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Sample records for finishing plant revision

  1. Maintenance implementation plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meldrom, C.A.

    1996-03-01

    This document outlines the Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located at the Hanford site at Richland, Washington. This MIP describes the PFP maintenance program relative to DOE order 4330.4B. The MIP defines the key actions needed to meet the guidelines of the Order to produce a cost-effective and efficient maintenance program. A previous report identified the presence of significant quantities of Pu-bearing materials within PFP that pose risks to workers. PFP`s current mission is to develop, install and operate processes which will mitigate these risks. The PFP Maintenance strategy is to equip the facility with systems and equipment able to sustain scheduled PFP operations. The current operating run is scheduled to last seven years. Activities following the stabilization operation will involve an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to determine future plant activities. This strategy includes long-term maintenance of the facility for safe occupancy and material storage. The PFP maintenance staff used the graded approach to dictate the priorities of the improvement and upgrade actions identified in Chapter 2 of this document. The MIP documents PFP compliance to the DOE 4330.4B Order. Chapter 2 of the MIP follows the format of the Order in addressing the eighteen elements. As this revision is a total rewrite, no sidebars are included to highlight changes.

  2. Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Plutonium Finishing Plant, also known as PFP, represented the end of the line (the final procedure) associated with plutonium production at Hanford.PFP was also...

  3. Plutonium finishing plant safety systems and equipment list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergquist, G.G.

    1995-01-06

    The Safety Equipment List (SEL) supports Analysis Report (FSAR), WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021 and the Plutonium Finishing Plant Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs), WHC-SD-CP-OSR-010. The SEL is a breakdown and classification of all Safety Class 1, 2, and 3 equipment, components, or system at the Plutonium Finishing Plant complex.

  4. Plutonium Finishing Plant safety evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) previously known as the Plutonium Process and Storage Facility, or Z-Plant, was built and put into operation in 1949. Since 1949 PFP has been used for various processing missions, including plutonium purification, oxide production, metal production, parts fabrication, plutonium recovery, and the recovery of americium (Am-241). The PFP has also been used for receipt and large scale storage of plutonium scrap and product materials. The PFP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) was prepared by WHC to document the hazards associated with the facility, present safety analyses of potential accident scenarios, and demonstrate the adequacy of safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and operational safety requirements (OSRs) necessary to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. Documented in this Safety Evaluation Report (SER) is DOE`s independent review and evaluation of the PFP FSAR and the basis for approval of the PFP FSAR. The evaluation is presented in a format that parallels the format of the PFP FSAR. As an aid to the reactor, a list of acronyms has been included at the beginning of this report. The DOE review concluded that the risks associated with conducting plutonium handling, processing, and storage operations within PFP facilities, as described in the PFP FSAR, are acceptable, since the accident safety analyses associated with these activities meet the WHC risk acceptance guidelines and DOE safety goals in SEN-35-91.

  5. CHARACTERISTICS OF KLEBSIELLA FROM TEXTILE FINISHING PLANT EFFLUENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebsiella strains are found in abnormally high numbers in a stream receiving wastewater from a textile finishing plant. Representative strains are randomly selected to determine biochemical, serotype, and virulence patterns. All strains conform to the commonly accepted biochemic...

  6. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Dangerous Waste Training Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ENTROP, G.E.

    1999-12-03

    This training plan describes general requirements, worker categories, and provides course descriptions for operation of the plutonium finishing plant (PFP) waste generation facilities, permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) units, and the 90-Day Accumulation Areas.

  7. Nuclear Power Plants. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell, Walter, III

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Why Use Nuclear Power?; From Atoms to Electricity; Reactor Types; Typical Plant Design Features; The Cost of Nuclear Power; Plants in the United States; Developments in Foreign…

  8. Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Nass, R. [Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage.

  9. Fire hazard analysis for Plutonium Finishing Plant complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCKINNIS, D.L.

    1999-02-23

    A fire hazards analysis (FHA) was performed for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Complex at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The scope of the FHA focuses on the nuclear facilities/structures in the Complex. The analysis was conducted in accordance with RLID 5480.7, [DOE Directive RLID 5480.7, 1/17/94] and DOE Order 5480.7A, ''Fire Protection'' [DOE Order 5480.7A, 2/17/93] and addresses each of the sixteen principle elements outlined in paragraph 9.a(3) of the Order. The elements are addressed in terms of the fire protection objectives stated in paragraph 4 of DOE 5480.7A. In addition, the FHA also complies with WHC-CM-4-41, Fire Protection Program Manual, Section 3.4 [1994] and WHC-SD-GN-FHA-30001, Rev. 0 [WHC, 1994]. Objectives of the FHA are to determine: (1) the fire hazards that expose the PFP facilities, or that are inherent in the building operations, (2) the adequacy of the fire safety features currently located in the PFP Complex, and (3) the degree of compliance of the facility with specific fire safety provisions in DOE orders, related engineering codes, and standards.

  10. Environmental-friendly wool fabric finishing by some water plant extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šmelcerović Miodrag

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, environmental-friendly finishing of wool fabric were processed with several water extract plants, such as hibiscus, St. John's wort, and marigold. The plant extracts have good basis in the commercial dyeing of wool, for garment and carpet industry. At the same time, the environmental-friendly finishing by water extracts plants shows very good fastness of the antimicrobial properties and coloration of wool fabric. From an ecological viewpoint, the substitution of chemical dyes with "natural products" may represent not only a strategy to reduce risk and pollutants but also an opportunity for new markets and new businesses, which can expend involving of ecology in trade policy.

  11. 76 FR 33879 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Endangered Status, Revised Critical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-09

    ... and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Endangered Status, Revised Critical Habitat Designation... and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 RIN 1018-AX18 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants... the currently endangered plant taxon, Monardella linoides ssp. viminea, in which the subspecies...

  12. A Study on Salt Attack Protection of Structural and Finishing Materials in Power Plant Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, W.B.; Kweon, K.J.; Suh, Y.P.; Nah, H.S.; Lee, K.J.; Park, D.S.; Jo, Y.K. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This is a final report written by both KEPRI and KICT as a co-operative research titled {sup A} study on Salt Protection of Structural and Finishings in Power Plant Structures{sup .} This study presented the methods to prevent the chloride-induced corrosion of power plant structures through collection and analysis of research datum relating to design, construction and maintenance for the prevention of structural and finishing materials, thru material performance tests for anti-corrosion under many kinds of chloride-induced corrosion environments. As a result, this study proposed the guidelines for design, construction and maintenance of power plant structures due to chloride-induced corrosion. (author). 257 refs., 111 figs., 86 tabs.

  13. The Chemical Hazards Assessment Prior to D&D of the Plutonium Finishing Plant, Hanford Nuclear Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, A. M.; Prevette, S. S.; Sherwood, A. R.; Fitch, L. R.; Ranade, D. G.; Oldham, R. W.

    2003-02-26

    This report describes the evaluation methods and results of a chemical safety status assessment of the process equipment at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation Plutonium Finishing Plant. This assessment, designated as the Plutonium Finishing Plant Residual Chemical Hazards Assessment, focused particular emphasis on the idle and inactive plant systems, though certain active areas also were examined to the extent that these were examined during a previous facility vulnerability assessment completed in 1999. The Plutonium Finishing Plant is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation that is situated in south central Washington State.

  14. Project Plan Remove Special Nuclear Material (SNM) from Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARTLETT, W.D.

    1999-09-14

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Remove SNM Materials. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617, Rev.0. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP Remove SNM Materials project. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baseline to manage the execution of the Remove SNM Materials project. Any deviation to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process. The Remove SNM Materials project provides the necessary support and controls required for DOE-HQ, DOE-RL, BWHC, and other DOE Complex Contractors the path forward to negotiate shipped/receiver agreements, schedule shipments, and transfer material out of PFP to enable final deactivation.

  15. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddox, B.S.

    1996-01-01

    This Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) sets forth the Environmental Safety and Health (ESH) standards/requirements for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). This S/RID is applicable to the appropriate life cycle phases of design, construction, operation, and preparation for decommissioning. These standards/requirements are adequate to ensure the protection of the health and safety of workers, the public, and the environment.

  16. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Safety Class and Safety Significant Commercial Grade Items (CGI) Critical Characteristic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    THOMAS, R.J.

    2000-04-24

    This document specifies the critical characteristics for Commercial Grade Items (CGI) procured for use in the Plutonium Finishing Plant as required by HNF-PRO-268 and HNF-PRO-1819. These are the minimum specifications that the equipment must meet in order to properly perform its safety function. There may be several manufacturers or models that meet the critical characteristics of any one item.

  17. Sludge stabilization at the Plutonium Finishing Plant, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This Environmental Assessment evaluates the proposed action to operate two laboratory-size muffle furnaces in glovebox HC-21C, located in the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The muffle furnaces would be used to stabilize chemically reactive sludges that contain approximately 25 kilograms (55 pounds) of plutonium by heating to approximately 500 to 1000{degrees}C (900 to 1800{degrees}F). The resulting stable powder, mostly plutonium oxide with impurities, would be stored in the PFP vaults. The presence of chemically reactive plutonium-bearing sludges in the process gloveboxes poses a risk to workers from radiation exposure and limits the availability of storage space for future plant cleanup. Therefore, there is a need to stabilize the material into a form suitable for long-term storage. This proposed action would be an interim action, which would take place prior to completion of an Environmental Impact Statement for the PFP which would evaluate stabilization of all plutonium-bearing materials and cleanout of the facility. However, only 10 percent of the total quantity of plutonium in reactive materials is in the sludges, so this action will not limit the choice of reasonable alternatives or prejudice the Record of Decision of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Environmental Impact Statement.

  18. Characterization of past and present solid waste streams from the plutonium finishing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, D R; Mayancsik, B A [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Pottmeyer, J A; Vejvoda, E J; Reddick, J A; Sheldon, K M; Weyns, M I [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States)

    1993-02-01

    During the next two decades the transuranic (TRU) wastes now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Over 50% of the TRU waste to be retrieved for shipment to the WIPP has been generated at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), also known as the Plutonium Processing and Storage Facility and Z Plant. The purpose of this report is to characterize the radioactive solid wastes generated by the PFP since its construction in 1947 using process knowledge, existing records, and history-obtained from interviews. The PFP is currently operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  19. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of plant-growth promoting Serratia proteamaculans S4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Saraswoti; Goodwin, Lynne A; Högberg, Nils; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Alström, Sadhna; Bruce, David; Quintana, Beverly; Munk, Christine; Daligault, Hajnalka; Teshima, Hazuki; Davenport, Karen; Reitenga, Krista; Green, Lance; Chain, Patrick; Erkkila, Tracy; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaojing; Xu, Yan; Kunde, Yulia; Chertkov, Olga; Han, James; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Szeto, Ernest; Mavromatis, Kostas; Huntemann, Marcel; Nolan, Matt; Pitluck, Sam; Deshpande, Shweta; Markowitz, Victor; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Finlay, Roger D

    2013-07-30

    Serratia proteamaculans S4 (previously Serratia sp. S4), isolated from the rhizosphere of wild Equisetum sp., has the ability to stimulate plant growth and to suppress the growth of several soil-borne fungal pathogens of economically important crops. Here we present the non-contiguous, finished genome sequence of S. proteamaculans S4, which consists of a 5,324,944 bp circular chromosome and a 129,797 bp circular plasmid. The chromosome contains 5,008 predicted genes while the plasmid comprises 134 predicted genes. In total, 4,993 genes are assigned as protein-coding genes. The genome consists of 22 rRNA genes, 82 tRNA genes and 58 pseudogenes. This genome is a part of the project "Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth-promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens" awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI's Community Sequencing Program.

  20. Characterization of past and present solid waste streams from the plutonium finishing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, D.R.; Mayancsik, B.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Pottmeyer, J.A.; Vejvoda, E.J.; Reddick, J.A.; Sheldon, K.M.; Weyns, M.I. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States)

    1993-02-01

    During the next two decades the transuranic (TRU) wastes now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Over 50% of the TRU waste to be retrieved for shipment to the WIPP has been generated at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), also known as the Plutonium Processing and Storage Facility and Z Plant. The purpose of this report is to characterize the radioactive solid wastes generated by the PFP since its construction in 1947 using process knowledge, existing records, and history-obtained from interviews. The PFP is currently operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  1. ASSESSING CHEMICAL HAZARDS AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) FOR PLANNING FUTURE D&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOPKINS, A.M.; KLOS, D.B.; MINETT, M.J.

    2007-01-25

    This paper documents the fiscal year (FY) 2006 assessment to evaluate potential chemical and radiological hazards associated with vessels and piping in the former plutonium process areas at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Evaluations by PFP engineers as design authorities for specific systems and other subject-matter experts were conducted to identify the chemical hazards associated with transitioning the process areas for the long-term layup of PFP before its eventual final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities in the main process facilities were suspended in September 2005 for a period of between 5 and 10 years. A previous assessment conducted in FY 2003 found that certain activities to mitigate chemical hazards could be deferred safely until the D and D of PFP, which had been scheduled to result in a slab-on-grade condition by 2009. As a result of necessary planning changes, however, D and D activities at PFP will be delayed until after the 2009 time frame. Given the extended project and plant life, it was determined that a review of the plant chemical hazards should be conducted. This review to determine the extended life impact of chemicals is called the ''Plutonium Finishing Plant Chemical Hazards Assessment, FY 2006''. This FY 2006 assessment addresses potential chemical and radiological hazard areas identified by facility personnel and subject-matter experts who reevaluated all the chemical systems (items) from the FY 2003 assessment. This paper provides the results of the FY 2006 chemical hazards assessment and describes the methodology used to assign a hazard ranking to the items reviewed.

  2. Pretreatment of Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sludge: Report for the period October 1990--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, G.J.; Swanson, J.L.

    1993-04-01

    The current mission of the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site is one of environmental restoration. A major task within this mission is the disposal of large volumes of high-level wastes (HLW) that are stored in underground tanks on the site. Under the current planning assumptions, all high-level tank waste will be vitrified as borosilicate glass and then disposed of in a geologic repository. The costs associated with this disposal scheme are very high. Thus, methods to reduce the volume of glass required to vitrify these wastes are currently being investigated. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sludge is a unique transuranic waste that is stored in tank 241- SY-102 on the Hanford site. As the name implies, the bulk of this material consists of waste from operations at the Plutonium Finishing Plant; but, other wastes have also been added (e.g., wastes from decontamination activities). Because the quantities of plutonium and americium in the PFP sludge are greater than 100 nCi/g, this sludge must be handled as a HLW. Approximately 6000 glass canisters would result from vitrifying this waste directly. Sludge washing would reduce the required number of canisters to {approximately}2500, with the volume of glass being driven by the low allowable concentration limit for Cr in the vitrification plant feed. The cost of production and subsequent geologic disposal of each canister of glass is expected to be $0.5 M to $1 M. Thus, an economic incentive exists to develop methods of pretreating the sludge to reduce the number of glass canisters needed to contain the final vitrified product.

  3. Pretreatment of Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sludge: Report for the period October 1990--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, G.J.; Swanson, J.L.

    1993-04-01

    The current mission of the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site is one of environmental restoration. A major task within this mission is the disposal of large volumes of high-level wastes (HLW) that are stored in underground tanks on the site. Under the current planning assumptions, all high-level tank waste will be vitrified as borosilicate glass and then disposed of in a geologic repository. The costs associated with this disposal scheme are very high. Thus, methods to reduce the volume of glass required to vitrify these wastes are currently being investigated. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sludge is a unique transuranic waste that is stored in tank 241- SY-102 on the Hanford site. As the name implies, the bulk of this material consists of waste from operations at the Plutonium Finishing Plant; but, other wastes have also been added (e.g., wastes from decontamination activities). Because the quantities of plutonium and americium in the PFP sludge are greater than 100 nCi/g, this sludge must be handled as a HLW. Approximately 6000 glass canisters would result from vitrifying this waste directly. Sludge washing would reduce the required number of canisters to [approximately]2500, with the volume of glass being driven by the low allowable concentration limit for Cr in the vitrification plant feed. The cost of production and subsequent geologic disposal of each canister of glass is expected to be $0.5 M to $1 M. Thus, an economic incentive exists to develop methods of pretreating the sludge to reduce the number of glass canisters needed to contain the final vitrified product.

  4. Total Measurement Uncertainty for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Segmented Gamma Scan Assay System

    CERN Document Server

    Fazzari, D M

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) for the Canberra manufactured Segmented Gamma Scanner Assay System (SGSAS) as employed at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). In this document, TMU embodies the combined uncertainties due to all of the individual random and systematic sources of measurement uncertainty. It includes uncertainties arising from corrections and factors applied to the analysis of transuranic waste to compensate for inhomogeneities and interferences from the waste matrix and radioactive components. These include uncertainty components for any assumptions contained in the calibration of the system or computation of the data. Uncertainties are propagated at 1 sigma. The final total measurement uncertainty value is reported at the 95% confidence level. The SGSAS is a gamma assay system that is used to assay plutonium and uranium waste. The SGSAS system can be used in a stand-alone mode to perform the NDA characterization of a containe...

  5. ORNL review of TRUEX flowsheet proposed for deployment at the Rockwell Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, W.D.; Bell, J.T.; Campbell, D.O.; Collins, E.D.

    1987-03-01

    The Transuranium Extraction (TRUEX) process will be installed at the Rockwell Hanford Operations (RHO) Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The purposes are to process the PFP waste to recover the plutonium, to isolate the americium, and to have the remaining waste converted to a non-TRU waste. Rockwell requested that ORNL provide an outside review of the process and its implementation. This review addresses the generation of the TRUEX feed, the chemical flowsheet, and the products and raffinates. It suggests that present PFP operations be modified to reduce the amount of transuranium elements that will be in the TRUEX process feed. This review also includes an assessment of the TRUEX solvent extraction flowsheet on the bases of material balance, adequate extraction and stripping stages, and solvent cleanup. The final part of the review includes results of three-party discussions (RHO, ORNL, and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)) of some major issues.

  6. The chemistry of tributyl phosphate at elevated temperatures in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Process Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barney, G.S.; Cooper, T.D.

    1994-06-01

    Potentially violent chemical reactions of the tributyl phosphate solvent used by the Plutonium Finishing Plant at the Hanford Site were investigated. There is a small probability that a significant quantity of this solvent could be accidental transferred to heated process vessels and react there with nitric acid or plutonium nitrate also present in the solvent extraction process. The results of laboratory studies of the reactions show that exothermic oxidation of tributyl phosphate by either nitric acid or actinide nitrates is slow at temperatures expected in the heated vessels. Less than four percent of the tributyl phosphate will be oxidized in these vented vessels at temperatures between 125{degrees}C and 250{degrees}C because the oxidant will be lost from the vessels by vaporization or decomposition before the tributyl phosphate can be extensively oxidized. The net amounts of heat generated by oxidation with concentrated nitric acid and with thorium nitrate (a stand-in for plutonium nitrate) were determined to be about -150 and -220 joules per gram of tributyl phosphate initially present, respectively. This is not enough heat to cause violent reactions in the vessels. Pyrolysis of the tributyl phosphate occurred in these mixtures at temperatures of 110{degrees}C to 270{degrees}C and produced mainly 1-butene gas, water, and pyrophosphoric acid. Butene gas generation is slow at expected process vessel temperatures, but the rate is faster at higher temperatures. At 252{degrees}C the rate of butene gas generated was 0.33 g butene/min/g of tributyl phosphate present. The measured heat absorbed by the pyrolysis reaction was 228 J/g of tributyl phosphate initially present (or 14.5 kcal/mole of tributyl phosphate). Release of flammable butene gas into process areas where it could ignite appears to be the most serious safety consideration for the Plutonium Finishing Plant.

  7. History and stabilization of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) complex, Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-18

    The 231-Z Isolation Building or Plutonium Metallurgy Building is located in the Hanford Site`s 200 West Area, approximately 300 yards north of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) (234-5 Building). When the Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) built it in 1944 to contain the final step for processing plutonium, it was called the Isolation Building. At that time, HEW used a bismuth phosphate radiochemical separations process to make `AT solution,` which was then dried and shipped to Los Alamos, New Mexico. (AT solution is a code name used during World War II for the final HEW product.) The process was carried out first in T Plant and the 224-T Bulk Reduction Building and B Plant and the 224-B Bulk Reduction Building. The 224-T and -B processes produced a concentrated plutonium nitrate stream, which then was sent in 8-gallon batches to the 231-Z Building for final purification. In the 231-Z Building, the plutonium nitrate solution underwent peroxide `strikes` (additions of hydrogen peroxide to further separate the plutonium from its carrier solutions), to form the AT solution. The AT solution was dried and shipped to the Los Alamos Site, where it was made into metallic plutonium and then into weapons hemispheres.` The 231-Z Building began `hot` operations (operations using radioactive materials) with regular runs of plutonium nitrate on January 16, 1945.

  8. Thermal Stability Studies of Candidate Decontamination Agents for Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant Plutonium-Contaminated Gloveboxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheele, Randall D.; Cooper, Thurman D.; Jones, Susan A.; Ewalt, John R.; Compton, James A.; Trent, Donald S.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.

    2005-09-29

    This report provides the results of PNNL's and Fluor's studies of the thermal stabilities of potential wastes arising from decontamination of Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant's plutonium contaminated gloveboxes. The candidate wastes arising from the decontamination technologies ceric nitrate/nitric acid, RadPro, Glygel, and Aspigel.

  9. Definition and means of maintaining the emergency notification and evacuation system portion of the plutonium finishing plant safety envelope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WHITE, W.F.

    1999-05-20

    The Emergency Evacuation and Notification System provides information to the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Building Emergency Director to assist in determining appropriate emergency response, notifies personnel of the required response, and assists in their response. The report identifies the equipment in the Safety Envelope (SE) for this System and the Administrative, Maintenance, and Surveillance Procedures used to maintain the SE Equipment.

  10. Treatment of Wastewater from Electroplating, Metal Finishing and Printed Circuit Board Manufacturing. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants Volume 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    One of four manuals dealing with the operation of wastewater plants, this document was designed to address the treatment of wastewater from electroplating, metal finishing, and printed circuit board manufacturing. It emphasizes how to operate and maintain facilities which neutralize acidic and basic waters; treat waters containing metals; destroy…

  11. Revised seismic and geologic siting regulations for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, A.J.; Chokshi, N.C. [Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The primary regulatory basis governing the seismic design of nuclear power plants is contained in Appendix A to Part 50, General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants, of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). General Design Criteria (GDC) 2 defines requirements for design bases for protection against natural phenomena. GDC 2 states the performance criterion that {open_quotes}Structures, systems, and components important to safety shall be designed to withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, . . . without loss of capability to perform their safety functions. . .{close_quotes}. Appendix A to Part 100, Seismic and Geologic Siting Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants, has been the principal document which provided detailed criteria to evaluate the suitability of proposed sites and suitability of the plant design basis established in consideration of the seismic and geologic characteristics of the proposed sites. Appendix A defines required seismological and geological investigations and requirements for other design conditions such as soil stability, slope stability, and seismically induced floods and water waves, and requirements for seismic instrumentation. The NRC staff is in the process of revising Appendix A. The NRC has recently revised seismic siting and design regulations for future applications. These revisions are discussed in detail in this paper.

  12. Medicinal plants and finished marketed herbal products used in the treatment of malaria in the Ashanti region, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komlaga, Gustav; Agyare, Christian; Dickson, Rita Akosua; Mensah, Merlin Lincoln Kwao; Annan, Kofi; Loiseau, Philippe M; Champy, Pierre

    2015-08-22

    Ethnobotanical survey was performed to document medicinal plants employed in the management of malaria in the Bosomtwe and Sekyere East Districts of the Ashanti Region (Ghana), in comparison with the plant ingredients in herbal antimalarial remedies registered by the Ghana Food and Drug Administration. Two hundred and three (203) herbalists from 33 communities within the two districts were interviewed on medicinal plants they use to manage malaria. A literature search was made to determine already documented plants. In addition, 23 finished marketed herbal products indicated for the management of malaria were identified and their labels examined to find out which of the plants mentioned in our survey were listed as ingredients and whether these products are in anyway regulated. Ninety-eight (98) species of plants were cited for the management of malaria. In comparison with literature citations, 12 (12.2%) species were reported for the management of malaria for the first time and 20 (20.4%) others for the first time in Ghana. Twenty-three (23) finished marketed herbal antimalarial products examined contained aerial or underground parts of 29 of the plants cited in our survey as ingredients. Twenty-two (22) of these products have been registered by the Ghana Food and Drugs Authority, four (4) of which were included in the recommended herbal medicine list for treating malaria in Ghana. This study provides new additions to the inventory of medicinal plants used for the management of malaria and reports the commercial availability and regulation of finished marketed labelled herbal products intended for the treatment of malaria in Ghana. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) [SEC 1 THRU 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ULLAH, M K

    2001-02-26

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. The DOE Richland Operations (DOE-RL) Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) is with Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH). Westinghouse Safety Management Systems (WSMS) provides management support to the PFP facility. Since 1991, the mission of the PFP has changed from plutonium material processing to preparation for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The PFP is in transition between its previous mission and the proposed D and D mission. The objective of the transition is to place the facility into a stable state for long-term storage of plutonium materials before final disposition of the facility. Accordingly, this update of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) reflects the current status of the buildings, equipment, and operations during this transition. The primary product of the PFP was plutonium metal in the form of 2.2-kg, cylindrical ingots called buttoms. Plutonium nitrate was one of several chemical compounds containing plutonium that were produced as an intermediate processing product. Plutonium recovery was performed at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) and plutonium conversion (from a nitrate form to a metal form) was performed at the Remote Mechanical C (RMC) Line as the primary processes. Plutonium oxide was also produced at the Remote Mechanical A (RMA) Line. Plutonium processed at the PFP contained both weapons-grade and fuels-grade plutonium materials. The capability existed to process both weapons-grade and fuels-grade material through the PRF and only weapons-grade material through the RMC Line although fuels-grade material was processed through the line before 1984. Amounts of these materials exist in storage throughout the facility in various residual forms left from previous years of operations.

  14. Notice of Construction for the Magnesium Hydroxide Precipitation Process at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JANSKY, M.T.

    1999-12-01

    The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration, and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of information listed in Appendix A.'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-1 10) lists the requirements that must be addressed. Additionally, the following description, attachments and references are provided to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide greater than 0.1 millirem per year total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI), and commencement is needed within a short time. Therefore, this application also is intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1), and it is requested that approval of this application also will constitute EPA acceptance of this initial startup notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2) will be provided at a later date. This NOC covers the activities associated with the Construction and operation activities involving the magnesium hydroxide precipitation process of plutonium solutions within the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP).

  15. 78 FR 46255 - Revisions to Environmental Review for Renewal of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Licenses; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 51 RIN 3150-AI42 Revisions to Environmental Review for Renewal of Nuclear Power Plant... environmental effect of renewing the operating license of a nuclear power plant. Compliance with the provisions... nuclear power plant. This document is necessary to clarify and correct the revisions made to the......

  16. Plan for the Startup of HA-21I Furnace Operations at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WILLIS, H.T.

    2000-02-17

    Achievement of Thermal Stabilization mission elements require the installation and startup of three additional muffle furnaces for the thermal stabilization of plutonium and plutonium bearing materials at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The release to operate these additional furnaces will require an Activity Based Startup Review. The conduct of the Activity Based Startup Review (ABSR) was approved by Fluor Daniel Hanford on October 15, 1999. This plan has been developed with the objective of identifying those activities needed to guide the controlled startup of five furnaces from authorization to unrestricted operations by adding the HA-211 furnaces in an orderly and safe manner after the approval to Startup has been given. The Startup Plan provides a phased approach that bridges the activities between the completion of the Activity Based Startup Review authorizing the use of the three additional furnaces and the unrestricted operation of the five thermal stabilization muffle furnaces. The four phases are: (1) the initiation of five furnace operations using three empty (simulated full) boat charges from HA-211 and two full charges from HC-21C; (2) three furnace operations (one full charge from HA-211 and two full charges from HC-21C); (3) four furnace operations (two full charges from HA-211 and two full charges from HC-21C); and (4) integrated five furnace operations and unrestricted operations. Phase 1 of the Plan will be considered as the cold runs. This Plan also provides management oversight and administrative controls that are to be implemented until unrestricted operations are authorized. It also provides a formal review process for ensuring that all preparations needed for full five furnace operations are completed and formally reviewed prior to proceeding to the increased activity levels associated with five furnace operations. Specific objectives include: (1) To ensure that activities are conducted in a safe manner. (2) To provide supplemental

  17. Pilot Plant Demonstration of a Sulfide Precipitation Process for Metal-Finishing Wastewater Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    TOAD Metal-Finishing Wastewater Treatment System 6 3 View of Portion of Treatment System 7 4 Section of Treatment System, Showing Clearwell 7 5 Filter... Clearwell Effluent Suspended Solids 21 10 Effluent Oil and Grease 22 1 1 Dewatered Sludge Solids 23 12 Operating Time, Wastewater Flows, and Volume of...showing clearwell . S S S - - - - - - - - - - S 0C C0 CL U. * 4 Figure 6. Control panel. c. Flow Equalization. The effluents from the cyanide

  18. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) 241-Z LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DEMOLITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHNSTON GA

    2008-01-15

    Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) is proud to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) 241-Z liquid Waste Treatment Facility Deactivation and Demolition (D&D) Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2008. The decommissioning of the 241-Z Facility presented numerous challenges, many of which were unique with in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The majority of the project budget and schedule was allocated for cleaning out five below-grade tank vaults. These highly contaminated, confined spaces also presented significant industrial safety hazards that presented some of the most hazardous work environments on the Hanford Site. The 241-Z D&D Project encompassed diverse tasks: cleaning out and stabilizing five below-grade tank vaults (also called cells), manually size-reducing and removing over three tons of process piping from the vaults, permanently isolating service utilities, removing a large contaminated chemical supply tank, stabilizing and removing plutonium-contaminated ventilation ducts, demolishing three structures to grade, and installing an environmental barrier on the demolition site . All of this work was performed safely, on schedule, and under budget. During the deactivation phase of the project between November 2005 and February 2007, workers entered the highly contaminated confined-space tank vaults 428 times. Each entry (or 'dive') involved an average of three workers, thus equaling approximately 1,300 individual confined -space entries. Over the course of the entire deactivation and demolition period, there were no recordable injuries and only one minor reportable skin contamination. The 241-Z D&D Project was decommissioned under the provisions of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), the 'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976' (RCRA), and the 'Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and

  19. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) 241-Z LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DEMOLITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHNSTON GA

    2008-01-15

    Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) is proud to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) 241-Z liquid Waste Treatment Facility Deactivation and Demolition (D&D) Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2008. The decommissioning of the 241-Z Facility presented numerous challenges, many of which were unique with in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The majority of the project budget and schedule was allocated for cleaning out five below-grade tank vaults. These highly contaminated, confined spaces also presented significant industrial safety hazards that presented some of the most hazardous work environments on the Hanford Site. The 241-Z D&D Project encompassed diverse tasks: cleaning out and stabilizing five below-grade tank vaults (also called cells), manually size-reducing and removing over three tons of process piping from the vaults, permanently isolating service utilities, removing a large contaminated chemical supply tank, stabilizing and removing plutonium-contaminated ventilation ducts, demolishing three structures to grade, and installing an environmental barrier on the demolition site . All of this work was performed safely, on schedule, and under budget. During the deactivation phase of the project between November 2005 and February 2007, workers entered the highly contaminated confined-space tank vaults 428 times. Each entry (or 'dive') involved an average of three workers, thus equaling approximately 1,300 individual confined -space entries. Over the course of the entire deactivation and demolition period, there were no recordable injuries and only one minor reportable skin contamination. The 241-Z D&D Project was decommissioned under the provisions of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), the 'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976' (RCRA), and the 'Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and

  20. 77 FR 55788 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Revised Critical Habitat for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... follows: Sec. 17.96 Critical habitat--plants. (a) Flowering plants. * * * * * Family Alliaceae: Allium... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 RIN 1018-AX42 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants... submit to the Federal Register proposed revised critical habitat determinations for both plants...

  1. Salmonella Enterica Prevalence in Finishing Pigs at Slaughter Plants in Northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacci, Cristina; Lanzoni, Elisa; Brindani, Franco; Bonardi, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Finishing pigs carrying Salmonella enterica are believed to be the main source of carcass contamination at the beginning of slaughtering. The aim of this study was to assess the S. enterica carrier status of finishing pigs at herd level by sampling pooled faeces on farm and mesenteric lymph nodes at slaughter in the North East of Italy. Environmental faecal samples belonging to 30 batches of pigs were collected on farm. At slaughter, mesenteric lymph nodes were collected from five randomly selected pigs per batch. S. enterica was isolated from 16 lymph nodes out of 150 (10.6%) and from seven out of 30 (23.3%) faecal samples. Four batches (13.3%) were positive to S. enterica both in lymph nodes and in faeces. The number of batches positive to S. enterica either in lymph nodes or in faeces was 13 out of 30 (43.3%). The most prevalent serovars from lymph nodes were S. Derby (25.0%) and S. Typhimurium monophasic variant 1, 4,[5],12:i:- (18.6%), which were also isolated from faecal material (14.3 and 42.8% respectively). Contaminated faecal material or lymph nodes could be a primary source of carcass contamination at slaughter during evisceration. S. enterica contamination is widespread on pig farms and carrier pigs pass undetected the inspection visits at slaughter, entering the food chain. Therefore, in order to control S. enterica in pigs, the need to quantify possible risk factors at slaughter and develop effective management strategies on farm is of paramount importance to ensure food safety.

  2. AN APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING & EVALUATING ALTERNATIVES FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF SUB-GRADE STRUCTURES AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOPKINS, A.M.; KLOS, D.B.

    2007-01-25

    In 2002, the Richland Operations Office (RL) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) developed milestones for transitioning the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) facility to a clean slab-on-grade configuration. These milestones required developing an engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EF/CA) for the facility's sub-grade structures and installations as part of a series of evaluations intended to provide for the transition of the facility to a clean slab-on-grade configuration. In addition to supporting decisions for interim actions, the analyses of sub-grade structures and installations performed through this EE/CA will contribute to the remedial investigation feasibility study(ies) and subsequently to the final records of decision for the relevant operable units responsible for site closure in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site.

  3. 75 FR 21394 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Final Revised Critical Habitat for Hine's Emerald...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... Revised Critical Habitat for Hine's Emerald Dragonfly (Somatochlora hineana); Final Rule #0;#0;Federal... Plants; Final Revised Critical Habitat for Hine's Emerald Dragonfly (Somatochlora hineana) AGENCY: Fish... (Service), are designating critical habitat for the Hine's emerald dragonfly (Somatochlora hineana) under...

  4. 78 FR 35719 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Revision To the Nonessential Experimental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 RIN 1018-AY46 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Revision To the Nonessential Experimental Population of the Mexican Wolf AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife...), propose to revise the existing nonessential experimental population designation of the Mexican wolf...

  5. 78 FR 54613 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Revision to the Nonessential Experimental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 RIN 1018-AY46 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Revision to the Nonessential Experimental Population of the Mexican Wolf AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... revise the existing nonessential experimental population designation of the Mexican wolf (Canis...

  6. Revised

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Vivian Kvist; Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Riis-Nielsen, Torben;

    This report is a revised analysis of the Danish data on CO2 emissions from forest, afforestation and deforestation for the period 1990 - 2008 and a prognosis for the period until 2020. Revision have included measurements from 2009 in the estimations. The report is funded by the Ministry of Climate...

  7. 77 FR 27490 - Plant-Specific Adoption, Revision 4 of the Improved Standard Technical Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... Technical Specifications, NUREG-1430, ``Standard Technical Specifications, Babcock and Wilcox Plants....resource@nrc.gov . NUREG-1430, ``Standard Technical Specifications, Babcock and Wilcox Plants'' Revision 4... ML12100A177 ML12100A178 Specifications, Babcock and Wilcox Plants'' NUREG-1431, ``Standard...

  8. 77 FR 13393 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Endangered Status, Revised Critical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... morphological and ecological description and diminished range. We also present our revised designation of... reference Monardella viminea as M. linoides ssp. viminea, and may include statements or data referring...

  9. Performance and carcass yield of broilers supplemented with plant extract during the finisher phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TCF Carlos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 600 one-day-old male Cobb 500 broilers were distributed according a completely randomized experimental design into the different dietary treatments. Broilers were fed the following dietary treatments: positive control diet (PC, containing 54 ppm zinc bacitracin; negative control diet (NC, with no inclusion of performance enhancers and 3% reduction in metabolizable energy, crude protein, and amino acid levels; PC up to 33 days and then NC, with the dietary addition of 75, 150, or 225 ppm plant extracts, until day 42 days of age. Broiler performance and carcass yield were evaluated. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Analysis System package (SAS Institute Inc., 2008, and submitted to polynomial regression analysis using the GLM procedure at 5% significance level. There was no influence of treatments on feed intake or weight gain, but feed conversion ratio of the broiler fed the plant extract was significantly higher (p0.05 of the applied treatments on carcass yield. We concluded that the replacement of performance-enhancing additives by plant extracts, at the evaluated inclusion levels, does not promote positive performance results.

  10. Surface finishing in hydroelectric power plants; Veredeln von Laufrad-Oberflaechen in Wasserkraftanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, Marion

    2010-07-01

    Flow optimized high performance surfaces of the rotor disks are prerequisite to reach high conversion efficiencies in hydroelectric power plants. The surface treatment can be performed using cold metal transfer (CMT) arc welding techniques developed by Fronius International GmbH, Wels, Austria. This technique yields significantly improved results with respect to energy, time and material savings compared to MIG welding or thermal spraying. Water-contact components, sealing and sliding surfaces are cladded using high-performance stainless materials. The CMT process is mainly used by Andritz Hydro Ravensburg for cladding purposes.

  11. 76 FR 59990 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Endangered Status, Revised Critical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    .... stoneana in Mexico other than observations of plants directly across the Mexican border from occurrences in... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 RIN 1018-AX18 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants... follows: ``The term `species' includes any subspecies of fish or wildlife or plants, and any...

  12. 78 FR 71676 - NUREG-1482, Revision 2, “Guidelines for Inservice Testing at Nuclear Power Plants, Final Report”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... COMMISSION NUREG-1482, Revision 2, ``Guidelines for Inservice Testing at Nuclear Power Plants, Final Report.... Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued a final report entitled: NUREG-1482, Revision 2....'' In the previous Revisions 0 and 1 of NUREG-1482, the NRC staff provides licensees guidelines...

  13. 77 FR 31828 - Notice of Request for Revision of a Currently Approved Collection Application for Plant Variety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... Information or Comments: Contact Bernadette Thomas, Information Technology Specialist, Plant Variety Protection Office (PVPO), Science and Technology, AMS, Room 401, National Agricultural Library (NAL), 10301... and revision to the currently approved information collection ``Application for ] Plant...

  14. 76 FR 81665 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revising the Listing of the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revising the Listing of the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) in the Western...-AX57 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revising the Listing of the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus... Minnesota population of gray wolves (Canis lupus) to conform to current statutory and policy...

  15. 78 FR 22556 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Recovery Plan for Lost River Sucker and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... of the same threats continue, such that both species remain in danger of extinction. Habitat loss... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Recovery Plan for Lost... the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants. We revised this plan because a...

  16. Monitoring well plugging and abandonment plan, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    Plugging and abandonment (P&A) of defunct groundwater monitoring wells is a primary element of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) (AJA Technical Services, Inc. 1996). This document is the revised groundwater monitoring well P&A plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan describes the systematic approach employed by Y-12 Plant GWPP to identify wells that require P&A, the technical methods employed to perform P&A activities, and administrative requirements. Original documentation for Y-12 Plant GWPP groundwater monitoring well P&A was provided in HSW, Inc. (1991). The original revision of the plan specified that a comprehensive monitoring well P&A was provided in HSW, Inc. (1991). The original revision of the plan specified that a comprehensive monitoring well P&A schedule be maintained. Wells are added to this list by issuance of both a P&A request and a P&A addendum to the schedule. The current Updated Subsurface Data Base includes a single mechanism to track the status of monitoring wells. In addition, rapid growth of the groundwater monitoring network and new regulatory requirements have resulted in constant changes to the status of wells. As a result, a streamlined mechanism to identify and track monitoring wells scheduled for P&A has been developed and the plan revised to formalize the new business practices.

  17. 77 FR 3255 - Notice of 229 Boundary Revision at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ... entry into or upon areas, buildings, and other facilities of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant... No: 2012-1214] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of 229 Boundary Revision at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion... provided in 10 CFR 860.4, into or upon this facility, installation, or real property of the Paducah...

  18. 78 FR 1879 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Revised Indiana Bat Summer Survey Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ...: Background The Indiana bat was originally listed as in danger of extinction under the Endangered Species... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Revised Indiana Bat Summer Survey Guidelines AGENCY...

  19. 78 FR 9409 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Revised Indiana Bat Summer Survey Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... INFORMATION: Background The Indiana bat was originally listed as in danger of extinction under the Endangered... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Revised Indiana Bat...

  20. 76 FR 9079 - Revision of Distilled Spirits Plant Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ...: Distilled Spirits Plants in General Distilled spirits taxation is a specialized area of Federal law. The... language principles in order to improve the clarity and readability of the regulatory texts. DATES... regulated, and how taxes on distilled spirits are collected, under Federal law. Basic Definitions Distilled...

  1. Monitoring well inspection and maintenance plan Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Inspection and maintenance of groundwater monitoring wells is a primary element of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). This document is the revised groundwater monitoring well inspection and maintenance plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The plan provides a systematic program for: (1) inspecting the physical condition of monitoring wells at the Y-12 Plant and (2) identifying maintenance needs that will extend the life of each well and ensure that representative groundwater quality samples and hydrologic data are collected from the wells. Original documentation for the Y-12 Plant GWPP monitoring well inspection and maintenance program was provided in HSW, Inc. 1991a. The original revision of the plan specified that only a Monitoring Well Inspection/Maintenance Summary need be updated and reissued each year. Rapid growth of the monitoring well network and changing regulatory requirements have resulted in constant changes to the status of wells (active or inactive) listed on the Monitoring Well Inspection/Maintenance Summary. As a result, a new mechanism to track the status of monitoring wells has been developed and the plan revised to formalize the new business practices. These changes are detailed in Sections 2.4 and 2.5.

  2. Standard technical specifications, Westinghouse Plants: Bases (Sections 2.0--3.3). Volume 2, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This NUREG contains the improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for Westinghouse plants. Revision 1 incorporates the cumulative changes to Revision 0, which was published in September 1992. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, specifically the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG), NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993 (58 FR 39132). Licensees are encouraged to upgrade their technical specifications consistent with those criteria and conforming, to the extent practical and consistent with the licensing basis for the facility, to Revision 1 to the improved STS. The Commission continues to place the highest priority on requests for complete conversions to the improved STS. Licensees adopting portions of the improved STS to existing technical specifications should adopt all related requirements, as applicable, to achieve a high degree of standardization and consistency.

  3. THE DEACTIVATION DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING OF THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) A FORMER PLUTONIUM PROCESSING FACILITY AT DOE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHARBONEAU, S.L.

    2006-02-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) was constructed as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. The Manhattan Project was developed to usher in the use of nuclear weapons to end the war. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material (SNM) for fabrication of nuclear devices for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race and later the processing of fuel grade mixed plutonium-uranium oxide to support DOE's breeder reactor program. In October 1990, at the close of the production mission for PFP, a shutdown order was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington, DC and issued to the Richland DOE field office. Subsequent to the shutdown order, a team from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) analyzed the hazards at PFP associated with the continued storage of certain forms of plutonium solutions and solids. The assessment identified many discrete actions that were required to stabilize the different plutonium forms into stable form and repackage the material in high integrity containers. These actions were technically complicated and completed as part of the PFP nuclear material stabilization project between 1995 and early 2005. The completion of the stabilization project was a necessary first step in deactivating PFP. During stabilization, DOE entered into negotiations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Washington and established milestones for the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) of the PFP. The DOE and its contractor, Fluor Hanford (Fluor), have made great progress in deactivating, decontaminating and decommissioning the PFP at the Hanford Site as detailed in this paper. Background information covering the PFP D&D effort includes descriptions of negotiations with the State of Washington concerning consent

  4. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Boiling water reactors, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWRs) (NUREG-1123, Revision 1) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examiner Standards (NUREG-1021) and the Examiner`s Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Written Examinations (NUREG/BR-0122), will cover the topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (10 CFR 55). The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7,000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at BWRs. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Organization of the Catalog, Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Functions, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. Revision 1 to the BWR Catalog represents a modification in form and content of the original catalog. The K/As were linked to their applicable 10 CFR 55 item numbers. SRO level K/As were identified by 10 CFR 55.43 item numbers. The plant-wide generic and system generic K/As were combined in one section with approximately one hundred new K/As. Component Cooling Water and Instrument Air Systems were added to the Systems Section. Finally, High Containment Hydrogen Concentration and Plant Fire On Site evolutions added to the Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions section.

  5. 76 FR 52355 - NUREG-1482, Revision 2, “Guidelines for Inservice Testing at Nuclear Power Plants, Draft Report...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ... COMMISSION NUREG-1482, Revision 2, ``Guidelines for Inservice Testing at Nuclear Power Plants, Draft Report... a document entitled: NUREG-1482, Revision 2, ``Guidelines for Inservice Testing at Nuclear Power... was submitted previously for public comments as draft NUREG-1946. Based on public comments,...

  6. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  7. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  8. Standard technical specifications: Combustion engineering plants. Volume 1, Revision 1: Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for Combustion Engineering Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS.

  9. Standard technical specifications General Electric plants, BWR/6. Volume 1, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for General Electric BWR/6 Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS.

  10. CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FOR THE D&D OF THE 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOPKINS, A.M.; MINETTE, M.J.; KLOS, D.B.

    2007-01-25

    This paper describes the unique challenges encountered and subsequent resolutions to accomplish the deactivation and decontamination of a plutonium ash contaminated building. The 232-Z Contaminated Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant was used to recover plutonium from process wastes such as rags, gloves, containers and other items by incinerating the items and dissolving the resulting ash. The incineration process resulted in a light-weight plutonium ash residue that was highly mobile in air. This light-weight ash coated the incinerator's process equipment, which included gloveboxes, blowers, filters, furnaces, ducts, and filter boxes. Significant airborne contamination (over 1 million derived air concentration hours [DAC]) was found in the scrubber cell of the facility. Over 1300 grams of plutonium held up in the process equipment and attached to the walls had to be removed, packaged and disposed. This ash had to be removed before demolition of the building could take place.

  11. Greenhouse production of Impatiens wallerana using a controlled-release fertiliser produces quality finished plants with enhanced garden performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrient management during production can greatly influence post-production quality of plants. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of controlled release fertilizer (CRF) applied at the time of plug planting on the garden performance (post-production) of impatiens (Impatiens wal...

  12. Standard technical specifications combustion engineering plants: Bases (Sections 2.0--3.3). Volume 2, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for General Electric BWR/6 Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes.

  13. Selection of lactic acid bacteria from fermented plant beverages to use as inoculants for improving the quality of the finished product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantachote, Duangporn; Charernjiratrakul, Wilawan

    2008-11-15

    Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) from fermented plant beverages were selected based on their antibacterial actions against potential food borne pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus PSSCMI 0004, Escherichia coli PSSCMI 0001, Salmonella typhimurium PSSCMI 0034 and Vibrio parahaemolyticus VP 4). Antibacterial activities were measured using an agar spot method. The Lactobacillus plantarum W90A strain isolated from a wild forest noni (Morinda coreia Ham) beverage was used as an inoculant. Three different inoculation procedures were conducted with the fruit of wild forest noni fermentations to establish which one was the best for controlling the numbers of yeast in the finished product. A 5% inoculum of L. plantarum W90A (LAB set), initial cell density 8.6 log cfu mL(-1), produced a better product and inhibitory properties against the test organisms, particularly E. coli PSSCMI 0001 than one with no inoculum or with a 5% inoculum from a previous natural fermented product. An LAB inoculum resulted in a reduced total bacterial count and no yeast throughout fermentation period (90 days). The lower yeast resulted in a reduction of the ethanol content to 2.9 g L(-1) compared to 12.2 g L(-1) inthe culture with no inoculum. The highest acidity (1.3-1.4%) with the same pH (3.3) was observed in both sets of inoculated fermentations, whereas the uninoculated set gave a pH value of 3.7 (1.2% acidity).

  14. Finish line plant-insect interactions mediated by insect feeding mode and plant interference: a case study of Brassica interactions with diamondback moth and turnip aphid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufbaf, Mahmoud; Fathipour, Yaghoub; Harvey, Jeffrey A; Hui, Cang

    2017-01-16

    There are gaps in our understanding of plant responses under different insect phytophagy modes and their subsequent effects on the insect herbivores' performance at late season. Here we compared different types of insect feeding by an aphid, Lipaphis erysimi, and a lepidopteran, Plutella xylostella, and how this affected defensive metabolites in leaves of 2 Brassica species when plants gain maturity. Thiocyanate concentrations after P. xylostella and L. erysimi feeding activities were the same. Total phenolics was higher after the phloem feeder feeding than the folivore activity. The plants compensatory responses (i.e., tolerance) to L. erysimi feeding was significantly higher than the responses to P. xylostella. This study showed that L. erysimi had higher carbon than P. xylostella whereas nitrogen in P. xylostella was 1.42 times that in L. erysimi. Population size of the phloem feeder was not affected by plant species or insect coexistence. However, there was no correlation between plant defensive metabolites and both insects' population size and biomass. This suggests that plant root biomass and tolerance index after different insect herbivory modes are not necessarily unidirectional. Importantly, the interaction between the folivore and the phloem feeder insects is asymmetric and the phloem feeder might be a trickier problem for plants than the folivore. Moreover, as both plants' common and special defenses decreased under interspecific interference, we suggest that specialist insect herbivores can be more challenged in ecosystems in which plants are not involved in interspecific interference. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. Magnetic Electrochemical Finishing Machining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    How to improve the finishing efficiency and surface roughness have been all along the objective of research in electrochemical polishing. However, the research activity, i.e. during electrochemical polishing, directly introduce the magnetic field to study how the magnetic field influences on the finishing efficiency, quality and the electrochemical process in the field of finishing machining technology, is insufficient. When introducing additional magnetic field in the traditional electrochemical pol...

  16. Revised Flora and List of Threatened and Endangered Plants for the John F. Kennedy Space Center Area, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalzer, Paul A.; Foster, Tammy E.; Duncan, Brean W.; Quincy, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The vascular flora of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) area was first studied in the 1970's, and the list was revised in 1990. Nomenclatural and taxonomic changes as well as additional collections required a revision of this list. The revised list includes 1024 taxa of which 803 are native and 221 are introduced. This appears to be a substantial proportion of the regional flora. Fifty taxa are endemic or nearly endemic, a level of endemism that appears high for the east coast of Florida. Of the 221 introduced plants, twenty-six are Category I invasive exotics and fifteen are Category II invasive exotics. Thirty-eight taxa are listed as threatened, endangered, or of special concern on state lists. For some of these taxa, populations on KSC appear to be important for their regional and global survival. The bryophyte flora of the KSC area includes 23 mosses and 20 liverworts and hornworts. The lichen flora is currently unknown.

  17. Revision of the Plant Bug Genus Tytthus (Hemiptera, Heteroptera, Miridae, Phylinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Henry

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The phyline plant bug genus Tytthus Fieber, previously containing 19 species, is revised. Isoproba Osborn and Drake, 1915, incorrectly placed in the subfamily Bryocorinae, tribe Dicyphini, is synonymized as a junior synonym of Tytthus Fieber, syn. n.; the only included species, Isoproba picea Osborn and Drake is transferred to Tytthus, comb. n., as the senior synonym of T. hondurensis Carvalho, syn. n.; and T. koreanus Josifov and Kerzhner, 1972 is synonymized with T. chinensis (Stål 1860, syn. n.; and a lectotype for T. parviceps is designated. The six new species T. femoralis from Cuba, Ecuador, Guatemala, Jamaica, Mexico, and Peru, T. fuscicornis from New Mexico (USA, T. mexicanus from Mexico, T. pallidus from Brazil and Panama, T. uniformis from Arizona and New Mexico (USA, and T. wheeleri from the eastern United States are described, bringing the total number of species for the genus to 24. A color adult habitus illustration of T. wheeleri, color photographs for each species (except T. juturnaiba Carvalho and Wallerstein, illustrations of male genitalia, scanning electron photomicrographs of selected structures of certain species, and an identification key are provided to facilitate species recognition. A phylogenetic analysis is offered to help infer relationships.

  18. Analysis and Comparison of Water Purification Processes and Finished Water Quality for 3 Water Treatment Plants%关于三个水厂净水工艺与供水水质的比较和分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳宇明; 陆茸; 毛丽娜; 沈元静; 何小清

    2014-01-01

    该文介绍了国内一自来水公司三个水厂的两个原水水质、净水工艺及出厂水水质。结果显示第一水厂的出厂水质较为理想,第二水厂次之,第三水厂为第三。第三水厂由于水源的问题导致出厂氨氮季节性超标,建议采取有效措施改进水源水质,以提高出厂水质。第二水厂需进行工艺改造,实施臭氧活性炭深度处理以进一步提高供水水质。第三水厂一期系统臭氧生物活性炭池置于砂滤池后较二期活性炭滤池置于砂滤池前出水有机物CODMn及TOC略低,但两者基本相近。建议第三水厂采取必要的措施改进水源水质,或再增加一道臭氧生物活性炭工序。%Water plants with two different raw water qualities,purification processes and their effluent water qualities were introduced in this paper. The finished water quality of NO. 1 plant is the best,and the NO. 2 is better. Due to raw water quality problem No. 3 water plant’s finished water ammonia nitrogen hardly meets the standard of GB 5749-2006 seasonally. Effective measures should be taken to improve the effluent water quality of No. 3 water plant No. 2 water plant need technological transformation to implement advanced treatment of O3 actived carbon to improve finished water quality. The organic indexes of effluent water of first-stage system in No. 3 water plant,of which O3 actived carbon filter is located behind the sand filter,is a little better than that of second-stage system, of which O3 actived carbon filter is located before the sand filter. But their finished water qualities are approximately same. Necessary measures to improve raw water quality for No. 3 water plant or to apply an additional ozone BAC process are recommended.

  19. THE CREATIVE APPLICATION OF SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY & WORK FORCE INNOVATIONS TO THE D&D OF PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHARBONEAU, S.L.

    2006-02-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) consists of a number of process and support buildings for handling plutonium. Building construction began in the late 1940's to meet national priorities and became operational in 1950 producing refined plutonium salts and metal for the United States nuclear weapons program. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material for fabrication into a nuclear device for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race. PFP has now completed its mission and is fully engaged in deactivation, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). At this time the PFP buildings are planned to be reduced to ground level (slab-on-grade) and the site remediated to satisfy national, Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington state requirements. The D&D of a highly contaminated plutonium processing facility presents a plethora of challenges. PFP personnel approached the D&D mission with a can-do attitude. They went into D&D knowing they were facing a lot of challenges and unknowns. There were concerns about the configuration control associated with drawings of these old process facilities. There were unknowns regarding the location of electrical lines and process piping containing chemical residues such as strong acids and caustics. The gloveboxes were highly contaminated with plutonium and chemical residues. Most of the glovebox windows were opaque with splashed process chemicals that coated the windows or etched them, reducing visibility to near zero. Visibility into the glovebox was a serious worker concern. Additionally, all the gloves in the gloveboxes were degraded and unusable. Replacing gloves in gloveboxes was necessary to even begin glovebox cleanout. The sheer volume of breathing air needed was also an issue. These and other challenges and PFP's approach to overcome these

  20. Revision of by-laws about effluents of EdF's nuclear power plants; Revision des arretes de rejets des centrales nucleaires d'EDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    In France, in application of the clean water law from January 3, 1992 and since the decree 95-540 from May 4, 1995, each basic nuclear facility receives a single permission which covers both its water takes and its radioactive and non-radioactive effluents. This decree, initially dedicated to new facilities has been enlarged to all existing installations for which the prefectorial by-laws have reached their date-line. Thus, up to now, five inter-ministerial by-laws have renewed the permissions of water takes and effluents evacuation of the power plants of Saint-Laurent-des-Eaux (Loir-et-Cher), Flamanville (Manche), Paluel (Seine-Maritime), Belleville (Cher) and Saint-Alban (Isere). These by-laws foresee an important abatement of the effluents and concern more particularly the tritium, {sup 14}C, the iodine isotopes and also some other non-radioactive chemical compounds. This document is a compilation of all revised by-laws about effluents and concerning the nuclear power plants listed above. (J.S.)

  1. CFDB Steam Heat Conduction Oil Composite Boiler Application in Dyeing and Finishing Plant%循环双流化床蒸汽导热油复合锅炉在染整厂的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林金辉

    2016-01-01

    The paper discuss about the principle, structure and advantages of the one new type and high efficient boiler-CFDB steam heat conduction oil composite boiler, what's more, the boiler has the case in dyeing and finishing plant that it has been built and running. Through practical testing, it can bring certain economic benefits, environmental benefits and social benefits, and make some reference for dyeing and finishing plant boiler system integration.%本文对一种新型高效锅炉-循环双流化床蒸汽导热油复合锅炉的原理、结构及优点做了论述,且该型锅炉已在染整厂有实例建成投入运行,通过实践检验,它能够带来一定的经济效益、环保效益和社会效益,为染整厂锅炉系统整合有一定借鉴作用。

  2. 78 FR 59429 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Designation of Critical Habitat for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... occurs in the contiguous United States, including New Mexico, and it would revise this species' critical... in the contiguous United States, including New Mexico. The lynx DPS was listed as threatened in 2000... 2009, we determined that adding lynx in New Mexico to the listing of the lynx DPS was warranted...

  3. 78 FR 29774 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Revised Supplement to the Grizzly Bear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... the Grizzly Bear Recovery Plan; Extension of Public Comment Period AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... Grizzly Bear Recovery Plan in the greater Yellowstone area. If you have previously submitted comments... Revised Supplement to the Grizzly Bear Recovery Plan is available at...

  4. 78 FR 17708 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Revised Supplement to the Grizzly Bear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... the Grizzly Bear Recovery Plan AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of document... availability of a draft Revised Supplement to the Grizzly Bear Recovery Plan. Specifically, this supplement..., Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) are federally listed as threatened under the Endangered...

  5. Surface finish measurement studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, E. C.

    1983-01-01

    The performance of stylus instruments for measuring the topography of National Transonic Facility (NTF) model surfaces both for monitoring during fabrication and as an absolute measurement of topography was evaluated. It was found that the shop-grade instruments can damage the surface of models and that their use for monitoring fabrication procedures can lead to surface finishes that are substantially out of range in critical areas of the leading edges. The development of a prototype light-scattering instrument which would allow for rapid assessment of the surface finish of a model is also discussed.

  6. Ultrasonic magnetic abrasive finishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ya-ping; MA Ji; ZHANG Jun-qiang; WANG Long-shan

    2006-01-01

    Put forward a new kind of polishing method, ultrasonic magnetic abrasive finishing (UMAF), and studied its mechanism of improving polishing efficiency. By analyzing all kind of forces acting on single abrasive particle in the polishing process and calculating the size of the composition of forces, get the conclusion that UMAF will enhance the efficiency of the normal magnetic abrasive finishing(MAF) due to the ultrasonic vibration increases the cutting force and depth. At last the idea of designing the UMAF system based on numerical control milling machine is put forward which is convenient to setup and will accelerate the practical application of MAF.

  7. Role of alginate in antibacterial finishing of textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiwei; He, Jinmei; Huang, Yudong

    2017-01-01

    Antibacterial finishing of textiles has been introduced as a necessary process for various purposes especially creating a fabric with antimicrobial activities. Currently, the textile industry continues to look for textiles antimicrobial finishing process based on sustainable biopolymers from the viewpoints of environmental friendliness, industrialization, and economic concerns. This paper reviews the role of alginate, a sustainable biopolymer, in the development of antimicrobial textiles, including both basic physicochemical properties of alginate such as preparation, chemical structure, molecular weight, solubility, viscosity, and sol-gel transformation property. Then different processing routes (e.g. nanocomposite coating, ionic cross-linking coating, and Layer-by-Layer coating) for the antibacterial finishing of textiles by using alginate are revised in some detail. The achievements in this area have increased our knowledge of alginate application in the field of textile industry and promoted the development of green textile finishing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Nanometric Finishing on Biomedical Implants by Abrasive Flow Finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Kavithaa Thirumalai; Balashanmugam, Natchimuthu; Shashi Kumar, Panaghra Veeraiah

    2016-01-01

    Abrasive flow finishing (AFF) is a non-conventional finishing technique that offers better accuracy, efficiency, consistency, economy in finishing of complex/difficult to machine materials/components and provides the possibility of effective automation as aspired by the manufacturing sector. The present study describes the finishing of a hip joint made of ASTM grade Co-Cr alloy by Abrasive Flow Machining (AFM) process. The major input parameters of the AFF process were optimized for achieving nanometric finishing of the component. The roughness average (Ra) values were recorded during experimentation using surface roughness tester and the results are discussed in detail. The surface finished hip joints were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and residual stress analysis using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The discussion lays emphasis on the significance, efficacy and versatile nature of the AFF process in finishing of bio-medical implants.

  9. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part 1, Introduction, integration, and summary: Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J.S. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Abrahmson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gilbert, E.S. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This report is a revision of NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990), Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis. This revision has been made to incorporate changes to the Health Effects Models recommended in two addenda to the NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 11, 1989 report. The first of these addenda provided recommended changes to the health effects models for low-LET radiations based on recent reports from UNSCEAR, ICRP and NAS/NRC (BEIR V). The second addendum presented changes needed to incorporate alpha-emitting radionuclides into the accident exposure source term. As in the earlier version of this report, models are provided for early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating the risks of seven types of cancer in adults - leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and ``other``. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Five classes of genetic diseases -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocations, and multifactorial diseases are also considered. Data are provided that should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk.

  10. 76 FR 50541 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Revised Critical Habitat for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... (structure and plant species) and will influence the germination, density, vigor, composition, and the... overbank flooding occurs, is integral to allow deposition of fine moist soils, water, nutrients, and seeds that provide the essential material for plant germination and growth. An abundance and distribution...

  11. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant No-migration variance petition. Addendum: Volume 7, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    This report describes various aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) including design data, waste characterization, dissolution features, ground water hydrology, natural resources, monitoring, general geology, and the gas generation/test program.

  12. Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan TA-60 Asphalt Batch Plant Revision 2: January 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval, Leonard Frank [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The Stormwater Pollution Prevention Team (PPT) is applicable to operations at the Technical Area (TA)- 60 Asphalt Batch Plant (ABP) located on Eniwetok Drive/Sigma Mesa, in Los Alamos County, New Mexico at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  13. 76 FR 75836 - Revisions to Distilled Spirits Plant Operations Reports and Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ..., and beer used for beverage purposes and distilled spirits used for nonbeverage purposes. Section 5001... number of plants authorized to produce or warehouse industrial spirits had begun to market spirits into...

  14. Print Finishing: From Manual to Automated Print Finishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Ward

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Meeting the demand for faster turnrounds and shorter print runs goes beyond making the printing press easier to set up and change. There is little point in producing plates and then sheets from a press if the post press area does not change to keep abreast of developments in prepress and the print room. The greatest impact is going to come from JDF, the end to end production data format which is finding wide spread acceptance in print areas. To date finishing equipment manufacturers are not as well represented within the CIP4 organisation as prepress and press vendors, but the major manufacturers are members. All are working to the goal of complete connectivity.The idea of JDF is that if the format of a print product like a magazine is known during the creation phases, the information can be used to preset machinery that is going to be used to produce it, so avoiding input errors and saving manufacturing time.A second aspect to JDF is that information about performance and progress is gathered and can be retrieved from a central point or made available to a customer. Production scheduling and costing becomes more accurate and customer relationships are deepened. However JDF to its fullest extent is not yet in use in connecting the finishing area to the rest of the printing plant. Around the world different companies are testing the idea of JDF to connect saddle stitchers, guillotines and binders with frantic work underway to be able to show results soon.

  15. Bioconversion of plant biomass to ethanol. Annual report and revised research plan, January 1977--January 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, R.E.; Bellamy, W.D.; Su, T.M.

    1978-03-23

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate on a laboratory scale the technical feasibility of the direct microbial conversion of pretreated wood to ethanol. During the first year of this contract, we investigated the feasibility of biologically delignifying wood with C. pruinosum and directly fermenting the pretreated wood to ethanol with a mixed culture. Bench-top fermentations of a thermophilic bacillus growing on glucose and of a mixed culture of thermophilic sporocytophaga (US) and a thermophilic bacillus growing on microcrystalline and amorphous cellulose were evaluated for growth and ethanol production. In the mixed culture fermentation of amorphous and microcrystalline cellulose, the specific rate of substrate depletion was calculated to be 0.087 hr/sup -1/ and 0.0346 hr/sup -1/, respectively. However, defining the growth requirements of C. pruinosum and sporocytophaga (US) proved more difficult than originally anticipated. In order to achieve the program objectives within the contract period, a revised research plan was developed based upon chemical pretreatment and the direct fermentation of pretreated hardwood to ethanol. In place of the biological delignification pretreatment step, we have substituted a chemically supplemented steam pretreatment step to partially delignify wood and to enhance its accessibility to microbial utilization. Clostridium thermocellum, which ferments cellulose directly to ethanol and acetic acid, has replaced the mixed culture fermentation stage for ethanol production. Research on the production of ethanol from xylose by the thermophilic bacillus ZB-B2 is retained as one means of utilizing the hemicellulose fraction of hardwood. Work on the genetic improvement of the ethanol yields of both cultures by suppressing acetic acid production is also retained. The rationale, experimental approach, and economic considerations of this revised research plan are also presented.

  16. Stable isotopes provide revised global limits of aerobic methane emissions from plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. F. Ferretti

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently Keppler et al. (2006 discovered a surprising new source of methane – terrestrial plants under aerobic conditions, with an estimated global production of 62–236 Tg yr−1 by an unknown mechanism. This is ~10–40% of the annual total of methane entering the modern atmosphere and ~30–100% of annual methane entering the pre-industrial (0 to 1700 AD atmosphere. Here we test this reported global production of methane from plants against ice core records of atmospheric methane concentration (CH4 and stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13CH4 over the last 2000 years. Our top-down approach determines that global plant emissions must be much lower than proposed by Keppler et al. (2006 during the last 2000 years and are likely to lie in the range 0–46 Tg yr−1 and 0–176 Tg yr−1 during the pre-industrial and modern eras, respectively.

  17. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Pressurized water reactors. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The examinations developed using the PWR catalog will cover those topics listed under Title 10, (ode of Federal Regulations Part 55. The PWR catalog contains approximately 5100 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Catalog Organization; Generic Knowledge and Abilities; Plant Systems; Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions; Components and Theory.

  18. Plant Roots: The Hidden Half. Chapter 16; Calcium and Gravitropism; Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Reedy, A. S. N.

    1995-01-01

    Environmental signals such as light and gravity control many aspects of plant growth and development. In higher plants, the directional growth of an organ in response to stimuli such as gravity and light is considered a tropic movement. Such movement could be either positive or negative with respect to a specific stimulus. In general, stems show a positive response to light and negative response to gravity. In contrast, most roots show a positive response to gravity and a negative response to light. Investigations on plant tropism date back a century when Darwin studied the phototropic responses of maize seedlings (Darwin). Although the precise mechanism of signal perception and transduction in roots is not understood, Darwin recognized over 100 years ago that the root cap is the probable site of signal perception. He discovered that the removal of the root cap eliminates the ability of roots to respond to gravity. Other investigators have since confirmed Darwin's observation (Konings; Evans et al.). In recent years, especially with the advent of the U.S. Space Program, there has been a renewed interest in understanding how plants respond to extracellular signals such as gravity (Halstead and Dutcher). Studies on the mechanisms involved in perception and transduction of gravity signal by roots would ultimately help us to better understand gravitropism and also to grow plants under microgravity conditions as in space. In this chapter, we restrict ourselves to the role of calcium in transduction of the gravity signal. In doing so, emphasis is given to the role of calcium-modulated proteins and their role in signal transduction in gravitropism. Detailed reviews on various other aspects of gravitropism (Scott, Torrey, Wilkins, Fim and Digby, Feldman, Pickard, Moore and Evans, Halstead and Dutcher, Poovaiah et al.) and on the role of calcium as a messenger in signal transduction in general have been published (Helper and Wayne, Poovaiah and Reddy, Roberts and Hartnon

  19. Career and Personal Development for Plant Science Core Curriculum. Instructor's Guide. Vol. 15. No. 1. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Bob R.; And Others

    Intended as part of the second year of instruction for students of vocational agriculture, this unit for a plant science core curriculum consists of five lessons designed to help students in their careers and personal development. Topics are: reconsidering career plans; finding information on available jobs; getting a job; developing as a…

  20. Water Treatment Plant Operation Volume 2. A Field Study Training Program. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. School of Engineering.

    The purpose of this water treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified water treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  1. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants. Volume 1. A Field Study Training Program. Third Edition. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    The purpose of this wastewater treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified wastewater treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  2. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transuranic Waste Baseline inventory report. Volume 2. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This document is the Baseline Inventory Report for the transuranic (alpha-bearing) wastes stored at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Waste stream profiles including origin, applicable EPA codes, typical isotopic composition, typical waste densities, and typical rates of waste generation for each facility are presented for wastes stored at the WIPP.

  3. 75 FR 78429 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Critical Habitat for the Preble's Meadow...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ... for the conservation of endangered and threatened species. Proactive management on U.S. Forest Service... habitat than is our use of distance ] from the stream edge, based on stream order (a classification of... increase in willow growth and a tall, dense herbaceous component of the plant community was observed in...

  4. 77 FR 71875 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Revised Critical Habitat for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ...-History Function Primary Constituent Elements for the Northern Spotted Owl Special Management... ecosystems and thousands of plant and animal species. It ranges from moist old-growth conifer forest in the... designing and conducting experiments to better understand how these different actions influence the...

  5. 不同水处理工艺的自来水出厂水中有机物的遗传毒性%Genotoxicity of organic extracts from finished water with different treatment process in six water plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方道奎; 余淑苑; 张隽; 张振; 周国宏; 李思果; 吴辉; 翟卉; 唐非

    2011-01-01

    目的:检测和评价某市6家A,B,C,D,E和F厂采用不同水处理工艺自来水厂出厂水中有机物的遗传毒性.方法通过鼠伤寒沙门菌致突变实验、微核实验及微量波动实验检测与比较各水样中有机物的致突变性.结果:6家自来水厂出厂水中有机物的鼠伤寒沙门菌致突变实验结果均为阳性;各厂出厂水中有机物诱导的小鼠骨髓细胞微核率由高至低依次为:D>E=A>C>F>B;C厂后加氯单元出水中有机物在每板0.25L的剂量下,微量波动实验对于TA98,TA100均出现阳性结果,并且各剂量的阳性反应孔存在明显的剂量反应关系(P<0.05).结论:某市6家自来水厂出厂水中的有机物具有明显的致突变作用,且以移码突变为主;微核实验与Ames实验对水中有机物遗传毒性检测与评价结果基本一致;微量波动实验可提高对水中有机物致突变性检测的灵敏度.%OBJECTIVE To explore the genotoxicity of organic extracts from finished water in 6 water plants A, B, C, D, E and F in a particular city. METHODS The following in vitro and in vivo tests were conducted: Ames test with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 with and without mammalian S9 activation component, microscale fluctuation test with S. typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 without mammalian S9 activation component, and mouse micronucleus test in mice polychromatic erythrocyte (PCE) stem cells. RESULTS Positive results were obtained by Ames test and micronucleus assay from all the finished water samples in six water plants. The micronucleus frequency was shown in the following order: D > E = A > C > F > B. Microscale fluctuation test showed that at the concentration of 0.25 L every plate and after post-chlorination treatment of plant C, the positive results in TA98 ( - S9 ) and TA100 ( - S9 ) ( P < 0. 05 ) were obtained.CONCLUSION Mutagenicity of finished water from 6 water plants in this city is relatively high and the type of mutagenicity

  6. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant No-Migration Variance Petition. Revision 1, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, Arlen

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of the WIPP No-Migration Variance Petition is to demonstrate, according to the requirements of RCRA {section}3004(d) and 40 CFR {section}268.6, that to a reasonable degree of certainty, there will be no migration of hazardous constituents from the facility for as long as the wastes remain hazardous. The DOE submitted the petition to the EPA in March 1989. Upon completion of its initial review, the EPA provided to DOE a Notice of Deficiencies (NOD). DOE responded to the EPA`s NOD and met with the EPA`s reviewers of the petition several times during 1989. In August 1989, EPA requested that DOE submit significant additional information addressing a variety of topics including: waste characterization, ground water hydrology, geology and dissolution features, monitoring programs, the gas generation test program, and other aspects of the project. This additional information was provided to EPA in January 1990 when DOE submitted Revision 1 of the Addendum to the petition. For clarity and ease of review, this document includes all of these submittals, and the information has been updated where appropriate. This document is divided into the following sections: Introduction, 1.0: Facility Description, 2.0: Waste Description, 3.0; Site Characterization, 4.0; Environmental Impact Analysis, 5.0; Prediction and Assessment of Infrequent Events, 6.0; and References, 7.0.

  7. Digital control systems in nuclear power plants: Failure information, modeling concepts, and applications. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galyean, W.J.

    1993-06-23

    This report briefly describes some current applications of advanced computerized digital display and control systems at US commercial nuclear power plants and presents the results of a literature search that was made to gather information on the reliability of these systems. Both hardware and software reliability were addressed in this review. Only limited failure rate information was found, with the chemical process industry being the primary source of information on hardware failure rates and expert opinion the primary source for software failure rates. Safety-grade digital control systems are typically installed on a functional like-for-like basis, replacing older analog systems without substantially changing interactions with other plant systems. Future work includes performing a limited probabilistic risk assessment of a representative DCS to assess its risk significance.

  8. 2003 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-04

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Kansas City Plant. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  9. 2003 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-05

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Pantex Plant. DOE is commited to assuring the health and safety of its workers. This includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  10. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.E. Mizia; W.E. Windes; W.R. Corwin; T.D. Burchell; C.E. Duty; Y. Katoh; J.W. Klett; T.E. McGreevy; R.K. Nanstad; W. Ren; P.L. Rittenhouse; L.L. Snead; R.W. Swindeman; D.F. Wlson

    2007-09-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 950°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Some of the general and administrative aspects of the R&D Plan include: • Expand American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Codes and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standards in support of the NGNP Materials R&D Program. • Define and develop inspection needs and the procedures for those inspections. • Support selected university materials related R&D activities that would be of direct benefit to the NGNP Project. • Support international materials related collaboration activities through the DOE sponsored Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Materials and Components (M&C) Project Management Board (PMB). • Support document review activities through the Materials Review Committee (MRC) or other suitable forum.

  11. Acceptable knowledge document for INEEL stored transuranic waste -- Rocky Flats Plant waste. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-23

    This document and supporting documentation provide a consistent, defensible, and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for waste generated at the Rocky Flats Plant which is currently in the accessible storage inventory at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The inventory consists of transuranic (TRU) waste generated from 1972 through 1989. Regulations authorize waste generators and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities to use acceptable knowledge in appropriate circumstances to make hazardous waste determinations. Acceptable knowledge includes information relating to plant history, process operations, and waste management, in addition to waste-specific data generated prior to the effective date of the RCRA regulations. This document is organized to provide the reader a comprehensive presentation of the TRU waste inventory ranging from descriptions of the historical plant operations that generated and managed the waste to specific information about the composition of each waste group. Section 2 lists the requirements that dictate and direct TRU waste characterization and authorize the use of the acceptable knowledge approach. In addition to defining the TRU waste inventory, Section 3 summarizes the historical operations, waste management, characterization, and certification activities associated with the inventory. Sections 5.0 through 26.0 describe the waste groups in the inventory including waste generation, waste packaging, and waste characterization. This document includes an expanded discussion for each waste group of potential radionuclide contaminants, in addition to other physical properties and interferences that could potentially impact radioassay systems.

  12. Sampling and analysis plan for Mount Plant D & D soils packages, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-02-01

    There are currently 682 containers of soils in storage at Mound Plant, generated between April 1 and October 31, 1990 as a result of excavation of soils containing plutonium-238 at two ongoing Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program sites. These areas are known as Area 14, the waste transfer system (WTS) hillside, and Area 17, the Special Metallurgical (SM) Building area. The soils from these areas are part of Mound Plant waste stream number AMDM-000000010, Contaminated Soil, and are proposed for shipment to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal as low-level radioactive waste. The sealed waste packages, constructed of either wood or metal, are currently being stored in Building 31 and at other locations throughout the Mound facility. At a meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada on October, 26, 1990, DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE-NV) and NTS representatives requested that the Mound Plant D&D soils proposed for shipment to NTS be sampled for Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) constituents. On December 14, 1990, DOE-NV also requested that additional analyses be performed on the soils from one of the soils boxes for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), particle size distribution, and free liquids. The purpose of this plan is to document the proposed sampling and analyses of the packages of D&D soils produced prior to October 31, 1990. In order to provide a thorough description of the soils excavated from the WTS and SM areas, sections 1.1 and 1.2 provide historical Information concerning the D&D soils, including waste stream evaluations and past sampling data.

  13. Toxicological benchmarks for screening potential contaminants of concern for effects on terrestrial plants: 1994 revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Will, M.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    One of the initial stages in ecological risk assessment for hazardous waste sites is screening contaminants to determine which of them are worthy of further consideration as contaminants of potential concern. This process is termed contaminant screening. It is performed by comparing measured ambient concentrations of chemicals to benchmark concentrations. Currently, no standard benchmark concentrations exist for assessing contaminants in soil with respect to their toxicity to plants. This report presents a standard method for deriving benchmarks for this purpose (phytotoxicity benchmarks), a set of data concerning effects of chemicals in soil or soil solution on plants, and a set of phytotoxicity benchmarks for 38 chemicals potentially associated with United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites. In addition, background information on the phytotoxicity and occurrence of the chemicals in soils is presented, and literature describing the experiments from which data were drawn for benchmark derivation is reviewed. Chemicals that are found in soil at concentrations exceeding both the phytotoxicity benchmark and the background concentration for the soil type should be considered contaminants of potential concern.

  14. Conversion of finished leather waste incorporated with plant fibers into value added consumer products - An effort to minimize solid waste in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teklay, A; Gebeyehu, G; Getachew, T; Yaynshet, T; Sastry, T P

    2017-07-29

    Presently, the leftovers from leather product industries are discarded as waste in Ethiopia. The objective of the present study was therefore, to prepare composite sheets by incorporating various plant fibers like enset (Ensete ventricosum), hibiscus (Hibiscus cannabinus), jute (Corchorus trilocularis L.), palm (Phoenix dactylifera) and sisal (Agave sisal) in various proportions into the leather waste. Resin binder (RB) and natural rubber latex (NRL) were used as binding agents for the preparation of the composite sheets. The composite sheets prepared were characterized for their physicochemical properties (tensile strength, elongation at break, stitch tear strength, water absorption, water desorption and flexing strength). Composite sheets prepared using RB having 10% hibiscus, 20% palm and 40% sisal fibers showed better mechanical properties than their respective controls. In composite sheets prepared using NRL having 30% jute fiber exhibited better mechanical properties than its control. Most of the plant fibers used in this study played a role in increasing the performance of the sheets. However, as seen from the results, the contribution of these plant fibers on performance of the composite sheets prepared is dependent on the ratio used and the nature of binder. The SEM studies have exhibited the composite nature of the sheets and FTIR studies have shown the functional groups of collagen protein, cellulose and binders. The prepared sheets were used as raw materials for preparation of items like stiff hand bags, ladies' purse, keychain, chappal upper, wallet, wall cover, mouse pad and other interior decorating products. By preparing such value added products, we can reduce solid waste; minimize environmental pollution and thereby securing environmental sustainability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. San Diego Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP) Rare Plant Monitoring Review and Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachern, Kathryn; Pavlik, Bruce M.; Rebman, Jon; Sutter, Rob

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The San Diego Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP) was developed for the conservation of plants and animals in the south part of San Diego County, under the California Natural Community Conservation Planning Act of 1991 (California Department of Fish and Game) and the Federal Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (16 U.S. Code 1531-1544.) The Program is on the leading edge of conservation, as it seeks to both guide development and conserve at-risk species with the oversight of both State and Federal agencies. Lands were identified for inclusion in the MSCP based on their value as habitat for at-risk plants or plant communities (Natural Community Conservation Planning, 2005). Since its inception in the mid-1990s the Program has protected over 100,000 acres, involving 15 jurisdictions and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG) in the conservation of 87 taxa. Surveys for covered species have been conducted, and management and monitoring have been implemented at some high priority sites. Each jurisdiction or agency manages and monitors their conservation areas independently, while collaborating regionally for long-term protection. The San Diego MSCP is on the forefront of conservation, in one of the most rapidly growing urban areas of the country. The planning effort that developed the MSCP was state-of-the-art, using expert knowledge, spatial habitat modeling, and principles of preserve design to identify and prioritize areas for protection. Land acquisition and protection are ahead of schedule for most jurisdictions. Surveys have verified the locations of many rare plant populations known from earlier collections, and they provide general information on population size and health useful for further conservation planning. Management plans have been written or are in development for most MSCP parcels under jurisdictional control. Several agencies are developing databases for implementation

  16. Quality assurance program description: Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant, Part 1. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This document describes the Department of Energy`s Richland Field Office (DOE-RL) quality assurance (QA) program for the processing of high-level waste as well as the Vitrification Project Quality Assurance Program for the design and construction of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). It also identifies and describes the planned activities that constitute the required quality assurance program for the HWVP. This program applies to the broad scope of quality-affecting activities associated with the overall HWVP Facility. Quality-affecting activities include designing, purchasing, fabricating, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning, erecting, installing, inspecting, testing, maintaining, repairing, and modifying. Also included are the development, qualification, and production of waste forms which may be safely used to dispose of high-level radioactive waste resulting from national defense activities. The HWVP QA program is made up of many constituent programs that are being implemented by the participating organizations. This Quality Assurance program description is intended to outline and define the scope and application of the major programs that make up the HWVP QA program. It provides a means by which the overall program can be managed and directed to achieve its objectives. Subsequent parts of this description will identify the program`s objectives, its scope, application, and structure.

  17. 76 FR 7528 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To Revise Critical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... substantial scientific information indicating that the revision may be warranted. In determining whether... scientific information'' threshold. We find that the petition does not present substantial information to... rule (70 FR 46924) under section 4(b)(2) of the Act; the petition presents no information...

  18. 77 FR 27010 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Critical Habitat for the Northern Spotted Owl

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ...; Revised Critical Habitat for the Northern Spotted Owl AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION... designated critical habitat for the northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina), and announced the... the northern spotted owl is extended to July 6, 2012. Please note comments submitted...

  19. 76 FR 38575 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Recovery Plan for the Northern Spotted Owl...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... Recovery Plan for the Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... Wildlife Service, announce the availability of the Revised Recovery Plan for the Northern Spotted Owl... Spotted Owl available for public review and comment from September 15 through November 15, 2010...

  20. 75 FR 57055 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Revised Recovery Plan for Utah Prairie Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... for Utah Prairie Dog AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of document... availability of a draft revised recovery plan for the Utah prairie dog (Cynomys parvidens). This species is.... The Utah prairie dog (Cynomys parvidens), found only in southwestern and central Utah, was listed...

  1. 77 FR 24975 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Recovery Plan for the Utah Prairie Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... Utah Prairie Dog AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of document availability... recovery plan for the Utah prairie dog (Cynomys parvidens). This species is federally listed as threatened... preparation of the final revised recovery plan for the Utah prairie dog. The Service and other...

  2. Dimensioning, Tolerancing, and Machine Finishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, George C.

    Intended for use with the vocational education student interested in technical drawing, this guide provides answers to questions relating to dimensioning and tolerancing machine drawings. It also gives examples of standard dimensioning practices, tolerancing applications, and finish applications. The problems and examples presented are based on…

  3. CAPSULE REPORT - MANAGING CYANIDE IN METAL FINISHING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to surface finishing manufacturers, metal finishing decision maker and regulators on management practices and control technologies for managing cyanide in the workplace. This information can benefit key industry stakeholder gro...

  4. Status of the revision of the 88/609 directive on the reduction of air pollutant emissions from large burning plants; Le point sur la revision de la Directive 88/609 relative a la reduction des emissions polluantes dans l`atmosphere, en provenance des grandes installations de combustion (GIC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The present European 88/609 directive, which applies to burning plants with a capacity of more than 50 MW (i.e. mainly power plant boilers and industrial energy production plants), is presented; different emission level limits are fixed for new and old plants, for the three main air pollutants (sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and dust). Results on emission pollution levels in 1990, following the 1988 directive are presented. Several revisions drafts have been studied, which included gas turbines, and the end of the separation between old and new plants

  5. 7 CFR 29.3517 - Finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finish. 29.3517 Section 29.3517 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3517 Finish. The reflectance factor in color perception. Finish indicates the sheen or...

  6. 7 CFR 29.3022 - Finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finish. 29.3022 Section 29.3022 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Finish. The reflectance factor in color perception. Finish indicates the sheen or shine of the surface of...

  7. 7 CFR 29.1017 - Finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finish. 29.1017 Section 29.1017 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1017 Finish. The reflectance factor in color perception. Finish indicates the sheen or...

  8. 7 CFR 29.2518 - Finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finish. 29.2518 Section 29.2518 Agriculture...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2518 Finish. The reflectance factor in color perception. Finish indicates the sheen or shine of the surface of a tobacco leaf. (See chart, § 29.2601.) ...

  9. 7 CFR 29.2268 - Finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finish. 29.2268 Section 29.2268 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2268 Finish. The reflectance factor in color perception. Finish indicates the sheen or shine of the surface of a...

  10. 27 CFR 25.231 - Finished beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finished beer. 25.231... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Beer Purchased From Another Brewer § 25.231 Finished beer. (a) A brewer may obtain beer in barrels and kegs, finished and ready for sale from another brewer. The purchasing...

  11. Revising Translations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kirsten Wølch; Schjoldager, Anne

    2011-01-01

    out by specialised revisers, but by staff translators, who revise the work of colleagues and freelancers on an ad hoc basis. Corrections are mostly given in a peer-to-peer fashion, though the work of freelancers and inexperienced in-house translators is often revised in an authoritative (nonnegotiable...

  12. The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loucks, C.S.; Selleck, C.B.

    1990-08-01

    The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is developing four areas of technology required for automated deburring, chamfering, and blending of machined edges: (1) the automatic programming of robot trajectories and deburring processes using information derived from a CAD database, (2) the use of machine vision for locating the workpiece coupled with force control to ensure proper tool contact, (3) robotic deburring, blending, and machining of precision chamfered edges, and (4) in-process automated inspection of the formed edge. The Laboratory, its components, integration, and results from edge finishing experiments to date are described here. Also included is a discussion of the issues regarding implementation of the technology in a production environment. 24 refs., 17 figs.

  13. Project C-018H, 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Process Condensate Treatment Facility, functional design criteria. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, N.

    1995-05-02

    This document provides the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) for Project C-018H, the 242-A Evaporator and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Condensate Treatment Facility (Also referred to as the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility [ETF]). The project will provide the facilities to treat and dispose of the 242-A Evaporator process condensate (PC), the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant process condensate (PDD), and the PUREX Plant ammonia scrubber distillate (ASD).

  14. Variables associated with odds of finishing and finish time in a 161-km ultramarathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegelin, Jacob A; Hoffman, Martin D

    2011-01-01

    We sought to determine the degree to which age, sex, calendar year, previous event experience and ambient race day temperature were associated with finishing a 100-mile (161-km) trail running race and with finish time in that race. We computed separate generalized linear mixed-effects regression models for (1) odds of finishing and (2) finish times of finishers. Every starter from 1986 to 2007 was used in computing the models for odds of finishing (8,282 starts by 3,956 individuals) and every finisher in the same period was included in the models for finish time (5,276 finishes). Factors associated with improved odds of finishing included being a first-time starter and advancing calendar year. Factors associated with reduced odds of finishing included advancing age above 38 years and warmer weather. Beyond 38 years of age, women had worse odds of finishing than men. Warmer weather had a similar effect on finish rates for men and women. Finish times were slower with advancing age, slower for women than men, and less affected by warm weather for women than for men. Calendar year was not associated with finish time after adjustment for other variables.

  15. Effects of cast gold surface finishing on plaque retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, M P; Shillingburg, H T; Duncanson, M G; Wade, C K

    1980-02-01

    The relationship between the surface finish on cast gold restorations and the amount of plaque deposited on that surface was examined. Six different finishes were tested. The rough finish was found to accumulate significantly less plaque than the other finishes. Every finish exhibited some plaque accumulation, even after the first 24 hours. Each finish accumulated progressively more plaque at each successive time interval.

  16. Summary of the technical specifications of the geothermal power plants in the world: revision 1. Report no. CATMEC/21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiPippo, R.

    1978-07-01

    Worldwide geothermal power plant installed capacity is listed by country with year of startup. Tables containing technical data are given for each of the geothermal power units installed in the world and for some of those under construction or in planning. The data cover the primary mechanical areas of the power station including the turbine, condenser, gas extraction system, and heat extraction system. In the case of plants which are in the planning stage or under construction, the plant design specifications are listed but must be viewed as preliminary. (MHR)

  17. Efficacy and safety of natural plant dyes in textile dyeing and antibacterial finishing%天然植物染料在纺织品染色与抗菌整理一浴中的功效性及安全性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    况敏

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism and test method of nature plant dye applied in textile dyeing and antibacterial finishing were analyzed. With the combination of domestic and foreign various test standards, the antibacterial performance test was enhanced through uniting the methods of absorption, transfer printing and transformation. The efficiency and safety of nature plant dye applied in textile dyeing and antibacterial finishing in one-bath has been summarized, which had obvious double effects of dyeing and antibacterial. It performed a better environmental property, a shorter process, a less wastewater discharge and a lower energy consumption.%通过分析天然植物染料在纺织品染色与抗菌整理中的作用机理和测试方法,结合国内外不同的测试标准,融合吸收法、转印法和转移法等加强抗菌性能的测试。总结了天然植物染料在纺织品染色与抗菌整理一浴中的功效性和安全性,染色抗菌双重效果比较明显,有着较好的环保性,工艺流程缩短、废水排放少、能耗低。

  18. International innovations in optical finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2004-10-01

    Every few years new polishing technologies attempt to make the transition from the research laboratory into the commercial sector. Success awaits any process that is well controlled and predictable (e.g., deterministic), rapid, capable of smoothing to sub-nm rms roughness levels while removing damage from grinding, affordable, and easily implemented. Applicability to different optical materials and a variety of part sizes and shapes is extremely important, but may not be required for a new technology to succeed in a niche market. This paper reviews six innovations in polishing of precision optics: Canon"s Super-Smooth Polisher (CSSP) that uses a sub-aperture pitch lap - a relatively mature but important base-line technology; Nikon / Osaka University"s RF Plasma Chemical Vaporization Machining (CVM); Epion"s Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) Process; the IOM University of Leipzig / NTGL Ion Beam Finishing (IBF) Technology; Zeeko"s "Precessions" Process with a sub-aperture section of an inflatable pad; and QED Technology"s Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) with a magnetic fluid ribbon. The removal mechanism and some recent achievements for each process are discussed.

  19. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 5, Chapter D, Appendix D1 (conclusion), Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Neville G.W.; Heuze, Francois E.; Miller, Hamish D.S.; Thoms, Robert L.

    1993-03-01

    The reference design for the underground facilities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant was developed using the best criteria available at initiation of the detailed design effort. These design criteria are contained in the US Department of Energy document titled Design Criteria, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Revised Mission Concept-IIA (RMC-IIA), Rev. 4, dated February 1984. The validation process described in the Design Validation Final Report has resulted in validation of the reference design of the underground openings based on these criteria. Future changes may necessitate modification of the Design Criteria document and/or the reference design. Validation of the reference design as presented in this report permits the consideration of future design or design criteria modifications necessitated by these changes or by experience gained at the WIPP. Any future modifications to the design criteria and/or the reference design will be governed by a DOE Standard Operation Procedure (SOP) covering underground design changes. This procedure will explain the process to be followed in describing, evaluating and approving the change.

  20. Innovative Deterministic Optical Surface Finishing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Increasing the optical surface finishing precision and reducing surface roughness will greatly benefit astronomy telescope and other optical systems. Conventional...

  1. 10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot plant: collector subsystem foundation construction. Revision No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-18

    Bid documents are provided for the construction of the collector subsystem foundation of the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant, including invitation to bid, bid form, representations and certifications, construction contract, and labor standards provisions of the Davis-Bacon Act. Instructions to bidders, general provisions and general conditions are included. Technical specifications are provided for the construction. (LEW)

  2. Neural network recognition of nuclear power plant transients. First annual report, April 15, 1992--April 15, 1993, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, E.B.; Danofsky, R.; Adams, J.; AlJundi, T.; Basu, A.; Dhanwada, C.; Kerr, J.; Kim, K.; Lanc, T.

    1993-02-23

    The objective of this report is to describe results obtained during the first year of funding that will lead to the development of an artificial neural network (ANN) fault - diagnostic system for the real - time classification of operational transients at nuclear power plants. The ultimate goal of this three-year project is to design, build, and test a prototype diagnostic adviser for use in the control room or technical support center at Duane Arnold Energy Center (DAEC); such a prototype could be integrated into the plant process computer or safety - parameter display system. The adviser could then warn and inform plant operators and engineers of plant component failures in a timely manner. This report describes the work accomplished in the first of three scheduled years for the project. Included herein is a summary of the first year`s results as, well as individual descriptions of each of the major topics undertaken by the researchers. Also included are reprints of the articles written under this funding as well as those that were published during the funded period.

  3. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This volume includes the following chapters: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant RCRA A permit application; facility description; waste analysis plan; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; RCRA contingency plan; personnel training; corrective action for solid waste management units; and other Federal laws.

  4. A comparative evaluation of fluidized bed assisted drag finishing and centrifugal disk dry finishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barletta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Drag finishing of brass (Cu-30 wt.% Zn rings using fluidized abrasives, which is a new finishing technology, is comparatively evaluated with centrifugal disk finishing. The comparison was performed by selecting the same abrasive granulates of two different sizes and operating the equipment for the same processing time or at their respective maximum speeds. The experimental analysis investigated the change in workpiece morphology, material removal during finishing and dimensional accuracy. The results showed that each of the types of equipment investigated in the study were capable of a high finishing performance with a relatively short processing time. However, fluidized bed assisted drag finishing was more effective than centrifugal disk finishing in both the achievable quality of the processed parts and reduced processing time. In contrast, centrifugal disk finishing was preferable whenever low erosion and stringent dimensional tolerances were demanded.

  5. Carbon allocation, source-sink relations and plant growth: do we need to revise our carbon centric concepts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Since the discovery that plants 'eat air' 215 years ago, carbon supply was considered the largely unquestioned top driver of plant growth. The ease at which CO2 uptake (C source activity) can be measured, and the elegant algorithms that describe the responses of photosynthesis to light, temperature and CO2 concentration, explain why carbon driven growth and productivity became the starting point of all process based vegetation models. Most of these models, nowadays adopt other environmental drivers, such as nutrient availability, as modulating co-controls, but the carbon priority is retained. Yet, if we believe in the basic rules of stoichometry of all life, there is an inevitable need of 25-30 elements other then carbon, oxygen and hydrogen to build a healthy plant body. Plants compete for most of these elements, and their availability (except for N) is finite per unit land area. Hence, by pure plausibility, it is a highly unlikely situation that carbon plays the rate limiting role of growth under natural conditions, except in deep shade or on exceptionally fertile soils. Furthermore, water shortage and low temperature, both act directly upon tissue formation (meristems) long before photosynthetic limitations come into play. Hence, plants will incorporate C only to the extent other environmental drivers permit. In the case of nutrients and mature ecosystems, this sink control of plant growth may be masked in the short term by a tight, almost closed nutrient cycle or by widening the C to other element ratio. Because source and sink activity must match in the long term, it is not possible to identify the hierarchy of growth controls without manipulating the environment. Dry matter allocation to C rich structures and reserves may provide some stoichimetric leeway or periodic escapes from the more fundamental, long-term environmental controls of growth and productivity. I will explain why carbon centric explanations of growth are limited or arrive at plausible answers

  6. NRC Research Program on Plant Aging: Listing and summaries of reports issued through September 1993. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vora, J.P.

    1993-12-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. This is a comprehensive hardware-oriented engineering research program focused on understanding the aging mechanisms of components and systems in nuclear power plants. The NPAR program also focuses on methods for simulating and monitoring the aging-related degradation of these components and systems. In addition, it provides recommendations for effective maintenance to manage aging and for implementation of the research results in the regulatory process. This document contains a listing and index of reports generated in the NPAR Program that were issued through September 1993 and summaries of those reports. Each summary describes the elements of the research covered in the report and outlines the significant results. For the convenience of the user, the reports are indexed by personal author, corporate author, and subject.

  7. 25 CFR 301.8 - Finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finish. 301.8 Section 301.8 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NAVAJO, PUEBLO, AND HOPI SILVER AND TURQUOISE PRODUCTS; STANDARDS § 301.8 Finish. All silver is to be hand polished. ...

  8. Revising Translations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kirsten Wølch; Schjoldager, Anne

    2011-01-01

    out by specialised revisers, but by staff translators, who revise the work of colleagues and freelancers on an ad hoc basis. Corrections are mostly given in a peer-to-peer fashion, though the work of freelancers and inexperienced in-house translators is often revised in an authoritative (nonnegotiable......) way. Most respondents and interviewees are worried about increasing pressures on the translation market, which, combined with customers’ general lack of understanding of the translation process, mean that systematic, all-encompassing quality assurance is rarely financially viable....

  9. Revision Notes

    CERN Document Server

    Matthewson, Siobhan; Debbadi, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Revision Notes: CCEA ICT for GCSE has been written by experienced teachers and examiners so that you can be confident that it covers only the facts and ideas you will be expected to recall and use in the exam. - Essential facts are carefully organised to make revising easier. - Exams tips show you how to avoid losing marks and get the best grade. - Check your understanding questions support you in the run-up to the exams, with answers provided free online at www.hodderplus.co.uk. This book will help you plan and pace your revision to suit your learning needs and can be integrated with other re

  10. Ethical Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Mary Kathryn

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the dilemma of how to respond to student papers advancing morally repugnant positions. Advocates conceptualizing writing as an ethical act and connecting ethics and revision. Describes briefly how three such student papers were handled. (SR)

  11. Scar revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 21. Lorenz P, Bari AS. Scar prevention, treatment, and revision. In: Neligan PC, ed. Plastic Surgery . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2013:chap 16. Read More Contracture deformity Keloids Review Date 4/14/2015 Updated ...

  12. Revising traditional theory on the link between plant body size and fitness under competition: evidence from old-field vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, Amanda J; Aarssen, Lonnie W

    2014-04-01

    The selection consequences of competition in plants have been traditionally interpreted based on a "size-advantage" hypothesis - that is, under intense crowding/competition from neighbors, natural selection generally favors capacity for a relatively large plant body size. However, this conflicts with abundant data, showing that resident species body size distributions are usually strongly right-skewed at virtually all scales within vegetation. Using surveys within sample plots and a neighbor-removal experiment, we tested: (1) whether resident species that have a larger maximum potential body size (MAX) generally have more successful local individual recruitment, and thus greater local abundance/density (as predicted by the traditional size-advantage hypothesis); and (2) whether there is a general between-species trade-off relationship between MAX and capacity to produce offspring when body size is severely suppressed by crowding/competition - that is, whether resident species with a larger MAX generally also need to reach a larger minimum reproductive threshold size (MIN) before they can reproduce at all. The results showed that MIN had a positive relationship with MAX across resident species, and local density - as well as local density of just reproductive individuals - was generally greater for species with smaller MIN (and hence smaller MAX). In addition, the cleared neighborhoods of larger target species (which had relatively large MIN) generally had - in the following growing season - a lower ratio of conspecific recruitment within these neighborhoods relative to recruitment of other (i.e., smaller) species (which had generally smaller MIN). These data are consistent with an alternative hypothesis based on a 'reproductive-economy-advantage' - that is, superior fitness under competition in plants generally requires not larger potential body size, but rather superior capacity to recruit offspring that are in turn capable of producing grand-offspring - and hence

  13. [Survival of the T28 femoral stem. Comparison of polished versus roughed-surface finish].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaidez Rosales, Pedro; Younger, Alastair; Renán León, Saúl; Poss, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Femoral stem loosening in total hip arthroplasty has a multifactorial etiology. T28 femoral stems have been made both roughed and polished-finish types, and differences in design are of interest in their effect on survival. One hundred and sixty-seven stems (84 polished and 83 roughed-finish) placed between 1975 and 1982 were evaluated. Gruen zones were used to determine loosening and survival was determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Revision was made in 24.8% of the cases. Twenty-year survival rates were of 85.2% for roughed-finish stems and of 64.2% for polished-finish stems. We were able to confirm our hypothesis concerning the longer survival rate of the roughed-finish implant which was of 87.95% at 17 years of follow-up. The survival-time of the implant was independent of diagnosis, cementation, age and positioning. The survival-time of the T28 cemented implant does not only depend on its texture but it has a multifactorial origin.

  14. Documentation of Hanford Site independent review of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herborn, D.I.

    1993-11-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is the Integrating Contractor for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project, and as such is responsible for preparation of the HWVP Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR). The HWVP PSAR was prepared pursuant to the requirements for safety analyses contained in US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 4700.1, Project Management System (DOE 1987); 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities (DOE 1986a); 5481.lB, Safety Analysis and Review System (DOE 1986b) which was superseded by DOE order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, for nuclear facilities effective April 30, 1992 (DOE 1992); and 6430.lA, General Design Criteria (DOE 1989). The WHC procedures that, in large part, implement these DOE requirements are contained in WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis Manual. This manual describes the overall WHC safety analysis process in terms of requirements for safety analyses, responsibilities of the various contributing organizations, and required reviews and approvals.

  15. Lean Management of Storage for Finished Product of Heavy Plate%宽厚板产成品库存的精益管理实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑林红

    2015-01-01

    To the insufficiency capacity of finished products inventory buffer, overproduction, stock high at await check section, more user self extracting in Heavy Plate plant, this article gives a triune management model of"production- sale- quality testing". A series of Lean management were adopted, such as optimizing technology and production control, revising and perfecting the system, intensifying spot market exploiting, regulating shipment mode etc., the finished product in inventory was reduced 21 061 tons in the three production lines, and reduced 78.07 million Yuan of occupation of funds.%针对宽厚板厂产成品库存缓冲能力不足、超量生产、待验库存量偏高、用户自提比例较高等问题,确定了"生产—销售—质检"三位一体的联动管理模式,采取优化工艺排产、修订完善制度、强化现货市场开拓、调整发运方式等一系列精益管理措施,使三产线合计降低产成品库存21 061 t,减少资金占用7 807万元.

  16. NCMS PWB Surface Finishes Team project summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokas, J.; DeSantis, C. [United Technologies Corp., Farmington, CT (United States). Hamilton Standard Div.; Wenger, G. [AT and T, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The NCMS PWB Surface Finishes Consortium is just about at the end of the five year program. Dozens of projects related to surface finishes and PWB solder-ability were performed by the team throughout the program, and many of them are listed in this paper. They are listed with a cross reference to where and when a technical paper was presented describing the results of the research. However, due to time and space constraints, this paper can summarize the details of only three of the major research projects accomplished by the team. The first project described is an ``Evaluation of PWB Surface Finishes.`` It describes the solderability, reliability, and wire bondability of numerous surface finishes. The second project outlined is an ``Evaluation of PWB Solderability Test Methods.`` The third project outlined is the ``Development and Evaluation of Organic Solderability Preservatives.``

  17. STEP based Finish Machining CAPP system

    OpenAIRE

    A Arivazhagan; Mehta, NK; Jain, PK

    2012-01-01

    This research paper presents various methodologies developed in a STEP based Computer Aided Process Planning (CAPP) system named "Finish Machining – CAPP" (FM-CAPP). It is developed to generate automatic process plans for finish machining prismatic parts. It is designed in a modular fashion consisting of three main modules, namely (i) Feature Recognition module (FRM) (ii) Machining Planning Module (MPM) and (iii) Setup Planning Module (SPM). The FRM Module analyses the geometrical and topolog...

  18. Surface Finish after Laser Metal Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombouts, M.; Maes, G.; Hendrix, W.; Delarbre, E.; Motmans, F.

    Laser metal deposition (LMD) is an additive manufacturing technology for the fabrication of metal parts through layerwise deposition and laser induced melting of metal powder. The poor surface finish presents a major limitation in LMD. This study focuses on the effects of surface inclination angle and strategies to improve the surface finish of LMD components. A substantial improvement in surface quality of both the side and top surfaces has been obtained by laser remelting after powder deposition.

  19. Revision of documents guide to obtain the renovation of licence of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, Units I and II; Revision de documentos guia para obtener la renovacion de licencia de la Central Nuclear Laguna Verde Unidades 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvio C, G. [ININ 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Fernandez S, G. [CFE, Gerencia de Centrales Nucleoelectricas, Subgerencia de Ingenieria, Carretera Veracruz-Medellin s/n (Km. 7.5), Dos Bocas, 54270 Veracruz (Mexico)]. e-mail: giarvio@yahoo.com.mx

    2008-07-01

    Unquestionably the renovation of license of the nuclear power plants , it this converting in a promising option to be able to gather in sure, reliable form and economic those requests about future energy in the countries with facilities of this type. This work it analyzes four documents guide and their application for the determination of the renovation of it licenses in nuclear plants that will serve of base for their aplication in the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde Units I and 2. The four documents in question are: the one Inform Generic of Learned Lessons on the Aging (NUREG - 1801), the Standard Revision Plan for the Renovation of License (NUREG - 1800), the Regulatory Guide for Renovation of License (GR-1.188), and the NEI 95-10, developed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy that is an Industrial Guide to Implement the Requirements of the 1OCFR Part 54-the Rule of Renovation of It licenses. (Author)

  20. Glazed Tiles as Floor Finish in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyin Emmanuel AKINDE

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Tile is no doubt rich in antiquity; its primordial  show, came as mosaic with primary prospect in sacred floor finish before its oblivion, courtesy of, later consciousness towards wall finish in banquets, kitchens, toilets, restaurants and even bars. Today, its renaissance as floor finish is apparent in private and public architectural structures with prevalence in residential, recreational, commercial, governmental and other spaces. In Nigeria, the use of glazed tiles as floor finish became apparent, supposedly in mid-twentieth century; and has since, witnessed ever increasing demands from all sundry; a development that is nascent and has necessitated its mass  production locally with pockets of firms in the country. The latter however, is a resultant response to taste cum glazed tiles affordability, whose divergent sophistication in design, colour, size and shape is believed preferred to terrazzo, carpet and floor flex tile. Accessible as glazed tile and production is, in recent times; its dearth of a holistic literature in Nigeria is obvious. In the light of the latter, this paper examine glazed tiles as floor finish in Nigeria, its advent, usage, production, challenge, benefit and prospect with the hope of opening further frontier in discipline specifics.

  1. Effect of Burnishing Parameters on Surface Finish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirsat, Uddhav; Ahuja, Basant; Dhuttargaon, Mukund

    2017-08-01

    Burnishing is cold working process in which hard balls are pressed against the surface, resulting in improved surface finish. The surface gets compressed and then plasticized. This is a highly finishing process which is becoming more popular. Surface quality of the product improves its aesthetic appearance. The product made up of aluminum material is subjected to burnishing process during which kerosene is used as a lubricant. In this study factors affecting burnishing process such as burnishing force, speed, feed, work piece diameter and ball diameter are considered as input parameters while surface finish is considered as an output parameter In this study, experiments are designed using 25 factorial design in order to analyze the relationship between input and output parameters. The ANOVA technique and F-test are used for further analysis.

  2. Effect of Burnishing Parameters on Surface Finish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirsat, Uddhav; Ahuja, Basant; Dhuttargaon, Mukund

    2016-06-01

    Burnishing is cold working process in which hard balls are pressed against the surface, resulting in improved surface finish. The surface gets compressed and then plasticized. This is a highly finishing process which is becoming more popular. Surface quality of the product improves its aesthetic appearance. The product made up of aluminum material is subjected to burnishing process during which kerosene is used as a lubricant. In this study factors affecting burnishing process such as burnishing force, speed, feed, work piece diameter and ball diameter are considered as input parameters while surface finish is considered as an output parameter In this study, experiments are designed using 25 factorial design in order to analyze the relationship between input and output parameters. The ANOVA technique and F-test are used for further analysis.

  3. Finishing of the cold mass assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    Photo 1 Technicians are putting in order the instrumentation wires. The prototype magnets were equipped with numerous sensors to monitor key parameters during the performance tests at cold conditions. Photo 2 The cold mass assembly is resting on special supports in order to allow the finishing operations. Technicians are putting in order the instrumentation wires. The prototype magnets were equipped with numerous sensors to monitor key parameters during the performance tests at cold conditions. Photo 3 View of the lyre-side end of the active part assembly. The extremity of the shrinking cylinder has been bevelled in view of welding the end cover. Photo 4 General view of the finishing station showing the special supporting structures (blue and yellow structures) needed for the geometric measurements and for the alignment operations. One can also see the light building surrounding the finishing station, which purpose is to isolate the laser measuring machines from disturbances. Photo 5 The extremity of the shri...

  4. Revision of species of Minerisporites, Azolla and associated plant microfossils from deposits of the Upper Palaeocene and Palaeocene/Eocene transition in the Netherlands, Belgium and the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, D J.; Collinson, M E.

    2001-05-01

    Species of the megaspore genus Minerisporites Potonié, megaspore apparatuses of species of the water fern Azolla Lamarck, and some associated organic-walled microfossils recovered from deposits of the Upper Palaeocene and Palaeocene/Eocene transition in the southern part of the Netherlands and neighbouring Belgium are redescribed on the basis of an examination of specimens under scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Originally studied about 40 years ago by S.J. Dijkstra, the re-examination has enabled emended diagnoses to be produced for six taxa: Minerisporites glossoferus (Dijkstra) Tschudy, M. mirabilis (Miner) Potonié, M. mirabilissimus (Dijkstra) Potonié, Azolla schopfii Dijkstra, A. teschiana Florschütz, and A. velus (Dijkstra) Jain and Hall. In addition, a revised description is provided for massulae of Salvinia Séguier that were originally thought to be megaspores and, hence, named by Dijkstra as Triletes? exiguus. The gross morphology and construction of the exospore of the species of Minerisporites are similar, but nevertheless sufficiently distinct for them to be maintained as separate taxa. Monolete microspores are preserved in hollows in the reticulate surface of some of the specimens of M. mirabilissimus. This is consistent with the presumed isoetalean affinity of Minerisporites. An apparent stratigraphic morphocline from M. glossoferus to M. mirabilis, suggested previously, is confirmed following our reassessment of their characteristics. The species of Azolla are all multi-floated, but they differ from each other in several ways, in particular with respect to the ultrastructure of the megaspore wall. They are also distinct from all other species that have been considered in sufficient detail for satisfactory comparisons to be made. The massulae of A. teschiana are described for the first time. The floats in A. velus are attached to the proximal part of the megaspore only by suprafilosal hairs. There are no maniculae. It is argued that

  5. Surface-finish measurement with interference microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sladky, R. E.

    1977-02-01

    Diamond turning copper and other metals, to produce mirror surfaces with reflectivities generally higher than can be obtained by lapping and polishing, has become an important new technology. Evaluation of the finish of these surfaces requires careful examination, using optical instruments. This document provides background information about the theory and equipment involved in this program. Data from several specimens have been acquired that show the type of surface finish that is obtained. Mirrors have been fabricated that show the state of the art that has been achieved in diamond turning copper and nickel.

  6. Foam Finishing%发泡涂饰

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dr. W. Wenzel; K. Pisaric; W. Schwaiger

    2006-01-01

    介绍了发泡剂在制革中的应用.详细给出了发泡剂的生产工艺以及需要不同成革的涂饰配方.结果表明,发泡涂饰对成革性能有明显改善.%The article introduced the application of foam in leather-making. The rules and production process of foam were supplied indetails. It also discussed the finish formulation and possible methods of application for different leather. The foam finishing can evidently improve the properties of leather.

  7. FFTF operations procedures preparation guide. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-12-01

    The Guide is intended to provide guidelines for the initial preparation of FFTF Operating Procedures. The Procedures Preparation Guide was developed from the plan presented and approved in the FFTF Reactor Plant Procedures Plan, PC-1, Revision 3.

  8. INTERNAL FINISHING OF CYLINDRICAL PIPES USING SINTERED MAGNETIC ABRASIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PALWINDER SINGH

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An internal magnetic abrasive finishing (MAF process was proposed to produce highly finished inner surfaces of workpieces used in critical applications. The process principle and the finishing characteristics of magnetic abrasive finishing of cylindrical pipes using sintered magnetic abrasives are described in this research work. Thesintered magnetic abrasive is a mixture of Al2O3 abrasive and ferromagnetic particles. The Al2O3 based sintered magnetic abrasives have been developed in sintering machine. The surface roughness measurements resulting from finishing experiments demonstrate the effects of the abrasive behavior on the surface modifications. Thesurface finish was analysed in terms of percent improvement in surface finish (PISF. Also surface finish was analysed using Response Surface Methodology (RSM. The obtained maximum PISF was 95% and minimum surface roughness was 0.05 μm Ra. To further study the improvement in surface finish, the surface was microscopically examined using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD.

  9. Admissible and Restrained Revision

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, R; 10.1613/jair.1874

    2011-01-01

    As partial justification of their framework for iterated belief revision Darwiche and Pearl convincingly argued against Boutiliers natural revision and provided a prototypical revision operator that fits into their scheme. We show that the Darwiche-Pearl arguments lead naturally to the acceptance of a smaller class of operators which we refer to as admissible. Admissible revision ensures that the penultimate input is not ignored completely, thereby eliminating natural revision, but includes the Darwiche-Pearl operator, Nayaks lexicographic revision operator, and a newly introduced operator called restrained revision. We demonstrate that restrained revision is the most conservative of admissible revision operators, effecting as few changes as possible, while lexicographic revision is the least conservative, and point out that restrained revision can also be viewed as a composite operator, consisting of natural revision preceded by an application of a "backwards revision" operator previously studied by Papini. ...

  10. ACL Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Paz, Matias; Dubois, Julieta Puig; Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Rasumoff, Alejandro; Yacuzzi, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a series of patients one year after an ACL revision with clinical evaluation and MRI, to consider their condition before returning to sports activities. Methods: A descriptive, prospective and longitudinal study was performed. A series of patients who underwent an ACL revision between March 2014 and March 2015 were evaluated after one year post surgery. They were evaluated using the Lysholm score, IKDC, Tegner, artrometry and MRI (3.0 t). A signal pattern and osteointegration was determined in the MRI. Graft signal intensity of the ACL graft using the signal/noise quotient value (SNQ) was also determined to evaluate the ligamentatization process state. Results: A total of 18 male patients were evaluated with a mean age of 31 years old.Average scores were: Lysholm 88 points, IKDC 80 points, Pre-surgical Tegner 9 points and postoperative 4 points. Artrhometry (KT1000) at 20 newtons showed a side to side difference of less than 3 mm in 88%. Only 44% of patients returned to their previous sport activity one year after revision.The MRI showed a heterogeneous signal in neoligaments in 34% of patients. SNQ showed graft integration in only 28%. Synovial fluid was found in bone-graft interphase in 44% of tunnels, inferring partial osteointegration. The heterogeneous signal was present in 50% of patients who did not return to the previous sport level activity. (Fisher statistics: p = 0.043) There were no meaningful differences in patients with auto or allografts. Conclusion: Although the clinical evaluation was satisfactory, only 44% of patients returned to the previous level of sport activity one year after the ACL surgery. The ligamentatization process was found in 28% of knees evaluated with MRI one year later. Partial osteointegration is inferred in 44%. Results showed a meaningful relation between the signal of neoligaments in the MRI and the return to sport activity in said series of patients. MRI is a useful tool

  11. Why Do Photo Finish Images Look Weird?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorcic, Bor; Planinsic, Gorazd

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with effects that appear on photographs of rotating objects when taken by a photo finish camera, a rolling shutter camera or a computer scanner. These effects are very similar to Roget's palisade illusion. A simple quantitative analysis of the images is also provided. The effects are explored using a computer scanner in a way that…

  12. Transport Phenomena in Textile Finishing Equipment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot Wassink, J.

    1985-01-01

    The application of transport phenomena to textile finishing processes is emphasised. By combination of the predominant transfer processes (momentum, mass and heat/mass transfer) and the engineering objective (operation, design and innovation), three cases are selected dealing with (a) momentum trans

  13. Vibratory finishing as a decontamination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, M.W.; Arrowsmith, H.W.; Allen, R.P.

    1980-10-01

    The major objective of this research is to develop vibratory finishing into a large-scale decontamination technique that can economicaly remove transuranic and other surface contamination from large volumes of waste produced by the operation and decommissioning of retired nuclear facilities. The successful development and widespread application of this decontamination technique would substantially reduce the volume of waste requiring expensive geologic disposal. Other benefits include exposure reduction for decontamination personnel and reduced risk of environmental contamination. Laboratory-scale studies showed that vibratory finishing can rapidly reduce the contamination level of transuranic-contaminated stainless steel and Plexiglas to well below the 10-nCi/g limit. The capability of vibratory finishing as a decontamination process was demonstrated on a large scale. The first decontamination demonstration was conducted at the Hanford N-Reactor, where a vibratory finisher was installed to reduce personnel exposure during the summer outage. Items decontaminated included fuel spacers, process-tube end caps, process-tube inserts, pump parts, ball-channel inspection tools and miscellaneous hand tools. A second demonstration is currently being conducted in the decontamination facility at the Hanford 231-Z Building. During this demonstration, transuranic-contaminated material from decommissioned plutonium facilities is being decontaminated to <10 nCi/g to minimize the volume of material that will require geologic disposal. Items that are being decontaminated include entire glove boxes, process-hood structural material and panels, process tanks, process-tank shields, pumps, valves and hand tools used during the decommissioning work.

  14. Pneumonia outbreaks in calves and finishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-19

    Pneumonia in calves and finishers. Ovarian tumour in a calf . Abortion associated with bovine herpesvirus 1 in a suckler herd. Parasitic gastroenteritis causing illthrift and death in sheep. Outbreaks of acute fasciolosis in sheep. These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for December 2015 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). British Veterinary Association.

  15. A revised and unified pressure-clamp/relaxation theory for studying plant cell water relations with pressure probes: in-situ determination of cell volume for calculation of volumetric elastic modulus and hydraulic conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipfer, T; Fei, J; Gambetta, G A; Shackel, K A; Matthews, M A

    2014-10-21

    The cell-pressure-probe is a unique tool to study plant water relations in-situ. Inaccuracy in the estimation of cell volume (νo) is the major source of error in the calculation of both cell volumetric elastic modulus (ε) and cell hydraulic conductivity (Lp). Estimates of νo and Lp can be obtained with the pressure-clamp (PC) and pressure-relaxation (PR) methods. In theory, both methods should result in comparable νo and Lp estimates, but this has not been the case. In this study, the existing νo-theories for PC and PR methods were reviewed and clarified. A revised νo-theory was developed that is equally valid for the PC and PR methods. The revised theory was used to determine νo for two extreme scenarios of solute mixing between the experimental cell and sap in the pressure probe microcapillary. Using a fully automated cell-pressure-probe (ACPP) on leaf epidermal cells of Tradescantia virginiana, the validity of the revised theory was tested with experimental data. Calculated νo values from both methods were in the range of optically determined νo (=1.1-5.0nL) for T. virginiana. However, the PC method produced a systematically lower (21%) calculated νo compared to the PR method. Effects of solute mixing could only explain a potential error in calculated νo of cell turgor) of 19%, which is a fundamental parameter in calculating νo. It followed from the revised theory that the ratio of ΔV/ΔP was inversely related to the solute reflection coefficient. This highlighted that treating the experimental cell as an ideal osmometer in both methods is potentially not correct. Effects of non-ideal osmotic behavior by transmembrane solute movement may be minimized in the PR as compared to the PC method.

  16. Finishing procedures in orthodontic-surgical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, Jean-Michel

    2015-09-01

    To ensure optimal results, we must do our utmost to achieve targets based on order, symmetry and precision, our ultimate aim being to strive towards the desired harmony, planned contrast and exact proportions. Orthodontic-surgical treatments require specific finishing procedures, which most often call for multidisciplinary, or even transdisciplinary, collaboration. Finishing will involve the dental arches just as much as the orofacial environment. Above all, treatment of this kind demands a highly targeted approach in combination with well-defined and perfectly executed techniques. To finish a case satisfactorily, reasonable targets should be aimed for to ensure they are achieved. One must be ambitious and yet wise. A tight alliance of surgeon and orthodontist will nurture convincing and achievable projects and good, lifelong outcomes. Following the consolidation phase, roughly 4 to 6 weeks post-surgery, we can initiate the final orthodontic treatment, which, in effect, constitutes a mini-treatment in its own right. "Details make perfection, but perfection is not a detail" (Leonardo Da Vinci). "A lucid mind is the ante-chamber of intelligence" (Léo Ferré). In the order of life, every form of unity is always unique, and if each of us is unique, it is because everyone else is too. Ambition, wisdom, lucidity and efficiency will guarantee a successful result, the successful result. We must not be mere observers of our treatments, but the architect, project manager and site foreman at one and the same time. One could talk ad infinitum about finishing orthodontic-surgical cases because everything else leads up to the case-finishing and even the fullest description could never be exhaustive. Copyright © 2015 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Population dynamics of swine influenza virus in farrow-to-finish and specialised finishing herds in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffen, W L A; Hunneman, W A; Quak, J; Verheijden, J H M; Stegeman, J A

    2009-05-28

    Influenza virus infections with subtypes H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2 are very common in domestic pigs in Europe. Data on possible differences of population dynamics in finishing pigs in farrow-to-finish herds and in specialised finishing herds are, however, scarce. The presence of sows and weaned piglets on the same premises may, however, affect the exposure of finishing pigs to influenza viruses. In a longitudinal study on 14 farrow-to-finish herds and 15 finishing herds, groups of pigs were followed by repeatedly testing the same animals for antibodies against all three influenza virus subtypes (H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2). At the end of the finishing period, the seroprevalences in farrow-to-finish and specialised finishing herds were 44.3% and 62.0%, respectively for H1N1, 6.6% and 19.3%, respectively for H3N2, and 57.2% and 25.6%, respectively for H1N2. For all three subtypes, the incidence of influenza virus infections was highest at the beginning of the finishing period in farrow-to-finish herds, while the incidence of influenza virus infections was highest at the end of the finishing period in finishing herds. Respiratory disease, probably related to the influenza infections, was observed in five of these herds only, but also occurred at the beginning of the finishing period in farrow-to-finish herds and at the end of the finishing period in finishing herds. The observed differences of population dynamics of influenza virus may affect choice and timing of intervention measures.

  18. 9 CFR 381.309 - Finished product inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY... Finished product inspection. (a) Finished product inspections must be handled according to: (1) A HACCP.... (b)-(c) (d) Procedures for finished product inspections where the HACCP plan for thermally...

  19. Wear analysis and finishing of bioceramic implant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkena, Berend; Reichstein, Martin; van der Meer, Marijke; Ostermeier, Sven; Hurschler, Christof

    2008-01-01

    A primary cause for revision operations of joint replacements is the implant loosening, due to immune reactions resulting from the agglomeration of polyethylene wear debris. Motivated by the successful application of bioceramic materials in hip joint prostheses, a trend towards the development of hard implant materials has occurred. Nonetheless in the area of total knee arthroplasty (TKA), modern efforts have still utilized polyethylene as the tibial-inlay joint component. The use of bioceramic hard-hard-pairings for total knee arthroplasty has been prevented by the complex kinematics and geometries required. Ceramics cannot cope with non-uniform loads, which suggests the need for new designs appropriate to the material. Furthermore, biomechanical requirements should be considered. A rolling-gliding wear simulator, which reproduces the movements and stresses of the knee joint on specimens of simplified geometry, has therefore been developed. High-precision machining processes for free formed bioceramic surfaces, with suitable grinding and polishing tools which adjust to constantly changing contact conditions, are essential. The goal is to put automated finishing in one clamping with five simultaneous controlled axes into practice. The developed manufacturing technologies will allow the advantageous bioceramic materials to be applied and accepted for more complex joint replacements such as knee prostheses.

  20. Sequence finishing and mapping of Drosophila melanogasterheterochromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Kennedy, Cameron; Acevedo,David; Evans-Holm, Martha; Frise, Erwin; Wan, Kenneth H.; Park, Soo; Mendez-Lago, Maria; Rossi, Fabrizio; Villasante, Alfredo; Dimitri,Patrizio; Karpen, Gary H.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2007-06-15

    Genome sequences for most metazoans are incomplete due tothe presence of repeated DNA in the pericentromeric heterochromatin. Theheterochromatic regions of D. melanogaster contain 20 Mb of sequenceamenable to mapping, sequence assembly and finishing. Here we describethe generation of 15 Mb of finished or improved heterochromatic sequenceusing available clone resources and assembly and mapping methods. We alsoconstructed a BAC-based physical map that spans approximately 13 Mb ofthe pericentromeric heterochromatin, and a cytogenetic map that positionsapproximately 11 Mb of BAC contigs and sequence scaffolds in specificchromosomal locations. The integrated sequence assembly and maps greatlyimprove our understanding of the structure and composition of this poorlyunderstood fraction of a metazoan genome and provide a framework forfunctional analyses.

  1. Addendum to the post-closure permit application for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the Y-12 Plant: Walk-in pits. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The revised Closure Plan was initially intended to apply to A Area, C-West, B Area, and the Walk-In Pits (WIPs) of the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). However, a strategy was developed to include the B Area [a solid waste management unit (SWMU)] with the WIPs so that both areas would be closed under one cap. The plan was presented to the State of Tennessee on March 8, 1990, and the Department of Energy was requested to review other unique alternatives to close the site. Therefore, in November 1992, the Closure Plan for B Area and the WIPs was prepared separately from that of the other sites associated with the BCBG and was presented in a RCRA Closure Plan. The Closure Plan revision issued April 1993 was intended to reflect the placement of the Kerr Hollow Quarry debris at the WIPs, revise the closure data, and acknowledge that the disposition of a monitoring well within the closure site could not be verified. A Post-Closure Permit Application (PCPA) was to include the WIPs; however, at the time of submittal, closure of the WIPs had not been certified. This addendum contains information on the WIPs to accompany the BCBG PCPA. The purpose of this document is to supplement the information provided in the BCBG PCPA. This document is not intended to be a stand-alone document. Only additional information regarding the WIPs is included in the sections of this document, which correspond to sections of the PCPA submitted in June 1994.

  2. Agile robotic edge finishing system research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes a new project undertaken by Sandia National Laboratories to develop an agile, automated, high-precision edge finishing system. The project has a two-year duration and was initiated in October, 1994. This project involves re-designing and adding additional capabilities to an existing finishing workcell at Sandia; and developing intelligent methods for automating process definition and for controlling finishing processes. The resulting system will serve as a prototype for systems that will be deployed into highly flexible automated production lines. The production systems will be used to produce a wide variety of products with limited production quantities and quick turnaround requirements. The prototype system is designed to allow programming, process definition, fixture re-configuration, and process verification to be performed off-line for new products. CAD/CAM (Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing) models of the part will be used to assist with the automated process development and process control tasks. To achieve Sandia`s performance goals, the system will be employ advanced path planning, burr prediction expert systems, automated process definition, statistical process models in a process database, and a two-level control scheme using hybrid position-force control and fuzzy logic control. In this paper, we discuss the progress and the planned system development under this project.

  3. Population dynamics of swine influenza virus in farrow-to-finish and specialised finishing herds in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, W.L.A.; Hunneman, W.A.; Quak, J.; Verheijden, J.H.M.; Stegeman, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Influenza virus infections with subtypes H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2 are very common in domestic pigs in Europe. Data on possible differences of population dynamics in finishing pigs in farrow-to-finish herds and in specialised finishing herds are, however, scarce. The presence of sows and weaned piglets on

  4. Cost benefit of patch testing with textile finish resins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Hamann, K

    1982-01-01

    Eleven years experience of textile finish resin patch testing of suspected textile dermatitis patients revealed 15 cases of allergic textile dermatitis among 428 patients tested. Ten of the 15 patients had a relevant positive patch test to one or more of a limited series of textile finishes; 1...... was negative and 4 were not tested with textile finishes. All 15 patients were formaldehyde sensitive. No unexpected, relevant, positive textile finish resin patch test was found. In this study a negative patch test to formaldehyde virtually excluded allergic contact dermatitis from textile finishes....

  5. Subjective qualitative assessment of the finish line of prosthetic preparations submitted to different finishing instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Tallita Foglietto; de Melo, Murilo Pereira; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Takeshita, Wilton Mitsunari; Ceribelli, Bruno Mafra; Vessoni Iwaki, Lilian Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Different instruments have been developed to improve crown finish lines after conventional preparation with diamond rotary instruments. However, more evidence on the effectiveness of these instruments is required. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the effectiveness of 4 different instruments used for cervical margin finishing in regard to the external line angle (ELA). Forty-eight freshly extracted third molar teeth with similar dimensions were conventionally prepared for crowns and randomly allocated into 4 groups (n=12) according to the finishing instrument: hand trimmer (HT), tungsten carbide bur (TCB), ultrasonic instrument (UI), and diamond rotary instrument (DRI) mounted in a contra angle handpiece with reduced speed. Photomicrographs from the margin profiles of each tooth were obtained with scanning electron microscopy (×40) before and after finishing procedures. The images were qualitatively analyzed (scores 1-4) by 9 experienced dental professionals. Average results were assessed with the paired t test and repeated measures ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD test (α=.05). HT, TCB, and UI demonstrated no significant differences between unfinished and finished mean ELA scores. DRI was the only group to demonstrate a significantly improved ELA (Pfinishing instrument capable of significantly improving the ELA, while TCB and UI produced nonsignificant improvement, and HT was detrimental to the ELA. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The surface finish of light-cured composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, S K; Henderson, L J

    1993-01-01

    A necessity for any dental restorative material is its ability to take and maintain a smooth surface finish. Composite resin restorative materials with fillers and matrix of differing hardness are difficult to finish and polish. The use of aluminum trioxide discs is a popular and acceptable method of finishing composite restorative materials where the material is accessible. Burs and stones are used for finishing and polishing inaccessible areas. This study was undertaken to compare the surface finish of composite resin restorative material when finished with white stones, superfine diamond burs and aluminum trioxide discs. The finished surface was measured with a profilometer and the roughness average value used to compare the surfaces. The aluminum trioxide discs gave the best and most consistent results. It was possible to attain similar results with the superfine diamond bur. However, the results were highly variable. None of the methods used achieved the smoothness of composite resin cured against a transparent matrix.

  7. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) HVAC System Component Index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DIAZ, E.N.; DICK, J.D.

    2000-07-26

    This document lists safety class (SC) and safety significant (SS) components for the Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning (HVAC) and specifies the critical characteristics for Commercial Grade Items (CGI), as required by HNF-PRO-268 and HNF-PRO-1819. These are the minimum specifications that the equipment must meet in order to properly perform its safety function. There may be several manufacturers or models that meet the critical characteristics for any one item.

  8. Economics of finishing Tanzania Shorthorn Zebu cattle in feedlot and optimum finishing period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asimwe, L.; Kimambo, A E; Laswai, G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Economic potential of finishing Tanzania Shorthorn Zebu (TSZ) cattle in feedlot was analysed using data obtained from two feedlot experiments carried out at Kongwa ranch in Tanzania. The experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of feeding agro-processing by products and length of feedlot...... finishing for TSZ cattle. The biological data collected from the two experiments were used as basis for deriving the economic scenarios. The range of days steers were kept in feedlot was set at 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 days. The dietary metabolisable energy intake (MEI) levels used in the study were 55 MJ...... in feedlot. Non-feed costs per kg extra meat were higher for short stays (4,500 TSh.) than long stays (2,630 TSh.) If meat prices were independent on finishing period length, high MEI was profitable with increment of (81%) profit per kg extra meat for an increase from 50 to 75 days in feedlot. Assuming a 10...

  9. Economics of finishing Tanzania Shorthorn Zebu cattle in feedlot and optimum finishing period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asimwe, L.; Kimambo, A E; Laswai, G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Economic potential of finishing Tanzania Shorthorn Zebu (TSZ) cattle in feedlot was analysed using data obtained from two feedlot experiments carried out at Kongwa ranch in Tanzania. The experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of feeding agro-processing by products and length of feedlot...... finishing for TSZ cattle. The biological data collected from the two experiments were used as basis for deriving the economic scenarios. The range of days steers were kept in feedlot was set at 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 days. The dietary metabolisable energy intake (MEI) levels used in the study were 55 MJ...... in feedlot. Non-feed costs per kg extra meat were higher for short stays (4,500 TSh.) than long stays (2,630 TSh.) If meat prices were independent on finishing period length, high MEI was profitable with increment of (81%) profit per kg extra meat for an increase from 50 to 75 days in feedlot. Assuming a 10...

  10. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program description for high-level waste form development and qualification. Revision 3, Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project has been established to convert the high-level radioactive waste associated with nuclear defense production at the Hanford Site into a waste form suitable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant will mix processed radioactive waste with borosilicate material, then heat the mixture to its melting point (vitrification) to forin a glass-like substance that traps the radionuclides in the glass matrix upon cooling. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program has been established to support the mission of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. This Quality Assurance Program Description has been written to document the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program.

  11. Philippines revises power plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, D.

    1988-02-01

    Following an unexpected surge in electricity demand the Philippines has revised its medium term power development programme. The sharp increase in electricity consumption follows three years of slack demand due to civil disturbances before the end of the Macros administration and the election of Corazon Aquino as President in 1986. Originally, the Aquino government's medium term power development plans called for about 500MW of generating capacity to be installed between 1986 and 1992. The three proposed plants were scheduled for commissioning in 1991 and 1992. However, a spurt in power demand growth during the past nine months has caused concern among industrialists that power shortages could occur by the end of the decade. So additional capacity will be installed to prevent an anticipated shortfall in electricity supplies by the early 1990s.

  12. Occurrence of neonicotinoid insecticides in finished drinking water and fate during drinking water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarich, Kathryn L.; Pflug, Nicholas C.; DeWald, Eden M.; Hladik, Michelle; Kolpin, Dana W.; Cwiertny, David M.; LeFevre, Gergory H.

    2017-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are widespread in surface waters across the agriculturally-intensive Midwestern US. We report for the first time the presence of three neonicotinoids in finished drinking water and demonstrate their general persistence during conventional water treatment. Periodic tap water grab samples were collected at the University of Iowa over seven weeks in 2016 (May-July) after maize/soy planting. Clothianidin, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam were ubiquitously detected in finished water samples and ranged from 0.24-57.3 ng/L. Samples collected along the University of Iowa treatment train indicate no apparent removal of clothianidin and imidacloprid, with modest thiamethoxam removal (~50%). In contrast, the concentrations of all neonicotinoids were substantially lower in the Iowa City treatment facility finished water using granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Batch experiments investigated potential losses. Thiamethoxam losses are due to base-catalyzed hydrolysis at high pH conditions during lime softening. GAC rapidly and nearly completely removed all three neonicotinoids. Clothianidin is susceptible to reaction with free chlorine and may undergo at least partial transformation during chlorination. Our work provides new insights into the persistence of neonicotinoids and their potential for transformation during water treatment and distribution, while also identifying GAC as an effective management tool to lower neonicotinoid concentrations in finished drinking water.

  13. Modelling Surface Finish in WEDM using RSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Joshi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM is a specialized thermal machining process capable of accurately machining parts with varying hardness or complex shapes, which have sharp edges that are very difficult to be machined by the conventional machining processes. This practical technology of the WEDM process is based on the conventional EDM sparking phenomenon utilizing the widely accepted non-contact technique of material removal. Since the introduction of the process, WEDM has evolved from a simple means of making tools and dies to the best alternative of producing micro-scale parts with the highest degree of dimensional accuracy and surface finish quality. The effect of various parameters of WEDM like pulse on time (TON, pulse off time (TOFF, gap voltage (SV have been investigated to reveal their impact on output parameter i.e., surface roughness of high carbon and high chromium steel using response surface methodology. Experimental plan is performed by standard RSM design called a BOX-BEHKEN DESIGN. The optimal set of process parameter has also been predicted to maximize the surface finish.

  14. PFP MICON maintenance manual. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvan, G.R.

    1995-01-25

    This manual covers the use of maintenance displays, maintenance procedures, system alarms and common system failures. This manual is intended to supplement the MICON maintenance training not replace it. It also assumes that the user is familiar with the normal operation of the MICON A/S system. The MICON system is a distributed control computer and, among other things, controls the HVAC system for the Plutonium Finishing Plant.

  15. 30 CFR 18.33 - Finish of surface joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Finish of surface joints. 18.33 Section 18.33... Requirements § 18.33 Finish of surface joints. Flat surfaces between bolt holes that form any part of a flame... § 18.31(a)(6). All metal surfaces forming a flame-arresting path shall be finished during the...

  16. [Experimental analysis of finishing lines in ceramometal restorations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascón, F; Gil, J A; Fons, A; Badal, R

    1990-11-01

    The preparation is the first step of any tooth reconstruction. The biological integration of the protesis is depending on the marginal adaptation (finish line of the preparation), occlusal adaptation (occlusal reduction), longevity of the restoration (retention and luting) and esthetics. The effect the two finish line of the preparation is studied using experimental design. In porcelain-fused-to-metal the finish line of the preparation in chanfer is superior at the beveled shoulder, because proportioning better marginal adaptation.

  17. Transition projects, Fiscal Year 1996: Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for WBS 1.31, 7.1, and 6.13. Revision 1, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartmell, D.B.

    1995-09-01

    Based on US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) review, specific areas of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Transition Projects ``Draft`` Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) were revised in preparation for the RL approval ceremony on September 26, 1995. These changes were reviewed with the appropriate RL Project Manager. The changes have been incorporated to the MYPP electronic file, and hard copies replacing the ``Draft`` MYPP will be distributed after the formal signing. In addition to the comments received, a summary level schedule and outyear estimates for the K Basin deactivation beginning in FY 2001 have been included. The K Basin outyear waste data is nearing completion this week and will be incorporated. This exclusion was discussed with Mr. N.D. Moorer, RL, Facility Transition Program Support/Integration. The attached MYPP scope/schedule reflects the Integrated Target Case submitted in the April 1995 Activity Data Sheets (ADS) with the exception of B Plant and the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The 8 Plant assumption in FY 1997 reflects the planning case in the FY 1997 ADS with a shortfall of $5 million. PFP assumptions have been revised from the FY 1997 ADS based on the direction provided this past summer by DOE-Headquarters. This includes the acceleration of the polycube stabilization back to its originally planned completion date. Although the overall program repricing in FY 1996 allowed the scheduled acceleration to fall with the funding allocation, the FY 1997 total reflects a shortfall of $6 million.

  18. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Modification of models resulting from addition of effects of exposure to alpha-emitting radionuclides: Revision 1, Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models, Addendum 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahamson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.; Gilbert, E.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify, through the use of models, the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The Reactor Safety Study provided the basis for most of the earlier estimates related to these health effects. Subsequent efforts by NRC-supported groups resulted in improved health effects models that were published in the report entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Consequence Analysis{close_quotes}, NUREG/CR-4214, 1985 and revised further in the 1989 report NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2. The health effects models presented in the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report were developed for exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) (beta and gamma) radiation based on the best scientific information available at that time. Since the 1989 report was published, two addenda to that report have been prepared to (1) incorporate other scientific information related to low-LET health effects models and (2) extend the models to consider the possible health consequences of the addition of alpha-emitting radionuclides to the exposure source term. The first addendum report, entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, Modifications of Models Resulting from Recent Reports on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Low LET Radiation, Part 2: Scientific Bases for Health Effects Models,{close_quotes} was published in 1991 as NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2, Addendum 1. This second addendum addresses the possibility that some fraction of the accident source term from an operating nuclear power plant comprises alpha-emitting radionuclides. Consideration of chronic high-LET exposure from alpha radiation as well as acute and chronic exposure to low-LET beta and gamma radiations is a reasonable extension of the health effects model.

  19. Technique of pulse electrochemical finishing in molds and dies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-you; LIU Xiao-mei; JIANG Kai-yong; WANG Hui; ZHOU Jin-jin

    2004-01-01

    Surface finishing is one of the most important processes in mould and die making. This process is necessary not only for smoothing the surface of die or mould, but also for removing the surface layer, which has been damaged by the preceding machining process and finally improve the performances and lifetime of moulds to a large extent. It has been reported that between 30% and 40% of the total time required to manufacture a die or mold is spent on finishing operations, most of which are performed by skilled workers employing traditional techniques. At present, key problems in mould and die finishing technology can improve the finishing efficiency, consistency and quality at reduced costs. A new and high efficiency unconventional finishing technology, pulse electrochemical finishing was introduced. Experiments were done in neutral nitrate electrolytes. The influence of electrolyte composition, intereletrode gap, finishing time, flow quality, current density, compositions of steel materials and pulse parameters on the resulting surface finishing was investigated. Results indicate that pulse parameters have important influence on operations finishing and the proper selection of pulse parameters can lead to both good smoothing efficiency and surface quality at low costs.

  20. Loosening After Acetabular Revision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckmann, Nicholas A.; Weiss, Stefan; Klotz, Matthias C.M.;

    2014-01-01

    The best method of revision acetabular arthroplasty remains unclear. Consequently, we reviewed the literature on the treatment of revision acetabular arthroplasty using revision rings (1541 cases; mean follow-up (FU) 5.7 years) and Trabecular Metal, or TM, implants (1959 cases; mean FU 3.7 years)...

  1. An introduction to the mechanics of performance assessment using examples of calculations done for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant between 1990 and 1992. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, R.P.

    1996-06-01

    This document provides an overview of the processes used to access the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The quantitative metrics used in the performance-assessment (PA) process are those put forward in the Environmental Protection Agency`s Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, HIgh-LEvel and transuranic radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191).

  2. Application of Plasma finishing on Cotton Fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Shankar Joshi,

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available “Plasma” word is derived from the Greek and referring to the “something molded or fabricated”. Plasma treatments are gaining popularity in the textile industry. Plasma treatment has to be controlled carefully to avoid detrimental action of the plasma onto the substrate. Plasma surface treatments show distinct advantages, because they are able to modify the surface properties of inert materials, sometimes with environment friendly devices. For fabrics, cold plasma treatments require the development of reliable and large systems. Application of “Plasma Technology” in chemical processing of textiles is one of the revolutionary ways to boost the textile wet processing right from pre-treatments to finishing.

  3. Finishing of the cold mass assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2001-01-01

    Photo 1 The connection-side end of the active part assembly. This view shows the electrical connections between the poles and the curved bus ended with flanges for the connection with the protection diode. Photo 2 The connection-side end of the active part assembly. This view shows the electrical connections between the poles, the auxiliary bus bars and the instrumentation wires. Photo 3 Lyre-side end of the active part assembly. One can see the mechanical support of the corretor magnets that are to be installed around the cold bore tubes. Photo 4 General view of the finishing station showing the special supporting structures (blue and yellow structures) needed for the geometric measurements and for the alignment operations. Around the magnet, there are datum points (on the tripodes) needed to build up the coordinates system for the measurements.

  4. Finishing of the cold mass assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2001-01-01

    Photo 1 Zoom of the lyre-side end of the active part assembly. The extremity of the shrinking cylinder has been bevelled in view of welding the end cover. Photo 2 General view of the finishing station showing the special supporting structures (blue and yellow structures) needed for the geometric measurements and for the alignment operations. Photo 3 Zoom of the lyre-side end of the active part assembly. One can also see the auxiliary bus bars needed to power the corrector magnets that are installed in the dipole cold mass assembly. Photo 4 Technicians are putting in order the instrumentation wires. The prototype magnets were equipped with numerous sensors to monitor key parameters during the performance tests at cold conditions.

  5. Enhancing Surface Finish of Additively Manufactured Titanium and Cobalt Chrome Elements Using Laser Based Finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, Wojciech S.; Tian, Yingtao; Cabo, Aldara Pan; Ardron, Marcus; Maier, Robert R. J.; Prangnell, Philip; Weston, Nicholas J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers the possibility of creating a complex free form object as a single element, which is not possible using traditional mechanical machining. Unfortunately the typically rough surface finish of additively manufactured parts is unsuitable for many applications. As a result AM parts must be post-processed; typically mechanically machined and/or and polished using either chemical or mechanical techniques (both of which have their limitations). Laser based polishing is based on remelting of a very thin surface layer and it offers potential as a highly repeatable, higher speed process capable of selective area polishing, and without any waste problems (no abrasives or liquids). In this paper an in-depth investigation of CW laser polishing of titanium and cobalt chrome AM elements is presented. The impact of different scanning strategies, laser parameters and initial surface condition on the achieved surface finish is evaluated.

  6. 16 CFR 1509.8 - Construction and finishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Construction and finishing. 1509.8 Section 1509.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.8 Construction and finishing. (a) All wood...

  7. 16 CFR 1508.7 - Construction and finishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Construction and finishing. 1508.7 Section 1508.7 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1508.7 Construction and finishing. (a) All wood surfaces...

  8. Salmonella infection and immune response in finishing pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finishing pigs infected with Salmonella pose significant food safety risks by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. A study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in finishing pigs, and the immunological alterations that occur in Salmonella-carrier pigs, by longitudinally com...

  9. Population dynamics of swine influenza virus in finishing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza virus infections in swine were first noticed in the US in 1918, during the human pandemic of the Spanish flu. In Europe, seroprevalences for the three most common swine influenza strains at the moment, H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2, range from 20-80% in finishing pigs at the end of the finishing per

  10. Influence of finishing on the electrochemical properties of dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, T; Hattori, M; Hasegawa, K; Yoshinari, M; Kawada, E; Oda, Y

    2000-05-01

    Dental alloy surface finishing procedures of may influence their electrochemical behavior, which is used to evaluate their corrosion resistance. We examined the polarization resistance and potentiodynamic polarization profile of the precious-metal alloys, Type 4 gold alloy and silver-palladium alloy, and the base-metal alloys, nickel-chromium alloy, cobalt-chromium alloy, and CP-titanium. Three types of finishing procedure were examined: mirror-finishing using 0.05 micron alumina particles, polishing using #600 abrasive paper and sandblasting. Dissolution of the alloy elements in 0.9% NaCl solution was also measured and compared with the electrochemical evaluation. The corrosion resistance of the dental alloys was found to relate to finishing as follows: The polarization resistance and potentiodynamic polarization behavior revealed that the corrosion resistance improved in the order of sandblasting, #600-abrasive-paper polishing, and mirror-finishing. While the corrosion potential, critical current density and passive current density varied depending on the type of finishing, the transpassive potential remained unchanged. The influence of finishing on the corrosion resistance of precious-metal alloys was less significant than on that of base-metal alloys. A mirror-finishing specimen was recommended for use in evaluation of the corrosion resistance of various dental alloys.

  11. Population dynamics of swine influenza virus in finishing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza virus infections in swine were first noticed in the US in 1918, during the human pandemic of the Spanish flu. In Europe, seroprevalences for the three most common swine influenza strains at the moment, H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2, range from 20-80% in finishing pigs at the end of the finishing

  12. IPEEE review of external events of the Asco I nuclear plant; Revision del IPEEE de sucesos externos de la Central Nuclear Asco I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, A.; Canadell, F.; Beltran, F.; Pifarre, D.; Hernandez, H.; Gasca, C.

    2012-07-01

    During the risk analysis update of Asco PP (2010), it has been carried out a review of the vulnerabilities against severe accidents caused by external events (individual Plant Examination of external Events, IPEEE). The assessment has included analysis of accidents in industrial and military facilities nearby and transportation accidents (i.e., rail, road and aircraft impact) release of hazardous materials on site, external flooding, turbine missiles and strong winds. (Author)

  13. Surface-Finish Measurement with Interference Microscopes,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-02-01

    5) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Bewley, H. D. 65 Redstone Arsenal Hutcheson, G. J. Union Carbide Corporation • New York Winters, Charles...Singer, S. Sollid, J. E. Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Stief, S. S. Wilcox.W. J.,Jr Oak Ridge National Laboratory Weir.J. R.,Jr OakRidge...February 1977 MIC QUALITY INSPECTED < UNION CARBIDE OAK RIDGE Y-12 PLANT OAK RIDGE. prepared for the U.S. ENERGY RESEARCH AND

  14. 印染厂节能减排实用工艺装备技术(五)——染整设备风机、泵类调速的节电%Processes and equipments for energy saving and emission reduction in dyeing plants(V)——Speed governing and energy saving of fan and pump in dyeing and finishing machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈立秋

    2011-01-01

    Air volume of fan and pump flow in dyeing and finishing machines fluctuate within wide ranges, their shaft powers are in proportion to the cube of the rotating speed, they can be controlled close to ideal control curve by AC variable frequency speed regulation. Advantages of AC variable frequency speed regulation are introduced. Results of technological upgrading of typical machines in dyeing and finishing companies are enumerated.%染整设备的风机风量和泵类流量在运行中变化大,其轴功率与转速的立方成正比,采用交流变频调速控制,可接近理想控制曲线.文中论述了交流变频调速的优点,列举了染整企业典型设备的技改效果.

  15. W. R. Grace: Plant Uses Six Sigma Methodology and Traditional Heat Balance Analysis to Identify Energy Conservation Opportunities at Curtis Bay Works (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2003-12-01

    The plant-wide energy assessment at W. R. Grace's Curtis Bay Works helped identify four projects with combined potential savings of $840,000 per year. A separate, unique project that would partner W. R. Grace with the City of Baltimore to recover and use landfill gas (methane) to cogenerate steam and electricity was also identified during the assessment. If implemented, the project would recover gas from the landfill to replace 40% of the electricity and 65% of the fuel currently required to produce steam at Curtis Bay Works. Annual savings are estimated at $900,000 to $1.2 million.

  16. Phosphorus requirement of finishing feedlot calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, G E; Klopfenstein, T J; Milton, C T; Brink, D; Orth, M W; Whittet, K M

    2002-06-01

    Dietary P supplied to feedlot cattle is important because an inadequate supply will compromise performance, whereas excess P may harm the environment. However, P requirements of feedlot cattle are not well documented. Therefore, 45 steer calves (265.2+/-16.6 kg) were individually fed to determine the P required for gain and bone integrity over a 204-d finishing period. The basal diet consisted of 33.5% high-moisture corn, 30% brewers grits, 20% corn bran, 7.5% cottonseed hulls, 3% tallow, and 6% supplement. Treatments consisted of 0.16 (no supplemental inorganic P), 0.22, 0.28, 0.34, and 0.40% P (DM basis). Supplemental P was provided by monosodium phosphate top-dressed to the daily feed allotment. Blood was sampled every 56 d to assess P status. At slaughter, phalanx and metacarpal bones were collected from the front leg to determine bone ash and assess P resorption from bone. Dry matter intake and ADG did not change linearly (P > 0.86) or quadratically (P > 0.28) due to P treatment. Feed efficiency was not influenced (P > 0.30) by P treatment and averaged 0.169. Plasma inorganic P averaged across d 56 to 204 responded quadratically, with calves fed 0.16% P having the lowest concentration of plasma inorganic P. However, plasma inorganic P concentration (5.7 mg/dL) for steers fed 0.16% P is generally considered adequate. Total bone ash weight was not influenced by dietary P for phalanx (P = 0.19) or metacarpal bones (P = 0.37). Total P intake ranged from 14.2 to 35.5 g/d. The NRC (1996) recommendation for these calves was 18.7 g/d, assuming 68% absorption. Based on performance results, P requirements for finishing calves is < 0.16% of diet DM or 14.2 g/d. Based on these observations, we suggest that typical grain-based feedlot cattle diets do not require supplementation of inorganic mineral P to meet P requirements.

  17. The effect of a collar and surface finish on cemented femoral stems: a prospective randomised trial of four stem designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutt, Jonathan; Hazlerigg, Alexandra; Aneel, Ansari; Epie, Geoffrey; Dabis, Husam; Twyman, Roy; Cobb, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    The optimal design for a cemented femoral stem remains a matter of debate. Over time, the shape, surface finish and collar have all been modified in various ways. A clear consensus has not yet emerged regarding the relative merits of even the most basic design features of the stem. We undertook a prospective randomised trial comparing surface finish and the effect of a collar on cemented femoral component subsidence, survivorship and clinical function. One hundred and sixty three primary total hip replacement patients were recruited prospectively and randomised to one of four groups to receive a cemented femoral stem with either a matt or polished finish, and with or without a collar. At two years, although there was a trend for increased subsidence in the matt collarless group, this was not statistically significant (p = 0.18). At a mean of 10.1 years follow-up, WOMAC scores for the surviving implants were good, (Range of means 89-93) without significant differences. Using revision or radiographic loosening as the endpoint, survivorship of the entire cohort was 93 % at 11 yrs, (CI 87-97 %). There were no significant differences in survivorship between the two groups with polished stems or the two groups with matt stems. A comparison of the two collarless stems demonstrated a statistically significant difference in survivorship between polished (100 %) and matt (88 %) finishes (p = 0.02). In the presence of a collar, surface finish did not significantly affect survivorship or function. Between the two collarless groups a polished surface conferred an improved survivorship.

  18. 78 FR 35072 - Proposed Revisions to Reliability Assurance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Proposed Revisions to Reliability Assurance Program AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... Plants: LWR Edition,'' Section 17.4, ``Reliability Assurance Program.'' DATES: Submit comments by July...

  19. Lineage-specific biology revealed by a finished genome assembly of the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Deanna M; Goodstadt, Leo; Hillier, Ladeana W; Zody, Michael C; Goldstein, Steve; She, Xinwe; Bult, Carol J; Agarwala, Richa; Cherry, Joshua L; DiCuccio, Michael; Hlavina, Wratko; Kapustin, Yuri; Meric, Peter; Maglott, Donna; Birtle, Zoë; Marques, Ana C; Graves, Tina; Zhou, Shiguo; Teague, Brian; Potamousis, Konstantinos; Churas, Christopher; Place, Michael; Herschleb, Jill; Runnheim, Ron; Forrest, Daniel; Amos-Landgraf, James; Schwartz, David C; Cheng, Ze; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Eichler, Evan E; Ponting, Chris P

    2009-05-05

    The mouse (Mus musculus) is the premier animal model for understanding human disease and development. Here we show that a comprehensive understanding of mouse biology is only possible with the availability of a finished, high-quality genome assembly. The finished clone-based assembly of the mouse strain C57BL/6J reported here has over 175,000 fewer gaps and over 139 Mb more of novel sequence, compared with the earlier MGSCv3 draft genome assembly. In a comprehensive analysis of this revised genome sequence, we are now able to define 20,210 protein-coding genes, over a thousand more than predicted in the human genome (19,042 genes). In addition, we identified 439 long, non-protein-coding RNAs with evidence for transcribed orthologs in human. We analyzed the complex and repetitive landscape of 267 Mb of sequence that was missing or misassembled in the previously published assembly, and we provide insights into the reasons for its resistance to sequencing and assembly by whole-genome shotgun approaches. Duplicated regions within newly assembled sequence tend to be of more recent ancestry than duplicates in the published draft, correcting our initial understanding of recent evolution on the mouse lineage. These duplicates appear to be largely composed of sequence regions containing transposable elements and duplicated protein-coding genes; of these, some may be fixed in the mouse population, but at least 40% of segmentally duplicated sequences are copy number variable even among laboratory mouse strains. Mouse lineage-specific regions contain 3,767 genes drawn mainly from rapidly-changing gene families associated with reproductive functions. The finished mouse genome assembly, therefore, greatly improves our understanding of rodent-specific biology and allows the delineation of ancestral biological functions that are shared with human from derived functions that are not.

  20. Lineage-specific biology revealed by a finished genome assembly of the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M Church

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The mouse (Mus musculus is the premier animal model for understanding human disease and development. Here we show that a comprehensive understanding of mouse biology is only possible with the availability of a finished, high-quality genome assembly. The finished clone-based assembly of the mouse strain C57BL/6J reported here has over 175,000 fewer gaps and over 139 Mb more of novel sequence, compared with the earlier MGSCv3 draft genome assembly. In a comprehensive analysis of this revised genome sequence, we are now able to define 20,210 protein-coding genes, over a thousand more than predicted in the human genome (19,042 genes. In addition, we identified 439 long, non-protein-coding RNAs with evidence for transcribed orthologs in human. We analyzed the complex and repetitive landscape of 267 Mb of sequence that was missing or misassembled in the previously published assembly, and we provide insights into the reasons for its resistance to sequencing and assembly by whole-genome shotgun approaches. Duplicated regions within newly assembled sequence tend to be of more recent ancestry than duplicates in the published draft, correcting our initial understanding of recent evolution on the mouse lineage. These duplicates appear to be largely composed of sequence regions containing transposable elements and duplicated protein-coding genes; of these, some may be fixed in the mouse population, but at least 40% of segmentally duplicated sequences are copy number variable even among laboratory mouse strains. Mouse lineage-specific regions contain 3,767 genes drawn mainly from rapidly-changing gene families associated with reproductive functions. The finished mouse genome assembly, therefore, greatly improves our understanding of rodent-specific biology and allows the delineation of ancestral biological functions that are shared with human from derived functions that are not.

  1. Finishing of the cold mass assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2001-01-01

    Photo 1 General view of the finishing station showing the special supporting structures (blue and yellow structures) needed for the geometric measurements and for the alignment operations. Around the magnet, there are datum points (on the tripodes) needed to build up the coordinates system for the measurements. Photo 2 The corrector magnets that are sextupoles are prepared for a plug-in fixation on their mechanical support. Photo 3 A corretor magnet has been installed on the left cold bore tube. The second one is waiting on the table for installation. Photo 4 The mechanical mole holding the corner cube reflector of the 3-D measuring machine is introduced in the cold bore tube (the right one on the picture). This will allow to pick up the X-Y-Z coordinates of the centre of the cold bore tube on its entire length. Photo 5 This picture shows the driving system that is completely computer controlled to pull the mechanical mole inside the cold bore tube. Photo 6 This picture shows details of the driving system...

  2. Optimizing parameters for magnetorheological finishing supersmooth surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Haobo; Feng, Zhijing; Wang, Yingwei

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents a reasonable approach to this issue, i.e., computer controlled magnetorheological finishing (MRF). In MRF, magnetically stiffened magnetorheological (MR) abrasive fluid flows through a preset converging gap that is formed by a workpiece surface and a moving rigid wall, to create precise material removal and polishing. Tsinghua University recently completed a project with MRF technology, in which a 66 mm diameter, f/5 parabolic mirror was polished to the shape accuracy of λ/17 RMS (λ=632.8nm) and the surface roughness of 1.22 nm Ra. This was done on a home made novel aspheric computer controlled manufacturing system. It is a three-axis, self-rotating wheel machine, the polishing tool is driven with one motor through a belt. This paper presents the manufacturing and testing processes, including establish the mathematics model of MRF optics on the basis of Preston equation, profiler test and relative coefficients, i.e., pressure between workpiece and tool, velocity of MR fluid in polishing spot, tolerance control of geometrical parameters such as radius of curvature and conic constant also been analyzed in the paper. Experiments were carried out on the features of MRF. The results indicated that the required convergent speed, surface roughness could be achieved with high efficiency.

  3. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 4, Revision 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    The US Department of Energy is currently constructing the Waste Isolation Pilot near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The full-scale pilot plant will demonstrate the feasibility of the safe disposal of defense-related nuclear waste in a bedded salt formation at a depth of 2160 feet below the surface. WIPP will provide for the permanent storage of 25,000 cu ft of remote-handled (RH) transuranic waste and 6,000,000 cu ft of contact-handled (CH) transuranic waste. This paper covers the major mechanical/structural design considerations for the waste hoist and its hoist tower structure. The design of the hoist system and safety features incorporates state-of-the-art technology developed in the hoist and mining industry to ensure safe operation for transporting nuclear waste underground. Also included are design specifications for VOC-10 monitoring system.

  4. Effect of Eco-finishing on Naturally Colored Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈英; 宋心远

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies desizing and polishing of naturally colored cotton with different enzyme. The reactivity of cellulases was measured. The percentage of decrement, bulkiness and color difference of fabrics both before and after eco-finishing were tested. The reasons were analyzed. The results indicates that the desizing of amylase can be applied on naturally colored cotton, and cellulases have polishing effect on it. Moreover eco-finishing with enzyme can provide many better properties to naturally colored cotton than that of normal finishing. Also this process has no pollution as enzyme can be degraded by bioreaction.

  5. Relevance of microbial finished product testing in food safety management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwietering, Marcel H.; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Membré, Jeanne Marie

    2016-01-01

    -active way by implementing an effective food safety management system. For verification activities in a food safety management system, finished product testing may however be useful. For three cases studies; canned food, chocolate and cooked ham, the relevance of testing both of finished products...... and the production environment is discussed. Since the level of control of different processes can be largely different it is beneficial if the frequency of sampling of finished products and production environments would be related to the associated human health risk, which can be assessed on the basis of risk...

  6. An overview of plastic optical fiber end finishers at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishina, M.; Lindenmeyer, C.; Korienek, J.

    1993-11-01

    Several years ago the need for equipment to precisely finish the ends of plastic optical fibers was recognized. Many high energy physics experiments use thousands of these fibers which must be polished on one or both ends. A fast, easy-to-operate machine yielding repeatable finishes was needed. Three types of machines were designed and constructed that are in daily use at Fermilab, all finish the fiber ends by flycutting with a diamond tool. Althrough diamond flycutting of plastic is not new, the size and fragility of plastic optical fibers present several challenges.

  7. Total hip arthroplasty with cement and use of a collared matte-finish femoral component: nineteen to twenty-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, John J; Liu, Steve S; Firestone, Daniel E; Yehyawi, Tameem M; Goetz, Devon D; Sullivan, Jason; Vittetoe, David A; O'Rourke, Michael R; Johnston, Richard C

    2008-02-01

    In the mid- to late 1970s, on the basis of laboratory and finite element data, many surgeons in the United States began using collared matte-finish femoral components and metal-backed acetabular components in their total hip arthroplasties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term results of the use of one such construct in arthroplasties performed by a single surgeon in a consecutive nonselected patient cohort. Between January 1984 and December 1985, 273 patients underwent a total of 304 consecutive nonselected total hip arthroplasties with cement and use of the Iowa femoral component (which is collared, has a proximal cobra shape, and has a matte finish) and a metal-backed TiBac acetabular component performed by a single surgeon. At nineteen to twenty years postoperatively, only two patients (two hips) were lost to follow-up. For clinical evaluation, we attempted to interview all living patients and the families of the patients who had died to verify the status of the hip prosthesis or any revisions. Radiographic evaluation consisted of analysis for loosening and osteolysis as well as wear of the acetabular component. At the time of the nineteen to twenty-year follow-up, the rate of revision of the arthroplasty for any reason was 10.5% (thirty-two hips) for all patients and 25% (twenty-three hips) for living patients. The rate of revision due to aseptic femoral loosening was 2.6% (eight hips). There was radiographic evidence of loosening of the femoral component in fifteen hips (4.9%), including those that were revised, and femoral osteolysis was seen distal to the trochanters in twenty-two hips (7.2%). The rate of revision due to aseptic loosening of the acetabular component was 7.9% (twenty-four hips), and there was radiographic evidence of acetabular loosening in forty-two hips (13.8%), including those that were revised. This study demonstrates the durability of a cemented matte-finish collared femoral component at twenty years postoperatively

  8. Effect of Moringa oleifera leaf meal on finisher pig growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Animal Science ... meal on finisher pig growth performance, meat quality, shelf life and fatty acid composition of pork ... Feed intake was measured daily, pig liveweight was measured weekly, and average daily gains ...

  9. Exposure to organic solvents during cosmetic finishing of cars

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bråtveit, M; Moen, B E

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the exposure to organic solvents during degreasing, washing and polishing of cars, and to obtain information about acute health symptoms in car-finishing workers...

  10. Equipments for Dyeing & Finishing are Facing Low Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shimiao

    2010-01-01

    @@ Dyeing & finishing industry makes it possible for textile products to present colorful world on them.When it beautifies human's life immensely,it also makes great consumption of energy and resources,and causes environmental pollution.

  11. Environmentally friendly antibacterial cotton textiles finished with siloxane sulfopropylbetaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiguo; Chen, Shaojun; Jiang, Song; Xiong, Meiling; Luo, Junxuan; Tang, Jiaoning; Ge, Zaochuan

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports a novel environmentally friendly antibacterial cotton textile finished with reactive siloxane sulfopropylbetaine(SSPB). The results show that SSPB can be covalently bound onto the cotton textile surface, imparting perdurable antibacterial activity. The textiles finished with SSPB have been investigated systematically from the mechanical properties, thermal stability, hydrophilic properties and antibacterial properties. It is found that the hydrophilicity and breaking strength are improved greatly after the cotton textiles are finished with SSPB. Additionally, the cotton textiles finished with SSPB exhibit good antibacterial activities against gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus, ATCC 6538), gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (E.coli, 8099) and fungi Candida albicans (C.albicans, ATCC 10231). Moreover, SSPB is nonleachable from the textiles, and it does not induce skin stimulation and is nontoxic to animals. Thus, SSPB is ideal candidate for environmentally friendly antibacterial textile applications.

  12. Implementation of the Resource Disincentive in 40 CFR part 191.14 (e) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    In 1986, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project Office (WPO) (DOE-WPO) prepared a strategy for complying with the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Standards for the management of transuranic (TRU) waste. Section 3.2.2.2 of the DOE`s report addressed compliance with the Assurance Requirements found in 40 CFR {section} 191.14. One of the Assurance Requirements addresses the selection of repository sites that contain recoverable natural resources. This report documents that the site selection process for the WIPP facility did indeed comply with the natural resource disincentive requirement in 40 CFR {section} 191,14(e) at the time selected and therefore complies with the standard at this time. Thus, it shall be shown that it is reasonably certain that the WIPP site provides better overall protection than practical alternatives that were available when the site was selected. It is important to point out here, and it will be discussed later in the report, that the resource disincentive requirement is a preliminary siting criterion that requires further evaluation of sites that have resources (i.e, hydrocarbons, minerals and groundwater) in the vicinity or on the site. This further evaluation requires that for sites that do have resources, a qualitative determination must be made that the site will provide better overall protection than practical alternatives. The purpose of this report is not to provide a quantitative evaluation for selection of the WIPP site. A further discussion on the difference between the qualitative analysis required under 40 CFR {section} 191.14(e) and the quantitative analysis under other sections of 40 CFR 191 is provided in {section}2.1 of this report.

  13. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 4, Chapter D, Appendix D1 (beginning), Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lappin, A. R.

    1993-03-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is designed for receipt, handling, storage, and permanent isolation of defense-generated transuranic wastes, is being excavated at a depth of approximately 655 m in bedded halites of the Permian Salado Formation of southeastern New Mexico. Site-characterization activities at the present WIPP site began in 1976. Full construction of the facility began in 1983, after completion of ``Site and Preliminary Design Validation`` (SPDV) activities and reporting. Site-characterization activities since 1983 have had the objectives of updating or refining the overall conceptual model of the geologic, hydrologic, and structural behavior of the WIPP site and providing data adequate for use in WIPP performance assessment. This report has four main objectives: 1. Summarize the results of WIPP site-characterization studies carried out since the spring of 1983 as a result of specific agreements between the US Department of Energy and the State of New Mexico. 2. Summarize the results and status of site-characterization and facility-characterization studies carried out since 1983, but not specifically included in mandated agreements. 3. Compile the results of WIPP site-characterization studies into an internally consistent conceptual model for the geologic, hydrologic, geochemical, and structural behavior of the WIPP site. This model includes some consideration of the effects of the WIPP facility and shafts on the local characteristics of the Salado and Rustler Formations. 4. Discuss the present limitations and/or uncertainties in the conceptual geologic model of the WIPP site and facility. The objectives of this report are limited in scope, and do not include determination of whether or not the WIPP Project will comply with repository-performance criteria developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40CFR191).

  14. Stripping for Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donna

    1996-01-01

    Describes a three-step process by which students are taught to revise their writing by listing each sentence on another paper, combining sentences by eliminating redundancy, reducing information to appositives, and reducing information to participles, as well as revising the reduced number of sentences by including verbals, action verbs,…

  15. Writing as Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della-Piana, Gabriel M.; Endo, George T.

    This proposal for a longitudinal experimental study with a treatment intervention focuses on the process of writing as revision. Revision refers to the process which occurs prior to and throughout the writing of a work, rather than the final editing. According to this process, the writer goes through five stages: preconceptions concerning style…

  16. Solder flow over fine line PWB surface finishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosking, F.M.; Hernandez, C.L.

    1998-08-01

    The rapid advancement of interconnect technology has stimulated the development of alternative printed wiring board (PWB) surface finishes to enhance the solderability of standard copper and solder-coated surfaces. These new finishes are based on either metallic or organic chemistries. As part of an ongoing solderability study, Sandia National Laboratories has investigated the solder flow behavior of two azole-based organic solderability preservations, immersion Au, immersion Ag, electroless Pd, and electroless Pd/Ni on fine line copper features. The coated substrates were solder tested in the as-fabricated and environmentally-stressed conditions. Samples were processed through an inerted reflow machine. The azole-based coatings generally provided the most effective protection after aging. Thin Pd over Cu yielded the best wetting results of the metallic coatings, with complete dissolution of the Pd overcoat and wetting of the underlying Cu by the flowing solder. Limited wetting was measured on the thicker Pd and Pd over Ni finishes, which were not completely dissolved by the molten solder. The immersion Au and Ag finishes yielded the lowest wetted lengths, respectively. These general differences in solderability were directly attributed to the type of surface finish which the solder came in contact with. The effects of circuit geometry, surface finish, stressing, and solder processing conditions are discussed.

  17. 40 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart Tttt of... - Example Logs for Recording Leather Finish Use and HAP Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Finish Use and HAP Content 1 Figure 1 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Finishing Operations Part 63, Subpt. TTTT, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63—Example Logs for Recording Leather Finish Use and HAP Content Month:______Year:______ Finish Inventory Log Finish type Finish...

  18. 40 CFR 425.90 - Applicability; description of the retan-wet finish-splits subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... retan-wet finish-splits subcategory. 425.90 Section 425.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Retan-Wet Finish-Splits Subcategory § 425.90 Applicability; description of the retan-wet finish...

  19. 40 CFR 425.40 - Applicability; description of the retan-wet finish-sides subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... retan-wet finish-sides subcategory. 425.40 Section 425.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Retan-Wet Finish-Sides Subcategory § 425.40 Applicability; description of the retan-wet finish...

  20. Orthodontic treatment outcomes obtained by application of a finishing protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Carvajal-Flórez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the results of a finishing protocol implemented in patients treated in the Orthodontics graduate program at Universidad de Antioquia. Evaluation was carried out by means of the criteria set by the Objective Grading System (OGS of the American Board of Orthodontics (ABO. Methods: Cast models and panoramic radiographs of 34 patients were evaluated. The intervention group (IG consisted of 17 patients (19.88 ± 4.4 years old treated under a finishing protocol. This protocol included training in finishing, application of a finishing guide, brackets repositioning and patient's follow-up. Results of the IG were compared to a control group of 17 patients (21.88 ± 7.0 years old selected by stratified randomization without finishing intervention (CG. Results: The scores for both CG and IG were 38.00 ± 9.0 and 31.41 ± 9.6 (p = 0.048, respectively. The score improved significantly in the IG group, mainly regarding marginal ridges (CG: 5.59 ± 2.2; IG: 3.65 ± 1.8 (p = 0.009 and root angulation (CG: 7.59 ± 2.8; IG: 4.88 ± 2.6 (p = 0.007. Criteria that did not improve, but had the highest scores were: alignment (CG: 6.35 ± 2.7; IG: 6.82 ± 2.8 (p = 0.62 and buccolingual inclination (CG: 3.6 ± 5.88; IG: 5.29 ± 3.9 (p = 0.65. Conclusions: Standardization and implementation of a finishing protocol contributed to improve clinical performance in the Orthodontics graduate program, as expressed by occlusal outcomes. Greater emphasis should be given on the finishing phase to achieve lower scores in the ABO grading system.

  1. Letter of Map Revision

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  2. Katz's revisability paradox dissolved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, Allard; Verhaegh, Sander

    2013-01-01

    Quine's holistic empiricist account of scientific inquiry can be characterized by three constitutive principles: noncontradiction, universal revisability and pragmatic ordering. We show that these constitutive principles cannot be regarded as statements within a holistic empiricist's scientific theo

  3. Katz's revisability paradox dissolved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, Allard; Verhaegh, Sander

    2013-01-01

    Quine's holistic empiricist account of scientific inquiry can be characterized by three constitutive principles: noncontradiction, universal revisability and pragmatic ordering. We show that these constitutive principles cannot be regarded as statements within a holistic empiricist's scientific

  4. Revised Total Coliform Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) aims to increase public health protection through the reduction of potential pathways for fecal contamination in the distribution system of a public water system (PWS).

  5. Studies on Application of Aroma Finish on Silk Fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipparagi, Sanganna Aminappa; Srinivasa, Thirumalappa; Das, Brojeswari; Naik, Subhas Venkatappa; Purushotham, Serampur Parappa

    2016-10-01

    Aromatic treatments on textiles have gained importance in the recent years. In the present article work has been done on fragrance finish application on silk material. Silk is an expensive natural fibre used for apparel purpose and known for its feel and appeal. Incorporation of fragrance material in silk product, will add more value to it. Present work focuses to impart durable aroma finish for silk products to be home washed or subjected to dry cleaning. Microencapsulated aroma chemical has been used for the treatment. Impregnation method, Exhaust method, Dip-Pad-Dry method and Spray method have been used to see the influence of application method on the uptake and performance. Evaluation of the aroma treated material has been done through subjective evaluation as per Odor Intensity Reference Scaling (OIRS). Effect of the aroma finishing on the physical properties of the fabric has also been studied. No adverse effect has been observed on the stiffness of the fabric after the aroma treatment.

  6. Tool steel quality and surface finishing of plastic molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Agnelli Mesquita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastic industry is today in a constant growth, demanding several products from other segments, which includes the plastic molds, mainly used in the injection molding process. Considering all the requirements of plastic molds, the surface finishing is of special interest, as the injected plastic part is able to reproduce any details (and also defects from the mold surface. Therefore, several aspects on mold finishing are important, mainly related to manufacturing conditions - machining, grinding, polishing and texturing, and also related to the tool steel quality, in relation to microstructure homogeneity and non-metallic inclusions (cleanliness. The present paper is then focused on this interrelationship between steel quality and manufacturing process, which are both related to the final quality of plastic mold surfaces. Examples are discussed in terms of surface finishing of plastic molds and the properties or the microstructure of mold steels.

  7. New trends for PWB surface finishes in mobile phone applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Würtz; Ambat, Rajan; Rasmussen, Anette Alsted

    2005-01-01

    pads in terminals from Nokia with positive impact on solder joint reliability. Theoretical electrochemical studies, experimental work and full scale high volume production has now demonstrated that Carbon surface finish for Key- and spring contact-pads, combined with the right concept design will make...... use of Imm. Ni/Au unnecessary in the near future. The end result is higher reliability with less expensive and simpler processes. This paper will discuss the various considerations for choice of surface finish and results from the extensive feasibility studies performed by Nokia Mobile Phones...

  8. Crossing the Finish Line: Completing College at America's Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, William G.; Chingos, Matthew M.; McPherson, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The United States has long been a model for accessible, affordable education, as exemplified by the country's public universities. And yet less than 60 percent of the students entering American universities today are graduating. Why is this happening, and what can be done? "Crossing the Finish Line" provides the most detailed exploration…

  9. Polishing Metal Mirrors to 0,025 Micron Surface Finish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P. E.

    1978-01-01

    A research program undertaken by the Danish Atomic Energy Commission required the fabrication of metal mirrors measuring 1 m long by 53 mm wide, which had to be finished to extremely tight tolerances on thickness, plane-parallelism and surface characteristics. Progressively finer diamond compounds...

  10. Finished Genome Sequence of Collimonas arenae Cal35

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Je-Jia; de Jager, Victor; Deng, Wen-ling; Leveau, Johan

    2015-01-01

    We announce the finished genome sequence of soil forest isolate Collimonas arenae Cal35, which comprises a 5.6-Mbp chromosome and 41-kb plasmid. The Cal35 genome is the second one published for the bacterial genus Collimonas and represents the first opportunity for high-resolution comparison of geno

  11. Finished Genome Sequence of Collimonas arenae Cal35

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Je-Jia; de Jager, Victor; Deng, Wen-ling; Leveau, Johan

    2015-01-01

    We announce the finished genome sequence of soil forest isolate Collimonas arenae Cal35, which comprises a 5.6-Mbp chromosome and 41-kb plasmid. The Cal35 genome is the second one published for the bacterial genus Collimonas and represents the first opportunity for high-resolution comparison of geno

  12. 9 CFR 318.309 - Finished product inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY... be handled according to: (1) A HACCP plan for canned product that addresses hazards associated with... this section. (b)-(c) (d) Procedures for handling finished product inspections where the HACCP plan...

  13. Relevance of microbial finished product testing in food safety management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwietering, M.H.; Jacxsens, L.; Membre, J.M.; Nauta, M.; Peterz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Management of microbiological food safety is largely based on good design of processes, products and procedures. Finished product testing may be considered as a control measure at the end of the production process. However, testing gives only very limited information on the safety status of a food.

  14. Effect of panel alignment and surface finish on bond strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouters, J.M.; Doe, P.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Baker, W.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1991-10-01

    The flexural strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of panel alignment and bond surface finish. Bond strength was shown to be highly dependent on both parameters with only a narrow range of values yielding a high strength bond. This study was performed for the heavy water-containing acrylic vessel for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory detector.

  15. Relevance of microbial finished product testing in food safety management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwietering, M.H.; Jacxsens, L.; Membre, J.M.; Nauta, M.; Peterz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Management of microbiological food safety is largely based on good design of processes, products and procedures. Finished product testing may be considered as a control measure at the end of the production process. However, testing gives only very limited information on the safety status of a food.

  16. Graphic Arts: The Press and Finishing Processes. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crummett, Dan

    This document contains teacher and student materials for a course in graphic arts concentrating on printing presses and the finishing process for publications. Seven units of instruction cover the following topics: (1) offset press systems; (2) offset inks and dampening chemistry; (3) offset press operating procedures; (4) preventive maintenance…

  17. Perceptual Orientation for Housing Interior Walls Finishes Choice and Preference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. ZINAS, Bako Zachariah

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Housing interior walls are decorated and finished with various decorative materials of paints of varying properties ranging from texture to coloration. In choosing the preferred finishing and decorative materials, housing owners, users and prospective owners have attendant underlying factors and reasons for their choices. These choice activities usually provoke and invoke certain perceptual orientations that underlie the choices. These perceptual orientations are normally very complex and can only be disentangled by elicitation. This paper presents perceptual orientations of prospective house owners‟ choice and preference for interior walls finishes in Yola, Nigeria. The study was conducted within the theoretical and conceptual framework of means-end chain (MEC model. 15 prospective house owners were interviewed using the laddering interviewing technique after a structured questionnaire survey was carried out. The results showed that twelve (12 identified unique perceptual orientation pathways were established, motivated by four (4 user values, and intervened by four (4 expected functional affordances. The findings disentangled the design expectations of housing users/owners for finishing their housing interiors which can be pointers for designers and Architects for their design processes and decisions.

  18. Performance and cost implication of finisher turkeys fed varying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance and cost implication of finisher turkeys fed varying levels of rice millingwaste. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... 50% rice milling waste produced enhanced performance that was next to the control in terms ...

  19. Manipulating mechanics and chemistry in precision optics finishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D. Jacobs

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Deterministic processing is critical to modern precision optics finishing. Put simply, determinism is the ability to predict an outcome before carrying out an activity. With the availability of computer numerically controlled (CNC equipment and sophisticated software algorithms, it is now possible to grind and polish optics from a variety of materials to surface shape accuracies of ~20 nm peak-to-valley (p–v, with surface roughness values (measured on white light interferometers over 250 μm×350 μm areas to sub-nm root-mean-square (rms levels. In the grinding phase the capability now exists to estimate removal rates, surface roughness, and the depth of subsurface damage (SSD for a previously unprocessed material, knowing its Young's modulus, hardness, and fracture toughness. An understanding of how chemistry aids in the abrasive-driven removal of material from the surface during polishing is also critical. Recent polishing process research reveals the importance of chemistry, specifically slurry pH, for preventing particle agglomeration in order to achieve smooth surface finishes with conventional pad or pitch laps. New sub-aperture polishing processes like magnetorheological finishing (MRF can smooth and shape flat, spherical, aspheric and free-form surfaces within a few process iterations. Difficult to finish optical materials like soft polymer polymethyl methacrylate, microstructured polycrystalline zinc sulfide, and water soluble single-crystal potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP can be finished with MRF. The key is the systematic alteration of MR fluid chemistry and mechanics (i.e. the abrasive to match the unique physical properties of each workpiece.

  20. The effects of stainless steel finish on Salmonella Typhimurium attachment, biofilm formation and sensitivity to chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlisselberg, Dov B; Yaron, Sima

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on stainless steel (SS) surfaces can be sources for cross contamination in food processing facilities, possessing a great threat to public health and food quality. Here the aim was to demonstrate the influence of surface finish of AISI 316 SS on colonization, biofilm formation and susceptibility of Salmonella Typhimurium to disinfection. Initial attachment of S. Typhimurium on surfaces of SS was four times lower, when surface was polished by Bright-Alum (BA) or Electropolishing (EP), as compared to Mechanical Sanded (MS) or the untreated surface (NT). The correlation between roughness and initial bacterial attachment couldn't account on its own to explain differences seen. Biofilms with similar thickness (15-18 μm) were developed on all surfaces 1-day post inoculation, whereas EP was the least covered surface (23%). Following 5-days, biofilm thickness was lowest on EP and MS (30 μm) and highest on NT (62 μm) surfaces. An analysis of surface composition suggested a link between surface chemistry and biofilm development, where the higher concentrations of metal ions in EP and MS surfaces correlated with limited biofilm formation. Interestingly, disinfection of biofilms with chlorine was up to 130 times more effective on the EP surface (0.005% surviving) than on the other surfaces. Overall these results suggest that surface finish should be considered carefully in a food processing plant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Activated sludge respirometry to assess solar detoxification of a metal finishing effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Juanes, L.; Amat, A.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Textil y Papelera, Escuela Politecnica Superior de Alcoy, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Plaza Ferrandiz y Carbonell s/n, E-03801 Alcoy (Spain); Arques, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Textil y Papelera, Escuela Politecnica Superior de Alcoy, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Plaza Ferrandiz y Carbonell s/n, E-03801 Alcoy (Spain)], E-mail: aarques@txp.upv.es; Bernabeu, A.; Silvestre, M.; Vicente, R. [Departamento de Ingenieria Textil y Papelera, Escuela Politecnica Superior de Alcoy, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Plaza Ferrandiz y Carbonell s/n, E-03801 Alcoy (Spain); Ano, E. [Departamento de Gestion e Innovacion, Area de producto y desarrollo sostenible, Asociacion de Investigacion de la Industria del Juguete, Conexas y Afines (AIJU), Avda. de la industria, 23, 03440 Ibi (Spain)], E-mail: m.ambiente@aiju.info

    2008-05-30

    Inhibition of the respiration of activated sludge has been tested as a convenient method to estimate toxicity of aqueous solutions containing copper and cyanide, such as metal finishing effluents; according to this method, an EC{sub 50} of 0.5 mg/l was determined for CN{sup -} and 3.0 mg/l for copper. Solar detoxification of cyanide-containing solutions was studied using TiO{sub 2}, but this process was unfavourable because of the inhibitory role that plays the copper ions present in real effluents on the oxidation of cyanide. On the other hand, the oxidative effect of hydrogen peroxide was greatly enhanced by Cu{sup 2+} and solar irradiation, as complete elimination of free and complexed cyanide could be accomplished, together with precipitation of copper, in experiments carried out at pilot plant scale with real metal finishing effluents. Under these conditions, total detoxification was achieved according to respirometric measurements although some remaining toxicity was determined by more sensitive Vibrio fischeri luminescent assay.

  2. Revising and editing for translators

    CERN Document Server

    Mossop, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Revising and Editing for Translators provides guidance and learning materials for translation students learning to edit texts written by others, and professional translators wishing to improve their self-revision ability or learning to revise the work of others. Editing is understood as making corrections and improvements to texts, with particular attention to tailoring them to the given readership. Revising is this same task applied to draft translations. The linguistic work of editors and revisers is related to the professional situations in which they work. Mossop offers in-depth coverage of a wide range of topics, including copyediting, style editing, structural editing, checking for consistency, revising procedures and principles, and translation quality assessment. This third edition provides extended coverage of computer aids for revisers, and of the different degrees of revision suited to different texts. The inclusion of suggested activities and exercises, numerous real-world examples, a proposed gra...

  3. Immunological, physiological and behavioral effects of Salmonella enterica carriage and shedding in experimentally infected finishing pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finishing pigs infected with Salmonella pose significant food safety risks by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. This study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in finishing pigs, and associated immunological, physiological, and behavioral alterations, by longitudinally ...

  4. Hardness of celluloid strip-finished or polished composite surfaces with time

    OpenAIRE

    Park, S. H.; KREJCI,Ivo; Lutz, F

    2000-01-01

    An in-vitro study revealed that a celluloid strip-finished composite surface discolored more than the polished composite surface. Thus, the celluloid strip-finished composite surface may not cure enough compared with the polished composite surface.

  5. 76 FR 19182 - Petition for Rulemaking-Classification of Polyurethane Foam and Certain Finished Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... Polyurethane Foam and Certain Finished Products Containing Polyurethane Foam as Hazardous Materials AGENCY... of State Fire Marshals (NASFM). The NASFM petitioned PHMSA to classify polyurethane foam and certain finished products containing polyurethane foam as hazardous material for purposes of transportation...

  6. Revision without ordinals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivello, Edoardo

    2013-01-01

    We show that Herzberger’s and Gupta’s revision theories of truth can be recast in purely inductive terms, without any appeal neither to the transfinite ordinal numbers nor to the axiom of Choice. The result is presented in an abstract and general setting, emphasising both its validity for a wide ran

  7. Revision of Oxandra (Annonaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junikka, L.; Maas, P.J.M.; Maas-van de Kamer, H.; Westra, L.Y.Th.

    2016-01-01

    A taxonomic revision is given of the Neotropical genus Oxandra (Annonaceae). Within the genus 27 species are recognized, 4 of which are new to science. Most of the species are occurring in tropical South America, whereas a few (6) are found in Mexico and Central America and two in the West Indies

  8. Revision of Pachycentria (Melastomataceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clausing, Gudrun

    2000-01-01

    A revision of Pachycentria Blume, which includes the monotypic Pogonanthera Blume, is presented. Pachycentria comprises eight species and one subspecies. Two species, P. vogelkopensis and P. hanseniana, are newly described. The genus is distinguished from other genera in the Medinillinae by a small

  9. Revision of the Sarcospermataceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, H.J.; Varossieau, W.W.

    1938-01-01

    The genus Sarcosperma was excluded from the Sapotaceae by the first-named writer in 1925, the group being considered as of family rank. In 1926 the same author published a concise and fragmentary revision of the monotypic order, in which two new Malaysian species were described. The continental spec

  10. 印染厂节能减排实用工艺装备技术(十七)——染整工艺张力控制%Processes and equipments for energy saving and emission reduction in dyeing plants(XⅦ)——Tension control in dyeing and finishing process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈立秋

    2012-01-01

    In open-width fabric processing, additional tension generated from multi-guider unit will result in fabric drafting and shrinkage increasing. Proper compensation of resistance moment of the guiders and shortening the process are suggested. Jig dyeing with lower constant tension control can increase the batch diameter and reduce the running time. Winding in lower tension can eliminate the seaming crease during cold pad-batch dyeing of knitted fabric in open-width. The tension formed during wet processing will affect the length measurement accuracy of the finished cloth package. Using suitable measuring device can improve the measuring accuracy,%织物平幅加工中,多导布辊单元装置产生的附加张力牵伸织物,致使缩水率增大.在正确补偿导布辊阻力矩的前提下,可通过缩短工艺流程设备解决.卷染时采用低恒张力控制,可使卷径扩大,减少缸次.针织物平幅连续染整加工是节能减排和改善针织品品质的重大技术改进,其“瓶颈”是平幅冷轧堆染色,而低恒张力收卷则是防患“缝头”痕的重要措施.此外,染整加工产生的张力会影响成品布卷装交货的测长精度,采用其有张紧带的恒张力测长装置,可提高测长精度.

  11. 40 CFR 63.1347 - Standards for raw and finish mills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Standards for raw and finish mills. 63... and Operating Limits § 63.1347 Standards for raw and finish mills. The owner or operator of each new or existing raw mill or finish mill at a facility which is a major source subject to the provisions...

  12. Effects of surface finish and mechanical training on Ni-Ti sheets for elastocaloric cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrecht, Kurt; Tusek, Jaka; Sanna, Simone

    2016-01-01

    and acceptable durability. We study the effects of surface finish and training techniques on dog bone shaped polycrystalline samples of NiTi. The fatigue life of several samples with four different surface finishes was measured and it was shown that a smooth surface, especially at the edges, greatly improved...... of the material was weakly influenced by the surface finish....

  13. 40 CFR 63.5390 - How do I measure the HAP content of a finish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... finish? 63.5390 Section 63.5390 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Leather Finishing Operations Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5390 How do I measure the HAP content of a finish? (a) To determine...

  14. Protecting wood decks from biodegradation and weathering : evaluation of deck finish systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. J. Morrell; P. F. Schneider; R. Sam Williams

    2001-01-01

    Mildew resistance, water repellency, and overall finish appearance were evaluated for 32 deck finishes on western redcedar (Thuja plicata D. Donn.) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) after 12, 21, and 39 months of outdoor exposure in western Oregon. The finishes were either solvent-borne or waterborne; were ei- ther clear, tinted, or lightly...

  15. 46 CFR 116.422 - Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Fire Protection § 116.422 Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish... Commandant. (b) Bulkheads, linings and ceilings may be covered by a combustible interior finish provided that...

  16. Finish machining of hardened gears wheels using cubic boron nitride (CBN inserts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Talar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some results of investigation of finish machining of hardened bearing surfaces of cylindrical gear wheels. Finish machining has been performed with wedges of defined geometry made of CBN. The presented investigation results are related mainly to the wear processes of the cutting wedges. Additional results of quality examination of finish machined gear wheels have been presented, too.

  17. 77 FR 60897 - Safety Zone: America's Cup World Series Finish-Line, San Francisco, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone: America's Cup World Series Finish-Line, San... race finishes that will occur in vicinity of San Francisco West Yacht Harbor Light 2. Unauthorized... to finish the races in the subject location on September 18, 2012, and the event would occur before...

  18. 40 CFR 63.5395 - How do I measure the density of a finish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... finish? 63.5395 Section 63.5395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Leather Finishing Operations Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5395 How do I measure the density of a finish? (a) To determine the...

  19. Wrinkle Resistant Finishing of Cotton Fabrics with the Complex System of PBTCA/CA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋海涛; 隋淑英; 朱平; 董朝红; 张林

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,the wrinkle resistant finishing of cotton fabric with the complex system of PBTCA and CA was mainly discussed.The influence of finishing conditions such as the amount of finishing agent and catalyst,curing temperature and curing time were st

  20. 40 CFR 427.80 - Applicability; description of the coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory. 427.80 Section 427.80 Protection of Environment... SOURCE CATEGORY Coating or Finishing of Asbestos Textiles Subcategory § 427.80 Applicability; description of the coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  1. Surface profiling in mating parts by combined nonabrasive finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolentsev, EV; Fedonin, ON; Smolentsev, VP

    2017-02-01

    Nonabrasive finishing of precision mating surfaces in locking devices with the use of a combined erosion-chemical process at the first stage of the processing and with the use of anodic dissolution by alternating low-voltage current at the final stage of a refinement operation till gapless joints obtaining is considered. It is shown that the application of electro-erosion, electrochemical and combined nonabrasive finishing in mating parts opens up a possibility to ensure stable impermeability in locking devices on a macro- and micro-level through the method of a substantiated purpose of technological modes. A procedure is created for the development of such modes, and on their basis technological processes for the obtaining of gapless mating surfaces meeting the performance requirements for locking devices are developed. For this purpose, qualitative devices resistant to hostile environment are manufactured that is urgent for the mechanical engineering including repetition work for the equipment of petrochemical industry, transport and household machinery.

  2. Dietary starch types affect liver nutrient metabolism of finishing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chen; Li, Yanjiao; Li, Jiaolong; Zhang, Lin; Zhou, Guanghong; Gao, Feng

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different starch types on liver nutrient metabolism of finishing pigs. In all ninety barrows were randomly allocated to three diets with five replicates of six pigs, containing purified waxy maize starch (WMS), non-waxy maize starch (NMS) and pea starch (PS) (the amylose to amylopectin ratios were 0·07, 0·19 and 0·28, respectively). After 28 d of treatments, two per pen (close to the average body weight of the pen) were weighed individually, slaughtered and liver samples were collected. Compared with the WMS diet, the PS diet decreased the activities of glycogen phosphorylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and the expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 in liver (P0·05). Compared with the WMS diet, the PS diet reduced the expressions of glutamate dehydrogenase and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 in liver (Pliver compared with the WMS diet (Pliver of finishing pigs.

  3. The finished DNA sequence of human chromosome 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Steven E; Muzny, Donna M; Buhay, Christian J; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Ding, Yan; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Gill, Rachel; Gunaratne, Preethi; Harris, R Alan; Hawes, Alicia C; Hernandez, Judith; Hodgson, Anne V; Hume, Jennifer; Jackson, Andrew; Khan, Ziad Mohid; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Lewis, Lora R; Lozado, Ryan J; Metzker, Michael L; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Miner, George R; Montgomery, Kate T; Morgan, Margaret B; Nazareth, Lynne V; Scott, Graham; Sodergren, Erica; Song, Xing-Zhi; Steffen, David; Lovering, Ruth C; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Yuan, Yi; Zhang, Zhengdong; Adams, Charles Q; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Ayele, Mulu; Brown, Mary J; Chen, Guan; Chen, Zhijian; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Davis, Clay; Delgado, Oliver; Dinh, Huyen H; Draper, Heather; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Havlak, Paul; Jackson, Laronda R; Jacob, Leni S; Kelly, Susan H; Li, Li; Li, Zhangwan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wen; Lu, Jing; Maheshwari, Manjula; Nguyen, Bao-Viet; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O; Pasternak, Shiran; Perez, Lesette M; Plopper, Farah J H; Santibanez, Jireh; Shen, Hua; Tabor, Paul E; Verduzco, Daniel; Waldron, Lenee; Wang, Qiaoyan; Williams, Gabrielle A; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Allen, Carlana C; Amin, Anita G; Anyalebechi, Vivian; Bailey, Michael; Barbaria, Joseph A; Bimage, Kesha E; Bryant, Nathaniel P; Burch, Paula E; Burkett, Carrie E; Burrell, Kevin L; Calderon, Eliana; Cardenas, Veronica; Carter, Kelvin; Casias, Kristal; Cavazos, Iracema; Cavazos, Sandra R; Ceasar, Heather; Chacko, Joseph; Chan, Sheryl N; Chavez, Dean; Christopoulos, Constantine; Chu, Joseph; Cockrell, Raynard; Cox, Caroline D; Dang, Michelle; Dathorne, Stephanie R; David, Robert; Davis, Candi Mon'Et; Davy-Carroll, Latarsha; Deshazo, Denise R; Donlin, Jeremy E; D'Souza, Lisa; Eaves, Kristy A; Egan, Amy; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra J; Escotto, Michael; Flagg, Nicole; Forbes, Lisa D; Gabisi, Abdul M; Garza, Melissa; Hamilton, Cerissa; Henderson, Nicholas; Hernandez, Omar; Hines, Sandra; Hogues, Marilyn E; Huang, Mei; Idlebird, DeVincent G; Johnson, Rudy; Jolivet, Angela; Jones, Sally; Kagan, Ryan; King, Laquisha M; Leal, Belita; Lebow, Heather; Lee, Sandra; LeVan, Jaclyn M; Lewis, Lakeshia C; London, Pamela; Lorensuhewa, Lorna M; Loulseged, Hermela; Lovett, Demetria A; Lucier, Alice; Lucier, Raymond L; Ma, Jie; Madu, Renita C; Mapua, Patricia; Martindale, Ashley D; Martinez, Evangelina; Massey, Elizabeth; Mawhiney, Samantha; Meador, Michael G; Mendez, Sylvia; Mercado, Christian; Mercado, Iracema C; Merritt, Christina E; Miner, Zachary L; Minja, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Teresa; Mohabbat, Farida; Mohabbat, Khatera; Montgomery, Baize; Moore, Niki; Morris, Sidney; Munidasa, Mala; Ngo, Robin N; Nguyen, Ngoc B; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi O; Nwokenkwo, Stanley; Obregon, Melissa; Oguh, Maryann; Oragunye, Njideka; Oviedo, Rodolfo J; Parish, Bridgette J; Parker, David N; Parrish, Julia; Parks, Kenya L; Paul, Heidie A; Payton, Brett A; Perez, Agapito; Perrin, William; Pickens, Adam; Primus, Eltrick L; Pu, Ling-Ling; Puazo, Maria; Quiles, Miyo M; Quiroz, Juana B; Rabata, Dina; Reeves, Kacy; Ruiz, San Juana; Shao, Hongmei; Sisson, Ida; Sonaike, Titilola; Sorelle, Richard P; Sutton, Angelica E; Svatek, Amanda F; Svetz, Leah Anne; Tamerisa, Kavitha S; Taylor, Tineace R; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Nicole; Thorn, Rachel D; Trejos, Zulma Y; Trevino, Brenda K; Ukegbu, Ogechi N; Urban, Jeremy B; Vasquez, Lydia I; Vera, Virginia A; Villasana, Donna M; Wang, Ling; Ward-Moore, Stephanie; Warren, James T; Wei, Xuehong; White, Flower; Williamson, Angela L; Wleczyk, Regina; Wooden, Hailey S; Wooden, Steven H; Yen, Jennifer; Yoon, Lillienne; Yoon, Vivienne; Zorrilla, Sara E; Nelson, David; Kucherlapati, Raju; Weinstock, George; Gibbs, Richard A

    2006-03-16

    Human chromosome 12 contains more than 1,400 coding genes and 487 loci that have been directly implicated in human disease. The q arm of chromosome 12 contains one of the largest blocks of linkage disequilibrium found in the human genome. Here we present the finished sequence of human chromosome 12, which has been finished to high quality and spans approximately 132 megabases, representing approximately 4.5% of the human genome. Alignment of the human chromosome 12 sequence across vertebrates reveals the origin of individual segments in chicken, and a unique history of rearrangement through rodent and primate lineages. The rate of base substitutions in recent evolutionary history shows an overall slowing in hominids compared with primates and rodents.

  4. Surface roughness of composite resins after finishing and polishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagem Filho Halim

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of surface finishing methods on the average surface roughness of resin composites. Seven composites and two polishing systems were used. One hundred and twenty-six conical specimens of each material were prepared in stainless steel molds against a polyester strip. Forty-two of them remained intact and were used as controls. Each half of the remaining samples was polished with either diamond burs or diamond burs + aluminum oxide discs. The results showed no statistical difference in average surface roughness (Ra, mm between the polyester strip and aluminum oxide discs (p>0.05. However, finishing with diamond burs showed a statistically higher average roughness for all composites (p<0.05. Statistical differences were detected among materials (p<0.05 in the use of diamond burs.

  5. Method and system for processing optical elements using magnetorheological finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menapace, Joseph Arthur; Schaffers, Kathleen Irene; Bayramian, Andrew James; Molander, William A

    2012-09-18

    A method of finishing an optical element includes mounting the optical element in an optical mount having a plurality of fiducials overlapping with the optical element and obtaining a first metrology map for the optical element and the plurality of fiducials. The method also includes obtaining a second metrology map for the optical element without the plurality of fiducials, forming a difference map between the first metrology map and the second metrology map, and aligning the first metrology map and the second metrology map. The method further includes placing mathematical fiducials onto the second metrology map using the difference map to form a third metrology map and associating the third metrology map to the optical element. Moreover, the method includes mounting the optical element in the fixture in an MRF tool, positioning the optical element in the fixture; removing the plurality of fiducials, and finishing the optical element.

  6. RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY IN FINISH TURNING INCONEL 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aruna,

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Machining of hard materials used in aerospace applications require hard and tough cutting tools. Ceramic tools and cermets are used in machining of nickel alloys for such applications. In this study finish turning of Inconel 718 is carried out with cermet tools. Cutting parameters are designed using Taguchi’s DOE and the experiments are conducted for the designed parameters. The surface finish measurement is carried for the various conditions and data obtained are used to build up the mathematical surface model using response surface methodology. The adequacy of the developed mathematical model is proved by ANOVA. The findings of this study show new results and the second order model was quite adequate.

  7. Monitoring and control of fine abrasive finishing processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarev, Ruslan

    In engineering, surfaces with specified functional properties are of high demand in various applications. Desired surface finish can be obtained using several methods. Abrasive finishing is one of the most important processes in the manufacturing of mould and dies tools. It is a principal method...... of this work was to investigate foundations for process monitoring and control methods in application to semi-automated polishing machine based on the industrial robot. The monitoring system was built on NI data acquisition system with two sensors, acoustic emission sensor and accelerometer. Acquired sensory...... signals were analysed in time-frequency domain and specific process features are extracted in relation to machining parameters and processed surface properties. Development and research of the process monitoring was done with background in evaluation of surface roughness parameters. The characterization...

  8. Farmer and Public Attitudes Toward Lamb Finishing Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Grahame; Jongman, Ellen; Greenfield, L; Hemsworth, Paul

    2016-01-01

    To develop research and policy on the welfare of lambs in intensive finishing systems, it is important to understand public and sheep farmers' attitudes. The aim of this research was to identify and compare farmer and community attitudes relevant to the intensification of lamb finishing. The majority of respondents in the community sample expressed concern about all listed welfare issues, but particularly about feedlotting of lambs and the associated confinement. These attitudes correlated with community views on the importance of welfare issues including social contact and freedom to roam. Farmers expressed much lower levels of concern than did the general public except with regard to the health of lambs, disease control, access to shade, and lack of access to clean water.

  9. Surface finishing of resin-modified glass ionomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liporoni, Priscila; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre; Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Dos Santos Dias, Carlos Tadeu; Paradella, Thais Cachute

    2003-01-01

    This study utilized spectrophotometry to evaluate in vitro superficial dye deposition on resin-modified glass ionomer, following different surface finishing and polishing treatments. Materials that were photocured adjacent to the mylar strip produced the surfaces with the lowest mean after superficial staining. A restorative technique without excesses resulted in a smoother surface and prolonged the life of the restoration. The resin-modified glass ionomers tested offer adequate clinical performance.

  10. Marginal Fit of CEREC Crowns at Different Finish Line Curvatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    that can mimic the optical prope11ies of enamel and dentin, with a high flexural strength of 150MPa. These materials are machinable and contain...heat-polymerized resin composite inlays, he had the new idea of tooth colored inlays inserted adhesively with resin-based composite as a luting...human enamel . Journal of American Dental Association, 127 (1), 74-80. Tao, J., & Han, D. (2009). The effect of finish line curvature on marginal fit

  11. The importance of surface finish to energy performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Geoff B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Power generation in solar energy systems, thermal control in buildings and mitigation of the Urban Heat Island problem, are all sensitive to directional response to incoming radiation. The radiation absorption and emission profile also plays a crucial role in each system's response and depends strongly on surface finish. This important sensitivity needs wider recognition in materials data sheets, system modeling, plus in materials and environmental engineering. The impact of surface roughness on thermal response of natural and man-made external environments is examined. Important examples will be given of the role of surface finish within each class. Total emittance links to the way surface finish influences directional emittance E(θ. Smooth surface thermal emittance on PV module covers, many solar absorbers, some roof paints, polished concrete, and glass windows can be up to 15% different from insulator results based on fully diffuse models of the same material. Widespread evidence indicates smooth metals and low-E solar absorber surfaces cool faster, and smooth insulators slower than previously thought. Matt paint is cooler than low sheen paint under the same solar heating impacts and normal concrete cooler than polished. Emittance for water is the prime environmental example of oblique impacts as it reflects strongly at oblique incidence, which leads to a significant drop in E(θ. Ripples or waves however raise water's average emittance. A surprise in this work was the high sensitivity of total E and its angular components to roughness in the depth range of 0.1–0.8 μm, which are well under ambient thermal IR wavelengths of 3–30 μm but common in metal finishing. Parallel energy flows such as evaporation and convective cooling vary if emittance varies. Thermal image analysis can provide insights into angular radiative effects.

  12. Hybrid machining processes perspectives on machining and finishing

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Kapil; Laubscher, R F

    2016-01-01

    This book describes various hybrid machining and finishing processes. It gives a critical review of the past work based on them as well as the current trends and research directions. For each hybrid machining process presented, the authors list the method of material removal, machining system, process variables and applications. This book provides a deep understanding of the need, application and mechanism of hybrid machining processes.

  13. Manipulating mechanics and chemistry in precision optics finishing

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2007-01-01

    Deterministic processing is critical to modern precision optics finishing. Put simply, determinism is the ability to predict an outcome before carrying out an activity. With the availability of computer numerically controlled (CNC) equipment and sophisticated software algorithms, it is now possible to grind and polish optics from a variety of materials to surface shape accuracies of ~20 nm peak-to-valley (p–v), with surface roughness values (measured on white light interferometers over 250 μm...

  14. Ageing of Dry Cement Mixes for Finishing Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronius VEKTARIS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry building mixes, stored in the air, absorb water vapor and CO2 gas and ageing because properties of binding materials, mostly Portland cement, deteriorate after its prehydration and carbonation. In this paper the ageing singularities of dry cement mixes for finishing purposes and additives for retarding this process has been determinated. Ordinary and quickly hardening Portland cements absorb H2O and CO2 more than white cement – about 70 % – 75 % and 30 % – 38 % per month of innitial mass, respectively. White cement is more resistant to prehydration and carbonation, because it contains less C3A, C4AF and alkali, characterized initial activity. Dry mixes with white cement, although slower, but still worse after stored. Influence of routine dry mortar mixes ingredients and additives (methyl cellulose, pigments, sand and lime on prehydration properties of the mixes for finishing purpose is not substantial. Significant positive influence comes from the addition of fatty acid salts (zinc stearate or sodium oleate. The dry cement mixes for finishing purpose has been recomended to hydrophobisate with one of these additives, adding about 1 % by weight of cement during preducing mixes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.3.5243

  15. Ageing of Dry Cement Mixes for Finishing Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronius VEKTARIS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry building mixes, stored in the air, absorb water vapor and CO2 gas and ageing because properties of binding materials, mostly Portland cement, deteriorate after its prehydration and carbonation. In this paper the ageing singularities of dry cement mixes for finishing purposes and additives for retarding this process has been determinated. Ordinary and quickly hardening Portland cements absorb H2O and CO2 more than white cement – about 70 % – 75 % and 30 % – 38 % per month of innitial mass, respectively. White cement is more resistant to prehydration and carbonation, because it contains less C3A, C4AF and alkali, characterized initial activity. Dry mixes with white cement, although slower, but still worse after stored. Influence of routine dry mortar mixes ingredients and additives (methyl cellulose, pigments, sand and lime on prehydration properties of the mixes for finishing purpose is not substantial. Significant positive influence comes from the addition of fatty acid salts (zinc stearate or sodium oleate. The dry cement mixes for finishing purpose has been recomended to hydrophobisate with one of these additives, adding about 1 % by weight of cement during preducing mixes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.3.5243

  16. Ageing of Dry Cement Mixes for Finishing Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronius VEKTARIS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry building mixes, stored in the air, absorb water vapor and CO2 gas and ageing because properties of binding materials, mostly Portland cement, deteriorate after its prehydration and carbonation. In this paper the ageing singularities of dry cement mixes for finishing purposes and additives for retarding this process has been determinated. Ordinary and quickly hardening Portland cements absorb H2O and CO2 more than white cement – about 70 % – 75 % and 30 % – 38 % per month of innitial mass, respectively. White cement is more resistant to prehydration and carbonation, because it contains less C3A, C4AF and alkali, characterized initial activity. Dry mixes with white cement, although slower, but still worse after stored. Influence of routine dry mortar mixes ingredients and additives (methyl cellulose, pigments, sand and lime on prehydration properties of the mixes for finishing purpose is not substantial. Significant positive influence comes from the addition of fatty acid salts (zinc stearate or sodium oleate. The dry cement mixes for finishing purpose has been recomended to hydrophobisate with one of these additives, adding about 1 % by weight of cement during preducing mixes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.3.5243

  17. 76 FR 3077 - Notice of Decision To Revise a Heat Treatment Schedule for Emerald Ash Borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... Emerald Ash Borer AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: We are advising the public of our decision to revise a heat treatment schedule for the emerald ash borer... revised treatment schedule will be sufficient to treat emerald ash borer. DATES: Effective Date:...

  18. 77 FR 74688 - Final Recovery Plan, First Revision; Mexican Spotted Owl

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Final Recovery Plan, First Revision; Mexican Spotted Owl AGENCY: Fish and... Service, announce the availability of our final recovery plan, first revision, for the Mexican Spotted Owl... and threatened wildlife and plants. ADDRESSES: If you wish to view the recovery plan, you may obtain...

  19. Effects of Fiber Finish on the Performance of Asphalt Binders and Mastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. Putman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effects of finishes applied to polyester fibers on the properties of asphalt binders and mastics. Asphalt binders were mixed with finishes that were extracted from the fibers, and mastics were also made with binder and fibers (with and without finish to isolate the effects of the finish. The results indicated that crude source plays a significant role in how the fiber finish affects the binders and mastics. Additionally different finishes had different effects on binder properties. The major finding of this study is that different polyester fibers, even from the same manufacturer, may not necessarily perform the same in an asphalt mixture. It is important to use fibers that are compatible with the particular asphalt binder that is being used because of the significance of the binder source on the interaction between the finish and the binder.

  20. The Formation of the Surface during AN Abrasive Finishing at Constant and Variable Clamping Forces: Finishing at Constant and Variable Clamping Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratov, Karim Ravilevich; Muratov, Ravil Arifovich; Ablyaz, Timur Rizovich; Gashev, Evgeniy Anatolyevich

    2017-06-01

    In this work the flat abrasive finishing process is reported. The mechanical and chemical phenomena taking place during the finishing process are described. The most common forming process schemes observed during abrasive treatment are reviewed. The schemes of pulsed, geometrical and energetic models are discussed. On the basis of the energetic hypothesis and Preston hypothesis, the rational law of clamping force variation during the finishing is established. This law allowed for the stabilization of the contact pressure and an increase of the treatment efficiency. An exponential dependence of a boundary contact area variation during the finishing of planes with different initial profiles of the macro-topography is developed. An experimental confirmation of the Preston hypothesis during the abrasive finishing is carried out with the plane-finishing machine “Rastr 220”. The comparison experiments are carried out at constant and variable clamping forces of the treated surface towards the tool. It is found that by varying the forces according to the exponential law (i.e. similar to the changing of the boundary contact area during the abrasive finishing) the process efficiency is increasing by a factor of 2.5-3. It is shown that the changes of the root mean square deviation σ of the roughness Ra of a treated surface in the beginning of the process (at time t=1 min) during the finishing at a constant clamping force is two times higher compared to the treatment at a variable clamping force in the same time period.

  1. Nomenclature and the National Wetland Plant List

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    The National Wetland Plant List (NWPL) is being revised by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S...Wetland Plant List The National Wetland Plant List (NWPL) is being revised by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service... phylogenies predicated on molecular sequence analyses in combination with morphological char- acteristics and other biological and habitat features. ERDC

  2. Polymer micromolds with near optical quality surface finishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Pun-Pang; Knopf, George K.; Nikumb, Suwas

    2012-03-01

    Disposable microfluidic systems are used to avoid sample contamination in a variety of medical and environmental monitoring applications. A contactless hot intrusion (HI) process for fabricating reusable polymer micromolds with near "optical quality" surface finishes is described in this paper. A metallic hot intrusion mask with the desired microchannels and related passive components is first machined using a tightly focused beam from a diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) laser. The polymer mold master is then created by pressing the 2D metallic mask onto a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrate. Since it is a contactless fabrication process the resultant 3D micro-reliefs have near optical quality surface finishes. Unfortunately, the desired micro-relief dimensions (height and width) are not easily related to the hot intrusion process parameters of pressure, temperature, and time exposure profile. A finite element model is introduced to assist the manufacturing engineer in predicting the behavior of the PMMA substrate material as it deforms under heat and pressure during micromold manufacture. The FEM model assumes that thermo-plastics like PMMA become "rubber like" when heated to a temperature slightly above the glass transition temperature. By controlling the material temperature and maintaining its malleable state, it is possible to use the stress-strain relationship to predict the profile dimensions of the imprinted microfeature. Examples of curved microchannels fabricated using PMMA mold masters are presented to illustrate the proposed methodology and verify the finite element model. In addition, the non-contact formation of the micro-reliefs simplifies the demolding process and helps to preserve the high quality surface finishes.

  3. Phenotypic and Genotypic Diversity of Salmonella in Finishing Swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Alda F A; Funk, Julie A; Habing, Greg G; Bolin, Carole

    2016-04-01

    Salmonella enterica (nontyphoidal) is one of the major causes of foodborne diseases in the United States and worldwide. Molecular typing methods are significant tools used to better understand the transmission and ecology of Salmonella in order to implement pre-harvest control measures. The objectives of this study were to describe the Salmonella genotypes, the distribution of isolate subtypes from different ecological niches (i.e., barn environment, nursery, and individual pigs) and their evolution over time in a longitudinal study conducted in three finishing sites (housing pigs from 10 weeks of age until slaughter at 24-26 weeks of age). Among the 107 Salmonella isolates submitted for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, there were 25 distinct subtypes. PFGE genotyping results were consistent with the serotype findings. A large number of distinguishable PFGE patterns (i.e., within the same serovar) were observed and different combinations of subtypes were identified within and across sites and cohorts. New subtypes may result of the introduction of new strains, genetic changes, or ongoing transmission of evolved strains within the production system. The same subtypes were detected intermittently during the study period, which suggests the persistence of indistinguishable subtypes in this production system. In addition, this study suggests persistence of the same subtype over several cohorts of pigs and potential residual contamination from the barn. Factors affecting adaptation and transmission of Salmonella within and among ecological systems (e.g., finishing pigs, nursery, and environment) should be further investigated. Understanding genotypic diversity of Salmonella in different ecological niches during pre-harvest may contribute to the development of more targeted and cost effective control programs during nursery and finishing phases.

  4. High precision optical finishing of lightweight silicon carbide aspheric mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, John; Young, Kevin

    2010-10-01

    Critical to the deployment of large surveillance optics into the space environment is the generation of high quality optics. Traditionally, aluminum, glass and beryllium have been used; however, silicon carbide becomes of increasing interest and availability due to its high strength. With the hardness of silicon carbide being similar to diamond, traditional polishing methods suffer from slow material removal rates, difficulty in achieving the desired figure and inherent risk of causing catastrophic damage to the lightweight structure. Rather than increasing structural capacity and mass of the substrate, our proprietary sub-aperture aspheric surface forming technology offers higher material removal rates (comparable to that of Zerodur or Fused Silica), a deterministic approach to achieving the desired figure while minimizing contact area and the resulting load on the optical structure. The technology performed on computer-controlled machines with motion control software providing precise and quick convergence of surface figure, as demonstrated by optically finishing lightweight silicon carbide aspheres. At the same time, it also offers the advantage of ideal pitch finish of low surface micro-roughness and low mid-spatial frequency error. This method provides a solution applicable to all common silicon carbide substrate materials, including substrates with CVD silicon carbide cladding, offered by major silicon carbide material suppliers. This paper discusses a demonstration mirror we polished using this novel technology. The mirror is a lightweight silicon carbide substrate with CVD silicon carbide cladding. It is a convex hyperbolic secondary mirror with 104mm diameter and approximately 20 microns aspheric departure from best-fit sphere. The mirror has been finished with surface irregularity of better than 1/50 wave RMS @632.8 nm and surface micro-roughness of under 2 angstroms RMS. The technology has the potential to be scaled up for manufacturing capabilities of

  5. Revision Total Elbow Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Miguel A; Cheung, Emilie V; Murthi, Anand M

    2017-08-01

    Despite recent technologic advances, total elbow arthroplasty has complication rates higher than that of total joint arthroplasty in other joints. With new antirheumatic treatments, the population receiving total elbow arthroplasty has shifted from patients with rheumatoid arthritis to those with posttraumatic arthritis, further compounding the high complication rate. The most common reasons for revision include infection, aseptic loosening, fracture, and component failure. Common mechanisms of total elbow arthroplasty failure include infection, aseptic loosening, fracture, component failure, and instability. Tension band fixation, allograft struts with cerclage wire, and/or plate and screw constructs can be used for fracture stabilization.

  6. MARKOWITZ STRATEGIES REVISED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Jia-an; Zhou Xunyu

    2009-01-01

    Continuous-time Markowitz's mean-variance efficient strategies are modified by parameterizing a critical quantity. It is shown that these parameterized Markowitz strategies could reach the original mean target with arbitrarily high probabilities. This, in turn, motivates the introduction of certain stopped strategies where stock holdings are liquidated whenever the parameterized Markowitz strategies reach the present value of the mean target. The risk aspect of the revised Markowitz strategies are examined via expected discounted loss from the initial budget. A new portfolio selection model is suggested based on the results of the paper.

  7. Recovery of Salmonella enterica from seropositive finishing pig herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Danilo Lo Fo; Dahl, J.; van der Wolf, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    , apparent 'false-positive' serological results may well represent real infections not detected by bacteriological testing. For screening purposes, serological testing provides an indication of exposure to Salmonella, which forms the basis for targeted sampling, intervention and logistic slaughter procedures....... by the blood-sampling of 50 finishing pigs. Bacteriological sampling was performed by 20 pen faecal samples per herd. Over-all, 47% of the blood samples had an OD% larger than 10 and 23% larger than 40. Salmonella was isolated from 135 (9.3%) pen faecal samples in 32 herds (42%). Twenty-eight of these herds...

  8. Determination of heavy metal toxicity of finished leather solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Ahmet

    2009-05-01

    This paper investigates the toxicity in leather products of heavy metals known to be detrimental to the ecosystem. Heavy metal concentrations in leather samples were identified with ICP-OES, and toxicity was determined using a MetPLATE bioassay. Chromium and aluminium were found to constitute 98% of the total concentration of heavy metals in finished leather tanned with chromium and aluminium salts, while in some vegetable-tanned leather, zirconium was the only heavy metal identified. The average inhibition values for chromium, aluminium and vegetable tanned leather were 98.08%, 97.04% and 62.36%, respectively.

  9. THE MOISTURE METER OF THE DOUGH SEMI-FINISHED PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Kvasnikov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. In the article a new method and device of measuring of humidity of semi-finished products isoffered from a test which is based on measuring of free falling time of purveyance from a dough in an airenvironment under the action of gravity. The basic factors of external environment, influencing on humidityof purveyances of tests - pressure and temperature, are marked. By a mathematical design the analysis ofinfluencing of atmospheric pressure and temperature is conducted on humidity of purveyances from thedough.Keywords: humidity meters, oscillation transformer, products from a dough, simulation.

  10. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 3, Chapter C, Appendix C3 (conclusion)--Chapter C, Appendix C9: Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roggenthen, D. K.; McFeeters, T. L.; Nieweg, R. G.; Blakeslee, J. J.

    1993-03-01

    This volume contains appendices for the following: results of extraction procedure (EP) toxicity data analyses; summary of headspace gas analysis in Rocky Flats Plant sampling program-FY 1988; waste drum gas generation sampling program at Rocky Flats Plant during FY 1988; TRU waste sampling program waste characterization; summary of headspace gas analyses in TRU waste sampling program; summary of volatile organic compounds analyses in TRU waste sampling program; totals analysis versus toxicity characteristic leaching procedure; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste characterization sampling and analysis methods; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste characterization analytical methods; data reduction, validation and reporting; examples of waste screening checklists; and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant generator/storage site waste screening and acceptance audit program.

  11. Specification And Control Of Surface Finish: Empiricism Versus Dogmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, K. J.; Obray, C.; Jungles, J.

    1985-06-01

    This paper reviews the development of the analysis of surface finish from the early attempts in the 1930s to the present day. The development of parameters used in surface analysis is shown in context with the instrumental techniques available at the time, and it is argued that characterization based on graphical and experimental convenience has influenced industrial practice. As the requirements of manufacture and functional performance have been stretched by advancing technology, many industrialists have been forced to accept the fact that existing specification practices are limited and have sought alternative descriptions based on well-established techniques; but these techniques themselves are limited, their suitability to in-process measurement being practically nonexistent. It is shown that attempts have been made recently to develop optical methods of assessing surface finish using traditional parameters such as Ra. This paper suggests that it may be time to look toward a new form of specification that is more suited to assessment by optical transducers, and some methods of assessment are proposed. To support this view, a simple low-cost device is discussed that can be calibrated to give Ra but that also presents information in a more relevant empirical way that may be more valid than the existing parameter specification.

  12. Application of Acid Dyestuffs with Different Molecule Structure in Combined Dyeing and Finishing of Cotton Fabric

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yong-chun

    2005-01-01

    Simultaneous dyeing and durable press finishing of cotton fabrics with acid dyes bearing the different molecule structure and durable press finishing agent (DP agent abbr. ) based on modified DMDHEU were investigated by using the pad-dry-cure process. Some factors affecting the process, such as structure of acid dyes, DP agent, catalysts and curing temperature were discussed. The dyed and finished fabrics were evaluated with respect to color strength, fixation, crease recovery angle, breaking strength and fastness properties. The results indicate that structure of acid dyes has a striking effect on the color strength of dyed and finished cotton fabric. The color strength and dry crease recovery angle of dyed and finished cotton fabric increases, whereas breaking strength decreases with increasing concentration of DP agent. It is necessary for ammonium nitrate to serve as catalyst. It is found that relatively satisfactory properties of dyed and finished cotton fabric can be obtained with appropriate adjustment of treating conditions.

  13. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 11, Chapter D, Appendix D4--Chapter D, Appendix D17: Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This volume contains appendices D4 through D17 which cover the following: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report; ecological monitoring program at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; site characterization; regional and site geology and hydrology; general geology; dissolution features; ground water hydrology; typical carbon sorption bed efficiency; VOC monitoring plan for bin-room tests; chemical compatibility analysis of waste forms and container materials; probable maximum precipitation; WHIP supplementary roof support system room 1, panel 1; and corrosion risk assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant ``humid`` test bins.

  14. Engineering drawing field verification program. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulk, P.F.

    1994-10-12

    Safe, efficient operation of waste tank farm facilities is dependent in part upon the availability of accurate, up-to-date plant drawings. Accurate plant drawings are also required in support of facility upgrades and future engineering remediation projects. This supporting document establishes the procedure for performing a visual field verification of engineering drawings, the degree of visual observation being performed and documenting the results. A copy of the drawing attesting to the degree of visual observation will be paginated into the released Engineering Change Notice (ECN) documenting the field verification for future retrieval and reference. All waste tank farm essential and support drawings within the scope of this program will be converted from manual to computer aided drafting (CAD) drawings. A permanent reference to the field verification status will be placed along the right border of the CAD-converted drawing, referencing the revision level, at which the visual verification was performed and documented.

  15. Local public document room directory. Revision 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This directory (NUREG/BR-0088, Revision 7) lists local public document rooms (LPDRs) for commercial nuclear power plants with operating or possession-only licenses or under construction, plus the LPDRs for potential high-level radioactive waste repository sites, gaseous diffusion plants, certain fuel cycle facilities, certain low-level waste disposal facilities, and any temporary LPDRs established for the duration of licensing proceedings. In some instances, the LPDR libraries maintain document collections for more than one licensed facility. The library staff members listed are the persons most familiar with the LPDR collections. Reference librarians in the NRC Headquarters Public Document Room (PDR) are also available to assist the public in locating NRC documents.

  16. Revised Rules for Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Jensen, F. M.; Middleton, C.;

    This paper is based on research performed for the Highway Agency, London, UK under the project DPU/9/44 "Revision of Bridge Assessment Rules Based on Whole Life Performance: Concrete Bridges" It contains details of a methodology which can be used to generate Whole Life (WL) reliability profiles....... These WL reliability profiles may be used to establish revised rules for Concrete Bridges....

  17. Emotion Processes in Knowledge Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, Gregory J.; Kendeou, Panayiota; Butterfuss, Reese

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, a number of insights have been gained into the cognitive processes that explain how individuals overcome misconceptions and revise their previously acquired incorrect knowledge. The current study complements this line of research by investigating the moment-by-moment emotion processes that occur during knowledge revision using a…

  18. Interior Design: Revision as Focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smede, Shelly D.

    2000-01-01

    Describes how the author teaches her eighth-grade students to revise their writing, providing "working revision days" in class, offering direction and structure, and thereby helping students learn how much impact going back to a piece of writing and making sweeping changes can have on the end result. (SR)

  19. Investigation into the Application of Polymer Finishes on Textiles by Inkjet Printing

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Digital finishing of textiles involves the application of polymer finishes onto the textile substrates in controllable quantities and at prescribed locations that gives the substrate multiple functionalities and performance characteristics. In this study, piezoelectric Drop-on-Demand inkjet printing of shrink resist finishes onto textiles was investigated with a view to imparting dimensional stability and potentially could produce sculptured textural effects with subsequent laundering felting...

  20. Comparison of hole surface finishing processes with roller burnishing method applied in copper materials

    OpenAIRE

    Adnan AKKURT; Kurt, Abdullah; Ahmet ÖZDEMİR; ŞEKER, Ulvi

    2014-01-01

    Surface finishing processes such as drilling, turning, reaming, grinding, honing and roller burnishing etc. are widely used in manufacturing as hole surface finishing process. In addition to the characteristics of hole such as the surface roughness, the surface hardness and the wear resistance, the circularity and cylindricality of hole are also effective on the performance of hole. In this paper, it is presented that different hole surface finishing processes were applied to the samples made...

  1. Surgical scar revision: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Garg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Scar formation is an inevitable consequence of wound healing from either a traumatic or a surgical intervention. The aesthetic appearance of a scar is the most important criteria to judge the surgical outcome. An understanding of the anatomy and wound healing along with experience, meticulous planning and technique can reduce complications and improve the surgical outcome. Scar revision does not erase a scar but helps to make it less noticeable and more acceptable. Both surgical and non-surgical techniques, used either alone or in combination can be used for revising a scar. In planning a scar revision surgeon should decide on when to act and the type of technique to use for scar revision to get an aesthetically pleasing outcome. This review article provides overview of methods applied for facial scar revision. This predominantly covers surgical methods.

  2. Surface finish mechanics explain different clinical survivorship of cemented femoral stems for total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beksac, Burak; Taveras, Nicole A; Valle, Alejandro Gonzalez Della; Salvati, Eduardo A

    2006-01-01

    The ability of bone cement to adhere to the implant surface is dependent on the surface finish. Stems with a rough surface finish require greater force to disrupt their interface with the cement than do stems with a smooth or polished surface. However, if micromotion occurs at the cement-metal interface, the fretting of a smoother surface implant results in less cement and metallic abrasion than an implant with a rough surface finish. Today, surgeons implant femoral stems with a wide variety of surface finish and textures that are supported by the previously mentioned contrasting philosophy of fixation. This article presents the micro and macro surface finish mechanics, history, and rationale for changes in surface finish, the clinical and operative implications of changes in surface finish, the retrieval analysis, and the clinical evidence that examine the consequences of changes in surface finish in the outcome of cemented femoral stems for total hip arthroplasty. Current data and our own experience support the use of cemented femoral stems with a smooth or polished surface finish.

  3. Herd-level risk factors for antimicrobial demanding gastrointestinal diseases in Danish herds with finisher pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybschmann, G. K.; Ersbøll, A.K.; Vigre, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    quarter per herd. Three potential herd-level risk factors were evaluated: herd size (number of finishers delivered for slaughter); herd health status (herds in the Specific Pathogen Free (SPF) System, conventional herds); and herd type (herds including only finishers, integrated herds). Data were analyzed...... using general linear mixed models with repeated measurements. Smaller herds had a larger AMU per finisher than larger herds. Integrated herds had lower AMU as compared with herds with only finishers. Herds within the SPF System had a larger decrease in AMU with increasing herd size compared...

  4. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 2, Chapter C, Appendix C1--Chapter C, Appendix C3 (beginning), Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This volume contains appendices for the following: Rocky Flats Plant and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste process information; TRUPACT-II content codes (TRUCON); TRUPACT-II chemical list; chemical compatibility analysis for Rocky Flats Plant waste forms; chemical compatibility analysis for waste forms across all sites; TRU mixed waste characterization database; hazardous constituents of Rocky Flats Transuranic waste; summary of waste components in TRU waste sampling program at INEL; TRU waste sampling program; and waste analysis data.

  5. Crude oil and finished fuel storage stability: An annotated review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whisman, M.L.; Anderson, R.P.; Woodward, P.W.; Giles, H.N.

    1991-01-01

    A state-of-the-art review and assessment of storage effects on crude oil and product quality was undertaken through a literature search by computer accessing several data base sources. Pertinent citations from that literature search are tabulated for the years 1980 to the present. This 1990 revision supplements earlier reviews by Brinkman and others which covered stability publications through 1979 and an update in 1983 by Goetzinger and others that covered the period 1952--1982. For purposes of organization, citations are listed in the current revision chronologically starting with the earliest 1980 publications. The citations have also been divided according to primary subject matter. Consequently 11 sections appear including: alternate fuels, gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, residual fuel, crude oil, biodegradation, analyses, reaction mechanisms, containment, and handling and storage. Each section contains a brief narrative followed by all the citations for that category.

  6. A study on scar revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Talwar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scars are psychologically distressing for the patients and have an impact on the quality of life and self esteem of the patients. Scar revision is an aesthetic skill which is mastered by plastic surgeons and encroached now by dermatosurgeons. Scars on the face are aesthetically unacceptable and various techniques have been improvised for making a scar aesthetically acceptable. Various types of techniques are used for scar revision like W plasty, Z plasty and VY plasty. Aims: To see the efficacy of various scar revision techniques including Z plasty, VY plasty and W plasty in 30 patients with disfiguring scars. Methods: We selected twenty patients of disfiguring scars for the study. The scars from various causes including trauma and burns were included in our study. Various techniques of scar revision include Z plasty, W plasty and VY plasty were performed according to the type and site of scar. Results: Male: female was 1.5: 1. The scar revision surgery yielded excellent results with minimal complications including haematoma formation, secondary infection and delayed healing seen in 5% patients each. Regarding the efficacy of scar revision, excellent improvement was seen in 60% patients, moderate improvement was seen in 30% patients and mild improvement was seen in 10% patients. Conclusions: Dermatologists can employ a number of surgical scar revision techniques. While some are better suited to treat specific types of scars, they can be used in combination with each other or with adjunctive therapies to achieve optimal results.

  7. Influence of cervical finish line type on the marginal adaptation of zirconia ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comlekoglu, Muharrem; Dundar, Mine; Ozcan, Mutlu; Gungor, Mehmet; Gokce, Bulent; Artunc, Celal

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effect of different cervical finish line designs on the marginal adaptation of a zirconia ceramic. Four different marginal finish lines (c: chamfer, mc: mini-chamfer, fe: feather-edge and s: rounded shoulder) were prepared on phantom incisors. Die models for each preparation group (N = 28, n = 7 per finish line design group) were made of epoxy resin. Y-TZP (ICE Zirkon) frameworks were manufactured by a copy-milling system (Zirconzahn) using prefabricated blanks and tried on the master models for initial adaptation of the framework; they were then sintered, followed by veneering (Zirconzahn). The finished crowns were cemented with a polycarboxylate cement (Poly F) under 300 g load and ultrasonically cleaned. The specimens were sliced and the marginal gap was measured, considering absolute marginal opening (AMO) and marginal opening (MO) for each coping under a stereomicroscope with image processing software (Lucia). The measurements were statistically analyzed using the Kruskal Wallis, Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests at a significance level of alpha = 0.01. Means of AMO measurement (microm) for the feather-edge finish line (87 +/- 10) was significantly lower than that of the chamfer (144 +/- 14), shoulder (114 +/- 16) and mini-chamfer finish line types (114 +/- 11) (p finish line (68 +/- 9) (p finish line type had an influence on the marginal adaptation of the tested zirconia ceramic. Although the feather-edge finish line resulted in lower AMO and MO values, with its proven mechanical disadvantage, it cannot be recommended in clinical applications of zirconia crowns. This type of finish line has acted solely as a control group to test the null hypothesis in the current study. For better marginal adaptation, both shoulder and mini-chamfer finish line types could be suggested for zirconia crowns.

  8. Analysis of Failure to Finish a Race in a Cohort of Thoroughbred Racehorses in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Jasmine; Rogers, Chris; Bolwell, Charlotte; Cogger, Naomi; Gee, Erica; Mcllwraith, Wayne

    2016-05-25

    The objective was to describe the incidence of failure to finish a race in flat-racing Thoroughbreds in New Zealand as these are summary indicators of falls, injuries and poor performance. Retrospective data on six complete flat racing seasons (n = 188,615 race starts) of all Thoroughbred flat race starts from 1 August 2005 to 31 July 2011 were obtained. The incidence of failure to finish events and binomial exact 95% confidence intervals were calculated per 1000 horse starts. The association between horse-, rider- and race-level variables with the outcomes failure to finish, pulled-up/fell and lost rider were examined with a mixed effects Poisson regression model. A total of 544 horses failed to finish in 188,615 race starts with an overall incidence of 2.88 per 1000 horse starts (95% CI 2.64-3.12). The incidence of failure to finish horses across each race year showed little variability. In the univariable analysis race distance, larger field size, season, and ratings bands showed association with failing to finish a race. The overall failure to finish outcome was associated with season, race distance and ratings bands (horse experience and success ranking criteria). In the multivariable analysis, race distance and ratings bands were associated with horses that pulled-up/fell; season, apprentice allowances and ratings bands were associated with the outcome lost rider. The failure to finish rate was lower than international figures for race day catastrophic injury. Racing and environmental variables were associated with failure to finish a race highlighting the multifactorial nature of race-day events. Further investigation of risk factors for failure to finish is required to better understand the reasons for a low failure to finish rate in Thoroughbred flat races in New Zealand.

  9. Simulation of Magnetic Field Assisted Finishing (MFAF) Process Utilizing Smart MR Polishing Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Anwesa; Das, Manas

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic field assisted finishing process is an advanced finishing process. This process is capable of producing nanometer level surface finish. In this process magnetic field is applied to control the finishing forces using magnetorheological polishing medium. In the current study, permanent magnet is used to provide the required magnetic field in the finishing zone. The working gap between the workpiece and the magnet is filled with MR fluid which is used as the polishing brush to remove surface undulations from the top surface of the workpiece. In this paper, the distribution of magnetic flux density on the workpiece surface and behaviour of MR polishing medium during finishing are analyzed using commercial finite element packages (Ansys Maxwell® and Comsol®). The role of magnetic force in the indentation of abrasive particles on the workpiece surface is studied. A two-dimensional simulation study of the steady, laminar, and incompressible MR fluid flow behaviour during finishing process is carried out. The material removal and surface roughness modelling of the finishing process are also presented. The indentation force by a single active abrasive particle on the workpiece surface is modelled during simulation. The velocity profile of MR fluid with and without application of magnetic field is plotted. It shows non-Newtonian property without application of magnetic field. After that the total material displacement due to one abrasive particle is plotted. The simulated roughness profile is in a good agreement with the experimental results. The conducted study will help in understanding the fluid behavior and the mechanism of finishing during finishing process. Also, the modelling and simulation of the process will help in achieving better finishing performance.

  10. Analysis of Failure to Finish a Race in a Cohort of Thoroughbred Racehorses in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Tanner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to describe the incidence of failure to finish a race in flat-racing Thoroughbreds in New Zealand as these are summary indicators of falls, injuries and poor performance. Retrospective data on six complete flat racing seasons (n = 188,615 race starts of all Thoroughbred flat race starts from 1 August 2005 to 31 July 2011 were obtained. The incidence of failure to finish events and binomial exact 95% confidence intervals were calculated per 1000 horse starts. The association between horse-, rider- and race-level variables with the outcomes failure to finish, pulled-up/fell and lost rider were examined with a mixed effects Poisson regression model. A total of 544 horses failed to finish in 188,615 race starts with an overall incidence of 2.88 per 1000 horse starts (95% CI 2.64–3.12. The incidence of failure to finish horses across each race year showed little variability. In the univariable analysis race distance, larger field size, season, and ratings bands showed association with failing to finish a race. The overall failure to finish outcome was associated with season, race distance and ratings bands (horse experience and success ranking criteria. In the multivariable analysis, race distance and ratings bands were associated with horses that pulled-up/fell; season, apprentice allowances and ratings bands were associated with the outcome lost rider. The failure to finish rate was lower than international figures for race day catastrophic injury. Racing and environmental variables were associated with failure to finish a race highlighting the multifactorial nature of race-day events. Further investigation of risk factors for failure to finish is required to better understand the reasons for a low failure to finish rate in Thoroughbred flat races in New Zealand.

  11. Thermal Properties of Anionic Polyurethane Composition for Leather Finishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga KOVTUNENKO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal properties of anionic polyurethane composition mixed with collagen product and hydrophilic sodium form of montmorillonite for use in the finishing of leather were studied by thermogravimetric method. The thermal indices of processes of thermal and thermo-oxidative destruction depending on the polyurethane composition were determined. The influence of anionic polyurethane composition on thermal behavior of chromium tanned gelatin films that imitate the leather were studied. APU composition with natural compounds increases their thermal stability both in air and in nitrogen atmosphere due to the formation of additional bonds between active groups of APU, protein and chrome tanning agent as the result of chemical reactions between organic and inorganic parts with the new structure formation.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.10043

  12. Thermal Properties of Anionic Polyurethane Composition for Leather Finishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga KOVTUNENKO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal properties of anionic polyurethane composition mixed with collagen product and hydrophilic sodium form of montmorillonite for use in the finishing of leather were studied by thermogravimetric method. The thermal indices of processes of thermal and thermo-oxidative destruction depending on the polyurethane composition were determined. The influence of anionic polyurethane composition on thermal behavior of chromium tanned gelatin films that imitate the leather were studied. APU composition with natural compounds increases their thermal stability both in air and in nitrogen atmosphere due to the formation of additional bonds between active groups of APU, protein and chrome tanning agent as the result of chemical reactions between organic and inorganic parts with the new structure formation.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.10043

  13. Finishing technologies for processing of optical microelectronic items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratov, K. R.; Ablyaz, T. R.; Gashev, E. A.; Khanov, A. M.; Varlamov, N. V.

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses comparative studies of the influence of specific pressure and speed of relative motion of tool and item on polishing capacity and quality of processed surface of lithium niobate single crystal. The equation for calculation of total depth of layer destroyed upon finishing and time of polishing required for its removal. Analysis of polishing tool has accounted for strength properties of the polishing material, removal capacity, and quality of processed surface of lithium niobate single crystal. It is experimentally established that upon basic pressure both for woven and unwoven polishers with the highest capacity the lower limit of grain coarseness of polishing suspension is 1/0.5 μm. A reserve of increase in shape accuracy and polishing quality is the use of polishers with equal thickness and structure of working surface.

  14. Research on reducing the edge effect in magnetorheological finishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Dai, Yifan; Peng, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Jianmin

    2011-03-20

    The edge effect could not be avoided in most optical manufacturing methods based on the theory of computer controlled optical surfacing. The difference between the removal function at the workpiece edge and that inside it is also the primary cause for edge effect in magnetorheological finishing (MRF). The change of physical dimension and removal ratio of the removal function is investigated through experiments. The results demonstrate that the situation is different when MRF "spot" is at the leading edge or at the trailing edge. Two methods for reducing the edge effect are put into practice after analysis of the processing results. One is adopting a small removal function for dealing with the workpiece edge, and the other is utilizing the removal function compensation. The actual processing results show that these two ways are both effective on reducing the edge effect in MRF.

  15. Viscosity behavior of magnetic suspensions in fluid-assisted finishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic fluid-assisted finishing has been verified both theoretically and experimentally as an effective fabrication technology for optical mirrors and lenses. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a novel design of polishing tool and demonstrate the possible applications of this technology. The work includes studying the viscosity of the magnetic suspensions of micrometer-sized Carbonyl iron particles under the influence of a magnetic field. Both the cases of magnetizable suspension with and without abrasive cerium oxide particles are studied for their ensuing polishing effectiveness. Determination of material removal function is conducted using a Wyko Nat1100 interferometer. Experiments to reduce surface roughness with the proposed tool are also performed using a K9 mirror as the work-piece. Results show that the surface accuracy is improved over three times to less than 0.5 nm after two cycles of polishing.

  16. Microencapsulated citronella oil for mosquito repellent finishing of cotton textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specos, M M Miró; García, J J; Tornesello, J; Marino, P; Vecchia, M Della; Tesoriero, M V Defain; Hermida, L G

    2010-10-01

    Microcapsules containing citronella essential oil were prepared by complex coacervation and applied to cotton textiles in order to study the repellent efficacy of the obtained fabrics. Citronella released from treated textiles was indirectly monitored by the extractable content of its main components. Repellent activity was assessed by exposure of a human hand and arm covered with the treated textiles to Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Fabrics treated with microencapsulated citronella presented a higher and longer lasting protection from insects compared to fabrics sprayed with an ethanol solution of the essential oil, assuring a repellent effect higher than 90% for three weeks. Complex coacervation is a simple, low cost, scalable and reproducible method of obtaining encapsulated essential oils for textile application. Repellent textiles were achieved by padding cotton fabrics with microcapsules slurries using a conventional pad-dry method. This methodology requires no additional investment for textile finishing industries, which is a desirable factor in developing countries.

  17. Nutrition behaviors, perceptions, and beliefs of recent marathon finishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Patrick B

    2016-09-01

    To describe the nutrition behaviors, perceptions, and beliefs of marathoners. A survey-based study was conducted with 422 recent marathon finishers (199 men, 223 women). Participants reported their running background, demographics, diets followed, supplements used, and food/fluid intake during their most recent marathon (median 7 days prior), as well as beliefs about hydration, fueling, and sources of nutrition information. Median finishing times were 3:53 (3:26-4:35) and 4:25 (3:50-4:59) h:min for men and women during their most recent marathon. Most participants (66.1%) reported typically following a moderate-carbohydrate, moderate-fat diet, while 66.4% carbohydrate-loaded prior to their most recent marathon. Among 139 participants following a specific diet over the past year, the most common were vegetarian/vegan/pescatarian (n = 39), Paleolithic (n = 16), gluten-free (n = 15), and low-carbohydrate (n = 12). Roughly 35% of participants took a supplement intended to improve running performance over the past month. Women were more likely to follow specific diets (39.0% vs. 26.1%), while men were more likely to recently use performance-enhancing supplements (40.2% vs. 30.0%). Most participants (68.3%) indicated they were likely or very likely to rely on a structured plan to determine fluid intake, and 75% were confident in their ability to hydrate. At least 35.6% of participants thought they could improve marathon performance by 8% or more with nutrition interventions. Scientific journals ranked as the most reliable source of nutrition information, while running coaches ranked as the most likely source to be utilized. Findings from this investigation, such as diets and supplements utilized by marathoners, can be used by practitioners and researchers alike to improve the dissemination of scientifically-based information on nutrition and marathon running.

  18. Subaperture approaches to finishing and testing astronomical optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Gregory W.; Tricard, Marc

    2004-07-01

    We describe the application of both stitching interferometry and magneto-rheological finishing (MRF) to the surface metrology and final figure correction of large optics. These particular subaperture technologies help to address the need for flexible systems that improve both overall manufacturing time and cost effectiveness. MRF can achieve high volumetric removal rates with a small-footprint tool that is perfectly conformable and highly stable. This tool is therefore well suited to finishing large optics (including aspheres) and correcting mid-spatial frequency errors. The system does not need vacuum, reduces microroughness to below one nm rms on most materials, and is able to meet the figure tolerance specs for astronomical optics. Such a technology is ideally complemented by a system for the stitching of interferometric subaperture data. Stitching inherently enables the testing of larger apertures with higher resolution and, thanks to the inbuilt calibration, even to higher accuracy in many situations. Moreover, given the low-order character of the dominant residual uncertainties in the stitched full-aperture data, such an approach is well suited to adaptive mirrors because the actuators correct precisely these deformations. While this approach enables the non-null testing of parts with greater aspheric departure and can lead to a significantly reduced non-common air path in the testing of long-radius concave parts, it is especially effective for convex optics. That is, stitching is particularly well suited to the testing of secondary mirrors and, alongside the testing of the off-axis primary segments, these are clearly critical challenges for extremely large telescope (ELT) projects.

  19. 76 FR 55137 - Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... COMMISSION Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory..., ``Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants.'' This guide endorses Revision 4A to... Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants,'' which provides methods that......

  20. 77 FR 30030 - Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... COMMISSION Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants.'' This guide endorses Revision 4A to Nuclear Management and Resources... Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants,'' Part 50, ``Domestic......

  1. Revised accident source terms for light-water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soffer, L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents revised accident source terms for light-water reactors incorporating the severe accident research insights gained in this area over the last 15 years. Current LWR reactor accident source terms used for licensing date from 1962 and are contained in Regulatory Guides 1.3 and 1.4. These specify that 100% of the core inventory of noble gases and 25% of the iodine fission products are assumed to be instantaneously available for release from the containment. The chemical form of the iodine fission products is also assumed to be predominantly elemental iodine. These assumptions have strongly affected present nuclear air cleaning requirements by emphasizing rapid actuation of spray systems and filtration systems optimized to retain elemental iodine. A proposed revision of reactor accident source terms and some im implications for nuclear air cleaning requirements was presented at the 22nd DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference. A draft report was issued by the NRC for comment in July 1992. Extensive comments were received, with the most significant comments involving (a) release fractions for both volatile and non-volatile species in the early in-vessel release phase, (b) gap release fractions of the noble gases, iodine and cesium, and (c) the timing and duration for the release phases. The final source term report is expected to be issued in late 1994. Although the revised source terms are intended primarily for future plants, current nuclear power plants may request use of revised accident source term insights as well in licensing. This paper emphasizes additional information obtained since the 22nd Conference, including studies on fission product removal mechanisms, results obtained from improved severe accident code calculations and resolution of major comments, and their impact upon the revised accident source terms. Revised accident source terms for both BWRS and PWRS are presented.

  2. 40 CFR 35.4180 - Must my group keep financial records after we finish our TAG?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Must my group keep financial records after we finish our TAG? 35.4180 Section 35.4180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Managing Your Tag § 35.4180 Must my group keep financial records after we finish our TAG? (a) You must keep...

  3. A system response to an outbreak of enzootic pneumonia in grow/finish pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Abstract A Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae-negative commercial swine production system broke with enzootic pneumonia at their grow/finish site in southern Manitoba in October, 2003. System responses included feed medication, depopulation, delayed shipment of pigs to the infected site, vaccination of at risk sow herds, and disinfection when grow/finish site depopulation was completed. PMID:15532888

  4. Minimum 10-year survival of Kerboull cemented stems according to surface finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadouche, Moussa; Baqué, François; Lefevre, Nicolas; Kerboull, Marcel

    2008-02-01

    The optimal surface finish for a cemented THA stem is still debated. We hypothesized surface finish would influence survival of Kerboull cemented hip arthroplasties and a matte finish would have lower survival. We reviewed survival of 433 total hip arthroplasties in 395 patients: 284 consecutive patients (310 hips) were enrolled in a prospective, randomized study of polished (165 hips) or matte finish stems (145 hips) and compared to a historical series of satin stems (123 hips) in 111 patients. The satin and matte finish implants had similar geometry but the polished was quadrangular rather than oval. Finish roughnesses were: polished (radius, 0.04 microm), satin (radius, 0.9 microm), and matte (radius, 1.7 microm). The mean age of the patients at the time of the index arthroplasty was 63.6 years. The survival rate at 13 years, using radiographic loosening as the end point, was 97.3%+/-2.6% for polished stems, 97.1%+/-2.1% for satin stems, and 78.9%+/-5.8% for matte stems. The data suggest survival of Kerboull stems was higher with a polished or satin surface finish than with a matte finish. Level II, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  5. Surface morphology changes of acrylic resins during finishing and polishing phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucio Serra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The finishing and polishing phases are essential to improve smoothness and shining on the surface of acrylic resins used to make removable orthodontic appliances. A good surface finishing reduces roughness, which facilitates hygiene, prevents staining and provides greater comfort to the patients. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper was to analyze the changes on surface morphology of acrylic resins during finishing and polishing phases. METHODS: Thirty discs (10 mm in diameter and 5 mm in length were made with acrylic resin and randomly divided into ten groups. The control group did not receive any treatment while the other groups received gradual finishing and polishing. The last group received the entire finishing and polishing procedures. Surface morphology was qualitatively analyzed through scanning electron microscopy and quantitatively analyzed through a laser profilometer test. RESULTS: The acrylic resin surfaces without treatment showed bubbles which were not observed in the subsequent phases. Wearing out with multilaminated burs, finishing with wood sandpaper and finishing with water sandpaper resulted in surfaces with decreasing irregularities. The surfaces that were polished with pumice and with low abrasive liquids showed high superficial smoothness. CONCLUSION: Highly smooth acrylic resin surfaces can be obtained after mechanical finishing and polishing performed with multilaminated burs, wood sandpaper, water sandpaper, pumice and low abrasive liquids.

  6. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced... my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  7. 21 CFR 181.26 - Drying oils as components of finished resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) shall include: Chinawood oil (tung oil). Dehydrated castor oil. Linseed oil. Tall oil. [42 FR 14638, Mar... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Drying oils as components of finished resins. 181... Prior-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.26 Drying oils as components of finished resins. Substances...

  8. Novel Mycoplasma hyosynoviae vaccination of one herd failed to prevent lameness in finishing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Klara Tølbøll; Nielsen, Elisabeth Okholm; Christensen, Dennis;

    difference in the prevalence of lameness was found (P=0.157). All lame finishers were treated with Lincosin® and Flunixin® by injection for three days. In conclusion, this novel M. hyosynoviae vaccine could not successfully prevent the development of lameness in finishing pigs presumed to have been caused...

  9. Effects of roughage inclusion and particle size on performance and rumination behavior of finishing beef steers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughage is mechanically processed to increase digestibility, and handling and mixing characteristics in finishing diets. Roughage is fed to promote rumen health and decrease digestive upset, but inclusion in finishing diets is limited due to the cost per unit of energy. Rumination behavior may be a...

  10. New finishing possibilities for producing durable multifunctional cotton/wool and viscose/wool blended fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, N A; El-Zairy, M R; Eid, B M; El-Zairy, E M R; Emam, E M

    2015-03-30

    This research work focuses on the development of a one-bath functional finishing procedure for imparting durable multifunctional properties such as easy care, soft-hand, antibacterial and/or ultra violet (UV) protection to cotton/wool and viscose/wool blends using diverse finishing combinations and formulations. In this study finishing agents such as reactant resin, silicon softeners, 4-hydroxybenzophenone, triclosan, and pigment colorant were selected using magnesium chloride/citric acid as a mixed catalyst and the pad-dry microwave fixation technique. The results reveal that enhancement in the imparted functional properties are governed by type of the finished substrate as well as nature and concentration of finishing formulation components. The finished fabrics still retained high level of functionalities even after 15 consecutive laundering. Surface morphology and composition of selected samples were investigated using scan electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. The mode of interactions was also investigated. Practical applications for multifunctionlization of cellulose/wool blended fabrics are possible using these sorts of proper finishing formulations and unique finishing application method.

  11. 40 CFR 410.20 - Applicability; description of the wool finishing subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the wool finishing subcategory. 410.20 Section 410.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wool Finishing Subcategory § 410.20 Applicability; description...

  12. Relationship between residual feed intake, performance, and carcass parameters of pasture finished cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2009 and 2010, Angus-crossbred steers (n = 39) were used to evaluate the relationship between residual feed intake (RFI), pasture-finishing performance and carcass parameters. During RFI determinations prior to pasture finishing initiation in mid-April, animals were fed an alfalfa hay cube diet....

  13. Integration of biotechnological wastewater treatment units in textile finishing factories: from end of the pipe solutions to combined production and wastewater treatment units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitkenhauer, H; Meyer, U

    2001-08-23

    Increasing costs for water, wastewater and energy put pressure on textile finishing plants to increase the efficiency of wet processing. An improved water management can decrease the use of these resources and is a prerequisite for the integration of an efficient, anaerobic on-site pretreatment of effluents that will further cut wastewater costs. A two-phase anaerobic treatment is proposed, and successful laboratory experiments with model effluents from the cotton finishing industry are reported. The chemical oxygen demand of this wastewater was reduced by over 88% at retention times of 1 day or longer. The next step to boost the efficiency is to combine the production and wastewater treatment. The example of cotton fabric desizing (removing size from the fabric) illustrates how this final step of integration uses the acidic phase bioreactor as a part of the production and allows to close the water cycle of the system.

  14. Anthocyanins. Plant pigments and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Mateus, Nuno; De Freitas, Victor

    2014-07-23

    Anthocyanins are plant pigments widespread in nature. They play relevant roles in plant propagation and ecophysiology and plant defense mechanisms and are responsible for the color of fruits and vegetables. A large number of novel anthocyanin structures have been identified, including new families such as pyranoanthocyanins or anthocyanin oligomers; their biosynthesis pathways have been elucidated, and new plants with "a la carte" colors have been created by genetic engineering. Furthermore, evidence about their benefits in human health has accumulated, and processes of anthocyanin absorption and biotransformation in the human organism have started to be ascertained. These advances in anthocyanin research were revised in the Seventh International Workshop on Anthocyanins that took place in Porto (Portugal) on September 9-11, 2013. Some selected papers are collected in this special issue, where aspects such as anthocyanin accumulation in plants, relationship with color expression, stability in plants and food, and bioavailability or biological activity are revised.

  15. Circumcision revision in male children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Al-Ghazo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine indications for circumcision revision and to identify the specialty of the person who performed unsatisfactory primary circumcision. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The authors reviewed medical records of 52 cases that underwent circumcision revision over a 6-year period (1998 to 2004. Sleeve surgical technique was used for revision in patients with redundant foreskin or concealed penis, penoplasty for partial or complete degloving of the penis and meatotomy for external meatal stenosis. The mean age of children was 32 months (range 6 months to 9 years. RESULTS: Most of unsatisfactory primary circumcisions (86.7% were performed by laymen. All patients who underwent circumcision revision had good to excellent cosmetic results. CONCLUSION: Primary circumcision performed by laymen carry a high complication rate and serious complications may occur. A period of training and direct supervision by physicians is required before allowing laymen to perform circumcision independently.

  16. 170 - 174_Yarube_revised

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    acquisition, organization, utilization, and revision of knowledge ... The test was originally developed for use in rats to overcome stress ..... insulin or insulin resistance is associated with memory ... cerebral atrophy and white matter changes.

  17. 76 FR 31381 - Office Of New Reactors; Proposed Revision 4 to Standard Review Plan; Section 8.1 on Electric...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants,'' on a proposed Revision 4 to Standard Review Plan (SRP... Position (BTP) 8-8 on ``Onsite (Emergency Diesel Generators) and Offsite Power Sources Allowed Outage Time... COMMISSION Office Of New Reactors; Proposed Revision 4 to Standard Review Plan; Section 8.1 on Electric...

  18. 75 FR 27838 - Notice of Availability of Draft NUREG-1800, Revision 2; “Standard Review Plan for Review of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... NUREG-1800, Revision 2; ``Standard Review Plan for Review of License Renewal Applications for Nuclear Power Plants'' and Draft NUREG-1801, Revision 2; ``Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report'' AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ACTION: Issuance of draft NUREG-1800, ``Standard Review Plan...

  19. 75 FR 80857 - Notice of Availability of NUREG-1800, Revision 2; “Standard Review Plan for Review of License...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... COMMISSION Notice of Availability of NUREG-1800, Revision 2; ``Standard Review Plan for Review of License Renewal Applications for Nuclear Power Plants'' and NUREG-1801, Revision 2; ``Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report'' AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ACTION: Issuance of...

  20. Effects of individual aerobic performance on finish time in mountain running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Dieter; Burtscher, Johannes; Burtscher, Martin

    2012-06-01

    It was hypothesized that for each mountain running competition, there is a certain individual performance level below which running times increase dramatically. The running times of 869 finishers of 3 international mountain running competitions have been analysed. A hyperbolic association was demonstrated between finish times in mountain running competitions and individual performance at the anaerobic threshold (VO2AT(Race)). Due to the non-linear association, there is an increasing effect on both the finish time and the change of finish time with decreasing aerobic performance. In all three competitions, the change of finish time is about 7 times more pronounced in mountain runners with the lowest VO2ATL,, compared to those with the highest values of VO2AT(Race). Both athletes and organizers should keep in mind these effects of decreasing aerobic performance on running times and potentially associated risks.

  1. 牛仔面料的染整加工%Dyeing and finishing of denim fabric

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭志忠

    2011-01-01

    介绍了牛仔面料和成衣的印染深加工和后整理,包括拔染印花、风格涂层整理、丝光免烫整理工艺、成衣涂料染色、激光刻蚀和立体压皱整理.介绍了各整理工艺的处方和流程,并指出了工艺中的注意事项.%Dyeing and finishing processes of denim fabric and garments are introduced, including discharge printing, coating finishing, mercerizing and easy-care finishing, pigment garment dyeing, laser engraving and 3-dimensional crease memory finishing. Recipes and procedures of finishing processes are discussed, and precautions are put forward.

  2. Temperature Control of Hot Strip Finishing Mill with Inter Stand Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Kunio; Anbe, Yoshiharu; Imanari, Hiroyuki

    It is important for hot strip mill to keep finishing mill delivery temperature to it’s target value because of yield strength and tensile strength of rolled strip. We propose a new method for finishing mill delivery temperature control (FDTC) of a hot strip mill using inter stand strip coolant (ISC). FDTC consists of initial setting (before threading) values calculation of ISC flow rate and finishing mill speed, feed forward FDTC (FF-FDTC) and feedback FDTC (FB-FDTC). The mathematical strip temperature model of finishing mill was identified using normal operating data and some tests. Actual mill application with 7 stands finishing mill showed good FDTC results and also it made possible to increase rolling speed which increase production rate.

  3. Mortality on grower/finisher-only swine operations in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Losinger W.C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available For 53 grower/finisher-only swine operations that participated in the United States National Animal Health Monitoring System 1995 National Swine Study, mortality among finisher pigs ranged from 0 to 12.0% over a 6-month period. Twenty-six (49.1% had 2% mortality. Nine (17.0% operations experienced >4% mortality. Fisher's exact test revealed that operations with all-in all-out management were significantly more likely to have 1 grower/finisher pig came from another source. Larger operations (where >900 pigs entered the grower/finisher phase practiced all-in, all-out management more frequently than smaller operations, and had a lower mean percent mortality than smaller operations. Diagnosis of Salmonella in finisher pigs performed at a laboratory or by a veterinarian in the 12 months prior to interview was associated with both increased percent mortality and increased percent mortality per day.

  4. [Pressure sore revision surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsche, Karin Marion

    2010-02-22

    Pressure sores are a major problem for patients as well as society in general. Immobilised patients are especially at risk. This group of patients with pressure sores should be hospitalised to perform surgical revision of the wound and reconstruction using a flap. Such surgery demands extensive postoperative relief of the flap. The University Centre for Wound Healing at Odense University Hospital has tested the effects of a reduction of the formerly recommended relief period from three to two weeks. In this article we report results covering all patients who have undergone surgery and reconstruction of pressure sores during the period from 1st October 2001 to 1st November 2008. The results are divided into two periods: the period before and the period after the introduction of the reduced relief period. A total of 80 patients were included; 34 in the first period and 46 in the second period. We achieved a considerable reduction in median length of stay from 38 to 27 days with no increase in surgical or complication frequency. Furthermore, the share of fully healed remained unchanged. We believe that there is no risk in shortening the immobile postoperative relief phase following reconstruction of pressure wounds in immobilised patients.

  5. Revision du Genre Aseraggodes Kaup

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chabanaud, P.

    1930-01-01

    Le présent travail comprend la définition du genre Aseraggodes Kaup et la revision, sous forme d'une clef dichotomique, de toutes les espèces qui le composent, revision établie d'après les types eux-mêmes de ces espèces. Ce genre Aseraggodes appartient à la famille des Soleidae et à la sousfamille

  6. A study on scar revision

    OpenAIRE

    Ashutosh Talwar; Neerja Puri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Scars are psychologically distressing for the patients and have an impact on the quality of life and self esteem of the patients. Scar revision is an aesthetic skill which is mastered by plastic surgeons and encroached now by dermatosurgeons. Scars on the face are aesthetically unacceptable and various techniques have been improvised for making a scar aesthetically acceptable. Various types of techniques are used for scar revision like W plasty, Z plasty and VY plasty. Aims:...

  7. Revision of infected knee arthroplasties in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, Martin; Jørgensen, Christoffer C; Bagger, Jens;

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - The surgical treatment of periprosthetic knee infection is generally either a partial revision procedure (open debridement and exchange of the tibial insert) or a 2-stage exchange arthroplasty procedure. We describe the failure rates of these procedures on a nationwide...... prosthesis with a re-revision rate due to infection of 34%, as compared to 55% in revisions of a revision prosthesis (p = 0.05). The failure rate of the 2-stage revisions was 30%. Median time interval between stages was 84 (9-597) days. 117 (54%) of the 2-stage revisions were revisions of a primary...... prosthesis with a re-revision rate due to infection of 21%, as compared to 29% in revisions of a previously revised prosthesis (p = 0.1). Overall postoperative mortality was 0.6% in high-volume centers (> 30 procedures within 2 years) as opposed to 7% in the remaining centers (p = 0.003). Interpretation...

  8. The topographic development and areal parametric characterization of a stratified surface polished by mass finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Karl; Blunt, Liam; Fleming, Leigh

    2015-09-01

    Mass finishing is amongst the most widely used finishing processes in modern manufacturing, in applications from deburring to edge radiusing and polishing. Processing objectives are varied, ranging from the cosmetic to the functionally critical. One such critical application is the hydraulically smooth polishing of aero engine component gas-washed surfaces. In this, and many other applications the drive to improve process control and finish tolerance is ever present. Considering its widespread use mass finishing has seen limited research activity, particularly with respect to surface characterization. The objectives of the current paper are to; characterise the mass finished stratified surface and its development process using areal surface parameters, provide guidance on the optimal parameters and sampling method to characterise this surface type for a given application, and detail the spatial variation in surface topography due to coupon edge shadowing. Blasted and peened square plate coupons in titanium alloy are wet (vibro) mass finished iteratively with increasing duration. Measurement fields are precisely relocated between iterations by fixturing and an image superimposition alignment technique. Surface topography development is detailed with ‘log of process duration’ plots of the ‘areal parameters for scale-limited stratified functional surfaces’, (the Sk family). Characteristic features of the Smr2 plot are seen to map out the processing of peak, core and dale regions in turn. These surface process regions also become apparent in the ‘log of process duration’ plot for Sq, where lower core and dale regions are well modelled by logarithmic functions. Surface finish (Ra or Sa) with mass finishing duration is currently predicted with an exponential model. This model is shown to be limited for the current surface type at a critical range of surface finishes. Statistical analysis provides a group of areal parameters including; Vvc, Sq, and Sdq

  9. 9 CFR 108.6 - Revision of plot plans, blueprints, and legends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., and legends. 108.6 Section 108.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... FACILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS § 108.6 Revision of plot plans, blueprints, and legends..., blueprints, or legends and submit to Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service for review and filing...

  10. Assessing Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Excreta from Grower-finisher Pigs Fed Prevalent Rations in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van, Vu Thi Khanh; Sommer, Sven G.; Vu, C. C.

    2010-01-01

    Livestock production in Vietnam is, as in most Asian countries, increasing rapidly and changing into specialized highly intensified operations. The volume of animal excreta generated exceeds the capacity of the operation land base and cannot be utilized efficiently. As a consequence, there is a l......Livestock production in Vietnam is, as in most Asian countries, increasing rapidly and changing into specialized highly intensified operations. The volume of animal excreta generated exceeds the capacity of the operation land base and cannot be utilized efficiently. As a consequence......, there is a loss of plant nutrients from livestock farms that causes environmental pollution. This study carried out a feed and excretion experiment measuring fecal characteristic, daily fecal production, daily nitrogen and phosphorous excretion from grower-finisher pigs fed prevalent rations in Vietnam....... Furthermore, equations for assessing the excretion were tested, which can be used in farm models for optimal recycling of manure while focusing on reducing pollution. The results indicated that fecal production and nutrient excretion were affected by the different rations tested. This study showed that five...

  11. Assessment of a potential agricultural application of Bangkok-digested sewage sludge and finished compost products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreesai, Siranee; Peapueng, Panadda; Tippayamongkonkun, Taninporn; Sthiannopkao, Suthipong

    2013-09-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the levels of plant nutrients, heavy metals, parasites and fecal coliform bacteria in Bangkok-produced sewage sludge and finished compost products for potential agricultural application, as well as to compare the quality of compost under different composting conditions. The results indicated that digested sewage sludge had high fertilizing values for organic matter (19.01 ± 0.09%), total nitrogen (2.17 ± 0.07%), total phosphorus (2.06 ± 0.06%) and total potassium (1.16 ± 0.22%), but it was contaminated with human pathogens, including fecal coliform bacteria, viable helminthes egg and active forms of parasite cysts. Thus, fresh sewage sludge should not be disposed on land unless it has undergone pathogen reduction. It is proven that the quality of the sludge mixed with grass clippings at a ratio of 6:1 volume/volume after having passed a windrow composting process for 8 weeks can be classified as class A biosolids as the levels of remaining fecal coliforms were safety utilization.

  12. Performance and carcass traits of finishing heifers fed crude glycerin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, G L; Shelor, M K; Drouillard, J S

    2009-02-01

    Crossbred heifers (n = 373; 421.6 kg +/- 28.9) were fed finishing diets containing 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, or 16% crude glycerin (DM basis). Diets consisted of steam-flaked corn with 6% alfalfa hay and 1.2% urea and provided 300 mg of monensin, 90 mg of tylosin, and 0.5 mg of melengestrol acetate per animal daily. Cattle were stratified by BW and allocated randomly, within strata, to concrete-surfaced feedlot pens each containing 6 to 7 heifers, with 9 pens per dietary treatment. Cattle were transitioned from the control diet to diets containing increasing proportions of glycerin over a period of 10 d. Cattle had ad libitum access to feed, and diets were delivered once daily throughout the 85-d trial period. As the concentration of glycerin increased, DMI decreased linearly (P glycerin had ADG of 1.19, 1.34, 1.29, 1.25, 1.17, and 1.03 kg, respectively (linear, P = 0.013; quadratic, P = 0.010). Feeding glycerin had a quadratic effect on G:F, and G:F was optimal when glycerin was fed at 2% of the diet (quadratic, P = 0.046). Glycerin increased the final BW by 12.7, 8.1, and 5.3 kg when fed at 2, 4, and 8% of the diet, respectively, but reduced the final BW by 1.9 and 14.3 kg when included at 12 and 16% of the diet (linear, P = 0.009; quadratic, P = 0.006). Similarly, HCW increased by 8.1, 5.1, and 3.3 kg when glycerin was fed at 2, 4, and 8% of the diet, respectively, but were 1.2 and 9.1 kg less than controls when glycerin was fed at 12 and 16%, respectively (linear, P = 0.009; quadratic, P = 0.006). Longissimus muscle area decreased linearly as glycerin concentrations increased (P glycerin resulted in linear decreases in subcutaneous fat over the 12th rib and marbling scores (P = 0.045). Glycerin tended to decrease the percentage of cattle grading USDA Choice (P = 0.084) and increase the percentage of cattle grading USDA Select. Adding glycerin to cattle-finishing diets improved BW gain and feed efficiency, particularly when added at concentrations of 8% or less on a DM

  13. SURFACE FINISHES ON STAINLESS STEEL REDUCE BACTERIAL ATTACHMENT AND EARLY BIOFILM FORMATION: SCANNING ELECTRON AND ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three common finishing treatments of stainless steel that are used for equipment during poultry processing were tested for resistance to bacterial contamination. Methods were developed to measure attached bacteria and to identify factors that make surface finishes susceptible or ...

  14. Provenance of the oil in par-fried French fries after finish frying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khusaibi, Mohammed; Gordon, Michael H; Lovegrove, Julie A; Niranjan, Keshavan

    2012-01-01

    Frozen par-fried French fries are finish-fried either by using the same type of oil used for par frying, or a different type. The nutritive quality of the final oil contained in the product depends on the relative amounts and the fatty acid (FA) composition of the oils used for par frying and finish frying. With the aim of understanding the provenance of the oil in the final product, par-fried French fries-either purchased ready or prepared in the laboratory-were finish fried in oils different from the ones used for par frying. The moisture content, oil content, and FA compositions of the par-fried and finish-fried products were experimentally determined, and the relative amounts of each of the oils present in the final product were calculated using the FAs as markers and undertaking a mass balance on each component FA. The results demonstrate that 89% to 93% of the total oil in the final product originates from the finish-frying step. The study also shows that a significant proportion of the oil absorbed during par frying is expelled from the product during finish frying. Further, the expulsion of par-frying oil was found to occur in the early stages of the finish-frying step. Experiments involving different combinations of par-frying and finish-frying oils showed that the relative proportions of the 2 oils did not depend on the individual fatty acid profiles. This study concludes that any positive health benefits of using an oil having a favorable FA profile for par frying, can potentially be lost, if the oil used for finish frying has a less favorable composition. This paper estimates the relative amounts of oil in French fries that have been fried in 2 stages-a par-frying step and a finish-frying step-which is commonly practiced in food service establishments as well as homes. The 2 key conclusions are: (1) nearly 90% of the oil content of the final product is the one used for finish frying; that is, a processor may use very good oil for par frying but if the

  15. 77 FR 65852 - Notice of Request for Revision to and Extension of Approval of an Information Collection...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ... PPA, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) regulates the importation of citrus fruit...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Notice of Request for Revision to and... Into the Continental United States AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA....

  16. A Review of Criticality Accidents 2000 Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas P. McLaughlin; Shean P. Monahan; Norman L. Pruvost; Vladimir V. Frolov; Boris G. Ryazanov; Victor I. Sviridov

    2000-05-01

    Criticality accidents and the characteristics of prompt power excursions are discussed. Sixty accidental power excursions are reviewed. Sufficient detail is provided to enable the reader to understand the physical situation, the chemistry and material flow, and when available the administrative setting leading up to the time of the accident. Information on the power history, energy release, consequences, and causes are also included when available. For those accidents that occurred in process plants, two new sections have been included in this revision. The first is an analysis and summary of the physical and neutronic features of the chain reacting systems. The second is a compilation of observations and lessons learned. Excursions associated with large power reactors are not included in this report.

  17. Classification and storage of wastewater from floor finish removal operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, Charles E. [Univ. of San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This study evaluates the wastewater generated from hard surface floor finish removal operations at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in order to determine if this wastewater is a hazardous waste, either by statistical evaluation, or other measurable regulatory guidelines established in California Regulations. This research also comparatively evaluates the 55 gallon drum and other portable tanks, all less than 1,000 gallons in size in order to determine which is most effective for the management of this waste stream at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The statistical methods in SW-846 were found to be scientifically questionable in their application to hazardous waste determination. In this statistical evaluation, the different data transformations discussed in the regulatory guidance document were applied along with the log transformation to the population of 18 samples from 55 gallon drums. Although this statistical evaluation proved awkward in its application, once the data is collected and organized on a spreadsheet this statistical analysis can be an effective tool which can aid the environmental manager in the hazardous waste classification process.

  18. Prophylometric and SEM analyses of four different finishing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHIODERA, G.; CERUTTI, F.; CERUTTI, A.; PUTIGNANO, A.; MANGANI, F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Adhesion is the pivot of the modern restorative dentistry. Inlays, onlays and veneers have become a valid alternative to the traditional prosthetic treatments even in the rehabilitation of extremely damaged teeth, allowing a consistent saving of sound tooth tissues. Composite resins and dental adhesive are continously investigated and improved, nevertheless the optimization of the tooth-adhesive interface has to be considered: in fact, the long-term stability of adhesion between tooth and composite material depends on the treatment of the amelo-dentinal surfaces. This study investigated the quality of the occlusal walls of a cavity prepared to receive an inlay and finished with four different systems: thin and extra-thin diamond coated burs, a 12-blades carbide burs and a diamond-coated tip driven by sonic instrument. Consequently, prophylometric and SEM analyses were performed on the samples. The average roughness values recorded by the prophylometer were expressed by the parameters Ra and RZ: there is a correspondence between the numeric values and the pictures of the SEM. The results show a better quality (low roughness values) of the surface treated with multi-blade burs, followed by the this and extra-thin diamond coated burs. The 25 micron diamond-coated tip of the sonic instrument obtains the roughest surface and a sensibly higher amount of smear layer than the other tested systems. PMID:23741601

  19. A hybrid approach for the automated finishing of bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Ali; Klammer, Aaron A; Robins, William P; Chin, Chen-Shan; Webster, Dale; Paxinos, Ellen; Hsu, David; Ashby, Meredith; Wang, Susana; Peluso, Paul; Sebra, Robert; Sorenson, Jon; Bullard, James; Yen, Jackie; Valdovino, Marie; Mollova, Emilia; Luong, Khai; Lin, Steven; LaMay, Brianna; Joshi, Amruta; Rowe, Lori; Frace, Michael; Tarr, Cheryl L; Turnsek, Maryann; Davis, Brigid M; Kasarskis, Andrew; Mekalanos, John J; Waldor, Matthew K; Schadt, Eric E

    2012-07-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technology have improved our ability to characterize most genomic diversity. However, accurate resolution of large structural events is challenging because of the short read lengths of second-generation technologies. Third-generation sequencing technologies, which can yield longer multikilobase reads, have the potential to address limitations associated with genome assembly. Here we combine sequencing data from second- and third-generation DNA sequencing technologies to assemble the two-chromosome genome of a recent Haitian cholera outbreak strain into two nearly finished contigs at >99.9% accuracy. Complex regions with clinically relevant structure were completely resolved. In separate control assemblies on experimental and simulated data for the canonical N16961 cholera reference strain, we obtained 14 scaffolds of greater than 1 kb for the experimental data and 8 scaffolds of greater than 1 kb for the simulated data, which allowed us to correct several errors in contigs assembled from the short-read data alone. This work provides a blueprint for the next generation of rapid microbial identification and full-genome assembly.

  20. Evaluation of different finish line designs in base metal alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghandeh R

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was performed according to the widespread application of base metal alloys"nand few articles published about the marginal integrity of restorations fabricated by these metals."nThree standard dies of a maxillary first premolar were prepared with a flat shoulder finish line in buccal"naspect and chamfer in palatal. One of them left with no change. On the buccal aspect of the second and"nthird dies 135?and 1607 bevel were added respectively"nUsing dual wax technique, nine wax patterns were formed on each die and casting procedure of selected"nnon precious alloy was performed by centrifugal method. Marginal gaps of each copping seated on dies"nwere measured by scanning electron microscope (SEM with X500 magnification. Measurements were"ndone on three areas of marked dies on buccal aspect. Measurement son palatal aspect was done on"nmarked midpalatal point as control."nResults and statistical analysis showed no significant difference among marginal gaps in lingual aspect."nBut on the buccal aspect there were statistically significant differences among the groups (P<0.001. Flat"nshoulder had the best marginal integrity (mean 4 micron. Shoulder with 160' bevel had the most marginal"ngap (mean 26.5 micron and shoulder with 1357 bevel was between two other groups (mean 15.7 micron.

  1. BEEF TALLOW AND EMULSIFIER IN GROWING-FINISHING PIG DIETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KASSIA M. SANTOS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Two trials were aimed to evaluate beef tallow in diets with and without emulsifier on performance of pigs at growing-finishing phases. In the first trial, 15 barrows (22.03±0.62 kg were distributed among three treatments: reference diet; test diet 1 (5% beef tallow and test diet 2 (10% beef tallow. Beef tallow presented average value of 7130.97 kcal ME/kg. For the performance trail, 30 barrows (24.85±1.18 kg were distributed among five treatments: T1 - diet with soybean oil and 3230 kcal ME /kg; T2 - diet with beef tallow and 3230 kcal ME/kg; T3 - diet with beef tallow and 3080 kcal ME/kg; T4 - diet with beef tallow, 3080 kcal/kg and 0.1% emulsifier; T5 - diet with beef tallow, 2930 kcal ME/kg and 0.1% emulsifier. Feed conversion was worse in animals fed diet with 3080 kcal ME/kg containing beef tallow and with 2930 kcal ME/kg with beef tallow and emulsifier. For economic availability, animals fed diet with beef tallow and 3230 kcal ME/kg and those fed diet with 3080 kcal ME/kg containing beef tallow and emulsifier, did not differ from animals fed diet with soybean oil, which enables the reduction up to 150 kcal ME/kg be compensated by emulsifier addition.

  2. Regalzier: study of a typical historical plaster finish in Venice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Remotto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Regalzier is one of the most common types of plasterwork on medieval buildings in Venice until the 15th century but remained popular also during the next centuries in the north of Italy. Despite the widespread occurrence of this kind of finishing treatment, the information about the materials and the techniques used to create it is still scarce. For this reason and thanks to growing interest in traditional building construction techniques, a set of 21 samples were collected from a number of decorative elements and brick walls belonging to historical buildings of the 15th century in Venice. The samples were investigated by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy–Energy Dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDX, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, Thermal Analysis (TG-DSC and Raman spectroscopy. The results allowed the characterization of the materials, contributing to the knowledge of traditional building construction techniques. This information is also important when considering the choice of proper restoration treatments, according to the recent concepts of sustainability, compatibility and use of local materials.

  3. Finishing systems on the final surface roughness of composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Richard; Neiva, Gisele; Dennison, Joseph; Yaman, Peter

    2008-02-01

    This study evaluated differences in surface roughness of a microhybrid (Gradia Direct, GC America) and a nanofil (Filtek Supreme, 3M ESPE) composite using four polishing systems: PoGo/Enhance (DENTSPLY/Caulk), Sof-Lex (3M ESPE), Astropol (Ivoclar Vivadent), and Optidisc (KerrHawe). An aluminum mold was used to prepare 2 X 60 composite disks (10 mm X 2 mm). Composite was packed into the mold, placed between two glass slabs, and polymerized for 40 seconds from the top and bottom surfaces. Specimens were finished to a standard rough surface using Moore's disks with six brushing strokes. Specimens were rinsed and stored in artificial saliva in individual plastic bags at 36 degrees C for 24 hours prior to testing. Specimens were randomly assigned to one of the four polishing systems and were polished for 30 seconds (10 seconds per grit) with brushing strokes according to the manufacturer's instructions. Mean surface roughness (Ra) was recorded with a surface-analyzer 24 hours after storage in artificial saliva, both before and after polishing. Means were analyzed using two-way and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey multiple comparison tests at p composites for individual polishing systems (p=0.3991). Filtek specimens were smoother than Gradia specimens after baseline roughening. Sof-Lex provided the smoothest final surface when used with either composite. Astropol provided a rough surface for Gradia specimens.

  4. Finishing procedures in Orthodontics: dental dimensions and proportions (microesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Carlos Bodart Brandão

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present article is to describe procedures that can be performed to achieve excellence in orthodontic treatment finishing. The content is limited to microesthetics, which comprises the concept of ideal dental dimensions and proportions (white esthetics and its correlation with the periodontium (pink esthetics. Standards of normality are described both in their real dimensions (dental height and width, and in those effectively perceived by the observer, the virtual dimensions. METHODS: The best scientific evidence was sought in the literature to support the clinical procedures that must guide the professional to obtain maximum esthetic quality on their treatments. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate what the other specialties in Dentistry expect from Orthodontics and, specially, what they have to offer. Clinical cases will be used to illustrate the dental movement that might maximize treatment outcome and to confront the ideal standards with the current state of the art. CONCLUSION: Treatment quality is directly related to the amount of procedures implemented by the orthodontist, associated with concepts and resources from Periodontics and Dental Prosthesis. Microesthetics cannot be seen in isolation, but rather as the key to establish a pleasant smile (miniesthetics in addition to a harmonious face (macroesthetics and a human being with high self-esteem (hyper-esthetics.

  5. Optimum selection of high performance mirror substrates for diamond finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Kenneth S.; Comstock, Lovell E.; Wamboldt, Leonard; Sutherland, James S.

    2016-05-01

    Due to advances in manufacturing processes, the substrate options for high performance diamond machined mirrors are expanding. Fewer compromises have to be made to achieve the needed weight, stiffness and finish while maintaining reasonable costs. In addition to the traditional mirror materials like aluminum and beryllium, there are some less common materials that can now be included in the trade space that fill the cost and performance continuum between wrought aluminum and beryllium mirrors. Aluminum and beryllium, respectively, had been the low cost/fair performance and very high cost/very high performance bounds for substrate selection. These additional substrates provide multiple near net shape blank options and processes, mostly within these bounds, that can be considered in a mirror cost versus performance trade analysis. This paper will include a summary of some advances in manufacturing processes that provide more substrate options for diamond machined mirrors with some sample performance analysis and data. This is merged with the traditional substrate options to illustrate the now larger mirror substrate trade space. Some benchmark structural analysis is provided to back up a generic mirror design trade study.

  6. Surface Finish and Residual Stresses Induced by Orthogonal Dry Machining of AA7075-T651.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Walid; Songmene, Victor; Bocher, Philippe

    2014-02-28

    The surface finish was extensively studied in usual machining processes (turning, milling, and drilling). For these processes, the surface finish is strongly influenced by the cutting feed and the tool nose radius. However, a basic understanding of tool/surface finish interaction and residual stress generation has been lacking. This paper aims to investigate the surface finish and residual stresses under the orthogonal cutting since it can provide this information by avoiding the effect of the tool nose radius. The orthogonal machining of AA7075-T651 alloy through a series of cutting experiments was performed under dry conditions. Surface finish was studied using height and amplitude distribution roughness parameters. SEM and EDS were used to analyze surface damage and built-up edge (BUE) formation. An analysis of the surface topography showed that the surface roughness was sensitive to changes in cutting parameters. It was found that the formation of BUE and the interaction between the tool edge and the iron-rich intermetallic particles play a determinant role in controlling the surface finish during dry orthogonal machining of the AA7075-T651 alloy. Hoop stress was predominantly compressive on the surface and tended to be tensile with increased cutting speed. The reverse occurred for the surface axial stress. The smaller the cutting feed, the greater is the effect of cutting speed on both axial and hoop stresses. By controlling the cutting speed and feed, it is possible to generate a benchmark residual stress state and good surface finish using dry machining.

  7. Wall finish selection in hospital design: a survey of facility managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavy, Sarel; Dixit, Manish K

    2012-01-01

    This paper seeks to analyze healthcare facility managers' perceptions regarding the materials used for interior wall finishes and the criteria used to select them. It also examines differences in wall finish materials and the selection process in three major hospital spaces: emergency, surgery, and in-patient units. These findings are compared with healthcare designers' perceptions on similar issues, as currently documented in the literature. Hospital design and the materials used for hospital construction have a considerable effect on the environment and health of patients. A 2002 survey revealed which characteristics healthcare facility designers consider when selecting materials for healthcare facilities; however, no similar study has examined the views of facility managers on building finish selection. A 22-question survey questionnaire was distributed to 210 facility managers of metropolitan, for-profit hospitals in Texas; IRB approval was obtained. Respondents were asked to rank 10 interior wall finish materials and 11 selection criteria for wall finishes. Data from 48 complete questionnaires were analyzed using descriptive statistics and nonparametric statistical analysis methods. The study found no statistically significant differences in terms of wall finish materials or the characteristics for material selection in the three major spaces studied. It identified facility managers' four most-preferred wall finish materials and the five-most preferred characteristics, with a statistical confidence level of greater than 95%. The paper underscores the importance of incorporating all perspectives: facility designers and facility managers should work together toward achieving common organizational goals.

  8. Hydrophilic modification of polyester fabric by applying nanocrystalline cellulose containing surface finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Masuduz; Liu, Hongbin; Xiao, Huning; Chibante, Felipe; Ni, Yonghao

    2013-01-16

    In this study, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fabric was modified by applying a hydrophilic surface finishing agent that contains nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC). To impart superior hydrophilicity, NCC was further cationically modified through quaternization by grafting glycidyl tri-methyl ammonium chloride (GTMAC). A textile binder, PrintRite595(®), was added to the finishing system. The surface finish was applied on the fabric using a rolling-drying-curing process. The modified fabric was characterized in terms of coating durability, moisture regain, and wettability. The durability of the surface finish was tested by six repeated washing steps. The surface properties of the fabric changed from hydrophobic to hydrophilic after heat treatment with the NCC-containing surface finishing agent. The results from the washing fastness, SEM, FTIR, and EDX analyses confirmed that the cationic NCC-containing textile surface finish showed superior adhesion onto the cationic dyeable (anionic) PET surface over the un-modified NCC. Furthermore, the cationic textile surface finish was capable of withstanding multiple washing cycles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Roughness Analysis on Composite Materials (Microfilled, Nanofilled and Silorane) After Different Finishing and Polishing Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettini, Francesco; Corsalini, Massimo; Savino, Maria Grazia; Stefanachi, Gianluca; Venere, Daniela Di; Pappalettere, Carmine; Monno, Giuseppe; Boccaccio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The finishing and polishing of composite materials affect the restoration lifespan. The market shows a variety of finishing and polishing procedures and the choice among them is conditioned by different factors such as the resulting surface roughness. In the present study, 156 samples were realized with three composite materials, -microfilled, nanofilled and silorane-, and treated with different finishing and polishing procedures. Profilometric analyses were carried out on the samples' surface, the measured roughness values were submitted to statistical analysis. A complete factorial plan was drawn up and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to investigate whether the following factors affect the values of roughness: (i) material; (ii) polishing/finishing procedure. Tukey post-hoc test was also conducted to evaluate any statistically significant differences between the material/procedure combinations. The results show that the tested materials do not affect the resulting surface quality but roughness values depend on the finishing/polishing procedure adopted. The procedures that involve: (a) the finishing with medium Sof-Lex discs and (b) the finishing with two tungsten carbide multi-blade milling cutters Q series and UF series are those that allow the lowest values of roughness to be obtained.

  10. Effects of Wet and Dry Finishing and Polishing on Surface Roughness and Microhardness of Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Nasoohi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of wet and dry finishing and polishing on microhardness and roughness of microhybrid and nanohybrid composites.Materials and Methods: Thirty samples were fabricated of each of the Polofil Supra and Aelite Aesthetic All-Purpose Body microhybrid and Grandio and Aelite Aesthetic Enamel nanohybrid composite resins. Each group (n=30 was divided into three subgroups of D, W and C (n=10. Finishing and polishing were performed dry in group D and under water coolant in group W. Group C served as the control group and did not receive finishing and polishing. Surface roughness of samples was measured by a profilometer and their hardness was measured by a Vickers hardness tester. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (P<0.05.Results: The smoothest surfaces with the lowest microhardness were obtained under Mylar strip without finishing/polishing for all composites (P<0.0001. The highest surface roughness was recorded for dry finishing/polishing for all composites (P<0.0001. Dry finishing/polishing increased the microhardness of all composites (P<0.0001.Conclusions: Dry finishing and polishing increases the microhardness and surface roughness of microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. Keywords: Composite Resins; Dental Polishing; Hardness

  11. Effect of Plasma Surface Finish on Wettability and Mechanical Properties of SAC305 Solder Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Koike, Junichi; Yoon, Jeong-Won; Yoo, Sehoon

    2016-12-01

    The wetting behavior, interfacial reactions, and mechanical reliability of Sn-Ag-Cu solder on a plasma-coated printed circuit board (PCB) substrate were evaluated under multiple heat-treatments. Conventional organic solderability preservative (OSP) finished PCBs were used as a reference. The plasma process created a dense and highly cross-linked polymer coating on the Cu substrates. The plasma finished samples had higher wetting forces and shorter zero-cross times than those with OSP surface finish. The OSP sample was degraded after sequential multiple heat treatments and reflow processes, whereas the solderability of the plasma finished sample was retained after multiple heat treatments. After the soldering process, similar microstructures were observed at the interfaces of the two solder joints, where the development of intermetallic compounds was observed. From ball shear tests, it was found that the shear force for the plasma substrate was consistently higher than that for the OSP substrate. Deterioration of the OSP surface finish was observed after multiple heat treatments. Overall, the plasma surface finish was superior to the conventional OSP finish with respect to wettability and joint reliability, indicating that it is a suitable material for the fabrication of complex electronic devices.

  12. 40 CFR 425.20 - Applicability; description of the hair save, chrome tan, retan-wet finish subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... save, chrome tan, retan-wet finish subcategory. 425.20 Section 425.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hair Save, Chrome Tan, Retan-Wet Finish Subcategory § 425.20 Applicability...

  13. 40 CFR 63.5385 - How do I measure the quantity of finish applied to the leather?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I measure the quantity of finish... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Leather Finishing Operations Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5385 How do I measure the quantity of finish applied to the...

  14. 78 FR 3900 - Generic Drug User Fee-Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient and Finished Dosage Form Facility Fee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... drug active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and finished dosage form (FDF) facilities user fees for... applications in the backlog as of October 1, 2012, on finished dosage form (FDF) and active pharmaceutical... Finished Dosage Form Facility Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2013 AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration,...

  15. Associations between feed and water antimicrobial use in farrow-to-finish swine herds and antimicrobial resistance of fecal Escherichia coli from grow-finish pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengren, Leigh B; Waldner, Cheryl L; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Dowling, Patricia M; Harding, John C S

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli (n = 1439), isolated from the feces of apparently healthy grow-finish pigs in 20 herds, were tested for susceptibility to 16 antimicrobials. Logistic regression models were developed for each resistance that was observed in more than 5% of the isolates. Each production phase's (suckling, nursery, grow-finish pigs or sows) antimicrobial exposure rate, through feed or water, was considered as a risk factor. Management variables were evaluated as potential confounders. Six resistance outcomes were associated with an antimicrobial use risk factor and four included exposures of pigs outside the grow-finish phase. In the case of sulfamethoxazole, the odds of resistance increased 2.3 times for every 100,000 pig-days of nursery pig exposure to sulfonamides. Thus, swine producers and veterinarians must be aware that antimicrobial use in pigs distant from market could have food safety repercussions. Five resistance outcomes were associated with exposure to an unrelated antimicrobial class. Most notably, the odds of sulfamethoxazole and chloramphenicol resistance were each six times higher in herds reporting high (more than 500/1,000 pig-days) grow-finish pig, macrolide exposure compared to herds with no macrolide use in grow-finish pigs. Therefore, the potential for co-selection should be considered in antimicrobial use decisions. This study emphasizes the importance of judicious antimicrobial use in pork production.

  16. Design and Feasibility Testing of the truth FinishIt Tobacco Countermarketing Brand Equity Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W Douglas; Rath, Jessica; Pitzer, Lindsay; Hair, Elizabeth C; Snider, Jeremy; Cantrell, Jennifer; Vallone, Donna

    2016-07-01

    The original truth campaign was a branded, national smoking prevention mass media effort focused on at-risk youth ages 12-17. Today the truth brand focuses on the goal of finishing tobacco (truth FinishIt). There have been significant changes in the tobacco control landscape, leading FinishIt to focus on 15- to 21-year-olds. The present article reports on formative research and media monitoring data collected to pilot test a new truth FinishIt brand equity scale. The goals of this study were to (a) content analyze truth FinishIt mass media ads, (b) assess truth's social media and followers' perceptions of truth's digital brand identity, and (c) develop and feasibility test a new version of the truth FinishIt brand equity scale using data from an existing Truth Initiative media monitoring study. Through factor analysis, we identified a brand equity scale, as in previous research, consisting of 4 main constructs: brand loyalty, leadership/satisfaction, personality, and awareness. Targeted truth attitudes and beliefs about social perceptions, acceptability, and industry-related beliefs were regressed on the higher order factor and each of the 4 individual brand equity factors. Ordinary least squares regression models generally showed associations in the expected directions (positive for anti-tobacco and negative for pro-tobacco) between targeted attitudes/beliefs and truth FinishIt brand equity. This study succeeded in developing and validating a new truth FinishIt brand equity scale. The scale may be a valuable metric for future campaign evaluation. Future studies should examine the effects of truth FinishIt brand equity on tobacco use behavioral outcomes over time.

  17. Study on ultra-precision magnetic abrasive finishing process using low frequency alternating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jinzhong, E-mail: wjz.0926@163.com; Zou, Yanhua, E-mail: yanhua@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp; Sugiyama, Hitoshi, E-mail: sugiyama@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp

    2015-07-15

    We proposed a new ultra-precision magnetic abrasive finishing (MAF) process using low frequency alternating magnetic field in this paper. Magnetic cluster themselves may produce the up and down movement change under alternating magnetic force. The movement may not only promote the dispersion of micro-magnetic particles, but also improve stirring effect and cross-cutting effects of the abrasives, achieving circulation and update to ensure the stability of grinding tools. This process is considered to be able to efficiently apply in ultra-precision finishing of plane and complicated micro-surfaces. In this study, we investigated the effects of alternating magnetic field on magnetic field distribution, finishing force and abrasive behavior. Furthermore, a set of experimental devices have been designed for finishing SUS304 stainless steel plate. The present work is aimed at understanding finishing particularity of this process and studying impacts of important process parameters namely grinding fluid, rotational speed of magnetic pole, current frequency on change in finish surface and material removal. Experimental results indicate that the process can realize ultra-precision finishing of plane by using oily grinding fluid. In the present research, the surface roughness of SUS304 stainless steel plate was improved from 240.24 nm to 4.38 nm by this process. - Highlights: • We investigated magnetic field distribution in processing region. • Magnetic cluster can produce a fluctuating finishing force in alternating magnetic field. • Oily grinding fluid is more applicable to this process. • Few nanometer finish surface can be obtained by this process.

  18. ALARA Design Review for the Resumption of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Cementation Process Project Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Dayley, L

    2000-01-01

    The requirements for the performance of radiological design reviews are codified in 10CFR835, Occupational Radiation Protection. The basic requirements for the performance of ALARA design reviews are presented in the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM). The HSRCM has established trigger levels requiring radiological reviews of non-routine or complex work activities. These requirements are implemented in site procedures HNF-PRO-1622 and 1623. HNF-PRO-1622 Radiological Design Review Process requires that ''radiological design reviews [be performed] of new facilities and equipment and modifications of existing facilities and equipment''. In addition, HNF-PRO-1623 Radiological Work Planning Process requires a formal ALARA Review for planned activities that are estimated to exceed 1 person-rem total Dose Equivalent (DE). The purpose of this review is to validate that the original design for the PFP Cementation Process ensures that the principles of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) were included...

  19. Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) [VOL 1 & 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SETH, S.S.

    2000-01-10

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Policy 450.4, Safety Management System Policy commits to institutionalizing an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) throughout the DOE complex as a means of accomplishing its missions safely. DOE Acquisition Regulation 970.5204-2 requires that contractors manage and perform work in accordance with a documented safety management system.

  20. The Tiger Team Process in the Rebaselining of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BAILEY, R.W.

    2000-02-01

    This paper will describe the integrated, teaming approach and planning process utilized by the Tiger Team in the development of the IPMP. This paper will also serve to document the benefits derived from this implementation process.

  1. Integrated project management plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant stabilization and deactivation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SINCLAIR, J.C.

    1999-05-03

    This document sets forth the plans, organization, and control systems for managing the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project, and includes the top level cost and schedule baselines. The project includes the stabilization of Pu-bearing materials, storage, packaging, and transport of these and other nuclear materials, surveillance and maintenance of facilities and systems relied upon for storage of the materials, and transition of the facilities in the PFP Complex.

  2. Fixed dental prostheses with vertical tooth preparations without finish lines: A report of two patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Solá-Ruíz, María Fernanda; Chust, César; Ferreiroa, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Tooth abutments can be prepared to receive fixed dental prostheses with different types of finish lines. The literature reports different complications arising from tooth preparation techniques, including gingival recession. Vertical preparation without a finish line is a technique whereby the abutments are prepared by introducing a diamond rotary instrument into the sulcus to eliminate the cementoenamel junction and to create a new prosthetic cementoenamel junction determined by the prosthetic margin. This article describes 2 patients whose dental abutments were prepared to receive ceramic restorations using vertical preparation without a finish line. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. SEM Evaluation of Surrounding Enamel after Finishing of Composite Restorations- Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovan, G.; Stoleriu, S.; Solomon, S.; Ghiorghe, A.; Sandu, A. V.; Andrian, S.

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the surface characteristics of the enamel adjacent to composite resin after finishing the restoration with different diamond and tungsten carbide burs. The topography of enamel was observed by using a scanning electron microscope. Finishing with extra-/ultra-fine carbide burs, and extra-fine diamond burs resulted in smooth surfaces. In few areas some superficial scratches with no clinical relevance were observed. Deep grooves were observed on the surface of enamel when fine diamond burs were used. Finishing of composite restorations with coarse burs should be avoided when there is a high risk of touching and scratching adjacent enamel during the procedure.

  4. A New Catalyst in the Crease Recovery Finishing of Silk Fabrics with Epoxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-ming; SHEN Gan-qing

    2004-01-01

    The paper here intends to discuss silk crease recovery finishing behavior with ED GE (ethylene diglycidal ether) in the presence of a new catalyst WSH. The results show that ED GE reacts with silk fibroin and forms cross linkages through ether bond. The formation of cross linking was examined by FITR spectroscopy, soluble time in acid solution and changes of amino acids. Handle of treated silk with catalyst WSH is better than that of silk treated with the traditional catalysts such as thiosulfates and thiocyanates. Finishing technique, physical properties of the finished silk fabrics and evaluation of cross linkages are discussed.

  5. An Expert System for the Prediction of Surface Finish in Turning Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    U; S; Dixit; K; Acharyya; A; D; Sahasrabudhe

    2002-01-01

    Prediction of surface finish in turning process is a difficult but important task. Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) can reliably pred ict the surface finish but require a lot of training data. To overcome this prob lem, an expert system approach is proposed, wherein it will be possible to predi ct the surface finish from limited experiments. The expert system contains a kno wledge base prepared from machining data handbooks and number of experiments con ducted by turning steel rods, over a wide range of c...

  6. Synthesis of Fluorocyclotriphosphazene Derivatives and Their Fire-Retardant Finishing on Cotton Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhanxiong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel fire-retardant agents, fluorocyclotriphosphazene derivatives with the substitution groups of 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy groups were synthesized using hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene and 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropyl alcohol as starting materials. The synthesized fire-retardant agent was emulsified and applied on the cotton fabric finishing to reduce the flammability and afford water/oil repellency simultaneously. The optimum finishing process was achieved according to the test of cotton finishing with fluorocyclotriphosphazene. The treated cotton showed not only excellent fire-retardant performance, but also water and oil repellency with little change in strength and whiteness.

  7. Concentration data for anthropogenic organic compounds in groundwater, surface water, and finished water of selected community water systems in the United States, 2002-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Janet M.; Kingsbury, James A.; Hopple, Jessica A.; Delzer, Gregory C.

    2010-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey began implementing Source Water-Quality Assessments (SWQAs) in 2001 that focus on characterizing the quality of source water and finished water of aquifers and major rivers used by some of the larger community water systems in the United States. As used in SWQA studies, source water is the raw (ambient) water collected at the supply well before water treatment (for groundwater) or the raw (ambient) water collected from the river near the intake (for surface water), and finished water is the water that has been treated and is ready to be delivered to consumers. Finished-water samples are collected before the water enters the distribution system. The primary objective of SWQAs is to determine the occurrence of more than 250 anthropogenic organic compounds in source water used by community water systems, many of which currently are unregulated in drinking water by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A secondary objective is to understand recurrence patterns in source water and determine if these patterns also occur in finished water before distribution. SWQA studies were conducted in two phases for most studies completed by 2005, and in one phase for most studies completed since 2005. Analytical results are reported for a total of 295 different anthropogenic organic compounds monitored in source-water and finished-water samples collected during 2002-10. The 295 compounds were classified according to the following 13 primary use or source groups: (1) disinfection by-products; (2) fumigant-related compounds; (3) fungicides; (4) gasoline hydrocarbons, oxygenates, and oxygenate degradates; (5) herbicides and herbicide degradates; (6) insecticides and insecticide degradates; (7) manufacturing additives; (8) organic synthesis compounds; (9) pavement- and combustion-derived compounds; (10) personal-care and domestic-use products; (11) plant- or animal-derived biochemicals; (12) refrigerants and

  8. Interaction of dispersed polyvynil acetate with silicate in finishing materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runova, R. F.

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the processes of interaction between calcium silicate hydrates and dispersed polyvinyl acetate in tight films with the aim of developing compounds meant for restoration and finishing works. The basis of this development relies on the concept concerning the determining role of the crystal-chemical factor of the silicate phase in the formation of organic-mineral compounds of increased durability. The characteristics of dispersed calcium silicate hydrates are portrayed. The preparation conditions, accounting for the synthesis of the product of submicrocrystalline structure, conforming with the stoichiometry CaO∙SiO2 =0.8-2.0 have been determined. The interaction has been studied for compounds achieved by mixing ingredients in a rapid whirling mixer, and subjected to hardening at T=20+2 T. With the aid of XRD, DTA and Infra-Red Spectrometry methods the formation process of the sophisticated polymer silicate phase in the material was observed for a period of 90 days. The properties of the film were investigated and its high resistance against the influence of external factors was established. On this basis a conclusion concerning the quite high effectiveness of substituting portland cement with dispersed calcium silicate hydrate in polymer cement compounds has been made. White colour and other various special properties determine the suitability for repair and finishing works on facades of buildings.

    Este artículo está orientado a estudiar los procesos de interacción entre los silicatos cálcicos hidratados y el acetato de polivinilo disperso en capas impermeables, con el objeto de desarrollar compuestos destinados para la restauración. El fundamento de estos estudios es determinar el papel que los factores cristaloquímicos de las fases silicato tienen en la formación de compuestos órganominerales de elevada durabilidad. Se han descrito las características de los silicatos cálcicos hidratados

  9. John P Peters (1887-1955): McCarthyism and the Unfinished Revision of Quantitative Clinical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Richard M

    2017-02-01

    John P Peters is considered one of the founders of modern clinical chemistry. In more than 200 research articles, he brought clinical biochemistry to the bedside, advancing the use of laboratory medicine in diagnosis and disease management. His two-volume landmark textbook Quantitative Clinical Chemistry, coauthored with Donald Dexter van Slyke (1883-1971) and released in 1931-1932, defined clinical chemistry as a distinct professional discipline within medicine. A three-volume revision was begun in 1937. Peters took on the task of revising Volumes I and II but never finished Volume II. His outspoken public advocacy for social reform, world peace, and universal health care made him a target in the era of McCarthyism. Three times between 1949 and 1953 he was brought before the Loyalty Review Board with charges of being a communist and a sympathetic supporter of subversive organizations. According to his family, the turmoil of the McCarthyism persecution shortened his life and prevented him from completing the one thing he wanted to do in his professional life, finish the revision of his landmark clinical chemistry textbook.

  10. Quantum interaction. Revised selected papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dawei; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Lei [Aberdeen Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Computing; Melucci, Massimo [Padua Univ., Padova (Italy). Dept. of Information Engineering; Frommholz, Ingo [Bedfordshire Univ. (United Kingdom); Arafat, Sachi (eds.) [Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Computing Science

    2011-07-01

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Quantum Interaction, QI 2011, held in Aberdeen, UK, in June 2011. The 26 revised full papers and 6 revised poster papers, presented together with 1 tutorial and 1 invited talk were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions during two rounds of reviewing and improvement. The papers show the cross-disciplinary nature of quantum interaction covering topics such as computation, cognition, mechanics, social interaction, semantic space and information representation and retrieval. (orig.)

  11. Medical writing, revising and editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Morten

    2006-01-01

    The globalization of science makes medical writing, editing and revision a rapidly growing field of linguistic study and practice. Medical science texts are written according to uniform, general guidelines and medical genres have become highly conventionalized in terms of structure and linguistic...... form. Medical editing often takes the form of peer review and mainly addresses issues of contents and overall validity. Medical revision incorporates the checking of the macrostructure and the microstructure of the text, its language and style and its suitability for the target reader or client...

  12. Medical writing, revising and editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Morten

    2006-01-01

    The globalization of science makes medical writing, editing and revision a rapidly growing field of linguistic study and practice. Medical science texts are written according to uniform, general guidelines and medical genres have become highly conventionalized in terms of structure and linguistic...... form. Medical editing often takes the form of peer review and mainly addresses issues of contents and overall validity. Medical revision incorporates the checking of the macrostructure and the microstructure of the text, its language and style and its suitability for the target reader or client...

  13. Revising Nabokov Revising”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Bouchet

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Nabokov revised his works as he translated them and, on another plane, canon revisionism has been having its backlash and provoked other refracting waves. The purpose of the conference was to advance Nabokov studies through the discussion of how our view of Nabokov’s standing and his works today should be revised, especially after the publication of The Original of Laura. However the conference was not confined to just this theme, since “revising” is a word rich with implications. To borrow s...

  14. The Affordable Pre-Finishing of Silicon Carbide for Optical Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Creare proposes to develop a novel, laser-assisted, pre-finishing process for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coated silicon-carbide ceramics. Our innovation will...

  15. Study for Reduction of Outgassing Property of Adsorbed Water Gas for Improved Surface Finished Titanium Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Masatoshi; Kurisu, Hiroki; Uchida, Takashi; Yamamoto, Setsuo; Ishizawa, Katsunobu; Nomura, Takeru; Eda, Takahiro; Murashige, Nobuyuki

    This paper addresses the development of the surface finishing for a titanium material and the study for the reduction of outgassing property of adsorbed water (H2O) molecules. Developed surface finishing is composed of the buffing for the reduction of the surface roughness and improved chemical polishing for the thick surface oxide layer compared with the chemical polishing so far. The surface roughness of the surface finished titanium material is reduced 35% and the thickness of the surface oxide layer increases by 30%. The total amount of thermal desorbed H2O gas for the new surface finished titanium is reduced 30%. It is considered that the origin for the decrease of the amount of desorption H2O gas is the reduction of the adsorption sites due to the decrease of the surface roughness and the reduction of adsorption energy of H2O gas due to the strong surface oxidation for a titanium material.

  16. Analysis of the influence of electrolyte on surface finish in electropolished stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, M.; Núñez, P. J.; García, E.; Trujillo, R.

    2012-04-01

    Electropolishing is a surface finishing process of metals and alloys that enhances brilliant surface finishes with low surface roughness values. The most widely used electrolytes for the electropolishing of stainless steel are varying concentrations of phosphoric and sulphuric acid, and occasionally additives such as chromic acid. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of three commonly used industrial electrolytes in terms of the surface finish of electropolished stainless steel AISI 316L. Each electrolyte had varying sulphuric-phosphoric acid combinations with or without chromic acid. The following electropolishing conditions were assessed: current density, bath temperature, electropolishing time, and initial surface texture. The results revealed that adding chromic acid to the electrolyte did not significantly enhance surface finish, and electropolishing ranges were quite similar for all three electrolytes.

  17. Conservation of filtering in manufacturing systems with unreliable machines and finished goods buffers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingshan Li

    2006-01-01

    nature of manufacturing systems, this law offers a tool for selecting the smallest, that is, lean, finished goods buffering, which is necessary and sufficient to ensure the desired level ofcustomer demand satisfaction.

  18. Investigating Effect of Machining Parameters of CNC Milling on Surface Finish by Taguchi Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Joshi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available CNC End milling is a unique adaption of the conventional milling process which uses an end mill tool for the machining process. CNC Vertical End Milling Machining is a widely accepted material removal process used to manufacture components with complicated shapes and profiles. During the End milling process, the material is removed by the end mill cutter. The effects of various parameters of end milling process like spindle speed, depth of cut, feed rate have been investigated to reveal their Impact on surface finish using Taguchi Methodology. Experimental plan is performed by a Standard Orthogonal Array. The results of analysis of variance (ANOVA indicate that the feed Rate is most influencing factor for modeling surface finish. The graph of S-N Ratio indicates the optimal setting of the machining parameter which gives the optimum value of surface finish. The optimal set of process parameters has also been predicted to maximize the surface finish.

  19. Investigating Effect of Machining Parameters of CNC Milling on Surface Finish by Taguchi Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Joshi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available CNC End milling is a unique adaption of the conventional milling process which uses an end mill tool for the machining process. CNC Vertical End Milling Machining is a widely accepted material removal process used to manufacture components with complicated shapes and profiles. During the End milling process, the material is removed by the end mill cutter. The effects of various parameters of end milling process like spindle speed, depth of cut, feed rate have been investigated to reveal their Impact on surface finish using Taguchi Methodology. Experimental plan is performed by a Standard Orthogonal Array. The results of analysis of variance (ANOVA indicate that the feed Rate is most influencing factor for modelling surface finish. The graph of S-N Ratio indicates the optimal setting of the machining parameter which gives the optimum value of surface finish. The optimal set of process parameters has also been predicted to maximize the surface finish.

  20. Low-Stress Silicon Cladding for Surface Finishing Large UVOIR Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I research, ZeCoat Corporation demonstrated a low-stress silicon cladding process for surface finishing large UVOIR mirrors. A polishable cladding is...

  1. DESIGN OF FILL AND FINISH FACILITY FOR ACTIVE PHARMACEUTICAL INGREDIENTS (API

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NUUR LAILA KHAIRUDDIN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fill and finish operations continue to be one of the most heavily outsourced activities in the biopharmaceutical manufacturing market today. There are a few aspects that need to be consider in outsource activities like logistic, storage condition, facility certification and audit as regulations and standards which the manufacturer should adhere. Risk would be greater and extra care should be taken when outsource from foreign fill and finish facility. Thus, the internal aseptic fill and finish facility with audit checklist will help to minimize the risk during logistic and storage and also minimize the cost for outsource fill and finish facility. The data collections are through survey and conceptual design with simulation as the execution part.

  2. Field tests of the first complete solar heating successfully finished; Feldtests erster Solarkomplettheizung erfolgreich abgeschlossen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kranich, Kerstin [Westfa, Hagen (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    Recently, the field tests of a new complete solar heating system could successfully be finished. The heating system obtains a primary energy saving of up to 60 % by means of a covering degree of 85 % by renewable energy sources. The effective combination of new hybrid solar heat collectors, a heat pump, a combination buffer memory and an ice latent heat storage finished the test phase and comes to the market in a few weeks.

  3. Diet History Questionnaire: Database Revision History

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following details all additions and revisions made to the DHQ nutrient and food database. This revision history is provided as a reference for investigators who may have performed analyses with a previous release of the database.

  4. Revised Human Health Risk Assessment on Chlorpyrifos

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have revised our human health risk assessment and drinking water exposure assessment for chlorpyrifos that supported our October 2015 proposal to revoke all food residue tolerances for chlorpyrifos. Learn about the revised analysis.

  5. Diet History Questionnaire: Database Revision History

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following details all additions and revisions made to the DHQ nutrient and food database. This revision history is provided as a reference for investigators who may have performed analyses with a previous release of the database.

  6. Revision of failed humeral head resurfacing arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp N Streubel

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Outcomes of revision of HHR arthroplasty in this cohort did not improve upon those reported for revision of stemmed humeral implants. A comparative study would be required to allow for definitive conclusions to be made.

  7. Finishing genomes with limited resources: lessons from an ensemble of microbial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishop-Lilly Kimberly A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While new sequencing technologies have ushered in an era where microbial genomes can be easily sequenced, the goal of routinely producing high-quality draft and finished genomes in a cost-effective fashion has still remained elusive. Due to shorter read lengths and limitations in library construction protocols, shotgun sequencing and assembly based on these technologies often results in fragmented assemblies. Correspondingly, while draft assemblies can be obtained in days, finishing can take many months and hence the time and effort can only be justified for high-priority genomes and in large sequencing centers. In this work, we revisit this issue in light of our own experience in producing finished and nearly-finished genomes for a range of microbial species in a small-lab setting. These genomes were finished with surprisingly little investments in terms of time, computational effort and lab work, suggesting that the increased access to sequencing might also eventually lead to a greater proportion of finished genomes from small labs and genomics cores.

  8. The optimal parameters in a magnetically assisted finishing system using Taguchi's method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pa, P.S., E-mail: myhow@seed.net.t

    2010-11-01

    An intelligent design system was created that efficiently uses magnetic force to assist in the discharge of dregs from the electrode gap during the electrochemical step of a surface finishing process. In this electrochemical finishing experiment, the author used an electrode mated to the shape of the workpiece and supplied with continuous or pulsed direct current. The study used Taguchi's Method to analyze the combination of optimal parameters. The experimental parameters include four factors at three levels for the evaluation of surface roughness after the magnetically assisted electrochemical finishing process. These four factors are voltage, magnetic field strength, the distance between the two magnets and the electrode rotation speed. For this design a higher rotation speed of the electrode produced a better finish. A higher voltage with magnetic assistance can alleviate the difficulties of dregs discharge and also reduce the finishing time. Smaller distances between the two magnets, or a larger magnetic field intensity provides more magnetic force, improved discharge and results in a better finish. The average effect of magnetic assistance was greater than that of pulsed current and there is no need to prolong machining time to compensate for off-time.

  9. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of finishing techniques on IRM and EBA retrofillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, E L; Steiman, H R

    1997-07-01

    Various techniques have been advocated for finishing retrofilling materials. This study evaluated marginal interfaces between tooth structure and the retrofilling material following three techniques of finishing IRM and EBA. This interface was evaluated for the presence of flash and for adaptation to the prepared canal walls. Thirty-one teeth were divided into six groups of five and one control. The teeth were instrumented to a minimum of a 35 K-file, obturated with gutta-percha, resected perpendicular to their long axes and ultrasonically prepared to receive a retrofilling. The teeth were filled with either IRM or EBA cement and finished by ball burnishing, burnishing with a moistened cotton pellet, or with a carbide finishing bur in a high-speed handpiece with air/water spray. Photomicrographs were made and examined by four evaluators. Retrofillings finished with a finishing bur displayed significantly better marginal adaptation and little evidence of flash when compared to the other techniques (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between ball burnished or moistened cotton pellet techniques or between retrofilling materials used in this study (p < 0.05).

  10. Effect of Finishing Time on Microleakage at the Composite-Repair Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Berahman, Nazanin; Niazi, Elmira

    2016-01-01

    Repair is a conservative treatment of defective composite restoration. Sealing the repair interface is a critical factor to achieve successful repaired restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluatethe effect of three finishing times on the microleakage at the composite-repair interface. Eighty composite specimens (Z250) were made and aged for eight weeks in water. They were randomly divided into four groups. In the control group, repairing was done with no surface treatment and using bonding agent. In groups 2 to 4, the specimens were repaired following roughening, etching and use of Adper Single Bond, and finished immediately, after 20 minutes and after 24 hours, respectively. After thermocycling, the microleakage at the repair interface was assessed using dye-penetration technique. The results were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). There was a significant difference among the four groups (P<0.001). The control group with the highest leakage showed a significant difference with the other groups (P<0.05). Immediate finishing showed a significantly higher leakage compared to 20-minute and 24-hour delayed finishing time (P<0.001). The two latter groups had no difference. Immediate finishing of the repaired restorations negatively affect the sealing at the repair interface, while 20-minute and 24-hour delayed finishing had no adverse effect on the interface sealing.

  11. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Chapter E, Appendix E1, Chapter L, Appendix L1: Volume 12, Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project was authorized by the US Department of Energy 5 (DOE) National Security and Military Applications of the Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-164). Its legislative mandate is to provide a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive waste resulting from national defense programs and activities. To fulfill this mandate, the WIPP facility has been designed to perform scientific investigations of the behavior of bedded salt as a repository medium and the interactions between the soft and radioactive wastes. In 1991, DOE proposed to initiate a experimental Test Phase designed to demonstrate the performance of the repository. The Test Phase activities involve experiments using transuranic (TRU) waste typical of the waste planned for future disposal at the WIPP facility. Much of this TRU waste is co-contaminated with chemical constituents which are defined as hazardous under HWMR-7, Pt. II, sec. 261. This waste is TRU mixed waste and is the subject of this application. Because geologic repositories, such as the WIPP facility, are defined under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as land disposal facilities, the groundwater monitoring requirements of HWMR-7, PLV, Subpart X, must be addressed. HWMR-7, Pt. V, Subpart X, must be addressed. This appendix demonstrates that groundwater monitoring is not needed in order to demonstrate compliance with the performance standards; therefore, HWMR-7, Pt.V, Subpart F, will not apply to the WIPP facility.

  12. A Practical Propositional Knowledge Base Revision Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶雪红; 孙伟; 等

    1997-01-01

    This paper gives an outline of knowledge base revision and some recently presented complexity results about propostitional knowledge base revision.Different methods for revising propositional knowledge base have been proposed recently by several researchers,but all methods are intractable in the general case.For practical application,this paper presents a revision method for special case,and gives its corresponding polynomial algorithm.

  13. Soft tissue trauma and scar revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Steven R; Sjogren, Phayvanh P

    2014-11-01

    Numerous techniques and treatments have been described for scar revision, with most studies focusing on the adult population. A comprehensive review of the literature reveals a paucity of references related specifically to scar revision in children. This review describes the available modalities in pediatric facial scar revision. The authors have integrated current practices in soft tissue trauma and scar revision, including closure techniques and materials, topical therapy, steroid injection, cutaneous laser therapy, and tissue expanders.

  14. Revised hypothesis and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norsk, P; Drummer, C; Christensen, N J

    2001-01-01

    Results from space have been unexpected and not predictable from the results of ground-based simulations. Therefore, the concept of how weightlessness and gravity modulates the regulation of body fluids must be revised and a new simulation model developed. The main questions to ask in the future ...

  15. Air Pollution Primer. Revised Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, Rena

    This revised and updated book is written to inform the citizens on the nature, causes, and effects of air pollution. It is written in terms familiar to the layman with the purpose of providing knowledge and motivation to spur community action on clean air policies. Numerous charts and drawings are provided to support discussion of air pollution…

  16. Revised Safety Code A2

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Secretariat

    2005-01-01

    Please note that the revised Safety Code A2 (Code A2 rev.) entitled "REPORTING OF ACCIDENTS AND NEAR MISSES" is available on the web at the following url: https://edms.cern.ch/document/335502/LAST_RELEASED Paper copies can also be obtained from the SC Unit Secretariat, e-mail: sc.secretariat@cern.ch SC Secretariat

  17. Revised Accounting for Business Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Arlette C.; Key, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) has recently issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141 (Revised 2007) Business Combinations. The object of this Statement is to improve the relevance, representational faithfulness, and comparability of reported information about a business combination and its effects. This Statement…

  18. Ethical considerations in revision rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Ivan

    2012-08-01

    The problems that arise when reviewing another surgeon's work, the financial aspects of revision surgery, and the controversies that present in marketing and advertising will be explored. The technological advances of computer imaging and the Internet have introduced new problems that require our additional consideration.

  19. Revision of Drymophloeus (Areceacea: Arecoideae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zona, Scott

    1999-01-01

    A revision of the genus Drymophloeus (Arecaceae: Arecoideae: Ptychospermatinae) recognizes seven species, distributed from the Maluku Islands of Indonesia to Western Samoa. The history of the genus is reviewed. A key, species descriptions, a complete list of synonymy, a list of specimens examined, i

  20. A revision of Ichnocarpus (Apocynaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middleton, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The genus Ichnocarpus is revised. A total of 12 species are recognised, of which one new species is described. Three new combinations in Ichnocarpus and one in Anodendron are made. Micrechites and Lamechites are treated as synonyms of Ichnocarpus. Nomina nuda and species exclusae have been given as

  1. Curriculum revision and ICT integration

    OpenAIRE

    Atanasova-Pacemska, Tatjana

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we will present the possibilities for revision and development of the curriculum of "Math Teaching Methods" related to Child-centered methodology and ICT integration. This paper is a result of the projects: "Teacher, Technology and young learners" and "Child-centered methodology" supported by USAID and World Learning.

  2. REVISION MASTOIDECTOMY AND ITS GOAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampath Kumar Singh Katewad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The main aims in doing surgery for chronic otitis media are: 1. Complete clearance of progressive disease from its site and form dry and well-epithelialised cavity. 2. Prevention of recurrent and residual cholesteatoma achieved by modifying the anatomy of tympanomastoid compartments. 3. Hearing improvement by reconstructing the ossicles and tympanic membrane. The main indication for revision surgery is failure to achieve above said aims by previous surgeon. The aim of our study was to identify the causes of recurrent disease and the factors that helps in chronic otitis media surgery to minimise the revisions & report the results of revision mastoidectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this study, thirty patients are selected and operated for revision mastoidectomy surgery at our institute during the period from May 2013 – Dec 2015. These cases were analysed retrospectively, patients who had discharging ear with the history of previous intact canal wall and canal down mastoidectomy surgeries were selected for this study. OBSERVATION AND RESULTS In this study, the common age group of patients who underwent revision surgery - 8-46 yrs. (mean 19 yrs.. Majority of patients are female, 16 cases (53.33%; and males 14 cases (46.66%. Revision mastoidectomies were applied to 12 cases (40% of previous canal wall up mastoidectomies and 18 cases (60% of prior canal down mastoidectomies. 60% of cases had residual/recurrent cholesteatoma which was the most common finding seen. While in 33.3% cases patient had only chronic granulations. The most frequent site of cholesteatoma was mastoid antrum/mastoid cavity seen in 73% followed by attic 42.3% and mesotympanum in 40% of cases. The common failure in primary surgery was inadequate clearance of diseased mastoid air cells - 48%, high facial bridge - 48%, stenotic meatoplasty - 40%, incomplete removal of buttress - 30%. Tympanic membrane perforation - 6.66% of cases with poor architecture of mastoidectomy

  3. Revising Psychiatry's Charter Document: "DSM-IV."

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Lucille Parkinson; Gerring, Joan Page

    1994-01-01

    Reports findings from a three-year study by a composition researcher and a psychiatrist of the revision of an important mental health book: "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders." Examines the revision using three methodologies. Concludes that the revision functions to achieve certain social and political effects. (HB)

  4. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-01-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery. PMID:27583011

  5. A taxonomic revision of the genus Podocarpus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laubenfels, de D.J.

    1985-01-01

    In connection with the forthcoming revision of the Coniferae for the Flora Malesiana, the author thought it necessary to revise the genus Podocarpus. Although this genus has a substantial representation in Malesia (30 species), the revision is too involved to be appropriate with the Flora Malesiana

  6. Finished genome of the fungal wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola reveals dispensome structure, chromosome plasticity, and stealth pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen B Goodwin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The plant-pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola (asexual stage: Septoria tritici causes septoria tritici blotch, a disease that greatly reduces the yield and quality of wheat. This disease is economically important in most wheat-growing areas worldwide and threatens global food production. Control of the disease has been hampered by a limited understanding of the genetic and biochemical bases of pathogenicity, including mechanisms of infection and of resistance in the host. Unlike most other plant pathogens, M. graminicola has a long latent period during which it evades host defenses. Although this type of stealth pathogenicity occurs commonly in Mycosphaerella and other Dothideomycetes, the largest class of plant-pathogenic fungi, its genetic basis is not known. To address this problem, the genome of M. graminicola was sequenced completely. The finished genome contains 21 chromosomes, eight of which could be lost with no visible effect on the fungus and thus are dispensable. This eight-chromosome dispensome is dynamic in field and progeny isolates, is different from the core genome in gene and repeat content, and appears to have originated by ancient horizontal transfer from an unknown donor. Synteny plots of the M. graminicola chromosomes versus those of the only other sequenced Dothideomycete, Stagonospora nodorum, revealed conservation of gene content but not order or orientation, suggesting a high rate of intra-chromosomal rearrangement in one or both species. This observed "mesosynteny" is very different from synteny seen between other organisms. A surprising feature of the M. graminicola genome compared to other sequenced plant pathogens was that it contained very few genes for enzymes that break down plant cell walls, which was more similar to endophytes than to pathogens. The stealth pathogenesis of M. graminicola probably involves degradation of proteins rather than carbohydrates to evade host defenses during the biotrophic

  7. Effect of sow history features on growth and feed intake in grow-finish pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell-Kubiak, E; Knol, E F; Bijma, P

    2012-01-01

    The sow provides a specific environment to her offspring during gestation and lactation. Certain features in the early life of the sow (sow history features) may affect her ability to deliver and feed a healthy litter. In genetic analyses of grow-finish traits, these effects are estimated as common litter or permanent sow effects. The objective of this research was to identify sow history features that affect the growth rate (GR) and feed intake (FI) of her offspring during the grow-finish stage. Data from 17,743 grow-finish pigs, coming from 604 sires and 681 crossbred sows, were recorded between May 2001 and February 2010 at the experimental farm of the Institute for Pig Genetics (Beilen, the Netherlands). The grow-finish stage was divided into 2 phases (phase 1: 26 to 75 kg; phase 2: 75 to 115 kg). The sow history features were birth litter size, birth year and season, birth farm, weaning age, age of transfer to the experimental farm, and age at first insemination. The sow features were added to the basic model one at a time to study their effect on the grow-finish traits of the pigs. Subsequently, significant sow features (P finish pigs by 0.1 g/d. The heritability estimates for GR and FI (only in phase 2 of the grow-finish stage) decreased after adding the sow features to the model. No differences were found in estimates of the common litter effects between the basic model and the model with all significant sow features. The estimates of the permanent sow effect changed for FI from 0.03 (basic model) to 0.00 (model with sow features), and for FI in phase 1, the permanent sow effect decreased from 0.03 (basic model) to 0.01 (model with sow features). In conclusion, selected sow features do affect the grow-finish traits of the pigs, but their estimates are small and explain only a small proportion of the differences in the GR and FI of grow-finish pigs. The sow features partially explained the permanent sow effect of FI-related traits and did not explain the

  8. 40 CFR 425.30 - Applicability; description of the hair save or pulp, non-chrome tan, retan-wet finish subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... save or pulp, non-chrome tan, retan-wet finish subcategory. 425.30 Section 425.30 Protection of... FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hair Save or Pulp, Non-Chrome Tan, Retan-Wet Finish Subcategory § 425.30 Applicability; description of the hair save or pulp, non-chrome tan, retan-wet finish subcategory. The...

  9. Fatigue and fracture resistance of zirconia crowns prepared with different finish line designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of finish line design on the fatigue, fracture resistance, and failure type of veneered zirconia restorations. A CAD/CAM system (Cercon) was used to prepare zirconia frameworks (0.5 mm thick) for a maxillary central incisor. Three finish line designs were evaluated: a complete narrow chamfer, a narrow chamfer with a lingual ledge, and a complete ledge. The prepared frameworks were veneered using a press-on ceramic (Ceram Press) and were cemented on the corresponding prepared teeth using a resin cement (Panavia F2.0). The cemented specimens were thermocycled, subjected to dynamic fatigue, and finally loaded till fracture. Fractured specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope to assess fracture type. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc tests were used to analyze the data (α= 0.05). The finish line design did not have any significant statistical influence on the fracture resistance (F = 1.9, p= 0.346) or on the failure type of the tested specimens. Adjusted R squared value (R = 0.049) indicated a weak correlation between finish line design and fracture load of the tested specimens. All specimens failed due to cracking and fracture of the veneer ceramic. Meanwhile, the framework remained entirely intact. Three narrow chamfer finish line specimens demonstrated adhesive fracture of the veneer ceramic during dynamic fatigue testing, related to overextension of the veneer ceramic during the layering procedure. Within the limitations of this study, the finish line design did not influence the fatigue or the fracture resistance of veneered zirconia crowns. Selection of any of the finish line designs should be based on the clinical condition of the restored tooth. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  10. Surface Finish and Residual Stresses Induced by Orthogonal Dry Machining of AA7075-T651

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Jomaa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface finish was extensively studied in usual machining processes (turning, milling, and drilling. For these processes, the surface finish is strongly influenced by the cutting feed and the tool nose radius. However, a basic understanding of tool/surface finish interaction and residual stress generation has been lacking. This paper aims to investigate the surface finish and residual stresses under the orthogonal cutting since it can provide this information by avoiding the effect of the tool nose radius. The orthogonal machining of AA7075-T651 alloy through a series of cutting experiments was performed under dry conditions. Surface finish was studied using height and amplitude distribution roughness parameters. SEM and EDS were used to analyze surface damage and built-up edge (BUE formation. An analysis of the surface topography showed that the surface roughness was sensitive to changes in cutting parameters. It was found that the formation of BUE and the interaction between the tool edge and the iron-rich intermetallic particles play a determinant role in controlling the surface finish during dry orthogonal machining of the AA7075-T651 alloy. Hoop stress was predominantly compressive on the surface and tended to be tensile with increased cutting speed. The reverse occurred for the surface axial stress. The smaller the cutting feed, the greater is the effect of cutting speed on both axial and hoop stresses. By controlling the cutting speed and feed, it is possible to generate a benchmark residual stress state and good surface finish using dry machining.

  11. Influence of way of finishing furniture segments on amount emissions VOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Čech

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with the influence of way of finishing furniture segments on amount emissions VOCs (volatile organic compounds. The so-called Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC are among the largest pollution sources of both the internal and external environments.VOC is defined as emission of any organic compound or a mixture thereof, with the exception of methane, whereby the compound exerts the pressure of 0.01 kPa or more at the temperature of 20 °C (293.15 K and reaches the corresponding volatility under the specific conditions of its use and can undergo photochemical reactions with nitrogen oxides when exposed to solar radiation. The effects of VOC upon environment can be described by equation: VOC + NOx + UV radiation + heat = tropospheric ozone (O3In this work there were tested MDF (medium density fibreboard coated by resin impregnated paper was used for the furniture components’ production. Next were tested compressed wood, which was used as a second material of furniture components. These both chosen materials was covered by resin impregnated paper and than sequentially finished by regular coat of finish.An attention of this study is especially put on mentioned factors and on quantity of instant and long-term VOCs emissions emitted from furniture components.The amount of emissions from furniture components, in different phases of the preparation including the resin impregnated paper coating finish, was monitored within the time intervals of 24 hours and 720 hours starting after the time of the finish preparation.The MDF (medium density fibreboard coated by resin impregnated paper was used for the furniture components´ production.A compressed wood was used as a second material of furniture components. This alternative material was covered by resin impregnated paper and than sequentially finished by regular coat of finish.

  12. Revised FINAL–REPORT NO. 2: INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY SUMMARY AND RESULTS FOR THE ENRICO FERMI ATOMIC POWER PLANT, UNIT 1, NEWPORT, MICHIGAN (DOCKET NO. 50 16; RFTA 10-004) 2018-SR-02-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erika Bailey

    2011-10-27

    The Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant, Unit 1 (Fermi 1) was a fast breeder reactor design that was cooled by sodium and operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. On May 10, 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) granted an operating license, DPR-9, to the Power Reactor Development Company (PRDC), a consortium specifically formed to own and operate a nuclear reactor at the Fermi 1 site. The reactor was designed for a maximum capability of 430 megawatts (MW); however, the maximum reactor power with the first core loading (Core A) was 200 MW. The primary system was filled with sodium in December 1960 and criticality was achieved in August 1963. The reactor was tested at low power during the first couple years of operation. Power ascension testing above 1 MW commenced in December 1965 immediately following the receipt of a high-power operating license. In October 1966 during power ascension, zirconium plates at the bottom of the reactor vessel became loose and blocked sodium coolant flow to some fuel subassemblies. Two subassemblies started to melt and the reactor was manually shut down. No abnormal releases to the environment occurred. Forty-two months later after the cause had been determined, cleanup completed, and the fuel replaced, Fermi 1 was restarted. However, in November 1972, PRDC made the decision to decommission Fermi 1 as the core was approaching its burn-up limit. The fuel and blanket subassemblies were shipped off-site in 1973. Following that, the secondary sodium system was drained and sent off-site. The radioactive primary sodium was stored on-site in storage tanks and 55 gallon (gal) drums until it was shipped off-site in 1984. The initial decommissioning of Fermi 1 was completed in 1975. Effective January 23, 1976, DPR-9 was transferred to the Detroit Edison Company (DTE) as a 'possession only' license (DTE 2010a). This report details the confirmatory activities performed during the second Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

  13. Revision Gore-Tex medialization laryngoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jacob T; Bates, Dwight D; Postma, Gregory N

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate the indications, results, and safety of revision Gore-Tex medialization laryngoplasty (GML). A retrospective chart review of 156 patients that underwent GML procedures between the years 1998-2002. Study population consisted of those patients who required revision surgery for any reason. Sixteen patients required 22 revision procedures. Indications for revision were divided into 2 groups, complications and glottal closure problems. Complications included extruded or displaced implants (n = 4). The most common glottal closure problem was undercorrection (n = 9). Others included anterior overcorrection (n = 1) and persistent posterior glottal gap (n = 2). Revision procedures included GML (n = 9), injection augmentation (n = 9), endoscopic implant removal (n = 2), and arytenoid adduction (n = 2). In patients with glottal closure problems, the GCI improved in all 10 and the voice rating scale improved in 9. Reasons for revision of GML are variable, the most common being undercorrection. A variety of safe, effective revision techniques are available with a high success rate.

  14. Distribution of Salmonella serovars in breeding, nursery, and grow-to-finish pigs, and risk factors for shedding in ten farrow-to-finish swine farms in Alberta and Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Wendy; Rajić, Andrijana; Waldner, Cheryl; McFall, Margaret; Chow, Eva; Muckle, Anne; Rosengren, Leigh

    2010-04-01

    The study objectives were to investigate Salmonella prevalence, serovar distribution, and risk factors for shedding in 10 purposively selected farrow-to-finish farms in Saskatchewan and Alberta. Pooled fecal samples from the breeding and grow-finish phases and individual fecal samples from breeding, nursery, and grow-finish pigs were cultured for Salmonella; serotyping of isolates was performed. Pig and pen characteristics were recorded for each pig and pen sampled.Overall, 407/1143 (36%) of samples were Salmonella positive; within-farm prevalence ranged from 1% to 79%. Sows, nursery, and grow-finish pigs accounted for 43%, 29%, and 28% of positive samples, respectively. More Salmonella were detected in pooled pen than individual pig samples (P finisher (OR 2.9, P finish farms and should be targeted in control efforts. The latter might also apply to the use of pelleted feed, which remains the most consistently reported significant risk factor for Salmonella shedding in pigs.

  15. 76 FR 73720 - Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Westinghouse AP1000...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Westinghouse AP1000 Pressurized..., NUREG-2103, Revision 0, ``Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant...

  16. Fundamental studies of tin whiskering in microelectronics finishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinol, Lesly Agnes

    Common electronics materials, such as tin, copper, steel, and brass, are ambient reactive under common use conditions, and as such are prone to corrosion. During the early 1940s, reports of failures due to electrical shorting of components caused by 'whisker' (i.e., filamentary surface protrusion) growth on many surface types---including the aforementioned metals---began to emerge. Lead alloying of tin (3--10% by weight, typically in the eutectic proportion) eliminated whiskering risk for decades, until the July 2006 adoption of the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) directive was issued by the European Union. This directive, which has since been adopted by California and parts of China, severely restricted the use of lead (market, imposing the need for developing reliable new "lead-free" alternatives to SnPb. In spite of the abundance of modern-day anecdotes chronicling whisker-related failures in satellites, nuclear power stations, missiles, pacemakers, and spacecraft navigation equipment, pure tin finishes are still increasingly being employed today, and the root cause(s) of tin whiskering remains elusive. This work describes a series of structured experiments exploring the fundamental relationships between the incidence of tin whiskering (as dependent variable) and numerous independent variables. These variables included deposition method (electroplating, electroless plating, template-based electrochemical synthesis, and various physical vapor deposition techniques, including resistive evaporation, electron beam evaporation, and sputtering), the inclusion of microparticles and organic contamination, the effects of sample geometry, and nanostructuring. Key findings pertain to correlations between sample geometry and whisker propensity, and also to the stress evolution across a series of 4"-diameter silicon wafers of varying thicknesses with respect to the degree of post-metallization whiskering. Regarding sample geometry, it was found that smaller

  17. Belief Revision and Argumentation Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falappa, Marcelo Alejandro; Kern-Isberner, Gabriele; Simari, Guillermo Ricardo

    Belief revision is the process of changing beliefs to adapt the epistemic state of an agent to a new piece of information. The logical formalization of belief revision is a topic of research in philosophy, logic, and in computer science, in areas such as databases or artificial intelligence. On the other hand, argumentation is concerned primarily with the evaluation of claims based on premises in order to reach conclusions. Both provide basic and substantial techniques for the art of reasoning, as it is performed by human beings in everyday life situations and which goes far beyond logical deduction. Reasoning, in this sense, makes possible to deal successfully with problems in uncertain, dynamic environments and has been promoting the development of human societies.

  18. Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias: Classification revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demosthenes Bouros MD, PhD, FCCP

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The American Thoracic Society (ATS, the European Respiratory Society (ERS and the Japan Respiratory Society (JRS are planning a revision of the 2002 ATS/ERS International Multidisciplinary Classification of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias (IIPs1. In two years’ time it will be 10 years since its publication and with a view to publishing the revision after 10 years (i.e., in 2012, a steering committee has been established, which met in New Orleans during ATS congress in May 2010 and more recently in Barcelona during the ERS congress (Photo. The committee will meet again during the ATS and the ERS congresses that will be held in the next two years, with an additional meeting in Modena, Italy, in Αpril 2011.

  19. Revising Academic Library Governance Handbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen Stevens

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Regardless of our status (tenure track, non-tenure track, staff, and/or union, academic librarians at colleges and universities may use a handbook or similar document as a framework for self-governance. These handbooks typically cover rank descriptions, promotion requirements, and grievance rights, among other topics. Unlike employee handbooks used in the corporate world, these documents may be written and maintained by academic librarians themselves1. In 2010, a group of academic librarians at George Mason University was charged with revising our Librarians’ Handbook. Given the dearth of literature about academic librarians’ handbooks and their revision, we anticipate our library colleagues in similar situations will benefit from our experience and recommendations.

  20. Clean Air Act. Revision 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Air Act, as amended, and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. This Reference Book has been completely revised and is current through February 15, 1994.

  1. Finisher and performance trends in female and male mountain ultramarathoners by age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüst CA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Christoph Alexander Rüst,1 Beat Knechtle,1,2 Evelyn Eichenberger,1 Thomas Rosemann,1 Romuald Lepers31Institute of General Practice and for Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, 2Gesundheitszentrum St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland; 3French Institute of Health and Medical Research, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Burgundy, Dijon, FranceBackground: This study examined changes according to age group in the number of finishers and running times for athletes in female and male mountain ultramarathoners competing in the 78 km Swiss Alpine Marathon, the largest mountain ultramarathon in Europe and held in high alpine terrain.Methods: The association between age and performance was investigated using analysis of variance and both single and multilevel regression analyses.Results: Between 1998 and 2011, a total of 1,781 women and 12,198 men finished the Swiss Alpine Marathon. The number of female finishers increased (r2 = 0.64, P = 0.001, whereas the number of male finishers (r2 = 0.18, P = 0.15 showed no change. The annual top ten men became older and slower, whereas the annual top ten women became older but not slower. Regarding the number of finishers in the age groups, the number of female finishers decreased in the age group 18–24 years, whereas the number of finishers increased in the age groups 30–34, 40–44, 45–49, 50–54, 55–59, 60–64, and 70–74 years. In the age groups 25–29 and 35–39 years, the number of finishers showed no changes across the years. In the age group 70–74 years, the increase in number of finishers was linear. For all other age groups, the increase was exponential. For men, the number of finishers decreased in the age groups 18–24, 25–29, 30–34, and 35–39 years. In the age groups 40–44, 45–49, 50–54, 55–59, 60–64, 70–74, and 75–79 years, the number of finishers increased. In the age group 40–44 years, the increase was linear. For all other age groups, the

  2. Cross-Cultural Consumer Acceptability and Purchase Intent of Forage-Finished Rib-Eye Steaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrico, Damir Dennis; Wardy, Wisdom; Pujols, Kairy Dharali; Carabante, Kennet Mariano; Jirangrat, Wannita; Scaglia, Guillermo; Janes, Marlene E; Prinyawiwatkul, Witoon

    2015-10-01

    Rib-eye steaks, from 3 forage-finished systems (S1, S2, and S3) and 1 commercial steak (C), either cooked by 1-sided-grilling or 2-sided-grilling, were evaluated for sensory acceptability [overall appearance (ORA) and overall appearance of fat (OAF) for raw steaks; overall appearance (OCA), overall beef aroma (OBA), overall beef flavor (OBF), juiciness, tenderness and overall liking (OL) for cooked steaks] and purchase intent by Hispanic, Asian and U.S. consumers. They also indicated preferred degree of doneness and cooking methods. Cross-cultural differences in preferences and consumer acceptability of rib-eye steaks were observed. Grilling was the most preferred cooking method. Hispanics and Asians preferred medium and/or medium well, while U.S. consumers preferred medium and/or medium rare. For cooked steaks, the population effect was significant for all sensory attributes; Asians generally scored lower than did Hispanics and U.S. consumers. C and S3 generally had higher scores for all sensory attributes across 3 populations. Purchase intent for all forage-finished steaks was higher for Hispanics and U.S. consumers compared to Asians (50.0% to 77.8% compared with 43.2% to 65.9%). Attributes influencing purchase intent of forage-finished steaks differed among populations: tenderness (odds ratio = 1.4) for Hispanics, OCA (odds ratio = 1.5) for Asians, and OBF (odds ratio = 1.3) for U.S. consumers. Overall, this study demonstrated that the type of forage-finished system and ethnic differences influenced sensory acceptability and purchase intent of forage-finished rib-eye steaks. Demand for forage-finished beef has increased worldwide due to its potential health benefits. Little is known regarding the cross-cultural effects on the consumer acceptance of forage-finished beef. We evaluated sensory acceptance and purchase intent of raw and cooked forage-finished rib-eye steaks using Hispanic, Asian, and U.S. (White and African American) populations. This study

  3. Revised dietary guidelines for Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Young Ai; Lee, Haeng Shin; Kim, Bok Hee; Lee, Yoonna; Lee, Hae Jeung; Moon, Jae Jin; Kim, Cho-il

    2008-01-01

    With rapidly changing dietary environment, dietary guidelines for Koreans were revised and relevant action guides were developed. First, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee was established with experts and government officials from the fields of nutrition, preventive medicine, health promotion, agriculture, education and environment. The Committee set dietary goals for Koreans aiming for a better nutrition state of all after a thorough review and analysis of recent information related to nutritional status and/or problems of Korean population, changes in food production/supply, disease pattern, health policy and agricultural policy. Then, the revised dietary guidelines were proposed to accomplish these goals in addition to 6 different sets of dietary action guides to accommodate specific nutrition and health problems of respective age groups. Subsequently, these guidelines and guides were subjected to the focus group review, consumer perception surveys, and a public hearing for general and professional comments. Lastly, the language was clarified in terms of public understanding and phraseology. The revised Dietary guidelines for Koreans are as follows: eat a variety of grains, vegetables, fruits, fish, meat, poultry and dairy products; choose salt-preserved foods less, and use less salt when you prepare foods; increase physical activity for a healthy weight, and balance what you eat with your activity; enjoy every meal, and do not skip breakfast; if you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation; prepare foods properly, and order sensible amounts; enjoy our rice-based diet.

  4. Revision of hip resurfacing arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wera, Glenn D; Gillespie, Robert J; Petty, Carter; Petersilge, William J; Kraay, Matthew J; Goldberg, Victor M

    2010-08-01

    Metal-on-metal (MOM) hip resurfacing has become an increasingly popular treatment for young, active patients with degenerative disease of the hip, as bearing surfaces with better wear properties are now available. One proposed advantage of resurfacing is its ability to be successfully revised to total hip arthroplasty (THA). In addition, radiographic parameters that may predict failure in hip resurfacing have yet to be clearly defined. Seven MOM resurfacing arthroplasties were converted to conventional THAs because of aseptic failure. Using Harris Hip Scores (HHS) and Short Form 12 (SF-12) questionnaire scores, we compared the clinical outcomes of these patients with those of patients who underwent uncomplicated MOM hip resurfacing. In addition, all revisions were radiographically evaluated. Mean follow-up periods were 51 months (revision group) and 43 months (control group). There was no significant difference between the 2 groups' HHS or SF-12 scores. There was no dislocation or aseptic loosening after conversion of any resurfacing arthroplasty. Valgus neck-shaft angle (P hip resurfacing. Conversion of aseptic failure of hip resurfacing to conventional THA leads to clinical outcomes similar to those of patients who undergo uncomplicated hip resurfacing. The orientation of the femur and the components placed play a large role in implant survival in hip resurfacing. More work needs to be done to further elucidate these radiographic parameters.

  5. The chamfer finish line: preclinical student performance using different bur designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansueto, Michael A; Abdulkarim, Hatem A; Thabet, Walid R; Haney, Stephan J

    2010-06-01

    The primary purposes of this investigation were to evaluate sophomore dental student performance in the production of a chamfer finish line using two diamond bur types-a round-ended bur and a torpedo-shaped bur-and to gain student feedback about their preferences for bur type. Fifty students took part in the study, each of whom prepared the buccal surfaces of two mandibular molar typodont teeth, producing chamfer finish lines. Students prepared both teeth in the same laboratory session and were randomly assigned to two groups that were required to prepare the first of the two molars with a specific bur type. The prepared chamfer finish lines were scored and the data analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Student performance was significantly better when the round-ended bur was used (p=0.005). Student feedback was collected with a survey that consisted of four questions and the opportunity to provide write-in comments. In response to the question "Overall, was one bur type better?" 58 percent of the students preferred the round-ended bur for creating a chamfer finish line. The most frequent write-in comment, made by twelve of the fifty students, criticized the torpedo-shaped bur for creating finish lines that were too shallow or too long.

  6. Surface roughness of microparticulated and nanoparticulated composites after finishing and polishing procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Arai Sadami Shinkai

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluated the surface roughness of one microparticulate resin composite Durafill (Heraeus Kulzer Weihrheim, Germany andfour nanoparticulate resins 4 Seasons (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein Esthet x (Dentsply, Milford, DE, USA, Point 4 and Supreme (3M-ESPE, Dental Products,St. Paul, MN, USA. Methods: After finishing with a diamond bur point (F, and polishing with silicone points of gray, green and pink color Politipit (Ivoclar Vivadent,Schaan, Liechtenstein, four stages of completion were performed, simulating one of finishing and three of polishing a resin restoration. Ten samples of each composite resin were measured for surface roughness with surface profilometer (Mitutoyo Corporation, Tokyo, Japan after each of finishing and polishing sequence.Results: The results showed that nanoparticulate and microparticulate resins presented a significant difference in the surface roughness values, in all finishing and polishing steps. Conclusion: Of the the nanoparticulate resins 4 Seasons (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein, Point 4 (Kerr CO, Orange, CA, USA, and also microparticulate Durafill (Heraeus Kulzer Weihrheim, Germany presented significantly lower surface roughness values after completing all the finishing and polishing stages.

  7. Flame retardant finishing of cotton fabric based on synergistic compounds containing boron and nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kongliang; Gao, Aiqin; Zhang, Yongsheng

    2013-10-15

    Boric acid and compound containing nitrogen, 2,4,6-tri[(2-hydroxy-3-trimethyl-ammonium)propyl]-1,3,5-triazine chloride (Tri-HTAC) were used to finish cotton fabric. The flame retardant properties of the finished cotton fabrics and the synergetic effects of boron and nitrogen elements were investigated and evaluated by limited oxygen index (LOI) method. The mechanism of cross-linking reaction among cotton fiber, Tri-HTAC, and boric acid was discussed by FTIR and element analysis. The thermal stability and surface morphology of the finished cotton fabrics were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. The finishing system of the mixture containing boron and nitrogen showed excellent synergistic flame retardancy for cotton fabric. The cotton fabric finished with mixture system had excellent flame retardancy. The LOI value of the treated cotton fabric increased over 27.5. Tri-HTAC could form covalent bonds with cellulose fiber and boric acid. The flame retardant cotton fabric showed a slight decrease in tensile strength and whiteness. The surface morphology of flame retardant cotton fiber was smooth.

  8. 77 FR 12227 - Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule: Uncovered Finished Water Reservoirs; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ...The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is hosting a public meeting on April 24, 2012, concerning information that may inform the regulatory review of the uncovered finished water reservoir requirement in the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2 rule). At this meeting, EPA will provide background information on the LT2 rule's uncovered finished water reservoir requirement and the agency's Six Year Review process. EPA also plans to discuss and solicit public input on data and information related to microbial occurrence of Cryptosporidium, Giardia, viruses, and other pathogens/indicators in uncovered finished water reservoirs; public health risks; strategies to control or remove contaminants in uncovered finished water reservoirs; and potential assessment approaches to determine the effectiveness of these control and/or removal strategies. The primary focus of this meeting is to have a scientific and technical discussion related to uncovered finished water reservoirs. EPA will consider the data and/or information discussed at this meeting during the agency's review of the LT2 rule, which the agency announced as part of EPA's Retrospective Review Plan under Executive Order (E.O.) 13563 in August 2011.

  9. Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion on composite resin surfaces after different finishing and polishing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, C A; Eskelson, E; Cavalli, V; Liporoni, P C S; Jorge, A O C; do Rego, M A

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion on the surface of three composite resins (nanofilled, Filtek Z350, 3M ESPE, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; nanohybrid, Vit-1-escence, Ultradent Products, South Jordan, UT, USA; and microhybrid, Esthet X, Dentsply, Milford, DE, USA) following different finishing and polishing techniques. Sixty standardized samples (6 × 3 mm) of each composite were produced and randomly divided into three finishing and polishing treatments (n=20): 1) control group: composite resin surface in contact with Mylar matrix strips with no finishing or polishing performed, 2) Sof-Lex aluminum oxide disc technique (3M ESPE, and 3) carbide bur finishing and Astrobrush polishing technique (Ultradent). Half the samples of each group were incubated in human saliva for 1 hour, and all the samples were subjected to S mutans (ATCC 35688) biofilm development. The mean log of CFU/mL present in the S mutans biofilm was calculated, and data were statistically analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test (pcomposites' surfaces, regardless of the polishing treatment performed (pcomposite (Filtek Z350) had the lowest bacterial adherence with each of the finishing and polishing techniques despite the presence or absence of human saliva (padhesion on the surface of the microhybrid and nanofilled composites in the absence of human saliva.

  10. Marketing Strategy Formulation for the Introduction of Eukula Strato German Wood Finishes in Local Market of Emerging Indian Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Suraj Kushe Shekhar; Mehaboob P K

    2013-01-01

    Wood finishing relates to the process of embellishing or protecting the surface of the wood. The paper aimed at formulating a marketing strategy for introducing water borne German based Wood Finishes named Eukula Strato into local market of northern Kerala, India. Multiple cross sectional descriptive research with judgmental sampling technique elicited responses from Finishers, Furniture manufacturers and Interior designers. Findings revealed that Eukula Strato had a distinct advantage when c...

  11. Marketing Strategy Formulation for the Introduction of Eukula Strato German Wood Finishes in Local Market of Emerging Indian Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraj Kushe Shekhar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wood finishing relates to the process of embellishing or protecting the surface of the wood. The paper aimed at formulating a marketing strategy for introducing water borne German based Wood Finishes named Eukula Strato into local market of northern Kerala, India. Multiple cross sectional descriptive research with judgmental sampling technique elicited responses from Finishers, Furniture manufacturers and Interior designers. Findings revealed that Eukula Strato had a distinct advantage when compared to any other Wood Finish that was available in the local market. Findings and suggestions were reported as per 4P’s of marketing mix. Percentage analysis, Chi square analysis etc were used to interpret the results

  12. A European longitudinal study in Salmonella seronegative and seropositive-classified finishing pig herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Danilo Lo Fo; Dahl, J.; Wingstrand, Anne;

    2004-01-01

    in pig herds. For this purpose, 17 finishing pig herds initially classified as seropositive and 15 as seronegative, were followed for a 2-year period through serological and bacteriological sampling. The study included 10 herds from Denmark, 13 from The Netherlands, 4 from Germany and 5 from Sweden...... and was performed between October 1996 and May 1999. The Salmonella status of finishing pig herds was determined by an initial blood sampling of approximately 50 finishing pigs close to market weight per herd. The development of the Salmonella status of the selected herds was assessed at seven subsequent sampling.......0, 95 % CI 3.2-32.8). When Salmonella was isolated from pen faecal samples, the herd was more likely to be classified seropositive in the same sampling round, compared to no Salmonella being detected (OR 4.0, 95 % CI 1.1-14.6). The stability of an initially allocated Salmonella status was found to vary...

  13. Ultrasounds: an industrial solution to optimise costs, environmental requests and quality for textile finishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouters, Moïse; Rumeau, Pascal; Tierce, Pascal; Costes, Sandrine

    2004-01-01

    Ultrasounds are widely used at industrial scale for cleaning of mechanical pieces for example. Potential applications exist for finishing of textiles. This work aimed to improve traditional textile finishing processes thanks to ultrasound. The technical objective was to develop specific applicators of ultrasonic energy which could be adapted on jigger, a widespread textile finishing machine. Laboratory studies have allowed to define the conditions for application of ultrasounds and check their effects on fibre structure, validated by trials in dynamic conditions. Ultrasound technology makes it possible to intensify the phenomena of diffusion and washing by the effect of cavitation and improves effectiveness of traditional washing treatments. Industrial ultrasound processes need further optimisation on industrial machines.

  14. Effects of surface finish and mechanical training on Ni-Ti sheets for elastocaloric cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Engelbrecht

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Elastocaloric cooling has emerged as a promising alternative to vapor compression in recent years. Although the technology has the potential to be more efficient than current technologies, there are many technical challenges that must be overcome to realize devices with high performance and acceptable durability. We study the effects of surface finish and training techniques on dog bone shaped polycrystalline samples of NiTi. The fatigue life of several samples with four different surface finishes was measured and it was shown that a smooth surface, especially at the edges, greatly improved fatigue life. The effects of training both on the structure of the materials and the thermal response to an applied strain was studied. The load profile for the first few cycles was shown to change the thermal response to strain, the structure of the material at failure while the final structure of the material was weakly influenced by the surface finish.

  15. Effects of finishing rolling temperatures and reduction on the mechanical properties of hot rolled multiphase steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhuang; WU Di

    2007-01-01

    Effects of finishing rolling temperatures and reduction on the mechanical properties of hot rolled multiphase steel were investigated. Thermo-mechanical control processing (TMCP) was conducted by using a laboratory hot rolling mill, in which three different kinds of finishing rolling temperatures and reduction and various austempering times were applied. The results showed that polygonal ferrite, granular bainite and larger amount of stabilized retained austenite can be obtained by controlled rolling processes, and that the strain-induced transformation to martensite from the retained austenite can occur gradually when the steel is deformed during tensile test. Mechanical properties increase with decreasing finishing rolling temperature and increasing amount of deformation. The most TRIP (transformation induced plasticity) effect, and ultimate tensile strength (UTS), total elongation (TEL) and the product of ultimate tensile strength and total elongation (UTS× TEL) are obtained at 20 min.

  16. Growing and slaughtering performance of Apennine heavy lamb finished at pasture in Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Cestola

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-six Apennine male lambs were allotted into 2 groups, under different finishing systems: group P (maximum pasture allowance and group S (intensive finishing. Lambs were slaughtered either at 30 kg of weight or at 110 days of age (in case they couldn’t reach final weight because of a sharp decline in pasture productivity in summer. Post-weaning ADG were significantly higher in the S group (about 77 g/d and P lambs had lower weights, dressing percentage (due to higher gastro-intestinal apparatus content and SEUROP conformation scores. Finishing lambs at pasture could have better results after an early weaning or using different mating strategies to escape the dramatic fall in pasture dry matter availability during summer.

  17. Finishing of additively manufactured titanium alloy by shape adaptive grinding (SAG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucamp, Anthony T.; Namba, Yoshiharu; Charlton, Phillip; Jain, Samyak; Graziano, Arthur A.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, rapid prototyping of titanium alloy components for medical and aeronautics application has become viable thanks to advances in technologies such as electron beam melting (EBM) and selective laser sintering (SLS). However, for many applications the high surface roughness generated by additive manufacturing techniques demands a post-finishing operation to improve the surface quality prior to usage. In this paper, the novel shape adaptive grinding process has been applied to finishing titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) additively manufactured by EBM and SLS. It is shown that the micro-structured surface layer resulting from the melting process can be removed, and the surface can then be smoothed down to less than 10 nm Ra (starting from 4-5 μm Ra) using only three different diamond grit sizes. This paper also demonstrates application of the technology to freeform shapes, and documents the dimensional accuracy of finished artifacts.

  18. Influence of Edge Rolling Reduction on Plate-Edge Stress Distribution During Finish Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hai-liang; LIU Xiang-hua; CHEN Li-qing; LI Chang-sheng; ZHI Ying; LI Xin-wen

    2009-01-01

    Dimensions of one kind of stainless steel plate before finish rolling were obtained through analysis of the rough rolling processes by finite element method and updated geometrical method.The FE models of finish rolling process with a front edge roll were built,and influences of the edge rolling reduction on-the stress change in the plate edge during finish roiling were analyzed.The results show that when the edge rolling reduction is increased from 0 mm to 2 ram,the compressive stress in plate corner clearly increases in edge rolling process,and the zone of tensile stress during whole rolling decreases;when the edge rolling reduction is increased from 2 mm to 5 mm,the compressive stress in the plate corner seldom changes,and the compressive stress decreases after the horizontal rolling.

  19. Improvements in Sand Mold/Core Technology: Effects on Casting Finish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prof. John J. Lannutti; Prof. Carroll E. Mobley

    2005-08-30

    In this study, the development and impact of density gradients on metal castings were investigated using sand molds/cores from both industry and from in-house production. In spite of the size of the castings market, almost no quantitative information about density variation within the molds/cores themselves is available. In particular, a predictive understanding of how structure and binder content/chemistry/mixing contribute to the final surface finish of these products does not exist. In this program we attempted to bridge this gap by working directly with domestic companies in examining the issues of surface finish and thermal reclamation costs resulting from the use of sand molds/cores. We show that these can be substantially reduced by the development of an in-depth understanding of density variations that correlate to surface finish. Our experimental tools and our experience with them made us uniquely qualified to achieve technical progress.

  20. The association between measurements of antimicrobial use and resistance in the faeces microbiota of finisher batches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalhoff Andersen, Vibe; de Knegt, Leonardo; Munk, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The objectives were to present three approaches for calculating antimicrobial (AM) use in pigs that take into account the rearing period and rearing site, and to study the association between these measurements and phenotypical resistance and abundance of resistance genes in faeces samples from 10...... finisher batches. The AM use was calculated relative to the rearing period of the batches as (i) 'Finisher Unit Exposure' at unit level, (ii) 'Lifetime Exposure' at batch level and (iii) 'Herd Exposure' at herd level. A significant effect on the occurrence of tetracycline resistance measured by cultivation...... effect was observed on the occurrence of genes coding for the AM resistance classes: aminoglycoside, lincosamide, macrolide, β-lactam, sulfonamide and tetracycline. No effect was observed for Finisher Unit Exposure. Overall, the study shows that Lifetime Exposure is an efficient measurement of AM use...

  1. Evaluation of Some Finishing Properties of Oil Palm Particleboard for Furniture Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnasingam, J.; Nyugen, V.; Ioras, F.

    The finishing properties of particleboard made from the Empty-Fruit Bunch (EFB) of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) were evaluated for its suitability for furniture applications, using different coating and overlay materials. The results found that the thick plastic-formica overlay provided the best surface finish, in terms of surface smoothness, adhesion strength and impact resistance. Although the polyurethane lacquer provided an acceptable finish, its quality and performance is not comparable to that of the thick plastic overlay. Despite the fact that the use of such overlay material may render the material not aesthetically appealing and limit it to concealed applications or where the thick overlay material is tolerated, its cost competitiveness and environmental friendliness may be able to position the oil palm particleboard as a substitute for the conventional wood-based particleboard in the furniture manufacturing industry.

  2. 76 FR 66089 - Access Authorization Program for Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ... COMMISSION Access Authorization Program for Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide 5.66, ``Access Authorization Program for Nuclear Power Plants.'' This guide... Authorization Requirements for Nuclear Power Plants,'' and 10 CFR part 26, ``Fitness for Duty Programs.'' The......

  3. Surface roughness and staining susceptibility of composite resins after finishing and polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Palialol, Alan Rodrigo Muniz; Cavalli, Vanessa; Giannini, Marcelo

    2011-02-01

    The study aims to investigate the influence of filler size and finishing systems on the surface roughness and staining of three composite resins. Three composites, classified according to their filler size, were selected: Filtek Supreme Plus/nanofill (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA), Esthet-X/minifill (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE, USA), and Renamel Microfill/microfill (Cosmedent Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Composite specimens were made in stainless steel split molds and polished with Sof-Lex (3M ESPE), Enhance+PoGo (Dentsply Caulk), or FlexiDiscs+Enamelize (Cosmedent Inc.). Finishing systems were used according to the manufacturers' instructions and polished surfaces were evaluated with a profilometer and then immersed in 2% methylene blue for 24 hours. Specimens were then prepared for spectrophotometric analysis and results were statistically analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test. No significant differences in surface roughness among the composites were found when the surfaces were treated with Enhance+PoGo. In addition, no differences were observed when the Filtek Supreme Plus composite was submitted to surface staining evaluation. In general, the composites polished with the finishing systems from the same company demonstrated lower surface roughness and staining. The results of this study recommend that composite resins could be finished and polished with finishing systems supplied by the composite's manufacturer. The surface roughness and staining of composite resins were not influenced solely by filler size. Dentists should finish and polish composite resin with the polishing agent supplied by the same manufacturer. The smallest filler size does not necessarily result in a low surface roughness and staining susceptibility. © 2011, COPYRIGHT THE AUTHORS. JOURNAL COMPILATION © 2011, WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  4. Comparison of two feeding finishing treatments on production and quality of organic beef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Cozzi

    Full Text Available The study compared growth and slaughter performance and meat quality of organic beef cattle finished with or without pasture grazing. One group of 10 Limousin heifers was finished under confined conditions and fed ad libitum a total mixed ration based on maize silage, hay and cereal grains. A second group of 10 Limousin heifers rotationally grazed two contiguous pasture plots of 1.5 ha each with a daily supplementation of a concentrate mix based on cereal grains and roasted soybeans. Heifers were slaughtered at commercial finishing and meat quality traits were assessed on Longissimus thoracis muscle. The grazing group, due to a lower average daily gain (0.74 vs. 0.95 kg/day; P<0.05, required a prolonged finishing period (172 vs. 155 days; P<0.05 than the confined animals. Meat samples from grazing cattle were less tender (shear force: 3.92 vs. 3.24 kg/cm2; P<0.05 and showed a lower lightness (L*: 33.0 vs. 35.8; P<0.001 and a higher redness (15.4 vs. 13.7; P<0.01 and yellowness (15.6 vs. 14.6; P<0.05. Fatty acid composition of the intramuscular fat was significantly affected by the finishing system. Grazing heifers had a higher content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (4.06 vs. 3.66% of total fatty acids; P<0.05, conjugated linoleic acids (0.16 vs. 0.10% of total fatty acids; P<0.01 and ω-3 (0.44 vs. 0.30% of total fatty acids; P<0.001 than confined animals. The detrimental effects of pasture grazing on growth performance and on some important meat quality traits explain the limited adoption of this finishing system in organic beef production.

  5. 77 FR 77117 - Proposed Revision 0 on Access Authorization-Operational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... through revisions to the nuclear power reactor licensee Commission- approved Physical Security Plan under... of Licensed Activities in Nuclear Power Reactors against Radiological Sabotage,'' Section (b)(7... Authorization Requirements for Nuclear Power Plants,'' and the criminal history checks of 10 CFR...

  6. 76 FR 38349 - Plan Revision for Colville, and the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forests, Washington (Collectively...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    ... invasive species. These amended plans will remain in effect until the revision takes effect. The Okanogan..., and root diseases. All of these changes have led to reductions in habitat for some species and... relating to plant and animal species and their habitats. The habitat goals and objectives of the...

  7. 77 FR 7531 - Disapproval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Montana; Revisions to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... concrete plants, mineral crushers'' in new rule ARM 17.8.743(1)(b) as submitted by the State of Montana on... proposed an action for the above SIP revision submittals on September 26, 2011 (76 FR 59338). We accepted..., particulate matter, carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), lead, nitrogen oxides (NO X ) or any...

  8. 76 FR 64372 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Revised Recovery Plan, First Revision, for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... shoreline habitats. Both species spawn during spring, over gravel bottoms in tributary streams and rivers... also spawn over gravel bottoms at shoreline springs along the margins of Upper Klamath Lake (Janney et... actions and priorities in the plan's Implementation Schedule reflect a biologically sound...

  9. An object-oriented Bayesian network modeling the causes of leg disorders in finisher herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Birk; Kristensen, Anders Ringgaard; Toft, Nils

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of an effective control strategy against disease in a finisher herd requires knowledge regarding the disease level in the herd. A Bayesian network was constructed that can estimate risk indexes for three cause-categories of leg disorders in a finisher herd. The cause...... pigs (e.g. results from diagnostic tests) were used to estimate the most likely cause of leg disorders at herd level. As information to the model originated from two different levels, we used an object-oriented structure in order to ease the specification of the Bayesian network. Hence, a Herd class...

  10. Multi-Parameter Analysis of Surface Finish in Electro-Discharge Machining of Tool Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Victoria Anghel

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a multi- parameter analysis of surface finish imparted to tool-steel plates by electro-discharge machining (EDM is presented. The interrelationship between surface texture parameters and process parameters is emphasized. An increased number of parameters is studied including amplitude, spacing, hybrid and fractal parameters,, as well. The correlation of these parameters with the machining conditions is investigated. Observed characteristics become more pronounced, when intensifying machining conditions. Close correlation exists between certain surface finish parameters and EDM input variables and single and multiple statistical regression models are developed.

  11. Effects of finishing diet and pre-slaughter fasting time on meat quality in crossbred pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. PARTANEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the carbohydrate composition of finishing diet (fed from 80 to 107 kg of body weight and the length of pre-slaughter fasting on pork quality were studied in a 2 × 2 factorial experiment with 80 crossbred pigs. The control finishing diet was based on barley and soybean meal, and the fibrous finishing diet was based on barley, barley fibre, faba beans, and rapeseed cake. These diets contained 465 and 362 g starch and 177 and 250 g dietary fibre per kg, respectively. The fasting times of 25 and 41 h were obtained by giving the pigs their last meal at different times. Longer fasting lowered the glycolytic potential of the longissimus lumborum muscle (P = 0.01, whereas the finishing diet had no effect. Different muscles responded differently to the treatments. Longer fasting increased the ultimate pH of the semimembranosus muscle (P = 0.02, but did not affect that of the longissimus lumborum and semispinalis capitis muscles. The finishing diets did not affect the ultimate pH of the investigated muscles. A diet × fasting time interaction was seen in the lightness of the semimembranosus muscle (P = 0.05. The fibrous diet resulted in darker meat than the control diet did in pigs that were fasted for 25 h (P < 0.05. Longer fasting darkened the meat colour in pigs fed the fibrous diet (P < 0.05 but not in those fed the control diet. The meat from the semispinalis capitis muscle was darker in pigs fed the fibrous than those fed the control diet (P = 0.04. The treatments did not affect the colour of the longissimus lumborum muscle. Longer fasting decreased drip loss from the meat of pigs fed the control diet (P < 0.05. The eating quality of the pork was not influenced by the finishing diets or the fasting time. The pigs also grew equally fast on both finishing diets. In conclusion, a moderate alteration in the carbohydrate composition of a finishing diet or longer pre-slaughter fasting can have some effects on pork quality in crossbred pigs

  12. Digital Restoration from Start to Finish How to repair old and damaged photographs

    CERN Document Server

    Ctein,

    2010-01-01

    Digital Restoration: Start to Finish 2nd edition guides you step-by-step through the entire process of restoring old photographs and repairing new ones using Adobe Photoshop, Picture Window, and now Elements. Nothing is left out, from choosing the right hardware and software and getting the photographs into the computer, to getting the finished photo out of the computer and preserving it for posterity.  LEARN HOW TO: Scan faded and damaged prints or films Improve snapshots with Shadow/Highlight adjustment Correct uneven exposure Fix color and skin tones quickly with Curves, plug-ins, a

  13. Effect of sow history features on growth and feed intake in grow-finish pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Sell-Kubiak, E.B.; Knol, E.F.; Bijma, P

    2012-01-01

    The sow provides a specific environment to her offspring during gestation and lactation. Certain features in the early life of the sow (sow history features) may affect her ability to deliver and feed a healthy litter. In genetic analyses of grow-finish traits, these effects are estimated as common litter or permanent sow effects. The objective of this research was to identify sow history features that affect the growth rate (GR) and feed intake (FI) of her offspring during the grow-finish st...

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE FRICTION CONDITIONS IN THE FINISHING STANDS OF A HOT STRIP MILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Augusto Gorni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The decrease in hot strength or even rolling load as strain increases in some stands of the finishing hot strip mill with no metallurgical reasons is a relatively common event. Apparently this fact is associated with modification in the tribological conditions between rolling stock and work roll surfaces due to unexpected interactions with scale. The aim of this work is to determine the values of the friction coefficient in the several stands of the finishing hot strip mill at Usiminas-Cubatão, as well to determine quantitative relationships between this coefficient and relevant process parameters, like strain degree and peripherical work roll speed.

  15. Feedback control strategy of longitudinal temperature and finished carbonization time for coke oven and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Huo; Zhi Wen; Dong Chen; Yueling Shen; Yongqin Zhang; Xiaoming Zhi

    2004-01-01

    Based on the detailed analysis of the third coke oven in BaoSteel, a feedback control strategy of longitudinal temperature and finished carbonization time of coke ovens was proposed and it was applied to the third coke oven in BaoSteel. As a result, the ratio of the instance that the absolute deviation of the longitudinal temperature is within ±7°C and the finished carbonization time within ± 10 rain is more than 80%, having acquired the patent saving effect of an energy consumption lowered by 2.92%. At the same time, it can provide an example for the same coke ovens inside and outside the nation.

  16. Au microstructure and the functional properties of Ni/Au finishes on ceramic IC packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, E.D.; Baxter, W.K. [Coors Electronic Package Co., Chattanooga, TN (United States); Braski, D.N.; Watkins, T.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Ni/Au plated finishes used on thick-film metallized multilayer ceramic packages for integrated circuits must meet functional requirements such as bondability, sealability, and solderability. Their ability to do so is dependent, among other things, on the ability of the Au deposit to inhibit the grain boundary diffusion and subsequent surface oxidation of Ni. In this study, the relation between functional performance, Ni diffusionr ate, and Au microstructure was examined. Extent of Ni diffusion during heating was determined by Auger electron spectroscopy for several electrolytic and electroless Ni/Au finishing processes. Results were correlated with differences in Au microstructures determined by SEM, atomic force microscopy, and XRD.

  17. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS FOR MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION IN HOT FINISHING ROLLING OF STEEL STRIPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.D. Qu; S.H. Zhang; D.Z. Li; Z.T. Wang

    2007-01-01

    A computer model that describes the evolution of microstructures during the hot finishing rolling of SS400 steel has been proposed. It has been found that the microstructure strongly depends on processing of materials and on their parameters, which affected the history of the thermomechanical variables, such as temperature, strain, and strain rate. To investigate the microstructural evolutions during the hot finishing rolling process, the rigid-thermoviscoplastic finite element method (FEM)has been combined with dynamic recrystallization, static recrystallization, and grain growth models.The simulation results show a good agreement with those from the prediction software online.

  18. Modeling digestibility of dietary phosphorus in growing and finish pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symeou, V; Edwards, S A; Kyriazakis, I

    2012-12-01

    Low P digestibility combined with intensive pig production can lead to water pollution. The aim of this paper was to develop a model able to represent P digestion in pigs across diets and contribute towards the reduction of P excretion. Phosphorus in plant feedstuffs includes some nonphytate P (NPP) that is readily digested but is mostly as organic phytate P (oP) that is indigestible unless it is dephosphorylated. The ability of pigs to dephosphorylate oP using endogenous phytase enzymes is limited and is a function of Ca intake. The effect of Ca (g/kg diet) on the proportion of oP dephosphorylated (kg/kg) in the small intestine (SI) and large intestine (LI) was determined as 0.26 - (0.015 × dietary Ca) and 0.69 - (0.059 × dietary Ca), respectively. The dephosphorylated oP in the LI was assumed to be indigestible and was excreted. Proportion of oP dephosphosphorylation (kg/kg) by microbial and plant phytase activity (FTU) in the stomach was estimated to be 0.56 × [1 - exp(-0.001 × FTU)] and 0.38 × [1 - exp(-0.002 × FTU)], respectively. Phosphorus digestibility (kg/kg) of NPP and dephosphorylated oP in the SI was assumed to be constant at 0.8. The model was used to predict P digestibility in 2 experiments by Stein et al. (2011) and Poulsen et al. (2010) and compare the predictions with experimental outcomes. The model successfully predicted the P digestibility to a range of dietary Ca concentrations and for 2 levels of supplementation with microbial phytase. However, the predictions overestimated P digestion systematically but always within a 10% margin of the observed values. The model could be a useful tool for formulating strategies to improve the efficiency of P digestion and reduce soluble P excretion in pigs.

  19. Revised SRC-I project baseline. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    International Coal Refining Company (ICRC), in cooperation with the Commonwealth of Kentucky has contracted with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to design, build and operate a first-of-its-kind plant demonstrating the economic, environmental, socioeconomic and technical feasibility of the direct coal liquefaction process known as SRC-I. ICRC has made a massive commitment of time and expertise to design processes, plan and formulate policy, schedules, costs and technical drawings for all plant systems. These fully integrated plans comprise the Project Baseline and are the basis for all future detailed engineering, plant construction, operation, and other work set forth in the contract between ICRC and the DOE. Volumes I and II of the accompanying documents constitute the updated Project Baseline for the SRC-I two-stage liquefaction plant. International Coal Refining Company believes this versatile plant design incorporates the most advanced coal liquefaction system available in the synthetic fuels field. SRC-I two-stage liquefaction, as developed by ICRC, is the way of the future in coal liquefaction because of its product slate flexibility, high process thermal efficiency, and low consumption of hydrogen. The SRC-I Project Baseline design also has made important state-of-the-art advances in areas such as environmental control systems. Because of a lack of funding, the DOE has curtailed the total project effort without specifying a definite renewal date. This precludes the development of revised accurate and meaningful schedules and, hence, escalated project costs. ICRC has revised and updated the original Design Baseline to include in the technical documentation all of the approved but previously non-incorporated Category B and C and new Post-Baseline Engineering Change Proposals.

  20. My revision notes Edexcel GCSE computer science

    CERN Document Server

    Cushing, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Unlock your full potential with this revision guide which focuses on the key content and skills you need to know. With My Revision Notes for AQA GCSE Computer Science, which perfectly matches the latest examined elements of the course, you can: - Take control of your revision: plan and focus on the areas you need to revise, with advice, summaries and notes from author Steve Cushing - Show you fully understand key topics by using specific strategies and theories to add depth to your knowledge of programming and computing issues and processes - Apply programming and com