WorldWideScience

Sample records for finite heat reservoirs

  1. Overall conductance and heat transfer area minimization of refrigerators and heat pumps with finite heat reservoirs

    Sarkar, J.; Bhattacharyya, Souvik

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, the overall conductance and the overall heat transfer area per unit capacity of refrigeration and heat pump systems have been minimized analytically considering both internal and external irreversibilities with variable temperature (finite capacity) heat reservoirs. Hot and cold side refrigerant temperatures, conductance and heat transfer area ratios have been optimized to attain this goal. The results have been verified with the more elaborate numerical optimization results obtained for ammonia based vapour compression refrigeration and heat pump systems working with variable temperature reservoirs. It is observed that the analytical results for optimum refrigerant temperatures, minimum overall conductance and heat transfer area deviate marginally from the numerically optimized results (within 1%), if one assumes a constant heat rejection temperature. The deviation of minimum overall conductance and heat transfer area is more (about 20%), if one considers both the desuperheating and condensation regions separately. However, in the absence of complex and elaborate numerical models, the simple analytical results obtained here can be used as reasonably accurate preliminary guidelines for optimization of refrigeration and heat pump systems

  2. Seismic response of concrete gravity dams with finite reservoir

    Baumber, T.; Ghobarah, A.

    1992-01-01

    In most previous analyses of dam responses to earthquake ground motion, the upstream reservoir is assumed to be infinite in length and completely straight. The meandering nature of the river system, however, results in the creation of a finite length reservoir upstream of the dam structure. A study was carried out to examine the effects of the finite length of the reservoir on the dynamic behavior of the monolith. The effect of excitation of the far end of the boundary on the monolith's response is also of interest. The dam-foundation-reservoir system is modelled using a sub-structuring approach. The analysis is conducted in the frequency domain and utilizes the finite element technique. The water in the reservoir is assumed to be compressible, inviscid, and irrotational. The upstream reservoir is assumed to have a rectangular cross-section. It was found that the finite length reservoir assumption results in supplementary response peaks in the monolith's response. The finite reservoir length allows the reservoir to resonate both in horizontal and vertical directions. The magnitude and spacing of these supplementary response peaks are dependent on the length of the reservoir. The phase of the ground motion which affects the far end boundary of the reservoir was also found to have a significant effect on the dam monolith's response. 8 refs., 5 figs

  3. Electrokinetic Flow in Microchannels with Finite Reservoir Size Effects

    Yan, D; Yang, C; Nguyen, N-T; Huang, X

    2006-01-01

    In electrokinetically-driven microfluidic applications, reservoirs are indispensable and have finite sizes. During operation processes, as the liquid level difference in reservoirs keeps changing as time elapses, the flow characteristics in a microchannel exhibit a combination of the electroosmotic flow and the time-dependent induced backpressure-driven flow. In this work, an assessment of the finite reservoir size effect on electroosmotic flows is presented theoretically and experimentally. A model is developed to describe the timedependent electrokinetic flow with finite reservoir size effects. The theoretical analysis shows that under certain conditions the finite reservoir size effect is significant. The important parameters that describe the effect of finite reservoir size on the flow characteristics are discussed. A new concept denoted as 'effective pumping period' is introduced to characterize the reservoir size effect. The proposed model clearly identifies the mechanisms of the finitereservoir size effects and is further confirmed by using micro-PIV technique. The results of this study can be used for facilitating the design of microfluidic devices

  4. Performance analysis for an irreversible variable temperature heat reservoir closed intercooled regenerated Brayton cycle

    Wang Wenhua; Chen Lingen; Sun Fengrui; Wu Chih

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the theory of finite time thermodynamics is used in the performance analysis of an irreversible closed intercooled regenerated Brayton cycle coupled to variable temperature heat reservoirs. The analytical formulae for dimensionless power and efficiency, as functions of the total pressure ratio, the intercooling pressure ratio, the component (regenerator, intercooler, hot and cold side heat exchangers) effectivenesses, the compressor and turbine efficiencies and the thermal capacity rates of the working fluid and the heat reservoirs, the pressure recovery coefficients, the heat reservoir inlet temperature ratio, and the cooling fluid in the intercooler and the cold side heat reservoir inlet temperature ratio, are derived. The intercooling pressure ratio is optimized for optimal power and optimal efficiency, respectively. The effects of component (regenerator, intercooler and hot and cold side heat exchangers) effectivenesses, the compressor and turbine efficiencies, the pressure recovery coefficients, the heat reservoir inlet temperature ratio and the cooling fluid in the intercooler and the cold side heat reservoir inlet temperature ratio on optimal power and its corresponding intercooling pressure ratio, as well as optimal efficiency and its corresponding intercooling pressure ratio are analyzed by detailed numerical examples. When the heat transfers between the working fluid and the heat reservoirs are executed ideally, the pressure drop losses are small enough to be neglected and the thermal capacity rates of the heat reservoirs are infinite, the results of this paper replicate those obtained in recent literature

  5. Finite-Time Thermoeconomic Optimization of a Solar-Driven Heat Engine Model

    Fernando Angulo-Brown

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the thermoeconomic optimization of an irreversible solar-driven heat engine model has been carried out by using finite-time/finite-size thermodynamic theory. In our study we take into account losses due to heat transfer across finite time temperature differences, heat leakage between thermal reservoirs and internal irreversibilities in terms of a parameter which comes from the Clausius inequality. In the considered heat engine model, the heat transfer from the hot reservoir to the working fluid is assumed to be Dulong-Petit type and the heat transfer to the cold reservoir is assumed of the Newtonian type. In this work, the optimum performance and two design parameters have been investigated under two objective functions: the power output per unit total cost and the ecological function per unit total cost. The effects of the technical and economical parameters on the thermoeconomic performance have been also discussed under the aforementioned two criteria of performance.

  6. Master equation and two heat reservoirs.

    Trimper, Steffen

    2006-11-01

    A simple spin-flip process is analyzed under the presence of two heat reservoirs. While one flip process is triggered by a bath at temperature T, the inverse process is activated by a bath at a different temperature T'. The situation can be described by using a master equation approach in a second quantized Hamiltonian formulation. The stationary solution leads to a generalized Fermi-Dirac distribution with an effective temperature Te. Likewise the relaxation time is given in terms of Te. Introducing a spin representation we perform a Landau expansion for the averaged spin as order parameter and consequently, a free energy functional can be derived. Owing to the two reservoirs the model is invariant with respect to a simultaneous change sigma-sigma and TT'. This symmetry generates a third order term in the free energy which gives rise a dynamically induced first order transition.

  7. Method of extracting heat from dry geothermal reservoirs

    Potter, R.M.; Robinson, E.S.; Smith, M.C.

    1974-01-22

    Hydraulic fracturing is used to interconnect two or more holes that penetrate a previously dry geothermal reservoir, and to produce within the reservoir a sufficiently large heat-transfer surface so that heat can be extracted from the reservoir at a usefully high rate by a fluid entering it through one hole and leaving it through another. Introduction of a fluid into the reservoir to remove heat from it and establishment of natural (unpumped) convective circulation through the reservoir to accomplish continuous heat removal are important and novel features of the method. (auth)

  8. Finite element simulation of heat transfer

    Bergheau, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    This book introduces the finite element method applied to the resolution of industrial heat transfer problems. Starting from steady conduction, the method is gradually extended to transient regimes, to traditional non-linearities, and to convective phenomena. Coupled problems involving heat transfer are then presented. Three types of couplings are discussed: coupling through boundary conditions (such as radiative heat transfer in cavities), addition of state variables (such as metallurgical phase change), and coupling through partial differential equations (such as electrical phenomena).? A re

  9. Improving reservoir history matching of EM heated heavy oil reservoirs via cross-well seismic tomography

    Katterbauer, Klemens

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced recovery methods have become significant in the industry\\'s drive to increase recovery rates from oil and gas reservoirs. For heavy oil reservoirs, the immobility of the oil at reservoir temperatures, caused by its high viscosity, limits the recovery rates and strains the economic viability of these fields. While thermal recovery methods, such as steam injection or THAI, have extensively been applied in the field, their success has so far been limited due to prohibitive heat losses and the difficulty in controlling the combustion process. Electromagnetic (EM) heating via high-frequency EM radiation has attracted attention due to its wide applicability in different environments, its efficiency, and the improved controllability of the heating process. While becoming a promising technology for heavy oil recovery, its effect on overall reservoir production and fluid displacements are poorly understood. Reservoir history matching has become a vital tool for the oil & gas industry to increase recovery rates. Limited research has been undertaken so far to capture the nonlinear reservoir dynamics and significantly varying flow rates for thermally heated heavy oil reservoir that may notably change production rates and render conventional history matching frameworks more challenging. We present a new history matching framework for EM heated heavy oil reservoirs incorporating cross-well seismic imaging. Interfacing an EM heating solver to a reservoir simulator via Andrade’s equation, we couple the system to an ensemble Kalman filter based history matching framework incorporating a cross-well seismic survey module. With increasing power levels and heating applied to the heavy oil reservoirs, reservoir dynamics change considerably and may lead to widely differing production forecasts and increased uncertainty. We have shown that the incorporation of seismic observations into the EnKF framework can significantly enhance reservoir simulations, decrease forecasting

  10. Thermodynamic performance analysis of sequential Carnot cycles using heat sources with finite heat capacity

    Park, Hansaem; Kim, Min Soo

    2014-01-01

    The maximum efficiency of a heat engine is able to be estimated by using a Carnot cycle. Even though, in terms of efficiency, the Carnot cycle performs the role of reference very well, its application is limited to the case of infinite heat reservoirs, which is not that realistic. Moreover, considering that one of the recent key issues is to produce maximum work from low temperature and finite heat sources, which are called renewable energy sources, more advanced theoretical cycles, which can present a new standard, and the research about them are necessary. Therefore, in this paper, a sequential Carnot cycle, where multiple Carnot cycles are connected in parallel, is studied. The cycle adopts a finite heat source, which has a certain initial temperature and heat capacity, and an infinite heat sink, which is assumed to be ambient air. Heat transfer processes in the cycle occur with the temperature difference between a heat reservoir and a cycle. In order to resolve the heat transfer rate in those processes, the product of an overall heat transfer coefficient and a heat transfer area is introduced. Using these conditions, the performance of a sequential Carnot cycle is analytically calculated. Furthermore, as the efforts for enhancing the work of the cycle, the optimization research is also conducted with numerical calculation. - Highlights: • Modified sequential Carnot cycles are proposed for evaluating low grade heat sources. • Performance of sequential Carnot cycles is calculated analytically. • Optimization study for the cycle is conducted with numerical solver. • Maximum work from a heat source under a certain condition is obtained by equations

  11. A parallel adaptive finite difference algorithm for petroleum reservoir simulation

    Hoang, Hai Minh

    2005-07-01

    Adaptive finite differential for problems arising in simulation of flow in porous medium applications are considered. Such methods have been proven useful for overcoming limitations of computational resources and improving the resolution of the numerical solutions to a wide range of problems. By local refinement of the computational mesh where it is needed to improve the accuracy of solutions, yields better solution resolution representing more efficient use of computational resources than is possible with traditional fixed-grid approaches. In this thesis, we propose a parallel adaptive cell-centered finite difference (PAFD) method for black-oil reservoir simulation models. This is an extension of the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) methodology first developed by Berger and Oliger (1984) for the hyperbolic problem. Our algorithm is fully adaptive in time and space through the use of subcycling, in which finer grids are advanced at smaller time steps than the coarser ones. When coarse and fine grids reach the same advanced time level, they are synchronized to ensure that the global solution is conservative and satisfy the divergence constraint across all levels of refinement. The material in this thesis is subdivided in to three overall parts. First we explain the methodology and intricacies of AFD scheme. Then we extend a finite differential cell-centered approximation discretization to a multilevel hierarchy of refined grids, and finally we are employing the algorithm on parallel computer. The results in this work show that the approach presented is robust, and stable, thus demonstrating the increased solution accuracy due to local refinement and reduced computing resource consumption. (Author)

  12. Diffusion of heat from a finite, rectangular, plane heat source

    Ferreri, J.C.; Caballero, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    Non-dimensional results for the temperature field originating in a rectangular, finite, plane heat source with infinitesimal thickness are introduced. The source decays in time, zero decay being a particular case. Results are useful for obtaining an aproximation of the maximum temperature of a system holding an internal heat source. The range selected for the parameters is specially useful in the case of a nuclear waste repository. The application to the case of mass diffussion arises from analogy. (Author) [es

  13. Three dimensional heat transport modeling in Vossoroca reservoir

    Arcie Polli, Bruna; Yoshioka Bernardo, Julio Werner; Hilgert, Stephan; Bleninger, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Freshwater reservoirs are used for many purposes as hydropower generation, water supply and irrigation. In Brazil, according to the National Energy Balance of 2013, hydropower energy corresponds to 70.1% of the Brazilian demand. Superficial waters (which include rivers, lakes and reservoirs) are the most used source for drinking water supply - 56% of the municipalities use superficial waters as a source of water. The last two years have shown that the Brazilian water and electricity supply is highly vulnerable and that improved management is urgently needed. The construction of reservoirs affects physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the water body, e.g. stratification, temperature, residence time and turbulence reduction. Some water quality issues related to reservoirs are eutrophication, greenhouse gas emission to the atmosphere and dissolved oxygen depletion in the hypolimnion. The understanding of the physical processes in the water body is fundamental to reservoir management. Lakes and reservoirs may present a seasonal behavior and stratify due to hydrological and meteorological conditions, and especially its vertical distribution may be related to water quality. Stratification can control heat and dissolved substances transport. It has been also reported the importance of horizontal temperature gradients, e.g. inflows and its density and processes of mass transfer from shallow to deeper regions of the reservoir, that also may impact water quality. Three dimensional modeling of the heat transport in lakes and reservoirs is an important tool to the understanding and management of these systems. It is possible to estimate periods of large vertical temperature gradients, inhibiting vertical transport and horizontal gradients, which could be responsible for horizontal transport of heat and substances (e.g. differential cooling or inflows). Vossoroca reservoir was constructed in 1949 by the impoundment of São João River and is located near to

  14. Effect of heat loss in a geothermal reservoir

    Ganguly, Sayantan; Tan, Lippong; Date, Abhijit; Mohan Kumar, Mandalagiri Subbarayappa

    This paper reports a three-dimensional (3D) numerical study to determine the effect of heat loss on the transient heat transport and temperature distribution in a geothermal reservoir. The operation of a geothermal power plant, which is essentially an injection-production process, involves

  15. HEATING-7, Multidimensional Finite-Difference Heat Conduction Analysis

    2000-01-01

    problems, surface fluxes may be plotted with H7TECPLOT which requires the proprietary software TECPLOT. HEATING 7.3 runs under Windows95 and WindowsNT on PC's. No future modifications are planned for HEATING7. See README.1ST for more information. 2 - Method of solution: Three steady-state solution techniques are available: point-successive over-relaxation iterative method with extrapolation, direct-solution (for one-dimensional or two-dimensional problems), and conjugate gradient. Transient problems may be solved using any one of several finite-difference schemes: Crank-Nicolson implicit, Classical Implicit Procedure (CIP), Classical Explicit Procedure (CEP), or Levy explicit method (which for some circumstances allows a time step greater than the CEP stability criterion.) The solution of the system of equations arising from the implicit techniques is accomplished by point-successive over-relaxation iteration and includes procedures to estimate the optimum acceleration parameter. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: All surfaces in a model must be parallel to one of the coordinate axes which makes modeling complex geometries difficult. Transient change of phase problems can only be solved with one of the explicit techniques - an implicit change-of-phase capability has not been implemented

  16. TACO: a finite element heat transfer code

    Mason, W.E. Jr.

    1980-02-01

    TACO is a two-dimensional implicit finite element code for heat transfer analysis. It can perform both linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady state problems. Either plane or axisymmetric geometries can be analyzed. TACO has the capability to handle time or temperature dependent material properties and materials may be either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent loadings and boundary conditions are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additionally, TACO has some specialized features such as internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance), bulk nodes, enclosure radiation with view factor calculations, and chemical reactive kinetics. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A bandwidth and profile minimization option is also available in the code. Graphical representation of data generated by TACO is provided by a companion post-processor named POSTACO. The theory on which TACO is based is outlined, the capabilities of the code are explained, the input data required to perform an analysis with TACO are described. Some simple examples are provided to illustrate the use of the code

  17. Thermo-economic optimization of an endoreversible four-heat-reservoir absorption-refrigerator

    Qin Xiaoyong; Chen Lingen; Sun Fengrui; Wu Chih

    2005-01-01

    Based on an endoreversible four-heat-reservoir absorption-refrigeration-cycle model, the optimal thermo-economic performance of an absorption-refrigerator is analyzed and optimized assuming a linear (Newtonian) heat-transfer law applies. The optimal relation between the thermo-economic criterion and the coefficient of performance (COP), the maximum thermo-economic criterion, and the COP and specific cooling load for the maximum thermo-economic criterion of the cycle are derived using finite-time thermodynamics. Moreover, the effects of the cycle parameters on the thermo-economic performance of the cycle are studied by numerical examples

  18. Electro-magnetic heating in viscous oil reservoir

    Das, S. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[Marathon Oil Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-10-15

    This paper discussed electromagnetic (EM) heating techniques for primary and secondary enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes. Ohmic, induction, and formation resistive heating techniques were discussed. Issues related to energy equivalence and hardware requirements were reviewed. Challenges related to heat losses in vertical wellbores, well integrity, and galvanic corrosion were also outlined. A pair of 1500 foot horizontal wells in a heavy oil reservoir were then modelled in order to optimize EM recovery processes. DC current was used in a base case water flood run. Electrical conductivities were measured. The model was converted to a homogenous model in order to study injector and producer electrodes. The study showed that reservoir resistance was low, and most of the heating took place near the electrode area where electric lines diverged or converged. Results of the study suggested that EM heating in formations is not as efficient as steam-based processes. Accurate simulations of EM heating processes within reservoirs are difficult to obtain, as the amounts of estimated heat input are sensitive to grid refinement. It was concluded that hot spots in the EM electrodes have also caused failures in other field applications and studies. 11 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Optimization of powered Stirling heat engine with finite speed thermodynamics

    Ahmadi, Mohammad H.; Ahmadi, Mohammad Ali; Pourfayaz, Fathollah; Bidi, Mokhtar; Hosseinzade, Hadi; Feidt, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Based on finite speed method and direct method, the optimal performance is investigated. • The effects of major parameters on the optimal performance are investigated. • The accuracy of the results was compared with previous works. - Abstract: Popular thermodynamic analyses including finite time thermodynamic analysis was lately developed based upon external irreversibilities while internal irreversibilities such as friction, pressure drop and entropy generation were not considered. The aforementioned disadvantage reduces the reliability of the finite time thermodynamic analysis in the design of an accurate Stirling engine model. Consequently, the finite time thermodynamic analysis could not sufficiently satisfy researchers for implementing in design and optimization issues. In this study, finite speed thermodynamic analysis was employed instead of finite time thermodynamic analysis for studying Stirling heat engine. The finite speed thermodynamic analysis approach is based on the first law of thermodynamics for a closed system with finite speed and the direct method. The effects of heat source temperature, regenerating effectiveness, volumetric ratio, piston stroke as well as rotational speed are included in the analysis. Moreover, maximum output power in optimal rotational speed was calculated while pressure losses in the Stirling engine were systematically considered. The result reveals the accuracy and the reliability of the finite speed thermodynamic method in thermodynamic analysis of Stirling heat engine. The outcomes can help researchers in the design of an appropriate and efficient Stirling engine.

  20. Radiant heating of petroleum reservoirs; Aquecimento radiante de reservatorios petroliferos

    Sidrim, Fernando A.C.

    1990-12-31

    This work presents a proposal of a simplified model for the enhanced oil recovery process through radiant heating of oil reservoirs. The resulting continuity, energy and motion equations were solved analytically for the prediction of the increase in well flow rates. The heat loss to adjacent formations and the necessary for the establishment of the temperature profile,which are transient terms of energy equation, have been neglected. Also, no temperature gradient in the axial direction has been modelled as a cylindrical wave propagating in a loss medium. It is concluded that: the inclusion of a radial conduction term in the energy equation led to higher flow rates than the ones predicted by the literature existing solution; if the absorption coefficient is too large, it is profitable to dry the reservoir around the well bore; the transient terms in the energy equation are significant for extended periods of well production. 47 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Performance of discrete heat engines and heat pumps in finite time

    Feldmann; Kosloff

    2000-05-01

    The performance in finite time of a discrete heat engine with internal friction is analyzed. The working fluid of the engine is composed of an ensemble of noninteracting two level systems. External work is applied by changing the external field and thus the internal energy levels. The friction induces a minimal cycle time. The power output of the engine is optimized with respect to time allocation between the contact time with the hot and cold baths as well as the adiabats. The engine's performance is also optimized with respect to the external fields. By reversing the cycle of operation a heat pump is constructed. The performance of the engine as a heat pump is also optimized. By varying the time allocation between the adiabats and the contact time with the reservoir a universal behavior can be identified. The optimal performance of the engine when the cold bath is approaching absolute zero is studied. It is found that the optimal cooling rate converges linearly to zero when the temperature approaches absolute zero.

  2. Quantum heat engine operating between thermal and spin reservoirs

    Wright, Jackson S. S. T.; Gould, Tim; Carvalho, André R. R.; Bedkihal, Salil; Vaccaro, Joan A.

    2018-05-01

    Landauer's erasure principle is a cornerstone of thermodynamics and information theory [R. Landauer, IBM J. Res. Dev. 5, 183 (1961), 10.1147/rd.53.0183]. According to this principle, erasing information incurs a minimum energy cost. Recently, Vaccaro and Barnett [J. A. Vaccaro and S. M. Barnett, Proc. R. Soc. A 467, 1770 (2011), 10.1098/rspa.2010.0577] explored information erasure in the context of multiple conserved quantities and showed that the erasure cost can be solely in terms of spin angular momentum. As Landauer's erasure principle plays a fundamental role in heat engines, their result considerably widens the possible configurations that heat engines can have. Motivated by this, we propose here an optical heat engine that operates under a single thermal reservoir and a spin angular momentum reservoir coupled to a three-level system with two energy degenerate ground states. The proposed heat engine operates without producing waste heat and goes beyond the traditional Carnot engine where the working fluid is subjected to two thermal baths at different temperatures.

  3. Loop Heat Pipe Temperature Oscillation Induced by Gravity Assist and Reservoir Heating

    Ku, Jentung; Garrison, Matt; Patel, Deepak; Robinson, Frank; Ottenstein, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The Laser Thermal Control System (LCTS) for the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) to be installed on NASA's Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat-2) consists of a constant conductance heat pipe and a loop heat pipe (LHP) with an associated radiator. During the recent thermal vacuum testing of the LTCS where the LHP condenser/radiator was placed in a vertical position above the evaporator and reservoir, it was found that the LHP reservoir control heater power requirement was much higher than the analytical model had predicted. Even with the control heater turned on continuously at its full power, the reservoir could not be maintained at its desired set point temperature. An investigation of the LHP behaviors found that the root cause of the problem was fluid flow and reservoir temperature oscillations, which led to persistent alternate forward and reversed flow along the liquid line and an imbalance between the vapor mass flow rate in the vapor line and liquid mass flow rate in the liquid line. The flow and temperature oscillations were caused by an interaction between gravity and reservoir heating, and were exacerbated by the large thermal mass of the instrument simulator which modulated the net heat load to the evaporator, and the vertical radiator/condenser which induced a variable gravitational pressure head. Furthermore, causes and effects of the contributing factors to flow and temperature oscillations intermingled.

  4. Finite element model for heat conduction in jointed rock masses

    Gartling, D.K.; Thomas, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    A computatonal procedure for simulating heat conduction in a fractured rock mass is proposed and illustrated in the present paper. The method makes use of a simple local model for conduction in the vicinity of a single open fracture. The distributions of fractures and fracture properties within the finite element model are based on a statistical representation of geologic field data. Fracture behavior is included in the finite element computation by locating local, discrete fractures at the element integration points

  5. Thermoporoelastic effects during heat extraction from low-permeability reservoirs

    Salimzadeh, Saeed; Nick, Hamidreza M.; Zimmerman, R. W.

    2018-01-01

    Thermoporoelastic effects during heat extraction from low permeability geothermal reservoirs are investigated numerically, based on the model of a horizontal penny-shaped fracture intersected by an injection well and a production well. A coupled formulation for thermo-hydraulic (TH) processes...... in EGS projects. Therefore, using the undrained thermal expansion coefficient for the matrix may overestimate the volumetric strain of the rock in low-permeability enhanced geothermal systems, whereas using a drained thermal expansion coefficient for the matrix may underestimate the volumetric strain...

  6. Finite Element Analysis of Dam-Reservoir Interaction Using High-Order Doubly Asymptotic Open Boundary

    Yichao Gao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The dam-reservoir system is divided into the near field modeled by the finite element method, and the far field modeled by the excellent high-order doubly asymptotic open boundary (DAOB. Direct and partitioned coupled methods are developed for the analysis of dam-reservoir system. In the direct coupled method, a symmetric monolithic governing equation is formulated by incorporating the DAOB with the finite element equation and solved using the standard time-integration methods. In contrast, the near-field finite element equation and the far-field DAOB condition are separately solved in the partitioned coupled methodm, and coupling is achieved by applying the interaction force on the truncated boundary. To improve its numerical stability and accuracy, an iteration strategy is employed to obtain the solution of each step. Both coupled methods are implemented on the open-source finite element code OpenSees. Numerical examples are employed to demonstrate the performance of these two proposed methods.

  7. Data assimilation method for fractured reservoirs using mimetic finite differences and ensemble Kalman filter

    Ping, Jing

    2017-05-19

    Optimal management of subsurface processes requires the characterization of the uncertainty in reservoir description and reservoir performance prediction. For fractured reservoirs, the location and orientation of fractures are crucial for predicting production characteristics. With the help of accurate and comprehensive knowledge of fracture distributions, early water/CO 2 breakthrough can be prevented and sweep efficiency can be improved. However, since the rock property fields are highly non-Gaussian in this case, it is a challenge to estimate fracture distributions by conventional history matching approaches. In this work, a method that combines vector-based level-set parameterization technique and ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for estimating fracture distributions is presented. Performing the necessary forward modeling is particularly challenging. In addition to the large number of forward models needed, each model is used for sampling of randomly located fractures. Conventional mesh generation for such systems would be time consuming if possible at all. For these reasons, we rely on a novel polyhedral mesh method using the mimetic finite difference (MFD) method. A discrete fracture model is adopted that maintains the full geometry of the fracture network. By using a cut-cell paradigm, a computational mesh for the matrix can be generated quickly and reliably. In this research, we apply this workflow on 2D two-phase fractured reservoirs. The combination of MFD approach, level-set parameterization, and EnKF provides an effective solution to address the challenges in the history matching problem of highly non-Gaussian fractured reservoirs.

  8. A note on heat reservoirs and the like

    De los Santos, Francisco; López-Lacomba, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    From Clausius's principle, the entropy change in a closed system satisfies ΔS ⩾ ∑ k Q k /T k , where the equality holds for reversible processes and the inequality holds for irreversible processes. However, the entropy changes of infinite heat reservoirs are routinely calculated as ΔS = Q/T, independently of the nature of the heat exchange, whether reversible or irreversible. We show how this result comes about by considering the direct thermal contact between two systems, and then by allowing one of them to be much larger than the other. We then re-examine the usual definition of reversibility to reconcile it with the expression found for the entropy change. (paper)

  9. Finite element calculation of stress induced heating of superconductors

    Akin, J.E.; Moazed, A.

    1976-01-01

    This research is concerned with the calculation of the amount of heat generated due to the development of mechanical stresses in superconducting composites. An emperical equation is used to define the amount of stress-induced heat generation per unit volume. The equation relates the maximum applied stress and the experimental measured hysteresis loop of the composite stress-strain diagram. It is utilized in a finite element program to calculate the total stress-induced heat generation for the superconductor. An example analysis of a solenoid indicates that the stress-induced heating can be of the same order of magnitude as eddy current effects

  10. Heat Engine With Finite Thermal Reservoirs and Nonideal Efficiency

    2009-05-01

    temperatura . Para este fin, se introduce una eficiencia dinámica de la segunda ley que se supone constante. Como la eficiencia de la primera-ley...aumenta de cero hasta el límite de Carnot, la temperatura final común de los depósitos se interpola entre la media aritmética y la media geométrica de...sus temperaturas iniciales. La producción total de trabajo y el cambio de entropía de los depósitos se calcula y se relaciona con las eficiencias

  11. A quantum Szilard engine without heat from a thermal reservoir

    Hamed Mohammady, M.; Anders, Janet

    2017-11-01

    We study a quantum Szilard engine that is not powered by heat drawn from a thermal reservoir, but rather by projective measurements. The engine is constituted of a system { S }, a weight { W }, and a Maxwell demon { D }, and extracts work via measurement-assisted feedback control. By imposing natural constraints on the measurement and feedback processes, such as energy conservation and leaving the memory of the demon intact, we show that while the engine can function without heat from a thermal reservoir, it must give up at least one of the following features that are satisfied by a standard Szilard engine: (i) repeatability of measurements; (ii) invariant weight entropy; or (iii) positive work extraction for all measurement outcomes. This result is shown to be a consequence of the Wigner-Araki-Yanase theorem, which imposes restrictions on the observables that can be measured under additive conservation laws. This observation is a first-step towards developing ‘second-law-like’ relations for measurement-assisted feedback control beyond thermality.

  12. Mixed Finite Element Simulation with Stability Analysis for Gas Transport in Low-Permeability Reservoirs

    Mohamed F. El-Amin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas exists in considerable quantities in tight reservoirs. Tight formations are rocks with very tiny or poorly connected pors that make flow through them very difficult, i.e., the permeability is very low. The mixed finite element method (MFEM, which is locally conservative, is suitable to simulate the flow in porous media. This paper is devoted to developing a mixed finite element (MFE technique to simulate the gas transport in low permeability reservoirs. The mathematical model, which describes gas transport in low permeability formations, contains slippage effect, as well as adsorption and diffusion mechanisms. The apparent permeability is employed to represent the slippage effect in low-permeability formations. The gas adsorption on the pore surface has been described by Langmuir isotherm model, while the Peng-Robinson equation of state is used in the thermodynamic calculations. Important compatibility conditions must hold to guarantee the stability of the mixed method by adding additional constraints to the numerical discretization. The stability conditions of the MFE scheme has been provided. A theorem and three lemmas on the stability analysis of the mixed finite element method (MFEM have been established and proven. A semi-implicit scheme is developed to solve the governing equations. Numerical experiments are carried out under various values of the physical parameters.

  13. Finite-size effect on optimal efficiency of heat engines.

    Tajima, Hiroyasu; Hayashi, Masahito

    2017-07-01

    The optimal efficiency of quantum (or classical) heat engines whose heat baths are n-particle systems is given by the strong large deviation. We give the optimal work extraction process as a concrete energy-preserving unitary time evolution among the heat baths and the work storage. We show that our optimal work extraction turns the disordered energy of the heat baths to the ordered energy of the work storage, by evaluating the ratio of the entropy difference to the energy difference in the heat baths and the work storage, respectively. By comparing the statistical mechanical optimal efficiency with the macroscopic thermodynamic bound, we evaluate the accuracy of the macroscopic thermodynamics with finite-size heat baths from the statistical mechanical viewpoint. We also evaluate the quantum coherence effect on the optimal efficiency of the cycle processes without restricting their cycle time by comparing the classical and quantum optimal efficiencies.

  14. Finite element solution of two dimensional time dependent heat equation

    Maaz

    1999-01-01

    A Microsoft Windows based computer code, named FHEAT, has been developed for solving two dimensional heat problems in Cartesian and Cylindrical geometries. The programming language is Microsoft Visual Basic 3.0. The code makes use of Finite element formulation for spatial domain and Finite difference formulation for time domain. Presently the code is capable of solving two dimensional steady state and transient problems in xy- and rz-geometries. The code is capable excepting both triangular and rectangular elements. Validation and benchmarking was done against hand calculations and published results. (author)

  15. Stress analysis of heated concrete using finite elements

    Majumdar, P.; Gupta, A.; Marchertas, A.

    1994-01-01

    Described is a finite element analysis of concrete, which is subjected to rapid heating. Using thermal mass transport calculation, the moisture content, temperature and pore pressure distribution over space and time is obtained first. From these effects, stress at various points of the concrete are computed using the finite element method. Contribution to the stress formulation comes from three components, namely the thermal expansion, pore pressure, and the shrinkage of concrete due to moisture loss (from dehydration). The material properties of concrete are assumed to be homogeneous, elastic, and cracking is not taken into consideration. (orig.)

  16. Improving reservoir history matching of EM heated heavy oil reservoirs via cross-well seismic tomography

    Katterbauer, Klemens; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    process. While becoming a promising technology for heavy oil recovery, its effect on overall reservoir production and fluid displacements are poorly understood. Reservoir history matching has become a vital tool for the oil & gas industry to increase

  17. Effect of boundary conditions on pressure behavior of finite-conductivity fractures in bounded stratified reservoirs

    Osman, Mohammed E.; Abou-Kassem, J.H. [Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department, UAE University, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    1996-08-15

    In this study, a mathematical model was developed to model the pressure behavior of a well located in a bounded multilayer reservoir and crossed by a finite-conductivity vertical fracture. It was found that the dimensionless pressure function and its derivative strongly depend on fracture conductivity and fracture extension during early times. The effect of reservoir heterogeneity on the pressure function is negligible compared to that on the pressure derivative. Both functions exhibit four flow periods: bilinear, formation linear, pseudoradial and pseudosteady-state which are separated by transition periods. One or more of these flow periods may be missing. Data obtained from a long test and which are characterized by a unit slope line indicate that the well is intercepted by deeply extended fractures. It has been found that the fractional production rates of different layers are a good measure of reservoir and fracture characteristics. Flowmeter survey data can be used to eliminate the non-uniqueness problem when using the type curves presented in this study

  18. FEHM, Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code

    Zyvoloski, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: FEHM is a numerical simulation code for subsurface transport processes. It models 3-D, time-dependent, multiphase, multicomponent, non-isothermal, reactive flow through porous and fractured media. It can accurately represent complex 3-D geologic media and structures and their effects on subsurface flow and transport. Its capabilities include flow of gas, water, and heat; flow of air, water, and heat; multiple chemically reactive and sorbing tracers; finite element/finite volume formulation; coupled stress module; saturated and unsaturated media; and double porosity and double porosity/double permeability capabilities. 2 - Methods: FEHM uses a preconditioned conjugate gradient solution of coupled linear equations and a fully implicit, fully coupled Newton Raphson solution of nonlinear equations. It has the capability of simulating transport using either a advection/diffusion solution or a particle tracking method. 3 - Restriction on the complexity of the problem: Disk space and machine memory are the only limitations

  19. Heat conduction analysis of multi-layered FGMs considering the finite heat wave speed

    Rahideh, H.; Malekzadeh, P.; Golbahar Haghighi, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Using a layerwise-incremental differential quadrature for heat transfer of FGMs. ► Superior accuracy with fewer degrees of freedom of the method with respect to FEM. ► Considering multi-layered functionally graded materials. ► Hyperbolic heat transfer analysis of thermal system with heat generation. ► Showing the effect of heat wave speed on thermal characteristic of the system. - Abstract: In this work, the heat conduction with finite wave heat speed of multi-layered domain made of functionally graded materials (FGMs) subjected to heat generation is simulated. For this purpose, the domain is divided into a set of mathematical layers, the number of which can be equal or greater than those of the physical layers. Then, in each mathematical layer, the non-Fourier heat transfer equations are employed. Since, the governing equations have variable coefficients due to FGM properties, as an efficient and accurate method the differential quadrature method (DQM) is adopted to discretize both spatial and temporal domains in each layer. This results in superior accuracy with fewer degrees of freedom than conventional finite element method (FEM). To verify this advantages through some comparison studies, a finite element solution are also obtained. After demonstrating the convergence and accuracy of the method, the effects of heat wave speed for two different set of boundary conditions on the temperature distribution and heat flux of the domain are studied.

  20. Exergoeconomic performance optimization of an endoreversible intercooled regenerative Brayton combined heat and power plant coupled to variable-temperature heat reservoirs

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Lingen; Sun, Fengrui [College of Naval Architecture and Power, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan 430033 (China)

    2012-07-01

    An endoreversible intercooled regenerative Brayton combined heat and power (CHP) plant model coupled to variable-temperature heat reservoirs is established. The exergoeconomic performance of the CHP plant is investigated using finite time thermodynamics. The analytical formulae about dimensionless profit rate and exergy efficiency of the CHP plant with the heat resistance losses in the hot-, cold- and consumer-side heat exchangers, the intercooler and the regenerator are deduced. By taking the maximum profit rate as the objective, the heat conductance allocation among the five heat exchangers and the choice of intercooling pressure ratio are optimized by numerical examples, the characteristic of the optimal dimensionless profit rate versus corresponding exergy efficiency is investigated. When the optimization is performed further with respect to the total pressure ratio, a double-maximum profit rate is obtained. The effects of the design parameters on the double-maximum dimensionless profit rate and corresponding exergy efficiency, optimal total pressure ratio and optimal intercooling pressure ratio are analyzed in detail, and it is found that there exist an optimal consumer-side temperature and an optimal thermal capacitance rate matching between the working fluid and the heat reservoir, respectively, corresponding to a thrice-maximum dimensionless profit rate.

  1. Tracer Testing for Estimating Heat Transfer Area in Fractured Reservoirs

    Pruess, Karsten; van Heel, Ton; Shan, Chao

    2004-05-12

    A key parameter governing the performance and life-time of a Hot Fractured Rock (HFR) reservoir is the effective heat transfer area between the fracture network and the matrix rock. We report on numerical modeling studies into the feasibility of using tracer tests for estimating heat transfer area. More specifically, we discuss simulation results of a new HFR characterization method which uses surface-sorbing tracers for which the adsorbed tracer mass is proportional to the fracture surface area per unit volume. Sorption in the rock matrix is treated with the conventional formulation in which tracer adsorption is volume-based. A slug of solute tracer migrating along a fracture is subject to diffusion across the fracture walls into the adjacent rock matrix. Such diffusion removes some of the tracer from the fluid in the fractures, reducing and retarding the peak in the breakthrough curve (BTC) of the tracer. After the slug has passed the concentration gradient reverses, causing back-diffusion from the rock matrix into the fracture, and giving rise to a long tail in the BTC of the solute. These effects become stronger for larger fracture-matrix interface area, potentially providing a means for estimating this area. Previous field tests and modeling studies have demonstrated characteristic tailing in BTCs for volatile tracers in vapor-dominated reservoirs. Simulated BTCs for solute tracers in single-phase liquid systems show much weaker tails, as would be expected because diffusivities are much smaller in the aqueous than in the gas phase, by a factor of order 1000. A much stronger signal of fracture-matrix interaction can be obtained when sorbing tracers are used. We have performed simulation studies of surface-sorbing tracers by implementing a model in which the adsorbed tracer mass is assumed proportional to the fracture-matrix surface area per unit volume. The results show that sorbing tracers generate stronger tails in BTCs, corresponding to an effective

  2. CASKETSS-HEAT: a finite difference computer program for nonlinear heat conduction problems

    Ikushima, Takeshi

    1988-12-01

    A heat conduction program CASKETSS-HEAT has been developed. CASKETSS-HEAT is a finite difference computer program used for the solution of multi-dimensional nonlinear heat conduction problems. Main features of CASKETSS-HEAT are as follows. (1) One, two and three-dimensional geometries for heat conduction calculation are available. (2) Convection and radiation heat transfer of boundry can be specified. (3) Phase change and chemical change can be treated. (4) Finned surface heat transfer can be treated easily. (5) Data memory allocation in the program is variable according to problem size. (6) The program is a compatible heat transfer analysis program to the stress analysis program SAP4 and SAP5. (7) Pre- and post-processing for input data generation and graphic representation of calculation results are available. In the paper, brief illustration of calculation method, input data and sample calculation are presented. (author)

  3. Heat Conduction Analysis Using Semi Analytical Finite Element Method

    Wargadipura, A. H. S.

    1997-01-01

    Heat conduction problems are very often found in science and engineering fields. It is of accrual importance to determine quantitative descriptions of this important physical phenomena. This paper discusses the development and application of a numerical formulation and computation that can be used to analyze heat conduction problems. The mathematical equation which governs the physical behaviour of heat conduction is in the form of second order partial differential equations. The numerical resolution used in this paper is performed using the finite element method and Fourier series, which is known as semi-analytical finite element methods. The numerical solution results in simultaneous algebraic equations which is solved using the Gauss elimination methodology. The computer implementation is carried out using FORTRAN language. In the final part of the paper, a heat conduction problem in a rectangular plate domain with isothermal boundary conditions in its edge is solved to show the application of the computer program developed and also a comparison with analytical solution is discussed to assess the accuracy of the numerical solution obtained

  4. An element-based finite-volume method approach for naturally fractured compositional reservoir simulation

    Marcondes, Francisco [Federal University of Ceara, Fortaleza (Brazil). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering and Material Science], e-mail: marcondes@ufc.br; Varavei, Abdoljalil; Sepehrnoori, Kamy [The University of Texas at Austin (United States). Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering Dept.], e-mails: varavei@mail.utexas.edu, kamys@mail.utexas.edu

    2010-07-01

    An element-based finite-volume approach in conjunction with unstructured grids for naturally fractured compositional reservoir simulation is presented. In this approach, both the discrete fracture and the matrix mass balances are taken into account without any additional models to couple the matrix and discrete fractures. The mesh, for two dimensional domains, can be built of triangles, quadrilaterals, or a mix of these elements. However, due to the available mesh generator to handle both matrix and discrete fractures, only results using triangular elements will be presented. The discrete fractures are located along the edges of each element. To obtain the approximated matrix equation, each element is divided into three sub-elements and then the mass balance equations for each component are integrated along each interface of the sub-elements. The finite-volume conservation equations are assembled from the contribution of all the elements that share a vertex, creating a cell vertex approach. The discrete fracture equations are discretized only along the edges of each element and then summed up with the matrix equations in order to obtain a conservative equation for both matrix and discrete fractures. In order to mimic real field simulations, the capillary pressure is included in both matrix and discrete fracture media. In the implemented model, the saturation field in the matrix and discrete fractures can be different, but the potential of each phase in the matrix and discrete fracture interface needs to be the same. The results for several naturally fractured reservoirs are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method. (author)

  5. Hybrid finite volume/ finite element method for radiative heat transfer in graded index media

    Zhang, L.; Zhao, J. M.; Liu, L. H.; Wang, S. Y.

    2012-09-01

    The rays propagate along curved path determined by the Fermat principle in the graded index medium. The radiative transfer equation in graded index medium (GRTE) contains two specific redistribution terms (with partial derivatives to the angular coordinates) accounting for the effect of the curved ray path. In this paper, the hybrid finite volume with finite element method (hybrid FVM/FEM) (P.J. Coelho, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf., vol. 93, pp. 89-101, 2005) is extended to solve the radiative heat transfer in two-dimensional absorbing-emitting-scattering graded index media, in which the spatial discretization is carried out using a FVM, while the angular discretization is by a FEM. The FEM angular discretization is demonstrated to be preferable in dealing with the redistribution terms in the GRTE. Two stiff matrix assembly schemes of the angular FEM discretization, namely, the traditional assembly approach and a new spherical assembly approach (assembly on the unit sphere of the solid angular space), are discussed. The spherical assembly scheme is demonstrated to give better results than the traditional assembly approach. The predicted heat flux distributions and temperature distributions in radiative equilibrium are determined by the proposed method and compared with the results available in other references. The proposed hybrid FVM/FEM method can predict the radiative heat transfer in absorbing-emitting-scattering graded index medium with good accuracy.

  6. Hybrid finite volume/ finite element method for radiative heat transfer in graded index media

    Zhang, L.; Zhao, J.M.; Liu, L.H.; Wang, S.Y.

    2012-01-01

    The rays propagate along curved path determined by the Fermat principle in the graded index medium. The radiative transfer equation in graded index medium (GRTE) contains two specific redistribution terms (with partial derivatives to the angular coordinates) accounting for the effect of the curved ray path. In this paper, the hybrid finite volume with finite element method (hybrid FVM/FEM) (P.J. Coelho, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf., vol. 93, pp. 89-101, 2005) is extended to solve the radiative heat transfer in two-dimensional absorbing-emitting-scattering graded index media, in which the spatial discretization is carried out using a FVM, while the angular discretization is by a FEM. The FEM angular discretization is demonstrated to be preferable in dealing with the redistribution terms in the GRTE. Two stiff matrix assembly schemes of the angular FEM discretization, namely, the traditional assembly approach and a new spherical assembly approach (assembly on the unit sphere of the solid angular space), are discussed. The spherical assembly scheme is demonstrated to give better results than the traditional assembly approach. The predicted heat flux distributions and temperature distributions in radiative equilibrium are determined by the proposed method and compared with the results available in other references. The proposed hybrid FVM/FEM method can predict the radiative heat transfer in absorbing-emitting-scattering graded index medium with good accuracy.

  7. A numerical investigation of combined heat storage and extraction in deep geothermal reservoirs

    Major, Márton; Poulsen, Søren Erbs; Balling, Niels

    2018-01-01

    Heat storage capabilities of deep sedimentary geothermal reservoirs are evaluated through numerical model simulations. We combine storage with heat extraction in a doublet well system when storage phases are restricted to summer months. The effects of stored volume and annual repetition on energy...... recovery are investigated. Recovery factors are evaluated for several different model setups and we find that storing 90 °C water at 2500 m depth is capable of reproducing, on average 67% of the stored energy. In addition, ambient reservoir temperature of 75 °C is slightly elevated leading to increased...... efficiency. Additional simulations concerning pressure build-up in the reservoir are carried out to show that safety levels may not be reached. Reservoir characteristics are inspired by Danish geothermal conditions, but results are assumed to have more general validity. Thus, deep sedimentary reservoirs...

  8. Effect of finite heat input on the power performance of micro heat engines

    Khu, Kerwin; Jiang, Liudi; Markvart, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Micro heat engines have attracted considerable interest in recent years for their potential exploitation as micro power sources in microsystems and portable devices. Thermodynamic modeling can predict the theoretical performance that can be potentially achieved by micro heat engine designs. An appropriate model can not only provide key information at the design stage but also indicate the potential room for improvement in existing micro heat engines. However, there are few models reported to date which are suitable for evaluating the power performance of micro heat engines. This paper presents a new thermodynamic model for determining the theoretical limit of power performance of micro heat engines with consideration to finite heat input and heat leakage. By matching the model components to those of a representative heat engine layout, the theoretical power, power density, and thermal efficiency achievable for a micro heat engine can be obtained for a given set of design parameters. The effects of key design parameters such as length and thermal conductivity of the engine material on these theoretical outputs are also investigated. Possible trade-offs among these performance objectives are discussed. Performance results derived from the developed model are compared with those of a working micro heat engine (P3) as an example. -- Highlights: → Thermodynamic model for micro heat engines. → Effect of different parameters on potential performance. → Tradeoffs for determining optimal size of micro engines.

  9. An Embedded 3D Fracture Modeling Approach for Simulating Fracture-Dominated Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Johnston, Henry [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wang, Cong [Colorado School of Mines; Winterfeld, Philip [Colorado School of Mines; Wu, Yu-Shu [Colorado School of Mines

    2018-02-14

    An efficient modeling approach is described for incorporating arbitrary 3D, discrete fractures, such as hydraulic fractures or faults, into modeling fracture-dominated fluid flow and heat transfer in fractured geothermal reservoirs. This technique allows 3D discrete fractures to be discretized independently from surrounding rock volume and inserted explicitly into a primary fracture/matrix grid, generated without including 3D discrete fractures in prior. An effective computational algorithm is developed to discretize these 3D discrete fractures and construct local connections between 3D fractures and fracture/matrix grid blocks of representing the surrounding rock volume. The constructed gridding information on 3D fractures is then added to the primary grid. This embedded fracture modeling approach can be directly implemented into a developed geothermal reservoir simulator via the integral finite difference (IFD) method or with TOUGH2 technology This embedded fracture modeling approach is very promising and computationally efficient to handle realistic 3D discrete fractures with complicated geometries, connections, and spatial distributions. Compared with other fracture modeling approaches, it avoids cumbersome 3D unstructured, local refining procedures, and increases computational efficiency by simplifying Jacobian matrix size and sparsity, while keeps sufficient accuracy. Several numeral simulations are present to demonstrate the utility and robustness of the proposed technique. Our numerical experiments show that this approach captures all the key patterns about fluid flow and heat transfer dominated by fractures in these cases. Thus, this approach is readily available to simulation of fractured geothermal reservoirs with both artificial and natural fractures.

  10. A numerical study of EGS heat extraction process based on a thermal non-equilibrium model for heat transfer in subsurface porous heat reservoir

    Chen, Jiliang; Jiang, Fangming

    2016-02-01

    With a previously developed numerical model, we perform a detailed study of the heat extraction process in enhanced or engineered geothermal system (EGS). This model takes the EGS subsurface heat reservoir as an equivalent porous medium while it considers local thermal non-equilibrium between the rock matrix and the fluid flowing in the fractured rock mass. The application of local thermal non-equilibrium model highlights the temperature-difference heat exchange process occurring in EGS reservoirs, enabling a better understanding of the involved heat extraction process. The simulation results unravel the mechanism of preferential flow or short-circuit flow forming in homogeneously fractured reservoirs of different permeability values. EGS performance, e.g. production temperature and lifetime, is found to be tightly related to the flow pattern in the reservoir. Thermal compensation from rocks surrounding the reservoir contributes little heat to the heat transmission fluid if the operation time of an EGS is shorter than 15 years. We find as well the local thermal equilibrium model generally overestimates EGS performance and for an EGS with better heat exchange conditions in the heat reservoir, the heat extraction process acts more like the local thermal equilibrium process.

  11. Heat transfer within a concrete slab with a finite microwave heating source

    Lagos, L.E.; Li, W.; Ebadian, M.A.; Grubb, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    In the present paper, the concrete decontamination and decommissioning process with a finite microwave heating source is investigated theoretically. For the microwave induced heating pattern, a multilayer concrete slab, which includes steel reinforcement mesh, is assumed to be exposed to a finite plane microwave source at normal incidence. Two-dimensional heat transport within the concrete is also considered to evaluate the variations of temperature with heating time at different frequencies with and without the presence of the reinforcement bars. Four commonly used industrial microwave frequencies of 0.896, 2.45, 10.6 and 18.0 GHz have been selected. The results revealed that as the microwave frequency increases to, or higher than 10.6 GHz, the maximum temperature shifts toward the front surface of the concrete. It was found that the presence of a steel reinforcement mesh causes part of the microwave energy to be blocked and reflected. Furthermore, it was observed that the temperature distribution is nearly uniform within the dimensions of the microwave applicator for a high microwave power intensity and a short heating time. (author)

  12. Thermal protection from a finite period of heat exposure – Heat survival of flight data recorders

    Rana, Ruhul Amin; Li, Ri

    2015-01-01

    This work relates to developing thermal protection for a finite period of exposure to a high temperature environment. This type of transient heat transfer problem starts with a heating period, which is then followed by a cooling period once the high temperature environment disappears. The study is particularly relevant to the thermal protection of flight data recorders from high temperature flame. In this work, transient heat conduction through a three-concentric-layer configuration is numerically studied, which includes a metal housing, a thermal insulation, and a phase change material. The thermal performance is evaluated using the center temperature changing with time. It is found that the center temperature reaches a peak during cooling period rather than heating period. Time taken to reach the peak and the peak value depend on the sizes and properties of the layers. The properties include latent heat of fusion, melting temperature, heat capacities, and thermal conductivities. Parametric study is conducted to analyze and distinguish the influence of these parameters. The study provides general guidance for determining sizes and selecting materials for the thermal design of flight data recorders. Additionally, the study is also useful for other similar applications, for which thermal management and protection over a period of time is needed. In this paper, analysis starts with a baseline configuration composed of specific materials and sizes. Finite changes are applied to sizes, properties of the materials, and the results are compared to understand the roles of the varied parameters in affecting the thermal protection performance. - Highlights: • We study the thermal design of flight data recorders for heat survival. • Consecutive heating and cooling of 3-layer configuration is investigated. • Influences of sizes and material properties on thermal protection are explored

  13. Influence of heat exchange of reservoir with rocks on hot gas injection via a single well

    Nikolaev, Vladimir E.; Ivanov, Gavril I.

    2017-11-01

    In the computational experiment the influence of heat exchange through top and bottom of the gas-bearing reservoir on the dynamics of temperature and pressure fields during hot gas injection via a single well is investigated. The experiment was carried out within the framework of modified mathematical model of non-isothermal real gas filtration, obtained from the energy and mass conservation laws and the Darcy law. The physical and caloric equations of state together with the Newton-Riemann law of heat exchange of gas reservoir with surrounding rocks, are used as closing relations. It is shown that the influence of the heat exchange with environment on temperature field of the gas-bearing reservoir is localized in a narrow zone near its top and bottom, though the size of this zone is increased with time.

  14. Cold reservoir integrated into a brine circuit of energy roofing, coupled to a heat pump

    Schroeder, M.

    1983-12-01

    Model studies are presented in which the economic effects of a cold reservoir integrated in a heat pump system were established. Cold reservoirs have the following advantages: 1. The absolute annual savings increase with the storage volume. Storage volumes of 1 to 10 m/sup 3/ are economical, depending on the mode of operation. 2. If the storage volume is sufficiently large, the heat pump (operated in a bivalent, parallel system) can supply a considerable amount of the required even below the design temperature. 3. With a sufficiently large storage volume, the heat pump may be operated in more or less monovalent mode even if the heat pump has not been designed for a minimum ambient temperature.

  15. Thermal tolerances of fish from a reservoir receiving heated effluent from a nuclear reactor

    Holland, W.E.; Smith, M.H.; Gibbons, J.W.; Brown, D.H.

    1974-01-01

    The heat tolerances of bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) subjected to heated effluent from a nuclear reactor was compared with those of bluegill living at normal temperatures. Three of the four study areas were located in the Par Pond reservoir system on the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. Results shown that at least one species of warm-water fish can adjust to elevated aquatic temperatures in a natural environment by becoming more tolerant. (U.S.)

  16. A finite volume procedure for fluid flow, heat transfer and solid-body stress analysis

    Jagad, P. I.; Puranik, B. P.; Date, A. W.

    2018-01-01

    A unified cell-centered unstructured mesh finite volume procedure is presented for fluid flow, heat transfer and solid-body stress analysis. An in-house procedure (A. W. Date, Solution of Transport Equations on Unstructured Meshes with Cell

  17. Finite element simulation of internal flows with heat transfer using a ...

    Unknown

    Velocity correction method; finite element simulation; turbulent .... CFD, developments in turbulence modeling have been only evolutionary and ...... variables are made dimensionless using appropriate combinations of Uav, H, ...... Srinivas M 1994 Finite element analysis of internal flows with heat transfer Ph D thesis, Indian.

  18. Two dimensional finite element heat transfer models for softwood

    Hongmei Gu; John F. Hunt

    2004-01-01

    The anisotropy of wood creates a complex problem for solving heat and mass transfer problems that require analyses be based on fundamental material properties of the wood structure. Most heat transfer models use average thermal properties across either the radial or tangential directions and have not differentiated the effects of cellular alignment, earlywood/latewood...

  19. A quantum Otto engine with finite heat baths

    Pozas-Kerstjens, Alejandro; Brown, Eric G.; Hovhannisyan, Karen V.

    2018-01-01

    We study a driven harmonic oscillator operating an Otto cycle by strongly interacting with two thermal baths of finite size. Using the tools of Gaussian quantum mechanics, we directly simulate the dynamics of the engine as a whole, without the need to make any approximations. This allows us...... to understand the non-equilibrium thermodynamics of the engine not only from the perspective of the working medium, but also as it is seen from the thermal baths' standpoint. For sufficiently large baths, our engine is capable of running a number of perfect cycles, delivering finite power while operating very...... close to maximal efficiency. Thereafter, having traversed the baths, the perturbations created by the interaction abruptly deteriorate the engine's performance. Weadditionally study the correlations generated in the system, and, in particular, we find a direct connection between the build up of bath...

  20. Optimization of solar-powered Stirling heat engine with finite-time thermodynamics

    Yaqi, Li [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Xi' an Research Institute of Hi-Tech, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710025 (China); Yaling, He; Weiwei, Wang [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2011-01-15

    A mathematical model for the overall thermal efficiency of the solar-powered high temperature differential dish-Stirling engine with finite-rate heat transfer, regenerative heat losses, conductive thermal bridging losses and finite regeneration processes time is developed. The model takes into consideration the effect of the absorber temperature and the concentrating ratio on the thermal efficiency; radiation and convection heat transfer between the absorber and the working fluid as well as convection heat transfer between the heat sink and the working fluid. The results show that the optimized absorber temperature and concentrating ratio are at about 1100 K and 1300, respectively. The thermal efficiency at optimized condition is about 34%, which is not far away from the corresponding Carnot efficiency at about 50%. Hence, the present analysis provides a new theoretical guidance for designing dish collectors and operating the Stirling heat engine system. (author)

  1. Analysis for pressure transient of coalbed methane reservoir based on Laplace transform finite difference method

    Lei Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on fractal geometry, fractal medium of coalbed methane mathematical model is established by Langmuir isotherm adsorption formula, Fick's diffusion law, Laplace transform formula, considering the well bore storage effect and skin effect. The Laplace transform finite difference method is used to solve the mathematical model. With Stehfest numerical inversion, the distribution of dimensionless well bore flowing pressure and its derivative was obtained in real space. According to compare with the results from the analytical method, the result from Laplace transform finite difference method turns out to be accurate. The influence factors are analyzed, including fractal dimension, fractal index, skin factor, well bore storage coefficient, energy storage ratio, interporosity flow coefficient and the adsorption factor. The calculating error of Laplace transform difference method is small. Laplace transform difference method has advantages in well-test application since any moment simulation does not rely on other moment results and space grid.

  2. Analysis for pressure transient of coalbed methane reservoir based on Laplace transform finite difference method

    Lei Wang; Hongjun Yin; Xiaoshuang Yang; Chuncheng Yang; Jing Fu

    2015-01-01

    Based on fractal geometry, fractal medium of coalbed methane mathematical model is established by Langmuir isotherm adsorption formula, Fick's diffusion law, Laplace transform formula, considering the well bore storage effect and skin effect. The Laplace transform finite difference method is used to solve the mathematical model. With Stehfest numerical inversion, the distribution of dimensionless well bore flowing pressure and its derivative was obtained in real space. According to compare wi...

  3. Dual and primal mixed Petrov-Galerkin finite element methods in heat transfer problems

    Loula, A.F.D.; Toledo, E.M.

    1988-12-01

    New mixed finite element formulations for the steady state heat transfer problem are presented with no limitation in the choice of conforming finite element spaces. Adding least square residual forms of the governing equations of the classical Galerkin formulation the original saddle point problem is transformed into a minimization problem. Stability analysis, error estimates and numerical results are presented, confirming the error estimates and the good performance of this new formulation. (author) [pt

  4. TRIP: a finite element computer program for the solution of convection heat transfer problems

    Slagter, W.; Roodbergen, H.A.

    1976-01-01

    The theory and use of the finite element code TRIP are described. The code calculates temperature distributions in three-dimensional continua subjected to convection heat transfer. A variational principle for transport phenomena is applied to solve the convection heat transfer problem with temperature and heat flux boundary conditions. The finite element discretization technique is used to reduce the continuous spatial solution into a finite number of unknowns. The method is developed in detail to determine temperature distributions in coolant passages of fuel rod bundles which are idealized by hexahedral elements. The development of the TRIP code is discussed and the listing of the program is given in FORTRAN IV. An example is given to illustrate the validity and practicality of the method

  5. heat flow in a finite isolated pulsed avalanche semiconductor diode

    ES Obe

    1981-03-01

    Mar 1, 1981 ... high-power high-efficiency avalanche semiconductor devices. The ... computed, and useful practical design curves for a specified operation .... iv. For spherical shells of radius, ρ(x,y,z) = √x2+y2+z2. > R, the heat source.

  6. An Approximate Solution for Predicting the Heat Extraction and Preventing Heat Loss from a Closed-Loop Geothermal Reservoir

    Bisheng Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximate solutions are found for a mathematical model developed to predict the heat extraction from a closed-loop geothermal system which consists of two vertical wells (one for injection and the other for production and one horizontal well which connects the two vertical wells. Based on the feature of slow heat conduction in rock formation, the fluid flow in the well is divided into three stages, that is, in the injection, horizontal, and production wells. The output temperature of each stage is regarded as the input of the next stage. The results from the present model are compared with those obtained from numerical simulator TOUGH2 and show first-order agreement with a temperature difference less than 4°C for the case where the fluid circulated for 2.74 years. In the end, a parametric study shows that (1 the injection rate plays dominant role in affecting the output performance, (2 higher injection temperature produces larger output temperature but decreases the total heat extracted given a specific time, (3 the output performance of geothermal reservoir is insensitive to fluid viscosity, and (4 there exists a critical point that indicates if the fluid releases heat into or absorbs heat from the surrounding formation.

  7. Thermodynamic optimization with a finite number of heat intercepts for cryogenic systems with parameters stepwise continuous

    Bisio, G.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the thermodynamic optimization by the variation of the heat transfer rate in a finite number of points through insulation for the general case of one-dimensional heat transfer (flat plate, hollow cylinder and hollow sphere) in systems, consisting of different materials in series, whose thermal conductivity is a function of temperature and of the coordinate in the heat flux direction. Besides, some parameters or their first derivative are assumed stepwise continuous. For this purpose, the results of some researches by the author pertinent to the properties of entropy production rate in the one-dimensional heat transfer are utilized

  8. Effect of Discrete Fracture Network Characteristics on the Sustainability of Heat Production in Enhanced Geothermal Reservoirs

    Riahi, A.; Damjanac, B.

    2013-12-01

    Viability of an enhanced or engineered geothermal reservoir is determined by the rate of produced fluid at production wells and the rate of temperature drawdown in the reservoir as well as that of the produced fluid. Meeting required targets demands sufficient permeability and flow circulation in a relatively large volume of rock mass. In-situ conditions such overall permeability of the bedrock formation, magnitude and orientation of stresses, and the characteristics of the existing Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) greatly affect sustainable heat production. Because much of the EGS resources are in formations with low permeability, different stimulation techniques are required prior to the production phase to enhance fluid circulation. Shear stimulation or hydro-shearing is the method of injecting a fluid into the reservoir with the aim of increasing the fluid pressure in the naturally fractured rock and inducing shear failure or slip events. This mechanism can enhance the system's permeability through permanent dilatational opening of the sheared fractures. Using a computational modeling approach, the correlation between heat production and DFN statistical characteristics, namely the fracture length distribution, fracture orientation, and also fracture density is studied in this paper. Numerical analyses were completed using two-dimensional distinct element code UDEC (Itasca, 2011), which represents rock masses as an assembly of interacting blocks separated by fractures. UDEC allows for simulation of fracture propagation along the predefined planes only (i.e., the trajectory of the hydraulic fracture is not part of the solution of the problem). Thus, the hydraulic fracture is assumed to be planar, aligned with the direction of the major principal stress. The pre-existing fractures were represented explicitly. They are discontinuities which deform elastically, but also can open and slip (Coulomb slip law) as a function of pressure and total stress changes. The fluid

  9. Plasma density profiles and finite bandwidth effects on electron heating

    Spielman, R.B.; Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Bollen, W.M.; Woo, W.

    1980-01-01

    Intense, p-polarized microwaves are incident on an inhomogeneous plasma in a cylindrical waveguide. Microwaves are mainly absorbed by resonant absorption near the critical surface (where the plasma frequency, ω/sub pe/, equals the microwave frequency, ω/sub o/). The localized plasma waves strongly modify the plasma density. Step-plateau density profiles or a cavity are created depending on the plasma flow speed. Hot electron production is strongly affected by the microwave bandwidth. The hot electron temperature varies as T/sub H/ is proportional to (Δ ω/ω) -0 25 . As the hot electron temperature decreases with increasing driver bandwidth, the hot electron density increases. This increase is such that the heat flux into the overdense region (Q is proportional to eta/sub H/T/sub H/ 3 2 ) is nearly constant

  10. Finite element procedures for coupled linear analysis of heat transfer, fluid and solid mechanics

    Sutjahjo, Edhi; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    Coupled finite element formulations for fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and solid mechanics are derived from the conservation laws for energy, mass, and momentum. To model the physics of interactions among the participating disciplines, the linearized equations are coupled by combining domain and boundary coupling procedures. Iterative numerical solution strategy is presented to solve the equations, with the partitioning of temporal discretization implemented.

  11. Laminar forced convective/conductive heat transfer by finite element method

    Kushwaha, H.S.; Kakodkar, A.

    1982-01-01

    The present study is directed at developing a finite element computer program for solution of decoupled convective/conductive heat transfer problems. Penalty function formulation has been used to solve momentum equations and subsequently transient energy equation is solved using modified Crank-Nicolson method. The optimal upwinding scheme has been employed in energy equation to remove oscillations at high Peclet number. (author)

  12. COYOTE: a finite element computer program for nonlinear heat conduction problems

    Gartling, D.K.

    1978-06-01

    COYOTE is a finite element computer program designed for the solution of two-dimensional, nonlinear heat conduction problems. The theoretical and mathematical basis used to develop the code is described. Program capabilities and complete user instructions are presented. Several example problems are described in detail to demonstrate the use of the program

  13. Finite element method for radiation heat transfer in multi-dimensional graded index medium

    Liu, L.H.; Zhang, L.; Tan, H.P.

    2006-01-01

    In graded index medium, ray goes along a curved path determined by Fermat principle, and curved ray-tracing is very difficult and complex. To avoid the complicated and time-consuming computation of curved ray trajectories, a finite element method based on discrete ordinate equation is developed to solve the radiative transfer problem in a multi-dimensional semitransparent graded index medium. Two particular test problems of radiative transfer are taken as examples to verify this finite element method. The predicted dimensionless net radiative heat fluxes are determined by the proposed method and compared with the results obtained by finite volume method. The results show that the finite element method presented in this paper has a good accuracy in solving the multi-dimensional radiative transfer problem in semitransparent graded index medium

  14. Heat transfer monitoring in solids by means of finite element analysis software

    Hernandez W, J.; Suarez, V.; Guarachi, J.; Calderon, A.; Juarez, A. G.; Rojas T, J. B.; Marin, E.

    2012-10-01

    We study the radial heat transfer in a homogeneous and isotropic substance with a heat linear source in its axial axis. For this, we used hot wire photothermal technique in order to obtain the temperature distribution as a function of radial distance and time exposure. Also, the solution of the transient heat transport equation for this problem was obtained with appropriate boundary conditions, by means of finite element technique. The comparison of the experimental and simulated results shows a good agree, which demonstrate the utility of this methodology in the investigation of the thermal response of substances, in the radial configuration. (Author)

  15. Application of the finite element method to problems with heat radiation exchange

    Breitbach, G.; Altes, J.

    1985-07-01

    The calculation of temperature distributions for systems exchanging heat radiation requires in a first step the determination of the heat fluxes caused by radiation at its surfaces. In this paper the radiation transport equation is developed and it is shown, that it can be derived from a variational principle. The functional of the variational principle is the starting point of a numerical solution method. By using Finite Element Procedures a system of linear equations is derived, which supplies an approximation of the radiosity. Having the radiosity the heat flux at the surfaces, which governs as the boundary condition the temperature distribution in the structure, can be calculated. (orig.) [de

  16. Heat transfer monitoring by means of the hot wire technique and finite element analysis software.

    Hernández Wong, J; Suarez, V; Guarachi, J; Calderón, A; Rojas-Trigos, J B; Juárez, A G; Marín, E

    2014-01-01

    It is reported the study of the radial heat transfer in a homogeneous and isotropic substance with a heat linear source in its axial axis. For this purpose, the hot wire characterization technique has been used, in order to obtain the temperature distribution as a function of radial distance from the axial axis and time exposure. Also, the solution of the transient heat transport equation for this problem was obtained under appropriate boundary conditions, by means of finite element technique. A comparison between experimental, conventional theoretical model and numerical simulated results is done to demonstrate the utility of the finite element analysis simulation methodology in the investigation of the thermal response of substances. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficient formulation of the finite element method for heat conduction in solids

    Sandsmark, N.; Aamodt, B.; Medonos, S.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to describe efficient methods and computer programs for analysis of heat conduction problems related to design and control of components of nuclear power plants and similar structures where thermal problems are of interest. A short presentation of basic equations and the finite element formulation of three-dimensional stationary and transient heat conduction is given. The finite element types that are used are isoparametric hexahedrons with eight or twenty nodes. The use of consistent as well as diagonal capacity matrices is discussed. Reduction of the transient heat conduction problem may be accomplished by means of the 'master-slave' technique. Furthermore, the superelement technique is discussed for both stationary and transient heat conduction. For the solution of transient problems, the trapezoidal time integration scheme is used. The methods and principles outlined in the paper are materialized in a computer program, NV615, which is one of the application programs in the program system SESAM-69. A brief description is given of NV615. Furthermore, attention is given to combined heat conduction and subsequent thermal stress analysis. Data representing geometry, calculated temperature distribution etc. may be transferred automatically from the heat conduction program to stress analysis programs. As an example of practical application the temperature distribution versus time in a turbine wheel during start up is analysed. Thermal stresses are calculated at selected time instants

  18. A finite volume method for cylindrical heat conduction problems based on local analytical solution

    Li, Wang

    2012-10-01

    A new finite volume method for cylindrical heat conduction problems based on local analytical solution is proposed in this paper with detailed derivation. The calculation results of this new method are compared with the traditional second-order finite volume method. The newly proposed method is more accurate than conventional ones, even though the discretized expression of this proposed method is slightly more complex than the second-order central finite volume method, making it cost more calculation time on the same grids. Numerical result shows that the total CPU time of the new method is significantly less than conventional methods for achieving the same level of accuracy. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A finite volume method for cylindrical heat conduction problems based on local analytical solution

    Li, Wang; Yu, Bo; Wang, Xinran; Wang, Peng; Sun, Shuyu

    2012-01-01

    A new finite volume method for cylindrical heat conduction problems based on local analytical solution is proposed in this paper with detailed derivation. The calculation results of this new method are compared with the traditional second-order finite volume method. The newly proposed method is more accurate than conventional ones, even though the discretized expression of this proposed method is slightly more complex than the second-order central finite volume method, making it cost more calculation time on the same grids. Numerical result shows that the total CPU time of the new method is significantly less than conventional methods for achieving the same level of accuracy. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermodynamic optimization for cryogenic systems with a finite number of heat intercepts

    Bisio, G.

    1989-01-01

    It has been already shown that in cryogenic plants it is very useful to apply thermodynamic optimization, either with a continuous variation of the heat transfer rate through the insulation or with the spatial positioning of discrete heat exchangers in the same insulation. The aim of this paper is to study the thermodynamic optimization by the variation of the heat transfer rate in a finite number of points through insulation for one-dimensional materials in series, whose equivalent conductivity is a function of temperature. For this purpose the results of some researches by the author, in the field of generalized thermodynamics, for the properties of some functions and in particular of the rate of entropy production, regarding one-dimensional heat transfer, are utilized

  1. Discontinuous finite elements applied to solution of problems about heat transfer in heterogeneous media

    Ferreira, Monica Barcellos Jansen; Carmo, Eduardo Gomes Dutra do

    2000-01-01

    Heat transfer problems in heterogenous media with large variation of thermal conductivity are notorious for the difficulties in obtaining good numerical results. In this work it is proposed an application of a new mixed discontinuous finite element formulation to this class of problems, which produces good results without the need of high mesh refinement. Stability and consistency aspects are considered and numerical results are presented to show the efficacy of the method. (author)

  2. Two-dimensional finite element heat transfer model of softwood. Part II, Macrostructural effects

    Hongmei Gu; John F. Hunt

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite element model was used to study the effects of structural features on transient heat transfer in softwood lumber with various orientations. Transient core temperature was modeled for lumber samples “cut” from various locations within a simulated log. The effects of ring orientation, earlywood to latewood (E/L) ratio, and ring density were...

  3. TRUMP3-JR: a finite difference computer program for nonlinear heat conduction problems

    Ikushima, Takeshi

    1984-02-01

    Computer program TRUMP3-JR is a revised version of TRUMP3 which is a finite difference computer program used for the solution of multi-dimensional nonlinear heat conduction problems. Pre- and post-processings for input data generation and graphical representations of calculation results of TRUMP3 are avaiable in TRUMP3-JR. The calculation equations, program descriptions and user's instruction are presented. A sample problem is described to demonstrate the use of the program. (author)

  4. Transient thermal stresses in an orthotropic finite rectangular plate due to arbitrary surface heat-generations

    Sugano, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The transient thermal stresses in an orthotropic finite rectangular plate due to arbitrary surface heat-generations on two edges are studied by means of the Airy stress function. The purposes of this paper are to present a method of determing the transient thermal stresses in an orthographic rectangular plate with four edges of distinct thermal boundary condition of the third kind which exactly satisfy the traction-free conditions of shear stress over all boundaries including four corners of the plate, and to consider the effects of the anisotropies of material properties and the convective heat transfer on the upper and lower surfaces on the thermal stress distribution. (orig.)

  5. User's Manual for SPECTROM-41: a Finite-Element Heat Transfer Program

    Svalstad, D.K.

    1983-06-01

    This User's Manual addresses SPECTROM-41: A Finite Element Heat Transfer Computer Program. The user is introduced to the program's capabilities and operation, with required user input outlined in detail. Example problems are included to illustrate the use of the various program features, and included to illustrate the use of the various program features, and analytical solutions are presented for four of the examples to provide a measure of program accuracy. Past and ongoing comparative benchmark analyses are highlighted to provide the user with an indication of how SPECTROM-41 predictions compare with other available heat transfer programs

  6. Finite speed heat transport in a quantum spin chain after quenched local cooling

    Fries, Pascal; Hinrichsen, Haye

    2017-04-01

    We study the dynamics of an initially thermalized spin chain in the quantum XY-model, after sudden coupling to a heat bath of lower temperature at one end of the chain. In the semi-classical limit we see an exponential decay of the system-bath heatflux by exact solution of the reduced dynamics. In the full quantum description however, we numerically find the heatflux to reach intermediate plateaus where it is approximately constant—a phenomenon that we attribute to the finite speed of heat transport via spin waves.

  7. Non-linear heat transfer computer code by finite element method

    Nagato, Kotaro; Takikawa, Noboru

    1977-01-01

    The computer code THETA-2D for the calculation of temperature distribution by the two-dimensional finite element method was made for the analysis of heat transfer in a high temperature structure. Numerical experiment was performed for the numerical integration of the differential equation of heat conduction. The Runge-Kutta method of the numerical experiment produced an unstable solution. A stable solution was obtained by the β method with the β value of 0.35. In high temperature structures, the radiative heat transfer can not be neglected. To introduce a term of the radiative heat transfer, a functional neglecting the radiative heat transfer was derived at first. Then, the radiative term was added after the discretion by variation method. Five model calculations were carried out by the computer code. Calculation of steady heat conduction was performed. When estimated initial temperature is 1,000 degree C, reasonable heat blance was obtained. In case of steady-unsteady temperature calculation, the time integral by THETA-2D turned out to be under-estimation for enthalpy change. With a one-dimensional model, the temperature distribution in a structure, in which heat conductivity is dependent on temperature, was calculated. Calculation with a model which has a void inside was performed. Finally, model calculation for a complex system was carried out. (Kato, T.)

  8. Finite time thermodynamic analysis and optimization of solar-dish Stirling heat engine with regenerative losses

    Sharma Arjun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the performance of the solar-driven Stirling engine system to maximize the power output and thermal efficiency using the non-linearized heat loss model of the solar dish collector and the irreversible cycle model of the Stirling engine. Finite time thermodynamic analysis has been done for combined system to calculate the finite-rate heat transfer, internal heat losses in the regenerator, conductive thermal bridging losses and finite regeneration process time. The results indicate that exergy efficiency of dish system increases as the effectiveness of regenerator increases but decreases with increase in regenerative time coefficient. It is also found that optimal range of collector temperature and corresponding concentrating ratio are 1000 K~1400 K and 1100~1400, respectively in order to get maximum value of exergy efficiency. It is reported that the exergy efficiency of this dish system can reach the maximum value when operating temperature and concentrating ratio are 1150 K and 1300, respectively.

  9. Thermal pollution of rivers and reservoirs by discharges of heated water from thermal and nuclear power plants

    Makarov, I.

    1974-12-01

    The problems are discussed of the thermal pollution of rivers and water reservoirs by discharges of heated water from thermal and nuclear power plants. The problems concerned are quantitative and qualitative changes in biocenoses, the disturbance or extinction of flora and fauna, physiological changes in organisms and changes in the hydrochemical regime. (Z.M.)

  10. Modelling of Evaporator in Waste Heat Recovery System using Finite Volume Method and Fuzzy Technique

    Jahedul Islam Chowdhury

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaporator is an important component in the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC-based Waste Heat Recovery (WHR system since the effective heat transfer of this device reflects on the efficiency of the system. When the WHR system operates under supercritical conditions, the heat transfer mechanism in the evaporator is unpredictable due to the change of thermo-physical properties of the fluid with temperature. Although the conventional finite volume model can successfully capture those changes in the evaporator of the WHR process, the computation time for this method is high. To reduce the computation time, this paper develops a new fuzzy based evaporator model and compares its performance with the finite volume method. The results show that the fuzzy technique can be applied to predict the output of the supercritical evaporator in the waste heat recovery system and can significantly reduce the required computation time. The proposed model, therefore, has the potential to be used in real time control applications.

  11. Heating without heat: Thermodynamics of passive energy filters between finite systems.

    Muñoz-Tapia, R; Brito, R; Parrondo, J M R

    2017-09-01

    Passive filters allowing the exchange of particles in a narrow band of energy are currently used in microrefrigerators and energy transducers. In this Rapid Communication, we analyze their thermal properties using linear irreversible thermodynamics and kinetic theory, and discuss a striking phenomenon: the possibility of simultaneously increasing or decreasing the temperatures of two systems without any supply of energy. This occurs when the filter induces a flow of particles whose energy is between the average energies of the two systems. Here we show that this selective transfer of particles does not need the action of any sort of Maxwell demon and can be carried out by passive filters without compromising the second law of thermodynamics. This phenomenon allows us to design cycles between two reservoirs at temperatures T_{1}

  12. Finite

    W.R. Azzam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the application of using a skirted foundation system to study the behavior of foundations with structural skirts adjacent to a sand slope and subjected to earthquake loading. The effect of the adopted skirts to safeguard foundation and slope from collapse is studied. The skirts effect on controlling horizontal soil movement and decreasing pore water pressure beneath foundations and beside the slopes during earthquake is investigated. This technique is investigated numerically using finite element analysis. A four story reinforced concrete building that rests on a raft foundation is idealized as a two-dimensional model with and without skirts. A two dimensional plain strain program PLAXIS, (dynamic version is adopted. A series of models for the problem under investigation were run under different skirt depths and lactation from the slope crest. The effect of subgrade relative density and skirts thickness is also discussed. Nodal displacement and element strains were analyzed for the foundation with and without skirts and at different studied parameters. The research results showed a great effectiveness in increasing the overall stability of the slope and foundation. The confined soil footing system by such skirts reduced the foundation acceleration therefore it can be tended to damping element and relieved the transmitted disturbance to the adjacent slope. This technique can be considered as a good method to control the slope deformation and decrease the slope acceleration during earthquakes.

  13. SOLUTION OF TRANSIENT HEAT CONDUCTION PROBLEM BY THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD

    Süleyman TAŞGETİREN

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of temperature distribution is generally the first step in the design of machine elements subjected to ubnormal temperatures in their service life and for selection of materials. During this heat transfer analysis, the boundary and enviromental conditions must be modeled realistically and the geometry must be well represented. A variety of materials deviating from simple constant property isotropic material to composit materials having different properties according to direction of reinforcements are to be analysed. Then, the finite element method finds a large application area due to its use of same notation in heat transfer analysis and mechanical analysis of elements. In this study, the general formulation of two dimensional transient heat conduction is developed and a sample solution is given for arectangular bar subjected to convection baundary condition.

  14. An axisymmetrical non-linear finite element model for induction heating in injection molding tools

    Guerrier, Patrick; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Menotti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the heating and cooling phase of an induction heated injection molding tool accurately, the temperature dependent magnetic properties, namely the non-linear B-H curves, need to be accounted for in an induction heating simulation. Hence, a finite element model has been developed......, including the non-linear temperature dependent magnetic data described by a three-parameter modified Frohlich equation fitted to the magnetic saturation curve, and solved with an iterative procedure. The numerical calculations are compared with experiments conducted with two types of induction coils, built...... in to the injection molding tool. The model shows very good agreement with the experimental temperature measurements. It is also shown that the non-linearity can be used without the temperature dependency in some cases, and a proposed method is presented of how to estimate an effective linear permeability to use...

  15. Finite Element Modelling of a Pattern of Temperature Distribution during Travelling Heat Source from Oxyacetylene Flame

    Alkali Adam Umar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A 3D Finite element model was developed to analyse the conduction temperature distribution on type 304 stainless steel workpiece. An experimental heating-only test was conducted using the input parameters from FEM model which predicted the temperature field on the 304 stainless steel work pieces. Similar temperature pattern was noticed for both the FEM model as well as the experimental. Conduction was observed to be the dominant heat transfer mode. Maximum temperatures were observed to occur at the regions of contact between flame heat and the work pieces. Maximum temperature attained during the two investigated runs was 355°C. Even so austenite crystal morphology was retained on the preheated workpiece.

  16. An Assessment of Some Design Constraints on Heat Production of a 3D Conceptual EGS Model Using an Open-Source Geothermal Reservoir Simulation Code

    Yidong Xia; Mitch Plummer; Robert Podgorney; Ahmad Ghassemi

    2016-02-01

    Performance of heat production process over a 30-year period is assessed in a conceptual EGS model with a geothermal gradient of 65K per km depth in the reservoir. Water is circulated through a pair of parallel wells connected by a set of single large wing fractures. The results indicate that the desirable output electric power rate and lifespan could be obtained under suitable material properties and system parameters. A sensitivity analysis on some design constraints and operation parameters indicates that 1) the fracture horizontal spacing has profound effect on the long-term performance of heat production, 2) the downward deviation angle for the parallel doublet wells may help overcome the difficulty of vertical drilling to reach a favorable production temperature, and 3) the thermal energy production rate and lifespan has close dependence on water mass flow rate. The results also indicate that the heat production can be improved when the horizontal fracture spacing, well deviation angle, and production flow rate are under reasonable conditions. To conduct the reservoir modeling and simulations, an open-source, finite element based, fully implicit, fully coupled hydrothermal code, namely FALCON, has been developed and used in this work. Compared with most other existing codes that are either closed-source or commercially available in this area, this new open-source code has demonstrated a code development strategy that aims to provide an unparalleled easiness for user-customization and multi-physics coupling. Test results have shown that the FALCON code is able to complete the long-term tests efficiently and accurately, thanks to the state-of-the-art nonlinear and linear solver algorithms implemented in the code.

  17. Finite Volume Element (FVE) discretization and multilevel solution of the axisymmetric heat equation

    Litaker, Eric T.

    1994-12-01

    The axisymmetric heat equation, resulting from a point-source of heat applied to a metal block, is solved numerically; both iterative and multilevel solutions are computed in order to compare the two processes. The continuum problem is discretized in two stages: finite differences are used to discretize the time derivatives, resulting is a fully implicit backward time-stepping scheme, and the Finite Volume Element (FVE) method is used to discretize the spatial derivatives. The application of the FVE method to a problem in cylindrical coordinates is new, and results in stencils which are analyzed extensively. Several iteration schemes are considered, including both Jacobi and Gauss-Seidel; a thorough analysis of these schemes is done, using both the spectral radii of the iteration matrices and local mode analysis. Using this discretization, a Gauss-Seidel relaxation scheme is used to solve the heat equation iteratively. A multilevel solution process is then constructed, including the development of intergrid transfer and coarse grid operators. Local mode analysis is performed on the components of the amplification matrix, resulting in the two-level convergence factors for various combinations of the operators. A multilevel solution process is implemented by using multigrid V-cycles; the iterative and multilevel results are compared and discussed in detail. The computational savings resulting from the multilevel process are then discussed.

  18. Finite element based design optimization of WENDELSTEIN 7-X divertor components under high heat flux loading

    Plankensteiner, A.; Leuprecht, A.; Schedler, B.; Scheiber, K.-H.; Greuner, H.

    2007-01-01

    In the divertor of the nuclear fusion experiment WENDELSTEIN 7-X (W7-X) plasma facing high heat flux target elements have to withstand severe loading conditions. The thermally induced mechanical stressing turns out to be most critical with respect to lifetime predictions of the target elements. Therefore, different design variants of those CFC flat tile armoured high heat flux components have been analysed via the finite element package ABAQUS aiming at derivation of an optimized component design under high heat flux conditions. The investigated design variants comprise also promising alterations in the cooling channel design and castellation of the CFC flat tiles which, however, from a system integration and manufacturing standpoint of view, respectively, are evaluated to be critical. Therefore, the numerical study as presented here mainly comprises a reference variant that is comparatively studied with a variant incorporating a bi-layer-type AMC-Cu/OF-Cu interlayer at the CFC/Cu-interface. The thermo-mechanical material characteristics are accounted for in the finite element models with elastic-plastic properties being assigned to the metallic sections CuCrZr, AMC-Cu and OF-Cu, respectively, and orthotropic nonlinear-elastic properties being used for the CFC sections. The calculated temporal and spatial evolution of temperatures, stresses, and strains for the individual design variants are evaluated with special attention being paid to stress measures, plastic strains, and damage parameters indicating the risk of failure of CFC and the CFC/Cu-interface, respectively. This way the finite element analysis allows to numerically derive an optimized design variant within the framework of expected operating conditions in W7-X

  19. NAMMU: finite element program for coupled heat and groundwater flow problems

    Rae, J.; Robinson, P.C.

    1979-11-01

    NAMMU is a computer program which will calculate the evolution in time of coupled water and heat flow in a porous medium. It is intended to be used primarily for modelling studies of underground nuclear waste repositories. NAMMU is based on the Galerkin-Finite-element method and has self-adjusting time stepping. The present version is written for 2-dimensional cartesian or cylindrical coordinate systems. It has been checked against two calculations from the KBS study and an exact solution by Hodgkinson for a very idealised repository design. (author)

  20. Finite Difference Analysis of Transient Heat Transfer in Surrounding Rock Mass of High Geothermal Roadway

    Yuan Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on finite difference method, a mathematical model and a numerical model written by Fortran language were established in the paper. Then a series of experiments were conducted to figure out the evolution law of temperature field in high geothermal roadway. Research results indicate that temperature disturbance range increases gradually as the unsteady heat conduction goes on and it presents power function relationship with dimensionless time. Based on the case analysis, there is no distinct expansion of temperature disturbance range after four years of ventilation, when the temperature disturbance range R=13.6.

  1. Finite element analysis of volumetrically heated fluids in an axisymmetric enclosure

    Gartling, D.K.

    1979-01-01

    A general purpose finite element computer code has been used to analyze the steady state and transient response of a confined fluid that is heated volumetrically. The numerical procedure is demonstrated to be capable of resolving flow fields of considerable complexity without undue computational expense. Results are discussed for a Grashof number range (4.0 x 10 4 to 4.0 x 10 6 ) in which the flow varies from a steady, single cell configuration to a multiple cell configuration that includes a periodic interaction

  2. Electron heating caused by the ion-acoustic decay instability in a finite-length system

    Rambo, P.W.; Woo, W.; DeGroot, J.S.; Mizuno, K.

    1984-01-01

    The ion-acoustic decay instability is investigated for a finite-length plasma with density somewhat below the cutoff density of the electromagnetic driver (napprox.0.7n/sub c/). For this regime, the heating in a very long system can overpopulate the electron tail and cause linear saturation of the low phase velocity electron plasma waves. For a short system, the instability is nonlinearly saturated at larger amplitude by ion trapping. Absorption can be significantly increased by the large-amplitude ion waves. These results compare favorably with microwave experiments

  3. Finite Element Simulation of the Shear Effect of Ultrasonic on Heat Exchanger Descaling

    Lu, Shaolv; Wang, Zhihua; Wang, Hehui

    2018-03-01

    The shear effect on the interface of metal plate and its attached scale is an important mechanism of ultrasonic descaling, which is caused by the different propagation speed of ultrasonic wave in two different mediums. The propagating of ultrasonic wave on the shell is simulated based on the ANSYS/LS-DYNA explicit dynamic analysis. The distribution of shear stress in different paths under ultrasonic vibration is obtained through the finite element analysis and it reveals the main descaling mechanism of shear effect. The simulation result is helpful and enlightening to the reasonable design and the application of the ultrasonic scaling technology on heat exchanger.

  4. A finite element method based microwave heat transfer modeling of frozen multi-component foods

    Pitchai, Krishnamoorthy

    Microwave heating is fast and convenient, but is highly non-uniform. Non-uniform heating in microwave cooking affects not only food quality but also food safety. Most food industries develop microwavable food products based on "cook-and-look" approach. This approach is time-consuming, labor intensive and expensive and may not result in optimal food product design that assures food safety and quality. Design of microwavable food can be realized through a simulation model which describes the physical mechanisms of microwave heating in mathematical expressions. The objective of this study was to develop a microwave heat transfer model to predict spatial and temporal profiles of various heterogeneous foods such as multi-component meal (chicken nuggets and mashed potato), multi-component and multi-layered meal (lasagna), and multi-layered food with active packages (pizza) during microwave heating. A microwave heat transfer model was developed by solving electromagnetic and heat transfer equations using finite element method in commercially available COMSOL Multiphysics v4.4 software. The microwave heat transfer model included detailed geometry of the cavity, phase change, and rotation of the food on the turntable. The predicted spatial surface temperature patterns and temporal profiles were validated against the experimental temperature profiles obtained using a thermal imaging camera and fiber-optic sensors. The predicted spatial surface temperature profile of different multi-component foods was in good agreement with the corresponding experimental profiles in terms of hot and cold spot patterns. The root mean square error values of temporal profiles ranged from 5.8 °C to 26.2 °C in chicken nuggets as compared 4.3 °C to 4.7 °C in mashed potatoes. In frozen lasagna, root mean square error values at six locations ranged from 6.6 °C to 20.0 °C for 6 min of heating. A microwave heat transfer model was developed to include susceptor assisted microwave heating of a

  5. Recovery Act: Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems

    James A Menart, Professor

    2013-02-22

    This report is a compilation of the work that has been done on the grant DE-EE0002805 entitled Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems. The goal of this project was to develop a detailed computer simulation tool for GSHP (ground source heat pump) heating and cooling systems. Two such tools were developed as part of this DOE (Department of Energy) grant; the first is a two-dimensional computer program called GEO2D and the second is a three-dimensional computer program called GEO3D. Both of these simulation tools provide an extensive array of results to the user. A unique aspect of both these simulation tools is the complete temperature profile information calculated and presented. Complete temperature profiles throughout the ground, casing, tube wall, and fluid are provided as a function of time. The fluid temperatures from and to the heat pump, as a function of time, are also provided. In addition to temperature information, detailed heat rate information at several locations as a function of time is determined. Heat rates between the heat pump and the building indoor environment, between the working fluid and the heat pump, and between the working fluid and the ground are computed. The heat rates between the ground and the working fluid are calculated as a function time and position along the ground loop. The heating and cooling loads of the building being fitted with a GSHP are determined with the computer program developed by DOE called ENERGYPLUS. Lastly COP (coefficient of performance) results as a function of time are provided. Both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer programs developed as part of this work are based upon a detailed finite volume solution of the energy equation for the ground and ground loop. Real heat pump characteristics are entered into the program and used to model the heat pump performance. Thus these computer tools simulate the coupled performance of the ground loop and the heat pump. The

  6. Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump System

    Menart, James A. [Wright State University

    2013-02-22

    This report is a compilation of the work that has been done on the grant DE-EE0002805 entitled ?Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems.? The goal of this project was to develop a detailed computer simulation tool for GSHP (ground source heat pump) heating and cooling systems. Two such tools were developed as part of this DOE (Department of Energy) grant; the first is a two-dimensional computer program called GEO2D and the second is a three-dimensional computer program called GEO3D. Both of these simulation tools provide an extensive array of results to the user. A unique aspect of both these simulation tools is the complete temperature profile information calculated and presented. Complete temperature profiles throughout the ground, casing, tube wall, and fluid are provided as a function of time. The fluid temperatures from and to the heat pump, as a function of time, are also provided. In addition to temperature information, detailed heat rate information at several locations as a function of time is determined. Heat rates between the heat pump and the building indoor environment, between the working fluid and the heat pump, and between the working fluid and the ground are computed. The heat rates between the ground and the working fluid are calculated as a function time and position along the ground loop. The heating and cooling loads of the building being fitted with a GSHP are determined with the computer program developed by DOE called ENERGYPLUS. Lastly COP (coefficient of performance) results as a function of time are provided. Both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer programs developed as part of this work are based upon a detailed finite volume solution of the energy equation for the ground and ground loop. Real heat pump characteristics are entered into the program and used to model the heat pump performance. Thus these computer tools simulate the coupled performance of the ground loop and the heat pump

  7. FDiff3: a finite-difference solver for facilitating understanding of heat conduction and numerical analysis

    Russell, M.B. [University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield (United Kingdom). Department of Aerospace, Automotive and Design Engineering; Probert, S.D. [Cranfield University, Bedfordshire (United Kingdom). School of Engineering

    2004-12-01

    The growing requirement for energy thrift and hence the increasing emphasis on 'low-purchased-energy' designs are stimulating the need for more accurate insights into the thermal behaviours of buildings and their components. This better understanding is preferably achieved, rather than by using 'closed software' or teaching the relevant mathematics outside heat-transfer lessons, but from embedding the pertinent tutoring while dealing with heat-transfer problems using an open-source code approach. Hence a finite-difference software program (FDiff3) has been composed to show the principles of numerical analysis as well as improve the undergraduates' perception of transient conduction. The pedagogic approach behind the development, its present capabilities and applications to sample test-cases are discussed. (author)

  8. A finite volume procedure for fluid flow, heat transfer and solid-body stress analysis

    Jagad, P. I.

    2018-04-12

    A unified cell-centered unstructured mesh finite volume procedure is presented for fluid flow, heat transfer and solid-body stress analysis. An in-house procedure (A. W. Date, Solution of Transport Equations on Unstructured Meshes with Cell-Centered Colocated Variables. Part I: Discretization, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, vol. 48 (6), 1117-1127, 2005) is extended to include the solid-body stress analysis. The transport terms for a cell-face are evaluated in a structured grid-like manner. The Cartesian gradients at the center of each cell-face are evaluated using the coordinate transformation relations. The accuracy of the procedure is demonstrated by solving several benchmark problems involving different boundary conditions, source terms, and types of loading.

  9. Hybrid mesh finite volume CFD code for studying heat transfer in a forward-facing step

    Jayakumar, J S; Kumar, Inder [Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai (India); Eswaran, V, E-mail: jsjayan@gmail.com, E-mail: inderk@barc.gov.in, E-mail: eswar@iitk.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India)

    2010-12-15

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods employ two types of grid: structured and unstructured. Developing the solver and data structures for a finite-volume solver is easier than for unstructured grids. But real-life problems are too complicated to be fitted flexibly by structured grids. Therefore, unstructured grids are widely used for solving real-life problems. However, using only one type of unstructured element consumes a lot of computational time because the number of elements cannot be controlled. Hence, a hybrid grid that contains mixed elements, such as the use of hexahedral elements along with tetrahedral and pyramidal elements, gives the user control over the number of elements in the domain, and thus only the domain that requires a finer grid is meshed finer and not the entire domain. This work aims to develop such a finite-volume hybrid grid solver capable of handling turbulence flows and conjugate heat transfer. It has been extended to solving flow involving separation and subsequent reattachment occurring due to sudden expansion or contraction. A significant effect of mixing high- and low-enthalpy fluid occurs in the reattached regions of these devices. This makes the study of the backward-facing and forward-facing step with heat transfer an important field of research. The problem of the forward-facing step with conjugate heat transfer was taken up and solved for turbulence flow using a two-equation model of k-{omega}. The variation in the flow profile and heat transfer behavior has been studied with the variation in Re and solid to fluid thermal conductivity ratios. The results for the variation in local Nusselt number, interface temperature and skin friction factor are presented.

  10. Hybrid mesh finite volume CFD code for studying heat transfer in a forward-facing step

    Jayakumar, J. S.; Kumar, Inder; Eswaran, V.

    2010-12-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods employ two types of grid: structured and unstructured. Developing the solver and data structures for a finite-volume solver is easier than for unstructured grids. But real-life problems are too complicated to be fitted flexibly by structured grids. Therefore, unstructured grids are widely used for solving real-life problems. However, using only one type of unstructured element consumes a lot of computational time because the number of elements cannot be controlled. Hence, a hybrid grid that contains mixed elements, such as the use of hexahedral elements along with tetrahedral and pyramidal elements, gives the user control over the number of elements in the domain, and thus only the domain that requires a finer grid is meshed finer and not the entire domain. This work aims to develop such a finite-volume hybrid grid solver capable of handling turbulence flows and conjugate heat transfer. It has been extended to solving flow involving separation and subsequent reattachment occurring due to sudden expansion or contraction. A significant effect of mixing high- and low-enthalpy fluid occurs in the reattached regions of these devices. This makes the study of the backward-facing and forward-facing step with heat transfer an important field of research. The problem of the forward-facing step with conjugate heat transfer was taken up and solved for turbulence flow using a two-equation model of k-ω. The variation in the flow profile and heat transfer behavior has been studied with the variation in Re and solid to fluid thermal conductivity ratios. The results for the variation in local Nusselt number, interface temperature and skin friction factor are presented.

  11. Hybrid mesh finite volume CFD code for studying heat transfer in a forward-facing step

    Jayakumar, J S; Kumar, Inder; Eswaran, V

    2010-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods employ two types of grid: structured and unstructured. Developing the solver and data structures for a finite-volume solver is easier than for unstructured grids. But real-life problems are too complicated to be fitted flexibly by structured grids. Therefore, unstructured grids are widely used for solving real-life problems. However, using only one type of unstructured element consumes a lot of computational time because the number of elements cannot be controlled. Hence, a hybrid grid that contains mixed elements, such as the use of hexahedral elements along with tetrahedral and pyramidal elements, gives the user control over the number of elements in the domain, and thus only the domain that requires a finer grid is meshed finer and not the entire domain. This work aims to develop such a finite-volume hybrid grid solver capable of handling turbulence flows and conjugate heat transfer. It has been extended to solving flow involving separation and subsequent reattachment occurring due to sudden expansion or contraction. A significant effect of mixing high- and low-enthalpy fluid occurs in the reattached regions of these devices. This makes the study of the backward-facing and forward-facing step with heat transfer an important field of research. The problem of the forward-facing step with conjugate heat transfer was taken up and solved for turbulence flow using a two-equation model of k-ω. The variation in the flow profile and heat transfer behavior has been studied with the variation in Re and solid to fluid thermal conductivity ratios. The results for the variation in local Nusselt number, interface temperature and skin friction factor are presented.

  12. Simulation of incompressible flows with heat and mass transfer using parallel finite element method

    Jalal Abedi

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The stabilized finite element formulations based on the SUPG (Stream-line-Upwind/Petrov-Galerkin and PSPG (Pressure-Stabilization/Petrov-Galerkin methods are developed and applied to solve buoyancy-driven incompressible flows with heat and mass transfer. The SUPG stabilization term allows us to solve flow problems at high speeds (advection dominant flows and the PSPG term eliminates instabilities associated with the use of equal order interpolation functions for both pressure and velocity. The finite element formulations are implemented in parallel using MPI. In parallel computations, the finite element mesh is partitioned into contiguous subdomains using METIS, which are then assigned to individual processors. To ensure a balanced load, the number of elements assigned to each processor is approximately equal. To solve nonlinear systems in large-scale applications, we developed a matrix-free GMRES iterative solver. Here we totally eliminate a need to form any matrices, even at the element levels. To measure the accuracy of the method, we solve 2D and 3D example of natural convection flows at moderate to high Rayleigh numbers.

  13. An h-adaptive finite element method for turbulent heat transfer

    Carriington, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    A two-equation turbulence closure model (k-{omega}) using an h-adaptive grid technique and finite element method (FEM) has been developed to simulate low Mach flow and heat transfer. These flows are applicable to many flows in engineering and environmental sciences. Of particular interest in the engineering modeling areas are: combustion, solidification, and heat exchanger design. Flows for indoor air quality modeling and atmospheric pollution transport are typical types of environmental flows modeled with this method. The numerical method is based on a hybrid finite element model using an equal-order projection process. The model includes thermal and species transport, localized mesh refinement (h-adaptive) and Petrov-Galerkin weighting for the stabilizing the advection. This work develops the continuum model of a two-equation turbulence closure method. The fractional step solution method is stated along with the h-adaptive grid method (Carrington and Pepper, 2002). Solutions are presented for 2d flow over a backward-facing step.

  14. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHMN) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1995-01-01

    The finite element code FEHMN is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developed hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent K d model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect 14 C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also provide that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies

  15. Thermal radiation heat transfer in participating media by finite volume discretization using collimated beam incidence

    Harijishnu, R.; Jayakumar, J. S.

    2017-09-01

    The main objective of this paper is to study the heat transfer rate of thermal radiation in participating media. For that, a generated collimated beam has been passed through a two dimensional slab model of flint glass with a refractive index 2. Both Polar and azimuthal angle have been varied to generate such a beam. The Temperature of the slab and Snells law has been validated by Radiation Transfer Equation (RTE) in OpenFOAM (Open Field Operation and Manipulation), a CFD software which is the major computational tool used in Industry and research applications where the source code is modified in which radiation heat transfer equation is added to the case and different radiation heat transfer models are utilized. This work concentrates on the numerical strategies involving both transparent and participating media. Since Radiation Transfer Equation (RTE) is difficult to solve, the purpose of this paper is to use existing solver buoyantSimlpeFoam to solve radiation model in the participating media by compiling the source code to obtain the heat transfer rate inside the slab by varying the Intensity of radiation. The Finite Volume Method (FVM) is applied to solve the Radiation Transfer Equation (RTE) governing the above said physical phenomena.

  16. Comparison of Moving Boundary and Finite-Volume Heat Exchanger Models in the Modelica Language

    Adriano Desideri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available When modeling low capacity energy systems, such as a small size (5–150 kWel organic Rankine cycle unit, the governing dynamics are mainly concentrated in the heat exchangers. As a consequence, the accuracy and simulation speed of the higher level system model mainly depend on the heat exchanger model formulation. In particular, the modeling of thermo-flow systems characterized by evaporation or condensation requires heat exchanger models capable of handling phase transitions. To this aim, the finite volume (FV and the moving boundary (MB approaches are the most widely used. The two models are developed and included in the open-source ThermoCycle Modelica library. In this contribution, a comparison between the two approaches is presented. An integrity and accuracy test is designed to evaluate the performance of the FV and MB models during transient conditions. In order to analyze how the two modeling approaches perform when integrated at a system level, two organic Rankine cycle (ORC system models are built using the FV and the MB evaporator model, and their responses are compared against experimental data collected on an 11 kWel ORC power unit. Additionally, the effect of the void fraction value in the MB evaporator model and of the number of control volumes (CVs in the FV one is investigated. The results allow drawing general guidelines for the development of heat exchanger dynamic models involving two-phase flows.

  17. Parallel, Multigrid Finite Element Simulator for Fractured/Faulted and Other Complex Reservoirs based on Common Component Architecture (CCA)

    Milind Deo; Chung-Kan Huang; Huabing Wang

    2008-08-31

    Black-oil, compositional and thermal simulators have been developed to address different physical processes in reservoir simulation. A number of different types of discretization methods have also been proposed to address issues related to representing the complex reservoir geometry. These methods are more significant for fractured reservoirs where the geometry can be particularly challenging. In this project, a general modular framework for reservoir simulation was developed, wherein the physical models were efficiently decoupled from the discretization methods. This made it possible to couple any discretization method with different physical models. Oil characterization methods are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and it is possible to construct geologically constrained models of faulted/fractured reservoirs. Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) simulation provides the option of performing multiphase calculations on spatially explicit, geologically feasible fracture sets. Multiphase DFN simulations of and sensitivity studies on a wide variety of fracture networks created using fracture creation/simulation programs was undertaken in the first part of this project. This involved creating interfaces to seamlessly convert the fracture characterization information into simulator input, grid the complex geometry, perform the simulations, and analyze and visualize results. Benchmarking and comparison with conventional simulators was also a component of this work. After demonstration of the fact that multiphase simulations can be carried out on complex fracture networks, quantitative effects of the heterogeneity of fracture properties were evaluated. Reservoirs are populated with fractures of several different scales and properties. A multiscale fracture modeling study was undertaken and the effects of heterogeneity and storage on water displacement dynamics in fractured basements were investigated. In gravity-dominated systems, more oil could be recovered at a given pore

  18. Well and Inflow Performance Relationship for Heavy Oil Reservoir under Heating Treatment

    Hakiki, Farizal

    2017-10-17

    Well and Inflow Performance Relationship, termed TPR and IPR, respectively have been the unfailing methods to predict well performance. It is further to determine the schemes on optimising production. The main intention of the study is to explore TPR and IPR under heating treatment for heavy oil well. Klamono is a mature field which mostly has depleted wells, it produces heavy oil within 18.5 °API (>0.95 g/cc oil density), and therefore, artificial lifting method is necessary. Sucker Road Pump (SRP) and Electrical Submersible Pump (ESP) are the most deployed artificial lifting method in this reservoir. To boost the heavy oil production, the application of Electric Downhole Heater (EDH) in Well KLO-X1 is being studied. Whole Klamono\\'s production is more than 100,000 blpd within 97-99% water cut. By installing EDH, oil viscosity is decreased hence oil mobility ratio will play a role to decrease water cut. EDH is installed together with the tubing joint to simplify its application in the wellbore. The study shows that EDH application can elevate fluid (mixed oil and brine) temperature. Oil viscosity confirms a reduction from 68 to 46 cP. The gross well production is up to 12.2 bopd due optimising its outflow performance and reducing 97.5 to 96.9% water cut. The field data gives an incremental of 4.9 bopd. The computational results only show an attainment of net oil production up to 8.3 bopd (2 bopd incremental). The EDH works to lessen both density and viscosity as we hypothesised for the mechanism of thermally induced oil production improvement. The evaluation study on its economics aspect exhibits good result that is 1.4 USD/bbl additional profit margin according to field data despite the challenging annual rig rent cost. Following the field data, the expected net income through analytical model revealed that this project is financially promising.

  19. Well and Inflow Performance Relationship for Heavy Oil Reservoir under Heating Treatment

    Hakiki, Farizal; Aditya, A.; Ulitha, D. T.; Shidqi, M.; Adi, W. S.; Wibowo, K. H.; Barus, M.

    2017-01-01

    Well and Inflow Performance Relationship, termed TPR and IPR, respectively have been the unfailing methods to predict well performance. It is further to determine the schemes on optimising production. The main intention of the study is to explore TPR and IPR under heating treatment for heavy oil well. Klamono is a mature field which mostly has depleted wells, it produces heavy oil within 18.5 °API (>0.95 g/cc oil density), and therefore, artificial lifting method is necessary. Sucker Road Pump (SRP) and Electrical Submersible Pump (ESP) are the most deployed artificial lifting method in this reservoir. To boost the heavy oil production, the application of Electric Downhole Heater (EDH) in Well KLO-X1 is being studied. Whole Klamono's production is more than 100,000 blpd within 97-99% water cut. By installing EDH, oil viscosity is decreased hence oil mobility ratio will play a role to decrease water cut. EDH is installed together with the tubing joint to simplify its application in the wellbore. The study shows that EDH application can elevate fluid (mixed oil and brine) temperature. Oil viscosity confirms a reduction from 68 to 46 cP. The gross well production is up to 12.2 bopd due optimising its outflow performance and reducing 97.5 to 96.9% water cut. The field data gives an incremental of 4.9 bopd. The computational results only show an attainment of net oil production up to 8.3 bopd (2 bopd incremental). The EDH works to lessen both density and viscosity as we hypothesised for the mechanism of thermally induced oil production improvement. The evaluation study on its economics aspect exhibits good result that is 1.4 USD/bbl additional profit margin according to field data despite the challenging annual rig rent cost. Following the field data, the expected net income through analytical model revealed that this project is financially promising.

  20. Distance determination of NPP and oil reservoir on enhanced oil recovery based on heat loss and safety in view point

    Erlan Dewita; Dedy Priambodo; Sudi Ariyanto

    2013-01-01

    EOR is a method used to increasing oil recovery by injecting material or other to the reservoir. There are 3 EOR technique have been used in the world, namely thermal injection, chemical injection dan Miscible. Thermal injection method is the method most widely used in the world, however, one drawback is the loss of heat during steam distribution to the injection wells. In Indonesia, EOR application has been successfully done in the field of Duri, Chevron uses steam injection method, but still use petroleum as a fuel for steam production. In order to save oil reserves, it was done the introduction of co-generation nuclear power plants to supply some of the heat of nuclear power plants for EOR processes. In cogeneration nuclear power plant, the safety aspect is main priority. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the distance NPP with oil wells by considering heat loss and safety aspects. The method of study and calculations done using Tempo Cycle program. The study results showed that in the distance of 400 meter as exclusion zone of PBMR reactor, with pipe insulation thickness 1 in, the amount of heat loss of 277, 883 kw, while in pipe isolation thickness 2 in, amount of heat loss became 162,634 kw and with isolation thickness 3 in, amount of heat loss 120,767 kw., heat loss can be overcome and provide insulation pipes and improve the quality of saturated steam into superheated. (author)

  1. Inverse Estimation of Heat Flux and Temperature Distribution in 3D Finite Domain

    Muhammad, Nauman Malik

    2009-02-01

    Inverse heat conduction problems occur in many theoretical and practical applications where it is difficult or practically impossible to measure the input heat flux and the temperature of the layer conducting the heat flux to the body. Thus it becomes imperative to devise some means to cater for such a problem and estimate the heat flux inversely. Adaptive State Estimator is one such technique which works by incorporating the semi-Markovian concept into a Bayesian estimation technique thereby developing an inverse input and state estimator consisting of a bank of parallel adaptively weighted Kalman filters. The problem presented in this study deals with a three dimensional system of a cube with one end conducting heat flux and all the other sides are insulated while the temperatures are measured on the accessible faces of the cube. The measurements taken on these accessible faces are fed into the estimation algorithm and the input heat flux and the temperature distribution at each point in the system is calculated. A variety of input heat flux scenarios have been examined to underwrite the robustness of the estimation algorithm and hence insure its usability in practical applications. These include sinusoidal input flux, a combination of rectangular, linearly changing and sinusoidal input flux and finally a step changing input flux. The estimator's performance limitations have been examined in these input set-ups and error associated with each set-up is compared to conclude the realistic application of the estimation algorithm in such scenarios. Different sensor arrangements, that is different sensor numbers and their locations are also examined to impress upon the importance of number of measurements and their location i.e. close or farther from the input area. Since practically it is both economically and physically tedious to install more number of measurement sensors, hence optimized number and location is very important to determine for making the study more

  2. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHM) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1996-08-01

    The finite element code FEHMN, developed by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developing hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent Kd model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The new chemical capabilities of FEHMN are illustrated by using Los Alamos National Laboratory's site scale model of Yucca Mountain to model two-dimensional, vadose zone 14 C transport. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect 14 C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also prove that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies

  3. The Impact of Reduced Gravity on Free Convective Heat Transfer from a Finite, Flat, Vertical Plate

    Lotto, Michael A.; Johnson, Kirstyn M.; Nie, Christopher W.; Klaus, David M.

    2017-10-01

    Convective heat transfer is governed by a number of factors including various fluid properties, the presence of a thermal gradient, geometric configuration, flow condition, and gravity. Empirically-derived analytical relationships can be used to estimate convection as a function of these governing parameters. Although it is relatively straightforward to experimentally quantify the contributions of the majority of these variables, it is logistically difficult to assess the influence of reduced-gravity due to practical limitations of establishing this environment. Therefore, in order to explore this regime, a series of tests was conducted to evaluate convection under reduced-gravity conditions averaging 0.45 m/sec2 (0.05 g) achieved aboard a parabolic aircraft. The results showed a reduction in net heat transfer of approximately 61% in flight relative to a 1 g terrestrial baseline using the same setup. The average experimental Nusselt Number of 19.05 ± 1.41 statistically correlated with the predicted value of 18.90 ± 0.63 (N = 13), estimated using the Churchill-Chu correlation for free convective heat transfer from a finite, flat, vertical plate. Extrapolating this to similar performance in true microgravity (10-6 g) indicates that these conditions should yield a Nusselt Number of 1.27, which is 2.6% the magnitude of free convection at 1 g, or a reduction of 97.4%. With advection essentially eliminated, heat transfer becomes limited to diffusion and radiation, which are gravity-independent and nearly equivalent in magnitude in this case. These results offer a general guideline for integrating components that utilize natural (free) convective gas cooling in a spacecraft habitat and properly sizing the thermal control system.

  4. FEHMN 1.0: Finite element heat and mass transfer code

    Zyvoloski, G.; Dash, Z.; Kelkar, S.

    1991-04-01

    A computer code is described which can simulate non-isothermal multiphase multicomponent flow in porous media. It is applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and ground-water flow. The equations of heat and mass transfer for multiphase flow in porous and permeable media are solved using the finite element method. The permeability and porosity of the medium are allowed to depend on pressure and temperature. The code also has provisions for movable air and water phases and noncoupled tracers; that is, tracer solutions that do not affect the heat and mass transfer solutions. The tracers can be passive or reactive. The code can simulate two-dimensional, two-dimensional radial, or three-dimensional geometries. A summary of the equations in the model and the numerical solution procedure are provided in this report. A user's guide and sample problems are also included. The main use of FEHMN will be to assist in the understanding of flow fields in the saturated zone below the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository. 33 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs

  5. User's manual for the FEHM application - A finite-element heat- and mass-transfer code

    Zyvoloski, G.A.; Robinson, B.A.; Dash, Z.V.; Trease, L.L.

    1997-07-01

    The use of this code is applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and groundwater flow. A primary use of the FEHM application will be to assist in the understanding of flow fields and mass transport in the saturated and unsaturated zones below the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository in Nevada. The equations of heat and mass transfer for multiphase flow in porous and permeable media are solved in the FEHM application by using the finite-element method. The permeability and porosity of the medium are allowed to depend on pressure and temperature. The code also has provisions for movable air and water phases and noncoupled tracers; that is, tracer solutions that do not affect the heat- and mass-transfer solutions. The tracers can be passive or reactive. The code can simulate two-dimensional, two-dimensional radial, or three-dimensional geometries. In fact, FEHM is capable of describing flow that is dominated in many areas by fracture and fault flow, including the inherently three-dimensional flow that results from permeation to and from faults and fractures. The code can handle coupled heat and mass-transfer effects, such as boiling, dryout, and condensation that can occur in the near-field region surrounding the potential repository and the natural convection that occurs through Yucca Mountain due to seasonal temperature changes. This report outlines the uses and capabilities of the FEHM application, initialization of code variables, restart procedures, and error processing. The report describes all the data files, the input data, including individual input records or parameters, and the various output files. The system interface is described, including the software environment and installation instructions

  6. Stationary spectra of short-wave convective and magnetostatic fluctuations in a finite-pressure plasma and anomalous heat conductivity

    Vakulenko, M.O.

    1992-01-01

    Within the general renormalized statistical approach, the low-frequency short-wave stationary spectra of potential and magnetic perturbations in a finite-pressure plasma, are obtained. Anomalous heat conductivity considerably enhances due to non-linear interaction between magnetic excitations. 11 refs. (author)

  7. Association of Finite-Time Thermodynamics and a Bond-Graph Approach for Modeling an Endoreversible Heat Engine

    Michel Feidt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the approach known as Finite-Time Thermodynamics has provided a fruitful theoretical framework for the optimization of heat engines operating between a heat source (at temperature and a heat sink (at temperature . The aim of this paper is to propose a more complete approach based on the association of Finite-Time Thermodynamics and the Bond-Graph approach for modeling endoreversible heat engines. This approach makes it possible for example to find in a simple way the characteristics of the optimal operating point at which the maximum mechanical power of the endoreversible heat engine is obtained with entropy flow rate as control variable. Furthermore it provides the analytical expressions of the optimal operating point of an irreversible heat engine where the energy conversion is accompanied by irreversibilities related to internal heat transfer and heat dissipation phenomena. This original approach, applied to an analysis of the performance of a thermoelectric generator, will be the object of a future publication.

  8. Geothermal Frontier: Penetrate a boundary between hydrothermal convection and heat conduction zones to create 'Beyond Brittle Geothermal Reservoir'

    Tsuchiya, N.; Asanuma, H.; Sakaguchi, K.; Okamoto, A.; Hirano, N.; Watanabe, N.; Kizaki, A.

    2013-12-01

    EGS has been highlightened as a most promising method of geothermal development recently because of applicability to sites which have been considered to be unsuitable for geothermal development. Meanwhile, some critical problems have been experimentally identified, such as low recovery of injected water, difficulties to establish universal design/development methodology, and occurrence of large induced seismicity. Future geothermal target is supercritical and superheated geothermal fluids in and around ductile rock bodies under high temperatures. Ductile regime which is estimated beyond brittle zone is target region for future geothermal development due to high enthalpy fluids and relatively weak water-rock interaction. It is very difficult to determine exact depth of Brittle-Ductile boundary due to strong dependence of temperature (geotherm) and strain rate, however, ductile zone is considered to be developed above 400C and below 3 km in geothermal fields in Tohoku District. Hydrothermal experiments associated with additional advanced technology will be conducting to understand ';Beyond brittle World' and to develop deeper and hotter geothermal reservoir. We propose a new concept of the engineered geothermal development where reservoirs are created in ductile basement, expecting the following advantages: (a)simpler design and control the reservoir, (b)nearly full recovery of injected water, (c)sustainable production, (d)cost reduction by development of relatively shallower ductile zone in compression tectonic zones, (e)large quantity of energy extraction from widely distributed ductile zones, (f)establishment of universal and conceptual design/development methodology, and (g) suppression of felt earthquakes from/around the reservoirs. In ductile regime, Mesh-like fracture cloud has great potential for heat extraction between injection and production wells in spite of single and simple mega-fracture. Based on field observation and high performance hydrothermal

  9. A parallel finite-volume finite-element method for transient compressible turbulent flows with heat transfer

    Masoud Ziaei-Rad

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional numerical scheme is presented for the simulation of turbulent, viscous, transient compressible flows in the simultaneously developing hydraulic and thermal boundary layer region. The numerical procedure is a finite-volume-based finite-element method applied to unstructured grids. This combination together with a new method applied for the boundary conditions allows for accurate computation of the variables in the entrance region and for a wide range of flow fields from subsonic to transonic. The Roe-Riemann solver is used for the convective terms, whereas the standard Galerkin technique is applied for the viscous terms. A modified κ-ε model with a two-layer equation for the near-wall region combined with a compressibility correction is used to predict the turbulent viscosity. Parallel processing is also employed to divide the computational domain among the different processors to reduce the computational time. The method is applied to some test cases in order to verify the numerical accuracy. The results show significant differences between incompressible and compressible flows in the friction coefficient, Nusselt number, shear stress and the ratio of the compressible turbulent viscosity to the molecular viscosity along the developing region. A transient flow generated after an accidental rupture in a pipeline was also studied as a test case. The results show that the present numerical scheme is stable, accurate and efficient enough to solve the problem of transient wall-bounded flow.

  10. Transient thermal stresses in a transversely isotropic finite hollow circular cylinder due to arbitrary surface heat generations

    Sugano, Yoshihiro; Nakanishi, Takanori.

    1980-01-01

    The materials macroscopically regarded as anisotropic materials such as fiber-reinforced composite materials have become to be used for the structural elements at elevated temperature, and the studies on the problem of thermal stress in anisotropic bodies are carried out actively. The unsteady thermal stress in anisotropic finite circular cylinders has not been analyzed so far. In this study, the problem of unsteady thermal stress in an anisotropic finite circular cylinder having arbitrary surface heat generation in axial direction on the internal and external surfaces, and emitting heat from both ends and the internal and external surfaces, was analyzed. For the analysis of temperature distribution, generalized finite Fourier transformation and finite Hankel transformation were used, and thermal stress and thermal displacement were analyzed by the use of the stress function of Singh. By adopting the function used for the transformation nucleus in generalized finite Fourier transformation as the stress function, the analysis was made without separating symmetric and opposite symmetric problems. Numerical calculation was carried out on the basis of the analytical results, and the effects of the anisotropy in thermal conductivity, Young's modulus and linear expansion on unsteady temperature distribution, thermal stress and thermal displacement were quantitatively examined. (Kako, I.)

  11. An evaluation of a translator for finite element data to resistor/capacitor data for the heat diffusion equation

    Manteufel, R.D.; Klein, D.E.; Yoshimura, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper evaluates a translator for finite element data to resistor/capacitor data (FEM/RC) for the numerical solution of heat diffusion problems. The translator involves the derivation of thermal resistors and capacitors, implicit in the heat balance formulation of the finite difference method. It uses a finite element mesh, which consists of nodes and elements and is implicit in the Galerkin finite element method (GFEM). This hybrid translation method, FEM/RC, has been incorporated in Q/TRAN, a new thermal analysis computer code. This evaluation compares Q/TRAN, HEATING-6, and a research code employing GFEM on a purely mathematical, highly nonlinear steady-state conduction benchmark problem. The evaluation concludes that the FEM/RC technique has numerical characteristics that are consistent with comparable schemes for the benchmark problem. FEM/RC also accurately translates skewed meshes. Because FEM/RC generates resistors and capacitors, it appears to offer a more efficient method than the classical GFEM

  12. The experimental study of heat extraction of supercritical CO2 in the geothermal reservoir

    Huang Cyun-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer phenomena of supercritical CO2 are experimentally investigated in a horizontal tube for improving the efficiency of CO2-EGS.This study discuss the experimental verification of the numerical simulations. The experiment is conducted for the pressure, the flow rate, and particle size 1.54mm. In addition, the experiment and simulation that the maximum heat extraction is occurred at the 9MPa pressure and mass flow rate of 0.00109 kg/s. The maximum specific heat extraction at 9MPa and flow rate of 0.00082 kg/s. The results show that the numerical model has been experimentally verified of the feasibility. Furthermore, the pseudo-critical point had a significant influence on the heat extraction, temperature difference and specific heat extraction.

  13. Finite element modelling and simulation of free convection heat transfer in solar oven

    Sobamowo, M.G.; Ogunmola, B.Y.; Ayerin A.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Lagos, Akoka, Lagos (Nigeria)

    2013-07-01

    The use of solar energy for baking, heating or drying represents a sustainable way of solar energy applications with negligible negative effects. Solar oven is an alternative to conventional oven that rely heavily on coal and wood or Electric oven that uses the power from the National grid of which the end users have little or no control. Since the Solar oven uses no fuel and it costs nothing to run, it uses are widely promoted especially in situations where minimum fuel consumption or fire risks are considered highly important. As useful as the Solar Oven proved, it major setback in the area of applications has been its future sustainability. For the use of Solar Oven/Cookers to be sustained in the future, the design and development of solar oven must rely on sound analytical tools. Therefore, this work focused on the design and development of the solar oven. To test the performance of the Small Solar Oven a 5000cm3 beaker of water was put into the Oven and the temperature of the water was found to reach 810C after about 3hrs under an average ambient temperature of 300C. On no load test, the oven reached a maximum temperature of 112oC in 6hrs. In order to carry out the parametric studies and improve the performance of the Solar Oven, Mathematical models were developed and solved by using Characteristics-Based Split (CBS) Finite Element Method. The Model results were compared with the Experimental results and a good agreement was found between the two results.

  14. Discretisation of the non-linear heat transfer equation for food freezing processes using orthogonal collocation on finite elements

    E. D. Resende

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The freezing process is considered as a propagation problem and mathematically classified as an "initial value problem." The mathematical formulation involves a complex situation of heat transfer with simultaneous changes of phase and abrupt variation in thermal properties. The objective of the present work is to solve the non-linear heat transfer equation for food freezing processes using orthogonal collocation on finite elements. This technique has not yet been applied to freezing processes and represents an alternative numerical approach in this area. The results obtained confirmed the good capability of the numerical method, which allows the simulation of the freezing process in approximately one minute of computer time, qualifying its application in a mathematical optimising procedure. The influence of the latent heat released during the crystallisation phenomena was identified by the significant increase in heat load in the early stages of the freezing process.

  15. Experimental investigations and finite element simulation of cutting heat in vibrational and conventional drilling of cortical bone.

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Meng; Zhao, Xiangrui; Zhu, Gang; McClean, Colin; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Fan, Yubo

    2014-11-01

    Heat generated during bone drilling could cause irreversible thermal damage, which can lead to bone necrosis or even osteomyelitis. In this study, vibrational drilling was applied to fresh bovine bones to investigate the cutting heat in comparison with conventional drilling through experimental investigation and finite element analysis (FEA). The influence of vibrational frequency and amplitude on cutting heat generation and conduction were studied. The experimental results showed that, compared with the conventional drilling, vibrational drilling could significantly reduce the cutting temperature in drilling of cortical bone (P<0.05): the cutting temperature tended to decrease with increasing vibrational frequency and amplitude. The FEA results also showed that the vibrational amplitude holds a significant effect on the cutting heat conduction. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Forced convection on a heated horizontal flat plate with finite thermal conductivity in a non-Darcian porous medium

    Luna, N. [Direccion de Operacion Petrolera, Direccion General de Exploracion y Explotacion de Hidrocarburos, Secretaria de Energia, 03100 Mexico DF (Mexico); Mendez, F. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, 04510 Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The steady-state analysis of conjugated heat transfer process for the hydrodynamically developed forced convection flow on a heated flat plate embedded in a porous medium is studied. The governing equations for the fluid-saturated porous medium are solved analytically using the integral boundary layer approximation. This integral solution is coupled to the energy equation for the flat plate, where the longitudinal heat conduction effects are taken into account. The resulting equations are then reduced to an integro-differential equation which is solved by regular perturbation techniques and numerical methods. The analytical and numerical predictions for the temperature profile of the plate and appropriate local and average Nusselt numbers are plotted for finite values of the conduction parameter, {alpha}, which represents the presence of the longitudinal heat conduction effects. (authors)

  17. Space and Time Adaptive Two-Mesh hp-Finite Element Method for Transient Microwave Heating Problems

    Dubcová, Lenka; Šolín, Pavel; Červený, Jakub; Kůs, Pavel

    1-2, č. 30 (2010), s. 23-40 ISSN 0272-6343 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/07/0496; GA AV ČR IAA100760702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20570509 Keywords : hp-finite element method * microwave heating * edge elements Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.844, year: 2010

  18. Non-linear effects in vortex viscous flow in superconductors-role of finite heat removal velocity

    Bezuglyj, A.I.; Shklovskij, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    The role of finite heat removal velocity in experiments on non-linear effects in vortex viscous flow in superconducting films near critical temperature was investigated. It was shown that the account of thermal effects permits to explain the experimentally observed dependence of electron energy relaxation time and current break-down in voltage-current characteristic from magnetic field value. 5 refs.; 1 fig. (author)

  19. Numerical investigation of the efficiency of emission reduction and heat extraction in a sedimentary geothermal reservoir: a case study of the Daming geothermal field in China.

    Guo, Xuyang; Song, Hongqing; Killough, John; Du, Li; Sun, Pengguang

    2018-02-01

    The utilization of geothermal energy is clean and has great potential worldwide, and it is important to utilize geothermal energy in a sustainable manner. Mathematical modeling studies of geothermal reservoirs are important as they evaluate and quantify the complex multi-physical effects in geothermal reservoirs. However, previous modeling efforts lack the study focusing on the emission reduction efficiency and the deformation at geothermal wellbores caused by geothermal water extraction/circulation. Emission efficiency is rather relevant in geothermal projects introduced in areas characterized by elevated air pollution where the utilization of geothermal energy is as an alternative to burning fossil fuels. Deformation at geothermal wellbores is also relevant as significant deformation caused by water extraction can lead to geothermal wellbore instability and can consequently decrease the effectiveness of the heat extraction process in geothermal wells. In this study, the efficiency of emission reduction and heat extraction in a sedimentary geothermal reservoir in Daming County, China, are numerically investigated based on a coupled multi-physical model. Relationships between the efficiency of emission reduction and heat extraction, deformation at geothermal well locations, and geothermal field parameters including well spacing, heat production rate, re-injection temperature, rock stiffness, and geothermal well placement patterns are analyzed. Results show that, although large heat production rates and low re-injection temperatures can lead to decreased heat production in the last 8 years of heat extraction, they still improve the overall heat production capacity and emission reduction capacity. Also, the emission reduction capacity is positively correlated with the heat production capacity. Deformation at geothermal wellbore locations is alleviated by smaller well spacing, lower heat production rates, and smaller numbers of injectors in the well pattern, and by

  20. Weld residual stress according to the ways of heat input in the simulation of weld process using finite element analysis

    Yang, Jun Seog; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong

    2008-01-01

    This paper is to discuss distribution of welding residual stresses of a ferritic low alloy steel nozzle with dissimilar metal weld using Alloy 82/182. Two Dimensional (2D) thermo-mechanical finite element analyses are carried out to simulate multi-pass welding process on the basis of the detailed and fabrication data. On performing the welding analysis generally, the characteristics on the heat input and heat transfer of weld are affected on the weld residual stress analyses. Thermal analyses in the welding heat cycle process is very important process in weld residual stress analyses. Therefore, heat is rapidly input to the weld pass material, using internal volumetric heat generation, at a rate which raises the peak weld metal temperature to 2200 .deg. C and the base metal adjacent to the weld to about 1400 .deg. C. These are approximately the temperature that the weld metal and surrounding base materials reach during welding. Also, According to the various ways of applying the weld heat source, the predicted residual stress results are compared with measured axial, hoop and radial through-wall profiles in the heat affected zone of test component. Also, those results are compared with those of full 3-dimensional simulation

  1. Water injection into vapor- and liquid-dominated reservoirs: Modeling of heat transfer and mass transport

    Pruess, K.; Oldenburg, C.; Moridis, G.; Finsterle, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes recent advances in methods for simulating water and tracer injection, and presents illustrative applications to liquid- and vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs. High-resolution simulations of water injection into heterogeneous, vertical fractures in superheated vapor zones were performed. Injected water was found to move in dendritic patterns, and to experience stronger lateral flow effects than predicted from homogeneous medium models. Higher-order differencing methods were applied to modeling water and tracer injection into liquid-dominated systems. Conventional upstream weighting techniques were shown to be adequate for predicting the migration of thermal fronts, while higher-order methods give far better accuracy for tracer transport. A new fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator is described which allows a more accurate description of geofluids, and includes mineral dissolution and precipitation effects with associated porosity and permeability change. Comparisons between numerical simulation predictions and data for laboratory and field injection experiments are summarized. Enhanced simulation capabilities include a new linear solver package for TOUGH2, and inverse modeling techniques for automatic history matching and optimization.

  2. A theoretical study on the performances of thermoelectric heat engine and refrigerator with two-dimensional electron reservoirs

    Luo, Xiaoguang; Long, Kailin; Wang, Jun; Qiu, Teng; He, Jizhou; Liu, Nian

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical thermoelectric nanophysics models of low-dimensional electronic heat engine and refrigerator devices, comprising two-dimensional hot and cold reservoirs and an interconnecting filtered electron transport mechanism have been established. The models were used to numerically simulate and evaluate the thermoelectric performance and energy conversion efficiencies of these low-dimensional devices, based on three different types of electron transport momentum-dependent filters, referred to herein as k x , k y , and k r filters. Assuming the Fermi-Dirac distribution of electrons, expressions for key thermoelectric performance parameters were derived for the resonant transport processes, in which the transmission of electrons has been approximated as a Lorentzian resonance function. Optimizations were carried out and the corresponding optimized design parameters have been determined, including but not limited to the universal theoretical upper bound of the efficiency at maximum power for heat engines, and the maximum coefficient of performance for refrigerators. From the results, it was determined that k r filter delivers the best thermoelectric performance, followed by the k x filter, and then the k y filter. For refrigerators with any one of three filters, an optimum range for the full width at half maximum of the transport resonance was found to be B T.

  3. Heat transfer model and finite element formulation for simulation of selective laser melting

    Roy, Souvik; Juha, Mario; Shephard, Mark S.; Maniatty, Antoinette M.

    2017-10-01

    A novel approach and finite element formulation for modeling the melting, consolidation, and re-solidification process that occurs in selective laser melting additive manufacturing is presented. Two state variables are introduced to track the phase (melt/solid) and the degree of consolidation (powder/fully dense). The effect of the consolidation on the absorption of the laser energy into the material as it transforms from a porous powder to a dense melt is considered. A Lagrangian finite element formulation, which solves the governing equations on the unconsolidated reference configuration is derived, which naturally considers the effect of the changing geometry as the powder melts without needing to update the simulation domain. The finite element model is implemented into a general-purpose parallel finite element solver. Results are presented comparing to experimental results in the literature for a single laser track with good agreement. Predictions for a spiral laser pattern are also shown.

  4. A stabilized second-order time accurate finite element formulation for incompressible viscous flow with heat transfer

    Curi, Marcos Filardy

    2011-01-01

    In view of the problem of global warming and the search for clean energy sources, a worldwide expansion on the use of nuclear energy is foreseen. Thus, the development of science and technology regarding nuclear power plants is essential, in particular in the field of reactor engineering. Fluid mechanics and heat transfer play an important role in the development of nuclear reactors. Computational Fluid Mechanics (CFD) is becoming ever more important in the optimization of cost and safety of the designs. This work presents a stabilized second-order time accurate finite element formulation for incompressible flows with heat transfer. A second order time discretization precedes a spatial discretization using finite elements. The terms that stabilize the finite element method arise naturally from the discretization process, rather than being introduced a priori in the variational formulation. The method was implemented in the program 'ns n ew s olvec2d av 2 M PI' written in FORTRAN90, developed in the Parallel Computing Laboratory at the Institute of Nuclear Engineering (LCP/IEN). Numerical solutions of some representative examples, including free, mixed and forced convection, demonstrate that the proposed stabilized formulation attains very good agreement with experimental and computational results available in the literature. (author)

  5. Effects of Heat Input and Bead Generation Methods on Finite Element Analysis of Multi-Pass Welding Process

    Park, Won Dong; Kim, Ji Hoon; Bahn, Chi Bum [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Welding residual stresses are determined by various factors such as heat input, initial temperature of molten bead, heating time, cooling time, cooling conditions, and boundary conditions. In this study, a sensitivity analysis was performed to find the major factors and reasonable assumptions for simulation. Two-dimensional axisymmetric simulation was conducted by using commercial finite element analysis program ABAQUS, for multi-pass Alloy 82 welds in a 304 Stainless Steel and SA-105 Carbon Steel. The major object is to evaluate effects of the heat input methods and weld bead generation methods on the welding residual stress distribution. Totally four kinds of methods were compared. From the previous results, we could make the following conclusions. 1. Although there are non-negligible differences in HAZ depending on heat input method, welding residual stress distributions have roughly similar trends. However, it is needed to perform the more exact analysis to apply heat energy more carefully into the individual bead. 2. Residual stress distribution were similar for the two weld bead generation technique. However, overlapping was happened when element birth technique was applied. Effects of overlapping could not ignore as deformation increases. However, overlapping problem was avoided when quiet element technique was used. 3. Since existence of inactive bead elements, inaccurate weld residual stresses could be occurred in boundaries of previous and next weld elements in case of quiet element technique.

  6. Coupled convective and conductive heat transfer by up-wind finite element method

    Kushwaha, H.S.

    1981-01-01

    Some of concepts relating to finite element formulation of the Navier-Stoke's equations using mixed formulation and Penality formulation have been discussed. The two different approaches for solution of nonlinear differential equations for two different types of formulation have been described. Incremental Newton Raphson method can also be applied to mixed formulation. (author)

  7. On the reconstruction of inclusions in a heat conductive body from dynamical boundary data over a finite time interval

    Ikehata, Masaru; Kawashita, Mishio

    2010-01-01

    The enclosure method was originally introduced for inverse problems concerning non-destructive evaluation governed by elliptic equations. It was developed as one of the useful approaches in inverse problems and applied for various equations. In this paper, an application of the enclosure method to an inverse initial boundary value problem for a parabolic equation with a discontinuous coefficient is given. A simple method to extract the depth of unknown inclusions in a heat conductive body from a single set of the temperature and heat flux on the boundary observed over a finite time interval is introduced. Other related results with infinitely many data are also reported. One of them gives the minimum radius of the open ball centred at a given point that contains the inclusions. The formula for the minimum radius is newly discovered

  8. Effect of spatial variation of thermal conductivity on non-fourier heat conduction in a finite slab

    Goharkhah, Mohammad; Amiri, Shahin; Shokouhmand, Hossein

    2009-01-01

    The non-Fourier heat conduction problem in a finite slab is studied analytically. Dependence of thermal conductivity on space has been considered. The Laplace transform method is used to remove the time-dependent terms in the governing equation and the boundary conditions. The hyperbolic heat conduction (HHC) equation has been solved by employing trial solution method and collocation optimization criterion. Results show that the space-dependent thermal conductivity strongly affects the temperature distribution. A temperature peak on the insulated wall of the slab has been observed due to linear variation of thermal conductivity. It has been shown that the magnitude of the temperature peak increases with increasing the dimensionless relaxation time. To validate the approach, the results have been compared with the analytical solution obtained for a special case which shows a good agreement

  9. Two-dimensional finite element heat transfer model of softwood. Part I, Effective thermal conductivity

    John F. Hunt; Hongmei Gu

    2006-01-01

    The anisotropy of wood complicates solution of heat and mass transfer problems that require analyses be based on fundamental material properties of the wood structure. Most heat transfer models use average thermal properties across either the radial or tangential direction and do not differentiate the effects of cellular alignment, earlywood/latewood differences, or...

  10. A non-linear, finite element, heat conduction code to calculate temperatures in solids of arbitrary geometry

    Tayal, M.

    1987-01-01

    Structures often operate at elevated temperatures. Temperature calculations are needed so that the design can accommodate thermally induced stresses and material changes. A finite element computer called FEAT has been developed to calculate temperatures in solids of arbitrary shapes. FEAT solves the classical equation for steady state conduction of heat. The solution is obtained for two-dimensional (plane or axisymmetric) or for three-dimensional problems. Gap elements are use to simulate interfaces between neighbouring surfaces. The code can model: conduction; internal generation of heat; prescribed convection to a heat sink; prescribed temperatures at boundaries; prescribed heat fluxes on some surfaces; and temperature-dependence of material properties like thermal conductivity. The user has a option of specifying the detailed variation of thermal conductivity with temperature. For convenience to the nuclear fuel industry, the user can also opt for pre-coded values of thermal conductivity, which are obtained from the MATPRO data base (sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission). The finite element method makes FEAT versatile, and enables it to accurately accommodate complex geometries. The optional link to MATPRO makes it convenient for the nuclear fuel industry to use FEAT, without loss of generality. Special numerical techniques make the code inexpensive to run, for the type of material non-linearities often encounter in the analysis of nuclear fuel. The code, however, is general, and can be used for other components of the reactor, or even for non-nuclear systems. The predictions of FEAT have been compared against several analytical solutions. The agreement is usually better than 5%. Thermocouple measurements show that the FEAT predictions are consistent with measured changes in temperatures in simulated pressure tubes. FEAT was also found to predict well, the axial variations in temperatures in the end-pellets(UO 2 ) of two fuel elements irradiated

  11. Combined natural convection and surface radiation in the annular region between a volumetrically heated inner tube and a finite conducting outer tube

    Gianoulakis, S.; Klein, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    Buoyancy-driven natural-convection heat transfer in enclosures has been the subject of considerable research with applications to electronic packaging, solar collectors, and shipping containers for spent nuclear fuel. A numerical study has been carried out to predict combined natural-convection and radiation heat transfer in the annular region between concentric tubes. The inner tube was volumetrically heated. Both tubes were of finite conductance. The surfaces of the annular region were diffuse and gray. The gas in the annulus was assumed to be nonparticipating. A newly developed hybrid finite element finite difference method was used for the study. This method combines finite element discretization of geometries with finite difference discretized solution procedures for the governing differential equations. This study examined the effects of surface radiative properties and material conductivities on the temperature and velocity fields and on local heat transfer rates. Fluid Raleigh numbers ranging from 10 3 to 10 7 , ratios of solid to fluid region thermal conductivities ranging from 10 to 10 4 , and surface total hemispherical emissivities ranging from 0.0 to 1.0 were examined in this study. It was found that the heat transfer across the annulus was dominated by conduction and radiation for the lower Raleigh number flows. As the fluid Raleigh number increased, convection became a primary mode of heat transfer. As the surface emissivity was increased in the annulus, the average Nusselt number on the inner tube surface decreased

  12. Finite elements for heat diffusion in heterogenous media with axial symmetry-temperature profile in the neighborhood of a hot penetration

    Garcia, M.J.A.

    1982-07-01

    A computer program was developed in order to solve the Heat condution equation by means the finite element method. The program, named HEAT, was applied to some typical problems which have analytical solutions. The results by this program were further compared to those obtained by other computer programs that also use the finite element method. The main application of the HEAT program was the calculation of temperature profiles in a hot penetration of the contaiment building of Angra I. The results lead us to conclude that temperatures high enough to cause structural weakening of the contaiment concrete will not be reached, which is in accordance with A.C.I. regulations. (Author) [pt

  13. Performance analysis and comparison of an Atkinson cycle coupled to variable temperature heat reservoirs under maximum power and maximum power density conditions

    Wang, P.-Y.; Hou, S.-S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, performance analysis and comparison based on the maximum power and maximum power density conditions have been conducted for an Atkinson cycle coupled to variable temperature heat reservoirs. The Atkinson cycle is internally reversible but externally irreversible, since there is external irreversibility of heat transfer during the processes of constant volume heat addition and constant pressure heat rejection. This study is based purely on classical thermodynamic analysis methodology. It should be especially emphasized that all the results and conclusions are based on classical thermodynamics. The power density, defined as the ratio of power output to maximum specific volume in the cycle, is taken as the optimization objective because it considers the effects of engine size as related to investment cost. The results show that an engine design based on maximum power density with constant effectiveness of the hot and cold side heat exchangers or constant inlet temperature ratio of the heat reservoirs will have smaller size but higher efficiency, compression ratio, expansion ratio and maximum temperature than one based on maximum power. From the view points of engine size and thermal efficiency, an engine design based on maximum power density is better than one based on maximum power conditions. However, due to the higher compression ratio and maximum temperature in the cycle, an engine design based on maximum power density conditions requires tougher materials for engine construction than one based on maximum power conditions

  14. A Three-Dimensional, Immersed Boundary, Finite Volume Method for the Simulation of Incompressible Heat Transfer Flows around Complex Geometries

    Hassan Badreddine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current work focuses on the development and application of a new finite volume immersed boundary method (IBM to simulate three-dimensional fluid flows and heat transfer around complex geometries. First, the discretization of the governing equations based on the second-order finite volume method on Cartesian, structured, staggered grid is outlined, followed by the description of modifications which have to be applied to the discretized system once a body is immersed into the grid. To validate the new approach, the heat conduction equation with a source term is solved inside a cavity with an immersed body. The approach is then tested for a natural convection flow in a square cavity with and without circular cylinder for different Rayleigh numbers. The results computed with the present approach compare very well with the benchmark solutions. As a next step in the validation procedure, the method is tested for Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS of a turbulent flow around a surface-mounted matrix of cubes. The results computed with the present method compare very well with Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA measurements of the same case, showing that the method can be used for scale-resolving simulations of turbulence as well.

  15. Analysis and optimization of the heat-insulating light concrete hollow brick walls design by the finite element method

    Coz Diaz, J.J. del; Betegon Biempica, C.; Prendes Gero, M.B. [Edificio Departamental Viesques, No 7, 33204 Gijon (Asturias) (Spain); Garcia Nieto, P.J. [Departamento de Matematicas, Facultad de Ciencias, C/Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Asturias) (Spain)

    2007-06-15

    Department of Public Works, owners and building proprietors are demanding high-capacity heat-insulating exterior masonry components specifically for further energy savings. For housing and industrial structures there is also a great interest in light building materials with good physical material behaviour, with respect to an energy conscious and ecological design, which fulfils all strength and serviceability requirements. The major variables influencing the thermal conductivity of masonry materials are illustrated in this work by taking blocks made from no-fine lightweight concrete and different mortar properties. The finite element method (FEM) is used for finding accurate solutions of the heat transfer equation for five different light concrete hollow brick walls. Mathematically, the non-linearity is due to the radiation boundary condition inside the inner recesses of the bricks. The conduction and convection phenomena are taking into account in this study for three different values of the mortar conductivity and three different values for the bricks. Optimization of the walls is carried out from the finite element analysis of five hollow brick geometries by means of the mass overall thermal efficiency and the equivalent thermal conductivity. Finally, conclusions of this work are exposed. (author)

  16. Analysis and optimization of the heat-insulating light concrete hollow brick walls design by the finite element method

    Coz Diaz, J.J. del; Garcia Nieto, P.J.; Betegon Biempica, C.; Prendes Gero, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    Department of Public Works, owners and building proprietors are demanding high-capacity heat-insulating exterior masonry components specifically for further energy savings. For housing and industrial structures there is also a great interest in light building materials with good physical material behaviour, with respect to an energy conscious and ecological design, which fulfils all strength and serviceability requirements. The major variables influencing the thermal conductivity of masonry materials are illustrated in this work by taking blocks made from no-fine lightweight concrete and different mortar properties. The finite element method (FEM) is used for finding accurate solutions of the heat transfer equation for five different light concrete hollow brick walls. Mathematically, the non-linearity is due to the radiation boundary condition inside the inner recesses of the bricks. The conduction and convection phenomena are taking into account in this study for three different values of the mortar conductivity and three different values for the bricks. Optimization of the walls is carried out from the finite element analysis of five hollow brick geometries by means of the mass overall thermal efficiency and the equivalent thermal conductivity. Finally, conclusions of this work are exposed

  17. Finite element analysis of convective heat transfer problems with change of phase

    Gartling, D.K.

    1978-01-01

    A simple approximate method for treating fluid/solid change of phase problems within a finite-element framework is presented. Though still in the initial development stages, the method has proved capable of computing the motion of phase boundaries for various types of fluid flows and geometries. Further investigation of the method is needed to establish its accuracy and stability characteristics as well as its general reliability

  18. A new heat transfer analysis in machining based on two steps of 3D finite element modelling and experimental validation

    Haddag, B.; Kagnaya, T.; Nouari, M.; Cutard, T.

    2013-01-01

    Modelling machining operations allows estimating cutting parameters which are difficult to obtain experimentally and in particular, include quantities characterizing the tool-workpiece interface. Temperature is one of these quantities which has an impact on the tool wear, thus its estimation is important. This study deals with a new modelling strategy, based on two steps of calculation, for analysis of the heat transfer into the cutting tool. Unlike the classical methods, considering only the cutting tool with application of an approximate heat flux at the cutting face, estimated from experimental data (e.g. measured cutting force, cutting power), the proposed approach consists of two successive 3D Finite Element calculations and fully independent on the experimental measurements; only the definition of the behaviour of the tool-workpiece couple is necessary. The first one is a 3D thermomechanical modelling of the chip formation process, which allows estimating cutting forces, chip morphology and its flow direction. The second calculation is a 3D thermal modelling of the heat diffusion into the cutting tool, by using an adequate thermal loading (applied uniform or non-uniform heat flux). This loading is estimated using some quantities obtained from the first step calculation, such as contact pressure, sliding velocity distributions and contact area. Comparisons in one hand between experimental data and the first calculation and at the other hand between measured temperatures with embedded thermocouples and the second calculation show a good agreement in terms of cutting forces, chip morphology and cutting temperature.

  19. Solving nonlinear nonstationary problem of heat-conductivity by finite element method

    Антон Янович Карвацький

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Methodology and effective solving algorithm of non-linear dynamic problems of thermal and electric conductivity with significant temperature dependence of thermal and physical properties are given on the basis of finite element method (FEM and Newton linearization method. Discrete equations system FEM was obtained with the use of Galerkin method, where the main function is the finite element form function. The methodology based on successive solving problems of thermal and electrical conductivity has been examined in the work in order to minimize the requirements for calculating resources (RAM. in particular. Having used Mathcad software original programming code was developed to solve the given problem. After investigation of the received results, comparative analyses of accurate solution data and results of numerical solutions, obtained with the use of Matlab programming products, was held. The geometry of one fourth part of the finite sized cylinder was used to test the given numerical model. The discretization of the calculation part was fulfilled using the open programming software for automated Gmsh nets with tetrahedral units, while ParaView, which is an open programming code as well, was used to visualize the calculation results. It was found out that the maximum value violation of potential and temperature determination doesn`t exceed 0,2-0,83% in the given work according to the problem conditions

  20. Analysis of the nine-point finite difference approximation for the heat conduction equation in a nuclear fuel element

    Kadri, M.

    1983-01-01

    The time dependent heat conduction equation in the x-y Cartesian geometry is formulated in terms of a nine-point finite difference relation using a Taylor series expansion technique. The accuracy of the nine-point formulation over the five-point formulation has been tested and evaluated for various reactor fuel-cladding plate configurations using a computer program. The results have been checked against analytical solutions for various model problems. The following cases were considered in the steady-state condition: (a) The thermal conductivity and the heat generation were uniform. (b) The thermal conductivity was constant, the heat generation variable. (c) The thermal conductivity varied linearly with the temperature, the heat generation was uniform. (d) Both thermal conductivity and heat generation vary. In case (a), approximately, for the same accuracy, 85% fewer grid points were needed for the nine-point relation which has a 14% higher convergence rate as compared to the five-point relation. In case (b), on the average, 84% fewer grid points were needed for the nine-point relation which has a 65% higher convergence rate as compared to the five-point relation. In case (c) and (d), there is significant accuracy (91% higher than the five-point relation) for the nine-point relation when a worse grid was used. The numerical solution of the nine-point formula in the time dependent case was also more accurate and converges faster than the numerical solution of the five-point formula for all comparative tests related to heat conduction problems in a nuclear fuel element

  1. FEFLOW finite element modeling of flow, mass and heat transport in porous and fractured media

    Diersch, Hans-Jörg G

    2013-01-01

    Placing advanced theoretical and numerical methods in the hands of modeling practitioners and scientists, this book explores the FEFLOW system for solving flow, mass and heat transport processes in porous and fractured media. Offers applications and exercises.

  2. A new approach to the theory of heat conduction with finite wave speeds

    Vito Antonio Cimmelli

    1991-05-01

    Full Text Available Relations between the physical models describing the heat conduction in solids and a phenomenological model leading to quasi-linear hyperbolic equations and systems of conservation laws are presented. A new semi-empirical temperature scale is introduced in terms of which a modified Fourier law is formulated. The hyperbolicity of the heat conduction equation is discussed together with some wave propagation problems.

  3. Hydro-mechanically coupled finite-element analysis of the stability of a fractured-rock slope using the equivalent continuum approach: a case study of planned reservoir banks in Blaubeuren, Germany

    Song, Jie; Dong, Mei; Koltuk, Serdar; Hu, Hui; Zhang, Luqing; Azzam, Rafig

    2017-12-01

    Construction works associated with the building of reservoirs in mountain areas can damage the stability of adjacent valley slopes. Seepage processes caused by the filling and drawdown operations of reservoirs also affect the stability of the reservoir banks over time. The presented study investigates the stability of a fractured-rock slope subjected to seepage forces in the lower basin of a planned pumped-storage hydropower (PSH) plant in Blaubeuren, Germany. The investigation uses a hydro-mechanically coupled finite-element analyses. For this purpose, an equivalent continuum model is developed by using a representative elementary volume (REV) approach. To determine the minimum required REV size, a large number of discrete fracture networks are generated using Monte Carlo simulations. These analyses give a REV size of 28 × 28 m, which is sufficient to represent the equivalent hydraulic and mechanical properties of the investigated fractured-rock mass. The hydro-mechanically coupled analyses performed using this REV size show that the reservoir operations in the examined PSH plant have negligible effect on the adjacent valley slope.

  4. Hydro-mechanically coupled finite-element analysis of the stability of a fractured-rock slope using the equivalent continuum approach: a case study of planned reservoir banks in Blaubeuren, Germany

    Song, Jie; Dong, Mei; Koltuk, Serdar; Hu, Hui; Zhang, Luqing; Azzam, Rafig

    2018-05-01

    Construction works associated with the building of reservoirs in mountain areas can damage the stability of adjacent valley slopes. Seepage processes caused by the filling and drawdown operations of reservoirs also affect the stability of the reservoir banks over time. The presented study investigates the stability of a fractured-rock slope subjected to seepage forces in the lower basin of a planned pumped-storage hydropower (PSH) plant in Blaubeuren, Germany. The investigation uses a hydro-mechanically coupled finite-element analyses. For this purpose, an equivalent continuum model is developed by using a representative elementary volume (REV) approach. To determine the minimum required REV size, a large number of discrete fracture networks are generated using Monte Carlo simulations. These analyses give a REV size of 28 × 28 m, which is sufficient to represent the equivalent hydraulic and mechanical properties of the investigated fractured-rock mass. The hydro-mechanically coupled analyses performed using this REV size show that the reservoir operations in the examined PSH plant have negligible effect on the adjacent valley slope.

  5. Experimental Study and a Mathematical Model of the Processes in Frozen Soil Under a Reservoir with a Hot Heat-Transfer Agent

    Kislitsyn, A. A.; Shastunova, U. Yu.; Yanbikova, Yu. F.

    2018-05-01

    On an experimental setup, the authors have measured temperature fields in frozen soil during the filling of a reservoir with hot heat-transfer agent (oil), and also the change in the shape and position of the front of ice melting (isotherms T = 0°C) with time. The approximate solution of a two-dimensional Stefan problem on thawing of frozen soil has been given; it has been shown that satisfactory agreement with experimental results can only be obtained with account taken of the convective transfer of heat due to the water motion in the region of thawed soil.

  6. The effects of heat generation and wall interaction on freezing and melting in a finite slab

    Cheung, F.B.; Chawla, T.C.; Pedersen, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The processes of freezing and melting occurring in a heat-generating slab bounded by two semi-infinite cold walls is studied numerically. The method of collocation is employed to solve the various sets of governing equations describing the unsteady behavior of the system during different periods of time. Depending on the rate of internal heat generation and the thermal properties of the wall and the slab, several changes may take place in the system. These changes, as indicated by the transient locations of the solid-liquid interface, include transitions from freezing directly to melting, from freezing to cooling with phase change, from cooling to heating without phase change, and from heating to melting. Numerical predictions of the occurrence of these transitions, the rates of freezing and melting, and the duration of the transients are obtained as functions of several controlling dimensionless parameters of the system. Comparison is made with the case of a heat-generating sphere to further explore the effect of system geometry. (author)

  7. Application of a finite element method to leak before break (LBB) of a heat exchanger

    Lee, Choon-Yeol; Kwon, Jae-Do; Lee, Yong-Sun

    2003-01-01

    The leak before break (LBB) concept is difficult to apply to a structure with a thin tube that is immersed in a water environment. A heat exchanger in a nuclear power plant is such a structure. The present paper addresses an application of the LBB concept to a heat exchanger in a nuclear power plant. The minimum leaked coolant amount containing the radioactive material which can activate the radiation detector device installed near the heat exchanger is assumed. The postulated initial flaw size that cannot grow to the critical flaw size within the time period to activate the radiation detector is justified. In this case, the radiation detector can activate the warning signal caused by coolant leakage from initially postulated flaws of the heat exchanger. The nuclear plant can safely shutdown when this occurs. Since the postulated initial flaw size can not grow to the critical flaw size, the structural integrity of the heat exchanger is not impeded. Particularly the informational scenario presented in this paper discusses an actual nuclear plant. (author)

  8. User's Manual for the FEHM Application-A Finite-Element Heat- and Mass-Transfer Code

    George A. Zyvoloski; Bruce A. Robinson; Zora V. Dash; Lynn L. Trease

    1997-07-07

    This document is a manual for the use of the FEHM application, a finite-element heat- and mass-transfer computer code that can simulate nonisothermal multiphase multicomponent flow in porous media. The use of this code is applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and groundwater flow. A primary use of the FEHM application will be to assist in the understanding of flow fields and mass transport in the saturated and unsaturated zones below the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository in Nevada. The equations of heat and mass transfer for multiphase flow in porous and permeable media are solved in the FEHM application by using the finite-element method. The permeability and porosity of the medium are allowed to depend on pressure and temperature. The code also has provisions for movable air and water phases and noncoupled tracers; that is, tracer solutions that do not affect the heat- and mass-transfer solutions. The tracers can be passive or reactive. The code can simulate two-dimensional, two-dimensional radial, or three-dimensional geometries. In fact, FEHM is capable of describing flow that is dominated in many areas by fracture and fault flow, including the inherently three-dimensional flow that results from permeation to and from faults and fractures. The code can handle coupled heat and mass-transfer effects, such as boiling, dryout, and condensation that can occur in the near-field region surrounding the potential repository and the natural convection that occurs through Yucca Mountain due to seasonal temperature changes. The code is also capable of incorporating the various adsorption mechanisms, ranging from simple linear relations to nonlinear isotherms, needed to describe the very complex transport processes at Yucca Mountain. This report outlines the uses and capabilities of the FEHM application, initialization of code variables, restart procedures, and error processing. The report describes all the data files, the input data

  9. Solving transient conduction and radiation heat transfer problems using the lattice Boltzmann method and the finite volume method

    Mishra, Subhash C.; Roy, Hillol K.

    2007-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) was used to solve the energy equation of a transient conduction-radiation heat transfer problem. The finite volume method (FVM) was used to compute the radiative information. To study the compatibility of the LBM for the energy equation and the FVM for the radiative transfer equation, transient conduction and radiation heat transfer problems in 1-D planar and 2-D rectangular geometries were considered. In order to establish the suitability of the LBM, the energy equations of the two problems were also solved using the FVM of the computational fluid dynamics. The FVM used in the radiative heat transfer was employed to compute the radiative information required for the solution of the energy equation using the LBM or the FVM (of the CFD). To study the compatibility and suitability of the LBM for the solution of energy equation and the FVM for the radiative information, results were analyzed for the effects of various parameters such as the scattering albedo, the conduction-radiation parameter and the boundary emissivity. The results of the LBM-FVM combination were found to be in excellent agreement with the FVM-FVM combination. The number of iterations and CPU times in both the combinations were found comparable

  10. Preferential heating of oxygen 5{sup +} ions by finite-amplitude oblique Alfvén waves

    Maneva, Yana G.; Poedts, Stefaan [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Viñas, Adolfo [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, 20771 MD (United States); Araneda, Jaime [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160 - C, Concepción (Chile)

    2016-03-25

    Minor ions in the fast solar wind are known to have higher temperatures and to flow faster than protons in the interplanetary space. In this study we combine previous research on parametric instability theory and 2.5D hybrid simulations to study the onset of preferential heating of Oxygen 5{sup +} ions by large-scale finite-amplitude Alfvén waves in the collisionless fast solar wind. We consider initially non-drifting isotropic multi-species plasma, consisting of isothermal massless fluid electrons, kinetic protons and kinetic Oxygen 5{sup +} ions. The external energy source for the plasma heating and energization are oblique monochromatic Alfvén-cyclotron waves. The waves have been created by rotating the direction of initial parallel pump, which is a solution of the multi-fluid plasma dispersion relation. We consider propagation angles θ ≤ 30°. The obliquely propagating Alfvén pump waves lead to strong diffusion in the ion phase space, resulting in highly anisotropic heavy ion velocity distribution functions and proton beams. We discuss the application of the model to the problems of preferential heating of minor ions in the solar corona and the fast solar wind.

  11. Finite volume method for radiative heat transfer in an unstructured flow solver for emitting, absorbing and scattering media

    Gazdallah, Moncef; Feldheim, Véronique; Claramunt, Kilian; Hirsch, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the implementation of the finite volume method to solve the radiative transfer equation in a commercial code. The particularity of this work is that the method applied on unstructured hexahedral meshes does not need a pre-processing step establishing a particular marching order to visit all the control volumes. The solver simply visits the faces of the control volumes as numbered in the hexahedral unstructured mesh. A cell centred mesh and a spatial differencing step scheme to relate facial radiative intensities to nodal intensities is used. The developed computer code based on FVM has been integrated in the CFD solver FINE/Open from NUMECA Int. Radiative heat transfer can be evaluated within systems containing uniform, grey, emitting, absorbing and/or isotropically or linear anisotropically scattering medium bounded by diffuse grey walls. This code has been validated for three test cases. The first one is a three dimensional rectangular enclosure filled with emitting, absorbing and anisotropically scattering media. The second is the differentially heated cubic cavity. The third one is the L-shaped enclosure. For these three test cases a good agreement has been observed when temperature and heat fluxes predictions are compared with references taken, from literature.

  12. Exergetic efficiency optimization for an irreversible heat pump ...

    This paper deals with the performance analysis and optimization for irreversible heat pumps working on reversed Brayton cycle with constant-temperature heat reservoirs by taking exergetic efficiency as the optimization objective combining exergy concept with finite-time thermodynamics (FTT). Exergetic efficiency is ...

  13. Analytical filtration model for nonlinear viscoplastic oil in the theory of oil production stimulation and heating of oil reservoir in a dual-well system

    Ivanovich Astafev, Vladimir; Igorevich Gubanov, Sergey; Alexandrovna Olkhovskaya, Valeria; Mikhailovna Sylantyeva, Anastasia; Mikhailovich Zinovyev, Alexey

    2018-02-01

    Production of high-viscosity oil and design of field development systems for such oil is one of the most promising directions in the development of world oil industry. The ability of high-viscosity oil to show in filtration process properties typical for non-Newtonian systems is proven by experimental studies. Nonlinear relationship between the pressure gradient and the rate of oil flow is due to interaction of high-molecular substances, in particular, asphaltenes and tars that form a plastic structure in it. The authors of this article have used the analytical model of stationary influx of nonlinear viscoplastic oil to the well bottom in order to provide rationale for the intensifying impact on a reservoir. They also have analyzed the method of periodic heating of productive reservoir by means of dual-wells. The high-temperature source is placed at the bottom of the vertical well, very close to the reservoir; at the same time the side well, located outside the zone of expected rock damage, is used for production. Suggested method of systemic treatment of reservoirs with dual wells can be useful for small fields of high-viscosity oil. The effect is based on the opportunity to control the structural and mechanical properties of high-viscosity oil and to increase depletion of reserves.

  14. Advances in the discrete ordinates and finite volume methods for the solution of radiative heat transfer problems in participating media

    Coelho, Pedro J.

    2014-01-01

    Many methods are available for the solution of radiative heat transfer problems in participating media. Among these, the discrete ordinates method (DOM) and the finite volume method (FVM) are among the most widely used ones. They provide a good compromise between accuracy and computational requirements, and they are relatively easy to integrate in CFD codes. This paper surveys recent advances on these numerical methods. Developments concerning the grid structure (e.g., new formulations for axisymmetrical geometries, body-fitted structured and unstructured meshes, embedded boundaries, multi-block grids, local grid refinement), the spatial discretization scheme, and the angular discretization scheme are described. Progress related to the solution accuracy, solution algorithm, alternative formulations, such as the modified DOM and FVM, even-parity formulation, discrete-ordinates interpolation method and method of lines, and parallelization strategies is addressed. The application to non-gray media, variable refractive index media, and transient problems is also reviewed. - Highlights: • We survey recent advances in the discrete ordinates and finite volume methods. • Developments in spatial and angular discretization schemes are described. • Progress in solution algorithms and parallelization methods is reviewed. • Advances in the transient solution of the radiative transfer equation are appraised. • Non-gray media and variable refractive index media are briefly addressed

  15. Summary of the models and methods for the FEHM application - a finite-element heat- and mass-transfer code

    Zyvoloski, G.A.; Robinson, B.A.; Dash, Z.V.; Trease, L.L.

    1997-07-01

    The mathematical models and numerical methods employed by the FEHM application, a finite-element heat- and mass-transfer computer code that can simulate nonisothermal multiphase multi-component flow in porous media, are described. The use of this code is applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and groundwater flow. A primary use of the FEHM application will be to assist in the understanding of flow fields and mass transport in the saturated and unsaturated zones below the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository in Nevada. The component models of FEHM are discussed. The first major component, Flow- and Energy-Transport Equations, deals with heat conduction; heat and mass transfer with pressure- and temperature-dependent properties, relative permeabilities and capillary pressures; isothermal air-water transport; and heat and mass transfer with noncondensible gas. The second component, Dual-Porosity and Double-Porosity/Double-Permeability Formulation, is designed for problems dominated by fracture flow. Another component, The Solute-Transport Models, includes both a reactive-transport model that simulates transport of multiple solutes with chemical reaction and a particle-tracking model. Finally, the component, Constitutive Relationships, deals with pressure- and temperature-dependent fluid/air/gas properties, relative permeabilities and capillary pressures, stress dependencies, and reactive and sorbing solutes. Each of these components is discussed in detail, including purpose, assumptions and limitations, derivation, applications, numerical method type, derivation of numerical model, location in the FEHM code flow, numerical stability and accuracy, and alternative approaches to modeling the component

  16. A study of unsteady physiological magneto-fluid flow and heat transfer through a finite length channel by peristaltic pumping.

    Tripathi, Dharmendra; Bég, O Anwar

    2012-08-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic peristaltic flows arise in controlled magnetic drug targeting, hybrid haemodynamic pumps and biomagnetic phenomena interacting with the human digestive system. Motivated by the objective of improving an understanding of the complex fluid dynamics in such flows, we consider in the present article the transient magneto-fluid flow and heat transfer through a finite length channel by peristaltic pumping. Reynolds number is small enough and the wavelength to diameter ratio is large enough to negate inertial effects. Analytical solutions for temperature field, axial velocity, transverse velocity, pressure gradient, local wall shear stress, volume flowrate and averaged volume flowrate are obtained. The effects of the transverse magnetic field, Grashof number and thermal conductivity on the flow patterns induced by peristaltic waves (sinusoidal propagation along the length of channel) are studied using graphical plots. The present study identifies that greater pressure is required to propel the magneto-fluid by peristaltic pumping in comparison to a non-conducting Newtonian fluid, whereas, a lower pressure is required if heat transfer is effective. The analytical solutions further provide an important benchmark for future numerical simulations.

  17. Eddy Heat Conduction and Nonlinear Stability of a Darcy Lapwood System Analysed by the Finite Spectral Method

    Jónas Elíasson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A finite Fourier transform is used to perform both linear and nonlinear stability analyses of a Darcy-Lapwood system of convective rolls. The method shows how many modes are unstable, the wave number instability band within each mode, the maximum growth rate (most critical wave numbers on each mode, and the nonlinear growth rates for each amplitude as a function of the porous Rayleigh number. Single amplitude controls the nonlinear growth rates and thereby the physical flow rate and fluid velocity, on each mode. They are called the flak amplitudes. A discrete Fourier transform is used for numerical simulations and here frequency combinations appear that the traditional cut-off infinite transforms do not have. The discrete show a stationary solution in the weak instability phase, but when carried past 2 unstable modes they show fluctuating motion where all amplitudes except the flak may be zero on the average. This leads to a flak amplitude scaling process of the heat conduction, producing an eddy heat conduction coefficient where a Nu-RaL relationship is found. It fits better to experiments than previously found solutions but is lower than experiments.

  18. Simulation of heat pipe rapid transient performance using a multi-nodal implicit finite difference scheme

    Peery, J.S.; Best, F.R.

    1987-01-01

    A model to simulate heat pipe rapid transients has been developed. This model uses a one-dimensional development of the continuity and momentum equations to solve for the velocity and pressure distributions in both the liquid and vapor regions. A two-dimensional development of the energy equation is used to determine the temperature distributions in the liquid and vapor regions, as well as in the walls of the heat pipe. The vapor and liquid regions are coupled through mass and energy transfer due to evaporation and condensation. The model used for this phenomenon is based on the physical conditions of the vapor and liquid for a given node. However, this model for evaporation and condensation not only causes the energy equation to be nonlinear but also constrains the time step to 10 -4 seconds for convergence to be reached. The model has been run for small transients up to 2 seconds to produce temperature distributions and demonstrate the convergence difficulties associated with the evaporation/condensation model used

  19. Thermoelastic stress due to an instantaneous finite line heat source in an infinite medium

    Claesson, J.; Hellstroem, G.

    1995-09-01

    The problem originates from studies of nuclear waste repositories in rock. The problem is by superposition reduced to the case of a single, infinite, antisymmetric, instantaneous line heat source. The dimensionless problem turns out to depend on the dimensionless radial and axial coordinates only, although the original time-dependent problem contains several parameters. An exact analytical solution is derived. The solution is surprisingly handy, considering the complexity of the original problem. The stress and strain field are readily obtained from derivatives of the displacement components. These fields are studied and presented in detail. Asymptotic behaviour, field of principal stresses, regions of compression and tension, and largest values of compression and tension of the components are given as exact formulas. The solution may be used to test numerical models for coupled thermoelastic processes. It may also be used in more detailed numerical simulations of the process near the heat sources as boundary conditions to account for the three-dimensional global process. 7 refs

  20. Validation of TEMP: A finite line heat transfer code for geologic repositories for nuclear waste

    Atterbury, W.G.; Hetteburg, J.R.; Wurm, K.J.

    1987-09-01

    TEMP is a FORTRAN computer code for calculating temperatures in a geologic repository for nuclear waste. A previous report discusses the structure, usage, verification, and benchmarking of TEMP V1.0 (Wurm et al., 1987). This report discusses modifications to the program in the development of TEMP V1.1 and documents the validation of TEMP. The development of TEMP V1.1 from TEMP V1.0 consisted of two major efforts. The first was to recode several of the subroutines to improve logic flow and to allow for geometry-independent temperature calculation routines which, in turn, allowed for the addition of the geometry-independent validation option. The validation option provides TEMP with the ability to model any geometry of temperature sources with any step-wise heat release rate. This capability allows TEMP to model the geometry and heat release characteristics of the validation problems. The validation of TEMP V1.1 consists of the comparison of TEMP to three in-ground heater tests. The three tests chosen were Avery Island, Louisiana, Site A; Avery Island, Louisiana, Site C; and Asse Mine, Federal Republic of Germany, Site 2. TEMP shows marginal comparison with the two Avery Island sites and good comparison with the Asse Mine Site. 8 refs., 25 figs., 14 tabs

  1. Software requirements, design, and verification and validation for the FEHM application - a finite-element heat- and mass-transfer code

    Dash, Z.V.; Robinson, B.A.; Zyvoloski, G.A.

    1997-07-01

    The requirements, design, and verification and validation of the software used in the FEHM application, a finite-element heat- and mass-transfer computer code that can simulate nonisothermal multiphase multicomponent flow in porous media, are described. The test of the DOE Code Comparison Project, Problem Five, Case A, which verifies that FEHM has correctly implemented heat and mass transfer and phase partitioning, is also covered

  2. User`s manual for the FEHM application -- A finite-element heat- and mass-transfer code

    Zyvoloski, G.A.; Robinson, B.A.; Dash, Z.V.; Trease, L.L.

    1997-07-01

    The use of this code is applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and groundwater flow. A primary use of the FEHM application will be to assist in the understanding of flow fields and mass transport in the saturated and unsaturated zones below the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository in Nevada. The equations of heat and mass transfer for multiphase flow in porous and permeable media are solved in the FEHM application by using the finite-element method. The permeability and porosity of the medium are allowed to depend on pressure and temperature. The code also has provisions for movable air and water phases and noncoupled tracers; that is, tracer solutions that do not affect the heat- and mass-transfer solutions. The tracers can be passive or reactive. The code can simulate two-dimensional, two-dimensional radial, or three-dimensional geometries. In fact, FEHM is capable of describing flow that is dominated in many areas by fracture and fault flow, including the inherently three-dimensional flow that results from permeation to and from faults and fractures. The code can handle coupled heat and mass-transfer effects, such as boiling, dryout, and condensation that can occur in the near-field region surrounding the potential repository and the natural convection that occurs through Yucca Mountain due to seasonal temperature changes. This report outlines the uses and capabilities of the FEHM application, initialization of code variables, restart procedures, and error processing. The report describes all the data files, the input data, including individual input records or parameters, and the various output files. The system interface is described, including the software environment and installation instructions.

  3. Determination of heat transfer parameters by use of finite integral transform and experimental data for regular geometric shapes

    Talaghat, Mohammad Reza; Jokar, Seyyed Mohammad

    2017-12-01

    This article offers a study on estimation of heat transfer parameters (coefficient and thermal diffusivity) using analytical solutions and experimental data for regular geometric shapes (such as infinite slab, infinite cylinder, and sphere). Analytical solutions have a broad use in experimentally determining these parameters. Here, the method of Finite Integral Transform (FIT) was used for solutions of governing differential equations. The temperature change at centerline location of regular shapes was recorded to determine both the thermal diffusivity and heat transfer coefficient. Aluminum and brass were used for testing. Experiments were performed for different conditions such as in a highly agitated water medium ( T = 52 °C) and in air medium ( T = 25 °C). Then, with the known slope of the temperature ratio vs. time curve and thickness of slab or radius of the cylindrical or spherical materials, thermal diffusivity value and heat transfer coefficient may be determined. According to the method presented in this study, the estimated of thermal diffusivity of aluminum and brass is 8.395 × 10-5 and 3.42 × 10-5 for a slab, 8.367 × 10-5 and 3.41 × 10-5 for a cylindrical rod and 8.385 × 10-5 and 3.40 × 10-5 m2/s for a spherical shape, respectively. The results showed there is close agreement between the values estimated here and those already published in the literature. The TAAD% is 0.42 and 0.39 for thermal diffusivity of aluminum and brass, respectively.

  4. Finite element modeling of melting and fluid flow in the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell

    Gomez-Perez, N.; Rodriguez, J. F.; McWilliams, R. S.

    2017-04-01

    The laser-heated diamond anvil cell is widely used in the laboratory study of materials behavior at high-pressure and high-temperature, including melting curves and liquid properties at extreme conditions. Laser heating in the diamond cell has long been associated with fluid-like motion in samples, which is routinely used to determine melting points and is often described as convective in appearance. However, the flow behavior of this system is poorly understood. A quantitative treatment of melting and flow in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell is developed here to physically relate experimental motion to properties of interest, including melting points and viscosity. Numerical finite-element models are used to characterize the temperature distribution, melting, buoyancy, and resulting natural convection in samples. We find that continuous fluid motion in experiments can be explained most readily by natural convection. Fluid velocities, peaking near values of microns per second for plausible viscosities, are sufficiently fast to be detected experimentally, lending support to the use of convective motion as a criterion for melting. Convection depends on the physical properties of the melt and the sample geometry and is too sluggish to detect for viscosities significantly above that of water at ambient conditions, implying an upper bound on the melt viscosity of about 1 mPa s when convective motion is detected. A simple analytical relationship between melt viscosity and velocity suggests that direct viscosity measurements can be made from flow speeds, given the basic thermodynamic and geometric parameters of samples are known.

  5. Finite-Element 2-D Model of Induction Heating of Rotating Billets in System of Permanent Magnets and its Experimental Verification

    Mach, F.; Štarman, V.; Karban, P.; Doležel, Ivo; Kůs, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 5 (2014), s. 2584-2591 ISSN 0278-0046 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP102/11/0498 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : higher order finite-element method * induction heating * magnetic field Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 6.498, year: 2014

  6. Modeling heat transfer and inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in precooked meat products in Argentina using the finite element method.

    Santos, M V; Zaritzky, N; Califano, A

    2008-07-01

    The presence of Escherichia coli is linked with sanitary deficiencies and undercooking of meat products. Recent studies have detected E. coli O157:H7 in black blood sausages. Minimum time-temperature specifications to kill the bacteria were obtained by numerical simulations of the microscopic heat conduction equation using the finite element method, and calculating the temperature profile of the sausage and the population of E. coli at the coldest point during heating. The model was validated by heating sausages in a water-bath. The effects of heat transfer coefficients and water temperatures on the required time to achieve an inactivation value (IV) of 12(log) are reported. Macroscopic heat balances were simultaneously solved to consider the temperature drop in the water batch as a function of the ratio between the mass of thermally treated sausage and the heat capacity of the system.

  7. From Finite Time to Finite Physical Dimensions Thermodynamics: The Carnot Engine and Onsager's Relations Revisited

    Feidt, Michel; Costea, Monica

    2018-04-01

    Many works have been devoted to finite time thermodynamics since the Curzon and Ahlborn [1] contribution, which is generally considered as its origin. Nevertheless, previous works in this domain have been revealed [2], [3], and recently, results of the attempt to correlate Finite Time Thermodynamics with Linear Irreversible Thermodynamics according to Onsager's theory were reported [4]. The aim of the present paper is to extend and improve the approach relative to thermodynamic optimization of generic objective functions of a Carnot engine with linear response regime presented in [4]. The case study of the Carnot engine is revisited within the steady state hypothesis, when non-adiabaticity of the system is considered, and heat loss is accounted for by an overall heat leak between the engine heat reservoirs. The optimization is focused on the main objective functions connected to engineering conditions, namely maximum efficiency or power output, except the one relative to entropy that is more fundamental. Results given in reference [4] relative to the maximum power output and minimum entropy production as objective function are reconsidered and clarified, and the change from finite time to finite physical dimension was shown to be done by the heat flow rate at the source. Our modeling has led to new results of the Carnot engine optimization and proved that the primary interest for an engineer is mainly connected to what we called Finite Physical Dimensions Optimal Thermodynamics.

  8. Finite Element Analysis of High Heat Load Deformation and Mechanical Bending Correction of a Beamline Mirror for the APS Upgrade

    Goldring, Nicholas

    The impending Advanced Photon Source Upgrade (APS-U) will introduce a hard x-ray source that is set to surpass the current APS in brightness and coherence by two to three orders of magnitude. To achieve this, the storage ring light source will be equipped with a multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice. In order to fully exploit and preserve the integrity of new beams actualized by upgraded storage ring components, improved beamline optics must also be introduced. The design process of new optics for the APS-U and other fourth generation synchrotrons involves the challenge of accommodating unprecedented heat loads. This dissertation presents an ex-situ analysis of heat load deformation and the subsequent mechanical bending correction of a 400 mm long, grazing-incidence, H2O side-cooled, reflecting mirror subjected to x-ray beams produced by the APS-U undulator source. Bending correction is measured as the smallest rms slope error, sigmarms, that can be resolved over a given length of the heat deformed geometry due to mechanical bending. Values of sigmarms in the account for finish errors or other contributions to sigmarms beyond the scope of thermal deformation and elastic bending. The methodology of this research includes finite element analysis (FEA) employed conjointly with an analytical solution for mechanical bending deflection by means of an end couple. Additionally, the study will focus on two beam power density profiles predicted by the APS-U which were created using the software SRCalc. The profiles account for a 6 GeV electron beam with second moment widths of 0.058 and 0.011 mm in the x- and y- directions respectively; the electron beam is passed through a 4.8 m long, 28 mm period APS-U undulator which produces the x-ray beam incident at a 3 mrad grazing angle on the flat mirror surface for both cases. The first power density profile is the most extreme case created by the undulator at it's closest gap with a critical energy of 3 keV (k y=2.459); the second

  9. Application of heating in dex in Los Humeros geothermal reservoir; Comportamiento de los indices de calentamiento en el yacimiento geotermico de los Humeros

    Aragon, Alfonso; Arellano, Victor M; Izquierdo, Georgina; Garcia, Alfonso; Barragan, Rosa Maria; Verma, Mahendra P [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Pizano, Arturo [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Los Humeros (Mexico)

    2000-12-01

    Reservoir engineering uses several methodologies to evaluate reservoir information characteristics, which in one well vary with time during its production life. One of the methods widely used is the pressure analysis by stimulating the reservoir through cold water injection. For this case, the temperature is used as stimulating parameter and the resultant perturbation is analyzed for the formation intervals in order to determine reservoir permeability and thickness. This method requires a set of temperature logs taking a different stability time. The heating index is calculated from the temperature gradient with time. The index correlated with drilling parameters such as the circulation lost volume, lithology, drilling speed, et cetera. It is used identify interesting reservoir characteristics for production and injections purposes. The method is applied on wells: Br-2 from Broadlands, New Zealand; and H-11, H-31 and H-33 from Los Humeros, Mexico. The results indicate the usefulness of this method in evaluating geothermal reservoirs. [Spanish] La ingenieria de yacimientos dispone de diversas tecnicas para la evaluacion de las caracteristicas de los espesores de la formacion en un pozo, cuyo comportamiento cambia a largo de las diferentes etapas de su vida productiva. Uno de los metodos ampliamente utilizados es el comportamiento de la presion a traves de estimulos suministrados al yacimiento. Haciendo una analogia de la presion, para el caso de inyeccion de agua fria, se utiliza la temperatura como estimulo y se analizan los disturbios que esta provoca en algunas secciones de la formacion, a partir de lo cual es factible determinar intervalos permeables en el yacimiento. El metodo requiere de un par de perfiles de temperatura registrados a diferente tiempo de reposo del pozo. Con las diferencias de temperatura respecto al tiempo, se calcula el indice de calentamiento el cual se correlaciona con los parametros disponibles, contenidos durante la perforacion, como son

  10. The effects of intercooling and regeneration on the thermo-ecological performance analysis of an irreversible-closed Brayton heat engine with variable-temperature thermal reservoirs

    Sogut, Oguz Salim; Ust, Yasin; Sahin, Bahri

    2006-01-01

    A thermo-ecological performance analysis of an irreversible intercooled and regenerated closed Brayton heat engine exchanging heat with variable-temperature thermal reservoirs is presented. The effects of intercooling and regeneration are given special emphasis and investigated in detail. A comparative performance analysis considering the objective functions of an ecological coefficient of performance, an ecological function proposed by Angulo-Brown and power output is also carried out. The results indicate that the optimal total isentropic temperature ratio and intercooling isentropic temperature ratio at the maximum ecological coefficient of performance conditions (ECOP max ) are always less than those of at the maximum ecological function ( E-dot max ) and the maximum power output conditions ( W-dot max ) leading to a design that requires less investment cost. It is also concluded that a design at ECOP max conditions has the advantage of higher thermal efficiency and a lesser entropy generation rate, but at the cost of a slight power loss

  11. Finite Element Modeling in 3D of the Impact of Superfluid Helium Filled Micro-channels on the Heat Transfer through LHC Type Cable Insulation

    Bielert, E; ten Kate, H

    2012-01-01

    For a future luminosity upgrade of CERN’s Large Hadron Collider, a drastically improved heat removal in the inner triplet quadrupole magnets is required. One of the necessary improvements involves the cable insulation. A porous all-polyimide insulation scheme has been proposed recently. Essentially the insulation features a network of micro channels filled with superfluid helium that significantly increases the heat transfer through the insulation layer. A three dimensional Finite Element model required to simulate and study the enhanced heat transfer through the micro channels is presented here. The thermal coupling between heated cable and helium as well as the heat flux through the micro-channels are investigated. The model is validated by comparison of results with published measured data. Finally a sensitivity analysis is performed concerning the stability of the cables in magnet windings.

  12. Study of heating systems with finite elements to be used in poultry shed houses; Estudo de sistemas de aquecimento aplicado a galpoes avicolas com uso de elementos finitos

    Leva, Flavia Fernandes de

    2010-11-15

    The aim of this research was to evaluate and compare the behavior of temperature inside poultry sheds with bell jar type gas conventional heating and heating in the floor with use of a heat exchanger. It was used the public domain program FEMM 4.2 for the analysis of temperature through the use of finite elements techniques with data collected from two lots. Heating in the floor is made with the hot water flowing through a heat exchanger, which is installed below the bed; this hot water is from solar heaters. From the results obtained with the simulations can be observed that the heating through the floor provides a more homogeneous distribution breast when compared with the bell jar type heating. The flow of heat is upwards supplying thus the most needed heating of the bird that is the pectoral part. Energy consumption evaluation was made with use of LPG; this has enabled a comparative analysis of the quantity of electric energy necessary to provide the same thermal energy and the financial expenses obtained with the heating though LPG or electric energy for each lot. (author)

  13. Use of a hydrogeochemical approach in determining hydraulic connection between porous heat reservoirs in Kaifeng area, Henan, China

    Lin Xueyu; Taboure, Aboubacar; Wang Xinyi; Liao Zisheng

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a case study of hydraulic connectivity in a 300-1600 m deep, low temperature, sedimentary geothermal system in Kaifeng area, Henan province, China is presented. Based on lithologic data from 52 geothermal wells and chemical data on geothermal water (GW) from six depth-specific and representative wells, the system was chemically grouped into two main hot reservoirs (300-1300 m and 1300-1600 m deep), which were in turn, divided into six sub-reservoirs (SRs). Data on stable isotope ( 2 H and 18 O) ratios, radioactive isotope ( 14 C) radiation in conjunction with computation of mineral-fluid chemical equilibria were used to establish the recharge source (a mountainous region in the southwestern part of Zhengzhou, 60 km away); evaluate groundwater age which varied with well depth from 15630 ± 310 a to 24970 ± 330 a; and assess the chemical equilibrium state within the system. The results of different analysis did not suggest an obvious hydraulic connection between the two main hot reservoirs. The location of the recharge zone and the geohydrologic characteristics of the study area demonstrate that the GW utilized from the system is mainly derived from confined waters of meteoric origin

  14. Finite-elements modeling of radiant heat transfers between mobile surfaces; Modelisation par elements finis de transferts radiatifs entre surfaces mobiles

    Daurelle, J V; Cadene, V; Occelli, R [Universite de Provence, 13 - Marseille (France)

    1997-12-31

    In the numerical modeling of thermal industrial problems, radiant heat transfers remain difficult to take into account and require important computer memory and long computing time. These difficulties are enhanced when radiant heat transfers are coupled with finite-elements diffusive heat transfers because finite-elements architecture is complex and requires a lot of memory. In the case of radiant heat transfers along mobile boundaries, the methods must be optimized. The model described in this paper concerns the radiant heat transfers between diffuse grey surfaces. These transfers are coupled with conduction transfers in the limits of the diffusive opaque domain. 2-D and 3-D geometries are analyzed and two configurations of mobile boundaries are considered. In the first configuration, the boundary follows the deformation of the mesh, while in the second, the boundary moves along the fixed mesh. Matter displacement is taken into account in the term of transport of the energy equation, and an appropriate variation of the thermophysical properties of the transition elements between the opaque and transparent media is used. After a description of the introduction of radiative limit conditions in a finite-elements thermal model, the original methods used to optimize calculation time are explained. Two examples of application illustrate the approach used. The first concerns the modeling of radiant heat transfers between fuel rods during a reactor cooling accident, and the second concerns the study of heat transfers inside the air-gap of an electric motor. The method of identification of the mobile surface on the fixed mesh is described. (J.S.) 12 refs.

  15. Finite-elements modeling of radiant heat transfers between mobile surfaces; Modelisation par elements finis de transferts radiatifs entre surfaces mobiles

    Daurelle, J.V.; Cadene, V.; Occelli, R. [Universite de Provence, 13 - Marseille (France)

    1996-12-31

    In the numerical modeling of thermal industrial problems, radiant heat transfers remain difficult to take into account and require important computer memory and long computing time. These difficulties are enhanced when radiant heat transfers are coupled with finite-elements diffusive heat transfers because finite-elements architecture is complex and requires a lot of memory. In the case of radiant heat transfers along mobile boundaries, the methods must be optimized. The model described in this paper concerns the radiant heat transfers between diffuse grey surfaces. These transfers are coupled with conduction transfers in the limits of the diffusive opaque domain. 2-D and 3-D geometries are analyzed and two configurations of mobile boundaries are considered. In the first configuration, the boundary follows the deformation of the mesh, while in the second, the boundary moves along the fixed mesh. Matter displacement is taken into account in the term of transport of the energy equation, and an appropriate variation of the thermophysical properties of the transition elements between the opaque and transparent media is used. After a description of the introduction of radiative limit conditions in a finite-elements thermal model, the original methods used to optimize calculation time are explained. Two examples of application illustrate the approach used. The first concerns the modeling of radiant heat transfers between fuel rods during a reactor cooling accident, and the second concerns the study of heat transfers inside the air-gap of an electric motor. The method of identification of the mobile surface on the fixed mesh is described. (J.S.) 12 refs.

  16. Mesoscopic photon heat transistor

    Ojanen, T.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir-Wingreen-Landauer-typ......We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir......-Wingreen-Landauer-type of conductance formula, which gives the photonic heat current through an arbitrary circuit element coupled to two dissipative reservoirs at finite temperatures. As an illustration we present an exact solution for the case when the intermediate circuit can be described as an electromagnetic resonator. We discuss...

  17. Performance of heat engines with non-zero heat capacity

    Odes, Ron; Kribus, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Finite heat capacity is a second irreversibility mechanism in addition to thermal resistance. ► Heat capacity introduces thermal transients and reverse heat flow. ► Engine maximum power and efficiency are lower for finite heat capacity. ► Implementing the optimal engine cycle requires active control. - Abstract: The performance of a heat engine is analyzed subject to two types of irreversibility: a non-zero heat capacity, together with the more common finite heat transfer rate between the engine and the external heat reservoirs. The heat capacity represents an engine body that undergoes significant temperature variations during the engine cycle. An option to cut off the heat exchange between the engine and the external surrounding for part of the engine cycle is also explored. A variational approach was taken to find the engine’s internal temperature profile (which defines the internal thermodynamic cycle) that would produce maximum power. The maximum power is shown to be lower than the case of zero heat capacity, due to a loss of heat that is stored in the engine body and then lost, bypassing the thermodynamic cycle. The maximum efficiency and the efficiency at maximum power are also lower than the zero heat capacity case. Similar to the Curzon–Ahlborn analysis, power can be traded for increased efficiency, but for high heat capacity, the range of efficiency that is available for such a trade is diminished. Isolating the engine during part of the cycle reduces maximum power, but the efficiency at maximum power and the maximum efficiency are improved, due to better exploitation of heat stored in the engine body. This might be useful for real engines that are limited by the internal energy change during a single engine cycle or by the operating frequency, leading to a broader power–efficiency curve.

  18. Application of tungsten-fibre-reinforced copper matrix composites to a high-heat-flux component: A design study by dual scale finite element analysis

    Jeong-Ha You

    2006-01-01

    According to the European Power Plant Conceptual Study, actively cooled tungsten mono-block is one of the divertor design options for fusion reactors. In this study the coolant tube acts as a heat sink and the tungsten block as plasma-facing armour. A key material issue here is how to achieve high temperature strength and high heat conductivity of the heat sink tube simultaneously. Copper matrix composite reinforced with continuous strong fibres has been considered as a candidate material for heat sink of high-heat-flux components. Refractory tungsten wire is a promising reinforcement material due to its high strength, winding flexibility and good interfacial wetting with copper. We studied the applicability of tungsten-fibre-reinforced copper matrix composite heat sink tubes for the tungsten mono-block divertor by means of dual-scale finite element analysis. Thermo-elasto-plastic micro-mechanics homogenisation technique was applied. A heat flux of 15 MW/m 2 with cooling water temperature of 320 o C was considered. Effective stress-free temperature was assumed to be 500 o C. Between the tungsten block and the composite heat sink tube interlayer (1 mm thick) of soft Cu was inserted. The finite element analysis yields the following results: The predicted maximum temperature at steady state is 1223 o C at the surface and 562 o C at the interface between tube and copper layer. On the macroscopic scale, residual stress is generated during fabrication due to differences in thermal expansion coefficients of the materials. Strong compressive stress occurs in the tungsten block around the tube while weak tensile stress is present in the interlayer. The local and global probability of brittle failure of the tungsten block was also estimated using the probabilistic failure theories. The thermal stresses are significantly decreased upon subsequent heat flux loading. Resolving the composite stress on microscopic scale yields a maximum fibre axial stress of 3000 MPa after

  19. Reservoir management

    Satter, A.; Varnon, J.E.; Hoang, M.T.

    1992-01-01

    A reservoir's life begins with exploration leading to discovery followed by delineation of the reservoir, development of the field, production by primary, secondary and tertiary means, and finally to abandonment. Sound reservoir management is the key to maximizing economic operation of the reservoir throughout its entire life. Technological advances and rapidly increasing computer power are providing tools to better manage reservoirs and are increasing the gap between good and neural reservoir management. The modern reservoir management process involves goal setting, planning, implementing, monitoring, evaluating, and revising plans. Setting a reservoir management strategy requires knowledge of the reservoir, availability of technology, and knowledge of the business, political, and environmental climate. Formulating a comprehensive management plan involves depletion and development strategies, data acquisition and analyses, geological and numerical model studies, production and reserves forecasts, facilities requirements, economic optimization, and management approval. This paper provides management, engineers, geologists, geophysicists, and field operations staff with a better understanding of the practical approach to reservoir management using a multidisciplinary, integrated team approach

  20. Reservoir management

    Satter, A.; Varnon, J.E.; Hoang, M.T.

    1992-01-01

    A reservoir's life begins with exploration leading to discovery followed by delineation of the reservoir, development of the field, production by primary, secondary and tertiary means, and finally to abandonment. Sound reservoir management is the key to maximizing economic operation of the reservoir throughout its entire life. Technological advances and rapidly increasing computer power are providing tools to better manage reservoirs and are increasing the gap between good and neutral reservoir management. The modern reservoir management process involves goal setting, planning, implementing, monitoring, evaluating, and revising plans. Setting a reservoir management strategy requires knowledge of the reservoir, availability of technology, and knowledge of the business, political, and environmental climate. Formulating a comprehensive management plan involves depletion and development strategies, data acquisition and analyses, geological and numerical model studies, production and reserves forecasts, facilities requirements, economic optimization, and management approval. This paper provides management, engineers geologists, geophysicists, and field operations staff with a better understanding of the practical approach to reservoir management using a multidisciplinary, integrated team approach

  1. Unsteady MHD Heat Transfer in Couette Flow of Water at 4°C in a Rotating System with Ramped Temperature via Finite Element Method

    Reddy G.J.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An unsteady magnetohydromagnetic natural convection on the Couette flow of electrically conducting water at 4°C (Pr = 11.40 in a rotating system has been considered. A Finite Element Method (FEM was employed to find the numerical solutions of the dimensionless governing coupled boundary layer partial differential equations. The primary velocity, secondary velocity and temperature of water at 4°C as well as shear stresses and rate of heat transfer have been obtained for both ramped temperature and isothermal plates. The results are independent of the mesh (grid size and the present numerical solutions through the Finite Element Method (FEM are in good agreement with the existing analytical solutions by the Laplace Transform Technique (LTT. These are shown in tabular and graphical forms.

  2. Performance Optimization of Irreversible Air Heat Pumps Considering Size Effect

    Bi, Yuehong; Chen, Lingen; Ding, Zemin; Sun, Fengrui

    2018-06-01

    Considering the size of an irreversible air heat pump (AHP), heating load density (HLD) is taken as thermodynamic optimization objective by using finite-time thermodynamics. Based on an irreversible AHP with infinite reservoir thermal-capacitance rate model, the expression of HLD of AHP is put forward. The HLD optimization processes are studied analytically and numerically, which consist of two aspects: (1) to choose pressure ratio; (2) to distribute heat-exchanger inventory. Heat reservoir temperatures, heat transfer performance of heat exchangers as well as irreversibility during compression and expansion processes are important factors influencing on the performance of an irreversible AHP, which are characterized with temperature ratio, heat exchanger inventory as well as isentropic efficiencies, respectively. Those impacts of parameters on the maximum HLD are thoroughly studied. The research results show that HLD optimization can make the size of the AHP system smaller and improve the compactness of system.

  3. Carbon sequestration potential of the Habanero reservoir when carbon dioxide is used as the heat exchange fluid

    Chaoshui Xu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of sequestered carbon dioxide (CO2 as the heat exchange fluid in enhanced geothermal system (EGS has significant potential to increase their productivity, contribute further to reducing carbon emissions and increase the economic viability of geothermal power generation. Coupled CO2 sequestration and geothermal energy production from hot dry rock (HDR EGS were first proposed 15 years ago but have yet to be practically implemented. This paper reviews some of the issues in assessing these systems with particular focus on the power generation and CO2 sequestration capacity. The Habanero geothermal field in the Cooper Basin of South Australia is assessed for its potential CO2 storage capacity if supercritical CO2 is used as the working fluid for heat extraction. The analysis suggests that the major CO2 sequestration mechanisms are the storage in the fracture-stimulation damaged zone followed by diffusion into the pores within the rock matrix. The assessment indicates that 5% of working fluid loss commonly suggested as the storage capacity might be an over-estimate of the long-term CO2 sequestration capacity of EGS in which supercritical CO2 is used as the circulation fluid.

  4. Finite element analysis of heating a non-mixed liquid with non-uniform solar flux through semi-transparent medium

    Safdari, Y.B.; Sirivatch Shimpalee

    2000-01-01

    It has been shown in an application [1-3), in a solar flux heating of a liquid through a semi-transparent medium, that the far side of the medium receiving solar radiation achieves a higher temperature than the side receiving radiation. In this work, a two-dimensional transient finite element analysis of concentrated solo flux heating of a non-mixed liquid through a semi-transparent medium (such as glass) is carried out. The radiation heat flux is provided by a paraboloidal concentrator which focuses a non-uniform flux on the receiver. Realistic boundary conditions are considered to analyse the heat transfer problem to study the transient temperature distribution in the medium. The effects of a non-mixed liquid and a non-uniform flux show dramatic differences between the present work and the previous works [1-31. A non-mixed liquid causes greater temperature difference in the glass in both radial and axial direction than a mixed liquid used in the previous analysis. Therminol-55 is used as heated liquid for lower flux case, and sodium is used for high flux. The effect of the conductivity difference between the two liquids is studied. Results show that in the case of Therminol-55, the temperature of the liquid-side glass is much higher than that of the sodium case. The temperature distribution will be used to analyse the thermal stresses in the glass to see if fracture will occurs [4) in the glass. (Author)

  5. Two-dimensional finite element heat transfer model of softwood. Part III, Effect of moisture content on thermal conductivity

    Hongmei Gu; John F. Hunt

    2007-01-01

    The anisotropy of wood creates a complex problem for solving heat and mass transfer problems that require analyses be based on fundamental material properties of the wood structure. Most heat transfer models for softwood use average thermal properties across either the radial or tangential direction and do not differentiate the effects of cellular alignment or...

  6. Geothermal reservoir engineering

    Grant, Malcolm Alister

    2011-01-01

    As nations alike struggle to diversify and secure their power portfolios, geothermal energy, the essentially limitless heat emanating from the earth itself, is being harnessed at an unprecedented rate.  For the last 25 years, engineers around the world tasked with taming this raw power have used Geothermal Reservoir Engineering as both a training manual and a professional reference.  This long-awaited second edition of Geothermal Reservoir Engineering is a practical guide to the issues and tasks geothermal engineers encounter in the course of their daily jobs. The bo

  7. Cesium reservoir and interconnective components

    1994-03-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE (thermionic fuel element) suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW range. A thermionic converter must be supplied with cesium vapor for two reasons. Cesium atoms adsorbed on the surface of the emitter cause a reduction of the emitter work function to permit high current densities without excessive heating of the emitter. The second purpose of the cesium vapor is to provide space-charge neutralization in the emitter-collector gap so that the high current densities may flow across the gap unattenuated. The function of the cesium reservoir is to provide a source of cesium atoms, and to provide a reserve in the event that cesium is lost from the plasma by any mechanism. This can be done with a liquid cesium metal reservoir in which case it is heated to the desired temperature with auxiliary heaters. In a TFE, however, it is desirable to have the reservoir passively heated by the nuclear fuel. In this case, the reservoir must operate at a temperature intermediate between the emitter and the collector, ruling out the use of liquid reservoirs. Integral reservoirs contained within the TFE will produce cesium vapor pressures in the desired range at typical electrode temperatures. The reservoir material that appears to be the best able to meet requirements is graphite. Cesium intercalates easily into graphite, and the cesium pressure is insensitive to loading for a given intercalation stage. The goals of the cesium reservoir test program were to verify the performance of Cs-graphite reservoirs in the temperature-pressure range of interest to TFE operation, and to test the operation of these reservoirs after exposure to a fast neutron fluence corresponding to seven year mission lifetime. In addition, other materials were evaluated for possible use in the integral reservoir

  8. Effects of Heat Input and Bead Generation Methods on Finite Element Analysis of Cylindrical Multi-Pass Welding Process of Metals

    Park, Won Dong; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a finite element analysis of a cylindrical multi-pass weldment for dissimilar metals was performed. The effects of the heat input method and weld bead generation method were considered. We compared two heat input methods: the heat flux method and the temperature method. We also compared two weld bead generation methods: the element birth method and the quiet element method. Although the results of the thermal analysis show deviations between the two heat input methods, the welding residual stresses were similar. Because the areas exposed to high temperature were similar and the strength of the material was very low in high temperature (above the 1000 ℃), the effects of the weld bead temperature were insignificant. The distributions of the welding residual stress were similar to each other. However, gaps and overlaps occurred on the welding boundary surfaces when the element birth method was applied. The quiet element method is more suitable for a large deformation model in order to simulate a more accurate weld shape.

  9. Effects of Heat Input and Bead Generation Methods on Finite Element Analysis of Cylindrical Multi-Pass Welding Process of Metals

    Park, Won Dong; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Ji Hoon [Pusan Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this study, a finite element analysis of a cylindrical multi-pass weldment for dissimilar metals was performed. The effects of the heat input method and weld bead generation method were considered. We compared two heat input methods: the heat flux method and the temperature method. We also compared two weld bead generation methods: the element birth method and the quiet element method. Although the results of the thermal analysis show deviations between the two heat input methods, the welding residual stresses were similar. Because the areas exposed to high temperature were similar and the strength of the material was very low in high temperature (above the 1000 ℃), the effects of the weld bead temperature were insignificant. The distributions of the welding residual stress were similar to each other. However, gaps and overlaps occurred on the welding boundary surfaces when the element birth method was applied. The quiet element method is more suitable for a large deformation model in order to simulate a more accurate weld shape.

  10. An Approach to Define the Heat Flow in Drilling with Different Cooling Systems Using Finite Element Analysis

    Carlos Henrique Lauro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The heat generated in the cutting zone with high-speed drilling causes damage in the machined part. The heat can affect the dimensions of the hole considering its diameter. Moreover, the heat reduces tool life of uncoated and coated tools. This paper shows experimental tests with high-speed drilling in hardened steel. Drilling was performed on AISI H13 steel with dimensions of 100 × 40 × 14 mm and 52 HRC. The work pieces were drilled with coated drills (TiAlN. A flooded lubricant system and the minimal quantity of lubricant (MQL were applied to investigate the ability to remove heat from the cutting zone and to compare with dry tests. FEM was applied to define the heat flow and the coefficient of convection for the cooling systems. A steepest descent method was employed to minimize the difference between empirical and simulation data. The results showed that the simulation technique used to find values for heat flow and the coefficient of convection were close to the literature reference. In addition, the adjustment errors of the simulated temperature curves were less than 10% when compared with trial curves. Furthermore, the MQL showed a capability of cooling 3.5 times higher than that of the flooded system.

  11. Mixed Convection in Technological Reservoir of Thermal Power Station

    Kuznetsov Geniy V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of mixed convection of a viscous incompressible fluid in an open rectangular reservoir with inlet and outlet of mass with considering nonuniform heat sink at the external borders of the solution domain is solved. The region of the solution was limited by two vertical and by one horizontal walls of finite thickness and one free surface. The flat nonstationary mixed convection within the framework of Navier-Stokes model is examined for liquid and thermal conductivity for solid walls. Distributions of hydrodynamic parameters and temperatures with different intensity of heat sink on the outer contour of the cavity show a change in the intensity of heat sink on the region boundaries of the solution leads to scale changes in the structure of flow and temperature fields of the liquids.

  12. Timing of Hydrocarbon Fluid Emplacement in Sandstone Reservoirs in Neogene in Huizhou Sag, Southern China Sea, by Authigenic Illite 40Ar- 39Ar Laser Stepwise Heating

    Hesheng, Shi; Junzhang, Zhu; Huaning, Qiu; yu, Shu; Jianyao, Wu; Zulie, Long

    Timing of oil or gas emplacements is a new subject in isotopic geochronology and petroleum geology. Hamilton et al. expounded the principle of the illite K-Ar age: Illite is often the last or one of the latest mineral cements to form prior to hydrocarbon accumulation. Since the displacement of formation water by hydrocarbons will cause silicate diagenesis to cease, K-Ar ages for illite will constrain the timing of this event, and also constrain the maximum age of formation of the trap structure. In this study, the possibility of authigenic illites 40Ar- 39Ar dating has been investigated. The illite samples were separated from the Tertiary sandstones in three rich oil reservoir belts within the Huizhou sag by cleaning, fracturing by cycled cooling-heating, soxhlet-extraction with solvents of benzene and methanol and separating with centrifugal machine. If oil is present in the separated samples, ionized organic fragments with m/e ratios of 36 to 40 covering the argon isotopes will be yielded by the ion source of a mass spectrometer, resulting in wrong argon isotopic analyses and wrong 40Ar- 39Ar ages. The preliminary experiments of illite by heating did show the presence of ionized organic fragments with m/e ratios of 36 to 44. In order to clean up the organic gases completely and obtain reliable analysis results, a special purification apparatus has been established by Qiu et al. and proved valid by the sequent illite analyses. All the illite samples by 40Ar- 39Ar IR-laser stepwise heating yield stair-up age spectra in lower laser steps and plateaux in higher laser steps. The youngest apparent ages corresponding to the beginning steps are reasonable to be interpreted for the hydrocarbon accumulation ages. The weighted mean ages of the illites from the Zhuhai and Zhujiang Formations are (12.1 ± 1.1) Ma and (9.9 ± 1.2) Ma, respectively. Therefore, the critical emplacement of petroleum accumulation in Zhujiang Formation in Huizhou sag took place in ca 10 Ma. Late

  13. Effects of heater location and heater size on the natural convection heat transfer in a square cavity using finite element method

    Ngo, Ich Long; Byon, Chan [Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Finite element method was used to investigate the effects of heater location and heater size on the natural convection heat transfer in a 2D square cavity heated partially or fully from below and cooled from above. Rayleigh number (5 X 10{sup 2} ≤ Ra ≤ 5X10{sup 5}), heater size (0.1 ≤ D/L ≤ 1.0), and heater location (0.1 ≤ x{sub h}/L ≤ 0.5) were considered. Numerical results indicated that the average Nusselt number (Nu{sub m}) increases as the heater size decreases. In addition, when x{sub h}/L is less than 0.4, Nu{sub m} increases as x{sub h}/L increases, and Num decreases again for a larger value of x{sub h}/L. However, this trend changes when Ra is less than 10{sup 4}, suggesting that Nu{sub m} attains its maximum value at the region close to the bottom surface center. This study aims to gain insight into the behaviors of natural convection in order to potentially improve internal natural convection heat transfer.

  14. Irreversible absorption heat-pump and its optimal performance

    Chen Lingen; Qin Xiaoyong; Sun Fengrui; Wu Chih

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of an endoreversible absorption heat-pump cycle, a generalized irreversible four-heat-reservoir absorption heat-pump cycle model is established by taking account of the heat resistances, heat leak and irreversibilities due to the internal dissipation of the working substance. The heat transfer between the heat reservoir and the working substance is assumed to obey the linear (Newtonian) heat-transfer law, and the overall heat-transfer surface area of the four heat-exchangers is assumed to be constant. The fundamental optimal relations between the coefficient of performance (COP) and the heating-load, the maximum COP and the corresponding heating-load, the maximum heating load and the corresponding COP, as well as the optimal temperatures of the working substance and the optimal heat-transfer surface areas of the four heat-exchangers are derived by using finite-time thermodynamics. Moreover, the effects of the cycle parameters on the characteristics of the cycle are studied by numerical examples

  15. FY 1998 report on the development of technology for reservoir mass and heat flow characterization. Theme 5-2. Monitoring and modeling of reservoir mass and heat flows (Integrated reservoir modeling and simulation techniques/Modeling support technique); 1998 nendo chinetsu tansa gijutsu nado kensho chosa choryuso hendo tansaho kaihatsu hokokusho (yoyaku). 5-2. Choryuso hendo yosoku gijutsu (modeling shien gijutsu)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This R and D are aimed at establishing technology to support the reservoir modeling work required for predicting the reservoir variation from the geological/geochemical side. The contents of the development are (1) establishment of the practical measuring system for core fracture system, and (2) establishment of new modeling support technology. In (1), as the core fraction system measuring system, the measurement of fluid inclusion homogenization temperature and melting point and laser Raman spectroscopy were applied to the Wasabizawa area to obtain the results. In (2), the R and D were conducted of a rapid age measuring method for altered rock/unaltered rock and an analytical method for fluid flow using trace chemical components of hydrothermal minerals. In the former, 3-D thermoluminescent intensity of the age-known quartz was measured. The TL age of weak altered rock of Kijiyama dacite in the Wasabizawa area was 320Ka, almost the same result as 320Ka already reported. In the latter, trace components of quartz were measured at each well, and changes in the depth direction were made clear. It was made clear that the variation of Na/K ratio is large around the lost circulation stratum. The geothermal fluid flow was made clear by the analysis of similarity of the intensity ratio. (NEDO)

  16. Analytical model of unsteady-state convective heat transfer between the heat carrier and the finite sizes plate adjusted for the thermal relaxation

    Makarushkin Danila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A hyperbolic boundary value problem of the thermal conduction of a two-dimensional plate with the third kind boundary conditions is formulated. The transient thermal process in the plate is due to the temperature changes of the external medium over time and along the plate length, and also by a multiple step change of the plate surface heat transfer coefficient throughout the transient process. An analytical solution with improved convergence adjusted for thermal relaxation and thermal damping is obtained for the temperature field in the plate.

  17. Damage and fatigue crack growth of Eurofer steel first wall mock-up under cyclic heat flux loads. Part 2: Finite element analysis of damage evolution

    You, Jeong-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The surface heat flux load of 3.5 MW/m 2 produced substantial stresses and inelastic strains in the heat-loaded surface region, especially at the notch root. • The notch root exhibited a typical notch effect such as stress concentration and localized inelastic yield leading to a preferred damage development. • The predicted damage evolution feature agrees well with the experimental observation. • The smooth surface also experiences considerable stresses and inelastic strains. However, the stress intensity and the amount of inelastic deformation are not high enough to cause any serious damage. • The level of maximum inelastic strain is higher at the notch root than at the smooth surface. On the other hand, the amplitude of inelastic strain variation is comparable at both positions. • The amount of inelastic deformation is significantly affected by the length of pulse duration time indicating the important role of creep. - Abstract: In the preceding companion article (part 1), the experimental results of the high-heat-flux (3.5 MW/m 2 ) fatigue tests of a Eurofer bare steel first wall mock-up was presented. The aim was to investigate the damage evolution and crack initiation feature. The mock-up used there was a simplified model having only basic and generic structural feature of an actively cooled steel FW component for DEMO reactor. In that study, it was found that microscopic damage was formed at the notch root already in the early stage of the fatigue loading. On the contrary, the heat-loaded smooth surface exhibited no damage up to 800 load cycles. In this paper, the high-heat-flux fatigue behavior is investigated with a finite element analysis to provide a theoretical interpretation. The thermal fatigue test was simulated using the coupled damage-viscoplastic constitutive model developed by Aktaa. The stresses, inelastic deformation and damage evolution at the notch groove and at the smooth surface are compared. The different damage

  18. Use of a finite element model of heat transport in the human eye to predict time of death.

    Smart, Jimmy L; Kaliszan, Michal

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this work was to compare human temperature decay curves generated from execution of a COMSOL Multiphysics(®) finite element software model with that of experimental postmortem temperature decay curves. Experiments were performed in 10 human cadavers. The postmortem temperature was continuously measured in human eyeballs and rectums from c. 3 h up to 15 h postmortem. Model-generated curves reflected experimental curves for 10 cases with coefficients of determination ranging from 0.9448 to 0.9953. From modeling efforts, normalized temperature decay curves were generated to aid first responders to estimate time of death within the early postmortem period of 0-24 h. This proposed model has advantages over other models in that it is applied to the human eyeball, where temperature plateau effects are minimal to nonexistent. Nevertheless, the proposed model can be adjusted to compensate for any temperature plateau effects that do exist. It also can take account of antemortem hyperthermia conditions that are known to have occurred. The current model only applies to natural environmental conditions, with no forced convection, no direct sunlight, immersion in water, or other unusual conditions. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  19. Comparison of 3D Adaptive Remeshing Strategies for Finite Element Simulations of Electromagnetic Heating of Gold Nanoparticles

    Fadhil Mezghani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles are well known, but the study of their thermal behavior is in its infancy. However the local heating of surrounding medium, induced by illuminated nanostructures, opens the way to new sensors and devices. Consequently the accurate calculation of the electromagnetically induced heating of nanostructures is of interest. The proposed multiphysics problem cannot be directly solved with the classical refinement method of Comsol Multiphysics and a 3D adaptive remeshing process based on an a posteriori error estimator is used. In this paper the efficiency of three remeshing strategies for solving the multiphysics problem is compared. The first strategy uses independent remeshing for each physical quantity to reach a given accuracy. The second strategy only controls the accuracy on temperature. The third strategy uses a linear combination of the two normalized targets (the electric field intensity and the temperature. The analysis of the performance of each strategy is based on the convergence of the remeshing process in terms of number of elements. The efficiency of each strategy is also characterized by the number of computation iterations, the number of elements, the CPU time, and the RAM required to achieve a given target accuracy.

  20. Petroleum reservoir fault reactivation problem analysis through finite element viscodamage model; Analise de problema de reativacao de falha em reservatorio de petroleo por modelo de viscodano via metodo dos elementos finitos

    Fernandes, Julliana de P.V.; Guimaraes, Leonardo J. do N.; Gomes, Igor F.; Pontes Filho, Ivaldo Dario da S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Recently, many new constitutive models for geomechanical materials were developed taking into account its complex behavior. The continuum damage mechanics, formulated according to irreversible thermodynamics principles, can be used to model materials subjected to degradation of its mechanical properties. Reservoir depletion may result in compaction and subsidence that induces fault reactivation, among others consequences. The fault reactivation problem in petroleum reservoirs has been widely studied as its changes completely the flow regime in subsurface. Isotropic damage model can be used to model the fault reactivation process, where its hydro-mechanical properties (stiffness and permeability) are affected during the reservoir production. In this paper, a fault reactivation case in a synthetic reservoir is presented and a sensibility analysis is carried out to identify the main variables that influence this process. (author)

  1. Heat Transfer and Thermal Stress Analysis of a Mandibular Molar Tooth Restored by Different Indirect Restorations Using a Three-Dimensional Finite Element Method.

    Çelik Köycü, Berrak; İmirzalıoğlu, Pervin

    2017-07-01

    Daily consumption of food and drink creates rapid temperature changes in the oral cavity. Heat transfer and thermal stress caused by temperature changes in restored teeth may damage the hard and soft tissue components, resulting in restoration failure. This study evaluates the temperature distribution and related thermal stress on mandibular molar teeth restored via three indirect restorations using three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA). A 3D finite element model was constructed of a mandibular first molar and included enamel, dentin, pulp, surrounding bone, and indirect class 2 restorations of type 2 dental gold alloy, ceramic, and composite resin. A transient thermal FEA was performed to investigate the temperature distribution and the resulting thermal stress after simulated temperature changes from 36°C to 4 or 60°C for a 2-second time period. The restoration models had similar temperature distributions at 2 seconds in both the thermal conditions. Compared with 60°C exposure, the 4°C condition resulted in thermal stress values of higher magnitudes. At 4ºC, the highest stress value observed was tensile stress (56 to 57 MPa), whereas at 60°C, the highest stress value observed was compressive stress (42 to 43 MPa). These stresses appeared at the cervical region of the lingual enamel. The thermal stress at the restoration surface and resin cement showed decreasing order of magnitude as follows: composite > gold > ceramic, in both thermal conditions. The properties of the restorative materials do not affect temperature distribution at 2 seconds in restored teeth. The pulpal temperature is below the threshold for vital pulp tissue (42ºC). Temperature changes generate maximum thermal stress at the cervical region of the enamel. With the highest thermal expansion coefficient, composite resin restorations exhibit higher stress patterns than ceramic and gold restorations. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  2. Finite element analysis of heat and mass transfer of an unsteady MHD natural convection flow of a rotating fluid past a vertical porous plate in the presence of radiative heat transfer

    Anand Rao, J.; Prabhakar Reddy, B.

    2010-01-01

    The numerical solution of unsteady hydro-magnetic natural convection heat and mass transfer flow of a rotating, incompressible, viscous Boussinesq fluid is presented in this study in the presence of radiative heat transfer and a first order chemical reaction between the fluid and diffusing species. The Rosseland approximation for an optically thick fluid is invoked to describe the radiative flux. The solutions for velocity, temperature and concentration fields have been obtained by using Ritz finite element method. The results obtained are discussed for Grashof number(G r > 0) corresponding to cooling of the plate and (G r r , Sc, M, N, K, G r , G c and t with the help of graphs and tables. The numerical values of skin-friction coefficient entered in the tables. Results obtained show that a decrease in the temperature boundary layer occurs when the Prandtl number and the radiation parameter are increased and the flow velocity approaches steady state as the time parameter t, is increased. These findings are in quantitative agreement with earlier reported studies. (author)

  3. A finite element solution to conjugated heat transfer in tissue using magnetic resonance angiography to measure the in vitro velocity field

    Dutton, Andrew William

    1993-12-01

    A combined numerical and experimental system for tissue heat transfer analysis was developed. The goal was to develop an integrated set of tools for studying the problem of providing accurate temperature estimation for use in hyperthermia treatment planning in a clinical environment. The completed system combines (1) Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) to non-destructively measure the velocity field in situ, (2) the Streamwise Upwind Petrov-Galerkin finite element solution to the 3D steady state convective energy equation (CEE), (3) a medical image based automatic 3D mesh generator, and (4) a Gaussian type estimator to determine unknown thermal model parameters such as thermal conductivity, blood perfusion, and blood velocities from measured temperature data. The system was capable of using any combination of three thermal models (1) the Convective Energy Equation (CEE), (2) the Bioheat Transfer Equation (BHTE), and (3) the Effective Thermal Conductivity Equation (ETCE) Incorporation of the theoretically correct CEE was a significant theoretical advance over approximate models made possible by the use of MRA to directly measure the 3D velocity field in situ. Experiments were carried out in a perfused alcohol fixed canine liver with hyperthermia induced through scanned focused ultrasound Velocity fields were measured using Phase Contrast Angiography. The complete system was then used to (1) develop a 3D finite element model based upon user traced outlines over a series of MR images of the liver and (2) simulate temperatures at steady state using the CEE, BHTE, and ETCE thermal models in conjunction with the gauss estimator. Results of using the system on an in vitro liver preparation indicate the need for improved accuracy in the MRA scans and accurate spatial registration between the thermocouple junctions, the measured velocity field, and the scanned ultrasound power No individual thermal model was able to meet the desired accuracy of 0.5 deg C, the resolution

  4. Heat exchanges in a quenched ferromagnet

    Corberi, Federico; Zannetti, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , and CNISM, Unita di Salerno, Universita di Salerno, via Ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano, SA (Italy); Gonnella, Giuseppe; Piscitelli, Antonio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bari and INFN, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy)

    2013-02-01

    The off-equilibrium probability distribution of the heat exchanged by a ferromagnet in a time interval after a quench below the critical point is calculated analytically in the large-N limit. The distribution is characterized by a singular threshold Q{sub C} < 0, below which a macroscopic fraction of heat is released by the k = 0 Fourier component of the order parameter. The mathematical structure producing this phenomenon is the same responsible for the order parameter condensation in the equilibrium low temperature phase. The heat exchanged by the individual Fourier modes follows a non-trivial pattern, with the unstable modes at small wave vectors warming up the modes around a characteristic finite wave vector k{sub M}. Two internal temperatures, associated with the k = 0 and k = k{sub M} modes, rule the heat currents through a fluctuation relation similar to the one for stationary systems in contact with two thermal reservoirs. (fast track communication)

  5. Geothermal reservoirs. Position of slotted section of the tube casing

    Carotenuto, A.; Vanoli, L.; Casarosa, C.

    1999-01-01

    In the present work the authors have verified the influence of the position of slotted section casing on heat rate drawn by plants for exploitation of geothermal reservoirs that use heat exchangers placed at the bottom of the well (DHE). This study have been done modelling numerically the aquifer, by means of finite element method, evaluating the heat rate drawn by the heat exchanger at different position of the slotted section of the tube casing. Numerical calculations have allowed to show the influence of the main characteristics of the aquifer and of the main characteristics of the aquifer and of the plant on design of the slotted section of the tube casing. In particular, the authors have studied the influence of i) equivalent conductivity and permeability of the aquifer, ii) mass flow rate and the inlet and outlet aquifer temperature difference in the well, iii) the ratio between the length of the slotted section and the thickness of the geothermal layer, varying the position of the slotted section of the tube casing in the aquifer [it

  6. Hydrothermal regime and constraints on reservoir depth of the Jade site in the Mid-Okinawa Trough inferred from heat flow measurements

    Kinoshita, Masataka; Yamano, Makoto

    1997-02-01

    Detailed heat flow measurements revealed an enormous heat flow variation (102 to 105 mW m-2) in the Jade hydrothermal field (27°16'N, 127°05'E and water depth 1350 m) located on the slope of the Izena Hole in the Mid-Okinawa Trough. Within the Jade site, heat flow is higher than 1000 mW m-2 and decreases to ˜100 mW m-2 with a 1 km horizontal scale. Near the Jade black smoker, heat flow varies from >30,000 mW m-2 at a hydrothermally altered area to 1700 mW m-2 less than 100 m from it. A large-scale heat flow variation suggests that the base of the escarpment near the Jade site serves as a recharge area for the Jade site. Linear geotherms indicate that the upward Darcian flow within sediments is slower than ˜3 cm yr-1. Thus the fluid circulation pathways would basically be restricted in permeable channels. Estimated conductive heat output rate from the Jade site is 4-7 MW, which is comparable to heat output by a single black smoker vent (˜8 MW). One-dimensional thermal modeling predicts the existence of a boiling zone at ˜200 m beneath the Jade site, which may be overlain by a fractured impermeable layer. The normal chloride content of venting fluids from the black smoker may be explained either by upwelling of fluid which boiled at shallow depth but suffered no phase segregation, or by upwelling of fluid above the boiling interface.

  7. A stabilized second-order time accurate finite element formulation for incompressible viscous flow with heat transfer; Uma formulacao de elementos finitos estabilizada de segunda ordem no tempo para escoamentos viscosos com transferencia de calor

    Curi, Marcos Filardy

    2011-07-01

    In view of the problem of global warming and the search for clean energy sources, a worldwide expansion on the use of nuclear energy is foreseen. Thus, the development of science and technology regarding nuclear power plants is essential, in particular in the field of reactor engineering. Fluid mechanics and heat transfer play an important role in the development of nuclear reactors. Computational Fluid Mechanics (CFD) is becoming ever more important in the optimization of cost and safety of the designs. This work presents a stabilized second-order time accurate finite element formulation for incompressible flows with heat transfer. A second order time discretization precedes a spatial discretization using finite elements. The terms that stabilize the finite element method arise naturally from the discretization process, rather than being introduced a priori in the variational formulation. The method was implemented in the program 'ns{sub n}ew{sub s}olvec2d{sub av}2{sub M}PI' written in FORTRAN90, developed in the Parallel Computing Laboratory at the Institute of Nuclear Engineering (LCP/IEN). Numerical solutions of some representative examples, including free, mixed and forced convection, demonstrate that the proposed stabilized formulation attains very good agreement with experimental and computational results available in the literature. (author)

  8. Heat pipe

    Triggs, G.W.; Lightowlers, R.J.; Robinson, D.; Rice, G.

    1986-01-01

    A heat pipe for use in stabilising a specimen container for irradiation of specimens at substantially constant temperature within a liquid metal cooled fast reactor, comprises an evaporator section, a condenser section, an adiabatic section therebetween, and a gas reservoir, and contains a vapourisable substance such as sodium. The heat pipe further includes a three layer wick structure comprising an outer relatively fine mesh layer, a coarse intermediate layer and a fine mesh inner layer for promoting unimpeded return of condensate to the evaporation section of the heat pipe while enhancing heat transfer with the heat pipe wall and reducing entrainment of the condensate by the upwardly rising vapour. (author)

  9. Mathematical and field analysis of longitudinal reservoir infill

    Ke, W. T.; Capart, H.

    2016-12-01

    In reservoirs, severe problems are caused by infilled sediment deposits. In long term, the sediment accumulation reduces the capacity of reservoir storage and flood control benefits. In the short term, the sediment deposits influence the intakes of water-supply and hydroelectricity generation. For the management of reservoir, it is important to understand the deposition process and then to predict the sedimentation in reservoir. To investigate the behaviors of sediment deposits, we propose a one-dimensional simplified theory derived by the Exner equation to predict the longitudinal sedimentation distribution in idealized reservoirs. The theory models the reservoir infill geomorphic actions for three scenarios: delta progradation, near-dam bottom deposition, and final infill. These yield three kinds of self-similar analytical solutions for the reservoir bed profiles, under different boundary conditions. Three analytical solutions are composed by error function, complementary error function, and imaginary error function, respectively. The theory is also computed by finite volume method to test the analytical solutions. The theoretical and numerical predictions are in good agreement with one-dimensional small-scale laboratory experiment. As the theory is simple to apply with analytical solutions and numerical computation, we propose some applications to simulate the long-profile evolution of field reservoirs and focus on the infill sediment deposit volume resulting the uplift of near-dam bottom elevation. These field reservoirs introduced here are Wushe Reservoir, Tsengwen Reservoir, Mudan Reservoir in Taiwan, Lago Dos Bocas in Puerto Rico, and Sakuma Dam in Japan.

  10. Transient thermal stresses in a transversely isotropic finite composite hollow circular cylinder due to arbitrary surface heat-generations and surrounding temperatures

    Sugano, Y.

    1981-01-01

    An exact solution is given for the temperature distribution, the thermal stresses and displacements in a transversely isotropic finite composite hollow circular cylinder composed of two distinct cylindrical laminae. The temperature field is determined by using of the Laplace transform and the finite Fourier-cosine transform, respectively, with respect to time and axial coordinate included in the governing equation and the associated thermal stresses and displacements are analvsed by the use of a set of stress functions closely related to the Love's function valid for the axisymmetric isothermal problem of isotropic bodies. (orig.)

  11. Optimization between heating load and entropy-production rate for endoreversible absorption heat-transformers

    Sun Fengrui; Qin Xiaoyong; Chen Lingen; Wu Chih

    2005-01-01

    For an endoreversible four-heat-reservoir absorption heat-transformer cycle, for which a linear (Newtonian) heat-transfer law applies, an ecological optimization criterion is proposed for the best mode of operation of the cycle. This involves maximizing a function representing the compromise between the heating load and the entropy-production rate. The optimal relation between the ecological criterion and the COP (coefficient of performance), the maximum ecological criterion and the corresponding COP, heating load and entropy production rate, as well as the ecological criterion and entropy-production rate at the maximum heating load are derived using finite-time thermodynamics. Moreover, compared with the heating-load criterion, the effects of the cycle parameters on the ecological performance are studied by numerical examples. These show that achieving the maximum ecological criterion makes the entropy-production rate decrease by 77.0% and the COP increase by 55.4% with only 27.3% heating-load losses compared with the maximum heating-load objective. The results reflect that the ecological criterion has long-term significance for optimal design of absorption heat-transformers

  12. Economics of Developing Hot Stratigraphic Reservoirs

    Greg Mines; Hillary Hanson; Rick Allis; Joseph Moore

    2014-09-01

    Stratigraphic geothermal reservoirs at 3 – 4 km depth in high heat-flow basins are capable of sustaining 100 MW-scale power plants at about 10 c/kWh. This paper examines the impacts on the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of reservoir depth and temperature, reservoir productivity, and drillhole/casing options. For a reservoir at 3 km depth with a moderate productivity index by hydrothermal reservoir standards (about 50 L/s/MPa, 5.6 gpm/psi), an LCOE of 10c/kWh requires the reservoir to be at about 200°C. This is the upper temperature limit for pumps. The calculations assume standard hydrothermal drilling costs, with the production interval completed with a 7 inch liner in an 8.5 inch hole. If a reservoir at 4 km depth has excellent permeability characteristics with a productivity index of 100 L/s/MPa (11.3 gpm/psi), then the LCOE is about 11 c/kWh assuming the temperature decline rate with development is not excessive (< 1%/y, with first thermal breakthrough delayed by about 10 years). Completing wells with modest horizontal legs (e.g. several hundred meters) may be important for improving well productivity because of the naturally high, sub-horizontal permeability in this type of reservoir. Reducing the injector/producer well ratio may also be cost-effective if the injectors are drilled as larger holes.

  13. SILTATION IN RESERVOIRS

    Keywords: reservoir model, siltation, sediment, catchment, sediment transport. 1. Introduction. Sediment ... rendered water storage structures useless in less than 25 years. ... reservoir, thus reducing the space available for water storage and ...

  14. Reservoir fisheries of Asia

    Silva, S.S. De.

    1990-01-01

    At a workshop on reservoir fisheries research, papers were presented on the limnology of reservoirs, the changes that follow impoundment, fisheries management and modelling, and fish culture techniques. Separate abstracts have been prepared for three papers from this workshop

  15. Large reservoirs: Chapter 17

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Bettoli, Phillip William

    2010-01-01

    Large impoundments, defined as those with surface area of 200 ha or greater, are relatively new aquatic ecosystems in the global landscape. They represent important economic and environmental resources that provide benefits such as flood control, hydropower generation, navigation, water supply, commercial and recreational fisheries, and various other recreational and esthetic values. Construction of large impoundments was initially driven by economic needs, and ecological consequences received little consideration. However, in recent decades environmental issues have come to the forefront. In the closing decades of the 20th century societal values began to shift, especially in the developed world. Society is no longer willing to accept environmental damage as an inevitable consequence of human development, and it is now recognized that continued environmental degradation is unsustainable. Consequently, construction of large reservoirs has virtually stopped in North America. Nevertheless, in other parts of the world construction of large reservoirs continues. The emergence of systematic reservoir management in the early 20th century was guided by concepts developed for natural lakes (Miranda 1996). However, we now recognize that reservoirs are different and that reservoirs are not independent aquatic systems inasmuch as they are connected to upstream rivers and streams, the downstream river, other reservoirs in the basin, and the watershed. Reservoir systems exhibit longitudinal patterns both within and among reservoirs. Reservoirs are typically arranged sequentially as elements of an interacting network, filter water collected throughout their watersheds, and form a mosaic of predictable patterns. Traditional approaches to fisheries management such as stocking, regulating harvest, and in-lake habitat management do not always produce desired effects in reservoirs. As a result, managers may expend resources with little benefit to either fish or fishing. Some locally

  16. A Finite-Time Thermal Cycle Variational Optimization with a Stefan–Boltzmann Law for Three Different Criteria

    Juan C. Chimal-Eguía

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the power of the variational approach for studying the efficiency of thermal engines in the context of the Finite Time Thermodynamics (FTT. Using an endoreversible Curzon–Ahlborn (CA heat engine as a model for actual thermal engines, three different criteria for thermal efficiency were analyzed: maximum power output, ecological function, and maximum power density. By means of this procedure, the performance of the CA heat engine with a nonlinear heat transfer law (the Stefan–Boltzmann law was studied to describe the heat exchanges between the working substance and its thermal reservoirs. The specific case of the Müser engine for all the criteria was analyzed. The results confirmed some previous findings using other procedures and additionally new results for the Müser engine performance were obtained.

  17. Ecological optimization of quantum spin-1/2 heat engine at the classical limit

    Chen, T-H

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a study of finite-time thermodynamics applied to evaluate the ecological performance of a quantum heat engine which operates between two thermal reservoirs using the working substance of spin-1/2 systems. The quantum heat engine cycle is composed of two isothermal processes, an adiabatic process and an isomagnetic field process. A sequence of time evolution was determined from the quantum angular momentum rate based on the semigroup approach and the quantum master equation. The individual time duration is added to account for the total cycle time. The objective ecological function representing a compromise between power output and irreversibility is maximized with respect to cycle temperature ratio. Effects of thermal reservoir temperature ratio and magnetic field ratio on the ecological function have been discussed. A comparison of quantum heat engine performance under maximum ecological function and maximum power conditions is also presented

  18. Heat transfer

    Saad, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Heat transfer takes place between material systems as a result of a temperature difference. The transmission process involves energy conversions governed by the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The heat transfer proceeds from a high-temperature region to a low-temperature region, and because of the finite thermal potential, there is an increase in entropy. Thermodynamics, however, is concerned with equilibrium states, which includes thermal equilibrium, irrespective of the time necessary to attain these equilibrium states. But heat transfer is a result of thermal nonequilibrium conditions, therefore, the laws of thermodynamics alone cannot describe completely the heat transfer process. In practice, most engineering problems are concerned with the rate of heat transfer rather than the quantity of heat being transferred. Resort then is directed to the particular laws governing the transfer of heat. There are three distinct modes of heat transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. Although these modes are discussed separately, all three types may occur simultaneously

  19. Optimal operating conditions of a transcritical endoreversible cycle using a low enthalpy heat source

    Rachedi, Malika; Feidt, Michel; Amirat, Madjid; Merzouk, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamics analysis of a finite size heat engine driven by a finite heat source. • Mathematical modelling of a transcritical endoreversible organic Rankine cycle. • Parametric study of the optimum operating conditions of transcritical cycle. • Choice of appropriate parameters could lead to very promising efficiencies. - Abstract: In the context of thermodynamic analysis of finite dimensions systems, we studied the optimum operating conditions of an endoreversible thermal machine. In this study, we considered a transcritical cycle, considering external irreversibilities. The hot reservoir is a low enthalpy geothermal heat source; therefore, it is assumed to be finite, whereas the cold reservoir is assumed to be infinite. The power optimisation is investigated by searching the optimum effectiveness of the heat-exchanger at the hot side of the engine. The sum of the total effectiveness and the second law of thermodynamics are used as constraints for optimisation. The optimal temperatures of the working fluid and optimum performances are evaluated based on the most significant parameters of the system: (1) the ratio of heat capacity rate of the working fluid to the heat capacity rate of the coolant and (2) the ratio of the sink temperature to the temperature of the hot source. The parametric study of the cycle and its approximation by a trilateral cycle enabled us to determine the optimum value of the effectiveness of the heat exchangers and the optimal operating temperatures of the cycle considered. The efficiencies obtained are in the range of 15–25% and was found to exceed the efficiency expected by the Curzon and Ahlborn prevision; meanwhile, the Carnot efficiency remains at a high limit.

  20. Caprock Integrity during Hydrocarbon Production and CO2 Injection in the Goldeneye Reservoir

    Salimzadeh, Saeed; Paluszny, Adriana; Zimmerman, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a key technology for addressing climate change and maintaining security of energy supplies, while potentially offering important economic benefits. UK offshore, depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs have the potential capacity to store significant quantities of carbon dioxide, produced during power generation from fossil fuels. The Goldeneye depleted gas condensate field, located offshore in the UK North Sea at a depth of ~ 2600 m, is a candidate for the storage of at least 10 million tons of CO2. In this research, a fully coupled, full-scale model (50×20×8 km), based on the Goldeneye reservoir, is built and used for hydro-carbon production and CO2 injection simulations. The model accounts for fluid flow, heat transfer, and deformation of the fractured reservoir. Flow through fractures is defined as two-dimensional laminar flow within the three-dimensional poroelastic medium. The local thermal non-equilibrium between injected CO2 and host reservoir has been considered with convective (conduction and advection) heat transfer. The numerical model has been developed using standard finite element method with Galerkin spatial discretisation, and finite difference temporal discretisation. The geomechanical model has been implemented into the object-oriented Imperial College Geomechanics Toolkit, in close interaction with the Complex Systems Modelling Platform (CSMP), and validated with several benchmark examples. Fifteen major faults are mapped from the Goldeneye field into the model. Modal stress intensity factors, for the three modes of fracture opening during hydrocarbon production and CO2 injection phases, are computed at the tips of the faults by computing the I-Integral over a virtual disk. Contact stresses -normal and shear- on the fault surfaces are iteratively computed using a gap-based augmented Lagrangian-Uzawa method. Results show fault activation during the production phase that may affect the fault's hydraulic conductivity

  1. Fortescue reservoir development and reservoir studies

    Henzell, S.T.; Hicks, G.J.; Horden, M.J.; Irrgang, H.R.; Janssen, E.J.; Kable, C.W.; Mitchell, R.A.H.; Morrell, N.W.; Palmer, I.D.; Seage, N.W.

    1985-03-01

    The Fortescue field in the Gippsland Basin, offshore southeastern Australia is being developed from two platforms (Fortescue A and Cobia A) by Esso Australia Ltd. (operator) and BHP Petroleum. The Fortescue reservoir is a stratigraphic trap at the top of the Latrobe Group of sediments. It overlies the western flank of the Halibut and Cobia fields and is separated from them by a non-net sequence of shales and coals which form a hydraulic barrier between the two systems. Development drilling into the Fortescue reservoir commenced in April 1983 with production coming onstream in May 1983. Fortescue, with booked reserves of 44 stock tank gigalitres (280 million stock tank barrels) of 43/sup 0/ API oil, is the seventh major oil reservoir to be developed in the offshore Gippsland Basin by Esso/BHP. In mid-1984, after drilling a total of 20 exploration and development wells, and after approximately one year of production, a detailed three-dimensional, two-phase reservoir simulation study was performed to examine the recovery efficiency, drainage patterns, pressure performance and production rate potential of the reservoir. The model was validated by history matching an extensive suite of Repeat Formation Test (RFT) pressure data. The results confirmed the reserves basis, and demonstrated that the ultimate oil recovery from the reservoir is not sensitive to production rate. This result is consistent with studies on other high quality Latrobe Group reservoirs in the Gippsland Basin which contain undersaturated crudes and receive very strong water drive from the Basin-wide aquifer system. With the development of the simulation model during the development phase, it has been possible to more accurately define the optimal well pattern for the remainder of the development.

  2. Heat conduction in one-dimensional chains and nonequilibrium Lyapunov spectrum

    Posch, H.A.; Hoover, W.G.

    1998-01-01

    We define and study the heat conductivity κ and the Lyapunov spectrum for a modified 'ding-a-ling' chain undergoing steady heat flow. Free and bound particles alternate along a chain. In the present work, we use a linear gravitational potential to bind all the even-numbered particles to their lattice sites. The chain is bounded by two stochastic heat reservoirs, one hot and one cold. The Fourier conductivity of the chain decreases smoothly to a finite large-system limit. Special treatment of satellite collisions with the stochastic boundaries is required to obtain Lyapunov spectra. The summed spectra are negative, and correspond to a relatively small contraction in phase space, with the formation of a multifractal strange attractor. The largest of the Lyapunov exponents for the ding-a-ling chain appears to converge to a limiting value with increasing chain length, so that the large-system Lyapunov spectrum has a finite limit. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  3. Transport of reservoir fines

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    Modeling transport of reservoir fines is of great importance for evaluating the damage of production wells and infectivity decline. The conventional methodology accounts for neither the formation heterogeneity around the wells nor the reservoir fines’ heterogeneity. We have developed an integral...... dispersion equation in modeling the transport and the deposition of reservoir fines. It successfully predicts the unsymmetrical concentration profiles and the hyperexponential deposition in experiments....

  4. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    Baker, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book analyzes finite element theory as applied to computational fluid mechanics. It includes a chapter on using the heat conduction equation to expose the essence of finite element theory, including higher-order accuracy and convergence in a common knowledge framework. Another chapter generalizes the algorithm to extend application to the nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. Other chapters are concerned with the analysis of a specific fluids mechanics problem class, including theory and applications. Some of the topics covered include finite element theory for linear mechanics; potential flow; weighted residuals/galerkin finite element theory; inviscid and convection dominated flows; boundary layers; parabolic three-dimensional flows; and viscous and rotational flows

  5. Numerical Simulation of Two Dimensional Flows in Yazidang Reservoir

    Huang, Lingxiao; Liu, Libo; Sun, Xuehong; Zheng, Lanxiang; Jing, Hefang; Zhang, Xuande; Li, Chunguang

    2018-01-01

    This paper studied the problem of water flow in the Yazid Ang reservoir. It built 2-D RNG turbulent model, rated the boundary conditions, used the finite volume method to discrete equations and divided the grid by the advancing-front method. It simulated the two conditions of reservoir flow field, compared the average vertical velocity of the simulated value and the measured value nearby the water inlet and the water intake. The results showed that the mathematical model could be applied to the similar industrial water reservoir.

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of Methane Hydrate Reservoirs: Effects of Reservoir Parameters on Gas Productivity and Economics

    Anderson, B. J.; Gaddipati, M.; Nyayapathi, L.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a parametric study on production rates of natural gas from gas hydrates by the method of depressurization, using CMG STARS. Seven factors/parameters were considered as perturbations from a base-case hydrate reservoir description based on Problem 7 of the International Methane Hydrate Reservoir Simulator Code Comparison Study led by the Department of Energy and the USGS. This reservoir is modeled after the inferred properties of the hydrate deposit at the Prudhoe Bay L-106 site. The included sensitivity variables were hydrate saturation, pressure (depth), temperature, bottom-hole pressure of the production well, free water saturation, intrinsic rock permeability, and porosity. A two-level (L=2) Plackett-Burman experimental design was used to study the relative effects of these factors. The measured variable was the discounted cumulative gas production. The discount rate chosen was 15%, resulting in the gas contribution to the net present value of a reservoir. Eight different designs were developed for conducting sensitivity analysis and the effects of the parameters on the real and discounted production rates will be discussed. The breakeven price in various cases and the dependence of the breakeven price on the production parameters is given in the paper. As expected, initial reservoir temperature has the strongest positive effect on the productivity of a hydrate deposit and the bottom-hole pressure in the production well has the strongest negative dependence. Also resulting in a positive correlation is the intrinsic permeability and the initial free water of the formation. Negative effects were found for initial hydrate saturation (at saturations greater than 50% of the pore space) and the reservoir porosity. These negative effects are related to the available sensible heat of the reservoir, with decreasing productivity due to decreasing available sensible heat. Finally, we conclude that for the base case reservoir, the break-even price (BEP

  7. Superconductor Particles As The Working Media Of A Heat Engine

    Keefe, Peter D.

    2011-12-01

    A heat engine is presented in which the working media comprises a multiplicity of mutually isolated particles of Type I superconductor which are selectively processed through H-T phase space so as to convert a heat influx from a high temperature heat reservoir into a useful work output, wherein no heat is rejected to a low temperature heat reservoir.

  8. Scalable and Robust BDDC Preconditioners for Reservoir and Electromagnetics Modeling

    Zampini, S.; Widlund, O.B.; Keyes, David E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to show the effectiveness of recent algorithmic advances in Balancing Domain Decomposition by Constraints (BDDC) preconditioners for the solution of elliptic PDEs with highly heterogeneous coefficients, and discretized by means of the finite element method. Applications to large linear systems generated by div- and curl- conforming finite elements discretizations commonly arising in the contexts of modelling reservoirs and electromagnetics will be presented.

  9. Scalable and Robust BDDC Preconditioners for Reservoir and Electromagnetics Modeling

    Zampini, S.

    2015-09-13

    The purpose of the study is to show the effectiveness of recent algorithmic advances in Balancing Domain Decomposition by Constraints (BDDC) preconditioners for the solution of elliptic PDEs with highly heterogeneous coefficients, and discretized by means of the finite element method. Applications to large linear systems generated by div- and curl- conforming finite elements discretizations commonly arising in the contexts of modelling reservoirs and electromagnetics will be presented.

  10. Reservoir Engineering Management Program

    Howard, J.H.; Schwarz, W.J.

    1977-12-14

    The Reservoir Engineering Management Program being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory includes two major tasks: 1) the continuation of support to geothermal reservoir engineering related work, started under the NSF-RANN program and transferred to ERDA at the time of its formation; 2) the development and subsequent implementation of a broad plan for support of research in topics related to the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs. This plan is now known as the GREMP plan. Both the NSF-RANN legacies and GREMP are in direct support of the DOE/DGE mission in general and the goals of the Resource and Technology/Resource Exploitation and Assessment Branch in particular. These goals are to determine the magnitude and distribution of geothermal resources and reduce risk in their exploitation through improved understanding of generically different reservoir types. These goals are to be accomplished by: 1) the creation of a large data base about geothermal reservoirs, 2) improved tools and methods for gathering data on geothermal reservoirs, and 3) modeling of reservoirs and utilization options. The NSF legacies are more research and training oriented, and the GREMP is geared primarily to the practical development of the geothermal reservoirs. 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  11. Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical Modeling of Water Leak-Off Process during Hydraulic Fracturing in Shale Gas Reservoirs

    Fei Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The water leak-off during hydraulic fracturing in shale gas reservoirs is a complicated transport behavior involving thermal (T, hydrodynamic (H, mechanical (M and chemical (C processes. Although many leak-off models have been published, none of the models fully coupled the transient fluid flow modeling with heat transfer, chemical-potential equilibrium and natural-fracture dilation phenomena. In this paper, a coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC model based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics, hydrodynamics, thermo-poroelastic rock mechanics, and non-isothermal chemical-potential equations is presented to simulate the water leak-off process in shale gas reservoirs. The THMC model takes into account a triple-porosity medium, which includes hydraulic fractures, natural fractures and shale matrix. The leak-off simulation with the THMC model involves all the important processes in this triple-porosity medium, including: (1 water transport driven by hydraulic, capillary, chemical and thermal osmotic convections; (2 gas transport induced by both hydraulic pressure driven convection and adsorption; (3 heat transport driven by thermal convection and conduction; and (4 natural-fracture dilation considered as a thermo-poroelastic rock deformation. The fluid and heat transport, coupled with rock deformation, are described by a set of partial differential equations resulting from the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. The semi-implicit finite-difference algorithm is proposed to solve these equations. The evolution of pressure, temperature, saturation and salinity profiles of hydraulic fractures, natural fractures and matrix is calculated, revealing the multi-field coupled water leak-off process in shale gas reservoirs. The influences of hydraulic pressure, natural-fracture dilation, chemical osmosis and thermal osmosis on water leak-off are investigated. Results from this study are expected to provide a better understanding of the

  12. Finite elements methods in mechanics

    Eslami, M Reza

    2014-01-01

    This book covers all basic areas of mechanical engineering, such as fluid mechanics, heat conduction, beams, and elasticity with detailed derivations for the mass, stiffness, and force matrices. It is especially designed to give physical feeling to the reader for finite element approximation by the introduction of finite elements to the elevation of elastic membrane. A detailed treatment of computer methods with numerical examples are provided. In the fluid mechanics chapter, the conventional and vorticity transport formulations for viscous incompressible fluid flow with discussion on the method of solution are presented. The variational and Galerkin formulations of the heat conduction, beams, and elasticity problems are also discussed in detail. Three computer codes are provided to solve the elastic membrane problem. One of them solves the Poisson’s equation. The second computer program handles the two dimensional elasticity problems, and the third one presents the three dimensional transient heat conducti...

  13. Artificial Neural Network-Based Three-dimensional Continuous Response Relationship Construction of 3Cr20Ni10W2 Heat-Resisting Alloy and Its Application in Finite Element Simulation

    Li, Le; Wang, Li-yong

    2018-04-01

    The application of accurate constitutive relationship in finite element simulation would significantly contribute to accurate simulation results, which plays a critical role in process design and optimization. In this investigation, the true stress-strain data of 3Cr20Ni10W2 heat-resisting alloy were obtained from a series of isothermal compression tests conducted in a wide temperature range of 1203-1403 K and strain rate range of 0.01-10 s-1 on a Gleeble 1500 testing machine. Then the constitutive relationship was modeled by an optimally constructed and well-trained back-propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN). The evaluation of the BP-ANN model revealed that it has admirable performance in characterizing and predicting the flow behaviors of 3Cr20Ni10W2 heat-resisting alloy. Meanwhile, a comparison between improved Arrhenius-type constitutive equation and BP-ANN model shows that the latter has higher accuracy. Consequently, the developed BP-ANN model was used to predict abundant stress-strain data beyond the limited experimental conditions and construct the three-dimensional continuous response relationship for temperature, strain rate, strain, and stress. Finally, the three-dimensional continuous response relationship was applied to the numerical simulation of isothermal compression tests. The results show that such constitutive relationship can significantly promote the accuracy improvement of numerical simulation for hot forming processes.

  14. Sediment management for reservoir

    Rahman, A.

    2005-01-01

    All natural lakes and reservoirs whether on rivers, tributaries or off channel storages are doomed to be sited up. Pakistan has two major reservoirs of Tarbela and Managla and shallow lake created by Chashma Barrage. Tarbela and Mangla Lakes are losing their capacities ever since first impounding, Tarbela since 1974 and Mangla since 1967. Tarbela Reservoir receives average annual flow of about 62 MAF and sediment deposits of 0.11 MAF whereas Mangla gets about 23 MAF of average annual flows and is losing its storage at the rate of average 34,000 MAF annually. The loss of storage is a great concern and studies for Tarbela were carried out by TAMS and Wallingford to sustain its capacity whereas no study has been done for Mangla as yet except as part of study for Raised Mangla, which is only desk work. Delta of Tarbala reservoir has advanced to about 6.59 miles (Pivot Point) from power intakes. In case of liquefaction of delta by tremor as low as 0.12g peak ground acceleration the power tunnels I, 2 and 3 will be blocked. Minimum Pool of reservoir is being raised so as to check the advance of delta. Mangla delta will follow the trend of Tarbela. Tarbela has vast amount of data as reservoir is surveyed every year, whereas Mangla Reservoir survey was done at five-year interval, which has now been proposed .to be reduced to three-year interval. In addition suspended sediment sampling of inflow streams is being done by Surface Water Hydrology Project of WAPDA as also some bed load sampling. The problem of Chasma Reservoir has also been highlighted, as it is being indiscriminately being filled up and drawdown several times a year without regard to its reaction to this treatment. The Sediment Management of these reservoirs is essential and the paper discusses pros and cons of various alternatives. (author)

  15. Optimising reservoir operation

    Ngo, Long le

    Anvendelse af optimeringsteknik til drift af reservoirer er blevet et væsentligt element i vandressource-planlægning og -forvaltning. Traditionelt har reservoirer været styret af heuristiske procedurer for udtag af vand, suppleret i en vis udstrækning af subjektive beslutninger. Udnyttelse af...... reservoirer involverer en lang række interessenter med meget forskellige formål (f.eks. kunstig vanding, vandkraft, vandforsyning mv.), og optimeringsteknik kan langt bedre lede frem til afbalancerede løsninger af de ofte modstridende interesser. Afhandlingen foreslår en række tiltag, hvormed traditionelle...

  16. analysis of pressure variation of fluid in bounded circular reservoirs

    user

    analysis of the analysed finite element, imposing the boundary conditions and finally, getting the results that ... in reservoir engineering applications [2–7]. ... THEORY. The law of conservation of mass, Darcy's law and the equation of state has been combined to obtain the ..... fields in laser-two-layer solids weak interactions.

  17. Performance characteristics and parametric optimization of an irreversible magnetic Ericsson heat-pump

    Wei Fang; Lin Guoxing; Chen Jincan; Brueck, Ekkes

    2011-01-01

    Taking into account the finite-rate heat transfer in the heat-transfer processes, heat leak between the two external heat reservoirs, regenerative loss, regeneration time, and internal irreversibility due to dissipation of the cycle working substance, an irreversible magnetic Ericsson heat-pump cycle is presented. On the basis of the thermodynamic properties of magnetic materials, the performance characteristics of the irreversible magnetic Ericsson heat-pump are investigated and the relationship between the optimal heating load and the coefficient of performance (COP) is derived. Moreover, the maximum heating load and the corresponding COP as well as the maximum COP and the corresponding heating load are obtained. Furthermore, the other optimal performance characteristics are discussed in detail. The results obtained here may provide some new information for the optimal parameter design and the development of real magnetic Ericsson heat-pumps. -- Research Highlights: →The effects of multi-irreversibilities on the performance of a magnetic heat-pump are revealed. →Mathematical expressions of the heating load and the COP are derived and the optimal performance and operating parameters are analyzed and discussed. →Several important performance bounds are determined.

  18. The finite element method in engineering, 2nd edition

    Rao, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    This work provides a systematic introduction to the various aspects of the finite element method as applied to engineering problems. Contents include: introduction to finite element method; solution of finite element equations; solid and structural mechanics; static analysis; dynamic analysis; heat transfer; fluid mechanics and additional applications

  19. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian sandstone reservoirs. Final report

    Kelkar, M.

    1995-02-01

    This final report summarizes the progress during the three years of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description; (ii) scale-up procedures; (iii) outcrop investigation. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be described in three dimensions. The next step in reservoir description is to scale up reservoir properties for flow simulation. The second section addresses the issue of scale-up of reservoir properties once the spatial descriptions of properties are created. The last section describes the investigation of an outcrop.

  20. Groebner Finite Path Algebras

    Leamer, Micah J.

    2004-01-01

    Let K be a field and Q a finite directed multi-graph. In this paper I classify all path algebras KQ and admissible orders with the property that all of their finitely generated ideals have finite Groebner bases. MS

  1. Locally Finite Root Supersystems

    Yousofzadeh, Malihe

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of locally finite root supersystems as a generalization of both locally finite root systems and generalized root systems. We classify irreducible locally finite root supersystems.

  2. Parallel Numerical Simulations of Water Reservoirs

    Torres, Pedro; Mangiavacchi, Norberto

    2010-11-01

    The study of the water flow and scalar transport in water reservoirs is important for the determination of the water quality during the initial stages of the reservoir filling and during the life of the reservoir. For this scope, a parallel 2D finite element code for solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with scalar transport was implemented using the message-passing programming model, in order to perform simulations of hidropower water reservoirs in a computer cluster environment. The spatial discretization is based on the MINI element that satisfies the Babuska-Brezzi (BB) condition, which provides sufficient conditions for a stable mixed formulation. All the distributed data structures needed in the different stages of the code, such as preprocessing, solving and post processing, were implemented using the PETSc library. The resulting linear systems for the velocity and the pressure fields were solved using the projection method, implemented by an approximate block LU factorization. In order to increase the parallel performance in the solution of the linear systems, we employ the static condensation method for solving the intermediate velocity at vertex and centroid nodes separately. We compare performance results of the static condensation method with the approach of solving the complete system. In our tests the static condensation method shows better performance for large problems, at the cost of an increased memory usage. Performance results for other intensive parts of the code in a computer cluster are also presented.

  3. Modeling Reservoir-River Networks in Support of Optimizing Seasonal-Scale Reservoir Operations

    Villa, D. L.; Lowry, T. S.; Bier, A.; Barco, J.; Sun, A.

    2011-12-01

    HydroSCOPE (Hydropower Seasonal Concurrent Optimization of Power and the Environment) is a seasonal time-scale tool for scenario analysis and optimization of reservoir-river networks. Developed in MATLAB, HydroSCOPE is an object-oriented model that simulates basin-scale dynamics with an objective of optimizing reservoir operations to maximize revenue from power generation, reliability in the water supply, environmental performance, and flood control. HydroSCOPE is part of a larger toolset that is being developed through a Department of Energy multi-laboratory project. This project's goal is to provide conventional hydropower decision makers with better information to execute their day-ahead and seasonal operations and planning activities by integrating water balance and operational dynamics across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. This presentation details the modeling approach and functionality of HydroSCOPE. HydroSCOPE consists of a river-reservoir network model and an optimization routine. The river-reservoir network model simulates the heat and water balance of river-reservoir networks for time-scales up to one year. The optimization routine software, DAKOTA (Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications - dakota.sandia.gov), is seamlessly linked to the network model and is used to optimize daily volumetric releases from the reservoirs to best meet a set of user-defined constraints, such as maximizing revenue while minimizing environmental violations. The network model uses 1-D approximations for both the reservoirs and river reaches and is able to account for surface and sediment heat exchange as well as ice dynamics for both models. The reservoir model also accounts for inflow, density, and withdrawal zone mixing, and diffusive heat exchange. Routing for the river reaches is accomplished using a modified Muskingum-Cunge approach that automatically calculates the internal timestep and sub-reach lengths to match the conditions of

  4. Are Geotehrmal Reservoirs Stressed Out?

    Davatzes, N. C.; Laboso, R. C.; Layland-Bachmann, C. E.; Feigl, K. L.; Foxall, W.; Tabrez, A. R.; Mellors, R. J.; Templeton, D. C.; Akerley, J.

    2017-12-01

    Crustal permeability can be strongly influenced by developing connected networks of open fractures. However, the detailed evolution of a fracture network, its extent, and the persistence of fracture porosity are difficult to analyze. Even in fault-hosted geothermal systems, where heat is brought to the surface from depth along a fault, hydrothermal flow is heterogeneously distributed. This is presumably due to variations in fracture density, connectivity, and attitude, as well as variations in fracture permeability caused by sealing of fractures by precipitated cements or compaction. At the Brady Geothermal field in Nevada, we test the relationship between the modeled local stress state perturbed by dislocations representing fault slip or volume changes in the geothermal reservoir inferred from surface deformation measured by InSAR and the location of successful geothermal wells, hydrothermal activity, and seismicity. We postulate that permeability is favored in volumes that experience positive Coulomb stress changes and reduced compression, which together promote high densities of dilatant fractures. Conversely, permeability can be inhibited in locations where Coulomb stress is reduced, compression promotes compaction, or where the faults are poorly oriented in the stress field and consequently slip infrequently. Over geologic time scales spanning the development of the fault system, these local stress states are strongly influenced by the geometry of the fault network relative to the remote stress driving slip. At shorter time scales, changes in fluid pressure within the fracture network constituting the reservoir cause elastic dilations and contractions. We integrate: (1) direct observations of stress state and fractures in boreholes and the mapped geometry of the fault network; (2) evidence of permeability from surface hydrothermal features, production/injection wells and surface deformations related to pumping history; and (3) seismicity to test the

  5. Resource theory for work and heat

    Sparaciari, Carlo; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Fritz, Tobias

    2017-11-01

    Several recent results on thermodynamics have been obtained using the tools of quantum information theory and resource theories. So far, the resource theories utilized to describe thermodynamics have assumed the existence of an infinite thermal reservoir, by declaring that thermal states at some background temperature come for free. Here, we propose a resource theory of quantum thermodynamics without a background temperature, so that no states at all come for free. We apply this resource theory to the case of many noninteracting systems and show that all quantum states are classified by their entropy and average energy, even arbitrarily far away from equilibrium. This implies that thermodynamics takes place in a two-dimensional convex set that we call the energy-entropy diagram. The answers to many resource-theoretic questions about thermodynamics can be read off from this diagram, such as the efficiency of a heat engine consisting of finite reservoirs, or the rate of conversion between two states. This allows us to consider a resource theory which puts work and heat on an equal footing, and serves as a model for other resource theories.

  6. Mixing in heterogeneous internally-heated convection

    Limare, A.; Kaminski, E. C.; Jaupart, C. P.; Farnetani, C. G.; Fourel, L.; Froment, M.

    2017-12-01

    Past laboratory experiments of thermo chemical convection have dealt with systems involving fluids with different intrinsic densities and viscosities in a Rayleigh-Bénard setup. Although these experiments have greatly improved our understanding of the Earth's mantle dynamics, they neglect a fundamental component of planetary convection: internal heat sources. We have developed a microwave-based method in order to study convection and mixing in systems involving two layers of fluid with different densities, viscosities, and internal heat production rates. Our innovative laboratory experiments are appropriate for the early Earth, when the lowermost mantle was likely enriched in incompatible and heat producing elements and when the heat flux from the core probably accounted for a small fraction of the mantle heat budget. They are also relevant to the present-day mantle if one considers that radioactive decay and secular cooling contribute both to internal heating. Our goal is to quantify how two fluid layers mix, which is still very difficult to resolve accurately in 3-D numerical calculations. Viscosities and microwave absorptions are tuned to achieve high values of the Rayleigh-Roberts and Prandtl numbers relevant for planetary convection. We start from a stably stratified system where the lower layer has higher internal heat production and density than the upper layer. Due to mixing, the amount of enriched material gradually decreases to zero over a finite time called the lifetime. Based on more than 30 experiments, we have derived a scaling law that relates the lifetime of an enriched reservoir to the layer thickness ratio, a, to the density and viscosity contrasts between the two layers, and to their two different internal heating rates in the form of an enrichment factor beta=1+2*a*H1/H, where H1 is the heating rate of the lower fluid and H is the average heating rate. We find that the lifetime of the lower enriched reservoir varies as beta**(-7/3) in the low

  7. An investigation of using a phase-change material to improve the heat transfer in a small electronic module for an airborne radar application

    Snyder, K.W.

    1990-10-01

    Finding new and improved means of cooling small electronic packages are of great importance to today's electronic packaging engineer. Thermal absorption through the use of a material which changes phase is an attractive alternative. Taking advantage of the heat capacity of a material's latent heat of fusion is shown to absorb heat away from the electronics, thus decreasing the overall temperature rise of the system. The energy equation is formulated in terms of enthalpy and discretized using a finite-difference method. A FORTRAN program to solve the discretized equations is presented which can be used to analyze heat conduction in a rectangular region undergoing an isothermal phase change. An analysis of heat transfer through a miniature radar electronic module cooled by a phase-change reservoir is presented, illustrating the method's advantages over conventional heat sinks. 41 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Fiscal 1999 research and verification of geothermal energy exploring technologies and the like. Development of reservoir mass and heat flow characterization (Development of reservoir change prediction technology - Summary); 1999 nendo chinetsu tansa gijutsu nado kensho chosa hokokusho (yoyaku). Choryuso hendo tansaho kaihatsu (choryuso hendo yosoku gijutsu)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Efforts are exerted to develop technologies for accurately predicting reservoir expansion or other changes through a comprehensive analysis of the fracture hydrology method, gravity monitoring method, electrical and magnetic monitoring method, seismic monitoring method, and their associated technologies. The endeavors cover the development of a post processor system which involves gravity, self-potential, geochemistry, resistivity, etc., and is related to a reservoir simulator, and the development of a reservoir modelling technology. For the development of a post processor system, efforts continue (1) to develop a processor to deal with gravity, self-potential, resistivity, and geochemistry, (2) to carry out basic studies of changes in seismic propagation characteristics, (3) to develop databases, and (4) to develop a simulator interface. Under item (1), development involving gravity, self-potential, and geochemistry is complete, and now manuals are being prepared. A prototype design is complete for resistivity. For the development of a reservoir modelling technology, modelling is under way for the Onikobe and Sumikawa districts. Existing data are taken care of, and productivity predicting simulation is carried out. (NEDO)

  9. Effect of reservoir characteristics on the response of concrete gravity dams

    Baumber, T.; Ghobarah, A.

    1992-01-01

    In most previous analyses of dam responses to earthquake ground motion, the upstream reservoir is assumed to be infinite in length with horizontal bottom. This is rarely the actual geometry of a reservoir, as the upstream valley typically has complex geometry. A study was carried out to examine the effects of the geometry of the reservoir on the dynamic behavior of the monolith. The dam-foundation-reservoir system is modelled using a sub-structuring approach. The reservoir is modelled using a finite element formulation. The absorptive capacity of the reservoir's foundation is idealized as a one-dimensional boundary condition at the reservoir-foundation interface. The reservoir bottom is assumed to be sloping. It was found that the assumed shape of the upstream reservoir significantly affects the overall response of the dam-foundation-reservoir system. The frequencies and magnitudes of the response peaks are affected by the geometry of the reservoir. It was also found that the value of the wave reflection coefficient at the reservoir bottom has a significant effect on the system's response. 6 refs., 5 figs

  10. Fiscal 1999 research and verification of geothermal energy exploring technologies and the like. Development of reservoir mass and heat flow characterization (Development of seismic monitoring technology - Summary); 1999 nendo chinetsu tansa gijutsu nado kensho chosa hokokusho (yoyaku). Choryuso hendo tansaho kaihatsu (jishinha tansaho kaihatsu)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Development is under way of a reservoir mass and heat flow characterization method using seismic wave analysis. Specifics of the endeavor cover detailed studies of techniques for monitoring and analyzing seismic wave changes due to changes in the reservoir that accompanies production and reinjection of geothermal fluids, which are carried out through preliminary monitoring accomplished at the test field. For the construction of a microearthquake monitoring network, a monitoring network design is prepared, a data processing/analyzing system is improved and tested for serviceability, analysis programs for 3-dimensional velocity structure analysis technology are improved, and methods for analyzing changes in the reservoir are deliberated, all these based on the results of microearthquake preliminary monitoring and simulation carried out at the Akinomiya district, Akita Prefecture. For the research of elastic wave velocity structure change, short-duration reflection events and waveform changes due to geothermal power plant periodic inspections are extracted, and studies are conducted about the applicability of the diffraction stacking method to the exploration of geothermal energy. (NEDO)

  11. Nagylengyel: an interesting reservoir. [Yugoslovia

    Dedinszky, J

    1971-04-01

    The Nagylengyel oil field, discovered in 1951, has oil-producing formations mostly in the Upper-Triassic dolomites, in the Norian-Ractian transition formations, in the Upper-Cretaceous limestones and shales, and in the Miocene. The formation of the reservoir space occurred in many stages. A porous, cavernous fractured reservoir is developed in the Norian principal dolomite. A cavernous fractured reservoir exists in the Cretaceous limestone and in the Cretaceous shale and porous fractured reservoir is developed in the Miocene. The derivation of the model of the reservoir, and the conservative evaluation of the volume of the reservoir made it possible to use secondary recovery.

  12. Optimal implicit 2-D finite differences to model wave propagation in poroelastic media

    Itzá, Reymundo; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Parra, Jorge O.

    2016-08-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic waves in heterogeneous porous reservoir rocks is an important tool for the interpretation of seismic surveys in reservoir engineering. We apply globally optimal implicit staggered-grid finite differences (FD) to model 2-D wave propagation in heterogeneous poroelastic media at a low-frequency range (differentiation involves solving tridiagonal linear systems of equations through Thomas' algorithm.

  13. Anomalies in curved spacetime at finite temperature

    Boschi-Filho, H.; Natividade, C.P.

    1993-01-01

    We discuss the problem of the breakdown of conformal and gauge symmetries at finite temperature in curved spacetime background, when the changes in the background are gradual. We obtain the expressions for the Seeley's coefficients and the heat kernel expansion in this regime. As applications, we consider the self-interacting lambda phi''4 and chiral Schwinger models in curved backgrounds at finite temperature. (Author) 9 refs

  14. The impact of hydraulic flow unit & reservoir quality index on pressure profile and productivity index in multi-segments reservoirs

    Salam Al-Rbeawi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is studying the impact of the hydraulic flow unit and reservoir quality index (RQI on pressure profile and productivity index of horizontal wells acting in finite reservoirs. Several mathematical models have been developed to investigate this impact. These models have been built based on the pressure distribution in porous media, depleted by a horizontal well, consist of multi hydraulic flow units and different reservoir quality index. The porous media are assumed to be finite rectangular reservoirs having different configurations and the wellbores may have different lengths. Several analytical models describing flow regimes have been derived wherein hydraulic flow units and reservoir quality index have been included in addition to rock and fluid properties. The impact of these two parameters on reservoir performance has also been studied using steady state productivity index.It has been found that both pressure responses and flow regimes are highly affected by the existence of multiple hydraulic flow units in the porous media and the change in reservoir quality index for these units. Positive change in the RQI could lead to positive change in both pressure drop required for reservoir fluids to move towards the wellbore and hence the productivity index.

  15. Representing Reservoir Stratification in Land Surface and Earth System Models

    Yigzaw, W.; Li, H. Y.; Leung, L. R.; Hejazi, M. I.; Voisin, N.; Payn, R. A.; Demissie, Y.

    2017-12-01

    A one-dimensional reservoir stratification modeling has been developed as part of Model for Scale Adaptive River Transport (MOSART), which is the river transport model used in the Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) and Community Earth System Model (CESM). Reservoirs play an important role in modulating the dynamic water, energy and biogeochemical cycles in the riverine system through nutrient sequestration and stratification. However, most earth system models include lake models that assume a simplified geometry featuring a constant depth and a constant surface area. As reservoir geometry has important effects on thermal stratification, we developed a new algorithm for deriving generic, stratified area-elevation-storage relationships that are applicable at regional and global scales using data from Global Reservoir and Dam database (GRanD). This new reservoir geometry dataset is then used to support the development of a reservoir stratification module within MOSART. The mixing of layers (energy and mass) in the reservoir is driven by eddy diffusion, vertical advection, and reservoir inflow and outflow. Upstream inflow into a reservoir is treated as an additional source/sink of energy, while downstream outflow represented a sink. Hourly atmospheric forcing from North American Land Assimilation System (NLDAS) Phase II and simulated daily runoff by ACME land component are used as inputs for the model over the contiguous United States for simulations between 2001-2010. The model is validated using selected observed temperature profile data in a number of reservoirs that are subject to various levels of regulation. The reservoir stratification module completes the representation of riverine mass and heat transfer in earth system models, which is a major step towards quantitative understanding of human influences on the terrestrial hydrological, ecological and biogeochemical cycles.

  16. Heat simulation via Scilab programming

    Hasan, Mohammad Khatim; Sulaiman, Jumat; Karim, Samsul Arifin Abdul

    2014-07-01

    This paper discussed the used of an open source sofware called Scilab to develop a heat simulator. In this paper, heat equation was used to simulate heat behavior in an object. The simulator was developed using finite difference method. Numerical experiment output show that Scilab can produce a good heat behavior simulation with marvellous visual output with only developing simple computer code.

  17. Parallel reservoir simulator computations

    Hemanth-Kumar, K.; Young, L.C.

    1995-01-01

    The adaptation of a reservoir simulator for parallel computations is described. The simulator was originally designed for vector processors. It performs approximately 99% of its calculations in vector/parallel mode and relative to scalar calculations it achieves speedups of 65 and 81 for black oil and EOS simulations, respectively on the CRAY C-90

  18. unconventional natural gas reservoirs

    Correa G, Tomas F; Osorio, Nelson; Restrepo R, Dora P

    2009-01-01

    This work is an exploration about different unconventional gas reservoirs worldwide: coal bed methane, tight gas, shale gas and gas hydrate? describing aspects such as definition, reserves, production methods, environmental issues and economics. The overview also mentioned preliminary studies about these sources in Colombia.

  19. Performance of thermal solvent process in Athabasca reservoir

    Das, Swapan [Marathon Oil (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In the petroleum industry, due to depletion of conventional resources and high demand operators are looking into heavy oil and bitumen production. Different recovery methods exist, some of them based on heating the reservoir and others on the use of solvent. Thermal solvent process is a combination of both: a small amount of heat is used to maintain a solvent vapor phase in the reservoir. This process has advantages, solvent is mostly recycled which increases bitumen recovery efficiency and reduces the need for fresh solvent, but it also poses challenges, such as maintaining a vapor chamber and the fact that solvent solubility might be affected by heating. The aim of this paper is to discuss these issues. Simulations and field tests were conducted on bitumen in the the Athabasca region. This paper presented a thermal solvent process and its application's results in Athabasca reservoir.

  20. Finite-volume scheme for anisotropic diffusion

    Es, Bram van, E-mail: bramiozo@gmail.com [Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica, P.O. Box 94079, 1090GB Amsterdam (Netherlands); FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, The Netherlands" 1 (Netherlands); Koren, Barry [Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Blank, Hugo J. de [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, The Netherlands" 1 (Netherlands)

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we apply a special finite-volume scheme, limited to smooth temperature distributions and Cartesian grids, to test the importance of connectivity of the finite volumes. The area of application is nuclear fusion plasma with field line aligned temperature gradients and extreme anisotropy. We apply the scheme to the anisotropic heat-conduction equation, and compare its results with those of existing finite-volume schemes for anisotropic diffusion. Also, we introduce a general model adaptation of the steady diffusion equation for extremely anisotropic diffusion problems with closed field lines.

  1. Design of a lube oil reservoir by using flow calculations

    Rinkinen, J; Alfthan, A. [Institute of Hydraulics and Automation IHA, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland)] Suominen, J. [Institute of Energy and Process Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland); Airaksinen, A; Antila, K [R and D Engineer Safematic Oy, Muurame (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    The volume of usual oil reservoir for lubrication oil systems is designed by the traditional rule of thumb so that the total oil volume is theoretically changed in every 30 minutes by rated pumping capacity. This is commonly used settling time for air, water and particles to separate by gravity from the oil returning of the bearings. This leads to rather big volumes of lube oil reservoirs, which are sometimes difficult to situate in different applications. In this presentation traditionally sized lube oil reservoir (8 m{sup 3}) is modelled in rectangular coordinates and laminar oil flow is calculated by using FLUENT software that is based on finite difference method. The results of calculation are velocity and temperature fields inside the reservoir. The velocity field is used to visualize different particle paths through the reservoir. Particles that are studied by the model are air bubbles and water droplets. The interest of the study has been to define the size of the air bubbles that are released and the size of the water droplets that are separated in the reservoir. The velocity field is also used to calculate the modelled circulating time of the oil volume which is then compared with the theoretical circulating time that is obtained from the rated pump flow. These results have been used for designing a new lube oil reservoir. This reservoir has also been modelled and optimized by the aid of flow calculations. The best shape of the designed reservoir is constructed in real size for empirical measurements. Some results of the oil flow measurements are shown. (orig.) 7 refs.

  2. Design of a lube oil reservoir by using flow calculations

    Rinkinen, J.; Alfthan, A. [Institute of Hydraulics and Automation IHA, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland)] Suominen, J. [Institute of Energy and Process Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland); Airaksinen, A.; Antila, K. [R and D Engineer Safematic Oy, Muurame (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The volume of usual oil reservoir for lubrication oil systems is designed by the traditional rule of thumb so that the total oil volume is theoretically changed in every 30 minutes by rated pumping capacity. This is commonly used settling time for air, water and particles to separate by gravity from the oil returning of the bearings. This leads to rather big volumes of lube oil reservoirs, which are sometimes difficult to situate in different applications. In this presentation traditionally sized lube oil reservoir (8 m{sup 3}) is modelled in rectangular coordinates and laminar oil flow is calculated by using FLUENT software that is based on finite difference method. The results of calculation are velocity and temperature fields inside the reservoir. The velocity field is used to visualize different particle paths through the reservoir. Particles that are studied by the model are air bubbles and water droplets. The interest of the study has been to define the size of the air bubbles that are released and the size of the water droplets that are separated in the reservoir. The velocity field is also used to calculate the modelled circulating time of the oil volume which is then compared with the theoretical circulating time that is obtained from the rated pump flow. These results have been used for designing a new lube oil reservoir. This reservoir has also been modelled and optimized by the aid of flow calculations. The best shape of the designed reservoir is constructed in real size for empirical measurements. Some results of the oil flow measurements are shown. (orig.) 7 refs.

  3. High intensity heat pulse problem

    Yalamanchili, R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of finite-difference methods for the solution of partial differential equations is common in both design and research and development because of the advance of computers. The numerical methods for the unsteady heat diffusion equation received most attention not only because of heat transfer problems but also happened to be the basis for any study of parabolic partial differential equations. It is common to test the heat equation first even the methods developed for complex nonlinear parabolic partial differential equations arising in fluid mechanics or convective heat transfer. It is concluded that the finite-element method is conservative in both stability and monoscillation characteristics than the finite-difference method but not as conservative as the method of weighted-residuals. Since the finite-element is unique because of Gurtin's variational principle and numerous finite-differences can be constructed, it is found that some finite-difference schemes are better than the finite-element scheme in accuracy also. Therefore, further attention is focused here on finite-difference schemes only. Various physical problems are considered in the field of heat transfer. These include: numerous problems in steady and unsteady heat conduction; heat pulse problems, such as, plasma torch; problems arising from machining operations, such as, abrasive cut-off and surface grinding. (Auth.)

  4. APPLICATION OF INTEGRATED RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Jack Bergeron; Tom Blasingame; Louis Doublet; Mohan Kelkar; George Freeman; Jeff Callard; David Moore; David Davies; Richard Vessell; Brian Pregger; Bill Dixon; Bryce Bezant

    2000-03-01

    Reservoir performance and characterization are vital parameters during the development phase of a project. Infill drilling of wells on a uniform spacing, without regard to characterization does not optimize development because it fails to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, especially carbonate reservoirs. These reservoirs are typically characterized by: (1) large, discontinuous pay intervals; (2) vertical and lateral changes in reservoir properties; (3) low reservoir energy; (4) high residual oil saturation; and (5) low recovery efficiency. The operational problems they encounter in these types of reservoirs include: (1) poor or inadequate completions and stimulations; (2) early water breakthrough; (3) poor reservoir sweep efficiency in contacting oil throughout the reservoir as well as in the nearby well regions; (4) channeling of injected fluids due to preferential fracturing caused by excessive injection rates; and (5) limited data availability and poor data quality. Infill drilling operations only need target areas of the reservoir which will be economically successful. If the most productive areas of a reservoir can be accurately identified by combining the results of geological, petrophysical, reservoir performance, and pressure transient analyses, then this ''integrated'' approach can be used to optimize reservoir performance during secondary and tertiary recovery operations without resorting to ''blanket'' infill drilling methods. New and emerging technologies such as geostatistical modeling, rock typing, and rigorous decline type curve analysis can be used to quantify reservoir quality and the degree of interwell communication. These results can then be used to develop a 3-D simulation model for prediction of infill locations. The application of reservoir surveillance techniques to identify additional reservoir ''pay'' zones

  5. A finite landscape?

    Acharya, B.S.; Douglas, M.R.

    2006-06-01

    We present evidence that the number of string/M theory vacua consistent with experiments is finite. We do this both by explicit analysis of infinite sequences of vacua and by applying various mathematical finiteness theorems. (author)

  6. Nilpotent -local finite groups

    Cantarero, José; Scherer, Jérôme; Viruel, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    We provide characterizations of -nilpotency for fusion systems and -local finite groups that are inspired by known result for finite groups. In particular, we generalize criteria by Atiyah, Brunetti, Frobenius, Quillen, Stammbach and Tate.

  7. Behaviour of gas production from type 3 hydrate reservoirs

    Pooladi-Darvish, M. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering]|[Fekete Associates Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); Zatsepina, O. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; Hong, H. [Fekete Associates Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The possible role of gas hydrates as a potential energy resource was discussed with particular reference to methods for estimating the rate of gas production from hydrate reservoirs under different operating conditions. This paper presented several numerical simulations studies of gas production from type 3 hydrate reservoirs in 1-D and 2-D geometries. Type 3 reservoirs include gas production from hydrate-reservoirs that lie totally within the hydrate stability zone and are sandwiched by impermeable layers on top and bottom. The purpose of this study was to better understand hydrate decomposition by depressurization. The study questioned whether 1-D modeling of type 3 hydrate reservoirs is a reasonable approximation. It also determined whether gas rate increases or decreases with time. The important reservoir characteristics for determining the rate of gas production were identified. Last, the study determined how competition between fluid and heat flow affects hydrate decomposition. This paper also described the relation and interaction between the heat and fluid flow mechanisms in depressurization of type 3 hydrate reservoirs. All results of 1-D and 2-D numerical simulation and analyses were generated using the STARS simulator. It was shown that the rate of gas production depends on the initial pressure/temperature conditions and permeability of the hydrate bearing formation. A high peak rate may be achieved under favourable conditions, but this peak rate is obtained after an initial period where the rate of gas production increases with time. The heat transfer in the direction perpendicular to the direction of fluid flow is significant, requiring 2D modeling. The hydraulic diffusivity is low because of the low permeability of hydrate-bearing formations. This could result in competition between heat and fluid flow, thereby influencing the behaviour of decomposition. 6 refs., 3 tabs., 12 figs.

  8. Basic Finite Element Method

    Lee, Byeong Hae

    1992-02-01

    This book gives descriptions of basic finite element method, which includes basic finite element method and data, black box, writing of data, definition of VECTOR, definition of matrix, matrix and multiplication of matrix, addition of matrix, and unit matrix, conception of hardness matrix like spring power and displacement, governed equation of an elastic body, finite element method, Fortran method and programming such as composition of computer, order of programming and data card and Fortran card, finite element program and application of nonelastic problem.

  9. Composite Finite Sums

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, we extend the previous results of Chap. 2 to the more general case of composite finite sums. We describe what composite finite sums are and how their analysis can be reduced to the analysis of simple finite sums using the chain rule. We apply these techniques, next, on numerical integration and on some identities of Ramanujan.

  10. Composite Finite Sums

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    In this chapter, we extend the previous results of Chap. 2 to the more general case of composite finite sums. We describe what composite finite sums are and how their analysis can be reduced to the analysis of simple finite sums using the chain rule. We apply these techniques, next, on numerical integration and on some identities of Ramanujan.

  11. Chalk as a reservoir

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    , and the best reservoir properties are typically found in mudstone intervals. Chalk mudstones vary a lot though. The best mudstones are purely calcitic, well sorted and may have been redeposited by traction currents. Other mudstones are rich in very fine grained silica, which takes up pore space and thus...... basin, so stylolite formation in the chalk is controlled by effective burial stress. The stylolites are zones of calcite dissolution and probably are the source of calcite for porefilling cementation which is typical in water zone chalk and also affect the reservoirs to different extent. The relatively...... have hardly any stylolites and can have porosity above 40% or even 50% and thus also have relatively high permeability. Such intervals have the problem though, that increasing effective stress caused by hydrocarbon production results in mechanical compaction and overall subsidence. Most other chalk...

  12. Work reservoirs in thermodynamics

    Anacleto, Joaquim

    2010-01-01

    We stress the usefulness of the work reservoir in the formalism of thermodynamics, in particular in the context of the first law. To elucidate its usefulness, the formalism is then applied to the Joule expansion and other peculiar and instructive experimental situations, clarifying the concepts of configuration and dissipative work. The ideas and discussions presented in this study are primarily intended for undergraduate students, but they might also be useful to graduate students, researchers and teachers.

  13. Work reservoirs in thermodynamics

    Anacleto, Joaquim

    2010-05-01

    We stress the usefulness of the work reservoir in the formalism of thermodynamics, in particular in the context of the first law. To elucidate its usefulness, the formalism is then applied to the Joule expansion and other peculiar and instructive experimental situations, clarifying the concepts of configuration and dissipative work. The ideas and discussions presented in this study are primarily intended for undergraduate students, but they might also be useful to graduate students, researchers and teachers.

  14. Ecological optimization and parametric study of irreversible Stirling and Ericsson heat pumps

    Tyagi, S.K.; Kaushik, S.C.; Salohtra, R.

    2002-01-01

    This communication presents the ecological optimization and parametric study of irreversible Stirling and Ericsson heat pump cycles, in which the external irreversibility is due to finite temperature difference between working fluid and external reservoirs while the internal irreversibilities are due to regenerative heat loss and other entropy generations within the cycle. The ecological function is defined as the heating load minus the irreversibility (power loss) which is ambient temperature times the entropy generation. The ecological function is optimized with respect to working fluid temperatures, and the expressions for various parameters at the optimal operating condition are obtained. The effects of different operating parameters on the performance of these cycles have been studied. It is found that the effect of internal irreversibility parameter is more pronounced than the other parameters on the performance of these cycles. (author)

  15. Advantageous Reservoir Characterization Technology in Extra Low Permeability Oil Reservoirs

    Yutian Luo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper took extra low permeability reservoirs in Dagang Liujianfang Oilfield as an example and analyzed different types of microscopic pore structures by SEM, casting thin sections fluorescence microscope, and so on. With adoption of rate-controlled mercury penetration, NMR, and some other advanced techniques, based on evaluation parameters, namely, throat radius, volume percentage of mobile fluid, start-up pressure gradient, and clay content, the classification and assessment method of extra low permeability reservoirs was improved and the parameter boundaries of the advantageous reservoirs were established. The physical properties of reservoirs with different depth are different. Clay mineral variation range is 7.0%, and throat radius variation range is 1.81 μm, and start pressure gradient range is 0.23 MPa/m, and movable fluid percentage change range is 17.4%. The class IV reservoirs account for 9.56%, class II reservoirs account for 12.16%, and class III reservoirs account for 78.29%. According to the comparison of different development methods, class II reservoir is most suitable for waterflooding development, and class IV reservoir is most suitable for gas injection development. Taking into account the gas injection in the upper section of the reservoir, the next section of water injection development will achieve the best results.

  16. Radiative Heat Transfer in Combustion Applications: Parallel Efficiencies of Two Gas Models, Turbulent Radiation Interactions in Particulate Laden Flows, and Coarse Mesh Finite Difference Acceleration for Improved Temporal Accuracy

    Cleveland, Mathew A.

    initialization. The TRI effects are very sensitive to the initialization of the turbulence in the system. The TRI parameters are somewhat sensitive to the treatment of particulate temperature and the particulate optical thickness, and this effect are amplified by increased particulate loading. Monte Carlo radiative heat transfer simulations of time-dependent combustion processes generally involve an explicit evaluation of emission source because of the expense of the transport solver. Recently, Park et al. [5] have applied quasi-diffusion with Monte Carlo in high energy density radiative transfer applications. We employ a Crank-Nicholson temporal integration scheme in conjunction with the coarse mesh finite difference (CMFD) method, in an effort to improve the temporal accuracy of the Monte Carlo solver. Our results show that this CMFD-CN method is an improvement over Monte Carlo with CMFD time-differenced via Backward Euler, and Implicit Monte Carlo [6] (IMC). The increase in accuracy involves very little increase in computational cost, and the figure of merit for the CMFD-CN scheme is greater than IMC.

  17. Ensemble-Based Data Assimilation in Reservoir Characterization: A Review

    Seungpil Jung

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of ensemble-based data assimilation for strongly nonlinear problems on the characterization of heterogeneous reservoirs with different production histories. It concentrates on ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF and ensemble smoother (ES as representative frameworks, discusses their pros and cons, and investigates recent progress to overcome their drawbacks. The typical weaknesses of ensemble-based methods are non-Gaussian parameters, improper prior ensembles and finite population size. Three categorized approaches, to mitigate these limitations, are reviewed with recent accomplishments; improvement of Kalman gains, add-on of transformation functions, and independent evaluation of observed data. The data assimilation in heterogeneous reservoirs, applying the improved ensemble methods, is discussed on predicting unknown dynamic data in reservoir characterization.

  18. Population dynamics of excited atoms in non-Markovian environments at zero and finite temperature

    Zou Hong-Mei; Fang Mao-Fa

    2015-01-01

    The population dynamics of a two-atom system, which is in two independent Lorentzian reservoirs or in two independent Ohmic reservoirs respectively, where the reservoirs are at zero temperature or finite temperature, is studied by using the time-convolutionless master-equation method. The influences of the characteristics and temperature of a non-Markovian environment on the population of the excited atoms are analyzed. We find that the population trapping of the excited atoms is related to the characteristics and the temperature of the non-Markovian environment. The results show that, at zero temperature, the two atoms can be effectively trapped in the excited state both in the Lorentzian reservoirs and in the Ohmic reservoirs. At finite temperature, the population of the excited atoms will quickly decay to a nonzero value. (paper)

  19. The Impact of Dam-Reservoir-Foundation Interaction on Nonlinear Response of Concrete Gravity Dams

    Amini, Ali Reza; Motamedi, Mohammad Hossein; Ghaemian, Mohsen

    2008-01-01

    To study the impact of dam-reservoir-foundation interaction on nonlinear response of concrete gravity dams, a two-dimensional finite element model of a concrete gravity dam including the dam body, a part of its foundation and a part of the reservoir was made. In addition, the proper boundary conditions were used in both reservoir and foundation in order to absorb the energy of outgoing waves at the far end boundaries. Using the finite element method and smeared crack approach, some different seismic nonlinear analyses were done and finally, we came to a conclusion that the consideration of dam-reservoir-foundation interaction in nonlinear analysis of concrete dams is of great importance, because from the performance point of view, this interaction significantly improves the nonlinear response of concrete dams

  20. Estimation of oil reservoir thermal properties through temperature log data using inversion method

    Cheng, Wen-Long; Nian, Yong-Le; Li, Tong-Tong; Wang, Chang-Long

    2013-01-01

    Oil reservoir thermal properties not only play an important role in steam injection well heat transfer, but also are the basic parameters for evaluating the oil saturation in reservoir. In this study, for estimating reservoir thermal properties, a novel heat and mass transfer model of steam injection well was established at first, this model made full analysis on the wellbore-reservoir heat and mass transfer as well as the wellbore-formation, and the simulated results by the model were quite consistent with the log data. Then this study presented an effective inversion method for estimating the reservoir thermal properties through temperature log data. This method is based on the heat transfer model in steam injection wells, and can be used to predict the thermal properties as a stochastic approximation method. The inversion method was applied to estimate the reservoir thermal properties of two steam injection wells, it was found that the relative error of thermal conductivity for the two wells were 2.9% and 6.5%, and the relative error of volumetric specific heat capacity were 6.7% and 7.0%,which demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed method for estimating the reservoir thermal properties. - Highlights: • An effective inversion method for predicting the oil reservoir thermal properties was presented. • A novel model for steam injection well made full study on the wellbore-reservoir heat and mass transfer. • The wellbore temperature field and steam parameters can be simulated by the model efficiently. • Both reservoirs and formation thermal properties could be estimated simultaneously by the proposed method. • The estimated steam temperature was quite consistent with the field data

  1. Finite element modelling of solidification phenomena

    Unknown

    Abstract. The process of solidification process is complex in nature and the simulation of such process is required in industry before it is actually undertaken. Finite element method is used to simulate the heat transfer process accompanying the solidification process. The metal and the mould along with the air gap formation ...

  2. Phase transition in finite systems

    Chomaz, Ph.; Duflot, V.; Duflot, V.; Gulminelli, F.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present a review of selected aspects of Phase transitions in finite systems applied in particular to the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei. We show that the problem of the non existence of boundary conditions can be solved by introducing a statistical ensemble with an averaged constrained volume. In such an ensemble the microcanonical heat capacity becomes negative in the transition region. We show that the caloric curve explicitly depends on the considered transformation of the volume with the excitation energy and so does not bear direct informations on the characteristics of the phase transition. Conversely, partial energy fluctuations are demonstrated to be a direct measure of the equation of state. Since the heat capacity has a negative branch in the phase transition region, the presence of abnormally large kinetic energy fluctuations is a signal of the liquid gas phase transition. (author)

  3. Thermodynamics in finite time: A chemically driven engine

    Ondrechen, M.J.; Berry, R.S.; Andresen, B.

    1980-01-01

    The methods of finite time thermodynamics are applied to processes whose relaxation parameters are chemical rate coefficients within the working fluid. The direct optimization formalism used previously for heat engines with friction and finite heat transfer rates: termed the tricycle method: is extended to heat engines driven by exothermic reactions. The model is a flow reactor coupled by a heat exchanger to an engine. Conditions are established for the achievement of maximum power from such a system. Emphasis is on how the chemical kinetics control the finite-time thermodynamic extrema; first order, first order reversible, and second order reaction kinetics are analyzed. For the types of reactions considered here, there is always a finite positive flow rate in the reactor that yields maximum engine power. Maximum fuel efficiency is always attained in these systems at the uninteresting limit of zero flow rate

  4. Advances in photonic reservoir computing

    Van der Sande, Guy; Brunner, Daniel; Soriano, Miguel C.

    2017-05-01

    We review a novel paradigm that has emerged in analogue neuromorphic optical computing. The goal is to implement a reservoir computer in optics, where information is encoded in the intensity and phase of the optical field. Reservoir computing is a bio-inspired approach especially suited for processing time-dependent information. The reservoir's complex and high-dimensional transient response to the input signal is capable of universal computation. The reservoir does not need to be trained, which makes it very well suited for optics. As such, much of the promise of photonic reservoirs lies in their minimal hardware requirements, a tremendous advantage over other hardware-intensive neural network models. We review the two main approaches to optical reservoir computing: networks implemented with multiple discrete optical nodes and the continuous system of a single nonlinear device coupled to delayed feedback.

  5. An introduction to the UNCLE finite element scheme

    Enderby, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    UNCLE is a completely general finite element scheme which provides common input, output, equation-solving and other facilities for a family of finite element codes for linear and non-linear stress analysis, heat transfer etc. This report describes the concepts on which UNCLE is based and gives a general account of the facilities provided. (author)

  6. Finite element simulation of laser transmission welding of dissimilar ...

    user

    materials between polyvinylidene fluoride and titanium ... finite element (FE) thermal model is developed to simulate the laser ... Keywords: Laser transmission welding, Temperature field, Weld dimension, Finite element analysis, Thermal modeling. 1. .... 4) The heating phenomena due to the phase changes are neglected.

  7. An introduction to the UNCLE finite element scheme

    Enderby, J A [UK Atomic Energy Authority, Northern Division, Risley Nuclear Power Development Establishment, Risley, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    1983-05-01

    UNCLE is a completely general finite element scheme which provides common input, output, equation-solving and other facilities for a family of finite element codes for linear and non-linear stress analysis, heat transfer etc. This report describes the concepts on which UNCLE is based and gives a general account of the facilities provided. (author)

  8. Introduction to heat transfer

    Weisman, J.

    1983-01-01

    Heat may be defined as that form of energy which spontaneously flows between two bodies, or two regions of a body, by virtue of a temperature difference. The second law of thermodynamics tells us that we cannot have heat flow from a low temperature to high temperature without doing work. Heat flows spontaneously from a high temperature to a low temperature region. Thermodynamics, which is concerned with equilibrium states, cannot tell us anything about the rate of heat flow in the presence of a finite temperature difference. It is to the discipline of heat transfer to which we must turn for this answer

  9. BASIMO - Borehole Heat Exchanger Array Simulation and Optimization Tool

    Schulte, Daniel O.; Bastian, Welsch; Wolfram, Rühaak; Kristian, Bär; Ingo, Sass

    2017-04-01

    Arrays of borehole heat exchangers are an increasingly popular source for renewable energy. Furthermore, they can serve as borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) systems for seasonally fluctuating heat sources like solar thermal energy or district heating grids. The high temperature level of these heat sources prohibits the use of the shallow subsurface for environmental reasons. Therefore, deeper reservoirs have to be accessed instead. The increased depth of the systems results in high investment costs and has hindered the implementation of this technology until now. Therefore, research of medium deep BTES systems relies on numerical simulation models. Current simulation tools cannot - or only to some extent - describe key features like partly insulated boreholes unless they run fully discretized models of the borehole heat exchangers. However, fully discretized models often come at a high computational cost, especially for large arrays of borehole heat exchangers. We give an update on the development of BASIMO: a tool, which uses one dimensional thermal resistance and capacity models for the borehole heat exchangers coupled with a numerical finite element model for the subsurface heat transport in a dual-continuum approach. An unstructured tetrahedral mesh bypasses the limitations of structured grids for borehole path geometries, while the thermal resistance and capacity model is improved to account for borehole heat exchanger properties changing with depth. Thereby, partly insulated boreholes can be considered in the model. Furthermore, BASIMO can be used to improve the design of BTES systems: the tool allows for automated parameter variations and is readily coupled to other code like mathematical optimization algorithms. Optimization can be used to determine the required minimum system size or to increase the system performance.

  10. Encapsulated microsensors for reservoir interrogation

    Scott, Eddie Elmer; Aines, Roger D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.

    2016-03-08

    In one general embodiment, a system includes at least one microsensor configured to detect one or more conditions of a fluidic medium of a reservoir; and a receptacle, wherein the receptacle encapsulates the at least one microsensor. In another general embodiment, a method include injecting the encapsulated at least one microsensor as recited above into a fluidic medium of a reservoir; and detecting one or more conditions of the fluidic medium of the reservoir.

  11. All-optical reservoir computing.

    Duport, François; Schneider, Bendix; Smerieri, Anteo; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2012-09-24

    Reservoir Computing is a novel computing paradigm that uses a nonlinear recurrent dynamical system to carry out information processing. Recent electronic and optoelectronic Reservoir Computers based on an architecture with a single nonlinear node and a delay loop have shown performance on standardized tasks comparable to state-of-the-art digital implementations. Here we report an all-optical implementation of a Reservoir Computer, made of off-the-shelf components for optical telecommunications. It uses the saturation of a semiconductor optical amplifier as nonlinearity. The present work shows that, within the Reservoir Computing paradigm, all-optical computing with state-of-the-art performance is possible.

  12. Fractional finite Fourier transform.

    Khare, Kedar; George, Nicholas

    2004-07-01

    We show that a fractional version of the finite Fourier transform may be defined by using prolate spheroidal wave functions of order zero. The transform is linear and additive in its index and asymptotically goes over to Namias's definition of the fractional Fourier transform. As a special case of this definition, it is shown that the finite Fourier transform may be inverted by using information over a finite range of frequencies in Fourier space, the inversion being sensitive to noise. Numerical illustrations for both forward (fractional) and inverse finite transforms are provided.

  13. Finite quantum field theories

    Lucha, W.; Neufeld, H.

    1986-01-01

    We investigate the relation between finiteness of a four-dimensional quantum field theory and global supersymmetry. To this end we consider the most general quantum field theory and analyse the finiteness conditions resulting from the requirement of the absence of divergent contributions to the renormalizations of the parameters of the theory. In addition to the gauge bosons, both fermions and scalar bosons turn out to be a necessary ingredient in a non-trivial finite gauge theory. In all cases discussed, the supersymmetric theory restricted by two well-known constraints on the dimensionless couplings proves to be the unique solution of the finiteness conditions. (Author)

  14. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    Ku, Jentung

    2016-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The startup transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe startup behaviors. Topics include the four startup scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the startup scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power startup, and methods to enhance the startup success. Also addressed are the pressure spike and pressure surge during the startup transient, and repeated cycles of loop startup and shutdown under certain conditions.

  15. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Ghassemi, Ahmad [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2017-08-11

    The objective of this is to develop a 3-D numerical model for simulating mode I, II, and III (tensile, shear, and out-of-plane) propagation of multiple fractures and fracture clusters to accurately predict geothermal reservoir stimulation using the virtual multi-dimensional internal bond (VMIB). Effective development of enhanced geothermal systems can significantly benefit from improved modeling of hydraulic fracturing. In geothermal reservoirs, where the temperature can reach or exceed 350oC, thermal and poro-mechanical processes play an important role in fracture initiation and propagation. In this project hydraulic fracturing of hot subsurface rock mass will be numerically modeled by extending the virtual multiple internal bond theory and implementing it in a finite element code, WARP3D, a three-dimensional finite element code for solid mechanics. The new constitutive model along with the poro-thermoelastic computational algorithms will allow modeling the initiation and propagation of clusters of fractures, and extension of pre-existing fractures. The work will enable the industry to realistically model stimulation of geothermal reservoirs. The project addresses the Geothermal Technologies Office objective of accurately predicting geothermal reservoir stimulation (GTO technology priority item). The project goal will be attained by: (i) development of the VMIB method for application to 3D analysis of fracture clusters; (ii) development of poro- and thermoelastic material sub-routines for use in 3D finite element code WARP3D; (iii) implementation of VMIB and the new material routines in WARP3D to enable simulation of clusters of fractures while accounting for the effects of the pore pressure, thermal stress and inelastic deformation; (iv) simulation of 3D fracture propagation and coalescence and formation of clusters, and comparison with laboratory compression tests; and (v) application of the model to interpretation of injection experiments (planned by our

  16. Reservoir souring: it is all about risk mitigation

    Kuijvenhoven, Cor [Shell (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The presence of H2S in produced fluid can be due to various sources, among which are heat/rock interaction and leaks from other reservoirs. This paper discusses the reasons, risk assessment and tools for mitigating reservoir souring. Uncontrolled microorganism activity can cause a sweet reservoir (without H2S) to become sour (production of H2S). The development of bacteria is one of the main causes of reservoir souring in unconventional gas fields. It is difficult to predict souring in seawater due to produced water re-injection (PWRI). Risk assessment and modeling techniques for reservoir souring are discussed. Some of the factors controlling H2S production include injection location, presence of scavenging minerals and biogenic souring. Mitigation methods such as biocide treatment of injection water, sulphate removal from seawater, microbial monitoring techniques such as the molecular microbiology method (MMM), and enumeration by serial dilution are explained. In summary, it can be concluded that reservoir souring is a long-term problem and should be assessed at the beginning of operations.

  17. Reservoir engineering and hydrogeology

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Summaries are included which show advances in the following areas: fractured porous media, flow in single fractures or networks of fractures, hydrothermal flow, hydromechanical effects, hydrochemical processes, unsaturated-saturated systems, and multiphase multicomponent flows. The main thrust of these efforts is to understand the movement of mass and energy through rocks. This has involved treating fracture rock masses in which the flow phenomena within both the fractures and the matrix must be investigated. Studies also address the complex coupling between aspects of thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical processes associated with a nuclear waste repository in a fractured rock medium. In all these projects, both numerical modeling and simulation, as well as field studies, were employed. In the theoretical area, a basic understanding of multiphase flow, nonisothermal unsaturated behavior, and new numerical methods have been developed. The field work has involved reservoir testing, data analysis, and case histories at a number of geothermal projects

  18. FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    1999-06-11

    The four chapters that are described in this report cover a variety of subjects that not only give insight into the understanding of multiphase flow in fractured porous media, but they provide also major contribution towards the understanding of flow processes with in-situ phase formation. In the following, a summary of all the chapters will be provided. Chapter I addresses issues related to water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. There are two parts in this chapter. Part I covers extensive set of measurements for water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. Both single matrix block and multiple matrix blocks tests are covered. There are two major findings from these experiments: (1) co-current imbibition can be more efficient than counter-current imbibition due to lower residual oil saturation and higher oil mobility, and (2) tight fractured porous media can be more efficient than a permeable porous media when subjected to water injection. These findings are directly related to the type of tests one can perform in the laboratory and to decide on the fate of water injection in fractured reservoirs. Part II of Chapter I presents modeling of water injection in water-wet fractured media by modifying the Buckley-Leverett Theory. A major element of the new model is the multiplication of the transfer flux by the fractured saturation with a power of 1/2. This simple model can account for both co-current and counter-current imbibition and computationally it is very efficient. It can be orders of magnitude faster than a conventional dual-porosity model. Part II also presents the results of water injection tests in very tight rocks of some 0.01 md permeability. Oil recovery from water imbibition tests from such at tight rock can be as high as 25 percent. Chapter II discusses solution gas-drive for cold production from heavy-oil reservoirs. The impetus for this work is the study of new gas phase formation from in-situ process which can be significantly

  19. Reservoir sedimentation; a literature survey

    Sloff, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of literature is made on reservoir sedimentation, one of the most threatening processes for world-wide reservoir performance. The sedimentation processes, their impacts, and their controlling factors are assessed from a hydraulic engineering point of view with special emphasis on

  20. Finite Boltzmann schemes

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    In the special case of relaxation parameter = 1 lattice Boltzmann schemes for (convection) diffusion and fluid flow are equivalent to finite difference/volume (FD) schemes, and are thus coined finite Boltzmann (FB) schemes. We show that the equivalence is inherent to the homology of the

  1. Designs and finite geometries

    1996-01-01

    Designs and Finite Geometries brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this important area of mathematics. Designs and Finite Geometries serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most important research issues in the field.

  2. Supersymmetric theories and finiteness

    Helayel-Neto, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    We attempt here to present a short survey of the all-order finite Lagrangian field theories known at present in four-and two-dimensional space-times. The question of the possible relevance of these ultraviolet finite models in the formulation of consistent unified frameworks for the fundamental forces is also addressed to. (author)

  3. Simple Finite Sums

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    We will begin our treatment of summability calculus by analyzing what will be referred to, throughout this book, as simple finite sums. Even though the results of this chapter are particular cases of the more general results presented in later chapters, they are important to start with for a few reasons. First, this chapter serves as an excellent introduction to what summability calculus can markedly accomplish. Second, simple finite sums are encountered more often and, hence, they deserve special treatment. Third, the results presented in this chapter for simple finite sums will, themselves, be used as building blocks for deriving the most general results in subsequent chapters. Among others, we establish that fractional finite sums are well-defined mathematical objects and show how various identities related to the Euler constant as well as the Riemann zeta function can actually be derived in an elementary manner using fractional finite sums.

  4. Simple Finite Sums

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-01-01

    We will begin our treatment of summability calculus by analyzing what will be referred to, throughout this book, as simple finite sums. Even though the results of this chapter are particular cases of the more general results presented in later chapters, they are important to start with for a few reasons. First, this chapter serves as an excellent introduction to what summability calculus can markedly accomplish. Second, simple finite sums are encountered more often and, hence, they deserve special treatment. Third, the results presented in this chapter for simple finite sums will, themselves, be used as building blocks for deriving the most general results in subsequent chapters. Among others, we establish that fractional finite sums are well-defined mathematical objects and show how various identities related to the Euler constant as well as the Riemann zeta function can actually be derived in an elementary manner using fractional finite sums.

  5. Finite fields and applications

    Mullen, Gary L

    2007-01-01

    This book provides a brief and accessible introduction to the theory of finite fields and to some of their many fascinating and practical applications. The first chapter is devoted to the theory of finite fields. After covering their construction and elementary properties, the authors discuss the trace and norm functions, bases for finite fields, and properties of polynomials over finite fields. Each of the remaining chapters details applications. Chapter 2 deals with combinatorial topics such as the construction of sets of orthogonal latin squares, affine and projective planes, block designs, and Hadamard matrices. Chapters 3 and 4 provide a number of constructions and basic properties of error-correcting codes and cryptographic systems using finite fields. Each chapter includes a set of exercises of varying levels of difficulty which help to further explain and motivate the material. Appendix A provides a brief review of the basic number theory and abstract algebra used in the text, as well as exercises rel...

  6. Advances in photonic reservoir computing

    Van der Sande Guy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We review a novel paradigm that has emerged in analogue neuromorphic optical computing. The goal is to implement a reservoir computer in optics, where information is encoded in the intensity and phase of the optical field. Reservoir computing is a bio-inspired approach especially suited for processing time-dependent information. The reservoir’s complex and high-dimensional transient response to the input signal is capable of universal computation. The reservoir does not need to be trained, which makes it very well suited for optics. As such, much of the promise of photonic reservoirs lies in their minimal hardware requirements, a tremendous advantage over other hardware-intensive neural network models. We review the two main approaches to optical reservoir computing: networks implemented with multiple discrete optical nodes and the continuous system of a single nonlinear device coupled to delayed feedback.

  7. Hydrothermal analysis in engineering using control volume finite element method

    Sheikholeslami, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Control volume finite element methods (CVFEM) bridge the gap between finite difference and finite element methods, using the advantages of both methods for simulation of multi-physics problems in complex geometries. In Hydrothermal Analysis in Engineering Using Control Volume Finite Element Method, CVFEM is covered in detail and applied to key areas of thermal engineering. Examples, exercises, and extensive references are used to show the use of the technique to model key engineering problems such as heat transfer in nanofluids (to enhance performance and compactness of energy systems),

  8. Geothermal reservoir simulation of hot sedimentary aquifer system using FEFLOW®

    Nur Hidayat, Hardi; Gala Permana, Maximillian

    2017-12-01

    The study presents the simulation of hot sedimentary aquifer for geothermal utilization. Hot sedimentary aquifer (HSA) is a conduction-dominated hydrothermal play type utilizing deep aquifer, which is heated by near normal heat flow. One of the examples of HSA is Bavarian Molasse Basin in South Germany. This system typically uses doublet wells: an injection and production well. The simulation was run for 3650 days of simulation time. The technical feasibility and performance are analysed in regards to the extracted energy from this concept. Several parameters are compared to determine the model performance. Parameters such as reservoir characteristics, temperature information and well information are defined. Several assumptions are also defined to simplify the simulation process. The main results of the simulation are heat period budget or total extracted heat energy, and heat rate budget or heat production rate. Qualitative approaches for sensitivity analysis are conducted by using five parameters in which assigned lower and higher value scenarios.

  9. Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.

    Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Gilbert, Bob (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Lake, Larry W. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Thomas, Sunil G. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Klie, Hector (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Banchs, Rafael (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Nunez, Emilio J. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Jablonowski, Chris (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX)

    2006-11-01

    The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging

  10. Single-particle stochastic heat engine

    Rana, Shubhashis; Pal, P. S.; Saha, Arnab; Jayannavar, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    We have performed an extensive analysis of a single-particle stochastic heat engine constructed by manipulating a Brownian particle in a time-dependent harmonic potential. The cycle consists of two isothermal steps at different temperatures and two adiabatic steps similar to that of a Carnot engine. The engine shows qualitative differences in inertial and overdamped regimes. All the thermodynamic quantities, including efficiency, exhibit strong fluctuations in a time periodic steady state. The fluctuations of stochastic efficiency dominate over the mean values even in the quasistatic regime. Interestingly, our system acts as an engine provided the temperature difference between the two reservoirs is greater than a finite critical value which in turn depends on the cycle time and other system parameters. This is supported by our analytical results carried out in the quasistatic regime. Our system works more reliably as an engine for large cycle times. By studying various model systems, we observe that the operational characteristics are model dependent. Our results clearly rule out any universal relation between efficiency at maximum power and temperature of the baths. We have also verified fluctuation relations for heat engines in time periodic steady state.

  11. Investigation of seasonal thermal flow in a real dam reservoir using 3-D numerical modeling

    Üneş Fatih

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigations indicate that correct estimation of seasonal thermal stratification in a dam reservoir is very important for the dam reservoir water quality modeling and water management problems. The main aim of this study is to develop a hydrodynamics model of an actual dam reservoir in three dimensions for simulating a real dam reservoir flows for different seasons. The model is developed using nonlinear and unsteady continuity, momentum, energy and k-ε turbulence model equations. In order to include the Coriolis force effect on the flow in a dam reservoir, Coriolis force parameter is also added the model equations. Those equations are constructed using actual dimensions, shape, boundary and initial conditions of the dam and reservoir. Temperature profiles and flow visualizations are used to evaluate flow conditions in the reservoir. Reservoir flow’s process and parameters are determined all over the reservoir. The mathematical model developed is capable of simulating the flow and thermal characteristics of the reservoir system for seasonal heat exchanges. Model simulations results obtained are compared with field measurements obtained from gauging stations for flows in different seasons. The results show a good agreement with the field measurements.

  12. Finite elements and approximation

    Zienkiewicz, O C

    2006-01-01

    A powerful tool for the approximate solution of differential equations, the finite element is extensively used in industry and research. This book offers students of engineering and physics a comprehensive view of the principles involved, with numerous illustrative examples and exercises.Starting with continuum boundary value problems and the need for numerical discretization, the text examines finite difference methods, weighted residual methods in the context of continuous trial functions, and piecewise defined trial functions and the finite element method. Additional topics include higher o

  13. Understanding the True Stimulated Reservoir Volume in Shale Reservoirs

    Hussain, Maaruf; Saad, Bilal; Negara, Ardiansyah; Sun, Shuyu

    2017-01-01

    Successful exploitation of shale reservoirs largely depends on the effectiveness of hydraulic fracturing stimulation program. Favorable results have been attributed to intersection and reactivation of pre-existing fractures by hydraulically

  14. Using outcrop data for geological well test modelling in fractured reservoirs

    Aljuboori, F.; Corbett, P.; Bisdom, K.; Bertotti, G.; Geiger, S.

    2015-01-01

    Outcrop fracture data sets can now be acquired with ever more accuracy using drone technology augmented by field observations. These models can be used to form realistic, deterministic models of fractured reservoirs. Fractured well test models are traditionally seen to be finite or infinite

  15. Generation of Werner-like stationary states of two qubits in a thermal reservoir

    Jakobczyk, Lech

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of entanglement between two-level atoms immersed in the common photon reservoir at finite temperature is investigated. It is shown that in the regime of strong correlations there are nontrivial asymptotic states which can be interpreted in terms of thermal generalization of Werner states.

  16. Generation of Werner-like stationary states of two qubits in a thermal reservoir

    Jakobczyk, Lech, E-mail: ljak@ift.uni.wroc.p [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Wroclaw, Plac Maxa Borna 9, 50-204 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2010-01-14

    The dynamics of entanglement between two-level atoms immersed in the common photon reservoir at finite temperature is investigated. It is shown that in the regime of strong correlations there are nontrivial asymptotic states which can be interpreted in terms of thermal generalization of Werner states.

  17. Multilevel techniques lead to accurate numerical upscaling and scalable robust solvers for reservoir simulation

    Christensen, Max la Cour; Villa, Umberto; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-01-01

    approach is well suited for the solution of large problems coming from finite element discretizations of systems of partial differential equations. The AMGe technique from 10,9 allows for the construction of operator-dependent coarse (upscaled) models and guarantees approximation properties of the coarse...... implementation of the reservoir simulator is demonstrated....

  18. Finite Amplitude Ocean Waves

    IAS Admin

    wavelength, they are called shallow water waves. In the ... Deep and intermediate water waves are dispersive as the velocity of these depends on wavelength. This is not the ..... generation processes, the finite amplitude wave theories are very ...

  19. Finite Discrete Gabor Analysis

    Søndergaard, Peter Lempel

    2007-01-01

    frequency bands at certain times. Gabor theory can be formulated for both functions on the real line and for discrete signals of finite length. The two theories are largely the same because many aspects come from the same underlying theory of locally compact Abelian groups. The two types of Gabor systems...... can also be related by sampling and periodization. This thesis extends on this theory by showing new results for window construction. It also provides a discussion of the problems associated to discrete Gabor bases. The sampling and periodization connection is handy because it allows Gabor systems...... on the real line to be well approximated by finite and discrete Gabor frames. This method of approximation is especially attractive because efficient numerical methods exists for doing computations with finite, discrete Gabor systems. This thesis presents new algorithms for the efficient computation of finite...

  20. Finite size scaling theory

    Rittenberg, V.

    1983-01-01

    Fischer's finite-size scaling describes the cross over from the singular behaviour of thermodynamic quantities at the critical point to the analytic behaviour of the finite system. Recent extensions of the method--transfer matrix technique, and the Hamiltonian formalism--are discussed in this paper. The method is presented, with equations deriving scaling function, critical temperature, and exponent v. As an application of the method, a 3-states Hamiltonian with Z 3 global symmetry is studied. Diagonalization of the Hamiltonian for finite chains allows one to estimate the critical exponents, and also to discover new phase transitions at lower temperatures. The critical points lambda, and indices v estimated for finite-scaling are given

  1. Phytoplankton distribution in three thermally distinct reactor cooling reservoirs

    Wilde, E.W.

    1983-01-01

    Phytoplankton community structure was studied in relation to physicochemical characteristics of three South Carolina reservoirs in close proximity and of similar age and bottom type. Thermal alteration, resulting from the input of cooling water from a nuclear reactor, was substantially different in each reservoir. This provided an opportunity to compare water temperature effects separated from season. Water temperature (when examined independently in statistical models) appeared to be less important than other environmental variables in determining phytoplankton community structure. Pond C, a reservoir receiving intensely heated effluent (> 20 0 C ΔT), displayed low species diversity (Shannon-Weaver H 0 C in summer. Par Pond, having a maximum ΔT of 5 0 C, displayed no temperature-induced alteration of phytoplankton community structure

  2. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    Clark, T.E.; Love, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Finite-temperature supersymmetry (SUSY) is characterized by unbroken Ward identities for SUSY variations of ensemble averages of Klein-operator inserted imaginary time-ordered products of fields. Path-integral representations of these products are defined and the Feynman rules in superspace are given. The finite-temperature no-renormalization theorem is derived. Spontaneously broken SUSY at zero temperature is shown not to be restored at high temperature. (orig.)

  3. Design Techniques and Reservoir Simulation

    Ahad Fereidooni

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced oil recovery using nitrogen injection is a commonly applied method for pressure maintenance in conventional reservoirs. Numerical simulations can be practiced for the prediction of a reservoir performance in the course of injection process; however, a detailed simulation might take up enormous computer processing time. In such cases, a simple statistical model may be a good approach to the preliminary prediction of the process without any application of numerical simulation. In the current work, seven rock/fluid reservoir properties are considered as screening parameters and those parameters having the most considerable effect on the process are determined using the combination of experimental design techniques and reservoir simulations. Therefore, the statistical significance of the main effects and interactions of screening parameters are analyzed utilizing statistical inference approaches. Finally, the influential parameters are employed to create a simple statistical model which allows the preliminary prediction of nitrogen injection in terms of a recovery factor without resorting to numerical simulations.

  4. The Characteristics of Spanish Reservoirs

    Armengol, J; Merce, R

    2003-01-01

    Sau Reservoir was first filled in 1963 in a middle stretch of the Ter River, as part of a multi-use scheme, including hydroelectric power, agricultural irrigation, domestic and industrial water supply...

  5. A Time Domain Update Method for Reservoir History Matching of Electromagnetic Data

    Katterbauer, Klemens

    2014-03-25

    The oil & gas industry has been the backbone of the world\\'s economy in the last century and will continue to be in the decades to come. With increasing demand and conventional reservoirs depleting, new oil industry projects have become more complex and expensive, operating in areas that were previously considered impossible and uneconomical. Therefore, good reservoir management is key for the economical success of complex projects requiring the incorporation of reliable uncertainty estimates for reliable production forecasts and optimizing reservoir exploitation. Reservoir history matching has played here a key role incorporating production, seismic, electromagnetic and logging data for forecasting the development of reservoirs and its depletion. With the advances in the last decade, electromagnetic techniques, such as crosswell electromagnetic tomography, have enabled engineers to more precisely map the reservoirs and understand their evolution. Incorporating the large amount of data efficiently and reducing uncertainty in the forecasts has been one of the key challenges for reservoir management. Computing the conductivity distribution for the field for adjusting parameters in the forecasting process via solving the inverse problem has been a challenge, due to the strong ill-posedness of the inversion problem and the extensive manual calibration required, making it impossible to be included into an efficient reservoir history matching forecasting algorithm. In the presented research, we have developed a novel Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) based method for incorporating electromagnetic data directly into the reservoir simulator. Based on an extended Archie relationship, EM simulations are performed for both forecasted and Porosity-Saturation retrieved conductivity parameters being incorporated directly into an update step for the reservoir parameters. This novel direct update method has significant advantages such as that it overcomes the expensive and ill

  6. Phase transitions in finite systems

    Chomaz, Ph. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), DSM-CEA / IN2P3-CNRS, 14 - Caen (France); Gulminelli, F. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire

    2002-07-01

    In this series of lectures we will first review the general theory of phase transition in the framework of information theory and briefly address some of the well known mean field solutions of three dimensional problems. The theory of phase transitions in finite systems will then be discussed, with a special emphasis to the conceptual problems linked to a thermodynamical description for small, short-lived, open systems as metal clusters and data samples coming from nuclear collisions. The concept of negative heat capacity developed in the early seventies in the context of self-gravitating systems will be reinterpreted in the general framework of convexity anomalies of thermo-statistical potentials. The connection with the distribution of the order parameter will lead us to a definition of first order phase transitions in finite systems based on topology anomalies of the event distribution in the space of observations. Finally a careful study of the thermodynamical limit will provide a bridge with the standard theory of phase transitions and show that in a wide class of physical situations the different statistical ensembles are irreducibly inequivalent. (authors)

  7. Phase transitions in finite systems

    Chomaz, Ph.; Gulminelli, F.

    2002-01-01

    In this series of lectures we will first review the general theory of phase transition in the framework of information theory and briefly address some of the well known mean field solutions of three dimensional problems. The theory of phase transitions in finite systems will then be discussed, with a special emphasis to the conceptual problems linked to a thermodynamical description for small, short-lived, open systems as metal clusters and data samples coming from nuclear collisions. The concept of negative heat capacity developed in the early seventies in the context of self-gravitating systems will be reinterpreted in the general framework of convexity anomalies of thermo-statistical potentials. The connection with the distribution of the order parameter will lead us to a definition of first order phase transitions in finite systems based on topology anomalies of the event distribution in the space of observations. Finally a careful study of the thermodynamical limit will provide a bridge with the standard theory of phase transitions and show that in a wide class of physical situations the different statistical ensembles are irreducibly inequivalent. (authors)

  8. Understanding the True Stimulated Reservoir Volume in Shale Reservoirs

    Hussain, Maaruf

    2017-06-06

    Successful exploitation of shale reservoirs largely depends on the effectiveness of hydraulic fracturing stimulation program. Favorable results have been attributed to intersection and reactivation of pre-existing fractures by hydraulically-induced fractures that connect the wellbore to a larger fracture surface area within the reservoir rock volume. Thus, accurate estimation of the stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) becomes critical for the reservoir performance simulation and production analysis. Micro-seismic events (MS) have been commonly used as a proxy to map out the SRV geometry, which could be erroneous because not all MS events are related to hydraulic fracture propagation. The case studies discussed here utilized a fully 3-D simulation approach to estimate the SRV. The simulation approach presented in this paper takes into account the real-time changes in the reservoir\\'s geomechanics as a function of fluid pressures. It is consisted of four separate coupled modules: geomechanics, hydrodynamics, a geomechanical joint model for interfacial resolution, and an adaptive re-meshing. Reservoir stress condition, rock mechanical properties, and injected fluid pressure dictate how fracture elements could open or slide. Critical stress intensity factor was used as a fracture criterion governing the generation of new fractures or propagation of existing fractures and their directions. Our simulations were run on a Cray XC-40 HPC system. The studies outcomes proved the approach of using MS data as a proxy for SRV to be significantly flawed. Many of the observed stimulated natural fractures are stress related and very few that are closer to the injection field are connected. The situation is worsened in a highly laminated shale reservoir as the hydraulic fracture propagation is significantly hampered. High contrast in the in-situ stresses related strike-slip developed thereby shortens the extent of SRV. However, far field nature fractures that were not connected to

  9. Chickamauga reservoir embayment study - 1990

    Meinert, D.L.; Butkus, S.R.; McDonough, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The objectives of this report are three-fold: (1) assess physical, chemical, and biological conditions in the major embayments of Chickamauga Reservoir; (2) compare water quality and biological conditions of embayments with main river locations; and (3) identify any water quality concerns in the study embayments that may warrant further investigation and/or management actions. Embayments are important areas of reservoirs to be considered when assessments are made to support water quality management plans. In general, embayments, because of their smaller size (water surface areas usually less than 1000 acres), shallower morphometry (average depth usually less than 10 feet), and longer detention times (frequently a month or more), exhibit more extreme responses to pollutant loadings and changes in land use than the main river region of the reservoir. Consequently, embayments are often at greater risk of water quality impairments (e.g. nutrient enrichment, filling and siltation, excessive growths of aquatic plants, algal blooms, low dissolved oxygen concentrations, bacteriological contamination, etc.). Much of the secondary beneficial use of reservoirs occurs in embayments (viz. marinas, recreation areas, parks and beaches, residential development, etc.). Typically embayments comprise less than 20 percent of the surface area of a reservoir, but they often receive 50 percent or more of the water-oriented recreational use of the reservoir. This intensive recreational use creates a potential for adverse use impacts if poor water quality and aquatic conditions exist in an embayment.

  10. Analysis and optimization with ecological objective function of irreversible single resonance energy selective electron heat engines

    Zhou, Junle; Chen, Lingen; Ding, Zemin; Sun, Fengrui

    2016-01-01

    Ecological performance of a single resonance ESE heat engine with heat leakage is conducted by applying finite time thermodynamics. By introducing Nielsen function and numerical calculations, expressions about power output, efficiency, entropy generation rate and ecological objective function are derived; relationships between ecological objective function and power output, between ecological objective function and efficiency as well as between power output and efficiency are demonstrated; influences of system parameters of heat leakage, boundary energy and resonance width on the optimal performances are investigated in detail; a specific range of boundary energy is given as a compromise to make ESE heat engine system work at optimal operation regions. Comparing performance characteristics with different optimization objective functions, the significance of selecting ecological objective function as the design objective is clarified specifically: when changing the design objective from maximum power output into maximum ecological objective function, the improvement of efficiency is 4.56%, while the power output drop is only 2.68%; when changing the design objective from maximum efficiency to maximum ecological objective function, the improvement of power output is 229.13%, and the efficiency drop is only 13.53%. - Highlights: • An irreversible single resonance energy selective electron heat engine is studied. • Heat leakage between two reservoirs is considered. • Power output, efficiency and ecological objective function are derived. • Optimal performance comparison for three objective functions is carried out.

  11. Update on Production Chemistry of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Reservoir

    Simmons, Stuart; Kirby, Stefan; Allis, Rick; Moore, Joe; Fischer, Tobias

    2018-02-12

    Analyses of production fluids from the Roosevelt Hot Springs reservoir were acquired from well sampling campaigns in 2015 and 2016. The resulting data have been recalculated to reservoir conditions by correcting for effects of steam loss, and the values are compared to legacy data from earlier reports to quantify changes with time in response to fluid production. The reservoir composition is similar to that at the start of reservoir exploitation, having near neutral pH, total dissolved solids of 7000-10,000 mg/kg, and ionic ratios of Cl/HCO3 ~50-100, Cl/SO4 ~50-100, and Na/K ~4-5. Cation, gas and silica geothermometers indicate a range of equilibration temperatures between 240 and 300 °C, but quartz-silica values are most closely consistent with measured reservoir temperatures and well enthalpies. The largest change in fluid composition is observed in well 54-3. The fluid has evolved from being fed by a single phase liquid to a twophase mixture of steam and liquid due to pressure draw down. The fluid also shows a 25% increase in reservoir chloride and a ~20° C decrement of cooling related to mixing with injected brine. The other production wells also show increase in chloride and decrease in temperature, but these changes diminish in magnitude with distance from injection well 14-2. Stable isotope compositions indicate that the reservoir water is largely meteoric in origin, having been modified by hydrothermal waterrock interaction. The water has also become progressively enriched in isotopic values in response to steam loss and mixing of injectate. N2-Ar-He and helium isotope ratios indicate a deep magmatic source region that probably supplies the heat for the hydrothermal system, consistent with recent Quaternary volcanism in the Mineral Mountains.

  12. A rationale for reservoir management economics

    Hickman, T.S.

    1995-01-01

    Significant economic benefits can be derived from the application f reservoir management. The key elements in economical reservoir management are the efficient use of available resources and optimization of reservoir exploitation through a multidisciplined approach. This paper describes various aspects of and approaches to reservoir management and provides case histories that support the findings

  13. Generation of hybrid meshes for the simulation of petroleum reservoirs; Generation de maillages hybrides pour la simulation de reservoirs petroliers

    Balaven-Clermidy, S.

    2001-12-01

    Oil reservoir simulations study multiphase flows in porous media. These flows are described and evaluated through numerical schemes on a discretization of the reservoir domain. In this thesis, we were interested in this spatial discretization and a new kind of hybrid mesh has been proposed where the radial nature of flows in the vicinity of wells is directly taken into account in the geometry. Our modular approach described wells and their drainage area through radial circular meshes. These well meshes are inserted in a structured reservoir mesh (a Corner Point Geometry mesh) made up with hexahedral cells. Finally, in order to generate a global conforming mesh, proper connections are realized between the different kinds of meshes through unstructured transition ones. To compute these transition meshes that we want acceptable in terms of finite volume methods, an automatic method based on power diagrams has been developed. Our approach can deal with a homogeneous anisotropic medium and allows the user to insert vertical or horizontal wells as well as secondary faults in the reservoir mesh. Our work has been implemented, tested and validated in 2D and 2D1/2. It can also be extended in 3D when the geometrical constraints are simplicial ones: points, segments and triangles. (author)

  14. Geological model of supercritical geothermal reservoir related to subduction system

    Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2017-04-01

    Following the Great East Japan Earthquake and the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear power station on 3.11 (11th March) 2011, geothermal energy came to be considered one of the most promising sources of renewable energy for the future in Japan. The temperatures of geothermal fields operating in Japan range from 200 to 300 °C (average 250 °C), and the depths range from 1000 to 2000 m (average 1500 m). In conventional geothermal reservoirs, the mechanical behavior of the rocks is presumed to be brittle, and convection of the hydrothermal fluid through existing network is the main method of circulation in the reservoir. In order to minimize induced seismicity, a rock mass that is "beyond brittle" is one possible candidate, because the rock mechanics of "beyond brittle" material is one of plastic deformation rather than brittle failure. Supercritical geothermal resources could be evaluated in terms of present volcanic activities, thermal structure, dimension of hydrothermal circulation, properties of fracture system, depth of heat source, depth of brittle factures zone, dimension of geothermal reservoir. On the basis of the GIS, potential of supercritical geothermal resources could be characterized into the following four categories. 1. Promising: surface manifestation d shallow high temperature, 2 Probability: high geothermal gradient, 3 Possibility: Aseismic zone which indicates an existence of melt, 4 Potential : low velocity zone which indicates magma input. Base on geophysical data for geothermal reservoirs, we have propose adequate tectonic model of development of the supercritical geothermal reservoirs. To understand the geological model of a supercritical geothermal reservoir, granite-porphyry system, which had been formed in subduction zone, was investigated as a natural analog of the supercritical geothermal energy system. Quartz veins, hydrothermal breccia veins, and glassy veins are observed in a granitic body. The glassy veins formed at 500-550

  15. Bacterial pathogens in a reactor cooling reservoir

    Kasweck, K.L.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1978-01-01

    The results of the sampling in both Par Pond and Clark Hill Reservoir are given. The frequency of isolation is a qualitative parameter which indicates how often the specified bacterium was isolated from each habitat. Initial scoping experiments demonstrated that a wider variety of pathogenic bacteria occur in Par Pond than in Clark Hill Reservoir. Such findings are interesting because Par Pond does not receive any human wastes directly, yet bacteria generally associated with human wastes are more frequently isolated from Par Pond. Previous studies have demonstrated that certain non-spore-forming enteric bacteria do not survive the intense heat associated with the cooling water when the reactor is operating. However, even when the reactor is not operating, cooling water, consisting of 10% makeup water from Savannah River, continues to flow into Par Pond. This flow provides a source of bacteria which inoculate Par Pond. Once the reactor is again operating, these same bacteria appear to be able to survive and grow within the Par Pond system. Thus, Par Pond and the associated lakes and canals of the Par Pond system provide a pool of pathogens that normally would not survive in natural waters

  16. Finite-dimensional calculus

    Feinsilver, Philip; Schott, Rene

    2009-01-01

    We discuss topics related to finite-dimensional calculus in the context of finite-dimensional quantum mechanics. The truncated Heisenberg-Weyl algebra is called a TAA algebra after Tekin, Aydin and Arik who formulated it in terms of orthofermions. It is shown how to use a matrix approach to implement analytic representations of the Heisenberg-Weyl algebra in univariate and multivariate settings. We provide examples for the univariate case. Krawtchouk polynomials are presented in detail, including a review of Krawtchouk polynomials that illustrates some curious properties of the Heisenberg-Weyl algebra, as well as presenting an approach to computing Krawtchouk expansions. From a mathematical perspective, we are providing indications as to how to implement infinite terms Rota's 'finite operator calculus'.

  17. Finite temperature field theory

    Das, Ashok

    1997-01-01

    This book discusses all three formalisms used in the study of finite temperature field theory, namely the imaginary time formalism, the closed time formalism and thermofield dynamics. Applications of the formalisms are worked out in detail. Gauge field theories and symmetry restoration at finite temperature are among the practical examples discussed in depth. The question of gauge dependence of the effective potential and the Nielsen identities are explained. The nonrestoration of some symmetries at high temperature (such as supersymmetry) and theories on nonsimply connected space-times are al

  18. Generalized finite elements

    Wachspress, E.

    2009-01-01

    Triangles and rectangles are the ubiquitous elements in finite element studies. Only these elements admit polynomial basis functions. Rational functions provide a basis for elements having any number of straight and curved sides. Numerical complexities initially associated with rational bases precluded extensive use. Recent analysis has reduced these difficulties and programs have been written to illustrate effectiveness. Although incorporation in major finite element software requires considerable effort, there are advantages in some applications which warrant implementation. An outline of the basic theory and of recent innovations is presented here. (authors)

  19. Implementation of the superfluid helium phase transition using finite element modeling: Simulation of ransient heat transfer and He-I/He-II phase front movement in cooling channels of superconducting magnets

    Bielert, Erwin; Verweij, A.P.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.

    2013-01-01

    In the thermal design of high magnetic field superconducting accelerator magnets, the emphasis is on the use of superfluid helium as a coolant and stabilizing medium. The very high effective thermal conductivity of helium below the lambda transition temperature significantly helps to extract heat

  20. A coupled FE and scaled boundary FE-approach for the earthquake response analysis of arch dam-reservoir-foundation system

    Wang Yi; Lin Gao; Hu Zhiqiang

    2010-01-01

    For efficient and accurate modelling of arch dam-reservoir-foundation system a coupled Finite Element method (FEM) and Scaled Boundary Finite Element method (SBFEM) is developed. Both the dam-foundation interaction and the dam-reservoir interaction including the effect of reservoir boundary absorption are taken into account. The arch dam is modelled by FEM, while the reservoir domain and the unbounded foundation are modelled by SBFEM. In order to make comparison with the results available in the literature, the Morrow Point arch dam is selected for numerical analysis. The analyses are carried out in the frequency domain, and then the time-domain response of the dam-reservoir-foundation system is obtained by Inverse Fourier Transform.

  1. Scale Model Simulation of Enhanced Geothermal Reservoir Creation

    Gutierrez, M.; Frash, L.; Hampton, J.

    2012-12-01

    Geothermal energy technology has successfully provided a means of generating stable base load electricity for many years. However, implementation has been spatially limited to limited availability of high quality traditional hydro-thermal resources possessing the combination of a shallow high heat flow anomaly and an aquifer with sufficient permeability and continuous fluid recharge. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) has been proposed as a potential solution to enable additional energy production from the non-conventional hydro-thermal resources. Hydraulic fracturing is considered the primary means of creating functional EGS reservoirs at sites where the permeability of the rock is too limited to allow cost effective heat recovery. EGS reservoir creation requires improved fracturing methodology, rheologically controllable fracturing fluids, and temperature hardened proppants. Although large fracture volumes (several cubic km) have been created in the field, circulating fluid through these full volumes and maintaining fracture volumes have proven difficult. Stimulation technology and methodology as used in the oil and gas industry for sedimentary formations are well developed; however, they have not sufficiently been demonstrated for EGS reservoir creation. Insufficient data and measurements under geothermal conditions make it difficult to directly translate experience from the oil and gas industries to EGS applications. To demonstrate the feasibility of EGS reservoir creation and subsequent geothermal energy production, and to improve the understanding of hydraulic and propping in EGS reservoirs, a heated true-triaxial load cell with a high pressure fluid injection system was developed to simulate an EGS system from stimulation to production. This apparatus is capable of loading a 30x30x30 cubic cm rock sample with independent principal stresses up to 13 MPa while simultaneously providing heating up to 180 degree C. Multiple orientated boreholes of 5 to 10 mm

  2. Cloud computing and Reservoir project

    Beco, S.; Maraschini, A.; Pacini, F.; Biran, O.

    2009-01-01

    The support for complex services delivery is becoming a key point in current internet technology. Current trends in internet applications are characterized by on demand delivery of ever growing amounts of content. The future internet of services will have to deliver content intensive applications to users with quality of service and security guarantees. This paper describes the Reservoir project and the challenge of a reliable and effective delivery of services as utilities in a commercial scenario. It starts by analyzing the needs of a future infrastructure provider and introducing the key concept of a service oriented architecture that combines virtualisation-aware grid with grid-aware virtualisation, while being driven by business service management. This article will then focus on the benefits and the innovations derived from the Reservoir approach. Eventually, a high level view of Reservoir general architecture is illustrated.

  3. Multilevel techniques for Reservoir Simulation

    Christensen, Max la Cour

    The subject of this thesis is the development, application and study of novel multilevel methods for the acceleration and improvement of reservoir simulation techniques. The motivation for addressing this topic is a need for more accurate predictions of porous media flow and the ability to carry...... Full Approximation Scheme) • Variational (Galerkin) upscaling • Linear solvers and preconditioners First, a nonlinear multigrid scheme in the form of the Full Approximation Scheme (FAS) is implemented and studied for a 3D three-phase compressible rock/fluids immiscible reservoir simulator...... is extended to include a hybrid strategy, where FAS is combined with Newton’s method to construct a multilevel nonlinear preconditioner. This method demonstrates high efficiency and robustness. Second, an improved IMPES formulated reservoir simulator is implemented using a novel variational upscaling approach...

  4. A fully coupled finite element framework for thermal fracturing simulation in subsurface cold CO2 injection

    Shunde Yin

    2018-03-01

    Simulation of thermal fracturing during cold CO2 injection involves the coupled processes of heat transfer, mass transport, rock deforming as well as fracture propagation. To model such a complex coupled system, a fully coupled finite element framework for thermal fracturing simulation is presented. This framework is based on the theory of non-isothermal multiphase flow in fracturing porous media. It takes advantage of recent advances in stabilized finite element and extended finite element methods. The stabilized finite element method overcomes the numerical instability encountered when the traditional finite element method is used to solve the convection dominated heat transfer equation, while the extended finite element method overcomes the limitation with traditional finite element method that a model has to be remeshed when a fracture is initiated or propagating and fracturing paths have to be aligned with element boundaries.

  5. Reservoir effects in radiocarbon dating

    Head, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: The radiocarbon dating technique depends essentially on the assumption that atmospheric carbon dioxide containing the cosmogenic radioisotope 14 C enters into a state of equilibrium with all living material (plants and animals) as part of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Terrestrial reservoir effects occur when the atmospheric 14 C signal is diluted by local effects where systems depleted in 14 C mix with systems that are in equilibrium with the atmosphere. Naturally, this can occur with plant material growing close to an active volcano adding very old CO 2 to the atmosphere (the original 14 C has completely decayed). It can also occur in highly industrialised areas where fossil fuel derived CO 2 dilutes the atmospheric signal. A terrestrial reservoir effect can occur in the case of fresh water shells living in rivers or lakes where there is an input of ground water from springs or a raising of the water table. Soluble bicarbonate derived from the dissolution of very old limestone produces a 14 C dilution effect. Land snail shells and stream carbonate depositions (tufas and travertines) can be affected by a similar mechanism. Alternatively, in specific cases, these reservoir effects may not occur. This means that general interpretations assuming quantitative values for these terrestrial effects are not possible. Each microenvironment associated with samples being analysed needs to be evaluated independently. Similarly, the marine environment produces reservoir effects. With respect to marine shells and corals, the water depth at which carbonate growth occurs can significantly affect quantitative 14 C dilution, especially in areas where very old water is uplifted, mixing with top layers of water that undergo significant exchange with atmospheric CO 2 . Hence, generalisations with respect to the marine reservoir effect also pose problems. These can be exacerbated by the mixing of sea water with either terrestrial water in estuaries, or ground water where

  6. A finite quantum gravity

    Meszaros, A.

    1984-05-01

    In case the graviton has a very small non-zero mass, the existence of six additional massive gravitons with very big masses leads to a finite quantum gravity. There is an acausal behaviour on the scales that is determined by the masses of additional gravitons. (author)

  7. Finite lattice extrapolation algorithms

    Henkel, M.; Schuetz, G.

    1987-08-01

    Two algorithms for sequence extrapolation, due to von den Broeck and Schwartz and Bulirsch and Stoer are reviewed and critically compared. Applications to three states and six states quantum chains and to the (2+1)D Ising model show that the algorithm of Bulirsch and Stoer is superior, in particular if only very few finite lattice data are available. (orig.)

  8. Finite unified models

    Kapetanakis, D. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Mondragon, M. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Zoupanos, G. (National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece). Physics Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    We present phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the case of two models with three families the top quark mass is predicted to be 178.8 GeV. (orig.)

  9. Finite unified models

    Kapetanakis, D.; Mondragon, M.; Zoupanos, G.

    1993-01-01

    We present phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the case of two models with three families the top quark mass is predicted to be 178.8 GeV. (orig.)

  10. Finiteness and GUTs

    Kapetanakis, D.; Mondragon, M.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown how to obtain phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. A very interesting feature of the models with three families is that they predict the top quark mass to be around 178 GeV. 16 refs

  11. Robust RBF Finite Automata

    Šorel, Michal; Šíma, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 62, - (2004), s. 93-110 ISSN 0925-2312 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB2030007; GA MŠk LN00A056 Keywords : radial basis function * neural network * finite automaton * Boolean circuit * computational power Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.641, year: 2004

  12. Inside finite elements

    Weiser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    All relevant implementation aspects of finite element methods are discussed in this book. The focus is on algorithms and data structures as well as on their concrete implementation. Theory is covered as far as it gives insight into the construction of algorithms. Throughout the exercises a complete FE-solver for scalar 2D problems will be implemented in Matlab/Octave.

  13. Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drilling

    P. K. Pande

    1998-10-29

    Initial drilling of wells on a uniform spacing, without regard to reservoir performance and characterization, must become a process of the past. Such efforts do not optimize reservoir development as they fail to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. These reservoirs are typically characterized by: o Large, discontinuous pay intervals o Vertical and lateral changes in reservoir properties o Low reservoir energy o High residual oil saturation o Low recovery efficiency

  14. Sedimentological and Geomorphological Effects of Reservoir Flushing: The Cachi Reservoir, Costa Rica, 1996

    Brandt, Anders; Swenning, Joar

    1999-01-01

    Physical geography, hydrology, geomorphology, sediment transport, erosion, sedimentation, dams, reservoirs......Physical geography, hydrology, geomorphology, sediment transport, erosion, sedimentation, dams, reservoirs...

  15. Heat pipe dynamic behavior

    Issacci, F.; Roche, G. L.; Klein, D. B.; Catton, I.

    1988-01-01

    The vapor flow in a heat pipe was mathematically modeled and the equations governing the transient behavior of the core were solved numerically. The modeled vapor flow is transient, axisymmetric (or two-dimensional) compressible viscous flow in a closed chamber. The two methods of solution are described. The more promising method failed (a mixed Galerkin finite difference method) whereas a more common finite difference method was successful. Preliminary results are presented showing that multi-dimensional flows need to be treated. A model of the liquid phase of a high temperature heat pipe was developed. The model is intended to be coupled to a vapor phase model for the complete solution of the heat pipe problem. The mathematical equations are formulated consistent with physical processes while allowing a computationally efficient solution. The model simulates time dependent characteristics of concern to the liquid phase including input phase change, output heat fluxes, liquid temperatures, container temperatures, liquid velocities, and liquid pressure. Preliminary results were obtained for two heat pipe startup cases. The heat pipe studied used lithium as the working fluid and an annular wick configuration. Recommendations for implementation based on the results obtained are presented. Experimental studies were initiated using a rectangular heat pipe. Both twin beam laser holography and laser Doppler anemometry were investigated. Preliminary experiments were completed and results are reported.

  16. EXPRESIÓN SEMI-ANALÍTICA PARA EL CÁLCULO DE MATRICES DE CONDUCTIVIDAD DE ELEMENTOS FINITOS EN PROBLEMAS DE CONDUCCIÓN DE CALOR //\tA SEMI-ANALYTICAL EXPRESSION FOR CALCULATING FINITE ELEMENT CONDUCTIVITY MATRICES IN HEAT CONDUCTION PROBLEMS

    Hector Godoy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer equation by conduction is not more than a mathematical expression of the energy conservation law for a given solid. Solving the equation which model this problem is generally very dificult or impossible in an analytical way, so it is necessary to make a discrete approximation of the continuous problem. In this paper, we present a methodology applied to the quadrilateral finite elements in problems of heat transfer by conduction, where the components of the thermal conductivity matrix are obtained by a semi-analytical expression and simple algebraic manipulations. This technique has been used successfully in stiness arrays' integrations of bidimensional and tridimensional finite elements, reporting substantial improvements of CPU times compared with the Gaussian integration. // RESUMEN: La ecuación para la transferencia de calor por conducción no es más que una expresión matemática de la ley de conservación de la energía para un sólido dado. La resolución de la ecuación que modela este problema generalmente es muy difícil o imposible de obtener de forma analítica, por ello es necesario efectuar una aproximación discreta del problema continuo. En este trabajo, se presenta una metodología aplicada a elementos finitos cuadriláteros en problemas de transferencia de calor por conducción, donde las componentes de la matriz de conductividad térmica son obtenidas mediante una expresión semi-analítica y manipulaciones algebraicas sencillas. Esta técnica ha sido utilizada exitosamente en integraciones de matrices de rigidez de elementos finitos bidimensionales y tridimensionales,reportando mejoras sustanciales de tiempos de CPU en comparación con la integración Gaussiana.

  17. On-line Optimization-Based Simulators for Fractured and Non-fractured Reservoirs

    Milind D. Deo

    2005-08-31

    Oil field development is a multi-million dollar business. Reservoir simulation is often used to guide the field management and development process. Reservoir characterization and geologic modeling tools have become increasingly sophisticated. As a result the geologic models produced are complex. Most reservoirs are fractured to a certain extent. The new geologic characterization methods are making it possible to map features such as faults and fractures, field-wide. Significant progress has been made in being able to predict properties of the faults and of the fractured zones. Traditionally, finite difference methods have been employed in discretizing the domains created by geologic means. For complex geometries, finite-element methods of discretization may be more suitable. Since reservoir simulation is a mature science, some of the advances in numerical methods (linear, nonlinear solvers and parallel computing) have not been fully realized in the implementation of most of the simulators. The purpose of this project was to address some of these issues. {sm_bullet} One of the goals of this project was to develop a series of finite-element simulators to handle problems of complex geometry, including systems containing faults and fractures. {sm_bullet} The idea was to incorporate the most modern computing tools; use of modular object-oriented computer languages, the most sophisticated linear and nonlinear solvers, parallel computing methods and good visualization tools. {sm_bullet} One of the tasks of the project was also to demonstrate the construction of fractures and faults in a reservoir using the available data and to assign properties to these features. {sm_bullet} Once the reservoir model is in place, it is desirable to find the operating conditions, which would provide the best reservoir performance. This can be accomplished by utilization optimization tools and coupling them with reservoir simulation. Optimization-based reservoir simulation was one of the

  18. A combination of streamtube and geostatical simulation methodologies for the study of large oil reservoirs

    Chakravarty, A.; Emanuel, A.S.; Bernath, J.A. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, LaHabra, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The application of streamtube models for reservoir simulation has an extensive history in the oil industry. Although these models are strictly applicable only to fields under voidage balance, they have proved to be useful in a large number of fields provided that there is no solution gas evolution and production. These models combine the benefit of very fast computational time with the practical ability to model a large reservoir over the course of its history. These models do not, however, directly incorporate the detailed geological information that recent experience has taught is important. This paper presents a technique for mapping the saturation information contained in a history matched streamtube model onto a detailed geostatistically derived finite difference grid. With this technique, the saturation information in a streamtube model, data that is actually statistical in nature, can be identified with actual physical locations in a field and a picture of the remaining oil saturation can be determined. Alternatively, the streamtube model can be used to simulate the early development history of a field and the saturation data then used to initialize detailed late time finite difference models. The proposed method is presented through an example application to the Ninian reservoir. This reservoir, located in the North Sea (UK), is a heterogeneous sandstone characterized by a line drive waterflood, with about 160 wells, and a 16 year history. The reservoir was satisfactorily history matched and mapped for remaining oil saturation. A comparison to 3-D seismic survey and recently drilled wells have provided preliminary verification.

  19. Numerical simulations of highly buoyant flows in the Castel Giorgio - Torre Alfina deep geothermal reservoir

    Volpi, Giorgio; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Colucci, Francesca; Fischer, Thomas; Magri, Fabien

    2017-04-01

    /h. Furthermore, with the modeled distances our simulations showed no interference effects between the production and re-injection wells. Besides providing valuable guidelines for future exploitation of the Castel Giorgio - Torre Alfina deep geothermal reservoir, this example also highlights the large applicability and the high performance of the OpenGeoSys open-source code in handling coupled hydro-thermal simulations. REFERENCES Diersch, H. J. (2014). FEFLOW Finite Element Modeling of Flow, Mass and Heat Transport in Porous and Fractured Media, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, ISBN 978-3-642-38738-8. Kolditz, O., Bauer, S., Bilke, L., Böttcher, N., Delfs, J. O., Fischer, T., U. J. Görke, T. Kalbacher, G. Kosakowski, McDermott, C. I., Park, C. H., Radu, F., Rink, K., Shao, H., Shao, H.B., Sun, F., Sun, Y., Sun, A., Singh, K., Taron, J., Walther, M., Wang,W., Watanabe, N., Wu, Y., Xie, M., Xu, W., Zehner, B. (2012). OpenGeoSys: an open-source initiative for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical/chemical (THM/C) processes in porous media. Environmental Earth Sciences, 67(2), 589-599. Pruess, K., Oldenburg, C. M., & Moridis, G. J. (1999). TOUGH2 user's guide version 2. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  20. Nonlinear Conservation Laws and Finite Volume Methods

    Leveque, Randall J.

    Introduction Software Notation Classification of Differential Equations Derivation of Conservation Laws The Euler Equations of Gas Dynamics Dissipative Fluxes Source Terms Radiative Transfer and Isothermal Equations Multi-dimensional Conservation Laws The Shock Tube Problem Mathematical Theory of Hyperbolic Systems Scalar Equations Linear Hyperbolic Systems Nonlinear Systems The Riemann Problem for the Euler Equations Numerical Methods in One Dimension Finite Difference Theory Finite Volume Methods Importance of Conservation Form - Incorrect Shock Speeds Numerical Flux Functions Godunov's Method Approximate Riemann Solvers High-Resolution Methods Other Approaches Boundary Conditions Source Terms and Fractional Steps Unsplit Methods Fractional Step Methods General Formulation of Fractional Step Methods Stiff Source Terms Quasi-stationary Flow and Gravity Multi-dimensional Problems Dimensional Splitting Multi-dimensional Finite Volume Methods Grids and Adaptive Refinement Computational Difficulties Low-Density Flows Discrete Shocks and Viscous Profiles Start-Up Errors Wall Heating Slow-Moving Shocks Grid Orientation Effects Grid-Aligned Shocks Magnetohydrodynamics The MHD Equations One-Dimensional MHD Solving the Riemann Problem Nonstrict Hyperbolicity Stiffness The Divergence of B Riemann Problems in Multi-dimensional MHD Staggered Grids The 8-Wave Riemann Solver Relativistic Hydrodynamics Conservation Laws in Spacetime The Continuity Equation The 4-Momentum of a Particle The Stress-Energy Tensor Finite Volume Methods Multi-dimensional Relativistic Flow Gravitation and General Relativity References

  1. Stress estimation in reservoirs using an integrated inverse method

    Mazuyer, Antoine; Cupillard, Paul; Giot, Richard; Conin, Marianne; Leroy, Yves; Thore, Pierre

    2018-05-01

    Estimating the stress in reservoirs and their surroundings prior to the production is a key issue for reservoir management planning. In this study, we propose an integrated inverse method to estimate such initial stress state. The 3D stress state is constructed with the displacement-based finite element method assuming linear isotropic elasticity and small perturbations in the current geometry of the geological structures. The Neumann boundary conditions are defined as piecewise linear functions of depth. The discontinuous functions are determined with the CMA-ES (Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy) optimization algorithm to fit wellbore stress data deduced from leak-off tests and breakouts. The disregard of the geological history and the simplified rheological assumptions mean that only the stress field, statically admissible and matching the wellbore data should be exploited. The spatial domain of validity of this statement is assessed by comparing the stress estimations for a synthetic folded structure of finite amplitude with a history constructed assuming a viscous response.

  2. Prevention of Reservoir Interior Discoloration

    Arnold, K.F.

    2001-04-03

    Contamination is anathema in reservoir production. Some of the contamination is a result of welding and some appears after welding but existed before. Oxygen was documented to be a major contributor to discoloration in welding. This study demonstrates that it can be controlled and that some of the informal cleaning processes contribute to contamination.

  3. Nonlinear Multigrid for Reservoir Simulation

    Christensen, Max la Cour; Eskildsen, Klaus Langgren; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2016-01-01

    efficiency for a black-oil model. Furthermore, the use of the FAS method enables a significant reduction in memory usage compared with conventional techniques, which suggests new possibilities for improved large-scale reservoir simulation and numerical efficiency. Last, nonlinear multilevel preconditioning...

  4. Cross-flow analysis of injection wells in a multilayered reservoir

    Mohammadreza Jalali

    2016-09-01

    Natural and forced cross-flow is modeled for some injection wells in an oil reservoir located at North Sea. The solution uses a transient implicit finite difference approach for multiple sand layers with different permeabilities separated by impermeable shale layers. Natural and forced cross-flow rates for each reservoir layer during shut-in are calculated and compared with different production logging tool (PLT measurements. It appears that forced cross-flow is usually more prolonged and subject to a higher flow rate when compared with natural cross-flow, and is thus worthy of more detailed analysis.

  5. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Quantum chromodynamics; finite temperature; chiral perturbation theory; QCD sum rules. PACS Nos 11.10. ..... at finite temperature. The self-energy diagrams of figure 2 modify it to ..... method of determination at present. Acknowledgement.

  6. 49 CFR 236.792 - Reservoir, equalizing.

    2010-10-01

    ... Reservoir, equalizing. An air reservoir connected with and adding volume to the top portion of the equalizing piston chamber of the automatic brake valve, to provide uniform service reductions in brake pipe...

  7. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    Oliveira, M.W. de.

    1986-01-01

    The consequences of the incorporation of finite temperature effects in fields theories are investigated. Particularly, we consider the sypersymmetric non-linear sigma model, calculating the effective potencial in the large N limit. Initially, we present the 1/N expantion formalism and, for the O(N) model of scalar field, we show the impossibility of spontaneous symmetry breaking. Next, we study the same model at finite temperature and in the presence of conserved charges (the O(N) symmetry's generator). We conclude that these conserved charges explicitly break the symmetry. We introduce a calculation method for the thermodynamic potential of the theory in the presence of chemical potentials. We present an introduction to Supersymmetry in the aim of describing some important concepts for the treatment at T>0. We show that Suppersymmetry is broken for any T>0, in opposition to what one expects, by the solution of the Hierachy Problem. (author) [pt

  8. Using Finite Element Method

    M.H.R. Ghoreishy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This research work is devoted to the footprint analysis of a steel-belted radial tyre (185/65R14 under vertical static load using finite element method. Two models have been developed in which in the first model the tread patterns were replaced by simple ribs while the second model was consisted of details of the tread blocks. Linear elastic and hyper elastic (Arruda-Boyce material models were selected to describe the mechanical behavior of the reinforcing and rubbery parts, respectively. The above two finite element models of the tyre were analyzed under inflation pressure and vertical static loads. The second model (with detailed tread patterns was analyzed with and without friction effect between tread and contact surfaces. In every stage of the analysis, the results were compared with the experimental data to confirm the accuracy and applicability of the model. Results showed that neglecting the tread pattern design not only reduces the computational cost and effort but also the differences between computed deformations do not show significant changes. However, more complicated variables such as shape and area of the footprint zone and contact pressure are affected considerably by the finite element model selected for the tread blocks. In addition, inclusion of friction even in static state changes these variables significantly.

  9. Probabilistic finite elements

    Belytschko, Ted; Wing, Kam Liu

    1987-01-01

    In the Probabilistic Finite Element Method (PFEM), finite element methods have been efficiently combined with second-order perturbation techniques to provide an effective method for informing the designer of the range of response which is likely in a given problem. The designer must provide as input the statistical character of the input variables, such as yield strength, load magnitude, and Young's modulus, by specifying their mean values and their variances. The output then consists of the mean response and the variance in the response. Thus the designer is given a much broader picture of the predicted performance than with simply a single response curve. These methods are applicable to a wide class of problems, provided that the scale of randomness is not too large and the probabilistic density functions possess decaying tails. By incorporating the computational techniques we have developed in the past 3 years for efficiency, the probabilistic finite element methods are capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. Sample results for an elastic-plastic ten-bar structure and an elastic-plastic plane continuum with a circular hole subject to cyclic loadings with the yield stress on the random field are given.

  10. RECENT ADVANCES IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIR MODELING

    ORDOÑEZ, A; PEÑUELA, G; IDROBO, E. A; MEDINA, C. E

    2001-01-01

    Large amounts of oil reserves are contained in naturally fractured reservoirs. Most of these hydrocarbon volumes have been left behind because of the poor knowledge and/or description methodology of those reservoirs. This lack of knowledge has lead to the nonexistence of good quantitative models for this complicated type of reservoirs. The complexity of naturally fractured reservoirs causes the need for integration of all existing information at all scales (drilling, well logging, seismic, we...

  11. Reservoir resistivity characterization incorporating flow dynamics

    Arango, Santiago; Sun, Shuyu; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Katterbauer, Klemens

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for reservoir resistivity characterization are provided, in various aspects, an integrated framework for the estimation of Archie's parameters for a strongly heterogeneous reservoir utilizing the dynamics of the reservoir are provided. The framework can encompass a Bayesian estimation/inversion method for estimating the reservoir parameters, integrating production and time lapse formation conductivity data to achieve a better understanding of the subsurface rock conductivity properties and hence improve water saturation imaging.

  12. Reservoir resistivity characterization incorporating flow dynamics

    Arango, Santiago

    2016-04-07

    Systems and methods for reservoir resistivity characterization are provided, in various aspects, an integrated framework for the estimation of Archie\\'s parameters for a strongly heterogeneous reservoir utilizing the dynamics of the reservoir are provided. The framework can encompass a Bayesian estimation/inversion method for estimating the reservoir parameters, integrating production and time lapse formation conductivity data to achieve a better understanding of the subsurface rock conductivity properties and hence improve water saturation imaging.

  13. Time series analysis of water surface temperature and heat flux components in the Itumbiara Reservoir (GO, Brazil Análise da série temporal da temperatura da superfície da água e dos componentes do balanço de calor no Reservatório de Itumbiara (GO, Brasil

    Enner Herenio de Alcântara

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Water temperature plays an important role in ecological functioning and in controlling the biogeochemical processes of the aquatic system. Conventional water quality monitoring is expensive and time consuming. It is particularly challenging for large water bodies. Conversely, remote sensing can be considered a powerful tool to assess important properties of aquatic systems because it provides synoptic and frequent data acquisition over large areas. The objective of this study was to analyze time series of surface water temperature and heat flux to advance the understanding of temporal variations in a hydroelectric reservoir. METHOD: MODIS water-surface temperature (WST level 2, 1 km nominal resolution data (MOD11L2, version 5 were used. All available clear-sky MODIS/Terra images from 2003 to 2008 were used, resulting in a total of 786 daytime and 473 nighttime images. Time series of surface water temperature was obtained computing the monthly mean in a 3×3 window of three reservoir selected sites: 1 near the dam, 2 at the centre of the reservoir and 3 in the confluence of the rivers. In-situ meteorological data from 2003 to 2008 were used to calculate surface energy budget time series. Cross-wavelet, coherence and phase analysis were carried out to compute the correlation between daytime and nighttime surface water temperatures and the computed heat fluxes. RESULTS: The monthly mean of the day-time WST shows lager variability than the night-time WST. All time series (daytime and nighttime have a cyclical pattern, passing for a minimum (June - July and a maximum (December and January. Fourier and the Wavelet Analysis were applied to analyze this cyclical pattern. The daytime time series, presents peaks in 4.5, 6 12 and 36 months and the nighttime WST shows the highest spectral density at 12, 6, 3 and 2 months. The multiple regression analysis shows that for daytime WST, the heat flux terms explain 89% of the annual variation (RMS = 0.89

  14. Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings

    1985-01-22

    The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

  15. Jet operated heat pump

    Collard, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    A jet pump system is shown that utilizes waste heat to provide heating and/or cooling. Waste heat diverted through a boiler causes a refrigerant to evaporate and expand for supersonic discharge through a nozzle thereby creating a vacuum in an evaporator coil. The vacuum draws the refrigerant in a gaseous state into a condensing section of a jet pump along with refrigerant from a reservoir in a subcooled liquid form. This causes condensation of the gas in a condensation section of the jet pump, while moving at constant velocity. The change in momentum of the fluid overcomes the system high side pressure. Some of the condensate is cooled by a subcooler. Refrigerant in a subcooled liquid state from the subcooler is fed back into the evaporator and the condensing section with an adequate supply being insured by the reservoir. The motive portion of the condensate is returned to the boiler sans subcooling. By proper valving start-up is insured, as well as the ability to switch from heating to cooling

  16. Amplitude various angles (AVA) phenomena in thin layer reservoir: Case study of various reservoirs

    Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B., E-mail: bagusnur@bdg.centrin.net.id, E-mail: bagusnur@rock-fluid.com [Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Basic Science Center A 4" t" hfloor, Physics Dept., FMIPA, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Bandung (Indonesia); Susilowati, E-mail: bagusnur@bdg.centrin.net.id, E-mail: bagusnur@rock-fluid.com [Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Bandung (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    Amplitude various offset is widely used in petroleum exploration as well as in petroleum development field. Generally, phenomenon of amplitude in various angles assumes reservoir’s layer is quite thick. It also means that the wave is assumed as a very high frequency. But, in natural condition, the seismic wave is band limited and has quite low frequency. Therefore, topic about amplitude various angles in thin layer reservoir as well as low frequency assumption is important to be considered. Thin layer reservoir means the thickness of reservoir is about or less than quarter of wavelength. In this paper, I studied about the reflection phenomena in elastic wave which considering interference from thin layer reservoir and transmission wave. I applied Zoeppritz equation for modeling reflected wave of top reservoir, reflected wave of bottom reservoir, and also transmission elastic wave of reservoir. Results show that the phenomena of AVA in thin layer reservoir are frequency dependent. Thin layer reservoir causes interference between reflected wave of top reservoir and reflected wave of bottom reservoir. These phenomena are frequently neglected, however, in real practices. Even though, the impact of inattention in interference phenomena caused by thin layer in AVA may cause inaccurate reservoir characterization. The relation between classes of AVA reservoir and reservoir’s character are different when effect of ones in thin reservoir and ones in thick reservoir are compared. In this paper, I present some AVA phenomena including its cross plot in various thin reservoir types based on some rock physics data of Indonesia.

  17. Amplitude various angles (AVA) phenomena in thin layer reservoir: Case study of various reservoirs

    thfloor, Physics Dept., FMIPA, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Bandung (Indonesia))" data-affiliation=" (Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Basic Science Center A 4thfloor, Physics Dept., FMIPA, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Bandung (Indonesia))" >Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.; Susilowati

    2015-01-01

    Amplitude various offset is widely used in petroleum exploration as well as in petroleum development field. Generally, phenomenon of amplitude in various angles assumes reservoir’s layer is quite thick. It also means that the wave is assumed as a very high frequency. But, in natural condition, the seismic wave is band limited and has quite low frequency. Therefore, topic about amplitude various angles in thin layer reservoir as well as low frequency assumption is important to be considered. Thin layer reservoir means the thickness of reservoir is about or less than quarter of wavelength. In this paper, I studied about the reflection phenomena in elastic wave which considering interference from thin layer reservoir and transmission wave. I applied Zoeppritz equation for modeling reflected wave of top reservoir, reflected wave of bottom reservoir, and also transmission elastic wave of reservoir. Results show that the phenomena of AVA in thin layer reservoir are frequency dependent. Thin layer reservoir causes interference between reflected wave of top reservoir and reflected wave of bottom reservoir. These phenomena are frequently neglected, however, in real practices. Even though, the impact of inattention in interference phenomena caused by thin layer in AVA may cause inaccurate reservoir characterization. The relation between classes of AVA reservoir and reservoir’s character are different when effect of ones in thin reservoir and ones in thick reservoir are compared. In this paper, I present some AVA phenomena including its cross plot in various thin reservoir types based on some rock physics data of Indonesia

  18. Hydrogeochemistry and reservoir model of Fuzhou geothermal field, China

    Huang, H. F.; Goff, Fraser

    1986-03-01

    Fuzhou geothermal field is a low- to intermediate-temperature geothermal system consisting of meteoric water that circulates deeply along faults. The area of the field is about 9 km 2 but it is elongated in a NNW-trending direction. Fluids in the field are controlled by a series of four NNW extensional faults in Cretaceous granitic basement (Fuzhou fault zone). These faults feed warm waters into overlying permeable Quaternary sediments. The hydrothermal system consists of north and south parts whose chemical compositions are subtly different. In the northern part the system discharges sulfate/chloride waters with relatively low chloride concentrations, but in the south the system discharges chloride waters having relatively high chloride concentrations. Maximum wellhead temperatures are 97°C, which agrees with the chalcedony geothermometer in many cases. Based on the solubility of quartz, the deep-reservoir temperature cannot exceed 123 to 131°C. From heat and mass balance calculations, we conclude that the present total extracted capacity of fluid from the reservoir (20,000 tons/day) could be doubled without noticeable drawdown. We estimate the recoverable heat in the reservoir to be about 1.71 × 10 11 MJ.

  19. Thermal analysis of reservoir structure versus capillary pumped loop

    Lin Hungwen; Lin Weikeng

    2009-01-01

    Capillary pumped loop (CPL) was already used in man-made satellites and space aircrafts with proven heat control technology. However, small-sized CPL had not yet made a breakthrough application in electronic components owing to poor heat-absorption capacity of evaporator structure. Hence, a small-scale CPL was designed for server in this research. The evaporator was designed with a circular groove and embedded with a high density polyethylene (HDPE) as a capillary structure to absorb working fluid. The influence of reservoir upon thermal resistance was also analyzed. The experimental results showed that, under a filling level of 72%, CPL with optimized design could remove 110 W energy while maintaining its temperature at 80 deg. C. Comparison of CPL with/without reservoir, the loop thermal resistance R th,loop was reduced by 0.14 deg. C/W and was able to increase the stability of CPL, too, the results confirmed that reservoir could enhance CPL performance and this technology will probably find application in electronics cooling for electronic devices

  20. A Thermoelastic Hydraulic Fracture Design Tool for Geothermal Reservoir Development

    Ahmad Ghassemi

    2003-06-30

    Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Thus, knowledge of conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fracture are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. At times, the practice aims to create a number of parallel fractures connecting a pair of wells. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have set out to develop advanced thermo-mechanical models for design of artificial fractures and rock fracture research in geothermal reservoirs. These models consider the significant hydraulic and thermo-mechanical processes and their interaction with the in-situ stress state. Wellbore failure and fracture initiation is studied using a model that fully couples poro-mechanical and thermo-mechanical effects. The fracture propagation model is based on a complex variable and regular displacement discontinuity formulations. In the complex variable approach the displacement discontinuities are

  1. Multi-objective optimization of Stirling engine using Finite Physical Dimensions Thermodynamics (FPDT) method

    Li, Ruijie; Grosu, Lavinia; Queiros-Conde, Diogo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A gamma Stirling engine has been optimized using FPDT method by multi-objective criteria. • Genetic algorithm and decision making methods were used to get Pareto frontier and optimum points. • It shows: total thermal conductance, hot temperature, stroke and diameter ratios can be improved. - Abstract: In this paper, a solar energy powered gamma type SE has been optimized using Finite Physical Dimensions Thermodynamics (FPDT) method by multi-objective criteria. Genetic algorithm was used to get the Pareto frontier, and optimum points were obtained using the decision making methods of LINMAP and TOPSIS. The optimization results have been compared with those obtained using the ecological method. It was shown that the multi-objective optimization in this paper has a better balance among the optimizing criteria (maximum mechanical power, maximum thermal efficiency and minimum entropy generation flow). The effects of the hot source temperature and the total thermal conductance of the engine on the Pareto frontier have been also studied. This sensibility study shows that an increase in the hot reservoir temperature can increase the output mechanical power, the thermal efficiency of the engine, but also the entropy generation rate. In addition to this, an increase of the total thermal conductance of the engine can strongly increase the output mechanical power and only slightly increase the thermal efficiency. These results allow us to improve the engine performance after some modifications as geometrical dimensions (diameter, stroke, heat exchange surface, etc.) and physical parameters (temperature, thermal conductivity).

  2. Optimal Management of Geothermal Heat Extraction

    Patel, I. H.; Bielicki, J. M.; Buscheck, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Geothermal energy technologies use the constant heat flux from the subsurface in order to produce heat or electricity for societal use. As such, a geothermal energy system is not inherently variable, like systems based on wind and solar resources, and an operator can conceivably control the rate at which heat is extracted and used directly, or converted into a commodity that is used. Although geothermal heat is a renewable resource, this heat can be depleted over time if the rate of heat extraction exceeds the natural rate of renewal (Rybach, 2003). For heat extraction used for commodities that are sold on the market, sustainability entails balancing the rate at which the reservoir renews with the rate at which heat is extracted and converted into profit, on a net present value basis. We present a model that couples natural resource economic approaches for managing renewable resources with simulations of geothermal reservoir performance in order to develop an optimal heat mining strategy that balances economic gain with the performance and renewability of the reservoir. Similar optimal control approaches have been extensively studied for renewable natural resource management of fisheries and forests (Bonfil, 2005; Gordon, 1954; Weitzman, 2003). Those models determine an optimal path of extraction of fish or timber, by balancing the regeneration of stocks of fish or timber that are not harvested with the profit from the sale of the fish or timber that is harvested. Our model balances the regeneration of reservoir temperature with the net proceeds from extracting heat and converting it to electricity that is sold to consumers. We used the Non-isothermal Unconfined-confined Flow and Transport (NUFT) model (Hao, Sun, & Nitao, 2011) to simulate the performance of a sedimentary geothermal reservoir under a variety of geologic and operational situations. The results of NUFT are incorporated into the natural resource economics model to determine production strategies that

  3. Heat pumps: heat recovery

    Pielke, R

    1976-01-01

    The author firstly explains in a general manner the functioning of the heat pump. Following a brief look at the future heat demand and the possibilities of covering it, the various methods of obtaining energy (making use of solar energy, ground heat, and others) and the practical applications (office heating, swimming pool heating etc.) are explained. The author still sees considerable difficulties in using the heat pump at present on a large scale. Firstly there is not enough maintenance personnel available, secondly the electricity supply undertakings cannot provide the necessary electricity on a wide basis without considerable investments. Other possibilities to save energy or to use waste energy are at present easier and more economical to realize. Recuperative and regenerative systems are described.

  4. Prediction of tectonic stresses and fracture networks with geomechanical reservoir models

    Henk, A.; Fischer, K.

    2014-09-01

    This project evaluates the potential of geomechanical Finite Element (FE) models for the prediction of in situ stresses and fracture networks in faulted reservoirs. Modeling focuses on spatial variations of the in situ stress distribution resulting from faults and contrasts in mechanical rock properties. In a first methodological part, a workflow is developed for building such geomechanical reservoir models and calibrating them to field data. In the second part, this workflow was applied successfully to an intensively faulted gas reservoir in the North German Basin. A truly field-scale geomechanical model covering more than 400km 2 was built and calibrated. It includes a mechanical stratigraphy as well as a network of 86 faults. The latter are implemented as distinct planes of weakness and allow the fault-specific evaluation of shear and normal stresses. A so-called static model describes the recent state of the reservoir and, thus, after calibration its results reveal the present-day in situ stress distribution. Further geodynamic modeling work considers the major stages in the tectonic history of the reservoir and provides insights in the paleo stress distribution. These results are compared to fracture data and hydraulic fault behavior observed today. The outcome of this project confirms the potential of geomechanical FE models for robust stress and fracture predictions. The workflow is generally applicable and can be used for modeling of any stress-sensitive reservoir.

  5. Prediction of tectonic stresses and fracture networks with geomechanical reservoir models

    Henk, A.; Fischer, K. [TU Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften

    2014-09-15

    This project evaluates the potential of geomechanical Finite Element (FE) models for the prediction of in situ stresses and fracture networks in faulted reservoirs. Modeling focuses on spatial variations of the in situ stress distribution resulting from faults and contrasts in mechanical rock properties. In a first methodological part, a workflow is developed for building such geomechanical reservoir models and calibrating them to field data. In the second part, this workflow was applied successfully to an intensively faulted gas reservoir in the North German Basin. A truly field-scale geomechanical model covering more than 400km{sup 2} was built and calibrated. It includes a mechanical stratigraphy as well as a network of 86 faults. The latter are implemented as distinct planes of weakness and allow the fault-specific evaluation of shear and normal stresses. A so-called static model describes the recent state of the reservoir and, thus, after calibration its results reveal the present-day in situ stress distribution. Further geodynamic modeling work considers the major stages in the tectonic history of the reservoir and provides insights in the paleo stress distribution. These results are compared to fracture data and hydraulic fault behavior observed today. The outcome of this project confirms the potential of geomechanical FE models for robust stress and fracture predictions. The workflow is generally applicable and can be used for modeling of any stress-sensitive reservoir.

  6. Finite elements for the thermomechanical calculation of massive structures

    Argyris, J.H.; Szimmat, J.; Willam, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper examines the fine element analysis of thermal stress and deformation problems in massive structures. To this end compatible idealizations are utilized for heat conduction and static analysis in order to minimize the data transfer. For transient behaviour due to unsteady heat flow and/or inelastics material processes the two computational parts are interwoven in form of an integrated software package for finite element analysis of thermomechanical problems in space and time. (orig.) [de

  7. Heat transfer in underground heating experiments in granite, Stipa, Sweden

    Chan, T.; Javandel, I.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1980-04-01

    Electrical heater experiments have been conducted underground in granite at Stripa, Sweden, to investigate the effects of heating associated with nuclear waste storage. Temperature data from these experiments are compared with closed-form and finite-element solutions. Good agreement is found between measured temperatures and both types of models, but especially for a nonlinear finite-element heat conduction model incorporating convective boundary conditions, measured nonuniform initial rock temperature distribution, and temperature-dependent thermal conductivity. In situ thermal properties, determined by least-squares regression, are very close to laboratory values. A limited amount of sensitivity analysis is undertaken

  8. 4. International reservoir characterization technical conference

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the Fourth International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference held March 2-4, 1997 in Houston, Texas. The theme for the conference was Advances in Reservoir Characterization for Effective Reservoir Management. On March 2, 1997, the DOE Class Workshop kicked off with tutorials by Dr. Steve Begg (BP Exploration) and Dr. Ganesh Thakur (Chevron). Tutorial presentations are not included in these Proceedings but may be available from the authors. The conference consisted of the following topics: data acquisition; reservoir modeling; scaling reservoir properties; and managing uncertainty. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

  9. Diagenetic effect on permeabilities of geothermal sandstone reservoirs

    Weibel, Rikke; Olivarius, Mette; Kristensen, Lars

    The Danish subsurface contains abundant sedimentary deposits, which can be utilized for geothermal heating. The Upper Triassic – Lower Jurassic continental-marine sandstones of the Gassum Formation has been utilised as a geothermal reservoir for the Thisted Geothermal Plant since 1984 extracting...... and permeability is caused by increased diagenetic changes of the sandstones due to increased burial depth and temperatures. Therefore, the highest water temperatures typically correspond with the lowest porosities and permeabilities. Especially the permeability is crucial for the performance of the geothermal......-line fractures. Continuous thin chlorite coatings results in less porosity- and permeability-reduction with burial than the general reduction with burial, unless carbonate cemented. Therefore, localities of sandstones characterized by these continuous chlorite coatings may represent fine geothermal reservoirs...

  10. MIKROMITSETY- MIGRANTS IN MINGECHEVIR RESERVOIR

    M. A. Salmanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. It is hardly possible to predict the continued stability of the watercourse ecosystems without the study of biological characteristics and composition of organisms inhabiting them. In the last 35-40 years, environmental conditions of the Mingachevir reservoir are determined by the stationary anthropogenic pressure. It was found that such components of plankton as algae, bacteria and fungi play a leading role in the transformation and migration of pollutants. The role of the three groups of organisms is very important in maintaining the water quality by elimination of pollutants. Among the organisms inhabiting the Mingachevir Reservoir, micromycetes have not yet been studied. Therefore, the study of the species composition and seasonal dynamics, peculiarities of their growth and development in the environment with the presence of some of the pollutants should be considered to date.Methods. In order to determine the role of micromycetes-migrants in the mineralization of organic substrates, as an active participant of self-purification process, we used water samples from the bottom sediments as well as decaying and skeletonized stalks of cane, reeds, algae, macrophytes, exuvia of insects and fish remains submerged in water.Findings. For the first time, we obtained the data on the quality and quantity of microscopic mycelial fungi in freshwater bodies on the example of the Mingachevir water reservoir; we also studied the possibilities for oxygenating the autochthonous organic matter of allochthonous origin with micromycetes-migrants.Conclusions. It was found that the seasonal development of micromycetes-migrants within the Mingachevir reservoir is characterized by an increase in the number of species in the summer and a gradual reduction in species diversity in the fall. 

  11. TITUS: a general finite element system

    Bougrelle, P.

    1983-01-01

    TITUS is a general finite element structural analysis system which performs linear/non-linear, static/dynamic analyses of heat-transfer/thermo-mechanical problems. One of the major features of TITUS is that it was designed by engineers, to address engineers in an industrial environment. This has resulted in an easy to use system, with a high-level free-formatted problem oriented language, a large selection of pre- and post processors and sophisticated graphic capabilities. TITUS has many references in civil, mechanical and nuclear engineering applications. The TITUS system is available on various types of machines, from large mainframes to mini computers

  12. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-12-01

    We have developed and tested technology for a new type of direct hydrocarbon detection. The method uses inelastic rock properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic methods to the presence of oil and gas saturation. These methods include use of energy absorption, dispersion, and attenuation (Q) along with traditional seismic attributes like velocity, impedance, and AVO. Our approach is to combine three elements: (1) a synthesis of the latest rock physics understanding of how rock inelasticity is related to rock type, pore fluid types, and pore microstructure, (2) synthetic seismic modeling that will help identify the relative contributions of scattering and intrinsic inelasticity to apparent Q attributes, and (3) robust algorithms that extract relative wave attenuation attributes from seismic data. This project provides: (1) Additional petrophysical insight from acquired data; (2) Increased understanding of rock and fluid properties; (3) New techniques to measure reservoir properties that are not currently available; and (4) Provide tools to more accurately describe the reservoir and predict oil location and volumes. These methodologies will improve the industry's ability to predict and quantify oil and gas saturation distribution, and to apply this information through geologic models to enhance reservoir simulation. We have applied for two separate patents relating to work that was completed as part of this project.

  13. Williston Reservoir raising - environmental overview

    1988-07-01

    This preliminary environmental overview report was prepared by B.C. Hydro in June 1987 and revised in July 1988 as an initial assessment of a possible 1.5 m (5 ft.) raise in the Williston Reservoir maximum normal level. The enviromental overview study and the associated engineering and property studies were undertaken to provide information for a decision on whether to initiate more detailed studies. Overview studies are based mainly on available reports, mapping and field data, supplemented by limited site reconnaissance and, in this case, input from key agencies and groups. The lack of adequate mapping of areas which could be affected by reservoir raising did not permit definitive conclusion to be reached. This mapping will be done over the next year to complete the overview assessment. This document covers the impact assessment of socio-economic factors, forestry, reservoir clearing, heritage, recreation, aquatic resources, and wilflife. Further studies in each of these areas are also included. 54 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Reservoir floodplains support distinct fish assemblages

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Wigen, S. L.; Dagel, Jonah D.

    2014-01-01

    Reservoirs constructed on floodplain rivers are unique because the upper reaches of the impoundment may include extensive floodplain environments. Moreover, reservoirs that experience large periodic water level fluctuations as part of their operational objectives seasonally inundate and dewater floodplains in their upper reaches, partly mimicking natural inundations of river floodplains. In four flood control reservoirs in Mississippi, USA, we explored the dynamics of connectivity between reservoirs and adjacent floodplains and the characteristics of fish assemblages that develop in reservoir floodplains relative to those that develop in reservoir bays. Although fish species richness in floodplains and bays were similar, species composition differed. Floodplains emphasized fish species largely associated with backwater shallow environments, often resistant to harsh environmental conditions. Conversely, dominant species in bays represented mainly generalists that benefit from the continuous connectivity between the bay and the main reservoir. Floodplains in the study reservoirs provided desirable vegetated habitats at lower water level elevations, earlier in the year, and more frequently than in bays. Inundating dense vegetation in bays requires raising reservoir water levels above the levels required to reach floodplains. Therefore, aside from promoting distinct fish assemblages within reservoirs and helping promote diversity in regulated rivers, reservoir floodplains are valued because they can provide suitable vegetated habitats for fish species at elevations below the normal pool, precluding the need to annually flood upland vegetation that would inevitably be impaired by regular flooding. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Geothermal heat pump

    Bruno, R.; Tinti, F.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, for several types of buildings and users, the choice of conditioning by heat pump and low enthalpy geothermal reservoir has been increasing in the Italian market. In fact, such systems are efficient in terms of energy and consumption, they can perform, even at the same time, both functions, heating and cooling and they are environmentally friendly, because they do not produce local emissions. This article will introduce the technology and will focus on critical points of a geothermal field design, from actual practice, to future perspectives for the geo exchanger improvement. Finally, the article presents a best practice case in Bologna district, with an economic analysis showing the convenience of a geothermal heat pump. Conclusions of the real benefits of these plants can be drawn: compared to a non-negligible initial cost, the investment has a pay-back period almost always acceptable, usually less than 10 years. [it

  16. Optical Finite Element Processor

    Casasent, David; Taylor, Bradley K.

    1986-01-01

    A new high-accuracy optical linear algebra processor (OLAP) with many advantageous features is described. It achieves floating point accuracy, handles bipolar data by sign-magnitude representation, performs LU decomposition using only one channel, easily partitions and considers data flow. A new application (finite element (FE) structural analysis) for OLAPs is introduced and the results of a case study presented. Error sources in encoded OLAPs are addressed for the first time. Their modeling and simulation are discussed and quantitative data are presented. Dominant error sources and the effects of composite error sources are analyzed.

  17. Combinatorics of finite sets

    Anderson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Coherent treatment provides comprehensive view of basic methods and results of the combinatorial study of finite set systems. The Clements-Lindstrom extension of the Kruskal-Katona theorem to multisets is explored, as is the Greene-Kleitman result concerning k-saturated chain partitions of general partially ordered sets. Connections with Dilworth's theorem, the marriage problem, and probability are also discussed. Each chapter ends with a helpful series of exercises and outline solutions appear at the end. ""An excellent text for a topics course in discrete mathematics."" - Bulletin of the Ame

  18. The role of reservoir characterization in the reservoir management process (as reflected in the Department of Energy`s reservoir management demonstration program)

    Fowler, M.L. [BDM-Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States); Young, M.A.; Madden, M.P. [BDM-Oklahoma, Bartlesville, OK (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Optimum reservoir recovery and profitability result from guidance of reservoir practices provided by an effective reservoir management plan. Success in developing the best, most appropriate reservoir management plan requires knowledge and consideration of (1) the reservoir system including rocks, and rock-fluid interactions (i.e., a characterization of the reservoir) as well as wellbores and associated equipment and surface facilities; (2) the technologies available to describe, analyze, and exploit the reservoir; and (3) the business environment under which the plan will be developed and implemented. Reservoir characterization is the essential to gain needed knowledge of the reservoir for reservoir management plan building. Reservoir characterization efforts can be appropriately scaled by considering the reservoir management context under which the plan is being built. Reservoir management plans de-optimize with time as technology and the business environment change or as new reservoir information indicates the reservoir characterization models on which the current plan is based are inadequate. BDM-Oklahoma and the Department of Energy have implemented a program of reservoir management demonstrations to encourage operators with limited resources and experience to learn, implement, and disperse sound reservoir management techniques through cooperative research and development projects whose objectives are to develop reservoir management plans. In each of the three projects currently underway, careful attention to reservoir management context assures a reservoir characterization approach that is sufficient, but not in excess of what is necessary, to devise and implement an effective reservoir management plan.

  19. Seismic Modeling Of Reservoir Heterogeneity Scales: An Application To Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    Huang, J.; Bellefleur, G.; Milkereit, B.

    2008-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates, a type of inclusion compound or clathrate, are composed of gas molecules trapped within a cage of water molecules. The occurrence of gas hydrates in permafrost regions has been confirmed by core samples recovered from the Mallik gas hydrate research wells located within Mackenzie Delta in Northwest Territories of Canada. Strong vertical variations of compressional and shear sonic velocities and weak surface seismic expressions of gas hydrates indicate that lithological heterogeneities control the distribution of hydrates. Seismic scattering studies predict that typical scales and strong physical contrasts due to gas hydrate concentration will generate strong forward scattering, leaving only weak energy captured by surface receivers. In order to understand the distribution of hydrates and the seismic scattering effects, an algorithm was developed to construct heterogeneous petrophysical reservoir models. The algorithm was based on well logs showing power law features and Gaussian or Non-Gaussian probability density distribution, and was designed to honor the whole statistical features of well logs such as the characteristic scales and the correlation among rock parameters. Multi-dimensional and multi-variable heterogeneous models representing the same statistical properties were constructed and applied to the heterogeneity analysis of gas hydrate reservoirs. The petrophysical models provide the platform to estimate rock physics properties as well as to study the impact of seismic scattering, wave mode conversion, and their integration on wave behavior in heterogeneous reservoirs. Using the Biot-Gassmann theory, the statistical parameters obtained from Mallik 5L-38, and the correlation length estimated from acoustic impedance inversion, gas hydrate volume fraction in Mallik area was estimated to be 1.8%, approximately 2x108 m3 natural gas stored in a hydrate bearing interval within 0.25 km2 lateral extension and between 889 m and 1115 m depth

  20. Ground deformation at collapse calderas: influence of host rock lithology and reservoir multiplicity

    Geyer, A; Gottsmann, J [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen' s Road, BS8 1RJ, Bristol (United Kingdom)], E-mail: A.GeverTraver@bristol.ac.uk

    2008-10-01

    A variety of source mechanisms have been proposed to account for observed caldera deformation. Here we present a systematic set of new results from numerical forward modelling using a Finite Element Method. which provides a link between measured ground deformation and the inaccessible deformation source. We simulate surface displacements due to pressure changes in a shallow oblate reservoir overlain by host rock with variable mechanical properties. We find that the amplitude and wavelength of resultant ground deformation is dependent on the distribution of mechanically stiff and soft lithologies and their relative distribution above a reservoir. In addition, we note an influence of layering on the critical ratio of horizontal over vertical displacements, a criterion employed to discriminate between different finite source geometries.

  1. Numerical Methods for Plate Forming by Line Heating

    Clausen, Henrik Bisgaard

    2000-01-01

    Few researchers have addressed so far the topic Line Heating in the search for better control of the process. Various methods to help understanding the mechanics have been used, including beam analysis approximation, equivalent force calculation and three-dimensional finite element analysis. I...... consider here finite element methods to model the behaviour and to predict the heating paths....

  2. Finite-size scaling theory and quantum hamiltonian Field theory: the transverse Ising model

    Hamer, C.J.; Barber, M.N.

    1979-01-01

    Exact results for the mass gap, specific heat and susceptibility of the one-dimensional transverse Ising model on a finite lattice are generated by constructing a finite matrix representation of the Hamiltonian using strong-coupling eigenstates. The critical behaviour of the limiting infinite chain is analysed using finite-size scaling theory. In this way, excellent estimates (to within 1/2% accuracy) are found for the critical coupling and the exponents α, ν and γ

  3. Finiteness of corner vortices

    Kalita, Jiten C.; Biswas, Sougata; Panda, Swapnendu

    2018-04-01

    Till date, the sequence of vortices present in the solid corners of steady internal viscous incompressible flows was thought to be infinite. However, the already existing and most recent geometric theories on incompressible viscous flows that express vortical structures in terms of critical points in bounded domains indicate a strong opposition to this notion of infiniteness. In this study, we endeavor to bridge the gap between the two opposing stream of thoughts by diagnosing the assumptions of the existing theorems on such vortices. We provide our own set of proofs for establishing the finiteness of the sequence of corner vortices by making use of the continuum hypothesis and Kolmogorov scale, which guarantee a nonzero scale for the smallest vortex structure possible in incompressible viscous flows. We point out that the notion of infiniteness resulting from discrete self-similarity of the vortex structures is not physically feasible. Making use of some elementary concepts of mathematical analysis and our own construction of diametric disks, we conclude that the sequence of corner vortices is finite.

  4. TOUGH, Unsaturated Groundwater Transport and Heat Transport Simulation

    Pruess, K.A.; Cooper, C.; Osnes, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: A successor to the TOUGH program, TOUGH2 offers added capabilities and user features, including the flexibility to handle different fluid mixtures (water, water with tracer; water, CO 2 ; water, air; water, air with vapour pressure lowering, and water, hydrogen), facilities for processing of geometric data (computational grids), and an internal version control system to ensure referenceability of code applications. TOUGH (Transport of Unsaturated Groundwater and Heat) is a multi-dimensional numerical model for simulating the coupled transport of water, vapor, air, and heat in porous and fractured media. The program provides options for specifying injection or withdrawal of heat and fluids. Although primarily designed for studies of high-level nuclear waste isolation in partially saturated geological media, it should also be useful for a wider range of problems in heat and moisture transfer, and in the drying of porous materials. For example, geothermal reservoir simulation problems can be handled simply by setting the air mass function equal to zero on input. The TOUGH simulator was developed for problems involving strongly heat-driven flow. To describe these phenomena a multi-phase approach to fluid and heat flow is used, which fully accounts for the movement of gaseous and liquid phases, their transport of latent transitions between liquid and vapor. TOUGH takes account of fluid flow in both liquid and gaseous phases occurring under pressure, viscous, and gravity forces according to Darcy's law. Interference between the phases is represented by means of relative permeability functions. The code handles binary, but not Knudsen, diffusion in the gas phase and capillary and phase absorption effects for the liquid phase. Heat transport occurs by means of conduction with thermal conductivity dependent on water saturation, convection, and binary diffusion, which includes both sensible and latent heat. 2 - Method of solution: All

  5. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF UNSTEADY FILTRATION OF ELASTIC LIQUID IN AN INHOMOGENEOUS RESERVOIR

    A. G. Balamirzoev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the possibility of numerical solution of two-dimensional problem of unsteady filtration in an inhomogeneous elastic liquid reservoir. The problem of finding the distribution of the pressure p(x,y,t in the process of exploitation of deposits is reduced to the solution of a differential equation of parabolic type with variable coefficients. The problem is solved approximately by using the method of finite differences.

  6. Heat pipe heat storage performance

    Caruso, A; Pasquetti, R [Univ. de Provence, Marseille (FR). Inst. Universitaire des Systemes; Grakovich, L P; Vasiliev, L L [A.V. Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Inst. of the BSSR, Academy of Sciences, Minsk (BY)

    1989-01-01

    Heat storage offers essential thermal energy saving for heating. A ground heat store equipped with heat pipes connecting it with a heat source and to the user is considered in this paper. It has been shown that such a heat exchanging system along with a batch energy source meets, to a considerable extent, house heating requirements. (author).

  7. Thermal mapping studies at Kadra reservoir near Kaiga generating station site

    Ravi, P.M.; Nayak, P.D.; Sudhakar, J.; Mishra, D.G.; Hegde, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    An inherent problem in nuclear and thermal power plants are the release of heat energy into the environment through cooling system to water bodies such as lakes, rivers, estuaries and oceans. Two NPPs of Kaiga Generating Station, discharge the thermal effluent to the nearby Kadra reservoir. This paper presents the results of three year long comprehensive thermal mapping studies conducted by ESL, KGS as part of the Thermal Ecological Studies sponsored by Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences (BRNS), Department of Atomic Energy. Present studies clearly demonstrate that the thermally influenced zone in the reservoir is limited to a small volume of the reservoir and is not likely to lead any irreversible adverse impact on the ecosystem of the reservoir. (author)

  8. A Rock Physics Feasibility Study of the Geothermal Gassum Reservoir, Copenhagen Area, Denmark

    Bredesen, Kenneth; Dalgaard, Esben Borch; Mathiesen, Anders

    The subsurface of Denmark stores significant amounts of renewable geothermal energy which may contribute to domestic heating for centuries. However, establishing a successful geothermal plant with robust production capacity require reservoirs with sufficient high porosity and permeability. Modern...... quantitative seismic interpretation is a good approach to de-risk prospects and gain reservoir insight, but is so far not widely used for geothermal applications. In this study we perform a rock physics feasibility study as a pre-step towards quantitative seismic interpretation of geothermal reservoirs......, primarily in areas around Copenhagen. The results argue that it may be possible to use AVO and seismic inversion data to distinguish geothermal sandstone reservoirs from surrounding shales and to estimate porosity and permeability. Moreover, this study may represent new possibilities for future rock physics...

  9. Organic and weed control in water supply reservoirs of power plants

    Eswaran, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    Aquatic weeds and algal control in water supply reservoirs used for multipurpose use need specific attention, since they pose a lot of problem for the operating plants by affecting (a) the water quality of boiler and feed waters, (b) the performance of DM plants by reducing the efficiency of Anion beds, (c) the performance of Activated Carbon Filters (ACF) and (d) fouling induced corrosion problems in cooling water systems (Heat Exchangers and Piping materials) causing plant outages leading to production losses. The photosynthetic activity of planktonic plants which are growing abundantly in the open reservoir, sustained by the relatively high inorganic phosphate levels shoots up the pH of the reservoir water to very high levels. High pH, Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) and depleted plants can increase corrosion problems affecting plant performance. This paper focuses on the type of weeds prominent in the water supply reservoir at Kalpakkam and the associated problems in the Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). (author)

  10. Mimetic Finite Differences for Flow in Fractures from Microseismic Data

    Al-Hinai, Omar; Srinivasan, Sanjay; Wheeler, Mary F.

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for porous media flow in the presence of complex fracture networks. The approach uses the Mimetic Finite Difference method (MFD) and takes advantage of MFD's ability to solve over a general set of polyhedral cells. This flexibility is used to mesh fracture intersections in two and three-dimensional settings without creating small cells at the intersection point. We also demonstrate how to use general polyhedra for embedding fracture boundaries in the reservoir domain. The target application is representing fracture networks inferred from microseismic analysis.

  11. Mimetic Finite Differences for Flow in Fractures from Microseismic Data

    Al-Hinai, Omar

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for porous media flow in the presence of complex fracture networks. The approach uses the Mimetic Finite Difference method (MFD) and takes advantage of MFD\\'s ability to solve over a general set of polyhedral cells. This flexibility is used to mesh fracture intersections in two and three-dimensional settings without creating small cells at the intersection point. We also demonstrate how to use general polyhedra for embedding fracture boundaries in the reservoir domain. The target application is representing fracture networks inferred from microseismic analysis.

  12. Heat transfer

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Heat transfer. Heat conduction in solid slab. Convective heat transfer. Non-linear temperature. variation due to flow. HEAT FLUX AT SURFACE. conduction/diffusion.

  13. Heat Waves

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and spasms due ... that the body is having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - ...

  14. Heat Islands

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  15. Evaluation of MRI issues for a new neurological implant, the Sensor Reservoir.

    Shellock, Frank G; Knebel, Jörg; Prat, Angelina D

    2013-09-01

    A new neurological implant, the Sensor-Reservoir, was developed to provide a relative measurement of ICP, which permits a noninvasive technique to detect and localize occlusions in ventricular drainage systems and, thus, to identify mechanical damage to shunt valves. The "reservoir" of this device can be used to administer medication or a contrast agent, to extract cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), and with the possibility of directly measuring ICP. The Sensor-Reservoir was evaluated to identify possible MRI-related issues at 1.5-T/64-MHz and 3-T/128-MHz. Standard testing techniques were utilized to evaluate magnetic field interactions (i.e., translational attraction and torque), MRI-related heating, and artifacts at 3-T for the Sensor-Reservoir. In addition, 12 samples of the Sensor-Reservoir underwent testing to determine if the function of these devices was affected by exposures to various MRI conditions at 1.5-T/64-MHz and 3-T/128-MHz. Magnetic field interactions for the Sensor-Reservoir were not substantial. The heating results indicated a highest temperature rise of 1.8 °C, which poses no patient risks. Artifacts were relatively small in relation to the size and shape of the Sensor-Reservoir, but may interfere diagnostically if the area of interest is near the device. All devices were unaffected by exposures to MRI conditions at 1.5-T/64-MHz and 3-T/128-MHz. When specific guidelines are followed, the Sensor-Reservoir is "MR conditional" for patients undergoing MRI examinations at 3-T or less. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Expanding solvent SAGD in heavy oil reservoirs

    Govind, P.A. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Canadian Section, Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[ConocoPhillips Canada Resources Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada); Das, S.; Wheeler, T.J. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Srinivasan, S. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) projects have proven effective for the recovery of oil and bitumen. Expanding solvent (ES) SAGD pilot projects have also demonstrated positive results of improved performance. This paper presented the results of a simulation study that investigated several important factors of the ES-SAGD process, including solvent types; concentration; operating pressure; and injection strategy. The objectives of the study were to examine the effectiveness of the ES-SAGD process in terms of production acceleration and energy requirements; to optimize solvent selection; to understand the effect of dilation in unconsolidated oil sands and the directional impact on reservoir parameters and oil production rate in ES-SAGD; and to understand the impact of operating conditions such as pressure, solvent concentration, circulation preheating period and the role of conduction heating and grid size in this process. The advantages of ES-SAGD over SAGD were also outlined. The paper presented results of sensitivity studies that were conducted on these four factors. Conclusions and recommendations for operating strategy were also offered. It was concluded that dilation is an important factor for SAGD performance at high operating pressure. 8 refs., 15 figs.

  17. The Determining Finite Automata Process

    M. S. Vinogradova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of formal languages widely uses finite state automata both in implementation of automata-based approach to programming, and in synthesis of logical control algorithms.To ensure unambiguous operation of the algorithms, the synthesized finite state automata must be deterministic. Within the approach to the synthesis of the mobile robot controls, for example, based on the theory of formal languages, there are problems concerning the construction of various finite automata, but such finite automata, as a rule, will not be deterministic. The algorithm of determinization can be applied to the finite automata, as specified, in various ways. The basic ideas of the algorithm of determinization can be most simply explained using the representations of a finite automaton in the form of a weighted directed graph.The paper deals with finite automata represented as weighted directed graphs, and discusses in detail the procedure for determining the finite automata represented in this way. Gives a detailed description of the algorithm for determining finite automata. A large number of examples illustrate a capability of the determinization algorithm.

  18. Finite energy electroweak dyon

    Kimm, Kyoungtae [Seoul National University, Faculty of Liberal Education, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J.H. [Konkuk University, Department of Physics, College of Natural Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Y.M. [Konkuk University, Administration Building 310-4, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    The latest MoEDAL experiment at LHC to detect the electroweak monopole makes the theoretical prediction of the monopole mass an urgent issue. We discuss three different ways to estimate the mass of the electroweak monopole. We first present the dimensional and scaling arguments which indicate the monopole mass to be around 4 to 10 TeV. To justify this we construct finite energy analytic dyon solutions which could be viewed as the regularized Cho-Maison dyon, modifying the coupling strength at short distance. Our result demonstrates that a genuine electroweak monopole whose mass scale is much smaller than the grand unification scale can exist, which can actually be detected at the present LHC. (orig.)

  19. Probabilistic fracture finite elements

    Liu, W. K.; Belytschko, T.; Lua, Y. J.

    1991-05-01

    The Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics (PFM) is a promising method for estimating the fatigue life and inspection cycles for mechanical and structural components. The Probability Finite Element Method (PFEM), which is based on second moment analysis, has proved to be a promising, practical approach to handle problems with uncertainties. As the PFEM provides a powerful computational tool to determine first and second moment of random parameters, the second moment reliability method can be easily combined with PFEM to obtain measures of the reliability of the structural system. The method is also being applied to fatigue crack growth. Uncertainties in the material properties of advanced materials such as polycrystalline alloys, ceramics, and composites are commonly observed from experimental tests. This is mainly attributed to intrinsic microcracks, which are randomly distributed as a result of the applied load and the residual stress.

  20. Finite element modelling

    Tonks, M.R.; Williamson, R.; Masson, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Finite Element Method (FEM) is a numerical technique for finding approximate solutions to boundary value problems. While FEM is commonly used to solve solid mechanics equations, it can be applied to a large range of BVPs from many different fields. FEM has been used for reactor fuels modelling for many years. It is most often used for fuel performance modelling at the pellet and pin scale, however, it has also been used to investigate properties of the fuel material, such as thermal conductivity and fission gas release. Recently, the United Stated Department Nuclear Energy Advanced Modelling and Simulation Program has begun using FEM as the basis of the MOOSE-BISON-MARMOT Project that is developing a multi-dimensional, multi-physics fuel performance capability that is massively parallel and will use multi-scale material models to provide a truly predictive modelling capability. (authors)

  1. Global Carbon Reservoir Oxidative Ratios

    Masiello, C. A.; Gallagher, M. E.; Hockaday, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    Photosynthesis and respiration move carbon and oxygen between the atmosphere and the biosphere at a ratio that is characteristic of the biogeochemical processes involved. This ratio is called the oxidative ratio (OR) of photosynthesis and respiration, and is defined as the ratio of moles of O2 per moles of CO2. This O2/CO2 ratio is a characteristic of biosphere-atmosphere gas fluxes, much like the 13C signature of CO2 transferred between the biosphere and the atmosphere has a characteristic signature. OR values vary on a scale of 0 (CO2) to 2 (CH4), with most ecosystem values clustered between 0.9 and 1.2. Just as 13C can be measured for both carbon fluxes and carbon pools, OR can also be measured for fluxes and pools and can provide information about the processes involved in carbon and oxygen cycling. OR values also provide information about reservoir organic geochemistry because pool OR values are proportional to the oxidation state of carbon (Cox) in the reservoir. OR may prove to be a particularly valuable biogeochemical tracer because of its ability to couple information about ecosystem gas fluxes with ecosystem organic geochemistry. We have developed 3 methods to measure the OR of ecosystem carbon reservoirs and intercalibrated them to assure that they yield accurate, intercomparable data. Using these tools we have built a large enough database of biomass and soil OR values that it is now possible to consider the implications of global patterns in ecosystem OR values. Here we present a map of the natural range in ecosystem OR values and begin to consider its implications. One striking pattern is an apparent offset between soil and biospheric OR values: soil OR values are frequently higher than that of their source biomass. We discuss this trend in the context of soil organic geochemistry and gas fluxes.

  2. Theoretical and experimental fundamentals of designing promising technological equipment to improve efficiency and environmental safety of highly viscous oil recovery from deep oil reservoirs

    Moiseyev, V. A.; Nazarov, V. P.; Zhuravlev, V. Y.; Zhuykov, D. A.; Kubrikov, M. V.; Klokotov, Y. N.

    2016-12-01

    The development of new technological equipment for the implementation of highly effective methods of recovering highly viscous oil from deep reservoirs is an important scientific and technical challenge. Thermal recovery methods are promising approaches to solving the problem. It is necessary to carry out theoretical and experimental research aimed at developing oil-well tubing (OWT) with composite heatinsulating coatings on the basis of basalt and glass fibers. We used the method of finite element analysis in Nastran software, which implements complex scientific and engineering calculations, including the calculation of the stress-strain state of mechanical systems, the solution of problems of heat transfer, the study of nonlinear static, the dynamic transient analysis of frequency characteristics, etc. As a result, we obtained a mathematical model of thermal conductivity which describes the steady-state temperature and changes in the fibrous highly porous material with the heat loss by Stefan-Boltzmann's radiation. It has been performed for the first time using the method of computer modeling in Nastran software environments. The results give grounds for further implementation of the real design of the OWT when implementing thermal methods for increasing the rates of oil production and mitigating environmental impacts.

  3. A reservoir trap for antiprotons

    Smorra, Christian; Franke, Kurt; Nagahama, Hiroki; Schneider, Georg; Higuchi, Takashi; Van Gorp, Simon; Blaum, Klaus; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Quint, Wolfgang; Walz, Jochen; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Ulmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract arbitrary fractions of antiprotons from an accumulated reservoir, and to inject them into a Penning-trap system for high-precision measurements. In our trap-system antiproton storage times > 1.08 years are estimated. The device is fail-safe against power-cuts of up to 10 hours. This makes our planned comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons independent from accelerator cycles, and will enable us to perform experiments during long accelerator shutdown periods when background magnetic noise is low. The demonstrated scheme has the potential to be applied in many other precision Penning trap experiments dealing with exotic particles.

  4. Direct Use Reservoir Models - How We think They Work

    Culver, G.

    1990-01-01

    The resource base for low-to-moderate temperature direct use geothermal applications is large and wide spread throughout the western United States. The models for direct use resources likely to be utilized in EPA Region IX depict fluids percolating to significant depths, being heated and convecting to the surface or near surface. The most commonly utilized resource is the fault controlled lateral leakage type. Geothermal fluids within the shallow reservoir vary in temperature and chemistry depending on the distance from the upflow zone. Regulations governing injected water chemistry compared to receiving water chemistry should take variations of chemistry into account.

  5. Fast Multiscale Reservoir Simulations using POD-DEIM Model Reduction

    Ghasemi, Mohammadreza

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, we present a global-local model reduction for fast multiscale reservoir simulations in highly heterogeneous porous media with applications to optimization and history matching. Our proposed approach identifies a low dimensional structure of the solution space. We introduce an auxiliary variable (the velocity field) in our model reduction that allows achieving a high degree of model reduction. The latter is due to the fact that the velocity field is conservative for any low-order reduced model in our framework. Because a typical global model reduction based on POD is a Galerkin finite element method, and thus it can not guarantee local mass conservation. This can be observed in numerical simulations that use finite volume based approaches. Discrete Empirical Interpolation Method (DEIM) is used to approximate the nonlinear functions of fine-grid functions in Newton iterations. This approach allows achieving the computational cost that is independent of the fine grid dimension. POD snapshots are inexpensively computed using local model reduction techniques based on Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method (GMsFEM) which provides (1) a hierarchical approximation of snapshot vectors (2) adaptive computations by using coarse grids (3) inexpensive global POD operations in a small dimensional spaces on a coarse grid. By balancing the errors of the global and local reduced-order models, our new methodology can provide an error bound in simulations. Our numerical results, utilizing a two-phase immiscible flow, show a substantial speed-up and we compare our results to the standard POD-DEIM in finite volume setup.

  6. Axial anomaly at finite temperature and finite density

    Qian Zhixin; Su Rukeng; Yu, P.K.N.

    1994-01-01

    The U(1) axial anomaly in a hot fermion medium is investigated by using the real time Green's function method. After calculating the lowest order triangle diagrams, we find that finite temperature as well as finite fermion density does not affect the axial anomaly. The higher order corrections for the axial anomaly are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Effect of reservoir heterogeneity on air injection performance in a light oil reservoir

    Hu Jia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Air injection is a good option to development light oil reservoir. As well-known that, reservoir heterogeneity has great effect for various EOR processes. This also applies to air injection. However, oil recovery mechanisms and physical processes for air injection in heterogeneous reservoir with dip angle are still not well understood. The reported setting of reservoir heterogeneous for physical model or simulation model of air injection only simply uses different-layer permeability of porous media. In practice, reservoir heterogeneity follows the principle of geostatistics. How much of contrast in permeability actually challenges the air injection in light oil reservoir? This should be investigated by using layered porous medial settings of the classical Dykstra-Parsons style. Unfortunately, there has been no work addressing this issue for air injection in light oil reservoir. In this paper, Reservoir heterogeneity is quantified based on the use of different reservoir permeability distribution according to classical Dykstra-Parsons coefficients method. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on physical process and production performance of air injection in light oil reservoir through numerical reservoir simulation approach. The basic model is calibrated based on previous study. Total eleven pseudo compounders are included in this model and ten complexity of reactions are proposed to achieve the reaction scheme. Results show that oil recovery factor is decreased with the increasing of reservoir heterogeneity both for air and N2 injection from updip location, which is against the working behavior of air injection from updip location. Reservoir heterogeneity sometimes can act as positive effect to improve sweep efficiency as well as enhance production performance for air injection. High O2 content air injection can benefit oil recovery factor, also lead to early O2 breakthrough in heterogeneous reservoir. Well

  8. Data Compression of Hydrocarbon Reservoir Simulation Grids

    Chavez, Gustavo Ivan

    2015-05-28

    A dense volumetric grid coming from an oil/gas reservoir simulation output is translated into a compact representation that supports desired features such as interactive visualization, geometric continuity, color mapping and quad representation. A set of four control curves per layer results from processing the grid data, and a complete set of these 3-dimensional surfaces represents the complete volume data and can map reservoir properties of interest to analysts. The processing results yield a representation of reservoir simulation results which has reduced data storage requirements and permits quick performance interaction between reservoir analysts and the simulation data. The degree of reservoir grid compression can be selected according to the quality required, by adjusting for different thresholds, such as approximation error and level of detail. The processions results are of potential benefit in applications such as interactive rendering, data compression, and in-situ visualization of large-scale oil/gas reservoir simulations.

  9. On the evaluation of steam assisted gravity drainage in naturally fractured oil reservoirs

    Seyed Morteza Tohidi Hosseini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD as a successful enhanced oil recovery (EOR process has been applied to extract heavy and extra heavy oils. Huge amount of global heavy oil resources exists in carbonate reservoirs which are mostly naturally fractured reservoirs. Unlike clastic reservoirs, few studies were carried out to determine the performance of SAGD in carbonate reservoirs. Even though SAGD is a highly promising technique, several uncertainties and unanswered questions still exist and they should be clarified for expansion of SAGD methods to world wide applications especially in naturally fractured reservoirs. In this communication, the effects of some operational and reservoir parameters on SAGD processes were investigated in a naturally fractured reservoir with oil wet rock using CMG-STARS thermal simulator. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of fracture properties including fracture orientation, fracture spacing and fracture permeability on the SAGD performance in naturally fractured reservoirs. Moreover, one operational parameter was also studied; one new well configuration, staggered well pair was evaluated. Results indicated that fracture orientation influences steam expansion and oil production from the horizontal well pairs. It was also found that horizontal fractures have unfavorable effects on oil production, while vertical fractures increase the production rate for the horizontal well. Moreover, an increase in fracture spacing results in more oil production, because in higher fracture spacing model, steam will have more time to diffuse into matrices and heat up the entire reservoir. Furthermore, an increase in fracture permeability results in process enhancement and ultimate recovery improvement. Besides, diagonal change in the location of injection wells (staggered model increases the recovery efficiency in long-term production plan.

  10. Muon Tomography of Deep Reservoirs

    Bonneville, Alain H.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2016-12-31

    Imaging subsurface geological formations, oil and gas reservoirs, mineral deposits, cavities or magma chambers under active volcanoes has been for many years a major quest of geophysicists and geologists. Since these objects cannot be observed directly, different indirect geophysical methods have been developed. They are all based on variations of certain physical properties of the subsurface that can be detected from the ground surface or from boreholes. Electrical resistivity, seismic wave’s velocities and density are certainly the most used properties. If we look at density, indirect estimates of density distributions are performed currently by seismic reflection methods - since the velocity of seismic waves depend also on density - but they are expensive and discontinuous in time. Direct estimates of density are performed using gravimetric data looking at variations of the gravity field induced by the density variations at depth but this is not sufficiently accurate. A new imaging technique using cosmic-ray muon detectors has emerged during the last decade and muon tomography - or muography - promises to provide, for the first time, a complete and precise image of the density distribution in the subsurface. Further, this novel approach has the potential to become a direct, real-time, and low-cost method for monitoring fluid displacement in subsurface reservoirs.

  11. Smart waterflooding in carbonate reservoirs

    Zahid, A.

    2012-02-15

    During the last decade, smart waterflooding has been developed into an emerging EOR technology both for carbonate and sandstone reservoirs that does not require toxic or expensive chemicals. Although it is widely accepted that different salinity brines may increase the oil recovery for carbonate reservoirs, understanding of the mechanism of this increase is still developing. To understand this smart waterflooding process, an extensive research has been carried out covering a broad range of disciplines within surface chemistry, thermodynamics of crude oil and brine, as well as their behavior in porous media. The main conclusion of most previous studies was that it is the rock wettability alteration towards more water wetting condition that helps improving the oil recovery. In the first step of this project, we focused on verifying this conclusion. Coreflooding experiments were carried out using Stevens Klint outcrop chalk core plugs with brines without sulfate, as well as brines containing sulfate in different concentrations. The effects of temperature, injection rate, crude oil composition and different sulfate concentrations on the total oil recovery and the recovery rate were investigated. Experimental results clearly indicate improvement of the oil recovery without wettability alteration. At the second step of this project, we studied crude oil/brine interactions under different temperatures, pressures and salinity conditions in order to understand mechanisms behind the high salinity waterflooding. Our results show, in particular that sulfate ions may help decreasing the crude oil viscosity or formation of, seemingly, an emulsion phase between sulfate-enriched brine and oil at high temperature and pressure. Experimental results indicate that crude oils interact differently with the same brine solutions regarding phase behavior and viscosity measurements. This difference is attributed to the difference in composition of the different crude oils. More experiments

  12. Development of gas and gas condensate reservoirs

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    In the study of gas reservoir development, the first year topics are restricted on reservoir characterization. There are two types of reservoir characterization. One is the reservoir formation characterization and the other is the reservoir fluid characterization. For the reservoir formation characterization, calculation of conditional simulation was compared with that of unconditional simulation. The results of conditional simulation has higher confidence level than the unconditional simulation because conditional simulation considers the sample location as well as distance correlation. In the reservoir fluid characterization, phase behavior calculations revealed that the component grouping is more important than the increase of number of components. From the liquid volume fraction with pressure drop, the phase behavior of reservoir fluid can be estimated. The calculation results of fluid recombination, constant composition expansion, and constant volume depletion are matched very well with the experimental data. In swelling test of the reservoir fluid with lean gas, the accuracy of dew point pressure forecast depends on the component characterization. (author). 28 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. Stretch due to Penile Prosthesis Reservoir Migration

    E. Baten

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 43-year old patient presented to the emergency department with stretch, due to impossible deflation of the penile prosthesis, 4 years after successful implant. A CT-scan showed migration of the reservoir to the left rectus abdominis muscle. Refilling of the reservoir was inhibited by muscular compression, causing stretch. Removal and replacement of the reservoir was performed, after which the prosthesis was well-functioning again. Migration of the penile prosthesis reservoir is extremely rare but can cause several complications, such as stretch.

  14. Multi-data reservoir history matching for enhanced reservoir forecasting and uncertainty quantification

    Katterbauer, Klemens; Arango, Santiago; Sun, Shuyu; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Reservoir simulations and history matching are critical for fine-tuning reservoir production strategies, improving understanding of the subsurface formation, and forecasting remaining reserves. Production data have long been incorporated

  15. PDVSA Petrolera Sinovensa reservoir engineering project and optimization study

    Campos, O. [PDVSA Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Petrolera Sinovensa; Patino, J. [Kizer Energy Inc., Katy, TX (United States); Chalifoux, G.V. [Petrospec Engineering Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This paper presented a development plan for an extra-heavy oil field in Venezuela's Orinoco belt involving cold heavy oil production (CHOP) as well as a thermal follow-up process to increase the ultimate recovery factor. A reservoir simulation model was used to model various reservoir formations in order to assess their oil recovery potential. Several thermal recovery processes were considered, such as steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD), horizontal alternate steam drive (HASD), cyclic steam stimulation (CSS), horizontal continuous steam drive, and combined drive drainage (CDD). A geological static model and dynamic reservoir model were coupled for the well optimization evaluation. Production data were used to identify trends related to specific geological conditions. The study also examined methods of improving slotted liner designs and evaluated the use of electric heating as a means of improving CHOP performance. Results of the study showed that CDD offered the highest recovery rates as a follow-up to CHOP. The CDD process allowed for the use of existing wells drilled in the field. New horizontal wells will be placed between the existing wells. It was concluded that a CDD pilot should be implemented in order to prepare for a commercial implementation plan. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 14 figs.

  16. Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in Southeastern Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry

    Neupane, Ghanashyam [Idaho National Lab. (INL) and Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mattson, Earl D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL) and Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McLing, Travis L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Center for Advanced Energy Studies; Palmer, Carl D. [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Robert W. [Univ. of Idaho and Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wood, Thomas R. [Univ. of Idaho and Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Podgorney, Robert K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL) and Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Southeastern Idaho exhibits numerous warm springs, warm water from shallow wells, and hot water within oil and gas test wells that indicate a potential for geothermal development in the area. Although the area exhibits several thermal expressions, the measured geothermal gradients vary substantially (19 – 61 ºC/km) within this area, potentially suggesting a redistribution of heat in the overlying ground water from deeper geothermal reservoirs. We have estimated reservoir temperatures from measured water compositions using an inverse modeling technique (Reservoir Temperature Estimator, RTEst) that calculates the temperature at which multiple minerals are simultaneously at equilibrium while explicitly accounting for the possible loss of volatile constituents (e.g., CO2), boiling and/or water mixing. Compositions of a selected group of thermal waters representing southeastern Idaho hot/warm springs and wells were used for the development of temperature estimates. The temperature estimates in the the region varied from moderately warm (59 ºC) to over 175 ºC. Specifically, hot springs near Preston, Idaho resulted in the highest temperature estimates in the region.

  17. Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in Southeastern Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry

    Neupane, Ghanashyam; Mattson, Earl D.; McLing, Travis L.; Smith, Robert W.; Wood, Thomas R.; Podgorney, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Southeastern Idaho exhibits numerous warm springs, warm water from shallow wells, and hot water within oil and gas test wells that indicate a potential for geothermal development in the area. Although the area exhibits several thermal expressions, the measured geothermal gradients vary substantially (19 - 61 °C/km) within this area, potentially suggesting a redistribution of heat in the overlying ground water from deeper geothermal reservoirs. We have estimated reservoir temperatures from measured water compositions using an inverse modeling technique (Reservoir Temperature Estimator, RTEst) that calculates the temperature at which multiple minerals are simultaneously at equilibrium while explicitly accounting for the possible loss of volatile constituents (e.g., CO2), boiling and/or water mixing. Compositions of a selected group of thermal waters representing southeastern Idaho hot/warm springs and wells were used for the development of temperature estimates. The temperature estimates in the the region varied from moderately warm (59 °C) to over 175 °C. Specifically, hot springs near Preston, Idaho resulted in the highest temperature estimates in the region.

  18. Adaptive implicit method for thermal compositional reservoir simulation

    Agarwal, A.; Tchelepi, H.A. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[Stanford Univ., Palo Alto (United States)

    2008-10-15

    As the global demand for oil increases, thermal enhanced oil recovery techniques are becoming increasingly important. Numerical reservoir simulation of thermal methods such as steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is complex and requires a solution of nonlinear mass and energy conservation equations on a fine reservoir grid. The most currently used technique for solving these equations is the fully IMplicit (FIM) method which is unconditionally stable, allowing for large timesteps in simulation. However, it is computationally expensive. On the other hand, the method known as IMplicit pressure explicit saturations, temperature and compositions (IMPEST) is computationally inexpensive, but it is only conditionally stable and restricts the timestep size. To improve the balance between the timestep size and computational cost, the thermal adaptive IMplicit (TAIM) method uses stability criteria and a switching algorithm, where some simulation variables such as pressure, saturations, temperature, compositions are treated implicitly while others are treated with explicit schemes. This presentation described ongoing research on TAIM with particular reference to thermal displacement processes such as the stability criteria that dictate the maximum allowed timestep size for simulation based on the von Neumann linear stability analysis method; the switching algorithm that adapts labeling of reservoir variables as implicit or explicit as a function of space and time; and, complex physical behaviors such as heat and fluid convection, thermal conduction and compressibility. Key numerical results obtained by enhancing Stanford's General Purpose Research Simulator (GPRS) were also presented along with a list of research challenges. 14 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs., 1 appendix.

  19. Study of different factors affecting the electrical properties of natural gas reservoir rocks based on digital cores

    Jiang, Liming; Sun, Jianmeng; Wang, Haitao; Liu, Xuefeng

    2011-01-01

    The effects of the wettability and solubility of natural gas in formation water on the electrical properties of natural gas reservoir rocks are studied using the finite element method based on digital cores. The results show that the resistivity index of gas-wet reservoir rocks is significantly higher than that of water-wet reservoir rocks in the entire range of water saturation. The difference between them increases with decreasing water saturation. The resistivity index of natural gas reservoir rocks decreases with increasing additional conduction of water film. The solubility of natural gas in formation water has a dramatic effect on the electrical properties of reservoir rocks. The resistivity index of reservoir rocks increases as the solubility of natural gas increases. The effect of the solubility of natural gas on the resistivity index is very obvious under conditions of low water saturation, and it becomes weaker with increasing water saturation. Therefore, the reservoir wettability and the solubility of natural gas in formation water should be considered in defining the saturation exponent

  20. Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott

    1999-11-09

    The objectives of this quarterly report was to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period April - June 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the ''Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist''. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology.

  1. Axial anomaly at finite temperature

    Chaturvedi, S.; Gupte, Neelima; Srinivasan, V.

    1985-01-01

    The Jackiw-Bardeen-Adler anomaly for QED 4 and QED 2 are calculated at finite temperature. It is found that the anomaly is independent of temperature. Ishikawa's method [1984, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 53 1615] for calculating the quantised Hall effect is extended to finite temperature. (author)

  2. Heat exchangers

    Schmidt, E L; Eisenmann, G; Hahne, E [Stuttgart Univ. (TH) (F.R. Germany). Inst. fuer Thermodynamik und Waermetechnik

    1976-04-01

    A survey is presented on publications on design, heat transfer, form factors, free convection, evaporation processes, cooling towers, condensation, annular gap, cross-flowed cylinders, axial flow through a bundle of tubes, roughnesses, convective heat transfer, loss of pressure, radiative heat transfer, finned surfaces, spiral heat exchangers, curved pipes, regeneraters, heat pipes, heat carriers, scaling, heat recovery systems, materials selection, strength calculation, control, instabilities, automation of circuits, operational problems and optimization.

  3. Reservoir rock permeability prediction using support vector regression in an Iranian oil field

    Saffarzadeh, Sadegh; Shadizadeh, Seyed Reza

    2012-01-01

    Reservoir permeability is a critical parameter for the evaluation of hydrocarbon reservoirs. It is often measured in the laboratory from reservoir core samples or evaluated from well test data. The prediction of reservoir rock permeability utilizing well log data is important because the core analysis and well test data are usually only available from a few wells in a field and have high coring and laboratory analysis costs. Since most wells are logged, the common practice is to estimate permeability from logs using correlation equations developed from limited core data; however, these correlation formulae are not universally applicable. Recently, support vector machines (SVMs) have been proposed as a new intelligence technique for both regression and classification tasks. The theory has a strong mathematical foundation for dependence estimation and predictive learning from finite data sets. The ultimate test for any technique that bears the claim of permeability prediction from well log data is the accurate and verifiable prediction of permeability for wells where only the well log data are available. The main goal of this paper is to develop the SVM method to obtain reservoir rock permeability based on well log data. (paper)

  4. Boundary element analysis of earthquake induced hydrodynamic pressures in a water reservoir

    Jablonski, A.M.

    1988-11-01

    The seismic analysis of concrete gravity and arch dams is affected by the hydrodynamic pressures in the water reservoir. Boundary element method (BEM) formulations are derived for the hydrodynamic pressures arising in a gravity dam-reservoir-foundation system, treating both 2- and 3-dimensional cases. The formulations are based on the respective mathematical models which are governed by two- and three-dimensional Helmholtz equations with appropriate boundary conditions. For infinite reservoirs, loss of energy due to pressure waves moving away toward infinity strongly influence response. Since it is not possible to discretize an infinite extent, the radiation damping due to outgoing waves is accounted for by incorporating special boundary conditions at the far end, and in a similar manner the loss of energy due to absorption of waves by a flexible bottom of reservoir and banks can be accounted for by a special condition along the boundaries. Numerical results are obtained and compared with available classical solutions and convergence of numerical results with the size and number of boundary elements is studied. It is concluded that the direct boundary element method is an effective tool for the evaluation of the hydrodynamic pressures in finite and infinite dam-reservoir-foundation systems subjected to harmonic-type motion, and can easily be extended to any type of random motion with fast Fourier transform techniques. 82 refs., 65 figs., 25 tabs

  5. Reservoir characterization of the Upper Jurassic geothermal target formations (Molasse Basin, Germany): role of thermofacies as exploration tool

    Homuth, S.; Götz, A. E.; Sass, I.

    2015-06-01

    The Upper Jurassic carbonates of the southern German Molasse Basin are the target of numerous geothermal combined heat and power production projects since the year 2000. A production-orientated reservoir characterization is therefore of high economic interest. Outcrop analogue studies enable reservoir property prediction by determination and correlation of lithofacies-related thermo- and petrophysical parameters. A thermofacies classification of the carbonate formations serves to identify heterogeneities and production zones. The hydraulic conductivity is mainly controlled by tectonic structures and karstification, whilst the type and grade of karstification is facies related. The rock permeability has only a minor effect on the reservoir's sustainability. Physical parameters determined on oven-dried samples have to be corrected, applying reservoir transfer models to water-saturated reservoir conditions. To validate these calculated parameters, a Thermo-Triaxial-Cell simulating the temperature and pressure conditions of the reservoir is used and calorimetric and thermal conductivity measurements under elevated temperature conditions are performed. Additionally, core and cutting material from a 1600 m deep research drilling and a 4850 m (total vertical depth, measured depth: 6020 m) deep well is used to validate the reservoir property predictions. Under reservoir conditions a decrease in permeability of 2-3 magnitudes is observed due to the thermal expansion of the rock matrix. For tight carbonates the matrix permeability is temperature-controlled; the thermophysical matrix parameters are density-controlled. Density increases typically with depth and especially with higher dolomite content. Therefore, thermal conductivity increases; however the dominant factor temperature also decreases the thermal conductivity. Specific heat capacity typically increases with increasing depth and temperature. The lithofacies-related characterization and prediction of reservoir

  6. Finite flavour groups of fermions

    Grimus, Walter; Ludl, Patrick Otto

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of the theory of finite groups, with regard to their application as flavour symmetries in particle physics. In a general part, we discuss useful theorems concerning group structure, conjugacy classes, representations and character tables. In a specialized part, we attempt to give a fairly comprehensive review of finite subgroups of SO(3) and SU(3), in which we apply and illustrate the general theory. Moreover, we also provide a concise description of the symmetric and alternating groups and comment on the relationship between finite subgroups of U(3) and finite subgroups of SU(3). Although in this review we give a detailed description of a wide range of finite groups, the main focus is on the methods which allow the exploration of their different aspects. (topical review)

  7. On finite quantum field theories

    Rajpoot, S.; Taylor, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    The properties that make massless versions of N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory and a class of N = 2 supersymmetric theories finite are: (I) a universal coupling for the gauge and matter interactions, (II) anomaly-free representations to which the bosonic and fermionic matter belong, and (III) no charge renormalisation, i.e. β(g) = 0. It was conjectured that field theories constructed out of N = 1 matter multiplets are also finite if they too share the above properties. Explicit calculations have verified these theories to be finite up to two loops. The implications of the finiteness conditions for N = 1 finite field theories with SU(M) gauge symmetry are discussed. (orig.)

  8. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    Heister, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Today\\'s large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  9. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    Heister, Timo; Kronbichler, Martin; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Today's large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Optimization of thermal systems based on finite-time thermodynamics and thermoeconomics

    Durmayaz, A. [Istanbul Technical University (Turkey). Department of Mechanical Engineering; Sogut, O.S. [Istanbul Technical University, Maslak (Turkey). Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering; Sahin, B. [Yildiz Technical University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey). Department of Naval Architecture; Yavuz, H. [Istanbul Technical University, Maslak (Turkey). Institute of Energy

    2004-07-01

    The irreversibilities originating from finite-time and finite-size constraints are important in the real thermal system optimization. Since classical thermodynamic analysis based on thermodynamic equilibrium do not consider these constraints directly, it is necessary to consider the energy transfer between the system and its surroundings in the rate form. Finite-time thermodynamics provides a fundamental starting point for the optimization of real thermal systems including the fundamental concepts of heat transfer and fluid mechanics to classical thermodynamics. In this study, optimization studies of thermal systems, that consider various objective functions, based on finite-time thermodynamics and thermoeconomics are reviewed. (author)

  11. Estimation of Bank Erosion Due To Reservoir Operation in Cascade (Case Study: Citarum Cascade Reservoir

    Sri Legowo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentation is such a crucial issue to be noted once the accumulated sediment begins to fill the reservoir dead storage, this will then influence the long-term reservoir operation. The sediment accumulated requires a serious attention for it may influence the storage capacity and other reservoir management of activities. The continuous inflow of sediment to the reservoir will decrease the capacity of reservoir storage, the reservoir value in use, and the useful age of reservoir. Because of that, the rate of the sediment needs to be delayed as possible. In this research, the delay of the sediment rate is considered based on the rate of flow of landslide of the reservoir slope. The rate of flow of the sliding slope can be minimized by way of each reservoir autonomous efforts. This effort can be performed through; the regulation of fluctuating rate of reservoir surface current that does not cause suddenly drawdown and upraising as well. The research model is compiled using the searching technique of Non Linear Programming (NLP.The rate of bank erosion for the reservoir variates from 0.0009 to 0.0048 MCM/year, which is no sigrificant value to threaten the life time of reservoir.Mean while the rate of watershed sediment has a significant value, i.e: 3,02 MCM/year for Saguling that causes to fullfill the storage capacity in 40 next years (from years 2008.

  12. Quantum heat engines and refrigerators: continuous devices.

    Kosloff, Ronnie; Levy, Amikam

    2014-01-01

    Quantum thermodynamics supplies a consistent description of quantum heat engines and refrigerators up to a single few-level system coupled to the environment. Once the environment is split into three (a hot, cold, and work reservoir), a heat engine can operate. The device converts the positive gain into power, with the gain obtained from population inversion between the components of the device. Reversing the operation transforms the device into a quantum refrigerator. The quantum tricycle, a device connected by three external leads to three heat reservoirs, is used as a template for engines and refrigerators. The equation of motion for the heat currents and power can be derived from first principles. Only a global description of the coupling of the device to the reservoirs is consistent with the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Optimization of the devices leads to a balanced set of parameters in which the couplings to the three reservoirs are of the same order and the external driving field is in resonance. When analyzing refrigerators, one needs to devote special attention to a dynamical version of the third law of thermodynamics. Bounds on the rate of cooling when Tc→0 are obtained by optimizing the cooling current. All refrigerators as Tc→0 show universal behavior. The dynamical version of the third law imposes restrictions on the scaling as Tc→0 of the relaxation rate γc and heat capacity cV of the cold bath.

  13. Matlab and C programming for Trefftz finite element methods

    Qin, Qing-Hua

    2008-01-01

    Although the Trefftz finite element method (FEM) has become a powerful computational tool in the analysis of plane elasticity, thin and thick plate bending, Poisson's equation, heat conduction, and piezoelectric materials, there are few books that offer a comprehensive computer programming treatment of the subject. Collecting results scattered in the literature, MATLAB® and C Programming for Trefftz Finite Element Methods provides the detailed MATLAB® and C programming processes in applications of the Trefftz FEM to potential and elastic problems. The book begins with an introduction to th

  14. Estimation of reservoir parameter using a hybrid neural network

    Aminzadeh, F. [FACT, Suite 201-225, 1401 S.W. FWY Sugarland, TX (United States); Barhen, J.; Glover, C.W. [Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Toomarian, N.B. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Estimation of an oil field's reservoir properties using seismic data is a crucial issue. The accuracy of those estimates and the associated uncertainty are also important information. This paper demonstrates the use of the k-fold cross validation technique to obtain confidence bound on an Artificial Neural Network's (ANN) accuracy statistic from a finite sample set. In addition, we also show that an ANN's classification accuracy is dramatically improved by transforming the ANN's input feature space to a dimensionally smaller, new input space. The new input space represents a feature space that maximizes the linear separation between classes. Thus, the ANN's convergence time and accuracy are improved because the ANN must merely find nonlinear perturbations to the starting linear decision boundaries. These technique for estimating ANN accuracy bounds and feature space transformations are demonstrated on the problem of estimating the sand thickness in an oil field reservoir based only on remotely sensed seismic data.

  15. Reservoir parameter estimation using a hybrid neural network

    Aminzadeh, F. [DGB USA and FACT Inc., Sugarland, TX (United States); Barhen, J.; Glover, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States). Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Resesarch; Toomarian, N.B. [California Institute of Technology (United States). Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    2000-10-01

    The accuracy of an artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm is a crucial issue in the estimation of an oil field's reservoir properties from the log and seismic data. This paper demonstrates the use of the k-fold cross validation technique to obtain confidence bounds on an ANN's accuracy statistic from a finite sample set. In addition, we also show that an ANN's classification accuracy is dramatically improved by transforming the ANN's input feature space to a dimensionally smaller new input space. The new input space represents a feature space that maximizes the linear separation between classes. Thus, the ANN's convergence time and accuracy are improved because the ANN must merely find nonlinear perturbations to the starting linear decision boundaries. These techniques for estimating ANN accuracy bounds and feature space transformations are demonstrated on the problem of estimating the sand thickness in an oil field reservoir based only on remotely sensed seismic data. (author)

  16. Finite discrete field theory

    Souza, Manoelito M. de

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the physical meaning and the geometric interpretation of implementation in classical field theories. The origin of infinities and other inconsistencies in field theories is traced to fields defined with support on the light cone; a finite and consistent field theory requires a light-cone generator as the field support. Then, we introduce a classical field theory with support on the light cone generators. It results on a description of discrete (point-like) interactions in terms of localized particle-like fields. We find the propagators of these particle-like fields and discuss their physical meaning, properties and consequences. They are conformally invariant, singularity-free, and describing a manifestly covariant (1 + 1)-dimensional dynamics in a (3 = 1) spacetime. Remarkably this conformal symmetry remains even for the propagation of a massive field in four spacetime dimensions. We apply this formalism to Classical electrodynamics and to the General Relativity Theory. The standard formalism with its distributed fields is retrieved in terms of spacetime average of the discrete field. Singularities are the by-products of the averaging process. This new formalism enlighten the meaning and the problem of field theory, and may allow a softer transition to a quantum theory. (author)

  17. Mimetic finite difference method

    Lipnikov, Konstantin; Manzini, Gianmarco; Shashkov, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    The mimetic finite difference (MFD) method mimics fundamental properties of mathematical and physical systems including conservation laws, symmetry and positivity of solutions, duality and self-adjointness of differential operators, and exact mathematical identities of the vector and tensor calculus. This article is the first comprehensive review of the 50-year long history of the mimetic methodology and describes in a systematic way the major mimetic ideas and their relevance to academic and real-life problems. The supporting applications include diffusion, electromagnetics, fluid flow, and Lagrangian hydrodynamics problems. The article provides enough details to build various discrete operators on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes and summarizes the major convergence results for the mimetic approximations. Most of these theoretical results, which are presented here as lemmas, propositions and theorems, are either original or an extension of existing results to a more general formulation using polyhedral meshes. Finally, flexibility and extensibility of the mimetic methodology are shown by deriving higher-order approximations, enforcing discrete maximum principles for diffusion problems, and ensuring the numerical stability for saddle-point systems.

  18. Mathematical modeling of large floating roof reservoir temperature arena

    Liu Yang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The current study is a simplification of related components of large floating roof tank and modeling for three dimensional temperature field of large floating roof tank. The heat transfer involves its transfer between the hot fluid in the oil tank, between the hot fluid and the tank wall and between the tank wall and the external environment. The mathematical model of heat transfer and flow of oil in the tank simulates the temperature field of oil in tank. Oil temperature field of large floating roof tank is obtained by numerical simulation, map the curve of central temperature dynamics with time and analyze axial and radial temperature of storage tank. It determines the distribution of low temperature storage tank location based on the thickness of the reservoir temperature. Finally, it compared the calculated results and the field test data; eventually validated the calculated results based on the experimental results.

  19. Finite element and finite difference methods in electromagnetic scattering

    Morgan, MA

    2013-01-01

    This second volume in the Progress in Electromagnetic Research series examines recent advances in computational electromagnetics, with emphasis on scattering, as brought about by new formulations and algorithms which use finite element or finite difference techniques. Containing contributions by some of the world's leading experts, the papers thoroughly review and analyze this rapidly evolving area of computational electromagnetics. Covering topics ranging from the new finite-element based formulation for representing time-harmonic vector fields in 3-D inhomogeneous media using two coupled sca

  20. MeProRisk - a Joint Venture for Minimizing Risk in Geothermal Reservoir Development

    Clauser, C.; Marquart, G.

    2009-12-01

    Exploration and development of geothermal reservoirs for the generation of electric energy involves high engineering and economic risks due to the need for 3-D geophysical surface surveys and deep boreholes. The MeProRisk project provides a strategy guideline for reducing these risks by combining cross-disciplinary information from different specialists: Scientists from three German universities and two private companies contribute with new methods in seismic modeling and interpretation, numerical reservoir simulation, estimation of petrophysical parameters, and 3-D visualization. The approach chosen in MeProRisk consists in considering prospecting and developing of geothermal reservoirs as an iterative process. A first conceptual model for fluid flow and heat transport simulation can be developed based on limited available initial information on geology and rock properties. In the next step, additional data is incorporated which is based on (a) new seismic interpretation methods designed for delineating fracture systems, (b) statistical studies on large numbers of rock samples for estimating reliable rock parameters, (c) in situ estimates of the hydraulic conductivity tensor. This results in a continuous refinement of the reservoir model where inverse modelling of fluid flow and heat transport allows infering the uncertainty and resolution of the model at each iteration step. This finally yields a calibrated reservoir model which may be used to direct further exploration by optimizing additional borehole locations, estimate the uncertainty of key operational and economic parameters, and optimize the long-term operation of a geothermal resrvoir.

  1. Modeling surface energy fluxes and thermal dynamics of a seasonally ice-covered hydroelectric reservoir.

    Wang, Weifeng; Roulet, Nigel T; Strachan, Ian B; Tremblay, Alain

    2016-04-15

    The thermal dynamics of human created northern reservoirs (e.g., water temperatures and ice cover dynamics) influence carbon processing and air-water gas exchange. Here, we developed a process-based one-dimensional model (Snow, Ice, WAater, and Sediment: SIWAS) to simulate a full year's surface energy fluxes and thermal dynamics for a moderately large (>500km(2)) boreal hydroelectric reservoir in northern Quebec, Canada. There is a lack of climate and weather data for most of the Canadian boreal so we designed SIWAS with a minimum of inputs and with a daily time step. The modeled surface energy fluxes were consistent with six years of observations from eddy covariance measurements taken in the middle of the reservoir. The simulated water temperature profiles agreed well with observations from over 100 sites across the reservoir. The model successfully captured the observed annual trend of ice cover timing, although the model overestimated the length of ice cover period (15days). Sensitivity analysis revealed that air temperature significantly affects the ice cover duration, water and sediment temperatures, but that dissolved organic carbon concentrations have little effect on the heat fluxes, and water and sediment temperatures. We conclude that the SIWAS model is capable of simulating surface energy fluxes and thermal dynamics for boreal reservoirs in regions where high temporal resolution climate data are not available. SIWAS is suitable for integration into biogeochemical models for simulating a reservoir's carbon cycle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Smart Waterflooding in Carbonate Reservoirs

    Zahid, Adeel

    brine solutions regarding phase behavior and viscosity measurements. This difference is attributed to the difference in composition of the different crude oils. More experiments are carried out in order to understand mechanisms of the crude oil viscosity reduction and emulsion formation. We observed...... with and without aging. The total oil recovery, recovery rate and interaction mechanisms of ions with rock were studied for different injected fluids under different temperatures and wettability conditions. Experimental results demonstrate that the oil recovery mechanism under high salinity seawater flooding...... phase could be the possible reasons for the observed increase in oil recovery with sulfate ions at high temperature in chalk reservoirs, besides the mechanism of the rock wettability alteration. * Crude oil/brine interaction study suggests that viscosity reduction for crude oil in contact with brine...

  3. Reservoirs talk to pressure recorders

    Pamenter, C B

    1968-02-01

    Keeping pace with increased demand for efficiency in secondary recovery schemes is the widening use of downhole tools charged with supplying data before and during the operation of the projects. One of the most important of these is the pressure recorder. This highly sensitive instrument, housed in a tough, slim steel case and lowered by drill pipe or cable, accurately measures the pressure of its downhole environment. This information is instantly available at the surface whenever a pressure reading is required. Typical applications of surface recorders often contribute are: (1) production practices such as checking surface and subsurface equipment, and special lifting problems; (2) well conditions including regular productivity indices, data observations and for interference studies; (3) secondary recovery projects, in both producing and injection wells; and (4) reservoir conditions where oil-water contacts and damaged zones need close attention.

  4. Production Optimization of Oil Reservoirs

    Völcker, Carsten

    with emphasis on optimal control of water ooding with the use of smartwell technology. We have implemented immiscible ow of water and oil in isothermal reservoirs with isotropic heterogenous permeability elds. We use the method of lines for solution of the partial differential equation (PDE) system that governs...... the uid ow. We discretize the the two-phase ow model spatially using the nite volume method (FVM), and we use the two point ux approximation (TPFA) and the single-point upstream (SPU) scheme for computing the uxes. We propose a new formulation of the differential equation system that arise...... as a consequence of the spatial discretization of the two-phase ow model. Upon discretization in time, the proposed equation system ensures the mass conserving property of the two-phase ow model. For the solution of the spatially discretized two-phase ow model, we develop mass conserving explicit singly diagonally...

  5. Carbon emission from global hydroelectric reservoirs revisited.

    Li, Siyue; Zhang, Quanfa

    2014-12-01

    Substantial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from hydropower reservoirs have been of great concerns recently, yet the significant carbon emitters of drawdown area and reservoir downstream (including spillways and turbines as well as river reaches below dams) have not been included in global carbon budget. Here, we revisit GHG emission from hydropower reservoirs by considering reservoir surface area, drawdown zone and reservoir downstream. Our estimates demonstrate around 301.3 Tg carbon dioxide (CO2)/year and 18.7 Tg methane (CH4)/year from global hydroelectric reservoirs, which are much higher than recent observations. The sum of drawdown and downstream emission, which is generally overlooked, represents 42 % CO2 and 67 % CH4 of the total emissions from hydropower reservoirs. Accordingly, the global average emissions from hydropower are estimated to be 92 g CO2/kWh and 5.7 g CH4/kWh. Nonetheless, global hydroelectricity could currently reduce approximate 2,351 Tg CO2eq/year with respect to fuel fossil plant alternative. The new findings show a substantial revision of carbon emission from the global hydropower reservoirs.

  6. Zooplankton of the Zaporiz’ke Reservoir

    T. V. Mykolaichuk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to zooplankton species composition in the Zaporiz’ke Reservoir. The greatest species diversity was found in the macrophyte communities of the upper reservoir’s littoral, but the least zooplankton diversity – in the pelagic zone of the lower reservoir.

  7. Estimating Western U.S. Reservoir Sedimentation

    Bensching, L.; Livneh, B.; Greimann, B. P.

    2017-12-01

    Reservoir sedimentation is a long-term problem for water management across the Western U.S. Observations of sedimentation are limited to reservoir surveys that are costly and infrequent, with many reservoirs having only two or fewer surveys. This work aims to apply a recently developed ensemble of sediment algorithms to estimate reservoir sedimentation over several western U.S. reservoirs. The sediment algorithms include empirical, conceptual, stochastic, and processes based approaches and are coupled with a hydrologic modeling framework. Preliminary results showed that the more complex and processed based algorithms performed better in predicting high sediment flux values and in a basin transferability experiment. However, more testing and validation is required to confirm sediment model skill. This work is carried out in partnership with the Bureau of Reclamation with the goal of evaluating the viability of reservoir sediment yield prediction across the western U.S. using a multi-algorithm approach. Simulations of streamflow and sediment fluxes are validated against observed discharges, as well as a Reservoir Sedimentation Information database that is being developed by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Specific goals of this research include (i) quantifying whether inter-algorithm differences consistently capture observational variability; (ii) identifying whether certain categories of models consistently produce the best results, (iii) assessing the expected sedimentation life-span of several western U.S. reservoirs through long-term simulations.

  8. Ichthyofauna of the reservoirs of Central Vietnam

    I. A. Stolbunov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Species composition, distribution and abundance of fish in the pelagic and littoral zone of four reservoirs of Central Vietnam (Suoi Chau, Kam Lam, Da Ban and Suoi Dau were studied first. According to the research data the fish community of the reservoirs is represented by 43 species of 19 fish families.

  9. An index of reservoir habitat impairment

    Miranda, L.E.; Hunt, K.M.

    2011-01-01

    Fish habitat impairment resulting from natural and anthropogenic watershed and in-lake processes has in many cases reduced the ability of reservoirs to sustain native fish assemblages and fisheries quality. Rehabilitation of impaired reservoirs is hindered by the lack of a method suitable for scoring impairment status. To address this limitation, an index of reservoir habitat impairment (IRHI) was developed by merging 14 metrics descriptive of common impairment sources, with each metric scored from 0 (no impairment) to 5 (high impairment) by fisheries scientists with local knowledge. With a plausible range of 5 to 25, distribution of the IRHI scores ranged from 5 to 23 over 482 randomly selected reservoirs dispersed throughout the USA. The IRHI reflected five impairment factors including siltation, structural habitat, eutrophication, water regime, and aquatic plants. The factors were weakly related to key reservoir characteristics including reservoir area, depth, age, and usetype, suggesting that common reservoir descriptors are poor predictors of fish habitat impairment. The IRHI is rapid and inexpensive to calculate, provides an easily understood measure of the overall habitat impairment, allows comparison of reservoirs and therefore prioritization of restoration activities, and may be used to track restoration progress. The major limitation of the IRHI is its reliance on unstandardized professional judgment rather than standardized empirical measurements. ?? 2010 US Government.

  10. Monitoring programme of water reservoir Grliste

    Vuckovic, M; Milenkovic, P.; Lukic, D.

    2002-01-01

    The quality of surface waters is a very important problem incorporated in the environment protection, especially in water resources. The Timok border-land hasn't got sufficient underground and surface waters. This is certificated by the International Association for Water Resource. That was reason for building the water reservoir 'Grliste'. Drinking water from water reservoir 'Grliste' supplies Zajecar and the surroundings. (author)

  11. Geothermal reservoir insurance study. Final report

    1981-10-09

    The principal goal of this study was to provide analysis of and recommendations on the need for and feasibility of a geothermal reservoir insurance program. Five major tasks are reported: perception of risk by major market sectors, status of private sector insurance programs, analysis of reservoir risks, alternative government roles, and recommendations.

  12. Modeling the Transport and Fate of Fecal Pollution and Nutrients of Miyun Reservoir

    Liu, L.; Fu, X.; Wang, G.

    2009-12-01

    Miyun Reservoir, a mountain valley reservoir, is located 100 km northeast of Beijing City. Besides the functions of flood control, irrigation and fishery for Beijing area, Miyun Reservoir is the main drinking water storage for Beijing city. The water quality is therefore of great importance. Recently, the concentration of fecal pollution and nutrients in the reservoir are constantly rising to arrest the attention of Beijing municipality. Fecal pollution from sewage is a significant public health concern due to the known presence of human viruses and parasites in these discharges. To investigate the transport and fate of the fecal pollution and nutrients at Miyun reservoir and the health risks associated with drinking and fishery, the reservoir and two tributaries, Chaohe river and Baihe river discharging into it are being examined for bacterial, nutrients and other routine pollution. To understand the relative importance of different processes influencing pollution transport and inactivation, a finite-element model of surf-zone hydrodynamics (coupled with models for temperature, fecal pollution, nutrients and other routine contaminants) is used. The developed models are being verified by the observed water quality data including water temperature, conductivities and dissolved oxygen from the reservoir and its tributaries. Different factors impacting the inactivation of fecal pollution and the transport of nutrients such as water temperature, sedimentation, sunlight insolation are evaluated for Miyun reservoir by a sensitivity analysis analogized from the previous research of Lake Michigan (figure 1, indicating that solar insolation dominates the inactivation of E. Coli, an indicator of fecal pollution, Liu et al. 2006). The calibrated modeling system can be used to temporally and spatially simulate and predict the variation of the concentration of fecal pollution and nutrients of Miyun reservoir. Therefore this research can provide a forecasting tool for the

  13. Heat Stress

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH HEAT STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir OSHA-NIOSH ... hot environments may be at risk of heat stress. Exposure to extreme heat can result in occupational ...

  14. The freshwater reservoir effect in radiocarbon dating

    Philippsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    of magnitude and degree of variability of the freshwater reservoir effect over short and long timescales. Radiocarbon dating of recent water samples, aquatic plants, and animals, shows that age differences of up to 2000 14C years can occur within one river. The freshwater reservoir effect has also implications......The freshwater reservoir effect can result in anomalously old radiocarbon ages of samples from lakes and rivers. This includes the bones of people whose subsistence was based on freshwater fish, and pottery in which fish was cooked. Water rich in dissolved ancient calcium carbonates, commonly known...... as hard water, is the most common reason for the freshwater reservoir effect. It is therefore also called hardwater effect. Although it has been known for more than 60 years, it is still less well-recognized by archaeologists than the marine reservoir effect. The aim of this study is to examine the order...

  15. Reservoir model for the Alameda Central waterflood

    Randall, T E

    1968-01-01

    The basic approach used in developing the model to characterize the Alameda Central Unit Waterflood assumes continuity of the reservoir mechanics with time. The past performance was analyzed to describe the reservoir and future performance was assumed to follow the established patterns. To develop a mathematical picture of the Alameda Central Unit reservoir, a two-dimensional single-phase steady-state model was used in conjunction with material balance calculations, real-time conversion methods and oil-water interface advance calculations. The model was developed to optimize water injection allocation, determine the configuration of the frontal advance and evaluate the success of the waterflood. The model also provides a basis for continuing review and revision of the basic concepts of reservoir operation. The results of the reservoir study have confirmed the apparent lack of permeability orientation in the pool and indicate that the waterflood is progressing better than originally anticipated.

  16. Fiscal 1999 research and verification of geothermal energy exploring technologies and the like. Development of reservoir mass and heat flow characterization (Electrical and electromagnetic monitoring technology - Summary); 1999 nendo chinetsu tansa gijutsu nado kensho chosa hokokusho (yoyaku). Choryuso hendo tansaho kaihatsu (denki denjiki tansaho kaihatsu)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Facilities for monitoring self-potential and resistivity are installed in the Ogiri district, Kagoshima Prefecture, where the Ogiri geothermal power plant is situated, and studies are made about relations between hot water production/reinjection and potential/resistivity at the power plant for the development of a high-performance numerical simulation system for the reservoir. The activities cover the development of (1) a self-potential monitoring system, (2) the development of a resistivity monitoring system, and (3) the development of a reservoir change prediction technique using self-potential and resistivity. Under item (1), eight self-potential monitoring stations are newly installed for the monitoring effort to continue now at a total of 50 stations. Potential has risen by 20 mV in two years since the drilling of a production replenishment well in February of 1999, with the domain of change in potential also expanding. Under item (2), the 3D MT (3-dimensional magnetotelluric) technique is used for resistivity profile investigation at 80 monitoring stations and preliminary monitoring tests are conducted to deliberate positions for resistivity monitoring. Under item (3), tracer tests are conducted for constructing a high-precision reservoir model for predicting changes in temperature, etc., attributable to the return of reinjected hot water, and a natural state reservoir simulation model is fabricated. (NEDO)

  17. Fiscal 1999 research and verification of geothermal energy exploring technologies and the like. Development of reservoir mass and heat flow characterization (Development of fracture hydrological properties characterization technology - Summary); 1999 nendo chinetsu tansa gijutsu nado kensho chosa hokokusho (yoyaku). Choryuso hendo tansaho kaihatsu (danretsu suiri tansaho kaihatsu)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Efforts are under way to develop reservoir change evaluation technologies to be effective in evaluating reservoirs at their initial stage of development, in stabilizing the output of power stations after their commencement of service operation, and in probing into reservoirs in already-developed areas. One of them concerns the characterization of the hydrological properties of fractures. The development efforts involve (1) a pressure transient test method (measurement of the response of reservoirs to changes in borehole internal pressure), (2) a tiltmeter observation method (ground surface deformation measurement), and (3) a 2-phase flow metering method (metering of spurting fluids). Under item (1), a computer-aided borehole hydrology test system is built and field-tested to isolate problems. Also, a pressure transient test system is built by way of trial by use of which compressor-aided control is performed over air pressure in the borehole. Under item (2), it is made clear that changes, several MPa in scale, in the pressure in a borehole is detected by simulation and that a sufficiently capable system is realized using a tiltmeter available on the market. Under item (3), a device is fabricated which is a combination of a laser flowmeter and a void fraction meter, and a field test is conducted to assess its feasibility and to identify problems. (NEDO)

  18. Heat exchanges in coarsening systems

    Corberi, Federico [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E R Caianiello' , Università di Salerno, via Ponte don Melillo, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Gonnella, Giuseppe; Piscitelli, Antonio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Bari and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    This paper is a contribution to the understanding of the thermal properties of ageing systems where statistically independent degrees of freedom with greatly separated time scales are expected to coexist. Focusing on the prototypical case of quenched ferromagnets, where fast and slow modes can be respectively associated with fluctuations in the bulk of the coarsening domains and in their interfaces, we perform a set of numerical experiments specifically designed to compute the heat exchanges between different degrees of freedom. Our studies promote a scenario with fast modes acting as an equilibrium reservoir to which interfaces may release heat through a mechanism that allows fast and slow degrees to maintain their statistical properties independently.

  19. Finite spatial volume approach to finite temperature field theory

    Weiss, Nathan

    1981-01-01

    A relativistic quantum field theory at finite temperature T=β -1 is equivalent to the same field theory at zero temperature but with one spatial dimension of finite length β. This equivalence is discussed for scalars, for fermions, and for gauge theories. The relationship is checked for free field theory. The translation of correlation functions between the two formulations is described with special emphasis on the nonlocal order parameters of gauge theories. Possible applications are mentioned. (auth)

  20. Automatic Construction of Finite Algebras

    张健

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with model generation for equational theories,i.e.,automatically generating (finite)models of a given set of (logical) equations.Our method of finite model generation and a tool for automatic construction of finite algebras is described.Some examples are given to show the applications of our program.We argue that,the combination of model generators and theorem provers enables us to get a better understanding of logical theories.A brief comparison betwween our tool and other similar tools is also presented.