Ader, Université de Toulouse UPS-INSA-ISAE-Mines Albi, 31400, Toulouse (France); Gao, Y. [Institut Clément Ader, Université de Toulouse UPS-INSA-ISAE-Mines Albi, 31400, Toulouse (France); Geoffroy, S. [CNRS, Fédération de recherche FERMaT, CNRS, 31400, Toulouse (France); Laboratoire Matériaux et Durabilité des Constructions, Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INSA, 31077, Toulouse (France)

    2014-12-15

    The migration of neutrally buoyant finite sized particles in a Newtonian square channel flow is investigated in the limit of very low solid volumetric concentration, within a wide range of channel Reynolds numbers Re = [0.07-120]. In situ microscope measurements of particle distributions, taken far from the channel inlet (at a distance several thousand times the channel height), revealed that particles are preferentially located near the channel walls at Re > 10 and near the channel center at Re < 1. Whereas the cross-streamline particle motion is governed by inertia-induced lift forces at high inertia, it seems to be controlled by shear-induced particle interactions at low (but finite) Reynolds numbers, despite the low solid volume fraction (<1%). The transition between both regimes is observed in the range Re = [1-10]. In order to exclude the effect of multi-body interactions, the trajectories of single freely moving particles are calculated thanks to numerical simulations based on the force coupling method. With the deployed numerical tool, the complete particle trajectories are accessible within a reasonable computational time only in the inertial regime (Re > 10). In this regime, we show that (i) the particle undergoes cross-streamline migration followed by a cross-lateral migration (parallel to the wall) in agreement with previous observations, and (ii) the stable equilibrium positions are located at the midline of the channel faces while the diagonal equilibrium positions are unstable. At low flow inertia, the first instants of the numerical simulations (carried at Re = O(1)) reveal that the cross-streamline migration of a single particle is oriented towards the channel wall, suggesting that the particle preferential positions around the channel center, observed in the experiments, are rather due to multi-body interactions.

  11. Migration of finite sized particles in a laminar square channel flow from low to high Reynolds numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, M.; Magaud, P.; Gao, Y.; Geoffroy, S.

    2014-01-01

    The migration of neutrally buoyant finite sized particles in a Newtonian square channel flow is investigated in the limit of very low solid volumetric concentration, within a wide range of channel Reynolds numbers Re = [0.07-120]. In situ microscope measurements of particle distributions, taken far from the channel inlet (at a distance several thousand times the channel height), revealed that particles are preferentially located near the channel walls at Re > 10 and near the channel center at Re < 1. Whereas the cross-streamline particle motion is governed by inertia-induced lift forces at high inertia, it seems to be controlled by shear-induced particle interactions at low (but finite) Reynolds numbers, despite the low solid volume fraction (<1%). The transition between both regimes is observed in the range Re = [1-10]. In order to exclude the effect of multi-body interactions, the trajectories of single freely moving particles are calculated thanks to numerical simulations based on the force coupling method. With the deployed numerical tool, the complete particle trajectories are accessible within a reasonable computational time only in the inertial regime (Re > 10). In this regime, we show that (i) the particle undergoes cross-streamline migration followed by a cross-lateral migration (parallel to the wall) in agreement with previous observations, and (ii) the stable equilibrium positions are located at the midline of the channel faces while the diagonal equilibrium positions are unstable. At low flow inertia, the first instants of the numerical simulations (carried at Re = O(1)) reveal that the cross-streamline migration of a single particle is oriented towards the channel wall, suggesting that the particle preferential positions around the channel center, observed in the experiments, are rather due to multi-body interactions

  12. Number of particle creation and decoherence in the nonideal dynamical Casimir effect at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celeri, L.C.; Pascoal, F.; Ponte, M.A. de; Moussa, M.H.Y.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we investigate the dynamical Casimir effect in a nonideal cavity by deriving an effective Hamiltonian. We first compute a general expression for the average number of particle creation, applicable for any law of motion of the cavity boundary, under the only restriction of small velocities. We also compute a general expression for the linear entropy of an arbitrary state prepared in a selected mode, also applicable for any law of motion of a slow moving boundary. As an application of our results we have analyzed both the average number of particle creation and linear entropy within a particular oscillatory motion of the cavity boundary. On the basis of these expressions we develop a comprehensive analysis of the resonances in the number of particle creation in the nonideal dynamical Casimir effect. We also demonstrate the occurrence of resonances in the loss of purity of the initial state and estimate the decoherence times associated with these resonances. Since our results were obtained in the framework of the perturbation theory, they are restricted, under resonant conditions, to a short-time approximation.

  13. Improvement of the Stokesian Dynamics method for systems with finite number of particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ichiki, K.

    2002-01-01

    An improvement of the Stokesian Dynamics method for many-particle systems is presented. A direct calculation of the hydrodynamic interaction is used rather than imposing periodic boundary conditions. The two major diculties concern the accuracy and the speed of calculations. The accuracy discussed

  14. Effects of thermal and particle-number fluctuations on the giant isovector dipole modes for the 58Ni nucleus in the finite-temperature random-phase approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Dinhdang; Nguyen Zuythang

    1988-01-01

    Using the realistic single-particle energy spectrum obtained in the Woods-Saxon nucleon mean-field potential, we calculate the BCS pairing gap for 58 Ni as a function of temperature taking into account the thermal and particle-number fluctuations. The strength distributions of the electric dipole transitions and the centroids of the isovector giant dipole resonance (IV-GDR) are computed in the framework of the finite-temperature random-phase approximation (RPA) based on the Hamiltonian of the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model with separate dipole forces. It is shown that the change of the pairing gap at finite temperature can noticeably influence the IV-GDR localisation in realistic nuclei. By taking both thermal and quasiparticle fluctuations in the pairing gap into account the effect of the phase transition from superfluid to normal in the temperature dependence of the IV-GDR centroid is completely smeared out. (author)

  15. Reynolds number and settling velocity influence for finite-release particle-laden gravity currents in a basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, E. P.; Espath, L. F. R.; Laizet, S.; Silvestrini, J. H.

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional highly resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of particle-laden gravity currents are presented for the lock-exchange problem in an original basin configuration, similar to delta formation in lakes. For this numerical study, we focus on gravity currents over a flat bed for which density differences are small enough for the Boussinesq approximation to be valid. The concentration of particles is described in an Eulerian fashion by using a transport equation combined with the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, with the possibility of particles deposition but no erosion nor re-suspension. The focus of this study is on the influence of the Reynolds number and settling velocity on the development of the current which can freely evolve in the streamwise and spanwise direction. It is shown that the settling velocity has a strong influence on the spatial extent of the current, the sedimentation rate, the suspended mass and the shape of the lobe-and-cleft structures while the Reynolds number is mainly affecting the size and number of vortical structures at the front of the current, and the energy budget.

  16. Coagulation–fragmentation for a finite number of particles and application to telomere clustering in the yeast nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hozé, Nathanaël; Holcman, David

    2012-01-01

    We develop a coagulation–fragmentation model to study a system composed of a small number of stochastic objects moving in a confined domain, that can aggregate upon binding to form local clusters of arbitrary sizes. A cluster can also dissociate into two subclusters with a uniform probability. To study the statistics of clusters, we combine a Markov chain analysis with a partition number approach. Interestingly, we obtain explicit formulas for the size and the number of clusters in terms of hypergeometric functions. Finally, we apply our analysis to study the statistical physics of telomeres (ends of chromosomes) clustering in the yeast nucleus and show that the diffusion–coagulation–fragmentation process can predict the organization of telomeres. -- Highlights: ► We develop a coagulation–fragmentation model to study a system composed of a small number of stochastic particles. ► The stochastic objects are moving in a confined domain. ► We apply our analysis to study the statistical physics of telomeres (ends of chromosomes) clustering in the yeast nucleus. ► We show that the diffusion–coagulation–fragmentation process can predict the organization of telomeres in yeast.

  17. Quasi-particles at finite chemical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardim, F. G.; Steffens, F. M.

    2010-01-01

    We present in this work the thermodynamic consistent quasi-particle model at finite chemical potential, to describe the Quark Gluon Plasma composed of two light quarks and gluons. The quasi-particle general solution will be discussed, and comparison with perturbative QCD and lattice data will be shown.

  18. Negative numbers and antimatter particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsan, Ung Chan

    2012-01-01

    Dirac's equation states that an electron implies the existence of an antielectron with the same mass (more generally same arithmetic properties) and opposite charge (more generally opposite algebraic properties). Subsequent observation of antielectron validated this concept. This statement can be extended to all matter particles; observation of antiproton, antineutron, antideuton … is in complete agreement with this view. Recently antihypertriton was observed and 38 atoms of antihydrogen were trapped. This opens the path for use in precise testing of nature's fundamental symmetries. The symmetric properties of a matter particle and its mirror antimatter particle seem to be well established. Interactions operate on matter particles and antimatter particles as well. Conservation of matter parallels addition operating on positive and negative numbers. Without antimatter particles, interactions of the Standard Model (electromagnetism, strong interaction and weak interaction) cannot have the structure of group. Antimatter particles are characterized by negative baryonic number A or/and negative leptonic number L. Materialization and annihilation obey conservation of A and L (associated to all known interactions), explaining why from pure energy (A = 0, L = 0) one can only obtain a pair of matter particle antimatter particle — electron antielectron, proton and antiproton — via materialization where the mass of a pair of particle antiparticle gives back to pure energy with annihilation. These two mechanisms cannot change the difference in the number of matter particles and antimatter particles. Thus from pure energy only a perfectly symmetric (in number) universe could be generated as proposed by Dirac but observation showed that our universe is not symmetric, it is a matter universe which is nevertheless neutral. Fall of reflection symmetries shattered the prejudice that there is no way to define in an absolute way right and left or matter and antimatter

  19. Quasi-particles at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narnhofer, H.; Thirring, W.; Requardt, M.

    1983-01-01

    We study the consequences of the KMS-condition on the properties of quasi-particles, assuming their existence. We establish: (i) If the correlation functions decay sufficiently, we can create them by quasi-free field operators. (ii) There are many age-operators T conjugate to H. For special forms of the dispersion law epsilon(k) of the quasi-particles there is a T commuting with the; (iii) There are many age-operators T conjugate to H. For special forms of the dispersion law epsilon(k) of the quasi-particles there is a T commuting with the number of quasi-particles and its time-monotonicity describes how the quasi-particles travel to infinity. (orig.)

  20. Approximate particle number projection in hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosov, D.S.; Vdovin, A.I.

    1995-01-01

    Heated finite systems like, e.g., hot atomic nuclei have to be described by the canonical partition function. But this is a quite difficult technical problem and, as a rule, the grand canonical partition function is used in the studies. As a result, some shortcomings of the theoretical description appear because of the thermal fluctuations of the number of particles. Moreover, in nuclei with pairing correlations the quantum number fluctuations are introduced by some approximate methods (e.g., by the standard BCS method). The exact particle number projection is very cumbersome and an approximate number projection method for T ≠ 0 basing on the formalism of thermo field dynamics is proposed. The idea of the Lipkin-Nogami method to perform any operator as a series in the number operator powers is used. The system of equations for the coefficients of this expansion is written and the solution of the system in the next approximation after the BCS one is obtained. The method which is of the 'projection after variation' type is applied to a degenerate single j-shell model. 14 refs., 1 tab

  1. A particle finite element method for machining simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Matthias; Sator, Christian; Müller, Ralf

    2014-07-01

    The particle finite element method (PFEM) appears to be a convenient technique for machining simulations, since the geometry and topology of the problem can undergo severe changes. In this work, a short outline of the PFEM-algorithm is given, which is followed by a detailed description of the involved operations. The -shape method, which is used to track the topology, is explained and tested by a simple example. Also the kinematics and a suitable finite element formulation are introduced. To validate the method simple settings without topological changes are considered and compared to the standard finite element method for large deformations. To examine the performance of the method, when dealing with separating material, a tensile loading is applied to a notched plate. This investigation includes a numerical analysis of the different meshing parameters, and the numerical convergence is studied. With regard to the cutting simulation it is found that only a sufficiently large number of particles (and thus a rather fine finite element discretisation) leads to converged results of process parameters, such as the cutting force.

  2. Continental anthropogenic primary particle number emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasonen, Pauli; Kupiainen, Kaarle; Klimont, Zbigniew; Visschedijk, Antoon; Denier van der Gon, Hugo A. C.; Amann, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particle number concentrations impact our climate and health in ways different from those of aerosol mass concentrations. However, the global, current and future anthropogenic particle number emissions and their size distributions are so far poorly known. In this article, we present the implementation of particle number emission factors and the related size distributions in the GAINS (Greenhouse Gas-Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies) model. This implementation allows for global estimates of particle number emissions under different future scenarios, consistent with emissions of other pollutants and greenhouse gases. In addition to determining the general particulate number emissions, we also describe a method to estimate the number size distributions of the emitted black carbon particles. The first results show that the sources dominating the particle number emissions are different to those dominating the mass emissions. The major global number source is road traffic, followed by residential combustion of biofuels and coal (especially in China, India and Africa), coke production (Russia and China), and industrial combustion and processes. The size distributions of emitted particles differ across the world, depending on the main sources: in regions dominated by traffic and industry, the number size distribution of emissions peaks in diameters range from 20 to 50 nm, whereas in regions with intensive biofuel combustion and/or agricultural waste burning, the emissions of particles with diameters around 100 nm are dominant. In the baseline (current legislation) scenario, the particle number emissions in Europe, Northern and Southern Americas, Australia, and China decrease until 2030, whereas especially for India, a strong increase is estimated. The results of this study provide input for modelling of the future changes in aerosol-cloud interactions as well as particle number related adverse health effects, e.g. in response to tightening

  3. Continental anthropogenic primary particle number emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Paasonen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosol particle number concentrations impact our climate and health in ways different from those of aerosol mass concentrations. However, the global, current and future anthropogenic particle number emissions and their size distributions are so far poorly known. In this article, we present the implementation of particle number emission factors and the related size distributions in the GAINS (Greenhouse Gas–Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies model. This implementation allows for global estimates of particle number emissions under different future scenarios, consistent with emissions of other pollutants and greenhouse gases. In addition to determining the general particulate number emissions, we also describe a method to estimate the number size distributions of the emitted black carbon particles. The first results show that the sources dominating the particle number emissions are different to those dominating the mass emissions. The major global number source is road traffic, followed by residential combustion of biofuels and coal (especially in China, India and Africa, coke production (Russia and China, and industrial combustion and processes. The size distributions of emitted particles differ across the world, depending on the main sources: in regions dominated by traffic and industry, the number size distribution of emissions peaks in diameters range from 20 to 50 nm, whereas in regions with intensive biofuel combustion and/or agricultural waste burning, the emissions of particles with diameters around 100 nm are dominant. In the baseline (current legislation scenario, the particle number emissions in Europe, Northern and Southern Americas, Australia, and China decrease until 2030, whereas especially for India, a strong increase is estimated. The results of this study provide input for modelling of the future changes in aerosol–cloud interactions as well as particle number related adverse health effects, e.g. in response

  4. Finite-Reynolds-number effects in turbulence using logarithmic expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivasan, K.R.; Bershadskii, A.

    2006-12-01

    Experimental or numerical data in turbulence are invariably obtained at finite Reynolds numbers whereas theories of turbulence correspond to infinitely large Reynolds numbers. A proper merger of the two approaches is possible only if corrections for finite Reynolds numbers can be quantified. This paper heuristically considers examples in two classes of finite-Reynolds-number effects. Expansions in terms of logarithms of appropriate variables are shown to yield results in agreement with experimental and numerical data in the following instances: the third-order structure function in isotropic turbulence, the mixed-order structure function for the passive scalar and the Reynolds shear stress around its maximum point. Results suggestive of expansions in terms of the inverse logarithm of the Reynolds number, also motivated by experimental data, concern the tendency for turbulent structures to cluster along a line of observation and (more speculatively) for the longitudinal velocity derivative to become singular at some finite Reynolds number. We suggest an elementary hydrodynamical process that may provide a physical basis for the expansions considered here, but note that the formal justification remains tantalizingly unclear. (author)

  5. A mixed finite element method for particle simulation in lasertron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Meur, G.

    1987-03-01

    A particle simulation code is being developed with the aim to treat the motion of charged particles in electromagnetic devices, such as Lasertron. The paper describes the use of mixed finite element methods in computing the field components, without derivating them from scalar or vector potentials. Graphical results are shown

  6. A mixed finite element method for particle simulation in Lasertron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Meur, G.

    1987-01-01

    A particle simulation code is being developed with the aim to treat the motion of charged particles in electromagnetic devices, such as Lasertron. The paper describes the use of mixed finite element methods in computing the field components, without derivating them from scalar or vector potentials. Graphical results are shown

  7. QCD bound states at finite temperature and baryon number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinovsky, Yu.L.; Muenchow, L.

    1991-04-01

    Quark-antiquark bound states are described within the Bethe-Salpeter equation for a class of quark models with instantaneous 4-quark interaction at finite temperature. Thereby decompositions of the Bethe-Salpeter vertex and wave functions according to their Lorentz structures and the particles content are used. As an application of general scheme, we determine the mass spectrum of low-lying mesons for a special Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model inspired by QCD for hadrons. (orig.)

  8. Distribution of occupation numbers in finite Fermi systems and role of interaction in chaos and thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flambaum, V.V.; Izrailev, F.M.

    1997-01-01

    A method is developed for calculation of single-particle occupation numbers in finite Fermi systems of interacting particles. It is more accurate than the canonical distribution method and gives the Fermi-Dirac distribution in the limit of large number of particles. It is shown that statistical effects of the interaction are absorbed by an increase of the effective temperature. Criteria for quantum chaos and statistical equilibrium are considered. All results are confirmed by numerical experiments in the two-body random interaction model. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  9. Rational surfaces having only a finite number of exceptional curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahyane, M.

    2001-10-01

    We characterize the rational surfaces X which have a finite number of (-1)-curves under the assumption that - K X is nef (i.e., the intersection number of K X with any effective divisor on X is less than or equal to zero, where K X is a canonical divisor on X) and having self-intersection zero. A (-1)-curve is a smooth rational curve of self-intersection -1. (author)

  10. Strong coupling QCD at finite baryon-number density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsch, F.; Muetter, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    We present a new representation of the partition function for strong-coupling QCD which is suitable also for finite baryon-number-density simulations. This enables us to study the phase structure in the canonical formulation (with fixed baryon number B) as well as the grand canonical one (with fixed chemical potential μ). We find a clear signal for a first-order chiral phase transition at μ c a=0.63. The critical baryon-number density n c a 3 =0.045 is only slightly higher than the density of nuclear matter. (orig.)

  11. Possibilities of Particle Finite Element Methods in Industrial Forming Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, J.; Cante, J. C.; Weyler, R.; Hernandez, J.

    2007-04-01

    The work investigates the possibilities offered by the particle finite element method (PFEM) in the simulation of forming problems involving large deformations, multiple contacts, and new boundaries generation. The description of the most distinguishing aspects of the PFEM, and its application to simulation of representative forming processes, illustrate the proposed methodology.

  12. Finite difference time domain modelling of particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurgens, T.G.; Harfoush, F.A.

    1989-03-01

    Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) modelling has been successfully applied to a wide variety of electromagnetic scattering and interaction problems for many years. Here the method is extended to incorporate the modelling of wake fields in particle accelerators. Algorithmic comparisons are made to existing wake field codes, such as MAFIA T3. 9 refs., 7 figs

  13. Particle creation and particle number in an expanding universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    I describe the logical basis of the method that I developed in 1962 and 1963 to define a quantum operator corresponding to the observable particle number of a quantized free scalar field in a spatially-flat isotropically expanding (and/or contracting) universe. This work also showed for the first time that particles were created from the vacuum by the curved spacetime of an expanding spatially-flat Friedmann–Lemaître–Robertson–Walker (FLRW) universe. The same process is responsible for creating the nearly scale-invariant spectrum of quantized perturbations of the inflaton scalar field during the inflationary stage of the expansion of the universe. I explain how the method that I used to obtain the observable particle number operator involved adiabatic invariance of the particle number (hence, the name adiabatic regularization) and the quantum theory of measurement of particle number in an expanding universe. I also show how I was led in a surprising way, to the discovery in 1964 that there would be no particle creation by these spatially-flat FLRW universes for free fields of any integer or half-integer spin satisfying field equations that are invariant under conformal transformations of the metric. The methods I used to define adiabatic regularization for particle number were based on generally-covariant concepts like adiabatic invariance and measurement that were fundamental and determined results that were unique to each given adiabatic order. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’. (paper)

  14. On Using Particle Finite Element for Hydrodynamics Problems Solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Davidova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research is to develop software for the Particle Finite Element Method (PFEM and its verification on the model problem of viscous incompressible flow simulation in a square cavity. The Lagrangian description of the medium motion is used: the nodes of the finite element mesh move together with the fluid that allows to consider them as particles of the medium. Mesh cells deform when in time-stepping procedure, so it is necessary to reconstruct the mesh to provide stability of the finite element numerical procedure.Meshing algorithm allows us to obtain the mesh, which satisfies the Delaunay criteria: it is called \\the possible triangles method". This algorithm is based on the well-known Fortune method of Voronoi diagram constructing for a certain set of points in the plane. The graphical representation of the possible triangles method is shown. It is suitable to use generalization of Delaunay triangulation in order to construct meshes with polygonal cells in case of multiple nodes close to be lying on the same circle.The viscous incompressible fluid flow is described by the Navier | Stokes equations and the mass conservation equation with certain initial and boundary conditions. A fractional steps method, which allows us to avoid non-physical oscillations of the pressure, provides the timestepping procedure. Using the finite element discretization and the Bubnov | Galerkin method allows us to carry out spatial discretization.For form functions calculation of finite element mesh with polygonal cells, \

  15. Baryon number violation and particle collider experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinkhamer, F.R.; Nationaal Inst. voor Kernfysica en Hoge-Energiefysica

    1992-09-01

    Baryon number non-conservation, due to non-perturbative effects (sphalerons) in the standard model, may have been important in the early Universe. In this paper the possibility is discussed that similar effects could show up at future particle collider experiments. (author). 16 refs.; 3 figs

  16. Coupling of smooth particle hydrodynamics with the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaway, S.W.; Heinstein, M.W.; Swegle, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    A gridless technique called smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) has been coupled with the transient dynamics finite element code ppercase[pronto]. In this paper, a new weighted residual derivation for the SPH method will be presented, and the methods used to embed SPH within ppercase[pronto] will be outlined. Example SPH ppercase[pronto] calculations will also be presented. One major difficulty associated with the Lagrangian finite element method is modeling materials with no shear strength; for example, gases, fluids and explosive biproducts. Typically, these materials can be modeled for only a short time with a Lagrangian finite element code. Large distortions cause tangling of the mesh, which will eventually lead to numerical difficulties, such as negative element area or ''bow tie'' elements. Remeshing will allow the problem to continue for a short while, but the large distortions can prevent a complete analysis. SPH is a gridless Lagrangian technique. Requiring no mesh, SPH has the potential to model material fracture, large shear flows and penetration. SPH computes the strain rate and the stress divergence based on the nearest neighbors of a particle, which are determined using an efficient particle-sorting technique. Embedding the SPH method within ppercase[pronto] allows part of the problem to be modeled with quadrilateral finite elements, while other parts are modeled with the gridless SPH method. SPH elements are coupled to the quadrilateral elements through a contact-like algorithm. ((orig.))

  17. Diffusion of Finite-Size Particles in Confined Geometries

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, Maria

    2013-05-10

    The diffusion of finite-size hard-core interacting particles in two- or three-dimensional confined domains is considered in the limit that the confinement dimensions become comparable to the particle\\'s dimensions. The result is a nonlinear diffusion equation for the one-particle probability density function, with an overall collective diffusion that depends on both the excluded-volume and the narrow confinement. By including both these effects, the equation is able to interpolate between severe confinement (for example, single-file diffusion) and unconfined diffusion. Numerical solutions of both the effective nonlinear diffusion equation and the stochastic particle system are presented and compared. As an application, the case of diffusion under a ratchet potential is considered, and the change in transport properties due to excluded-volume and confinement effects is examined. © 2013 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  18. Baryon number dissipation at finite temperature in the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottola, E.; Raby, S.; Starkman, G.

    1990-01-01

    We analyze the phenomenon of baryon number violation at finite temperature in the standard model, and derive the relaxation rate for the baryon density in the high temperature electroweak plasma. The relaxation rate, γ is given in terms of real time correlation functions of the operator E·B, and is directly proportional to the sphaleron transition rate, Γ: γ preceq n f Γ/T 3 . Hence it is not instanton suppressed, as claimed by Cohen, Dugan and Manohar (CDM). We show explicitly how this result is consistent with the methods of CDM, once it is recognized that a new anomalous commutator is required in their approach. 19 refs., 2 figs

  19. Diffusion of Finite-Size Particles in Confined Geometries

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, Maria; Chapman, S. Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The diffusion of finite-size hard-core interacting particles in two- or three-dimensional confined domains is considered in the limit that the confinement dimensions become comparable to the particle's dimensions. The result is a nonlinear diffusion equation for the one-particle probability density function, with an overall collective diffusion that depends on both the excluded-volume and the narrow confinement. By including both these effects, the equation is able to interpolate between severe confinement (for example, single-file diffusion) and unconfined diffusion. Numerical solutions of both the effective nonlinear diffusion equation and the stochastic particle system are presented and compared. As an application, the case of diffusion under a ratchet potential is considered, and the change in transport properties due to excluded-volume and confinement effects is examined. © 2013 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  20. Hybrid finite element and Brownian dynamics method for charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Gary A., E-mail: ghuber@ucsd.edu; Miao, Yinglong [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0365 (United States); Zhou, Shenggao [Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Center for Interdiscipline Research, Soochow University, 1 Shizi Street, Suzhou, 215006 Jiangsu (China); Li, Bo [Department of Mathematics and Quantitative Biology Graduate Program, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0112 (United States); McCammon, J. Andrew [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0365 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0636 (United States)

    2016-04-28

    Diffusion is often the rate-determining step in many biological processes. Currently, the two main computational methods for studying diffusion are stochastic methods, such as Brownian dynamics, and continuum methods, such as the finite element method. A previous study introduced a new hybrid diffusion method that couples the strengths of each of these two methods, but was limited by the lack of interactions among the particles; the force on each particle had to be from an external field. This study further develops the method to allow charged particles. The method is derived for a general multidimensional system and is presented using a basic test case for a one-dimensional linear system with one charged species and a radially symmetric system with three charged species.

  1. Dynamic Systems with a Finite Degrees of Freedom Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ładziński Radosław

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Taking as a starting point the law of conservation of the total energy of the system, and introducing two basic state functions - the Lagrangian and the Rayleigh function, the general form of the equation of motion for any dynamic system with a finite number of degrees of freedom is derived. The theory is illustrated by considering the rotating - type electromechanical energy converter with six degrees of freedom being the model of all essentially important types of DC and AC machines, including rotating power amplifiers, induction - and synchronous type motors - all of them discussed from both, the steady-state and the transient point of view. In the next part of the paper there is described a simple electric circuit with its model characterized by the holonomic constraints of the velocity-type. Finally, there is presented the kinematics and dynamics of the interesting mechanical system - the gyroscope placed on the rotating Earth.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic duct and channel flows at finite magnetic Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandaru, Vinodh Kumar

    2015-11-27

    Magnetohydrodynamic duct flows have so far been studied only in the limit of negligible magnetic Reynolds numbers (R{sub m}). When R{sub m} is finite, the secondary magnetic field becomes significant, leading to a fully coupled evolution of the magnetic field and the conducting flow. Characterization of such flows is essential in understanding wall-bounded magnetohydrodynamic turbulence at finite R{sub m} as well as in industrial applications like the design of electromagnetic pumps and measurement of transient flows using techniques such as Lorentz force velocimetry. This thesis presents the development of a numerical framework for direct numerical simulations (DNS) of magnetohydrodynamic flows in straight rectangular ducts at finite R{sub m}, which is subsequently used to study three specific problems. The thesis opens with a brief overview of MHD and a review of the existing state of art in duct and channel MHD flows. This is followed by a description of the physical model governing the problem of MHD duct flow with insulating walls and streamwise periodicity. In the main part of the thesis, a hybrid finite difference-boundary element computational procedure is developed that is used to solve the magnetic induction equation with boundary conditions that satisfy interior-exterior matching of the magnetic field at the domain wall boundaries. The numerical procedure is implemented into a code and a detailed verification of the same is performed in the limit of low R{sub m} by comparing with the results obtained using a quasistatic approach that has no coupling with the exterior. Following this, the effect of R{sub m} on the transient response of Lorentz force is studied using the problem of a strongly accelerated solid conducting bar in the presence of an imposed localized magnetic field. The response time of Lorentz force depends linearly on R{sub m} and shows a good agreement with the existing experiments. For sufficiently large values of R{sub m}, the peak

  3. Baryon number fluctuations in quasi-particle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ameng [Southeast University Chengxian College, Department of Foundation, Nanjing (China); Luo, Xiaofeng [Central China Normal University, Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE), Institute of Particle Physics, Wuhan (China); Zong, Hongshi [Nanjing University, Department of Physics, Nanjing (China); Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology, Nanjing (China); Institute of Theoretical Physics, CAS, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-04-15

    Baryon number fluctuations are sensitive to the QCD phase transition and the QCD critical point. According to the Feynman rules of finite-temperature field theory, we calculated various order moments and cumulants of the baryon number distributions in the quasi-particle model of the quark-gluon plasma. Furthermore, we compared our results with the experimental data measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. It is found that the experimental data can be well described by the model for the colliding energies above 30 GeV and show large discrepancies at low energies. This puts a new constraint on the qQGP model and also provides a baseline for the QCD critical point search in heavy-ion collisions at low energies. (orig.)

  4. Seakeeping with the semi-Lagrangian particle finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadukandi, Prashanth; Servan-Camas, Borja; Becker, Pablo Agustín; Garcia-Espinosa, Julio

    2017-07-01

    The application of the semi-Lagrangian particle finite element method (SL-PFEM) for the seakeeping simulation of the wave adaptive modular vehicle under spray generating conditions is presented. The time integration of the Lagrangian advection is done using the explicit integration of the velocity and acceleration along the streamlines (X-IVAS). Despite the suitability of the SL-PFEM for the considered seakeeping application, small time steps were needed in the X-IVAS scheme to control the solution accuracy. A preliminary proposal to overcome this limitation of the X-IVAS scheme for seakeeping simulations is presented.

  5. Effects of the finite particle size in turbulent wall-bounded flows of dense suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Pedro; Picano, Francesco; Brandt, Luca; Breugem, Wim-Paul

    2018-05-01

    We use interface-resolved simulations to study finite-size effects in turbulent channel flow of neutrally-buoyant spheres. Two cases with particle sizes differing by a factor of 2, at the same solid volume fraction of 20% and bulk Reynolds number are considered. These are complemented with two reference single-phase flows: the unladen case, and the flow of a Newtonian fluid with the effective suspension viscosity of the same mixture in the laminar regime. As recently highlighted in Costa et al. (PRL 117, 134501), a particle-wall layer is responsible for deviations of the statistics from what is observed in the continuum limit where the suspension is modeled as a Newtonian fluid with an effective viscosity. Here we investigate the fluid and particle dynamics in this layer and in the bulk. In the particle-wall layer, the near wall inhomogeneity has an influence on the suspension micro-structure over a distance proportional to the particle size. In this layer, particles have a significant (apparent) slip velocity that is reflected in the distribution of wall shear stresses. This is characterized by extreme events (both much higher and much lower than the mean). Based on these observations we provide a scaling for the particle-to-fluid apparent slip velocity as a function of the flow parameters. We also extend the flow scaling laws in to second-order Eulerian statistics in the homogeneous suspension region away from the wall. Finite-size effects in the bulk of the channel become important for larger particles, while negligible for lower-order statistics and smaller particles. Finally, we study the particle dynamics along the wall-normal direction. Our results suggest that 1-point dispersion is dominated by particle-turbulence (and not particle-particle) interactions, while differences in 2-point dispersion and collisional dynamics are consistent with a picture of shear-driven interactions.

  6. Complex periodic potentials with a finite number of band gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, Avinash; Sukhatme, Uday

    2006-01-01

    We obtain several new results for the complex generalized associated Lame potential V(x)=a(a+1)m sn 2 (y,m)+b(b+1)m sn 2 (y+K(m),m)+f(f+1)m sn 2 (y+K(m)+iK ' (m),m)+g(g+1)m sn 2 (y+iK ' (m),m), where y≡x-K(m)/2-iK ' (m)/2, sn(y,m) is the Jacobi elliptic function with modulus parameter m, and there are four real parameters a,b,f,g. First, we derive two new duality relations which, when coupled with a previously obtained duality relation, permit us to relate the band edge eigenstates of the 24 potentials obtained by permutations of the parameters a,b,f,g. Second, we pose and answer the question: how many independent potentials are there with a finite number 'a' of band gaps when a,b,f,g are integers and a≥b≥f≥g≥0? For these potentials, we clarify the nature of the band edge eigenfunctions. We also obtain several analytic results when at least one of the four parameters is a half-integer. As a by-product, we also obtain new solutions of Heun's differential equation

  7. Particle image velocimetry investigation of a finite amplitude pressure wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, D.; Currie, T.; Fleck, R.; Chatfield, G.

    2006-03-01

    Particle image velocimetry is used to study the motion of gas within a duct subject to the passage of a finite amplitude pressure wave. The wave is representative of the pressure waves found in the exhaust systems of internal combustion engines. Gas particles are accelerated from stationary to 150 m/s and then back to stationary in 8 ms. It is demonstrated that gas particles at the head of the wave travel at the same velocity across the duct cross section at a given point in time. Towards the tail of the wave viscous effects are plainly evident causing the flow profile to tend towards parabolic. However, the instantaneous mean particle velocity across the section is shown to match well with the velocity calculated from a corresponding measured pressure history using 1D gas dynamic theory. The measured pressure history at a point in the duct was acquired using a high speed pressure transducer of the type typically used for engine research in intake and exhaust systems. It is demonstrated that these are unable to follow the rapid changes in pressure accurately and that they are prone to resonate under certain circumstances.

  8. Finite groups with the set of the number of subgroups of possible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Finite group; the number of subgroups of possible order. 1. Introduction. Throughout this paper, groups mentioned are finite and p is a prime. An important topic in the group theory is to investigate the number of subgroups of possible order, and con- versely it is also an important subject to determine the structure of a finite ...

  9. Single particle level density in a finite depth potential well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlomo, S.; Kolomietz, V.M.; Dejbakhsh, H.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the single particle level density g(ε) of a realistic finite depth potential well, concentrating on the continuum (ε>0) region. We carry out quantum-mechanical calculations of the partial level density g l (ε), associated with a well-defined orbital angular momentum l≤40, using the phase-shift derivative method and the Greens-function method and compare the results with those obtained using the Thomas-Fermi approximation. We also numerically calculate g(ε) as a l sum of g l (ε) up to a certain value of scr(l) max ≤40 and determine the corresponding smooth level densities using the Strutinsky smoothing procedure. We demonstrate, in accordance with Levinson close-quote s theorem, that the partial contribution g l (ε) to the single particle level density from continuum states has positive and negative values. However, g(ε) is nonnegative. We also point out that this is not the case for an energy-dependent potential well. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  10. Finite orbit energetic particle linear response to toroidal Alfven eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Ye Huanchun; Breizman, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    The linear response of energetic particles of the TAE modes is calculated taking into account their finite orbit excursion from the flux surfaces. The general expression reproduces the previously derived theory for small banana width; when the banana width Δ b is much larger than the mode thickness Δ m , we obtain a new compact expression for the linear power transfer. When Δ m /Δ b m /Δ b from that predicted by the narrow orbit theory. A comparison is made of the contribution to the TAE growth rate of energetic particles with a slowing-down distribution arising from an isotropic source, and a balanced-injected beam source when the source speed is close to the Alfven speed. For the same stored energy density, the contribution from the principal resonances (vertical strokev parallel vertical stroke=v A ) is substantially enhanced in the beam case compared to the isotropic case, while the contribution at the higher sidebands (vertical strokev parallel vertical stroke=v A /(2l-1) with l≥2) is substantially reduced. (orig.)

  11. Finite orbit energetic particle linear response to toroidal Alfven eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Ye, Huanchun; Breizman, B.N.

    1991-07-01

    The linear response of energetic particles to the TAE modes is calculated taking into account their finite orbit excursion from the flux surfaces. The general expression reproduces the previously derived theory for small banana width: when the banana width triangle b is much larger than the mode thickness triangle m , we obtain a new compact expression for the linear power transfer. When triangle m /triangle b much-lt 1, the banana orbit effect reduces the power transfer by a factor of triangle m /triangle b from that predicted by the narrow orbit theory. A comparison is made of the contribution to the TAE growth rate of energetic particles with a slowing-down distribution arising from an isotropic source, and a balance-injected beam source when the source speed is close to the Alfven speed. For the same stored energy density, the contribution from the principal resonances (|υ parallel | = υ A is substantially enhanced in the beam case compared to the isotropic case, while the contribution at the higher sidebands (|υ parallel |) = υ A /(2 ell - 1) with ell ≥ 2) is substantially reduced. 10 refs

  12. Finite translation surfaces with maximal number of translations

    OpenAIRE

    Schlage-Puchta, Jan-Christoph; Weitze-Schmithuesen, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    The natural automorphism group of a translation surface is its group of translations. For finite translation surfaces of genus g > 1 the order of this group is naturally bounded in terms of g due to a Riemann-Hurwitz formula argument. In analogy with classical Hurwitz surfaces, we call surfaces which achieve the maximal bound Hurwitz translation surfaces. We study for which g there exist Hurwitz translation surfaces of genus g.

  13. Elastic collisions of classical point particles on a finite frictionless linear track with perfectly reflecting endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, R.

    2006-03-01

    Repeated elastic collisions of point particles on a finite frictionless linear track with perfectly reflecting endpoints are considered. The problem is analysed by means of an elementary linear algebra approach. It is found that, starting with a state consisting of a projectile particle in motion at constant velocity and a target particle at rest in a fixed known position, the points at which collisions occur on track, when plotted versus progressive numerals, corresponding to the collisions themselves, show periodic patterns for a rather large choice of values of the initial position x(0) and on the mass ratio r. For certain values of these parameters, however, only regular behaviour over a large number of collisions is detected.

  14. Perturbation theory of the quark-gluon plasma at finite temperature and baryon number density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    At very high energy densities, hadronic matter becomes an almost ideal gas of quarks and gluons. In these circumstances, the effects of particle interactions are small, and to some order in perturbation theory are computable by methods involving weak coupling expansions. To illustrate the perturbative methods which may be used to compute the thermodynamic potential, the results and methods which are employed to compute to first order in α/sub s/ are reviewed. The problem of the plasmon effect, and the necessity of using non-perturbative methods when going beyond first order in α/sub s/ in evaluating the thermodynamic potential are discussed. The results at zero temperature and finite baryon number density to second order in α/sub s/ are also reviewed. The method of renormalization group improving the weak coupling expansions by replacing the expansion by an expansion in a temperature and baryon number density dependent coupling which approaches zero at high energy densities is discussed. Non-perturbative effects such as instantons are briefly mentioned and the breakdown of perturbation theory for the thermodynamical at order α/sub s/ 3 for finite temperature is presented

  15. Quantum number theoretic transforms on multipartite finite systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourdas, A; Zhang, S

    2009-06-01

    A quantum system composed of p-1 subsystems, each of which is described with a p-dimensional Hilbert space (where p is a prime number), is considered. A quantum number theoretic transform on this system, which has properties similar to those of a Fourier transform, is studied. A representation of the Heisenberg-Weyl group in this context is also discussed.

  16. Some Finite Sums Involving Generalized Fibonacci and Lucas Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kılıç

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available By considering Melham's sums (Melham, 2004, we compute various more general nonalternating sums, alternating sums, and sums that alternate according to (−12+1 involving the generalized Fibonacci and Lucas numbers.

  17. Modeling of finite-size droplets and particles in multiphase flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Khare

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The conventional point-particle approach for treating the dispersed phase in a continuous flowfield is extended by taking into account the effect of finite particle size, using a Gaussian interpolation from Lagrangian points to the Eulerian field. The inter-phase exchange terms in the conservation equations are distributed over the volume encompassing the particle size, as opposed to the Dirac delta function generally used in the point-particle approach. The proposed approach is benchmarked against three different flow configurations in a numerical framework based on large eddy simulation (LES turbulence closure. First, the flow over a circular cylinder is simulated for a Reynolds number of 3900 at 1 atm pressure. Results show good agreement with experimental data for the mean streamwise velocity and the vortex shedding frequency in the wake region. The calculated flowfield exhibits correct physics, which the conventional point-particle approach fails to capture. The second case deals with diesel jet injection in quiescent environment over a pressure range of 1.1–5.0 MPa. The calculated jet penetration depth closely matches measurements. It decreases with increasing chamber pressure, due to enhanced drag force in a denser fluid environment. Finally, water and acetone jet injection normal to air crossflow is studied at 1 atm. The calculated jet penetration and Sauter mean diameter of liquid droplets compare very well with measurements.

  18. Effect of Finite Particle Size on Convergence of Point Particle Models in Euler-Lagrange Multiphase Dispersed Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nili, Samaun; Park, Chanyoung; Haftka, Raphael T.; Kim, Nam H.; Balachandar, S.

    2017-11-01

    Point particle methods are extensively used in simulating Euler-Lagrange multiphase dispersed flow. When particles are much smaller than the Eulerian grid the point particle model is on firm theoretical ground. However, this standard approach of evaluating the gas-particle coupling at the particle center fails to converge as the Eulerian grid is reduced below particle size. We present an approach to model the interaction between particles and fluid for finite size particles that permits convergence. We use the generalized Faxen form to compute the force on a particle and compare the results against traditional point particle method. We apportion the different force components on the particle to fluid cells based on the fraction of particle volume or surface in the cell. The application is to a one-dimensional model of shock propagation through a particle-laden field at moderate volume fraction, where the convergence is achieved for a well-formulated force model and back coupling for finite size particles. Comparison with 3D direct fully resolved numerical simulations will be used to check if the approach also improves accuracy compared to the point particle model. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  19. Study of Finite Element Number Influence over the Obtained Results in Finite Element Analyses of a Mechanical Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Budai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper present the results of a study that was made to establish the influence of finite element number used to determined the real load of a structure. Actually, the study represent a linear static analyze for a link gear control mechanism of a Kaplan turbine. The all analyze was made for the normal condition of functioning having like final scope to determine de life time duration of mentioned mechanism.

  20. Evaluating the performance of the particle finite element method in parallel architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Juan M.; Nigro, Norberto M.; Idelsohn, Sergio R.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a high performance implementation for the particle-mesh based method called particle finite element method two (PFEM-2). It consists of a material derivative based formulation of the equations with a hybrid spatial discretization which uses an Eulerian mesh and Lagrangian particles. The main aim of PFEM-2 is to solve transport equations as fast as possible keeping some level of accuracy. The method was found to be competitive with classical Eulerian alternatives for these targets, even in their range of optimal application. To evaluate the goodness of the method with large simulations, it is imperative to use of parallel environments. Parallel strategies for Finite Element Method have been widely studied and many libraries can be used to solve Eulerian stages of PFEM-2. However, Lagrangian stages, such as streamline integration, must be developed considering the parallel strategy selected. The main drawback of PFEM-2 is the large amount of memory needed, which limits its application to large problems with only one computer. Therefore, a distributed-memory implementation is urgently needed. Unlike a shared-memory approach, using domain decomposition the memory is automatically isolated, thus avoiding race conditions; however new issues appear due to data distribution over the processes. Thus, a domain decomposition strategy for both particle and mesh is adopted, which minimizes the communication between processes. Finally, performance analysis running over multicore and multinode architectures are presented. The Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy number used influences the efficiency of the parallelization and, in some cases, a weighted partitioning can be used to improve the speed-up. However the total cputime for cases presented is lower than that obtained when using classical Eulerian strategies.

  1. Acceleration statistics of finite-sized particles in turbulent flow: the role of Faxen forces

    OpenAIRE

    Calzavarini, Enrico; Volk, Romain; Bourgoin, Mickael; Leveque, Emmanuel; Pinton, Jean-Francois; Toschi, Federico

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The dynamics of particles in turbulence when the particle size is larger than the dissipative scale of the carrier flow are studied. Recent experiments have highlighted signatures of particles' finiteness on their statistical properties, namely a decrease of their acceleration variance, an increase of correlation times (at increasing the particles size) and an independence of the probability density function of the acceleration once normalized to their variance. These ...

  2. Finite-temperature mobility of a particle coupled to a fermionic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castella, H.; Zotos, X.

    1996-01-01

    We study numerically the finite-temperature and frequency mobility of a particle coupled by a local interaction to a system of spinless fermions in one dimension. We find that when the model is integrable (particle mass equal to the mass of fermions) the static mobility diverges. Further, an enhanced mobility is observed over a finite parameter range away from the integrable point. We present an analysis of the finite-temperature static mobility based on a random matrix theory description of the many-body Hamiltonian. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  3. Solving for the particle-number-projected HFB wavefunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, L.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Recently we proposed a particle-number-conserving theory for nuclear pairing (Jia, 2013) [19] through the generalized density matrix formalism. The relevant equations were solved for the case when each single-particle level has a distinct set of quantum numbers and could only pair with its time-reversed partner (BCS-type Hamiltonian). In this work we consider the more general situation when several single-particle levels could have the same set of quantum numbers and pairing among these levels is allowed (HFB-type Hamiltonian). The pair condensate wavefunction (the HFB wavefunction projected onto good particle number) is determined by the equations of motion for density matrix operators instead of the variation principle. The theory is tested in the simple two-level model with factorizable pairing interactions, and semi-realistic models with the zero-range delta interaction and the realistic Bonn-CD interaction

  4. Frozen density embedding with non-integer subsystems' particle numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiano, Eduardo; Laricchia, Savio; Della Sala, Fabio

    2014-03-21

    We extend the frozen density embedding theory to non-integer subsystems' particles numbers. Different features of this formulation are discussed, with special concern for approximate embedding calculations. In particular, we highlight the relation between the non-integer particle-number partition scheme and the resulting embedding errors. Finally, we provide a discussion of the implications of the present theory for the derivative discontinuity issue and the calculation of chemical reactivity descriptors.

  5. Fluctuations in non-ideal pion gas with dynamically fixed particle number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomeitsev, E. E.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2018-05-01

    We consider a non-ideal hot pion gas with the dynamically fixed number of particles in the model with the λϕ4 interaction. The effective Lagrangian for the description of such a system is obtained after dropping the terms responsible for the change of the total particle number. Reactions π+π- ↔π0π0, which determine the isospin balance of the medium, are permitted. Within the self-consistent Hartree approximation we compute the effective pion mass, thermodynamic characteristics of the system and the variance of the particle number at temperatures above the critical point of the induced Bose-Einstein condensation when the pion chemical potential reaches the value of the effective pion mass. We analyze conditions for the condensate formation in the process of thermalization of an initially non-equilibrium pion gas. The normalized variance of the particle number increases with a temperature decrease but remains finite in the critical point of the Bose-Einstein condensation. This is due to the non-perturbative account of the interaction and is in contrast to the ideal-gas case. In the kinetic regime of the condensate formation the variance is shown to stay finite also.

  6. Numerical simulations of negatively buoyant jets in an immiscible fluid using the Particle Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mier-Torrecilla, Monica; Geyer, Adelina; Phillips, Jeremy C.; Idelsohn, Sergio R.; Oñate, Eugenio

    2010-05-01

    In this work we investigate numerically the injection of a negatively buoyant jet into a homogenous immiscible ambient fluid using the Particle Finite Element Method (PFEM), a newly developed tool that combines the flexibility of particle-based methods with the accuracy of the finite element discretization. In order to test the applicability of PFEM to the study of negatively buoyant jets, we have compared the two-dimensional numerical results with experiments investigating the injection of a jet of dyed water through a nozzle in the base of a cylindrical tank containing rapeseed oil. In both simulations and experiments, the fountain inlet flow velocity and nozzle diameter were varied to cover a wide range of Reynolds Re and Froude numbers Fr, such that 0.1 < Fr < 30, reproducing both weak and strong fountains in a laminar regime (8 < Re < 1350). Numerical results, together with the experimental observations, allow us to describe three different fountain behaviors that have not been previously reported. Based on the Re and Fr values for the numerical and experimental simulations, we have built a regime map to define how these values may control the occurrence of each of the observed flow types. Whereas the Fr number itself provides a prediction of the maximum penetration height of the jet, its combination with the Re number provides a prediction of the flow behavior for a specific nozzle diameter and injection velocity. Conclusive remarks concerning the dynamics of negatively buoyant jets may be applied later on to several geological situations, e.g. the flow structure of a fully submerged subaqueous eruptive vent discharging magma or the replenishment of magma chambers in the Earth's crust.

  7. Temperature-dependent particle-number projected moment of inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    Expressions of the parallel and perpendicular temperature-dependent particle-number projected nuclear moment of inertia have been established by means of a discrete projection method. They generalize that of the FTBCS method and are well adapted to numerical computation. The effects of particle-number fluctuations have been numerically studied for some even-even actinide nuclei by using the single-particle energies and eigenstates of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean field. It has been shown that the parallel moment of inertia is practically not modified by the use of the projection method. In contrast, the discrepancy between the projected and FTBCS perpendicular moment of inertia values may reach 5%. Moreover, the particle-number fluctuation effects vary not only as a function of the temperature but also as a function of the deformation for a given temperature. This is not the case for the system energy

  8. Multisite study of particle number concentrations in urban air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Roy M; Jones, Alan M

    2005-08-15

    Particle number concentration data are reported from a total of eight urban site locations in the United Kingdom. Of these, six are central urban background sites, while one is an urban street canyon (Marylebone Road) and another is influenced by both a motorway and a steelworks (Port Talbot). The concentrations are generally of a similar order to those reported in the literature, although higher than those in some of the other studies. Highest concentrations are at the Marylebone Road site and lowest are at the Port Talbot site. The central urban background locations lie somewhere between with concentrations typically around 20 000 cm(-3). A seasonal pattern affects all sites, with highest concentrations in the winter months and lowest concentrations in the summer. Data from all sites show a diurnal variation with a morning rush hour peak typical of an anthropogenic pollutant. When the dilution effects of windspeed are accounted for, the data show little directionality at the central urban background sites indicating the influence of sources from all directions as might be expected if the major source were road traffic. At the London Marylebone Road site there is high directionality driven by the air circulation in the street canyon, and at the Port Talbot site different diurnal patterns are seen for particle number count and PM10 influenced by emissions from road traffic (particle number count) and the steelworks (PM10) and local meteorological factors. Hourly particle number concentrations are generally only weakly correlated to NO(x) and PM10, with the former showing a slightly closer relationship. Correlations between daily average particle number count and PM10 were also weak. Episodes of high PM10 concentration in summer typically show low particle number concentrations consistent with transport of accumulation mode secondary aerosol, while winter episodes are frequently associated with high PM10 and particle number count arising from poor dispersion of

  9. The Particle Number Emission Characteristics of the Diesel Engine with a Catalytic Diesel Particle Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jia Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their adverse health effects and their abundance in urban areas, diesel exhaust ultrafine particles caused by the aftertreatment devices have been of great concern in the past years. An experiment of particles number emissions was carried out on a high-pressure, common rail diesel engine with catalytic diesel particle filter (CDPF to investigate the impact of CDPF on the number emission characteristics of particles. The results indicated that the conversion rates of CDPF is over 97%. The size distributions of particles are bimodal lognormal distributions downstream CDPF at 1400 r/min and 2300 r/min. CDPF has a lower conversion rates on the nucleation mode particles. The geometric number mean diameters of particles downstream CDPF is smaller than that upstream CDPF.

  10. An extended validation of the last generation of particle finite element method for free surface flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Juan M.; González, Leo M.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a new generation of the particle method known as Particle Finite Element Method (PFEM), which combines convective particle movement and a fixed mesh resolution, is applied to free surface flows. This interesting variant, previously described in the literature as PFEM-2, is able to use larger time steps when compared to other similar numerical tools which implies shorter computational times while maintaining the accuracy of the computation. PFEM-2 has already been extended to free surface problems, being the main topic of this paper a deep validation of this methodology for a wider range of flows. To accomplish this task, different improved versions of discontinuous and continuous enriched basis functions for the pressure field have been developed to capture the free surface dynamics without artificial diffusion or undesired numerical effects when different density ratios are involved. A collection of problems has been carefully selected such that a wide variety of Froude numbers, density ratios and dominant dissipative cases are reported with the intention of presenting a general methodology, not restricted to a particular range of parameters, and capable of using large time-steps. The results of the different free-surface problems solved, which include: Rayleigh-Taylor instability, sloshing problems, viscous standing waves and the dam break problem, are compared to well validated numerical alternatives or experimental measurements obtaining accurate approximations for such complex flows.

  11. Finiteness of the discrete spectrum of the three-particle Schroedinger operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullaev, Janikul I.; Khalkhujaev, Axmad, M.

    2001-08-01

    We analyse the spectrum of the three-particle Schroedinger operator with pair contact and three-particle interactions on the neighboring nodes on a three-dimensional lattice. We show that the essential spectrum of this operator is the union of two segments, one of which coincides with the spectrum of an unperturbed operator and the other called two-particle branch. We will prove finiteness of the discrete spectrum of the Schroedinger operator at all parameter values of the problem. (author)

  12. Numerical analysis of energetic particle stabilization of ballooning modes in finite-aspect-ratio tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Qibing; Peng Qiyang; Qu Wenxiao

    1993-09-01

    The effect of energetic trapped particles on the stabilization of ballooning modes in finite-aspect-ratio tokamaks is numerically analyzed. The numerical solution of boundary value problem of an integro-differential equation is successfully obtained by RKF integral method with variable step size. The results show that the instability domain of ballooning modes becomes small along with the increase of energetic particles pressure. The energetic trapped particles can partially or completely suppress the instability of ballooning modes

  13. Analyzing logistic map pseudorandom number generators for periodicity induced by finite precision floating-point representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persohn, K.J.; Povinelli, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A chaotic pseudorandom number generator (C-PRNG) poorly explores the key space. ► A C-PRNG is finite and periodic when implemented on a finite precision computer. ► We present a method to determine the period lengths of a C-PRNG. - Abstract: Because of the mixing and aperiodic properties of chaotic maps, such maps have been used as the basis for pseudorandom number generators (PRNGs). However, when implemented on a finite precision computer, chaotic maps have finite and periodic orbits. This manuscript explores the consequences finite precision has on the periodicity of a PRNG based on the logistic map. A comparison is made with conventional methods of generating pseudorandom numbers. The approach used to determine the number, delay, and period of the orbits of the logistic map at varying degrees of precision (3 to 23 bits) is described in detail, including the use of the Condor high-throughput computing environment to parallelize independent tasks of analyzing a large initial seed space. Results demonstrate that in terms of pathological seeds and effective bit length, a PRNG based on the logistic map performs exponentially worse than conventional PRNGs.

  14. Two-colour QCD at finite fundamental quark-number density and related theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hands, S.J.; Kogut, J.B.; Morrison, S.E.; Sinclair, D.K.

    2001-01-01

    We are simulating SU(2) Yang-Mills theory with four flavours of dynamical quarks in the fundamental representation of SU(2) 'colour' at finite chemical potential, μ for quark number, as a model for QCD at finite baryon number density. In particular we observe that for μ large enough this theory undergoes a phase transition to a state with a diquark condensate which breaks quark-number symmetry. In this phase we examine the spectrum of light scalar and pseudoscalar bosons and see evidence for the Goldstone boson associated with this spontaneous symmetry breaking. This theory is closely related to QCD at finite chemical potential for isospin, a theory which we are now studying for SU(3) colour

  15. Two-colour QCD at finite fundamental quark-number density and related theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hands, S. J.; Kogut, J. B.; Morrison, S. E.; Sinclair, D. K.

    2000-01-01

    We are simulating SU(2) Yang-Mills theory with four flavours of dynamical quarks in the fundamental representation of SU(2) colour at finite chemical potential, p for quark number, as a model for QCD at finite baryon number density. In particular we observe that for p large enough this theory undergoes a phase transition to a state with a diquark condensate which breaks quark-number symmetry. In this phase we examine the spectrum of light scalar and pseudoscalar bosons and see evidence for the Goldstone boson associated with this spontaneous symmetry breaking. This theory is closely related to QCD at finite chemical potential for isospin, a theory which we are now studying for SU(3) colour

  16. Does the flatness of the velocity derivative blow up at a finite Reynolds number?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivasan, K.R.; Bershadskii, A.

    2006-12-01

    A tentative suggestion is made that the flatness of the velocity derivative could reach an infinite value at finite (though very large) Reynolds number, with possible implications for the singularities of the Navier-Stokes equations. A direct test of this suggestion requires measurements at Reynolds numbers presently outside the experimental capacity, so an alternative suggestion that can be tested at accessible Reynolds numbers is also made. (author)

  17. First passage times in homogeneous nucleation: Dependence on the total number of particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yvinec, Romain; Bernard, Samuel; Pujo-Menjouet, Laurent; Hingant, Erwan

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by nucleation and molecular aggregation in physical, chemical, and biological settings, we present an extension to a thorough analysis of the stochastic self-assembly of a fixed number of identical particles in a finite volume. We study the statistics of times required for maximal clusters to be completed, starting from a pure-monomeric particle configuration. For finite volumes, we extend previous analytical approaches to the case of arbitrary size-dependent aggregation and fragmentation kinetic rates. For larger volumes, we develop a scaling framework to study the first assembly time behavior as a function of the total quantity of particles. We find that the mean time to first completion of a maximum-sized cluster may have a surprisingly weak dependence on the total number of particles. We highlight how higher statistics (variance, distribution) of the first passage time may nevertheless help to infer key parameters, such as the size of the maximum cluster. Finally, we present a framework to quantify formation of macroscopic sized clusters, which are (asymptotically) very unlikely and occur as a large deviation phenomenon from the mean-field limit. We argue that this framework is suitable to describe phase transition phenomena, as inherent infrequent stochastic processes, in contrast to classical nucleation theory

  18. Particle number fluctuations for the van der Waals equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vovchenko, V; Anchishkin, D V; Gorenstein, M I

    2015-01-01

    The van der Waals (VDW) equation of state describes a thermal equilibrium in system of particles, where both repulsive and attractive interactions between them are included. This equation predicts the existence of the first order liquid–gas phase transition and the critical point. The standard form of the VDW equation is given by the pressure function in a canonical ensemble (CE) with a fixed number of particles. In this paper the VDW equation is derived within the grand canonical ensemble (GCE) formulation. We argue that this procedure can be useful for new physical applications, in particular, the fluctuations of the number of particles, which are absent in the CE, can be studied in the GCE. For the VDW equation of state in the GCE the particle number fluctuations are calculated for the whole phase diagram, both outside and inside the liquid–gas mixed phase region. It is shown that the scaled variance of these fluctuations remains finite within the mixed phase and goes to infinity at the critical point. The GCE formulation of the VDW equation of state can also be an important step for its application in the statistical description of hadronic systems, where numbers of different particle species are usually not conserved. (paper)

  19. Diffusion of finite-sized hard-core interacting particles in a one-dimensional box: Tagged particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizana, L; Ambjörnsson, T

    2009-11-01

    We solve a nonequilibrium statistical-mechanics problem exactly, namely, the single-file dynamics of N hard-core interacting particles (the particles cannot pass each other) of size Delta diffusing in a one-dimensional system of finite length L with reflecting boundaries at the ends. We obtain an exact expression for the conditional probability density function rhoT(yT,t|yT,0) that a tagged particle T (T=1,...,N) is at position yT at time t given that it at time t=0 was at position yT,0. Using a Bethe ansatz we obtain the N -particle probability density function and, by integrating out the coordinates (and averaging over initial positions) of all particles but particle T , we arrive at an exact expression for rhoT(yT,t|yT,0) in terms of Jacobi polynomials or hypergeometric functions. Going beyond previous studies, we consider the asymptotic limit of large N , maintaining L finite, using a nonstandard asymptotic technique. We derive an exact expression for rhoT(yT,t|yT,0) for a tagged particle located roughly in the middle of the system, from which we find that there are three time regimes of interest for finite-sized systems: (A) for times much smaller than the collision time tparticle concentration and D is the diffusion constant for each particle, the tagged particle undergoes a normal diffusion; (B) for times much larger than the collision time t >taucoll but times smaller than the equilibrium time ttaue , rhoT(yT,t|yT,0) approaches a polynomial-type equilibrium probability density function. Notably, only regimes (A) and (B) are found in the previously considered infinite systems.

  20. [Ultrafine particle number concentration and size distribution of vehicle exhaust ultrafine particles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ye-qiang; Chen, Qiu-fang; Sun, Zai; Cai, Zhi-liang; Yang, Wen-jun

    2014-09-01

    Ultrafine particle (UFP) number concentrations obtained from three different vehicles were measured using fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS) and automobile exhaust gas analyzer. UFP number concentration and size distribution were studied at different idle driving speeds. The results showed that at a low idle speed of 800 rmin-1 , the emission particle number concentration was the lowest and showed a increasing trend with the increase of idle speed. The majority of exhaust particles were in Nuclear mode and Aitken mode. The peak sizes were dominated by 10 nm and 50 nm. Particle number concentration showed a significantly sharp increase during the vehicle acceleration process, and was then kept stable when the speed was stable. In the range of 0. 4 m axial distance from the end of the exhaust pipe, the particle number concentration decayed rapidly after dilution, but it was not obvious in the range of 0. 4-1 m. The number concentration was larger than the background concentration. Concentration of exhaust emissions such as CO, HC and NO showed a reducing trend with the increase of idle speed,which was in contrast to the emission trend of particle number concentration.

  1. Universal model of finite Reynolds number turbulent flow in channels and pipes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L'vov, V.S.; Procaccia, I.; Rudenko, O.

    2008-01-01

    In this Letter, we suggest a simple and physically transparent analytical model of pressure driven turbulent wall-bounded flows at high but finite Reynolds numbers Re. The model provides an accurate quantitative description of the profiles of the mean-velocity and Reynolds stresses (second order

  2. Mean-field theory of spin-glasses with finite coordination number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, I.; Sompolinsky, H.

    1987-01-01

    The mean-field theory of dilute spin-glasses is studied in the limit where the average coordination number is finite. The zero-temperature phase diagram is calculated and the relationship between the spin-glass phase and the percolation transition is discussed. The present formalism is applicable also to graph optimization problems.

  3. Very Large Data Volumes Analysis of Collaborative Systems with Finite Number of States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan, Ion; Ciurea, Cristian; Pavel, Sorin

    2010-01-01

    The collaborative system with finite number of states is defined. A very large database is structured. Operations on large databases are identified. Repetitive procedures for collaborative systems operations are derived. The efficiency of such procedures is analyzed. (Contains 6 tables, 5 footnotes and 3 figures.)

  4. Lagrangian analysis of multiscale particulate flows with the particle finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oñate, Eugenio; Celigueta, Miguel Angel; Latorre, Salvador; Casas, Guillermo; Rossi, Riccardo; Rojek, Jerzy

    2014-05-01

    We present a Lagrangian numerical technique for the analysis of flows incorporating physical particles of different sizes. The numerical approach is based on the particle finite element method (PFEM) which blends concepts from particle-based techniques and the FEM. The basis of the Lagrangian formulation for particulate flows and the procedure for modelling the motion of small and large particles that are submerged in the fluid are described in detail. The numerical technique for analysis of this type of multiscale particulate flows using a stabilized mixed velocity-pressure formulation and the PFEM is also presented. Examples of application of the PFEM to several particulate flows problems are given.

  5. Refined Betz limit for rotors with a finite number of blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2008-01-01

    The criterion of Betz for optimum rotors with a finite number of blades is revisited and used to determine the performance of wind turbines. The Betz criterion states that ideal efficiency is obtained when the distribution of circulation along the blade produces a rigidly helicoid wake that moves...... model is consistent with the general momentum theory and enables for the first time to determine the theoretical maximum efficiency of rotors with an arbitrary number of blades....

  6. Quantum phase crossovers with finite atom number in the Dicke model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J G; Castaños, O; Nahmad-Achar, E; López-Peña, R

    2013-01-01

    Two-level atoms interacting with a one-mode cavity field at zero temperature have order parameters which reflect the presence of a quantum phase transition at a critical value of the atom–cavity coupling strength. Two popular examples are the number of photons inside the cavity and the number of excited atoms. Coherent states provide a mean field description, which becomes exact in the thermodynamic limit. Employing symmetry-adapted (SA) SU(2) coherent states the quantum crossover, precursor of the critical behavior, can be described for a finite number of atoms. A variation after projection treatment, involving a numerical minimization of the SA energy surface, associates the quantum crossover with a discontinuity in the order parameters, which originates from competition between two local minima in the SA energy surface. Although this discontinuity is not present in finite systems, it provides a good description of 1/N effects in the observables. (paper)

  7. Diffusion of test particles in stochastic magnetic fields for small Kubo numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuer, Marcus; Spatschek, Karl H.

    2006-01-01

    Motion of charged particles in a collisional plasma with stochastic magnetic field lines is investigated on the basis of the so-called A-Langevin equation. Compared to the previously used V-Langevin model, here finite Larmor radius effects are taken into account. The A-Langevin equation is solved under the assumption that the Lagrangian correlation function for the magnetic field fluctuations is related to the Eulerian correlation function (in Gaussian form) via the Corrsin approximation. The latter is justified for small Kubo numbers. The velocity correlation function, being averaged with respect to the stochastic variables including collisions, leads to an implicit differential equation for the mean square displacement. From the latter, different transport regimes, including the well-known Rechester-Rosenbluth diffusion coefficient, are derived. Finite Larmor radius contributions show a decrease of the diffusion coefficient compared to the guiding center limit. The case of small (or vanishing) mean fields is also discussed

  8. Monte Carlo particle simulation and finite-element techniques for tandem mirror transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rognlien, T.D.; Cohen, B.I.; Matsuda, Y.; Stewart, J.J. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A description is given of numerical methods used in the study of axial transport in tandem mirrors owing to Coulomb collisions and rf diffusion. The methods are Monte Carlo particle simulations and direct solution to the Fokker-Planck equations by finite-element expansion. (author)

  9. PRIAM: A self consistent finite element code for particle simulation in electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Meur, G.; Touze, F.

    1990-06-01

    A 2 1/2 dimensional, relativistic particle simulation code is described. A short review of the used mixed finite element method is given. The treatment of the driving terms (charge and current densities), initial, boundary conditions are exposed. Graphical results are shown

  10. On the validation of the particle finite element method (PFEM) for complex engineering fluid flow problems

    OpenAIRE

    Larese De Tetto, Antonia; Rossi, Riccardo; Idelsohn Barg, Sergio Rodolfo; Oñate Ibáñez de Navarra, Eugenio

    2006-01-01

    Several comparisons between experiments and computational models are presented in the following pages. The objective is to verify the ability of Particle Finite Elements Methods (PFEM) [1] [2] to reproduce hydraulic phenomena involving large deformation of the fluid domain [4]. Peer Reviewed

  11. Monte Carlo particle simulation and finite-element techniques for tandem mirror transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rognlien, T.D.; Cohen, B.I.; Matsuda, Y.; Stewart, J.J. Jr.

    1985-12-01

    A description is given of numerical methods used in the study of axial transport in tandem mirrors owing to Coulomb collisions and rf diffusion. The methods are Monte Carlo particle simulations and direct solution to the Fokker-Planck equations by finite-element expansion. 11 refs

  12. Common fixed point theorems for finite number of mappings without continuity and compatibility on intuitionistic fuzzy metric spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Sushil; Deshpande, Bhavana

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to prove some common fixed point theorems for finite number of discontinuous, noncompatible mappings on noncomplete intuitionistic fuzzy metric spaces. Our results extend, generalize and intuitionistic fuzzify several known results in fuzzy metric spaces. We give an example and also give formulas for total number of commutativity conditions for finite number of mappings.

  13. Synchronization of finite-size particles by a traveling wave in a cylindrical flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, D. E.; Pushkin, D. O.; Shevtsova, V. M.

    2013-09-01

    Motion of small finite-size particles suspended in a cylindrical thermocapillary flow with an azimuthally traveling wave is studied experimentally and numerically. At certain flow regimes the particles spontaneously align in dynamic accumulation structures (PAS) of spiral shape. We find that long-time trajectories of individual particles in this flow fall into three basic categories that can be described, borrowing the dynamical systems terminology, as the stable periodic, the quasiperiodic, and the quasistable periodic orbits. Besides these basic types of orbits, we observe the "doubled" periodic orbits and shuttle-like particle trajectories. We find that ensembles of particles having periodic orbits give rise to one-dimensional spiral PAS, while ensembles of particles having quasiperiodic orbits form two-dimensional PAS of toroidal shape. We expound the reasons why these types of orbits and the emergence of the corresponding accumulation structures should naturally be anticipated based on the phase locking theory of PAS formation. We give a further discussion of PAS features, such as the finite thickness of PAS spirals and the probable scenarios of the spiral PAS destruction. Finally, in numerical simulations of inertial particles we observe formation of the spiral structures corresponding to the 3:1 "resonance" between the particle turnover frequency and the wave oscillations frequency, thus confirming another prediction of the phase locking theory. In view of the generality of the arguments involved, we expect the importance of this structure-forming mechanism to go far beyond the realm of the laboratory-friendly thermocapillary flows.

  14. Symmetry mappings concomitant to particle-number-conservation-baryon-number conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.R.

    1977-01-01

    Four theorem serve to demonstrate that matter fields in space-time admit certain timelike symmetry mappings concomitant to the familiar notion of particle number conservation, which can be more fundamentally accounted for by a type of projective invariance principle. These particular symmetry mappings include a family of symmetry properties that may be admitted by Riemannian space-times. In their strongest form, the results obtained provide some insight relating to the conservation of baryon number

  15. On the Set of the Numbers of Conjugates of Noncyclic Proper Subgroups of Finite Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Jiangtao; Zhang, Cui

    2013-01-01

    Let G be a finite group and (G) the set of the numbers of conjugates of noncyclic proper subgroups of G. We prove that (1) if |(G)| ≤ 2, then G is solvable, and (2) G is a nonsolvable group with |(G)| = 3 if and only if G≅PSL(2,5) or PSL(2,13) or SL(2,5) or SL(2,13)....

  16. Inequalities for finite trigonometric sums. An interplay: with some series related to harmonic numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omran Kouba

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An interplay between the sum of certain series related to harmonic numbers and certain finite trigonometric sums is investigated. This allows us to express the sum of these series in terms of the considered trigonometric sums, and permits us to find sharp inequalities bounding these trigonometric sums. In particular, this answers positively an open problem of Chen (Excursions in Classical Analysis, 2010.

  17. Alfven-wave particle interaction in finite-dimensional self-consistent field model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhye, N.; Horton, W.

    1998-01-01

    A low-dimensional Hamiltonian model is derived for the acceleration of ions in finite amplitude Alfven waves in a finite pressure plasma sheet. The reduced low-dimensional wave-particle Hamiltonian is useful for describing the reaction of the accelerated ions on the wave amplitudes and phases through the self-consistent fields within the envelope approximation. As an example, the authors show for a single Alfven wave in the central plasma sheet of the Earth's geotail, modeled by the linear pinch geometry called the Harris sheet, the time variation of the wave amplitude during the acceleration of fast protons

  18. Number and mass analysis of particles emitted by aircraft engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasiński Remigiusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exhaust emissions from aircraft is a complex issue because of the limited possibility of measurements in flight conditions. Most of the studies on this subject were performed on the basis of stationary test. Engine certification data is used to calculate total emissions generated by air transport. However, it doesnt provide any information about the local effects of air traffic. The main threat to local communities is particulate matter emissions, which adversely affects human health. Emissions from air transport affect air quality, particularly in the vicinity of the airports; it also contributes to the greenhouse effect. The article presents the measurement results of the concentration and size distribution of particles emitted during aircraft landing operation. Measurements were carried out during the landings of aircraft at a civilian airport. It was found that a single landing operation causes particle number concentration value increase of several ten-fold in a short period of time. Using aircraft engine certification data, the methodology for determination of the total number of particles emitted during a single landing operation was introduced.

  19. Multi-particle Anderson Localisation: Induction on the Number of Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chulaevsky, Victor; Suhov, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a follow-up of our recent papers Chulaevsky and Suhov (Commun Math Phys 283:479-489, 2008) and Chulaevsky and Suhov (Commun Math Phys in press, 2009) covering the two-particle Anderson model. Here we establish the phenomenon of Anderson localisation for a quantum N-particle system on a lattice with short-range interaction and in presence of an IID external potential with sufficiently regular marginal cumulative distribution function (CDF). Our main method is an adaptation of the multi-scale analysis (MSA; cf. Froehlich and Spencer, Commun Math Phys 88:151-184, 1983; Froehlich et al., Commun Math Phys 101:21-46, 1985; von Dreifus and Klein, Commun Math Phys 124:285-299, 1989) to multi-particle systems, in combination with an induction on the number of particles, as was proposed in our earlier manuscript (Chulaevsky and Suhov 2007). Recently, Aizenman and Warzel (2008) proved spectral and dynamical localisation for N-particle lattice systems with a short-range interaction, using an extension of the Fractional-Moment Method (FMM) developed earlier for single-particle models in Aizenman and Molchanov (Commun Math Phys 157:245-278, 1993) and Aizenman et al. (Commun Math Phys 224:219-253, 2001) (see also references therein) which is also combined with an induction on the number of particles

  20. Particle number fluctuations in the moment of inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, N.H.; Fellah, M.

    1991-01-01

    The nonphysical effects due to the false components introduced by the nonconservation of the particle number in the BCS states are eliminated in the theoretical values of the moment of inertia calculated by the microscopic cranking model. The states of the system are obtained by successive projections of the BCS states in the occupation number space. The moment of inertia appears then as a limit of a rapidly convergent sequence. The errors due to this false component have been numerically estimated and appear to be important both in the BCS states and in the matrix elements of the angular momentum. The predicted values of the moment of inertia satisfactorily reproduce the experimental data over a large number of nuclei within rare-earth and actinide regions with discrepancies ranging from 0.1% to 8%

  1. «Paralipomena» on uniqueness in inverse scattering from a finite number of data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Persico

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows new proof of non-uniqueness of the solution for the retrieving of a compact-supported function starting from a finite number of samples of its spectrum. As will be shown, this is relevant for linear inverse scattering problems, that in many cases can be recast as the reconstruction of a compact supported function from a finite set of samples of its spectrum. Since this reconstruction is not unique, from a practical point of view, any linear inverse scattering algorithm that can be recast in terms of a Fourier relationship between unknowns and data necessarily «trusts» on the absence of invisible objects in the particular situation at hand.

  2. Nonrelativistic trace and diffeomorphism anomalies in particle number background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzzi, Roberto; Baiguera, Stefano; Nardelli, Giuseppe

    2018-04-01

    Using the heat kernel method, we compute nonrelativistic trace anomalies for Schrödinger theories in flat spacetime, with a generic background gauge field for the particle number symmetry, both for a free scalar and a free fermion. The result is genuinely nonrelativistic, and it has no counterpart in the relativistic case. Contrary to naive expectations, the anomaly is not gauge invariant; this is similar to the nongauge covariance of the non-Abelian relativistic anomaly. We also show that, in the same background, the gravitational anomaly for a nonrelativistic scalar vanishes.

  3. Quantum correlation properties in Matrix Product States of finite-number spin rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing-Min; He, Qi-Kai

    2018-02-01

    The organization and structure of quantum correlation (QC) of quantum spin-chains are very rich and complex. Hence the depiction and measures about the QC of finite-number spin rings deserved to be investigated intensively by using Matrix Product States(MPSs) in addition to the case with infinite-number. Here the dependencies of the geometric quantum discord(GQD) of two spin blocks on the total spin number, the spacing spin number and the environment parameter are presented in detail. We also compare the GQD with the total correlation(TC) and the classical correlation(CC) and illustrate its characteristics. Predictably, our findings may provide the potential of designing the optimal QC experimental detection proposals and pave the way for the designation of optimal quantum information processing schemes.

  4. Finite-size effects on two-particle production in continuous and discrete spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Lednicky, R

    2005-01-01

    The effect of a finite space-time extent of particle production region on the lifetime measurement of hadronic atoms produced by a high energy beam in a thin target is discussed. Particularly, it is found that the neglect of this effect on the pionium lifetime measurement in the experiment DIRAC at CERN could lead to the lifetime overestimation on the level of the expected 10% statistical error. It is argued that the data on correlations of identical particles obtained in the same experimental conditions, together with transport code simulation, allow to diminish the systematic error in the extracted lifetime to an acceptable level. The theoretical systematic errors arising in the calculation of the finite-size effect due to the neglect of non-equal emission times in the pair c.m.s., the space-time coherence and the residual charge are shown to be negligible.

  5. Decreasing particle number concentrations in a warming atmosphere and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available New particle formation contributes significantly to the number concentration of condensation nuclei (CN as well as cloud CN (CCN, a key factor determining aerosol indirect radiative forcing of the climate system. Using a physics-based nucleation mechanism that is consistent with a range of field observations of aerosol formation, it is shown that projected increases in global temperatures could significantly inhibit new particle, and CCN, formation rates worldwide. An analysis of CN concentrations observed at four NOAA ESRL/GMD baseline stations since the 1970s and two other sites since 1990s reveals long-term decreasing trends that are consistent in sign with, but are larger in magnitude than, the predicted temperature effects. The possible reasons for larger observed long-term CN reductions at remote sites are discussed. The combined effects of rising temperatures on aerosol nucleation rates and other chemical and microphysical processes may imply substantial decreases in future tropospheric particle abundances associated with global warming, delineating a potentially significant feedback mechanism that increases Earth's climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. Further research is needed to quantify the magnitude of such a feedback process.

  6. Finite Element in Angle Unit Sphere Meshing for Charged Particle Transport.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Mario Ivan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Drumm, Clifton R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Finite element in angle formulations of the charged particle transport equation require the discretization of the unit sphere. In Sceptre, a three-dimensional surface mesh of a sphere is transformed into a two-dimensional mesh. Projection of a sphere onto a two-dimensional surface is well studied with map makers spending the last few centuries attempting to create maps that preserve proportion and area. Using these techniques, various meshing schemes for the unit sphere were investigated.

  7. Multiscale Modeling of Blood Flow: Coupling Finite Elements with Smoothed Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas; Vignal, Philippe; Li, Jun; Calo, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    A variational multi scale approach to model blood flow through arteries is proposed. A finite element discretization to represent the coarse scales (macro size), is coupled to smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that captures the fine scale features (micro scale). Blood is assumed to be incompressible, and flow is described through the Navier Stokes equation. The proposed cou- pling is tested with two benchmark problems, in fully coupled systems. Further refinements of the model can be incorporated in order to explicitly include blood constituents and non-Newtonian behavior. The suggested algorithm can be used with any particle-based method able to solve the Navier-Stokes equation.

  8. Multiscale Modeling of Blood Flow: Coupling Finite Elements with Smoothed Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    A variational multi scale approach to model blood flow through arteries is proposed. A finite element discretization to represent the coarse scales (macro size), is coupled to smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that captures the fine scale features (micro scale). Blood is assumed to be incompressible, and flow is described through the Navier Stokes equation. The proposed cou- pling is tested with two benchmark problems, in fully coupled systems. Further refinements of the model can be incorporated in order to explicitly include blood constituents and non-Newtonian behavior. The suggested algorithm can be used with any particle-based method able to solve the Navier-Stokes equation.

  9. Effects of Process Parameters on Copper Powder Compaction Process Using Multi-Particle Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güner, F.; Sofuoğlu, H.

    2018-01-01

    Powder metallurgy (PM) has been widely used in several industries; especially automotive and aerospace industries and powder metallurgy products grow up every year. The mechanical properties of the final product that is obtained by cold compaction and sintering in powder metallurgy are closely related to the final relative density of the process. The distribution of the relative density in the die is affected by parameters such as compaction velocity, friction coefficient and temperature. Moreover, most of the numerical studies utilizing finite element approaches treat the examined environment as a continuous media with uniformly homogeneous porosity whereas Multi-Particle Finite Element Method (MPFEM) treats every particles as an individual body. In MPFEM, each of the particles can be defined as an elastic- plastic deformable body, so the interactions of the particles with each other and the die wall can be investigated. In this study, each particle was modelled and analyzed as individual deformable body with 3D tetrahedral elements by using MPFEM approach. This study, therefore, was performed to investigate the effects of different temperatures and compaction velocities on stress distribution and deformations of copper powders of 200 µm-diameter in compaction process. Furthermore, 3-D MPFEM model utilized von Mises material model and constant coefficient of friction of μ=0.05. In addition to MPFEM approach, continuum modelling approach was also performed for comparison purposes.

  10. Finite element formulation of fluctuating hydrodynamics for fluids filled with rigid particles using boundary fitted meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Corato, M., E-mail: marco.decorato@unina.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, dei Materiali e della Produzione Industriale, Università di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Slot, J.J.M., E-mail: j.j.m.slot@tue.nl [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Hütter, M., E-mail: m.huetter@tue.nl [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); D' Avino, G., E-mail: gadavino@unina.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, dei Materiali e della Produzione Industriale, Università di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Maffettone, P.L., E-mail: pierluca.maffettone@unina.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, dei Materiali e della Produzione Industriale, Università di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Hulsen, M.A., E-mail: m.a.hulsen@tue.nl [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present a finite element implementation of fluctuating hydrodynamics with a moving boundary fitted mesh for treating the suspended particles. The thermal fluctuations are incorporated into the continuum equations using the Landau and Lifshitz approach [1]. The proposed implementation fulfills the fluctuation–dissipation theorem exactly at the discrete level. Since we restrict the equations to the creeping flow case, this takes the form of a relation between the diffusion coefficient matrix and friction matrix both at the particle and nodal level of the finite elements. Brownian motion of arbitrarily shaped particles in complex confinements can be considered within the present formulation. A multi-step time integration scheme is developed to correctly capture the drift term required in the stochastic differential equation (SDE) describing the evolution of the positions of the particles. The proposed approach is validated by simulating the Brownian motion of a sphere between two parallel plates and the motion of a spherical particle in a cylindrical cavity. The time integration algorithm and the fluctuating hydrodynamics implementation are then applied to study the diffusion and the equilibrium probability distribution of a confined circle under an external harmonic potential.

  11. 3D finite element modelling of force transmission and particle fracture of sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imseeh, Wadi H.; Alshibli, Khalid A. (Tennessee-K)

    2018-02-01

    Global compressive loading of granular media causes rearrangements of particles into a denser configuration. Under 1D compression, researchers observed that particles initially translate and rotate which lead to more contacts between particles and the development of force chains to resist applied loads. Particles within force chains resist most of the applied loads while neighbor particles provide lateral support to prevent particles within force chains from buckling. Several experimental and numerical models have been proposed in the literature to characterize force chains within granular materials. This paper presents a 3D finite element (FE) model that simulates 1D compression experiment on F-75 Ottawa sand. The FE mesh of particles closely matched 3D physical shape of sand particles that were acquired using 3D synchrotron micro-computed tomography (SMT) technique. The paper presents a quantitative assessment of the model, in which evolution of force chains, fracture modes, and stress-strain relationships showed an excellent agreement with experimental measurements reported by Cil et al. Alshibli (2017).

  12. Coupling of a 3-D vortex particle-mesh method with a finite volume near-wall solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marichal, Y.; Lonfils, T.; Duponcheel, M.; Chatelain, P.; Winckelmans, G.

    2011-11-01

    This coupling aims at improving the computational efficiency of high Reynolds number bluff body flow simulations by using two complementary methods and exploiting their respective advantages in distinct parts of the domain. Vortex particle methods are particularly well suited for free vortical flows such as wakes or jets (the computational domain -with non zero vorticity- is then compact and dispersion errors are negligible). Finite volume methods, however, can handle boundary layers much more easily due to anisotropic mesh refinement. In the present approach, the vortex method is used in the whole domain (overlapping domain technique) but its solution is highly underresolved in the vicinity of the wall. It thus has to be corrected by the near-wall finite volume solution at each time step. Conversely, the vortex method provides the outer boundary conditions for the near-wall solver. A parallel multi-resolution vortex particle-mesh approach is used here along with an Immersed Boundary method in order to take the walls into account. The near-wall flow is solved by OpenFOAM® using the PISO algorithm. We validate the methodology on the flow past a sphere at a moderate Reynolds number. F.R.S. - FNRS Research Fellow.

  13. Thermodynamic optimization with a finite number of heat intercepts for cryogenic systems with parameters stepwise continuous

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisio, G.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the thermodynamic optimization by the variation of the heat transfer rate in a finite number of points through insulation for the general case of one-dimensional heat transfer (flat plate, hollow cylinder and hollow sphere) in systems, consisting of different materials in series, whose thermal conductivity is a function of temperature and of the coordinate in the heat flux direction. Besides, some parameters or their first derivative are assumed stepwise continuous. For this purpose, the results of some researches by the author pertinent to the properties of entropy production rate in the one-dimensional heat transfer are utilized

  14. The Max-Plus Algebra of the Natural Numbers has no Finite Equational Basis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Esik, Zoltan; Ingolfsdottir, Anna

    2003-01-01

    This paper shows that the collection of identities which hold in the algebra N of the natural numbers with constant zero, and binary operations of sum and maximum is not finitely based. Moreover, it is proven that, for every n, the equations in at most n variables that hold in N do not form...... an equational basis. As a stepping stone in the proof of these facts, several results of independent interest are obtained. In particular, explicit descriptions of the free algebras in the variety generated by N are offered. Such descriptions are based upon a geometric characterization of the equations...

  15. The number of self-incompatibility alleles in a finite, subdivided population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H

    1998-01-01

    The actual and effective number of gametophytic self-incompatibility alleles maintained at mutation-drift-selection equilibrium in a finite population subdivided as in the island model is investigated by stochastic simulations. The existing theory founded by Wright predicts that for a given...... population size the number of alleles maintained increases monotonically with decreasing migration as is the case for neutral alleles. The simulation results here show that this is not true. At migration rates above Nm = 0.01-0.1, the actual and effective number of alleles is lower than for an undivided...... of individuals in the population but it underestimates the neutral effective size of the subdivided population. Udgivelsesdato: 1998-Jun...

  16. Destabilization of low mode number Alfven modes in a tokamak by energetic or alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, K.T.; Sigmar, D.J.; Whitson, J.C.

    1980-12-01

    With the inclusion of finite Larmor radius effects in the shear Alfven eigenmode equation, the continuous Alfven spectrum, which has been extensively discussed in ideal magnetohydrodynamics, is removed. Neutrally stable, discrete radial eigenmodes appear in the absence of sources of free energy and dissipation. Alpha (or energetic) particle toroidal drifts destabilize these modes, provided the particles are faster than the Alfven speed. Although the electron Landu resonance contributes to damping, a stability study of the parametric variation of the energy and the density scale length of the energetic particles shows that modes with low radial mode numbers remain unstable in most cases. Since the alpha particles are concentrated in the center of the plasma, this drift-type instability suggests anomalous helium ash diffusion. Indeed, it is shown that stochasticity of alpha orbits due to the overlapping of radially neighboring Alfven resonances is induced at low amplitudes, e/sub i//sup approx./phi/T/sub i/ greater than or equal to 0.05, implying a diffusion coefficient D/sub r//sup α/ greater than or equal to 4.4 x 10 3 cm 2 /s

  17. Flow simulation of a Pelton bucket using finite volume particle method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vessaz, C; Jahanbakhsh, E; Avellan, F

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to perform an accurate numerical simulation of the high-speed water jet impinging on a Pelton bucket. To reach this goal, the Finite Volume Particle Method (FVPM) is used to discretize the governing equations. FVPM is an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method, which combines attractive features of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics and conventional mesh-based Finite Volume Method. This method is able to satisfy free surface and no-slip wall boundary conditions precisely. The fluid flow is assumed weakly compressible and the wall boundary is represented by one layer of particles located on the bucket surface. In the present study, the simulations of the flow in a stationary bucket are investigated for three different impinging angles: 72°, 90° and 108°. The particles resolution is first validated by a convergence study. Then, the FVPM results are validated with available experimental data and conventional grid-based Volume Of Fluid simulations. It is shown that the wall pressure field is in good agreement with the experimental and numerical data. Finally, the torque evolution and water sheet location are presented for a simulation of five rotating Pelton buckets

  18. Steady finite-Reynolds-number flows in three-dimensional collapsible tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazel, Andrew L.; Heil, Matthias

    2003-07-01

    A fully coupled finite-element method is used to investigate the steady flow of a viscous fluid through a thin-walled elastic tube mounted between two rigid tubes. The steady three-dimensional Navier Stokes equations are solved simultaneously with the equations of geometrically nonlinear Kirchhoff Love shell theory. If the transmural (internal minus external) pressure acting on the tube is sufficiently negative then the tube buckles non-axisymmetrically and the subsequent large deformations lead to a strong interaction between the fluid and solid mechanics. The main effect of fluid inertia on the macroscopic behaviour of the system is due to the Bernoulli effect, which induces an additional local pressure drop when the tube buckles and its cross-sectional area is reduced. Thus, the tube collapses more strongly than it would in the absence of fluid inertia. Typical tube shapes and flow fields are presented. In strongly collapsed tubes, at finite values of the Reynolds number, two ’jets‘ develop downstream of the region of strongest collapse and persist for considerable axial distances. For sufficiently high values of the Reynolds number, these jets impact upon the sidewalls and spread azimuthally. The consequent azimuthal transport of momentum dramatically changes the axial velocity profiles, which become approximately uTheta-shaped when the flow enters the rigid downstream pipe. Further convection of momentum causes the development of a ring-shaped velocity profile before the ultimate return to a parabolic profile far downstream.

  19. Increasing effective number of neutrinos by decaying particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, K.; Kawasaki, M.; Nakayama, K.; Senami, M. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Cosmic Ray Research; Takahashi, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    We present models of decaying particles to increase the effective number of neutrinos N{sub {nu}} after big bang nucleosynthesis but before the structure formation begins. We point out that our scenario not only solves the discrepancy between the constraints on N{sub {nu}} from these two epochs, but also provides a possible answer to deeper inconsistency in the estimation of the matter power spectrum amplitude at small scales, represented by {sigma}{sub 8}, between the WMAP and some small scale matter power measurements such as the Lyman-{alpha} forest and weak lensing. We consider (a) saxion decay into two axions; (b) gravitino decay into axino and axion; (c) Dirac right-handed sneutrino decay into gravitino and right-handed neutrino. (orig.)

  20. A role of valence particles number equal to 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.; Kumar, S.; Hasan, Z.; Kumar, D.; Pradeep; Koranga, B.S.; Kumar, S.; Negi, D.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of the N p N n parametrization was first demonstrated by Casten in connection with the role of the proton-neutron interaction in the growth of deformation away from shell closures, and there have subsequently been many developments in this theme. The symbols N p and N n are number of valence particles/holes of protons and neutrons, respectively (where nucleons are counted as holes beyond the middle of a major shell). The observables which reflect collective structure in the deformed mass region for even-even nuclei such as E(2 + ), R 4/2 ≡ E(4 + )/E(2 + ) and B(E2) have behaved smoothly with N p N n

  1. Realistic noise-tolerant randomness amplification using finite number of devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Ramanathan, Ravishankar; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Karol; Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Paweł; Szarek, Tomasz; Wojewódka, Hanna

    2016-04-01

    Randomness is a fundamental concept, with implications from security of modern data systems, to fundamental laws of nature and even the philosophy of science. Randomness is called certified if it describes events that cannot be pre-determined by an external adversary. It is known that weak certified randomness can be amplified to nearly ideal randomness using quantum-mechanical systems. However, so far, it was unclear whether randomness amplification is a realistic task, as the existing proposals either do not tolerate noise or require an unbounded number of different devices. Here we provide an error-tolerant protocol using a finite number of devices for amplifying arbitrary weak randomness into nearly perfect random bits, which are secure against a no-signalling adversary. The correctness of the protocol is assessed by violating a Bell inequality, with the degree of violation determining the noise tolerance threshold. An experimental realization of the protocol is within reach of current technology.

  2. Comparisons of Particle Tracking Techniques and Galerkin Finite Element Methods in Flow Simulations on Watershed Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, D.; Yeh, G.

    2009-12-01

    This paper applies two numerical approximations, the particle tracking technique and Galerkin finite element method, to solve the diffusive wave equation in both one-dimensional and two-dimensional flow simulations. The finite element method is one of most commonly approaches in numerical problems. It can obtain accurate solutions, but calculation times may be rather extensive. The particle tracking technique, using either single-velocity or average-velocity tracks to efficiently perform advective transport, could use larger time-step sizes than the finite element method to significantly save computational time. Comparisons of the alternative approximations are examined in this poster. We adapt the model WASH123D to examine the work. WASH123D is an integrated multimedia, multi-processes, physics-based computational model suitable for various spatial-temporal scales, was first developed by Yeh et al., at 1998. The model has evolved in design capability and flexibility, and has been used for model calibrations and validations over the course of many years. In order to deliver a locally hydrological model in Taiwan, the Taiwan Typhoon and Flood Research Institute (TTFRI) is working with Prof. Yeh to develop next version of WASH123D. So, the work of our preliminary cooperationx is also sketched in this poster.

  3. Assessment of finite element and smoothed particles hydrodynamics methods for modeling serrated chip formation in hardened steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama Umer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to perform comparative analyses in modeling serrated chip morphologies using traditional finite element and smoothed particles hydrodynamics methods. Although finite element models are being employed in predicting machining performance variables for the last two decades, many drawbacks and limitations exist with the current finite element models. The problems like excessive mesh distortions, high numerical cost of adaptive meshing techniques, and need of geometric chip separation criteria hinder its practical implementation in metal cutting industries. In this study, a mesh free method, namely, smoothed particles hydrodynamics, is implemented for modeling serrated chip morphology while machining AISI H13 hardened tool steel. The smoothed particles hydrodynamics models are compared with the traditional finite element models, and it has been found that the smoothed particles hydrodynamics models have good capabilities in handling large distortions and do not need any geometric or mesh-based chip separation criterion.

  4. Improved method for estimating particle scattering probabilities to finite detectors for Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickael, M.; Gardner, R.P.; Verghese, K.

    1988-01-01

    An improved method for calculating the total probability of particle scattering within the solid angle subtended by finite detectors is developed, presented, and tested. The limiting polar and azimuthal angles subtended by the detector are measured from the direction that most simplifies their calculation rather than from the incident particle direction. A transformation of the particle scattering probability distribution function (pdf) is made to match the transformation of the direction from which the limiting angles are measured. The particle scattering probability to the detector is estimated by evaluating the integral of the transformed pdf over the range of the limiting angles measured from the preferred direction. A general formula for transforming the particle scattering pdf is derived from basic principles and applied to four important scattering pdf's; namely, isotropic scattering in the Lab system, isotropic neutron scattering in the center-of-mass system, thermal neutron scattering by the free gas model, and gamma-ray Klein-Nishina scattering. Some approximations have been made to these pdf's to enable analytical evaluations of the final integrals. These approximations are shown to be valid over a wide range of energies and for most elements. The particle scattering probability to spherical, planar circular, and right circular cylindrical detectors has been calculated using the new and previously reported direct approach. Results indicate that the new approach is valid and is computationally faster by orders of magnitude

  5. Colloids exposed to random potential energy landscapes: From particle number density to particle-potential and particle-particle interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bewerunge, Jörg; Capellmann, Ronja F.; Platten, Florian; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.; Sengupta, Ankush; Sengupta, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal particles were exposed to a random potential energy landscape that has been created optically via a speckle pattern. The mean particle density as well as the potential roughness, i.e., the disorder strength, were varied. The local probability density of the particles as well as its main characteristics were determined. For the first time, the disorder-averaged pair density correlation function g (1) (r) and an analogue of the Edwards-Anderson order parameter g (2) (r), which quantifies the correlation of the mean local density among disorder realisations, were measured experimentally and shown to be consistent with replica liquid state theory results.

  6. Nuclear fragmentation and the number of particle tracks in tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2006-01-01

    For high energy nuclei, the number of particle tracks per cell is modified by local nuclear reactions that occur, with large fluctuations expected for heavy ion tracks. Cells near the interaction site of a reaction will experience a much higher number of tracks than estimated by the average fluence. Two types of reaction products are possible and occur in coincidence; projectile fragments, which generally have smaller charge and similar velocity to that of the projectile, and target fragments, which are produced from the fragmentation of the nuclei of water atoms or other cellular constituents with low velocity. In order to understand the role of fragmentation in biological damage a new model of human tissue irradiated by heavy ions was developed. A box of the tissue is modelled with periodic boundary conditions imposed, which extrapolates the technique to macroscopic volumes of tissue. The cross sections for projectile and target fragmentation products are taken from the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation code previously developed at NASA Johnson Space Center. Statistics of fragmentation pathways occurring in a cell monolayer, as well as in a small volume of 10 x 10 x 10 cells are given. A discussion on approaches to extend the model to describe spatial distributions of inactivated or other cell damage types, as well as highly organised tissues of multiple cell types, is presented. (authors)

  7. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falgari, P.; Signer, A.; Zuerich Univ.

    2013-03-01

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of Γ X /m X , with Γ X and m X the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the q anti q partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the naive counting ∝Γ t /m t ∝1%. However, they can be sizeable, in excess of 10%, close to edges of certain kinematical distributions. The dependence of the results on the mass renormalization scheme, and its implication for a precise extraction of the top-quark mass, is also discussed.

  8. Possibilities of the particle finite element method for fluid-soil-structure interaction problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oñate, Eugenio; Celigueta, Miguel Angel; Idelsohn, Sergio R.; Salazar, Fernando; Suárez, Benjamín

    2011-09-01

    We present some developments in the particle finite element method (PFEM) for analysis of complex coupled problems in mechanics involving fluid-soil-structure interaction (FSSI). The PFEM uses an updated Lagrangian description to model the motion of nodes (particles) in both the fluid and the solid domains (the later including soil/rock and structures). A mesh connects the particles (nodes) defining the discretized domain where the governing equations for each of the constituent materials are solved as in the standard FEM. The stabilization for dealing with an incompressibility continuum is introduced via the finite calculus method. An incremental iterative scheme for the solution of the non linear transient coupled FSSI problem is described. The procedure to model frictional contact conditions and material erosion at fluid-solid and solid-solid interfaces is described. We present several examples of application of the PFEM to solve FSSI problems such as the motion of rocks by water streams, the erosion of a river bed adjacent to a bridge foundation, the stability of breakwaters and constructions sea waves and the study of landslides.

  9. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falgari, P. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Spinoza Inst.; Papanastasiou, A.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Signer, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2013-03-15

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of {Gamma}{sub X}/m{sub X}, with {Gamma}{sub X} and m{sub X} the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the q anti q partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the naive counting {proportional_to}{Gamma}{sub t}/m{sub t}{proportional_to}1%. However, they can be sizeable, in excess of 10%, close to edges of certain kinematical distributions. The dependence of the results on the mass renormalization scheme, and its implication for a precise extraction of the top-quark mass, is also discussed.

  10. Finite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.R. Azzam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the application of using a skirted foundation system to study the behavior of foundations with structural skirts adjacent to a sand slope and subjected to earthquake loading. The effect of the adopted skirts to safeguard foundation and slope from collapse is studied. The skirts effect on controlling horizontal soil movement and decreasing pore water pressure beneath foundations and beside the slopes during earthquake is investigated. This technique is investigated numerically using finite element analysis. A four story reinforced concrete building that rests on a raft foundation is idealized as a two-dimensional model with and without skirts. A two dimensional plain strain program PLAXIS, (dynamic version is adopted. A series of models for the problem under investigation were run under different skirt depths and lactation from the slope crest. The effect of subgrade relative density and skirts thickness is also discussed. Nodal displacement and element strains were analyzed for the foundation with and without skirts and at different studied parameters. The research results showed a great effectiveness in increasing the overall stability of the slope and foundation. The confined soil footing system by such skirts reduced the foundation acceleration therefore it can be tended to damping element and relieved the transmitted disturbance to the adjacent slope. This technique can be considered as a good method to control the slope deformation and decrease the slope acceleration during earthquakes.

  11. Finite element approach to global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations using magnetic coordinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fivaz, M.; Brunner, S.; Ridder, G. de; Sauter, O.; Tran, T.M.; Vaclavik, J.; Villard, L.; Appert, K.

    1997-08-01

    We present a fully-global linear gyrokinetic simulation code (GYGLES) aimed at describing the instable spectrum of the ion-temperature-gradient modes in toroidal geometry. We formulate the Particle-In-Cell method with finite elements defined in magnetic coordinates, which provides excellent numerical convergence properties. The poloidal mode structure corresponding to k // =0 is extracted without approximation from the equations, which reduces drastically the numerical resolution needed. The code can simulate routinely modes with both very long and very short toroidal wavelengths, can treat realistic (MHD) equilibria of any size and runs on a massively parallel computer. (author) 10 figs., 28 refs

  12. Navier--Stokes relaxation to sinh--Poisson states at finite Reynolds numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, D.; Shan, X.; Matthaeus, W.H.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical framework is proposed in which it seems possible to justify the computationally-observed relaxation of a two-dimensional Navier--Stokes fluid to a ''most probable,'' or maximum entropy, state. The relaxation occurs at large but finite Reynolds numbers, and involves substantial decay of higher-order ideal invariants such as enstrophy. A two-fluid formulation, involving interpenetrating positive and negative vorticity fluxes (continuous and square integrable) is developed, and is shown to be intimately related to the passive scalar decay problem. Increasing interpenetration of the two fluids corresponds to the decay of vorticity flux due to viscosity. It is demonstrated numerically that, in two dimensions, passive scalars decay rapidly, relative to mean-square vorticity (enstrophy). This observation provides a basis for assigning initial data to the two-fluid field variables

  13. Thermodynamic optimization for cryogenic systems with a finite number of heat intercepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisio, G.

    1989-01-01

    It has been already shown that in cryogenic plants it is very useful to apply thermodynamic optimization, either with a continuous variation of the heat transfer rate through the insulation or with the spatial positioning of discrete heat exchangers in the same insulation. The aim of this paper is to study the thermodynamic optimization by the variation of the heat transfer rate in a finite number of points through insulation for one-dimensional materials in series, whose equivalent conductivity is a function of temperature. For this purpose the results of some researches by the author, in the field of generalized thermodynamics, for the properties of some functions and in particular of the rate of entropy production, regarding one-dimensional heat transfer, are utilized

  14. Sacroiliac joint stability: Finite element analysis of implant number, orientation, and superior implant length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Derek P; Kiapour, Ali; Yerby, Scott A; Goel, Vijay K

    2018-03-18

    To analyze how various implants placement variables affect sacroiliac (SI) joint range of motion. An experimentally validated finite element model of the lumbar spine and pelvis was used to simulate a fusion of the SI joint using various placement configurations of triangular implants (iFuse Implant System ® ). Placement configurations were varied by changing implant orientation, superior implant length, and number of implants. The range of motion of the SI joint was calculated using a constant moment of 10 N-m with a follower load of 400 N. The changes in motion were compared between the treatment groups to assess how the different variables affected the overall motion of the SI joint. Transarticular placement of 3 implants with superior implants that end in the middle of the sacrum resulted in the greatest reduction in range of motion (flexion/extension = 73%, lateral bending = 42%, axial rotation = 72%). The range of motions of the SI joints were reduced with use of transarticular orientation (9%-18%) when compared with an inline orientation. The use of a superior implant that ended mid-sacrum resulted in median reductions of (8%-14%) when compared with a superior implant that ended in the middle of the ala. Reducing the number of implants, resulted in increased SI joint range of motions for the 1 and 2 implant models of 29%-133% and 2%-39%, respectively, when compared with the 3 implant model. Using a validated finite element model we demonstrated that placement of 3 implants across the SI joint using a transarticular orientation with superior implant reaching the sacral midline resulted in the most stable construct. Additional clinical studies may be required to confirm these results.

  15. Particle creation and Dirac's large number hypothesis; and Reply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canuto, V.; Adams, P.J.; Hsieh, S.H.; Tsiang, E.; Steigman, G.

    1976-01-01

    The claim made by Steigman (Nature; 261:479 (1976)), that the creation of matter as postulated by Dirac (Proc. R. Soc.; A338:439 (1974)) is unnecessary, is here shown to be incorrect. It is stated that Steigman's claim that Dirac's large Number Hypothesis (LNH) does not require particle creation is wrong because he has assumed that which he was seeking to prove, that is that rho does not contain matter creation. Steigman's claim that Dirac's LNH leads to nonsensical results in the very early Universe is superficially correct, but this only supports Dirac's contention that the LNH may not be valid in the very early Universe. In a reply Steigman points out that in Dirac's original cosmology R approximately tsup(1/3) and using this model the results and conclusions of the present author's paper do apply but using a variation chosen by Canuto et al (T approximately t) Dirac's LNH cannot apply. Additionally it is observed that a cosmological theory which only predicts the present epoch is of questionable value. (U.K.)

  16. Charged particle tracking through electrostatic wire meshes using the finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, L. J.; Karamyshev, O.; Welsch, C. P., E-mail: carsten.welsch@cockcroft.ac.uk [The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Wire meshes are used across many disciplines to accelerate and focus charged particles, however, analytical solutions are non-exact and few codes exist which simulate the exact fields around a mesh with physical sizes. A tracking code based in Matlab-Simulink using field maps generated using finite element software has been developed which tracks electrons or ions through electrostatic wire meshes. The fields around such a geometry are presented as an analytical expression using several basic assumptions, however, it is apparent that computational calculations are required to obtain realistic values of electric potential and fields, particularly when multiple wire meshes are deployed. The tracking code is flexible in that any quantitatively describable particle distribution can be used for both electrons and ions as well as other benefits such as ease of export to other programs for analysis. The code is made freely available and physical examples are highlighted where this code could be beneficial for different applications.

  17. Numerical simulation of a flow-like landslide using the particle finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Krabbenhoft, Kristian; Sheng, Daichao; Li, Weichao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an actual landslide process that occurred in Southern China is simulated by a continuum approach, the particle finite element method (PFEM). The PFEM attempts to solve the boundary-value problems in the framework of solid mechanics, satisfying the governing equations including momentum conservation, displacement-strain relation, constitutive relation as well as the frictional contact between the sliding mass and the slip surface. To warrant the convergence behaviour of solutions, the problem is formulated as a mathematical programming problem, while the particle finite element procedure is employed to tackle the issues of mesh distortion and free-surface evolution. The whole procedure of the landslide, from initiation, sliding to deposition, is successfully reproduced by the continuum approach. It is shown that the density of the mass has little influence on the sliding process in the current landslide, whereas both the geometry and the roughness of the slip surface play important roles. Comparative studies are also conducted where a satisfactory agreement is obtained.

  18. Modelling of tunnelling processes and rock cutting tool wear with the particle finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Josep Maria; Oñate, Eugenio; Suárez, Benjamín

    2013-09-01

    Underground construction involves all sort of challenges in analysis, design, project and execution phases. The dimension of tunnels and their structural requirements are growing, and so safety and security demands do. New engineering tools are needed to perform a safer planning and design. This work presents the advances in the particle finite element method (PFEM) for the modelling and the analysis of tunneling processes including the wear of the cutting tools. The PFEM has its foundation on the Lagrangian description of the motion of a continuum built from a set of particles with known physical properties. The method uses a remeshing process combined with the alpha-shape technique to detect the contacting surfaces and a finite element method for the mechanical computations. A contact procedure has been developed for the PFEM which is combined with a constitutive model for predicting the excavation front and the wear of cutting tools. The material parameters govern the coupling of frictional contact and wear between the interacting domains at the excavation front. The PFEM allows predicting several parameters which are relevant for estimating the performance of a tunnelling boring machine such as wear in the cutting tools, the pressure distribution on the face of the boring machine and the vibrations produced in the machinery and the adjacent soil/rock. The final aim is to help in the design of the excavating tools and in the planning of the tunnelling operations. The applications presented show that the PFEM is a promising technique for the analysis of tunnelling problems.

  19. Review of the modified finite particle method and application to incompressible solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Asprone

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the application of the Modified Finite Particle Method (MFPM on incompressibile elasticity problems. MFPM belongs to the class of meshless methods, nowadays widely investigated due to their characteristics of being totally free of any kind of grid or mesh. This characteristic makes meshless methods potentially useful for the study of large deformations problems and fluid dynamics. In particular, the aim of the work is to compare the results obtained with a simple displacement-based formulation, in the limit of incompressibility, and some formulations proposed in the literature for full incompressibility, where the typical divergence-free constraint is replaced by a different equation, the so-called Pressure Poisson Equation. The obtained results show that the MFPM achieves the expected second-order accuracy on formulation where the equations imposed as constraint satisfies also the original incompressibility equation. Other formulations, differently, do not satisfy the incompressibility constraint, and thus, they are not successfully applicable with the Modified Finite Particle Method.

  20. On the Longitudinal Dispersion in Conservative Transport Through Heterogeneous Porous Formations at Finite Peclet Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severino, Gerardo; Cuomo, Salvatore; Sommella, Angelo; D'urso, Guido

    2017-10-01

    We consider transport of a conservative solute through an aquifer as determined: (i) by the advective velocity, which depends upon the hydraulic conductivity K and (ii) by the local spreading due to the pore-scale dispersion (PSD). The flow is steady, and it takes place in a porous formation where, owing to its erratic spatial variations, the hydraulic log conductivity Y≡ln⁡K is modeled as a stationary Gaussian random field. The relative effect of the above mechanisms (i)-(ii) is quantified by the Peclet number>(Pe>) which, in most of the previous studies, was considered infinite (i.e., no PSD) due to the overtake of advective heterogeneities upon the PSD. Here we aim at generalizing such studies by accounting for the impact of finite Pe on conservative transport. Previous studies on the topic required extensive numerical computations. In the present note, we remove the computational burden by adopting the rational approximate expression of Dagan and Cvetkovic (1993) for the covariance of the velocity field. This allows one to obtain closed form expressions for the quantities characterizing the longitudinal plume's dispersion. Transport can be straightforwardly investigated by dealing with a modified Peclet number>(Pe>¯>) incorporating both the PSD and the aquifer's anisotropy. The satisfactory match to Cape Cod field data suggests that the present theoretical results lend themselves as a useful tool to assess the impact of the PSD upon conservative transport through heterogeneous porous formations.

  1. Finite volume simulation of 2-D steady square lid driven cavity flow at high reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yapici

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, computer simulation results of steady incompressible flow in a 2-D square lid-driven cavity up to Reynolds number (Re 65000 are presented and compared with those of earlier studies. The governing flow equations are solved by using the finite volume approach. Quadratic upstream interpolation for convective kinematics (QUICK is used for the approximation of the convective terms in the flow equations. In the implementation of QUICK, the deferred correction technique is adopted. A non-uniform staggered grid arrangement of 768x768 is employed to discretize the flow geometry. Algebraic forms of the coupled flow equations are then solved through the iterative SIMPLE (Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equation algorithm. The outlined computational methodology allows one to meet the main objective of this work, which is to address the computational convergence and wiggled flow problems encountered at high Reynolds and Peclet (Pe numbers. Furthermore, after Re > 25000 additional vortexes appear at the bottom left and right corners that have not been observed in earlier studies.

  2. Comment on ''Boltzmann equation and the conservation of particle number''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanette, D.

    1990-09-01

    In a recent paper (Z. Banggu, Phys. Rev. A 42, 761 (1990)) it is argued that some solutions of the Boltzmann equation do not satisfy particle conservation as a consequence of the independence of velocity on position. In this comment, the arguments and conclusions of that paper are discussed. In particular, it is stressed that the temporal series used for solving the kinetic equation are generally divergent. A discussion about the particle conservation in its solutions is also provided. (author). 4 refs

  3. Particle number emissions of gasoline hybrid electric vehicles; Partikelanzahl-Emission bei Hybridfahrzeugen mit Ottomotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Scott [Horiba Instruments Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV) are commonly reputed to be environmentally friendly. Different studies show that this assumption raises some questions in terms of particle number emissions. Against the background that upcoming emission standards will not only limit particle matter emissions but also particle number emissions for gasoline engines, the exhaust behaviour of downsized gasoline engines used in HEV should be investigated more extensively. A Horiba study compares the particle number emissions of a gasoline vehicle to those of a gasoline powered HEV. (orig.)

  4. On the functional form of particle number size distributions: influence of particle source and meteorological variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugerone, Katia; De Michele, Carlo; Ghezzi, Antonio; Gianelle, Vorne; Gilardoni, Stefania

    2018-04-01

    Particle number size distributions (PNSDs) have been collected periodically in the urban area of Milan, Italy, during 2011 and 2012 in winter and summer months. Moreover, comparable PNSD measurements were carried out in the rural mountain site of Oga-San Colombano (2250 m a.s.l.), Italy, during February 2005 and August 2011. The aerosol data have been measured through the use of optical particle counters in the size range 0.3-25 µm, with a time resolution of 1 min. The comparison of the PNSDs collected in the two sites has been done in terms of total number concentration, showing higher numbers in Milan (often exceeding 103 cm-3 in winter season) compared to Oga-San Colombano (not greater than 2×102 cm-3), as expected. The skewness-kurtosis plane has been used in order to provide a synoptic view, and select the best distribution family describing the empirical PNSD pattern. The four-parameter Johnson system-bounded distribution (called Johnson SB or JSB) has been tested for this aim, due to its great flexibility and ability to assume different shapes. The PNSD pattern has been found to be generally invariant under site and season changes. Nevertheless, several PNSDs belonging to the Milan winter season (generally more than 30 %) clearly deviate from the standard empirical pattern. The seasonal increase in the concentration of primary aerosols due to combustion processes in winter and the influence of weather variables throughout the year, such as precipitation and wind speed, could be considered plausible explanations of PNSD dynamics.

  5. Development of Modeling and Simulation for Magnetic Particle Inspection Using Finite Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun-Youl [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic particle inspection (MPI) is a widely used nondestructive inspection method for aerospace applications essentially limited to experiment-based approaches. The analysis of MPI characteristics that affect sensitivity and reliability contributes not only reductions in inspection design cost and time but also improvement of analysis of experimental data. Magnetic particles are easily attracted toward a high magnetic field gradient. Selection of a magnetic field source, which produces a magnetic field gradient large enough to detect a defect in a test sample or component, is an important factor in magnetic particle inspection. In this work a finite element method (FEM) has been employed for numerical calculation of the MPI simulation technique. The FEM method is known to be suitable for complicated geometries such as defects in samples. This thesis describes the research that is aimed at providing a quantitative scientific basis for magnetic particle inspection. A new FEM solver for MPI simulation has been developed in this research for not only nonlinear reversible permeability materials but also irreversible hysteresis materials that are described by the Jiles-Atherton model. The material is assumed to have isotropic ferromagnetic properties in this research (i.e., the magnetic properties of the material are identical in all directions in a single crystal). In the research, with a direct current field mode, an MPI situation has been simulated to measure the estimated volume of magnetic particles around defect sites before and after removing any external current fields. Currently, this new MPI simulation package is limited to solving problems with the single current source from either a solenoid or an axial directional current rod.

  6. Probabilistic homogenization of random composite with ellipsoidal particle reinforcement by the iterative stochastic finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowski, Damian; Kamiński, Marcin

    2018-01-01

    This study proposes a framework for determination of basic probabilistic characteristics of the orthotropic homogenized elastic properties of the periodic composite reinforced with ellipsoidal particles and a high stiffness contrast between the reinforcement and the matrix. Homogenization problem, solved by the Iterative Stochastic Finite Element Method (ISFEM) is implemented according to the stochastic perturbation, Monte Carlo simulation and semi-analytical techniques with the use of cubic Representative Volume Element (RVE) of this composite containing single particle. The given input Gaussian random variable is Young modulus of the matrix, while 3D homogenization scheme is based on numerical determination of the strain energy of the RVE under uniform unit stretches carried out in the FEM system ABAQUS. The entire series of several deterministic solutions with varying Young modulus of the matrix serves for the Weighted Least Squares Method (WLSM) recovery of polynomial response functions finally used in stochastic Taylor expansions inherent for the ISFEM. A numerical example consists of the High Density Polyurethane (HDPU) reinforced with the Carbon Black particle. It is numerically investigated (1) if the resulting homogenized characteristics are also Gaussian and (2) how the uncertainty in matrix Young modulus affects the effective stiffness tensor components and their PDF (Probability Density Function).

  7. Effect of finite cavity width on flow oscillation in a low-Mach-number cavity flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ke; Naguib, Ahmed M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    The current study is focused on examining the effect of the cavity width and side walls on the self-sustained oscillation in a low Mach number cavity flow with a turbulent boundary layer at separation. An axisymmetric cavity geometry is employed in order to provide a reference condition that is free from any side-wall influence, which is not possible to obtain with a rectangular cavity. The cavity could then be partially filled to form finite-width geometry. The unsteady surface pressure is measured using microphone arrays that are deployed on the cavity floor along the streamwise direction and on the downstream wall along the azimuthal direction. In addition, velocity measurements using two-component Laser Doppler Anemometer are performed simultaneously with the array measurements in different azimuthal planes. The compiled data sets are used to investigate the evolution of the coherent structures generating the pressure oscillation in the cavity using linear stochastic estimation of the velocity field based on the wall-pressure signature on the cavity end wall. The results lead to the discovery of pronounced harmonic pressure oscillations near the cavity's side walls. These oscillations, which are absent in the axisymmetric cavity, are linked to the establishment of a secondary mean streamwise circulating flow pattern near the side walls and the interaction of this secondary flow with the shear layer above the cavity. (orig.)

  8. Analytic calculation of finite-population reproductive numbers for direct- and vector-transmitted diseases with homogeneous mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Lindsay; Dushoff, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    The basic reproductive number, R0, provides a foundation for evaluating how various factors affect the incidence of infectious diseases. Recently, it has been suggested that, particularly for vector-transmitted diseases, R0 should be modified to account for the effects of finite host population within a single disease transmission generation. Here, we use a transmission factor approach to calculate such "finite-population reproductive numbers," under the assumption of homogeneous mixing, for both vector-borne and directly transmitted diseases. In the case of vector-borne diseases, we estimate finite-population reproductive numbers for both host-to-host and vector-to-vector generations, assuming that the vector population is effectively infinite. We find simple, interpretable formulas for all three of these quantities. In the direct case, we find that finite-population reproductive numbers diverge from R0 before R0 reaches half of the population size. In the vector-transmitted case, we find that the host-to-host number diverges at even lower values of R0, while the vector-to-vector number diverges very little over realistic parameter ranges.

  9. Diffusion and superdiffusion of a particle in a random potential with finite correlation time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, N.; Maass, P.; Feng, S.

    1995-01-01

    We study theoretically the long time asymptotic of a quantum particle moving in a random time-dependent potential with finite correlation time, in d=1. By applying a new unitary numerical scheme we first show the minor importance of quantum interference and then derive an effective Langevin-type equation for the corresponding clasical problem in the limit of weak potential. We find that on intermediate time scales E kin (t)∼t 2/5 , while the true long time asymptotic is determined by a new friction term, which gives rise to a stationary power law velocity distribution, multifractality of the velocity moments, and a slowing down of the superdiffusive behavior

  10. Cayley number and conservation laws for elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollendorf, F.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that the five conservation laws of charge, hyper-charge, barion number and the two lepton numbers lead to the construction of a commutative non-associative 24 dimensional linear algebra. Each element of the algebra is an ordered set of three Cayley numbers. (orig.) [de

  11. On the numerical dispersion of electromagnetic particle-in-cell code: Finite grid instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, M.D.; Huang, C.-K.; Zeng, Y.; Yi, S.A.; Albright, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used in relativistic particle beam and laser plasma modeling. However, the PIC method exhibits numerical instabilities that can render unphysical simulation results or even destroy the simulation. For electromagnetic relativistic beam and plasma modeling, the most relevant numerical instabilities are the finite grid instability and the numerical Cherenkov instability. We review the numerical dispersion relation of the Electromagnetic PIC model. We rigorously derive the faithful 3-D numerical dispersion relation of the PIC model, for a simple, direct current deposition scheme, which does not conserve electric charge exactly. We then specialize to the Yee FDTD scheme. In particular, we clarify the presence of alias modes in an eigenmode analysis of the PIC model, which combines both discrete and continuous variables. The manner in which the PIC model updates and samples the fields and distribution function, together with the temporal and spatial phase factors from solving Maxwell's equations on the Yee grid with the leapfrog scheme, is explicitly accounted for. Numerical solutions to the electrostatic-like modes in the 1-D dispersion relation for a cold drifting plasma are obtained for parameters of interest. In the succeeding analysis, we investigate how the finite grid instability arises from the interaction of the numerical modes admitted in the system and their aliases. The most significant interaction is due critically to the correct representation of the operators in the dispersion relation. We obtain a simple analytic expression for the peak growth rate due to this interaction, which is then verified by simulation. We demonstrate that our analysis is readily extendable to charge conserving models

  12. On the numerical dispersion of electromagnetic particle-in-cell code: Finite grid instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, M. D.; Huang, C.-K.; Zeng, Y.; Yi, S. A.; Albright, B. J.

    2015-09-01

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used in relativistic particle beam and laser plasma modeling. However, the PIC method exhibits numerical instabilities that can render unphysical simulation results or even destroy the simulation. For electromagnetic relativistic beam and plasma modeling, the most relevant numerical instabilities are the finite grid instability and the numerical Cherenkov instability. We review the numerical dispersion relation of the Electromagnetic PIC model. We rigorously derive the faithful 3-D numerical dispersion relation of the PIC model, for a simple, direct current deposition scheme, which does not conserve electric charge exactly. We then specialize to the Yee FDTD scheme. In particular, we clarify the presence of alias modes in an eigenmode analysis of the PIC model, which combines both discrete and continuous variables. The manner in which the PIC model updates and samples the fields and distribution function, together with the temporal and spatial phase factors from solving Maxwell's equations on the Yee grid with the leapfrog scheme, is explicitly accounted for. Numerical solutions to the electrostatic-like modes in the 1-D dispersion relation for a cold drifting plasma are obtained for parameters of interest. In the succeeding analysis, we investigate how the finite grid instability arises from the interaction of the numerical modes admitted in the system and their aliases. The most significant interaction is due critically to the correct representation of the operators in the dispersion relation. We obtain a simple analytic expression for the peak growth rate due to this interaction, which is then verified by simulation. We demonstrate that our analysis is readily extendable to charge conserving models.

  13. A non-conformal finite element/finite volume scheme for the non-structured grid-based approximation of low Mach number flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansanay-Alex, G.

    2009-01-01

    The development of simulation codes aimed at a precise simulation of fires requires a precise approach of flame front phenomena by using very fine grids. The need to take different spatial scale into consideration leads to a local grid refinement and to a discretization with homogeneous grid for computing time and memory purposes. The author reports the approximation of the non-linear convection term, the scalar advection-diffusion in finite volumes, numerical simulations of a flow in a bent tube, of a three-dimensional laminar flame and of a low Mach number an-isotherm flow. Non conformal finite elements are also presented (Rannacher-Turek and Crouzeix-Raviart elements)

  14. Nucleon matter equation of state, particle number fluctuations, and shear viscosity within UrQMD box calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motornenko, A.; Bravina, L.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Magner, A. G.; Zabrodin, E.

    2018-03-01

    Properties of equilibrated nucleon system are studied within the ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) transport model. The UrQMD calculations are done within a finite box with periodic boundary conditions. The system achieves thermal equilibrium due to nucleon-nucleon elastic scattering. For the UrQMD-equilibrium state, nucleon energy spectra, equation of state, particle number fluctuations, and shear viscosity η are calculated. The UrQMD results are compared with both, statistical mechanics and Chapman-Enskog kinetic theory, for a classical system of nucleons with hard-core repulsion.

  15. Modeling Fragment Simulating Projectile Penetration into Steel Plates Using Finite Elements and Meshfree Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O’Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulating fragment penetration into steel involves complicated modeling of severe behavior of the materials through multiple phases of response. Penetration of a fragment-like projectile was simulated using finite element (FE and meshfree particle formulations. Extreme deformation and failure of the material during the penetration event were modeled with several approaches to evaluate each as to how well it represents the actual physics of the material and structural response. A steel Fragment Simulating Projectile (FSP – designed to simulate a fragment of metal from a weapon casing – was simulated for normal impact into a flat square plate. A range of impact velocities was used to examine levels of exit velocity ranging from relatively small to one on the same level as the impact velocity. The numerical code EPIC, used for all the simulations presented herein, contains the element and particle formulations, as well as the explicit methodology and constitutive models needed to perform these simulations. These simulations were compared against experimental data, evaluating the damage caused to the projectile and the target plates, as well as comparing the residual velocity when the projectile perforated the target.

  16. Long-term cloud condensation nuclei number concentration, particle number size distribution and chemical composition measurements at regionally representative observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, Julia; Henning, Silvia; Decesari, Stefano; Henzing, Bas; Keskinen, Helmi; Sellegri, Karine; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Brito, Joel; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Kristensson, Adam; Kalivitis, Nikos; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Carbone, Samara; Jefferson, Anne; Park, Minsu; Schlag, Patrick; Iwamoto, Yoko; Aalto, Pasi; Äijälä, Mikko; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Ehn, Mikael; Frank, Göran; Fröhlich, Roman; Frumau, Arnoud; Herrmann, Erik; Herrmann, Hartmut; Holzinger, Rupert; Kos, Gerard; Kulmala, Markku; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Nenes, Athanasios; O'Dowd, Colin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Picard, David; Pöhlker, Christopher; Pöschl, Ulrich; Poulain, Laurent; Prévôt, André Stephan Henry; Swietlicki, Erik; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Artaxo, Paulo; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Ogren, John; Matsuki, Atsushi; Yum, Seong Soo; Stratmann, Frank; Baltensperger, Urs; Gysel, Martin

    2018-02-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) constitute the single largest uncertainty in anthropogenic radiative forcing. To reduce the uncertainties and gain more confidence in the simulation of ACI, models need to be evaluated against observations, in particular against measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Here we present a data set - ready to be used for model validation - of long-term observations of CCN number concentrations, particle number size distributions and chemical composition from 12 sites on 3 continents. Studied environments include coastal background, rural background, alpine sites, remote forests and an urban surrounding. Expectedly, CCN characteristics are highly variable across site categories. However, they also vary within them, most strongly in the coastal background group, where CCN number concentrations can vary by up to a factor of 30 within one season. In terms of particle activation behaviour, most continental stations exhibit very similar activation ratios (relative to particles > 20 nm) across the range of 0.1 to 1.0 % supersaturation. At the coastal sites the transition from particles being CCN inactive to becoming CCN active occurs over a wider range of the supersaturation spectrum. Several stations show strong seasonal cycles of CCN number concentrations and particle number size distributions, e.g. at Barrow (Arctic haze in spring), at the alpine stations (stronger influence of polluted boundary layer air masses in summer), the rain forest (wet and dry season) or Finokalia (wildfire influence in autumn). The rural background and urban sites exhibit relatively little variability throughout the year, while short-term variability can be high especially at the urban site. The average hygroscopicity parameter, κ, calculated from the chemical composition of submicron particles was highest at the coastal site of Mace Head (0.6) and lowest at the rain forest station ATTO (0.2-0.3). We performed closure studies based on κ-Köhler theory

  17. Visualization of 2-D and 3-D fields from its value in a finite number of points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dari, E.A.; Venere, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    This work describes a method for the visualization of two- and three-dimensional fields, given its value in a finite number of points. These data can be originated in experimental measurements, numerical results, or any other source. For the field interpolation, the space is divided into simplices (triangles or tetrahedrons), using the Watson algorithm to obtain the Delaunay triangulation. Inside each simplex, linear interpolation is assumed. The visualization is accomplished by means of Finite Elements post-processors, capable of handling unstructured meshes, which were also developed by the authors. (Author) [es

  18. Estimating particle number size distributions from multi-instrument observations with Kalman Filtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viskari, T.

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have several important effects on the environment and human society. The exact impact of aerosol particles is largely determined by their particle size distributions. However, no single instrument is able to measure the whole range of the particle size distribution. Estimating a particle size distribution from multiple simultaneous measurements remains a challenge in aerosol physical research. Current methods to combine different measurements require assumptions concerning the overlapping measurement ranges and have difficulties in accounting for measurement uncertainties. In this thesis, Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is presented as a promising method to estimate particle number size distributions from multiple simultaneous measurements. The particle number size distribution estimated by EKF includes information from prior particle number size distributions as propagated by a dynamical model and is based on the reliabilities of the applied information sources. Known physical processes and dynamically evolving error covariances constrain the estimate both over time and particle size. The method was tested with measurements from Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (DMPS), Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) and nephelometer. The particle number concentration was chosen as the state of interest. The initial EKF implementation presented here includes simplifications, yet the results are positive and the estimate successfully incorporated information from the chosen instruments. For particle sizes smaller than 4 micrometers, the estimate fits the available measurements and smooths the particle number size distribution over both time and particle diameter. The estimate has difficulties with particles larger than 4 micrometers due to issues with both measurements and the dynamical model in that particle size range. The EKF implementation appears to reduce the impact of measurement noise on the estimate, but has a delayed reaction to sudden

  19. Stereological Methods for Estimation of Total Number of Particles in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In certain organs, like the brain, it is important to count the number of neurons associated with a particular function or region. The count gives an estimate of the electronic units available for a specific task or are endowed with a quantum of electrical energy. Similar studies can be extended in organs like the kidney, glands ...

  20. Gravitational sedimentation of cloud of solid spherical particles at small Reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkhipov Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental results of study of gravitational sedimentation of highly-concentrated systems of solid spherical particles at small Reynolds numbers Re<1 are presented. Empirical equation for drag coefficient of the particle assembly has been obtained. The influence of initial particle concentration in the cloud on its dynamics and velocity has been analysed.

  1. Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm Coupled with Finite Element Limit Equilibrium Method for Geotechnical Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjun Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a modified particle swarm optimization algorithm coupled with the finite element limit equilibrium method (FELEM for the minimum factor of safety and the location of associated noncircular critical failure surfaces for various geotechnical practices. During the search process, the stress compatibility constraints coupled with the geometrical and kinematical compatibility constraints are firstly established based on the features of slope geometry and stress distribution to guarantee realistic slip surfaces from being unreasonable. Furthermore, in the FELEM, based on rigorous theoretical analyses and derivation, it is noted that the physical meaning of the factor of safety can be formulated on the basis of strength reserving theory rather than the overloading theory. Consequently, compared with the limit equilibrium method (LEM and the shear strength reduction method (SSRM through several numerical examples, the FELEM in conjunction with the improved search strategy is proved to be an effective and efficient approach to routine analysis and design in geotechnical practices with a high level of confidence.

  2. Air demand estimation in bottom outlets with the particle finite element method. Susqueda Dam case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Fernando; San-Mauro, Javier; Celigueta, Miguel Ángel; Oñate, Eugenio

    2017-07-01

    Dam bottom outlets play a vital role in dam operation and safety, as they allow controlling the water surface elevation below the spillway level. For partial openings, water flows under the gate lip at high velocity and drags the air downstream of the gate, which may cause damages due to cavitation and vibration. The convenience of installing air vents in dam bottom outlets is well known by practitioners. The design of this element depends basically on the maximum air flow through the air vent, which in turn is a function of the specific geometry and the boundary conditions. The intrinsic features of this phenomenon makes it hard to analyse either on site or in full scaled experimental facilities. As a consequence, empirical formulas are frequently employed, which offer a conservative estimate of the maximum air flow. In this work, the particle finite element method was used to model the air-water interaction in Susqueda Dam bottom outlet, with different gate openings. Specific enhancements of the formulation were developed to consider air-water interaction. The results were analysed as compared to the conventional design criteria and to information gathered on site during the gate operation tests. This analysis suggests that numerical modelling with the PFEM can be helpful for the design of this kind of hydraulic works.

  3. Performance of mixed formulations for the particle finite element method in soil mechanics problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monforte, Lluís; Carbonell, Josep Maria; Arroyo, Marcos; Gens, Antonio

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a computational framework for the numerical analysis of fluid-saturated porous media at large strains. The proposal relies, on one hand, on the particle finite element method (PFEM), known for its capability to tackle large deformations and rapid changing boundaries, and, on the other hand, on constitutive descriptions well established in current geotechnical analyses (Darcy's law; Modified Cam Clay; Houlsby hyperelasticity). An important feature of this kind of problem is that incompressibility may arise either from undrained conditions or as a consequence of material behaviour; incompressibility may lead to volumetric locking of the low-order elements that are typically used in PFEM. In this work, two different three-field mixed formulations for the coupled hydromechanical problem are presented, in which either the effective pressure or the Jacobian are considered as nodal variables, in addition to the solid skeleton displacement and water pressure. Additionally, several mixed formulations are described for the simplified single-phase problem due to its formal similitude to the poromechanical case and its relevance in geotechnics, since it may approximate the saturated soil behaviour under undrained conditions. In order to use equal-order interpolants in displacements and scalar fields, stabilization techniques are used in the mass conservation equation of the biphasic medium and in the rest of scalar equations. Finally, all mixed formulations are assessed in some benchmark problems and their performances are compared. It is found that mixed formulations that have the Jacobian as a nodal variable perform better.

  4. An induction-based magnetohydrodynamic 3D code for finite magnetic Reynolds number liquid-metal flows in fusion blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawczynski, Charlie; Smolentsev, Sergey; Abdou, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new induction-based magnetohydrodynamic code was developed using a finite difference method. • The code was benchmarked against purely hydrodynamic and MHD flows for low and finite magnetic Reynolds number. • Possible applications of the new code include liquid-metal MHD flows in the breeder blanket during unsteady events in the plasma. - Abstract: Most numerical analysis performed in the past for MHD flows in liquid-metal blankets were based on the assumption of low magnetic Reynolds number and involved numerical codes that utilized electric potential as the main electromagnetic variable. One limitation of this approach is that such codes cannot be applied to truly unsteady processes, for example, MHD flows of liquid-metal breeder/coolant during unsteady events in plasma, such as major plasma disruptions, edge-localized modes and vertical displacements, when changes in plasmas occur at millisecond timescales. Our newly developed code MOONS (Magnetohydrodynamic Object-Oriented Numerical Solver) uses the magnetic field as the main electromagnetic variable to relax the limitations of the low magnetic Reynolds number approximation for more realistic fusion reactor environments. The new code, written in Fortran, implements a 3D finite-difference method and is capable of simulating multi-material domains. The constrained transport method was implemented to evolve the magnetic field in time and assure that the magnetic field remains solenoidal within machine accuracy at every time step. Various verification tests have been performed including purely hydrodynamic flows and MHD flows at low and finite magnetic Reynolds numbers. Test results have demonstrated very good accuracy against known analytic solutions and other numerical data.

  5. An induction-based magnetohydrodynamic 3D code for finite magnetic Reynolds number liquid-metal flows in fusion blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawczynski, Charlie; Smolentsev, Sergey, E-mail: sergey@fusion.ucla.edu; Abdou, Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A new induction-based magnetohydrodynamic code was developed using a finite difference method. • The code was benchmarked against purely hydrodynamic and MHD flows for low and finite magnetic Reynolds number. • Possible applications of the new code include liquid-metal MHD flows in the breeder blanket during unsteady events in the plasma. - Abstract: Most numerical analysis performed in the past for MHD flows in liquid-metal blankets were based on the assumption of low magnetic Reynolds number and involved numerical codes that utilized electric potential as the main electromagnetic variable. One limitation of this approach is that such codes cannot be applied to truly unsteady processes, for example, MHD flows of liquid-metal breeder/coolant during unsteady events in plasma, such as major plasma disruptions, edge-localized modes and vertical displacements, when changes in plasmas occur at millisecond timescales. Our newly developed code MOONS (Magnetohydrodynamic Object-Oriented Numerical Solver) uses the magnetic field as the main electromagnetic variable to relax the limitations of the low magnetic Reynolds number approximation for more realistic fusion reactor environments. The new code, written in Fortran, implements a 3D finite-difference method and is capable of simulating multi-material domains. The constrained transport method was implemented to evolve the magnetic field in time and assure that the magnetic field remains solenoidal within machine accuracy at every time step. Various verification tests have been performed including purely hydrodynamic flows and MHD flows at low and finite magnetic Reynolds numbers. Test results have demonstrated very good accuracy against known analytic solutions and other numerical data.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Two-Fluid Mingling Using the Particle Finite Element Method with Applications to Magmatic and Volcanic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mier, M.; Costa, F.; Idelsohn, S.

    2008-12-01

    Many magmatic and volcanic processes (e.g., magma differentiation, mingling, transport in the volcanic conduit) are controlled by the physical properties and flow styles of high-temperature silicate melts. Such processes can be experimentally investigated using analog systems and scaling methods, but it is difficult to find the suitable material and it is generally not possible to quantitatively extrapolate the results to the natural system. An alternative means of studying fluid dynamics in volcanic systems is with numerical models. We have chosen the Particle Finite Element Method (PFEM), which is based on a Delaunay mesh that moves with the fluid velocity, the Navier-Stokes equations in Lagrangian formulation, and linear elements for velocity, pressure, and temperature. Remeshing is performed when the grid becomes too distorted [E. Oñate et al., 2004. The Particle Finite Element Method: An Overview. Int. J. Comput. Meth. 1, 267-307]. The method is ideal for tracking material interfaces between different fluids or media. Methods based on Eulerian reference frames need special techniques, such as level-set or volume-of-fluid, to capture the interface position, and these techniques add a significant numerical diffusion at the interface. We have performed a series of two-dimensional simulations of a classical problem of fluid dynamics in magmatic and volcanic systems: intrusion of a basaltic melt in a silica-rich magma reservoir. We have used realistic physical properties and equations of state for the silicate melts (e.g., temperature, viscosity, and density) and tracked the changes in the system for geologically relevant time scales (up to 100 years). The problem is modeled by the low-Mach-number equations derived from an asymptotic analysis of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations that removes shock waves from the flow but allows however large variations of density due to temperature variations. Non-constant viscosity and volume changes are taken into account

  7. Structural Optimization Design of Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine Blades Using a Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm and Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Pan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an optimization method for the structural design of horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT blades based on the particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO combined with the finite element method (FEM. The main goal is to create an optimization tool and to demonstrate the potential improvements that could be brought to the structural design of HAWT blades. A multi-criteria constrained optimization design model pursued with respect to minimum mass of the blade is developed. The number and the location of layers in the spar cap and the positions of the shear webs are employed as the design variables, while the strain limit, blade/tower clearance limit and vibration limit are taken into account as the constraint conditions. The optimization of the design of a commercial 1.5 MW HAWT blade is carried out by combining the above method and design model under ultimate (extreme flap-wise load conditions. The optimization results are described and compared with the original design. It shows that the method used in this study is efficient and produces improved designs.

  8. Friction tensor for a pair of Brownian particles: Spurious finite-size effects and molecular dynamics estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocquet, L.; Hansen, J.P.; Piasecki, J.

    1997-01-01

    In this work, we show that in any finite system, the binary friction tenser for two Brownian particles cannot be directly estimated from an evaluation of the microscopic Green Kubo formula, involving the time integral of force-force autocorrelation functions. This pitfall is associated with a subtle inversion of the thermodynamic and long-time limits and leads to spurious results for the estimates of the friction matrix based on molecular dynamics simulations. Starting from a careful analysis of the coupled Langevin equations for two interacting Brownian particles, we derive a method to circumvent these effects and extract the binary friction tenser from the correlation function matrix of the instantaneous forces exerted by the bath particles on the fixed Brownian particles, and from the relaxation of the total momentum of the bath in a finite system. The general methodology is applied to the case of two hard or soft Brownian spheres in a bath of light particles. Numerical estimates of the relevant correlation functions and of the resulting self and mutual components of the matrix of friction tensors are obtained by molecular dynamics simulations for various spacings between the Brownian particles

  9. [Particle Size and Number Density Online Analysis for Particle Suspension with Polarization-Differentiation Elastic Light Scattering Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-kang; Fang, Hui

    2016-03-01

    The basic principle of polarization-differentiation elastic light scattering spectroscopy based techniques is that under the linear polarized light incidence, the singlely scattered light from the superficial biological tissue and diffusively scattered light from the deep tissue can be separated according to the difference of polarization characteristics. The novel point of the paper is to apply this method to the detection of particle suspension and, to realize the simultaneous measurement of its particle size and number density in its natural status. We design and build a coaxial cage optical system, and measure the backscatter signal at a specified angle from a polystyrene microsphere suspension. By controlling the polarization direction of incident light with a linear polarizer and adjusting the polarization direction of collected light with another linear polarizer, we obtain the parallel polarized elastic light scattering spectrum and cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum. The difference between the two is the differential polarized elastic light scattering spectrum which include only the single scattering information of the particles. We thus compare this spectrum to the Mie scattering calculation and extract the particle size. We then also analyze the cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum by applying the particle size already extracted. The analysis is based on the approximate expressions taking account of light diffusing, from which we are able to obtain the number density of the particle suspension. We compare our experimental outcomes with the manufacturer-provided values and further analyze the influence of the particle diameter standard deviation on the number density extraction, by which we finally verify the experimental method. The potential applications of the method include the on-line particle quality monitoring for particle manufacture as well as the fat and protein density detection of milk products.

  10. Novel results in particle physics. AIP conference proceedings number 93; particle and fields subseries No. 27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panvini, R.S.; Alam, M.S.; Csorna, S.E.

    1982-09-01

    Topics include free quark searches, axions, charmed particle lifetimes, a composite model of the weak interactions, e + e - interactions, neutrino and beam dump experiments, grand unified theories, proton decay, neutrino oscillations, and high energy p anti p interactions. Separate entries were made in the data base for the papers presented

  11. Treatment of the intrinsic Hamiltonian in particle-number nonconserving theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hergert, H.; Roth, R.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the implications of using an intrinsic Hamiltonian in theories without particle-number conservation, e.g., the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approximation, where the Hamiltonian's particle-number dependence leads to discrepancies if one naively replaces the particle-number operator by its expectation value. We develop a systematic expansion that fixes this problem and leads to an a posteriori justification of the widely-used one- plus two-body form of the intrinsic kinetic energy in nuclear self-consistent field methods. The expansion's convergence properties as well as its practical applications are discussed for several sample nuclei.

  12. On the motion of non-spherical particles at high Reynolds number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandø, Matthias; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains a critical review of available methodology for dealing with the motion of non-spherical particles at higher Reynolds numbers in the Eulerian- Lagrangian methodology for dispersed flow. First, an account of the various attempts to classify the various shapes and the efforts...... motion it is necessary to account for the non-coincidence between the center of pressure and center of gravity which is a direct consequence of the inertial pressure forces associated with particles at high Reynolds number flow. Extensions for non-spherical particles at higher Reynolds numbers are far...

  13. Fast digital processor for event selection according to particle number difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiladze, S.G.; Gus'kov, B.N.; Li Van Sun; Maksimov, A.N.; Parfenov, A.N.

    1978-01-01

    A fast digital processor for a magnetic spectrometer is described. It is used in experimental searches for charmed particles. The basic purpose of the processor is discriminating events in the difference of numbers of particles passing through two proportional chambers (PC). The processor consists of three units for detecting signals with PC, and a binary coder. The number of inputs of the processor is 32 for the first PC and 64 for the second. The difference in the number of particles discriminated is from 0 to 8. The resolution time is 180 ns. The processor is built in the CAMAC standard

  14. Long-term cloud condensation nuclei number concentration, particle number size distribution and chemical composition measurements at regionally representative observatories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schmale

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol–cloud interactions (ACI constitute the single largest uncertainty in anthropogenic radiative forcing. To reduce the uncertainties and gain more confidence in the simulation of ACI, models need to be evaluated against observations, in particular against measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. Here we present a data set – ready to be used for model validation – of long-term observations of CCN number concentrations, particle number size distributions and chemical composition from 12 sites on 3 continents. Studied environments include coastal background, rural background, alpine sites, remote forests and an urban surrounding. Expectedly, CCN characteristics are highly variable across site categories. However, they also vary within them, most strongly in the coastal background group, where CCN number concentrations can vary by up to a factor of 30 within one season. In terms of particle activation behaviour, most continental stations exhibit very similar activation ratios (relative to particles  > 20 nm across the range of 0.1 to 1.0 % supersaturation. At the coastal sites the transition from particles being CCN inactive to becoming CCN active occurs over a wider range of the supersaturation spectrum. Several stations show strong seasonal cycles of CCN number concentrations and particle number size distributions, e.g. at Barrow (Arctic haze in spring, at the alpine stations (stronger influence of polluted boundary layer air masses in summer, the rain forest (wet and dry season or Finokalia (wildfire influence in autumn. The rural background and urban sites exhibit relatively little variability throughout the year, while short-term variability can be high especially at the urban site. The average hygroscopicity parameter, κ, calculated from the chemical composition of submicron particles was highest at the coastal site of Mace Head (0.6 and lowest at the rain forest station ATTO (0.2–0.3. We performed closure

  15. Power-law correlations and finite-size effects in silica particle aggregates studied by small-angle neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freltoft, T.; Kjems, Jørgen; Sinha, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering from normal, compressed, and water-suspended powders of aggregates of fine silica particles has been studied. The samples possessed average densities ranging from 0.008 to 0.45 g/cm3. Assuming power-law correlations between particles and a finite correlation length ξ......, the authors derive the scattering function S(q) from specific models for particle-particle correlation in these systems. S(q) was found to provide a satisfactory fit to the data for all samples studied. The fractal dimension df corresponding to the power-law correlation was 2.61±0.1 for all dry samples, and 2...

  16. Particle Number Dependence of the N-body Simulations of Moon Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Takanori; Hosono, Natsuki

    2018-04-01

    The formation of the Moon from the circumterrestrial disk has been investigated by using N-body simulations with the number N of particles limited from 104 to 105. We develop an N-body simulation code on multiple Pezy-SC processors and deploy Framework for Developing Particle Simulators to deal with large number of particles. We execute several high- and extra-high-resolution N-body simulations of lunar accretion from a circumterrestrial disk of debris generated by a giant impact on Earth. The number of particles is up to 107, in which 1 particle corresponds to a 10 km sized satellitesimal. We find that the spiral structures inside the Roche limit radius differ between low-resolution simulations (N ≤ 105) and high-resolution simulations (N ≥ 106). According to this difference, angular momentum fluxes, which determine the accretion timescale of the Moon also depend on the numerical resolution.

  17. Number concentrations of solid particles from the spinning top aerosol generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.P.

    1983-02-01

    A spinning top aerosol generator has been used to generate monodisperse methylene blue particles in the size range from 0.6 to 6 μm. The number concentrations of these aerosols have been determined by means of an optical particle counter and compared with the equivalent measurements obtained by filter collection and microscopy. (author)

  18. The path-integral analysis of an associative memory model storing an infinite number of finite limit cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimura, Kazushi; Kawamura, Masaki; Okada, Masato

    2004-01-01

    An exact solution of the transient dynamics of an associative memory model storing an infinite number of limit cycles with l finite steps is shown by means of the path-integral analysis. Assuming the Maxwell construction ansatz, we have succeeded in deriving the stationary state equations of the order parameters from the macroscopic recursive equations with respect to the finite-step sequence processing model which has retarded self-interactions. We have also derived the stationary state equations by means of the signal-to-noise analysis (SCSNA). The signal-to-noise analysis must assume that crosstalk noise of an input to spins obeys a Gaussian distribution. On the other hand, the path-integral method does not require such a Gaussian approximation of crosstalk noise. We have found that both the signal-to-noise analysis and the path-integral analysis give completely the same result with respect to the stationary state in the case where the dynamics is deterministic, when we assume the Maxwell construction ansatz. We have shown the dependence of the storage capacity (α c ) on the number of patterns per one limit cycle (l). At l = 1, the storage capacity is α c = 0.138 as in the Hopfield model. The storage capacity monotonically increases with the number of steps, and converges to α c = 0.269 at l ≅ 10. The original properties of the finite-step sequence processing model appear as long as the number of steps of the limit cycle has order l = O(1)

  19. On creating macroscopically identical granular systems with different numbers of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Devaraj; Rivas, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    One of the fundamental differences between granular and molecular hydrodynamics is the enormous difference in the total number of constituents. The small number of particles implies that the role of fluctuations in granular dynamics is of paramount importance. To obtain more insight in these fluctuations, we investigate to what extent it is possible to create identical granular hydrodynamic states with different number of particles. A definition is given of macroscopically equivalent systems, and the dependency of the conservation equations on the particle size is studied. We show that, in certain cases, and by appropriately scaling the microscopic variables, we are able to compare systems with significantly different number of particles that present the same macroscopic phenomenology. We apply these scalings in simulations of a vertically vibrated system, namely the density inverted granular Leidenfrost state and its transition to a buoyancy-driven convective state.

  20. Determination of the critical Shields number for particle erosion in laminar flow

    OpenAIRE

    Ouriemi , Malika; Aussillous , Pascale; Medale , Marc; Peysson , Yannick; Guazzelli , Élisabeth

    2007-01-01

    International audience; We present reproducible experimental measurements for the onset of grain motion in laminar flow and find a constant critical Shields number for particle erosion, i.e., c = 0.12± 0.03, over a large range of small particle Reynolds number: 1.5 10 −5 Re p 0.76. Comparison with previous studies found in the literature is provided.

  1. Pseudo-random number generation for Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations on GPU devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Carolyn L.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Molecular Dynamics codes implemented on GPUs have achieved two-order of magnitude computational accelerations. → Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations require a large number of random numbers per time step. → We introduce a method for generating small batches of pseudorandom numbers distributed over many threads of calculations. → With this method, Dissipative Particle Dynamics is implemented on a GPU device without requiring thread-to-thread communication. - Abstract: Brownian Dynamics (BD), also known as Langevin Dynamics, and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) are implicit solvent methods commonly used in models of soft matter and biomolecular systems. The interaction of the numerous solvent particles with larger particles is coarse-grained as a Langevin thermostat is applied to individual particles or to particle pairs. The Langevin thermostat requires a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) to generate the stochastic force applied to each particle or pair of neighboring particles during each time step in the integration of Newton's equations of motion. In a Single-Instruction-Multiple-Thread (SIMT) GPU parallel computing environment, small batches of random numbers must be generated over thousands of threads and millions of kernel calls. In this communication we introduce a one-PRNG-per-kernel-call-per-thread scheme, in which a micro-stream of pseudorandom numbers is generated in each thread and kernel call. These high quality, statistically robust micro-streams require no global memory for state storage, are more computationally efficient than other PRNG schemes in memory-bound kernels, and uniquely enable the DPD simulation method without requiring communication between threads.

  2. Figures of merit for detectors in digital radiography. II. Finite number of secondaries and structured backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineda, Angel R.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2004-01-01

    The current paradigm for evaluating detectors in digital radiography relies on Fourier methods. Fourier methods rely on a shift-invariant and statistically stationary description of the imaging system. The theoretical justification for the use of Fourier methods is based on a uniform background fluence and an infinite detector. In practice, the background fluence is not uniform and detector size is finite. We study the effect of stochastic blurring and structured backgrounds on the correlation between Fourier-based figures of merit and Hotelling detectability. A stochastic model of the blurring leads to behavior similar to what is observed by adding electronic noise to the deterministic blurring model. Background structure does away with the shift invariance. Anatomical variation makes the covariance matrix of the data less amenable to Fourier methods by introducing long-range correlations. It is desirable to have figures of merit that can account for all the sources of variation, some of which are not stationary. For such cases, we show that the commonly used figures of merit based on the discrete Fourier transform can provide an inaccurate estimate of Hotelling detectability

  3. On the number of elementary particles in a resolution dependent fractal spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jihuan

    2007-01-01

    We reconsider the fundamental question regarding the number of elementary particles in a minimally extended standard model. The main conclusion is that since the dimension of E-infinity spacetime is resolution dependent, then the number of elementary particles is also resolution dependent. For D = 10 of superstrings, D = 11 of M theory and D = 12 of F theory one finds N(SM) equal to (6)(10) = 60 (6)(11) = 66 and (6)(12) = 72 particles, respectively. This is in perfect agreement with prediction made previously by Mohamed Saladin El-Naschie and Marek-Crnjac

  4. Contribution from indoor sources to particle number and mass concentrations in residential houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Congrong; Morawska, Lidia; Hitchins, Jane; Gilbert, Dale

    As part of a large study investigating indoor air in residential houses in Brisbane, Australia, the purpose of this work was to quantify emission characteristics of indoor particle sources in 15 houses. Submicrometer particle number and approximation of PM 2.5 concentrations were measured simultaneously for more than 48 h in the kitchen of all the houses by using a condensation particle counter (CPC) and a photometer (DustTrak), respectively. In addition, characterizations of particles resulting from cooking conducted in an identical way in all the houses were measured by using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and a DustTrak. All the events of elevated particle concentrations were linked to indoor activities using house occupants diary entries, and catalogued into 21 different types of indoor activities. This enabled quantification of the effect of indoor sources on indoor particle concentrations as well as quantification of emission rates from the sources. For example, the study found that frying, grilling, stove use, toasting, cooking pizza, cooking, candle vaporizing eucalyptus oil and fan heater use, could elevate the indoor submicrometer particle number concentration levels by more than five times, while PM 2.5 concentrations could be up to 3, 30 and 90 times higher than the background levels during smoking, frying and grilling, respectively.

  5. Fokker-Planck equation associated with the Wigner function of a quantum system with a finite number of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohendet, O.

    1989-01-01

    We consider a quantum system with a finite number N of states and we show that a Markov process evolving in an 'extended' discrete phase can be associated with the discrete Wigner function of the system. This Wigner function is built using the Weyl quantization procedure on the group Z N xZ N . Moreover we can use this process to compute the quantum mean values as probabilistic expectations of functions of this process. This probabilistic formulation can be seen as a stochastic mechanics in phase space. (orig.)

  6. On the Required Number of Antennas in a Point-to-Point Large-but-Finite MIMO System

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz; Svensson, Tommy; Eriksson, Thomas; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of the point-to-point multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) systems in the presence of a large but finite numbers of antennas at the transmitters and/or receivers. Considering the cases with and without hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) feedback, we determine the minimum numbers of the transmit/receive antennas which are required to satisfy different outage probability constraints. We study the effect of the spatial correlation between the antennas on the system performance. Also, the required number of antennas are obtained for different fading conditions. Our results show that different outage requirements can be satisfied with relatively few transmit/receive antennas. © 2015 IEEE.

  7. On the Required Number of Antennas in a Point-to-Point Large-but-Finite MIMO System

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2015-11-12

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of the point-to-point multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) systems in the presence of a large but finite numbers of antennas at the transmitters and/or receivers. Considering the cases with and without hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) feedback, we determine the minimum numbers of the transmit/receive antennas which are required to satisfy different outage probability constraints. We study the effect of the spatial correlation between the antennas on the system performance. Also, the required number of antennas are obtained for different fading conditions. Our results show that different outage requirements can be satisfied with relatively few transmit/receive antennas. © 2015 IEEE.

  8. Seasonal cycle and modal structure of particle number size distribution at Dome C, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Järvinen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied new particle formation and modal behavior of ultrafine aerosol particles on the high East Antarctic plateau at the Concordia station, Dome C (75°06' S, 123°23' E. Aerosol particle number size distributions were measured in the size range 10–600 nm from 14 December 2007 to 7 November 2009. We used an automatic algorithm for fitting up to three modes to the size distribution data. The total particle number concentration was low with the median of 109 cm−3. There was a clear seasonal cycle in the total particle number and the volume concentrations. The concentrations were at their highest during the austral summer with the median values of 260 cm−3 and 0.086 μm3 cm−3, and at their lowest during the austral winter with corresponding values of 15 cm−3 and 0.009 μm3 cm−3. New particle formation events were determined from the size distribution data. During the measurement period, natural new particle formation was observed on 60 days and for 15 of these days the particle growth rates from 10 to 25 nm in size could be determined. The median particle growth rate during all these events was 2.5 nm h−1 and the median formation rate of 10 nm particles was 0.023 cm−3 s−1. Most of the events were similar to those observed at other continental locations, yet also some variability in event types was observed. Exceptional features in Dome C were the winter events that occurred during dark periods, as well as the events for which the growth could be followed during several consecutive days. We called these latter events slowly growing events. This paper is the first one to analyze long-term size distribution data from Dome C, and also the first paper to show that new particle formation events occur in central Antarctica.

  9. Direct numerical simulations of particle-laden density currents with adaptive, discontinuous finite elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Parkinson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs are an important tool for the detailed analysis of turbidity current dynamics. Models that resolve the vertical structure and turbulence of the flow are typically based upon the Navier–Stokes equations. Two-dimensional simulations are known to produce unrealistic cohesive vortices that are not representative of the real three-dimensional physics. The effect of this phenomena is particularly apparent in the later stages of flow propagation. The ideal solution to this problem is to run the simulation in three dimensions but this is computationally expensive. This paper presents a novel finite-element (FE DNS turbidity current model that has been built within Fluidity, an open source, general purpose, computational fluid dynamics code. The model is validated through re-creation of a lock release density current at a Grashof number of 5 × 106 in two and three dimensions. Validation of the model considers the flow energy budget, sedimentation rate, head speed, wall normal velocity profiles and the final deposit. Conservation of energy in particular is found to be a good metric for measuring model performance in capturing the range of dynamics on a range of meshes. FE models scale well over many thousands of processors and do not impose restrictions on domain shape, but they are computationally expensive. The use of adaptive mesh optimisation is shown to reduce the required element count by approximately two orders of magnitude in comparison with fixed, uniform mesh simulations. This leads to a substantial reduction in computational cost. The computational savings and flexibility afforded by adaptivity along with the flexibility of FE methods make this model well suited to simulating turbidity currents in complex domains.

  10. Pairing vibrational and isospin rotational states in a particle number and isospin projected generator coordinate method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.T.; Muether, H.; Faessler, A.

    1978-01-01

    Pairing vibrational and isospin rotational states are described in different approximations based on particle number and isospin projected, proton-proton, neutron-neutron and proton-neutron pairing wave functions and on the generator coordinate method (GCM). The investigations are performed in models for which an exact group theoretical solution exists. It turns out that a particle number and isospin projection is essential to yield a good approximation to the ground state or isospin yrast state energies. For strong pairing correlations (pairing force constant equal to the single-particle level distance) isospin cranking (-ωTsub(x)) yields with particle number projected pairing wave function also good agreement with the exact energies. GCM wave functions generated by particle number and isospin projected BCS functions with different amounts of pairing correlations yield for the lowest T=0 and T=2 states energies which are practically indistinguishable from the exact solutions. But even the second and third lowest energies of charge-symmetric states are still very reliable. Thus it is concluded that also in realistic cases isospin rotational and pairing vibrational states may be described in the framework of the GCM method with isospin and particle number projected generating wave functions. (Auth.)

  11. Estimation of inhaled airborne particle number concentration by subway users in Seoul, Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Minhae; Park, Sechan; Namgung, Hyeong-Gyu; Kwon, Soon-Bark

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) causes several diseases in the human body. The smaller particles, which have relatively large surface areas, are actually more harmful to the human body since they can penetrate deeper parts of the lungs or become secondary pollutants by bonding with other atmospheric pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides. The purpose of this study is to present the number of PM inhaled by subway users as a possible reference material for any analysis of the hazards to the human body arising from the inhalation of such PM. Two transfer stations in Seoul, Korea, which have the greatest number of users, were selected for this study. For 0.3–0.422 μm PM, particle number concentration (PNC) was highest outdoors but decreased as the tester moved deeper underground. On the other hand, the PNC between 1 and 10 μm increased as the tester moved deeper underground and showed a high number concentration inside the subway train as well. An analysis of the particles to which subway users are actually exposed to (inhaled particle number), using particle concentration at each measurement location, the average inhalation rate of an adult, and the average stay time at each location, all showed that particles sized 0.01–0.422 μm are mostly inhaled from the outdoor air whereas particles sized 1–10 μm are inhaled as the passengers move deeper underground. Based on these findings, we expect that the inhaled particle number of subway users can be used as reference data for an evaluation of the hazards to health caused by PM inhalation. - Highlights: • Size-dependent aerosol number was measured along the path of subway user. • Particles less than 0.4 μm were inhaled in outdoor but less so as deeper underground. • Coarse particles were inhaled significantly as users moved deeper underground. - We estimated the inhaled aerosol number concentration depending on particle size along the path of subway users.

  12. Estimation of inhaled airborne particle number concentration by subway users in Seoul, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minhae; Park, Sechan; Namgung, Hyeong-Gyu; Kwon, Soon-Bark

    2017-12-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) causes several diseases in the human body. The smaller particles, which have relatively large surface areas, are actually more harmful to the human body since they can penetrate deeper parts of the lungs or become secondary pollutants by bonding with other atmospheric pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides. The purpose of this study is to present the number of PM inhaled by subway users as a possible reference material for any analysis of the hazards to the human body arising from the inhalation of such PM. Two transfer stations in Seoul, Korea, which have the greatest number of users, were selected for this study. For 0.3-0.422 μm PM, particle number concentration (PNC) was highest outdoors but decreased as the tester moved deeper underground. On the other hand, the PNC between 1 and 10 μm increased as the tester moved deeper underground and showed a high number concentration inside the subway train as well. An analysis of the particles to which subway users are actually exposed to (inhaled particle number), using particle concentration at each measurement location, the average inhalation rate of an adult, and the average stay time at each location, all showed that particles sized 0.01-0.422 μm are mostly inhaled from the outdoor air whereas particles sized 1-10 μm are inhaled as the passengers move deeper underground. Based on these findings, we expect that the inhaled particle number of subway users can be used as reference data for an evaluation of the hazards to health caused by PM inhalation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Particle number size distributions in urban air before and after volatilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Birmili

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol particle number size distributions (size range 0.003–10 μm in the urban atmosphere of Augsburg (Germany were examined with respect to the governing anthropogenic sources and meteorological factors. The two-year average particle number concentration between November 2004 and November 2006 was 12 200 cm−3, i.e. similar to previous observations in other European cities. A seasonal analysis yielded twice the total particle number concentrations in winter as compared to summer as consequence of more frequent inversion situations and enhanced particulate emissions. The diurnal variations of particle number were shaped by a remarkable maximum in the morning during the peak traffic hours. After a mid-day decrease along with the onset of vertical mixing, an evening concentration maximum could frequently be observed, suggesting a re-stratification of the urban atmosphere. Overall, the mixed layer height turned out to be the most influential meteorological parameter on the particle size distribution. Its influence was even greater than that of the geographical origin of the prevailing synoptic-scale air mass.

    Size distributions below 0.8 μm were also measured downstream of a thermodenuder (temperature: 300 °C, allowing to retrieve the volume concentration of non-volatile compounds. The balance of particle number upstream and downstream of the thermodenuder suggests that practically all particles >12 nm contain a non-volatile core while additional nucleation of particles smaller than 6 nm could be observed after the thermodenuder as an interfering artifact of the method. The good correlation between the non-volatile volume concentration and an independent measurement of the aerosol absorption coefficient (R2=0.9 suggests a close correspondence of the refractory and light-absorbing particle fractions. Using the "summation method", an average diameter ratio of particles before and after volatilisation could

  14. In situ formation and spatial variability of particle number concentration in a European megacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikridas, M.; Sciare, J.; Freutel, F.; Crumeyrolle, S.; von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Borbon, A.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Merkel, M.; Crippa, M.; Kostenidou, E.; Psichoudaki, M.; Hildebrandt, L.; Engelhart, G. J.; Petäjä, T.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Drewnick, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kulmala, M.; Beekmann, M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-09-01

    Ambient particle number size distributions were measured in Paris, France, during summer (1-31 July 2009) and winter (15 January to 15 February 2010) at three fixed ground sites and using two mobile laboratories and one airplane. The campaigns were part of the Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation (MEGAPOLI) project. New particle formation (NPF) was observed only during summer on approximately 50 % of the campaign days, assisted by the low condensation sink (about 10.7 ± 5.9 × 10-3 s-1). NPF events inside the Paris plume were also observed at 600 m altitude onboard an aircraft simultaneously with regional events identified on the ground. Increased particle number concentrations were measured aloft also outside of the Paris plume at the same altitude, and were attributed to NPF. The Paris plume was identified, based on increased particle number and black carbon concentration, up to 200 km away from the Paris center during summer. The number concentration of particles with diameters exceeding 2.5 nm measured on the surface at the Paris center was on average 6.9 ± 8.7 × 104 and 12.1 ± 8.6 × 104 cm-3 during summer and winter, respectively, and was found to decrease exponentially with distance from Paris. However, further than 30 km from the city center, the particle number concentration at the surface was similar during both campaigns. During summer, one suburban site in the NE was not significantly affected by Paris emissions due to higher background number concentrations, while the particle number concentration at the second suburban site in the SW increased by a factor of 3 when it was downwind of Paris.

  15. Pseudo-random number generation for Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations on GPU devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Carolyn L.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2011-08-01

    Brownian Dynamics (BD), also known as Langevin Dynamics, and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) are implicit solvent methods commonly used in models of soft matter and biomolecular systems. The interaction of the numerous solvent particles with larger particles is coarse-grained as a Langevin thermostat is applied to individual particles or to particle pairs. The Langevin thermostat requires a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) to generate the stochastic force applied to each particle or pair of neighboring particles during each time step in the integration of Newton's equations of motion. In a Single-Instruction-Multiple-Thread (SIMT) GPU parallel computing environment, small batches of random numbers must be generated over thousands of threads and millions of kernel calls. In this communication we introduce a one-PRNG-per-kernel-call-per-thread scheme, in which a micro-stream of pseudorandom numbers is generated in each thread and kernel call. These high quality, statistically robust micro-streams require no global memory for state storage, are more computationally efficient than other PRNG schemes in memory-bound kernels, and uniquely enable the DPD simulation method without requiring communication between threads.

  16. Particle number concentration, size distribution and chemical composition during haze and photochemical smog episodes in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuemei; Chen, Jianmin; Cheng, Tiantao; Zhang, Renyi; Wang, Xinming

    2014-09-01

    The aerosol number concentration and size distribution as well as size-resolved particle chemical composition were measured during haze and photochemical smog episodes in Shanghai in 2009. The number of haze days accounted for 43%, of which 30% was severe (visibilitysmog episodes, about 5.89 times and 4.29 times those of clean days. The particle volume concentration and surface concentration in haze, photochemical smog and clean days were 102, 49, 15μm(3)/cm(3) and 949, 649, 206μm(2)/cm(3), respectively. As haze events got more severe, the number concentration of particles smaller than 50nm decreased, but the particles of 50-200nm and 0.5-1μm increased. The diurnal variation of particle number concentration showed a bimodal pattern in haze days. All soluble ions were increased during haze events, of which NH4(+), SO4(2-) and NO3(-) increased greatly, followed by Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Cl(-). These ions were very different in size-resolved particles during haze and photochemical smog episodes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Nano-particle drag prediction at low Reynolds number using a direct Boltzmann-BGK solution approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, B.

    2018-01-01

    This paper outlines a novel approach for solution of the Boltzmann-BGK equation describing molecular gas dynamics applied to the challenging problem of drag prediction of a 2D circular nano-particle at transitional Knudsen number (0.0214) and low Reynolds number (0.25-2.0). The numerical scheme utilises a discontinuous-Galerkin finite element discretisation for the physical space representing the problem particle geometry and a high order discretisation for molecular velocity space describing the molecular distribution function. The paper shows that this method produces drag predictions that are aligned well with the range of drag predictions for this problem generated from the alternative numerical approaches of molecular dynamics codes and a modified continuum scheme. It also demonstrates the sensitivity of flow-field solutions and therefore drag predictions to the wall absorption parameter used to construct the solid wall boundary condition used in the solver algorithm. The results from this work has applications in fields ranging from diagnostics and therapeutics in medicine to the fields of semiconductors and xerographics.

  18. Statistics of an ideal homogeneous Bose gas with a fixed number of particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, Vladimir A

    2001-01-01

    The distribution function w 0 (n 0 ) of the number n 0 of particles is found for the condensate of an ideal gas of free bosons with a fixed total number N of particles. It is shown that above the critical temperature (T > T c ) this function has the usual form w 0 (n 0 ) = (1 - e μ )e μn 0 , where μ is the chemical potential in temperature units. In a narrow vicinity of the critical temperature |T/T c - 1| ≤ N -1/3 , this distribution changes and at T c acquires the form of a resonance. The width of the resonance depends on the shape of the volume occupied by the gas and it has exponential (but not the Gaussian) wings. As the temperature is lowered, the resonance maximum shifts to larger values of n 0 and its width tends to zero, which corresponds to the suppression of fluctuations. For N → ∞, this change occurs abruptly. The distribution function of the number of particles in excited states for the systems with a fixed and a variable number of particles (when only a mean number of particles is fixed) prove to be identical and have the usual form. (physical basis of quantum electronics)

  19. Particle-particle and hole-hole RPA correlations at finite temperature and the temperature dependence of the level density parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinh Mau, N.

    1987-11-01

    The pp-hh RPA equations obtained by summing the infinite series of ladder, upwards and backwards going diagrams in the temperature two particle Green's functions are derived at finite temperature. The contribution to the thermodynamic grand potential due to pp-hh RPA correlations is calculated simultaneously to that of ph RPA correlations. A schematic model is constructed which shows that, as for ph RPA states, the energies of pp and hh RPA states have no temperature dependence at not too high temperature. Within the same model, the temperature dependence of the level density parameter is discussed

  20. Particle-particle and hole-hole RPA correlations at finite temperature and the temperature dependence of the level density parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinh Mau, N.

    1989-01-01

    The pp-hh RPA equations obtained by summing the infinite series of ladder, upwards- and backwards-going diagrams in the temperature two-particle Green functions are derived at finite temperature. The contribution to the thermodynamic grand potential due to pp-hh RPA correlations is calculated simultaneously to that of ph RPA correlations. A schematic model is constructed which shows that, as for ph RPA states, the energies of pp and hh RPA states have no temperature dependence at not too high temperature. Within the same model, the temperature dependence of the level density parameter is discussed. (orig.)

  1. Finite Atwood Number Effects on Deceleration-Phase Instability in Room-Temperature Direct-Drive Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S.; Knauer, J. P.; Radha, P. B.; Goncharov, V. N.

    2017-10-01

    Performance degradation in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions can be caused by several effects, one of which is Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth during the deceleration phase. In room-temperature plastic target implosions, this deceleration-phase RT growth is enhanced by the density discontinuity and finite Atwood numbers at the fuel-pusher interface. For the first time, an experimental campaign at the Omega Laser Facility systematically varied the ratio of deuterium-to-tritium (D-to-T) within the DT gas fill to change the Atwood number. The goal of the experiment was to understand the effects of Atwood number variation on observables like apparent ion temperature, yield, and variations in areal density and bulk fluid motion, which lead to broadening of neutron spectra along different lines of sight. Simulations by the hydrodynamic codes LILAC and DRACO were used to study growth rates for different D-to-T ratios and identify observable quantities effected by Atwood number variation. Results from simulations and the experiment are presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  2. Percolation transition in Yang-Mills matter at a finite number of colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lottini, Stefano; Torrieri, Giorgio

    2011-10-07

    We examine baryonic matter at a quark chemical potential of the order of the confinement scale μ(q)∼Λ(QCD). In this regime, quarks are supposed to be confined but baryons are close to the "tightly packed limit" where they nearly overlap in configuration space. We show that this system will exhibit a percolation phase transition when varied in the number of colors N(c): at high N(c), large distance correlations at the quark level are possible even if the quarks are essentially confined. At low N(c), this does not happen. We discuss the relevance of this for dense nuclear matter, and argue that our results suggest a new "phase transition," varying N(c) at constant μ(q).

  3. Conjectures on the normal covering number of finite symmetric and alternating groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Bubboloni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Let gamma(Sn be the minimum number of proper subgroups Hi, i = 1,...,ell, of the symmetric group Sn such that each element in Sn lies in some conjugate of one of the Hi. In this paper we conjecture that gamma(Sn =(n/2(1-1/p_1 (1-1/p_2 + 2, where p1, p2 are the two smallest primes in the factorization of n and n is neither a prime power nor a product of two primes. Support for the conjecture is given by a previous result for the case where n has at most two distinct prime divisors. We give further evidence by confirming the conjecture for certain integers of the form n = 15q, for an infinite set of primes q, and by reporting on a Magma computation. We make a similar conjecture for gamma(An, when n is even, and provide a similar amount of evidence.

  4. Asymptotic expansion in the local limit theorem for the particle number in the grand canonical ensemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogosian, S.

    1981-01-01

    It is known that in the grand canonical ensemble (for the case of small density of particles) the fluctuations (approximately mod(Λ)sup(1/2)) in the particle number have an asymptotic normal distribution as Λ→infinity. A similar statement holds for the distribution of the particle number in a bounded domain evaluated with respect to the limiting Gibbs distribution. The author obtains an asymptotic expansion in the local limit theorem for the particle number in the grand canonical ensemble, by using the asymptotic expansion of the grand canonical partition function. The coefficients of this expansion are not constants but depend on the form of the domain Λ. More precisely, they are constant up to a correction which is small (for large Λ). The author obtains an explicit form for the second term of the asymptotic expansion in the local limit theorem for the particle number, and also gets the first correction terms for the coefficients of this expansion. (Auth.)

  5. Finite-difference time domain solution of light scattering by arbitrarily shaped particles and surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanev, Stoyan; Sun, Wenbo

    2012-01-01

    for particle and surface scattering calculations and the uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) absorbing boundary conditions for truncation of the FDTD grid. We show that the FDTD approach has a significant potential for studying the light scattering by cloud, dust, and biological particles. The applications...

  6. Effects of the particle-number projection on the isovector pairing energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, N.H.; Fellah, M.; Oudih, M.R.; Benhamouda, N.

    2006-01-01

    The usual neutron-proton BCS wave function is simultaneously projected on both the good neutron and proton numbers using a discrete projection operator. The projected energy of the system is deduced as a limit of rapidly convergent sequence. It is numerically studied for the N=Z nuclei of which ''experimental'' pairing gaps may be deduced from the experimental odd-even mass differences. It then appears that the particle-number fluctuation effect is even more important than in the case of pairing between like-particles. (orig.)

  7. Aerosol number size distributions over a coastal semi urban location: Seasonal changes and ultrafine particle bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, S. Suresh; Kompalli, Sobhan Kumar; Moorthy, K. Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Number-size distribution is one of the important microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols that influence aerosol life cycle, aerosol-radiation interaction as well as aerosol-cloud interactions. Making use of one-yearlong measurements of aerosol particle number-size distributions (PNSD) over a broad size spectrum (~ 15–15,000 nm) from a tropical coastal semi-urban location-Trivandrum (Thiruvananthapuram), the size characteristics, their seasonality and response to mesoscale and synoptic scale meteorology are examined. While the accumulation mode contributed mostly to the annual mean concentration, ultrafine particles (having diameter < 100 nm) contributed as much as 45% to the total concentration, and thus constitute a strong reservoir, that would add to the larger particles through size transformation. The size distributions were, in general, bimodal with well-defined modes in the accumulation and coarse regimes, with mode diameters lying in the range 141 to 167 nm and 1150 to 1760 nm respectively, in different seasons. Despite the contribution of the coarse sized particles to the total number concentration being meager, they contributed significantly to the surface area and volume, especially during transport of marine air mass highlighting the role of synoptic air mass changes. Significant diurnal variation occurred in the number concentrations, geometric mean diameters, which is mostly attributed to the dynamics of the local coastal atmospheric boundary layer and the effect of mesoscale land/sea breeze circulation. Bursts of ultrafine particles (UFP) occurred quite frequently, apparently during periods of land-sea breeze transitions, caused by the strong mixing of precursor-rich urban air mass with the cleaner marine air mass; the resulting turbulence along with boundary layer dynamics aiding the nucleation. These ex-situ particles were observed at the surface due to the transport associated with boundary layer dynamics. The particle growth rates from

  8. Aerosol number size distributions over a coastal semi urban location: Seasonal changes and ultrafine particle bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, S. Suresh, E-mail: s_sureshbabu@vssc.gov.in [Space Physics Laboratory, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram 695022 (India); Kompalli, Sobhan Kumar [Space Physics Laboratory, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram 695022 (India); Moorthy, K. Krishna [Centre for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2016-09-01

    Number-size distribution is one of the important microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols that influence aerosol life cycle, aerosol-radiation interaction as well as aerosol-cloud interactions. Making use of one-yearlong measurements of aerosol particle number-size distributions (PNSD) over a broad size spectrum (~ 15–15,000 nm) from a tropical coastal semi-urban location-Trivandrum (Thiruvananthapuram), the size characteristics, their seasonality and response to mesoscale and synoptic scale meteorology are examined. While the accumulation mode contributed mostly to the annual mean concentration, ultrafine particles (having diameter < 100 nm) contributed as much as 45% to the total concentration, and thus constitute a strong reservoir, that would add to the larger particles through size transformation. The size distributions were, in general, bimodal with well-defined modes in the accumulation and coarse regimes, with mode diameters lying in the range 141 to 167 nm and 1150 to 1760 nm respectively, in different seasons. Despite the contribution of the coarse sized particles to the total number concentration being meager, they contributed significantly to the surface area and volume, especially during transport of marine air mass highlighting the role of synoptic air mass changes. Significant diurnal variation occurred in the number concentrations, geometric mean diameters, which is mostly attributed to the dynamics of the local coastal atmospheric boundary layer and the effect of mesoscale land/sea breeze circulation. Bursts of ultrafine particles (UFP) occurred quite frequently, apparently during periods of land-sea breeze transitions, caused by the strong mixing of precursor-rich urban air mass with the cleaner marine air mass; the resulting turbulence along with boundary layer dynamics aiding the nucleation. These ex-situ particles were observed at the surface due to the transport associated with boundary layer dynamics. The particle growth rates from

  9. Exposure to carbon monoxide, fine particle mass, and ultrafine particle number in Jakarta, Indonesia: effect of commute mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both, Adam F; Westerdahl, Dane; Fruin, Scott; Haryanto, Budi; Marshall, Julian D

    2013-01-15

    We measured real-time exposure to PM(2.5), ultrafine PM (particle number) and carbon monoxide (CO) for commuting workers school children, and traffic police, in Jakarta, Indonesia. In total, we measured exposures for 36 individuals covering 93 days. Commuters in private cars experienced mean (st dev) exposures of 22 (9.4) ppm CO, 91 (38) μg/m(3)PM(2.5), and 290 (150)×10(3) particles cm(-3). Mean concentrations were higher in public transport than in private cars for PM(2.5) (difference in means: 22%) and particle counts (54%), but not CO, likely reflecting in-vehicle particle losses in private cars owing to air-conditioning. However, average commute times were longer for private car commuters than public transport commuters (in our sample, 24% longer: 3.0 vs. 2.3 h per day). Commute and traffic-related exposures experienced by Jakarta residents are among the highest in the world, owing to high on-road concentrations and multi-hour commutes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. 2D modeling of direct laser metal deposition process using a finite particle method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anedaf, T.; Abbès, B.; Abbès, F.; Li, Y. M.

    2018-05-01

    Direct laser metal deposition is one of the material additive manufacturing processes used to produce complex metallic parts. A thorough understanding of the underlying physical phenomena is required to obtain a high-quality parts. In this work, a mathematical model is presented to simulate the coaxial laser direct deposition process tacking into account of mass addition, heat transfer, and fluid flow with free surface and melting. The fluid flow in the melt pool together with mass and energy balances are solved using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software NOGRID-points, based on the meshless Finite Pointset Method (FPM). The basis of the computations is a point cloud, which represents the continuum fluid domain. Each finite point carries all fluid information (density, velocity, pressure and temperature). The dynamic shape of the molten zone is explicitly described by the point cloud. The proposed model is used to simulate a single layer cladding.

  11. A method for measuring particle number emissions from vehicles driving on the road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J P; Harrison, R M; Evans, D E; Alam, A; Barnes, C; Carter, G

    2002-01-01

    Earlier research has demonstrated that the conditions of dilution of engine exhaust gases profoundly influence the size distribution and total number of particles emitted. Since real world dilution conditions are variable and therefore difficult to simulate, this research has sought to develop and validate a method for measuring particle number emissions from vehicles driving past on a road. This has been achieved successfully using carbon dioxide as a tracer of exhaust gas dilution. By subsequent adjustment of data to a constant dilution factor, it is possible to compare emissions from different vehicles using different technologies and fuels based upon real world emission data. Whilst further optimisation of the technique, especially in terms of matching the instrument response times is desirable, the measurements offer useful insights into emissions from gasoline and diesel vehicles, and the substantial proportion of particles emitted in the 3-7 nanometre size range.

  12. Monte Carlo method implemented in a finite element code with application to dynamic vacuum in particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C

    2009-01-01

    Modern particle accelerators require UHV conditions during their operation. In the accelerating cavities, breakdowns can occur, releasing large amount of gas into the vacuum chamber. To determine the pressure profile along the cavity as a function of time, the time-dependent behaviour of the gas has to be simulated. To do that, it is useful to apply accurate three-dimensional method, such as Test Particles Monte Carlo. In this paper, a time-dependent Test Particles Monte Carlo is used. It has been implemented in a Finite Element code, CASTEM. The principle is to track a sample of molecules during time. The complex geometry of the cavities can be created either in the FE code or in a CAD software (CATIA in our case). The interface between the two softwares to export the geometry from CATIA to CASTEM is given. The algorithm of particle tracking for collisionless flow in the FE code is shown. Thermal outgassing, pumping surfaces and electron and/or ion stimulated desorption can all be generated as well as differ...

  13. The successful of finite element to invent particle cleaning system by air jet in hard disk drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jai-Ngam, Nualpun; Tangchaichit, Kaitfa

    2018-02-01

    Hard Disk Drive manufacturing has faced very challenging with the increasing demand of high capacity drives for Cloud-based storage. Particle adhesion has also become increasingly important in HDD to gain more reliability of storage capacity. The ability to clean on surfaces is more complicated in removing such particles without damaging the surface. This research is aim to improve the particle cleaning in HSA by using finite element to develop the air flow model then invent the prototype of air cleaning system to remove particle from surface. Surface cleaning by air pressure can be applied as alternative for the removal of solid particulate contaminants that is adhering on a solid surface. These technical and economic challenges have driven the process development from traditional way that chemical solvent cleaning. The focus of this study is to develop alternative way from scrub, ultrasonic, mega sonic on surface cleaning principles to serve as a foundation for the development of new processes to meet current state-of-the-art process requirements and minimize the waste from chemical cleaning for environment safety.

  14. Navier-Stokes simulation with constraint forces: finite-difference method for particle-laden flows and complex geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfler, K; Schwarzer, S

    2000-06-01

    Building on an idea of Fogelson and Peskin [J. Comput. Phys. 79, 50 (1988)] we describe the implementation and verification of a simulation technique for systems of non-Brownian particles in fluids at Reynolds numbers up to about 20 on the particle scale. This direct simulation technique fills a gap between simulations in the viscous regime and high-Reynolds-number modeling. It also combines sufficient computational accuracy with numerical efficiency and allows studies of several thousand, in principle arbitrarily shaped, extended and hydrodynamically interacting particles on regular work stations. We verify the algorithm in two and three dimensions for (i) single falling particles and (ii) a fluid flowing through a bed of fixed spheres. In the context of sedimentation we compute the volume fraction dependence of the mean sedimentation velocity. The results are compared with experimental and other numerical results both in the viscous and inertial regime and we find very satisfactory agreement.

  15. Interpretation of quarks having fractional quantum numbers as structural quasi-particles by means of the composite model with integral quantum numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyapkin, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    The problem is raised on the interpretation of quarks having fractional quantum numbers as structural quasi-particles. A new composite model is proposed on the basis of the fundamental triplet representation of fermions having integral quantum numbers

  16. Approximate energy correction for particle number summetry breaking in constrained Hartree-Fock plus BCS calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redon, N.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, M.

    1989-01-01

    An approximate restoration of the particle number symmetry, a la Lipkin-Nogami, is numerically investigated in the context of Constrained Hartree-Fock plus BCS calculations. Its effect is assessed in a variety of physical situations like potential energy landscapes in transitional nuclei, shape isomerism at low spin and fission barriers of actinide nuclei

  17. Effects of particle-number-projection on nuclear moment of intertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozmej, P.

    1976-01-01

    The formalism of the moment of inertia in cranking model and BCS theory has been extended for the partially particle-number-projected BCS wave functions. The ground state moments of inertia obtained by this method are a little greater than those calculated by BCS method. A smooth growth of the moments of inertia for diminishing pairing strength constant has been obtained. (author)

  18. Fine particle number and mass concentration measurements in urban Indian households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönkkönen, P; Pai, P; Maynard, A; Lehtinen, K E J; Hämeri, K; Rechkemmer, P; Ramachandran, G; Prasad, B; Kulmala, M

    2005-07-15

    Fine particle number concentration (D(p)>10 nm, cm(-3)), mass concentrations (approximation of PM(2.5), microg m(-3)) and indoor/outdoor number concentration ratio (I/O) measurements have been conducted for the first time in 11 urban households in India, 2002. The results indicate remarkable high indoor number and mass concentrations and I/O number concentration ratios caused by cooking. Besides cooking stoves that used liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) or kerosene as the main fuel, high indoor concentrations can be explained by poor ventilation systems. Particle number concentrations of more than 300,000 cm(-3) and mass concentrations of more than 1000 microg m(-3) were detected in some cases. When the number and mass concentrations during cooking times were statistically compared, a correlation coefficient r>0.50 was observed in 63% of the households. Some households used other fuels like wood and dung cakes along with the main fuel, but also other living activities influenced the concentrations. In some areas, outdoor combustion processes had a negative impact on indoor air quality. The maximum concentrations observed in most cases were due to indoor combustion sources. Reduction of exposure risk and health effects caused by poor indoor air in urban Indian households is possible by improving indoor ventilation and reducing penetration of outdoor particles.

  19. How comparable are size-resolved particle number concentrations from different instruments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsby, K. E.; Pryor, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The need for comparability of particle size resolved measurements originates from multiple drivers including: (i) Recent suggestions that air quality standards for particulate matter should migrate from being mass-based to incorporating number concentrations. This move would necessarily be predicated on measurement comparability which is absolutely critical to compliance determination. (ii) The need to quantify and diagnose causes of variability in nucleation and growth rates in nano-particle experiments conducted in different locations. (iii) Epidemiological research designed to identify key parameters in human health responses to fine particle exposure. Here we present results from a detailed controlled laboratory instrument inter-comparison experiment designed to investigate data comparability in the size range of 2.01-523.3 nm across a range of particle composition, modal diameter and absolute concentration. Particle size distributions were generated using a TSI model 3940 Aerosol Generation System (AGS) diluted using zero air, and sampled using four TSI Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS) configurations and a TSI model 3091 Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS). The SMPS configurations used two Electrostatic Classifiers (EC) (model 3080) attached to either a Long DMA (LDMA) (model 3081) or a Nano DMA (NDMA) (model 3085) plumbed to either a TSI model 3025A Butanol Condensed Particle Counting (CPC) or a TSI model 3788 Water CPC. All four systems were run using both high and low flow conditions, and were operated with both the internal diffusion loss and multiple charge corrections turned on. The particle compositions tested were sodium chloride, ammonium nitrate and olive oil diluted in ethanol. Particles of all three were generated at three peak concentration levels (spanning the range observed at our experimental site), and three modal particle diameters. Experimental conditions were maintained for a period of 20 minutes to ensure experimental

  20. Contribution from the interaction Hamiltonian to the expectation value of particle number with the non-equilibrium quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Ryuuichi; Morozumi, Takuya; Takata, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    We develop the method analyzing particle number non-conserving phenomena with non-equilibrium quantum field-theory. In this study, we consider a CP violating model with interaction Hamiltonian that breaks particle number conservation. To derive the quantum Boltzmann equation for the particle number, we solve Schwinger-Dyson equation, which are obtained from two particle irreducible closed-time-path (2PI CTP) effective action. In this calculation, we show the contribution from interaction Hamiltonian to the time evolution of expectation value of particle number.

  1. On the time-averaging of ultrafine particle number size spectra in vehicular plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Yao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine vehicular particle (<100 nm number size distributions presented in the literature are mostly averages of long scan-time (~30 s or more spectra mainly due to the non-availability of commercial instruments that can measure particle distributions in the <10 nm to 100 nm range faster than 30 s even though individual researchers have built faster (1–2.5 s scanning instruments. With the introduction of the Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer (EEPS in 2004, high time-resolution (1 full 32-channel spectrum per second particle size distribution data become possible and allow atmospheric researchers to study the characteristics of ultrafine vehicular particles in rapidly and perhaps randomly varying high concentration environments such as roadside, on-road and tunnel. In this study, particle size distributions in these environments were found to vary as rapidly as one second frequently. This poses the question on the generality of using averages of long scan-time spectra for dynamic and/or mechanistic studies in rapidly and perhaps randomly varying high concentration environments. One-second EEPS data taken at roadside, on roads and in tunnels by a mobile platform are time-averaged to yield 5, 10, 30 and 120 s distributions to answer this question.

  2. Thermodynamic identities and particle number fluctuations in weakly interacting Bose-Einstein condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illuminati, Fabrizio [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Potsdam, Am Neuen Palais 10, D-14415, Potsdam (Germany); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, and INFM, Unita di Salerno, I-84081 Baronissi SA (Italy); Navez, Patrick [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Potsdam, Am Neuen Palais 10, D-14415, Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Materials Science, Demokritos NCSR, POB 60228, 15310 Athens (Greece); Wilkens, Martin [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Potsdam, Am Neuen Palais 10, D-14415, Potsdam (Germany)

    1999-08-14

    We derive exact thermodynamic identities relating the average number of condensed atoms and the root-mean-square fluctuations determined in different statistical ensembles for the weakly interacting Bose gas confined in a box. This is achieved by introducing the concept of auxiliary partition functions for model Hamiltonians that do conserve the total number of particles. Exploiting such thermodynamic identities, we provide the first, completely analytical prediction of the microcanonical particle number fluctuations in the weakly interacting Bose gas. Such fluctuations, as a function of the volume V of the box are found to behave normally, in contrast with the anomalous scaling behaviour V{sup 4/3} of the fluctuations in the ideal Bose gas. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  3. Effects of the Reynolds number on two-dimensional dielectrophoretic motions of a pair of particles under a uniform electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sang Mo; Mannoor, Madhusoodanan; Maniyeri, Ranjith Maniyeri

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents two-dimensional direct numerical simulations to explore the effect of the Reynolds number on the Dielectrophoretic (DEP) motion of a pair of freely suspended particles in an unbounded viscous fluid under an external uniform electric field. Accordingly, the electric potential is obtained by solving the Maxwell'00s equation with a great sudden change in the electric conductivity at the particle-fluid interface and then the Maxwell stress tensor is integrated to determine the DEP force exerted on each particle. The fluid flow and particle movement, on the other hand, are predicted by solving the continuity and Navier-Stokes equations together with the kinetic equations. Numerical simulations are carried out using a finite volume approach, composed of a sharp interface method for the electric potential and a direct-forcing immersed-boundary method for the fluid flow. Through the simulations, it is found that both particles with the same sign of the conductivity revolve and eventually align themselves in a line with the electric field. With different signs, to the contrary, they revolve in the reverse way and eventually become lined up at a right angle with the electric field. The DEP motion also depends significantly on the Reynolds number defined based on the external electric field for all the combinations of the conductivity signs. When the Reynolds number is approximately below Re cr ≈ 0.1, the DEP motion becomes independent of the Reynolds number and thus can be exactly predicted by the no-inertia solver that neglects all the inertial and convective effects. With increasing Reynolds number above the critical number, on the other hand, the particles trace larger trajectories and thus take longer time during their revolution to the eventual in-line alignment.

  4. Effects of the Reynolds number on two-dimensional dielectrophoretic motions of a pair of particles under a uniform electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sang Mo; Mannoor, Madhusoodanan [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Maniyeri, Ranjith Maniyeri [National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Mangalore (India)

    2016-07-15

    This paper presents two-dimensional direct numerical simulations to explore the effect of the Reynolds number on the Dielectrophoretic (DEP) motion of a pair of freely suspended particles in an unbounded viscous fluid under an external uniform electric field. Accordingly, the electric potential is obtained by solving the Maxwell'00s equation with a great sudden change in the electric conductivity at the particle-fluid interface and then the Maxwell stress tensor is integrated to determine the DEP force exerted on each particle. The fluid flow and particle movement, on the other hand, are predicted by solving the continuity and Navier-Stokes equations together with the kinetic equations. Numerical simulations are carried out using a finite volume approach, composed of a sharp interface method for the electric potential and a direct-forcing immersed-boundary method for the fluid flow. Through the simulations, it is found that both particles with the same sign of the conductivity revolve and eventually align themselves in a line with the electric field. With different signs, to the contrary, they revolve in the reverse way and eventually become lined up at a right angle with the electric field. The DEP motion also depends significantly on the Reynolds number defined based on the external electric field for all the combinations of the conductivity signs. When the Reynolds number is approximately below Re{sub cr} ≈ 0.1, the DEP motion becomes independent of the Reynolds number and thus can be exactly predicted by the no-inertia solver that neglects all the inertial and convective effects. With increasing Reynolds number above the critical number, on the other hand, the particles trace larger trajectories and thus take longer time during their revolution to the eventual in-line alignment.

  5. Constraints on the dark matter particle mass from the number of Milky Way satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polisensky, Emil; Ricotti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    We have conducted N-body simulations of the growth of Milky Way-sized halos in cold and warm dark matter cosmologies. The number of dark matter satellites in our simulated Milky Ways decreases with decreasing mass of the dark matter particle. Assuming that the number of dark matter satellites exceeds or equals the number of observed satellites of the Milky Way, we derive lower limits on the dark matter particle mass. We find with 95% confidence m s >13.3 keV for a sterile neutrino produced by the Dodelson and Widrow mechanism, m s >8.9 keV for the Shi and Fuller mechanism, m s >3.0 keV for the Higgs decay mechanism, and m WDM >2.3 keV for a thermal dark matter particle. The recent discovery of many new dark matter dominated satellites of the Milky Way in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey allows us to set lower limits comparable to constraints from the complementary methods of Lyman-α forest modeling and x-ray observations of the unresolved cosmic x-ray background and of dark matter halos from dwarf galaxy to cluster scales. Future surveys like LSST, DES, PanSTARRS, and SkyMapper have the potential to discover many more satellites and further improve constraints on the dark matter particle mass.

  6. Finite-time singularities and flow regularization in a hydromagnetic shell model at extreme magnetic Prandtl numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigro, G; Carbone, V

    2015-01-01

    Conventional surveys on the existence of singularities in fluid systems for vanishing dissipation have hitherto tried to infer some insight by searching for spatial features developing in asymptotic regimes. This approach has not yet produced a conclusive answer. One of the difficulties preventing us from getting a definitive answer is the limitations of direct numerical simulations which do not yet have a high enough resolution so far as to properly describe spatial fine structures in asymptotic regimes. In this paper, instead of searching for spatial details, we suggest seeking a principle, that would be able to discriminate between singular or not-singular behavior, among the integral and purely dynamical properties of a fluid system. We investigate the singularities developed by a hydromagnetic shell model during the magnetohydrodynamic turbulent cascade. Our results show that when the viscosity is equal to the magnetic diffusivity (unit magnetic Prandtl number) singularities appear in a finite time. A complex behavior is observed at extreme magnetic Prandtl numbers. In particular, the singularities persist in the limit of vanishing viscosity, while a complete regularization is observed in the limit of vanishing diffusivity. This dynamics is related to differences between the magnetic and the kinetic energy cascades towards small scales. Finally a comparison between the three-dimensional and the two-dimensional cases leads to conjecture that the existence of singularities may be related to the conservation of different ideal invariants. (paper)

  7. A multithreaded and GPU-optimized compact finite difference algorithm for turbulent mixing at high Schmidt number using petascale computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, M. P.; Yeung, P. K.; Buaria, D.; Gotoh, T.

    2017-11-01

    Turbulent mixing at high Schmidt number is a multiscale problem which places demanding requirements on direct numerical simulations to resolve fluctuations down the to Batchelor scale. We use a dual-grid, dual-scheme and dual-communicator approach where velocity and scalar fields are computed by separate groups of parallel processes, the latter using a combined compact finite difference (CCD) scheme on finer grid with a static 3-D domain decomposition free of the communication overhead of memory transposes. A high degree of scalability is achieved for a 81923 scalar field at Schmidt number 512 in turbulence with a modest inertial range, by overlapping communication with computation whenever possible. On the Cray XE6 partition of Blue Waters, use of a dedicated thread for communication combined with OpenMP locks and nested parallelism reduces CCD timings by 34% compared to an MPI baseline. The code has been further optimized for the 27-petaflops Cray XK7 machine Titan using GPUs as accelerators with the latest OpenMP 4.5 directives, giving 2.7X speedup compared to CPU-only execution at the largest problem size. Supported by NSF Grant ACI-1036170, the NCSA Blue Waters Project with subaward via UIUC, and a DOE INCITE allocation at ORNL.

  8. Sub-micron particle number size distribution characteristics at two urban locations in Leicester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Sarkawt M. L.; Cordell, Rebecca L.; Kos, Gerard P. A.; Weijers, E. P.; Monks, Paul S.

    2017-09-01

    The particle number size distribution (PNSD) of atmospheric particles not only provides information about sources and atmospheric processing of particles, but also plays an important role in determining regional lung dose. Owing to the importance of PNSD in understanding particulate pollution two short-term campaigns (March-June 2014) measurements of sub-micron PNSD were conducted at two urban background locations in Leicester, UK. At the first site, Leicester Automatic Urban Rural Network (AURN), the mean number concentrations of nucleation, Aitken, accumulation modes, the total particles, equivalent black carbon (eBC) mass concentrations were 2002, 3258, 1576, 6837 # cm-3, 1.7 μg m-3, respectively, and at the second site, Brookfield (BF), were 1455, 2407, 874, 4737 # cm-3, 0.77 μg m-3, respectively. The total particle number was dominated by the nucleation and Aitken modes, with both consisting of 77%, and 81% of total number concentrations at AURN and BF sites, respectively. This behaviour could be attributed to primary emissions (traffic) of ultrafine particles and the temporal evolution of mixing layer. The size distribution at the AURN site shows bimodal distribution at 22 nm with a minor peak at 70 nm. The size distribution at BF site, however, exhibits unimodal distribution at 35 nm. This study has for the first time investigated the effect of Easter holiday on PNSD in UK. The temporal variation of PNSD demonstrated a good degree of correlation with traffic-related pollutants (NOX, and eBC at both sites). The meteorological conditions, also had an impact on the PNSD and eBC at both sites. During the measurement period, the frequency of NPF events was calculated to be 13.3%, and 22.2% at AURN and BF sites, respectively. The average value of formation and growth rates of nucleation mode particles were 1.3, and 1.17 cm-3 s-1 and 7.42, and 5.3 nm h-1 at AURN, and BF sites, respectively. It can suggested that aerosol particles in Leicester originate mainly

  9. Explaining global surface aerosol number concentrations in terms of primary emissions and particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Spracklen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We synthesised observations of total particle number (CN concentration from 36 sites around the world. We found that annual mean CN concentrations are typically 300–2000 cm−3 in the marine boundary layer and free troposphere (FT and 1000–10 000 cm−3 in the continental boundary layer (BL. Many sites exhibit pronounced seasonality with summer time concentrations a factor of 2–10 greater than wintertime concentrations. We used these CN observations to evaluate primary and secondary sources of particle number in a global aerosol microphysics model. We found that emissions of primary particles can reasonably reproduce the spatial pattern of observed CN concentration (R2=0.46 but fail to explain the observed seasonal cycle (R2=0.1. The modeled CN concentration in the FT was biased low (normalised mean bias, NMB=−88% unless a secondary source of particles was included, for example from binary homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid and water (NMB=−25%. Simulated CN concentrations in the continental BL were also biased low (NMB=−74% unless the number emission of anthropogenic primary particles was increased or a mechanism that results in particle formation in the BL was included. We ran a number of simulations where we included an empirical BL nucleation mechanism either using the activation-type mechanism (nucleation rate, J, proportional to gas-phase sulfuric acid concentration to the power one or kinetic-type mechanism (J proportional to sulfuric acid to the power two with a range of nucleation coefficients. We found that the seasonal CN cycle observed at continental BL sites was better simulated by BL particle formation (R2=0.3 than by increasing the number emission from primary anthropogenic sources (R2=0.18. The nucleation constants that resulted in best overall match between model and observed CN concentrations were

  10. Explaining global surface aerosol number concentrations in terms of primary emissions and particle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, D. V.; Carslaw, K. S.; Merikanto, J.; Mann, G. W.; Reddington, C. L.; Pickering, S.; Ogren, J. A.; Andrews, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.; Boy, M.; Kulmala, M.; Laakso, L.; Lihavainen, H.; Kivekäs, N.; Komppula, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Kouvarakis, G.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.; Weller, R.; Gras, J.; Laj, P.; Sellegri, K.; Bonn, B.; Krejci, R.; Laaksonen, A.; Hamed, A.; Minikin, A.; Harrison, R. M.; Talbot, R.; Sun, J.

    2010-05-01

    We synthesised observations of total particle number (CN) concentration from 36 sites around the world. We found that annual mean CN concentrations are typically 300-2000 cm-3 in the marine boundary layer and free troposphere (FT) and 1000-10 000 cm-3 in the continental boundary layer (BL). Many sites exhibit pronounced seasonality with summer time concentrations a factor of 2-10 greater than wintertime concentrations. We used these CN observations to evaluate primary and secondary sources of particle number in a global aerosol microphysics model. We found that emissions of primary particles can reasonably reproduce the spatial pattern of observed CN concentration (R2=0.46) but fail to explain the observed seasonal cycle (R2=0.1). The modeled CN concentration in the FT was biased low (normalised mean bias, NMB=-88%) unless a secondary source of particles was included, for example from binary homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid and water (NMB=-25%). Simulated CN concentrations in the continental BL were also biased low (NMB=-74%) unless the number emission of anthropogenic primary particles was increased or a mechanism that results in particle formation in the BL was included. We ran a number of simulations where we included an empirical BL nucleation mechanism either using the activation-type mechanism (nucleation rate, J, proportional to gas-phase sulfuric acid concentration to the power one) or kinetic-type mechanism (J proportional to sulfuric acid to the power two) with a range of nucleation coefficients. We found that the seasonal CN cycle observed at continental BL sites was better simulated by BL particle formation (R2=0.3) than by increasing the number emission from primary anthropogenic sources (R2=0.18). The nucleation constants that resulted in best overall match between model and observed CN concentrations were consistent with values derived in previous studies from detailed case studies at individual sites. In our model, kinetic and activation

  11. Source apportionment of aerosol particles at a European air pollution hot spot using particle number size distributions and chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, Cecilia; Pokorná, Petra; Hovorka, Jan; Masiol, Mauro; Topinka, Jan; Zhao, Yongjing; Křůmal, Kamil; Cliff, Steven; Mikuška, Pavel; Hopke, Philip K

    2018-03-01

    Ostrava in the Moravian-Silesian region (Czech Republic) is a European air pollution hot spot for airborne particulate matter (PM), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and ultrafine particles (UFPs). Air pollution source apportionment is essential for implementation of successful abatement strategies. UFPs or nanoparticles of diameter hot-spot including nanoparticles, Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was applied to highly time resolved particle number size distributions (NSD, 14 nm-10 μm) and PM 0.09-1.15 chemical composition. Diurnal patterns, meteorological variables, gaseous pollutants, organic markers, and associations between the NSD factors and chemical composition factors were used to identify the pollution sources. The PMF on the NSD reveals two factors in the ultrafine size range: industrial UFPs (28%, number mode diameter - NMD 45 nm), industrial/fresh road traffic nanoparticles (26%, NMD 26 nm); three factors in the accumulation size range: urban background (24%, NMD 93 nm), coal burning (14%, volume mode diameter - VMD 0.5 μm), regional pollution (3%, VMD 0.8 μm) and one factor in the coarse size range: industrial coarse particles/road dust (2%, VMD 5 μm). The PMF analysis of PM 0.09-1.15 revealed four factors: SIA/CC/BB (52%), road dust (18%), sinter/steel (16%), iron production (16%). The factors in the ultrafine size range resolved with NSD have a positive correlation with sinter/steel production and iron production factors resolved with chemical composition. Coal combustion factor resolved with NSD has moderate correlation with SIA/CC/BB factor. The organic markers homohopanes correlate with coal combustion and the levoglucosan correlates with urban background. The PMF applications to NSD and chemical composition datasets are complementary. PAHs in PM 1 were found to be associated with coal combustion factor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Stress Analysis of a TRISO Coated Particle Fuel by Using ABAQUS Finite Element Visco-Elastoplastic Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Moon Sung; Kim, Y. M.; Lee, Y. W.

    2006-01-01

    The fundamental design for a gas-cooled reactor relies on an understanding of the behavior of a coated particle fuel. KAERI, which has been carrying out the Korean VHTR (Very High Temperature modular gas cooled Reactor) Project since 2004, is developing a fuel performance analysis code for a VHTR named COPA (COated Particle fuel Analysis). A validation of COPA was attempted by comparing its benchmark results with the visco-elastic solutions obtained from the ABAQUS code calculations for the IAEA-CRP-6 TRISO coated particle benchmark problems involving a creep, swelling, and pressure. However, the ABAQUS finite element model used for the above-mentioned analysis did not consider the material nonlinearity of the SiC coating layer that showed stress levels higher than the assumed yield point of the material. In this study, a consideration of the material nonlinearity is included in the ABAQUS model to obtain the visco-elastoplastic solutions and the results are compared with the visco-elastic solutions obtained from the previous ABAQUS model

  13. Dissipative particle dynamics of diffusion-NMR requires high Schmidt-numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azhar, Mueed; Greiner, Andreas [Laboratory for Simulation, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Korvink, Jan G., E-mail: jan.korvink@kit.edu, E-mail: david.kauzlaric@imtek.uni-freiburg.de [Laboratory for Simulation, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Department of Microstructure Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Kauzlarić, David, E-mail: jan.korvink@kit.edu, E-mail: david.kauzlaric@imtek.uni-freiburg.de [Laboratory for Simulation, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Freiburg, Albertstr. 19, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-06-28

    We present an efficient mesoscale model to simulate the diffusion measurement with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). On the level of mesoscopic thermal motion of fluid particles, we couple the Bloch equations with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). Thereby we establish a physically consistent scaling relation between the diffusion constant measured for DPD-particles and the diffusion constant of a real fluid. The latter is based on a splitting into a centre-of-mass contribution represented by DPD, and an internal contribution which is not resolved in the DPD-level of description. As a consequence, simulating the centre-of-mass contribution with DPD requires high Schmidt numbers. After a verification for fundamental pulse sequences, we apply the NMR-DPD method to NMR diffusion measurements of anisotropic fluids, and of fluids restricted by walls of microfluidic channels. For the latter, the free diffusion and the localisation regime are considered.

  14. Particle image velocimetry measurements of Mach 3 turbulent boundary layers at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, J. M.; Gupta, A. K.; Smith, M. S.; Marineau, E. C.

    2018-05-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of Mach 3 turbulent boundary layers (TBL) have been performed under low Reynolds number conditions, Re_τ =200{-}1000, typical of direct numerical simulations (DNS). Three reservoir pressures and three measurement locations create an overlap in parameter space at one research facility. This allows us to assess the effects of Reynolds number, particle response and boundary layer thickness separate from facility specific experimental apparatus or methods. The Morkovin-scaled streamwise fluctuating velocity profiles agree well with published experimental and numerical data and show a small standard deviation among the nine test conditions. The wall-normal fluctuating velocity profiles show larger variations which appears to be due to particle lag. Prior to the current study, no detailed experimental study characterizing the effect of Stokes number on attenuating wall-normal fluctuating velocities has been performed. A linear variation is found between the Stokes number ( St) and the relative error in wall-normal fluctuating velocity magnitude (compared to hot wire anemometry data from Klebanoff, Characteristics of Turbulence in a Boundary Layer with Zero Pressure Gradient. Tech. Rep. NACA-TR-1247, National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Springfield, Virginia, 1955). The relative error ranges from about 10% for St=0.26 to over 50% for St=1.06. Particle lag and spatial resolution are shown to act as low-pass filters on the fluctuating velocity power spectral densities which limit the measurable energy content. The wall-normal component appears more susceptible to these effects due to the flatter spectrum profile which indicates that there is additional energy at higher wave numbers not measured by PIV. The upstream inclination and spatial correlation extent of coherent turbulent structures agree well with published data including those using krypton tagging velocimetry (KTV) performed at the same facility.

  15. Tight coupling of particle size, number and composition in atmospheric cloud droplet activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Topping

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The substantial uncertainty in the indirect effect of aerosol particles on radiative forcing in large part arises from the influences of atmospheric aerosol particles on (i the brightness of clouds, exerting significant shortwave cooling with no appreciable compensation in the long wave, and on (ii their ability to precipitate, with implications for cloud cover and lifetime.

    Predicting the ambient conditions at which aerosol particles may become cloud droplets is largely reliant on an equilibrium relationship derived by Köhler (1936. However, the theoretical basis of the relationship restricts its application to particles solely comprising involatile compounds and water, whereas a substantial fraction of particles in the real atmosphere will contain potentially thousands of semi-volatile organic compounds in addition to containing semi-volatile inorganic components such as ammonium nitrate.

    We show that equilibration of atmospherically reasonable concentrations of organic compounds with a growing particle as the ambient humidity increases has potentially larger implications on cloud droplet formation than any other equilibrium compositional dependence, owing to inextricable linkage between the aerosol composition, a particles size and concentration under ambient conditions.

    Whilst previous attempts to account for co-condensation of gases other than water vapour have been restricted to one inorganic condensate, our method demonstrates that accounting for the co-condensation of any number of organic compounds substantially decreases the saturation ratio of water vapour required for droplet activation. This effect is far greater than any other compositional dependence; more so even than the unphysical effect of surface tension reduction in aqueous organic mixtures, ignoring differences in bulk and surface surfactant concentrations.

  16. Bounds on the number of possible Higgs particles using grand unification and exceptional Lie groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naschie, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    The total sum of dimensions of a magnum exceptional Lie symmetry groups hierarchy is 4α-bar o =(4)(137+k o )≅548. Dividing this value among the various quantum fields leads to the possibility of an eight degrees of freedom Higgs field. However analyzing the same situation using sub groups of the largest exceptional Lie group leads to the conclusion that we are likely to find three Higgs particles only at the energy scale of the standard model. Consequently five of the eight degrees of freedom are unlikely to materialize as particles at this particular energy scale. This conclusion is reinforced by an entirely different approach based on grand unification analysis which excludes any grand unification using 4HD, i.e. four Higgs doublets. This leaves us with one, two and three Higgs doublets. Noting that a super symmetric standard model with two Higgs doublets gives almost perfect grand unification and that the result agrees with our exceptional Lie symmetry groups analysis, we exclude everything else. The final result is that we expect to find at least three more Higgs particles leading to a total of 66 elementary particles while at a somewhat higher energy, the expected number of 69 particles found using E-infinity theory is obtained

  17. Parallel Finite Element Particle-In-Cell Code for Simulations of Space-charge Dominated Beam-Cavity Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Ko, K.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Limborg, C.; Ng, C.; Prudencio, E.; Schussman, G.; Uplenchwar, R.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel finite element (FE) particle-in-cell code Pic3P (Pic2P) for simulations of beam-cavity interactions dominated by space-charge effects. As opposed to standard space-charge dominated beam transport codes, which are based on the electrostatic approximation, Pic3P (Pic2P) includes space-charge, retardation and boundary effects as it self-consistently solves the complete set of Maxwell-Lorentz equations using higher-order FE methods on conformal meshes. Use of efficient, large-scale parallel processing allows for the modeling of photoinjectors with unprecedented accuracy, aiding the design and operation of the next-generation of accelerator facilities. Applications to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) RF gun are presented

  18. Multiple particles production for hadron-hadron reactions with finite hadronization time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbex, N.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental data on multiple particle production for proton-proton reaction are analysed in the context of a very simple analytical model. The model exhibits the essential features of hydrodynamical calculations as, e.g., the formation of an intermediate object, which undergoes expansion. The simultaneous analysis of different types of data allows for the conclusion that such data reflect the dynamics of this intermediate object and have a very deem connection to the elementary processes. (author)

  19. Rapid Frequency Chirps of TAE mode due to Finite Orbit Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Herb; Wang, Ge

    2013-10-01

    The tip model for the TAE mode in the large aspect ratio limit, conceived by Rosenbluth et al. in the frequency domain, together with an interaction term in the frequency domain based on a map model, has been extended into the time domain. We present the formal basis for the model, starting with the Lagrangian for the particle wave interaction. We shall discuss the formal nonlinear time domain problem and the procedure that needs to obtain solutions in the adiabatic limit.

  20. Effect of finited pressure on plasma stability and particle motion i axial-assymetrical open traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotel'nikov, I.A.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrodynamic equilibrium confiqurations of plasma are investigated as well as the processes of cross-section transfer in axial-asymmetrical open traps. It is shown that drift surfaces are essentially deformed allowing for the final β, and, as a rule, the property of local injection is disturbed. But non-injection of particle drift surfaces with different energies and a magnetic moment in a paraxial trap turns out to be small by the perimeter of paraxiallity even at βapproximately1

  1. States with a great number of quasi-particles in even lead isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, G.; Manfredi, V.R.

    1975-01-01

    The even lead isotopes have been studied by means of a spectral distribution calculation in the sub-spaces defined by their number of quasi-particles. The comparison with results obtained in the thin isotopes shows that the overlap of the various sub-spaces is strongly dependent on the residual interaction used; namely, states with a great number of quasi-particles do exist in the low energy part of the spectra. The problem of spurious states implied by this method, states responsible for an over-estimation of the sub-space coupling, is treated and various corrections are proposed for the dimensions as well as for the centroids and widths of the sub-spaces [fr

  2. Number Size Distributions and Seasonality of Submicron Particles in Europe 2008–2009

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Asmi, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Laj, P.; Fjaeraa, A.-M.; Sellegri, K.; Birmili, W.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Ždímal, Vladimír; Zíková, Naděžda; Putaud, J.-P.; Marioni, A.; Tunved, P.; Hansson, H.-C.; Fiebig, M.; Kivekäs, N.; Lihavainen, H.; Asmi, E.; Ulevicius, V.; Aalto, P.P.; Swietlicki, E.; Kristensson, E.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Kalivitis, N.; Kalapov, I.; Kiss, G.; de Leeuw, G.; Henzig, B.; Harrison, R. M.; Beddows, D.; O´Dowd, C.; Jennings, S.G.; Flentje, H.; Weinhold, K.; Meinhardt, F.; Ries, L.; Kulmala, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2011), s. 5505-5538 ISSN 1680-7316 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) RII3-CT-2006-026140; European Commission(XE) 36833; European Commission(IT) Ev-K2-CNR Grant - others:AFCE(FI) 1118615 Program:FP6 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : aerosol particle number * aerosol concentrations * european submicron Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.520, year: 2011

  3. Particle-number conservation in odd mass proton-rich nuclei in the isovector pairing case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellah, M.; Allal, N.H.; Oudih, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    An expression of a wave function which describes odd–even systems in the isovector pairing case is proposed within the BCS approach. It is shown that it correctly generalizes the one used in the pairing between like-particles case. It is then projected on the good proton and neutron numbers using the Sharp-BCS (SBCS) method. The expressions of the expectation values of the particle-number operator and its square, as well as the energy, are deduced in both approaches. The formalism is applied to study the isovector pairing effect and the number projection one on the ground state energy of odd mass N ≈ Z nuclei using the single-particle energies of a deformed Woods–Saxon mean-field. It is shown that both effects on energy do not exceed 2%, however, the absolute deviations may reach several MeV. Moreover, the np pairing effect rapidly diminishes as a function of (N - Z). The deformation effect is also studied. It is shown that the np pairing effect, either before or after the projection, as well as the projection effect, when including or not the isovector pairing, depends upon the deformation. However, it seems that the predicted ground state deformation will remain the same in the four approaches. (author)

  4. Constraints on the Dark Matter Particle Mass from the Number of Milky Way Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    assuming dark matter only simulations (we do not include the effect of baryons in our simulations). We adopted values for cosmological parameters from the...ar X iv :1 00 4. 14 59 v1 [ as tr o- ph .C O ] 9 A pr 2 01 0 Constraints on the Dark Matter Particle Mass from the Number of Milky Way...simulations of the growth of Milky Way-sized halos in cold and warm dark matter cosmologies. The number of dark matter satellites in our simulated Milky

  5. Isofocusing lens with cylindrical electrodes for charged particle beam with finite emittance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpak, E.V.; Smirnova, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    An axially symmetric lens, consisting of three cylindrical electrodes and designed for shaping the beams of charged particles with final emittance, is studied. The potentials on the lens electrodes, which ensure the maintenance of the crossover formed by the lens, are calculated. The dependences of the ratios of potentials on the lens electrodes are analyzed for different values of R 0 /R 0 1 ratios, where R 0 and R 1 are maximum values of initial values of coordinates and the slopes in the crossover, respectively. 4 refs.; 3 figs

  6. Comparison of sources of submicron particle number concentrations measured at two sites in Rochester, NY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasumba, John; Hopke, Philip K; Chalupa, David C; Utell, Mark J

    2009-09-01

    Sources contributing to the submicron particles (100-470 nm) measured between January 2002 and December 2007 at two different New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC) sites in Rochester, NY were identified and apportioned using a bilinear receptor model, positive matrix factorization (PMF). Measurements of aerosol size distributions and number concentrations for particles in the size range of 10-500 nm have been made since December 2001 to date in Rochester. The measurements are being made using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) consisting of a DMA and a CPC (TSI models 3071 and 3010, respectively). From December 2001 to March 2004, particle measurements were made at the NYS DEC site in downtown Rochester, but it was moved to the eastside of Rochester in May 2004. Each measurement period was divided into three seasons i.e., winter (December, January, and February), summer (June, July, and August), and the transitional periods (March, April, May, September, October, and November) so as to avoid experimental uncertainty resulting from too large season-to-season variability in ambient temperature and solar photon intensity that would lead to unstable/non-stationary size distributions. Therefore, the seasons were analyzed independently for possible sources. Ten sources were identified at both sites and these include traffic, nucleation, residential/commercial heating, industrial emissions, secondary nitrate, ozone- rich secondary aerosol, secondary sulfate, regionally transported aerosol, and a mixed source of nucleation and traffic. These results show that the measured total outdoor particle number concentrations in Rochester generally vary with similar temporal patterns, suggesting that the central monitoring site data can be used to estimate outdoor exposure in other parts of the city.

  7. Particle-pair relative velocity measurement in high-Reynolds-number homogeneous and isotropic turbulence using 4-frame particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Zhongwang; Ireland, Peter J.; Bragg, Andrew D.; Liang, Zach; Collins, Lance R.; Meng, Hui

    2018-02-01

    The radial relative velocity (RV) between particles suspended in turbulent flow plays a critical role in droplet collision and growth. We present a simple and accurate approach to RV measurement in isotropic turbulence—planar 4-frame particle tracking velocimetry—using routine PIV hardware. It improves particle positioning and pairing accuracy over the 2-frame holographic approach by de Jong et al. (Int J Multiphas Flow 36:324-332; de Jong et al., Int J Multiphas Flow 36:324-332, 2010) without using high-speed cameras and lasers as in Saw et al. (Phys Fluids 26:111702, 2014). Homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow ({R_λ }=357) in a new, fan-driven, truncated iscosahedron chamber was laden with either low-Stokes (mean St=0.09, standard deviation 0.05) or high-Stokes aerosols (mean St=3.46, standard deviation 0.57). For comparison, DNS was conducted under similar conditions ({R_λ }=398; St=0.10 and 3.00, respectively). Experimental RV probability density functions (PDF) and mean inward RV agree well with DNS. Mean inward RV increases with St at small particle separations, r, and decreases with St at large r, indicating the dominance of "path-history" and "inertial filtering" effects, respectively. However, at small r, the experimental mean inward RV trends higher than DNS, possibly due to the slight polydispersity of particles and finite light sheet thickness in experiments. To confirm this interpretation, we performed numerical experiments and found that particle polydispersity increases mean inward RV at small r, while finite laser thickness also overestimates mean inward RV at small r, This study demonstrates the feasibility of accurately measuring RV using routine hardware, and verifies, for the first time, the path-history and inertial filtering effects on particle-pair RV at large particle separations experimentally.

  8. Finite magnetic relaxation in x-space magnetic particle imaging: Comparison of measurements and ferrohydrodynamic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhavalikar, R; Hensley, D; Maldonado-Camargo, L; Croft, L R; Ceron, S; Goodwill, P W; Conolly, S M; Rinaldi, C

    2016-08-03

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is an emerging tomographic imaging technology that detects magnetic nanoparticle tracers by exploiting their non-linear magnetization properties. In order to predict the behavior of nanoparticles in an imager, it is possible to use a non-imaging MPI relaxometer or spectrometer to characterize the behavior of nanoparticles in a controlled setting. In this paper we explore the use of ferrohydrodynamic magnetization equations for predicting the response of particles in an MPI relaxometer. These include a magnetization equation developed by Shliomis (Sh) which has a constant relaxation time and a magnetization equation which uses a field-dependent relaxation time developed by Martsenyuk, Raikher and Shliomis (MRSh). We compare the predictions from these models with measurements and with the predictions based on the Langevin function that assumes instantaneous magnetization response of the nanoparticles. The results show good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the ferrohydrodynamic models and the measurements without the use of fitting parameters and provide further evidence of the potential of ferrohydrodynamic modeling in MPI.

  9. Mathematical Relationship Between Particle Reynolds Number and Ripple Factor using Tapi River Data, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Yadav

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The computation of bed load allows for the fact that only part of the shear stress is used for transport of sediments and some of the shear stress is wasted in overcoming the resistance due to bed forms therefore the total shear stress developed in the open channel requires correction in the form of correction factor called ripple factor. Different methods have been followed for correcting the actual shear stress in order to compute the sediment load. Correction factors are based on particular characteristics grain size of particle. In the present paper the ripple factor has been obtained for non uniform bed material considering the various variables like discharge, hydraulic mean depth, flow velocity, bed slope, average diameter of particle etc. by collecting the field data of Tapi river for 15 years for a particular gauging station. The ripple factor is obtained using Meyer Peter and Muller formula, Einstein Formula, Kalinske’s formula, Du Boy’s formula, Shield’s formula, Bagnold’s formula, average of six formulae and multiple regression analysis. The variation of ripple factor with particle Reynolds Number is studied. The ripple factor obtained by different approaches are further analyzed using Origin software and carrying out multiple regression on the 15 years of data with more than 10 parameters, ripple factor by multiple regression has been obtained. These values are further analysed and giving statistical mean to the parameters a relationship of power form has been developed. The ripple factor increases with the increase in the value of Particle Reynolds number. The large deviation is observed in case of Kalinske’s approach when compare with other approaches

  10. Estimate of main local sources to ambient ultrafine particle number concentrations in an urban area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Mahmudur; Mazaheri, Mandana; Clifford, Sam; Morawska, Lidia

    2017-09-01

    Quantifying and apportioning the contribution of a range of sources to ultrafine particles (UFPs, D oil refineries, and seaport) sources to the total ambient particle number concentration (PNC) in a busy, inner-city area in Brisbane, Australia using Bayesian statistical modelling and other exploratory tools. The Bayesian model was trained on the PNC data on days where NP formations were known to have not occurred, hourly traffic counts, solar radiation data, and smooth daily trend. The model was applied to apportion and quantify the contribution of NP formations and local traffic and non-traffic sources to UFPs. The data analysis incorporated long-term measured time-series of total PNC (D ≥ 6 nm), particle number size distributions (PSD, D = 8 to 400 nm), PM2.5, PM10, NOx, CO, meteorological parameters and traffic counts at a stationary monitoring site. The developed Bayesian model showed reliable predictive performances in quantifying the contribution of NP formation events to UFPs (up to 4 × 104 particles cm- 3), with a significant day to day variability. The model identified potential NP formation and no-formations days based on PNC data and quantified the sources contribution to UFPs. Exploratory statistical analyses show that total mean PNC during the middle of the day was up to 32% higher than during peak morning and evening traffic periods, which were associated with NP formation events. The majority of UFPs measured during the peak traffic and NP formation periods were between 30-100 nm and smaller than 30 nm, respectively. To date, this is the first application of Bayesian model to apportion different sources contribution to UFPs, and therefore the importance of this study is not only in its modelling outcomes but in demonstrating the applicability and advantages of this statistical approach to air pollution studies.

  11. Simultaneous projection of particle-number and angular momentum BCS wave-functions in the rare-earth nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudih, M.R.; Benhamouda, N.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N.H.

    2000-01-01

    A method of simultaneous particle-number and angular-momentum projection of the BCS wave-function is presented. The particle number projection method is of FBCS type. In the frame work of the adiabatic approximation, the rotational energies of the axially symmetric even-even nuclei are established and numerically calculated for the rare-earth region. (author)

  12. Size-resolved particle number emission patterns under real-world driving conditions using positive matrix factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Sáez, Aida; Viana, Mar; Barrios, Carmen C; Rubio, Jose R; Amato, Fulvio; Pujadas, Manuel; Querol, Xavier

    2012-10-16

    A novel on-board system was tested to characterize size-resolved particle number emission patterns under real-world driving conditions, running in a EURO4 diesel vehicle and in a typical urban circuit in Madrid (Spain). Emission profiles were determined as a function of driving conditions. Source apportionment by Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was carried out to interpret the real-world driving conditions. Three emission patterns were identified: (F1) cruise conditions, with medium-high speeds, contributing in this circuit with 60% of total particle number and a particle size distribution dominated by particles >52 nm and around 60 nm; (F2) transient conditions, stop-and-go conditions at medium-high speed, contributing with 25% of the particle number and mainly emitting particles in the nucleation mode; and (F3) creep-idle conditions, representing traffic congestion and frequent idling periods, contributing with 14% to the total particle number and with particles in the nucleation mode (emissions depending on particle size and driving conditions. Differences between real-world emission patterns and regulatory cycles (NEDC) are also presented, which evidence that detecting particle number emissions real-world driving conditions.

  13. Electrophoresis of fd-virus particles: experiments and an analysis of the effect of finite rod lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitenhuis, Johan

    2012-09-18

    The electrophoretic mobility of rodlike fd viruses is measured and compared to theory, with the theoretical calculations performed according to Stigter (Stigter, D. Charged Colloidal Cylinder with a Gouy Double-Layer. J. Colloid Interface Sci. 1975, 53, 296-306. Stigter, D. Electrophoresis of Highly Charged Colloidal Cylinders in Univalent Salt- Solutions. 1. Mobility in Transverse Field. J. Phys. Chem. 1978, 82, 1417-1423. Stigter, D. Electrophoresis of Highly Charged Colloidal Cylinders in Univalent Salt Solutions. 2. Random Orientation in External Field and Application to Polyelectrolytes. J. Phys. Chem. 1978, 82, 1424-1429. Stigter, D. Theory of Conductance of Colloidal Electrolytes in Univalent Salt Solutions. J. Phys. Chem. 1979, 83, 1663-1670), who describes the electrophoretic mobility of infinite cylinders including relaxation effects. Using the dissociation constants of the ionizable groups on the surfaces of the fd viruses, we can calculate the mobility without any adjustable parameter (apart from the possible Stern layer thickness). In addition, the approximation in the theoretical description of Stigter (and others) of using a model of infinitely long cylinders, which consequently is independent of the aspect ratio, is examined by performing more elaborate numerical calculations for finite cylinders. It is shown that, although the electrophoretic mobility of cylindrical particles in the limit of low ionic strength depends on the aspect ratio much more than "end effects", at moderate and high ionic strengths the finite and infinite cylinder models differ only to a degree that can be attributed to end effects. Furthermore, the range of validity of the Stokes regime is systematically calculated.

  14. Large Deviations and Quasipotential for Finite State Mean Field Interacting Particle Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The conclusion then follows by applying Lemma 4.4.2. 132 119 4.4.1 Iterative solver: The widest neighborhood structure We employ Gauss - Seidel ...nearest neighborhood structure described in Section 4.4.2. We use Gauss - Seidel iterative method for our numerical experiments. The Gauss - Seidel ...x ∈ Bh, M x ∈ Sh\\Bh, where M ∈ (V,∞) is a very large number, so that the iteration (4.5.1) converges quickly. For simplicity, we restrict our

  15. Stable source reconstruction from a finite number of measurements in the multi-frequency inverse source problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamehmedovic, Mirza; Kirkeby, Adrian; Knudsen, Kim

    2018-01-01

    setting: From measurements made at a finite set of frequencies we uniquely determine and reconstruct sources in a subspace spanned by finitely many Fourier-Bessel functions. Further, we obtain a constructive criterion for identifying a minimal set of measurement frequencies sufficient for reconstruction......, and under an additional, mild assumption, the reconstruction method is shown to be stable." Our analysis is based on a singular value decomposition of the source-to-measurement forward operators and the distribution of positive zeros of the Bessel functions of the first kind. The reconstruction method...

  16. Genotoxic effects of daily personal exposure to particle mass and number concentrations on buccal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Daniela S.; da Costa, Silvano César; Ribeiro, Marcos; Moreira, Camila A. B.; Beal, Alexandra; Squizzato, Rafaela; Rudke, Anderson Paulo; Rafee, Sameh Adib Abou; Martins, Jorge A.; Palioto, Graciana Freitas; Kumar, Prashant; Martins, Leila D.

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study is to assess personal exposure to Particle Number Concentrations (PNC) in four size ranges between 0.3 and 10 μm, and particulate matter (PM1; PM2.5; PM4; PM10) in order to evaluate possible genotoxic effects through a comet assay in buccal cells. A convenience cohort of 30 individuals from a Brazilian medium-sized city was selected. These individuals aged between 20 and 61 and worked in typical job categories (i.e., administrative, commerce, education, general services and transport). They were recruited to perform personal exposure measurements during their typical daily routine activities, totaling 240 h of sampling. The 8-h average mass concentrations in air for volunteers ranged from 2.4 to 31.8 μg m-3 for PM1, 4.2-45.1 μg m-3 for PM2.5, 7.9-66.1 μg m-3 for PM4 and from 23.1 to 131.7 μg m-3 for PM10. The highest PNC variation was found for 0.3-0.5 range, between 14 and 181 particles cm-3, 1 to 14 particles cm-3 for the 0.5-1.0 range, 0.2 to 2 particles cm-3 for the 1.0-2.5 range, and 0.06 to 0.7 particles cm-3 for the 2.5-10 range. Volunteers in the 'education' category experienced the lowest inhaled dose of PM2.5, as opposed to those involved in 'commercial' activities with the highest doses for PM10 (1.63 μg kg-1 h-1) and PM2.5 (0.61 μg kg-1 h-1). The predominant cause for these high doses was associated with the proximity of the workplace to the street and vehicle traffic. The comet assay performed in buccal cells indicated that the volunteers in 'commerce' category experienced the highest damage to their DeoxyriboNucleic Acid (DNA) compared with the control category (i.e. 'education'). These results indicate the variability in personal exposure of the volunteers in different groups, and the potential damage to DNA was much higher for those spending time in close proximity to the vehicle sources (e.g. commercial services) leading to exposure to a higher fraction of fine particles. This study builds understanding on the exposure

  17. Fibre bundle varieties and the number of generations of elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    The idea is presented that the number of generations of elementary particles in a gauge theory characterised by a given Lie algebra is the same as the number of topologically distinct principal fibre bundles with a structure group having the same Lie algebra and R 3 -(0) as base space. Two different generations thus have a different global structure or 'twist' to their fibre bundles. It is found that at most three generations are allowed for groups with the same Lie algebra as E 6 , at most four generations for groups with the same Lie algebra as SOsub(41+2) with 1>=2, and at most n generations for groups with the same Lie algebra as SUsub(n). (author)

  18. The influence of the Kubo number on the transport of energetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalchi, A

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the interaction between charged energetic particles and magnetized plasmas by using analytical theory. Based on the unified nonlinear transport (UNLT) theory we compute the diffusion coefficient across a large scale magnetic field. To achieve analytical tractability we use a simple Gaussian approach to model the turbulent magnetic fields. We show that the perpendicular diffusion coefficient depends only on two parameters, namely the Kubo number and the parallel mean free path. We combine the aforementioned turbulence model with the UNLT theory and we solve the corresponding integral equation numerically to show how these two parameters control the perpendicular diffusion coefficient. Furthermore, we consider two extreme cases, namely the case of strong and suppressed pitch-angle scattering, respectively. For each case we consider small and large Kubo numbers to achieve a further simplification. All our analytical findings are compared with formulas which are known in diffusion theory. (paper)

  19. First long-term study of particle number size distributions and new particle formation events of regional aerosol in the North China Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. J. Shen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric particle number size distributions (size range 0.003–10 μm were measured between March 2008 and August 2009 at Shangdianzi (SDZ, a rural research station in the North China Plain. These measurements were made in an attempt to better characterize the tropospheric background aerosol in Northern China. The mean particle number concentrations of the total particle, as well as the nucleation, Aitken, accumulation and coarse mode were determined to be 1.2 ± 0.9 × 104, 3.6 ± 7.9 × 103, 4.4 ± 3.4 × 103, 3.5 ± 2.8 × 103 and 2 ± 3 cm−3, respectively. A general finding was that the particle number concentration was higher during spring compared to the other seasons. The air mass origin had an important effect on the particle number concentration and new particle formation events. Air masses from northwest (i.e. inner Asia favored the new particle formation events, while air masses from southeast showed the highest particle mass concentration. Significant diurnal variations in particle number were observed, which could be linked to new particle formation events, i.e. gas-to-particle conversion. During particle formation events, the number concentration of the nucleation mode rose up to maximum value of 104 cm−3. New particle formation events were observed on 36% of the effective measurement days. The formation rate ranged from 0.7 to 72.7 cm−3 s−1, with a mean value of 8.0 cm−3 s−1. The value of the nucleation mode growth rate was in the range of 0.3–14.5 nm h−1, with a mean value of 4.3 nm h−1. It was an essential observation that on many occasions the nucleation mode was able to grow into the size of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN within a matter of several hours. Furthermore, the new particle formation was regularly followed by a measurable increase in particle mass

  20. Primary standard for the number concentration of liquid-borne particles in the 10 to 20 µm diameter range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, T.; Ehara, K.

    2011-02-01

    The national primary standard for the number concentration of liquid-borne particles in the 10 to 20 µm diameter range has been developed at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan. The standard consists of a total number counting type flow cytometer (T-FCM) and an electronic balance. The T-FCM is a commercial flow cytometer modified so that the total number of particles in an aqueous suspension sampled in a test tube can be counted, and the electronic balance is used to determine the mass of the suspension. This standard is intended to be used for calibrating commercial standard suspensions of monodisperse polystyrene latex (PSL) particles. The measurand in the calibration is the mass-based number concentration (the particle number in a unit mass of a suspension), and the calibration capability covers the concentration range from 5 × 102 to 2 × 106 particles g-1. When the concentration of the suspension is higher than 2 × 103 particles g-1, the suspension is first diluted to about 1 × 103 particles g-1 to suppress the coincidence loss in particle counting by the T-FCM. The validity of the calibration with the T-FCM was examined by comparison with an independent method in which a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to determine the number concentration of particles deposited on a silicon wafer. For a suspension of 10 µm PSL particles with a concentration of approximately 1 × 106 particles g-1, the concentration values determined by the T-FCM and SEM methods were 1.042 × 106 and 1.035 × 106 particles g-1, respectively: The difference was less than 0.7%. The relative expanded uncertainty of the measurement by the T-FCM method with the coverage factor k = 2 was 4.4%.

  1. Primary standard for the number concentration of liquid-borne particles in the 10 to 20 µm diameter range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, T; Ehara, K

    2011-01-01

    The national primary standard for the number concentration of liquid-borne particles in the 10 to 20 µm diameter range has been developed at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan. The standard consists of a total number counting type flow cytometer (T-FCM) and an electronic balance. The T-FCM is a commercial flow cytometer modified so that the total number of particles in an aqueous suspension sampled in a test tube can be counted, and the electronic balance is used to determine the mass of the suspension. This standard is intended to be used for calibrating commercial standard suspensions of monodisperse polystyrene latex (PSL) particles. The measurand in the calibration is the mass-based number concentration (the particle number in a unit mass of a suspension), and the calibration capability covers the concentration range from 5 × 10 2 to 2 × 10 6 particles g −1 . When the concentration of the suspension is higher than 2 × 10 3 particles g −1 , the suspension is first diluted to about 1 × 10 3 particles g −1 to suppress the coincidence loss in particle counting by the T-FCM. The validity of the calibration with the T-FCM was examined by comparison with an independent method in which a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to determine the number concentration of particles deposited on a silicon wafer. For a suspension of 10 µm PSL particles with a concentration of approximately 1 × 10 6 particles g −1 , the concentration values determined by the T-FCM and SEM methods were 1.042 × 10 6 and 1.035 × 10 6 particles g −1 , respectively: The difference was less than 0.7%. The relative expanded uncertainty of the measurement by the T-FCM method with the coverage factor k = 2 was 4.4%

  2. Vertical profiles of black carbon concentration and particle number size distribution in the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, L.; Deng, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The vertical distribution of aerosols is of great importance to our understanding in the impacts of aerosols on radiation balance and climate, as well as air quality and public health. To better understand and estimate the effects of atmospheric components including trace gases and aerosols on atmospheric environment and climate, an intensive field campaign, Vertical Observations of trace Gases and Aerosols in the North China Plain (VOGA-NCP), was carried out from late July to early August 2013 over a rural site in the polluted NCP. During the campaign, vertical profiles of black carbon (BC) concentration and particle number size distribution were measured respectively by a micro-Aethalometer and an optical particle counter attached to a tethered balloon within 1000 m height. Meteorological parameters, including temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction, were measured simultaneously by a radiosonde also attached to the tethered balloon. Preliminary results showed distinct diurnal variations of the vertical distribution of aerosol total number concentration and BC concentration, following the development of the mixing layer. Generally, there was a well mixing of aerosols within the mixing layer and a sharp decrease above the mixing layer. Particularly, a small peak of BC concentrations was observed around 400-500 m height for several profiles. Further analysis would be needed to explain such phenomenon. It was also found that measured vertical profiles of BC using the filter-based method might be affected by the vertical distribution of relative humidity.

  3. Novel collective excitations and the quasi-particle picture of quarks coupled with a massive boson at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo; Kunihiro, Teiji; Nemoto, Yukio

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by the observation that there may exist hadronic excitations even in the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase, we investigate how the properties of quarks, especially within the quasi-particle picture, are affected by the coupling with bosonic excitations at finite temperature (T), employing Yukawa models with a massive scalar (pseudoscalar) and vector (axial-vector) boson of mass m. The quark spectral function and the quasi-dispersion relations are calculated at one-loop order. We find that there appears at three-peak structure in the quark spectral function with a collective nature when T is comparable with m, irrespective of the type of boson considered. Such a multi-peak structure was first found in a chiral model yielding scalar composite bosons with a decay width. We elucidate the mechanism through which the new quark collective excitations are realized in terms of the Landau damping of a quark (an antiquark) induced by scattering with the thermally excited boson, which gives rise to mixing and hence a level repulsion between a quark (antiquark) and an antiquark-hole (quark-hole) in the thermally excited antiquark (quark) distribution. Our results suggest that the quarks in the QGP phase can be described within an interesting quasi-particle picture with a multi-peak spectral function. Because the models employed here are rather generic, our findings may represent a universal phenomenon for fermions coupled to a massive bosonic excitation with a vanishing or small width. The relevance of these results to other fields of physics, such as neutrino physics, is also briefly discussed. In addition, we describe a new aspect of the plasmino excitation obtained in the hard-thermal loop approximation. (author)

  4. Low Reynolds number steady state flow through a branching network of rigid vessels: II. A finite element mixture model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyghe, J.M.R.J.; Oomens, C.W.J.; Campen, van D.H.; Heethaar, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    This research aims at formulating and verifying a finite element mixture formulation for blood perfusion. The equations derived in a companion paper [3] are discretized according to the Galerkin method. A flow experiment in a rigid model of a vascular tree of about 500 vessels is performed in order

  5. Number-unconstrained quantum sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2017-12-01

    Quantum sensing is commonly described as a constrained optimization problem: maximize the information gained about an unknown quantity using a limited number of particles. Important sensors including gravitational wave interferometers and some atomic sensors do not appear to fit this description, because there is no external constraint on particle number. Here, we develop the theory of particle-number-unconstrained quantum sensing, and describe how optimal particle numbers emerge from the competition of particle-environment and particle-particle interactions. We apply the theory to optical probing of an atomic medium modeled as a resonant, saturable absorber, and observe the emergence of well-defined finite optima without external constraints. The results contradict some expectations from number-constrained quantum sensing and show that probing with squeezed beams can give a large sensitivity advantage over classical strategies when each is optimized for particle number.

  6. Explaining the spatiotemporal variation of fine particle number concentrations over Beijing and surrounding areas in an air quality model with aerosol microphysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xueshun; Wang, Zifa; Li, Jie; Chen, Huansheng; Hu, Min; Yang, Wenyi; Wang, Zhe; Ge, Baozhu; Wang, Dawei

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a three-dimensional air quality model with detailed aerosol microphysics (NAQPMS + APM) was applied to simulate the fine particle number size distribution and to explain the spatiotemporal variation of fine particle number concentrations in different size ranges over Beijing and surrounding areas in the haze season (Jan 15 to Feb 13 in 2006). Comparison between observations and the simulation indicates that the model is able to reproduce the main features of the particle number size distribution. The high number concentration of total particles, up to 26600 cm −3 in observations and 39800 cm −3 in the simulation, indicates the severity of pollution in Beijing. We find that primary particles with secondary species coating and secondary particles together control the particle number size distribution. Secondary particles dominate particle number concentration in the nucleation mode. Primary and secondary particles together determine the temporal evolution and spatial pattern of particle number concentration in the Aitken mode. Primary particles dominate particle number concentration in the accumulation mode. Over Beijing and surrounding areas, secondary particles contribute at least 80% of particle number concentration in the nucleation mode but only 10–20% in the accumulation mode. Nucleation mode particles and accumulation mode particles are anti-phased with each other. Nucleation or primary emissions alone could not explain the formation of the particle number size distribution in Beijing. Nucleation has larger effects on ultrafine particles while primary particles emissions are efficient in producing large particles in the accumulation mode. Reduction in primary particle emissions does not always lead to a decrease in the number concentration of ultrafine particles. Measures to reduce fine particle pollution in terms of particle number concentration may be different from those addressing particle mass concentration. - Highlights:

  7. Finite-span rotating flat-plate wings at low reynolds number and the effects of aspect ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Zakery R.

    In the complex and dangerous environments of the modern warrior and emergency professional, the small size, maneuverability, and stealth of flapping-wing micro air vehicles (MAVs), scaled to the size of large insects or hummingbirds, has the potential to provide previously inaccessible levels of situational awareness, reconnaissance capability, and flexibility directly to the front lines. Although development of such an efficient, autonomous, and capable MAV is years away, there are immediate contributions that can be made to the fundamental science of the flapping-wing-type propulsion that makes MAVs so attractive. This investigation contributes to those fundamentals by considering the unsteady vortex dynamics problem of a rigid, rectangular flat plate at a fixed angle of attack rotating from rest---a simplified hovering half-stroke. Parameters are chosen to be biologically-relevant and relevant to MAVs operating at Reynolds numbers of O (103), and experiments are performed in a 50% by mass glycerin-water mixture. These experiments use novel application of methodologies verified by rigorous uncertainty analysis. The overall objective is to understand the vortex formation and forces as well as aspect ratio ( AR) effects. Of interest is the overall, time-varying, three-dimensional vortex structure obtained qualitatively from dye visualization and quantitatively from volumes reconstructed using planar stereoscopic digital particle image velocimetry (S-DPIV) measurements. The velocity information from S-DPIV also allows statements to be made on leading-edge vortex (LEV) stability, spanwise flow, LEV and tip-vortex (TV) circulation, and numerous circulation scalings. Force measurements are made and the lift coefficient is discussed in the context of the flow structure, the dimensional lift and the ability to relate velocity and force measurements going forward. AR effects is a topic of continued interest to those performing MAV-related research and also a primary

  8. Isovector pairing effect on the particle-number projection two-proton separation energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, Djamila; Kerrouchi, Slimane [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Faculte de Physique, Algiers (Algeria); Fellah, Mohamed; Allal, Nassima-Hosni [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Faculte de Physique, Algiers (Algeria); Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, Comena, Algiers (Algeria)

    2009-07-01

    The two-proton separation energy is studied by performing a particle-number projection with and without inclusion of the isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing correlations. It is numerically evaluated for even-even rare-earth nuclei such that the np pairing parameter is non-zero. It is shown that the two-proton separation energy values calculated using the two approaches join, for almost all the considered elements, for the highest values of (N-Z). However, the results including the np pairing correlations are closest to the experimental data when available. Moreover, the two methods lead to the same prediction of the two-proton drip-line position, except for the Dysprosium and the Tungsten.

  9. Mobility particle size spectrometers: harmonization of technical standards and data structure to facilitate high quality long-term observations of atmospheric particle number size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wiedensohler

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mobility particle size spectrometers often referred to as DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizers or SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers have found a wide range of applications in atmospheric aerosol research. However, comparability of measurements conducted world-wide is hampered by lack of generally accepted technical standards and guidelines with respect to the instrumental set-up, measurement mode, data evaluation as well as quality control. Technical standards were developed for a minimum requirement of mobility size spectrometry to perform long-term atmospheric aerosol measurements. Technical recommendations include continuous monitoring of flow rates, temperature, pressure, and relative humidity for the sheath and sample air in the differential mobility analyzer.

    We compared commercial and custom-made inversion routines to calculate the particle number size distributions from the measured electrical mobility distribution. All inversion routines are comparable within few per cent uncertainty for a given set of raw data.

    Furthermore, this work summarizes the results from several instrument intercomparison workshops conducted within the European infrastructure project EUSAAR (European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research and ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network to determine present uncertainties especially of custom-built mobility particle size spectrometers. Under controlled laboratory conditions, the particle number size distributions from 20 to 200 nm determined by mobility particle size spectrometers of different design are within an uncertainty range of around ±10% after correcting internal particle losses, while below and above this size range the discrepancies increased. For particles larger than 200 nm, the uncertainty range increased to 30%, which could not be explained. The network reference mobility spectrometers with identical design agreed within ±4% in the

  10. Dragon kings of the deep sea: marine particles deviate markedly from the common number-size spectrum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bochdansky, A.B.; Clouse, M.A.; Herndl, G.

    2016-01-01

    Particles are the major vector for the transfer of carbon from the upper ocean to the deep sea. However, little is known about their abundance, composition and role at depths greater than 2000?m. We present the first number-size spectrum of bathy- and abyssopelagic particles to a depth of 5500?m

  11. A Critical Shock Mach Number for Particle Acceleration in the Absence of Pre-existing Cosmic Rays: M = √5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.; Yamazaki, R.

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that, under some generic assumptions, shocks cannot accelerate particles unless the overall shock Mach number exceeds a critical value M > √5. The reason is that for M ≤ √5 the work done to compress the flow in a particle precursor requires more enthalpy flux than the system can sustain.

  12. Seasonal variation of atmospheric particle number concentrations, new particle formation and atmospheric oxidation capacity at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. T. Nguyen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an analysis of the physical properties of sub-micrometer aerosol particles measured at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord (VRS, northeast Greenland, between July 2010 and February 2013. The study focuses on particle number concentrations, particle number size distributions and the occurrence of new particle formation (NPF events and their seasonality in the high Arctic, where observations and characterization of such aerosol particle properties and corresponding events are rare and understanding of related processes is lacking.A clear accumulation mode was observed during the darker months from October until mid-May, which became considerably more pronounced during the prominent Arctic haze months from March to mid-May. In contrast, nucleation- and Aitken-mode particles were predominantly observed during the summer months. Analysis of wind direction and wind speed indicated possible contributions of marine sources from the easterly side of the station to the observed summertime particle number concentrations, while southwesterly to westerly winds dominated during the darker months. NPF events lasting from hours to days were mostly observed from June until August, with fewer events observed during the months with less sunlight, i.e., March, April, September and October. The results tend to indicate that ozone (O3 might be weakly anti-correlated with particle number concentrations of the nucleation-mode range (10–30 nm in almost half of the NPF events, while no positive correlation was observed. Calculations of air mass back trajectories using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT model for the NPF event days suggested that the onset or interruption of events could possibly be explained by changes in air mass origin. A map of event occurrence probability was computed, indicating that southerly air masses from over the Greenland Sea were more likely linked to those

  13. Variability of sub-micrometer particle number size distributions and concentrations in the Western Mediterranean regional background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Cusack

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the daily and seasonal variability of particle number size distributions and concentrations, performed at the Montseny (MSY regional background station in the western Mediterranean from October 2010 to June 2011. Particle number concentrations at MSY were shown to be within range of various other sites across Europe reported in literature, but the seasonality of the particle number size distributions revealed significant differences. The Aitken mode is the dominant particle mode at MSY, with arithmetic mean concentrations of 1698 cm3, followed by the accumulation mode (877 cm−3 and the nucleation mode (246 cm−3. Concentrations showed a strong seasonal variability with large increases in particle number concentrations observed from the colder to warmer months. The modality of median size distributions was typically bimodal, except under polluted conditions when the size distribution was unimodal. During the colder months, the daily variation of particle number size distributions are strongly influenced by a diurnal breeze system, whereby the Aitken and accumulation modes vary similarly to PM1 and BC mass concentrations, with nocturnal minima and sharp day-time increases owing to the development of a diurnal mountain breeze. Under clean air conditions, high levels of nucleation and lower Aitken mode concentrations were measured, highlighting the importance of new particle formation as a source of particles in the absence of a significant condensation sink. During the warmer months, nucleation mode concentrations were observed to be relatively elevated both under polluted and clean conditions due to increased photochemical reactions, with enhanced subsequent growth owing to elevated concentrations of condensable organic vapours produced from biogenic volatile organic compounds, indicating that nucleation at MSY does not exclusively occur under clean air conditions. Finally, mixing of air masses between polluted and non

  14. High pulse number thermal shock tests on tungsten with steady state particle background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, M.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Loewenhoff, Th; Pintsuk, G.; Sergienko, G.; Steudel, I.; Unterberg, B.; Wessel, E.

    2017-12-01

    Thermal fatigue of metallic materials, which will be exposed to severe environmental conditions e.g. plasma facing materials in future fusion reactors, is an important issue in order to predict the life time of complete wall components. Therefore experiments in the linear plasma device PSI-2 were performed to investigate the synergistic effects of high pulse number thermal shock events (L = 0.38 GW m-2, Δt = 0.5 ms) and stationary D/He (6%) plasma particle background on the thermal fatigue behavior of tungsten. Similar to experiments with pure thermal loads, the induced microstructural and surface modifications such as recrystallization and roughening as well as crack formation become more pronounced with increasing number of thermal shock events. However, the amount of damage significantly increases for synergistic loads showing severe surface roughening, plastic deformation and erosion resulting from the degradation of the mechanical properties caused by bombardment and diffusion of D/He to the surface and the bulk of the material. Additionally, D/He induced blistering and bubble formation were observed for all tested samples, which could change the thermal and mechanical properties of near surface regions.

  15. Quantum particle-number fluctuations in a two-component Bose gas in a double-well potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zin, Pawel; Oles, Bartlomiej; Sacha, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    A two-component Bose gas in a double-well potential with repulsive interactions may undergo a phase separation transition if the interspecies interactions outweigh the intraspecies ones. We analyze the transition in the strong interaction limit within the two-mode approximation. Numbers of particles in each potential well are equal and constant. However, at the transition point, the ground state of the system reveals huge fluctuations of numbers of particles belonging to the different gas components; that is, the probability for observation of any mixture of particles in each potential well becomes uniform.

  16. Dragon kings of the deep sea: marine particles deviate markedly from the common number-size spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochdansky, Alexander B; Clouse, Melissa A; Herndl, Gerhard J

    2016-03-04

    Particles are the major vector for the transfer of carbon from the upper ocean to the deep sea. However, little is known about their abundance, composition and role at depths greater than 2000 m. We present the first number-size spectrum of bathy- and abyssopelagic particles to a depth of 5500 m based on surveys performed with a custom-made holographic microscope. The particle spectrum was unusual in that particles of several millimetres in length were almost 100 times more abundant than expected from the number spectrum of smaller particles, thereby meeting the definition of "dragon kings." Marine snow particles overwhelmingly contributed to the total particle volume (95-98%). Approximately 1/3 of the particles in the dragon-king size domain contained large amounts of transparent exopolymers with little ballast, which likely either make them neutrally buoyant or cause them to sink slowly. Dragon-king particles thus provide large volumes of unique microenvironments that may help to explain discrepancies in deep-sea biogeochemical budgets.

  17. Number size distribution of fine and ultrafine fume particles from various welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Peter; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Studies in the field of environmental epidemiology indicate that for the adverse effect of inhaled particles not only particle mass is crucial but also particle size is. Ultrafine particles with diameters below 100 nm are of special interest since these particles have high surface area to mass ratio and have properties which differ from those of larger particles. In this paper, particle size distributions of various welding and joining techniques were measured close to the welding process using a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). It turned out that welding processes with high mass emission rates (manual metal arc welding, metal active gas welding, metal inert gas welding, metal inert gas soldering, and laser welding) show mainly agglomerated particles with diameters above 100 nm and only few particles in the size range below 50 nm (10 to 15%). Welding processes with low mass emission rates (tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding) emit predominantly ultrafine particles with diameters well below 100 nm. This finding can be explained by considerably faster agglomeration processes in welding processes with high mass emission rates. Although mass emission is low for tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding, due to the low particle size of the fume, these processes cannot be labeled as toxicologically irrelevant and should be further investigated.

  18. Measurements of humidified particle number size distributions in a Finnish boreal forest: derivation of hygroscopic particle growth factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birmili, W.; Schwirn, K.; Nowak, A.; Rose, D.; Wiedensohler, A. (Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig (Germany)); Petaejae, T.; Haemeri, K.; Aalto, P.; Kulmala, M.; Boy, M. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Joutsensaari, J. (Univ. of Kuopio, Dept. of Physics (Finland))

    2009-07-01

    Dry and humidified size distributions of atmospheric particles were characterised at the atmospheric research station SMEAR 2, Finland between May and July 2004. Particles were classified in a size range between 3 and 800 nm at controlled relative humidities up to 90% by two instruments complementary in size range (HDMPS; Nano-HDMPS). Using the summation method, descriptive hygroscopic growth factors (DHGF) were derived for particle diameters between 70 and 300 nm by comparing dry and humidified size distributions. At 90% relative humidity, DHGF showed mean values between 1.25 and 1.45 in the accumulation mode, between 1.20 and 1.25 in the Aitken mode, and between 1.15 and 1.20 in the nucleation mode. Due to the high size resolution of the method, the transition in DHGF between the Aitken and accumulation modes, which reflects differences in the soluble fraction, could be pinpointed efficiently. For the accumulation mode, experimental DHGFs were compared to those calculated from a simplistic growth model initialised by in-situ chemical composition measurements, and yielded maximum deviations around 0.1. The variation in DHGF could only imperfectly be linked to meteorological factors. A pragmatic parameterisation of DHGF as a function of particle diameter and relative humidity was derived, and subsequently used to study the sensitivity of the condensational sink parameter (CS) as a function of height in a well-mixed boundary layer. (orig.)

  19. Intercomparison of 15 Aerodynamic Particle Size Spectrometers (APS 3321): Uncertainties in Particle Sizing and Number Size Distribution.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pfeifer, S.; Müller, T.; Weinhold, K.; Zíková, Naděžda; dos Santos, S.M.; Marinoni, A.; Bischof, O.F.; Kykal, C.; Ries, L.; Meinhardt, F.; Aalto, P.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2016), s. 1545-1551 ISSN 1867-1381 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 262254 - ACTRIS Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : counting efficiency * aerodynamic particle size spectrometers * laboratory study Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.089, year: 2016

  20. Source apportionment of ambient particle number concentrations in central Los Angeles using positive matrix factorization (PMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Sowlat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the positive matrix factorization (PMF receptor model (version 5.0 was used to identify and quantify major sources contributing to particulate matter (PM number concentrations, using PM number size distributions in the range of 13 nm to 10 µm combined with several auxiliary variables, including black carbon (BC, elemental and organic carbon (EC/OC, PM mass concentrations, gaseous pollutants, meteorological, and traffic counts data, collected for about 9 months between August 2014 and 2015 in central Los Angeles, CA. Several parameters, including particle number and volume size distribution profiles, profiles of auxiliary variables, contributions of different factors in different seasons to the total number concentrations, diurnal variations of each of the resolved factors in the cold and warm phases, weekday/weekend analysis for each of the resolved factors, and correlation between auxiliary variables and the relative contribution of each of the resolved factors, were used to identify PM sources. A six-factor solution was identified as the optimum for the aforementioned input data. The resolved factors comprised nucleation, traffic 1, traffic 2 (with a larger mode diameter than traffic 1 factor, urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and soil/road dust. Traffic sources (1 and 2 were the major contributor to PM number concentrations, collectively making up to above 60 % (60.8–68.4 % of the total number concentrations during the study period. Their contribution was also significantly higher in the cold phase compared to the warm phase. Nucleation was another major factor significantly contributing to the total number concentrations (an overall contribution of 17 %, ranging from 11.7 to 24 %, with a larger contribution during the warm phase than in the cold phase. The other identified factors were urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and soil/road dust, with relative contributions of approximately 12

  1. Creation of particles by time-dependent gravitational fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castagnino, M.; Weder, R.

    1979-01-01

    A method based on the formulation of a quantum equivalence principle is introduced in order to define particle annihilation and creation operators during the expansion of the universe. Our theory predicts the creation of a finite number of particles. (orig.)

  2. Aerosol and NOx emission factors and submicron particle number size distributions in two road tunnels with different traffic regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Imhof

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of aerosol particle number size distributions (18–700 nm, mass concentrations (PM2.5 and PM10 and NOx were performed in the Plabutsch tunnel, Austria, and in the Kingsway tunnel, United Kingdom. These two tunnels show different characteristics regarding the roadway gradient, the composition of the vehicle fleet and the traffic frequency. The submicron particle size distributions contained a soot mode in the diameter range D=80–100 nm and a nucleation mode in the range of D=20–40 nm. In the Kingsway tunnel with a significantly lower particle number and volume concentration level than in the Plabutsch tunnel, a clear diurnal variation of nucleation and soot mode particles correlated to the traffic density was observed. In the Plabutsch tunnel, soot mode particles also revealed a diurnal variation, whereas no substantial variation was found for the nucleation mode particles. During the night a higher number concentration of nucleation mode particles were measured than soot mode particles and vice versa during the day. In this tunnel with very high soot emissions during daytime due to the heavy-duty vehicle (HDV share of 18% and another 40% of diesel driven light-duty vehicles (LDV semivolatile species condense on the pre-existing soot surface area rather than forming new particles by homogeneous nucleation. With the low concentration of soot mode particles in the Kingsway tunnel, also the nucleation mode particles exhibit a diurnal variation. From the measured parameters real-world traffic emission factors were estimated for the whole vehicle fleet as well as differentiated into the two categories LDV and HDV. In the particle size range D=18–700 nm, each vehicle of the mixed fleet emits (1.50±0.08×1014 particles km-1 (Plabutsch and (1.26±0.10×1014 particles km-1 (Kingsway, while particle volume emission factors of 0.209±0.008 cm3 km-1 and 0.036±0.004 cm3 km-1, respectively, were obtained. PM1 emission factors of 104±4 mg

  3. DNS of buoyancy-driven flows and Lagrangian particle tracking in a square cavity at high Rayleigh numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puragliesi, R.; Dehbi, A.; Leriche, E.; Soldati, A.; Deville, M.O.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → 2D study of micro-size particle depletion driven by chaotic natural convective flows in square domains. → Description of velocity and temperature first and second moments with changing in the Rayleigh number. → Strong decoupling between the turbulent kinetic energy and the dissipation rate. → Particle recirculation sustained by the vertical hot boundary layer. → Deposition mostly induced by gravity, thermophoretic and lift forces are negligible. - Abstract: In this work we investigate numerically particle deposition in the buoyancy driven flow of the differentially heated cavity (DHC). We consider two values of the Rayleigh number (Ra = 10 9 , 10 10 ) and three values of the particle diameter (d p = 15, 25, 35 [μm]). We consider the cavity filled with air and particles with the same density of water ρ w = 1000 [kg/m 3 ] (aerosol). We use direct numerical simulations (DNS) for the continuous phase, and we solve transient Navier-Stokes and energy transport equations written in an Eulerian framework, under the Boussinesq approximation, for the viscous incompressible Newtonian fluid with constant Prandtl number (Pr = 0.71). First- and second-order statistics are presented for the continuous phase as well as important quantities like turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and temperature variance with the associated production and dissipation fields. The TKE production shows different behaviour at the two Rayleigh numbers. The Lagrangian approach has been chosen for the dispersed phase description. The forces taken into account are drag, gravity, buoyancy, lift and thermophoresis. A first incursion in the sedimentation mechanisms is presented. Current results indicate that the largest contribution to particle deposition is caused by gravitational settling, but a strong recirculating zone, which liftoffs and segregates particles, contributes to decrease settling. Deposition takes place mostly at the bottom wall. The influence of lift and thermophoretic

  4. DNS of buoyancy-driven flows and Lagrangian particle tracking in a square cavity at high Rayleigh numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puragliesi, R., E-mail: riccardo.puragliesi@psi.ch [Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Laboratoire d' Ingenierie Numerique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Dehbi, A., E-mail: abdel.dehbi@psi.ch [Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Leriche, E., E-mail: emmanuel.leriche@univ-st-etienne.fr [Universite de Lyon, F-42023 Saint-Etienne, LMFA-UJM St-Etienne, CNRS UMR 5509 Universite de St-Etienne, 23 rue Docteur Paul Michelon, F-42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Soldati, A., E-mail: soldati@uniud.it [Dipartimento di Energetica e Macchine, Universita di Udine, Via delle Scienze 208, IT-33100 Udine (Italy); Deville, M.O., E-mail: michel.deville@epfl.ch [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie Numerique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > 2D study of micro-size particle depletion driven by chaotic natural convective flows in square domains. > Description of velocity and temperature first and second moments with changing in the Rayleigh number. > Strong decoupling between the turbulent kinetic energy and the dissipation rate. > Particle recirculation sustained by the vertical hot boundary layer. > Deposition mostly induced by gravity, thermophoretic and lift forces are negligible. - Abstract: In this work we investigate numerically particle deposition in the buoyancy driven flow of the differentially heated cavity (DHC). We consider two values of the Rayleigh number (Ra = 10{sup 9}, 10{sup 10}) and three values of the particle diameter (d{sub p} = 15, 25, 35 [{mu}m]). We consider the cavity filled with air and particles with the same density of water {rho}{sub w} = 1000 [kg/m{sup 3}] (aerosol). We use direct numerical simulations (DNS) for the continuous phase, and we solve transient Navier-Stokes and energy transport equations written in an Eulerian framework, under the Boussinesq approximation, for the viscous incompressible Newtonian fluid with constant Prandtl number (Pr = 0.71). First- and second-order statistics are presented for the continuous phase as well as important quantities like turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and temperature variance with the associated production and dissipation fields. The TKE production shows different behaviour at the two Rayleigh numbers. The Lagrangian approach has been chosen for the dispersed phase description. The forces taken into account are drag, gravity, buoyancy, lift and thermophoresis. A first incursion in the sedimentation mechanisms is presented. Current results indicate that the largest contribution to particle deposition is caused by gravitational settling, but a strong recirculating zone, which liftoffs and segregates particles, contributes to decrease settling. Deposition takes place mostly at the bottom wall. The influence of lift

  5. Stochastic dynamics of resistive switching: fluctuations lead to optimal particle number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, Paul K; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz; Hazel, Andrew L; Straube, Arthur V

    2017-01-01

    Resistive switching (RS) is one of the foremost candidates for building novel types of non-volatile random access memories. Any practical implementation of such a memory cell calls for a strong miniaturization, at which point fluctuations start playing a role that cannot be neglected. A detailed understanding of switching mechanisms and reliability is essential. For this reason, we formulate a particle model based on the stochastic motion of oxygen vacancies. It allows us to investigate fluctuations in the resistance states of a switch with two active zones. The vacancies’ dynamics are governed by a master equation. Upon the application of a voltage pulse, the vacancies travel collectively through the switch. By deriving a generalized Burgers equation we can interpret this collective motion as nonlinear traveling waves, and numerically verify this result. Further, we define binary logical states by means of the underlying vacancy distributions, and establish a framework of writing and reading such memory element with voltage pulses. Considerations about the discriminability of these operations under fluctuations together with the markedness of the RS effect itself lead to the conclusion, that an intermediate vacancy number is optimal for performance. (paper)

  6. Stochastic dynamics of resistive switching: fluctuations lead to optimal particle number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Paul K.; Hazel, Andrew L.; Straube, Arthur V.; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2017-09-01

    Resistive switching (RS) is one of the foremost candidates for building novel types of non-volatile random access memories. Any practical implementation of such a memory cell calls for a strong miniaturization, at which point fluctuations start playing a role that cannot be neglected. A detailed understanding of switching mechanisms and reliability is essential. For this reason, we formulate a particle model based on the stochastic motion of oxygen vacancies. It allows us to investigate fluctuations in the resistance states of a switch with two active zones. The vacancies’ dynamics are governed by a master equation. Upon the application of a voltage pulse, the vacancies travel collectively through the switch. By deriving a generalized Burgers equation we can interpret this collective motion as nonlinear traveling waves, and numerically verify this result. Further, we define binary logical states by means of the underlying vacancy distributions, and establish a framework of writing and reading such memory element with voltage pulses. Considerations about the discriminability of these operations under fluctuations together with the markedness of the RS effect itself lead to the conclusion, that an intermediate vacancy number is optimal for performance.

  7. The number of elementary particles in a fractal M-theory of 11.2360667977 dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, J.-H.

    2007-01-01

    It is generally accepted that there are 60 experimentally found particles. The standard model strongly predicts two more hypothetical particles, the Higgs and the graviton. This paper reveals other possible scenario for predicting 69 particles at different energy scales in 11+φ 3 fractal dimensions of a fractal M theory, where φ=(5-1)/2. A modified Newton's law is suggested to experimentally verify our predictions at extremely small quantum scales. The modified Newton's law is in harmony with Heisenberg's uncertainty principle

  8. Aerosol particle mixing state, refractory particle number size distributions and emission factors in a polluted urban environment: Case study of Metro Manila, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecorius, Simonas; Madueño, Leizel; Vallar, Edgar; Alas, Honey; Betito, Grace; Birmili, Wolfram; Cambaliza, Maria Obiminda; Catipay, Grethyl; Gonzaga-Cayetano, Mylene; Galvez, Maria Cecilia; Lorenzo, Genie; Müller, Thomas; Simpas, James B.; Tamayo, Everlyn Gayle; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2017-12-01

    Ultrafine soot particles (black carbon, BC) in urban environments are related to adverse respiratory and cardiovascular effects, increased cases of asthma and premature deaths. These problems are especially pronounced in developing megacities in South-East Asia, Latin America, and Africa, where unsustainable urbanization ant outdated environmental protection legislation resulted in severe degradation of urban air quality in terms of black carbon emission. Since ultrafine soot particles do often not lead to enhanced PM10 and PM2.5 mass concentration, the risks related to ultrafine particle pollution may therefore be significantly underestimated compared to the contribution of secondary aerosol constituents. To increase the awareness of the potential toxicological relevant problems of ultrafine black carbon particles, we conducted a case study in Metro Manila, the capital of the Philippines. Here, we present a part of the results from a detailed field campaign, called Manila Aerosol Characterization Experiment (MACE, 2015). Measurements took place from May to June 2015 with the focus on the state of mixing of aerosol particles. The results were alarming, showing the abundance of externally mixed refractory particles (soot proxy) at street site with a maximum daily number concentration of approximately 15000 #/cm3. That is up to 10 times higher than in cities of Western countries. We also found that the soot particle mass contributed from 55 to 75% of total street site PM2.5. The retrieved refractory particle number size distribution appeared to be a superposition of 2 ultrafine modes at 20 and 80 nm with a corresponding contribution to the total refractory particle number of 45 and 55%, respectively. The particles in the 20 nm mode were most likely ash from metallic additives in lubricating oil, tiny carbonaceous particles and/or nucleated and oxidized organic polymers, while bigger ones (80 nm) were soot agglomerates. To the best of the authors' knowledge, no other

  9. Spatial variation of particle number concentration in school microscale environments and its impact on exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Farhad; Mazaheri, Mandana; Clifford, Sam; Crilley, Leigh R; Laiman, Rusdin; Morawska, Lidia

    2013-05-21

    It has not yet been established whether the spatial variation of particle number concentration (PNC) within a microscale environment can have an effect on exposure estimation results. In general, the degree of spatial variation within microscale environments remains unclear, since previous studies have only focused on spatial variation within macroscale environments. The aims of this study were to determine the spatial variation of PNC within microscale school environments, in order to assess the importance of the number of monitoring sites on exposure estimation. Furthermore, this paper aims to identify which parameters have the largest influence on spatial variation as well as the relationship between those parameters and spatial variation. Air quality measurements were conducted for two consecutive weeks at each of the 25 schools across Brisbane, Australia. PNC was measured at three sites within the grounds of each school, along with the measurement of meteorological and several other air quality parameters. Traffic density was recorded for the busiest road adjacent to the school. Spatial variation at each school was quantified using coefficient of variation (CV). The portion of CV associated with instrument uncertainty was found to be 0.3, and, therefore, CV was corrected so that only noninstrument uncertainty was analyzed in the data. The median corrected CV (CVc) ranged from 0 to 0.35 across the schools, with 12 schools found to exhibit spatial variation. The study determined the number of required monitoring sites at schools with spatial variability and tested the deviation in exposure estimation arising from using only a single site. Nine schools required two measurement sites and three schools required three sites. Overall, the deviation in exposure estimation from using only one monitoring site was as much as 1 order of magnitude. The study also tested the association of spatial variation with wind speed/direction and traffic density, using partial

  10. Tadpoles, anomaly cancellation and the expectation value of the number of the Higgs particles in the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naschie, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    We motivate the concept of infinitely large and hierarchical matrices in connection with the eight-dimensional super Riemannian tensor and the unification of all fundamental forces. Subsequently, we derive the number of particle-like states and the expectation value of the number of elementary particle content of a minimally extended standard model using the total number of tadpoles and anomaly cancellation condition:nH+29nt-nv=R(8)-N(SM)=2α-bar 0-1=273 where n H is the number of hyper multiplets, n t the number of tensor multiplets, n v the vector multiplets, R (8) is the number of independent components of Riemann's curvature tensor in eight dimensions, N(SM) is the number of elementary particles content of the standard model and α-bar 0 is the inverse fine structure constant. We can conclude that N(SM)=66. Consequently, we conjecture that five Higgs particles should be involved in the standard model

  11. Effects of the virtual particle number on the S matrix of the (phi4)/sub 1+1/ model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, H.; Girard, R.; Dufour, G.

    1987-01-01

    We present results of the S matrix in the (phi 4 )/sub 1 + 1/ model obtained by a nonperturbative calculation using a momentum-space discretization technique. First, we calculate the two-body S matrix in the strong-coupling regime (up to λ/sub eff/ = 3), with the restriction of taking into account only two-body virtual particle states. We find agreement with standard perturbation theory obtained by summing up the corresponding graphs to infinite order. We also estimate the effect of mass renormalization. Second, we investigate the effect of including higher virtual particle numbers in two-particle scattering in the cases λ/sub eff/ = (1/6) and λ/sub eff/ = 1. In both cases we find convergence of the S matrix with respect to increasing the virtual-particle-number cutoff

  12. A Finite-Orbit-Width Fokker-Planck solver for modeling of energetic particle interactions with waves, with application to Helicons in ITER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrov Yuri V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The bounce-average (BA finite-difference Fokker-Planck (FP code CQL3D [1,2] now includes the essential physics to describe the RF heating of Finite-Orbit-Width (FOW ions in tokamaks. The FP equation is reformulated in terms of Constants-Of-Motion coordinates, which we select to be particle speed, pitch angle, and major radius on the equatorial plane thus obtaining the distribution function directly at this location. Full-orbit, low collisionality neoclassical radial transport emerges from averaging the local friction and diffusion coefficients along guiding center orbits. Similarly, the BA of local quasilinear RF diffusion terms gives rise to additional radial transport. The local RF electric field components needed for the BA operator are usually obtained by a ray-tracing code, such as GENRAY, or in conjunction with full-wave codes. As a new, practical application, the CQL3D-FOW version is used for simulation of alpha-particle heating by high-harmonic waves in ITER. Coupling of high harmonic or helicon fast waves power to electrons is a promising current drive (CD scenario for high beta plasmas. However, the efficiency of current drive can be diminished by parasitic channeling of RF power into fast ions, such as alphas, through finite Larmor-radius effects. We investigate possibilities to reduce the fast ion heating in CD scenarios.

  13. Finite-thickness effect on speed of a counter-rotating vortex pair at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibah, Ummu; Nakagawa, Hironori; Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2018-03-01

    We establish a general formula for the translational speed of a counter-rotating vortex pair, valid for thick cores, moving in an incompressible fluid with and without viscosity. We extend to higher order the method of matched asymptotic expansions developed by Ting and Tung (1965 Phys. Fluids 8 1039–51). The solution of the Euler or the Navier–Stokes equations is constructed in the form of a power series in a small parameter, the ratio of the core radius to the distance between the core centers. For a viscous vortex pair, the small parameter should be \\sqrt{ν /{{Γ }}} where ν is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid and Γ is the circulation of each vortex. A correction due to the effect of finite thickness of the vortices to the traveling speed makes its appearance at fifth order. A drastic simplification is achieved of expressing it solely in terms of the strength of the second-order quadrupole field associated with the elliptical deformation of the core. For a viscous vortex pair, we exploit the conservation law for the hydrodynamic impulse to derive the growth of the distance between the vortices, which is cubic in time.

  14. The average number of alpha-particle hits to the cell nucleus required to eradicate a tumour cell population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeske, John C; Stinchcomb, Thomas G

    2006-01-01

    Alpha-particle emitters are currently being considered for the treatment of micrometastatic disease. Based on in vitro studies, it has been speculated that only a few alpha-particle hits to the cell nucleus are considered lethal. However, such estimates do not consider the stochastic variations in the number of alpha-particle hits, energy deposited, or in the cell survival process itself. Using a tumour control probability (TCP) model for alpha-particle emitters, we derive an estimate of the average number of hits to the cell nucleus required to provide a high probability of eradicating a tumour cell population. In simulation studies, our results demonstrate that the average number of hits required to achieve a 90% TCP for 10 4 clonogenic cells ranges from 18 to 108. Those cells that have large cell nuclei, high radiosensitivities and alpha-particle emissions occurring primarily in the nuclei tended to require more hits. As the clinical implementation of alpha-particle emitters is considered, this type of analysis may be useful in interpreting clinical results and in designing treatment strategies to achieve a favourable therapeutic outcome. (note)

  15. Zone of influence for particle number concentrations at signalised traffic intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Anju; Kumar, Prashant

    2015-12-01

    Estimation of zone of influences (ZoI) at signalised traffic intersections (TI) is important to accurately model particle number concentrations (PNCs) and their exposure to public at emission hotspot locations. However, estimates of ZoI for PNCs at different types of TIs are barely known. We carried out mobile measurements inside the car cabin with windows fully open for size-resolved PNCs in the 5-560 nm range on a 6 km long busy round route that had 10 TIs. These included four-way TIs without built-up area (TI4w-nb), four-way TIs with built-up area (TI4w-wb), three-way TIs without built-up area (TI3w-nb) and three-way TIs with built-up area (TI3w-wb). Mobile measurements were made with a fast response differential mobility spectrometer (DMS50). Driving speed and position of the car were recorded every second using a global positioning system (GPS). Positive matrix factorisation (PMF) modelling was applied on the data to quantify the contribution of PNCs released during deceleration, creep-idling, acceleration and cruising to total PNCs at the TIs. The objectives were to address the following questions: (i) how does ZoI vary at different types of TIs in stop- and go-driving conditions?, (ii) what is the effect of different driving conditions on ZoI of a TI?, (iii) how realistically can the PNC profiles be generalised within a ZoI of a TI?, and (iv) what is the share of emissions during different driving conditions towards the total PNCs at a TI? Average length of ZoI in longitudinal direction and along the road was found to be the highest (148 m; 89 to -59 m from the centre of a TI) at a TI3w-wb, followed by TI4w-nb (129 m; 79 to -42 m), TI3w-nb (86 m; 71 to -15 m) and TI4w-wb (79 m; 46 to -33 m) in stop- and go-driving conditions. During multiple stopping driving conditions when a vehicle stops at a TI more than once in a signal cycle due to oversaturation of vehicles, average length of ZoI increased by 55, 22 and 21% at TI4w-nb, TI3w-nb and TI3w-wb, respectively

  16. On the Required Number of Antennas in a Point-to-Point Large-but-Finite MIMO System: Outage-Limited Scenario

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2016-03-22

    This paper investigates the performance of the point-To-point multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) systems in the presence of a large but finite numbers of antennas at the transmitters and/or receivers. Considering the cases with and without hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) feedback, we determine the minimum numbers of the transmit/receive antennas, which are required to satisfy different outage probability constraints. Our results are obtained for different fading conditions and the effect of the power amplifiers efficiency/feedback error probability on the performance of the MIMO-HARQ systems is analyzed. Then, we use some recent results on the achievable rates of finite block-length codes, to analyze the effect of the codewords lengths on the system performance. Moreover, we derive closed-form expressions for the asymptotic performance of the MIMO-HARQ systems when the number of antennas increases. Our analytical and numerical results show that different outage requirements can be satisfied with relatively few transmit/receive antennas. © 1972-2012 IEEE.

  17. Implication of nonintegral occupation number and Fermi-Dirac statistics in the local-spin-density approximation applied to finite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhar, S.

    1989-01-01

    In electronic-structure calculations for finite systems using the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation, it is assumed that the eigenvalues of the Kohn-Sham equation should obey Fermi-Dirac (FD) statistics. In order to comply with this assumption for some of the transition-metal atoms, a nonintegral occupation number is used which also minimizes the total energy. It is shown here that for finite systems it is not necessary that the eigenvalues of the Kohn-Sham equation obey FD statistics. It is also shown that the Kohn-Sham exchange potential used in all LSD models is correct only for integer occupation number. With a noninteger occupation number the LSD exchange potential will be smaller than that given by the Kohn-Sham potential. Ab initio self-consistent spin-polarized calculations have been performed numerically for the total energy of an iron atom. It is found that the ground state belongs to the 3d 6 4s 2 configuration. The ionization potentials of all the Fe/sup n/ + ions are reported and are in agreement with experiment

  18. Exposure to fine particulate, black carbon, and particle number concentration in transportation microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Betancourt, R.; Galvis, B.; Balachandran, S.; Ramos-Bonilla, J. P.; Sarmiento, O. L.; Gallo-Murcia, S. M.; Contreras, Y.

    2017-05-01

    This research determined intake dose of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), equivalent black carbon (eBC), and number of sub-micron particles (Np) for commuters in Bogotá, Colombia. Doses were estimated through measurements of exposure concentration, a surrogate of physical activity, as well as travel times and speeds. Impacts of travel mode, traffic load, and street configuration on dose and exposure were explored. Three road segments were selected because of their different traffic loads and composition, and dissimilar street configuration. The transport modes considered include active modes (walking and cycling) and motorized modes (bus, car, taxi, and motorcycle). Measurements were performed simultaneously in the available modes at each road segment. High average eBC concentrations were observed throughout the campaign, ranging from 20 to 120 μgm-3 . Commuters in motorized modes experienced significantly higher exposure concentrations than pedestrians and bicyclists. The highest average concentrations of PM2.5, eBC , and Np were measured inside the city's Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system vehicles. Pedestrians and bicycle users in an open street configuration were exposed to the lowest average concentrations of PM2.5 and eBC , six times lower than those experienced by commuters using the BRT in the same street segment. Pedestrians experienced the highest particulate matter intake dose in the road segments studied, despite being exposed to lower concentrations than commuters in motorized modes. Average potential dose of PM2.5 and eBC per unit length traveled were nearly three times higher for pedestrians in a street canyon configuration compared to commuters in public transport. Slower travel speed and elevated inhalation rates dominate PM dose for pedestrians. The presence of dedicated bike lanes on sidewalks has a significant impact on reducing the exposure concentration for bicyclists compared to those riding in mixed traffic lanes. This study proposes a simple

  19. Configuration mixing of mean-field wave functions projected on angular momentum and particle number: Application to 24Mg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valor, A.; Heenen, P.-H.; Bonche, P.

    2000-01-01

    We present in this paper the general framework of a method which permits to restore the rotational and particle number symmetries of wave functions obtained in Skyrme HF + BCS calculations. This restoration is nothing but a projection of mean-field intrinsic wave functions onto good particle number and good angular momentum. The method allows us also to mix projected wave functions. Such a configuration mixing is discussed for sets of HF + BCS intrinsic states generated in constrained calculations with suitable collective variables. This procedure gives collective states which are eigenstates of the particle number and the angular momentum operators and between which transition probabilities are calculated. An application to 24 Mg is presented, with mean-field wave functions generated by axial quadrupole constraints. Theoretical spectra and transition probabilities are compared to the experiment

  20. A Model-Independent Discussion of Quark Number Density and Quark Condensate at Zero Temperature and Finite Quark Chemical Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shu-Sheng; Shi Chao; Cui Zhu-Fang; Zong Hong-Shi; Jiang Yu

    2015-01-01

    Generally speaking, the quark propagator is dependent on the quark chemical potential in the dense quantum chromodynamics (QCD). By means of the generating functional method, we prove that the quark propagator actually depends on p_4 + iμ from the first principle of QCD. The relation between quark number density and quark condensate is discussed by analyzing their singularities. It is concluded that the quark number density has some singularities at certain μ when T = 0, and the variations of the quark number density as well as the quark condensate are located at the same point. In other words, at a certain μ the quark number density turns to nonzero, while the quark condensate begins to decrease from its vacuum value. (paper)

  1. Effects of rigid or adaptive confinement on colloidal self-assembly. Fixed vs. fluctuating number of confined particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pȩkalski, J.; Ciach, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Almarza, N. G. [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-28

    The effects of confinement on colloidal self-assembly in the case of fixed number of confined particles are studied in the one dimensional lattice model solved exactly in the grand canonical ensemble (GCE) in Pȩkalski et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 014903 (2015)]. The model considers a pair interaction defined by a short-range attraction plus a longer-range repulsion. We consider thermodynamic states corresponding to self-assembly into clusters. Both fixed and adaptive boundaries are studied. For fixed boundaries, there are particular states in which, for equal average densities, the number of clusters in the GCE is larger than in the canonical ensemble. The dependence of pressure on density has a different form when the system size changes with fixed number of particles and when the number of particles changes with fixed size of the system. In the former case, the pressure has a nonmonotonic dependence on the system size. The anomalous increase of pressure for expanding system is accompanied by formation of a larger number of smaller clusters. In the case of elastic confining surfaces, we observe a bistability, i.e., two significantly different system sizes occur with almost the same probability. The mechanism of the bistability in the closed system is different to that of the case of permeable walls, where the two equilibrium system sizes correspond to a different number of particles.

  2. The Pagoda Sequence: a Ramble through Linear Complexity, Number Walls, D0L Sequences, Finite State Automata, and Aperiodic Tilings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Lunnon

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We review the concept of the number wall as an alternative to the traditional linear complexity profile (LCP, and sketch the relationship to other topics such as linear feedback shift-register (LFSR and context-free Lindenmayer (D0L sequences. A remarkable ternary analogue of the Thue-Morse sequence is introduced having deficiency 2 modulo 3, and this property verified via the re-interpretation of the number wall as an aperiodic plane tiling.

  3. High-Fidelity RF Gun Simulations with the Parallel 3D Finite Element Particle-In-Cell Code Pic3P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, A; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Limborg, C.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the first parallel Finite Element 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code, Pic3P, for simulations of RF guns and other space-charge dominated beam-cavity interactions. Pic3P solves the complete set of Maxwell-Lorentz equations and thus includes space charge, retardation and wakefield effects from first principles. Pic3P uses higher-order Finite Elementmethods on unstructured conformal meshes. A novel scheme for causal adaptive refinement and dynamic load balancing enable unprecedented simulation accuracy, aiding the design and operation of the next generation of accelerator facilities. Application to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) RF gun is presented.

  4. 100 years of elementary particles [Beam Line, vol. 27, number 1, Spring 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pais, Abraham; Weinberg, Steven; Quigg, Chris; Riordan, Michael; Panofsky, Wolfgang K.H.; Trimble, Virginia

    1997-01-01

    This issue of Beam Line commemorates the 100th anniversary of the April 30, 1897 report of the discovery of the electron by J.J. Thomson and the ensuing discovery of other subatomic particles. In the first three articles, theorists Abraham Pais, Steven Weinberg, and Chris Quigg provide their perspectives on the discoveries of elementary particles as well as the implications and future directions resulting from these discoveries. In the following three articles, Michael Riordan, Wolfgang Panofsky, and Virginia Trimble apply our knowledge about elementary particles to high-energy research, electronics technology, and understanding the origin and evolution of our Universe

  5. Three-Dimensional Interaction of a Large Number of Dense DEP Particles on a Plane Perpendicular to an AC Electrical Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanchuan Xie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of dielectrophoresis (DEP particles in an electric field has been observed in many experiments, known as the “particle chains phenomenon”. However, the study in 3D models (spherical particles is rarely reported due to its complexity and significant computational cost. In this paper, we employed the iterative dipole moment (IDM method to study the 3D interaction of a large number of dense DEP particles randomly distributed on a plane perpendicular to a uniform alternating current (AC electric field in a bounded or unbounded space. The numerical results indicated that the particles cannot move out of the initial plane. The similar particles (either all positive or all negative DEP particles always repelled each other, and did not form a chain. The dissimilar particles (a mixture of positive and negative DEP particles always attracted each other, and formed particle chains consisting of alternately arranged positive and negative DEP particles. The particle chain patterns can be randomly multitudinous depending on the initial particle distribution, the electric properties of particles/fluid, the particle sizes and the number of particles. It is also found that the particle chain patterns can be effectively manipulated via tuning the frequency of the AC field and an almost uniform distribution of particles in a bounded plane chip can be achieved when all of the particles are similar, which may have potential applications in the particle manipulation of microfluidics.

  6. Spatial & temporal variations of PM10 and particle number concentrations in urban air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Christer; Norman, Michael; Gidhagen, Lars

    2007-04-01

    The size of particles in urban air varies over four orders of magnitude (from 0.001 microm to 10 microm in diameter). In many cities only particle mass concentrations (PM10, i.e. particles tires and traction sand on streets during winter; up to 90% of the locally emitted PM10 may be due to road abrasion. PM10 emissions and concentrations, but not PNC, at kerbside are controlled by road moisture. Annual mean urban background PM10 levels are relatively uniformly distributed over the city, due to the importance of long range transport. For PNC local sources often dominate the concentrations resulting in large temporal and spatial gradients in the concentrations. Despite these differences in the origin of PM10 and PNC, the spatial gradients of annual mean concentrations due to local sources are of equal magnitude due to the common source, namely traffic. Thus, people in different areas experiencing a factor of 2 different annual PM10 exposure due to local sources will also experience a factor of 2 different exposure in terms of PNC. This implies that health impact studies based solely on spatial differences in annual exposure to PM10 may not separate differences in health effects due to ultrafine and coarse particles. On the other hand, health effect assessments based on time series exposure analysis of PM10 and PNC, should be able to observe differences in health effects of ultrafine particles versus coarse particles.

  7. Chaotic sedimentation of particle pairs in a vertical channel at low Reynolds number: Multiple states and routes to chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verjus, Romuald; Guillou, Sylvain; Ezersky, Alexander; Angilella, Jean-Régis

    2016-12-01

    The sedimentation of a pair of rigid circular particles in a two-dimensional vertical channel containing a Newtonian fluid is investigated numerically, for terminal particle Reynolds numbers (ReT) ranging from 1 to 10, and for a confinement ratio equal to 4. While it is widely admitted that sufficiently inertial pairs should sediment by performing a regular DKT oscillation (Drafting-Kissing-Tumbling), the present analysis shows in contrast that a chaotic regime can also exist for such particles, leading to a much slower sedimentation velocity. It consists of a nearly horizontal pair, corresponding to a maximum effective blockage ratio, and performing a quasiperiodic transition to chaos while increasing the particle weight. For less inertial regimes, the classical oblique doublet structure and its complex behavior (multiple stable states and hysteresis, period-doubling cascade and chaotic attractor) are recovered, in agreement with previous work [Aidun, C. K. and Ding, E.-J., "Dynamics of particle sedimentation in a vertical channel: Period-doubling bifurcation and chaotic state," Phys. Fluids 15, 1612 (2003)]. As a consequence of these various behaviors, the link between the terminal Reynolds number and the non-dimensional driving force is complex: it contains several branches displaying hysteresis as well as various bifurcations. For the range of Reynolds number considered here, a global bifurcation diagram is given.

  8. Mechanism of cluster DNA damage repair in response to high-atomic number and energy particles radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame, E-mail: Aroumougame.Asaithamy@UTsouthwestern.edu [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States); Chen, David J., E-mail: David.Chen@UTsouthwestern.edu [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., {gamma}- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles is slowly repaired or is irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure.

  9. Mechanism of cluster DNA damage repair in response to high-atomic number and energy particles radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., γ- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles is slowly repaired or is irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure.

  10. A finite landscape?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, B.S.; Douglas, M.R.

    2006-06-01

    We present evidence that the number of string/M theory vacua consistent with experiments is finite. We do this both by explicit analysis of infinite sequences of vacua and by applying various mathematical finiteness theorems. (author)

  11. Determinants of black carbon, particle mass and number concentrations in London transport microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Ioar; Kumar, Prashant; Hagen-Zanker, Alex; Andrade, Maria de Fatima; Slovic, Anne Dorothee; Pritchard, John P.; Geurs, Karst T.

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the determinants of personal exposure concentrations of commuters' to black carbon (BC), ultrafine particle number concentrations (PNC), and particulate matter (PM1, PM2.5 and PM10) in different travel modes. We quantified the contribution of key factors that explain the variation of the previous pollutants in four commuting routes in London, each covered by four transport modes (car, bus, walk and underground). Models were performed for each pollutant, separately to assess the effect of meteorology (wind speed) or ambient concentrations (with either high spatial or temporal resolution). Concentration variations were mainly explained by wind speed or ambient concentrations and to a lesser extent by route and period of the day. In multivariate models with wind speed, the wind speed was the common significant predictor for all the pollutants in the above-ground modes (i.e., car, bus, walk); and the only predictor variable for the PM fractions. Wind speed had the strongest effect on PM during the bus trips, with an increase in 1 m s-1 leading to a decrease in 2.25, 2.90 and 4.98 μg m-3 of PM1, PM2.5 and PM10, respectively. PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations in car trips were better explained by ambient concentrations with high temporal resolution although from a single monitoring station. On the other hand, ambient concentrations with high spatial coverage but lower temporal resolution predicted better the concentrations in bus trips, due to bus routes passing through streets with a high variability of traffic intensity. In the underground models, wind speed was not significant and line and type of windows on the train explained 42% of the variation of PNC and 90% of all PM fractions. Trains in the district line with openable windows had an increase in concentrations of 1 684 cm-3 for PNC and 40.69 μg m-3 for PM2.5 compared with trains that had non-openable windows. The results from this work can be used to target efforts to reduce personal exposures of

  12. Estimating the two-particle $K$-matrix for multiple partial waves and decay channels from finite-volume energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morningstar, Colin; Bulava, John; Singha, Bijit

    2017-01-01

    An implementation of estimating the two-to-two $K$-matrix from finite-volume energies based on the L\\"uscher formalism and involving a Hermitian matrix known as the "box matrix" is described. The method includes higher partial waves and multiple decay channels. Two fitting procedures for estimating...

  13. A unified monolithic approach for multi-fluid flows and fluid-structure interaction using the Particle Finite Element Method with fixed mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, P.; Idelsohn, S. R.; Oñate, E.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a strategy to solve multi-fluid and fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems using Lagrangian particles combined with a fixed finite element (FE) mesh. Our approach is an extension of the fluid-only PFEM-2 (Idelsohn et al., Eng Comput 30(2):2-2, 2013; Idelsohn et al., J Numer Methods Fluids, 2014) which uses explicit integration over the streamlines to improve accuracy. As a result, the convective term does not appear in the set of equations solved on the fixed mesh. Enrichments in the pressure field are used to improve the description of the interface between phases.

  14. Influence of Number of Implants and Attachment Type on Stress Distribution in Mandibular Implant-Retained Overdentures: Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed I. El-Anwar

    2017-03-01

    CONCLUSION: Caps deformation and stresses are negligible in cases of using locator attachment in comparison to ball attachments. This may indicate longer lifetime and less repair/maintenance operations in implant overdentures retained by locator attachments. Although the study revealed that bone was insensitive to a number of implants or attachment type, it may be recommended to use two implants in the canine region than using four, where the locator attachments were found to be better.

  15. International conference on production of particles with new quantum numbers: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: mechanisms of new particle production; the total cross section for e + e/sup /minus// → hadrons and its associated spectroscopy; recent results on the new particle states below 3.7 GeV produced in e + e/sup /minus// annihilations; new results on J//psi/ and /psi/' decays from DASP; excess muons and new results in /psi/ photoproduction; probing the new particles with hadron beams; properties of prompt leptons; muon production in hadron-hadron collisions; large transverse momentum photons from high energy proton proton collisions; dimuon and trimuon production in deep inelastic muon interactions; streamer chamber search for narrow hadrons with a muon-enriched trigger; threshold effects of new particle production by high energy neutrinos and antineutrinos; the observation of neutrino induced μ/sup /minus//e + events in the Fermilab bubble chamber; search for antineutrino induced μ + e/sup /minus// events; observation of muon-neutrino reactions producing a positron and a strange particle; observation of the reaction ν/sub μ/ + p → ν/sub μ/ + p; search for muonic pairs; strange particle production in neutrino interactions; neutral currents---the structure of the coupling; evidence for parity non-conservation in the weak neutral current; observation of elastic neutrino-proton scattering; threshold and other properties of U particle production in e + e/sup /minus// annihilation; anomalous muon production in e + e/sup /minus// collisions; electron production; strongly interacting heavy lepton; and /psi/'s without charm

  16. A comparative study of the number and mass of fine particles emitted with diesel fuel and marine gas oil (MGO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Md. Nurun; Brown, Richard J.; Ristovski, Zoran; Hustad, Johan Einar

    2012-09-01

    The current investigation reports on diesel particulate matter emissions, with special interest in fine particles from the combustion of two base fuels. The base fuels selected were diesel fuel and marine gas oil (MGO). The experiments were conducted with a four-stroke, six-cylinder, direct injection diesel engine. The results showed that the fine particle number emissions measured by both SMPS and ELPI were higher with MGO compared to diesel fuel. It was observed that the fine particle number emissions with the two base fuels were quantitatively different but qualitatively similar. The gravimetric (mass basis) measurement also showed higher total particulate matter (TPM) emissions with the MGO. The smoke emissions, which were part of TPM, were also higher for the MGO. No significant changes in the mass flow rate of fuel and the brake-specific fuel consumption (BSFC) were observed between the two base fuels.

  17. Total and size-resolved particle number and black carbon concentrations in urban areas near Schiphol airport (the Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuken, M.P.; Moerman, M.; Zandveld, P.; Henzing, J.S.; Hoek, G.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of black carbon, and size-resolved and total particle number concentrations (PNC) were investigated in the vicinity of Schiphol airport in the Netherlands, the fourth busiest airport in Europe. Continuous measurements were conducted between March and May 2014at Adamse Bos, located 7km

  18. Introduction to the spectral distribution method. Application example to the subspaces with a large number of quasi particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvieu, R.

    The assumptions and principles of the spectral distribution method are reviewed. The object of the method is to deduce information on the nuclear spectra by constructing a frequency function which has the same first few moments, as the exact frequency function, these moments being then exactly calculated. The method is applied to subspaces containing a large number of quasi particles [fr

  19. Is the Field of Numbers a Real Physical Field? On the Frequent Distribution and Masses of the Elementary Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyakov A. V.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Frequent distributions of the databases of the numerical values obtained by resolving algorithms, which describe physical and other processes, give a possibility for bonding the probability of that results the algorithms get. In the frequent distribution of the fractions of integers (rational numbers, local maxima which meet the ratios of masses of the elementary particles have been found.

  20. Size-resolved particle number emission patterns under real-world driving conditions using positive matrix factorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domínguez-Sáez, A.; Viana, M.; Barrios, C.C.; Rubio, J.R.; Amato, F.; Pujadas, M.; Querol, X.

    2012-01-01

    A novel on-board system was tested to characterize size-resolved particle number emission patterns under real-world driving conditions, running in a EURO4 diesel vehicle and in a typical urban circuit in Madrid (Spain). Emission profiles were determined as a function of driving conditions. Source

  1. Landmarks in particle physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Brookhaven Lecture Series, Number 238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adair, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    Robert Adair's lecture on Landmarks in Particle Physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a commemoration of the 40th Anniversary of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Adair describes ten researches in elementary particle physics at Brookhaven that had a revolutionary impact on the understanding of elementary particles. Two of the discoveries were made in 1952 and 1956 at the Cosmotron, BNL's first proton accelerator. Four were made in 1962 and 1964 at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, the Cosmotron's replacement. Two other discoveries in 1954 and 1956 were theoretical, and strong focusing (1952) is the only technical discovery. One discovery (1958) happened in an old barrack. Four of the discoveries were awarded the Nobel prize in Physics. Adair believes that all of the discoveries are worthy of the Nobel prize. 14 figs

  2. Analysis of the quantum numbers J(PC) of the X(3872) particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Budroni, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Cyr, D; Daronco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ranjan, N; Rappoccio, S; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-03-30

    We present an analysis of angular distributions and correlations of the X(3872) particle in the exclusive decay mode X(3872)-->J/psipi+ pi- with J/psi-->mu+ mu-. We use 780 pb-1 of data from pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We derive constraints on spin, parity, and charge conjugation parity of the X(3872) particle by comparing measured angular distributions of the decay products with predictions for different J(PC) hypotheses. The assignments J(PC)=1++ and 2-+ are the only ones consistent with the data.

  3. Number of Packages of Information which are processed in a Second by the Fundamental Particles (strings) of a Human Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholibeigian, Hassan; Gholibeigian, Ghasem; Gholibeigian, Kazem

    2016-11-01

    The fundamental particle (string) gets a package of complete information of its quantum state via inside of its sub-particle (sub-string) from dimension of information. This package is processed by sub-particle in each Planck time [Gholibeigian, APS 2015, abstract #L1.027]. On the other hand, a 70 kg human's body would have approximately 7*1027 atoms. Of that, 4.7*1027 would be hydrogen atoms. Another 1.8*1027 would be oxygen and there are 7.0*1026 carbon atoms. If we add that all up, total is 2.3*1028 protons, 1.8*1028 neutrons, and 2.3*1028 electrons. Each proton and neutron has 6 fundamental particles. So the total number of packages of information which are processed by each of us in a second becomes: I = [ 6 × (2 . 3 + 1 . 8) ×1028 + 2 . 3 ×1028 ] ×1044 = 2 . 69 ×1073 The processed information carry by fundamental particles. Based on Shanon equation, I = - S , this number can be equal to the increased entropy of each of us per second too. AmirKabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.

  4. Tethered balloon-based particle number concentration, and size distribution vertical profiles within the lower troposphere of Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Dongfang; Bian, Qinggen; Duan, Yusen; Zhao, Mengfei; Fei, Dongnian; Xiu, Guangli; Fu, Qingyan

    2017-04-01

    A tethered balloon-based measurement campaign of particle number concentration (PNC) and particle number size distribution (PNSD) in the size range of 15.7-661.2 nm was conducted within the lower troposphere of 1000 m in Shanghai, a Chinese megacity, during December of 2015. The meteorological conditions, PNC, and PNSD were synchronously measured at the ground-based station as well as by the tethered balloon. On ground level, the 88.2 nm particles were found to have the highest PNC. The Pearson correlation analysis based on the ground level data showed NO2 had a strong correlation with PNC. The synchronous measurement of PNC and PNSD at the ground station and on the tethered balloon showed that the 15.7-200 nm particles had higher PNC on ground level, but the PNC of 200-661.2 nm particles was higher at 400 m. One haze event (Dec 22nd-Dec 23rd) was selected for detailed discussion on the variation of vertical profiles of PNSD and PNC. The vertical distribution of characteristics of PNC and PNSD were observed and compared. Results indicated that the highest MaxDm (the diameter with the highest PNC) during those three launches all appeared at a high altitude, usually above 300 m. Compared to the clean days, the relatively bigger MaxDm at each height in the haze days also indicated regional transport of pollutants might contribute to more to that haze event.

  5. ELECTRON ACCELERATIONS AT HIGH MACH NUMBER SHOCKS: TWO-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS IN VARIOUS PARAMETER REGIMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Yosuke [Department of Physics, Chiba University, Yayoi-cho 1-33, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Amano, Takanobu; Hoshino, Masahiro, E-mail: ymatumot@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, Hongo 1-33, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-08-20

    Electron accelerations at high Mach number collisionless shocks are investigated by means of two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations with various Alfven Mach numbers, ion-to-electron mass ratios, and the upstream electron {beta}{sub e} (the ratio of the thermal pressure to the magnetic pressure). We find electrons are effectively accelerated at a super-high Mach number shock (M{sub A} {approx} 30) with a mass ratio of M/m = 100 and {beta}{sub e} = 0.5. The electron shock surfing acceleration is an effective mechanism for accelerating the particles toward the relativistic regime even in two dimensions with a large mass ratio. Buneman instability excited at the leading edge of the foot in the super-high Mach number shock results in a coherent electrostatic potential structure. While multi-dimensionality allows the electrons to escape from the trapping region, they can interact with the strong electrostatic field several times. Simulation runs in various parameter regimes indicate that the electron shock surfing acceleration is an effective mechanism for producing relativistic particles in extremely high Mach number shocks in supernova remnants, provided that the upstream electron temperature is reasonably low.

  6. Simultaneous projection of particle-number and angular momentum BCS wave-functions in the rare-earth nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudih, M.R.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N.H.; Benhamouda, N.

    1999-01-01

    It is well established that the BCS wave-functions are neither eigen-functions of the particle-number operator nor of the angular momentum operator. In a previous paper, we have developed a particle-number projection before variation method (of FBCS type). This discrete projection method is based on the SBCS wave-function. The aim of the present contribution is to perform a subsequent angular momentum projection by means of the Peierls-Yoccoz method. The general expression of the system energy, after the double projection, is established in the case of axial symmetry. For practical calculations, an approximation method is introduced. It leads to a semi-classical form of the rotational energy. The rotational spectra have been evaluated numerically for some even-even rare-earth nuclei. The single-particle energies and eigen-states are those of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean field. The obtained results are compared on one hand, to the experimental data, and on the other hand, to the theoretical spectra evaluated by a particle-number projection after variation method (of PBCS type). For all studied nuclei, the spectra determined by the FBCS method reproduce the experimental data better than those of the PBCS method. However, even if the present method is satisfying for low angular momenta, the agreement with the experimental data is lesser for I ≥ 8, particularly for the lighter studied nuclei. (authors)

  7. The motion of a cloud of solid spherical particles falling in a cellular flow field at low Stokes number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Benjamin; Bergougnoux, Laurence; Guazzelli, Elisabeth

    2017-11-01

    We present a jointed experimental and numerical study examining the influence of vortical structures on the settling of a cloud of solid spherical particles under the action of gravity at low Stokes numbers. The two-dimensional model experiment uses electro-convection to generate a two-dimensional array of controlled vortices which mimics a simplified vortical flow. Particle image-velocimetry and tracking are used to examine the motion of the cloud within this vortical flow. The cloud motion is compared to the predictions of a two-way-coupling numerical simulation.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation study of the development of finite-channel lock-release currents at high Grashof numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Seng-Keat

    2005-11-01

    Lock-exchange gravity current flows produced by the instantaneous release of a heavy fluid are investigated using 3-D well resolved Large Eddy Simulation simulations at Grashof numbers up to 8*10^9. It is found the 3-D simulations correctly predict a constant front velocity over the initial slumping phase and a front speed decrease proportional to t-1/3 (the time t is measured from the release) over the inviscid phase, in agreement with theory. The evolution of the current in the simulations is found to be similar to that observed experimentally by Hacker et al. (1996). The effect of the dynamic LES model on the solutions is discussed. The energy budget of the current is discussed and the contribution of the turbulent dissipation to the total dissipation is analyzed. The limitations of less expensive 2D simulations are discussed; in particular their failure to correctly predict the spatio-temporal distributions of the bed shear stresses which is important in determining the amount of sediment the gravity current can entrain in the case in advances of a loose bed.

  9. Particle number and particulate mass emissions of heavy duty vehicles in real operating conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymaniak Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the issue of PM emissions from HDV vehicles. The theoretical part discusses the problem of emission of this toxic compound in terms of particle structure taking into account the mass and dimensions of PM. Next, the methodology of the research and the results of the measurements performed under the conditions of actual operation were presented. The test drive routes were chosen in accordance with the operational purpose of the selected test vehicles. Two heavy vehicles were used for the study: a tractor with trailer and an eighteen meter long city bus. The test vehicles complied with the Euro V standard, with the second vehicle additionally complying with the EEV standard and being equipped with a DPF. The analysis of the research results was performed in the aspect of determining the operating time densities of vehicles and their drive systems as well as defining their emission characteristics and ecological indicators. PM and PN emissions were measured in the tests and particle size distribution was determined. It was shown that the exhaust gas after treatment system used in the city bus had a positive influence on the ecological indicators and had contributed to the reduction of PN emissions for heavier particles.

  10. Trends in size classified particle number concentration in subtropical Brisbane, Australia, based on a 5 year study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, J. F.; Wraith, D.; Mengersen, K.; Morawska, L.

    Particle number size distribution data in the range from 0.015 to 0.630 μm were collected over a 5-year period in the central business district (CBD) of Brisbane, Australia. Particle size distribution was summarised by total number concentration and number median diameter (NMD) as well as the number concentration of the 0.015-0.030 ( N15-30), 0.030-0.050 ( N30-50), 0.050-0.100 ( N50-100), 0.100-0.300 ( N100-300) and 0.300-0.630 ( N300-630) μm size classes. Morning (6:00-10:00) and afternoon (16:00-19:00) measurements, the former representing fresh traffic emissions (based on the local meteorological conditions) and the latter well-mixed emissions from the CBD, during weekdays were extracted and the respective monthly mean values were estimated for time series analysis. For all size fractions, average morning concentrations were about 1.5 higher than in the afternoon whereas NMD did not vary between the morning and afternoon. The trend and seasonal components were extracted through weighted linear regression models, using the monthly variance as weights. Only the morning measurements exhibited significant trends. During this time of the day, total particle number increased by 105.7% and the increase was greater for larger particles, resulting in a shift in NMD by 7.9%. Although no seasonal component was detected the evidence against it remained weak due to the limitations of the database.

  11. Characterisation of particle mass and number concentration on the east coast of the Malaysian Peninsula during the northeast monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Doreena; Latif, Mohd Talib; Juneng, Liew; Khan, Md Firoz; Amil, Norhaniza; Mead, Mohammed Iqbal; Nadzir, Mohd Shahrul Mohd; Moi, Phang Siew; Samah, Azizan Abu; Ashfold, Matthew J.; Sturges, William T.; Harris, Neil R. P.; Robinson, Andrew D.; Pyle, John A.

    2015-09-01

    Particle mass concentrations (PM10, PM2.5 and PM1) and particle number concentration ((PNC); 0.27 μm ≤ Dp ≤ 34.00 μm) were measured in the tropical coastal environment of Bachok, Kelantan on the Malaysian Peninsula bordering the southern edge of the South China Sea. Statistical methods were applied on a three-month hourly data set (9th January to 24th March 2014) to study the influence of north-easterly winds on the patterns of particle mass and PNC size distributions. The 24-h concentrations of particle mass obtained in this study were below the standard values detailed by the Recommended Malaysian Air Quality Guideline (RMAQG), United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and European Union (EU) except for PM2.5, which recorded a 24-h average of 30 ± 18 μg m-3 and exceeded the World Health Organisation (WHO) threshold value (25 μg m-3). Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that PNC with smaller diameter sizes (0.27-4.50 μm) showed a stronger influence, accounting for 57.6% of the variability in PNC data set. Concentrations of both particle mass and PNC increased steadily in the morning with a distinct peak observed at around 8.00 h, related to a combination of dispersion of accumulated particles overnight and local traffic. In addition to local anthropogenic, agricultural burning and forest fire activities, long-range transport also affects the study area. Hotspot and backward wind trajectory observations illustrated that the biomass burning episode (around February-March) significantly influenced PNC. Meteorological parameters influenced smaller size particles (i.e. PM1 and Dp (0.27-0.43 μm)) the most.

  12. Delocalized SYZ mirrors and confronting top-down SU(3)-structure holographic meson masses at finite g and N{sub c} with P(article) D(ata) G(roup) values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Vikas; Sil, Karunava [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Roorkee, Uttarakhand (India); Misra, Aalok [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Roorkee, Uttarakhand (India); McGill University, Physics Department, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2017-10-15

    Meson spectroscopy at finite gauge coupling - whereat any perturbative QCD computation would break down - and finite number of colors, from a top-down holographic string model, has thus far been entirely missing in the literature. This paper fills this gap. Using the delocalized type IIA SYZ mirror (with SU(3) structure) of the holographic type IIB dual of large-N thermal QCD of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) as constructed in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at finite coupling and number of colors (N{sub c} = number of D5(D5)-branes wrapping a vanishing two-cycle in the top-down holographic construct of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) = O(1) in the IR in the MQGP limit of Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at the end of a Seiberg-duality cascade), we obtain analytical (not just numerical) expressions for the vector and scalar meson spectra and compare our results with previous calculations of Sakai and Sugimoto (Prog Theor Phys 113:843. doi:10.1143/PTP.113.843 arXiv:hep-th/0412141, 2005) and Dasgupta et al. (JHEP 1507:122. doi:10.1007/JHEP07(2015)122 arXiv:1409.0559 [hep-th], 2015), and we obtain a closer match with the Particle Data Group (PDG) results of Olive et al. (Particle Data Group) (Chin Phys C 38:090001, 2014). Through explicit computations, we verify that the vector and scalar meson spectra obtained by the gravity dual with a black hole for all temperatures (small and large) are nearly isospectral with the spectra obtained by a thermal gravity dual valid for only low temperatures; the isospectrality is much closer for vector mesons than scalar mesons. The black-hole gravity dual (with a horizon radius smaller than the deconfinement scale) also provides the expected large-N suppressed decrease in vector meson mass with increase of temperature. (orig.)

  13. Delocalized SYZ mirrors and confronting top-down SU(3)-structure holographic meson masses at finite g and N_c with P(article) D(ata) G(roup) values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vikas; Misra, Aalok; Sil, Karunava

    2017-10-01

    Meson spectroscopy at finite gauge coupling - whereat any perturbative QCD computation would break down - and finite number of colors, from a top-down holographic string model, has thus far been entirely missing in the literature. This paper fills this gap. Using the delocalized type IIA SYZ mirror (with SU(3) structure) of the holographic type IIB dual of large- N thermal QCD of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) as constructed in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at finite coupling and number of colors (N_c = number of D5(\\overline{D5})-branes wrapping a vanishing two-cycle in the top-down holographic construct of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) = O(1) in the IR in the MQGP limit of Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at the end of a Seiberg-duality cascade), we obtain analytical (not just numerical) expressions for the vector and scalar meson spectra and compare our results with previous calculations of Sakai and Sugimoto (Prog Theor Phys 113:843. doi: 10.1143/PTP.113.843 arXiv:hep-th/0412141, 2005) and Dasgupta et al. (JHEP 1507:122. doi: 10.1007/JHEP07(2015)122 arXiv:1409.0559 [hep-th], 2015), and we obtain a closer match with the Particle Data Group (PDG) results of Olive et al. (Particle Data Group) (Chin Phys C 38:090001, 2014). Through explicit computations, we verify that the vector and scalar meson spectra obtained by the gravity dual with a black hole for all temperatures (small and large) are nearly isospectral with the spectra obtained by a thermal gravity dual valid for only low temperatures; the isospectrality is much closer for vector mesons than scalar mesons. The black-hole gravity dual (with a horizon radius smaller than the deconfinement scale) also provides the expected large- N suppressed decrease in vector meson mass with increase of temperature.

  14. Delocalized SYZ mirrors and confronting top-down SU(3)-structure holographic meson masses at finite g and Nc with P(article) D(ata) G(roup) values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Vikas; Sil, Karunava; Misra, Aalok

    2017-01-01

    Meson spectroscopy at finite gauge coupling - whereat any perturbative QCD computation would break down - and finite number of colors, from a top-down holographic string model, has thus far been entirely missing in the literature. This paper fills this gap. Using the delocalized type IIA SYZ mirror (with SU(3) structure) of the holographic type IIB dual of large-N thermal QCD of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) as constructed in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at finite coupling and number of colors (N c = number of D5(D5)-branes wrapping a vanishing two-cycle in the top-down holographic construct of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) = O(1) in the IR in the MQGP limit of Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at the end of a Seiberg-duality cascade), we obtain analytical (not just numerical) expressions for the vector and scalar meson spectra and compare our results with previous calculations of Sakai and Sugimoto (Prog Theor Phys 113:843. doi:10.1143/PTP.113.843 arXiv:hep-th/0412141, 2005) and Dasgupta et al. (JHEP 1507:122. doi:10.1007/JHEP07(2015)122 arXiv:1409.0559 [hep-th], 2015), and we obtain a closer match with the Particle Data Group (PDG) results of Olive et al. (Particle Data Group) (Chin Phys C 38:090001, 2014). Through explicit computations, we verify that the vector and scalar meson spectra obtained by the gravity dual with a black hole for all temperatures (small and large) are nearly isospectral with the spectra obtained by a thermal gravity dual valid for only low temperatures; the isospectrality is much closer for vector mesons than scalar mesons. The black-hole gravity dual (with a horizon radius smaller than the deconfinement scale) also provides the expected large-N suppressed decrease in vector meson mass with increase of temperature. (orig.)

  15. Total Particle Number Emissions from Modern Diesel, Natural Gas, and Hybrid Heavy-Duty Vehicles During On-Road Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyang; Quiros, David C; Thiruvengadam, Arvind; Pradhan, Saroj; Hu, Shaohua; Huai, Tao; Lee, Eon S; Zhu, Yifang

    2017-06-20

    Particle emissions from heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) have significant environmental and public health impacts. This study measured total particle number emission factors (PNEFs) from six newly certified HDVs powered by diesel and compressed natural gas totaling over 6800 miles of on-road operation in California. Distance-, fuel- and work-based PNEFs were calculated for each vehicle. Distance-based PNEFs of vehicles equipped with original equipment manufacturer (OEM) diesel particulate filters (DPFs) in this study have decreased by 355-3200 times compared to a previous retrofit DPF dynamometer study. Fuel-based PNEFs were consistent with previous studies measuring plume exhaust in the ambient air. Meanwhile, on-road PNEF shows route and technology dependence. For vehicles with OEM DPFs and Selective Catalytic Reduction Systems, PNEFs under highway driving (i.e., 3.34 × 10 12 to 2.29 × 10 13 particles/mile) were larger than those measured on urban and drayage routes (i.e., 5.06 × 10 11 to 1.31 × 10 13 particles/mile). This is likely because a significant amount of nucleation mode volatile particles were formed when the DPF outlet temperature reached a critical value, usually over 310 °C, which was commonly achieved when vehicle speed sustained over 45 mph. A model year 2013 diesel HDV produced approximately 10 times higher PNEFs during DPF active regeneration events than nonactive regeneration.

  16. Trapped particle confinement studies in L = 2 torsatrons for additional helical coils, radial electric field and finite beta effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, A.; Nakamura, Y.; Wakatani, M.

    1990-07-01

    L = 2 torsatrons are studied to improve the high energy trapped particle confinement with additional l = 1 and/or l = 3 helical coils. The winding laws are selected in two ways. One is to realize 'σ - optimization' by the additional helical coils, but this approach loses magnetic well region. The other selection is to produce or deepen the magnetic well by the additional helical coils. L=3 helical coils are usable to this end. In this case the improvement of the trapped particle confinement depends on magnetic axis position. Radial electric field producing sheared rotational motion is also considered to improve the trapped particle confinement in a standard l = 2 torsatron. By excluding cancellation between E x B and ΔB drift motion occurred for the parabolic potential profiles, all deeply trapped particles can be confined in the central region. Degradation of the trapped particle confinement by the Shafranov shift is mitigated by shifting the magnetic axis inside in the vacuum configuration. (author)

  17. The Higgs--physical and number theoretical arguments for the necessity of a triple elementary particle in super symmetric spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naschie, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    A careful counting routine of all experimentally confirmed elementary particles plus the theoretically conjectured ones needed for a sound formulation of a mathematically consistent field theory is undertaken within a minimal N=1 super symmetric extension of the standard model of high energy physics. The number arrived at is subsequently linked to certain massless on shell representations connected to the quantized gravity interaction. Finally with the help of number theoretical arguments arising from a rigorous application of the formalism of transfinite Heterotic super string and E-infinity theory, we show that the proposed scheme would lack mathematical consistency and elegant simplicity unless we retain a postulated triplet which is logically identified as the H + , H - and H 0 Higgs particles. Connections to the 11 dimensional M theory and Harari's extended 'sub-quarks' theory is also discussed

  18. Characterisation of sub-micron particle number concentrations and formation events in the western Bushveld Igneous Complex, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hirsikko

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available South Africa holds significant mineral resources, with a substantial fraction of these reserves occurring and being processed in a large geological structure termed the Bushveld Igneous Complex (BIC. The area is also highly populated by informal, semi-formal and formal residential developments. However, knowledge of air quality and research related to the atmosphere is still very limited in the area. In order to investigate the characteristics and processes affecting sub-micron particle number concentrations and formation events, air ion and aerosol particle size distributions and number concentrations, together with meteorological parameters, trace gases and particulate matter (PM were measured for over two years at Marikana in the heart of the western BIC. The observations showed that trace gas (i.e. SO2, NOx, CO and black carbon concentrations were relatively high, but in general within the limits of local air quality standards. The area was characterised by very high condensation sink due to background aerosol particles, PM10 and O3 concentration. The results indicated that high amounts of Aitken and accumulation mode particles originated from domestic burning for heating and cooking in the morning and evening, while during daytime SO2-based nucleation followed by the growth by condensation of vapours from industrial, residential and natural sources was the most probable source for large number concentrations of nucleation and Aitken mode particles. Nucleation event day frequency was extremely high, i.e. 86% of the analysed days, which to the knowledge of the authors is the highest frequency ever reported. The air mass back trajectory and wind direction analyses showed that the secondary particle formation was influenced both by local and regional pollution and vapour sources. Therefore, our observation of the annual cycle and magnitude of the particle formation and growth rates during

  19. Calculation of the output power in self-amplified spontaneous radiation using scaling of power with number of simulation particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, L.H.

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) experiments stimulate interest in quantitative comparison of measurements with theory. In this paper we show that the widely used simulation code TDA3D, developed by Tran and Wurtele [Comput. Phys. Commun. 54, 263 (1989)] even though a single frequency code, can be used to determine the output power in the SASE process with excellent approximation in the exponential growth regime. The method applies when the gain is not very high, which is a special advantage, because when the gain is not very high, the analytical calculation is particularly difficult since the exponential growing term does not dominate. The analysis utilizes a scaling relation between the output power and the number of simulation particles in the code TDA3D: left-angle P right-angle=N λ ' /N λ left-angle P ' right-angle, where left-angle P right-angle is the output power and N λ is the line density of the electrons, while left-angle P ' right-angle is the calculated output power using a line density N λ ' of the number of simulation particles in the code TDA3D. Because of the scaling property, the number of simulation particles can be taken to be many orders of magnitude less than the actual experiment. Comparison of our results with experiment yields new insight into the SASE process. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  20. Influence of implant number on the biomechanical behaviour of mandibular implant-retained/supported overdentures: a three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingyin; Pan, Shaoxia; Dong, Jing; Mo, Zhongjun; Fan, Yubo; Feng, Hailan

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate strain distribution in peri-implant bone, stress in the abutments and denture stability of mandibular overdentures anchored by different numbers of implants under different loading conditions, through three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D FEA). Four 3D finite element models of mandibular overdentures were established, using between one and four Straumann implants with Locator attachments. Three types of load were applied to the overdenture in each model: 100N vertical and inclined loads on the left first molar and a 100N vertical load on the lower incisors. The biomechanical behaviours of peri-implant bone, implants, abutments and overdentures were recorded. Under vertical load on the lower incisors, the single-implant overdenture rotated over the implant from side to side, and no obvious increase of strain was found in peri-implant bone. Under the same loading conditions, the two-implant-retained overdenture showed more apparent rotation around the fulcrum line passing through the two implants, and the maximum equivalent stress in the abutments was higher than in the other models. In the three-implant-supported overdenture, no strain concentration was found in cortical bone around the middle implant under three loading conditions. Single-implant-retained mandibular overdentures do not show damaging strain concentration in the bone around the only implant and may be a cost-effective treatment option for edentulous patients. A third implant can be placed between the original two when patients rehabilitated by two-implant overdentures report constant and obvious denture rotation around the fulcrum line. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Estimating the two-particle K-matrix for multiple partial waves and decay channels from finite-volume energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Morningstar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available An implementation of estimating the two-to-two K-matrix from finite-volume energies based on the Lüscher formalism and involving a Hermitian matrix known as the “box matrix” is described. The method includes higher partial waves and multiple decay channels. Two fitting procedures for estimating the K-matrix parameters, which properly incorporate all statistical covariances, are discussed. Formulas and software for handling total spins up to S=2 and orbital angular momenta up to L=6 are obtained for total momenta in several directions. First tests involving ρ-meson decay to two pions include the L=3 and L=5 partial waves, and the contributions from these higher waves are found to be negligible in the elastic energy range.

  2. Logarithmic corrections to the uncertainty principle and infinitude of the number of bound states of n-particle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, J.F.; Coutinho, F.A.B.; Malta, C.P.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that critical long distance behaviour for a two-body potential, defining the finiteness or infinitude of the number of negative eigenvalues of Schrodinger operators in ν-dimensions, are given by v sub(k) (r) = - [ν-2/2r] 2 - 1/(2rlnr) 2 + ... - 1/(2rlnr.lnlnr...ln sub(k)r) 2 where k=0,1... for ν not=2 and k=1,2... if ν=2. This result is a consequence of logarithmic corrections to an inequality known as Uncertainty Principle. If the continuum threshold in the N-body problem is defined by a two-cluster break up our results generate corrections to the existing sufficient conditions for the existence of infinitely many bound states. (Author) [pt

  3. Estimating marine aerosol particle volume and number from Maritime Aerosol Network data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Sayer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available As well as spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD, aerosol composition and concentration (number, volume, or mass are of interest for a variety of applications. However, remote sensing of these quantities is more difficult than for AOD, as it is more sensitive to assumptions relating to aerosol composition. This study uses spectral AOD measured on Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN cruises, with the additional constraint of a microphysical model for unpolluted maritime aerosol based on analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET inversions, to estimate these quantities over open ocean. When the MAN data are subset to those likely to be comprised of maritime aerosol, number and volume concentrations obtained are physically reasonable. Attempts to estimate surface concentration from columnar abundance, however, are shown to be limited by uncertainties in vertical distribution. Columnar AOD at 550 nm and aerosol number for unpolluted maritime cases are also compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data, for both the present Collection 5.1 and forthcoming Collection 6. MODIS provides a best-fitting retrieval solution, as well as the average for several different solutions, with different aerosol microphysical models. The "average solution" MODIS dataset agrees more closely with MAN than the "best solution" dataset. Terra tends to retrieve lower aerosol number than MAN, and Aqua higher, linked with differences in the aerosol models commonly chosen. Collection 6 AOD is likely to agree more closely with MAN over open ocean than Collection 5.1. In situations where spectral AOD is measured accurately, and aerosol microphysical properties are reasonably well-constrained, estimates of aerosol number and volume using MAN or similar data would provide for a greater variety of potential comparisons with aerosol properties derived from satellite or chemistry transport model data. However, without accurate AOD data and prior knowledge of

  4. Preequilibrium decay in the exciton model for nuclear potential with a finite depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogila, Ye.A.; Kolomiets, V.M.; Sanzhur, A.I.; Shlomo, S.

    1995-01-01

    The spectra of preequilibrium particles, taking into account the energy dependence of the single-particle level density, are calculated using the particle-hole (exciton) level density. We demonstrate the significant effect of the finite depth of the potential well (continuum effect) on partial emission spectra for configurations with a small exciton number

  5. Large-eddy simulations of 3D Taylor-Green vortex: comparison of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics, Lattice Boltzmann and Finite Volume methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajzer, A; Pozorski, J; Szewc, K

    2014-01-01

    In the paper we present Large-eddy simulation (LES) results of 3D Taylor- Green vortex obtained by the three different computational approaches: Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) and Finite Volume Method (FVM). The Smagorinsky model was chosen as a subgrid-scale closure in LES for all considered methods and a selection of spatial resolutions have been investigated. The SPH and LBM computations have been carried out with the use of the in-house codes executed on GPU and compared, for validation purposes, with the FVM results obtained using the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM. A comparative study in terms of one-point statistics and turbulent energy spectra shows a good agreement of LES results for all methods. An analysis of the GPU code efficiency and implementation difficulties has been made. It is shown that both SPH and LBM may offer a significant advantage over mesh-based CFD methods.

  6. Invariance identities associated with finite gauge transformations and the uniqueness of the equations of motion of a particle in a classical gauge field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rund, H.

    1984-01-01

    A certain class of geometric objects is considered against the background of a classical gauge field associated with an arbitrary structural Lie group. It is shown that the necessary and sufficient conditions for the invariance of the given objects under a finite gauge transformation are embodied in a set of three relations involving the derivatives of their components. As a special case these so-called invariance identities indicate that there cannot exist a gauge-invariant Lagrangian that depends on the gauge potentials, the interaction parameters, and the 4-velocity components of a test particle. However, the requirement that the equations of motion that result from such a lagrangian be gauge-invariant, uniquely determines the structure of these equations. (author)

  7. A Gibbs potential expansion with a quantic system made up of a large number of particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, Claude; Dominicis, Cyrano de

    1959-01-01

    Starting from an expansion derived in a previous work, we study the contribution to the Gibbs potential of the two-body dynamical correlations, taking into account the statistical correlations. Such a contribution is of interest for low density systems at low temperature. In the zero density limit, it reduces to the Beth Uhlenbeck expression of the second virial coefficient. For a system of fermions in the zero temperature limit, it yields the contribution of the Brueckner reaction matrix to the ground state energy, plus, under certain conditions, additional terms of the form exp. (β |Δ|), where the Δ are the binding energies of 'bound states' of the type first discussed by L. Cooper. Finally, we study the wave function of two particles immersed in a medium (defined by its temperature and chemical potential). lt satisfies an equation generalizing the Bethe Goldstone equation for an arbitrary temperature. Reprint of a paper published in 'Nuclear Physics' 10, 1959, p. 181-196 [fr

  8. Particle-number fluctuations and neutron-proton pairing effects on proton and neutron radii of even-even N Almost-Equal-To Z nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douici, M.; Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Faculte de Physique, USTHB BP 32 El-Alia, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria) and Institut des Sciences et Technologie, Centre Universitaire de Khemis Miliana, Route de Theniet-El-Had, 44225 Khemis-Milia (Algeria); Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Faculte de Physique, USTHB BP 32 El-Alia, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria) and Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, COMENA, BP399 Alger-Gare, Alger (Algeria); Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Faculte de Physique, USTHB BP 32 El-Alia, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria)

    2012-10-20

    The particle-number fluctuation effect on the root-mean-square (rms) proton and neutron radii of even-even N Almost-Equal-To Z nuclei is studied in the isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing case using an exact particle-number projection method and the Woods-Saxon model.

  9. Implicit and explicit schemes for mass consistency preservation in hybrid particle/finite-volume algorithms for turbulent reactive flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, Pavel P.; Pope, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    This work addresses the issue of particle mass consistency in Large Eddy Simulation/Probability Density Function (LES/PDF) methods for turbulent reactive flows. Numerical schemes for the implicit and explicit enforcement of particle mass consistency (PMC) are introduced, and their performance is examined in a representative LES/PDF application, namely the Sandia–Sydney Bluff-Body flame HM1. A new combination of interpolation schemes for velocity and scalar fields is found to better satisfy PMC than multilinear and fourth-order Lagrangian interpolation. A second-order accurate time-stepping scheme for stochastic differential equations (SDE) is found to improve PMC relative to Euler time stepping, which is the first time that a second-order scheme is found to be beneficial, when compared to a first-order scheme, in an LES/PDF application. An explicit corrective velocity scheme for PMC enforcement is introduced, and its parameters optimized to enforce a specified PMC criterion with minimal corrective velocity magnitudes

  10. Wrapped and unwrapped phase of radiation scattered by a discrete number of particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, Stephen M; Ridley, Kevin D

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates wrapped and unwrapped phase differences generated by a non-Gaussian scattering model: the two-dimensional random walk. Mean square values for these quantities are obtained for one and two scatterers, as well as the large scatterer limit when the field constitutes a circular complex Gaussian process. Numerical simulation is used to investigate the phase under more general fluctuation conditions, and reveals that the wrapped phase difference correlation converges rapidly to that result predicted for a Gaussian speckle field. Analytical results for the unwrapped phase indicate that this quantity transitions from a stationary process for one and two scatterers to a non-stationary process in the large scatterer limit. The nature of this transition is examined using numerical simulation for arbitrary scatterer number. Phase correlations are of consequence in various phase sensitive detection systems, and this paper examines both Gaussian and non-Gaussian fields

  11. Solid Particle Number Emission Factors of Euro VI Heavy-Duty Vehicles on the Road and in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giechaskiel, Barouch

    2018-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM), and in particular ultrafine particles, have a negative impact on human health. The contribution of vehicle PM emissions to air pollution is typically quantified with emission inventories, which need vehicle emission factors as input. Heavy-duty vehicles, although they represent a small percentage of the vehicle population in nearly every major country, contribute the majority of the on-road PM emissions. However, the published data of modern heavy-duty vehicle emissions are scarce, and for the newest Euro VI technologies, almost non-existent. The main objective of this paper is to present Solid Particle Number (SPN) emission factors from Euro VI heavy-duty vehicles using diesel, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), or Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). Urban, rural and motorway (highway) emissions were determined on the road at various European cities using SPN Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS). Additional tests on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer showed that the solid sub-23 nm fraction, which is not covered at the moment in the European regulation, is high, especially for CNG engines. The significant contribution of regeneration events and the effect of ambient temperature and engine cold-start on particle emissions were also discussed. PMID:29425174

  12. Solid Particle Number Emission Factors of Euro VI Heavy-Duty Vehicles on the Road and in the Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barouch Giechaskiel

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Particulate matter (PM, and in particular ultrafine particles, have a negative impact on human health. The contribution of vehicle PM emissions to air pollution is typically quantified with emission inventories, which need vehicle emission factors as input. Heavy-duty vehicles, although they represent a small percentage of the vehicle population in nearly every major country, contribute the majority of the on-road PM emissions. However, the published data of modern heavy-duty vehicle emissions are scarce, and for the newest Euro VI technologies, almost non-existent. The main objective of this paper is to present Solid Particle Number (SPN emission factors from Euro VI heavy-duty vehicles using diesel, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG, or Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG. Urban, rural and motorway (highway emissions were determined on the road at various European cities using SPN Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS. Additional tests on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer showed that the solid sub-23 nm fraction, which is not covered at the moment in the European regulation, is high, especially for CNG engines. The significant contribution of regeneration events and the effect of ambient temperature and engine cold-start on particle emissions were also discussed.

  13. Solid Particle Number Emission Factors of Euro VI Heavy-Duty Vehicles on the Road and in the Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giechaskiel, Barouch

    2018-02-09

    Particulate matter (PM), and in particular ultrafine particles, have a negative impact on human health. The contribution of vehicle PM emissions to air pollution is typically quantified with emission inventories, which need vehicle emission factors as input. Heavy-duty vehicles, although they represent a small percentage of the vehicle population in nearly every major country, contribute the majority of the on-road PM emissions. However, the published data of modern heavy-duty vehicle emissions are scarce, and for the newest Euro VI technologies, almost non-existent. The main objective of this paper is to present Solid Particle Number (SPN) emission factors from Euro VI heavy-duty vehicles using diesel, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), or Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). Urban, rural and motorway (highway) emissions were determined on the road at various European cities using SPN Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS). Additional tests on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer showed that the solid sub-23 nm fraction, which is not covered at the moment in the European regulation, is high, especially for CNG engines. The significant contribution of regeneration events and the effect of ambient temperature and engine cold-start on particle emissions were also discussed.

  14. Induced self-energy on a static scalar charged particle in the spacetime of a global monopole with finite core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, D; De Freitas, U; De Mello, E R Bezerra

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the induced self-energy and self-force on a scalar point-like charged test particle placed at rest in the spacetime of a global monopole admitting a general spherically symmetric inner structure to it. In order to develop this analysis we calculate the three-dimensional Green's function associated with this physical system. We explicitly show that for points outside the monopole's core the scalar self-energy presents two distinct contributions. The first one is induced by the non-trivial topology of the global monopole considered as a point-like defect and the second is a correction induced by the non-vanishing inner structure attributed to it. For points inside the monopole, the self-energy also present a similar structure, where now the first contribution depends on the geometry of the spacetime inside. As illustrations of the general procedure adopted, two specific models, namely flower-pot and the ballpoint-pen, are considered for the region inside. For these two different situations, we were able to obtain exact expressions for the self-energies and self-forces in the regions outside and inside the global monopole.

  15. Induced self-energy on a static scalar charged particle in the spacetime of a global monopole with finite core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, D; De Freitas, U; De Mello, E R Bezerra, E-mail: denis.barros@ifpb.edu.br, E-mail: umbelino@fisica.ufpb.br, E-mail: emello@fisica.ufpb.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da ParaIba, 58.800-970, Sousa, PB (Brazil)

    2011-03-21

    We analyze the induced self-energy and self-force on a scalar point-like charged test particle placed at rest in the spacetime of a global monopole admitting a general spherically symmetric inner structure to it. In order to develop this analysis we calculate the three-dimensional Green's function associated with this physical system. We explicitly show that for points outside the monopole's core the scalar self-energy presents two distinct contributions. The first one is induced by the non-trivial topology of the global monopole considered as a point-like defect and the second is a correction induced by the non-vanishing inner structure attributed to it. For points inside the monopole, the self-energy also present a similar structure, where now the first contribution depends on the geometry of the spacetime inside. As illustrations of the general procedure adopted, two specific models, namely flower-pot and the ballpoint-pen, are considered for the region inside. For these two different situations, we were able to obtain exact expressions for the self-energies and self-forces in the regions outside and inside the global monopole.

  16. Induced self-energy on a static scalar charged particle in the spacetime of a global monopole with finite core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Denis; Freitas, Umbelino; Mello, Eugenio Bezerra de [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Paraiba (IFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Universidade Federal da Paraiba (IFPB), PB (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Global monopoles are heavy spherically symmetric topological objects which may have been formed by the vacuum phase transition in the early universe after Planck time. Although the global monopole was first introduced by Sokolov and Starobinsky, its gravitational effects have been analyzed by Barriola and Vilenkin. We analyze the induced self-energy and self-force on a scalar point-like charged test particle placed at rest in the spacetime of a global monopole admitting a general spherically symmetric inner structure to it. In order to develop this analysis we calculate the three-dimensional Green function associated with this physical system. We explicitly show that for points outside the monopoles core the scalar self-energy presents two distinct contributions. The first one is induced by the non-trivial topology of the global monopole considered as a point-like defect and the second is a correction induced by the non-vanishing inner structure attributed to it. For points inside the monopole, the self-energy also present a similar structure, where now the first contribution depends on the geometry of the spacetime inside. As illustrations of the general procedure adopted, two specific models, namely flower-pot and the ball-point pen, are considered for the region inside. For these two different situations, we were able to obtain exact expressions for the self-energies and self-forces in the regions outside and inside the global monopole. (author)

  17. Induced self-energy on a static scalar charged particle in the spacetime of a global monopole with finite core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Denis; Freitas, Umbelino; Mello, Eugenio Bezerra de

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Global monopoles are heavy spherically symmetric topological objects which may have been formed by the vacuum phase transition in the early universe after Planck time. Although the global monopole was first introduced by Sokolov and Starobinsky, its gravitational effects have been analyzed by Barriola and Vilenkin. We analyze the induced self-energy and self-force on a scalar point-like charged test particle placed at rest in the spacetime of a global monopole admitting a general spherically symmetric inner structure to it. In order to develop this analysis we calculate the three-dimensional Green function associated with this physical system. We explicitly show that for points outside the monopoles core the scalar self-energy presents two distinct contributions. The first one is induced by the non-trivial topology of the global monopole considered as a point-like defect and the second is a correction induced by the non-vanishing inner structure attributed to it. For points inside the monopole, the self-energy also present a similar structure, where now the first contribution depends on the geometry of the spacetime inside. As illustrations of the general procedure adopted, two specific models, namely flower-pot and the ball-point pen, are considered for the region inside. For these two different situations, we were able to obtain exact expressions for the self-energies and self-forces in the regions outside and inside the global monopole. (author)

  18. Parallel Monte Carlo Particle Transport and the Quality of Random Number Generators: How Good is Good Enough?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procassini, R J; Beck, B R

    2004-01-01

    It might be assumed that use of a ''high-quality'' random number generator (RNG), producing a sequence of ''pseudo random'' numbers with a ''long'' repetition period, is crucial for producing unbiased results in Monte Carlo particle transport simulations. While several theoretical and empirical tests have been devised to check the quality (randomness and period) of an RNG, for many applications it is not clear what level of RNG quality is required to produce unbiased results. This paper explores the issue of RNG quality in the context of parallel, Monte Carlo transport simulations in order to determine how ''good'' is ''good enough''. This study employs the MERCURY Monte Carlo code, which incorporates the CNPRNG library for the generation of pseudo-random numbers via linear congruential generator (LCG) algorithms. The paper outlines the usage of random numbers during parallel MERCURY simulations, and then describes the source and criticality transport simulations which comprise the empirical basis of this study. A series of calculations for each test problem in which the quality of the RNG (period of the LCG) is varied provides the empirical basis for determining the minimum repetition period which may be employed without producing a bias in the mean integrated results

  19. Improved nano-particle tracking analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, John G

    2012-01-01

    Nano-particle tracking is a method to estimate a particle size distribution by tracking the movements of individual particles, using multiple images of particles moving under Brownian motion. A novel method to recover a particle size distribution from nano-particle tracking data is described. Unlike a simple histogram-based method, the method described is able to account for the finite number of steps in each particle track and consequently for the measurement uncertainty in the step-length data. Computer simulation and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the approach compared with the current method. (paper)

  20. Comparisons of Traffic-Related Ultrafine Particle Number Concentrations Measured in Two Urban Areas by Central, Residential, and Mobile Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Matthew C; Hudda, Neelakshi; Naumova, Elena N; Levy, Jonathan I; Brugge, Doug; Durant, John L

    2017-11-01

    Traffic-related ultrafine particles (UFP; monitoring strategies upon which the models are based have varied between studies. Our study compares particle number concentrations (PNC; a proxy for UFP) measured by three different monitoring approaches (central-site, short-term residential-site, and mobile on-road monitoring) in two study areas in metropolitan Boston (MA, USA). Our objectives were to quantify ambient PNC differences between the three monitoring platforms, compare the temporal patterns and the spatial heterogeneity of PNC between the monitoring platforms, and identify factors that affect correlations across the platforms. We collected >12,000 hours of measurements at the central sites, 1,000 hours of measurements at each of 20 residential sites in the two study areas, and >120 hours of mobile measurements over the course of ~1 year in each study area. Our results show differences between the monitoring strategies: mean one-minute PNC on-roads were higher (64,000 and 32,000 particles/cm 3 in Boston and Chelsea, respectively) compared to central-site measurements (23,000 and 19,000 particles/cm 3 ) and both were higher than at residences (14,000 and 15,000 particles/cm 3 ). Temporal correlations and spatial heterogeneity also differed between the platforms. Temporal correlations were generally highest between central and residential sites, and lowest between central-site and on-road measurements. We observed the greatest spatial heterogeneity across monitoring platforms during the morning rush hours (06:00-09:00) and the lowest during the overnight hours (18:00-06:00). Longer averaging times (days and hours vs. minutes) increased temporal correlations (Pearson correlations were 0.69 and 0.60 vs. 0.39 in Boston; 0.71 and 0.61 vs. 0.45 in Chelsea) and reduced spatial heterogeneity (coefficients of divergence were 0.24 and 0.29 vs. 0.33 in Boston; 0.20 and 0.27 vs. 0.31 in Chelsea). Our results suggest that combining stationary and mobile monitoring may lead

  1. Comparisons of traffic-related ultrafine particle number concentrations measured in two urban areas by central, residential, and mobile monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Matthew C.; Hudda, Neelakshi; Naumova, Elena N.; Levy, Jonathan I.; Brugge, Doug; Durant, John L.

    2017-11-01

    Traffic-related ultrafine particles (UFP; strategies upon which the models are based have varied between studies. Our study compares particle number concentrations (PNC; a proxy for UFP) measured by three different monitoring approaches (central-site, short-term residential-site, and mobile on-road monitoring) in two study areas in metropolitan Boston (MA, USA). Our objectives were to quantify ambient PNC differences between the three monitoring platforms, compare the temporal patterns and the spatial heterogeneity of PNC between the monitoring platforms, and identify factors that affect correlations across the platforms. We collected >12,000 h of measurements at the central sites, 1000 h of measurements at each of 20 residential sites in the two study areas, and >120 h of mobile measurements over the course of ∼1 year in each study area. Our results show differences between the monitoring strategies: mean 1 min PNC on-roads were higher (64,000 and 32,000 particles/cm3 in Boston and Chelsea, respectively) compared to central-site measurements (23,000 and 19,000 particles/cm3) and both were higher than at residences (14,000 and 15,000 particles/cm3). Temporal correlations and spatial heterogeneity also differed between the platforms. Temporal correlations were generally highest between central and residential sites, and lowest between central-site and on-road measurements. We observed the greatest spatial heterogeneity across monitoring platforms during the morning rush hours (06:00-09:00) and the lowest during the overnight hours (18:00-06:00). Longer averaging times (days and hours vs. minutes) increased temporal correlations (Pearson correlations were 0.69 and 0.60 vs. 0.39 in Boston; 0.71 and 0.61 vs. 0.45 in Chelsea) and reduced spatial heterogeneity (coefficients of divergence were 0.24 and 0.29 vs. 0.33 in Boston; 0.20 and 0.27 vs. 0.31 in Chelsea). Our results suggest that combining stationary and mobile monitoring may lead to improved characterization of

  2. Transfinite Numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    this is a characteristic difference between finite and infinite sets and created an immensely useful branch of mathematics based on this idea which had a great impact on the whole of mathe- matics. For example, the question of what is a number (finite or infinite) is almost a philosophical one. However Cantor's work turned it ...

  3. Aerosol number size distribution and new particle formation at a rural/coastal site in Pearl River Delta (PRD) of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shang; Hu, Min; Wu, Zhijun; Wehner, Birgit; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Cheng, Yafang

    Continuous measurements of aerosol number size distribution in the range of 3 nm-10 μm were performed in Pearl River Delta (PRD), China. These measurements were made during the period of 3 October to 5 November in 2004 at rural/coastal site, Xinken (22°37'N, 113°35'E, 6 m above sea level), in the south suburb of Guangzhou City (22°37'N, 113°35'E, 6 m above sea level), using a Twin Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS) combined with an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). The aerosol particles at Xinken were divided into four groups according to the observation results: nucleation mode particles (3-30 nm), Aitken mode particles (30-130 nm), accumulation mode particles (130-1000 nm) and coarse mode particles (1-10 μm). Concentrations of nucleation mode, Aitken mode and accumulation mode particles were observed in the same order of magnitude (about 10,000 cm -3), among which the concentration of Aitken mode particle was the highest. The Aitken mode particles usually had two peaks: the morning peak may be caused by the land-sea circulation, which is proven to be important for transporting aged aerosols back to the sampling site, while the noon peak was ascribed to the condensational growth of new particles. New particle formation events were found on 7 days of 27 days, the new particle growth rates ranged from 2.2 to 19.8 nm h -1 and the formation rates ranged from 0.5 to 5.2 cm -3 s -1, both of them were in the range of typical observed formation rates (0.01-10 cm -3 s -1) and typical particle growth rates (1-20 nm h -1). The sustained growth of the new particles for several hours under steady northeast wind indicated that the new particle formation events may occur in a large homogeneous air mass.

  4. A particle-number conserving microscopic approach to octupole deformation of normal deformed and superdeformed states in 194Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nhan Hao, T.V.; Phu Dat, D.H.; Hoang Tung, N.; Tran, H.N.

    2015-01-01

    The left–right asymmetric deformation of normal deformed (ND) and superdeformed (SD) states of 194 Pb has been investigated in the framework of the parity-symmetry projection of the highly truncated diagonalization approach (HTDA), which is suited to treat the correlations in an explicitly particle-number conserving microscopic approach. A Skyrme energy density functional using the SIII and SkM* interactions has been considered to treat the particle–hole channel, whereas a density-independent δ force has been adopted for the residual interaction. The obtained results are compared with previous approaches. The calculated octupole phonon excitation energy is found to be in good qualitative agreement with available data in the ND state. (author)

  5. Effects of DME mixing on number density and size properties of soot particles in counterflow non-premixed ethylene flames

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, J. H.; Choi, B. C.; Lee, S. M.; Chung, Suk-Ho; Jung, K. S.; Jeong, W. L.; Choi, S. K.; Park, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of DME mixing on the number density and size of soot particles, DME was mixed in a counter flow non-premixed ethylene flame with mixture ratios of 5%, 14% and 30%. A laser extinction/scattering technique has been adopted to measure the volume fraction, number density, and mean size of soot particles. The experimental results showed that the highest soot concentrations were observed for flames with mixture ratios of 5% and 14%; however, for a mixture ratio of 30% the soot concentration decreased. Numerical results showed that the concentrations of propargyl radicals (C3H3) at the 5% and 14% ratios were higher than those measured in the ethylene-based flame, and the production of benzene (C6H6) in the 5% and 14% DME mixture flames was also increased. This indicates the crucial role of propargyl in benzene ring formation. These reactions generally become stronger with increased DME mixing, except for A1- + H2 → A1 + H (-R554) and n-C4H5 + C2H2 → A1 + H (R542). Therefore, it is indicated that adding DME to ethylene flames promotes benzene ring formation. Note that although the maximum C6H6 concentration is largest in the 30% DME mixing flame, the soot volume fraction is smaller than those for the 5% and 14% mixture ratios. This is because the local C6H6 concentration decreases in the relatively low temperature region in the fuel side where soot growth occurs. © 2015, The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  6. Effects of DME mixing on number density and size properties of soot particles in counterflow non-premixed ethylene flames

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, J. H.

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the effect of DME mixing on the number density and size of soot particles, DME was mixed in a counter flow non-premixed ethylene flame with mixture ratios of 5%, 14% and 30%. A laser extinction/scattering technique has been adopted to measure the volume fraction, number density, and mean size of soot particles. The experimental results showed that the highest soot concentrations were observed for flames with mixture ratios of 5% and 14%; however, for a mixture ratio of 30% the soot concentration decreased. Numerical results showed that the concentrations of propargyl radicals (C3H3) at the 5% and 14% ratios were higher than those measured in the ethylene-based flame, and the production of benzene (C6H6) in the 5% and 14% DME mixture flames was also increased. This indicates the crucial role of propargyl in benzene ring formation. These reactions generally become stronger with increased DME mixing, except for A1- + H2 → A1 + H (-R554) and n-C4H5 + C2H2 → A1 + H (R542). Therefore, it is indicated that adding DME to ethylene flames promotes benzene ring formation. Note that although the maximum C6H6 concentration is largest in the 30% DME mixing flame, the soot volume fraction is smaller than those for the 5% and 14% mixture ratios. This is because the local C6H6 concentration decreases in the relatively low temperature region in the fuel side where soot growth occurs. © 2015, The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  7. Effect of meal composition on postprandial lipid concentrations and lipoprotein particle numbers: A randomized cross-over study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Shah

    Full Text Available It is unclear how high-protein (HP and high-monounsaturated fat (HMF meals affect postprandial blood lipids and lipoprotein particle numbers (LPN.To compare a HP versus a HMF meal on postprandial lipid and LPN responses.Twenty-four participants (age: 36.3±15.0 years; body mass index: 23.6±2.0 kg/m2; 45.8% female were fed a HP (31.9% energy from protein and a HMF (35.2% fat and 20.7% monounsaturated fat meal in a randomized cross-over trial design. Energy and carbohydrate content were the same across meals. Blood samples were drawn in the fasting state and 3 hour postprandial state, and assessed for lipids and LPN.Repeated measures analysis showed a significant (p<0.05 treatment by time interaction effect for triglycerides (TG, the primary variable, total high-density lipoprotein particles (T-HDLP and T-HDLP minus large-buoyant high-density lipoprotein 2b (T-HDLP-LB-HDL2b. HP versus HMF condition led to significantly lower TG at 120 (geometric mean: 90.1 (95% confidence interval (CI: 76.4-106.3 vs. 146.5 (124.2-172.9 mg/dL and 180 (101.4 (83.1-123.8 vs. 148.7 (121.9-181.4 mg/dL min and higher T-HDLP at 120 (mean difference: 297.3 (95% CI: 48.6-545.9 nmol/L and 180 (291.6 (15.8-567.5 nmol/L min. The difference in T-HDLP by condition was due to the significantly higher small-dense HDLP (T-HDLP-LB-HDL2b during HP versus HMF condition at 120 (mean difference: 452.6 (95% CI: 177.4-727.9 nmol/L and 180 (496.8 (263.1-730.6 nmol/L min. Area under the curve analysis showed that HP versus HMF condition led to significantly lower TG, non-HDLP, and very-low-density lipoprotein particles (VLDLP responses but significantly less favorable responses in LB-HDL2b particles, T-HDLP-LB-HDL2b, and LB-HDL2b/T-HDLP ratio.The HP meal led to lower TG, non-HDLP, and VLDLP but less favorable LB-HDL2b, small-dense HDLP, and LB-HDL2b/T-HDLP ratio responses versus a HMF meal. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings over multiple meals.

  8. Simultaneous measurements of particle number size distributions at ground level and 260 m on a meteorological tower in urban Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Yuying; Zhang, Yingjie; Wang, Qingqing; Xu, Weiqi; Chen, Chen; Han, Tingting; Zhang, Fang; Li, Zhanqing; Fu, Pingqing; Li, Jie; Wang, Zifa; Sun, Yele

    2017-06-01

    Despite extensive studies into the characterization of particle number size distributions at ground level, real-time measurements above the urban canopy in the megacity of Beijing have never been performed to date. Here we conducted the first simultaneous measurements of size-resolved particle number concentrations at ground level and 260 m in urban Beijing from 22 August to 30 September. Our results showed overall similar temporal variations in number size distributions between ground level and 260 m, yet periods with significant differences were also observed. Particularly, accumulation-mode particles were highly correlated (r2 = 0. 85) at the two heights, while Aitken-mode particles presented more differences. Detailed analysis suggests that the vertical differences in number concentrations strongly depended on particle size, and particles with a mobility diameter between 100 and 200 nm generally showed higher concentrations at higher altitudes. Particle growth rates and condensation sinks were also calculated, which were 3.2 and 3.6 nm h-1, and 2.8 × 10-2 and 2.9 × 10-2 s-1, at ground level and 260 m, respectively. By linking particle growth with aerosol composition, we found that organics appeared to play an important role in the early stage of the growth (09:00-12:00 LT) while sulfate was also important during the later period. Positive matrix factorization of size-resolved number concentrations identified three common sources at ground level and 260 m, including a factor associated with new particle formation and growth events (NPEs), and two secondary factors that represent photochemical processing and regional transport. Cooking emission was found to have a large contribution to small particles and showed much higher concentration at ground level than 260 m in the evening. These results imply that investigation of NPEs at ground level in megacities needs to consider the influences of local cooking emissions. The impacts of regional emission controls on

  9. Evaluation of solid particle number and black carbon for very low particulate matter emissions standards in light-duty vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M-C Oliver; Shields, J Erin

    2017-06-01

    To reliably measure at the low particulate matter (PM) levels needed to meet California's Low Emission Vehicle (LEV III) 3- and 1-mg/mile particulate matter (PM) standards, various approaches other than gravimetric measurement have been suggested for testing purposes. In this work, a feasibility study of solid particle number (SPN, d50 = 23 nm) and black carbon (BC) as alternatives to gravimetric PM mass was conducted, based on the relationship of these two metrics to gravimetric PM mass, as well as the variability of each of these metrics. More than 150 Federal Test Procedure (FTP-75) or Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (US06) tests were conducted on 46 light-duty vehicles, including port-fuel-injected and direct-injected gasoline vehicles, as well as several light-duty diesel vehicles equipped with diesel particle filters (LDD/DPF). For FTP tests, emission variability of gravimetric PM mass was found to be slightly less than that of either SPN or BC, whereas the opposite was observed for US06 tests. Emission variability of PM mass for LDD/DPF was higher than that of both SPN and BC, primarily because of higher PM mass measurement uncertainties (background and precision) near or below 0.1 mg/mile. While strong correlations were observed from both SPN and BC to PM mass, the slopes are dependent on engine technologies and driving cycles, and the proportionality between the metrics can vary over the course of the test. Replacement of the LEV III PM mass emission standard with one other measurement metric may imperil the effectiveness of emission reduction, as a correlation-based relationship may evolve over future technologies for meeting stringent greenhouse standards. Solid particle number and black carbon were suggested in place of PM mass for the California LEV III 1-mg/mile FTP standard. Their equivalence, proportionality, and emission variability in comparison to PM mass, based on a large light-duty vehicle fleet examined, are dependent on engine

  10. Number Size Distribution of Ambient Particles in a Typical Urban Site: The First Polish Assessment Based on Long-Term (9 Months Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Klejnowski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents results from the long-term measurements of particle number carried out at an urban background station in Zabrze, Poland. Ambient particles with aerodynamic diameters of between 28 nm and 10 μm were investigated by means of a DEKATI thirteen-stage electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI. The particle number-size distribution was bimodal, whilst its density function had the local maxima in the aerodynamic diameter intervals 0.056–0.095 μm and 0.157–0.263 μm. The average particle number in winter was nearly twice as high as in summer. The greatest number concentrations in winter were those of the particles with diameters of between 0.617 and 2.41 μm, that is, the anthropogenic particles from fossil fuel combustion. Approximately 99% of the particles observed in Zabrze had aerodynamic diameters ≤1 μm—they may have originated from the combustion of biomass, liquid, and gaseous fuels in domestic stoves or in car engines. The daily variation of particle number was similar for both seasons—the highest values were observed in the morning (traffic rush hour and in the afternoon/late evening (traffic and house heating emissions. An additional maximum (0.028–0.056 μm observed in the early afternoon in summer was due to the intensive formation of new PM particles from gas precursors.

  11. Nanoparticle filtration performance of NIOSH-certified particulate air-purifying filtering facepiece respirators: evaluation by light scattering photometric and particle number-based test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengasamy, Samy; Eimer, Benjamin C

    2012-01-01

    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certification test methods employ charge neutralized NaCl or dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols to measure filter penetration levels of air-purifying particulate respirators photometrically using a TSI 8130 automated filter tester at 85 L/min. A previous study in our laboratory found that widely different filter penetration levels were measured for nanoparticles depending on whether a particle number (count)-based detector or a photometric detector was used. The purpose of this study was to better understand the influence of key test parameters, including filter media type, challenge aerosol size range, and detector system. Initial penetration levels for 17 models of NIOSH-approved N-, R-, and P-series filtering facepiece respirators were measured using the TSI 8130 photometric method and compared with the particle number-based penetration (obtained using two ultrafine condensation particle counters) for the same challenge aerosols generated by the TSI 8130. In general, the penetration obtained by the photometric method was less than the penetration obtained with the number-based method. Filter penetration was also measured for ambient room aerosols. Penetration measured by the TSI 8130 photometric method was lower than the number-based ambient aerosol penetration values. Number-based monodisperse NaCl aerosol penetration measurements showed that the most penetrating particle size was in the 50 nm range for all respirator models tested, with the exception of one model at ~200 nm size. Respirator models containing electrostatic filter media also showed lower penetration values with the TSI 8130 photometric method than the number-based penetration obtained for the most penetrating monodisperse particles. Results suggest that to provide a more challenging respirator filter test method than what is currently used for respirators containing electrostatic media, the test method should utilize a sufficient number

  12. Finite fields and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mullen, Gary L

    2007-01-01

    This book provides a brief and accessible introduction to the theory of finite fields and to some of their many fascinating and practical applications. The first chapter is devoted to the theory of finite fields. After covering their construction and elementary properties, the authors discuss the trace and norm functions, bases for finite fields, and properties of polynomials over finite fields. Each of the remaining chapters details applications. Chapter 2 deals with combinatorial topics such as the construction of sets of orthogonal latin squares, affine and projective planes, block designs, and Hadamard matrices. Chapters 3 and 4 provide a number of constructions and basic properties of error-correcting codes and cryptographic systems using finite fields. Each chapter includes a set of exercises of varying levels of difficulty which help to further explain and motivate the material. Appendix A provides a brief review of the basic number theory and abstract algebra used in the text, as well as exercises rel...

  13. The classification of the finite simple groups, number 7 part III, chapters 7-11 the generic case, stages 3b and 4a

    CERN Document Server

    Gorenstein, Daniel; Solomon, Ronald

    2018-01-01

    The classification of finite simple groups is a landmark result of modern mathematics. The multipart series of monographs which is being published by the AMS (Volume 40.1-40.7 and future volumes) represents the culmination of a century-long project involving the efforts of scores of mathematicians published in hundreds of journal articles, books, and doctoral theses, totaling an estimated 15,000 pages. This part 7 of the series is the middle of a trilogy (Volume 40.5, Volume 40.7, and forthcoming Volume 40.8) treating the Generic Case, i.e., the identification of the alternating groups of degree at least 13 and most of the finite simple groups of Lie type and Lie rank at least 4. Moreover, Volumes 40.4-40.8 of this series will provide a complete treatment of the simple groups of odd type, i.e., the alternating groups (with two exceptions) and the groups of Lie type defined over a finite field of odd order, as well as some of the sporadic simple groups. In particular, this volume completes the construction, be...

  14. Nature of Atmospheric Aerosols over the Desert Areas in the Asian Continent: Chemical State and Number Concentration of Particles Measured at Dunhuang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaka, Y.; Shi, G.-Y.; Shen, Z.; Kim, Y. S.; Trochkine, D.; Matsuki, A.; Zhang, D.; Shibata, T.; Nagatani, M.; Nakata, H.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of aerosol were made in August and October 2001, and January 2002, at Dunhuang, China (40 o 00'N, 94 o 30'E), to understand the nature of atmospheric particles over the desert areas in the Asian continent. Balloon-borne measurements with an optical particle counter suggested that particle size and concentration had a noticeable peak in size range of super micron in not only the boundary mixing layer but also the free troposphere. Thickness of the boundary mixing layer, from distributions of particle concentration, was about 4 km in summer (17 August 2001), about2.5 km in fall (17 October 2001), and about 3 km in winter (11 January 2002), which suggest active mixing of particles near the boundary in summer. Number-size distribution of particle showed a noticeable peak in the super micron particles size range in the mixing boundary layer: 0.4-2 particles cm -3 at diameter>1.2 μm in summer, 0.05-4 particles cm -3 at diameter >1.2 μm in fall, and 0.1-5 particles cm -3 at diameter>1.2 μm in winter. In winter strong inversion of atmospheric temperature was found in the height range from the boundary to about 3 km and vertical distribution of particle concentration well corresponded with the temperature distribution. Chemical elements of individual aerosols, which were collected in the boundary layer atmosphere at Dunhuang (18 October 2001) were analyzed with an electron microscope equipped with EDX. Those single particle analysis suggested that most of the particles with supermicron size were soil particles, and those particles had little sulfate on its surface. This is a very important different point,comparing with the chemical state of soil particles, which were transported from the desert area of China to Japan, and showed frequently the existence of sulfate on the particle surface. Therefore, it is strongly suggested that dust particles can be chemically modified during their long-range transport from desert areas to Japan

  15. Study on Sumbawa gold ore liberation using rod mill: effect of rod-number and rotational speed on particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetya, A.; Mawadati, A.; Putri, A. M. R.; Petrus, H. T. B. M.

    2018-01-01

    Comminution is one of crucial steps in gold ore processing used to liberate the valuable minerals from gaunge mineral. This research is done to find the particle size distribution of gold ore after it has been treated through the comminution process in a rod mill with various number of rod and rotational speed that will results in one optimum milling condition. For the initial step, Sumbawa gold ore was crushed and then sieved to pass the 2.5 mesh and retained on the 5 mesh (this condition was taken to mimic real application in artisanal gold mining). Inserting the prepared sample into the rod mill, the observation on effect of rod-number and rotational speed was then conducted by variating the rod number of 7 and 10 while the rotational speed was varied from 60, 85, and 110 rpm. In order to be able to provide estimation on particle distribution of every condition, the comminution kinetic was applied by taking sample at 15, 30, 60, and 120 minutes for size distribution analysis. The change of particle distribution of top and bottom product as time series was then treated using Rosin-Rammler distribution equation. The result shows that the homogenity of particle size and particle size distribution is affected by rod-number and rotational speed. The particle size distribution is more homogeneous by increasing of milling time, regardless of rod-number and rotational speed. Mean size of particles do not change significantly after 60 minutes milling time. Experimental results showed that the optimum condition was achieved at rotational speed of 85 rpm, using rod-number of 7.

  16. On-board measurement of particle numbers and their size distribution from a light-duty diesel vehicle: Influences of VSP and altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Ge, Yunshan; Wang, Xin; Hao, Lijun; Tan, Jianwei; Peng, Zihang; Zhang, Chuanzhen; Gong, Huiming; Huang, Ying

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the particle size-resolved distribution from a China-3 certificated light-duty diesel vehicle was measured by using a portable emission measurement system (PEMS). In order to examine the influences of vehicle specific power (VSP) and high-altitude operation, measurements were conducted at 8 constant speeds, which ranged from 10 to 80km/hr at 10km/hr intervals, and two different high altitudes, namely 2200 and 3200m. The results demonstrated that the numbers of particles in all size ranges decreased significantly as VSP increased when the test vehicle was running at lower speeds (vehicle resulted in increased particle number emissions at low and high driving speeds; however, particle numbers obtained at moderate speeds decreased as altitude rose. When the test vehicle was running at moderate speeds, particle numbers measured at the two altitudes were very close, except for comparatively higher number concentrations of nanoparticles measured at 2200m. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Evaluation and modelling of the size fractionated aerosol particle number concentration measurements nearby a major road in Helsinki - Part I: Modelling results within the LIPIKA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjola, M. A.; Pirjola, L.; Karppinen, A.; Härkönen, J.; Korhonen, H.; Hussein, T.; Ketzel, M.; Kukkonen, J.

    2007-08-01

    A field measurement campaign was conducted near a major road "Itäväylä" in an urban area in Helsinki in 17-20 February 2003. Aerosol measurements were conducted using a mobile laboratory "Sniffer" at various distances from the road, and at an urban background location. Measurements included particle size distribution in the size range of 7 nm-10 μm (aerodynamic diameter) by the Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) and in the size range of 3-50 nm (mobility diameter) by Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), total number concentration of particles larger than 3 nm detected by an ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC), temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, driving route of the mobile laboratory, and traffic density on the studied road. In this study, we have compared measured concentration data with the predictions of the road network dispersion model CAR-FMI used in combination with an aerosol process model MONO32. For model comparison purposes, one of the cases was additionally computed using the aerosol process model UHMA, combined with the CAR-FMI model. The vehicular exhaust emissions, and atmospheric dispersion and transformation of fine and ultrafine particles was evaluated within the distance scale of 200 m (corresponding to a time scale of a couple of minutes). We computed the temporal evolution of the number concentrations, size distributions and chemical compositions of various particle size classes. The atmospheric dilution rate of particles is obtained from the roadside dispersion model CAR-FMI. Considering the evolution of total number concentration, dilution was shown to be the most important process. The influence of coagulation and condensation on the number concentrations of particle size modes was found to be negligible on this distance scale. Condensation was found to affect the evolution of particle diameter in the two smallest particle modes. The assumed value of the concentration of condensable organic

  18. Evaluation and modelling of the size fractionated aerosol particle number concentration measurements nearby a major road in Helsinki ─ Part I: Modelling results within the LIPIKA project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ketzel

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A field measurement campaign was conducted near a major road "Itäväylä" in an urban area in Helsinki in 17–20 February 2003. Aerosol measurements were conducted using a mobile laboratory "Sniffer" at various distances from the road, and at an urban background location. Measurements included particle size distribution in the size range of 7 nm–10 μm (aerodynamic diameter by the Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI and in the size range of 3–50 nm (mobility diameter by Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS, total number concentration of particles larger than 3 nm detected by an ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC, temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, driving route of the mobile laboratory, and traffic density on the studied road. In this study, we have compared measured concentration data with the predictions of the road network dispersion model CAR-FMI used in combination with an aerosol process model MONO32. For model comparison purposes, one of the cases was additionally computed using the aerosol process model UHMA, combined with the CAR-FMI model. The vehicular exhaust emissions, and atmospheric dispersion and transformation of fine and ultrafine particles was evaluated within the distance scale of 200 m (corresponding to a time scale of a couple of minutes. We computed the temporal evolution of the number concentrations, size distributions and chemical compositions of various particle size classes. The atmospheric dilution rate of particles is obtained from the roadside dispersion model CAR-FMI. Considering the evolution of total number concentration, dilution was shown to be the most important process. The influence of coagulation and condensation on the number concentrations of particle size modes was found to be negligible on this distance scale. Condensation was found to affect the evolution of particle diameter in the two smallest particle modes. The assumed value of the concentration of

  19. New considerations for PM, Black Carbon and particle number concentration for air quality monitoring across different European cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Reche

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In many large cities of Europe standard air quality limit values of particulate matter (PM are exceeded. Emissions from road traffic and biomass burning are frequently reported to be the major causes. As a consequence of these exceedances a large number of air quality plans, most of them focusing on traffic emissions reductions, have been implemented in the last decade. In spite of this implementation, a number of cities did not record a decrease of PM levels. Thus, is the efficiency of air quality plans overestimated? Do the road traffic emissions contribute less than expected to ambient air PM levels in urban areas? Or do we need a more specific metric to evaluate the impact of the above emissions on the levels of urban aerosols?

    This study shows the results of the interpretation of the 2009 variability of levels of PM, Black Carbon (BC, aerosol number concentration (N and a number of gaseous pollutants in seven selected urban areas covering road traffic, urban background, urban-industrial, and urban-shipping environments from southern, central and northern Europe.

    The results showed that variations of PM and N levels do not always reflect the variation of the impact of road traffic emissions on urban aerosols. However, BC levels vary proportionally with those of traffic related gaseous pollutants, such as CO, NO2 and NO. Due to this high correlation, one may suppose that monitoring the levels of these gaseous pollutants would be enough to extrapolate exposure to traffic-derived BC levels. However, the BC/CO, BC/NO2 and BC/NO ratios vary widely among the cities studied, as a function of distance to traffic emissions, vehicle fleet composition and the influence of other emission sources such as biomass burning. Thus, levels of BC should be measured at air quality monitoring sites.

    During morning traffic rush hours, a narrow variation in the N/BC ratio was evidenced, but a wide variation of

  20. Influence of isovector pairing and particle-number projection effects on spectroscopic factors for one-pair like-particle transfer reactions in proton-rich even-even nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbouzid, Y.; Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Oudih, M. R.

    2018-04-01

    Isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing and particle-number fluctuation effects on the spectroscopic factors (SF) corresponding to one-pair like-particle transfer reactions in proton-rich even-even nuclei are studied. With this aim, expressions of the SF corresponding to two-neutron stripping and two-proton pick-up reactions, which take into account the isovector np pairing effect, are established within the generalized BCS approach, using a schematic definition proposed by Chasman. Expressions of the same SF which strictly conserve the particle number are also established within the Sharp-BCS (SBCS) discrete projection method. In both cases, it is shown that these expressions generalize those obtained when only the pairing between like particles is considered. First, the formalism is tested within the Richardson schematic model. Second, it is applied to study even-even proton-rich nuclei using the single-particle energies of a Woods-Saxon mean-field. In both cases, it is shown that the np pairing effect and the particle-number projection effect on the SF values are important, particularly in N = Z nuclei, and must then be taken into account.

  1. Seasonal variation of atmospheric particle number concentrations, new particle formation and atmospheric oxidation capacity at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Quynh T.; Glasius, Marianne; Sørensen, Lise L.

    2016-01-01

    mode was observed during the darker months from October until mid-May, which became considerably more pronounced during the prominent Arctic haze months from March to mid-May. In contrast, nucleation- and Aitken-mode particles were predominantly observed during the summer months. Analysis of wind...

  2. Finite groups and quantum physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornyak, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    Concepts of quantum theory are considered from the constructive “finite” point of view. The introduction of a continuum or other actual infinities in physics destroys constructiveness without any need for them in describing empirical observations. It is shown that quantum behavior is a natural consequence of symmetries of dynamical systems. The underlying reason is that it is impossible in principle to trace the identity of indistinguishable objects in their evolution—only information about invariant statements and values concerning such objects is available. General mathematical arguments indicate that any quantum dynamics is reducible to a sequence of permutations. Quantum phenomena, such as interference, arise in invariant subspaces of permutation representations of the symmetry group of a dynamical system. Observable quantities can be expressed in terms of permutation invariants. It is shown that nonconstructive number systems, such as complex numbers, are not needed for describing quantum phenomena. It is sufficient to employ cyclotomic numbers—a minimal extension of natural numbers that is appropriate for quantum mechanics. The use of finite groups in physics, which underlies the present approach, has an additional motivation. Numerous experiments and observations in the particle physics suggest the importance of finite groups of relatively small orders in some fundamental processes. The origin of these groups is unclear within the currently accepted theories—in particular, within the Standard Model.

  3. Estimation of aerosol particle number distribution with Kalman Filtering – Part 2: Simultaneous use of DMPS, APS and nephelometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Viskari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Extended Kalman Filter (EKF is used to estimate particle size distributions from observations. The focus here is on the practical application of EKF to simultaneously merge information from different types of experimental instruments. Every 10 min, the prior state estimate is updated with size-segregating measurements from Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (DMPS and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS as well as integrating measurements from a nephelometer. Error covariances are approximate in our EKF implementation. The observation operator assumes a constant particle density and refractive index. The state estimates are compared to particle size distributions that are a composite of DMPS and APS measurements. The impact of each instrument on the size distribution estimate is studied. Kalman Filtering of DMPS and APS yielded a temporally consistent state estimate. This state estimate is continuous over the overlapping size range of DMPS and APS. Inclusion of the integrating measurements further reduces the effect of measurement noise. Even with the present approximations, EKF is shown to be a very promising method to estimate particle size distribution with observations from different types of instruments.

  4. Uncertainty in particle number modal analysis during transient operation of compressed natural gas, diesel, and trap-equipped diesel transit buses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmén, Britt A; Qu, Yingge

    2004-04-15

    The relationships between transient vehicle operation and ultrafine particle emissions are not well-known, especially for low-emission alternative bus technologies such as compressed natural gas (CNG) and diesel buses equipped with particulate filters/traps (TRAP). In this study, real-time particle number concentrations measured on a nominal 5 s average basis using an electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) for these two bus technologies are compared to that of a baseline catalyst-equipped diesel bus operated on ultralow sulfur fuel (BASE) using dynamometer testing. Particle emissions were consistently 2 orders of magnitude lower for the CNG and TRAP compared to BASE on all driving cycles. Time-resolved total particle numbers were examined in terms of sampling factors identified as affecting the ability of ELPI to quantify the particulate matter number emissions for low-emitting vehicles such as CNG and TRAP as a function of vehicle driving mode. Key factors were instrument sensitivity and dilution ratio, alignment of particle and vehicle operating data, sampling train background particles, and cycle-to-cycle variability due to vehicle, engine, after-treatment, or driver behavior. In-cycle variability on the central business district (CBD) cycle was highest for the TRAP configuration, but this could not be attributed to the ELPI sensitivity issues observed for TRAP-IDLE measurements. Elevated TRAP emissions coincided with low exhaust temperature, suggesting on-road real-world particulate filter performance can be evaluated by monitoring exhaust temperature. Nonunique particle emission maps indicate that measures other than vehicle speed and acceleration are necessary to model disaggregated real-time particle emissions. Further testing on a wide variety of test cycles is needed to evaluate the relative importance of the time history of vehicle operation and the hysteresis of the sampling train/dilution tunnel on ultrafine particle emissions. Future studies should

  5. Effects of biodiesel, engine load and diesel particulate filter on nonvolatile particle number size distributions in heavy-duty diesel engine exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Li-Hao; Liou, Yi-Jyun; Cheng, Man-Ting; Lu, Jau-Huai; Yang, Hsi-Hsien; Tsai, Ying I; Wang, Lin-Chi; Chen, Chung-Bang; Lai, Jim-Shoung

    2012-01-15

    Diesel engine exhaust contains large numbers of submicrometer particles that degrade air quality and human health. This study examines the number emission characteristics of 10-1000 nm nonvolatile particles from a heavy-duty diesel engine, operating with various waste cooking oil biodiesel blends (B2, B10 and B20), engine loads (0%, 25%, 50% and 75%) and a diesel oxidation catalyst plus diesel particulate filter (DOC+DPF) under steady modes. For a given load, the total particle number concentrations (N(TOT)) decrease slightly, while the mode diameters show negligible changes with increasing biodiesel blends. For a given biodiesel blend, both the N(TOT) and mode diameters increase modestly with increasing load of above 25%. The N(TOT) at idle are highest and their size distributions are strongly affected by condensation and possible nucleation of semivolatile materials. Nonvolatile cores of diameters less than 16 nm are only observed at idle mode. The DOC+DPF shows remarkable filtration efficiency for both the core and soot particles, irrespective of the biodiesel blend and engine load under study. The N(TOT) post the DOC+DPF are comparable to typical ambient levels of ≈ 10(4)cm(-3). This implies that, without concurrent reductions of semivolatile materials, the formation of semivolatile nucleation mode particles post the after treatment is highly favored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of biodiesel, engine load and diesel particulate filter on nonvolatile particle number size distributions in heavy-duty diesel engine exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Li-Hao, E-mail: lhy@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Occupational Safety and Health, China Medical University, 91, Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Liou, Yi-Jyun [Department of Occupational Safety and Health, China Medical University, 91, Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Man-Ting [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250, Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40254, Taiwan (China); Lu, Jau-Huai [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250, Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40254, Taiwan (China); Yang, Hsi-Hsien [Department of Environmental Engineering and Management, Chaoyang University of Technology, 168, Jifeng E. Road, Taichung 41349, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ying I. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Science, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, 60, Sec. 1, Erh-Jen Road, Tainan 71710, Taiwan (China); Wang, Lin-Chi [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Cheng Shiu University, 840, Chengcing Road, Kaohsiung 83347, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chung-Bang [Fuel Quality and Engine Performance Research, Refining and Manufacturing Research Institute, Chinese Petroleum Corporation, 217, Minsheng S. Road, Chiayi 60036, Taiwan (China); Lai, Jim-Shoung [Department of Occupational Safety and Health, China Medical University, 91, Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of waste cooking oil biodiesel, engine load and DOC + DPF on nonvolatile particle size distributions in HDDE exhaust. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing biodiesel blends cause slight decreases in the total particle number concentrations and negligible changes in size distributions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing load results in modest increases in both the total particle number concentrations and sizes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of semivolatile materials are strongest at idle, during which nonvolatile cores <16 nm were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The DOC + DPF shows remarkable filtration efficiency for both the core and soot particles, irrespective of biodiesel blend and load. - Abstract: Diesel engine exhaust contains large numbers of submicrometer particles that degrade air quality and human health. This study examines the number emission characteristics of 10-1000 nm nonvolatile particles from a heavy-duty diesel engine, operating with various waste cooking oil biodiesel blends (B2, B10 and B20), engine loads (0%, 25%, 50% and 75%) and a diesel oxidation catalyst plus diesel particulate filter (DOC + DPF) under steady modes. For a given load, the total particle number concentrations (N{sub TOT}) decrease slightly, while the mode diameters show negligible changes with increasing biodiesel blends. For a given biodiesel blend, both the N{sub TOT} and mode diameters increase modestly with increasing load of above 25%. The N{sub TOT} at idle are highest and their size distributions are strongly affected by condensation and possible nucleation of semivolatile materials. Nonvolatile cores of diameters less than 16 nm are only observed at idle mode. The DOC + DPF shows remarkable filtration efficiency for both the core and soot particles, irrespective of the biodiesel blend and engine load under study. The N{sub TOT} post the DOC + DPF are comparable to typical ambient levels of

  7. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS.Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu*, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, ...

  8. A non-conformal finite element/finite volume scheme for the non-structured grid-based approximation of low Mach number flows; Un schema elements finis non-conformes/volumes finis pour l'approximation en maillages non-structures des ecoulements a faible nombre de Mach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansanay-Alex, G.

    2009-06-17

    The development of simulation codes aimed at a precise simulation of fires requires a precise approach of flame front phenomena by using very fine grids. The need to take different spatial scale into consideration leads to a local grid refinement and to a discretization with homogeneous grid for computing time and memory purposes. The author reports the approximation of the non-linear convection term, the scalar advection-diffusion in finite volumes, numerical simulations of a flow in a bent tube, of a three-dimensional laminar flame and of a low Mach number an-isotherm flow. Non conformal finite elements are also presented (Rannacher-Turek and Crouzeix-Raviart elements)

  9. Comparison of vortex-element and finite-volume simulations of low Reynolds number flow over a confined backward-facing step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, R.W.; Fonty, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a novel vortex element method for simulating incompressible laminar flow over a two-dimensional backward-facing step. The model employs an operator-splitting technique to compute the evolution of the vorticity field downstream of abrupt changes in flow geometry. During the advective stage of the computation, a semi-Lagrangian scheme is used to update the positions of the vortex elements, whilst an analytical diffusion algorithm employing Oseen vortices is implemented during the diffusive time step. Redistributing the vorticity analytically instead of using the more traditional random-walk method enables the numerical model to simulate steady flows directly and avoids the need to filter the results to remove the oscillations created by the random-walk procedure. Model validation has been achieved by comparing the length of the recirculating eddy behind a confined backward-facing step against data from experimental and alternative numerical investigations. In addition, results from the vortex element method are compared against predictions obtained using the commercial finite-volume computational fluid dynamics code, CFD-ACE+. The results show that the vortex element scheme marginally overpredicts the length of the downstream recirculating eddy, implying that the method may be associated with an artificial reduction in the vorticity diffusion rate. Nevertheless the results demonstrate that the proposed vortex redistribution scheme provides a practical alternative to traditional random-walk discrete vortex algorithms. (author)

  10. Effects of biodiesel, engine load and diesel particulate filter on nonvolatile particle number size distributions in heavy-duty diesel engine exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Li-Hao; Liou, Yi-Jyun; Cheng, Man-Ting; Lu, Jau-Huai; Yang, Hsi-Hsien; Tsai, Ying I.; Wang, Lin-Chi; Chen, Chung-Bang; Lai, Jim-Shoung

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The effects of waste cooking oil biodiesel, engine load and DOC + DPF on nonvolatile particle size distributions in HDDE exhaust. ► Increasing biodiesel blends cause slight decreases in the total particle number concentrations and negligible changes in size distributions. ► Increasing load results in modest increases in both the total particle number concentrations and sizes. ► The effects of semivolatile materials are strongest at idle, during which nonvolatile cores TOT ) decrease slightly, while the mode diameters show negligible changes with increasing biodiesel blends. For a given biodiesel blend, both the N TOT and mode diameters increase modestly with increasing load of above 25%. The N TOT at idle are highest and their size distributions are strongly affected by condensation and possible nucleation of semivolatile materials. Nonvolatile cores of diameters less than 16 nm are only observed at idle mode. The DOC + DPF shows remarkable filtration efficiency for both the core and soot particles, irrespective of the biodiesel blend and engine load under study. The N TOT post the DOC + DPF are comparable to typical ambient levels of ∼10 4 cm −3 . This implies that, without concurrent reductions of semivolatile materials, the formation of semivolatile nucleation mode particles post the aftertreatment is highly favored.

  11. Variation of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions at the urban and downwind regional sites in the Pearl River Delta during summertime pollution episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, D. L.; Hu, M.; Wu, Z. J.; Guo, S.; Wen, M. T.; Nowak, A.; Wehner, B.; Wiedensohler, A.; Takegawa, N.; Kondo, Y.; Wang, X. S.; Li, Y. P.; Zeng, L. M.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2010-10-01

    In order to characterize the features of particulate pollution in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) in the summer, continuous measurements of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions were simultaneously performed at Guangzhou urban site (GZ) and Back-garden downwind regional site (BG) in July 2006. Particle number concentration from 20 nm to 10 μm at BG was (1.7±0.8)×104 cm-3, about 40% lower than that at GZ, (2.9±1.1)×104 cm-3. The total particle volume concentration at BG was 94±34 μm3 cm-3, similar to that at GZ, 96±43 μm3 cm-3. More 20-100 nm particles, significantly affected by the traffic emissions, were observed at GZ, while 100-660 nm particle number concentrations were similar at both sites as they are more regional. PM2.5 values were similar at GZ (69±43 μg m-3) and BG (69±58 μg m-3) with R2 of 0.71 for the daily average PM2.5 at these two sites, indicating the fine particulate pollution in the PRD region to be regional. Two kinds of pollution episodes, the accumulation pollution episode and the regional transport pollution episode, were observed. Fine particles over 100 nm dominated both number and volume concentrations of total particles during the late periods of these pollution episodes. Accumulation and secondary transformation are the main reasons for the nighttime accumulation pollution episode. SO42-, NO3- accounted for about 60% in 100-660 nm particle mass and PM2.5 increase. When south or southeast wind prevailed in the PRD region, regional transport of pollutants took place. Regional transport contributed about 30% to fine particulate pollution at BG during a regional transport case. Secondary transformation played an important role during regional transport, causing higher increase rates of secondary ions in PM1.0 than other species and shifting the peaks of sulfate and ammonium mass size distributions to larger sizes. SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+ accounted for about 70% and 40% of PM1.0 and PM2.5, respectively.

  12. Size distribution and total number concentration of ultrafine and accumulation mode particles and hospital admissions in children and the elderly in Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Wåhlin, Peter; Raaschou-Nielsen, O

    2008-01-01

    (15 May 2001 to 31 December 2004) and hospital admissions due to cardiovascular (CVD) and respiratory disease (RD) in the elderly (age >or=65 years), and due to asthma in children (age 5-18 years). We examined these associations in the presence of PM(10), PM(2.5) (particulate matter ... that particle volume/mass from long-range transported air pollution is relevant for CVD and RD admissions in the elderly, and possibly particle numbers from traffic sources for paediatric asthma....

  13. Effects of thermal fluctuations and fluid compressibility on hydrodynamic synchronization of microrotors at finite oscillatory Reynolds number: a multiparticle collision dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theers, Mario; Winkler, Roland G

    2014-08-28

    We investigate the emergent dynamical behavior of hydrodynamically coupled microrotors by means of multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) simulations. The two rotors are confined in a plane and move along circles driven by active forces. Comparing simulations to theoretical results based on linearized hydrodynamics, we demonstrate that time-dependent hydrodynamic interactions lead to synchronization of the rotational motion. Thermal noise implies large fluctuations of the phase-angle difference between the rotors, but synchronization prevails and the ensemble-averaged time dependence of the phase-angle difference agrees well with analytical predictions. Moreover, we demonstrate that compressibility effects lead to longer synchronization times. In addition, the relevance of the inertia terms of the Navier-Stokes equation are discussed, specifically the linear unsteady acceleration term characterized by the oscillatory Reynolds number ReT. We illustrate the continuous breakdown of synchronization with the Reynolds number ReT, in analogy to the continuous breakdown of the scallop theorem with decreasing Reynolds number.

  14. Use of a generalized Stokes number to determine the aerodynamic capture efficiency of non-Stokesian particles from a compressible gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, R.; Rosner, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    The aerodynamic capture efficiency of small but nondiffusing particles suspended in a high-speed stream flowing past a target is known to be influenced by parameters governing small particle inertia, departures from the Stokes drag law, and carrier fluid compressibility. By defining an effective Stokes number in terms of the actual (prevailing) particle stopping distance, local fluid viscosity, and inviscid fluid velocity gradient at the target nose, it is shown that these effects are well correlated in terms of a 'standard' (cylindrical collector, Stokes drag, incompressible flow, sq rt Re much greater than 1) capture efficiency curve. Thus, a correlation follows that simplifies aerosol capture calculations in the parameter range already included in previous numerical solutions, allows rational engineering predictions of deposition in situations not previously specifically calculated, and should facilitate the presentation of performance data for gas cleaning equipment and aerosol instruments.

  15. Investigation of the two-quasiparticle bands in the doubly-odd nucleus 166Ta using a particle-number conserving cranked shell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, ZhenHua

    2016-07-01

    The high-spin rotational properties of two-quasiparticle bands in the doubly-odd 166Ta are analyzed using the cranked shell model with pairing correlations treated by a particle-number conserving method, in which the blocking effects are taken into account exactly. The experimental moments of inertia and alignments and their variations with the rotational frequency hω are reproduced very well by the particle-number conserving calculations, which provides a reliable support to the configuration assignments in previous works for these bands. The backbendings in these two-quasiparticle bands are analyzed by the calculated occupation probabilities and the contributions of each orbital to the total angular momentum alignments. The moments of inertia and alignments for the Gallagher-Moszkowski partners of these observed two-quasiparticle rotational bands are also predicted.

  16. Association of Air Pollution Exposures With High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Particle Number: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Griffith; Mora, Samia; Greenland, Philip; Tsai, Michael; Gill, Ed; Kaufman, Joel D

    2017-05-01

    The relationship between air pollution and cardiovascular disease may be explained by changes in high-density lipoprotein (HDL). We examined the cross-sectional relationship between air pollution and both HDL cholesterol and HDL particle number in the MESA Air study (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Air Pollution). Study participants were 6654 white, black, Hispanic, and Chinese men and women aged 45 to 84 years. We estimated individual residential ambient fine particulate pollution exposure (PM 2.5 ) and black carbon concentrations using a fine-scale likelihood-based spatiotemporal model and cohort-specific monitoring. Exposure periods were averaged to 12 months, 3 months, and 2 weeks prior to examination. HDL cholesterol and HDL particle number were measured in the year 2000 using the cholesterol oxidase method and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. We used multivariable linear regression to examine the relationship between air pollution exposure and HDL measures. A 0.7×10 - 6 m - 1 higher exposure to black carbon (a marker of traffic-related pollution) averaged over a 1-year period was significantly associated with a lower HDL cholesterol (-1.68 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval, -2.86 to -0.50) and approached significance with HDL particle number (-0.55 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval, -1.13 to 0.03). In the 3-month averaging time period, a 5 μg/m 3 higher PM 2.5 was associated with lower HDL particle number (-0.64 μmol/L; 95% confidence interval, -1.01 to -0.26), but not HDL cholesterol (-0.05 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval, -0.82 to 0.71). These data are consistent with the hypothesis that exposure to air pollution is adversely associated with measures of HDL. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Characterization of particle number concentrations and PM2.5 in a school: influence of outdoor air pollution on indoor air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hai; Morawska, Lidia; He, Congrong; Zhang, Yanli L; Ayoko, Godwin; Cao, Min

    2010-07-01

    The impact of air pollution on school children's health is currently one of the key foci of international and national agencies. Of particular concern are ultrafine particles which are emitted in large quantities, contain large concentrations of toxins and are deposited deeply in the respiratory tract. In this study, an intensive sampling campaign of indoor and outdoor airborne particulate matter was carried out in a primary school in February 2006 to investigate indoor and outdoor particle number (PN) and mass concentrations (PM(2.5)), and particle size distribution, and to evaluate the influence of outdoor air pollution on the indoor air. For outdoor PN and PM(2.5), early morning and late afternoon peaks were observed on weekdays, which are consistent with traffic rush hours, indicating the predominant effect of vehicular emissions. However, the temporal variations of outdoor PM(2.5) and PN concentrations occasionally showed extremely high peaks, mainly due to human activities such as cigarette smoking and the operation of mower near the sampling site. The indoor PM(2.5) level was mainly affected by the outdoor PM(2.5) (r = 0.68, p changes to the modal structure of particle number and size distribution, even though the I/O ratio was different for different size classes. The I/O curves had a maximum value for particles with diameters of 100-400 nm under both occupied and unoccupied scenarios, whereas no significant difference in I/O ratio for PM(2.5) was observed between occupied and unoccupied conditions. Inspection of the size-resolved I/O ratios in the preschool centre and the classroom suggested that the I/O ratio in the preschool centre was the highest for accumulation mode particles at 600 nm after school hours, whereas the average I/O ratios of both nucleation mode and accumulation mode particles in the classroom were much lower than those of Aitken mode particles. The findings obtained in this study are useful for epidemiological studies to estimate the

  18. An analysis of supersonic flows with low-Reynolds number compressible two-equation turbulence models using LU finite volume implicit numerical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.

    1994-01-01

    A generalized flow solver using an implicit Lower-upper (LU) diagonal decomposition based numerical technique has been coupled with three low-Reynolds number kappa-epsilon models for analysis of problems with engineering applications. The feasibility of using the LU technique to obtain efficient solutions to supersonic problems using the kappa-epsilon model has been demonstrated. The flow solver is then used to explore limitations and convergence characteristics of several popular two equation turbulence models. Several changes to the LU solver have been made to improve the efficiency of turbulent flow predictions. In general, the low-Reynolds number kappa-epsilon models are easier to implement than the models with wall-functions, but require much finer near-wall grid to accurately resolve the physics. The three kappa-epsilon models use different approaches to characterize the near wall regions of the flow. Therefore, the limitations imposed by the near wall characteristics have been carefully resolved. The convergence characteristics of a particular model using a given numerical technique are also an important, but most often overlooked, aspect of turbulence model predictions. It is found that some convergence characteristics could be sacrificed for more accurate near-wall prediction. However, even this gain in accuracy is not sufficient to model the effects of an external pressure gradient imposed by a shock-wave/ boundary-layer interaction. Additional work on turbulence models, especially for compressibility, is required since the solutions obtained with base line turbulence are in only reasonable agreement with the experimental data for the viscous interaction problems.

  19. Finite flavour groups of fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimus, Walter; Ludl, Patrick Otto

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of the theory of finite groups, with regard to their application as flavour symmetries in particle physics. In a general part, we discuss useful theorems concerning group structure, conjugacy classes, representations and character tables. In a specialized part, we attempt to give a fairly comprehensive review of finite subgroups of SO(3) and SU(3), in which we apply and illustrate the general theory. Moreover, we also provide a concise description of the symmetric and alternating groups and comment on the relationship between finite subgroups of U(3) and finite subgroups of SU(3). Although in this review we give a detailed description of a wide range of finite groups, the main focus is on the methods which allow the exploration of their different aspects. (topical review)

  20. Probability Estimates of Solar Particle Event Doses During a Period of Low Sunspot Number for Thinly-Shielded Spacecraft and Short Duration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, William; Tylka, Allan J.; Dietrich, William; Rojdev, Kristina; Matzkind, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    In an earlier paper (Atwell, et al., 2015), we investigated solar particle event (SPE) radiation exposures (absorbed dose) to small, thinly-shielded spacecraft during a period when the sunspot number (SSN) was less than 30. These SPEs contain Ground Level Events (GLE), sub-GLEs, and sub-sub-GLEs (Tylka and Dietrich, 2009, Tylka and Dietrich, 2008, and Atwell, et al., 2008). GLEs are extremely energetic solar particle events having proton energies extending into the several GeV range and producing secondary particles in the atmosphere, mostly neutrons, observed with ground station neutron monitors. Sub-GLE events are less energetic, extending into the several hundred MeV range, but do not produce secondary atmospheric particles. Sub-sub GLEs are even less energetic with an observable increase in protons at energies greater than 30 MeV, but no observable proton flux above 300 MeV. In this paper, we consider those SPEs that occurred during 1973-2010 when the SSN was greater than 30 but less than 50. In addition, we provide probability estimates of absorbed dose based on mission duration with a 95% confidence level (CL). We also discuss the implications of these data and provide some recommendations that may be useful to spacecraft designers of these smaller spacecraft.

  1. Quantization of a Hamiltonian system with an infinite number of degrees of freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhidkov, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    We propose a method of quantization of a discrete Hamiltonian system with an infinite number of degrees of freedom. Our approach is analogous to the usual finite-dimensional quantum mechanics. We construct an infinite-dimensional Schroedinger equation. We show that it is possible to pass from the finite-dimensional quantum mechanics to our construction in the limit when the number of particles tends to infinity. In the paper rigorous mathematical methods are used. 9 refs. (author)

  2. Beyond the relativistic mean-field approximation. II. Configuration mixing of mean-field wave functions projected on angular momentum and particle number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.

    2006-01-01

    The framework of relativistic self-consistent mean-field models is extended to include correlations related to the restoration of broken symmetries and to fluctuations of collective variables. The generator coordinate method is used to perform configuration mixing of angular-momentum and particle-number projected relativistic wave functions. The geometry is restricted to axially symmetric shapes, and the intrinsic wave functions are generated from the solutions of the relativistic mean-field+Lipkin-Nogami BCS equations, with a constraint on the mass quadrupole moment. The model employs a relativistic point-coupling (contact) nucleon-nucleon effective interaction in the particle-hole channel, and a density-independent δ-interaction in the pairing channel. Illustrative calculations are performed for 24 Mg, 32 S, and 36 Ar, and compared with results obtained employing the model developed in the first part of this work, i.e., without particle-number projection, as well as with the corresponding nonrelativistic models based on Skyrme and Gogny effective interactions

  3. Low Reynolds number airfoil aerodynamic loads determination via line integral of velocity obtained with particle image velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.; Su, Y.Y. [McGill University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-11-15

    The small magnitude lift forces generated by both a NACA 0012 airfoil and a thin flat plate at Re = 29,000 and 54,000 were determined through the line integral of velocity, obtained with particle image velocimetry, via the application of the Kutta-Joukowsky theorem. Surface pressure measurements of the NACA0012 airfoil were also obtained to validate the lift coefficient C{sub l}. The bound circulation was found to be insensitive to the size and aspect ratio of the rectangular integration loop for pre-stall angles. The present C{sub l} data were also found to agree very well with the surface pressure-determined lift coefficient for pre-stall conditions. A large variation in C{sub l} with the loop size and aspect ratio for post-stall conditions was, however, observed. Nevertheless, the present flat-plate C{sub l} data were also found to collectively agree with the published force-balance measurements at small angles of attack, despite the large disparity exhibited among the various published data at high angles. Finally, the ensemble-averaged wake velocity profiles were also used to compute the drag coefficient and, subsequently, the lift-to-drag ratio. (orig.)

  4. Generalized finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachspress, E.

    2009-01-01

    Triangles and rectangles are the ubiquitous elements in finite element studies. Only these elements admit polynomial basis functions. Rational functions provide a basis for elements having any number of straight and curved sides. Numerical complexities initially associated with rational bases precluded extensive use. Recent analysis has reduced these difficulties and programs have been written to illustrate effectiveness. Although incorporation in major finite element software requires considerable effort, there are advantages in some applications which warrant implementation. An outline of the basic theory and of recent innovations is presented here. (authors)

  5. THE EFFECT OF THE REYNOLDS NUMBER OF AIR FLOW TO THE PARTICLE COLLECTION EFFICIENCY OF A FIBROUS FILTER MEDIUM WITH CYLINDRICAL SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P. Kouropoulos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At this study an attempt for the theoretical approach of the Re ynolds number effect of air flow to the particle collection efficiency of a fibrous fil ter with cylindrical section will be made. Initially, a report of the air filtration models to fibrous filter media will be presented along with an explanation of both the parameters and the physical quantities which govern the air filtration process. Furthermore, the resul ting equation from the mathematical model will be applied to a real filter medium and the characteristic curves of filter efficiency will be drawn. The change of a filter medi um efficiency with regard to the Reynolds number of air flow that passes through the filt er, derived from the curves, will be studied. The general conclusion that we have is that as the Reynolds number of filtered air increases, the collection efficiency of the filter decreases.

  6. Calculation of effective atomic number and electron density of essential biomolecules for electron, proton, alpha particle and multi-energetic photon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Onaran, Tayfur

    2015-07-01

    Effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and electron densities (Ne) of some essential biomolecules have been calculated for total electron interaction, total proton interaction and total alpha particle interaction using an interpolation method in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV. Also, the spectrum weighted Zeff for multi-energetic photons has been calculated using Auto-Zeff program. Biomolecules consist of fatty acids, amino acids, carbohydrates and basic nucleotides of DNA and RNA. Variations of Zeff and Ne with kinetic energy of ionizing charged particles and effective photon energies of heterogeneous sources have been studied for the given materials. Significant variations in Zeff and Ne have been observed through the entire energy region for electron, proton and alpha particle interactions. Non-uniform variation has been observed for protons and alpha particles in low and intermediate energy regions, respectively. The maximum values of Zeff have found to be in higher energies for total electron interaction whereas maximum values have found to be in relatively low energies for total proton and total alpha particle interactions. When it comes to the multi-energetic photon sources, it has to be noted that the highest Zeff values were found at low energy region where photoelectric absorption is the pre-dominant interaction process. The lowest values of Zeff have been shown in biomolecules such as stearic acid, leucine, mannitol and thymine, which have highest H content in their groups. Variation in Ne seems to be more or less the same with the variation in Zeff for the given materials as expected.

  7. Effects of aromatics, olefins and distillation temperatures (T50 & T90) on particle mass and number emissions from gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Rencheng; Hu, Jingnan; Bao, Xiaofeng; He, Liqiang; Zu, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Abstratct: Fuel quality is among the primary reasons for severe vehicle pollution. A limited understanding of the effects of gasoline properties on modern vehicle emissions is one obstacle for the establishment of stricter fuel standards in China. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of aromatic and olefin contents and T50 and T90 (defined as the 50%v and 90%v distillation temperatures) on tailpipe emissions from gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles compliant with China 4 standards. Both gaseous and particle emissions using different types of gasoline were measured. Changing aromatic and olefin contents had relatively small impacts on fuel consumption. Compared with olefins and T90, the regulated gaseous emissions were impacted more by aromatics and T50. Evident decreases of the particle mass (PM) and particle number (PN) emissions were noticed when the aromatic content and T90 decreased. Reducing the olefin content slightly decreased the PM emissions and increased the PN emissions. With decreasing T50, the PM emissions increased and the PN emissions slightly decreased. These results suggest that aromatic content and T90 should be decreased to reduce particle emissions from GDI vehicles. The information presented in this study provides some suggestions for how to improve gasoline quality in China. - Highlights: • Effect of aromatics, olefins, T50 and T90 on GDI vehicle emissions was investigated. • Aromatics and olefins had little impact on fuel consumption and CO 2 emissions. • Reducing the aromatic content and T90 significantly decreased PM and PN emissions. • Changing the olefin content and T50 had a minor impact on particle emissions. • Thresholds of aromatics and T90 should be tightened in future gasoline regulations.

  8. Determination of the fundamental scale of gravity and the number of space-time dimensions from high energetic particle interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruppert, J.; Rahmede, C.; Bleicher, M.

    2005-01-01

    Within the ADD-model, we elaborate an idea by Vacavant and Hinchliffe [J. Phys. G 27 (2001) 1839] and show quantitatively how to determine the fundamental scale of TeV-gravity and the number of compactified extra dimensions from data at LHC. We demonstrate that the ADD-model leads to strong correlations between the missing E T in gravitons at different center of mass energies. This correlation puts strong constraints on this model for extra dimensions, if probed at s=5.5 TeV and s=14 TeV at LHC

  9. Universal conditions for finite renormalizable quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranner, G.

    1990-10-01

    Analyzing general renormalization constants in covariant gauge and minimal subtraction, we consider universal conditions for cancelling UV-divergences in renormalizable field theories with simple gauge groups, and give constructive methods for finding nonsupersymmetric finite models. The divergent parts of the renormalization constants for fields explicitly depend on the gauge parameter ξ. Finite theories simply need finite couplings. We show that respective FinitenessConditions imply a hierarchy, the center of which are the FCs for the gauge coupling g and the Yukawa couplings of the massless theory. To gain more information about F we analyze the Yukawa-FC in greater detail. Doing so algebraically, we find out and fix all inner symmetries. Additionally, Yuakawa-couplings must be invariant under gauge transformation. Then it becomes extremely difficult to obey a FC, yield rational numbers for F ∼ 1, and satisfy the factorization-condition, unless F = 1. The particular structure of the F = 1-system allows for a most general ansatz. We figure out the simplest case, getting precisely just couplings and particle content of a general N=1-supersymmetric theory. We list a class of roughly 4000 types of theories, containing all supersymmetric, completely finite, and many more finite theories as well. (Author, shortened by Quittner) 11 figs., 54 refs

  10. Description of Discordance Between LDL Cholesterol, Non-HDL Cholesterol, and LDL Particle Number Among Patients of a Lipid Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua W Gaborcik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: While LDL cholesterol measures the cholesterol content within an LDL particle (LDL-P, it may not reflect LDL-P concentrations. If discordance exists, LDL-P may better predict cardiovascular events compared to LDL-C and non-HDL cholesterol (non-HDL-C. In primary prevention patients, discordance has been associated with diabetes, ethnicity, gender, metabolic syndrome, and smoking history. Objective: To describe discordance in patients of a lipid clinic by exploring associations between patient characteristics and discordance among LDL-C, non-HDL-C, or LDL-P. Secondarily to compare proportion of patients with baseline concordance versus discordance who have ASCVD events, diagnoses of new onset diabetes or death. Methods: A retrospective, single-center cohort study at a large academic medical center was conducted. Patients establishing care from January 2009 through December 2012 with complete initial labs were included. Logistic regression models were used to explore associations between discordance and patient characteristics. Results: Of 603 patients screened, the final cohort included 166 patients with 104 (62.7% discordant. LDL-P was the most common discordant value. Discordance was associated with gender, smoking status, use of lipid lowering medications, and achieving patient specific LDL-C goals. In terms of any event observed after initial measurements, no significant differences were detected between discordant and concordant groups. Conclusion: Within a lipid clinic population, discordance was associated with male gender, smoking status, lipid-lowering therapy, and being at patient specific LDL-C goal. While associations were found in our population, clinicians should consider measuring LDL-P to fully assess presence or extent of discordance. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the

  11. NACRE II: an update of the NACRE compilation of charged-particle-induced thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei with mass number A<16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.; Ohta, M.; Utsunomiya, H.

    2013-01-01

    An update of the NACRE compilation [3] is presented. This new compilation, referred to as NACRE II, reports thermonuclear reaction rates for 34 charged-particle induced, two-body exoergic reactions on nuclides with mass number A 6 ≲T⩽10 10 K range. Along with the ‘adopted’ rates, their low and high limits are provided. The new rates are available in electronic form as part of the Brussels Library (BRUSLIB) of nuclear data. The NACRE II rates also supersede the previous NACRE rates in the Nuclear Network Generator (NETGEN) for astrophysics. [ (http://www.astro.ulb.ac.be/databases.html)

  12. Asymptotics for the number of negative eigenvalues of a model operator related to a system of three-particles on lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasulov, T.H.

    2009-04-01

    A model operator H μ , μ > 0 associated to a system of three particles on the three-dimensional lattice Z 3 . We study the case where the parameter function w has a special form with the nondegenerate minimum at the n, n > 1 points. If the associated Friedrichs model has a zero energy resonance, then we prove that the operator H μ has infinitely many negative eigenvalues accumulating at zero. Moreover, we obtain an asymptotic value for the number of negative eigenvalues of H μ lying below z < 0 with respect to the spectral parameter z → -0. (author)

  13. Eulerian numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, T Kyle

    2015-01-01

    This text presents the Eulerian numbers in the context of modern enumerative, algebraic, and geometric combinatorics. The book first studies Eulerian numbers from a purely combinatorial point of view, then embarks on a tour of how these numbers arise in the study of hyperplane arrangements, polytopes, and simplicial complexes. Some topics include a thorough discussion of gamma-nonnegativity and real-rootedness for Eulerian polynomials, as well as the weak order and the shard intersection order of the symmetric group. The book also includes a parallel story of Catalan combinatorics, wherein the Eulerian numbers are replaced with Narayana numbers. Again there is a progression from combinatorics to geometry, including discussion of the associahedron and the lattice of noncrossing partitions. The final chapters discuss how both the Eulerian and Narayana numbers have analogues in any finite Coxeter group, with many of the same enumerative and geometric properties. There are four supplemental chapters throughout, ...

  14. Fluctuations of the number of adsorbed micro/nanoparticles in sensors for measurement of particle concentration in air and liquid environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokić Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model of fluctuations of the number of adsorbed micro/nanoparticles in environmental sensors operating in air and liquids is presented, taking into account the effects of the mass transfer processes of the target particles in a sensor reaction chamber. The expressions for the total power of the corresponding adsorption-desorption noise, and for the corresponding signal-to-noise ratio are also derived. The presented analysis shows that the transfer processes can have a significant influence on the sensors limiting performance. The influence on both the fluctuations spectrum and the signal-to-noise ratio is estimated at different values of target particles concentration, functionalization sites surface density, and adsorption and desorption rate constants (the values are chosen from the ranges corresponding to real conditions. The analysis provides the guidelines for optimization of sensor design and operating conditions for the given target substance and sensor functionalization, in order to decrease the influence of the mass transfer, thus improving the ultimate performance (e.g. minimal detectable signal, signal-to-noise ratio of sensors for particle detection. The calculations we performed show that it is possible to increase the signal-to-noise ratio for as much as two orders of magnitude by using the optimization that eliminates the mass transfer influence. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR32008

  15. Deriving the largest expected number of elementary particles in the standard model from the maximal compact subgroup H of the exceptional Lie group E7(-5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naschie, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    The maximal number of elementary particles which could be expected to be found within a modestly extended energy scale of the standard model was found using various methods to be N = 69. In particular using E-infinity theory the present Author found the exact transfinite expectation value to be =α-bar o /2≅69 where α-bar o =137.082039325 is the exact inverse fine structure constant. In the present work we show among other things how to derive the exact integer value 69 from the exceptional Lie symmetry groups hierarchy. It is found that the relevant number is given by dim H = 69 where H is the maximal compact subspace of E 7(-5) so that N = dim H = 69 while dim E 7 = 133

  16. The Determining Finite Automata Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Vinogradova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of formal languages widely uses finite state automata both in implementation of automata-based approach to programming, and in synthesis of logical control algorithms.To ensure unambiguous operation of the algorithms, the synthesized finite state automata must be deterministic. Within the approach to the synthesis of the mobile robot controls, for example, based on the theory of formal languages, there are problems concerning the construction of various finite automata, but such finite automata, as a rule, will not be deterministic. The algorithm of determinization can be applied to the finite automata, as specified, in various ways. The basic ideas of the algorithm of determinization can be most simply explained using the representations of a finite automaton in the form of a weighted directed graph.The paper deals with finite automata represented as weighted directed graphs, and discusses in detail the procedure for determining the finite automata represented in this way. Gives a detailed description of the algorithm for determining finite automata. A large number of examples illustrate a capability of the determinization algorithm.

  17. Low speed/low rarefaction flow simulation in micro/nano cavity using DSMC method with small number of particles per cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiri-Jaghargh, Ali; Roohi, Ehsan; Niazmand, Hamid; Stefanov, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to extend the validity of the simplified Bernoulli-trials (SBT)/dual grid algorithm, newly proposed by Stefanov, as a suitable alternative of the standard collision scheme in the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, for solving low speed/low Knudsen number rarefied micro/nano flows. The main advantage of the SBT algorithm is to provide accurate calculations using much smaller number of particles per cell, i.e., ≈ 1. Compared to the original development of SBT [1], we extend the application of the SBT scheme to the near continuum rarefied flows, i.e., Kn = 0.005, where NTC scheme requires a relatively large sample size. Comparing the results of the SBT/dual grid scheme with NTC, it is shown that the SBT/dual grid scheme could successfully predict the thermal pattern and hydrodynamics field as well as surface parameters such as velocity slip and temperature jump. Nonlinear flux-corrected transport algorithm (FCT) is also employed as a filter to extract the smooth solution from the noisy DSMC calculation for low-speed/low-Knudsen number DSMC calculations. The results indicate that combination of SBT/dual grid and FTC filtering can decrease the total sample size needed to reach smooth solution without losing significant accuracy.

  18. The dependence on energy and mass-number of the α-particle optical potential: A justification for the folding model approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, E.; Gils, H.J.; Rebel, H.; Pesl, R.

    1980-09-01

    Data for elastic scattering of α-particles by sup(40,42,44,48)Ca, 50 Ti, 52 Cr and 90 Zr at 104 MeV, by 40 Ca, sup(46,48,50)Ti, 58 Ni, 90 Zr and 208 Pb at 140 MeV and by sup(58,60,62,64)Ni at 173 MeV are analysed using a Fourier-Bessel description of the optical potential. All data extend to large angles thus allowing unique determination of volume integrals and rms radii of the potentials. The variations with mass number and energy of these quantities are investigated and conclusions are drawn about studies of nuclear radii with the help of optical potentials. (orig.)

  19. Comparison between microscopic methods for finite-temperature Bose gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, S.P.; Negretti, Antonio; Proukakis, N.P.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the equilibrium properties of a weakly interacting, trapped quasi-one-dimensional Bose gas at finite temperatures and compare different theoretical approaches. We focus in particular on two stochastic theories: a number-conserving Bogoliubov (NCB) approach and a stochastic Gross...... on different thermodynamic ensembles (NCB, canonical; SGPE, grand-canonical), they yield the correct condensate statistics in a large Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) (strong enough particle interactions). For smaller systems, the SGPE results are prone to anomalously large number fluctuations, well known...

  20. Observations on finite quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, R.; Itzykson, C.

    1986-01-01

    We study the canonical transformations of the quantum mechanics on a finite phase space. For simplicity we assume that the configuration variable takes an odd prime number 4 K±1 of distinct values. We show that the canonical group is unitarily implemented. It admits a maximal abelian subgroup of order 4 K, commuting with the finite Fourier transform F, a finite analogue of the harmonic oscillator group. This provides a natural construction of F 1/K and of an orthogonal basis of eigenstates of F [fr

  1. Characteristics of Ambient Black Carbon Mass and Size-Resolved Particle Number Concentrations during Corn Straw Open-Field Burning Episode Observations at a Rural Site in Southern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Yang, Li-Sing

    2016-07-08

    Information on the effect of open-field burning of agricultural residues on ambient black carbon (BC) mass and size-resolved particle number concentrations is scarce. In this study, to understand the effect of such open-field burning on short-term air quality, real-time variations of the BC mass and size-resolved particle number concentrations were monitored before and during a corn straw open-field burning episode at a rural site. Correlations between the BC mass and size-resolved particle number concentrations during the episode were investigated. Moreover, the particle number size distribution and absorption Ångström exponent were determined for obtaining the characteristics of aerosol emissions from the corn straw open-field burning. The results can be used to address public health concerns and as a reference for managing similar episodes of open-field burning of agricultural residues.

  2. Statistical effect of interactions on particle creation in expanding universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Hideo

    1982-01-01

    The statistical effect of interactions which drives many-particle systems toward equilibrium is expected to change the qualitative and quantitative features of particle creation in expanding universe. To investigate this problem a simplified model called the finite-time reduction model is formulated and applied to the scalar particle creation in the radiation dominant Friedmann universe. The number density of created particles and the entropy production due to particle creation are estimated. The result for the number density is compared with that in the conventional free field theory. It is shown that the statistical effect increases the particle creation and lengthens the active creation period. As for the entropy production it is shown that it is negligible for scalar particles in the Friedmann universe. (author)

  3. Particle propagator of the spin Calogero–Sutherland model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Ryota; Kato, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    Explicit-exact expressions for the particle propagator of the spin 1/2 Calogero–Sutherland model are derived for the system of a finite number of particles and for that in the thermodynamic limit. Derivation of the expression in the thermodynamic limit is also presented in detail. Combining this result with the hole propagator obtained in earlier studies, we calculate the spectral function of the single particle Green's function in the full range of the energy and momentum space. The resultant spectral function exhibits power-law singularity characteristic to correlated particle systems in one dimension. (paper)

  4. Groebner Finite Path Algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Leamer, Micah J.

    2004-01-01

    Let K be a field and Q a finite directed multi-graph. In this paper I classify all path algebras KQ and admissible orders with the property that all of their finitely generated ideals have finite Groebner bases. MS

  5. Locally Finite Root Supersystems

    OpenAIRE

    Yousofzadeh, Malihe

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of locally finite root supersystems as a generalization of both locally finite root systems and generalized root systems. We classify irreducible locally finite root supersystems.

  6. A comparison of the lattice discrete particle method to the finite-element method and the K&C material model for simulating the static and dynamic response of concrete.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jovanca J.; Bishop, Joseph E.

    2013-11-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by the graduate student Jovanca Smith during a summer internship in the summer of 2012 with the aid of mentor Joe Bishop. The projects were a two-part endeavor that focused on the use of the numerical model called the Lattice Discrete Particle Model (LDPM). The LDPM is a discrete meso-scale model currently used at Northwestern University and the ERDC to model the heterogeneous quasi-brittle material, concrete. In the first part of the project, LDPM was compared to the Karagozian and Case Concrete Model (K&C) used in Presto, an explicit dynamics finite-element code, developed at Sandia National Laboratories. In order to make this comparison, a series of quasi-static numerical experiments were performed, namely unconfined uniaxial compression tests on four varied cube specimen sizes, three-point bending notched experiments on three proportional specimen sizes, and six triaxial compression tests on a cylindrical specimen. The second part of this project focused on the application of LDPM to simulate projectile perforation on an ultra high performance concrete called CORTUF. This application illustrates the strengths of LDPM over traditional continuum models.

  7. The Stokes-Einstein relation at moderate Schmidt number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Xie, Xiaoyi; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael; Donev, Aleksandar

    2013-12-07

    The Stokes-Einstein relation for the self-diffusion coefficient of a spherical particle suspended in an incompressible fluid is an asymptotic result in the limit of large Schmidt number, that is, when momentum diffuses much faster than the particle. When the Schmidt number is moderate, which happens in most particle methods for hydrodynamics, deviations from the Stokes-Einstein prediction are expected. We study these corrections computationally using a recently developed minimally resolved method for coupling particles to an incompressible fluctuating fluid in both two and three dimensions. We find that for moderate Schmidt numbers the diffusion coefficient is reduced relative to the Stokes-Einstein prediction by an amount inversely proportional to the Schmidt number in both two and three dimensions. We find, however, that the Einstein formula is obeyed at all Schmidt numbers, consistent with linear response theory. The mismatch arises because thermal fluctuations affect the drag coefficient for a particle due to the nonlinear nature of the fluid-particle coupling. The numerical data are in good agreement with an approximate self-consistent theory, which can be used to estimate finite-Schmidt number corrections in a variety of methods. Our results indicate that the corrections to the Stokes-Einstein formula come primarily from the fact that the particle itself diffuses together with the momentum. Our study separates effects coming from corrections to no-slip hydrodynamics from those of finite separation of time scales, allowing for a better understanding of widely observed deviations from the Stokes-Einstein prediction in particle methods such as molecular dynamics.

  8. Particle-number conserving analysis for the 2-quasiparticle and high-K multi-quasiparticle states in doubly-odd 174,176Lu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bingheng; Lei Yi'an; Zhang Zhenhua

    2013-01-01

    Two-quasiparticle bands and low-lying excited high-K four-, six-, and eight-quasiparticle bands in the doubly-odd 174,176 Lu are analyzed by using the cranked shell model (CSM) with the pairing correlations treated by a particle-number conserving (PNC) method, in which the blocking effects are taken into account exactly. The proton and neutron Nilsson level schemes for 174,176 Lu are taken from the adjacent odd-A Lu and Hf isotopes, which are adopted to reproduce the experimental bandhead energies of the one-quasiproton and one-quasineutron bands of these odd-A Lu and Hf nuclei, respectively. Once the quasiparticle configurations are determined, the experimental bandhead energies and the moments of inertia of these two- and multi-quasiparticle bands are well reproduced by PNC-CSM calculations. The Coriolis mixing of the low-K (K=|Ω 1 -Ω 2 |) two-quasiparticle band of the Gallagher-Moszkowski doublet with one nucleon in the Ω=1/2 orbital is analyzed. (authors)

  9. [Particle numbers in classified sizes of roadside dust caused by studded tires in the air at different heights from the pavement surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Niioka, T; Kurasaki, M; Kojima, Y

    1996-07-01

    Increased use of motor vehicles has produced various risks to human health due to air pollution by noxious gases, heavy metals and roadside dust. Since the late 1970s, the wide spread use of studded tires for cars has caused pavement wear, resulting in not only economic losses, but also roadside air pollution in cold and snowy regions in Japan. The most serious environmental problem in Sapporo, a city with heavy snowfall, in the 1980s, was roadside dust derived from studded tires. The inhabitants suffered from this dust in the early winter and in the early spring when the streets were not covered with snow. To investigate the influence of such roadside dust upon human health, particle numbers in classified sizes of roadside dust were counted after the roadside dust in the air was collected with a device we constructed at 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 cm above the pavement surface. The results indicated that the concentration of roadside dust in the air did not greatly vary according to the height from the pavement surface. The results also suggested that xenogranuloma, reported in lungs of stray dogs, under roadside dust-pollution conditions such as those examined here, may occur in humans in the future.

  10. Phenology of a Vegetation Barrier and Resulting Impacts on Near-Highway Particle Number and Black Carbon Concentrations on a School Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina H. Fuller

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Traffic-related air pollution is a persistent concern especially in urban areas where populations live in close proximity to roadways. Innovative solutions are needed to minimize human exposure and the installation of vegetative barriers shows potential as a method to reduce near-road concentrations. This study investigates the impact of an existing stand of deciduous and evergreen trees on near-road total particle number (PNC and black carbon (BC concentrations across three seasons. Measurements were taken during spring, fall and winter on the campus of a middle school in the Atlanta (GA, USA area at distances of 10 m and 50 m from a major interstate highway. We identified consistent decreases in BC concentrations, but not for PNC, with increased distance from the highway. In multivariable models, hour of day, downwind conditions, distance to highway, temperature and relative humidity significantly predicted pollutant concentrations. The magnitude of effect of these variables differed by season, however, we were not able to show a definitive impact of the vegetative barrier on near-road concentrations. More detailed studies are necessary to further examine the specific configurations and scenarios that may produce pollutant and exposure reductions.

  11. Correlations of particle number concentrations and metals with nitrogen oxides and other traffic-related air pollutants in Glasgow and London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Jiménez, Araceli; Heal, Mathew R.; Beverland, Iain J.

    2012-07-01

    Particle number concentration (PNC) and transition metal content are implicated in the health effects of airborne particulate matter (PM) but they are difficult to measure so consequently their temporal and spatial variations are not well characterized. Daily concentrations of PNC and particle-bound water-soluble metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, As, Cd and Pb) were measured at background and kerbside sites in Glasgow and London to examine if other metrics of air pollution such as optical darkness (absorbance) of collected filter samples of PM, gravimetric PM, and NO, NO2 and CO gas concentrations, can be used as surrogates for the temporal and spatial variations of the former. NO2 and NOx exhibited a high degree of within-site correlation and with PNC and water-soluble metals (Fe, Cu, As, Cd, Pb) at background sites in both cities. There is therefore potential to use NO2 and NOx as surrogates for PNC and water-soluble metal at background sites. However, correlation was weaker in complex street canyon environments where pollutant concentrations are strongly affected by local sources and the small-scale variations in pollutant dispersion induced by the wind regimes within street canyons. The corollary of the high correlation between NO2 and PNC and water-soluble metals at the background sites is that the latter pollutants may act as confounders for health effects attributed to NO2 from such sites. Concentrations of CO cannot be used as a surrogate for PNC. Increments in daily NOx and NO2 concentrations between trafficked and background sites were shown to be a simple and novel surrogate for daily spatial variation of PNC; for example, increments in NOx explained 78-79% of the variance in PNC at the paired sites in both Glasgow and London, but relationships were city specific. The increments in NOx also explained 70% of the spatial variation in Cu and Ni in Glasgow but not in London. Weekly NO2 measurements derived from passive diffusion tubes were also shown to

  12. Scattering of particles with internal degrees of freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slipushenko, S. V.; Tur, A. V.; Yanovsky, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    The scattering of particles with a small number of internal degrees of freedom is considered. Billiard formalism is used to study the scattering of two such structurally complex particles. The main scattering characteristics are found. Various types of scattering modes are revealed. In particular, a mode is detected when the velocity of motion of such particles away from each other is higher than their approach velocity before the collision. The scattering of such particles is shown to occur after a finite number of collisions. A generalized Newton law is proposed for the collision of particles with a small number of degrees of freedom, and the form of the effective coefficient of restitution is found

  13. When the number crunchers took on the particle smashers in a race to expose the naked quark, the stakes could hardly have been higher

    CERN Multimedia

    MacKenzie, Dana

    2005-01-01

    It was a true clash of the titans. In the blue corner: a multimilliion-dollar particle accelerator. In the red: one of the world's most powerful supecomputers. Both were battling to pin down the lifetime of an ephemeral subatomic particle known as the D-meson (3 pages)

  14. Finite and profinite quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vourdas, Apostolos

    2017-01-01

    This monograph provides an introduction to finite quantum systems, a field at the interface between quantum information and number theory, with applications in quantum computation and condensed matter physics. The first major part of this monograph studies the so-called `qubits' and `qudits', systems with periodic finite lattice as position space. It also discusses the so-called mutually unbiased bases, which have applications in quantum information and quantum cryptography. Quantum logic and its applications to quantum gates is also studied. The second part studies finite quantum systems, where the position takes values in a Galois field. This combines quantum mechanics with Galois theory. The third part extends the discussion to quantum systems with variables in profinite groups, considering the limit where the dimension of the system becomes very large. It uses the concepts of inverse and direct limit and studies quantum mechanics on p-adic numbers. Applications of the formalism include quantum optics and ...

  15. Finite discrete field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Manoelito M. de

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the physical meaning and the geometric interpretation of implementation in classical field theories. The origin of infinities and other inconsistencies in field theories is traced to fields defined with support on the light cone; a finite and consistent field theory requires a light-cone generator as the field support. Then, we introduce a classical field theory with support on the light cone generators. It results on a description of discrete (point-like) interactions in terms of localized particle-like fields. We find the propagators of these particle-like fields and discuss their physical meaning, properties and consequences. They are conformally invariant, singularity-free, and describing a manifestly covariant (1 + 1)-dimensional dynamics in a (3 = 1) spacetime. Remarkably this conformal symmetry remains even for the propagation of a massive field in four spacetime dimensions. We apply this formalism to Classical electrodynamics and to the General Relativity Theory. The standard formalism with its distributed fields is retrieved in terms of spacetime average of the discrete field. Singularities are the by-products of the averaging process. This new formalism enlighten the meaning and the problem of field theory, and may allow a softer transition to a quantum theory. (author)

  16. Comparative study of Monte Carlo particle transport code PHITS and nuclear data processing code NJOY for PKA energy spectra and heating number under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Y.; Ogawa, T.

    2016-01-01

    The modelling of the damage in materials irradiated by neutrons is needed for understanding the mechanism of radiation damage in fission and fusion reactor facilities. The molecular dynamics simulations of damage cascades with full atomic interactions require information about the energy distribution of the Primary Knock on Atoms (PKAs). The most common process to calculate PKA energy spectra under low-energy neutron irradiation is to use the nuclear data processing code NJOY2012. It calculates group-to-group recoil cross section matrices using nuclear data libraries in ENDF data format, which is energy and angular recoil distributions for many reactions. After the NJOY2012 process, SPKA6C is employed to produce PKA energy spectra combining recoil cross section matrices with an incident neutron energy spectrum. However, intercomparison with different processes and nuclear data libraries has not been studied yet. Especially, the higher energy (~5 MeV) of the incident neutrons, compared to fission, leads to many reaction channels, which produces a complex distribution of PKAs in energy and type. Recently, we have developed the event generator mode (EGM) in the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System PHITS for neutron incident reactions in the energy region below 20 MeV. The main feature of EGM is to produce PKA with keeping energy and momentum conservation in a reaction. It is used for event-by-event analysis in application fields such as soft error analysis in semiconductors, micro dosimetry in human body, and estimation of Displacement per Atoms (DPA) value in metals and so on. The purpose of this work is to specify differences of PKA spectra and heating number related with kerma between different calculation method using PHITS-EGM and NJOY2012+SPKA6C with different libraries TENDL-2015, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 for fusion relevant materials

  17. Contrast in air pollution components between major streets and background locations: Particulate matter mass, black carbon, elemental composition, nitrogen oxide and ultrafine particle number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boogaard, Hanna; Kos, Gerard P. A.; Weijers, Ernie P.; Janssen, Nicole A. H.; Fischer, Paul H.; van der Zee, Saskia C.; de Hartog, Jeroen J.; Hoek, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Policies to reduce outdoor air pollution concentrations are often assessed on the basis of the regulated pollutants. Whether these are the most appropriate components to assess the potential health benefits is questionable, as other health-relevant pollutants may be more strongly related to traffic. The aim of this study is to compare the contrast in concentration between major roads and (sub)urban background for a large range of pollutants and to analyze the magnitude of the measured difference in the street - background for major streets with different street configurations. Measurements of PM 10, PM 2.5, particle number concentrations (PNC), black carbon (BC), elemental composition of PM 10 and PM 2.5 and NO x were conducted simultaneously in eight major streets and nine (sub)urban background locations in the Netherlands. Measurements were done six times for a week during a six month period in 2008. High contrasts between busy streets and background locations in the same city were found for chromium, copper and iron (factor 2-3). These elements were especially present in the coarse fraction of PM. In addition, high contrasts were found for BC and NO x (factor 1.8), typically indicators of direct combustion emissions. The contrast for PNC was similar to BC. NO 2 contrast was lower (factor 1.5). The largest contrast was found for two street canyons and two streets with buildings at one side of the street only. The contrast between busy streets and urban background in NO 2 was less than the contrast found for BC, PNC and elements indicative of non-exhaust emissions, adding evidence that NO 2 is not representing (current) traffic well. The study supports a substantial role for non-exhaust emissions including brake- and tyre wear and road dust in addition to direct combustion emissions. Significant underestimation of disease burden may occur when relying too much on the regulated components.

  18. News Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

  19. Finite W-algebras and intermediate statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbarin, F.; Ragoucy, E.; Sorba, P.

    1995-01-01

    New realizations of finite W-algebras are constructed by relaxing the usual constraint conditions. Then finite W-algebras are recognized in the Heisenberg quantization recently proposed by Leinaas and Myrheim, for a system of two identical particles in d dimensions. As the anyonic parameter is directly associated to the W-algebra involved in the d=1 case, it is natural to consider that the W-algebra framework is well adapted for a possible generalization of the anyon statistics. ((orig.))

  20. Density functional approach for pairing in finite size systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hupin, G.

    2011-09-01

    The combination of functional theory where the energy is written as a functional of the density, and the configuration mixing method, provides an efficient description of nuclear ground and excited state properties. The specific pathologies that have been recently observed, show the lack of a clear underlying justification associated to the breaking and the restoration of symmetries within density functional theory. This thesis focuses on alternative treatments of pairing correlations in finite many body systems that consider the breaking and the restoration of the particle number conservation. The energy is written as a functional of a projected quasi-particle vacuum and can be linked to the one obtained within the configuration mixing framework. This approach has been applied to make the projection either before or after the application of the variational principle. It is more flexible than the usual configuration mixing method since it can handle more general effective interactions than the latter. The application to the Krypton isotopes shows the feasibility and the efficiency of the method to describe pairing near closed shell nuclei. Following a parallel path, a theory where the energy is written as a functional of the occupation number and natural orbitals is proposed. The new functional is benchmarked in an exactly solvable model, the pairing Hamiltonian. The efficiency and the applicability of the new theory have been tested for various pairing strengths, single particle energy spectra and numbers of particles. (author)

  1. Finite connectivity attractor neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wemmenhove, B; Coolen, A C C

    2003-01-01

    We study a family of diluted attractor neural networks with a finite average number of (symmetric) connections per neuron. As in finite connectivity spin glasses, their equilibrium properties are described by order parameter functions, for which we derive an integral equation in replica symmetric approximation. A bifurcation analysis of this equation reveals the locations of the paramagnetic to recall and paramagnetic to spin-glass transition lines in the phase diagram. The line separating the retrieval phase from the spin-glass phase is calculated at zero temperature. All phase transitions are found to be continuous

  2. Particle accelerators test cosmological theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.; Steigman, G.

    1988-01-01

    Over the past decade two subfields of science, cosmology and elementary-particle physics, have become married in a symbiotic relationship that has produced a number of exciting offspring. These offspring are beginning to yield insights on the creation of spacetime and matter at epochs as early as 10 to the minus 43 to 10 to the minus 35 second after the birth of the universe in the primordial explosion known as the big bang. Important clues to the nature of the big bang itself may even come from a theory currently under development, known as the ultimate theory of everything (T.E.O.). A T.E.O. would describe all the interactions among the fundamental particles in a single bold stroke. Now that cosmology ahs begun to make predictions about elementary-particle physics, it has become conceivable that those cosmological predictions could be checked with carefully controlled accelerator experiments. It has taken more than 10 years for accelerators to reach the point where they can do the appropriate experiments, but the experiments are now in fact in progress. The preliminary results confirm the predictions of cosmology. The cosmological prediction the authors have been concerned with pertains to setting limits on the number of fundamental particles of matter. It appears that there are 12 fundamental particles, as well as their corresponding antiparticles. Six of the fundamental particles are quarks. The other six are leptons. The 12 particles are grouped in three families, each family consisting of four members. Cosmology suggests there must be a finite number of families and, further limits the possible range of to small values: only three or at most four families exist. 7 figs

  3. Hexagon POPE: effective particles and tree level resummation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Córdova, Lucía [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy & Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute,University of Waterloo,Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2017-01-12

    We present the resummation of the full Pentagon Operator Product Expansion series of the hexagon Wilson loop in planar N=4 SYM at tree level. We do so by considering the one effective particle states formed by a fundamental flux tube excitation and an arbitrary number of the so called small fermions which are then integrated out. We derive the one effective particle measures at finite coupling. By evaluating these measures at tree level and summing over all one effective particle states we reproduce the full 6 point tree level amplitude.

  4. Nilpotent -local finite groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, José; Scherer, Jérôme; Viruel, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    We provide characterizations of -nilpotency for fusion systems and -local finite groups that are inspired by known result for finite groups. In particular, we generalize criteria by Atiyah, Brunetti, Frobenius, Quillen, Stammbach and Tate.

  5. The Effect of Prolactin on the Number of Membrane-Associated Particles in Kidney Cells of the Euryhaline Teleost Gasterosteus aculeatus during Transfer from Seawater to Freshwater : A Freeze-Etch Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.; Veenhuis, M.

    1974-01-01

    The membranes of kidney cells of 3-spined sticklebacks were examined in freeze-etch replicas. The numbers of particles adhering to surfaces and fracture faces of the outer cell membranes and the membranes of the basal labyrinth were determined. The latter membranes probably are the main location of

  6. Basic Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Hae

    1992-02-01

    This book gives descriptions of basic finite element method, which includes basic finite element method and data, black box, writing of data, definition of VECTOR, definition of matrix, matrix and multiplication of matrix, addition of matrix, and unit matrix, conception of hardness matrix like spring power and displacement, governed equation of an elastic body, finite element method, Fortran method and programming such as composition of computer, order of programming and data card and Fortran card, finite element program and application of nonelastic problem.

  7. Finite-temperature field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapusta, J.I.; Landshoff, P.V.

    1989-01-01

    Particle number is not conserved in relativistic theories although both lepton and baryon number are. Therefore when discussing the thermodynamics of a quantum field theory one uses the grand canonical formalism. The entropy S is maximised, keeping fixed the ensemble averages E and N of energy and lepton number. Two lagrange multipliers are introduced. (author)

  8. Composite Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, we extend the previous results of Chap. 2 to the more general case of composite finite sums. We describe what composite finite sums are and how their analysis can be reduced to the analysis of simple finite sums using the chain rule. We apply these techniques, next, on numerical integration and on some identities of Ramanujan.

  9. Composite Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    In this chapter, we extend the previous results of Chap. 2 to the more general case of composite finite sums. We describe what composite finite sums are and how their analysis can be reduced to the analysis of simple finite sums using the chain rule. We apply these techniques, next, on numerical integration and on some identities of Ramanujan.

  10. Super-renormalizable or finite Lee–Wick quantum gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Modesto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a class of multidimensional higher derivative theories of gravity without extra real degrees of freedom besides the graviton field. The propagator shows up the usual real graviton pole in k2=0 and extra complex conjugates poles that do not contribute to the absorptive part of the physical scattering amplitudes. Indeed, they may consistently be excluded from the asymptotic observable states of the theory making use of the Lee–Wick and Cutkosky, Landshoff, Olive and Polkinghorne prescription for the construction of a unitary S-matrix. Therefore, the spectrum consists of the graviton and short lived elementary unstable particles that we named “anti-gravitons” because of their repulsive contribution to the gravitational potential at short distance. However, another interpretation of the complex conjugate pairs is proposed based on the Calmet's suggestion, i.e. they could be understood as black hole precursors long established in the classical theory. Since the theory is CPT invariant, the conjugate complex of the micro black hole precursor can be interpreted as a white hole precursor consistently with the 't Hooft complementarity principle. It is proved that the quantum theory is super-renormalizable in even dimension, i.e. only a finite number of divergent diagrams survive, and finite in odd dimension. Furthermore, turning on a local potential of the Riemann tensor we can make the theory finite in any dimension. The singularity-free Newtonian gravitational potential is explicitly computed for a range of higher derivative theories. Finally, we propose a new super-renormalizable or finite Lee–Wick standard model of particle physics.

  11. Dynamics and Melting of Finite Plasma Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Patrick; K"Ahlert, Hanno; Baumgartner, Henning; Thomsen, Hauke; Bonitz, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Interacting few-particle systems in external trapping potentials are of strong current interest since they allow to realize and control strong correlation and quantum effects [1]. Here, we present our recent results on the structural and thermodynamic properties of the crystal-like Wigner phase of complex plasma confined in a 3D harmonic potential. We discuss the linear response of the strongly correlated system to external excitations, which can be described in terms of normal modes [2]. By means of first-principle simulations the details of the melting phase transitions of these mesoscopic systems are systematically analysed with the melting temperatures being determined by a modified Lindemann parameter for the pair distance fluctuations [3]. The critical temperatures turn out to be utmost sensitive to finite size effects (i.e., the exact particle number), and form of the (screened) interaction potential.[4pt] [1] PhD Thesis, P. Ludwig, U Rostock (2008)[0pt] [2] C. Henning et al., J. Phys. A 42, 214023 (2009)[0pt] [3] B"oning et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 113401 (2008)

  12. Relativistic ''potential model'' for N-particle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, H.P.

    1986-08-01

    Neither quantum field theory nor S-Matrix theory have a well defined procedure for going over to an approximation that can be reliably used in non-relativistic models for nuclear physics. We meet the problem here by constructing a finite particle number relativistic scattering theory for (scalar) particles and mesons using integral equations of the Faddeev-Yakubovsky type. Restricted to N particles and one meson, we can go from the relativistic theory to a ''potential theory'' in the integral equation formulation by using boundary states which do not contain the meson asymptotically. The meson-particle input amplitudes contain a pole at the particle mass, and the particle-particle input amplitudes are null. This gives unique definition (numerically calculable) to the particle-particle off-shell amplitude, and hence to the covariant ''scattering potential'' (but not to the noninvariant concept of ''potential energy''). As we have commented before, if we take these scattering amplitudes as iput for relativistic Faddeev equations, the results are identical to those obtained from the same model starting from three particles and one meson. In this paper we explore how far we can extend this relativistic ''potential model'' to higher numbers of particles and mesons. 10 refs

  13. The Higgs and the expectation value of the number of elementary particles in a supersymmetric extensions of the standard model of high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naschie, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    Supersymmetry, colours and chirality are utilized to develop three minimally extended versions of the standard model. Based on these models, it is possible to predict that few new elementary particles are likely to be found experimentally at an energy scale which is very modestly above that of the electroweak. Connections to the 8064 massless states of Heterotic string theory are also discussed

  14. The theory of finitely generated commutative semigroups

    CERN Document Server

    Rédei, L; Stark, M; Gravett, K A H

    1966-01-01

    The Theory of Finitely Generated Commutative Semigroups describes a theory of finitely generated commutative semigroups which is founded essentially on a single """"fundamental theorem"""" and exhibits resemblance in many respects to the algebraic theory of numbers. The theory primarily involves the investigation of the F-congruences (F is the the free semimodule of the rank n, where n is a given natural number). As applications, several important special cases are given. This volume is comprised of five chapters and begins with preliminaries on finitely generated commutative semigroups before

  15. On the spectrum of particles created in a Robertson-Walker universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, T.

    1983-01-01

    Created particle spectra are calculated in Robertson-Walker universes and discussed with a special emphasis on their dependence upon the initial and final times at which a WKB-like positive frequency conditions should be imposed. It is shown that the obtained spectra are very sensitive to these times if the WKB approximation for the field equation is not valid in their neighborhood. It is also shown that the total number density of created particles remains finite if the final time is set to be finite. (author)

  16. N-particle effective generators of the Poincare group derived from a field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, A.; Gloeckle, W.

    1999-01-01

    In quantum mechanics the principle of relativity is guaranteed by unitary operators being associated with inhomogeneous Lorentz transformations ensuring that quantum mechanical expectation values remain unchanged. In field theory the ten generators of inhomogeneous Lorentz transformations can be derived from a scalar Lagrangian density describing the physical system of interest. They obey the well known Poincare Lie algebra. For interacting systems some of the generators become operators allowing for particle production or annihilation so that the generators act on the full Fock space. However, given a field theory on the whole Fock space we prove that it is possible to construct generators acting on a subspace with a finite number of particles by one and the same unitary transformation of all generators leaving the Poincare algebra valid. In this manner it is in principle possible to derive a relativistically invariant theory of interacting particles on a Hilbert space with a finite number of particles from a field theoretical Lagrangian. Refs. 3 (author)

  17. A new variational formulation of kinetic plasma theory and the application of moving finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    A new variational formulation has been developed for the system of equations governing kinetic plasmas and electromagnetic fields. It is used to apply the method of Moving Finite Elements to the electromagnetic fields. The fields are expanded in a basis of linear finite elements on a movable, unstructured grid of triangles in 2D or tetrahedra in 3D, while the plasma distribution function is expanded in a basis of super particles. Minimization of the variational with respect to the time derivatives of the field quantities yields a coupled system of equations for simultaneously advancing the amplitudes and node positions, resulting in adaptive grid motion. The adaptivity of the grid may save a large factor in the size of the grid and the number of particles required in many problems. Minimization of the variational with respect to the time derivatives of the particle positions and velocities gives the equations of motion, providing consistent prescriptions for assigning particles to the grid and fields to the particles. Orthogonality conditions on the particles are derived as conditions for keeping their equations of motion independent. Collisions can be included in a natural way. The relationship between PIC methods and alternative methods of discretizing phase space is clarified

  18. Evolution of collision numbers for a chaotic gas dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidgop, Alexander Jonathan; Fouxon, Itzhak

    2011-11-01

    We put forward a conjecture of recurrence for a gas of hard spheres that collide elastically in a finite volume. The dynamics consists of a sequence of instantaneous binary collisions. We study how the numbers of collisions of different pairs of particles grow as functions of time. We observe that these numbers can be represented as a time integral of a function on the phase space. Assuming the results of the ergodic theory apply, we describe the evolution of the numbers by an effective Langevin dynamics. We use the facts that hold for these dynamics with probability one, in order to establish properties of a single trajectory of the system. We find that for any triplet of particles there will be an infinite sequence of moments of time, when the numbers of collisions of all three different pairs of the triplet will be equal. Moreover, any value of difference of collision numbers of pairs in the triplet will repeat indefinitely. On the other hand, for larger numbers of pairs there is but a finite number of repetitions. Thus the ergodic theory produces a limitation on the dynamics.

  19. Finite Mathematics and Discrete Mathematics: Is There a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marvin L.

    Discrete mathematics and finite mathematics differ in a number of ways. First, finite mathematics has a longer history and is therefore more stable in terms of course content. Finite mathematics courses emphasize certain particular mathematical tools which are useful in solving the problems of business and the social sciences. Discrete mathematics…

  20. Cycles through all finite vertex sets in infinite graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kundgen, Andre; Li, Binlong; Thomassen, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    is contained in a cycle of G. We apply this to extend a number of results and conjectures on finite graphs to Hamiltonian curves in infinite locally finite graphs. For example, Barnette’s conjecture (that every finite planar cubic 3-connected bipartite graph is Hamiltonian) is equivalent to the statement...

  1. Cholesterol Efflux Capacity, High-Density Lipoprotein Particle Number, and Incident Cardiovascular Events: An Analysis From the JUPITER Trial (Justification for the Use of Statins in Prevention: An Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Amit V; Demler, Olga V; Adelman, Steven J; Collins, Heidi L; Glynn, Robert J; Ridker, Paul M; Rader, Daniel J; Mora, Samia

    2017-06-20

    Recent failures of drugs that raised high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels to reduce cardiovascular events in clinical trials have led to increased interest in alternative indices of HDL quality, such as cholesterol efflux capacity, and HDL quantity, such as HDL particle number. However, no studies have directly compared these metrics in a contemporary population that includes potent statin therapy and low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. HDL cholesterol levels, apolipoprotein A-I, cholesterol efflux capacity, and HDL particle number were assessed at baseline and 12 months in a nested case-control study of the JUPITER trial (Justification for the Use of Statins in Prevention: An Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin), a randomized primary prevention trial that compared rosuvastatin treatment to placebo in individuals with normal low-density lipoprotein cholesterol but increased C-reactive protein levels. In total, 314 cases of incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) (myocardial infarction, unstable angina, arterial revascularization, stroke, or cardiovascular death) were compared to age- and gender-matched controls. Conditional logistic regression models adjusting for risk factors evaluated associations between HDL-related biomarkers and incident CVD. Cholesterol efflux capacity was moderately correlated with HDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein A-I, and HDL particle number (Spearman r = 0.39, 0.48, and 0.39 respectively; P capacity (OR/SD, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.72-1.10; P =0.28), HDL cholesterol (OR/SD, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.66-1.02; P =0.08), or apolipoprotein A-I (OR/SD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.67-1.03; P =0.08). Twelve months of rosuvastatin (20 mg/day) did not change cholesterol efflux capacity (average percentage change -1.5%, 95% CI, -13.3 to +10.2; P =0.80), but increased HDL cholesterol (+7.7%), apolipoprotein A-I (+4.3%), and HDL particle number (+5.2%). On-statin cholesterol efflux capacity was inversely associated with incident CVD (OR/SD, 0.62; 95% CI, 0

  2. Clifford algebra in finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, M.

    1997-12-01

    We consider the most general power counting renormalizable and gauge invariant Lagrangean density L invariant with respect to some non-Abelian, compact, and semisimple gauge group G. The particle content of this quantum field theory consists of gauge vector bosons, real scalar bosons, fermions, and ghost fields. We assume that the ultimate grand unified theory needs no cutoff. This yields so-called finiteness conditions, resulting from the demand for finite physical quantities calculated by the bare Lagrangean. In lower loop order, necessary conditions for finiteness are thus vanishing beta functions for dimensionless couplings. The complexity of the finiteness conditions for a general quantum field theory makes the discussion of non-supersymmetric theories rather cumbersome. Recently, the F = 1 class of finite quantum field theories has been proposed embracing all supersymmetric theories. A special type of F = 1 theories proposed turns out to have Yukawa couplings which are equivalent to generators of a Clifford algebra representation. These algebraic structures are remarkable all the more than in the context of a well-known conjecture which states that finiteness is maybe related to global symmetries (such as supersymmetry) of the Lagrangean density. We can prove that supersymmetric theories can never be of this Clifford-type. It turns out that these Clifford algebra representations found recently are a consequence of certain invariances of the finiteness conditions resulting from a vanishing of the renormalization group β-function for the Yukawa couplings. We are able to exclude almost all such Clifford-like theories. (author)

  3. Collective dynamics of particles from viscous to turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The book surveys the state-of-the-art methods that are currently available to model and simulate the presence of rigid particles in a fluid flow. For particles that are very small relative to the characteristic flow scales and move without interaction with other particles, effective equations of motion for particle tracking are formulated and applied (e.g. in gas-solid flows). For larger particles, for particles in liquid-solid flows and for particles that interact with each other or possibly modify the overall flow detailed model are presented. Special attention is given to the description of the approximate force coupling method (FCM) as a more general treatment for small particles, and derivations in the context of low Reynolds numbers for the particle motion as well as application at finite Reynolds numbers are provided. Other topics discussed in the book are the relation to higher resolution immersed boundary methods, possible extensions to non-spherical particles and examples of applications of such met...

  4. Olber's Paradox Revisited in a Static and Finite Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Building a Universe populated by stars identical to our Sun and taking into consideration the wave-particle duality of light, the biological limits of the human eye, the finite size of stars and the finiteness of our Universe, we conclude that the sky could very well be dark at night. Besides the human eye, the dominant parameter is the finite…

  5. Fractional finite Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Kedar; George, Nicholas

    2004-07-01

    We show that a fractional version of the finite Fourier transform may be defined by using prolate spheroidal wave functions of order zero. The transform is linear and additive in its index and asymptotically goes over to Namias's definition of the fractional Fourier transform. As a special case of this definition, it is shown that the finite Fourier transform may be inverted by using information over a finite range of frequencies in Fourier space, the inversion being sensitive to noise. Numerical illustrations for both forward (fractional) and inverse finite transforms are provided.

  6. Finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucha, W.; Neufeld, H.

    1986-01-01

    We investigate the relation between finiteness of a four-dimensional quantum field theory and global supersymmetry. To this end we consider the most general quantum field theory and analyse the finiteness conditions resulting from the requirement of the absence of divergent contributions to the renormalizations of the parameters of the theory. In addition to the gauge bosons, both fermions and scalar bosons turn out to be a necessary ingredient in a non-trivial finite gauge theory. In all cases discussed, the supersymmetric theory restricted by two well-known constraints on the dimensionless couplings proves to be the unique solution of the finiteness conditions. (Author)

  7. A laboratory comparison of emission factors, number size distributions and morphology of ultrafine particles from eleven different household cookstove-fuel systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset includes all data used to generate figures in the manuscript and supporting information for the publication entitled "Emission factors, number size...

  8. On the number of special numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We now apply the theory of the Thue equation to obtain an effective bound on m. Indeed, by Lemma 3.2, we can write m2 = ba3 and m2 − 4 = cd3 with b, c cubefree. By the above, both b, c are bounded since they are cubefree and all their prime factors are less than e63727. Now we have a finite number of. Thue equations:.

  9. Redistribution of energetic particles by background turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauff, T.; Jenko, F.

    2007-01-01

    The quest to understand the turbulent transport of particles, momentum and energy in magnetized plasmas remains a key challenge in fusion research. A basic issue being .still relatively poorly understood is the turbulent ExB advection of charged test particles with large gyroradii. Especially the interaction of alpha particles or impurities with the background turbulence is of great interest. In order to understand the dependence of the particle diffusivity on the interaction mechanisms between FLR effects and the special structure of a certain type of turbulence, direct numerical simulations are done in artificially created two dimensional turbulent electrostatic fields, assuming a constant magnetic field. Finite gyroradius effects are introduced using the gyrokinetic approximation which means that the gyrating particle is simply replaced by a charged ring. Starting from an idealized isotropic potential with Gaussian autocorrelation function, numerous test particle simulations are done varying both the gyroradius and the Kubo number of the potential. It is found that for Kubo numbers larger than about unity, the particle diffusivity is almost independent of the gyroradius as long as the latter does not exceed the correlation length of the electrostatic potential, whereas for small Kubo numbers the diffusivity is monotonically reduced. The underlying physical mechanisms of this behavior are identified and an analytic approach is developed which favorably agrees with the simulation results. The investigations are extended by introducing anisotropic structures like streamers and zonal flows into the artificial potential, leading to quantitative modulations of the gyroradius dependence of the diffusion coefficient. Analytic models are used to explain these various effects. After having developed a general overview on the behavior in simplified artificial potentials, test particle simulations in realistic turbulence created by the gyrokinetic turbulence code GENE are

  10. Two-color fluorescence analysis of individual virions determines the distribution of the copy number of proteins in herpes simplex virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Richard W; Monnier, Nilah; Li, Haitao; Zhou, Dejian; Browne, Helena; Klenerman, David

    2007-08-15

    We present a single virion method to determine absolute distributions of copy number in the protein composition of viruses and apply it to herpes simplex virus type 1. Using two-color coincidence fluorescence spectroscopy, we determine the virion-to-virion variability in copy numbers of fluorescently labeled tegument and envelope proteins relative to a capsid protein by analyzing fluorescence intensity ratios for ensembles of individual dual-labeled virions and fitting the resulting histogram of ratios. Using EYFP-tagged capsid protein VP26 as a reference for fluorescence intensity, we are able to calculate the mean and also, for the first time to our knowledge, the variation in numbers of gD, VP16, and VP22 tegument. The measurement of the number of glycoprotein D molecules was in good agreement with independent measurements of average numbers of these glycoproteins in bulk virus preparations, validating the method. The accuracy, straightforward data processing, and high throughput of this technique make it widely applicable to the analysis of the molecular composition of large complexes in general, and it is particularly suited to providing insights into virus structure, assembly, and infectivity.

  11. Finite Boltzmann schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    In the special case of relaxation parameter = 1 lattice Boltzmann schemes for (convection) diffusion and fluid flow are equivalent to finite difference/volume (FD) schemes, and are thus coined finite Boltzmann (FB) schemes. We show that the equivalence is inherent to the homology of the

  12. Designs and finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Designs and Finite Geometries brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this important area of mathematics. Designs and Finite Geometries serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most important research issues in the field.

  13. Supersymmetric theories and finiteness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helayel-Neto, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    We attempt here to present a short survey of the all-order finite Lagrangian field theories known at present in four-and two-dimensional space-times. The question of the possible relevance of these ultraviolet finite models in the formulation of consistent unified frameworks for the fundamental forces is also addressed to. (author)

  14. Simple Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    We will begin our treatment of summability calculus by analyzing what will be referred to, throughout this book, as simple finite sums. Even though the results of this chapter are particular cases of the more general results presented in later chapters, they are important to start with for a few reasons. First, this chapter serves as an excellent introduction to what summability calculus can markedly accomplish. Second, simple finite sums are encountered more often and, hence, they deserve special treatment. Third, the results presented in this chapter for simple finite sums will, themselves, be used as building blocks for deriving the most general results in subsequent chapters. Among others, we establish that fractional finite sums are well-defined mathematical objects and show how various identities related to the Euler constant as well as the Riemann zeta function can actually be derived in an elementary manner using fractional finite sums.

  15. Simple Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-01-01

    We will begin our treatment of summability calculus by analyzing what will be referred to, throughout this book, as simple finite sums. Even though the results of this chapter are particular cases of the more general results presented in later chapters, they are important to start with for a few reasons. First, this chapter serves as an excellent introduction to what summability calculus can markedly accomplish. Second, simple finite sums are encountered more often and, hence, they deserve special treatment. Third, the results presented in this chapter for simple finite sums will, themselves, be used as building blocks for deriving the most general results in subsequent chapters. Among others, we establish that fractional finite sums are well-defined mathematical objects and show how various identities related to the Euler constant as well as the Riemann zeta function can actually be derived in an elementary manner using fractional finite sums.

  16. Finite-size corrections in simulation of dipolar fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloni, Luc; Puibasset, Joël

    2017-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of dipolar fluids are performed at different numbers of particles N = 100-4000. For each size of the cubic cell, the non-spherically symmetric pair distribution function g(r,Ω) is accumulated in terms of projections gmnl(r) onto rotational invariants. The observed N dependence is in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions for the finite-size corrections of different origins: the explicit corrections due to the absence of fluctuations in the number of particles within the canonical simulation and the implicit corrections due to the coupling between the environment around a given particle and that around its images in the neighboring cells. The latter dominates in fluids of strong dipolar coupling characterized by low compressibility and high dielectric constant. The ability to clean with great precision the simulation data from these corrections combined with the use of very powerful anisotropic integral equation techniques means that exact correlation functions both in real and Fourier spaces, Kirkwood-Buff integrals, and bridge functions can be derived from box sizes as small as N ≈ 100, even with existing long-range tails. In the presence of dielectric discontinuity with the external medium surrounding the central box and its replica within the Ewald treatment of the Coulombic interactions, the 1/N dependence of the gmnl(r) is shown to disagree with the, yet well-accepted, prediction of the literature.

  17. A New Approach for the Statistical Thermodynamic Theory of the Nonextensive Systems Confined in Different Finite Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hui-Yi; Wang, Jian-Hui; Ma, Yong-Li

    2014-06-01

    For a small system at a low temperature, thermal fluctuation and quantum effect play important roles in quantum thermodynamics. Starting from micro-canonical ensemble, we generalize the Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical factor from infinite to finite systems, no matter the interactions between particles are considered or not. This generalized factor, similar to Tsallis's q-form as a power-law distribution, has the restriction of finite energy spectrum and includes the nonextensivities of the small systems. We derive the exact expression for distribution of average particle numbers in the interacting classical and quantum nonextensive systems within a generalized canonical ensemble. This expression in the almost independent or elementary excitation quantum finite systems is similar to the corresponding ones obtained from the conventional grand-canonical ensemble. In the reconstruction for the statistical theory of the small systems, we present the entropy of the equilibrium systems and equation of total thermal energy. When we investigate the thermodynamics for the interacting nonextensive systems, we obtain the system-bath heat exchange and "uncompensated heat" which are in the thermodynamical level and independent on the detail of the system-bath coupling. For ideal finite systems, with different traps and boundary conditions, we calculate some thermodynamic quantities, such as the specific heat, entropy, and equation of state, etc. Particularly at low temperatures for the small systems, we predict some novel behaviors in the quantum thermodynamics, including internal entropy production, heat exchanges between the system and its surroundings and finite-size effects on the free energy.

  18. Finite Optimal Stopping Problems: The Seller's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Mehdi; Smith, J. Cole

    2011-01-01

    We consider a version of an optimal stopping problem, in which a customer is presented with a finite set of items, one by one. The customer is aware of the number of items in the finite set and the minimum and maximum possible value of each item, and must purchase exactly one item. When an item is presented to the customer, she or he observes its…

  19. Entangling transformations in composite finite quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vourdas, A

    2003-01-01

    Phase space methods are applied in the context of finite quantum systems. 'Galois quantum systems' (with a dimension which is a power of a prime number) are considered, and symplectic Sp(2,Z(d)) transformations are studied. Composite systems comprising two finite quantum systems are also considered. Symplectic Sp(4,Z(d)) transformations are classified into local and entangling ones and the necessary matrices which perform such transformations are calculated numerically

  20. Finite W-algebras and intermediate statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbarin, F.; Ragoucy, E.; Sorba, P.

    1994-09-01

    New realizations of finite W-algebras are constructed by relaxing the usual conditions. Then finite W-algebras are recognized in the Heisenberg quantization recently proposed by Leinaas and Myrheim, for a system of two identical particles in d dimensions. As the anyonic parameter is directly associated to the W-algebra involved in the d=1 case, it is natural to consider that the W-algebra framework is well adapted for a possible generalization of the anyon statistics. (author). 13 refs

  1. High mobility group protein number17 cross-links primarily to histone H2A in the reconstituted HMG 17 - nucleosome core particle complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, G.R.; Yau, P.; Yasuda, H.; Traut, R.R.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    The neighbor relationship of lamb thymus High Mobility Group (HMG) protein 17 to native HeLa nucleosome core particle histones in the reconstituted complex has been studied. 125 I-labeled HMG 17 was cross-linking to core histones using the protein-protein cross-linking reagent 2-iminothiolane. Specific cross-linked products were separated on a two-dimensional Triton-acid-urea/SDS gel system, located by autoradiography, excised and quantified. Disulfide bonds in the cross links were then cleaved and the protein constituents were identified by SDS gel electrophoresis. HMG 17 cross-linked primarily to histone H2A while lower levels of cross-linking occurred between HMG 17 and the other histones. In contrast, cross-linking between two HMG 17 molecules bound on the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that H2A comprises part of the HMG 17 binding site but that HMG 17 is sufficiently elongated and mobile to permit cross-linking to the other histones and to a second HMG 17 molecule. These results are in agreement with the current model for the structure of the nucleosome and the proposed binding sites for HMG 17

  2. A development of the Gibbs potential of a quantised system made up of a large number of particles. III. The contribution of binary collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BLOCH, Claude; DE DOMINICIS, Cyrano

    1959-01-01

    Starting from an expansion derived in a previous work, we study the contribution to the Gibbs potential of the two-body dynamical correlations, taking into account the statistical correlations. Such a contribution is of interest for low-density systems at low temperature. In the zero density limit, it reduces to the Beth-Uhlenbeck expression for the second virial coefficient. For a system of fermions in the zero temperature limit, it yields the contribution of the Brueckner reaction matrix to the ground state energy, plus, under certain conditions, additional terms of the form exp ( β / Δ /), where the Δ are the binding energies of 'bound states' of the type first discussed by L. Cooper. Finally, we study the wave function of two particles immersed in a medium (defined by its temperature and chemical potential). It satisfies an equation generalizing the Bethe-Goldstone equation for an arbitrary temperature. Reprint of a paper published in Nuclear Physics, 10, p. 509-526, 1959

  3. Effect study of multi-bubbles on stress distribution of fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yi; Wang Xiaomin; Long Chongsheng

    2015-01-01

    The finite element model was proposed to simulate the process of the UO_2 dispersion fuel particle sustaining the internal pressure of multi-bubbles, and the stress distribution of fuel particle with intra-bubbles was calculated. The results show that when the bubbles line equidistantly along x axis, the max normal stress along y axis increases with the number of bubbles, meanwhile, the increment of the normal stress gradually decreases. There is a limit that the effect of bubble's number imposes on the max normal stress in the fuel particle. When multi-column of bubbles exist, the max normal stress along x axis in the fuel particle increases, and the max normal stress along y axis decreases with the increase of the number of bubble column. The stress concentration in the fuel particle decreases with the spacing radius ratio increasing. (authors)

  4. Finite-size scaling of survival probability in branching processes

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Millan, Rosalba; Font-Clos, Francesc; Corral, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Branching processes pervade many models in statistical physics. We investigate the survival probability of a Galton-Watson branching process after a finite number of generations. We reveal the finite-size scaling law of the survival probability for a given branching process ruled by a probability distribution of the number of offspring per element whose standard deviation is finite, obtaining the exact scaling function as well as the critical exponents. Our findings prove the universal behavi...

  5. Investigation of the effective atomic numbers of dosimetric materials for electrons, protons and alpha particles using a direct method in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Aksakal, Oğuz; Akkuş, Tuba

    2015-11-01

    A direct method has been used for the first time, to compute effective atomic numbers (Z eff) of water, air, human tissues, and some organic and inorganic compounds, for total electron proton and alpha particle interaction in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV. The obtained values for Z eff were then compared to those obtained using an interpolation procedure. In general, good agreement has been observed for electrons, and the difference (%) in Z eff between the results of the direct and the interpolation method was found to be energy range from 10 keV to 1 MeV. More specifically, results of the two methods were found to agree well (Dif. energy region with respect to the total electron interaction. On the other hand, values for Z eff calculated using both methods for protons and alpha particles generally agree with each other in the high-energy region above 10 MeV.

  6. Canonical harmonic tracking of charged particles in circular accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvardakov, V.; Levichev, E.

    2006-01-01

    Harmonic tracking is a method used to study non-linear particle dynamics in a circular accelerator. The tracking algorithm is based on numerical solution of the Hamilton equations of motion. An essential feature of the method is the approximation of Hamiltonian perturbation terms by a finite number of azimuthal harmonics, which provides an effective tool for optimization of non-linear particle motion. The equations of motion are solved canonically, with the first-order prediction made using the explicit Lie transformation. The major features of harmonic tracking are presented and examples of its application are discussed

  7. Canonical harmonic tracking of charged particles in circular accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvardakov, V.; Levichev, E.

    2006-03-01

    Harmonic tracking is a method used to study non-linear particle dynamics in a circular accelerator. The tracking algorithm is based on numerical solution of the Hamilton equations of motion. An essential feature of the method is the approximation of Hamiltonian perturbation terms by a finite number of azimuthal harmonics, which provides an effective tool for optimization of non-linear particle motion. The equations of motion are solved canonically, with the first-order prediction made using the explicit Lie transformation. The major features of harmonic tracking are presented and examples of its application are discussed.

  8. Real-time visualization of dynamic particle contact failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parab, Niranjan D.; Hudspeth, Matthew; Claus, Ben; Guo, Zherui; Sun, Tao; Fezzaa, Kamel; Chen, Weinong W.

    2017-01-01

    Granular materials are widely used to resist impact and blast. Under these dynamic loadings, the constituent particles in the granular system fracture. To study the fracture mechanisms in brittle particles under dynamic compressive loading, a high speed X-ray phase contrast imaging setup was synchronized with a Kolsky bar apparatus. Controlled compressive loading was applied on two contacting particles using the Kolsky bar apparatus and fracture process was captured using the high speed X-ray imaging setup. Five different particles were investigated: soda-lime glass, polycrystalline silica (silicon dioxide), polycrystalline silicon, barium titanate glass, and yttrium stabilized zirconia. For both soda lime glass and polycrystalline silica particles, one of the particles fragmented explosively, thus breaking into many small pieces. For Silicon and barium titanate glass particles, a finite number of cracks were observed in one of the particles causing it to fracture. For yttrium stabilized zirconia particles, a single meridonial crack developed in one of the particles, breaking it into two parts.

  9. Finite elements and approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zienkiewicz, O C

    2006-01-01

    A powerful tool for the approximate solution of differential equations, the finite element is extensively used in industry and research. This book offers students of engineering and physics a comprehensive view of the principles involved, with numerous illustrative examples and exercises.Starting with continuum boundary value problems and the need for numerical discretization, the text examines finite difference methods, weighted residual methods in the context of continuous trial functions, and piecewise defined trial functions and the finite element method. Additional topics include higher o

  10. On the incompatibility of parity, baryon number and supersymmetries in hadron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosser, D.

    1976-01-01

    Consider a theory with nontrivial S-matrix, nonvanishing masses and the property that to every mass belongs only a finite number of different types of particles. Suppose that it admits parity, baryon number and supersymmetries. It is shown that, if the theory accommodates a supermultiplet of hadrons and if all physically realizable vectors belonging to the mass of this supermultiplet represent hadrons, then the theory is inconsistent. In the derivation use is made of the experimental fact that hadrons have baryon number zero if they are bosons and baryon number +-1 if they are fermions

  11. Theory of analogous force on number sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canessa, Enrique [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    2003-08-01

    A general statistical thermodynamic theory that considers given sequences of x-integers to play the role of particles of known type in an isolated elastic system is proposed. By also considering some explicit discrete probability distributions p{sub x} for natural numbers, we claim that they lead to a better understanding of probabilistic laws associated with number theory. Sequences of numbers are treated as the size measure of finite sets. By considering p{sub x} to describe complex phenomena, the theory leads to derive a distinct analogous force f{sub x} on number sets proportional to ({partial_derivative}p{sub x}/{partial_derivative}x){sub T} at an analogous system temperature T. In particular, this yields to an understanding of the uneven distribution of integers of random sets in terms of analogous scale invariance and a screened inverse square force acting on the significant digits. The theory also allows to establish recursion relations to predict sequences of Fibonacci numbers and to give an answer to the interesting theoretical question of the appearance of the Benford's law in Fibonacci numbers. A possible relevance to prime numbers is also analyzed. (author)

  12. Use of low density lipoprotein particle number levels as an aid in statin treatment decisions for intermediate risk patients: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Dov; Arellano, Andre R; Caulfield, Michael P; Louie, Judy Z; Bare, Lance A; Devlin, James J; Melander, Olle

    2016-12-07

    The 2013 ACC/AHA guideline recommended either no statin therapy or moderate-intensity statin therapy (MST) for intermediate risk patients-those with 5-7.5% 10-year risk and without cardiovascular disease (CVD), hypercholesterolemia or diabetes. The guideline further suggested that the therapy choice be based on patient-clinician discussions of risks and benefits. Since low-density lipoprotein particle (LDL-P) levels were reported to be associated with CVD independently of traditional risk factors in intermediate and low risk patients, we investigated the cost-effectiveness of using LDL-P levels to identify intermediate risk patients likely to benefit from initiating or intensifying statin therapy. We evaluated 5 care strategies for intermediate risk patients. These included the strategies suggested by the guideline: no-statin therapy and MST. We compared each of these strategies to a related strategy that incorporated LDL-P testing. No-statin therapy was compared with the strategy of MST for those with high LDL-P levels and no statin therapy for all other patients (test-and-MST). MST was compared with the strategy of high-intensity statin therapy (HST) for those with high LDL-P levels and MST for all other patients (test-and-HST). We also evaluated the strategy of HST for all. Costs (payer perspective) and utilities were assessed over a 5-year time horizon in a Markov model of 100,000 hypothetical intermediate risk patients. HST dominated all other strategies, costing less and-despite causing 739 more cases of diabetes than did MST-resulting in more quality adjusted life-years (QALYs). For patient-clinician discussions that would otherwise lead to the MST strategy, we found the test-and-HST strategy reduced costs by $4.67 MM and resulted in 134 fewer CVD events and 115 additional QALYs. For patient-clinician discussions that would otherwise lead to no statin therapy, we found that the test-and-MST strategy reduced costs by $3.25 MM, resulted in 97 fewer CVD events

  13. Introduction to finite temperature and finite density QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2014-01-01

    It has been pointed out that QCD (Quantum Chromodynamics) in the circumstances of medium at finite temperature and density shows numbers of phenomena similar to the characteristics of solid state physics, e.g. phase transitions. In the past ten years, the very high temperature and density matter came to be observed experimentally at the heavy ion collisions. At the same time, the numerical QCD analysis at finite temperature and density attained quantitative level analysis possible owing to the remarkable progress of computers. In this summer school lecture, it has been set out to give not only the recent results, but also the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry, the fundamental theory of finite temperature and further expositions as in the following four sections. The first section is titled as 'Introduction to Finite Temperature and Density QCD' with subsections of 1.1 standard model and QCD, 1.2 phase transition and phase structure of QCD, 1.3 lattice QCD and thermodynamic quantity, 1.4 heavy ion collision experiments, and 1.5 neutron stars. The second one is 'Equilibrium State' with subsections of 2.1 chiral symmetry, 2.2 vacuum state: BCS theory, 2.3 NJL (Nambu-Jona-Lasinio) model, and 2.4 color superconductivity. The third one is 'Static fluctuations' with subsections of 3.1 fluctuations, 3.2 moment and cumulant, 3.3 increase of fluctuations at critical points, 3.4 analysis of fluctuations by lattice QCD and Taylor expansion, and 3.5 experimental exploration of QCD phase structure. The fourth one is 'Dynamical Structure' with 4.1 linear response theory, 4.2 spectral functions, 4.3 Matsubara function, and 4.4 analyses of dynamical structure by lattice QCD. (S. Funahashi)

  14. Finite Amplitude Ocean Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    wavelength, they are called shallow water waves. In the ... Deep and intermediate water waves are dispersive as the velocity of these depends on wavelength. This is not the ..... generation processes, the finite amplitude wave theories are very ...

  15. Finite Discrete Gabor Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Peter Lempel

    2007-01-01

    frequency bands at certain times. Gabor theory can be formulated for both functions on the real line and for discrete signals of finite length. The two theories are largely the same because many aspects come from the same underlying theory of locally compact Abelian groups. The two types of Gabor systems...... can also be related by sampling and periodization. This thesis extends on this theory by showing new results for window construction. It also provides a discussion of the problems associated to discrete Gabor bases. The sampling and periodization connection is handy because it allows Gabor systems...... on the real line to be well approximated by finite and discrete Gabor frames. This method of approximation is especially attractive because efficient numerical methods exists for doing computations with finite, discrete Gabor systems. This thesis presents new algorithms for the efficient computation of finite...

  16. Finite size scaling theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittenberg, V.

    1983-01-01

    Fischer's finite-size scaling describes the cross over from the singular behaviour of thermodynamic quantities at the critical point to the analytic behaviour of the finite system. Recent extensions of the method--transfer matrix technique, and the Hamiltonian formalism--are discussed in this paper. The method is presented, with equations deriving scaling function, critical temperature, and exponent v. As an application of the method, a 3-states Hamiltonian with Z 3 global symmetry is studied. Diagonalization of the Hamiltonian for finite chains allows one to estimate the critical exponents, and also to discover new phase transitions at lower temperatures. The critical points lambda, and indices v estimated for finite-scaling are given

  17. Variable property, steady, axi-symmetric, laminar, continuum plasma flow over spheroidal particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Yuemin; Jog, Milind A.

    2005-01-01

    Steady, continuum, laminar plasma flow over spheroidal particles has been numerically investigated in this paper using a finite volume method. To body-fit the non-spherical particle surface, an adaptive orthogonal grid is generated. The flow field and the temperature distribution are calculated for oblate and prolate particle shapes. A number of particle surface temperatures and far field temperatures are considered and thermo-physical property variation is fully accounted for in our model. The particle shapes are represented in terms of axis ratio which is defined as the ratio of axis perpendicular to the flow direction to the axis along the flow direction. For oblate shape, axis ratios from 1.6 (disk-like) to 1 (sphere) are used whereas for prolate shape, axis ratios of 1(sphere) to 0.4 (cylinder-like) are used. Effects of flow Reynolds number, particle shape, surface and far field temperatures, and variable properties, on the flow field, temperature variations, drag coefficient, and Nusselt number are outlined. Results show that particle shape has significant effect on flow and heat transfer to particle surface. Compared to a constant property flow, accounting for thermo-physical property variation leads to prediction of higher temperature and velocity gradients in the vicinity of the particle surface. Based on the numerical results, a correlation for the Nusslet number is proposed that accounts for the effect of particle shape in continuum flow with large thermo-physical property variation

  18. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.E.; Love, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Finite-temperature supersymmetry (SUSY) is characterized by unbroken Ward identities for SUSY variations of ensemble averages of Klein-operator inserted imaginary time-ordered products of fields. Path-integral representations of these products are defined and the Feynman rules in superspace are given. The finite-temperature no-renormalization theorem is derived. Spontaneously broken SUSY at zero temperature is shown not to be restored at high temperature. (orig.)

  19. Low Reynolds number suspension gravity currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sandeep; Salin, Dominique; Talon, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    The extension of a gravity current in a lock-exchange problem, proceeds as square root of time in the viscous-buoyancy phase, where there is a balance between gravitational and viscous forces. In the presence of particles however, this scenario is drastically altered, because sedimentation reduces the motive gravitational force and introduces a finite distance and time at which the gravity current halts. We investigate the spreading of low Reynolds number suspension gravity currents using a novel approach based on the Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) method. The suspension is modeled as a continuous medium with a concentration-dependent viscosity. The settling of particles is simulated using a drift flux function approach that enables us to capture sudden discontinuities in particle concentration that travel as kinematic shock waves. Thereafter a numerical investigation of lock-exchange flows between pure fluids of unequal viscosity, reveals the existence of wall layers which reduce the spreading rate substantially compared to the lubrication theory prediction. In suspension gravity currents, we observe that the settling of particles leads to the formation of two additional fronts: a horizontal front near the top that descends vertically and a sediment layer at the bottom which aggrandises due to deposition of particles. Three phases are identified in the spreading process: the final corresponding to the mutual approach of the two horizontal fronts while the laterally advancing front halts indicating that the suspension current stops even before all the particles have settled. The first two regimes represent a constant and a decreasing spreading rate respectively. Finally we conduct experiments to substantiate the conclusions of our numerical and theoretical investigation.

  20. Finite Volumes for Complex Applications VII

    CERN Document Server

    Ohlberger, Mario; Rohde, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The methods considered in the 7th conference on "Finite Volumes for Complex Applications" (Berlin, June 2014) have properties which offer distinct advantages for a number of applications. The second volume of the proceedings covers reviewed contributions reporting successful applications in the fields of fluid dynamics, magnetohydrodynamics, structural analysis, nuclear physics, semiconductor theory and other topics. The finite volume method in its various forms is a space discretization technique for partial differential equations based on the fundamental physical principle of conservation. Recent decades have brought significant success in the theoretical understanding of the method. Many finite volume methods preserve further qualitative or asymptotic properties, including maximum principles, dissipativity, monotone decay of free energy, and asymptotic stability. Due to these properties, finite volume methods belong to the wider class of compatible discretization methods, which preserve qualitative propert...