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Sample records for fingers physical microbiological

  1. Physical, chemical and microbiological changes in alcoholic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in alcoholic fermentation of sugar syrup produced from cassava flour with Saccharomyces cereviseae (baker's yeast) were investigated. ... Fermentation of sugar syrup from cassava flour is associated with physical and chemical changes that occur in other form of fermentation alongside increased in biomass.

  2. The microbiological quality and some physical parameters of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the microbiological and some physical quantities and effect of the two different water sources used for meat processing at the Lafenwa abattoir, Abeokuta, Nigeria. Water sources identified are the Lafenwa river and Tap water supply. A total of 33 samples were collected and analyzed. The total viable ...

  3. Physical, Chemical, and Microbiological Characteristics of Ronto During Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Khairina

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe purpose of this study was to determine the physical, chemical, and microbiological changes of ronto during storage at room and cold temperatures. Ronto was prepared by mixing fresh shrimp, salt, and rice with a ratio of 7 : 1 : 2 and fermented in a closed container for 14 days. Ronto produced was stored at room and cold (5oC temperatures. Samples were withdrawn every 4 weeks and analyzed for its physical, chemical, and microbiological characteristics. The characteristic changes of ronto stored at low temperature were generally slower than those at room temperature. The changes in colour, viscosity, acidity, total volatile bases, and microbial counts were lower in ronto kept at 5oC compared to those in ronto kept at room temperature. The colour of ronto stored at low temperature remained red after 20 weeks, whereas the colour of ronto kept at room temperature turned brownish after 20 weeks.

  4. Microbiological and physical-chemical characteristics of fermented milk beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.H.P. Andrade

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate some microbiological and physical-chemical characteristics of fermented milk beverages collected at the main supermarkets in Belo Horizonte (MG. 40 samples of the products corresponding to five distinct brands were collected. They were submitted to the following analyses: Most Probable Number (MPN of total (30ºC and thermal tolerant coliforms (45ºC, Salmonella spp., coagulase positive Staphylococcus, molds and yeasts, lactic acid bacteria, pH, titratable acidity and contents of moisture, total solids, protein and fat. The analyses were carried out during the last week of shelf life. The microbiological quality of the samples was good and the counts of lactic bacteria were above the minimum established by the official legislation. Streptococcus and Lactobacillus were isolated and identified from the products and Lactobacillus delbrueckii was molecularly identified in three samples. The mean values for the contents of fat and protein, titratable acidity, pH, moisture and total solids ranged from 1.24 to 1.98%; 1.88 to 2.22%; 0.54 to 0.66%; 3.91 to 4.16; 81.18 to 83.25% and 16.75 to 18.82%, respectively. All samples had protein content in agreement with the official legislation.

  5. Comparison of oxygen saturation values obtained from fingers on physically restrained or unrestrained sides of the body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhan, Esra Akin; Yönt, Gülendam Hakverdioğlu; Khorshid, Leyla

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare semiexperimentally the pulse oximetry values obtained from a finger on restrained or unrestrained sides of the body. The pulse oximeter provides a noninvasive measurement of the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in arterial blood. One of the procedures most frequently applied to patients in intensive care units is the application of physical restraint. Circulation problems are the most important complication in patients who are physically restrained. Evaluation of oxygen saturation from body parts in which circulation is impeded or has deteriorated can cause false results. The research sample consisted of 30 hospitalized patients who participated in the study voluntarily and who were concordant with the inclusion criteria of the study. Patient information and patient follow-up forms were used for data collection. Pulse oximetry values were measured simultaneously using OxiMax Nellcor finger sensors from fingers on the restrained and unrestrained sides of the body. Numeric and percentile distributions were used in evaluating the sociodemographic properties of patients. A significant difference was found between the oxygen saturation values obtained from a finger of an arm that had been physically restrained and a finger of an arm that had not been physically restrained. The mean oxygen saturation value measured from a finger of an arm that had been physically restrained was found to be 93.40 (SD, 2.97), and the mean oxygen saturation value measured from a finger of an arm that had not been physically restrained was found to be 95.53 (SD, 2.38). The results of this study indicate that nurses should use a finger of an arm that is not physically restrained when evaluating oxygen saturation values to evaluate them correctly.

  6. Characterisation of gaharu hydrosol: Physical, chemical and microbiological properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Humaira Lau Abdullah; Salmah Moosa

    2010-01-01

    Gaharu hydrosol is produced during the hydro distillation of resinous wood part of Aquilaria sp. This aromatic water is being considered as a by-product in the industry. There is interest to turn this aromatic by-product into aroma therapy products. The present study is carried out in order to understand the properties of gaharu hydrosol, physically, chemically and microbiologically. Gaharu hydrosol from two different extraction facilities for example at Kedaik Agar wood Sdn. Bhd. and Malaysian Nuclear Agency were characterised in this study. All the gaharu hydrosol samples displayed acidic nature, with pH in the range of 3.62 - 4.53. Four antioxidant assays were carried out to ascertain the antioxidant capabilities of two gaharu hydrosol samples through the total phenolic content assay, ABTS + radical scavenging activity, DPPH· radical scavenging activity and ferric reducing activity (FRAP). The results revealed that the samples exhibited lower antioxidant capabilities as compared to the positive control. For microbial population study, fungi was not present in the samples as there was no growth observed on the Plate Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA) using membrane filtration technique. The antibacterial activity of the gaharu hydrosol against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was determined using agar dilution method and disk diffusion method. The results showed that the gaharu hydrosol did not inhibit the growth of both the bacteria. The results obtained from this study will be further evaluated for the development of new products using this aromatic gaharu by-product. (author)

  7. INFLUENCE MATURATION OF VEAL ON THE MICROBIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL INDICATORS

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    Simona Kunová

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate microbial and pH changes in veal meat during maturation. Total viable counts, coliform bacteria and pH changes in chilling meat were evaluated after 24 hours, 7 days and 14 days of meat maturation. There were analysed 8 samples of veal meeat. Results of microbiological analysis were compared with Commission regulation (EC No 2073/2005 on microbiological criteria for foodstuffs. Total viable counts (TVC in samples after 24 hours of chilling ranged from 2.02 log CFU.cm-to 4.21 log CFU.cm-2 (1.64 . 104 CFU.cm-2. The average number of TVC after 24 hours of meat maturation was 3.27 log CFU.cm-2, coliform bacteria (CB after 24 hours were lower than than 1 log cfu.cm-2 in five samples, and the highest number of coliform bacteria was 1.65 log cfu.cm-2, average number of CB was 1.13 log cfu.cm-2. pH values in samples after 24 hours of maturation were in range from 6.6 to 7.0, average pH value was 6.8. TVC in samples after 7 days of chilling ranged from 3.09 log CFU.cm-2 to 4.01 log CFU.cm-2, the average number of TVC after 7 days of storage was 3.39 log CFU.cm-2. CB after 7 days of meat maturation were lower than 1 log CFU cm-2 in three samples, the highest value of CB was 2.07 log CFU cm-2, the average value of CB in samples after 7 days of meat chilling was 1.03 log CFU cm-2. pH values of meat after 7 days of maturation ranged from 5.5 to 6.1. The average pH value of samples after 7 days of storage was 5.73 pH values of meat after 14 days of maturation ranged from 6.0 to 6.4. The average pH value of samples after 14 days of storage was 6.16.

  8. Trigger finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... digit; Trigger finger release; Locked finger; Digital flexor tenosynovitis ... cut or hand Yellow or green drainage from the cut Hand pain or discomfort Fever If your trigger finger returns, call your surgeon. You may need another surgery.

  9. Finger pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  10. Influence of packaging and potassium sorbate on the physical, physicochemical and microbiological alterations of guava preserves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Carvalho Menezes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The elaboration of preserves through fruit processing is a promising alternative for their conservation. Such processing provides pleasant flavor due to the increase of sweetness and allows good conservation of the product for a prolonged time. Seeking quality and higher durability of fruit preserves, the purpose of this work was to evaluate the interference of potassium sorbate addition, and polypropylene, metallic and cellophane film packaging on the quality of guava (Psidium guajava L. preserves during storage, through the physical, physiochemical and microbiological characteristics. The physical, physiochemical and microbiological analyses showed that the different types of packaging did not interfere in the stability of the guava preserves until the 5th month of storage - time being the factor that most influences the quality of the preserves when stored under temperature and humidity of 19.6 °C and 76.2%, respectively. The potassium sorbate caused an increase of the soluble solid levels and a decrease of the water activity. Regardless of the treatment, the preserves remained microbiologically stable during storage.

  11. Soil physical and microbiological attributes cultivated with the common bean under two management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Adriana De Gennaro

    Full Text Available Agricultural management systems can alter the physical and biological soil quality, interfering with crop development. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical and microbiological attributes of a Red Latosol, and its relationship to the biometric parameters of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, irrigated and grown under two management systems (conventional tillage and direct seeding, in Campinas in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The experimental design was of randomised blocks, with a split-plot arrangement for the management system and soil depth, analysed during the 2006/7 and 2007/8 harvest seasons, with 4 replications. The soil physical and microbiological attributes were evaluated at depths of 0.00-0.05, 0.05-0.10, 0.10-0.20 and 0.20-0.40 m. The following were determined for the crop: density, number of pods per plant, number of beans per pod, thousand seed weight, total weight of the shoots and harvest index. Direct seeding resulted in a lower soil physical quality at a depth of 0.00-0.05 m compared to conventional tillage, while the opposite occurred at a depth of 0.05-0.10 m. The direct seeding showed higher soil biological quality, mainly indicated by the microbial biomass nitrogen, basal respiration and metabolic quotient. The biometric parameters in the bean were higher under the direct seeding compared to conventional tillage.

  12. Characterization samples of Tigris river water treated with nano colloidal silver (physically, chemically, microbiologically)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumboos, H. I.; Beden, S. J.; Zouari, K.; Chkir, N.; Ahmed, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    Many researches of using nano silver in purification of drinking water from bacteria and its effect on stan dared properties as drinking water were established. Two stages accomplished in these projects. First stage include preparation of colloidal silver with characterization process and prepare water samples through sedimentation, filtration process, PH and turbidity measure then treated with colloidal silver in volume ratio (0.1-Λ) ml/100ml. The second stage represent select the better results from stage one and take samples to determine the standard characterization values with chemical, physical and microbiological taste. Results will be compared with Iraq standard certification. (Author)

  13. Physical, chemical and microbiological analysis of the water quality of Rawal Lake, Pakistan

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    Mehreen Hassan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available What better gift of nature would be than good quality water? In order to assess the quality of water of Rawal Lake, following research was carried out. Rawal lake is a source of drinking water supplied to many areas of Rawalpindi and Islamabad’ the capital city of Pakistan. Water of this lake is being highly polluted by the local communities alongside the lake through solid waste dumping. Samples of surface water were collected, tested and analyzed in the laboratory on the basis of physical, chemical and microbiological parameters. The results showed uncertainties in many of the selected parameters. Microbiological analysis revealed high contamination of E. coli, fecal coliform and total coliform in the samples proving it unfit for drinking. It was found that the concentration of all physical parameters such as nitrates, chloride, pH and conductivity were within the normal limits. The level of heavy metals like lead, iron, chromium etc. was also found low. Turbidity at some points exceeded the maximum acceptable limit as per WHO statement.

  14. THE EFFECT OF SELECTED PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PARAMETERS ON MICROBIOLOGICAL STATUS OF THE VISTULA RIVER NEAR WARSAW

    OpenAIRE

    Janusz Augustynowicz; Mariusz Nierebiński; Małgorzata Zawada; Russel Russel

    2016-01-01

    The types of organisms present in water reservoirs depend on water purity and biochemical processes that occur. Therefore, one of the methods of water quality assessment is to determine its condition by determining the biological indicators, including microbiological parameters. The aim of the experiment presented in this paper was to investigate the effects of selected physical and chemical parameters of water samples from the Vistula River on the microbiological status of water. The experim...

  15. Physical-chemical and microbiological characteristics of the irradiated Prato cheese in the ripening period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, Erika M.R.; Domarco, Rachel E.; Spoto, Marta H.F.; Blumer, Lucimara; Matraia, Clarice; Gurgel, Maria Sylvia C.C. do Amaral

    2000-01-01

    The present work studied the influence of gamma irradiation in the ripening period of Prato cheese. The cheese was irradiated in the first day of ripening with doses of 1, 2, 3 and 4 kGy and control in a cobalto-60 source and stored at 10-12 deg C and at ±85% RH for 60 days. The physical-chemical and microbiological characteristics were analysed every each 15 days of ripening. The increased of the dose of radiation decreased the total microbial count of the cheese. Compared to the control, the irradiation in the first day of ripening did not affect the physical-chemical characteristics of the cheese, excepted for color and soluble protein. The difference observed in these characteristic was that with the increased of the dose of radiation the soluble protein and the color of the Prato cheese. (author)

  16. Physical and functional sensitivity of zinc finger transcription factors to redox change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X; Bishopric, N H; Discher, D J; Murphy, B J; Webster, K A

    1996-01-01

    Redox regulation of DNA-binding proteins through the reversible oxidation of key cysteine sulfhydryl groups has been demonstrated to occur in vitro for a range of transcription factors. The direct redox regulation of DNA binding has not been described in vivo, possibly because most protein thiol groups are strongly buffered against oxidation by the highly reduced intracellular environment mediated by glutathione, thioredoxin, and associated pathways. For this reason, only accessible protein thiol groups with high thiol-disulfide oxidation potentials are likely to be responsive to intracellular redox changes. In this article, we demonstrate that zinc finger DNA-binding proteins, in particular members of the Sp-1 family, appear to contain such redox-sensitive -SH groups. These proteins displayed a higher sensitivity to redox regulation than other redox-responsive factors both in vitro and in vivo. This effect was reflected in the hyperoxidative repression of transcription from promoters with essential Sp-1 binding sites, including the simian virus 40 early region, glycolytic enzyme, and dihydrofolate reductase genes. Promoter analyses implicated the Sp-1 sites in this repression. Non-Sp-1-dependent redox-regulated genes including metallothionein and heme oxygenase were induced by the same hyperoxic stress. The studies demonstrate that cellular redox changes can directly regulate gene expression in vivo by determining the level of occupancy of strategically positioned GC-binding sites. PMID:8622648

  17. Production of fish finger from sand smelt ( Atherina boyeri , RISSO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, changes of chemical, microbiological load and sensory properties of fish fingers prepared from sand smelt (Atherina boyeri, RISSO 1810) were investigated during storage (for 6 months at -18°C). The fish finger nutritional composition changed with the fish finger process. The changes in moisture, crude protein, ...

  18. Fermentation of maize (Zea mays L.) meal or mawe production in Benin : physical, chemical and microbiological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hounhouigan, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    Mawè is a sour dough made from partially dehulled maize meal, which has undergone natural fermentation for 1 to 3 days.

    In this thesis, the processing methods, the characteristics of the products and the physical, chemical and microbiological changes during natural fermentation of

  19. EFFECT OF THYME ESSENTIAL OIL ADDITION ON PHYSICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF TABLE EGGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrieta Arpášová

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Essentialoils areintensivefragrant, oilyliquidsubstances containedindifferent parts of theplant. Their function is based on organoleptic effect and stimulation of organism to the production of digestive juices. Result is ahigherdigestibilityandabsorption of nutirents. Besides antibacterial properties, essential oils or their components have been shown to exhibit antiviral,antimycotic, antitoxigenic, antiparasitic, and insecticidal properties. In this experiment the effects of supplementation of the diet for laying hens with thyme essential oils on physical and microbiological egg parameters were studied.Hens of laying hybrid Hy-Line Brown (n=30 were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=10 and fed for 23 weeks on diets with thyme essential oil supplemented. In the first experimental group the feed mixture was supplemented with thyme essential oil addition in a dose 0.5 g/kg, in the second one some essential oil in a dose 1g/kg. The results suggest that all of qualitative parameters of egg internal content (yolk weight (g, yolk index, percentage portion egg yolk (%, yolk index, yolk colour (°HLR, albumen weight (g, percentage portion of albumen (%, Haugh Units (HU, albumen index were with thyme essential oil addition insignificantly influenced (P>0.05. The number of coliforms, enterococci, fungi and yeasts decreased with increasing dose of oil. The number of lactobacilli was zero in all groups.

  20. THE EFFECT OF SELECTED PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PARAMETERS ON MICROBIOLOGICAL STATUS OF THE VISTULA RIVER NEAR WARSAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Augustynowicz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The types of organisms present in water reservoirs depend on water purity and biochemical processes that occur. Therefore, one of the methods of water quality assessment is to determine its condition by determining the biological indicators, including microbiological parameters. The aim of the experiment presented in this paper was to investigate the effects of selected physical and chemical parameters of water samples from the Vistula River on the microbiological status of water. The experiment was conducted in water samples collected in the central part of the Vistula River in Warsaw. The analyses of selected parameters were performed once a month throughout the year. Microbiological tests included: number of nitrogen fixing bacteria, MPN nitrifying bacteria, MPN sulfate-reducing bacteria. Physical and chemical parameters such as temperature, pH and total nitrogen content were determined in water samples. The results showed a correlation between temperature, pH and microbiological parameters. However, there was no significant correlation between the number of tested microorganisms and the concentration of total nitrogen in water samples.

  1. Physical-chemical, microbiological and sensory evaluation of spicy soybean paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cristina Faria Vieira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop a spicy soybean paste. Three formulations of spicy soybean paste were prepared, and then submitted to prior microbiological and sensory acceptance test with 50 untrained tasters. The most accepted formulation was evaluated on the microbiological quality during its shelf life. Significant differences were found (p <0.05 for the attributes flavor, aroma, texture and overall impression for the formulation B of spicy soybean paste, the most accepted of the two. It was found that the microbiological analyzes are within the established by the Technical Regulation on microbiological standards for food nº 12 of January 2nd, 2001. The mean values found for the physicochemical analyzes were 38.93% for moisture, 11.00% for lipids, proteins and 11.12% to 6.85% for ash content. The spicy soybean paste is a good food option, presenting good sensory acceptance.

  2. Robotic hand and fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Curt Michael; Dullea, Kevin J.

    2017-06-06

    Technologies pertaining to a robotic hand are described herein. The robotic hand includes one or more fingers releasably attached to a robotic hand frame. The fingers can abduct and adduct as well as flex and tense. The fingers are releasably attached to the frame by magnets that allow for the fingers to detach from the frame when excess force is applied to the fingers.

  3. Food engineering and predictive microbiology: on the necessity to combine biological and physical kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafart, P

    2005-04-15

    Predictive microbiology is mainly applied in the area of risk assessment, but unusually regarded as a tool for the optimisation of processes, which needs the implementation of food engineering. Combination of predictive microbiology and food engineering allows both the assessment of a process in relation to risk and its optimisation. Intrinsic comparison between processes in relation to risk, on one hand, and the development of process optimisation tools on the other hand, necessitates the implementation of new concepts and the involvement of simplified and standard calculations based upon reference target strains and environmental conditions. Some conventional concepts related to heat treatments are extended, while some new ones related to bacterial growth are derived from the gamma concept of Marcel Zwietering.

  4. Preparation of a cereal bar containing bocaiuva: physical, nutritional, microbiological and sensory evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Leite Munhoz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Regional fruit have been increasingly used in recent years in the preparation of foodstuffs because besides promoting the biome preservation, it is obtained differentiated and value-added products. This study aimed to prepare cereal bars containing pulp and kernel of bocaiuva and determine the nutritional quality, assess the acceptability, and microbiological quality. Two formulations of cereal bar were prepared with pulp dehydrated by osmoconvection and kernel of bocaiuva. The formulations were analyzed as for the texture, color analysis, proximate composition, fatty acids profile, mineral, microbiology and sensory evaluation. Cereal bars presented on average, in g 100 g-1, 4.83 moisture, 8.01 protein, 12.93 lipids, 1.30 ash, 53.75 total carbohydrate, 19.78 fiber and 363.41 kcal 100 g-1 total caloric value. Bars represented a source of calcium and iron and had a high content of oleic acid, average of 20 g 100 g-1 total lipids. In the microbiological evaluation, cereal bars have met the standards set by the legislation, being suitable for consumption. As for the attributes evaluated in the sensory analysis, all showed mean values above 6, considered acceptable for consumption. The use of bocaiuva may contribute to highlight differentiated taste and appearance, emphasizing the use of native fruits in the preparation of new products.

  5. Fingers that change color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanching of the fingers; Fingers - pale; Toes that change color; Toes - pale ... These conditions can cause fingers or toes to change color: Buerger disease. Chilblains. Painful inflammation of small ...

  6. Differences in chemical, physical and microbiological characteristics of Italian burrata cheeses made in artisanal and industrial plants of Apulia Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Rea

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The burrata cheese is a traditional product from Southern Italy, consisting of an envelope of pasta filata (stretched curd filled with cream and pasta filata strips (usually leftovers from mozzarella production. Physical [water activity (aw, pH], chemical (moisture, NaCl content and microbiological [total viable count (TVC, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Yersinia enterocolitica, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Enterobacteriaceae, coagulase-positive staphylococci] characteristics of burrata cheeses manufactured in artisanal and industrial plants were evaluated. The artisanal burrata showed lower aw values in the filling and the final product. The same was recorded in the filling for the moisture, probably due to differences between the types of cream used in the artisanal and the industrial cheesemaking. The pH value of the filling differed between the two groups but no difference was recorded in the final product. Microbiological differences were also recorded, with higher values for TVC and E. coli in artisanal than industrial burrata. All samples were negative for the other microbial determinations, with the exception of coagulase-positive staphylococci and Y. enterocolitica, which were detected in artisanal burrata. Differences in cheesemaking process were probably responsible for the strong variability of the physical and chemical data between the two cheeses; furthermore, differences in the hygienic features were also recorded. Even though artisanal products showed lower aw and pH values and higher NaCl concentration, the higher E. coli loads highlighted the need for a more accurate compliance with hygienic procedures along the artisanal cheesemaking process.

  7. La Popala creek: quality analysis of water from some physical - chemical, microbiological variables and aquatic macroinvertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milan Valoyes, Wandy Yohanna; Caicedo Quintero, Orlando; Aguirre Ramirez, Nestor Jaime

    2011-01-01

    The Popala creek supplies water to the people of Bolombolo in Venecia municipality in Antioquia, Colombia. In November 14th and 28th of 2009, four sampling station were located along the creek, to measure five sets of variables: physico- chemical, microbiological, aquatic macroinvertebrate, biological indicators and biotic index BMWP.Physico- chemical variables, aquatic macroinvertebrates and index BMWP indicate good environmental conditions in station 2, located about 150 m from the headwaters (station 1). On the other hand, Station 4, located near to the Cauca River, exhibits deterioration in water quality. Stations 3 and 4 displayed high levels of fecal coliforms. However, the samples taken from Bolombolo's water supply network indicate the water of the aqueduct is adequate for human consumption.

  8. Research of organoleptic, physical-chemical and microbiological indicators of the enriched cottage cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Sviridova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of enriched curd by introducing a kelp of Laminaria family – Laminariaceae is discussed. The change of quality characteristics of the curd during storage have been studied. It was found that for the enriched product that meets the requirements of standards on the organoleptic, physico-chemical and microbiological parameters, optimal amount of kelp is 1%. Bigger amount of Laminaria led to the slight increase in the acidity of the product and the deterioration of organoleptic characteristics. The microbiological analysis of samples of enriched cheese showed absence of coliform bacteria, bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus aureus and molds. During the entire storage period of product a decrease of product contamination was observed. The most intense microflora reduction observed in the test sample after 120 hours of storage. Hence, a kelp exhibit antimicrobial activity. During the storage period the number of micro-organisms met the requirements of the standards. By the end of the storage period an amount of lactic acid bacteria in the product was at least 106 CFU / g. Adding of a 1% kelp to the curd promoted slight increase the energy value of the product, while the iodine content increased by 10 times. Thus, the use for food of 100 g of the enriched by laminaria cheese satisfy the adult daily requirement of iodine by 60–70%. Furthermore, the use of kelp as addition to the curd brings not only iodine but also vitamins, microelements and other beneficial agents for humans. Based on the above we can recommend this product as a prophylactic and preventive nutrition for different groups of the population suffering from iodine deficiency.

  9. Effect of organic selenium-enriched yeast supplementation in finishing sheep diet on carcasses microbiological contamination and meat physical characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Velázquez-Garduño

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of feeding Pelibuey sheep on diet supplemented with different doses of organic selenium (Se-enriched yeast on carcasses microbiological contamination and meat physical characteristics. The experiment was conducted during the finishing stage of 18 female sheep and lasted for 60 days. In a complete randomized design, sheep were distributed to one of three treatments: the control without Se-yeast (T1, the control supplemented with Se-yeast at 0.35 mg Se/kg DM (T2, and control supplemented with Se-yeast at 0.60 mg Se/kg DM (T3. The yeast product used was Selyeast 3000TM yeast (LFA Lesaffre, Toluca, Mexico with a Se concentration of 3000 ppm (mg/kg. Lambs were slaughtered at the end of the experiment at an average weight of 39.5±4.41 kg and samples were taken for microbiological analysis. There were no differences between treatments (P>0.05 and the aerobic plate counts for T1, T2 and T3 had indexes of 0.10, 0.08 and 0.08 log10 CFU/cm2, respectively. Total coliform counts obtained were 0.13, 0.10 and 0.09 log10 CFU/cm2 for T1, T2 and T3, respectively, and the faecal coliform counts were 0.09 log10 CFU/cm2 for T1, 0.06 log10 CFU/cm2 for T2 and 0.07 log10 CFU/cm2 for T3. No significant effects (P>0.05 were observed for carcasses physical characteristics of microbial growth, initial and ultimate pH and temperature, colour values and water holding capacity. It can therefore be concluded that organic Se-enriched yeast did not affect carcasses bacterial proliferation or meat physical characteristics.

  10. Predictive microbiology for cosmetics based on physicals, chemicals and concentration parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalleb, S; De Vaugelade, S; Sella, O; Lavarde, M; Mielcarek, C; Pense-Lheritier, A-M; Pirnay, S

    2015-02-01

    Challenge test (CT) is essential to assure the efficiency of the preservative system in products. A previous study realized by our staff in 2012, carried out to evaluate the influence of three parameters (ethanol, pH and water) on the microbiological cosmetics products conservation. Following this work, a correlation between aw (based on the glycerine concentration) and the selected parameter has been demonstrated. In the present study, smaller limits of ethanol, pH and glycerine were applied to determinate CT necessity. Sixteen stables O/W cosmetics creams with different concentration of ethanol (1-19%), glycerine (3-16%) and different pH (6-11) were formulated. To evaluate the efficiency of the different formulations, CTs were performed according to the International Standard ISO 11930:2012. To determine the influence of the parameters, a D-optimal plan generated by Design Expert(®) was applied. Design of Experiments software offers to plan, estimate and control the statistics and models for factorial and no-factorial designs. Challenge tests results show that 10 formula passed criteria A, two passed criteria B and four are not conform. Mostly, an ethanol concentration higher than 16% exempts products of CT. It has been shown that an ethanol concentration between 10.5% and 16%, and an glycerine concentration >10%; or if the ethanol concentration is between 5% and 10.5%, glycerine is >6% and pH is ≥10, the CT is not required. Ethanol has a significant impact on conservation and especially when it is correlated with glycerine and pH. Finally, a glycerine concentration higher than 16% exempts products of CT. Following the analysis of the different concentration, a correlation between glycerine and ethanol that directly influence microbiological protection of cosmetics products has been established. Indeed, by controlling ethanol, pH and glycerine, many products may be exempted from the CT. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de

  11. Indoor air purification by dielectric barrier discharge combined with ionic wind: physical and microbiological investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermann, E.; Prehn, F.; Schmidt, M.; Höft, H.; Brandenburg, R.; Kettlitz, M.

    2018-04-01

    A non-thermal plasma source based on a surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is developed for purification of recirculating air in operating theatres in hospitals. This is a challenging application due to high flow rates, short treatment times and the low threshold for ozone in the ventilated air. Therefore, the surface DBD was enhanced in order to generate an ionic wind, which can deflect and thus, filter out airborne microorganisms. Electrical and gas diagnostics as well as microbiological experiments were performed in a downscaled plasma source under variation of various electrical parameters, but application-oriented airflow velocity and humidity. The dependence of electrical power and ozone concentration as well as charged particles in the plasma treated air on frequency, voltage and relative humidity is presented and discussed. The presence of humidity causes a more conductive dielectric surface and thus a weaker plasma formation, especially at low frequency. The airborne test bacteria, Escherichia coli, showed significant effect to plasma treatment (up to 20% reduction) and to plasma with ionic wind (up to 90% removal); especially a configuration with 70% removal and an accompanying ozone concentration of only 360 ppb is promising for future application.

  12. Prosthetic rehabilitation of an amputated finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Garg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amputation of finger causes devastating physical, psychosocial, and economic damage to an individual. The concealment of an amputated part with the help of prosthesis can shield an amputee from social stigma. Prosthesis for such patient must be comfortable to wear lightweight, durable, cosmetically pleasing easy to put on and remove. The restoration of finger amputations depends on the amount of tissue involved, the involvement of bone, the angles and levels of amputation, and the involvement of other fingers. The microsurgical reimplantation helps to save many severely injured and traumatically amputed finger. The prosthetic rehabilitation of an amputated finger is considered when microvascular reconstruction is not possible, unavailable, unsuccessful, or unaffordable. Most accepted material is silicones because of their better esthetics, ease of manipulation, and availability. This paper presents prosthetic rehabilitation of index finger of the right hand with custom made silicon prosthesis.

  13. 7 CFR 58.938 - Physical requirements and microbiological limits for sweetened condensed milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... (f) Keeping quality. Samples incubated at 90-100 °F shall show no physical evidence of deterioration after seven days. (g) Composition. Shall meet the minimum requirements of the Food and Drug...

  14. Investigations of Physical-Chemical and Microbiological Deterioration of Chocolate Pralines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Cecilie Lykke Marvig

    Chocolate pralines, defined as soft fruit, sugar or fat based fillings covered with a chocolate shell, are multidomain, complex food products. The chocolate shell consists of a continuous fat phase in which sugar and cocoa particles are dispersed. The fillings can vary in composition and texture...... and complex interactions between intrinsic and external parameters, and spoilage can be of either microbial or physical-chemical character or a combination of the two. Chocolate belong to the group of low moisture food products and is only susceptible to physical-chemical spoilage, while the fillings has...... intermediate moisture content and are spoiled both by growth of microorganisms and physical-chemical changes. Microbial spoilage is experienced as production of off-flavours, formation of slime, gas production leading to cracking of the chocolate shell, or visible growth on the surface of the filling. Physical...

  15. Influence of physical damage and freezing on histamine concentration and microbiological quality of yellowfin tuna during processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo García-Tapia

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Yellowfin tuna has a high level of free histidine in their muscle, which can lead to histamine formation by microorganisms if temperature abuse occurs during handling and further processing. The objective of this study was to measure levels of histamine in damaged and undamaged thawed muscle to determine the effect of physical damage on the microbial count and histamine formation during the initial steps of canning processing and to isolate and identify the main histamine-forming microorganisms present in the flesh of yellowfin tuna. Total mesophilic and psicrophilic microorganisms were determined using the standard plate method. The presence of histamine-forming microorganisms was determined in a modified Niven's agar. Strains were further identified using the API 20E kit for enterobacteriaceae and Gram-negative bacilli. Physically damaged tuna did not show higher microbiological contamination than that of undamaged muscle tuna. The most active histamine-forming microorganism present in tuna flesh was Morganella morganii. Other decarboxylating microorganisms present were Enterobacter agglomerans and Enterobacter cloacae. Physical damage of tune during catching and handling did not increase the level of histamine or the amount of microorganisms present in tuna meat during frozen transportation, but they showed a higher risk of histamine-forming microorganism growth during processing.

  16. Comparative study of the detection of joint injury in early-stage rheumatoid arthritis by magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist and finger joints and physical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Mami; Kawakami, Atsushi; Iwamoto, Naoki; Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Fujikawa, Keita; Aramaki, Toshiyuki; Kita, Junko; Okada, Akitomo; Koga, Tomohiro; Arima, Kazuhiko; Kamachi, Makoto; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Nakamura, Hideki; Ida, Hiroaki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Takao, Shoichiro; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Uetani, Masataka; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2011-03-01

    To verify whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-proven joint injury is sensitive as compared with joint injury determined by physical examination. MRI of the wrist and finger joints of both hands was examined in 51 early-stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients by both plain and gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-enhanced MRI. Synovitis, bone edema, and bone erosion (the latter two included as bone lesions at the wrist joints); metacarpophalangeal joints; and proximal interphalangeal joints were considered as MRI-proven joint injury. Japan College of Rheumatology-certified rheumatologists had given a physical examination just before the MRI study. The presence of tender and/or swollen joints in the same fields as MRI was considered as joint injury on physical examination. The association of MRI-proven joint injury with physical examination-proven joint injury was examined. A total of 1,110 sites were available to be examined. MRI-proven joint injury was found in 521 sites, whereas the other 589 sites were normal. Physical examination-proven joint injury was found in 305 sites, which was significantly low as compared with MRI-proven joint injury (P = 1.1 × 10(-12) versus MRI). Joint injury on physical examination was not found in 81.5% of the sites where MRI findings were normal. Furthermore, an association of the severity of MRI-proven joint injury with that of joint injury on physical examination was clearly demonstrated (P = 1.6 × 10(-15), r(s) = 0.469). Our present data suggest that MRI is not only sensitive but accurately reflects the joint injury in patients with early-stage RA. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Development and the physical, chemical, microbiological and sensory analyses of red pepper seasoned with parmesan cheese - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v35i3.12794

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Teixeira de Souza Sora

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pickles comprising red pepper seasoned with Parmesan cheese has been developed as a new type of product developed by family cottage industries. Two formulations were prepared, or rather, with and without the preservative potassium sorbate, which underwent several physical, chemical, microbiological and sensory analyses. Physical and chemical analyses were undertaken for acidity, pH and °Brix; microbiological analyses for total heat-tolerant coliforms, Salmonella sp, molds, yeasts; sensory aspects such as physical features, aroma, flavor and texture, coupled to purchase intention among tasters were investigated. Both formulations comprised physical, chemical and microbiological parameters within standards. Sensory evaluation showed satisfactory results and research on purchase intention showed approximately 80% acceptability. Results from physical, chemical and microbiological tests showed that pickled pepper seasoned with Parmesan cheese may be prepared with citric acid as a preservative. Sensory evaluation and purchase intention indicate a real production and sale possibility of pickled peppers seasoned with Parmesan cheese by family cottage industries.  

  18. THE EFFECT OF STORAGE ON PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FISH WASTE ACIDIFIED USING FERMENTED VEGETABLES WASTE EXTRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sulistiyanto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Fish waste (“ikan rucah” is part of discarded fishing product, which is composed by non-food categorized fish (NFC-fish. Quality of NFC-fish meal that was made by dipping in extract of fermented vegetable’s waste has been reported better than commercial fish meal, but the effect after storing remained in question. Experiment was conducted to study the effect of different time of storing on physic-organoleptical, chemical and microbiological characteristics of the acidified NFC-fish meal that was made by dipped in extract of fermented vegetable’s waste (FVW-exctract. The NFC-Fish was soaked in the FVW-exctract by the ratio 1:1 (w/v for 4 hours, and then it was dripped out and dried. The dried fish was ground passed through 20 mesh, kept into plastic bags and stored at the room temperature (23-25 °C and 70-80% RH for 0, 1, 2 and 4 months. Physic-organoleptical, chemical and biologycal characteristics were parameters observed. Experiment was conducted by completely randomized design (CRD. Data were analysed by the GLM of SAS. Actual number of moisture, crude protein, extract ether, and proteolytic bacteria of fish meal were significantly influenced by time of storing (P<0.05. Dipping NFC-fish in the FVW-exctract effectively maintain the physical characteristics, pH, moisture, crude protein, extract ether and the number of proteolytic bacteria of fish meal up to 2 months of storage. Dipping NFC-fish in the FVW-exctract provide better characteristics on physical, chemical and microbiologycal than the commercial fish meal at the same condition of storage.

  19. Evaluating effects of sewage sludge and household compost on soil physical, chemical and microbiological properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debosz, K.; Petersen, S.O.; Kure, L.K.

    2002-01-01

    C, as well as in the field. The following properties were monitored: wet-stability of soil aggregates, clay dispersibility, hot-water extractable carbohydrates, resin-extractable P-i, inorganic N, biomass C and N, PLFA profiles, FDA hydrolysis activity, beta-glucosidase activity and CO2 evolution. In general......Recycling of organic wastes within agriculture may help maintain soil fertility via effects on physical, chemical and biological properties. Efficient use, however, requires an individual assessment of waste products, and effects should be compared with natural variations due to climate and soil......, effects of waste amendment were positive, but moderate compared to the dynamics observed in unamended soil, and mainly occurred in the first several weeks after amendment. The temporal dynamics of inorganic N, FDA hydrolysis activity, biomass C and PLFA composition appeared to be faster under...

  20. Evaluating effects of sewage sludge and household compost on soil physical, chemical and microbiological properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debosz, K.; Petersen, S.O.; Kure, L.K.

    2002-01-01

    Recycling of organic wastes within agriculture may help maintain soil fertility via effects on physical, chemical and biological properties. Efficient use, however, requires an individual assessment of waste products, and effects should be compared with natural variations due to climate and soil......C, as well as in the field. The following properties were monitored: wet-stability of soil aggregates, clay dispersibility, hot-water extractable carbohydrates, resin-extractable P-i, inorganic N, biomass C and N, PLFA profiles, FDA hydrolysis activity, beta-glucosidase activity and CO2 evolution. In general......, effects of waste amendment were positive, but moderate compared to the dynamics observed in unamended soil, and mainly occurred in the first several weeks after amendment. The temporal dynamics of inorganic N, FDA hydrolysis activity, biomass C and PLFA composition appeared to be faster under...

  1. Hospital effluents management: Chemical, physical, microbiological risks and legislation in different countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, E; Bonetta, Si; Bertino, C; Lorenzi, E; Bonetta, Sa; Gilli, G

    2016-03-01

    Hospital wastewater (HWW) can contain hazardous substances, such as pharmaceutical residues, chemical hazardous substances, pathogens and radioisotopes. Due to these substances, hospital wastewater can represent a chemical, biological and physical risk for public and environmental health. In particular, several studies demonstrate that the main effects of these substances can't be neutralised by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). These substances can be found in a wide range of concentrations due to the size of a hospital, the bed density, number of inpatients and outpatients, the number and the type of wards, the number and types of services, the country and the season. Some hazardous substances produced in hospital facilities have a regulatory status and are treated like waste and are disposed of accordingly (i.e., dental amalgam and medications). Legislation is quite homogeneous for these substances in all industrial countries. Problems that have emerged in the last decade concern substances and microorganisms that don't have a regulatory status, such as antibiotic residues, drugs and specific pathogens. At a global level, guidelines exist for treatment methods for these effluents, but legislation in all major industrial countries don't contain limitations on these parameters. Therefore, a monitoring system is necessary for these effluents as well as for substances and pathogens, as these elements can represent a risk to the environment and public health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The effects of gamma irradiation on the microbiological, physical and sensory qualities of diced tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Anuradha; Manley, Jacqueline; DeCosta, Suresh; Caporaso, Fred; Foley, Denise

    2002-03-01

    Diced Roma tomatoes were treated with gamma irradiation and evaluated for changes in microbial, physical, chemical and sensory properties. Dosages for Trial 1 were 0.0, 0.39, 0.56 and 1.82 kGy and in Trial 2, 0.0, 0.50, 1.24 and 3.70 kGy. Irradiation at 3.70 kGy resulted in no aerobic populations through day 12 and significantly fewer colonies through day 15 whereas yeast and mold populations experienced a 2 log reduction through day 12. Color, titratable acidity, and °Brix were not significantly affected by irradiation. Tissue firmness decreased with increasing dose but not with storage time. Treatment with 3.7 kGy decreased firmness by 50% and 20% with 0.5 kGy, however, the reduced firmness induced by 0.50 kGy was undetected by a 9 member trained sensory panel. A significant ( p⩽0.05) inverse correlation between changes in texture and water-soluble pectin (WSP) was determined while total pectin remained relatively constant and oxalate soluble pectin content decreased slightly with irradiation dose. The significant inverse correlation between the loss of firmness and WSP indicates that the changes in WSP play an important role in the tissue softening of tomatoes, This study indicates that irradiation at 0.5 kGy can reduce microbial counts substantially to improve microbial shelf life without adverse effects on sensory qualities.

  3. Physical-chemical and microbiological changes in Cerrado Soil under differing sugarcane harvest management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachid, Caio T C C; Piccolo, Marisa C; Leite, Deborah Catharine A; Balieiro, Fabiano C; Coutinho, Heitor Luiz C; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Peixoto, Raquel S; Rosado, Alexandre S

    2012-08-08

    Sugarcane cultivation plays an important role in Brazilian economy, and it is expanding fast, mainly due to the increasing demand for ethanol production. In order to understand the impact of sugarcane cultivation and management, we studied sugarcane under different management regimes (pre-harvest burn and mechanical, unburnt harvest, or green cane), next to a control treatment with native vegetation. The soil bacterial community structure (including an evaluation of the diversity of the ammonia oxidizing (amoA) and denitrifying (nirK) genes), greenhouse gas flow and several soil physicochemical properties were evaluated. Our results indicate that sugarcane cultivation in this region resulted in changes in several soil properties. Moreover, such changes are reflected in the soil microbiota. No significant influence of soil management on greenhouse gas fluxes was found. However, we did find a relationship between the biological changes and the dynamics of soil nutrients. In particular, the burnt cane and green cane treatments had distinct modifications. There were significant differences in the structure of the total bacterial, the ammonia oxidizing and the denitrifying bacterial communities, being that these groups responded differently to the changes in the soil. A combination of physical and chemical factors was correlated to the changes in the structures of the total bacterial communities of the soil. The changes in the structures of the functional groups follow a different pattern than the physicochemical variables. The latter might indicate a strong influence of interactions among different bacterial groups in the N cycle, emphasizing the importance of biological factors in the structuring of these communities. Sugarcane land use significantly impacted the structure of total selected soil bacterial communities and ammonia oxidizing and denitrifier gene diversities in a Cerrado field site in Central Brazil. A high impact of land use was observed in soil under

  4. Physical-chemical and microbiological changes in Cerrado Soil under differing sugarcane harvest management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Caio TCC

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sugarcane cultivation plays an important role in Brazilian economy, and it is expanding fast, mainly due to the increasing demand for ethanol production. In order to understand the impact of sugarcane cultivation and management, we studied sugarcane under different management regimes (pre-harvest burn and mechanical, unburnt harvest, or green cane, next to a control treatment with native vegetation. The soil bacterial community structure (including an evaluation of the diversity of the ammonia oxidizing (amoA and denitrifying (nirK genes, greenhouse gas flow and several soil physicochemical properties were evaluated. Results Our results indicate that sugarcane cultivation in this region resulted in changes in several soil properties. Moreover, such changes are reflected in the soil microbiota. No significant influence of soil management on greenhouse gas fluxes was found. However, we did find a relationship between the biological changes and the dynamics of soil nutrients. In particular, the burnt cane and green cane treatments had distinct modifications. There were significant differences in the structure of the total bacterial, the ammonia oxidizing and the denitrifying bacterial communities, being that these groups responded differently to the changes in the soil. A combination of physical and chemical factors was correlated to the changes in the structures of the total bacterial communities of the soil. The changes in the structures of the functional groups follow a different pattern than the physicochemical variables. The latter might indicate a strong influence of interactions among different bacterial groups in the N cycle, emphasizing the importance of biological factors in the structuring of these communities. Conclusion Sugarcane land use significantly impacted the structure of total selected soil bacterial communities and ammonia oxidizing and denitrifier gene diversities in a Cerrado field site in Central Brazil

  5. Analysis of Physical, Chemical and Microbiological Pollution in one Right Click

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabet, A.; Khoury, A.

    2011-01-01

    Current researches on the topic of indoor air pollution are moving towards expertise and prevention. Therefore it seems so critical to invest in the area of expertise and create a measuring device performing chemical, physical and bacteriological analysis in one click. Our choice of development towards this system of information management is oriented towards a modular system which can simultaneously transmit on real-time the analysis in the internet. Our production work has used several solutions and analyzed several possible methods such as microprocessor that has shown its reliability. The electronic system worked well even with some problems solved at the level of detection of particles α, β and γ. The solution NO-IP as for the transfer of data over the Internet has been successfully tested. In the same way we have been constrained to achieve measurement campaigns to verify the ability of the device to give consistent values. These campaigns were conducted on the Beaulieu of the University of Rennes 1, given the size of the site; it gives us a fairly comprehensive range of situations. These measurement campaigns extended for several months, with the purpose of comparing and analyzing the various results. These campaigns offer an opportunity of testing the operation of the aircraft and assessing the performance, knowing that all measures were compared to the device certified EN (Gasman). For the development of our device, we specify the direction and scope of the study area, analyze the existing level of detection performed and technical data manipulated, obtain a comprehensive description of the electronic system and reach a reasoned choice of a solution type of development. This allowed us to develop a multifunction prototype which objective is to control the quality of indoor air pollution in habitations. This device admits the same principle as product modem M2M (Machine to Machine). Through processes M2M, machinery (measuring instruments (device) and air

  6. Active packaged lamb with oxygen scavenger/carbon dioxide emitter sachet: physical-chemical and microbiological stability during refrigerated storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Trindade

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lamb meat has been commercialized in Brazil almost exclusively as a frozen product due to the longer shelf life provided by freezing when compared to refrigeration. However, as a result of the current trend of increased demand for convenience products, a need has emerged for further studies to facilitate the marketing of refrigerated lamb cuts. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the contribution of active packaging technology in extending the shelf life of lamb loins (Longissimus lumborum stored under refrigeration (1±1 ° C when compared to the traditional vacuum packaging. For this purpose, two kinds of sachets were employed: oxygen scavenger sachet and oxygen scavenger/carbon dioxide emitter sachet. Experiments were conducted in three treatments: 1 Vacuum (Control, 2 Vacuum + oxygen scavenger sachet and 3 Vacuum + oxygen scavenger/carbon dioxide emitter sachet. Microbiological (counts of anaerobic psychrotrophs, coliform at 45 ° C, coagulase-positive staphylococci, Salmonella and lactic acid bacteria and physical-chemical (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, objective color, pH value, water loss from cooking and shear force analyses were carried out weekly for a total storage period of 28 days. The experiment was performed three times for all treatments. Results showed that the lamb meat remained stable with respect to the majority of the evaluated physical and chemical indexes and remained within the standards established by Brazilian legislation for pathogenic microorganisms throughout the storage period in all three packaging systems. However, all treatments presented elevated counts of anaerobic psychrotrophic microorganisms and lactic acid bacteria, reaching values above 10(7 CFU/g at 28 days of storage. Thus, under the conditions tested, neither the oxygen scavenger sachet nor the dual function sachet (oxygen scavenger/carbon dioxide emitter were able to extend the shelf life of refrigerated lamb loin when added to this

  7. Salty Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneegurt, Mark A.; Wedel, Adrianne N.; Pokorski, Edward W.

    2004-01-01

    Using microbiology activities in the classroom is an effective way for teachers to address National Standards in the life sciences. However, common microbiology activities that involve swabbing doorknobs and hands are too risky due to the likelihood of culturing human pathogens. In addition, making sterile media and maintaining sterile conditions…

  8. Trigger Finger (Stenosing Tenosynovitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a friend * required fields From * To * DESCRIPTION Stenosing tenosynovitis is a condition commonly known as “trigger finger.” It is sometimes also called “trigger thumb.” The tendons that bend the fingers glide easily with ...

  9. Food microbiology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Royal Society of Chemistry (Great Britain); Moss, M. O; Adams, M. R

    2008-01-01

    ... is directed primarily at students of Microbiology, Food Science and related subjects up to Master's level and assumes some knowledge of basic microbiology. We have chosen not to burden the text with references to the primary literature in order to preserve what we hope is a reasonable narrative flow. Some suggestions for further reading for each chapter are included in Chapter 12. These are largely review articles and monographs which develop the overview provided and can also give access to...

  10. Multiple Fingers - One Gestalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezkan, Alexandra; Manuel, Steven G; Colgate, J Edward; Klatzky, Roberta L; Peshkin, Michael A; Drewing, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The Gestalt theory of perception offered principles by which distributed visual sensations are combined into a structured experience ("Gestalt"). We demonstrate conditions whereby haptic sensations at two fingertips are integrated in the perception of a single object. When virtual bumps were presented simultaneously to the right hand's thumb and index finger during lateral arm movements, participants reported perceiving a single bump. A discrimination task measured the bump's perceived location and perceptual reliability (assessed by differential thresholds) for four finger configurations, which varied in their adherence to the Gestalt principles of proximity (small versus large finger separation) and synchrony (virtual spring to link movements of the two fingers versus no spring). According to models of integration, reliability should increase with the degree to which multi-finger cues integrate into a unified percept. Differential thresholds were smaller in the virtual-spring condition (synchrony) than when fingers were unlinked. Additionally, in the condition with reduced synchrony, greater proximity led to lower differential thresholds. Thus, with greater adherence to Gestalt principles, thresholds approached values predicted for optimal integration. We conclude that the Gestalt principles of synchrony and proximity apply to haptic perception of surface properties and that these principles can interact to promote multi-finger integration.

  11. Environmental microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briški, Felicita; Vuković Domanovac, Marija

    2017-10-01

    For most people, microorganisms are out of sight and therefore out of mind but they are large, extremely diverse group of organisms, they are everywhere and are the dominant form of life on planet Earth. Almost every surface is colonized by microorganisms, including our skin; however most of them are harmless to humans. Some microorganisms can live in boiling hot springs, whereas others form microbial communities in frozen sea ice. Among their many roles, microorganisms are necessary for biogeochemical cycling, soil fertility, decomposition of dead plants and animals and biodegradation of many complex organic compounds present in the environment. Environmental microbiology is concerned with the study of microorganisms in the soil, water and air and their application in bioremediation to reduce environmental pollution through the biological degradation of pollutants into non-toxic or less toxic substances. Field of environmental microbiology also covers the topics such as microbially induced biocorrosion, biodeterioration of constructing materials and microbiological quality of outdoor and indoor air.

  12. Effect of storage temperature at 7°C on the physical-chemical and microbiological quality of industrialized cooked chicken breast meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandriane Pizato

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of storage temperature at 7°Con the physical-chemical and microbiological quality of industrialized cooked chicken breast meat was analyzed. Frozen cooked breast meat supplied from a poultry-processing industry was used. Fillets were stored at a prescribed temperature (7°C for 15-17 days and the sample’s chemical composition and initial pH was determined. Color, texture and microbiology were analyzed to determine the shelf-life of the cooked chicken breast meat. Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli were not detected. The highest values of Chroma a* were observed at 312 and 360 hours, exhibiting an intense red color resulting from meat deterioration. Chroma b* failed to show any significant difference between the first and last day of storage. Lightness (L* was decreased with storage time and revealed a darker color caused by microbial spoilage. Texture decreased from 2.93 to 1.12 kgf. It may be concluded that shelf-life attended to expectations with regard to texture, color and microbiology of cooked chicken breast meat stored at7°C during 13 days.

  13. Sheep Milk Yogurt from a Short Food Supply Chain: Study of the Microbiological, Chemico-Physical and Organoleptic Parameters in Relation to Shelf-Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marri, Nicla; Carfora, Virginia; Patriarca, Daniela; Veschetti, Maria Cristina; Giacinti, Giuseppina; Giangolini, Gilberto; Amatiste, Simonetta

    2014-08-28

    Aim of this work was to analyse some microbiological, chemico-physical and organoleptic parameters of sheep milk yogurt during and after its declared shelf-life. Five samples of a sheep's milk yogurt of the same lot, collected from a short supply chain ovine dairy farm of the Roman province, were analysed. Declared shelf-life of the product was 30 days. The products were examined at 2, 14, 30, 35 and 40 days from the production date, performing the following microbiological analyses: enumeration of i) colony-forming units characteristic of the yogurt, ii) Enterobacteriaceae , iii) yeasts and/or moulds at 25°C. Microbiological identification was performed by miniature biochemical tests and for the lactic acid bacteria also by PCR. At every test interval, evaluation of organoleptic parameters and pH was also performed. The analysed product maintained an almost constant amount of lactic acid bacteria until the end of the declared shelf-life. Concerning lactic acid bacteria, a 100% concordance of the results observed by using biochemical identification methods and PCR assays was obtained. After 14 days from the production, the presence of yeasts ( Candida famata ) was revealed, while the presence of moulds was detected after 30 days. Ralstonia picketii , an environmental microorganism, was also isolated. The results obtained in this study indicate that yogurt spoilage is mainly due to the growth of specific microorganisms of spoilage, such as yeasts and moulds.

  14. Individual finger sensibility in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfar, John C; Yaseen, Zaneb; Stern, Peter J; Kiefhaber, Thomas R

    2010-11-01

    Sensibility testing plays a role in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). No single physical examination test has proven to be of critical value in the diagnosis, especially when compared with electrodiagnostic testing (EDX). The purpose of this study was to define which digits are most affected by CTS, both subjectively and with objective sensibility testing. A prospective series of 35 patients (40 hands) with EDX-positive, isolated CTS were evaluated preoperatively using 2 objective sensibility tests: static 2-point discrimination (2PD) and abbreviated Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (SWMF) testing. Detailed surveys of subjective symptoms were also collected. Patients identified the middle finger as the most symptomatic over all others (51%). Objective 2PD results of each digit mirrored the subjective data, with higher values for the middle finger (mean 6.07 mm, (p thumb > index > small). Correlations failed between EDX, symptoms, and SWMF results or 2PD in the index finger. Positive but weak correlation (p = .002, r = .42) was found between EDX and 2PD only in the middle fingers. The middle finger is the most likely to show changes in 2PD in patients with positive EDX findings for CTS. Middle finger 2PD is best able to correlate with EDX when compared with 2PD of other digits. The SWMF testing also shows the middle digit testing as more sensitive, but this finding may be difficult to use clinically. Diagnostic I. Copyright © 2010 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); hide

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  16. The physical and microbiological quality of chicken meat in the different type of enterprise poultry slaughterhouse: a case study in Karanganyar District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertanto, B. S.; Nurmalasari, C. D. A.; Nuhriawangsa, A. M. P.; Cahyadi, M.; Kartikasari, L. R.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the physical and microbiological quality of chicken meat produced by the different type of enterprise slaughterhouse in Karanganyar District. The number of 20 poultry slaughterhouses was determined by convenience sampling method. The samples of chicken meat were randomly collected from medium enterprise poultry slaughterhouses (n=12) and small enterprise poultry slaughterhouses (n=8). A survey was carried out among poultry slaughterhouses in Karanganyar District. All the samples were subjected to physical quality consisted of pH test, texture, and color, while microbiological quality consisted of total plate count, microbial detection of Escherichia coli and Salmonella. The data were analyzed using descriptive quantitative analysis. The study showed that chicken meat in 6 small enterprise slaughterhouses and 11 medium enterprise slaughterhouses had normal pH of 5.81 - 6.3. Color and texture of chicken meats had relatively normal in both small and medium enterprise slaughterhouses. The total plate count of chicken meat showed in both small and medium enterprise slaughterhouses was 1x101 CFU/gr, and Salmonella was detected in 1 medium enterprise slaughterhouse. The overall results of the study suggest that the potential risk of chicken meat contamination depends on the processing of chicken meat in poultry slaughterhouses.

  17. Mixing methods, tasting fingers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Anna; Mol, Annemarie; Satalkar, Priya

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on an ethnographic experiment. Four finger eating experts and three novices sat down for a hot meal and ate with their hands. Drawing on the technique of playing with the familiar and the strange, our aim was not to explain our responses, but to articulate them. As we seek...... words to do so, we are compelled to stretch the verb "to taste." Tasting, or so our ethnographic experiment suggests, need not be understood as an activity confined to the tongue. Instead, if given a chance, it may viscously spread out to the fingers and come to include appreciative reactions otherwise...

  18. Multi-fingered robotic hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Carl F. (Inventor); Salisbury, Kenneth, Jr. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A robotic hand is presented having a plurality of fingers, each having a plurality of joints pivotally connected one to the other. Actuators are connected at one end to an actuating and control mechanism mounted remotely from the hand and at the other end to the joints of the fingers for manipulating the fingers and passing externally of the robot manipulating arm in between the hand and the actuating and control mechanism. The fingers include pulleys to route the actuators within the fingers. Cable tension sensing structure mounted on a portion of the hand are disclosed, as is covering of the tip of each finger with a resilient and pliable friction enhancing surface.

  19. A Finger Exoskeleton Robot for Finger Movement Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Heng Hsu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a finger exoskeleton robot has been designed and presented. The prototype device was designed to be worn on the dorsal side of the hand to assist in the movement and rehabilitation of the fingers. The finger exoskeleton is 3D-printed to be low-cost and has a transmission mechanism consisting of rigid serial links which is actuated by a stepper motor. The actuation of the robotic finger is by a sliding motion and mimics the movement of the human finger. To make it possible for the patient to use the rehabilitation device anywhere and anytime, an Arduino™ control board and a speech recognition board were used to allow voice control. As the robotic finger follows the patients voice commands the actual motion is analyzed by Tracker image analysis software. The finger exoskeleton is designed to flex and extend the fingers, and has a rotation range of motion (ROM of 44.2°.

  20. Cutaneous Microembolism of Fingers and Toes

    OpenAIRE

    Uwe Wollina; André Koch; Birgit Heinig; Georgi Tchernev; Torello Lotti

    2018-01-01

    A macro vascular embolism is a well-known emergency. In contrast, cutaneous microembolism is a lesser known symptom. However, cutaneous microembolism of fingers and toes is a red flag symptom for vascular emergencies. The underlying cause may involve infectious, immunological, metabolic and physical disorders, coagulation disorders and malignancies. Early recognition can help to live safe.

  1. Evaluation of the ionizing radiation effects in microbiology, physical and chemical and sensory aspects of ice cream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogovschi, Vladimir Dias

    2015-01-01

    The ice cream is defined as an emulsion of fats and proteins or a mixture of water and sugar, other ingredients may be added provided since they do not affect the product. It is considered a food of high nutritional value, providing lipids, carbohydrates, protein, calcium, phosphorus, and other minerals and vitamins (A, B1, B2, B6, C, D, E and K), and it is considered one of the most important products and higher interest to the dairy industry due to great demand by the consumers. The diseases related to food consumption are considered one of the most significant problems. Several outbreaks related to microbiological contamination of ice cream have been reported in recent decades in Asia, Europe and America. It is believed that the ice cream, as a frozen food, presents no risk to the population health. However, it is considered an excellent environment for the growth of microorganisms due to its composition, pH close to neutrality and long storage period. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microbiological, sensory and physicochemical aspects of ice cream. The ice cream samples were irradiated with gamma rays (60Co) with the doses of LOkGy, 2.0kGy, 3.0kGy and 4.0kGy. The samples intended for the inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538), Escherichia coli (ATCC 11229) and Salmonella abaetetuba (ATCC 35640) have been irradiated with doses of 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0kGy. It can be concluded that the dose of 3.0kGy was adequate to reduce most of the studied microorganisms to undetected levels. The use of gamma radiation affected the texture and the parameters of the colorimetric analyses of the ice cream. The results of the sensorial analyses showed that the better accepted dose was 3.0kGy. (author)

  2. Olive mill wastewater disposal in evaporation ponds in Sfax (Tunisia): moisture content effect on microbiological and physical chemical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboui, Raja; Hadrich, Bilel; Gharsallah, Néji; Ammar, Emna

    2009-11-01

    The study of the isotherms desorption of olive mill wastewater (OMW) was investigated to describe its water activity under different saturated environments. The microbial biodegradation of OMW during its storage in 5 evaporation ponds located in Agareb (Sfax-Tunisia) was carried out during the oil-harvesting year held 105 days in 2004. Gravimetric static method using saturated salt solutions was used and OMW as placed at 30 degrees C and under different water activities ranging from 0.11 to 0.90. Eight models were taken from the literature to describe experimental desorption isotherms. During storage, the evolution of physico-chemical parameters including pH, temperature, evaporation, humidity, total phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD) and phenols and three microbiological flora (aerobic mesophilic bacteria, yeasts and moulds) were considered. At 30 degrees C, when relative humidity increased in the experimented ponds of 69, 84 and 90%, the evaporation speed decreased from 1.24 x 10(-5) to 5 x 10(-6) cm(3) s(-1), from 6 x 10(-5) to 7 x 10(-6) cm(3) s(-1) and from 5 x 10(-6) to 1.1 x 10(-7) cm(3) s(-1) respectively. The desorption isotherm exhibited a sigmoidal curve corresponding to type II, typical of many organic material. The GAB and Peleg models gave the best fit for describing the relationship between the equilibrium moisture content and water activity in OMW (R (2) = 0.998). During the storage period, the analysis showed an increase of all the physico-chemical parameters studied, except phenols and total phosphorus concentrations. The microbiological study showed the predominance of yeasts and moulds and the decrease of bacteria population after 75 days reflecting both effect of recalcitrant compounds and the water activity on microbial growth.

  3. Mixing methods, tasting fingers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Anna; Mol, Annemarie; Satalkar, Priya

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on an ethnographic experiment. Four finger eating experts and three novices sat down for a hot meal and ate with their hands. Drawing on the technique of playing with the familiar and the strange, our aim was not to explain our responses, but to articulate them. As we seek wo...

  4. Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling

    KAUST Repository

    Gardiner, Bennett P. J.

    2015-02-23

    © 2015 American Physical Society. The mathematical model of a steadily propagating Saffman-Taylor finger in a Hele-Shaw channel has applications to two-dimensional interacting streamer discharges which are aligned in a periodic array. In the streamer context, the relevant regularization on the interface is not provided by surface tension but instead has been postulated to involve a mechanism equivalent to kinetic undercooling, which acts to penalize high velocities and prevent blow-up of the unregularized solution. Previous asymptotic results for the Hele-Shaw finger problem with kinetic undercooling suggest that for a given value of the kinetic undercooling parameter, there is a discrete set of possible finger shapes, each analytic at the nose and occupying a different fraction of the channel width. In the limit in which the kinetic undercooling parameter vanishes, the fraction for each family approaches 1/2, suggesting that this "selection" of 1/2 by kinetic undercooling is qualitatively similar to the well-known analog with surface tension. We treat the numerical problem of computing these Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling, which turns out to be more subtle than the analog with surface tension, since kinetic undercooling permits finger shapes which are corner-free but not analytic. We provide numerical evidence for the selection mechanism by setting up a problem with both kinetic undercooling and surface tension and numerically taking the limit that the surface tension vanishes.

  5. Self-reported wrist and finger symptoms associated with other physical/mental symptoms and use of computers/mobile phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpinen, Leena; Pääkkönen, Rauno; Gobba, Fabriziomaria

    2018-03-01

    Recently, computer, mobile phone and Internet use has increased. This study aimed to determine the possible relation between self-reported wrist and finger symptoms (aches, pain or numbness) and using computers/mobile phones, and to analyze how the symptoms are specifically associated with utilizing desktop computers, portable computers or mini-computers and mobile phones. A questionnaire was sent to 15,000 working-age Finns (age 18-65). Via a questionnaire, 723 persons reported wrist and finger symptoms often or more with use. Over 80% use mobile phones daily and less than 30% use desktop computers or the Internet daily at leisure, e.g., over 89.8% quite often or often experienced pain, numbness or aches in the neck, and 61.3% had aches in the hips and the lower back. Only 33.7% connected their symptoms to computer use. In the future, the development of new devices and Internet services should incorporate the ergonomics of the hands and wrists.

  6. The chemical/physical and microbiological characteristics of typical bath and laundry waste waters. [waste water reclamation during manned space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypes, W. D.; Batten, C. E.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Chemical/physical and microbiological characteristics are studied of typical bath and laundry waters collected during a 12 day test in which the untreated waste waters were reused for toilet flush. Most significant changes were found for ammonia, color, methylene blue active substances, phosphates, sodium, sulfates, total organic carbon, total solids, and turbidity in comparison with tap water baseline. The mean total number of microorganisms detected in the waste waters ranged from 1 million to 10 to the 7th power cells/m1 and the mean number of possible coliforms ranged from 10 to the 5th power to 1 million. An accumulation of particulates and an objectible odor were detected in the tankage used during the 12 day reuse of the untreated waste waters. The combined bath and laundry waste waters from a family of four provided 91 percent of the toilet flush water for the same family.

  7. DIGIT-PHYSICS: Digits Are Bosons Are Quanta Because (On Average) Quanta and Bosons Are and Always Were Digits!!! DIGITS?: For a Very Long Time Giving Us All The FINGER!!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig; Newcomb, Simon; Strutt-Rayleigh, John William; Poincare, Henri; Weyl, Hermann; Benford, Frederick; Antonoff, Marvin

    2015-03-01

    DIGIT-PHYSICS: DIGITS?: For a Very Long Time Giving Us All The FINGER!!!: CONTRA Wigner,``On the Unreasonable Effectiveness of Physics in Mathematics!'' A Surprise in Theoretical/Experimental Physics and/or Ostensibly Pure-Mathematics: PHYSICS: Quantum-Mechanics/Statistical-.Mechanics. DIGITS-LAW(S); DIGITS' ostensibly ``pure-mathematics' 1:1-map onto the QUANTUM!!! [Google:''http://www.benfordonline.net/ list/ chronological'']: Newcomb[Am.J.Math.4,39(1881)]-Poincare[Calcul des Probabilité(1912)]-Weyl[Math.Ann., 77, 313(1916)-Benford[J.Am.Phil Soc,78,115 (1938)]-..-Antonoff/Siegel[AMS Joint-Mtg.,San Diego(2002)-abs.# 973-60-124] empirical inter-digit{on-ANY/ALL averageS) = log[base =10] (1 + 1/d) = log[base =10] ([d +1]/d) upon algebraic-inversion is d = 1/[10⌃[ ] -1] 1/[2.303..e⌃[ ] -1] 1/[2.303..e⌃[] -1] 1/[2.303..e⌃[ ω] -1]: Digits Are Bosons Are Quanta Because (On Average) Quanta and Bosons Are and Always Were Digits!!! (Ex: atom energy-levels numbering: 0,...,9) ANY/ALL QUANTUM-physics[Planck(1901)-Einstein(1905)-Bose(1924)-Einstein(1925)-vs.Fermi(1927)-Dirac(1927)-...] is and always was Newcomb(1881) DIGIT-physics!!!

  8. Preprinting Microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Patrick D

    2017-05-23

    The field of microbiology has experienced significant growth due to transformative advances in technology and the influx of scientists driven by a curiosity to understand how microbes sustain myriad biochemical processes that maintain Earth. With this explosion in scientific output, a significant bottleneck has been the ability to rapidly disseminate new knowledge to peers and the public. Preprints have emerged as a tool that a growing number of microbiologists are using to overcome this bottleneck. Posting preprints can help to transparently recruit a more diverse pool of reviewers prior to submitting to a journal for formal peer review. Although the use of preprints is still limited in the biological sciences, early indications are that preprints are a robust tool that can complement and enhance peer-reviewed publications. As publishing moves to embrace advances in Internet technology, there are many opportunities for preprints and peer-reviewed journals to coexist in the same ecosystem. Copyright © 2017 Schloss.

  9. Shell Egg Vacuum Loader Cup Microbiological and Physical Quality Changes Associated with the Use of Various Sanitizing Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were conducted to determine the effects of various sanitizing compounds on the microbial and physical quality of shell egg processing vacuum loader cups. The sanitizing compounds utilized were: sterile, distilled water; 200 ppm sodium hypochlorite; 200 ppm calcium hypochlorite and 200 ppm ...

  10. Temperature and water potential of grey clays in relation to their physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics and phytocoenology within the scope of the Radovesice Dump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Zoubková

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Radovesice Dump is a part of brown-coal Most basin, which is situated in the northern part of the Czech Republic. Grey clays are the anthropogenic substrates, which have been used here as a reclamation material in most cases. Water potential of these substrates corresponds to their physical properties, annual precipitation, soil temperature and terrain exposition. All of these characteristics are the limiting factors of soil water, which is available to plants. Area left to spontaneous succession and reclaimed area served as the serviced ones. Water potential was studied in three depths (10, 20 and 30 cm of soil profile and the evaluated values showed significant difference between individual depths as well as exposition. As far as chemical analyses are concerned, the highest values were recorded in case of reclaimed area, whereas the levels of soil moisture here were medium. On the other hand, area left to spontaneous succession showed the lowest values in this sense, however specific representation of vegetation was much large-scale. As far as microbiological characteristics are concerned, the concentrations of phospholipid fatty acids were relatively low in both cases. To the dominant herb species belonged Calamagrostis epigejos, Urtica dioica, Alopecurus pratensis and Astragalus glycyphyllos. It was found that spontaneous succession was more variable as far as the specific representation of vegetation is concerned, though favourable soil physical and chemical properties were provided by technical reclamation too.

  11. Robotic Finger Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Platt, Robert J., Jr. (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  12. Heat treatment and gamma radiation effects on the physical-chemical, microbiological and sensory stability of pure sugarcane juice or added with fruit juices, stored under refrigeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Aline Cristine Garcia de

    2007-01-01

    Sugarcane juice is a taste drink, energetic, no alcoholic that conserves all the nutrients in cane sugar. It was very appreciated by the Brazilian population and its production has been shown to be a highly lucrative business. This research had the following objectives: evaluate the acceptance of the consuming market and the stability of pure sugarcane juice or added with natural fruit juices, submitted of heat treatment (70 deg C/ 25 min) and/ or gamma radiation (2,5 kGy) and stored in high density polyethylene bottles, under refrigeration (5 +- 1 deg C). Sugarcane juice market test was evaluated through the application of 350 questionnaires on six Sao Paulo cities. Sugarcane juice stability was evaluated through microbiological (psychotropic count, lactic bacteria and yeasts and molds count), physical-chemical (pH, color, titratable acidity, soluble solids, ratio and polyphenoloxidase activity) and sensory (hedonic test) parameters. Centesimal composition was determined analyzing: humidity, caloric value, total carbohydrates, total and reducing sugars, lipids, proteins, ascorbic acid, ash and minerals. Sugarcane juice shelf life period was determinate ever 7 days over a period of 42 days stored under refrigeration. The data were submitted to the variance analysis and compared by Tukey's test (p<0,05). Among the 350 interviewed people, more of the half one is interested about its habitual food safe and care about street foods. Sandwiches had been cited foods as routinely consumed, followed for the sugarcane juice and 'pastel'. Among the interviewed ones, 80% had mentioned to appreciate sugarcane juice. It had not correlation between age and school age and the preference for the consumption form was with lemon juice addition. About 55% of the interviewed ones had mentioned that would more frequently consume sugarcane juice processed and packed. Sugarcane juice processing did not modify the flavor and taste of the drink. It was concluded from the sensory analyses

  13. Hidradenocarcinoma of the finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazerali, Rahim S; Tan, Cynthia; Fung, Maxwell A; Chen, Steven L; Wong, Michael S

    2013-04-01

    Hidradenocarcinoma is a rare adnexal neoplasm representing the malignant counterpart of hidradenoma derived from eccrine sweat glands. Misdiagnosis of this disease is common due to the wide variety of histological patterns and rarity of this malignancy. We report an 87-year-old man presenting with a rare case of biopsy-proven hidradenocarcinoma of the finger. There is no standard care of treatment of hidradenocarcinoma, especially of those tumors in rare locations such as the fingers, given its rarity, variable tumor behavior and histology. Although limited treatment strategies exist, detailed data including TNM, location, histologic type and grade, and patient age should be gathered for optimal treatment strategy. The literature supports a 3-fold approach to these malignancies involving margin-free resection, sentinel lymph node biopsy to evaluate possible metastasis, and long-term follow-up given high risk of recurrence. Our treatment strategy involved a 4-fold, multidisciplinary approach involving reconstruction to optimize tumor-free remission and hand function.

  14. Adjustment to finger amputation and silicone finger prosthesis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuret, Zala; Burger, Helena; Vidmar, Gaj; Maver, Tomaz

    2018-01-11

    Finger amputations are the most common amputations of upper limbs. They influence hand function, general functioning and quality of life. One of the possibilities for rehabilitation after finger amputation is fitting a silicone finger prosthesis. We wanted to evaluate the adjustment to amputation and prosthesis use in patients after finger amputation. We included 42 patients with partial or complete single or multiple finger amputation of one hand who visited the outpatient clinic for prosthetics and orthotics at our institute and received a silicone prosthesis. We assessed their adjustment to amputation and prosthesis with the Trinity Amputation and Prosthesis Experience Scales (TAPES). Most of the patients (28, 67%) had a single finger amputated. The average scores on all TAPES subscales (except adjustment to limitation) were above 50% of the maximum possible score. On average, the scores were the highest on the general adjustment and satisfaction with the prosthesis subscales. Silicone prostheses for finger amputation of upper limb play an important role in the process of adaptation to amputation. They offer aesthetically satisfying results and alleviate social interactions, which influences overall quality of life. Implications for Rehabilitation Silicone prostheses for finger amputation of upper limb offer an aesthetically satisfying result and alleviate problems with social interactions. Their influence on hand function is not optimal, but the prosthesis improves the amputee's quality of life.

  15. Finger vein recognition based on finger crease location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhiying; Ding, Shumeng; Yin, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Finger vein recognition technology has significant advantages over other methods in terms of accuracy, uniqueness, and stability, and it has wide promising applications in the field of biometric recognition. We propose using finger creases to locate and extract an object region. Then we use linear fitting to overcome the problem of finger rotation in the plane. The method of modular adaptive histogram equalization (MAHE) is presented to enhance image contrast and reduce computational cost. To extract the finger vein features, we use a fusion method, which can obtain clear and distinguishable vein patterns under different conditions. We used the Hausdorff average distance algorithm to examine the recognition performance of the system. The experimental results demonstrate that MAHE can better balance the recognition accuracy and the expenditure of time compared with three other methods. Our resulting equal error rate throughout the total procedure was 3.268% in a database of 153 finger vein images.

  16. Microbiological, physical, chemical and sensory characteristics of milk fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum - doi: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v35i1.11939

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Furlaneto-Maia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study developed a fermented milk with Lactobacillus plantarum and evaluated its microbiological, physical-chemical and sensory characteristics during 70 days of storage at 10ºC. The study analyzed the counts of total viable cells, total and thermotolerant coliforms, yeast and mold; acidity, pH, ash, fat and total solids; sensory evaluation and purchase intention of the final product by consumers. Nutrition information was compared with seven commercial brands of fermented dairy products. The final formula contained 10% sugar, 6% milk powder and 4% microbial inoculum. The final product was fat-free. Acidity, ash content and total solids were stable during storage, unlike pH. No total or thermotolerant coliforms, yeast or mold were detected. L. plantarum counts ranged from 10.1 Log10 CFU mL-1 at the beginning to 8.9 Log10 CFU mL-1 at the end of the storage period. The product had good acceptance and high purchase intent. The nutrition information of fermented milk was similar to those of commercial brands evaluated. L. plantarum demonstrated good viability in fermented milk, and although not considered a probiotic food in Brazil, it is promising for the production of foods with functional properties and/or health claims.  

  17. Emotional Communication in Finger Braille

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Matsuda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe analyses of the features of emotions (neutral, joy, sadness, and anger expressed by Finger Braille interpreters and subsequently examine the effectiveness of emotional expression and emotional communication between people unskilled in Finger Braille. The goal is to develop a Finger Braille system to teach emotional expression and a system to recognize emotion. The results indicate the following features of emotional expression by interpreters. The durations of the code of joy were significantly shorter than the durations of the other emotions, the durations of the code of sadness were significantly longer, and the finger loads of anger were significantly larger. The features of emotional expression by unskilled subjects were very similar to those of the interpreters, and the coincidence ratio of emotional communication was 75.1%. Therefore, it was confirmed that people unskilled in Finger Braille can express and communicate emotions using this communication medium.

  18. INFLUENCE OF PACKAGING MATERIAL AND STORAGE TIME ON PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF SET YOGURT: A COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN MODIFIED BIODEGRADABLE POLY(LACTIC ACID AND POLYPROPYLENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAWADON PETCHWATTANA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The current paper investigates the influence of storage time and type of polymeric packaging material on the chemical, physical and microbiological properties of set yogurt. Firstly, poly(lactic acid (PLA was modified by using a core-shell rubber (CSR and an acrylic processing aid (PA to produce PLA with high toughness and good processability. Secondly, an appropriate PLA/PA/CSR composition was selected and fabricated to yogurt cup. The yogurt was stored in both modified PLA and polypropylene (PP packages to observe some physical, chemical and biological changes. Finally, the biodegradation test was made on both packages and compared with that cellulose. Experimental results revealed that adding 5wt% CSR gave PLA/PA as tough as PP. Types of packaging material and storage time did not change the color of yogurt. The number of lactic acid bacteria grew significantly after they had been incubated for 6 days. The bacterial viability decreased dramatically due to the increased acidity and the decreased pH. A positive impact on the viability of bacterial growth was found when yogurt was stored in modified PLA package. This made yogurt had more health benefits than stored in PP package. The biodegradation test results indicated that the modified PLA degraded at a rapid rate. It achieved approximately 50% biodegradation within 40 days which was comparable to the time required to degrade the cellulose, whereas PP was non-biodegradable over the period studied. In summary, substitution conventional PP by a novel modified PLA seems to be a better way for both the health and the environment benefits.

  19. A physical based equivalent circuit modeling approach for ballasted InP DHBT multi-finger devices at millimeter-wave frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midili, Virginio; Squartecchia, Michele; Johansen, Tom Keinicke

    2016-01-01

    Multifinger InP DHBTs can be designed with a ballasting resistor to improve power capability. However accurate modeling is needed to predict high frequency behavior of the device. This paper presents two distinct modeling approaches: one based on EM simulations and one based on a physical...

  20. Advances Afoot in Microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Robin; Karon, Brad S

    2017-07-01

    In 2016, the American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium to examine point-of-care (POC) microbiology testing and to evaluate its effects on clinical microbiology. Colloquium participants included representatives from clinical microbiology laboratories, industry, and the government, who together made recommendations regarding the implementation, oversight, and evaluation of POC microbiology testing. The colloquium report is timely and well written (V. Dolen et al., Changing Diagnostic Paradigms for Microbiology , 2017, https://www.asm.org/index.php/colloquium-reports/item/6421-changing-diagnostic-paradigms-for-microbiology?utm_source=Commentary&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=diagnostics). Emerging POC microbiology tests, especially nucleic acid amplification tests, have the potential to advance medical care. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Ionizing radiation effects of Cobalt-60 on the physical-chemical, sensorial and microbiological of bread with addition of linseed (Linum usitatissimum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Neila Camargo de

    2011-01-01

    The incorporation of functional ingredients on breading products has grown very much lately, because of the preoccupation with the consumers' health. The linseed has awakened the interest by its high level of fiber, lignin, omega-3 and antioxidants compounds. The objective of the present work is evaluate the ionizing radiation effect of 60 Co on the physical-chemical, sensorial and microbiological characteristics of bread with addition of different concentration of brown linseed. There were elaborated 3 types of bread: French roll, form bread prepared with the mixture and form bread produced with conventional ingredients. It was added smashed brown linseed on the bread dough, with concentrations of 8% and 12%. After the preparation, the three kinds of bread packed with polypropylene packages and taken to the IPEN/USP (Institute of Nuclear Energetic Research/University of São Paulo) and irradiated with doses of 6, 8 and 10 kGy. Treatments were elaborated without the addition of linseed and without irradiation, for control, totalizing 12 distinct treatments, to each bread formula tested. Chemical analyses were made (centesimal composition, anti-nutritional compounds, anti-oxidant activity, glycemic index, fat acids, complex B vitamins and minerals); physical analyses (cooking index, volume, color and water activity); sensorial analyses (preference tests and Descriptive Quantitative Analysis - ADQ); microbiological analysis and a survey about irradiated products. It could be seen that the addition of linseed was efficient to increase the level of alimentary fiber and the level of lipids on the 3 bread formula. The three kinds of bread that received the linseed addition and that were not irradiated presented increase on the level of total phenolic; however, when the samples which received the linseed addition were submitted to the irradiation process, it could be noticed the decrease of the antioxidant capacity. There was an increase on the level of omega-3

  2. [Multiple finger geodes in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeffel, J C; Oprisescu, B; Bresson, A; Ploier, R; Vidailhet, M

    1993-06-01

    Three pediatric patients with multiple geodes in the fingers are reported. This condition occurs mainly between one and three years and at seven years of age and is more common in winter. Affected fingers are swollen. Roentgenograms disclose several small lucent defects which are usually located in the middle phalanx. Several fingers are usually involved. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate is increased in virtually every case. Resolution occurs spontaneously within a few weeks or months. There is no tendency towards recurrence. Although the condition is inflammatory, exposure to cold is probably a precipitating factor.

  3. Physical, chemical and microbiological properties of mixed hydrogenated palm kernel oil and cold-pressed rice bran oil as ingredients in non-dairy creamer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunakorn Katsri

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The physical, chemical and microbiological properties of hydrogenated palm kernel oil (PKO and cold-pressed rice bran oil (RBOas ingredients in the production of liquid and powdered non-dairy creamer (coffee whitener were studied. The mixing ratios between hydrogenated PKO and cold-pressed RBO were statistically designed as of 100:0, 90:10,80:20, 70:30, 60:40, 50:50, 40:60, 30:70, 20:80, 10:90 and 0:100.The color, absorbanceand viscosity of the mixtures were investigated. As the ratio of cold-pressed RBO increased, the color became darker (L*of 93.06 to 86.25 and the absorbance significantly increased, while the viscosity of the mixtures of 20:80, 10:90 and 0:100 (54 cp. were the highest amongst the ratios tested.The hydrogenated PKO and cold-pressed RBO mixtures were further chemically tested for fatty acids, -oryzanol, -tocopherol, trans-fat contents andantioxidant activity. There were 10 fatty acids present in hydrogenated PKO with saturated fatty acid being the most predominant. Comparatively, there were only 5 fatty acids found in cold-pressed RBO with monounsaturated fatty acid being the major fatty acid. -Oryzanol and -tocopherol contents were higher with increasingcold-pressed RBO from 0-100% (0 to 1,155.00 mg/100g oil and 0.09 to 30.82 mg/100g oil, respectively. Antioxidant activity was increased with increasing cold-pressed RBO from 0-100% (9.26 to 94.24%.The pure hydrogenated PKO contained higher trans-fat content than that of the 90:10 and 80:20 mixtures (2.73, 1.93 and 1.85mg/100g oil,respectively while other samples had no trans-fat. No microorganisms were present in any of the samples.Therefore, substitution of hydrogenated PKO by cold-pressed RBO from 30-100% would offer more nutritional values and better chemical and physical properties of non-dairy creamer.

  4. Microbiology: principles and explorations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Black, Jacquelyn G

    2012-01-01

    ... introduction to the study of Microbiology in the same engaging writing style throughout the narrative. The text's is even more reader-friendly and focuses on microbiology, allied health, agriculture and food sciences topics"--

  5. Marine Microbiology: Facets & Opportunities

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.

    The book titled “Marine Microbiology: Facets & Opportunities” is an attempt to bring together some facets of marine microbiology as have been made out by many contemporaries in particular from the tropical marine regions. There are 18 contributed...

  6. High-pressure microbiology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michiels, Chris; Bartlett, Douglas Hoyt; Aertsen, Abram

    2008-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. High Hydrostatic Pressure Effects in the Biosphere: from Molecules to Microbiology * Filip Meersman and Karel Heremans . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. Effects...

  7. Microbiological corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladislavlev, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    Problems is considered of development of the microbiological corrosion of the NPP equipment. The main attention is paid to the selective character of microbiological corrosion in zones of welded joints of austenitic steels. It is noted that the presence of technological defects promotes growth of corrosional damages. Methods for microbiological corrosion protection are discussed

  8. Aquatic Microbiology Laboratory Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Robert C.; And Others

    This laboratory manual presents information and techniques dealing with aquatic microbiology as it relates to environmental health science, sanitary engineering, and environmental microbiology. The contents are divided into three categories: (1) ecological and physiological considerations; (2) public health aspects; and (3)microbiology of water…

  9. Elastic fingering in rotating Hele-Shaw flows

    KAUST Repository

    Carvalho, Gabriel D.

    2014-05-21

    The centrifugally driven viscous fingering problem arises when two immiscible fluids of different densities flow in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell. In this conventional setting an interplay between capillary and centrifugal forces makes the fluid-fluid interface unstable, leading to the formation of fingered structures that compete dynamically and reach different lengths. In this context, it is known that finger competition is very sensitive to changes in the viscosity contrast between the fluids. We study a variant of such a rotating flow problem where the fluids react and produce a gellike phase at their separating boundary. This interface is assumed to be elastic, presenting a curvature-dependent bending rigidity. A perturbative weakly nonlinear approach is used to investigate how the elastic nature of the interface affects finger competition events. Our results unveil a very different dynamic scenario, in which finger length variability is not regulated by the viscosity contrast, but rather determined by two controlling quantities: a characteristic radius and a rigidity fraction parameter. By properly tuning these quantities one can describe a whole range of finger competition behaviors even if the viscosity contrast is kept unchanged. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  10. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  11. [Finger extension. II. Materials and methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, J N; Boabighi, A; Laudet, C; Guerin-Surville, H; Baux, S

    1992-06-01

    The study of the extensor apparatus through different methods concerns 200 fingers, the most of fresh cadavers. The dissection through direct observation or with surgical microscope of the dorsal aponeurosis of 30 fingers has been completed by an histological study of 10 fingers. The mechanic properties of each dorsal aponeurotic structure has been tested by extensometry on 12 fingers. The functional study of the role and of the transmission of the different motor components concerns 128 fingers. It has been completed by experimental sections of each aponeurotic structure concerning 20 fingers.

  12. Spectrometric microbiological analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlager, Kenneth J.; Meissner, Ken E.

    1996-04-01

    Currently, there are four general approaches to microbiological analysis, i.e., the detection, identification and quantification of micro-organisms: (1) Traditional culturing and staining procedures, metabolic fermentations and visual morphological characteristics; (2) Immunological approaches employing microbe-specific antibodies; (3) Biotechnical techniques employing DNA probes and related genetic engineering methods; and (4) Physical measurement techniques based on the biophysical properties of micro-organisms. This paper describes an instrumentation development in the fourth of the above categories, physical measurement, that uses a combination of fluorometric and light scatter spectra to detect and identify micro-organisms at the species level. A major advantage of this approach is the rapid turnaround possible in medical diagnostic or water testing applications. Fluorometric spectra serve to define the biochemical characteristics of the microbe, and light scatter spectra the size and shape morphology. Together, the two spectra define a 'fingerprint' for each species of microbe for detection, identification and quantification purposes. A prototype instrument has been developed and tested under NASA sponsorship based on fluorometric spectra alone. This instrument demonstrated identification and quantification capabilities at the species level. The paper reports on test results using this instrument, and the benefits of employing a combination of fluorometric and light scatter spectra.

  13. Automation in Clinical Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the trend toward automation in clinical pathology laboratories has largely bypassed the clinical microbiology laboratory. In this article, we review the historical impediments to automation in the microbiology laboratory and offer insight into the reasons why we believe that we are on the cusp of a dramatic change that will sweep a wave of automation into clinical microbiology laboratories. We review the currently available specimen-processing instruments as well as the total laboratory automation solutions. Lastly, we outline the types of studies that will need to be performed to fully assess the benefits of automation in microbiology laboratories. PMID:23515547

  14. ANALYTICAL MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains equipment that performs a broad array of microbiological analyses for pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms. It performs challenge studies...

  15. Environmental Microbiology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Microbiology Laboratory, located in Bldg. 644 provides a dual-gas respirometer for measurement of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide evolution...

  16. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  17. A Method for Recognizing State of Finger Flexure and Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terado, Toshihiko; Fujiwara, Osamu

    In our country, the handicapped and the elderly people in bed increase rapidly. In the bedridden person’s daily life, there may be limitations in the physical movement and the means of mutual communication. For the support of their comfortable daily lives, therefore, the development of human interface equipment becomes an important task. The equipment of this kind is being already developed by means of laser beam, eye-tracking, breathing motion and myo-electric signals, while the attachment and handling are normally not so easy. In this study, paying attention to finger motion, we have developed human interface equipment easily attached to the body, which enables one to measure the finger flexure and extension for mutual communication. The state of finger flexure and extension is identified by a threshold level analysis from the 3D-locus data for the finger movement, which can be measured through the infrared rays from the LED markers attached to a glove with the previously developed prototype system. We then have confirmed from an experiment that nearly 100% recognition for the finger movement can be achieved.

  18. The effects of over sea height of locality on some chemical, health, microbiological, physical and technological parameters of cow milk and sensorical properties of cheeses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oto Hanuš

    2005-01-01

    .The individual milk samples, feedstuff samples (total mixed ration (TMR on feeding trough and mean excrement samples were collected at seven dairy cow herds and two main milked breeds of cattle (in the CR for three years. Bulk milk samples were collected as well. It was done two times per year in winter (February, Marz and summer (August, September seasons. The herds were localised in lowland (N; ≤ 350 m of o.s.h. and highland (P; > 350 m of o.s.h. areas. The breed effect (H = Holstein and C = local Bohemian spotted cattle based on Simmental breed was good balanced between N and P areas. The milk yields of herds varied from 5500 to 10000 kg of milk per lactation. The different but typical varieties of nourishment and feeding systems of dairy cows were applied in the herds: N = alfalfa silage with maize silage; P = clover-grass silage, grass silage with maize silage and grass pasture as well. The concentrates were feeded according to milk yield and nutrition demand standards.Investigated chemical-compositional, physical, health and technological parameters in individual milk samples were as follows: daily milk yield (ML; kg of milk per day; fat content (Tuk; g/100ml; lactose content (Lak; g/100g of monohydrate; solids non fat (STP; g/100g; somatic cell count (PSB; tis./ml; urea content (Mo; mg/100ml; acetone concentration (Ac; mg/l; acidity, concentration of H ions (pH; electrical conductivity (Vod; mS/cm; alcohol stability (Alk; consumption of 96% ethanol to milk protein coagulation point; titratable acidity (SH; ml NaOH solution 2,5 mmol/l; time for enzymatic coa- gulation (Čas; sec.; rennet curds firmnes (PEV; mm in contrary sense; subjective estimation of rennet curds quality (KV; from 1st = good to 4th = bad; volume of the whey at rennet precipitation (SYR; in ml; crude protein content (HB; Kjeldahl total N×6,38; g/100g; casein content (KAS; Kjeldahl casein N×6,38; g/100g; true protein (ČB; Kjeldahl protein N×6,38; g/100g; whey protein (SB; difference ČB-KAS; g/100g

  19. Oral Microbiology and Immunology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Olsen, Ingar

    , dental assistants and trainees may find it a useful source of reference. The contents are based on general microbiology and immunology. Oral microbiology is given particular attention, with examples relevant to oral infectious diseases. Each chapter opens with a relatively short pre-reading section...

  20. Microbiology of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of microbiology of water, covering publications of 1967-77. This review covers: (1) microbial indicators of pollution; and (2) microbiology of rivers, potable waters, natural lakes, and impoundments. A list of 192 references is also presented. (HM)

  1. Microbiological Spoilage of Cereal Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Frederick K.; Johnson, Billie L.

    A wide range of cereal products, including bakery items, refrigerated dough, fresh pasta products, dried cereal products, snack foods, and bakery mixes, are manufactured for food consumption. These products are subject to physical, chemical, and microbiological spoilage that affects the taste, aroma, leavening, appearance, and overall quality of the end consumer product. Microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature and have the potential for causing food spoilage and foodborne disease. However, compared to other categories of food products, bakery products rarely cause food poisoning. The heat that is applied during baking or frying usually eliminates pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, and low moisture contributes to product stability. Nevertheless, microbiological spoilage of these products occurs, resulting in substantial economic losses.

  2. [Environmental microbiological control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Salas, Carmen; Tordoya Titichoca, Igberto J; Ezpeleta Baquedano, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    The environmental microbiological control is necessary to prevent infections associated with certain procedures that are performed at the hospital. In this review the procedures for control of water and dialysis fluids, and air in operating rooms and immunocompromised units are addressed. The dialysis quality management guidelines define the highest levels of chemical, microbiological and endotoxin in purified water and dialysis fluids based on the recommendations of scientific societies. The microbiological control of water and dialysis fluids should include detection of microorganisms and endotoxin levels. Regarding the microbiological air sampling of operating rooms and immunocompromised units the types of clean rooms in which is recommended to perform microbiological air monitoring; the sample collection methods; culture media; incubation conditions; the most common microorganisms, and permissible levels depending on the type of surgery are described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Microbiological and physico-chemical assessment of the quality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The domestic raw water sources in Nkonkobe and Gogogo were characterised by using both microbiological and standard physical methods to investigate the quality of the water at the sampling sites. For microbiological analysis, indicator bacteria namely, heterotrophic bacteria, total and faecal coliforms and for physical ...

  4. Physical-chemicals parameters and microbiological indicators in sewage treatment of Ciudad Real; Parametros fisicoquimicos e indicadores microbiologicos en la depuracion de aguas residuales de Ciudad Real

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Solanilla, E.; Ubeda Iranzo, J.F.; Perez Bencecry, C. [E.U.I. Tecnica Agricola. Ciudad Real. Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (Spain)

    1997-05-01

    The aim of this work is to find out the possible relationship between some physico-chemical (pH, conductivity dissolved oxygen, suspended solids, DBO, DQO) and sanitary microbiological parameters (total coliforms, faecal coliforms, faecal streptococcus , coliphages) in a sewage treatment. It was carried out in a waste water treatment plant with an activated sludges process of conventional design. The most significative effects that primary treatment and the biological treatment on the parameters analyzed were stablished. On the other hand, effective chlorine doses and contact time were determined for a possible reuse of the treated water. (Author) 16 refs.

  5. Oxidation-Mediated Fingering in Liquid Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaker, Collin B.; Hight, David C.; O'Regan, John D.; Dickey, Michael D.; Daniels, Karen E.

    2017-10-01

    We identify and characterize a new class of fingering instabilities in liquid metals; these instabilities are unexpected due to the large interfacial tension of metals. Electrochemical oxidation lowers the effective interfacial tension of a gallium-based liquid metal alloy to values approaching zero, thereby inducing drastic shape changes, including the formation of fractals. The measured fractal dimension (D =1.3 ±0.05 ) places the instability in a different universality class than other fingering instabilities. By characterizing changes in morphology and dynamics as a function of droplet volume and applied electric potential, we identify the three main forces involved in this process: interfacial tension, gravity, and oxidative stress. Importantly, we find that electrochemical oxidation can generate compressive interfacial forces that oppose the tensile forces at a liquid interface. The surface oxide layer ultimately provides a physical and electrochemical barrier that halts the instabilities at larger positive potentials. Controlling the competition between interfacial tension and oxidative (compressive) stresses at the interface is important for the development of reconfigurable electronic, electromagnetic, and optical devices that take advantage of the metallic properties of liquid metals.

  6. [When doors slam, fingers jam!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudet, I; Toubal, K; Carnet, C; Rekhroukh, H; Zelmat, B; Debuisson, C; Cahuzac, J-P

    2007-08-01

    Epidemiological analysis in a universitary paediatric emergency unit of children admitted after accidental injuries resulting from fingers crushed in a door. Prospective, descriptive cohort study from September 6th, 2004 to July 1st, 2005 included all children admitted for finger injuries crushed in a non-automatic door. included accidents due to automatic doors, toy's or refrigerator doors, families who refused to participate to the study or families who had left the waiting area before medical examination. Collected data were patient and family characteristics, accident characteristics and its management. Three hundred and forty children affected by 427 digital lesions were included. The mean age was 5.5+/-3.8 years (range 4 months - 15.5 years). Male/female ratio was equal to 1.2: 1. Fifty-eight percent of patients belonged to families composed of 3 or more siblings. Ninety-three per cent of families came to hospital within the first 2 hours after the accident (mean delay 99+/-162 min, median range 54 minutes). Location of the accident was: domestic (62%, at home (64%)), at school (17%). Locations within the home were: the bedroom (33%), bathroom and toilets (21%). An adult was present in 75% of cases and responsible for the trauma in 25% of accidents, another child in 44%. The finger or fingers were trapped on the hinge side in 57% of patients. No specific safeguard devices were used by 94% of families. Among victims, 20% had several crushed digits; left and right hand were injured with an equal frequency. The commonest involved digits were: the middle finger (29%), the ring finger (23%). The nail plate was damaged in 60% of digital lesions, associated with a wound (50%), a distal phalanx fracture (P3) (12%). Six children had a partial or complete amputation of P3, 2 children a lesion of the extensor tendon, 1 child had a rupture of the external lateral ligament. Three percent of children required an admission to the paediatric orthopaedic surgery unit. Post

  7. Clinical microbiology informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Daniel D; Sintchenko, Vitali; Rauch, Carol A; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2014-10-01

    The clinical microbiology laboratory has responsibilities ranging from characterizing the causative agent in a patient's infection to helping detect global disease outbreaks. All of these processes are increasingly becoming partnered more intimately with informatics. Effective application of informatics tools can increase the accuracy, timeliness, and completeness of microbiology testing while decreasing the laboratory workload, which can lead to optimized laboratory workflow and decreased costs. Informatics is poised to be increasingly relevant in clinical microbiology, with the advent of total laboratory automation, complex instrument interfaces, electronic health records, clinical decision support tools, and the clinical implementation of microbial genome sequencing. This review discusses the diverse informatics aspects that are relevant to the clinical microbiology laboratory, including the following: the microbiology laboratory information system, decision support tools, expert systems, instrument interfaces, total laboratory automation, telemicrobiology, automated image analysis, nucleic acid sequence databases, electronic reporting of infectious agents to public health agencies, and disease outbreak surveillance. The breadth and utility of informatics tools used in clinical microbiology have made them indispensable to contemporary clinical and laboratory practice. Continued advances in technology and development of these informatics tools will further improve patient and public health care in the future. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. [Symmetrical lividity of the fingers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsard, E; Kossard, S

    1988-07-01

    Symmetric lividity of the soles of the feet was first reported in two children in 1925 by Pernet. The characteristic manifestation of this dermatosis consisted in hyperkeratosis and hyperhidrosis with livid discoloration of the pressure areas of the soles. Later the same name was applied to a similar dermatosis in which the hyperkeratotic and hyperhidrotic patches of skin on the soles had a whitish grey discoloration and the livid color, if present at all, was seen only over the marginal areas not affected by the keratosis. Similar livid keratoses affecting the palmar sides of the fingers have been seen only occasionally. The 17-year-old girl presented in this paper had a 11-year history of emotional hyperhidrosis and is a rare illustration of symmetrical lividity in its original form, localized to the fingers only.

  9. Hand-arm vibration syndrome and dose-response relation for vibration induced white finger among quarry drillers and stonecarvers. Italian Study Group on Physical Hazards in the Stone Industry.

    OpenAIRE

    Bovenzi, M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To investigate the occurrence of disorders associated with the hand arm vibration syndrome in a large population of stone workers in Italy. The dose-response relation for vibration induced white finger (VWF) was also studied. METHODS--The study population consisted of 570 quarry drillers and stonecarvers exposed to vibration and 258 control stone workers who performed only manual activity. Each subject was interviewed with health and workplace assessment questionnaires. Sensorineu...

  10. Effects of packaging systems and fat concentrations on microbiology, sensory and physical properties of ground beef stored at 4±1°C for 25 days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavieri, N; Williams, S K

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated effects of modified atmosphere (MAP, 0.4% carbon monoxide [CO], 30% carbon dioxide, and 69.6% nitrogen), vacuum (VP) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) packaging systems and fat levels (10, 20 and 30% fat) on ground beef stored at 4 ± 1°C for 25 days for microbiology, sensory, pH, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), objective color, headspace and residual CO. As storage time increased, pH decreased (Pmeat increased (P redness decreased and brown discoloration increased during storage. As psychrotrophic bacteria counts increased, panelists detected color and off-odor deterioration in all systems. The CO treatment had no effect on maintaining the carboxymyoglobin "cherry red" fresh meat color during meat spoilage. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Microbiology, philosophy and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Maureen A

    2016-09-01

    There are not only many links between microbiological and philosophical topics, but good educational reasons for microbiologists to explore the philosophical issues in their fields. I examine three broad issues of classification, causality and model systems, showing how these philosophical dimensions have practical implications. I conclude with a discussion of the educational benefits for recognising the philosophy in microbiology. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Segregation induced fingering instabilities in granular avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Mark; Thornton, Anthony; Johnson, Chris; Kokelaar, Pete; Gray, Nico

    2013-04-01

    the governing equations, are linearly unstable to arbitrarily small perturbations. It should be noted similar stability characteristics are found for shallow layer fluid flows on an inclined plane, with small wavelength perturbations stabilised by the inclusion of empirical frictional drag and viscous dissipation. Furthermore, depth-averaged models for roll waves on a monodisperse, shallow granular layer released on an inclined plane have a similar problem with high wave-number modes remaining linearly unstable. In this case the high wavenumber instability can be suppressed by the inclusion of (phenomenological) viscous dissipation. It is possible that by including similar rheological terms in our depth-averaged model the small wavelength modes can be stabilised and a well defined finger width can be predicted. This is the first model to describe the break-up of a uniform front of granular material, and it represents a crucial step forward in obtaining a mathematical model of this process. However, the current model is not complete and remains linearly unstable to arbitrarily small wavelength perturbations. We anticipate that these small wavelength instabilities can be stabilised by including additional physical effects, and this remains an active avenue of investigation. Reference: Woodhouse, M; Thornton, A. R.; Johnson, C.G.; Kokelaar, P, and Gray, J.M.N.T. Segregation-induced fingering instabilities in granular free surface flows. Journal of Fluids Mechanics. (2012). 709 543-580

  13. Current status of ultrasonography of the finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seun Ah; Kim, Baek Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Na [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sun Young [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyung Hee [Incheon Baek Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The recent development of advanced high-resolution transducers has enabled the fast, easy, and dynamic ultrasonographic evaluation of small, superficial structures such as the finger. In order to best exploit these advances, it is important to understand the normal anatomy and the basic pathologies of the finger, as exemplified by the following conditions involving the dorsal, volar, and lateral sections of the finger: sagittal band injuries, mallet finger, and Boutonnière deformity (dorsal aspect); flexor tendon tears, trigger finger, and volar plate injuries (volar aspect); gamekeeper’s thumb (Stener lesions) and other collateral ligament tears (lateral aspect); and other lesions. This review provides a basis for understanding the ultrasonography of the finger and will therefore be useful for radiologists.

  14. In the finger it lingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Mohamad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A previously healthy 80-year-old woman presented with a history of a thorn prick injury over the distal phalange of her left finger obtained while gardening two months ago. She claimed to have a non-healing cut with a nodular lesion, which progressively increased in size, extending upwards towards the region of her left arm. There was no fever or palpable lymph nodes in the axillary region. She had been prescribed antibiotics from the local hospital but her condition did not improve.

  15. Basics of radiation microbiology for food protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    The microbiological basics of food poisoning, food spoilage, and ionizing energy treatments are presented. Factors influencing the microbial resistance of ionizing radiation, including the use of physical agents for combination treatments, are briefly reviewed, and parameters involved in dose selection are considered

  16. Physicochemical, Microbiological and Sensory Properties of Yoghurt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of incorporation of Carrot Juice on the physiochemical, microbiological and sensory properties of yoghurt. Materials and method: Carrot Juice (CAJ) was used to substitute 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90% Yoghurt (YOG).The physical, chemical ...

  17. microbiological eva fermented african locust bea preservativ

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    period of time during which the food produc was remain safe , be certain to retain desire microbiology, physical .... as food handlers (Bukar et al., 2012). At 30 days Mucor sp and Rhizopus sp were the predominant fungal .... “Hedonic Scale” A. Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. Retrieved July. 16, 2016 from encylopedia.com.

  18. Oral Microbiology and Immunology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Olsen, Ingar

    , dental assistants and trainees may find it a useful source of reference. The contents are based on general microbiology and immunology. Oral microbiology is given particular attention, with examples relevant to oral infectious diseases. Each chapter opens with a relatively short pre-reading section......This textbook is based on the curricula for dental students in the Nordic countries, and the authors teach the subject at three universities in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Although primarily for undergraduates, the book may also appeal to Ph.D. students and general practitioners. In addition...

  19. Microbiological soil regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, D.; Wiesner, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Interdiciplinary Task Force ''Environmental Biotechnology - Soil'' of DECHEMA aims to pool the knowledge potential of the Dechema study committees on environmental biotechnology and soil protection with a view to the advancement of microbiological soil decontamination techniques. This conference volume on the 9th expert meeting of Dechema on environmental protection subjects entitled ''Microbiological Soil Regeneration'', held on February 27th and 28th, 1991, and the subsequent compilation of results give an intermediate account of the ongoing work of the Dechema Task Force. (orig.) [de

  20. Surgical Treatment of Trigger Finger: Open Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firat Ozan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, open A1 pulley release results were evaluated in patients with a trigger finger diagnosis. 45 patients (29 females, 16 males, mean age 50.7 ± 11.9; range (24-79, 45 trigger fingers were released via open surgical technique. On the 25 of 45 cases were involved in the right hand and 16 of them were at the thumb, 2 at index, 6 at the middle and 1 at ring finger. Similarly, at the left hand, 15 of 20 cases were at the thumb, 1 at the index finger, 2 at middle finger and 2 at ring finger. Average follow-up time was 10.2 ± 2.7 (range, 6-15 months. Comorbidities in patients were; diabetes mellitus at 6 cases (13.3%, hypertension at 11 cases (24.4%, hyperthyroidism at 2 cases (4.4%, dyslipidemia at 2 cases (4.4% and lastly 2 cases had carpal tunnel syndrome operation. The mean time between the onset of symptoms to surgery was 6.9 ± 4.8 (range, 2-24 months. Patient satisfaction was very good in 34 cases (75.4% and good in 11 (24.6% patients. The distance between the pulpa of the operated finger and the palm was normal in every case postoperatively. We have not encountered any postoperative complications. We can recommend that; A1 pulley release via open incision is an effective and reliable method in trigger finger surgery.

  1. Groundwater pollution microbiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitton, G.; Gerba, C.P.

    1984-01-01

    This book provides a survey of available information on groundwater pollution microbiology. It is useful as a starting point for students and professionals investigating this topic. Subjects discussed include bacteria and virus movement through soils, carcinogenicity of some organic chemicals detected in groundwater, sampling techniques, and land treatment systems. Include references to the journal literature and a subject index.

  2. Making Microbiology Even Smaller!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Linda Mull; Motz, Vicki Abrams

    2013-01-01

    We outline protocols for producing slant-minis (SLINIs) and mini-deeps (MEEPs) and examples of their use in simple microbiology experiments suitable for high school students. The principal benefits of these protocols are decreased cost associated with significantly reduced media use; easier, less expensive disposal of waste; and increased safety…

  3. Use of twin dorsal middle phalangeal finger flaps for thumb or index finger reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, W; Chen, K J

    2013-05-01

    Amputation or degloving injuries of the thumb or index finger are highly disabling. We describe the use of twin dorsal middle finger flaps harvested from the dorsal aspects of the middle and ring fingers, and based on one palmar proper digital artery, its venae comitantes, and the dorsal branches of the palmar digital nerves of the middle and ring fingers, respectively. These flaps offer advantages when large soft tissue defects of the thumb or index finger are present. In this study, twin dorsal middle finger flaps were used in nine patients (six thumbs, three index fingers). All flaps completely survived. At the mean follow-up of 20 months, the appearance of the reconstructed thumbs or index fingers was acceptable, the length was maintained, and the mean static 2-point discrimination values were 10 mm in the palmar flap and 13 mm in the dorsal flap of the reconstructed digit. All patients were satisfied with the appearance and mobility of the donor fingers. All but one donor finger showed normal finger pulp sensibility, with a static 2-point discrimination between 3 and 6 mm.

  4. Fine finger motor skill training with exoskeleton robotic hand in chronic stroke: stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockenfeld, Corinna; Tong, Raymond K Y; Susanto, Evan A; Ho, Sze-Kit; Hu, Xiao-ling

    2013-06-01

    Background and Purpose. Stroke survivors often show a limited recovery in the hand function to perform delicate motions, such as full hand grasping, finger pinching and individual finger movement. The purpose of this study is to describe the implementation of an exoskeleton robotic hand together with fine finger motor skill training on 2 chronic stroke patients. Case Descriptions. Two post-stroke patients participated in a 20-session training program by integrating 10 minutes physical therapy, 20 minutes robotic hand training and 15 minutes functional training tasks with delicate objects(card, pen and coin). These two patients (A and B) had cerebrovascular accident at 6 months and 11 months respectively when enrolled in this study. Outcomes. The results showed that both patients had improvements in Fugl-Meyer assessment (FM), Action Research Arm Test (ARAT). Patients had better isolation of the individual finger flexion and extension based on the reduced muscle co-contraction from the electromyographic(EMG) signals and finger extension force after 20 sessions of training. Discussion. This preliminary study showed that by focusing on the fine finger motor skills together with the exoskeleton robotic hand, it could improve the motor recovery of the upper extremity in the fingers and hand function, which were showed in the ARAT. Future randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness.

  5. The effects of human finger and Chinese character on Chinese handwriting performance on mobile touch devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Chen, Cuiling

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate Chinese handwriting on mobile touch devices, considering the effects of three characteristics of the human finger (type, length, and width) and three characteristics of Chinese characters (direction of the first stroke, number of strokes, and structure). Due to the popularity of touch devices in recent years, finger input for Chinese characters has attracted more attention from both industry and academia. However, previous studies have no systematical consideration on the effects of human finger and Chinese characters on Chinese handwriting performance. An experiment was reported in this article to illustrate the effects of the human finger and Chinese characters on the Chinese handwriting performance (i.e., input time, accuracy, number of protruding strokes, mental workload, satisfaction, and physical fatigue). The experiment results indicated that all six factors have significant effects on Chinese handwriting performance, especially on the input time, accuracy, and number of protruding strokes. Finger type, finger length, finger width, direction of the first stroke, number of strokes, and character structures are significantly influencing Chinese handwriting performance. These factors should be taken into more consideration in future research and the practical design for Chinese handwriting systems.

  6. The effects of strength training on finger strength and hand dexterity in healthy elderly individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsdottir, Halla B; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2008-10-01

    We investigated the effect of 6 wk of strength training on maximal pressing (MVC) force, indexes of finger individuation (enslaving), and performance in accurate force production tests and in functional hand tests in healthy, physically fit, elderly individuals. Twelve participants (average age 76 yr) exercised with both hands. One of the hands exercised by pressing with the proximal phalanges (targeting mainly intrinsic hand muscles), whereas the other hand exercised by pressing with the finger tips (targeting mainly extrinsic hand muscles). Training led to higher MVC forces, higher enslaving indexes, and improved performance on the pegboard grooved test. Changes in an index of multi-finger force stabilizing synergy showed a significant correlation with changes in the index of force variability in the accurate force production test. Strong transfer effects were seen to the site that did not perform strength training exercise within each hand. Effects of exercise at the proximal site were somewhat stronger compared with those of exercise at the finger tips, although the differences did not reach significance level. Control tests showed that repetitive testing by itself did not significantly change the maximal finger force and enslaving. The results suggest that strength training is an effective way to improve finger strength. It can also lead to changes in finger interaction and in performance of accurate force production tasks. Adaptations at a neural level are likely to mediate the observed effects. Overall, the data suggest that strength training can also improve the hand function of less healthy elderly subjects.

  7. 21 CFR 866.2540 - Microbiological incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2540 Microbiological... intended for medical purposes to cultivate microorganisms and aid in the diagnosis of disease. (b...

  8. KARAKTERISTIK FISIK, KIMIA, MIKROBIOLOGI WHEY KEFIR DAN AKTIVITASNYA TERHADAP PENGHAMBATAN ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME (ACE [Physical, Chemical and Microbiological Characteristics of Whey Kefir and Its Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE Inhibitory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Febrisiantosa*

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the characteristics of whey-based kefir products and their activity to inhibit the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE. Kefir was produced by using many types of whey, namely SK: skim milk based kefir (control; WK: gouda cheese whey based kefir; and WKB: commercial whey powder based kefir. The experimental design was a completely randomized design. Each treatment was conducted in triplicates. Kefirs were evaluated for physical and chemical properties (pH, total titratable acidity, viscosity, protein, fat, lactose, and alcohol, microbiological (lactic acid bacteria and yeast population, peptide concentration, ACE inhibition, IC50 and Inhibition Efficiency Ratio (IER. The results showed that the types of whey used for kefir productions significantly affected the physical and chemical characteristics of the products (p0.05. The peptide concentration and ACE inhibitory activity of WK, 1.54±0.02 mg/mL and 73.07±0.91%, was significantly higher (p0.05 from the control (47.19±0.09% per mg/mL but was significantly higher (p<0.05 than that of WKB (45.75±0.18% per mg/mL. This research indicated that whey kefir is a potential source of bioactive peptide for antihypertention agent.

  9. Veterinary microbiology and microbial disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quinn, P. J

    2011-01-01

    "Veterinary Microbiology is one of the core subjects for veterinary students. Fully revised and expanded, this new edition covers every aspect of veterinary microbiology for students in both paraclinical and clinical years...

  10. Microbiological soil properties after logging and slash burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest. Wright

    1957-01-01

    Considerable study has been made of the effects of logging and slash burning on chemical and physical properties of forest soils. However, little is known of the effect of such operations on microbiological properties.

  11. Individual finger control of a modular prosthetic limb using high-density electrocorticography in a human subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotson, Guy; McMullen, David P.; Fifer, Matthew S.; Johannes, Matthew S.; Katyal, Kapil D.; Para, Matthew P.; Armiger, Robert; Anderson, William S.; Thakor, Nitish V.; Wester, Brock A.; Crone, Nathan E.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. We used native sensorimotor representations of fingers in a brain-machine interface (BMI) to achieve immediate online control of individual prosthetic fingers. Approach. Using high gamma responses recorded with a high-density electrocorticography (ECoG) array, we rapidly mapped the functional anatomy of cued finger movements. We used these cortical maps to select ECoG electrodes for a hierarchical linear discriminant analysis classification scheme to predict: (1) if any finger was moving, and, if so, (2) which digit was moving. To account for sensory feedback, we also mapped the spatiotemporal activation elicited by vibrotactile stimulation. Finally, we used this prediction framework to provide immediate online control over individual fingers of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory modular prosthetic limb. Main results. The balanced classification accuracy for detection of movements during the online control session was 92% (chance: 50%). At the onset of movement, finger classification was 76% (chance: 20%), and 88% (chance: 25%) if the pinky and ring finger movements were coupled. Balanced accuracy of fully flexing the cued finger was 64%, and 77% had we combined pinky and ring commands. Offline decoding yielded a peak finger decoding accuracy of 96.5% (chance: 20%) when using an optimized selection of electrodes. Offline analysis demonstrated significant finger-specific activations throughout sensorimotor cortex. Activations either prior to movement onset or during sensory feedback led to discriminable finger control. Significance. Our results demonstrate the ability of ECoG-based BMIs to leverage the native functional anatomy of sensorimotor cortical populations to immediately control individual finger movements in real time.

  12. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depiante, Eduardo V.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change.

  13. Trends in wine microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramón, D

    1997-12-01

    During the last few years many winemakers have started to use pure Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, frequently isolated from their own geographical regions, to produce wines of more reproductable quality. This microbiological simplification has opened the way for the genetic modification of wine yeast strains. This review concerns the application of molecular techniques in oenology, not only from the point of view of the construction of recombinant strains but also for the study of the population dynamics of wine fermentations.

  14. Infection: microbiology and management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Jane; Gillespie, S. H; Bannister, Barbara A

    2006-01-01

    ..., management and control. The presentation, diagnosis and management of individual diseases are described in the systematic chapters. Each chapter introduces the range of diseases that can affect the relevant system, and lists the pathogens responsible for each presentation in approximate order of importance. For each individual pathogen, the epidemiology and microbiology, clinical presentations and diagnosis, and strategies for prevention and control are described. This textbook is designed to be used either as a...

  15. Finger prosthesis: a boon to handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ridhima; Kumar, Lakshya; Rao, Jitendra; Singh, Kamleshwar

    2013-08-29

    This is a clinical case report of a 52-year-old male patient with four partially missing fingers of the left hand. The article describes the clinical and laboratory procedure of making prosthesis with modern silicone material. A wax pattern was fabricated using the right hand of the patient. A special type of wax was formulated to make the pattern so that it can be easily moulded and carved. Intrinsic and extrinsic staining was also performed to match the adjacent skin colour. The patient was given the finger prosthesis and was asked to use a half glove (sports) to mask the junction between the prosthesis and the normal tissue. It also provides additional retention to the artificial fingers. The patient felt his social acceptance improved after wearing the finger prosthesis.

  16. Effects of the modified atmosphere and irradiation on the microbiological, physical-chemical and sensory characteristics of the 'minas frescal' cheese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Vanessa Pires da

    2004-01-01

    The experiment was divided into two parts. Initially, it was studied the 'Minas Frescal' cheeses packed under atmospheric air, modified atmosphere of 70% CO2 and 30% N2 (ATM) and vacuum. Second the cheeses packed under these three treatments had been radiated by doses of 2 KGy. In the two parts of the experiment, it was analyzed the microbial evolution and, the sensory and physical-chemical characteristics of the cheeses under the different treatments during a 4 deg C-storage. In the first phase of the experiment it was verified that the ATM and the vacuum decreased the intensity of the total population growth of aerobic mesophilic and psychotropic and had reduced the population of Staphylococcus positive coagulase, but they had not been efficient controlling the total coliforms and Escherichia coli, while in control all the populations had continuously grown, according to the sensory characteristics of the cheeses, color, odor and appearance. These characteristics were kept the same during the 40 days of storage, and the control decreased the acceptability levels gradually, being rejected in the 17 th day. In the second part of the experiment, it was observed that a 2KGy-irradiation over the 'Minas Frescal' cheeses reduced the populations of aerobic mesophilic, aerobic and anaerobic psychotropic, Staphylococcus positive coagulase, total coliforms and Escherichia coli. The ATM and vacuum treatments were very efficient therefore they prevented the growth of these microorganisms during the storage, while in control, the aerobic mesophilic and psychotropic population grew during the storage. According to sensory aspects, the ATM treatment was the most efficient one, because it kept the appearance, texture and flavor for more than 43 days while the vacuum kept for 36 days and the control for only 8 days. The use of the irradiation with modified atmosphere and low temperatures of storage increased the shelf life of the cheeses, hindering the growth of the microbial

  17. Effect of mixed spices in lemon glass marinade cuisine on changes in chemical physical and microbiological quality of ready-to-cook Thai indigenous chicken meat during chilled storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wongwiwat, P.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of spices on chemical, physical and microbiological quality of ready-to-cook Thai indigenous chicken meat were investigated during storage at 4oC for 15 days. The spices used with marinade ingredient (soya sauce, oyster sauce, sugar and salt were lemon glass, black pepper, garlic, coriander root and mixed spices. Non-marinated chicken meat (control 1 and marinated only ingredients (control 2 were used as control treatments. The qualities of ready-to-cook chicken meat that were evaluated were shear force, % drip loss, surface color (L*, a*, b*, lipid oxidation (TBARS, myoglobin oxidation (% metmyoglobin and microbial growth. Effects of spices on shear force and % drip loss were not significantly different (P>0.05 but they efficiently reduced lipid oxidation and microbial growth of chicken meat. Mixed spices significantly reduced oxidation of lipid (P0.05. However, marinade at 12.5% (w/w showed high efficiency in inhibiting deterioration of ready-to-cook chicken meat.

  18. Stainless steel quadralatch finger test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1996-01-01

    The design of the quadralatch on the universal samplers was changed in response to flammable gas operating constraints. Additional redesign of the fingers was included to facilitate manufacturability. The new design was tested to assure satisfactory performance. It was shown that the fingers can hold a sampler in place with an upward force of at least 2200 N (500 pounds) and that the mechanical remote latch unit can release the quadralatch under this condition of maximum upward force

  19. Finger replantation: surgical technique and indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbary, S; Dap, F; Dautel, G

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we discuss the surgical technique of finger replantation in detail, distinguishing particularities of technique in cases of thumb amputation, children fingertip replantation, ring finger avulsion, and very distal replantations. We emphasize the principles of bone shortening, the spare part concept, the special importance of nerve sutures and the use of vein graft in case of avulsion or crushing. However, even if finger replantation is now a routine procedure, a clear distinction should be made between revascularization and functional success. The indications for finger replantation are then detailed in the second part of this paper. The absolute indications for replantation are thumb, multiple fingers, transmetacarpal or hand, and any upper extremity amputation in a child whatever the level. Fingertip amputations distal to the insertion of the Flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) are also a good indication. Other cases are more controversial because of the poor functional outcome, especially for the index finger, which is often functionally excluded. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  20. On the continuum-scale simulation of gravity-driven fingers with hysteretic Richards equation: Trucation error induced numerical artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ELIASSI,MEHDI; GLASS JR.,ROBERT J.

    2000-03-08

    The authors consider the ability of the numerical solution of Richards equation to model gravity-driven fingers. Although gravity-driven fingers can be easily simulated using a partial downwind averaging method, they find the fingers are purely artificial, generated by the combined effects of truncation error induced oscillations and capillary hysteresis. Since Richards equation can only yield a monotonic solution for standard constitutive relations and constant flux boundary conditions, it is not the valid governing equation to model gravity-driven fingers, and therefore is also suspect for unsaturated flow in initially dry, highly nonlinear, and hysteretic media where these fingers occur. However, analysis of truncation error at the wetting front for the partial downwind method suggests the required mathematical behavior of a more comprehensive and physically based modeling approach for this region of parameter space.

  1. Finger multibiometric cryptosystems: fusion strategy and template security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jialiang; Li, Qiong; Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.; Niu, Xiamu

    2014-03-01

    We address two critical issues in the design of a finger multibiometric system, i.e., fusion strategy and template security. First, three fusion strategies (feature-level, score-level, and decision-level fusions) with the corresponding template protection technique are proposed as the finger multibiometric cryptosystems to protect multiple finger biometric templates of fingerprint, finger vein, finger knuckle print, and finger shape modalities. Second, we theoretically analyze different fusion strategies for finger multibiometric cryptosystems with respect to their impact on security and recognition accuracy. Finally, the performance of finger multibiometric cryptosystems at different fusion levels is investigated on a merged finger multimodal biometric database. The comparative results suggest that the proposed finger multibiometric cryptosystem at feature-level fusion outperforms other approaches in terms of verification performance and template security.

  2. Microbiologically active nanocomposite media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petranovskii, Vitalii; Panina, Lyudmila; Bogomolova, Eugenia; Belostotskaya, Galina

    2003-07-01

    The most recent approach to the development of novel antimicrobial and antifungal agents is based on the application of synthetic and natural zeolites, because zeolites are known to be the carrier and slow releaser of the heavy metals with olygodynamic properties. The microbiological activity of the ion-exchanged zeolites is attributed to the ionic state of the metal sreleased from the zeolites by ion re-exchange. In the present work we used low cost natural clinoptilolite (Cli) as a substrate for copper and silver in different states. The state of oxidation of the exchanged metal in zeolite with supported Cu and Ag species (in the form of cations, small clusters, sub-coloidal particles, large particles) in order to fit them to fulfill the following criteria: to demonstrate their high protective abilities against fungi and long-term stability. The study of structure of samples with XRD, UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR, their stability with temperature and during storage was carried out for obtaining the correct correlation with microbiological activity.

  3. [New microbiological techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, S; Wieser, A; Bonkat, G

    2017-06-01

    Microbiological diagnostic procedures have changed rapidly in recent years. This is especially true in the field of molecular diagnostics. Classical culture-based techniques are still the gold standard in many areas; however, they are already complemented by automated and also molecular techniques to guarantee faster and better quality results. The most commonly used techniques include real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) based systems and nucleic acid hybridization. These procedures are used most powerfully from direct patient samples or in assays to detect the presence of nonculturable or fastidious organisms. Further techniques such as DNA sequencing are not yet used routinely for urological samples and can be considered experimental. However, in conjunction with dropping prices and further technical developments, these techniques promise to be used much more in the near future. Regarding bacterial identification from culture, mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has become the technique of choice in recent years especially in Europe. It has tremendously shortened the time to result. This is now going to be extended to antibiotic susceptibility testing. This is of paramount importance in view of ever rising antimicrobial resistance rates. Techniques described in this review offer a faster and better microbiological diagnosis. Such continuous improvements are critical especially in times of cost pressure and rising antimicrobial resistance rates. It is in our interest to provide the best possible care for patients and in this regard a good and effective communication between the laboratory and the clinician is of vital importance.

  4. Hand-arm vibration syndrome and dose-response relation for vibration induced white finger among quarry drillers and stonecarvers. Italian Study Group on Physical Hazards in the Stone Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovenzi, M

    1994-09-01

    To investigate the occurrence of disorders associated with the hand arm vibration syndrome in a large population of stone workers in Italy. The dose-response relation for vibration induced white finger (VWF) was also studied. The study population consisted of 570 quarry drillers and stonecarvers exposed to vibration and 258 control stone workers who performed only manual activity. Each subject was interviewed with health and workplace assessment questionnaires. Sensorineural and VWF disorders were staged according to the Stockholm workshop scales. Vibration was measured on a representative sample of percussive and rotary tools. The 8 h energy equivalent frequency weighted acceleration (A (8)) and lifetime vibration doses were calculated for each of the exposed stone workers. Sensorineural and musculoskeletal symptoms occurred more frequently in the workers exposed to vibration than in the controls, but trend statistics did not show a linear exposure-response relation for these disorders. The prevalence of VWF was found to be 30.2% in the entire group exposed to vibration. Raynaud's phenomenon was discovered in 4.3% of the controls. VWF was strongly associated with exposure to vibration and a monotonic dose-response relation was found. According to the exposure data of this study, the expected percentage of stone workers affected with VWF tends to increase roughly in proportion to the square root of A(8) (for a particular exposure period) or in proportion to the square root of the duration of exposure (for a constant magnitude of vibration). Even although limited to a specific work situation, the dose-response relation for VWF estimated in this study suggests a time dependency such that halving the years of exposure allows a doubling of the energy equivalent vibration. According to these findings, the vibration exposure levels currently under discussion within the European Community seem to represent reasonable exposure limits for the protection of workers against

  5. HE upgrade beyond phase 1. Finger scintillator option.

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, Sergey; Boyarintsev, A.Yu; Emeliantchik, Igor; Golutvin, Igor; Grinyov, B.V; Ershov, Yuri; Levchuk, Leonid; Litomin, Aliaksandr; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Popov, V.F; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Sorokin, Pavlo; Zhmurin, Petro

    2014-01-01

    CMS hadron calorimeters (HB, HE, HO) have been in operation for several years and contributed substantially to the success of the CMS Physics Program. The endcap calorimeter HE suffered more radiation damage than anticipated causing rapid degradation of scintillator segments (tiles) which have a higher radiation flux from secondary particles than HB and HO. A proposal to upgrade of HE calorimeter will provide a solution for survivability at future LHC higher luminosity. A finger-strip plastic scintillator option has many advantages and is a lower cost alternative to keep the excellent HE performance at high luminosity. Measurements and simulations have been performed and this method is a good upgrade strategy.

  6. Admittance Control of a Multi-Finger Arm Based on Manipulability of Fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Huang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the previous studies, admittance control and impedance control for a finger-arm robot using the manipulability of the finger were studied and methods of realizing the controls have been proposed. In this study, two 3-DOF fingers are attached to the end-effector of a 6-DOF arm to configure a multi-finger arm robot. Based on the previous methods, the authors have proposed an admittance control for a multi-finger arm robot using the manipulability of the fingers in this study. Algorithms of the averaging method and the mini-max method were introduced to establish a manipulability criterion of the two fingers in order to generate a cooperative movement of the arm. Comparison of the admittance controls combined with the top search method and local optimization method for the multi-finger arm robot was made and features of the control methods were also discussed. The stiffness control and damping control were experimentally evaluated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  7. Robotic finger perturbation training improves finger postural steadiness and hand dexterity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Yasuhide; Ikeda, Atsutoshi; Shinohara, Minoru

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to understand the effect of robotic finger perturbation training on steadiness in finger posture and hand dexterity in healthy young adults. A mobile robotic finger training system was designed to have the functions of high-speed mechanical response, two degrees of freedom, and adjustable loading amplitude and direction. Healthy young adults were assigned to one of the three groups: random perturbation training (RPT), constant force training (CFT), and control. Subjects in RPT and CFT performed steady posture training with their index finger using the robot in different modes: random force in RPT and constant force in CFT. After the 2-week intervention period, fluctuations of the index finger posture decreased only in RPT during steady position-matching tasks with an inertial load. Purdue pegboard test score improved also in RPT only. The relative change in finger postural fluctuations was negatively correlated with the relative change in the number of completed pegs in the pegboard test in RPT. The results indicate that finger posture training with random mechanical perturbations of varying amplitudes and directions of force is effective in improving finger postural steadiness and hand dexterity in healthy young adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Replantation (Finger, Hand, or Arm)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 80% of its original use an excellent result. Rehabilitation For replant patients Physical therapy and temporary bracing ... If you have completed an amputation, therapy and rehabilitation also play a large part in recovery. For ...

  9. Isolated A1 Pulley Rupture of Left Fourth Finger in Kendo Players: Two Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Hyung; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Joo, Seung Ho

    2015-10-01

    Annular pulley injury of fingers is usually observed in rock climbers who support their entire body weight with flexed fingers during climbing. But these lesions can also follow trivial trauma, such as lifting heavy objects with the fingertips, or during sports and recreational activities. The A2 and A4 pulleys are most usually involved and reported most frequently. However, traumatic A1 pulley rupture has not been reported yet, to the best of our knowledge. Kendo is a very vigorous martial art with frequent physical contact. Therefore, we reported two cases of repetitive microtraumatic left fourth finger A1 pulley rupture in Kendo players with results from physical examination and imaging studies, such as ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, together with related literature.

  10. Tendon displacements during voluntary and involuntary finger movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, Nathalie; Gijsbertse, Kaj; Selles, Ruud W; de Korte, Chris L; Veeger, DirkJan H E J; Stegeman, Dick F; Maas, Huub

    2018-01-23

    In the human hand, independent movement control of individual fingers is limited. One potential cause for this is mechanical connections between the tendons and muscle bellies corresponding to the different fingers. The aim of this study was to determine the tendon displacement of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) of both the instructed and the neighboring, non-instructed fingers during single finger flexion movements. In nine healthy subjects (age 22-29 years), instructed and non-instructed FDS finger tendon displacement of the index, middle and ring finger was measured using 2D ultrasound analyzed with speckle tracking software in two conditions: active flexion of all finger joints with all fingers free to move and active flexion while the non-instructed fingers were restricted. Our results of the free movement protocol showed an average tendon displacement of 27 mm for index finger flexion, 21 mm for middle finger flexion and 17 mm for ring finger flexion. Displacements of the non-instructed finger tendons (≈12 mm) were higher than expected based of the amount of non-instructed finger movement. In the restricted protocol, we found that, despite minimal joint movements, substantial non-instructed finger tendon displacement (≈9 mm) was still observed, which was interpreted as a result of tendon strain. When this strain component was subtracted from the tendon displacement of the non-instructed fingers during the free movement condition, the relationship between finger movement and tendon displacement of the instructed and non-instructed finger became comparable. Thus, when studying non-instructed finger tendon displacement it is important to take tendon strain into consideration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Gravity Induced Ordering of Frictional Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Jon; Sandnes, Bjørnar; Toussaint, Renaud; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Flekkøy, Eirik

    2014-05-01

    Experiments on confined two-phase flow systems, involving air and a dense suspension, have revealed highly non-trivial flow morphologies. As the air displaces the suspension, the grains that make up the suspension tend to accumulate along the interface, and can build up force chains that jam the accumulated region. This dynamics will generate "frictional fingers" of air coated by a region of densely packed grains. The fingers have a characteristic width that balances surface tension and frictional forces of the densely packed grains. When these fingers grow under the influence of gravity, they can align either horizontally or vertically, or grow in a random isotropic fashion. The transition between the different modes of finger growth depends on the density of grains, and the gravitational force component. We present an analytic model to account for the transitions between the modes. We further present a numerical scheme that enables us to simulate the dynamics of the process. The numerical and analytic results are in good agreements with the experimental findings. Finally we show how this process could explain patterns that emerge naturally in early stages of dyke formation. These patterns are formed when hot fluid displaces partly molten rocks and packs the hard mineral grains composing it together, thereby forming finger structures that remain frozen in the dyke walls.

  12. Viscoelastic fingering with a pulsed pressure signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corvera Poire, E; Rio, J A del

    2004-01-01

    We derive a generalized Darcy's law in the frequency domain for a linear viscoelastic fluid flowing in a Hele-Shaw cell. This leads to an analytic expression for the dynamic permeability that has maxima which are several orders of magnitude larger than the static permeability. We then follow an argument of de Gennes (1987 Europhys. Lett. 2 195) to obtain the smallest possible finger width when viscoelasticity is important. Using this and a conservation law, we obtain the lowest bound for the width of a single finger displacing a viscoelastic fluid. When the driving force consists of a constant pressure gradient plus an oscillatory signal, our results indicate that the finger width varies in time following the frequency of the incident signal. Also, the amplitude of the finger width in time depends on the value of the dynamic permeability at the imposed frequency. When the finger is driven with a frequency that maximizes the permeability, variations in the amplitude are also maximized. This gives results that are very different for Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids. For the former ones the amplitude of the oscillation decays with frequency. For the latter ones on the other hand, the amplitude has maxima at the same frequencies that maximize the dynamic permeability

  13. Physical, chemical and microbiological changes during natural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The lactic acid bacteria population was higher in the traditional product at the start of fermentation (6.1 log cfu/g wet basis versus 4.5 in the modified process) because of the malting step. ... Total soluble and reducing sugar content first increased, and then decreased with a concomitant increase in organic acids. The major ...

  14. Physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics of lafun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-20

    Jul 20, 2009 ... varieties grown by the local farmers are suitable for lafun production. The use of previously prepared lafun as ' ... ferred by consumers (Oyewole and Afolami, 2001). More recently, Nwabueze and Odunsi (2007) ..... International Development Agency) for financial support for the present work. REFERENCES.

  15. Physical, Sensory and Microbiological Properties of Wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bread was produced from the flour blends using the straight dough method. Loaf weight and volume decreased significantly (p < 0.05) with increasing levels of plantain flour inclusion. Sensory evaluation of the flour samples revealed significant differences in the ratings for crumb colour and texture between 100% wheat ...

  16. Quality assurance in microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora D

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality assurance (QA is the total process whereby the quality of laboratory reports can be guaranteed. The term quality control covers that part of QA, which primarily concerns the control of errors in the performance of tests and verification of test results. All materials, equipment and procedures must be adequately controlled. Culture media must be tested for sterility and performance. Each laboratory must have standard operating procedures (SOPs. QA of pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical stages of microbiological procedures should be incorporated in SOPs. The laboratory must be well lit with dust-free air-conditioned environment. Environmental conditions should be monitored. Supervisory and technical personnel should be well qualified. The laboratory should participate in external and internal quality assurance schemes.

  17. Microbiology of aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könönen, Eija; Müller, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-01

    For decades, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been considered the most likely etiologic agent in aggressive periodontitis. Implementation of DNA-based microbiologic methodologies has considerably improved our understanding of the composition of subgingival biofilms, and advanced open-ended molecular techniques even allow for genome mapping of the whole bacterial spectrum in a sample and characterization of both the cultivable and not-yet-cultivable microbiota associated with periodontal health and disease. Currently, A. actinomycetemcomitans is regarded as a minor component of the resident oral microbiota and as an opportunistic pathogen in some individuals. Its specific JP2 clone, however, shows properties of a true exogenous pathogen and has an important role in the development of aggressive periodontitis in certain populations. Still, limited data exist on the impact of other microbes specifically in aggressive periodontitis. Despite a wide heterogeneity of bacteria, especially in subgingival samples collected from patients, bacteria of the red complex in particular, and those of the orange complex, are considered as potential pathogens in generalized aggressive periodontitis. These types of bacterial findings closely resemble those found for chronic periodontitis, representing a mixed polymicrobial infection without a clear association with any specific microorganism. In aggressive periodontitis, the role of novel and not-yet-cultivable bacteria has not yet been elucidated. There are geographic and ethnic differences in the carriage of periodontitis-associated microorganisms, and they need to be taken into account when comparing study reports on periodontal microbiology in different study populations. In the present review, we provide an overview on the colonization of potential periodontal pathogens in childhood and adolescence, and on specific microorganisms that have been suspected for their role in the initiation and progression of aggressive

  18. Qualidade física, microbiológica e parasitológica de alfaces (Lactuca sativa de diferentes sistemas de cultivo Physical, microbiological and parasitological quality of lettuce (Lactuca sativa from different growing processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Regina R. de Santana

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A alface (Lactuca sativa é a hortaliça folhosa mais comercializada no Brasil. Seu baixo valor calórico a qualifica para diversas dietas, o que favorece o seu consumo sob a forma crua, possibilitando a ocorrência de enfermidades intestinais. O objetivo deste trabalho foi realizar uma avaliação física, microbiológica e parasitológica de amostras de alfaces, variedade crespa, provenientes dos sistemas de cultivo orgânico, tradicional e hidropônico, comercializadas nos principais supermercados da cidade de Salvador (BA, no período de setembro de 2003 a junho de 2004. As amostras do cultivo hidropônico apresentaram o menor peso total e da parte bio-comestível, diferindo significativamente (pThe lettuce (Lactuca sativa has economic importance to the people in Brazil. The aim of this study was to carry out a physical, microbiological and parasitological evaluations in the lettuce samples - crisp variety, according to organic, traditional and hydroponics growing processes, commercialized at the supermarkets of the City of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, collected from September/2003 until June/2004. The hydroponics lettuce samples showed the lowest total and edible part weight; they were inserted into Extra rate quality standard, according to the current legislation, whereas the organic and traditional lettuce samples were inserted into First and Second rate quality standard, respectively. The lettuce samples, independently of the growing process, showed low hygienic conditions, indicated by the presence of parasites of animal or human origin, and high concentration of fecal coliforms; the organic lettuce samples showed the highest frequencies of enteroparasities and fecal coliforms concentration, followed by the traditional and hydroponics lettuce samples. Considering the obtained results, the importance of this kind of food in the transmission of enteroparasities is stressed, as well as the need of actions which improve the sanitary conditions

  19. ATRIBUTOS MICROBIOLÓGICOS, QUÍMICOS E FÍSICOS DE SOLO SOB DIFERENTES SISTEMAS DE MANEJO E CONDIÇÕES DE CERRADO MICROBIOLOGICAL, CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL ATTRIBUTES OF SOIL UNDER DIFFERENT CROP SYSTEMS AND CERRADO CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezesmundo Ferreira Gomes

    2011-01-01

    ="color: #000000;">The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of soil use and management on its chemical, physical and microbiological attributes. The research was carried out from the winter (2007 to the summer (2008, in Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil, in a Distroferric Red Latossol. Data were analyzed as a complete randomized experimental design, with 5 collected samples that established 5 replications per management system. The management systems were: Area 1: area alloted to reforestation; Area 2: conventional soil tillage; Area 3: no-tillage; Area 4: degraded forage; and Area 5: natural system (native forest. The evaluation of a management system in its first year of implementation was not sufficient to evaluate the impacts on soil physical and microbiological attributes. The substitution of native vegetation by cultivation systems can cause important alterations on soil chemical attributes from the first year of implementation. Microbiological attributes were efficient indicators of alterations in physical attributes according to the soil use and management.

    KEY-WORDS: Soil quality; microbial biomass carbon; management practices.

     

  20. Perceiving fingers in single-digit arithmetic problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria eBerteletti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate in children the neural underpinnings of finger representation and finger movement involved in single-digit arithmetic problems. Evidence suggests that finger representation and finger-based strategies play an important role in learning and understanding arithmetic. Because different operations rely on different networks, we compared activation for subtraction and multiplication problems in independently localized finger somatosensory and motor areas and tested whether activation was related to skill. Brain activations from children between 8 and 13 years of age revealed that only subtraction problems significantly activated finger motor areas, suggesting reliance on finger-based strategies. In addition, larger subtraction problems yielded greater somatosensory activation than smaller problems, suggesting a greater reliance on finger representation for larger numerical values. Interestingly, better performance in subtraction problems was associated with lower activation in the finger somatosensory area. Our results support the importance of fine-grained finger representation in arithmetical skill and are the first neurological evidence for a functional role of the somatosensory finger area in proficient arithmetical problem solving, in particular for those problems requiring quantity manipulation. From an educational perspective, these results encourage investigating whether different finger-based strategies facilitate arithmetical understanding and encourage educational practices aiming at integrating finger representation and finger-based strategies as a tool for instilling stronger numerical sense.

  1. The Zinc Finger of Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain Protein 2 Is Essential for Efficient Hydroxylation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Patrick R; Song, Daisheng; Chung, Yu Jin; Khurana, Tejvir S; Lee, Frank S

    2016-09-15

    Prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2) (also known as EGLN1) is a key oxygen sensor in mammals that posttranslationally modifies hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIF-α) and targets it for degradation. In addition to its catalytic domain, PHD2 contains an evolutionarily conserved zinc finger domain, which we have previously proposed recruits PHD2 to the HSP90 pathway to promote HIF-α hydroxylation. Here, we provide evidence that this recruitment is critical both in vitro and in vivo We show that in vitro, the zinc finger can function as an autonomous recruitment domain to facilitate interaction with HIF-α. In vivo, ablation of zinc finger function by a C36S/C42S Egln1 knock-in mutation results in upregulation of the erythropoietin gene, erythrocytosis, and augmented hypoxic ventilatory response, all hallmarks of Egln1 loss of function and HIF stabilization. Hence, the zinc finger ordinarily performs a critical positive regulatory function. Intriguingly, the function of this zinc finger is impaired in high-altitude-adapted Tibetans, suggesting that their adaptation to high altitude may, in part, be due to a loss-of-function EGLN1 allele. Thus, these findings have important implications for understanding both the molecular mechanism of the hypoxic response and human adaptation to high altitude. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Microbiological profile of selected mucks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbek-Szreniawska, M.; Wyczółkowski, A. I.

    2009-04-01

    INTRODUCTION Matyka-Sarzynska and Sokolowska (2000) emphasize that peats and peat soils comprise large areas of Poland. The creation of soil begins when the formation of swamp has ended. Gawlik (2000) states that the degree of influence of the mucky process of organic soils on the differentiations of the conditions of growth and development of plants is mainly connected with the changes of moisture-retentive properties of mucks which constitute the material for these soils, and the loss of their wetting capacities. The above-mentioned changes, which usually occur gradually and show a clear connection with the extent of dehydration and, at times, with its duration, intensify significantly when the soils are under cultivation. The mucky process of peat soils leads to transformations of their physical, chemical and biological properties. The main ingredient of peat soils is organic substance. The substance is maintained inside them by the protective activity of water. The process of land improvement reduces the humidity of the environment, and that Intensifies the pace of the activity of soil microorganisms which cause the decay of organic substance. The decay takes place in the direction of two parallel processes: mineralization and humification. All groups of chemical substances constituting peat undergo mineralization. Special attention should be called to the mineralization of carbon and nitrogen compounds, which constitute a large percentage of theorganic substance of the peat organic mass. Okruszko (1976) has examined scientificbases of the classification of peat soils depending on the intensity of the muck process. The aim of this publication was to conduct a microbiological characteristic of selected mucky material. METHODS AND MATERIALS Soil samples used in the experiments were acquired from the Leczynsko-Wlodawski Lake Region, a large area of which constitutes a part of the Poleski National Park, which is covered to a large extent with high peat bogs. It was

  3. Finger forces in fastball baseball pitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Obata, Satoshi; Nasu, Daiki; Kadota, Koji; Matsuo, Tomoyuki; Fleisig, Glenn S

    2017-08-01

    Forces imparted by the fingers onto a baseball are the final, critical aspects for pitching, however these forces have not been quantified previously as no biomechanical technology was available. In this study, an instrumented baseball was developed for direct measurement of ball reaction force by individual fingers and used to provide fundamental information on the forces during a fastball pitch. A tri-axial force transducer with a cable having an easily-detachable connector were installed in an official baseball. Data were collected from 11 pitchers who placed the fingertip of their index, middle, ring, or thumb on the transducer, and threw four-seam fastballs to a target cage from a flat mound. For the index and middle fingers, resultant ball reaction force exhibited a bimodal pattern with initial and second peaks at 38-39ms and 6-7ms before ball release, and their amplitudes were around 97N each. The ring finger and thumb produced single-peak forces of approximately 50 and 83N, respectively. Shear forces for the index and middle fingers formed distinct peak at 4-5ms before release, and the peaks summed to 102N; a kinetic source for backspin on the ball. An additional experiment with submaximal pitching effort showed a linear relationship of peak forces with ball velocity. The peak ball reaction force for fastballs exceeded 80% of maximum finger strength measured, suggesting that strengthening of the distal muscles is important both for enhancing performance and for avoiding injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Evolution across the Curriculum: Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmeister, Alita R.; Smith, James J.

    2016-01-01

    An integrated understanding of microbiology and evolutionary biology is essential for students pursuing careers in microbiology and healthcare fields. In this Perspective, we discuss the usefulness of evolutionary concepts and an overall evolutionary framework for students enrolled in microbiology courses. Further, we propose a set of learning goals for students studying microbial evolution concepts. We then describe some barriers to microbial evolution teaching and learning and encourage the continued incorporation of evidence-based teaching practices into microbiology courses at all levels. Next, we review the current status of microbial evolution assessment tools and describe some education resources available for teaching microbial evolution. Successful microbial evolution education will require that evolution be taught across the undergraduate biology curriculum, with a continued focus on applications and applied careers, while aligning with national biology education reform initiatives. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education PMID:27158306

  5. Zinc-finger nucleases: a panoramic view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Dana

    2011-02-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are emerging as very powerful tools for directed genome modifications. Their key features are: a DNA-binding domain comprised of zinc fingers that can be designed to favor very specific targets; a nonspecific cleavage domain that must dimerize to cut DNA--this requirement enhances specificity and minimizes random cleavage. ZFNs have been shown to be effective in a wide range of organisms and cell types. This article reviews discoveries that led to the development of ZFNs, cites examples of successes in genome engineering, and projects how ZFNs may be used in the future, particularly in applications to humans.

  6. Contamination by human fingers. The Midas touch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwozdz, R.; Grass, F.

    2004-01-01

    Anthropogenic activity is one of the causes of contamination in the human environment: contamination of air, water, top soils, plants and food products has complex effects on human health problems. Wear and abrasion of various surfaces are constant processes in daily life, and commonly include interaction between human fingers and surfaces of every conceivable material. New methods for investigation of trace transfer processes by human fingers are described. Results of transfer for commonly used metals such as gold, silver, zinc, cadmium, tin, cobalt, nickel, chromium and iron are presented. Relationship between transfer of metals by touch and the general problem of purity in analytical activities is briefly discussed. (author)

  7. Admittance Control of a Multi-Finger Arm Based on Manipulability of Fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Hori

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the previous studies, admittance control and impedance control for a finger‐arm robot using the manipulability of the finger were studied and methods of realizing the controls have been proposed. In this study, two 3‐DOF fingers are attached to the end‐effector of a 6‐DOF arm to configure a multi‐finger arm robot. Based on the previous methods, the authors have proposed an admittance control for a multi‐finger arm robot using the manipulability of the fingers in this study. Algorithms of the averaging method and the mini‐max method were introduced to establish a manipulability criterion of the two fingers in order to generate a cooperative movement of the arm. Comparison of the admittance controls combined with the top search method and local optimization method for the multi‐finger arm robot was made and features of the control methods were also discussed. The stiffness control and damping control were experimentally evaluated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  8. Next Generation Microbiology Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. M.; Oubre, C. M.; Elliott, T. F.; Castro, V. A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    As humans continue to explore deep into space, microorganisms will travel with them. The primary means to mitigate the risk of infectious disease are a combination of prudent spacecraft design and rigorous operational controls. The effectiveness of these methods are evaluated by microbiological monitoring of spacecraft, food, water, and the crew that is performed preflight, in-flight, and post-flight. Current NASA requirements associated with microbiological monitoring are based on culture-based methodology where microorganisms are grown on a semi-solid growth medium and enumerated. Subsequent identification of the organisms requires specialized labor and large equipment, which historically has been performed on Earth. Requirements that rely strictly on culture-based units limit the use of non-culture based monitoring technology. Specifically, the culture-based "measurement criteria" are Colony Forming Units (CFU, representing the growth of one microorganism at a single location on the agar medium) per a given volume, area, or sample size. As the CFU unit by definition is culture-based, these requirements limit alternative technologies for spaceflight applications. As spaceflight missions such as those to Mars extend further into space, culture-based technology will become difficult to implement due to the (a) limited shelf life of the culture media, (b) mass/volume necessary to carry these consumables, and (c) problems associated with the production of biohazardous material in the habitable volume of the spacecraft. In addition, an extensive amount of new knowledge has been obtained during the Space Shuttle, NASA-Mir, and International Space Station Programs, which gave direction for new or modified microbial control requirements for vehicle design and mission operations. The goal of this task is to develop and recommend a new set of requirements for vehicle design and mission operations, including microbiological monitoring, based upon "lessons learned" and new

  9. ANALYSIS WITH MSC ADAMS OF A 5-FINGER AND 3-PHALANX /FINGER UNDER-ACTUATEDMECHANICAL HAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe POPESCU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the analysis with MSC ADAMS of a 5-fingered and 3-phalanx/finger underactuatedmechanical hand, designed by the author to work on industrial robots. Moreover, in order to increasegrasping safety in the automated handling process, the author has fitted each finger with a locking sequence inthe final phase of grasping. Thus, the mechanism of mechanical hand is considered to be a mechanical systemand is treated like a set of rigid bodies connected by mechanical linkages and elastic elements. To model andsimulate this mechanism with MSC ADAMS programme, the author covered the following stages: constructionof the model, testing-simulation, validation, finishing, parameterization, and optimization

  10. Predictive Food Microbiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre

    Listeria monocytogenes is a well-known food borne pathogen that potentially causes listeriosis. No outbreaks or cases of listeriosis have been associated with cottage cheese, but several confirmed cases and outbreaks in the EU and the US have been related to dairy products made from raw or pasteu......Listeria monocytogenes is a well-known food borne pathogen that potentially causes listeriosis. No outbreaks or cases of listeriosis have been associated with cottage cheese, but several confirmed cases and outbreaks in the EU and the US have been related to dairy products made from raw...... or pasteurised milk. This, in combination with the fact that cottage cheese support growth of Listeria monocytogenes, induces a documentation requirement on the food producer. In the EU regulatory framework, mathematical models are recognised as a suitable supplement to traditional microbiological methods...... was clearly important to include when predicting growth response of Listeria monocytogenes in fermented dairy products. Alternative, semi-mechanistic, iimodelling approaches were evaluated based on methods applied in the fermentation technology. The dynamics of lactic acid concentration and product p...

  11. Tangible Widgets for a Multiplayer Tablet Game in Comparison to Finger Touch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mads Bock; Fisker, Martin; Topp, Kasper Steen Fischer

    2015-01-01

    Tangible widgets are graspable physical objects that can be detected by a capacitive touch screen. These are used as an interaction method in the tablet game "Hover Wars", a 2-player competitive combat game. Hover Wars was designed to work mainly with tangible widgets and the affordances thereof...... in mind. A version using finger touch was also implemented and the controls were changed to work optimally with this interaction method. The two versions were compared to each other in a user study, revealing that players tend to prefer the usage of tangible widgets over finger touch. The study also...

  12. Task specificity of finger dexterity tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, M.A.M.; Krul, A.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Finger dexterity tests are generally used to assess performance decrease due to gloves, cold and pathology. It is generally assumed that the O’Connor and Purdue Pegboard test yield similar results. In this experiment we compared these two tests for dry conditions without gloves, and for dry and wet

  13. Task specificity of finger dexterity tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, M.A.M.; Krul, A.J.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Finger dexterity tests are generally used to assess performance decrease due to gloves, cold and pathology. It is generally assumed that the O'Connor and Purdue Pegboard test yield similar results. In this experiment we compared these two tests for dry conditions without gloves, and for dry and wet

  14. Finger cold-induced vasodilation : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H. A M

    Cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) in the finger tips generally occurs 5-10 min after the start of local cold exposure of the extremities. This phenomenon is believed to reduce the risk of local cold injuries. However, CIVD is almost absent during hypothermia, when survival of the organism takes

  15. Treatment Options for Mallet Finger : A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Jeroen M.; Beets, Michiel R.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Rood, Akkie; Welters, Carlo F. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Mallet finger is a common injury. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the different treatment options of mallet injuries and their indications, outcomes, and potential complications. Methods: A literature-based study was conducted using the PubMed database comprising world

  16. Clubbed fingers: the claws we lost?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, A.A.M.; Vermeij-Keers, C.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van; Gooren, L.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    Clubbed digits resemble the human embryonic fingers and toes, which took like the digits of a claw. Clubbed digits, thus, may represent the return of the embryonic claw and may even represent the claws man has lost during evolution, if ontogenesis realty recapitulates phylogenesis. We put forward

  17. Finger Search in Grammar-Compressed Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Christiansen, Anders Roy; Cording, Patrick Hagge

    2016-01-01

    random access, that is, given a position in the original uncompressed string report the character at that position. In this paper we study the random access problem with the finger search property, that is, the time for a random access query should depend on the distance between a specified index f...

  18. Designing Fingers in Simulation based on Imprints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiuf Schwartz, Lukas Christoffer Malte; Wolniakowski, Adam; Werner, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Gripper design is nowadays an area of ongoing research activity. The problem of creating a generic and automated gripper design approach tailored for a specific task is still far from solved. In this paper, we propose a new method of generating finger cut-outs aimed at simplifying the design...

  19. Finger cold-induced vasodilation : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) in the finger tips generally occurs 5-10 min after the start of local cold exposure of the extremities. This phenomenon is believed to reduce the risk of local cold injuries. However, CIVD is almost absent during hypothermia, when survival of the organism takes

  20. Optical Myography: Detecting Finger Movements by Looking at the Forearm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eNissler

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the crucial problems found in the scientific community of assistive / rehabilitation robotics nowadays is that of automatically detecting what a disabled subject (for instance, a hand amputee wants to do, exactly when she wants to do it and strictly for the time she wants to do it. This problem, commonly called intent detection, has traditionally been tackled using surface electromyography, a technique which suffers from a number of drawbacks, including the changes in the signal induced by sweat and muscle fatigue. With the advent of realistic, physically plausible augmented- and virtual-reality environments for rehabilitation, this approach does not suffice anymore. In this paper we explore a novel method to solve the problem, that we call Optical Myography (OMG. The idea is to visually inspect the human forearm (or stump to reconstruct what fingers are moving and to what extent. In a psychophysical experiment involving ten intact subjects, we used visual fiducial markers (AprilTags and a standard web-camera to visualize the deformations of the surface of the forearm, which then were mapped to the intended finger motions. As ground truth, a visual stimulus was used, avoiding the need for finger sensors (force/position sensors, datagloves, etc.. Two machine-learning approaches, a linear and a non-linear one, were comparatively tested in settings of increasing realism. The results indicate an average error in the range of 0.05 to 0.22 (root mean square error normalized over the signal range, in line with similar results obtained with more mature techniques such as electromyography. If further successfully tested in the large, this approach could lead to vision-based intent detection of amputees, with the main application of letting such disabled persons dexterously and reliably interact in an augmented- / virtual-reality setup.

  1. Novel Dexterous Robotic Finger Concept with Controlled Stiffness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink, M.; Carloni, Raffaella; Brouwer, Dannis Michel; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel robotic finger concept for variable impedance grasping in unstructured tasks. The novel robotic finger combines three key features: minimal actuation, variable mechanical compliance and full manipulability. This combination of features allows for a minimal component

  2. Activity patterns of extrinsic finger flexors and extensors during movements of instructed and non-instructed fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, Nathalie; Stegeman, Dick F; van den Noort, Josien C; H E J Veeger, DirkJan; Maas, Huub

    2018-02-01

    The fingers of the human hand cannot be controlled fully independently. This phenomenon may have a neurological as well as a mechanical basis. Despite previous studies, the neuromechanics of finger movements are not fully understood. The aims of this study were (1) to assess the activation and coactivation patterns of finger specific flexor and extensor muscle regions during instructed single finger flexion and (2) to determine the relationship between enslaved finger movements and respective finger muscle activation. In 9 healthy subjects (age 22-29), muscle activation was assessed during single finger flexion using a 90 surface electromyography electrode grid placed over the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) and the extensor digitorum (ED). We found (1) no significant differences in muscle activation timing between fingers, (2) considerable muscle activity in flexor and extensor regions associated with the non-instructed fingers and (3) no correlation between the muscle activations and corresponding movement of non-instructed fingers. A clear disparity was found between the movement pattern of the non-instructed fingers and the activity pattern of the corresponding muscle regions. This suggests that mechanical factors, such as intertendinous and myofascial connections, may also affect finger movement independency and need to be taken into consideration when studying finger movement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. CHEMICAL TRANSPORT AND SPONTANEOUS LAYER FORMATION IN FINGERING CONVECTION IN ASTROPHYSICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Justin M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 201 Interdisciplinary Sciences Building, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Garaud, Pascale [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Baskin School of Engineering, 1156 High Street, Mail Stop SOE2, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Stellmach, Stephan, E-mail: jumbrown@ucsc.edu [Institut fuer Geophysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2013-05-01

    A region of a star that is stable to convection according to the Ledoux criterion may nevertheless undergo additional mixing if the mean molecular weight increases with radius. This process is called fingering (thermohaline) convection and may account for some of the unexplained mixing in stars such as those that have been polluted by planetary infall and those burning {sup 3}He. We propose a new model for mixing by fingering convection in the parameter regime relevant for stellar (and planetary) interiors. Our theory is based on physical principles and supported by three-dimensional direct numerical simulations. We also discuss the possibility of formation of thermocompositional staircases in fingering regions, and their role in enhancing mixing. Finally, we provide a simple algorithm to implement this theory in one-dimensional stellar codes, such as KEPLER and MESA.

  4. Multi-Finger Interaction and Synergies in Finger Flexion and Extension Force Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaebum Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to discover finger interaction indices during single-finger ramp tasks and multi-finger coordination during a steady state force production in two directions, flexion, and extension. Furthermore, the indices of anticipatory adjustment of elemental variables (i.e., finger forces prior to a quick pulse force production were quantified. It is currently unknown whether the organization and anticipatory modulation of stability properties are affected by force directions and strengths of in multi-finger actions. We expected to observe a smaller finger independency and larger indices of multi-finger coordination during extension than during flexion due to both neural and peripheral differences between the finger flexion and extension actions. We also examined the indices of the anticipatory adjustment between different force direction conditions. The anticipatory adjustment could be a neural process, which may be affected by the properties of the muscles and by the direction of the motions. The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC force was larger for flexion than for extension, which confirmed the fact that the strength of finger flexor muscles (e.g., flexor digitorum profundus was larger than that of finger extensor (e.g., extensor digitorum. The analysis within the uncontrolled manifold (UCM hypothesis was used to quantify the motor synergy of elemental variables by decomposing two sources of variances across repetitive trials, which identifies the variances in the uncontrolled manifold (VUCM and that are orthogonal to the UCM (VORT. The presence of motor synergy and its strength were quantified by the relative amount of VUCM and VORT. The strength of motor synergies at the steady state was larger in the extension condition, which suggests that the stability property (i.e., multi-finger synergies may be a direction specific quantity. However, the results for the existence of anticipatory adjustment; however, no difference

  5. Traumatic Finger Amputation Treatment Preference among Hand Surgeons in the United States and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shauver, Melissa J; Nishizuka, Takanobu; Hirata, Hitoshi; Chung, Kevin C

    2016-04-01

    Large geographic differences in procedure utilization draw into question its appropriate use. In Japan, replantation is frequent for even very distal finger amputations. In the United States, revision amputation is far more common. There has been no detailed investigation into the drivers of these differences. The authors created a survey to assess experience with replantation, estimates of physical and functional outcomes, attitudes toward amputees, and preferences in several injury scenarios. The survey was distributed to members of the Finger Replantation and Amputation Multicenter Study and to hand surgeons making podium presentations at the Thirty-Second Annual Meeting of the Central Japanese Society for Surgery of the Hand. One hundred percent of both groups responded. There were no significant differences in surgeon experience. Japanese surgeons were significantly more likely to recommend replantation in all scenarios, despite 62 percent ranking function 6 months after replantation as "poor." Japanese surgeons also rated the appearance of a hand with an amputated finger significantly poorer. Finally, Japanese surgeons were significantly more likely to report stigmatization against finger amputees. There is no study with a high level of evidence comparing outcomes following replantation and revision amputation. The lack of evidence results in surgeons basing recommendations on personal preference. In this case, Japanese surgeons preferred replantation despite agreeing that functional outcomes were suboptimal. This may be because of Japanese cultural beliefs. Comparative effectiveness research, such as that planned by the Finger Replantation and Amputation Multicenter Study, can provide evidence toward the appropriate use of replantation.

  6. Amputation of finger by horse bite with complete avulsion of both flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Lior; Stahl, Shalom; Rovitsky, Alexey; Peled, Eli

    2011-08-08

    Amputation of fingers with tendon avulsion occurs through a traction injury, and most occur through a ring avulsion mechanism. Usually the flexor digitorum profundus is torn out with the amputated finger. Replantation usually is recommended only when the amputation is distal to the flexor digitorum superficialis insertion. Animal bites are relatively common, with a decreasing order of frequency of dogs, cats, and humans. Horse bites are relatively infrequent but are associated with crush injuries and tissue loss when they occur. This article describes a 23-year-old man with amputation of his middle finger at the level of the proximal phalanx after being bitten by a horse. The amputated stump was avulsed with the middle finger flexor digitorum profundus and flexor digitorum superficialis torn from the muscle-tendon junction from approximately the middle of the forearm. The patient had no other injuries, and he was able to move his other 4 fingers with only mild pain. As the amputated digit was not suitable for replantation, the wound was irrigated and debrided. The edges of the phalanx were trimmed, and the edges of the wound were sutured. Tetanus toxoid and rabies vaccine were administered, along with intravenous amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. The patient was discharged from the hospital 2 days later, with no sign of infection of the wound or compartment syndrome of the forearm. This case demonstrates the weakest point in the myotendinous junction and emphasizes the importance of a careful physical examination in patients with a traumatic amputation. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. The effect of finger spreading on drag of the hand in human swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houwelingen, Josje; Willemsen, Dennis H J; Kunnen, Rudie P J; van Heijst, GertJan F; Grift, Ernst Jan; Breugem, Wim Paul; Delfos, Rene; Westerweel, Jerry; Clercx, Herman J H; van de Water, Willem

    2017-10-03

    The effect of finger spread on overall drag on a swimmer's hand is relatively small, but could be relevant for elite swimmers. There are many sensitivities in measuring this effect. A comparison between numerical simulations, experiments and theory is urgently required to observe whether the effect is significant. In this study, the beneficial effect of a small finger spread in swimming is confirmed using three different but complementary methods. For the first time numerical simulations and laboratory experiments are conducted on the exact same 3D model of the hand with attached forearm. The virtual version of the hand with forearm was implemented in a numerical code by means of an immersed boundary method and the 3D printed physical version was studied in a wind tunnel experiment. An enhancement of the drag coefficient of 2% and 5% compared to the case with closed fingers was found for the numerical simulation and experiment, respectively. A 5% and 8% favorable effect on the (dimensionless) force moment at an optimal finger spreading of 10° was found, which indicates that the difference is more outspoken in the force moment. Moreover, an analytical model is proposed, using scaling arguments similar to the Betz actuator disk model, to explain the drag coefficient as a function of finger spacing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Immiscible three-dimensional fingering in porous media: A weakly nonlinear analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Rodolfo; Dias, Eduardo O.; Miranda, José A.

    2018-03-01

    We present a weakly nonlinear theory for the development of fingering instabilities that arise at the interface between two immiscible viscous fluids flowing radially outward in a uniform three-dimensional (3D) porous medium. By employing a perturbative second-order mode-coupling scheme, we investigate the linear stability of the system as well as the emergence of intrinsically nonlinear finger branching events in this 3D environment. At the linear stage, we find several differences between the 3D radial fingering and its 2D counterpart (usual Saffman-Taylor flow in radial Hele-Shaw cells). These include the algebraic growth of disturbances and the existence of regions of absolute stability for finite values of viscosity contrast and capillary number in the 3D system. On the nonlinear level, our main focus is to get analytical insight into the physical mechanism resulting in the occurrence of finger tip-splitting phenomena. In this context, we show that the underlying mechanism leading to 3D tip splitting relies on the coupling between the fundamental interface modes and their first harmonics. However, we find that in three dimensions, in contrast to the usual 2D fingering structures normally encountered in radial Hele-Shaw flows, tip splitting into three branches can also be observed.

  9. Finger Based Techniques for Nonvisual Touchscreen Text Entry

    OpenAIRE

    Fakrudeen, Mohammed; Yousef, Sufian; Miraz, Mahdi H.; Hussein, AbdelRahman Hamza

    2017-01-01

    This research proposes Finger Based Technique (FBT) for non-visual touch screen device interaction designed for blind users. Based on the proposed technique, the blind user can access virtual keys based on finger holding positions. Three different models have been proposed. They are Single Digit Finger-Digit Input (FDI), Double Digit FDI for digital text entry, and Finger-Text Input (FTI) for normal text entry. All the proposed models were implemented with voice feedback while enabling touch ...

  10. Transition to finger convection in double-diffusive convection

    OpenAIRE

    Kellner, M.; Tilgner, A.

    2014-01-01

    Finger convection is observed experimentally in an electrodeposition cell in which a destabilizing gradient of copper ions is maintained against a stabilizing temperature gradient. This double-diffusive system shows finger convection even if the total density stratification is unstable. Finger convection is replaced by an ordinary convection roll if convection is fast enough to prevent sufficient heat diffusion between neighboring fingers, or if the thermal buoyancy force is less than 1/30 of...

  11. Características físico-químicas e microbiológicas de morango minimamente processado Physical-chemical and microbiological characteristics of fresh-cut strawberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana dos Reis Ponce

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar as alterações físico-químicas e microbiológicas de morangos submetidos ao processamento mínimo. Foram avaliados os efeitos da lavagem com cloreto de cálcio ou polietilenoglicol na microbiota contaminante e na textura dos morangos e da sanificação com ozônio gasoso ou clorado orgânico. Análises de textura, cor, perda de massa e microbiota contaminante foram feitas durante o armazenamento a 5 °C por 12 dias em embalagens envoltas com uma a quatro camadas de filme de cloreto de polivinil (PVC. A adição de até 1,5% de cloreto de cálcio ou de 0,5% de polietilenoglicol na água de lavagem não garantiu a manutenção da textura do morango ao final do período de armazenamento. A ozonização dos morangos por 60 minutos foi mais efetiva para reduzir (p This study aimed to evaluate the physical-chemical and microbiological changes in strawberries subjected to the fresh-cut process. The effects on the contaminants and texture of strawberries washed with calcium chloride and polyethylene glycol and of ozone gas and organic chlorine as sanitizer to reduce microbial contamination were evaluated. Analyses of texture, color, weight loss and microbial contaminants were made during storage at 5 °C for 12 days in packs wrapped in up to four layers of PVC film. The addition of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% of calcium chloride or 0.5% of polyethylene glycol in the washing water did not ensure the maintenance of the texture of the strawberry at the end of the period of storage. The ozonation of strawberries for 60 minutes was more effective in reducing (p < 0.05 the count of mesophilic aerobics microorganisms, yeasts and molds and coliforms, when compared to results obtained with strawberries ozonizated for 30 minutes and immersed in a solution of organic chlorine. The strawberries stored in packages covered with three layers of PVC film showed an increase in texture and intensity of browning and a reduction in

  12. Microbiological Methodology in Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abyzov, S. S.; Gerasimenko, L. M.; Hoover, R. B.; Mitskevich, I. N.; Mulyukin, A. L.; Poglazova, M. N.; Rozanov, A. Y.

    2005-01-01

    Searching for life in astromaterials to be delivered from the future missions to extraterrestrial bodies is undoubtedly related to studies of the properties and signatures of living microbial cells and microfossils on Earth. As model terrestrial analogs of Martian polar subsurface layers are often regarded the Antarctic glacier and Earth permafrost habitats where alive microbial cells preserved viability for millennia years due to entering the anabiotic state. For the future findings of viable microorganisms in samples from extraterrestrial objects, it is important to use a combined methodology that includes classical microbiological methods, plating onto nutrient media, direct epifluorescence and electron microscopy examinations, detection of the elemental composition of cells, radiolabeling techniques, PCR and FISH methods. Of great importance is to ensure authenticity of microorganisms (if any in studied samples) and to standardize the protocols used to minimize a risk of external contamination. Although the convincing evidence of extraterrestrial microbial life will may come from the discovery of living cells in astromaterials, biomorphs and microfossils must also be regarded as a target in search of life evidence bearing in mind a scenario that alive microorganisms had not be preserved and underwent mineralization. Under the laboratory conditions, processes that accompanied fossilization of cyanobacteria were reconstructed, and artificially produced cyanobacterial stromatolites resembles by their morphological properties those found in natural Earth habitats. Regarding the vital importance of distinguishing between biogenic and abiogenic signatures and between living and fossil microorganisms in analyzed samples, it is worthwhile to use some previously developed approaches based on electron microscopy examinations and analysis of elemental composition of biomorphs in situ and comparison with the analogous data obtained for laboratory microbial cultures and

  13. Left hand finger force in violin playing: tempo, loudness, and finger differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Obata, Satoshi

    2009-07-01

    A three-dimensional force transducer was installed in the neck of a violin under the A string at the D5 position in order to study the force with which the violinist clamps the string against the fingerboard under normal playing conditions. Violinists performed repetitive sequences of open A- and fingered D-tones using the ring finger at tempi of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 notes/s at mezzo-forte. At selected tempi, the effects of dynamic level and the use of different fingers were investigated as well. The force profiles were clearly dependent on tempo and dynamic level. At slow tempi, the force profiles were characterized by an initial pulse followed by a level force to the end of the finger contact period. At tempi higher than 2 Hz, only pulsed profiles were observed. The peak force exceeded 4.5 N at 1 and 2 Hz and decreased to 1.7 N at 16 Hz. All force and impulse values were lower at softer dynamic levels, and when using the ring or little finger compared to the index finger.

  14. The Incidence of Finger Ridge Counts among the Christian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was attempted to obtain the occurrence total and absolute finger ridge counts from 102 unrelated Christian populations (60 males and 42 females) of Mysore city, Karnataka state of India. Data were collected by biometric scanner (USB finger print reader). The mean values of Total finger ridge count and ...

  15. Association Between Finger Clubbing and Chronic Lung Disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Finger clubbed patients had higher risk of hypoxemia (46.7%), pulmonary hypertension (46.7%) and advanced disease in WHO stage III/ IV (91.7%) compared to non-finger clubbed patients. Finger clubbed patients had lower CD4 cells count and percentage (median 369cells, 13%) compared to non-clubbed patients ...

  16. Evolution across the Curriculum: Microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alita R. Burmeister

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An integrated understanding of microbiology and evolutionary biology is essential for students pursuing careers in microbiology and healthcare fields. In this Perspective, we discuss the usefulness of evolutionary concepts and an overall evolutionary framework for students enrolled in microbiology courses. Further, we propose a set of learning goals for students studying microbial evolution concepts. We then describe some barriers to microbial evolution teaching and learning and encourage the continued incorporation of evidence-based teaching practices into microbiology courses at all levels. Next, we review the current status of microbial evolution assessment tools and describe some education resources available for teaching microbial evolution. Successful microbial evolution education will require that evolution be taught across the undergraduate biology curriculum, with a continued focus on applications and applied careers, while aligning with national biology education reform initiatives.

  17. New Egyptian Journal of Microbiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The journal welcomes papers focusing on microbiological and/or immunological studies from medical or pharmaceutical perspectives. Research pieces on bacteria, fungi, viruses, protozoa, algae, spores, immunity, immune systems, health and pharmaceutical applications are highly relevant ...

  18. Medical Microbiology: Deficits and Remedies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabridge, Michael G.

    1974-01-01

    Microbiology is a typical medical science in which basic information can have direct application. Yet, surveys and questionnaires of recent medical school graduates indicate a serious lack of retentiion in regard to basic biological science. (Author)

  19. [Microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Delgado, Rafael; García, Federico; Eiros, José M; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl

    2007-12-01

    Currently, there are around 150,000 HIV-infected patients in Spain. This number, together with the fact that this disease is now a chronic condition since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, has generated an increasing demand on the clinical microbiology laboratories in our hospitals. This increase has occurred not only in the diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic diseases, but also in tests related to the diagnosis and therapeutic management of HIV infection. To meet this demand, the Sociedad de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clinica (Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology) has updated its standard Procedure for the microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection. The main advances related to serological diagnosis, plasma viral load, and detection of resistance to antiretroviral drugs are reviewed in this version of the Procedure.

  20. Microbiological Defacement of Navy Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    R. Barned. "Fungus-resistant paints for the humid tropics," Journal of Oil and Colour , Chemists Association, vol 69, 1976, pp 6248. 12. M. A. Post, W...34Microbiological attack on paint films," Journal of Oil and Colour Chemists Association, vol 43, no. 12, Dec 1960, pp 842-858. 15. L. A. O’Neill. "Microbiological...3,4 ,5-Tribromosalicylanilide Tributyltin fluoride Tributyltin salicylate 2,3,5-Trichloro-4-(propylsulfonyl) pyridine *Source: EPA; compounds may

  1. A Diabetic Elderly Man with Finger Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Noraini; Badrin, Salziyan; Wan Abdullah, Wan Noor Hasbee

    2018-03-01

    Fixed cutaneous sporotrichosis is a differential diagnosis that can be considered in diabetic patients who present with a poorly healing ulcer. Although its prevalence is low, it can occur in patients with immunocompromised status. Here we report a case of a 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus who presented with a 1-month history of an unhealed ulcer over the tip of his left middle finger. He experienced a cat bite over his left middle finger 1 month prior to the appearance of the lesion. A skin biopsy revealed the presence of Sporothrix schenckii . Oral itraconazole 200 mg twice daily was started empirically and the patient showed marked improvement in the skin lesion after 2 months of therapy.

  2. Botulinum toxin injection of spastic finger flexors in hemiplegic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, A A; McGinn, M; Chappell, R

    2000-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of botulinum toxin injection of spastic finger flexors followed by intensive training of finger extensors. Fourteen subjects with chronic hemiplegia spasticity of the upper limb had electromyographic-guided botulinum toxin injection into the long finger flexors. All patients presented with minimal active finger extension with the wrist flexed, sustained clonus of the finger flexors, functional proximal arm function, and absence of fixed contracture. Cadaver dissections directed selection of two injection sites: the flexor digitorum sublimis and the flexor digitorum profundus. Fifty mouse units of botulinum toxin were injected into each muscle. After injection, the subjects were instructed in a home program of stretching the long finger flexors, upper limb weight bearing with a weight-bearing splint, and exercise to improve finger extension control. Compared with preinjection measures, assessment the first week after the initial injection showed significantly reduced tone, reduced clonus, and greater active finger extension with the wrist in the neutral position. Four months later, the Ashworth scale increased to preinjection levels in the six subjects with repeated injections but was again decreased postinjection. Active finger extension with the wrist in the neutral position and clonus showed a statistically nonsignificant trend toward cumulative improvement after the second injection. The greatest change in finger extension and spasticity reduction occurred after the first injection. Continued significant improvement in finger extension was not observed.

  3. Dynamic analysis of C/C composite finger seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guoding

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A seal device as an important component of aeroengines has decisive influence on performance, reliability, and working life of aeroengines. With the development of aeroengines, demands on the performance characteristics of seal devices are made strictly. Finger seal as a novel kind of sealing device, recently attracts more and more attentions in academic circles and engineering fields at home and abroad. Research on finger seals has been extensively developed, especially on leakage and wear performances under dynamic conditions. However, it is a pity that the work on finger seals has been limited with a single approach that is improving the performance by structural optimization; in addition, the technology of dynamic analysis on finger seals is weak. Aiming at the problems mentioned above, a distributed mass equivalent dynamic model of finger seals considering the coupling effect of overlaid laminates is established in the present paper, the dynamic performance of 2.5 dimension C/C composite finger seal is analyzed with the model, and then the effects of fiber bundle density and fiber bundle preparation direction on finger seal’s dynamic performance are discussed, as well as compared with those of Co-based alloy finger seal. The current work is about dynamic analysis of finger seals and application of C/C composite in this paper may have much academic significance and many engineering values for improving research level of finger seal dynamics and exploring feasibility of C/C composite being used for finger seals.

  4. A Parametric Modelling Method for Dexterous Finger Reachable Workspaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhen Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The well-known algorithms, such as the graphic method, analytical method or numerical method, have some defects when modelling the dexterous finger workspace, which is a significant kinematical feature of dexterous hands and valuable for grasp planning, motion control and mechanical design. A novel modelling method with convenient and parametric performances is introduced to generate the dexterous-finger reachable workspace. This method constructs the geometric topology of the dexterous-finger reachable workspace, and uses a joint feature recognition algorithm to extract the kinematical parameters of the dexterous finger. Compared with graphic, analytical and numerical methods, this parametric modelling method can automatically and conveniently construct a more vivid workspace's forms and contours of the dexterous finger. The main contribution of this paper is that a workspace-modelling tool with high interactive efficiency is developed for designers to precisely visualize the dexterous-finger reachable workspace, which is valuable for analysing the flexibility of the dexterous finger.

  5. Finger Search in the Implicit Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Nielsen, Jesper Asbjørn Sindahl; Truelsen, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    , and delete in times $\\mathcal{O}(q(t))$, $\\mathcal{O}(q^{-1}(\\log n)\\log n)$, $\\mathcal{O}(\\log n)$, and $\\mathcal{O}(\\log n)$, respectively, for any q(t) = Ω(logt). Finally we show that the search operation must take Ω(logn) time for the special case where the finger is always changed to the element...

  6. Angiolipoma of index finger: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Durmus

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Angiolipomas are usually found in the upper extremities, shoulder and back. They are seldom found in the hands, face and lower extremities. They usually occur as painful soft tissue masses or they may compress the neighboring structures (e.g. nerves depending on the size and location. In this report we present an angiolipoma case located in the finger and discuss related recent cases described in the literature. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(1.000: 22-25

  7. Time, touch and temperature affect perceived finger position and ownership in the grasp illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héroux, Martin E; Bayle, Nicolas; Butler, Annie A; Gandevia, Simon C

    2018-01-15

    The brain's internal model of the body and the sense of body ownership are fundamental to interaction with the world. It is thought that temporally congruent, repetitive multisensory stimuli are required to elicit a sense of body ownership. Here we investigate the ability of static cutaneous stimuli - passively grasping an artificial finger - to induce body ownership and alter perceived body position; we also investigate how physical characteristics of grasped objects alter these senses. We show that static cutaneous stimuli can alter perceived body position and induce an illusion of ownership and also that signals of temperature, texture and shape of grasped finger-sized objects influence body ownership. Thus, these aspects of human proprioception can be altered by a single sustained sensory stimulus and by the physical characteristics of held objects. Perceived body position and ownership are fundamental to our ability to sense and interact with the world. Previous work indicates that temporally congruent, repetitive multisensory stimuli are needed to alter the sense of body ownership. In the present study 30 subjects passively grasped an artificial rubber finger with their left index and thumb while their right index finger, located 12 cm below, was lightly clamped. Fingers with varied physical characteristics were also passively grasped to determine how these characteristics influenced perceived body position and ownership. Subjects immediately felt their hands to be 5.3 cm [3.4-7.3] (mean [95%CI]) closer, a feeling that remained after 3 min (6.0 cm [4.5-7.5]). By the end of the trial, perceived ownership increased by 1.2 [0.6-1.9] points on a 7-point Likert scale, with the group average moving from 'neither agree or disagree' at the start to 'somewhat agree' at the end. Compared to grasping a control rubber finger, grasping a cold, rough, oddly shaped or rectangular shaped finger-like object reduced perceived ownership. These results provide new insights

  8. Pacifier Use, Finger Sucking, and Infant Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rachel; Moore, Melisa; Mindell, Jodi A

    2016-01-01

    Few studies to date have investigated the relationship between pacifier use or finger sucking and infant sleep. One hundred and four mothers of infants (ages 0-11 months) completed the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire (BISQ). Infants who engaged in finger sucking had fewer night wakings and longer stretches of nighttime sleep, although less daytime sleep. There were no significant differences in sleep patterns between pacifier users and infants who did not engage in nonnutritive sucking. Furthermore, no significant differences were found across groups for sleep ecology, including parental involvement at bedtime and following night wakings. Finally, infants were consistently able to retrieve their pacifiers independently by 7 months of age, although this did not appear to be associated with sleep outcomes. Results suggest that when parents are deciding whether to give their infant a pacifier, sleep may not be a critical factor. In contrast, parents of finger and thumb suckers should be reassured that this nonnutritive sucking is beneficial to sleep, at least in the first year of life.

  9. Visual Foraging With Fingers and Eye Gaze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ómar I. Jóhannesson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A popular model of the function of selective visual attention involves search where a single target is to be found among distractors. For many scenarios, a more realistic model involves search for multiple targets of various types, since natural tasks typically do not involve a single target. Here we present results from a novel multiple-target foraging paradigm. We compare finger foraging where observers cancel a set of predesignated targets by tapping them, to gaze foraging where observers cancel items by fixating them for 100 ms. During finger foraging, for most observers, there was a large difference between foraging based on a single feature, where observers switch easily between target types, and foraging based on a conjunction of features where observers tended to stick to one target type. The pattern was notably different during gaze foraging where these condition differences were smaller. Two conclusions follow: (a The fact that a sizeable number of observers (in particular during gaze foraging had little trouble switching between different target types raises challenges for many prominent theoretical accounts of visual attention and working memory. (b While caveats must be noted for the comparison of gaze and finger foraging, the results suggest that selection mechanisms for gaze and pointing have different operational constraints.

  10. Palm to Finger Ulnar Sensory Nerve Conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidowich, Eduardo; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M; Orsini, Marco; Pupe, Camila; Pessoa, Bruno; Bittar, Caroline; Pires, Karina Lebeis; Bruno, Carlos; Coutinho, Bruno Mattos; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Ribeiro, Pedro; Velasques, Bruna; Bittencourt, Juliana; Teixeira, Silmar; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2015-12-29

    Ulnar neuropathy at the wrist (UNW) is rare, and always challenging to localize. To increase the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of UNW many authors advocate the stimulation of the ulnar nerve (UN) in the segment of the wrist and palm. The focus of this paper is to present a modified and simplified technique of sensory nerve conduction (SNC) of the UN in the wrist and palm segments and demonstrate the validity of this technique in the study of five cases of type III UNW. The SNC of UN was performed antidromically with fifth finger ring recording electrodes. The UN was stimulated 14 cm proximal to the active electrode (the standard way) and 7 cm proximal to the active electrode. The normal data from amplitude and conduction velocity (CV) ratios between the palm to finger and wrist to finger segments were obtained. Normal amplitude ratio was 1.4 to 0.76. Normal CV ratio was 0.8 to 1.23.We found evidences of abnormal SNAP amplitude ratio or substantial slowing of UN sensory fibers across the wrist in 5 of the 5 patients with electrophysiological-definite type III UNW.

  11. Palm to finger ulnar sensory nerve conduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Davidowich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ulnar neuropathy at the wrist (UNW is rare, and always challenging to localize. To increase the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of UNW many authors advocate the stimulation of the ulnar nerve (UN in the segment of the wrist and palm. The focus of this paper is to present a modified and simplified technique of sensory nerve conduction (SNC of the UN in the wrist and palm segments and demonstrate the validity of this technique in the study of five cases of type III UNW. The SNC of UN was performed antidromically with fifth finger ring recording electrodes. The UN was stimulated 14 cm proximal to the active electrode (the standard way and 7 cm proximal to the active electrode. The normal data from amplitude and conduction velocity (CV ratios between the palm to finger and wrist to finger segments were obtained. Normal amplitude ratio was 1.4 to 0.76. Normal CV ratio was 0.8 to 1.23.We found evidences of abnormal SNAP amplitude ratio or substantial slowing of UN sensory fibers across the wrist in 5 of the 5 patients with electrophysiological-definite type III UNW.

  12. Finger Thickening during Extra-Heavy Oil Waterflooding: Simulation and Interpretation Using Pore-Scale Modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Regaieg

    Full Text Available Although thermal methods have been popular and successfully applied in heavy oil recovery, they are often found to be uneconomic or impractical. Therefore, alternative production protocols are being actively pursued and interesting options include water injection and polymer flooding. Indeed, such techniques have been successfully tested in recent laboratory investigations, where X-ray scans performed on homogeneous rock slabs during water flooding experiments have shown evidence of an interesting new phenomenon-post-breakthrough, highly dendritic water fingers have been observed to thicken and coalesce, forming braided water channels that improve sweep efficiency. However, these experimental studies involve displacement mechanisms that are still poorly understood, and so the optimization of this process for eventual field application is still somewhat problematic. Ideally, a combination of two-phase flow experiments and simulations should be put in place to help understand this process more fully. To this end, a fully dynamic network model is described and used to investigate finger thickening during water flooding of extra-heavy oils. The displacement physics has been implemented at the pore scale and this is followed by a successful benchmarking exercise of the numerical simulations against the groundbreaking micromodel experiments reported by Lenormand and co-workers in the 1980s. A range of slab-scale simulations has also been carried out and compared with the corresponding experimental observations. We show that the model is able to replicate finger architectures similar to those observed in the experiments and go on to reproduce and interpret, for the first time to our knowledge, finger thickening following water breakthrough. We note that this phenomenon has been observed here in homogeneous (i.e. un-fractured media: the presence of fractures could be expected to exacerbate such fingering still further. Finally, we examine the impact of

  13. Image Quality Enhancement Using the Direction and Thickness of Vein Lines for Finger-Vein Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ho Park

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the increased emphasis placed on the protection of privacy, biometric recognition systems using physical or behavioural characteristics such as fingerprints, facial characteristics, iris and finger-vein patterns or the voice have been introduced in applications including door access control, personal certification, Internet banking and ATM machines. Among these, finger-vein recognition is advantageous in that it involves the use of inexpensive and small devices that are difficult to counterfeit. In general, finger-vein recognition systems capture images by using near infrared (NIR illumination in conjunction with a camera. However, such systems can face operational difficulties, since the scattering of light from the skin can make capturing a clear image difficult. To solve this problem, we proposed new image quality enhancement method that measures the direction and thickness of vein lines. This effort represents novel research in four respects. First, since vein lines are detected in input images based on eight directional profiles of a grey image instead of binarized images, the detection error owing to the non-uniform illumination of the finger area can be reduced. Second, our method adaptively determines a Gabor filter for the optimal direction and width on the basis of the estimated direction and thickness of a detected vein line. Third, by applying this optimized Gabor filter, a clear vein image can be obtained. Finally, the further processing of the morphological operation is applied in the Gabor filtered image and the resulting image is combined with the original one, through which finger-vein image of a higher quality is obtained. Experimental results from application of our proposed image enhancement method show that the equal error rate (EER of finger-vein recognition decreases to approximately 0.4% in the case of a local binary pattern-based recognition and to approximately 0.3% in the case of a wavelet transform

  14. Fingering patterns during droplet impact on heated surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavari, Mohammad; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Tran, Tuan

    2015-05-07

    A droplet impinging on a sufficiently heated surface may be cushioned by its own vapor and never touch the surface. In previous work, the transition to this so-called Leidenfrost regime was only qualitatively described as an abrupt change between the "contact-boiling" regime, which is characterized by violent boiling behaviors, and the Leidenfrost state. We reveal that the wetted area can be used as a quantity that quantitatively characterizes this transition and it is a continuous function of surface temperature up to the Leidenfrost regime. The wetted area exhibits fingering patterns caused by vapor flow under the liquid. This underlines the crucial role of vapor transport in the Leidenfrost transition and unveils the physical mechanism of the transition to the Leidenfrost regime.

  15. "Finger" structure of tiles in CMS Endcap Hadron Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, Sergey; Danilov, Mikhail; Emeliantchik, Igor; Ershov, Yuri; Golutvin, Igor; Grinyov, B.V; Ibragimova, Elvira; Levchuk, Leonid; Litomin, Aliaksandr; Makankin, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Nuritdinov, I; Popov, V.F; Rusinov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Sorokin, Pavlo; Tarkovskiy, Evgueni; Tashmetov, A; Vasiliev, S.E; Yuldashev, Bekhzod; Zamyatin, Nikolay; Zhmurin, Petro

    2015-01-01

    Two CMS Endcap hadron calorimeters (HE) have been in operation for several years and contributed substantially to the success of the CMS Physics Program. The HE calorimeter suffered more from the radiation than it had been anticipated because of rapid degradation of scintillator segments (tiles) which have a high radiation flux of secondary particles. Some investigations of scintillators have shown that the degradation of plastic scintillator increases significantly at low dose rates. A proposal to upgrade up-grade the HE calorimeter has been prepared to provide a solution for survivability of the future LHC at higher luminosity and higher energy. A finger-strip plastic scintillator option has many advantages and is a lower cost alternative to keep the excellent HE performance at high luminosity. Measurements have been performed and this method has proved to be a good upgrade strategy.

  16. [Safety in the Microbiology laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo-Molinero, Estrella; Alados, Juan Carlos; de la Pedrosa, Elia Gómez G; Leiva, José; Pérez, José L

    2015-01-01

    The normal activity in the laboratory of microbiology poses different risks - mainly biological - that can affect the health of their workers, visitors and the community. Routine health examinations (surveillance and prevention), individual awareness of self-protection, hazard identification and risk assessment of laboratory procedures, the adoption of appropriate containment measures, and the use of conscientious microbiological techniques allow laboratory to be a safe place, as records of laboratory-acquired infections and accidents show. Training and information are the cornerstones for designing a comprehensive safety plan for the laboratory. In this article, the basic concepts and the theoretical background on laboratory safety are reviewed, including the main legal regulations. Moreover, practical guidelines are presented for each laboratory to design its own safety plan according its own particular characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  17. [Post-mortem microbiology analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, Amparo; Alberola, Juan; Cohen, Marta Cecilia

    2013-12-01

    Post-mortem microbiology is useful in both clinical and forensic autopsies, and allows a suspected infection to be confirmed. Indeed, it is routinely applied to donor studies in the clinical setting, as well as in sudden and unexpected death in the forensic field. Implementation of specific sampling techniques in autopsy can minimize the possibility of contamination, making interpretation of the results easier. Specific interpretation criteria for post-mortem cultures, the use of molecular diagnosis, and its fusion with molecular biology and histopathology have led to post-mortem microbiology playing a major role in autopsy. Multidisciplinary work involving microbiologists, pathologists, and forensic physicians will help to improve the achievements of post-mortem microbiology, prevent infectious diseases, and contribute to a healthier population. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of fingers in number processing in young children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eLafay

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between finger counting and numerical processing in 4- to 7-year-old children. Children were assessed on a variety of numerical tasks and we examined the correlations between their rates of success and their frequency of finger use in a counting task. We showed that children’s performance on finger pattern comparison and identification tasks did not correlate with the frequency of finger use. However, this last variable correlated with the percentages of correct responses in an enumeration task (i.e., Give-N task, even when the age of children was entered as a covariate in the analysis. Despite this correlation, we showed that some children who never used their fingers in the counting task were able to perform optimally in the enumeration task. Overall, our results support the conclusion that finger counting is useful but not necessary to develop accurate symbolic numerical skills. Moreover, our results suggest that the use of fingers in a counting task is related to the ability of children in a dynamic enumeration task but not to static tasks involving recognition or comparison of finger patterns. Therefore, it could be that the link between fingers and numbers remain circumscribed to counting tasks and do not extent to static finger montring situations.

  19. The role of fingers in number processing in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafay, Anne; Thevenot, Catherine; Castel, Caroline; Fayol, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between finger counting and numerical processing in 4-7-year-old children. Children were assessed on a variety of numerical tasks and we examined the correlations between their rates of success and their frequency of finger use in a counting task. We showed that children's performance on finger pattern comparison and identification tasks did not correlate with the frequency of finger use. However, this last variable correlated with the percentages of correct responses in an enumeration task (i.e., Give-N task), even when the age of children was entered as a covariate in the analysis. Despite this correlation, we showed that some children who never used their fingers in the counting task were able to perform optimally in the enumeration task. Overall, our results support the conclusion that finger counting is useful but not necessary to develop accurate symbolic numerical skills. Moreover, our results suggest that the use of fingers in a counting task is related to the ability of children in a dynamic enumeration task but not to static tasks involving recognition or comparison of finger patterns. Therefore, it could be that the link between fingers and numbers remain circumscribed to counting tasks and do not extent to static finger montring situations.

  20. Speed invariance of independent control of finger movements in pianists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soechting, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Independent control of finger movements characterizes skilled motor behaviors such as tool use and musical performance. The purpose of the present study was to identify the effect of movement frequency (tempo) on individuated finger movements in piano playing. Joint motion at the digits was recorded while 5 expert pianists were playing 30 excerpts from musical pieces with different fingering and key locations either at a predetermined normal tempo or as fast as possible. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis using an expectation-maximization algorithm determined three distinct patterns of finger movement coordination for a keypress with each of the index, middle, ring, and little fingers at each of the two tempi. The finger kinematics of each coordination pattern was overall similar across the tempi. Tone sequences assigned into each cluster were also similar for both tempi. A linear regression analysis determined no apparent difference in the amount of movement covariation between the striking and nonstriking fingers at both metacarpo-phalangeal and proximal-interphalangeal joints across the two tempi, which indicated no effect of tempo on independent finger movements in piano playing. In addition, the standard deviation of interkeystroke interval across strokes did not differ between the two tempi, indicating maintenance of rhythmic accuracy of keystrokes. Strong temporal constraints on finger movements during piano playing may underlie the maintained independent control of fingers over a wider range of tempi, a feature being likely to be specific to skilled pianists. PMID:22815403

  1. Microbiology Learning and Education Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarner, Jeannette; Niño, Silvia M

    2016-05-01

    The ubiquity of devices that connect to the Internet has exploded, allowing for easy dissemination of information. Many teachers from kindergarten to universities use the information obtained online or post material they want their students to access. Online media readily places articles, books, videos, and games at our fingertips. The public in general also gathers health information from the Internet. The following review will explore what has been published regarding microbiology education and learning online and the use of electronic media by microbiologists for scientific purposes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. The Role of Vision in the Development of Finger-Number Interactions: Finger-Counting and Finger-Montring in Blind Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crollen, Virginie; Mahe, Rachel; Collignon, Olivier; Seron, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that the use of the fingers may play a functional role in the development of a mature counting system. However, the role of developmental vision in the elaboration of a finger numeral representation remains unexplored. In the current study, 14 congenitally blind children and 14 matched sighted controls undertook…

  3. Prosthetic finger phalanges with lifelike skin compliance for low-force social touching interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Shuzhi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prosthetic arms and hands that can be controlled by the user's electromyography (EMG signals are emerging. Eventually, these advanced prosthetic devices will be expected to touch and be touched by other people. As realistic as they may look, the currently available prosthetic hands have physical properties that are still far from the characteristics of human skins because they are much stiffer. In this paper, different configurations of synthetic finger phalanges have been investigated for their skin compliance behaviour and have been compared with the phalanges of the human fingers and a phalanx from a commercially available prosthetic hand. Methods Handshake tests were performed to identify which areas on the human hand experience high contact forces. After these areas were determined, experiments were done on selected areas using an indenting probe to obtain the force-displacement curves. Finite element simulations were used to compare the force-displacement results of the synthetic finger phalanx designs with that of the experimental results from the human and prosthetic finger phalanges. The simulation models were used to investigate the effects of (a varying the internal topology of the finger phalanx and (b varying different materials for the internal and external layers. Results and Conclusions During handshake, the high magnitudes of contact forces were observed at the areas where the full grasping enclosure of the other person's hand can be achieved. From these areas, the middle phalanges of the (a little, (b ring, and (c middle fingers were selected. The indentation experiments on these areas showed that a 2 N force corresponds to skin tissue displacements of more than 2 mm. The results from the simulation model show that introducing an open pocket with 2 mm height on the internal structure of synthetic finger phalanges increased the skin compliance of the silicone material to 235% and the polyurethane material to

  4. Neural control of finger movement via intracortical brain-machine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Z T; Schroeder, K E; Vu, P P; Bullard, A J; Tat, D M; Nu, C S; Vaskov, A; Nason, S R; Thompson, D E; Bentley, J N; Patil, P G; Chestek, C A

    2017-12-01

    Intracortical brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) are a promising source of prosthesis control signals for individuals with severe motor disabilities. Previous BMI studies have primarily focused on predicting and controlling whole-arm movements; precise control of hand kinematics, however, has not been fully demonstrated. Here, we investigate the continuous decoding of precise finger movements in rhesus macaques. In order to elicit precise and repeatable finger movements, we have developed a novel behavioral task paradigm which requires the subject to acquire virtual fingertip position targets. In the physical control condition, four rhesus macaques performed this task by moving all four fingers together in order to acquire a single target. This movement was equivalent to controlling the aperture of a power grasp. During this task performance, we recorded neural spikes from intracortical electrode arrays in primary motor cortex. Using a standard Kalman filter, we could reconstruct continuous finger movement offline with an average correlation of ρ  =  0.78 between actual and predicted position across four rhesus macaques. For two of the monkeys, this movement prediction was performed in real-time to enable direct brain control of the virtual hand. Compared to physical control, neural control performance was slightly degraded; however, the monkeys were still able to successfully perform the task with an average target acquisition rate of 83.1%. The monkeys' ability to arbitrarily specify fingertip position was also quantified using an information throughput metric. During brain control task performance, the monkeys achieved an average 1.01 bits s -1 throughput, similar to that achieved in previous studies which decoded upper-arm movements to control computer cursors using a standard Kalman filter. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of brain control of finger-level fine motor skills. We believe that these results represent an important step

  5. Neural control of finger movement via intracortical brain-machine interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Z. T.; Schroeder, K. E.; Vu, P. P.; Bullard, A. J.; Tat, D. M.; Nu, C. S.; Vaskov, A.; Nason, S. R.; Thompson, D. E.; Bentley, J. N.; Patil, P. G.; Chestek, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Objective. Intracortical brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) are a promising source of prosthesis control signals for individuals with severe motor disabilities. Previous BMI studies have primarily focused on predicting and controlling whole-arm movements; precise control of hand kinematics, however, has not been fully demonstrated. Here, we investigate the continuous decoding of precise finger movements in rhesus macaques. Approach. In order to elicit precise and repeatable finger movements, we have developed a novel behavioral task paradigm which requires the subject to acquire virtual fingertip position targets. In the physical control condition, four rhesus macaques performed this task by moving all four fingers together in order to acquire a single target. This movement was equivalent to controlling the aperture of a power grasp. During this task performance, we recorded neural spikes from intracortical electrode arrays in primary motor cortex. Main results. Using a standard Kalman filter, we could reconstruct continuous finger movement offline with an average correlation of ρ  =  0.78 between actual and predicted position across four rhesus macaques. For two of the monkeys, this movement prediction was performed in real-time to enable direct brain control of the virtual hand. Compared to physical control, neural control performance was slightly degraded; however, the monkeys were still able to successfully perform the task with an average target acquisition rate of 83.1%. The monkeys’ ability to arbitrarily specify fingertip position was also quantified using an information throughput metric. During brain control task performance, the monkeys achieved an average 1.01 bits s-1 throughput, similar to that achieved in previous studies which decoded upper-arm movements to control computer cursors using a standard Kalman filter. Significance. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of brain control of finger-level fine motor skills. We believe

  6. [The modern microbiology in the clinical managing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal Román, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The tuberculosis is one of the most important and mortal diseases of the world. The microbiological confirmatory diagnosis and the microbiological therapeutic orientation are fundamental nowadays in the tuberculosis in AIDS and in the Resistant tuberculosis. They are described throughout the time by the classic Microbiology: From 1882 to final 20th century (130 years). With the modern current Microbiology: In the beginning of the 21st century (20-30 years). And as will be done with the future Microbiology: From the years 2020-30. The important advances are outlined in the modern and future clinical microbiology, for the control of the Tuberculosis.

  7. Torque Control of Underactuated Tendon-driven Robotic Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J. (Inventor); Wampler, Charles W. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic system includes a robot having a total number of degrees of freedom (DOF) equal to at least n, an underactuated tendon-driven finger driven by n tendons and n DOF, the finger having at least two joints, being characterized by an asymmetrical joint radius in one embodiment. A controller is in communication with the robot, and controls actuation of the tendon-driven finger using force control. Operating the finger with force control on the tendons, rather than position control, eliminates the unconstrained slack-space that would have otherwise existed. The controller may utilize the asymmetrical joint radii to independently command joint torques. A method of controlling the finger includes commanding either independent or parameterized joint torques to the controller to actuate the fingers via force control on the tendons.

  8. Microbiology as if Bird Watching

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 10. Microbiology as if Bird Watching. Milind G Watve. Classroom Volume 1 Issue 10 October 1996 pp 78-81. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/10/0078-0081. Author Affiliations.

  9. Modern industrial microbiology and biotechnology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Okafor, Nduka

    2007-01-01

    ... and cells, site-directed mutation and metabolic engineering. Simultaneously, microbiology has addressed itself to some current problems such as the fight against cancer by the production of anti-tumor antibiotics; it has changed the traditional practice in a number of areas: for example the deep sea has now joined the soil as the medium for the search for ...

  10. Veterinary Microbiology, 3rd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterinary Microbiology, Third Edition is organized into four sections and begins with an updated and expanded introductory section on infectious disease pathogenesis, diagnosis and clinical management. The second section covers bacterial and fungal pathogens, and the third section describes viral d...

  11. Soil Microbiology, Ecology, and Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 4th edition of Soil Microbiology, Ecology, and Biochemistry Edited by Eldor Paul continues in the vein of the 3rd edition by providing an excellent, broad-reaching introduction to soil biology. The new edition improves on the previous by providing extensive supplementary materials, links to outs...

  12. MICROBIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF CONFECTIONARY PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubomíra Juhaniaková

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine microbiological quality of confectionery products. In confectionery products microbiological parameters: total count of bacteria, coliforms bacteria,mesophilic aerobes bacteria and microscopic filamentous fungi were observed. The confectionery products were evaluated: Kremeš and Venčekcake. For microbiological tests 20 samples of confectionery products were used. The numbers of total count of bacteria ranged from 3.29 log CFU.g-1, the number of mesophilic aerobes bacteria ranged from 1.86 to 2.85 log CFU.g-1, coliforms bacteria in confectionery products ranged from 0to 2.06CFU.g-1and the number of microscopic fungi ranged from 1.13 to 1.96CFU.g-1. The samples of cake prom private production showed better microbiological quality as samples from market production. All investigated samples of confectionary products were inaccordance with the Codex Alimentarius of the Slovak Republic.

  13. Aspergillus Sydowi Infection of Human Finger Nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Barde

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of Aspergillus sydowi infection of left middle finger nail is described ′ The presence of fungal hypae with phialids and spores on direct microscopy as well as in culture, the colour of the sub-ungual mass of the nail resembling the colour of the fungus in, culture′ repeated isolations of A sydowi from the diseased tissue along with the absence of any established pathogenic species in the specimen are taken as evidences that this fungus was invading the nail tissue.

  14. Finger Injuries in Football and Rugby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzinga, Kate E; Chung, Kevin C

    2017-02-01

    Football and rugby athletes are at increased risk of finger injuries given the full-contact nature of these sports. Some players may return to play early with protective taping, splinting, and casting. Others require a longer rehabilitation period and prolonged time away from the field. The treating hand surgeon must weigh the benefits of early return to play for the current season and future playing career against the risks of reinjury and long-term morbidity, including post-traumatic arthritis and decreased range of motion and strength. Each player must be comprehensively assessed and managed with an individualized treatment plan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Finger Clubbing Caused by Herbal Tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifudin Rashiq

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Clubbing of the fingers is often taken to be a sign of serious illness. Its discovery, particularly if there are associated symptoms in the cardiovascular, respiratory or gastrointestinal systems, usually leads to exhaustive investigation. A case is presented in which the etiology of clubbing was found only when a new history of heavy ingestion of herbal tea was obtained, extensive work-up having previously been unhelpful. Other cases appearing in the English-language literature are cited, some universal etiological associations are described, and an attempt is made to explain the phenomenon, based on a recent theory of the cause of clubbing.

  16. Genome editing with engineered zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urnov, Fyodor D; Rebar, Edward J; Holmes, Michael C; Zhang, H Steve; Gregory, Philip D

    2010-09-01

    Reverse genetics in model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster, Arabidopsis thaliana, zebrafish and rats, efficient genome engineering in human embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells, targeted integration in crop plants, and HIV resistance in immune cells - this broad range of outcomes has resulted from the application of the same core technology: targeted genome cleavage by engineered, sequence-specific zinc finger nucleases followed by gene modification during subsequent repair. Such 'genome editing' is now established in human cells and a number of model organisms, thus opening the door to a range of new experimental and therapeutic possibilities.

  17. Discrimination of Finger Area of Somatosensory Cortex by NIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingdi; Hayami, Takehito; Iramina, Keiji

    We carried out a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) study to observe the hemodynamic responses associated with cortical activation in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) by finger electrical stimulation. We examined whether NIRS can assist in investigating the somatotopic arrangement of fingers on the SI hand area. We found that although relatively low in spatial resolution, NIRS can to some extent help to discriminate the representations of thumb and ring finger on the SI hand area.

  18. Sensing DNA damage by PARP-like fingers

    OpenAIRE

    Petrucco, Stefania

    2003-01-01

    PARP-like zinc fingers are protein modules, initially described as nick-sensors of poly(ADP-ribosyl)-polymerases (PARPs), which are found at the N-terminus of different DNA repair enzymes. I chose to study the role of PARP-like fingers in AtZDP, a 3′ DNA phosphoesterase, which is the only known enzyme provided with three such finger domains. Here I show that PARP-like fingers can maintain AtZDP onto damaged DNA sites without interfering with its DNA end repair functions. Damage recognition by...

  19. Tetanus following replantation of an amputated finger: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Kenji; Murakami, Chikako; Fujioka, Masaki

    2012-10-08

    Tetanus is an infectious disease caused by tetanus toxin produced by Clostridium tetani and induces severe neurological manifestations. We treated a patient who developed tetanus during hospitalization for replantation of an amputated finger. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published case report of such an entity. A 49-year-old Japanese man had an amputation of his right middle finger at the distal interphalangeal joint region in an accident at work. His middle finger was successfully replanted, but his fingertip was partially necrotized because of crushing and so additional reconstruction with a reverse digital arterial flap was performed 15 days after the injury. Tetanus developed 21 days after replantation of the middle finger, but symptoms remitted via rapid diagnosis and treatment. In replantation after finger trauma with exposure of nerve and blood vessel bundles, concern over injuring nerves and blood vessels may prevent irrigation and debridement from being performed sufficiently; these treatments may have been insufficiently performed in this patient. It is likely that the replanted middle finger partially adhered, and Clostridium tetani colonized the partially necrotized region. Even when there is only limited soil contamination, administration of tetanus toxoid and anti-tetanus immunoglobulin is necessary when the fingers are injured outdoors and the finger nerves and blood vessels are exposed. The drugs should be administered just after replantation if the finger has been amputated. However, if clinicians pay attention to the possibility of tetanus development, treatment can be rapidly initiated.

  20. Tetanus following replantation of an amputated finger: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashida Kenji

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Tetanus is an infectious disease caused by tetanus toxin produced by Clostridium tetani and induces severe neurological manifestations. We treated a patient who developed tetanus during hospitalization for replantation of an amputated finger. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published case report of such an entity. Case presentation A 49-year-old Japanese man had an amputation of his right middle finger at the distal interphalangeal joint region in an accident at work. His middle finger was successfully replanted, but his fingertip was partially necrotized because of crushing and so additional reconstruction with a reverse digital arterial flap was performed 15 days after the injury. Tetanus developed 21 days after replantation of the middle finger, but symptoms remitted via rapid diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions In replantation after finger trauma with exposure of nerve and blood vessel bundles, concern over injuring nerves and blood vessels may prevent irrigation and debridement from being performed sufficiently; these treatments may have been insufficiently performed in this patient. It is likely that the replanted middle finger partially adhered, and Clostridium tetani colonized the partially necrotized region. Even when there is only limited soil contamination, administration of tetanus toxoid and anti-tetanus immunoglobulin is necessary when the fingers are injured outdoors and the finger nerves and blood vessels are exposed. The drugs should be administered just after replantation if the finger has been amputated. However, if clinicians pay attention to the possibility of tetanus development, treatment can be rapidly initiated.

  1. Concomitant presentation of carpal tunnel syndrome and trigger finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollstein Ronit A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS and trigger finger (TF are common conditions that may occur in the same patient. The etiology of most cases is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rate of concomitant occurrence of these two conditions at presentation and to compare the concomitant occurrence in normal and diabetic patients. Methods One-hundred and eight consecutive subjects presenting to our hand clinic with CTS and/or TF were evaluated. The existence of both of these conditions was documented through a standard history and physical examination. The definition of trigger finger was determined by tenderness over the A1 pulley, catching, clicking or locking. CTS was defined in the presence of at least two of the following: numbness and tingling in a median nerve distribution, motor and sensory nerve loss (median nerve, a positive Tinel's or Phalen's test and positive electrophysiologic studies. Results The average age of the participants was 62.2 ± 13.6 years. Sixty-seven patients presented with symptoms and signs of CTS (62%, 41 (38% subjects with signs and symptoms of TF. Following further evaluation, 66 patients (61% had evidence of concomitant CTS and TF. Fifty-seven patients (53% of all study patients had diabetes. The rate of subjects with diabetes was similar among the groups (p = 0.8, Chi-square test. Conclusion CTS and TF commonly occur together at presentation though the symptoms of one condition will be more prominent. Our results support a common local mechanism that may be unrelated to the presence of diabetes. We recommend evaluation for both conditions at the time of presentation.

  2. The effects of strength training on finger strength and hand dexterity in healthy elderly individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Olafsdottir, Halla B.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of 6 wk of strength training on maximal pressing (MVC) force, indexes of finger individuation (enslaving), and performance in accurate force production tests and in functional hand tests in healthy, physically fit, elderly individuals. Twelve participants (average age 76 yr) exercised with both hands. One of the hands exercised by pressing with the proximal phalanges (targeting mainly intrinsic hand muscles), whereas the other hand exercised by pressing with the fin...

  3. Determination of aerial microbiological contamination in scholastic sports environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacarro, C; Picco, A M; Grisoli, P; Rodolfi, M

    2003-01-01

    To assess the microbiological indoor air quality (IAQ) of high school and college gyms during physical training lessons and to evaluate the effective microbiological exposure of students. Air samples from 11 high school and college gyms of Pavia, Italy were collected. Total bacterial counts, total fungal counts and characterization of fungal taxa were determined. Air quality was evaluated using three microbiological contamination indices: the global index of microbiological contamination per m3 (GIMC per m3), the index of mesophilic bacterial contamination (IMC) and the amplification index (AI). This work testifies that air contamination in indoor gyms is always superior to that of the outdoor environment. Nevertheless, students are exposed to relatively low concentrations of airborne micro-organisms. The highest values of fungal counts and GIMC per m3 (>14,661) were observed between April and October when the central heating systems were switched off. The lowest fungal counts were detected in modern buildings equipped with forced ventilation systems. From qualitative aeromycological studies, 45 fungal taxa were identified, and different potentially allergenic species were isolated. The standardization of air sampling methods and the correct evaluation of aeromicrobiological results allow the classification of indoor air healthiness. The proposed microbiological contamination indices together with the characterization of airborne fungal taxa are useful tools for detailed description of IAQ.

  4. Cholinergic vasodilator mechanism in human fingers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffman, J.D.; Cohen, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    The effect of a cholinergic agonist and antagonist on finger blood flow (FBF) was studied in 10 normal subjects. Total finger blood flow was measured by venous occlusion, air plethysmography, and capillary blood flow (FCF) by the disappearance rate of a radio-isotope from a fingertip injection. Methacholine in doses of 10-80 ..mu..g/min was given by constant infusion via a brachial artery catheter. Average FBF and vascular resistance were not significantly affected. However, the half time (t/sub 1/2/) of the disappearance rate decreased from 50.8 +/- 13.4 to 11.1 +/- 1.5 min; a decrease occurred in all subjects. In seven subjects, atropine (0.2 mg) had no affect alone but inhibited the effect of methacholine on FCF and prevented the redness and sweating of the forearm and hand that occurs with this agent. This study demonstrates a muscarinic cholinergic vasodilator mechanism in the fingertip that uniquely increase capillary blood flow.

  5. Dermatoglyphic patterns on fingers and gynecological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Sakineh; Rasouli, Mina

    2018-03-01

    Fingerprints have so far been used for determining the basis of certain malignant diseases, with positive outcomes. Considering the high rates of cancer-related mortality in Iran, this study was conducted for the purpose of examining the dermatoglyphic pattern of fingers in patients with gynecological cancers as compared to healthy people. The present study was conducted on 151 women with gynecological cancers as the case group and 152 healthy women with no history of such cancers as control group. The dematographic details of participants from both control and case groups were collected using a checklist, and the pattern of their fingerprints was prepared and examined. The data were analyzed for their significance using chi-square test and t- test. Odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Dermatoglyphic analysis showed that arch and loop patterns significantly changed in cases group as compared to control. However, the odds ratio suggested that loop pattern in 6 or more fingers might be a risk factor for developing gynecological cancers. Our results showed that there is an association between fingerprint patterns and gynecological cancers and so, dermatoglyphic analysis may aid in the early diagnosis of these cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. New Egyptian Journal of Microbiology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NEJMI) publishes research in all fields of Microbiology. The journal welcomes papers focusing on microbiological and/or immunological studies from medical or pharmaceutical perspectives. Research on bacteria, fungi, viruses, protozoa, algae ...

  7. New Egyptian Journal of Microbiology: Journal Sponsorship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New Egyptian Journal of Microbiology: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > New Egyptian Journal of Microbiology: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Preamble to marine microbiology: Facets and opportunities

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.

    The book titled 'Marine Microbiology: Facets & Opportunities' is an attempt to bring together some facets of marine microbiology as have been made out by many contemporaries in particular from the tropical marine regions. There are 18 contributed...

  9. African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology is an open access journal, published 3 times per annum. It includes original research papers covering all aspects of Medical Microbiology – Bacteriology, Virology, Rickettsiology, Chlamydiology, Mycology, Mycobacteriology, and Actinomycetales, Parasitology, ...

  10. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    There have been three physics meetings since the last CMS week: “physics days” on March 27-29, the Physics/ Trigger week on April 23-27 and the most recent physics days on May 22-24. The main purpose of the March physics days was to finalize the list of “2007 analyses”, i.e. the few topics that the physics groups will concentrate on for the rest of this calendar year. The idea is to carry out a full physics exercise, with CMSSW, for select physics channels which test key features of the physics objects, or represent potential “day 1” physics topics that need to be addressed in advance. The list of these analyses was indeed completed and presented in the plenary meetings. As always, a significant amount of time was also spent in reviewing the status of the physics objects (reconstruction) as well as their usage in the High-Level Trigger (HLT). The major event of the past three months was the first “Physics/Trigger week” in Apri...

  11. Finger-like voids induced by viscous fingering during phase inversion of alumina/PES/NMP suspensions

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Bo

    2012-07-01

    The formation mechanism of phase-inversion ceramic hollow fibre membranes has not been well understood. In this paper, we report on the formation of finger-like macrovoids during non-solvent-induced phase inversion of alumina/PES/NMP suspensions. A membrane structure without such finger-like macrovoids was observed when the suspension was slowly immersed into pure ethanol or a mixture of 70. wt% NMP and 30. wt% water, whereas finger-like macrovoids occurred when the suspension was slid into the non-solvents at higher speeds. We found that the formation process of finger-like macrovoids could be fully or partially reversed when nascent membranes were taken out from water shortly after immersion, depending on the duration of the immersion. Splitting of the fingers during the formation of the macrovoids was also observed during the phase inversion of two alumina/PES/NMP suspensions. These experimental observations were not predicted by current theories of finger-like macrovoid formation in polymer membranes, but appear to mimic the well-known viscous fingering phenomenon. We therefore propose that in the phase inversion of ceramic suspensions, the viscous fingering phenomenon is an important mechanism in the formation of finger-like voids. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Modelling salt finger formation using the Imperial College Ocean Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacTavish, F. P.; Cotter, C. J.; Piggott, M. D.

    2009-04-01

    We present numerical simulations of salt finger formation produced using the Imperial College Ocean Model (ICOM) which is a finite element model using adaptive meshing. Our aim is to validate the model against published data and to develop the capability to simulate salt finger formation using adaptive meshes. Salt fingering is a form of double-diffusion which occurs because heat diffuses more quickly than salt. When an area of warm, salty water overlies an area of colder, fresher water, an initial perturbation can lead to some of the water from the lower layer moving into the top layer. Its temperature then increases more quickly than its salinity, so that the water is less dense than its surroundings and it will rise up more. This process repeats to form salt fingers, with salt fingers also forming in the downward direction. Salt fingers play a role in oceanic mixing, in particular they are responsible for maintaining thermohaline staircases such as the C-SALT staircase which have been observed extensively, particularly in the tropics. The study of salt fingers could therefore improve our understanding of processes in the ocean, and inform the design of subgrid parameterisations in general circulation models. We used the salt finger formation test case of Oezgoekmen et al (1998) in order to validate ICOM. The formation of salt fingers is modelled by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for a two-dimensional rectangular area of Boussinesq fluid, beginning with two layers of water, the top warm and salty and the bottom cold and fresh, with parameters chosen to match the test case of Oezgoekmen et al (1998). The positions of the interfaces between the fingering layer and the mixed layers as well as the finger growth rate and the kinetic energy are plotted against time. The results are compared with those of Oezgoekmen et al (1998). We present results from structured meshes and preliminary results using adaptive meshing.

  13. African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Aims and scope. African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology is the official Journal of African Society for Clinical Microbiology. It publishes original research papers in all aspects of Medical Microbiology, including Bacteriology, Virology Rickettsiology and Chlamydiology, Mycology, ...

  14. 42 CFR 493.821 - Condition: Microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Microbiology. 493.821 Section 493.821 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.821 Condition: Microbiology. The specialty of microbiology includes, for purposes of...

  15. 42 CFR 493.909 - Microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Microbiology. 493.909 Section 493.909 Public Health... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.909 Microbiology. The subspecialties under the specialty of microbiology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are bacteriology...

  16. Experiments and Phase-field Modeling of Hydrate Growth at the Interface of Migrating Gas Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X.; Jimenez-Martinez, J.; Porter, M. L.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2016-12-01

    The fate of methane bubbles escaping from seafloor seeps remains an important research question, as it directly concerns our understanding of the impact of seafloor methane leakage on ocean biogeochemistry. While the physics of rising bubbles in a water column has been studied extensively, the process is poorly understood when the gas bubbles form a hydrate ``crust" during their ascent. Understanding bubble rise, expansion and dissolution under these conditions is essential to determine the fate of bubble plumes of hydrate-forming gases such as methane and carbon dioxide from natural and man-made accidental releases. Here, we first present experimental observations of the dynamics of a bubble of Xenon in a water-filled and pressurized Hele-Shaw cell. The evolution is controlled by two processes: (1) the formation of a hydrate "crust" around the bubble, and (2) viscous fingering from bubble expansion (Figure 1). To reproduce the experimental observations, we propose a phase-field model that describes the nucleation and thickening of a porous solid shell on a moving gas-liquid interface. We design the free energy of the three-phase system (gas-liquid-hydrate) to rigorously account for interfacial effects, mutual solubility, and phase transformations (hydrate formation and disappearance). We introduce a pseudo-plasticity model with large viscosity variations to describe the plate-like rheology of the hydrate shell. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model, which illustrate the emergence of complex "crustal fingering" patterns as a result of gas fingering dynamics modulated by hydrate growth at the interface. Figure caption: Snapshot of the Hele-Shaw cell experiment. As the bubble expands from depressurization of the cell, gas fingers move through the liquid and Xe-hydrate readily forms at the gas-liquid interface, giving rise to complex "crustal fingering" patterns.

  17. Microbiological treatment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of microorganisms which are ubiquitous throughout nature to bring about information of organic and inorganic compounds in radioactive wastes has been recognized. Unlike organic contaminants, metals cannot be destroyed, but must be either removed or converted to a stable form. Radionuclides and toxic metals in wastes may be present initially in soluble form or, after disposal may be converted to a soluble form by chemical or microbiological processes. The key microbiological reactions include (i) oxidation/reduction; (ii) change in pH and Eh which affects the valence state and solubility of the metal; (iii) production of sequestering agents; and (iv) bioaccumulation. All of these processes can mobilize or stabilize metals in the environment

  18. Revival of Archaeal Methane Microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welte, Cornelia U

    2018-01-01

    The methane concentration in the Earth's atmosphere is rising, and, as methane is a potent greenhouse gas, it contributes considerably to climate change. It is produced by methanogenic archaea that thrive in anoxic habitats and can be oxidized by methane-oxidizing bacteria or archaea. In this Perspective , recent innovations and discoveries in archaeal methane microbiology are discussed and a future outlook on how novel methane-metabolizing archaea might be cultivated is provided.

  19. Microbiological quality of natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, J J; Figueras, M J

    1997-12-01

    Several aspects of the microbiological quality of natural waters, especially recreational waters, have been reviewed. The importance of the water as a vehicle and/or a reservoir of human pathogenic microorganisms is also discussed. In addition, the concepts, types and techniques of microbial indicator and index microorganisms are established. The most important differences between faecal streptococci and enterococci have been discussed, defining the concept and species included. In addition, we have revised the main alternative indicators used to measure the water quality.

  20. Evaluation of the ionizing radiation effects in microbiology, physical and chemical and sensory aspects of ice cream; Avaliacao dos efeitos da radiacao ionizante nos aspectos microbiologicos, fisico-quimicos e sensoriais de sorvetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogovschi, Vladimir Dias

    2015-06-01

    The ice cream is defined as an emulsion of fats and proteins or a mixture of water and sugar, other ingredients may be added provided since they do not affect the product. It is considered a food of high nutritional value, providing lipids, carbohydrates, protein, calcium, phosphorus, and other minerals and vitamins (A, B1, B2, B6, C, D, E and K), and it is considered one of the most important products and higher interest to the dairy industry due to great demand by the consumers. The diseases related to food consumption are considered one of the most significant problems. Several outbreaks related to microbiological contamination of ice cream have been reported in recent decades in Asia, Europe and America. It is believed that the ice cream, as a frozen food, presents no risk to the population health. However, it is considered an excellent environment for the growth of microorganisms due to its composition, pH close to neutrality and long storage period. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microbiological, sensory and physicochemical aspects of ice cream. The ice cream samples were irradiated with gamma rays (60Co) with the doses of LOkGy, 2.0kGy, 3.0kGy and 4.0kGy. The samples intended for the inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538), Escherichia coli (ATCC 11229) and Salmonella abaetetuba (ATCC 35640) have been irradiated with doses of 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0kGy. It can be concluded that the dose of 3.0kGy was adequate to reduce most of the studied microorganisms to undetected levels. The use of gamma radiation affected the texture and the parameters of the colorimetric analyses of the ice cream. The results of the sensorial analyses showed that the better accepted dose was 3.0kGy. (author)

  1. substitute for Zn(II) in zinc fingers?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zinc finger domains consist of sequences of amino acids containing cysteine and histidine residues tetrahedrally coordinated to a zinc ion. The role of zinc in a DNA binding finger was considered purely structural due to the absence of redox chemistry in zinc. However, whether other metals e.g. Co(II) or Cd(II) can substitute ...

  2. Experience of Percutaneous Trigger Finger Release under Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Trigger finger is a common disorder of upper extremity. Majority of the patients can be treated conservatively but some resistant cases eventually need surgery. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of percutaneous trigger finger release under local anesthesia. Subjects and Methods: This is a ...

  3. Pattern of Trigger Finger among Patients Attending a Musculo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Trigger finger is a common finger problem thought to be due to thickening of tendon sheath with or without localized tendon thickening, resulting in a narrowed tunnel for tendon excursion with ultimate restriction of tendon movement. It can be seen in anyone, it is however seen frequently in diabetic patients and ...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device intended... generic type of device includes prostheses that consist of a single flexible across-the-joint component...

  5. Biomimetic finger extension mechanism for soft wearable hand rehabilitation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Heo, Si-Hwan; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2017-07-01

    For the rehabilitation and assistance of the hand functions, wearable devices have been developed, and the interest in tendon driven mechanisms have especially increased since it allows light weight and compact design. The tendon driven hand rehabilitation devices provides grasping force via exo-tendons routed on the dorsal and palmar sides of the hand pulled by remotely located actuators. However, most of the devices were not able to provide natural joint extension sequence of the finger and showed hyperextension of finger joints because the tendons for extension were fixed at the fingertip, concentrating the torque at the distal interphalangeal joint. In this study, a ring-type biomimetic finger extension mechanism was developed, which mimics the origin, structure, and orientation of the extensor tendon. The biomimetic mechanism was evaluated by comparing the motion with voluntary finger extension and the motion made by other conventional tendon driven finger extension mechanisms. The biomimetic extension mechanism provided the same joint extension sequence with voluntary finger extension, and the fully extended posture was most close to the voluntary finger extension among the tendon-driven mechanisms used in the experiments. The joint angle differences between the proposed tendon mechanism and the voluntary finger extension was -1.2 °±3.4 °, -2.9°±2.0°, and -3.1°±8.0° for distal phalangeal, proximal phalangeal, and metacarpo-phalangeal joint, respectively.

  6. A biomechanical study of the finger pulley system during repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirouche, F; Gonzalez, M; Koldoff, J; Tioco, J; Ham, K

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the mechanics of the finger/pulley system when subjected to various excisions and repairs. Several cadaver hands were used to study the finger/pulley's function, finger joint dynamics, and the relationship between tendon excursion and finger joint angles of rotation. By using a method of continuous and simultaneous data acquisition of the entire finger joint's motion, a more detailed analysis was achieved. Our experimental investigation is based on the use of four micro-potentiometers inserted at the finger's joints and a pulley system to simulate tendon excursion. Using this procedure, a detailed kinematic analysis of the entire finger was performed. This included analysis of the intact hand, various pulley excisions, and reconstruction. In addition to introducing a new method of acquisition, a mathematical model was developed for the inverse dynamic analysis of the finger pulley system. From this model, the torques required at the joints for the motion were computed. The results provided new insight into possible ways of characterizing kinematic changes resulting from pulley damage and repair.

  7. Can We Call It "Stinky-finger Syndrome?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Masood; War, Firdous Ahmed; Kumar, Mohit

    2017-01-01

    Many accounts refer to insertion of finger into anus mostly for gratification from stimulation of prostate gland, but index case Mr. M. continued doing this to get rid of constipation that eventually led to feelings of guilt, stinky fingers, not able to defecate normally, and dysphoric emotions. Further research is needed to find out the phenomenology of this condition.

  8. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable amount of progress has been made in Physics since the last CMS Week in June given the exponential growth in the delivered LHC luminosity. The first major milestone was the delivery of a variety of results to the ICHEP international conference held in Paris this July. For this conference, CMS prepared 15 Physics Analysis Summaries on physics objects and 22 Summaries on new and interesting physics measurements that exploited the luminosity recorded by the CMS detector. The challenge was incorporating the largest batch of luminosity that was delivered only days before the conference (300 nb-1 total). The physics covered from this initial running period spanned hadron production measurements, jet production and properties, electroweak vector boson production, and even glimpses of the top quark. Since then, the accumulated integrated luminosity has increased by a factor of more than 100, and all groups have been working tremendously hard on analysing this dataset. The September Physics Week was held ...

  9. In-depth study of DNA binding of Cys2His2 finger domains in testis zinc-finger protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chi Chou

    Full Text Available Previously, we identified that both fingers 1 and 2 in the three Cys2His2 zinc-finger domains (TZD of testis zinc-finger protein specifically bind to its cognate DNA; however, finger 3 is non-sequence-specific. To gain insights into the interaction mechanism, here we further investigated the DNA-binding characteristics of TZD bound to non-specific DNAs and its finger segments bound to cognate DNA. TZD in non-specific DNA binding showed smaller chemical shift perturbations, as expected. However, the direction of shift perturbation, change of DNA imino-proton NMR signal, and dynamics on the 15N backbone atom significantly differed between specific and non-specific binding. Using these unique characteristics, we confirmed that the three single-finger segments (TZD1, TZD2 and TZD3 and the two-finger segment (TZD23 non-specifically bind to the cognate DNA. In comparison, the other two-finger segment (TZD12 binding to the cognate DNA features simultaneous non-specific and semi-specific binding, both slowly exchanged in terms of NMR timescale. The process of TZD binding to the cognate DNA is likely stepwise: initially TZD non-specifically binds to DNA, then fingers 1 and 2 insert cooperatively into the major groove of DNA by semi-specific binding, and finally finger 3 non-specifically binds to DNA, which promotes the specific binding on fingers 1 and 2 and stabilizes the formation of a specific TZD-DNA complex.

  10. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    The CPT project came to an end in December 2006 and its original scope is now shared among three new areas, namely Computing, Offline and Physics. In the physics area the basic change with respect to the previous system (where the PRS groups were charged with detector and physics object reconstruction and physics analysis) was the split of the detector PRS groups (the old ECAL-egamma, HCAL-jetMET, Tracker-btau and Muons) into two groups each: a Detector Performance Group (DPG) and a Physics Object Group. The DPGs are now led by the Commissioning and Run Coordinator deputy (Darin Acosta) and will appear in the correspond¬ing column in CMS bulletins. On the physics side, the physics object groups are charged with the reconstruction of physics objects, the tuning of the simulation (in collaboration with the DPGs) to reproduce the data, the provision of code for the High-Level Trigger, the optimization of the algorithms involved for the different physics analyses (in collaboration with the analysis gr...

  11. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    There have been numerous developments in the physics area since the September CMS week. The biggest single event was the Physics/Trigger week in the end of Octo¬ber, whereas in terms of ongoing activities the “2007 analyses” went into high gear. This was in parallel with participation in CSA07 by the physics groups. On the or¬ganizational side, the new conveners of the physics groups have been selected, and a new database for man¬aging physics analyses has been deployed. Physics/Trigger week The second Physics-Trigger week of 2007 took place during the week of October 22-26. The first half of the week was dedicated to working group meetings. The ple¬nary Joint Physics-Trigger meeting took place on Wednesday afternoon and focused on the activities of the new Trigger Studies Group (TSG) and trigger monitoring. Both the Physics and Trigger organizations are now focused on readiness for early data-taking. Thus, early trigger tables and preparations for calibr...

  12. 78 FR 68907 - Agency Information Collection (Hand and Finger Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... Finger Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... Control No. 2900- NEW (Hand and Finger Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any... Benefits Questionnaire)''. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Hand and Finger Conditions Disability Benefits...

  13. PHYSICS

    CERN Document Server

    Submitted by

    Physics Week: plenary meeting on physics groups plans for startup (14–15 May 2008) The Physics Objects (POG) and Physics Analysis (PAG) Groups presented their latest developments at the plenary meeting during the Physics Week. In the presentations particular attention was given to startup plans and readiness for data-taking. Many results based on the recent cosmic run were shown. A special Workshop on SUSY, described in a separate section, took place the day before the plenary. At the meeting, we had also two special DPG presentations on “Tracker and Muon alignment with CRAFT” (Ernesto Migliore) and “Calorimeter studies with CRAFT” (Chiara Rovelli). We had also a report from Offline (Andrea Rizzi) and Computing (Markus Klute) on the San Diego Workshop, described elsewhere in this bulletin. Tracking group (Boris Mangano). The level of sophistication of the tracking software increased significantly over the last few months: V0 (K0 and Λ) reconstr...

  14. Three-dimensional printing of a microneedle array on personalized curved surfaces for dual-pronged treatment of trigger finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seng Han; Ng, Jian Yao; Kang, Lifeng

    2017-01-10

    The hand function of patients who suffer from trigger finger can be impaired by the use of traditional splints. There is also a risk of systemic side effects with oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used for pain relief. Microneedle-assisted transdermal drug delivery offers an attractive alternative for local delivery of NSAIDs. However, traditional microneedle arrays fabricated on flat surfaces are unable to deliver drugs effectively across the undulating skin surface of affected finger(s). In this study, using 3D printing, a dual-function microneedle array has been fabricated on personalized curved surfaces (microneedle splint) for drug delivery and splinting of the affected finger. The novel microneedle splint was assessed for its physical characteristics and the microneedles were shown to withstand up to twice the average thumb force without fracturing. An average skin penetration efficiency of 64% on dermatomed human cadaver skin was achieved and the final microneedle splint showed biocompatibility with human dermal cell lines. A significantly higher amount of diclofenac permeated through the skin by 0.5 h with the use of the microneedle splint as compared to intact skin. The fabricated microneedle splint can thus be a potential new approach to treat trigger finger via personalized splinting without affecting normal hand function.

  15. A Case of Left Atrial Myxoma Whose Initial Symptom Was Finger Ischemic Symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Maho; Eguchi, Kazuo; Ogawa, Masaya; Takahashi, Kan; Nagai, Michiaki; Shimpo, Masahisa; Misawa, Yoshio; Kario, Kazuomi

    2018-01-01

    We experienced a 45-year-old Japanese man who was transferred to our hospital complaining of acute onset of pain and pallor in the right lower limb. Two years earlier, he had complained of repetitive pain at rest and pallor in the left third and fourth fingers. The physical exam and angiography demonstrated occlusion of finger arteries, however we could not reach final diagnosis. Acute arterial occlusive disease in the right lower limb was suspected. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a gross tumor in the left atrium, which suggested left atrial myxoma. An emergency tumorectomy was successfully conducted. Pathologically, the fragile tumor and resultant thrombosis could have caused the patient's peripheral circulatory failure at least two years prior to this episode. A rigorous systemic survey is important even when the ischemic symptom is localized in peripheral circulation.

  16. [RARE LOCALIZATION OF OSTEOID OSTEOMA--DISTAL PHALANX OF THE RING FINGER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarić, K; Prutki, M; Starčević, D; Seiwerth, S; Bojanić, I

    2016-09-01

    With this clinical observation we would like to bring to mind osteoid osteoma as a possible cause of problems of distal phalanx of the fingers. Osteoid osteoma occurs rarely at this location and has atypical presentation. The main symptoms are swelling and redness of the fingertip with nail deformity, while typical night pain may not be present. Unusual clinical and x-ray presentation of tumor in this localization can make diagnosis of osteoid osteoma very difficult. A 20-year-old patient reported pain in the fingertip of his right ring finger persisting for five years. Swelling and redness of the fingertip combined with nail deformity was also present. X-rays showed osteolysis in the base of distal phalanx. Magnetic resonance imaging showed suspicion of osteoid osteoma, which was confirmed by computed tomography (CT). We performed surgical removal of osteoid osteoma in February 2014. The tumor was approached by longitudinal incision on the lateral side of the distal phalanx of the ring finger and the basal part of distal phalanx was cut with a small chisel to enable access to cystic change of the bone. Tumor removal with excochleation was performed and the material thus obtained was sent for histopathologic analysis. After surgery, the ring finger was immobilized in a plaster splint for a three-week period. After removal of immobilization, the patient was referred to physical therapy consisting of individual exercises in order to obtain the full range of motion in all joints of the hands and strengthen hand and forearm muscles. After surgical removal of osteoid osteoma, all symptoms disappeared completely. Histopathologic findings confirmed the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma. After physical therapy, he returned to daily activities without any problems. On regular follow ups at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery, clinical findings were normal and the patient had no pain or discomforts. Full recovery was shown by the result of the DASH questionnaire three months after

  17. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.  Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish how ready we are to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the week was thus pac...

  18. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.   Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish (we hoped) the readiness of CMS to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the...

  19. Tangential finger forces use mechanical advantage during static grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slota, Gregory P; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2012-02-01

    When grasping and manipulating objects, the central controller utilizes the mechanical advantage of the normal forces of the fingers for torque production. Whether the same is valid for tangential forces is unknown. The main purpose of this study was to determine the patterns of finger tangential forces and the use of mechanical advantage as a control mechanism when dealing with objects of nonuniform finger positioning. A complementary goal was to explore the interaction of mechanical advantage (moment arm) and the role a finger has as a torque agonist/antagonist with respect to external torques (±0.4 N m). Five 6-df force/torque transducers measured finger forces while subjects held a prism handle (6 cm width × 9 cm height) with and without a single finger displaced 2 cm (handle width). The effect of increasing the tangential moment arm was significant (p forces (in >70% of trials) and hence creating greater moments. Thus, the data provides evidence that the grasping system as a rule utilizes mechanical advantage for generating tangential forces. The increase in tangential force was independent of whether the finger was acting as a torque agonist or antagonist, revealing their effects to be additive.

  20. Torque control of underactuated tendon-driven fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Abdallah

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Given an underactuated tendon-driven finger, the finger posture is underdetermined and can move freely ("flop" in a region of slack tendons. This work shows that such an underactuated finger can be operated in tendon force control (rather than position control with effective performance. The force control eliminates the indeterminate slack while commanding a parameterized space of desired torques. The torque will either push the finger to the joint limits or wrap around an external object with variable torque – behavior that is sufficient for primarily gripping fingers. In addition, introducing asymmetric joint radii to the design allows the finger to command an expanded range of joint torques and to scan an expanded set of external surfaces. This study is motivated by the design and control of the secondary fingers of the NASA-GM R2 humanoid hand.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  1. The relation between the anthropometric characteristics of fingers and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Mardanshahi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anthropometry is a science of human body measurement that could be used for manufacturing artificial limbs or prosthesis, investigating body differences between populations, utilizing in forensics and criminology, or even in the diagnosis of some diseases. Two of the most important anthropometric characteristics are dermatoglyphic patterns and finger length. Many studies have evaluated the relation between these two characteristics in different diseases such as cancers. It assumed that dermatoglyphic patterns and finger length could be used as predictors of some cancers such as gastric, ovarian, prostate, testicular, and breast cancers. In this review, we evaluated the relation between dermatoglyphic variability and finger length in different cancers more precisely.

  2. Technological Microbiology: Development and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana C. Vitorino

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Over thousands of years, modernization could be predicted for the use of microorganisms in the production of foods and beverages. However, the current accelerated pace of new food production is due to the rapid incorporation of biotechnological techniques that allow the rapid identification of new molecules and microorganisms or even the genetic improvement of known species. At no other time in history have microorganisms been so present in areas such as agriculture and medicine, except as recognized villains. Currently, however, beneficial microorganisms such as plant growth promoters and phytopathogen controllers are required by various agricultural crops, and many species are being used as biofactories of important pharmacological molecules. The use of biofactories does not end there: microorganisms have been explored for the synthesis of diverse chemicals, fuel molecules, and industrial polymers, and strains environmentally important due to their biodecomposing or biosorption capacity have gained interest in research laboratories and in industrial activities. We call this new microbiology Technological Microbiology, and we believe that complex techniques, such as heterologous expression and metabolic engineering, can be increasingly incorporated into this applied science, allowing the generation of new and improved products and services.

  3. Technological Microbiology: Development and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitorino, Luciana C; Bessa, Layara A

    2017-01-01

    Over thousands of years, modernization could be predicted for the use of microorganisms in the production of foods and beverages. However, the current accelerated pace of new food production is due to the rapid incorporation of biotechnological techniques that allow the rapid identification of new molecules and microorganisms or even the genetic improvement of known species. At no other time in history have microorganisms been so present in areas such as agriculture and medicine, except as recognized villains. Currently, however, beneficial microorganisms such as plant growth promoters and phytopathogen controllers are required by various agricultural crops, and many species are being used as biofactories of important pharmacological molecules. The use of biofactories does not end there: microorganisms have been explored for the synthesis of diverse chemicals, fuel molecules, and industrial polymers, and strains environmentally important due to their biodecomposing or biosorption capacity have gained interest in research laboratories and in industrial activities. We call this new microbiology Technological Microbiology, and we believe that complex techniques, such as heterologous expression and metabolic engineering, can be increasingly incorporated into this applied science, allowing the generation of new and improved products and services.

  4. Technological Microbiology: Development and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitorino, Luciana C.; Bessa, Layara A.

    2017-01-01

    Over thousands of years, modernization could be predicted for the use of microorganisms in the production of foods and beverages. However, the current accelerated pace of new food production is due to the rapid incorporation of biotechnological techniques that allow the rapid identification of new molecules and microorganisms or even the genetic improvement of known species. At no other time in history have microorganisms been so present in areas such as agriculture and medicine, except as recognized villains. Currently, however, beneficial microorganisms such as plant growth promoters and phytopathogen controllers are required by various agricultural crops, and many species are being used as biofactories of important pharmacological molecules. The use of biofactories does not end there: microorganisms have been explored for the synthesis of diverse chemicals, fuel molecules, and industrial polymers, and strains environmentally important due to their biodecomposing or biosorption capacity have gained interest in research laboratories and in industrial activities. We call this new microbiology Technological Microbiology, and we believe that complex techniques, such as heterologous expression and metabolic engineering, can be increasingly incorporated into this applied science, allowing the generation of new and improved products and services. PMID:28539920

  5. Biogas Production: Microbiology and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnürer, Anna

    Biogas, containing energy-rich methane, is produced by microbial decomposition of organic material under anaerobic conditions. Under controlled conditions, this process can be used for the production of energy and a nutrient-rich residue suitable for use as a fertilising agent. The biogas can be used for production of heat, electricity or vehicle fuel. Different substrates can be used in the process and, depending on substrate character, various reactor technologies are available. The microbiological process leading to methane production is complex and involves many different types of microorganisms, often operating in close relationships because of the limited amount of energy available for growth. The microbial community structure is shaped by the incoming material, but also by operating parameters such as process temperature. Factors leading to an imbalance in the microbial community can result in process instability or even complete process failure. To ensure stable operation, different key parameters, such as levels of degradation intermediates and gas quality, are often monitored. Despite the fact that the anaerobic digestion process has long been used for industrial production of biogas, many questions need still to be resolved to achieve optimal management and gas yields and to exploit the great energy and nutrient potential available in waste material. This chapter discusses the different aspects that need to be taken into consideration to achieve optimal degradation and gas production, with particular focus on operation management and microbiology.

  6. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    The all-plenary format of the CMS week in Cyprus gave the opportunity to the conveners of the physics groups to present the plans of each physics analysis group for tackling early physics analyses. The presentations were complete, so all are encouraged to browse through them on the Web. There is a wealth of information on what is going on, by whom and on what basis and priority. The CMS week was followed by two CMS “physics events”, the ICHEP08 days and the physics days in July. These were two weeks dedicated to either the approval of all the results that would be presented at ICHEP08, or to the review of all the other Monte-Carlo based analyses that were carried out in the context of our preparations for analysis with the early LHC data (the so-called “2008 analyses”). All this was planned in the context of the beginning of a ramp down of these Monte Carlo efforts, in anticipation of data.  The ICHEP days are described below (agenda and talks at: http://indic...

  7. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Joe Incandela

    There have been two plenary physics meetings since the December CMS week. The year started with two workshops, one on the measurements of the Standard Model necessary for “discovery physics” as well as one on the Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT). Meanwhile the tail of the “2007 analyses” is going through the last steps of approval. It is expected that by the end of January all analyses will have converted to using the data from CSA07 – which include the effects of miscalibration and misalignment. January Physics Days The first Physics Days of 2008 took place on January 22-24. The first two days were devoted to comprehensive re¬ports from the Detector Performance Groups (DPG) and Physics Objects Groups (POG) on their planning and readiness for early data-taking followed by approvals of several recent studies. Highlights of POG presentations are included below while the activities of the DPGs are covered elsewhere in this bulletin. January 24th was devo...

  8. Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cullen, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    Defined as the scientific study of matter and energy, physics explains how all matter behaves. Separated into modern and classical physics, the study attracts both experimental and theoretical physicists. From the discovery of the process of nuclear fission to an explanation of the nature of light, from the theory of special relativity to advancements made in particle physics, this volume profiles 10 pioneers who overcame tremendous odds to make significant breakthroughs in this heavily studied branch of science. Each chapter contains relevant information on the scientist''s childhood, research, discoveries, and lasting contributions to the field and concludes with a chronology and a list of print and Internet references specific to that individual.

  9. Effects of aging and Tai Chi on finger-pointing toward stationary and moving visual targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Jasmine C; Hui-Chan, Christina W; Tsang, William W

    2010-01-01

    Kwok JC, Hui-Chan CW, Tsang WW. Effects of aging and Tai Chi on finger-pointing toward stationary and moving visual targets. To examine the aging effect on speed and accuracy in finger pointing toward stationary and moving visual targets between young and older healthy subjects and whether or not Tai Chi practitioners perform better than healthy older controls in these tasks. Cross-sectional study. University-based rehabilitation center. University students (n=30) (aged 24.2+/-3.1y), were compared with healthy older control subjects (n=30) (aged 72.3+/-7.2y) and experienced (n=31) (mean years of practice, 7.1+/-6.5y) Tai Chi practitioners (aged 70.3+/-5.9y). Not applicable. Subjects pointed with the index finger of their dominant hand from a fixed starting position on a desk to a visual signal (1.2cm diameter dot) appearing on a display unit, as quickly and as accurately as possible. Outcome measures included (1) reaction time-the time from the appearance of the dot to the onset of the anterior deltoid electromyographic response; (2) movement time-the time from onset of the electromyographic response to touching of the dot; and (3) accuracy-the absolute deviation of the subject's finger-pointing location from center of the dot. Young subjects achieved significantly faster reaction and movement times with significantly better accuracy than older control subjects in all finger-pointing tasks. Tai Chi practitioners attained significantly better accuracy than older controls in pointing to stationary visual signals appearing contralaterally and centrally to their pointing hand. They also demonstrated significantly better accuracy when the target was moving. Accuracy in Tai Chi practitioners was similar to young controls. Eye-hand coordination in finger-pointing declines with age in time and accuracy domains. However, Tai Chi practitioners attained significantly better accuracy than control subjects similar in age, sex, and physical activity level. Copyright (c) 2010

  10. Control of viscous fingering by nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabet, Nasser; Hassanzadeh, Hassan; Abedi, Jalal

    2017-12-01

    A substantial viscosity increase by the addition of a low dose of nanoparticles to the base fluids can well influence the dynamics of viscous fingering. There is a lack of detailed theoretical studies that address the effect of the presence of nanoparticles on unstable miscible displacements. In this study, the impact of nonreactive nanoparticle presence on the stability and subsequent mixing of an originally unstable binary system is examined using linear stability analysis (LSA) and pseudospectral-based direct numerical simulations (DNS). We have parametrized the role of both nondepositing and depositing nanoparticles on the stability of miscible displacements using the developed static and dynamic parametric analyses. Our results show that nanoparticles have the potential to weaken the instabilities of an originally unstable system. Our LSA and DNS results also reveal that nondepositing nanoparticles can be used to fully stabilize an originally unstable front while depositing particles may act as temporary stabilizers whose influence diminishes in the course of time. In addition, we explain the existing inconsistencies concerning the effect of the nanoparticle diffusion coefficient on the dynamics of the system. This study provides a basis for further research on the application of nanoparticles for control of viscosity-driven instabilities.

  11. Dermal pocketing following distal finger replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhaindran, Mark E; Paavilainen, Pasi; Tan, David M K; Peng, Yeong Pin; Lim, Aymeric Y T

    2010-08-01

    Replantation is an ideal technique for reconstruction following fingertip amputation as it provides 'like for like' total reconstruction of the nail complex, bone pulp tissue and skin with no donor-site morbidity. However, fingertips are often not replanted because veins cannot be found or are thought to be too small to repair. Attempts at 'cap-plasty' or pocketing of replanted tips with and without microvascular anastomosis have been done in the past with varying degrees of success. We prospectively followed up a group of patients who underwent digital replantation and dermal pocketing in the palm to evaluate the outcome of this procedure. There were 10 patients with 14 amputated digits (two thumbs, five index, four middle, two ring and one little) who underwent dermal pocketing of the amputated digit following replantation. Among the 14 digits that were treated with dermal pocketing, 11 survived completely, one had partial atrophy and two were completely lost. Complications encountered included finger stiffness (two patients) and infection of the replanted fingertip with osteomyelitis of the distal phalanx (one patient). We believe that this technique can help increase the chance of survival for distal replantation with an acceptable salvage rate of 85% in our series. Copyright 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Changes in physiological and some nutritional, nutraceuticals, chemical-physical, microbiological and sensory quality of minimally processed cactus pears cvs 'Bianca', 'Gialla' and 'Rossa' stored under passive modified atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Amedeo; Continella, Alberto; La Malfa, Stefano; D'Aquino, Salvatore

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the overall quality changes of minimally processed cactus pears cvs 'Bianca', Gialla' and 'Rossa' stored at 4 °C for 10 days. Periodically in-package CO 2 , O 2 and C 2 H 4 were determined and fruit were assessed for overall quality changes (pH, acidity, sugars, phenolics, betacyanins and betaxanthines, antioxidant capacity, colour, firmness, microbiological population and sensory attributes). In a preliminary study three different polymeric films were tested to select the most suitable to design a package with a short lag time to achieve steady-state conditions. Results showed marked differences between measured in-package CO 2 and O 2 values and those calculated based on respiration of peeled fruit and film permeance to CO 2 and O 2 provided by manufactures. The sensory evaluation of packed fruit indicated in film BBT-Bolphane, which created a steady-state in-package partial pressure for CO 2 of 4.3-4.8 kPa and for O 2 of 4.8-5.5 kPa, as the best film. Results of in-package gas composition with the three cultivars were similar to those achieved in cv. 'Gialla' with the preliminary test. All measured qualitative parameters changed slightly over the storage period for all cultivars and followed the same trend, despite significant differences existing among cultivars. This study clearly showed a similar physiological behavior of minimally processed 'Bianca', 'Gialla' and 'Rossa' cactus pears. Storage conditions optimal for one cultivar fit well for the others; thus mixing fruit of different cultivars in a package designed for one specific cultivar does not lead to relevant deviation from expected results. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Dietary effects of oregano (Origanum vulgaris L. plant or sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill. wood extracts on microbiological, chemical-physical characteristics and lipid oxidation of cooked ham during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ranucci

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the dietary effect of feeding pigs with diets enriched with sweet chestnut wood (Castanea sativa Mill. or oregano (Origanum vulgaris L. extract on the microbiological and chemical characteristics of cooked pork ham. Three groups of 10 pigs were fed with a control diet (CTRL, with the CTRL diet enriched with 0.2% of oregano extract (OR and with the CTRL diet enriched with 0.2% of sweet chestnut wood extract (SCW, respectively. Six cooked hams per group were produced, sliced and packaged under a modified atmosphere (N2:CO2=80:20 and stored at refrigeration temperature (4±1°C. Three packages per cooked ham were sampled for analyses at three different storage times (0, 10 and 20 days. At day 0 time, antioxidant capacity of the products (ORACFL assay and chemical composition were performed. At each sampling time, from all the samples the following analyses were performed: Total Microbial Count (TMC, Lactic Acid Bacteria count (LAB, Enterobacteriaceae count, Listeria monocytogenes, pH value, colour coordinates (L*, a*, b*, total basic volatile nitrogen (TBVN and thio-barbituric reactive substances (TBARs determinations. No differences in TMC, LAB and Enterobacteriaceae count, pH, TBVN, chemical composition and L* values were registered between the three groups at all the sampling times considered. No Listeria monocytogenes was detected in the samples tested. Significant differences were registered for ORACFL at 0 days, a* and b* values and TBARs value at 10 and 20 days of storage, with higher values for ORACFL, a* and b* values and lower values for TBARs in SCW and OR than CTRL. No antimicrobial effect could be recorded for OR and SCW but a higher oxidative stability, also highlighted by the colour maintenance, was observed in both OR and SCW.

  14. Dietary Effects of Oregano (Origanum Vulgaris L.) Plant or Sweet Chestnut (Castanea Sativa Mill.) Wood Extracts on Microbiological, Chemico-Physical Characteristics and Lipid Oxidation of Cooked ham During Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranucci, David; Miraglia, Dino; Trabalza-Marinucci, Massimo; Acuti, Gabriele; Codini, Michela; Ceccarini, Maria Rachele; Forte, Claudio; Branciari, Raffaella

    2015-11-02

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dietary effect of feeding pigs with diets enriched with sweet chestnut wood ( Castanea sativa Mill.) or oregano ( Origanum vulgaris L.) extract on the microbiological and chemical characteristics of cooked pork ham. Three groups of 10 pigs were fed with a control diet (CTRL), with the CTRL diet enriched with 0.2% of oregano extract (OR) and with the CTRL diet enriched with 0.2% of sweet chestnut wood extract (SCW), respectively. Six cooked hams per group were produced, sliced and packaged under a modified atmosphere (N2:CO2=80:20) and stored at refrigeration temperature (4±1°C). Three packages per cooked ham were sampled for analyses at three different storage times (0, 10 and 20 days). At day 0 time, antioxidant capacity of the products (ORAC FL assay) and chemical composition were performed. At each sampling time, from all the samples the following analyses were performed: total microbial count (TMC), lactic acid bacteria count (LAB), Enterobacteriaceae count, Listeria monocytogenes , pH value, colour coordinates (L*, a*, b*), total basic volatile nitrogen (TBVN) and thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARs) determinations. No differences in TMC, LAB and Enterobacteriaceae count, pH, TBVN, chemical composition and L* values were registered between the three groups at all the sampling times considered. No Listeria monocytogenes was detected in the samples tested. Significant differences were registered for ORAC FL at 0 days, a* and b* values and TBARs value at 10 and 20 days of storage, with higher values for ORAC FL , a* and b* values and lower values for TBARs in SCW and OR than CTRL. No antimicrobial effect could be recorded for OR and SCW but a higher oxidative stability, also highlighted by the colour maintenance, was observed in both OR and SCW.

  15. Development of Functional Recovery Training Device for Hemiplegic Fingers with Finger-expansion Facilitation Exercise by Stretch Reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yong; Iwashita, Hisashi; Kawahira, Kazumi; Hayashi, Ryota

    This paper develops a functional recovery training device to perform repetition facilitating exercise for hemiplegic finger rehabilitation. On the facilitation exercise, automatic finger expansion can be realized and facilitated by stretch reflex, where a stimulation forces is applied instantaneously on flexion finger for making strech reflex and resistance forces are applied for maintaining the strech reflex. In this paper, novel parallel mechanisms, force sensing system with high sensitivity and resistance accompanying cooperation control method are proposed for sensing, controlling and realizing the stimulation force, resistance forces, strech reflex and repetition facilitating exercise. The effectivities and performances of the device are shown by some experiments.

  16. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Hill

    2012-01-01

    The months that have passed since the last CMS Bulletin have been a very busy and exciting time for CMS physics. We have gone from observing the very first 8TeV collisions produced by the LHC to collecting a dataset of the collisions that already exceeds that recorded in all of 2011. All in just a few months! Meanwhile, the analysis of the 2011 dataset and publication of the subsequent results has continued. These results come from all the PAGs in CMS, including searches for the Higgs boson and other new phenomena, that have set the most stringent limits on an ever increasing number of models of physics beyond the Standard Model including dark matter, Supersymmetry, and TeV-scale gravity scenarios, top-quark physics where CMS has overtaken the Tevatron in the precision of some measurements, and bottom-quark physics where CMS made its first discovery of a new particle, the Ξ*0b baryon (candidate event pictured below). Image 2:  A Ξ*0b candidate event At the same time POGs and PAGs...

  17. PHYSICS

    CERN Document Server

    Guenther Dissertori

    The time period between the last CMS week and this June was one of intense activity with numerous get-together targeted at addressing specific issues on the road to data-taking. The two series of workshops, namely the “En route to discoveries” series and the “Vertical Integration” meetings continued.   The first meeting of the “En route to discoveries” sequence (end 2007) had covered the measurements of the Standard Model signals as necessary prerequisite to any claim of signals beyond the Standard Model. The second meeting took place during the Feb CMS week and concentrated on the commissioning of the Physics Objects, whereas the third occurred during the April Physics Week – and this time the theme was the strategy for key new physics signatures. Both of these workshops are summarized below. The vertical integration meetings also continued, with two DPG-physics get-togethers on jets and missing ET and on electrons and photons. ...

  18. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2011-01-01

    Since the last CMS Week, all physics groups have been extremely active on analyses based on the full 2010 dataset, with most aiming for a preliminary measurement in time for the winter conferences. Nearly 50 analyses were approved in a “marathon” of approval meetings during the first two weeks of March, and the total number of approved analyses reached 90. The diversity of topics is very broad, including precision QCD, Top, and electroweak measurements, the first observation of single Top production at the LHC, the first limits on Higgs production at the LHC including the di-tau final state, and comprehensive searches for new physics in a wide range of topologies (so far all with null results unfortunately). Most of the results are based on the full 2010 pp data sample, which corresponds to 36 pb-1 at √s = 7 TeV. This report can only give a few of the highlights of a very rich physics program, which is listed below by physics group...

  19. Fuzzy based finger vein recognition with rotation invariant feature matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezhilmaran, D.; Joseph, Rose Bindu

    2017-11-01

    Finger vein recognition is a promising biometric with commercial applications which is explored widely in the recent years. In this paper, a finger vein recognition system is proposed using rotation invariant feature descriptors for matching after enhancing the finger vein images with an interval type-2 fuzzy method. SIFT features are extracted and matched using a matching score based on Euclidian distance. Rotation invariance of the proposed method is verified in the experiment and the results are compared with SURF matching and minutiae matching. It is seen that rotation invariance is verified and the poor quality issues are solved efficiently with the designed system of finger vein recognition during the analysis. The experiments underlines the robustness and reliability of the interval type-2 fuzzy enhancement and SIFT feature matching.

  20. Tension Distribution in a Tendon-Driven Robotic Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method is provided for distributing tension among tendons of a tendon-driven finger in a robotic system, wherein the finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons. The method includes determining a maximum functional tension and a minimum functional tension of each tendon of the finger, and then using a controller to distribute tension among the tendons, such that each tendon is assigned a tension value less than the maximum functional tension and greater than or equal to the minimum functional tension. The method satisfies the minimum functional tension while minimizing the internal tension in the robotic system, and satisfies the maximum functional tension without introducing a coupled disturbance to the joint torques. A robotic system includes a robot having at least one tendon-driven finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons, and a controller having an algorithm for controlling the tendons as set forth above.

  1. Successful treatment of a guitarist with a finger joint injury using instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry Loghmani, M; Bayliss, Amy J; Clayton, Greg; Gundeck, Evelina

    2015-12-01

    Finger injuries are common and can greatly affect a musician's quality of life. A 55-year-old man, who had injured the proximal interphalangeal joint of the left index finger 6 months prior to any intervention, was treated with a manual therapy approach incorporating instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM). Initial examination findings included self-reported pain and functional limitations and physical impairments that significantly impeded his ability to play the acoustic guitar. He was treated once a week for 6 weeks with IASTM, joint mobilization, therapeutic exercise, and ice massage. Additionally, a home exercise program and self-care instructions were provided. The patient gained positive outcomes with improvements in pain (Numerical Pain Rating Scale while playing the guitar: initial 5/10, discharge 1/10) and function (Disability Arm Shoulder Hand Sports-Performing Arts Optional Module: initial 75; discharge 6·25), each reaching a minimum clinically important difference. Importantly, he was able to play the guitar with minimal to no pain as desired. Physical measures also improved, including an immediate gain in finger range of motion with IASTM alone. Manual therapy approaches integrating IASTM may provide an effective conservative treatment strategy for patients with finger/hand conditions in the performing arts and other patient populations.

  2. Evaluation of the conservative treatment of Trigger finger by local instillation of corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muris Pecar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trigger Finger (tenosynovitis stenosans is a specific, named disease from a group of repetitive strain injury (RSI diseases, caused by inflammation which results in difficulties during muscle contraction and weakened and painful tendon movement. It is common in the outpatient physical medicine and rehabilitation practice. The aim of our study was to evaluate the success of conservative treatment of Trigger Finger by local instillation of corticosteroids.Methods: The study was designed as an observational and open analysis of the results of conservative treatment of 45 patients. We used precise instillation of steroid anti-inflammatory antirheumatic drugs in the area of patho-anatomic, microtraumatic injuries of tendon and its sheath. Patients were evaluated before and after the treatment with 0 to 5 evaluation score scale. The data were analyzed using X2 test.Results: Most of the patients had evaluation score of 2, 3 and 4, before the treatment. After the treatment 10 (29% patients had achieved score 4 and 35 (71% patients had achieved score 5. All of the patients with score 5 had excellent working ability with full working capacity. Other patients had well-preserved working ability, which improved to excellent in maximum of 7 days.Conclusions: Conservative treatment of Trigger finger shows good therapeutic effects and taking into account the benefits, convenience and generally lower cost of conservative treatment for the patient, should be considered as an effective alternative to surgical treatment.

  3. Interfacial elastic fingering in Hele-Shaw cells: A weakly nonlinear study

    KAUST Repository

    Carvalho, Gabriel D.

    2013-11-11

    We study a variant of the classic viscous fingering instability in Hele-Shaw cells where the interface separating the fluids is elastic, and presents a curvature-dependent bending rigidity. By employing a second-order mode-coupling approach we investigate how the elastic nature of the interface influences the morphology of emerging interfacial patterns. This is done by focusing our attention on a conventionally stable situation in which the fluids involved have the same viscosity. In this framework, we show that the inclusion of nonlinear effects plays a crucial role in inducing sizable interfacial instabilities, as well as in determining the ultimate shape of the pattern-forming structures. Particularly, we have found that the emergence of either narrow or wide fingers can be regulated by tuning a rigidity fraction parameter. Our weakly nonlinear findings reinforce the importance of the so-called curvature weakening effect, which favors the development of fingers in regions of lower rigidity. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  4. Microbiological monitoring in geothermal plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawi, M.; Lerm, S.; Vetter, A.; Vieth, A.; Seibt, A.; Wolfgramm, M.; Würdemann, H.

    2009-12-01

    In times of increasing relevance of alternative energy resources the utilization of geothermal energy and subsurface energy storage gains importance and arouses increasing interest of scientists. The research project “AquiScreen” investigates the operational reliability of geothermally used groundwater systems under microbial, geochemical, mineralogical and petrological aspects. Microbiological analyses based on fluid and solid phases of geothermal systems are conducted to evaluate the impact of microbial populations on these systems. The presentation focuses on first results obtained from microbiological monitoring of geothermal plants located in two different regions of Germany: the North German Basin and the Molasse Basin in the southern part characterized by different salinities and temperatures. Fluid and filter samples taken during regular plant operation were investigated using genetic fingerprinting based on PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes to characterize the microbial biocenosis of the geothermal aquifer. Sequencing of dominant bands of the fingerprints and the subsequent comparison to 16S rRNA genes from public databases enables a correlation to metabolic classes and provides information about the biochemical processes in the deep biosphere. The genetic profiles revealed significant differences in microbiological community structures of geothermal aquifers investigated. Phylogenetic analyses indicate broad metabolical diversity adapted to the specific conditions in the aquifers. Additionally a high amount of so far uncultivated microorganisms was detected indicating very specific indigenous biocenosis. However, in all geothermal plants bacteria were detected despite of fluid temperatures from 45° to 120°C. The identified microorganisms are closely related to thermophilic and hyperthermophilic species detectable in hot wells and hot springs, like Thermus scotoductus and Thermodesulfovibrio yellowstonii, respectively. Halophilic species were detected in

  5. The effects of vibration-reducing gloves on finger vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welcome, Daniel E.; Dong, Ren G.; Xu, Xueyan S.; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves have been used to reduce the hand-transmitted vibration exposures from machines and powered hand tools but their effectiveness remains unclear, especially for finger protection. The objectives of this study are to determine whether VR gloves can attenuate the vibration transmitted to the fingers and to enhance the understanding of the mechanisms of how these gloves work. Seven adult male subjects participated in the experiment. The fixed factors evaluated include hand force (four levels), glove condition (gel-filled, air bladder, no gloves), and location of the finger vibration measurement. A 3-D laser vibrometer was used to measure the vibrations on the fingers with and without wearing a glove on a 3-D hand-arm vibration test system. This study finds that the effect of VR gloves on the finger vibration depends on not only the gloves but also their influence on the distribution of the finger contact stiffness and the grip effort. As a result, the gloves increase the vibration in the fingertip area but marginally reduce the vibration in the proximal area at some frequencies below 100 Hz. On average, the gloves reduce the vibration of the entire fingers by less than 3% at frequencies below 80 Hz but increase at frequencies from 80 to 400 Hz. At higher frequencies, the gel-filled glove is more effective at reducing the finger vibration than the air bladder-filled glove. The implications of these findings are discussed. Relevance to industry Prolonged, intensive exposure to hand-transmitted vibration can cause hand-arm vibration syndrome. Vibration-reducing gloves have been used as an alternative approach to reduce the vibration exposure. However, their effectiveness for reducing finger-transmitted vibrations remains unclear. This study enhanced the understanding of the glove effects on finger vibration and provided useful information on the effectiveness of typical VR gloves at reducing the vibration transmitted to the fingers. The new

  6. Robotic Hand with Flexible Fingers for Grasping Cylindrical Objects

    OpenAIRE

    柴田, 瑞穂

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, a robotic hand for grasping a cylindrical object is proposed. This robotic hand has flexible fingers that can hold a cylindrical object during moving. We introduce a grasping strategy for a cylindrical object in terms of state transition graph. In this strategy the robotic hand picks up the cylindrical object utilizing a suction device before the hand grasp the object. We also design the flexible fingers; then, we investigate the validity of this robotic hand via several e...

  7. Finger avulsion injuries: A report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fejjal N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury that occurs to a finger wearing a ring though rare can have grave consequences. It is a preventable injury which has a peculiar mode of trauma that is usually occupational. Injury ranges from simple contusion to degloving of soft tissues to traumatic amputation. We hereby report our experience of four cases of finger avulsion injuries due to a ring and discuss their variable clinical presentation and individualized management.

  8. Finger blood content, light transmission, and pulse oximetry errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, T M; Lawson, R A; Young, J D

    1992-01-01

    The changes in light emitting diode current necessary to maintain a constant level of light incident upon a photodetector were measured in 20 volunteers at the two wavelengths employed by pulse oximeters. Three states of finger blood content were assessed; exsanguinated, hyperaemic, and normal. The changes in light emitting diode current with changes in finger blood content were small and are not thought to represent a significant source of error in saturation as measured by pulse oximetry.

  9. Downward finger displacement distinguishes Parkinson disease dementia from Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Abraham; Deep, Aman; Shi, Jiong; Dhall, Rohit; Shafer, Saulena; Moguel-Cobos, Guillermo; Dhillon, Ravneet; Frames, Christopher W; McCauley, Margaret

    2018-02-01

    Purpose/Aim of the study: To study finger displacement in patients with Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). We examined 56 patients with PDD and 35 with AD. Patients were examined during their regular outpatient clinic visit. Finger displacement was measured by observers not actively involved in the study using a creative grid ruler for all PDD and AD patients. Finger displacement was examined by asking patients to point their index fingers toward the grid ruler with the nails facing upward. Patients were asked to maintain the pointing position for 15 s. After 15 s, patients were asked to close their eyes for another 15 s while maintaining the same position. A positive result was downward index finger displacement of ≥5 cm within the 15-second time window with eyes closed. Of the 56 PDD patients, 53 had bilateral finger displacement of >5 cm. In comparison, of the 35 AD patients, only 1 patient had minimal displacement. Results of the non-invasive finger displacement test may provide insight, on an outpatient basis, of the integrity of subcortical-cortical circuits. Downward finger displacement, especially bilateral downward displacement, may signal the extensive disruption of subcortical-cortical circuits that occurs in PDD patients. AChE: acetylcholinesterase; AD: Alzheimer disease; DLB: dementia with Lewy bodies; ET: essential tremor; MDS-UPDRS: Movement Disorder Society-sponsored Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale; MMSE: Mini-Mental State Examination; PD: Parkinson disease; PDD: Parkinson disease dementia.

  10. Individual Finger Sensibility in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Which Digits to Keep and Which to Eliminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfar, John C; Yaseen, Zaneb; Stern, Peter J; Kiefhaber, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sensibility testing plays a role in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). No single physical test has proven to be of critical value in the diagnosis especially when compared to electrodiagnostic studies (EDX). Correlations between individual tests and both symptoms and EDX have been elusive. Notably, previous literature has not documented differences between individual digits when examined with standard diagnostic tests and there is no suggestion that any digit should be systematically excluded from evaluation in CTS. Methods A prospective series of patients with EDX positive, isolated CTS patients were tested immediately preoperatively to evaluate individual digits with static two point discrimination (2PD) and abbreviated Semmes-Weinstein Monofilament (SWMF) tests. Detailed surveys of symptom density in the entire upper extremity were collected in addition to subjective perceptions of the most affected digit. Results Patients favored the middle finger over all others (51%) when asked which was the most affected by CTS. Objective 2PD results of each digit mirrored the subjective data, with higher values for the middle (mean 6.07mm, Pthumb>index>small) but suffered from lack of continuously assessable sensibility. Correlations failed between EDX, symptoms, complaints, monofilament results or 2PD in the index. Positive correlation (P=.002, r=.42, weak) was found between EDX and 2PD of the middle in isolation. Conclusions The middle finger is the most likely to show changes in 2PD in patients with positive EDX findings. Middle finger 2PD is best able to correlate (weakly) with EDX when compared to 2PD of other fingers and SWMF testing. Monfilaments alone are capable of showing the middle as more sensitive but application of this result is hampered by unavailable monofilaments. PMID:21050964

  11. Tools for Microbiological risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassett, john; Nauta, Maarten; Lindqvist, Roland

    . The information generated through conducting a risk assessment, such as a risk estimate, ranking of risks, identification of key controlling or risk-generating factors, or highlighting of data gaps,can assist governments in their role of setting national policies, criteria or providing public health advice......Microbiological Risk Assessment (MRA) has emerged as a comprehensive and systematic approach for addressing the risk of pathogens in specific foods and/or processes. At government level, MRA is increasingly recognised as a structured and objective approach to understand the level of risk in a given...... food/pathogen scenario. Tools developed so far support qualitative and quantitative assessments of the risk that a food pathogen poses to a particular population. Risk can be expressed as absolute numbers or as relative (ranked) risks. The food industry is beginning to appreciate that the tools for MRA...

  12. Dental abscess: A microbiological review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental abscess is a frequently occurring infectious process known to the health practice. The fate of the infection depends on the virulence of the bacteria, host resistance factors, and regional anatomy. Serious consequences arising from the spread of a dental abscess lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Acute dental abscess is polymicrobial, comprising of strict anaerobes, such as anaerobic cocci, Prevotella, Fusobacterium species, and facultative anaerobes, such as viridans group streptococci and the Streptococcus anginosus group. Numerous novel, uncultivable and fastidious organisms have been identified as potential pathogens with the use of non-culture techniques. The majority of localized dental abscesses respond to surgical treatment while the use of antimicrobials is limited to severe spreading infections. There is a need for good-quality clinical trials of sufficient size to identify the ideal treatment. The microbiology of the acute dentoalveolar abscess and its treatment in the light of improved culture and diagnostic methods are reviewed.

  13. Expert systems in clinical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstanley, Trevor; Courvalin, Patrice

    2011-07-01

    This review aims to discuss expert systems in general and how they may be used in medicine as a whole and clinical microbiology in particular (with the aid of interpretive reading). It considers rule-based systems, pattern-based systems, and data mining and introduces neural nets. A variety of noncommercial systems is described, and the central role played by the EUCAST is stressed. The need for expert rules in the environment of reset EUCAST breakpoints is also questioned. Commercial automated systems with on-board expert systems are considered, with emphasis being placed on the "big three": Vitek 2, BD Phoenix, and MicroScan. By necessity and in places, the review becomes a general review of automated system performances for the detection of specific resistance mechanisms rather than focusing solely on expert systems. Published performance evaluations of each system are drawn together and commented on critically.

  14. Integrating optical finger motion tracking with surface touch events

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRitchie, Jennifer; McPherson, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method of integrating two contrasting sensor systems for studying human interaction with a mechanical system, using piano performance as the case study. Piano technique requires both precise small-scale motion of fingers on the key surfaces and planned large-scale movement of the hands and arms. Where studies of performance often focus on one of these scales in isolation, this paper investigates the relationship between them. Two sensor systems were installed on an acoustic grand piano: a monocular high-speed camera tracking the position of painted markers on the hands, and capacitive touch sensors attach to the key surfaces which measure the location of finger-key contacts. This paper highlights a method of fusing the data from these systems, including temporal and spatial alignment, segmentation into notes and automatic fingering annotation. Three case studies demonstrate the utility of the multi-sensor data: analysis of finger flexion or extension based on touch and camera marker location, timing analysis of finger-key contact preceding and following key presses, and characterization of individual finger movements in the transitions between successive key presses. Piano performance is the focus of this paper, but the sensor method could equally apply to other fine motor control scenarios, with applications to human-computer interaction. PMID:26082732

  15. High-frequency ultrasonographic examination of the finger pulley system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutry, Nathalie; Titécat, Marie; Demondion, Xavier; Glaude, Eddy; Fontaine, Christian; Cotten, Anne

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of high-frequency ultrasonography to provide for direct evaluation of the annular and cruciform finger pulley system. In the first part of the work, a cadaveric study was performed to outline the normal anatomy of the annular and cruciform finger pulley system. Eighteen cadaveric hands were cut (n = 10) or dissected (n = 8). Two musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively reviewed in consensus the photographs of anatomic sections and dissections. This cadaveric study gave the 2 readers the opportunity to learn the normal anatomy of the finger pulley system. In the second part of the work, the annular and cruciform finger pulley system of 20 hands of volunteers was evaluated by ultrasonography with a 17-MHz linear transducer. Images were retrospectively analyzed by means of consensus of the 2 radiologists with respect to the visibility of each finger pulley. For annular (A) pulleys, high frequency ultrasonography showed A1, A2, A3, and A4 in 100%, 100%, 65%, and 100% of cases, respectively. For cruciform (C) pulleys, high-frequency ultrasonography showed only C1 in 45% of cases. Direct visualization of A5, C2, and C3 was not possible. High-frequency ultrasonography allows excellent depiction of finger pulleys except for annular pulley A5 and cruciform pulleys C2 and C3.

  16. Fluidic Channels Produced by Electro Hydrodynamic Viscous Fingering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behler, Kristopher; Wetzel, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Viscous fingering is a term describing fingerlike extensions of liquid from a column of low viscosity liquid that has been injected into a more viscous liquid. The modification of viscous fingering, known as electro hydrodynamic viscous fingering (EHVF), utilizes large electrical potentials of 10-60 kV. The fingers see a reduction in size and increase in branching behavior due to the potential applied to the system. The resulting finely structured patterns are analogous to biological systems such as blood vessels and the lymphatic system. In this study silicone oils and water were studied in thin channel Hele-Shaw cells. The interfacial tension was optimized by altering the surfactant concentration in the silicone oils. EHVF of liquid filled packed beds consisting of beads and silicone oils showed retardation of the relaxation of the fingers after the voltage was turned off. Decreased relaxation provides a means to solidify patterns into a curable material, such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). After the water is evacuated from the fingers, the cured materials then possess hollow channels that can be refilled and emptied, thus creating an artificial circulatory system.

  17. Integrating optical finger motion tracking with surface touch events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eMacRitchie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of integrating two contrasting sensor systems for studying human interaction with a mechanical system, using piano performance as the case study. Piano technique requires both precise small-scale motion of fingers on the key surfaces and planned large-scale movement of the hands and arms. Where studies of performance often focus on one of these scales in isolation, this paper investigates the relationship between them. Two sensor systems were installed on an acoustic grand piano: a monocular high-speed camera tracking the position of painted markers on the hands, and capacitive touch sensors attach to the key surfaces which measure the location of finger-key contacts. This paper highlights a method of fusing the data from these systems, including temporal and spatial alignment, segmentation into notes and automatic fingering annotation. Three case studies demonstrate the utility of the multi-sensor data: analysis of finger flexion or extension based on touch and camera marker location, timing analysis of finger-key contact preceding and following key presses, and characterisation of individual finger movements in the transitions between successive key presses. Piano performance is the focus of this paper, but the sensor method could equally apply to other fine motor control scenarios, with applications to human-computer interaction.

  18. Microbiology of pediatric orbital cellulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Steven H; Yen, Michael T; Miller, Aaron M; Yen, Kimberly G

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the microbiology of pediatric orbital cellulitis associated with sinusitis. Retrospective review of medical records of pediatric patients treated for orbital cellulitis. All pediatric patients treated for orbital cellulitis associated with sinusitis at Texas Children's Hospital between December 1, 2001 and September 30, 2005 were reviewed. Data collected included patient age, history, microbiology results, and surgical intervention. Thirty-eight cases were identified. Fifteen cases required medical management, whereas 23 patients received a combination of medical and surgical intervention. Three patients had multiple surgical procedures performed. Of the procedures performed, four were sinus irrigation, 12 were sinusotomy and drainage, nine were orbitotomy with drainage of abscess, and one was craniotomy with drainage of abscess. Surgical aspirate specimens yielded a higher positive culture result rate with 9/9 of orbital abscesses and 13/16 of sinus aspirates demonstrating a positive yield. Two of the 27 blood cultures had a positive yield. Staphylococcus species was the most common organism isolated. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) represented 73% of S. aureus isolates. Streptococcus species was the next most common pathogen. Three cultures yielded Haemophilus species with one being positive for H. influenzae. Organisms responsible for causing pediatric orbital cellulitis are evolving, with Staphylococcus followed by Streptococcus species being the most common pathogens. The occurrence of MRSA in pediatric orbital cellulitis is increasing, and empiric antimicrobial therapy should be directed against these organisms if they are prevalent in the community. Sinus and orbital abscess aspirates yielded the greatest number of positive cultures, though these invasive surgical procedures should be performed only when clinically indicated.

  19. Pressure head distribution during unstable flow in relation to the formation and dissipation of fingers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiroyuki Cho,; Rooij, de G.H.

    2002-01-01

    Wetting front instability creates a shallow induction zone from which fingers emerge that rapidly transport water and solutes downwards. How the induction zone affects finger location and spacing is unknown. In the moist subsoil, fingers may well dissipate because the finger tips no longer have to

  20. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    the PAG conveners

    2011-01-01

    The delivered LHC integrated luminosity of more than 1 inverse femtobarn by summer and more than 5 by the end of 2011 has been a gold mine for the physics groups. With 2011 data, we have submitted or published 14 papers, 7 others are in collaboration-wide review, and 75 Physics Analysis Summaries have been approved already. They add to the 73 papers already published based on the 2010 and 2009 datasets. Highlights from each physics analysis group are described below. Heavy ions Many important results have been obtained from the first lead-ion collision run in 2010. The published measurements include the first ever indications of Υ excited state suppression (PRL synopsis), long-range correlation in PbPb, and track multiplicity over a wide η range. Preliminary results include the first ever measurement of isolated photons (showing no modification), J/ψ suppression including the separation of the non-prompt component, further study of jet fragmentation, nuclear modification factor...

  1. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    The Physics Groups are actively engaged on analyses of the first data from the LHC at 7 TeV, targeting many results for the ICHEP conference taking place in Paris this summer. The first large batch of physics approvals is scheduled for this CMS Week, to be followed by four more weeks of approvals and analysis updates leading to the start of the conference in July. Several high priority analysis areas were organized into task forces to ensure sufficient coverage from the relevant detector, object, and analysis groups in the preparation of these analyses. Already some results on charged particle correlations and multiplicities in 7 TeV minimum bias collisions have been approved. Only one small detail remains before ICHEP: further integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC! Beyond the Standard Model measurements that can be done with these data, the focus changes to the search for new physics at the TeV scale and for the Higgs boson in the period after ICHEP. Particle Flow The PFT group is focusing on the ...

  2. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2012-01-01

      The period since the last CMS Bulletin has been historic for CMS Physics. The pinnacle of our physics programme was an observation of a new particle – a strong candidate for a Higgs boson – which has captured worldwide interest and made a profound impact on the very field of particle physics. At the time of the discovery announcement on 4 July, 2012, prominent signals were observed in the high-resolution H→γγ and H→ZZ(4l) modes. Corroborating excess was observed in the H→W+W– mode as well. The fermionic channel analyses (H→bb, H→ττ), however, yielded less than the Standard Model (SM) expectation. Collectively, the five channels established the signal with a significance of five standard deviations. With the exception of the diphoton channel, these analyses have all been updated in the last months and several new channels have been added. With improved analyses and more than twice the i...

  3. PHYSICS

    CERN Document Server

    L. Demortier

    Physics-wise, the CMS week in December was dominated by discussions of the analyses that will be carried out in the “next six months”, i.e. while waiting for the first LHC collisions.  As presented in December, analysis approvals based on Monte Carlo simulation were re-opened, with the caveat that for this work to be helpful to the goals of CMS, it should be carried out using the new software (CMSSW_2_X) and associated samples.  By the end of the week, the goal for the physics groups was set to be the porting of our physics commissioning methods and plans, as well as the early analyses (based an integrated luminosity in the range 10-100pb-1) into this new software. Since December, the large data samples from CMSSW_2_1 were completed. A big effort by the production group gave a significant number of events over the end-of-year break – but also gave out the first samples with the fast simulation. Meanwhile, as mentioned in December, the arrival of 2_2 meant that ...

  4. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Darin Acosta

    2010-01-01

    The collisions last year at 900 GeV and 2.36 TeV provided the long anticipated collider data to the CMS physics groups. Quite a lot has been accomplished in a very short time. Although the delivered luminosity was small, CMS was able to publish its first physics paper (with several more in preparation), and commence the commissioning of physics objects for future analyses. Many new performance results have been approved in advance of this CMS Week. One remarkable outcome has been the amazing agreement between out-of-the-box data with simulation at these low energies so early in the commissioning of the experiment. All of this is testament to the hard work and preparation conducted beforehand by many people in CMS. These analyses could not have happened without the dedicated work of the full collaboration on building and commissioning the detector, computing, and software systems combined with the tireless work of many to collect, calibrate and understand the data and our detector. To facilitate the efficien...

  5. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2012-01-01

      2012 has started off as a very busy year for the CMS Physics Groups. Planning for the upcoming higher luminosity/higher energy (8 TeV) operation of the LHC and relatively early Rencontres de Moriond are the high-priority activities for the group at the moment. To be ready for the coming 8-TeV data, CMS has made a concerted effort to perform and publish analyses on the 5 fb−1 dataset recorded in 2011. This has resulted in the submission of 16 papers already, including nine on the search for the Higgs boson. In addition, a number of preliminary results on the 2011 dataset have been released to the public. The Exotica and SUSY groups approved several searches for new physics in January, such as searches for W′ and exotic highly ionising particles. These were highlighted at a CERN seminar given on 24th  January. Many more analyses, from all the PAGs, including the newly formed SMP (Standard Model Physics) and FSQ (Forward and Small-x QCD), were approved in February. The ...

  6. Digital finger: beyond phenomenological figures of touch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Elo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mika Elo is a postdoctoral researcher and lecturer in visual culture at Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture (Aalto-ARTS, Helsinki. His research interests include theory of photographic media, philosophical media theory, and artistic research. He is participating in discussions in these areas in the capacity of curator, visual artist and researcher. He has published articles in Finnish, German, and English among others on Benjamin, Nancy, artistic research and photography theory. His doctoral thesis Valokuvan medium [The Medium of Photography] was published in Finnish in 2005 (Tutkijaliitto, Helsinki. In 2009–2011 he worked in the Figures of Touch research project (figuresoftouch.com, and since 2011 he is the director of Media Aesthetics research group at Aalto-ARTS, Department of Media.Author Biography The article reflects on digitality and interface design in terms of the multiple senses of touch. Touching is presented as a “pathic” sense of being exposed, which implies that touching exceeds the tactile and even the phenomenal world. A particular focus is set on Aristotle's and Husserl's ways of thematizing the sense of touch. In this way, two extremes of the phenomenological thinking of touching are articulated: touching as an indistinct and heterogeneous constituent of sensitivity and touching as the guarantor of immediacy of the sense experience. Referring to Derrida's critical notes concerning haptocentrism, the article attempts to problematize the hand and the finger as phenomenological figures of touch and as holds of haptic realism. The article concludes that insofar as digital interface design aims at haptic realism it conceives of the sense of touch in terms of narcissistic feedback and thus tends to conceal the pathic moment of touching.

  7. THE MICROBIOLOGY OF SOUTH AFRICAN DRIED SAUSAGE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    THE MICROBIOLOGY OF SOUTH AFRICAN DRIED SAUSAGE. W.H. Holzapfel and A.N. Hail. Receipt of MS s.3.76. Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, University of hetoria and. Animol and Dairv Science Reseorch Institute, Irene. OPSOMMING: DIE MIKROBIOLOGIE VAN SUID.AFRIKAANSE DROiWORS.

  8. Journal of Tropical Microbiology and Biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Tropical Microbiology and Biotechnology (JTMB) formerly Journal of Tropical Microbiology gives preeminence to the central role of modern biotechnology and microorganisms as tools and targets in current research, which is largely multidisciplinary. JTMB covers a broad range of topics, such as disease ...

  9. Effect of the linkers between the zinc fingers in zinc finger protein 809 on gene silencing and nuclear localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichida, Yu, E-mail: ichida-y@ncchd.go.jp; Utsunomiya, Yuko; Onodera, Masafumi

    2016-03-18

    Zinc finger protein 809 (ZFP809) belongs to the Kruppel-associated box-containing zinc finger protein (KRAB-ZFP) family and functions in repressing the expression of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV). ZFP809 binds to the primer-binding site (PBS)located downstream of the MoMLV-long terminal repeat (LTR) and induces epigenetic modifications at integration sites, such as repressive histone modifications and de novo DNA methylation. KRAB-ZFPs contain consensus TGEKP linkers between C2H2 zinc fingers. The phosphorylation of threonine residues within linkers leads to the inactivation of zinc finger binding to target sequences. ZFP809 also contains consensus linkers between zinc fingers. However, the function of ZFP809 linkers remains unknown. In the present study, we constructed ZFP809 proteins containing mutated linkers and examined their ability to silence transgene expression driven by MLV, binding ability to MLV PBS, and cellular localization. The results of the present study revealed that the linkers affected the ability of ZFP809 to silence transgene expression. Furthermore, this effect could be partly attributed to changes in the localization of ZFP809 proteins containing mutated linkers. Further characterization of ZFP809 linkers is required for understanding the functions and features of KRAB-ZFP-containing linkers. - Highlights: • ZFP809 has three consensus linkers between the zinc fingers. • Linkers are required for ZFP809 to silence transgene expression driven by MLV-LTR. • Linkers affect the precise nuclear localization of ZFP809.

  10. Microbiological Food Safety Surveillance in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xiaoyan; Li, Ning; Guo, Yunchang; Liu, Xiumei; Yan, Lin; Li, Ying; Yang, Shuran; Hu, Jing; Zhu, Jianghui; Yang, Dajin

    2015-08-28

    Microbiological food safety surveillance is a system that collects data regarding food contamination by foodborne pathogens, parasites, viruses, and other harmful microbiological factors. It helps to understand the spectrum of food safety, timely detect food safety hazards, and provide relevant data for food safety supervision, risk assessment, and standards-setting. The study discusses the microbiological surveillance of food safety in China, and introduces the policies and history of the national microbiological surveillance system. In addition, the function and duties of different organizations and institutions are provided in this work, as well as the generation and content of the surveillance plan, quality control, database, and achievement of the microbiological surveillance of food safety in China.

  11. PHYSICS

    CERN Document Server

    C. Hill

    2013-01-01

    The period since the last CMS bulletin has seen the end of proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy 8 TeV, a successful proton-lead collision run at 5 TeV/nucleon, as well as a “reference” proton run at 2.76 TeV. With these final LHC Run 1 datasets in hand, CMS Physics Analysis Groups have been busy analysing these data in preparation for the winter conferences. Moreover, despite the fact that the pp run only concluded in mid-December (and there was consequently less time to complete data analyses), CMS again made a strong showing at the Rencontres de Moriond in La Thuile (EW and QCD) where nearly 40 new results were presented. The highlight of these preliminary results was the eagerly anticipated updated studies of the properties of the Higgs boson discovered in July of last year. Meanwhile, preparations for Run 2 and physics performance studies for Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrade scenarios are ongoing. The Higgs analysis group produced updated analyses on the full Run 1 dataset (~25 f...

  12. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2013-01-01

    In the period since the last CMS Bulletin, the LHC – and CMS – have entered LS1. During this time, CMS Physics Analysis Groups have performed more than 40 new analyses, many of which are based on the complete 8 TeV dataset delivered by the LHC in 2012 (and in some cases on the full Run 1 dataset). These results were shown at, and well received by, several high-profile conferences in the spring of 2013, including the inaugural meeting of the Large Hadron Collider    Physics Conference (LHCP) in Barcelona, and the 26th International Symposium on Lepton Photon Interactions at High Energies (LP) in San Francisco. In parallel, there have been significant developments in preparations for Run 2 of the LHC and on “future physics” studies for both Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrades of the CMS detector. The Higgs analysis group produced five new results for LHCP including a new H-to-bb search in VBF production (HIG-13-011), ttH with H to γ&ga...

  13. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. D'Hondt

    The Electroweak and Top Quark Workshop (16-17th of July) A Workshop on Electroweak and Top Quark Physics, dedicated on early measurements, took place on 16th-17th July. We had more than 40 presentations at the Workshop, which was an important milestone for 2007 physics analyses in the EWK and TOP areas. The Standard Model has been tested empirically by many previous experiments. Observables which are nowadays known with high precision will play a major role for data-based CMS calibrations. A typical example is the use of the Z to monitor electron and muon reconstruction in di-lepton inclusive samples. Another example is the use of the W mass as a constraint for di-jets in the kinematic fitting of top-quark events, providing information on the jet energy scale. The predictions of the Standard Model, for what concerns proton collisions at the LHC, are accurate to a level that the production of W/Z and top-quark events can be used as a powerful tool to commission our experiment. On the other hand the measure...

  14. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Christopher Hill

    2013-01-01

    Since the last CMS Bulletin, the CMS Physics Analysis Groups have completed more than 70 new analyses, many of which are based on the complete Run 1 dataset. In parallel the Snowmass whitepaper on projected discovery potential of CMS for HL-LHC has been completed, while the ECFA HL-LHC future physics studies has been summarised in a report and nine published benchmark analyses. Run 1 summary studies on b-tag and jet identification, quark-gluon discrimination and boosted topologies have been documented in BTV-13-001 and JME-13-002/005/006, respectively. The new tracking alignment and performance papers are being prepared for submission as well. The Higgs analysis group produced several new results including the search for ttH with H decaying to ZZ, WW, ττ+bb (HIG-13-019/020) where an excess of ~2.5σ is observed in the like-sign di-muon channel, and new searches for high-mass Higgs bosons (HIG-13-022). Search for invisible Higgs decays have also been performed both using the associ...

  15. Human Safety in Veterinary Microbiology Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar B. P.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory work should be carried out with a minimum of risk to the health of the staff working in laboratory. This requires careful consideration of the risks involved in a particular procedure,followed by appropriate measures to minimise the risk of human disease. This concerned exclusively with risks from infectious agents, but physical and chemical injuries in microbiology laboratories must also be prevented. Risks from infection are reduced by good laboratory techniques and secured facilities which aid in the containment of pathogens. It is important to understand that containment of pathogens can be used for preventing disease in humans and animals. Often the same methods of containment are used for both preventing laboratory-acquired infection in humans and for preventing escape of pathogens that could cause an outbreak of animal disease. Although the methods, techniques and facilities required may be the same, the list of pathogens and categorization into levels of risk will differ depending on whether it is human or animal disease control that is the primary objective. Existing national and international reference laboratories have considerable experience in the operation of safe working practices and provision of appropriate facilities. When new laboratories are being established, it would be prudent to seek advice from the competent authorities at established institutes and it is important to comply with legislative requirements. [Vet. World 2009; 2(3.000: 113-117

  16. Making fingers and words count in a cognitive robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Cruz, Vivian M; Di Nuovo, Alessandro; Di Nuovo, Santo; Cangelosi, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from developmental as well as neuroscientific studies suggest that finger counting activity plays an important role in the acquisition of numerical skills in children. It has been claimed that this skill helps in building motor-based representations of number that continue to influence number processing well into adulthood, facilitating the emergence of number concepts from sensorimotor experience through a bottom-up process. The act of counting also involves the acquisition and use of a verbal number system of which number words are the basic building blocks. Using a Cognitive Developmental Robotics paradigm we present results of a modeling experiment on whether finger counting and the association of number words (or tags) to fingers, could serve to bootstrap the representation of number in a cognitive robot, enabling it to perform basic numerical operations such as addition. The cognitive architecture of the robot is based on artificial neural networks, which enable the robot to learn both sensorimotor skills (finger counting) and linguistic skills (using number words). The results obtained in our experiments show that learning the number words in sequence along with finger configurations helps the fast building of the initial representation of number in the robot. Number knowledge, is instead, not as efficiently developed when number words are learned out of sequence without finger counting. Furthermore, the internal representations of the finger configurations themselves, developed by the robot as a result of the experiments, sustain the execution of basic arithmetic operations, something consistent with evidence coming from developmental research with children. The model and experiments demonstrate the importance of sensorimotor skill learning in robots for the acquisition of abstract knowledge such as numbers.

  17. Microbiological Lessons Learned from the Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Ott, C. Mark; Bruce, Rebekah; Castro, Victoria A.; Mehta, Satish K.

    2011-01-01

    After 30 years of being the centerpiece of NASA s human spacecraft, the Space Shuttle will retire. This highly successful program provided many valuable lessons for the International Space Station (ISS) and future spacecraft. Major microbiological risks to crewmembers include food, water, air, surfaces, payloads, animals, other crewmembers, and ground support personnel. Adverse effects of microorganisms are varied and can jeopardize crew health and safety, spacecraft systems, and mission objectives. Engineering practices and operational procedures can minimize the negative effects of microorganisms. To minimize problems associated with microorganisms, appropriate steps must begin in the design phase of new spacecraft or space habitats. Spacecraft design must include requirements to control accumulation of water including humidity, leaks, and condensate on surfaces. Materials used in habitable volumes must not contribute to microbial growth. Use of appropriate materials and the implementation of robust housekeeping that utilizes periodic cleaning and disinfection will prevent high levels of microbial growth on surfaces. Air filtration can ensure low levels of bioaerosols and particulates in the breathing air. The use of physical and chemical steps to disinfect drinking water coupled with filtration can provide safe drinking water. Thorough preflight examination of flight crews, consumables, and the environment can greatly reduce pathogens in spacecraft. The advances in knowledge of living and working onboard the Space Shuttle formed the foundation for environmental microbiology requirements and operations for the International Space Station (ISS) and future spacecraft. Research conducted during the Space Shuttle Program resulted in an improved understanding of the effects of spaceflight on human physiology, microbial properties, and specifically the host-microbe interactions. Host-microbe interactions are substantially affected by spaceflight. Astronaut immune

  18. Microbiological consequences of indoor composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naegele, A; Reboux, G; Vacheyrou, M; Valot, B; Millon, L; Roussel, S

    2016-08-01

    Recycling of organic waste appeals to more and more people. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microbiological contamination around organic waste bins at three distances over a 12-month period. Contamination near the customary trash of control households was evaluated at the beginning to ensure that there is no recruitment bias. Air samples using the MAS 100 impactor were carried out in 38 dwellings that do household waste composting and in 10 dwellings of controls. Collection of particles by CIP 10 rotating cup sampler and dust samples collected by electrostatic dust collector cloths were acquired in dwellings that do household waste composting. Samples were analyzed by culture and by real-time quantitative PCR. Information about dwelling characteristics and inhabitant practices was obtained by a standardized questionnaire. The genera most often isolated were Penicillium, Aspergillus, Cladosporium and Streptomyces. Near the organic waste bins, bioaerosol samples showed an increase of Acarus siro (P = 0.001). Sedimented dust analyses highlighted an increase of A. siro, Wallemia sebi, Aspergillus versicolor, and Cladosporium sphaerospermum concentrations after a 12-month survey compared to the beginning. Composting favors microorganism development over time, but does not seem to have an effect on the bioaerosol levels and the surface microbiota beyond 0.5 m from the waste bin. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Heat treatment and gamma radiation effects on the physical-chemical, microbiological and sensory stability of pure sugarcane juice or added with fruit juices, stored under refrigeration;Efeitos do processamento termico e da radiacao gama na estabilidade fisico-quimica, microbiologica e sensorial de caldo de cana puro e adicionado de suco de frutas, armazenado sob refrigeracao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Aline Cristine Garcia de

    2007-07-01

    Sugarcane juice is a taste drink, energetic, no alcoholic that conserves all the nutrients in cane sugar. It was very appreciated by the Brazilian population and its production has been shown to be a highly lucrative business. This research had the following objectives: evaluate the acceptance of the consuming market and the stability of pure sugarcane juice or added with natural fruit juices, submitted of heat treatment (70 deg C/ 25 min) and/ or gamma radiation (2,5 kGy) and stored in high density polyethylene bottles, under refrigeration (5 +- 1 deg C). Sugarcane juice market test was evaluated through the application of 350 questionnaires on six Sao Paulo cities. Sugarcane juice stability was evaluated through microbiological (psychotropic count, lactic bacteria and yeasts and molds count), physical-chemical (pH, color, titratable acidity, soluble solids, ratio and polyphenoloxidase activity) and sensory (hedonic test) parameters. Centesimal composition was determined analyzing: humidity, caloric value, total carbohydrates, total and reducing sugars, lipids, proteins, ascorbic acid, ash and minerals. Sugarcane juice shelf life period was determinate ever 7 days over a period of 42 days stored under refrigeration. The data were submitted to the variance analysis and compared by Tukey's test (p<0,05). Among the 350 interviewed people, more of the half one is interested about its habitual food safe and care about street foods. Sandwiches had been cited foods as routinely consumed, followed for the sugarcane juice and 'pastel'. Among the interviewed ones, 80% had mentioned to appreciate sugarcane juice. It had not correlation between age and school age and the preference for the consumption form was with lemon juice addition. About 55% of the interviewed ones had mentioned that would more frequently consume sugarcane juice processed and packed. Sugarcane juice processing did not modify the flavor and taste of the drink. It was concluded from the

  20. Qualidade microbiológica e físico-química de sucos de laranja comercializados nas vias públicas de Porto Alegre/RS Microbiological and physical-chemical quality of orange juices commercialised in public streets of Porto Alegre city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla K. RUSCHEL

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available O comércio de sucos de laranja não pasteurizados vem aumentando nos últimos anos na cidade de Porto Alegre/RS. Com o intuito de avaliar a qualidade desses produtos, análises físico-químicas e microbiológicas foram realizadas em 52 amostras de sucos de laranja comercializados nas vias públicas de Porto Alegre. As análises microbiológicas demonstraram 44,23% (n=23 das amostras, em desacordo com os padrões estabelecidos pela Legislação Federal vigente, sendo os bolores e leveduras encontrados em níveis inapropriados em todas as amostras reprovadas. Coliformes fecais foram encontrados acima das quantidades permitidas em 5,7% (n=3 das amostras e Salmonella cholerasuis foi identificada em uma das amostras analisadas. As análises físico-químicas apresentaram 89,47% das amostras em desacordo com pelo menos um dos parâmetros analisados. Com base nestes resultados, sugerem-se maiores cuidados nas boas práticas de fabricação (BPF, principalmente na higiene pessoal de manipuladores e sanificação de máquinas extratoras.The commercialisation of nonpasteurized orange juice has been increased in recent years in Porto Alegre city, in South Brazil. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the quality of this product. Physical-chemical and microbiological analyses were performed in 52 samples of orange juice purchased in the streets of Porto Alegre city. The microbiological analysis demonstrated that 44,23% (n=23 of the samples did not agree with Federal Regulations. All the reproved samples presented inappropriate levels of molds and yeasts. Fecal coliforms were found in 5,7% (n=3 of the samples, while Salmonella Cholerasuis was isolated from one sample. The physical-chemical analysis demonstrated that 89,47% of the samples were in discordance with parameters established by Federal Regulations. Based on the results, good manufacturing practices (GMP, specially on personnel hygienic habits, and equipment sanitization are necessary.

  1. Hybrid-Actuated Finger Prosthesis with Tactile Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yee Low

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Finger prostheses are devices developed to emulate the functionality of natural human fingers. On top of their aesthetic appearance in terms of shape, size and colour, such biomimetic devices require a high level of dexterity. They must be capable of gripping an object, and even manipulating it in the hand. This paper presents a biomimetic robotic finger actuated by a hybrid mechanism and integrated with a tactile sensor. The hybrid actuation mechanism comprises a DC micromotor and a Shape Memory Alloy (SMA wire. A customized test rig has been developed to measure the force and stroke produced by the SMA wire. In parallel with the actuator development, experimental investigations have been conducted on Quantum Tunnelling Composite (QTC and Pressure Conductive Rubber (PCR towards the development of a tactile sensor for the finger. The viability of using these materials for tactile sensing has been determined. Such a hybrid actuation approach aided with tactile sensing capability enables a finger design as an integral part of a prosthetic hand for applications up to the transradial amputation level.

  2. Effect of individual finger skin temperature on vibrotactile perception threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Harazin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In healthy people, the vibrotactile perception threshold (VPT at fingertips depends on a given measurement method and on individual characteristics such as age, gender and finger skin temperature. The aim of the study was to compare the VPT values in 2 groups of healthy subjects with different finger skin temperature. Materials and Methods: The study group comprised 56 males and 76 females, who formed pairs matched with respect to age, gender and body mass index (BMI but differing in terms of finger skin temperature at pre-launch testing. The finger skin temperature of less than 29°C indicated the subjects with "cold hands" and that of more than 29°C, the subjects with "warm hands". The measuring system made use of P8 pallesthesiometer (EMSON-MAT, Poland and the measurement procedure was in compliance with the ISO 13091-1:2001 standard. VPT measurements were performed for the index, middle and ring fingers of both hands at the frequencies of 4 Hz, 25 Hz, 31.5 Hz, 63 Hz, 125 Hz and 250 Hz. Results: The findings of the study revealed that the mean VPTs among the subjects with "cold hands" were significantly higher than the corresponding values among the subjects with "warm hands". Conclusions: The type of individual peripheral thermoregulation should be considered when assessing the VPT and determining its reference values.

  3. Evaluation of electron beam irradiation for disinfection of turmeric fingers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumoto, K.; Fujino, M.; Supriyadi; Suzuki, T.; Hayashi, T.

    1991-01-01

    Turmeric finger as one of the most popular spices has been widely used for food manufacturing. However, it has also been a major cause of bacterial infestation of food materials especially in curry, ham and sausage manufacturing. In this study decontamination of bacteria in turmeric finger by electron beam irradiation was evaluated by comparing with several other decontamination methods: i.e., boiling, microwave irradiation, treatment by twin screw extruder and gamma-ray irradiation. By estimation of colony counting on nutrient agar plate, turmeric finger without any treatment gave total viable cell at 10 8 /g. Turmeric finger which was irradiated by electron beam at 10kGy dose dramatically reduced thermotolerant cell population below self restriction level (<1000/g), which has been required by food hygiene law. The same level of sterilization effect was obtained only by gamma-ray irradiation at 10kGy and 20kGy. On the other hand, although treatment through twin screw extruder slightly reduced bacterial numbers, neither boiling nor microwave irradiation gave sufficient decontamination effect on turmeric fingers

  4. Evaluation of electron beam irradiation for disinfection of turmeric fingers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumoto, Kyoden; Fujino, Masayuki; Supriyadi (Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Research Inst. for Food Science); Suzuki, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Toru

    1991-08-01

    Turmeric finger as one of the most popular spices has been widely used for food manufacturing. However, it has also been a major cause of bacterial infestation of food materials especially in curry, ham and sausage manufacturing. In this study decontamination of bacteria in turmeric finger by electron beam irradiation was evaluated by comparing with several other decontamination methods: i.e., boiling, microwave irradiation, treatment by twin screw extruder and gamma-ray irradiation. By estimation of colony counting on nutrient agar plate, turmeric finger without any treatment gave total viable cell at 10{sup 8}/g. Turmeric finger which was irradiated by electron beam at 10 kGy dose dramatically reduced thermotolerant cell population below self restriction level (<1000/g), which has been required by food hygiene law. The same level of sterilization effect was obtained only by gamma-ray irradiation at 10 kGy and 20 kGy. On the other hand, although treatment through twin screw extruder slightly reduced bacterial numbers, neither boiling nor microwave irradiation gave sufficient decontamination effect on turmeric fingers. (author).

  5. Evaluation of electron beam irradiation for disinfection of turmeric fingers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumoto, Kyoden; Fujino, Masayuki; Supriyadi; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Toru.

    1991-01-01

    Turmeric finger as one of the most popular spices has been widely used for food manufacturing. However, it has also been a major cause of bacterial infestation of food materials especially in curry, ham and sausage manufacturing. In this study decontamination of bacteria in turmeric finger by electron beam irradiation was evaluated by comparing with several other decontamination methods: i.e., boiling, microwave irradiation, treatment by twin screw extruder and gamma-ray irradiation. By estimation of colony counting on nutrient agar plate, turmeric finger without any treatment gave total viable cell at 10 8 /g. Turmeric finger which was irradiated by electron beam at 10 kGy dose dramatically reduced thermotolerant cell population below self restriction level (<1000/g), which has been required by food hygiene law. The same level of sterilization effect was obtained only by gamma-ray irradiation at 10 kGy and 20 kGy. On the other hand, although treatment through twin screw extruder slightly reduced bacterial numbers, neither boiling nor microwave irradiation gave sufficient decontamination effect on turmeric fingers. (author)

  6. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    V.Ciulli

    2011-01-01

    The main programme of the Physics Week held between 16th and 20th May was a series of topology-oriented workshops on di-leptons, di-photons, inclusive W, and all-hadronic final states. The goal of these workshops was to reach a common understanding for the set of objects (ID, cleaning...), the handling of pile-up, calibration, efficiency and purity determination, as well as to revisit critical common issues such as the trigger. Di-lepton workshop Most analysis groups use a di-lepton trigger or a combination of single and di-lepton triggers in 2011. Some groups need to collect leptons with as low PT as possible with strong isolation and identification requirements as for Higgs into WW at low mass, others with intermediate PT values as in Drell-Yan studies, or high PT as in the Exotica group. Electron and muon reconstruction, identification and isolation, was extensively described in the workshop. For electrons, VBTF selection cuts for low PT and HEEP cuts for high PT were discussed, as well as more complex d...

  7. Automation in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Susan M; Marlowe, Elizabeth M

    2013-09-01

    Imagine a clinical microbiology laboratory where a patient's specimens are placed on a conveyor belt and sent on an automation line for processing and plating. Technologists need only log onto a computer to visualize the images of a culture and send to a mass spectrometer for identification. Once a pathogen is identified, the system knows to send the colony for susceptibility testing. This is the future of the clinical microbiology laboratory. This article outlines the operational and staffing challenges facing clinical microbiology laboratories and the evolution of automation that is shaping the way laboratory medicine will be practiced in the future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2350... consists primarily of liquid or solid biological materials intended for medical purposes to cultivate...

  9. Prediction of contact forces of underactuated finger by adaptive neuro fuzzy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petković, Dalibor; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Abbasi, Almas; Kiani, Kourosh; Al-Shammari, Eiman Tamah

    2015-12-01

    To obtain adaptive finger passive underactuation can be used. Underactuation principle can be used to adapt shapes of the fingers for grasping objects. The fingers with underactuation do not require control algorithm. In this study a kinetostatic model of the underactuated finger mechanism was analyzed. The underactuation is achieved by adding the compliance in every finger joint. Since the contact forces of the finger depend on contact position of the finger and object, it is suitable to make a prediction model for the contact forces in function of contact positions of the finger and grasping objects. In this study prediction of the contact forces was established by a soft computing approach. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was applied as the soft computing method to perform the prediction of the finger contact forces.

  10. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: chemical interactions of primary biological aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Deguillaume

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the influence of primary biological aerosols (PBA on atmospheric chemistry and vice versa through microbiological and chemical properties and processes. Several studies have shown that PBA represent a significant fraction of air particulate matter and hence affect the microstructure and water uptake of aerosol particles. Moreover, airborne micro-organisms, namely fungal spores and bacteria, can transform chemical constituents of the atmosphere by metabolic activity. Recent studies have emphasized the viability of bacteria and metabolic degradation of organic substances in cloud water. On the other hand, the viability and metabolic activity of airborne micro-organisms depend strongly on physical and chemical atmospheric parameters such as temperature, pressure, radiation, pH value and nutrient concentrations. In spite of recent advances, however, our knowledge of the microbiological and chemical interactions of PBA in the atmosphere is rather limited. Further targeted investigations combining laboratory experiments, field measurements, and modelling studies will be required to characterize the chemical feedbacks, microbiological activities at the air/snow/water interface supplied to the atmosphere.

  11. Dorsal finger texture recognition: Investigating fixed-length SURF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, Daniel; Kückelhahn, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We seek to create fixed-length features from dorsal finger skin images extracted by the SURF interest point detector to combine it in the privacy enhancing helper data scheme. The source of the biometric samples is the GUC45 database which features finger vein, fingerprint and dorsal finger skin...... images for modality fusion. First, the region of interest (ROI) is extracted, after which SURF features are extracted, and finally two different approaches for creating fixed length feature vectors are applied. SURF performance on the ROI is comparable to the PolyU database reported in the literature...... the complexity of the SURF matching scheme, a reduction in run-time of 75%–80% has been achieved, with only minimal precision loss; EER increases from 0.74% to 1%. The complexity of the matching can be reduced from O(n2) to constant time, but at a higher precision cost and resulting in an EER of 16.51%....

  12. Compensating Pose Uncertainties Through Appropriate Gripper Finger Cutouts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolniakowski, Adam; Gams, Andrej; Kiforenko, Lilita

    2017-01-01

    capabilities in a sample industrial object grasping scenario for a finger that was designed using an automated simulation-based geometry optimization method [1, 2]. We test the developed gripper with a set of grasps subjected to structured perturbation in a simulation environment and in the real-world setting......The gripper finger design is a recurring problem in many robotic grasping platforms used in industry. The task of switching the gripper configuration to accommodate for a new batch of objects typically requires engineering expertise, and is a lengthy and costly iterative trial-and-error process....... We provide a comparison of the data obtained by using both of these approaches. We argue that the strong correspondence observed in results validates the use of dynamic simulation for the gripper finger design and optimization....

  13. Compensating Pose Uncertainties through Appropriate Gripper Finger Cutouts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolniakowski, Adam; Gams, Andrej; Kiforenko, Lilita

    2018-01-01

    The gripper finger design is a recurring problem in many robotic grasping platforms used in industry. The task of switching the gripper configuration to accommodate a new batch of objects typically requires engineering expertise and is a lengthy and costly iterative trial-and-error process. One...... in a sample industrial object grasping scenario for a finger that was designed using an automated simulation-based geometry optimization method (Wolniakowski et al., 2013, 2015). We test the developed gripper with a set of grasps subjected to structured perturbation in a simulation environment and in the real......-world setting. We provide a comparison of the data obtained by using both of these approaches. We argue that the strong correspondence observed in results validates the use of dynamic simulation for the gripper finger design and optimization....

  14. Finger dermatoglyphic variations in Rengma Nagas of Nagaland India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Sudip Datta; Pal, Paramita; Mukherjee, Deba P

    2009-03-01

    The Rengma Nagas are one of the major Mongoloid tribal populations in the North-Eastern state of Nagaland in India. Population variation and sexual dimorphism in respect of finger dermatoglyphic characteristics in 207 adult individuals (104 males and 103 females) are reported in this present context. Frequency distribution of finger pattern types in different digits (both left and right sides combined) showed that whorls were the most prevalent patterns among both males (52.19%) and females (55.69%), followed by loops (47.70% in males and 42.81% in females). Significant sex differences in Dankmeijer Index (t = 1.47; p dermatoglyphic pattern types, Pattern Intensity Index in fingers, TFRC and AFRC no significant sex differences were observed.

  15. Design of rehabilitation robot hand for fingers CPM training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongfu; Chan, T. W.; Tong, K. Y.; Kwong, K. K.; Yao, Xifan

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a low-cost prototype for rehabilitation robot aide patient do hands CPM (continuous passive motion) training. The design of the prototype is based on the principle of Rutgers Master II glove, but it is better in performance for more improvement made. In the design, it uses linear motors to replace pneumatic actuators to make the product more portable and mobile. It increases finger training range to 180 degree for the full range training of hand finger holding and extension. Also the prototype can not only be wearing on palm and fore arm do training for face to face with finger move together, but also be put in the opposite hand glove wear direction for hand rehabilitation training. During the research, Solidworks is used as the tool for mechanical design and movement simulation. It proved through experiment that the prototype made in the research is appropriate for hand do CPM training.

  16. Finger vein recognition based on convolutional neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Gesi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biometric Authentication Technology has been widely used in this information age. As one of the most important technology of authentication, finger vein recognition attracts our attention because of its high security, reliable accuracy and excellent performance. However, the current finger vein recognition system is difficult to be applied widely because its complicated image pre-processing and not representative feature vectors. To solve this problem, a finger vein recognition method based on the convolution neural network (CNN is proposed in the paper. The image samples are directly input into the CNN model to extract its feature vector so that we can make authentication by comparing the Euclidean distance between these vectors. Finally, the Deep Learning Framework Caffe is adopted to verify this method. The result shows that there are great improvements in both speed and accuracy rate compared to the previous research. And the model has nice robustness in illumination and rotation.

  17. Trigger finger presenting secondary to leiomyoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harb Ziad

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a previously undescribed entity: trigger finger secondary to a leiomyoma. This is the first time such a case has been reported and highlights the fact that common conditions can sometimes present secondary to rare diseases. Case presentation A 39-year-old Caucasian man presented with a fairly typical presentation of trigger finger. During surgical treatment, the lesion was excised and sent for histology, which showed tissue consistent with a leiomyoma. The patient made an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Trigger finger is a common condition that is usually easily diagnosed and managed. However, it is important to appreciate that uncommon conditions, such as leiomyoma, can present with what is sometimes considered trivial disease, and one should always consider the differential diagnoses even when faced with relatively benign conditions.

  18. Interrater reliability in finger joint goniometer measurement in Dupuytren's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrand, Christina; Krevers, Barbro; Kvist, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    We investigated interrater reliability of motion (ROM) measurement in the finger joints of people with Dupuytren's disease. Eight raters measured flexion and extension of the three finger joints in one affected finger of each of 13 people with different levels of severity of Dupuytren's disease, giving 104 measures of joints and motions. Reliability measures, represented by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of the mean (SEM), and differences between raters with the highest and lowest mean scores, were calculated. ICCs ranged from .832 to .973 depending on joint and motion. The SEM was ≤3° for all joints and motions. Differences in mean between highest and lowest raters were larger for flexion than for extension; the largest difference was in the distal interphalangeal joint. The results indicate that following these standardized guidelines, the interrater reliability of goniometer measurements is high for digital ROM in people with Dupuytren's disease.

  19. Microbiology and radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colasanti, R.; Coutts, D.; Pugh, S.Y.R.; Rosevear, A.

    1990-03-01

    The present Nirex Safety Assessment Research Programme on microbiology is based on experimental as well as theoretical work. It has concentrated on the study of how mixed, natural populations of microbes might survive and grow on the organic component of Low Level Radioactive Wastes (LLW) and PCM (Plutonium Contaminated Waste) in a cementitious waste repository. The present studies indicate that both carbon dioxide and methane will be produced by microbial action within the repository. Carbon dioxide will dissolve and react with the concrete to a limited extent so methane will be the principal component of the produced gas. The concentration of hydrogen, derived from corrosion, will be depressed by microbial action and that this will further elevate methane levels. Actual rates of production will be lower than that in a domestic landfill due to the more extreme pH. Microbial action will clearly affect the aqueous phase chemistry where organic material is present in the waste. The cellulosic fraction is the main determinant of cell growth and the appearance of soluble organics. The structure of the mathematical model which has been developed, predicts the general features which are intuitively expected in a developing microbial population. It illustrates that intermediate compounds will build up in the waste until growth of the next organism needed for sequential degradation is initiated. The soluble compounds in the pore water and the mixture of microbes present in the waste will vary with time and sustain biological activity over a prolonged period. Present estimates suggest that most microbial action in the repository will be complete after 400 years. There is scope for the model to deal with environmental factors such as temperature and pH and to introduce other energy sources such as hydrogen. (author)

  20. Microbiological Monitoring in Geothermal Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawi, M.; Lerm, S.; Linder, R.; Vetter, A.; Vieth-Hillebrand, A.; Miethling-Graff, R.; Seibt, A.; Wolfgramm, M.; Wuerdemann, H.

    2010-12-01

    In the scope of the research projects “AquiScreen” and “MiProTherm” we investigated geothermally used groundwater systems under microbial, geochemical, mineralogical and petrological aspects. On one side an enhanced process understanding of engineered geothermal systems is mandatory to optimize plant reliability and economy, on the other side this study provides insights into the microbiology of terrestrial thermal systems. Geothermal systems located in the North German Basin and the Molasse Basin were analyzed by sampling of fluids and solid phases. The investigated sites were characterized by different temperatures, salinities and potential microbial substrates. The microbial population was monitored by the use of genetic fingerprinting techniques and PCR-cloning based on PCR-amplified 16S rRNA and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) genes. DNA-sequences of fingerprints and cloned PCR-products were compared to public databases and correlated with metabolic classes to provide information about the biogeochemical processes. In all investigated geothermal plants, covering a temperature range from 5° to 120°C, microorganisms were found. Phylogenetic gene analyses indicate a broad diversity of microorganisms adapted to the specific conditions in the engineered system. Beside characterized bacteria like Thermus scotoductus, Siderooxidans lithoautotrophicus and the archaeon Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus a high number of so far uncultivated microorganisms was detected. As it is known that - in addition to abiotic factors - microbes like sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are involved in the processes of corrosion and scaling in plant components, we identified SRB by specific analyses of DSR genes. The SRB detected are closely related to thermotolerant and thermophilic species of Desulfotomaculum, Thermodesulfovibrio, Desulfohalobium and Thermodesulfobacterium, respectively. Overall, the detection of microbes known to be involved in biocorrosion and the

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging and radiographic findings of seal finger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marjelund, S.; Tikkakoski, T.; Isokangas, M.; Raeisaenen, S.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiographic findings of five patients with seal finger. Material and Methods: The MR images and radiographs of five patients with seal finger were retrospectively evaluated. MRI was performed on four patients in the subacute phase, and follow-up imaging was done on one of them at 5 months. One patient had MRI only at a later stage 5 years after onset. Radiographs were taken three times in the subacute phase and once at a later stage. One patient had had seal finger in another finger previously. Results: Short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR) sequence showed extensive subcutaneous soft tissue edema in all four patients in the subacute phase and tenosynovitis of the flexion tendons in two cases. Three patients had edema in 2-3 phalanges, and effusion in the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint was seen in one case. At the later stage, no signal pathology in soft tissues or bones was seen in STIR images. In the subacute phase, radiographs showed digital soft-tissue swelling in three patients, and one patient had a narrowed DIP joint, periarticular osteoporosis, and a periosteal reaction. At the later stage, flexion contracture of the finger was seen. Conclusion: In addition to soft-tissue infection, seal finger causes bone marrow edema, tenosynovitis, and effusion in the interphalangeal joints visible as increased signal intensity in STIR images. Radiographs reveal periarticular osteoporosis with loss of cartilage in the subacute phase and flexion contracture at the later stage. MRI (STIR) allows more precise delineation of the inflammatory process compared to radiography

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging and radiographic findings of seal finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marjelund, S.; Tikkakoski, T.; Isokangas, M.; Raeisaenen, S. [Oulu Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-12-15

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiographic findings of five patients with seal finger. Material and Methods: The MR images and radiographs of five patients with seal finger were retrospectively evaluated. MRI was performed on four patients in the subacute phase, and follow-up imaging was done on one of them at 5 months. One patient had MRI only at a later stage 5 years after onset. Radiographs were taken three times in the subacute phase and once at a later stage. One patient had had seal finger in another finger previously. Results: Short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR) sequence showed extensive subcutaneous soft tissue edema in all four patients in the subacute phase and tenosynovitis of the flexion tendons in two cases. Three patients had edema in 2-3 phalanges, and effusion in the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint was seen in one case. At the later stage, no signal pathology in soft tissues or bones was seen in STIR images. In the subacute phase, radiographs showed digital soft-tissue swelling in three patients, and one patient had a narrowed DIP joint, periarticular osteoporosis, and a periosteal reaction. At the later stage, flexion contracture of the finger was seen. Conclusion: In addition to soft-tissue infection, seal finger causes bone marrow edema, tenosynovitis, and effusion in the interphalangeal joints visible as increased signal intensity in STIR images. Radiographs reveal periarticular osteoporosis with loss of cartilage in the subacute phase and flexion contracture at the later stage. MRI (STIR) allows more precise delineation of the inflammatory process compared to radiography.

  3. Microbiological surveillance and antimicrobial stewardship minimise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbiological surveillance and antimicrobial stewardship minimise the need for ultrabroad-spectrum combination therapy for treatment of nosocomial infections in a trauma intensive care unit: An audit of an evidence-based empiric antimicrobial policy.

  4. Finger doses for staff handling radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Gauri S; Sharma, Sanjay K; Rath, Gaura K

    2006-09-01

    Radiation doses to the fingers of occupational workers handling 99mTc-labeled compounds and 131I for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in nuclear medicine were measured by thermoluminescence dosimetry. The doses were measured at the base of the ring finger and the index finger of both hands in 2 groups of workers. Group 1 (7 workers) handled 99mTc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, and group 2 (6 workers) handled 131I for diagnosis and therapy. Radiation doses to the fingertips of 3 workers also were measured. Two were from group 1, and 1 was from group 2. The doses to the base of the fingers for the radiopharmacy staff and physicians from group 1 were observed to be 17+/-7.5 (mean+/-SD) and 13.4+/-6.5 microSv/GBq, respectively. Similarly, the dose to the base of the fingers for the 3 physicians in group 2 was estimated to be 82.0+/-13.8 microSv/GBq. Finger doses for the technologists in both groups could not be calculated per unit of activity because they did not handle the radiopharmaceuticals directly. Their doses were reported in millisieverts that accumulated in 1 wk. The doses to the fingertips of the radiopharmacy worker and the physician in group 1 were 74.3+/-19.8 and 53.5+/-21.9 microSv/GBq, respectively. The dose to the fingertips of the physician in group 2 was 469.9+/-267 microSv/GBq. The radiation doses to the fingers of nuclear medicine staff at our center were measured. The maximum expected annual dose to the extremities appeared to be less than the annual limit (500 mSv/y), except for a physician who handled large quantities of 131I for treatment. Because all of these workers are on rotation and do not constantly handle radioactivity throughout the year, the doses to the base of the fingers or the fingertips should not exceed the prescribed annual limit of 500 mSv.

  5. Finger injuries from infant mittens; a continuing but preventable hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, M D; Seymour, P

    1996-04-01

    During the last 4 years, three infants have presented with finger-tip injuries secondary to entrapment in woollen/synthetic mittens. The accident happened at home in one case but the other two occurred in different neonatal units. Spontaneous amputation of the terminal phalanx of the index finger occurred in two patients but in the other there was complete healing. This problem may be avoided by restricting the use of mittens, by changing their design, and by a greater awareness of this hazard.

  6. Trace element finger printing of emeralds by PIXE and PIGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xinpei; Palmer, G.R.; MacArthur, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The concentrations of 18 major- and minor-elements in 12 Emeralds from different mines and two synthetic ones are measured with proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and γ-ray emission (PIGE). The concentration and distribution of 18 elements are used to establish the characteristic finger print pattern of each Emerald. With the help of cluster analysis of SYSTAT statistical package for IBMPC, these finger prints are analysed, from which a quantitative description of the dissimilarities between Emeralds can be given

  7. Transforming clinical microbiology with bacterial genome sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Didelot, Xavier; Bowden, Rory; Wilson, Daniel J.; Peto, Tim E. A.; Crook, Derrick W.

    2012-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing of bacteria has recently emerged as a cost-effective and convenient approach for addressing many microbiological questions. Here we review the current status of clinical microbiology and how it has already begun to be transformed by the use of next-generation sequencing. We focus on three essential tasks: identifying the species of an isolate, testing its properties such as resistance to antibiotics and virulence, and monitoring the emergence and spread of bacterial pa...

  8. Medical microbiology training needs and trainee experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Josephine; Elamin, Wael; Millar, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Training in microbiology is continuing to evolve. Standardisation of this process has, in part, been achieved through the development of a training curriculum by the Royal College of Pathologists (RCPath). A substantial proportion of microbiology training occurs through telephone consultations. To ascertain the content of these interactions and the extent to which the necessary skills outlined by the curriculum are attainable via these consultations. Records of telephone consultations made by microbiology registrars (SpR) on the Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) over a 6 month period were analysed with regard to who initiated contact and the type of advice provided. An average of 426 SpR entries per month were made on the LIMS following telephone consultations. These consultations were predominantly initiated by fellow clinicians as opposed to the SpR. The majority (79%) of advice entailed guidance as to the use of antimicrobials which resulted in an alteration of the current regimen in 54% of cases. This study represents the first attempt to quantify the telephone consultations of microbiology trainees. It is concluded that although such interactions provide a means of attaining some of the competencies outlined by the RCPath curriculum, the bias towards antimicrobial advice reflects a discrepancy between the needs of the service users and the broad skill set advocated by the current microbiology training programme. Future modifications will need to take this into account to ensure both the training of SpRs and the microbiology service is fit for purpose.

  9. Finger movement function after ultrasound-guided percutaneous pulley release for trigger finger: effects of postoperative rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Szu-Ching; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Hsu, Hsiu-Yun; Jou, I-Ming; Sun, Yung-Nien; Su, Fong-Chin

    2015-01-01

    To develop and test a postoperative rehabilitation protocol for use by individuals with trigger finger undergoing ultrasound-guided percutaneous pulley release. Nonrandomized controlled trial. Hospital and local community. Individuals suffering from trigger finger with joint contracture (N=21) were recruited and grouped into an intervention group (n=9) or a control group (n=12). All the participants underwent the same surgical procedure performed by the same surgeon. A 4-week postoperative rehabilitation program was designed based on the wound healing process. The intervention group received postoperative rehabilitation after the surgery, whereas the control group received no treatment after the surgery. The finger movement functions were quantitatively evaluated before and 1 month after the surgery using a 3-dimensional motion capture system. The fingertip workspace and joint range of motion (ROM) were evaluated while the participant was performing a sequential 5-posture movement, including finger extension, intrinsic plus, straight fist, full fist, and hook fist. The intervention group demonstrated significantly more improvements than the control group in the fingertip workspace (49% vs 17%), ROM of the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint (16% vs 4%), ROM of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint (21% vs 5%), and total active ROM (17% vs 5%). This pilot study evaluated a postoperative rehabilitation protocol for trigger finger and demonstrated its effects on various finger functions. Participants who underwent the rehabilitation program had significantly more improvements in the fingertip workspace, ROM of the DIP and PIP joints, and total active ROM. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Efeito do tipo de corte nas características físico-químicas e microbiológicas do melão 'cantaloupe' (Cucumis melo L. Híbrido hy-Mark minimamente processado Effect of type of cutting on the physical chemical and microbiological characteristics of 'Cantaloupe' melon (Cucumis melo L. Hybrid hy-Mark minimally processed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Cordeiro de Oliveira

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito de dois tipos de cortes (manual e mecânico nas características físico-químicas e microbiológicas do melão 'Cantaloupe' minimamente processado e refrigerado. Frutos com grau de maturação adequado foram selecionados, lavados, sanificados (200 ppm de cloro ativo/2 minutos e processados de acordo com o tipo de corte. Os frutos utilizados para o corte mecânico foram descascados em máquina descascadora e após a retirada das sementes, submetidos ao corte com auxílio de máquina de corte. Os destinados ao corte manual foram descascados e cortados com auxílio facas, colocados em imersão em solução de hipoclorito de sódio (20 ppm de cloro ativo por 30 segundos e acondicionados em embalagens flexíveis PET, armazenados a 4°C ± 1°C e avaliados a cada três dias por um período de 15 dias. Ao final dos experimentos, concluiu-se que para o processamento mínimo de melão 'Cantaloupe', o corte manual foi o mais indicado, por apresentar melhor estabilidade das características de cor, textura, pH, umidade e contagens microbiológicas durante o armazenamento.The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of two types of cutting (manual and mechanic on the physical-chemical and microbiological characteristics of processed and refrigerated 'Cantaloupe' melon. The fruits in the appropriate stage of ripening were selected, washed, sanitized (200ppm of active chlorine/2 minutes and processed in agreement with types of cutting. The fruits used for the mechanical cutting were cutting in peeling machine and after at retreat of the seeds, submitted to the cutting with aid of cutting machine. The fruits destined at manual cutting were peeled and cut with aid of knives, immerged in chlorinated water (20 mg.L-1 of active chlorine for 30 seconds and conditioned in PET flexible packing, stored at 4°C ± 1°C and were carried out each three days during 15 days. At the end of the experiments it was

  11. Morpho-agronomic Classification of Some Native and Exotic Finger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Finger millet (Eleusine coracana L.) is one of the important indigenous crops of Africa. The productivity of the crop, however, is very low owing to several factors including the inherent low-yielding potential of the cultivars. Information on genetic diversity among the available germplasm collections is very useful for breeding ...

  12. Cold-Blooded Attention: Finger Temperature Predicts Attentional Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Rodrigo C.; Moënne-Loccoz, Cristóbal; Maldonado, Pedro E.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal stress has been shown to increase the chances of unsafe behavior during industrial and driving performances due to reductions in mental and attentional resources. Nonetheless, establishing appropriate safety standards regarding environmental temperature has been a major problem, as modulations are also be affected by the task type, complexity, workload, duration, and previous experience with the task. To bypass this attentional and thermoregulatory problem, we focused on the body rather than environmental temperature. Specifically, we measured tympanic, forehead, finger and environmental temperatures accompanied by a battery of attentional tasks. We considered a 10 min baseline period wherein subjects were instructed to sit and relax, followed by three attentional tasks: a continuous performance task (CPT), a flanker task (FT) and a counting task (CT). Using multiple linear regression models, we evaluated which variable(s) were the best predictors of performance. The results showed a decrement in finger temperature due to instruction and task engagement that was absent when the subject was instructed to relax. No changes were observed in tympanic or forehead temperatures, while the environmental temperature remained almost constant for each subject. Specifically, the magnitude of the change in finger temperature was the best predictor of performance in all three attentional tasks. The results presented here suggest that finger temperature can be used as a predictor of alertness, as it predicted performance in attentional tasks better than environmental temperature. These findings strongly support that peripheral temperature can be used as a tool to prevent unsafe behaviors and accidents. PMID:28955215

  13. Cold-Blooded Attention: Finger Temperature Predicts Attentional Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo C. Vergara

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal stress has been shown to increase the chances of unsafe behavior during industrial and driving performances due to reductions in mental and attentional resources. Nonetheless, establishing appropriate safety standards regarding environmental temperature has been a major problem, as modulations are also be affected by the task type, complexity, workload, duration, and previous experience with the task. To bypass this attentional and thermoregulatory problem, we focused on the body rather than environmental temperature. Specifically, we measured tympanic, forehead, finger and environmental temperatures accompanied by a battery of attentional tasks. We considered a 10 min baseline period wherein subjects were instructed to sit and relax, followed by three attentional tasks: a continuous performance task (CPT, a flanker task (FT and a counting task (CT. Using multiple linear regression models, we evaluated which variable(s were the best predictors of performance. The results showed a decrement in finger temperature due to instruction and task engagement that was absent when the subject was instructed to relax. No changes were observed in tympanic or forehead temperatures, while the environmental temperature remained almost constant for each subject. Specifically, the magnitude of the change in finger temperature was the best predictor of performance in all three attentional tasks. The results presented here suggest that finger temperature can be used as a predictor of alertness, as it predicted performance in attentional tasks better than environmental temperature. These findings strongly support that peripheral temperature can be used as a tool to prevent unsafe behaviors and accidents.

  14. Systematic classification of the His-Me finger superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonska, Jagoda; Matelska, Dorota; Steczkiewicz, Kamil; Ginalski, Krzysztof

    2017-11-16

    The His-Me finger endonucleases, also known as HNH or ββα-metal endonucleases, form a large and diverse protein superfamily. The His-Me finger domain can be found in proteins that play an essential role in cells, including genome maintenance, intron homing, host defense and target offense. Its overall structural compactness and non-specificity make it a perfectly-tailored pathogenic module that participates on both sides of inter- and intra-organismal competition. An extremely low sequence similarity across the superfamily makes it difficult to identify and classify new His-Me fingers. Using state-of-the-art distant homology detection methods, we provide an updated and systematic classification of His-Me finger proteins. In this work, we identified over 100 000 proteins and clustered them into 38 groups, of which three groups are new and cannot be found in any existing public domain database of protein families. Based on an analysis of sequences, structures, domain architectures, and genomic contexts, we provide a careful functional annotation of the poorly characterized members of this superfamily. Our results may inspire further experimental investigations that should address the predicted activity and clarify the potential substrates, to provide more detailed insights into the fundamental biological roles of these proteins. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Reference values for the nickel concentration in human finger nails

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Peters, K; Menné, T

    1991-01-01

    A reference value for the nickel concentration in finger nails from people who are not occupationally exposed to nickel was determined on the basis of nail samples from 95 healthy individuals. The mean +/- standard deviation was 1.19 +/- 1.61 mg/kg and the median was 0.49 mg/kg (range 0.042-7.50 mg...

  16. Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... respective DNA can help to generate engineered zinc fingers for therapeutic purposes involving genome targeting. Exploring the structure–function relationships of the existing zinc finger–DNA complexes can aid in predicting the probable zinc .... tered to a defined family based on binding data. How-.

  17. Finger-stylus for non touch-enable systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Chaudhary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since computer was invented, people are using many devices to interact with computer. Initially there were keyboard, mouse etc. but with advancement of technology, new ways are being discovered that are quite common and natural to the humans like stylus for touch-enabled systems. In the current age of technology, the user is expected to touch the machine interface to give input. Hand gesture is used in such a way to interact with machines where natural bare hand is used to communicate without touching machine interface. It gives a feeling to the user that he is interacting in a natural way with some human, not with traditional machines. This paper presents a technique where the user need not touch the machine interface to draw on the screen. Here hand finger draws shapes on monitor like stylus, without touching the monitor. This method can be used in many applications including games. The finger is used as an input device that acts like a paint-brush or finger-stylus and is used to make shapes in front of the camera. Fingertip extraction and motion tracking were done in Matlab with real time constraints. This work is an early attempt to replace stylus with the natural finger without touching the screen.

  18. Amniogenesis in Schreiber's long-fingered bat Miniopterus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schreiber's long-fingered bat, Miniopterus schreibersii natalensis is seasonally monoestrous, carrying a single foetus in the right uterine horn. Implantation is superficial, the amnion being a pleuramnion. Lateral folds, originating from the ends of the caudal and cephalic folds, are the main contributors in the formation of the ...

  19. Development of transgenic finger millet (Eleusine coracana (L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-18

    Jan 18, 2012 ... tropical regions of Africa and Asia (O'Kennedy et al. 2006). Finger millet ... University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore, was used for the introduction of rice chitinase gene. A tissue culture protocol (Ceasar and Ignacimuthu 2008) was used for the ... The culture was maintained at 26°C on an orbital shaker.

  20. Cortical activation during finger tapping in thyroid dysfunction: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MADU

    Cortical activation during finger tapping in thyroid dysfunction: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study. S KHUSHU. 1,*, S SENTHIL KUMARAN. 1, T SEKHRI. 2, R P TRIPATHI. 1, P C JAIN. 3 and V JAIN. 1. 1NMR Research Centre, 2Thyroid Research Centre, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied sciences,. Brig.

  1. Moving Fingers under a Stick: A Laboratory Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massalha, Taha; Lanir, Yuval; Gluck, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We consider a demonstration in which pupils alternately slide and stop their fingers under a long horizontal rod which they support. The changeover is described in terms of the relevant kinetic and static friction. We present a model calculation, performed on a spreadsheet, which clarifies the process and describes graphically the stepwise…

  2. Optimal Finger Search Trees in the Pointer Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Lagogiannis, George; Makris, Christos

    2003-01-01

    We develop a new finger search tree with worst-case constant update time in the Pointer Machine (PM) model of computation. This was a major problem in the field of Data Structures and was tantalizingly open for over twenty years while many attempts by researchers were made to solve it. The result...

  3. Development of transgenic finger millet (Eleusine coracana (L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-18

    Jan 18, 2012 ... quickly in size, leading to death of seedlings within 25–30 days after the spraying of the fungal spores. High level of resistance was conferred by transgenic finger ... viral diseases through alien gene transfer. Fungal disease is a major constraint in the crop production due to high yield loss. Significant yield ...

  4. Experience of Percutaneous Trigger Finger Release under Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    95. 5. Carrozzella J, Stern PJ, Von Kuster LC. Transection of radial digital nerve of the thumb during trigger release. J Hand Surg. Am 1989;14:198‑200. 6. Lorthioir J Jr. Surgical treatment of trigger‑finger by a subcutaneous method. J Bone Joint ...

  5. Compensating Pose Uncertainties Through Appropriate Gripper Finger Cutouts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolniakowski, Adam; Gams, Andrej; Kiforenko, Lilita

    2018-01-01

    The gripper finger design is a recurring problem in many robotic grasping platforms used in industry. The task of switching the gripper configuration to accommodate for a new batch of objects typically requires engineering expertise, and is a lengthy and costly iterative trial-and-error process. ...

  6. Gold Finger: Metal Jewellery as a Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Therapy!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hlaing

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyarticular psoriatic arthritis is a chronic, progressive and disabling auto-immune disease often affecting the small joints of the hands in a symmetrical fashion. The disease can progress rapidly causing joint swelling and damaging cartilage and bone around the joints resulting in severe deformities. We report a very unusual case of a 49-year-old woman who presented with polyarticular psoriatic arthritis affecting all proximal interphalangeal (PIP joints of both hands except the left ring finger PIP joint. On clinical examination there was no evidence of arthritis in the left ring finger PIP joint. We confirmed the paucity of joint damage in the PIP joint of the left ring finger using more modern imaging modalities such as musculoskeletal ultrasound and MRI scan of the small joints of the hands. All other PIP joints in both hands demonstrated advanced degrees of joint damage secondary to chronic psoriatic inflammatory arthritis. We postulated that wearing a gold wedding ring has helped protecting the PIP joint of the left ring finger from the damaging effect of inflammatory arthritis. The possible mechanisms by which metal jewellery (gold ring confer protection to adjacent joints was discussed.

  7. Tensile Strength of Finger Joints at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter C.; Olesen, Frits Bolonius

    A series of test s aimed a t establishing the effect of temperature upon the tensile strength parallel-to-grain of finger jointed laminae for glulam has been conducted in the Fire Research Laboratory at Aalborg University Centre. The objective of this report is to present the background...

  8. Digital thermography of the fingers and toes in Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mie Jin; Kwon, Seong Ryul; Jung, Kyong-Hee; Joo, Kowoon; Park, Shin-Goo; Park, Won

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether skin temperature measurement by digital thermography on hands and feet is useful for diagnosis of Raynaud's phenomenon (RP). Fifty-seven patients with RP (primary RP, n = 33; secondary RP, n = 24) and 146 healthy volunteers were recruited. After acclimation to room temperature for 30 min, thermal imaging of palmar aspect of hands and dorsal aspect of feet were taken. Temperature differences between palm (center) and the coolest finger and temperature differences between foot dorsum (center) and first toe significantly differed between patients and controls. The area under curve analysis showed that temperature difference of the coolest finger (cutoff value: 2.2℃) differentiated RP patients from controls (sensitivity/specificity: 67/60%, respectively). Temperature differences of first toe (cutoff value: 3.11℃) also discriminated RP patients (sensitivity/specificity: about 73/66%, respectively). A combination of thermographic assessment of the coolest finger and first toe was highly effective in men (sensitivity/specificity : about 88/60%, respectively) while thermographic assessment of first toe was solely sufficient for women (sensitivity/specificity: about 74/68%, respectively). Thermographic assessment of the coolest finger and first toe is useful for diagnosing RP. In women, thermography of first toe is highly recommended.

  9. Variability and trait relationships among finger millet accessions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    of finger millet to determine the genetic potential for future use in breeding programmes. A total of 100 accessions were evaluated for morpho-agronomic characters in a 10 x 10 lattice design at. NaSARRI and Ikulwe in Uganda for two seasons. Analysis of variance revealed mean squares of the genotypes were significant ...

  10. Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... Support Vector Machine (SVM) is a state-of-the-art classifica- tion technique. Using canonical binding model, the C2H2 zinc finger protein–DNA interaction interface is modelled by the pairwise amino acid–base interactions. Using a classification framework, known examples of non-binding ZF–DNA pairs.

  11. The potential of young, green finger-jointed Eucalyptus grandis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drying will occur naturally while the lumber is fixed within the roof truss structure. The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate the strength and stiffness variation of the finger-jointed E. grandis product in both the green and dry state for different age and dimension lumber, (2) to investigate the variation in density, warp ...

  12. Singing Greeting Card Beeper as a Finger Pulse Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belusic, Gregor; Zupancic, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    We constructed a robust and low-priced finger pulse sensor from a singing greeting card beeper. The beeper outputs the plethysmographic signal, which is indistinguishable from that of commercial grade sensors. The sensor can be used in school for a number of experiments in human cardiovascular physiology.

  13. Effect of Intercropping Finger Millet with two Indigenous Legumes at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In phase one, an indigenous edible legume (Crotalaria brevidens) and a fodder legume (Trifolium quartinianum) were intercropped with finger millet. Each plot was supplied with three nitrogen fertilizer rates (0, 20, and 40 Kg N/ha) in the form of Urea (46% N) in a completely randomized block design with three replicates.

  14. Osseointegrated silicone finger prosthesis using dental implants: a renovated technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Dileep Nag; Sankar, V Vijay; Chirumamilla, Naveen; Reddy, V Vamsikrishna

    2014-11-01

    In clinical practice, we come across patients with traumatically amputated or congenitally missing partial or complete fingers that can be restored using microsurgical replantation or transplantation procedures. However, in some cases this might not be possible due to systemic or local factors and the lost or missing part has to be replaced prosthetically to offer psychological and functional wellbeing. These prostheses can be constructed with various materials like acrylics or silicone retained with the help of auxiliary aids. However, these prostheses cause some hindrance in performing functions like writing, typing, etc. The aim of the present trial was to ameliorate the existing design of implant supported finger prosthesis. Distal phalange of middle finger replaced with implant supported silicone finger prosthesis is modified by utilizing a metal framework to support silicone material to improve rigidity while working. We could achieve a good function, esthetics and tactile sensibility with this modified design. Whenever, feasible this design can improve the performance and patients feel a deep sense of satisfaction and improved self-esteem with this modified prosthesis.

  15. Corticokinematic coherence during active and passive finger movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piitulainen, H; Bourguignon, M; De Tiège, X; Hari, R; Jousmäki, V

    2013-05-15

    Corticokinematic coherence (CKC) refers to coupling between magnetoencephalographic (MEG) brain activity and hand kinematics. For voluntary hand movements, CKC originates mainly from the primary sensorimotor (SM1) cortex. To learn about the relative motor and sensory contributions to CKC, we recorded CKC from 15 healthy subjects during active and passive right index-finger movements. The fingertip was either touching or not touching table, resulting in active-touch, active-no-touch, passive-touch, and passive-no-touch conditions. The kinematics of the index-finger was measured with a 3-axis accelerometer. Beamformer analysis was used to locate brain activations for the movements; somatosensory-evoked fields (SEFs) elicited by pneumatic tactile stimulation of the index finger served as a functional landmark for cutaneous input. All active and passive movements resulted in statistically significant CKC at the movement frequency (F0) and its first harmonic (F1). The main CKC sources at F0 and F1 were in the contralateral SM1 cortex with no spatial differences between conditions, and distinct from the SEF sources. At F1, the coherence was by two thirds stronger for passive than active movements, with no difference between touch vs. no-touch conditions. Our results suggest that the CKC occurring during repetitive finger movements is mainly driven by somatosensory, primarily proprioceptive, afferent input to the SM1 cortex, with negligible effect of cutaneous input. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Efficacy of acupuncture on pain after replantation of severed finger].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Chen, Yuezhen; Feng, Zhengen; Fu, Juan; Zhou, Fangyan

    2015-07-01

    To observe the efficacy of acupuncture on pain after replantation of severed finger. A total of 80 patients who underwent replantation of severed finger were randomly divided into an observation group and a control group, 40 cases in each one. The patients in the control group were treated with postoperative routine care of hand surgery, while patients in the observation group, based on the regular treatment, were treated with acupuncture within first 72 h of surgery. The health side of Yanglingquan (GB 34), Xuehai (SP 10), Hegu (LI 4), Houxi (SI 3) were selected and the needles were retained for 30 min. The acupuncture was given for 6 times. The evaluation was performed by using visual analogue scale (VAS) 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h after surgery. The use of analgesics after surgery was recorded in the two groups, and the blood supply and survival rate of severed finger were evaluated. Compared between the two groups, the VAS 4 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h and 48 h after surgery in the observation group was lower than that in the control group (all Pobservation group was lower than that in the control group (Pobservation group was lower than that in the control group (Ppostoperative pain of replantation of severed finger, and reduce the occurrence rate of abnormal blood supply, which is worthy of clinical promotion.

  17. Bioethanol production from finger millet ( Eleusine coracana ) straw ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The possibility of producing bioethanol from the biomass of finger millet straw was studied. The effects of temperature, acid concentration, hydrolysis time, and substrate concentration were investigated. The result showed that a maximum sugar content of 79.04 and 82.01 %w/w was achieved using phenol-sulfuric acid and ...

  18. Integration of Diagnostic Microbiology in a Model of Total Laboratory Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Rin, Giorgio; Zoppelletto, Maira; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Although automation has become widely utilized in certain areas of diagnostic testing, its adoption in diagnostic microbiology has proceeded much more slowly. To describe our real-world experience of integrating an automated instrument for diagnostic microbiology (Walk-Away Specimen Processor, WASPLab) within a model of total laboratory automation (TLA). The implementation process was divided into 2 phases. The former period, lasting approximately 6 weeks, entailed the installation of the WASPLab processor to operate as a stand-alone instrumentation, whereas the latter, lasting approximately 2 weeks, involved physical connection of the WASPLab with the automation. Using the WASPLab instrument in conjunction with the TLA model, we obtained a time savings equivalent to the work of 1.2 full-time laboratory technicians for diagnostic microbiology. The connection of WASPLab to TLA allowed its management by a generalist or clinical chemistry technician, with no need for microbiology skills on the part of either worker. Hence, diagnostic microbiology could be performed by the staff that is already using the TLA, extending their activities to include processing urgent clinical chemistry and hematology specimens. The time to result was also substantially improved. According to our experience, using the WASPLab instrument as part of a TLA in diagnostic microbiology holds great promise for optimizing laboratory workflow and improving the quality of testing. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. The Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger Protein: Two Decades of Molecular Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suliman, Bandar Ali; Xu, Dakang; Williams, Bryan Raymond George

    2012-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) protein, also known as Zbtb16 or Zfp145, was first identified in a patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia, where a reciprocal chromosomal translocation t(11;17)(q23;q21) resulted in a fusion with the RARA gene encoding retinoic acid receptor alpha. The wild-type Zbtb16 gene encodes a transcription factor that belongs to the POK (POZ and Krüppel) family of transcriptional repressors. In addition to nine Krüppel-type sequence-specific zinc fingers, which make it a member of the Krüppel-like zinc finger protein family, the PLZF protein contains an N-terminal BTB/POZ domain and RD2 domain. PLZF has been shown to be involved in major developmental and biological processes, such as spermatogenesis, hind limb formation, hematopoiesis, and immune regulation. PLZF is localized mainly in the nucleus where it exerts its transcriptional repression function, and many post-translational modifications affect this ability and also have an impact on its cytoplasmic/nuclear dissociation. PLZF achieves its transcriptional regulation by binding to many secondary molecules to form large multi-protein complexes that bind to the regulatory elements in the promoter region of the target genes. These complexes are also capable of physically interacting with its target proteins. Recently, PLZF has become implicated in carcinogenesis as a tumor suppressor gene, since it regulates the cell cycle and apoptosis in many cell types. This review will examine the major advances in our knowledge of PLZF biological activities that augment its value as a therapeutic target, particularly in cancer and immunological diseases.

  20. Teaching microbiological food safety through case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Dubois-Brissonnet

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Higher education students usually ask for more training based on case studies. This was addressed by designing a specific food safety module (24 hours in which students were shown how to predict microbiological risks in food products i.e. they were asked to determine product shelf-life according to product formulation, preservation methods and consumption habits using predictive microbiology tools. Working groups of four students first identified the main microbiological hazards associated with a specific product. To perform this task, they were given several documents including guides for good hygiene practices, reviews on microbiological hazards in the food sector, flow sheets, etc…  After three-hours of work, the working groups prepared and gave an oral presentation in front of their classmates and professors. This raised comments and discussion that allowed students to adjust their conclusions before beginning the next step of their work. This second step consisted in the evaluation of the safety risk associated with the two major microbiological hazards of the product studied, using predictive microbiology. Students then attended a general lecture on the different tools of predictive microbiology and tutorials (6 hours that made them familiar with the modelling of bacterial growth or inactivation. They applied these tools (9 hours to predict the shelf-life of the studied product according to various scenarios of preservation (refrigeration, water activity, concentration of salt or acid, modified atmosphere, etc… and/or consumption procedures (cooking. The module was concluded by oral presentations of each working group and included student evaluation (3 hours.

  1. Evaluation of oral microbiology lab curriculum reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Min; Gao, Zhen Y; Wu, Xin Y; Jiang, Chen X; Du, Jia H

    2015-12-07

    According to the updated concept of oral microbiology, the School of Stomatology, Wuhan University, has carried out oral microbiology teaching reforms during the last 5 years. There was no lab curriculum before 2009 except for a theory course of oral microbiology. The school has implemented an innovative curriculum with oral medicine characteristics to strengthen understanding of knowledge, cultivate students' scientific interest and develop their potential, to cultivate the comprehensive ability of students. This study was designed to evaluate the oral microbiology lab curriculum by analyzing student performance and perceptions regarding the curriculum from 2009 to 2013. The lab curriculum adopted modalities for cooperative learning. Students collected dental plaque from each other and isolated the cariogenic bacteria with selective medium plates. Then they purified the enrichment culture medium and identified the cariogenic strains by Gram stain and biochemical tests. Both quantitative and qualitative data for 5 years were analysed in this study. Part One of the current study assessed student performance in the lab from 2009 to 2013. Part Two used qualitative means to assess students' perceptions by an open questionnaire. The 271 study students' grades on oral microbiology improved during the lab curriculum: "A" grades rose from 60.5 to 81.2 %, and "C" grades fell from 28.4 to 6.3 %. All students considered the lab curriculum to be interesting and helpful. Quantitative and qualitative data converge to suggest that the lab curriculum has strengthened students' grasp of important microbiology-related theory, cultivated their scientific interest, and developed their potential and comprehensive abilities. Our student performance and perception data support the continued use of the innovative teaching system. As an extension and complement of the theory course, the oral microbiology lab curriculum appears to improve the quality of oral medicine education and help to

  2. Finger and foot tapping sensor system for objective motor assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurić-Jovičić Milica

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Finger tapping test is commonly used in neurological examinations as a test of motor performance. The new system comprising inertial and force sensors and custom proprietary software was developed for quantitative estimation and assessment of finger and foot tapping tests. The aim of this system was to provide diagnosis support and objective assessment of motor function. Methods. Miniature inertial sensors were placed on fingertips and used for measuring finger movements. A force sensor was placed on the fingertip of one finger, in order to measure the force during tapping. For foot tapping assessment, an inertial sensor was mounted on the subject’s foot, which was placed above a force platform. By using this system, various parameters such as a number of taps, tapping duration, rhythm, open and close speed, the applied force and tapping angle, can be extracted for detailed analysis of a patient’s motor performance. The system was tested on 13 patients with Parkinson’s disease and 14 healthy controls. Results. The system allowed easy measurement of listed parameters, and additional graphical representation showed quantitative differences in these parameters between neurological patient and healthy subjects. Conclusion. The novel system for finger and foot tapping test is compact, simple to use and efficiently collects patient data. Parameters measured in patients can be compared to those measured in healthy subjects, or among groups of patients, or used to monitor progress of the disease, or therapy effects. Created data and scores could be used together with the scores from clinical tests, providing the possibility for better insight into the diagnosis. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 175090 and Grant no. 175016

  3. The results of surgical and nonsurgical treatment of mallet finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starčević Branislav

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The injury of the hand tendon classified as mallet finger presents the loss of continuity of the united lateral band of the extensor apparatus above distal interphalangeal joint, which consequently leads to specific deformity of distal interphalangeal joint which is called mallet (hammer finger. Objective Our paper had several research Objectives: presentation of the existing Results of surgical and nonsurgical treatment of mallet finger deformities and comparison of our findings and other authors’ Results. Method: The study was retro-prospective, and analyzed 62 patients treated in the Clinical Center of Serbia in Belgrade (at the Institute of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology, and the Emergency Center in the period 1998 to 2003. The follow up of these patients lasted at least 8 months (from 8.3 months to 71.7 months. An average follow up was 28.7 months. The Objective parameters used in the study were as follows: sex, age, dominating hand, hand injury, finger injury, mode of treatment, complications, distal interphalangeal joint flexion and total movement of the distal interphalangeal joint. Collected data were analyzed by χ2-test and Student’s t-test. The confidence interval was p=0.05. Results: A total range of motion was 51.9±6.6 for nonsurgically treated patients, and 48.2±4.2 degrees for operated patients. Mean extension deficit of the distal interphalangeal joint was 6.5±3.3 for nonsurgical and 10.0±3.2 for operated patients. Conclusion: The Results confirmed that nonsurgical mode of treatment of mallet finger deformity was much more successful than surgical Method of treating the same deformity.

  4. Pressure head distribution during unstable flow in relation to the formation and dissipation of fingers

    OpenAIRE

    H. Cho; G. H. de Rooij; G. H. de Rooij

    2002-01-01

    Wetting front instability creates a shallow induction zone from which fingers emerge that rapidly transport water and solutes downwards. How the induction zone affects finger location and spacing is unknown. In the moist subsoil, fingers may well dissipate because the finger tips no longer have to overcome the water entry value. Both flow regions were investigated in a two-dimensional chamber with a fine-over-coarse glass bead porous medium. A capillary fringe was created by upward wetting th...

  5. Pressure head distribution during unstable flow in relation to the formation and dissipation of fingers

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroyuki Cho; Rooij, de, G.H.

    2002-01-01

    International audience; Wetting front instability creates a shallow induction zone from which fingers emerge that rapidly transport water and solutes downwards. How the induction zone affects finger location and spacing is unknown. In the moist subsoil, fingers may well dissipate because the finger tips no longer have to overcome the water entry value. Both flow regions were investigated in a two-dimensional chamber with a fine-over-coarse glass bead porous medium. A capillary fringe was crea...

  6. Food safety assurance systems: Microbiological testing, sampling plans, and microbiological criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwietering, M.H.; Ross, T.; Gorris, L.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Microbiological criteria give information about the quality or safety of foods. A key component of a microbiological criterion is the sampling plan. Considering: (1) the generally low level of pathogens that are deemed tolerable in foods, (2) large batch sizes, and (3) potentially substantial

  7. [Bacterial identification methods in the microbiology laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou, Germán; Fernández-Olmos, Ana; García, Celia; Sáez-Nieto, Juan Antonio; Valdezate, Sylvia

    2011-10-01

    In order to identify the agent responsible of the infectious process and understanding the pathogenic/pathological implications, clinical course, and to implement an effective antimicrobial therapy, a mainstay in the practice of clinical microbiology is the allocation of species to a microbial isolation. In daily routine practice microbiology laboratory phenotypic techniques are applied to achieve this goal. However, they have some limitations that are seen more clearly for some kinds of microorganism. Molecular methods can circumvent some of these limitations, although its implementation is not universal. This is due to higher costs and the level of expertise required for thei implementation, so molecular methods are often centralized in reference laboratories and centers. Recently, proteomics-based methods made an important breakthrough in the field of diagnostic microbiology and will undoubtedly have a major impact on the future organization of the microbiology services. This paper is a short review of the most noteworthy aspects of the three bacterial identification methods described above used in microbiology laboratories. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Modelling solute leaching during fingered flow by integrating and expanding various theoretical and empirical concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, de G.H.; Hiroyuki Cho,

    1999-01-01

    Wetting front instability (fingered flow) accelerates solute transport through the unsaturated zone to the groundwater table. Whether fingers widen or dissipate close to the groundwater is unclear. Water flow in a two-dimensional artificial capillary fringe below a dry layer exhibiting fingered flow

  9. Computer simulation of viscous fingering in a lifting Hele-Shaw cell ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report a computer simulation study of fingering patterns, where circular or square grooves are etched on to the lower plate. Results are compared with experiments. Keywords. Viscous fingering; Hele-Shaw cell; simulation. PACS Nos 47.15.gp; 47.20.Gv; 07.05.Tp. 1. Introduction. Viscous fingering in the lifting Hele-Shaw ...

  10. Computer simulation of viscous fingering in a lifting Hele-Shaw cell ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We simulate viscous fingering generated by separating two plates with a constant force, in a lifting Hele-Shaw cell. Variation in the patterns for different fluid viscosity and lifting force is studied. Viscous fingering is strongly affected by anisotropy. We report a computer simulation study of fingering patterns, where circular or ...

  11. Squamous cell carcinoma of the finger masquerading as an abscess. Case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S T

    2012-02-03

    A 43-year-old man presented with an abscess on his left ring finger, which recurred despite multiple drainage procedures. Histological examination of the lesion was unhelpful; it was only on histopathological examination of the finger after ray amputation that the diagnosis of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma was established. This case illustrates the need to consider malignancy when dealing with chronic finger infections.

  12. Finger nail plate shape and size for personal identification – a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Examination of 4 sets of identical twins showed no difference in the shapes and sizes of the fingernails on each finger. It would appear that the finger nail plate shapes /sizes of the hands show diversities similar to finger prints and therefore can be considered and developed further for personal identification in developing ...

  13. Summary of research on microbiological processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, A.L.

    1992-09-01

    Storage of thermal energy in aquifers has obvious benefits of saving energy and decreasing the consumption of fossil fuels. However, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), which involves groundwater aquifers as the storage medium for heat or chill, impinges on the environment. A literature review of pertinent microbiology publications (Hicks and Stewart, 1988) identified the potential for the interaction of ATES systems and microbiological processes to create a source of infectious diseases and the potential for damage to the environment. In addition, the review identified a potential for microbiological processes to develop conditions that would interfere with the operation of an ATES system. As a result of this research effort, investigators from Finland, Germany, Switzerland, and the United States have examined several ATES systems in operation and have observed that the ATES systems studied do not contribute to infectious disease transmission, do not adversely affect the environment, and do not contribute significantly to biofouling or biocorrosion

  14. Transforming clinical microbiology with bacterial genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didelot, Xavier; Bowden, Rory; Wilson, Daniel J; Peto, Tim E A; Crook, Derrick W

    2012-09-01

    Whole-genome sequencing of bacteria has recently emerged as a cost-effective and convenient approach for addressing many microbiological questions. Here, we review the current status of clinical microbiology and how it has already begun to be transformed by using next-generation sequencing. We focus on three essential tasks: identifying the species of an isolate, testing its properties, such as resistance to antibiotics and virulence, and monitoring the emergence and spread of bacterial pathogens. We predict that the application of next-generation sequencing will soon be sufficiently fast, accurate and cheap to be used in routine clinical microbiology practice, where it could replace many complex current techniques with a single, more efficient workflow.

  15. Diagnostic virology laboratory within a microbiology setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, S J

    1984-01-01

    The virology section at St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Connecticut, is not a separate laboratory division but is a part of the microbiology division and is supervised by the same personnel who supervise bacteriology, mycology, mycobacteriology, and serology. Current volume is over 1,000 cultures yearly with 12 to 24 percent positive. Isolates are confirmed and typed by the Connecticut State Health Department Laboratory. Specimen distribution, percentage positive specimens, and distribution of viral isolates are similar to those reported from microbiology laboratories with separate virology laboratories directed by a full-time doctoral-level virologist. Our seven years' experience demonstrates that a microbiology laboratory without a full-time doctoral-level virologist can provide clinically useful virologic information.

  16. The value of postmortem microbiology cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    Since the inception of evidence-based scientific concepts in medicine in the 19th century, the utility of postmortem microbiologic examinations has been a topic of controversy. For every study describing a lack of correlation between antemortem clinical and laboratory findings and postmortem culture results, there is equal evidence from other studies that indicates at least some limited utility in select cases. While the contributions of autopsies and postmortem microbiologic examinations in the discovery of novel infectious microorganisms are generally appreciated by the medical and scientific societies, the problems of implementing routine procedures in daily autopsy practice clearly relate to the lack of consensus on their broader utility as well as to a lack of regulatory guidelines. This review provides an overview of the literature-based evidence regarding the utility of postmortem microbiologic examinations together with some practical aspects and guidelines for those confronted with the issue of whether to allow or discourage the use of bacteriologic cultures obtained during autopsies.

  17. [Quality assurance in food microbiology laboratories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwiek-Ludwicka, K; Windyga, B; Karłowski, K

    1996-01-01

    In the paper the quality assurance system in food microbiology laboratories to ensure the reliability of the analytical data are discussed. To introduce quality assurance system in the laboratory all activities such as sampling, method selection, laboratory environment, equipment, reagents and media, staff, reference materials, internal quality control and external quality control (proficiency testing) that effect on the results must be documented and controlled. The kind of food sample, condition and time of storage before analysis and proper selection of methodology have significant influence on the result of the microbiological analysis. Equipment used to carry out the test must work properly. Implementation of of the internal and external quality control to the routine work of the food microbiology laboratory means that the production of the results is under control and that the data are reliable. If the quality assurance system is properly implemented and well documented it makes the base for the laboratory to get the accreditation.

  18. Summary of research on microbiological processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, A.L.

    1992-09-01

    Storage of thermal energy in aquifers has obvious benefits of saving energy and decreasing the consumption of fossil fuels. However, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), which involves groundwater aquifers as the storage medium for heat or chill, impinges on the environment. A literature review of pertinent microbiology publications (Hicks and Stewart, 1988) identified the potential for the interaction of ATES systems and microbiological processes to create a source of infectious diseases and the potential for damage to the environment. In addition, the review identified a potential for microbiological processes to develop conditions that would interfere with the operation of an ATES system. As a result of this research effort, investigators from Finland, Germany, Switzerland, and the United States have examined several ATES systems in operation and have observed that the ATES systems studied do not contribute to infectious disease transmission, do not adversely affect the environment, and do not contribute significantly to biofouling or biocorrosion.

  19. The method of obtaining and microbiological analysis of national product “Khoytpak”

    OpenAIRE

    Sat Ch.; Kungaa Ch.

    2016-01-01

    The described technology of production of the Tuvan national dairy drink “Khoytpak” on the basis of which the patent. Carried out organoleptic, physical and chemical and microbiological studies of fermented national drink “Khoytpak”, produced on an industrial scale in dairy.

  20. Ionizing radiation effects of Cobalt-60 on the physical-chemical, sensorial and microbiological of bread with addition of linseed (Linum usitatissimum); Efeitos da radiacao ionizante de cobalto-60 nas caracteristicas fisico-quimicas sensoriais e microbiolgicas de paes com adicao de linhaca (Linum usitatissimum)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Neila Camargo de

    2011-07-01

    The incorporation of functional ingredients on breading products has grown very much lately, because of the preoccupation with the consumers' health. The linseed has awakened the interest by its high level of fiber, lignin, omega-3 and antioxidants compounds. The objective of the present work is evaluate the ionizing radiation effect of {sup 60}Co on the physical-chemical, sensorial and microbiological characteristics of bread with addition of different concentration of brown linseed. There were elaborated 3 types of bread: French roll, form bread prepared with the mixture and form bread produced with conventional ingredients. It was added smashed brown linseed on the bread dough, with concentrations of 8% and 12%. After the preparation, the three kinds of bread packed with polypropylene packages and taken to the IPEN/USP (Institute of Nuclear Energetic Research/University of São Paulo) and irradiated with doses of 6, 8 and 10 kGy. Treatments were elaborated without the addition of linseed and without irradiation, for control, totalizing 12 distinct treatments, to each bread formula tested. Chemical analyses were made (centesimal composition, anti-nutritional compounds, anti-oxidant activity, glycemic index, fat acids, complex B vitamins and minerals); physical analyses (cooking index, volume, color and water activity); sensorial analyses (preference tests and Descriptive Quantitative Analysis - ADQ); microbiological analysis and a survey about irradiated products. It could be seen that the addition of linseed was efficient to increase the level of alimentary fiber and the level of lipids on the 3 bread formula. The three kinds of bread that received the linseed addition and that were not irradiated presented increase on the level of total phenolic; however, when the samples which received the linseed addition were submitted to the irradiation process, it could be noticed the decrease of the antioxidant capacity. There was an increase on the level of omega-3

  1. Estabilidade físico-química, microbiológica e sensorial de carne ovina embalada a vácuo estocada sob refrigeração Physical and chemical stability microbiological and sensory analysis of vacuum packed sheep meat stored under refrigeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaella de Paula Paseto Fernandes

    2012-04-01

    (lipid oxidation, objective color, pH value, chemical composition, cooking losses and instrumental texture, microbiological analysis (total count of psychrotrophic anaerobic, coliform count at 45°C, coagulase-positive staphylococci and the presence of Salmonella and sensory analysis (color, flavor and overall appearance. The vacuum packed lamb meat remained stable as to most physical and chemical indexes and microbiological indexes showed good stability throughout the 28 days of storage according to Brazilian legislation standards to pathogenic microorganisms. In relation to the stability evaluation of chilled sheep loin, it was detected a high increase of counts for psychrotrophic anaerobic microorganisms, reaching around 10(7CFU g-1 sample at 14 days storage, but the pannelists did not detect significant sensory changes during all the period. It is concluded that the shelf life of sheep loin stored at 4°C, is at least, 28 days.

  2. An Assessment of the Microbiological Quality and Physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    microbial growth, particulates, environmental tobacco smoke, combustion products including carbon monoxide, pesticides, asbestos, lead-based paint, heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems etc (IAQ, 2004). An in-depth study by. Morey et al (1990) suggest that the greatest air pollutants are the biological pollutants ...

  3. Physical-Chemical and microbiological study of sourmilk | Tiku ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Food Technology in Africa. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 2 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  4. Electrokinetic Fingering In Hele-Shaw Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzadeh, Mohammad; Bazant, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Large scale flow problems in porous media, such as those encountered in underground oil reservoirs, are typically described by the Darcy's law. However, it is well known that many underground rock formations contain surface groups and minerals that dissociate in the presence of water. Convection of these charges by the pressure driven flow can then set up streaming current and streaming potential that affects the flow. Furthermore, electric fields that are often used to enhance oil recovery, e.g. by reducing the oil's viscosity through electro-thermal heating, drive electro-osmotic flows that could set up very large pressure in small pores. The full description of fluid flow thus requires a solution to the fully coupled electrokinetic problem. In their seminal work, Saffman and Taylor showed that the moving interface between two immiscible fluids in a porous medium becomes unstable if pushed by the low-viscosity fluid. Here we report on the role of electrokinetic phenomena on stability of these viscous fronts in Hele-Shaw cells by using analytic as well as numerical approaches. Interestingly, we find that the instability could be suppressed if the right physical conditions are met or otherwise enhanced, leading to greater mixing of two fluids.

  5. Serendipia y Microbiología

    OpenAIRE

    Quevedo Ganoza, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    En el Editorial de "Ciencia e Investigación" (Vol. VIII, Número I) sobre "Serendipia y la Investigación Científica en la Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica de la UNMSM", ofrecimos presentar uno o más artículos que revisaran, comentaran y transcribieran las informaciones tomadas de tres publicaciones que se ocuparon de Serendipia y descubrimientos científicos en Química, Microbiología y Farmacología. En esta oportunidad, nos ocuparemos de Serendipia y Microbiología, basándonos en los artículos ...

  6. Applications of flow cytometry in food microbiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano Valerin, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    A compilation of data about cytometry and its applications is performed to analyze the impact on food microbiology. The technique of flow cytometry is described and the use in various fields of microbiology is analyzed. Flow cytometry future could be implemented in many clinical laboratories and food, considering the cost / benefit test to be done, because at the moment it has a high cost. The existence of new fluorochromes and monoclonal antibodies enable that many intracellular and extracellular cell parameters are detected in the future. The technique can be developed in the country in few years considering that the technique has improved the sensitivity and specificity of many tests [es

  7. Manual de microbiología

    OpenAIRE

    Montoya Campuzano, Olga Inés

    1999-01-01

    Resumen: el manual de microbiología general fue elaborado con el objetivo de proporcionarle al estudiante de Zootecnia de la Universidad Nacional, las técnicas básicas en microbiología, de interés para aquellos cursos que 10 requieren. El estudiante trabajara con los microorganismos (patógenos y no patógenos de importancia, en las áreas de asistencia técnica que le corresponde prestar como: calidad de agua, de alimentos, de Semen entre otras

  8. A review of microbiology service learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Ginny

    2017-02-01

    Service learning is a teaching method that incorporates community engagement into the curriculum of a course. Service learning is becoming increasingly popular on college campuses and across disciplines. Studies have shown many benefits to service learning for the students and the community they serve. Service learning has been incorporated into science courses, including microbiology. This review will address the benefits to service learning and provide an overview of the various types of service-learning projects that have been completed in microbiology courses. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Radiation microbiology in food preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    The lethal effect of ionizing energy on micro-organisms and the influence of species, growth phase, gaseous atmosphere, temperature, water activity, chemical sensitizers and physical agents on microbial resistance are described briefly. Concern has often been expressed that the use of low doses of ionizing energy for processing food might result in mutants with increased resistance, virulence or toxin production capacity, that diagnostic characteristics of pathogens may alter, or that alterations in normal food spoilage patterns could cause storage problems. These fears are examined in a food preservation context and found to be unwarranted. The rationale for quantitative estimates of the dose of ionizing energy needed for specific food preservation applications is given and comparison made between the ionizing energy sensitivities of food pathogens and spoilage organisms

  10. "Suture fixation of the fingers": an effective method for positioning burned and contracted fingers using a pulley system as a guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Bakhshaeekia, Alireza

    2011-03-01

    Preserving function of the hand is the aim of treatment in burned hands; appropriate splinting is one of the important measures during acute and chronic treatment. We introduce an effective safe method for positioning of fingers without violating the joints; In this method before performing skin graft for palmar finger burn or contracture release we suture tip of finger with silk 2-0 and fix it to dorsum of hand while extending the finger and for preventing slipping we insert some pulley like circles tied with silk 2-0 fixing over dorsum of mid phalanx. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. fMRI assessment of somatotopy in human Brodmann area 3b by electrical finger stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, R; Villringer, K; Mackert, B M; Schwiemann, J; Braun, J; Curio, G; Villringer, A; Wolf, K J

    1998-01-26

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is capable of detecting focal brain activation induced by electrical stimulation of single fingers in human subjects. In eight subjects somatotopic arrangement of the second and fifth finger was found in Brodmann area 3b of the primary somatosensory cortex. In four subjects the representation area of the second finger was located lateral and inferior to the fifth finger; in one subject the somatotopy was reversed. In three subjects representation areas of the two fingers in Brodmann area 3b were found overlapping. Additional activated areas were found on the crown of ipsilateral and contralateral postcentral gyrus (Brodmann areas 1 and 2) and posterior parietal cortex.

  12. Charge pumping with finger capacitance for body sensor energy harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Alyssa Y; Maharbiz, Michel M

    2017-07-01

    Sensors are becoming ubiquitous and increasingly integrated with and on the human body; powering such "body network" devices remains an outstanding problem. In this paper, we demonstrate a touch interrogation powered energy harvesting system. This system transforms the kinetic energy of a human finger to electric energy, with each tap producing approximately 1 nJ of energy at a storage capacitor. As is well known for touch display devices, the proximity of a finger can alter the effective value of small capacitances; we demonstrate that these capacitance changes can drive a current which is rectified to charge a capacitor. As a demonstration, an untethered circuit charged this way can deliver enough instantaneous power to light a red LED every ~ 10 seconds. This technology illustrates the ability to communicate with and operate low-power sensors with motions already used for interfacing to devices.

  13. Reference values for the nickel concentration in human finger nails

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Peters, K; Menné, T

    1991-01-01

    A reference value for the nickel concentration in finger nails from people who are not occupationally exposed to nickel was determined on the basis of nail samples from 95 healthy individuals. The mean +/- standard deviation was 1.19 +/- 1.61 mg/kg and the median was 0.49 mg/kg (range 0.042-7.50 mg....../kg). The 95% confidence interval of the population mean was 0.51-1.26 mg/kg and the 95% confidence interval of the population median was 0.39-0.74 mg/kg. The random sample consisted of 59 women and 36 men. No significant difference between the nickel levels in finger nails from men and women could...

  14. Pressure head distribution during unstable flow in relation to the formation and dissipation of fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Cho

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Wetting front instability creates a shallow induction zone from which fingers emerge that rapidly transport water and solutes downwards. How the induction zone affects finger location and spacing is unknown. In the moist subsoil, fingers may well dissipate because the finger tips no longer have to overcome the water entry value. Both flow regions were investigated in a two-dimensional chamber with a fine-over-coarse glass bead porous medium. A capillary fringe was created by upward wetting through capillary rise. Upon ponding with dye-coloured water, fingers emerged, propagated downward and diverged when reaching the capillary fringe. Microtensiometers were installed in the induction zone, the fingers, and in the capillary fringe. In the induction zone, a lateral sinusoidal pressure head developed within minutes. Only in one of two experiments could the observed pressure head pattern be satisfactorily reproduced by a steady-state model assuming uniform induction zone properties and uniform infiltration. Later, fingers emerged below the pressure head minima. The induction zone did not affect finger properties. The pressure head in the induction zone was determined by the depth of the finger tips. The water requirement of the fingers dictated the lateral pressure head gradients. The pressure heads in the capillary fringe supported the hypothesis that the flow stabilised and dissipated there. Keywords: fingered flow, wetting front instability, unsaturated flow, microtensiometers, induction zone, capillary fringe

  15. Use of a robotic device to measure age-related decline in finger proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingemanson, Morgan L; Rowe, Justin B; Chan, Vicky; Wolbrecht, Eric T; Cramer, Steven C; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in proprioception are known to affect postural stability, yet the extent to which such changes affect the finger joints is poorly understood despite the importance of finger proprioception in the control of skilled hand movement. We quantified age-related changes in finger proprioception in 37 healthy young, middle-aged, and older adults using two robot-based tasks wherein participants' index and middle fingers were moved by an exoskeletal robot. The first task assessed finger position sense by asking participants to indicate when their index and middle fingers were directly overlapped during a passive crisscross movement; the second task assessed finger movement detection by asking participants to indicate the onset of passive finger movement. When these tasks were completed without vision, finger position sense errors were 48 % larger in older adults compared to young participants (p proprioceptive reaction time was 78 % longer in older adults compared to young adults (p proprioception, these age-related differences were no longer apparent. No difference between dominant and non-dominant hand performance was found for either proprioception task. These findings demonstrate that finger proprioception is impaired in older adults, and visual feedback can be used to compensate for this deficit. The findings also support the feasibility and utility of the FINGER robot as a sensitive tool for detecting age-related decline in proprioception.

  16. OpenStax: Microbiology Provides a Cost-Effective and Accessible Resource for Undergraduate Microbiology Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Lyn Gunn

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This is a review of Openstax: Microbiology, a textbook that has been put together by a collaborative effort between Openstax College and the American Society for Microbiology.  The text will be offered in a variety of formats including web-based, PDF, and hardcopy, and is set for publication Spring 2016. Review of: OpenStax: Microbiology. Nina Parker, Mark Schneegurt, and Anh-Hue Tu; (2016. OpenStax and ASM. 1100 pages. (Note: At time of journal printing, this book was not yet published. Certain publication details may change slightly.

  17. Irradiation of lettuce (Lactuca sativa. L.): microbiological and sensory aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuhako, Vanessa Provenzano

    2005-01-01

    The increasing demand for fresh foods have stimulated the marketing of minimally processed vegetables. However, these products maintain most of their natural microbiota even after being sanitized, including pathogenic microorganisms. Refrigerated storage allows the growth of psychotropic microorganisms and among them the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. The ingestion of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes may represent a risk to pregnant women and their fetuses and to immunocompromised people. Non-thermal alternative processes for food preservation, such as irradiation, can reduce pathogenic and spoilage microorganism populations without impairing substantial changes in sensory, physical or chemical attributes. The aims of this research were to evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on L. monocytogenes artificially inoculated on minimally processed lettuce, to evaluate its effect on lettuce leaves through acceptance sensory test and to determine the irradiated vegetable shelf life through sensory and microbiological tests. A mixture of 4 types of lettuce (Iceberg, Boston, Loose-leaf and Red loose-leaf) were artificially inoculated with L. monocytogenes (7 log UFC/g lettuce) and then exposed to 0.3; 0.6; 0.9 and 1.2 kGy, under refrigeration. The DlO values for L. monocytogenes varied fram 0.18 to 0.21 kGy. Sensory and microbiological tests indicated that the shelf life of Iceberg lettuce stored at 7 deg C was 5 and 7 days for the irradiated and non-irradiated samples, respectively, and for the irradiated and non-irradiated Loose-leaf lettuce samples were 10 days. For the non-irradiated Boston sample, the shelf life was 3 days and for the Irradiated 7 days. Red loose-leaf showed 5 and 4 days of shelf lives for the irradiated and non-irradiated, respectively. Irradiated samples presented better microbiological quality than non-irradiated ones. The irradiation is feasible process to improve quality and safety of lettuce leaves. (author)

  18. Increased densities and calcifications in the finger bones of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, A; Bruk, I; Laron, Z

    1976-06-01

    A feature of irregular calcifications and increased densities in the metaphyseal region of the fingers of the hand in adolescent children, occurring mostly in males, is described. These changes become evident at puberty and disappear with the closure of the epiphyses. The etiology of this feature does not appear to be related to a specific hormone. It may be the result of an imbalance between those hormones which cause the pubertal spurt, possibly combined with an irregularity of testosterone secretion.

  19. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael J; Johnson, Simon A; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-03-06

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick-slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function.

  20. Closed traumatic rupture of the ring finger flexor tendon pulley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropet, Y; Menez, D; Balmat, P; Pem, R; Vichard, P

    1990-09-01

    We report an unusual case of closed traumatic rupture of the ring finger flexor tendon pulley not previously reported in the literature. This injury occurred in a 21-year-old athlete during rockclimbing. Lack of flexion of the distal interphalangeal joint was accompanied by a palpable subcutaneous cord on the palmar side of the proximal phalanx. A simple repair of the pulley was done. The postoperative functional result was satisfactory.

  1. Hypermobility and proprioception in the finger joints of flautists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigues-Cano, Isabel; Bird, Howard A

    2014-06-01

    Ergonomically, the flute is especially complex among wind instruments, and flautists may therefore be at particular risk of performance-related musculoskeletal disorders. Yet little is known about injury prevalence among flute players, and even less in those flautists who are also hypermobile. Recent research has found hand and wrist pain to be common complaints among flautists. Understanding of the predictors of injury and pain is therefore crucial as the presence of pain decreases performance quality and causes unnecessary time loss. There is a strong relationship between hypermobility and impaired proprioception, although many musicians may acquire greater proprioception than the average population. We have compared flexibility and proprioception of the hand in a study of flautists. Twenty flautists took part in the study. General hypermobility, the passive range of motion of the 3 specific joints most involved in flute playing, and proprioception acuity were all measured accurately for the first time in this awkward instrument that needs high levels of dexterity. Flautists' finger joints have a greater range of movement than in the general population. This group of flute players had especially large ranges of movement in the finger joints, which take the weight of the instrument. Although flautists have hypermobile finger joints, they are not generally hypermobile elsewhere as measured by the Beighton Scale. Flautists, even with very mobile finger joints, have very accurate proprioception, which may be acquired through training. The study of instrumentalists may provide an ideal model for study of the interaction between localized joint flexibility and joint proprioception, both inherited and acquired.

  2. The "Haptic Finger"- a new device for monitoring skin condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Mami; Lévêque, Jean Luc; Tagami, Hachiro; Kikuchi, Katsuko; Chonan, Seifi

    2003-05-01

    Touching the skin is of great importance for the Clinician for assessing roughness, softness, firmness, etc. This type of clinical assessment is very subjective and therefore non-reproducible from one Clinician to another one or even from time to time for the same Clinician. In order to objectively monitor skin texture, we developed a new sensor, placed directly on the Clinician's finger, which generate some electric signal when slid over the skin surface. The base of this Haptic Finger sensor is a thin stainless steel plate on which sponge rubber, PVDF foil, acetate film and gauze are layered. The signal generated by the sensor was filtered and digitally stored before processing. In a first in vitro experiment, the sensor was moved over different skin models (sponge rubber covered by silicon rubber) of varying hardness and roughness. These experiments allowed the definition of two parameters characterizing textures. The first parameter is variance of the signal processed using wavelet analysis, representing an index of roughness. The second parameter is dispersion of the power spectrum density in the frequency domain, corresponding to hardness. To validate these parameters, the Haptic Finger was used to scan skin surfaces of 30 people, 14 of whom displayed a skin disorder: xerosis (n = 5), atopic dermatitis (n = 7), and psoriasis (n = 2). The results obtained by means of the sensor were compared with subjective, clinical evaluations by a Clinician who scored both roughness and hardness of the skin. Good agreement was observed between clinical assessment of the skin and the two parameters generated using the Haptic Finger. Use of this sensor could prove extremely valuable in cosmetic research where skin surface texture (in terms of tactile properties) is difficult to measure.

  3. Progress in cultivation-independent phyllosphere microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Thomas; Ruppel, Silke

    2014-01-01

    Most microorganisms of the phyllosphere are nonculturable in commonly used media and culture conditions, as are those in other natural environments. This review queries the reasons for their 'noncultivability' and assesses developments in phyllospere microbiology that have been achieved cultivation independently over the last 4 years. Analyses of total microbial communities have revealed a comprehensive microbial diversity. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and metagenomic sequencing were applied to investigate plant species, location and season as variables affecting the composition of these communities. In continuation to culture-based enzymatic and metabolic studies with individual isolates, metaproteogenomic approaches reveal a great potential to study the physiology of microbial communities in situ. Culture-independent microbiological technologies as well advances in plant genetics and biochemistry provide methodological preconditions for exploring the interactions between plants and their microbiome in the phyllosphere. Improving and combining cultivation and culture-independent techniques can contribute to a better understanding of the phyllosphere ecology. This is essential, for example, to avoid human-pathogenic bacteria in plant food. © 2013 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  4. A comparative study of microbiological and physicochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative study of microbiological and physicochemical characteristics of water distributed from two water treatment plants in Rwanda. ... Thus, as recommendation to WASAC authority, there is a need for improvement in the water management strategy for better water quality especially along the distribution network.

  5. Microbiologically influenced corrosion in ship ballast tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyer, A.

    2013-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is known to be a dangerous process in ship tanks due to its rapid and yet unpredictable occurrence, leading to extremely fast local corrosion, possibly jeopardizing the structural integrity, in a relatively short time. This project focuses on a

  6. Polar and Alpine Microbiology - Earth's Cryobiosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Elster, Josef; Margesin, R.; Wagner, D.; Häggblom, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-4, č. článku fiw221. ISSN 0168-6496 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : diversity * Polar regions * Polar Microbiology Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 3.720, year: 2016

  7. Physicochemical and microbiological characteristics of Italian salami ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the inclusion of different levels of pequi (Caryocar Brasiliense, Cambess) pulp in the processing of Italian salami made of lamb for the evaluation of their physicochemical and microbiological characteristics. Six formulations of Italian salamis were processed: no pequi ...

  8. Validation of qualitative microbiological test methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJzerman-Boon, Pieta C.; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers a statistical model for the detection mechanism of qualitative microbiological test methods with a parameter for the detection proportion (the probability to detect a single organism) and a parameter for the false positive rate. It is demonstrated that the detection proportion

  9. Microbiological Load of Selected Oral Liquid Pharmaceuticals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The microbiological quality of 24 samples of oral pharmaceuticals comprising antacids, cough and paracetamol syrups purchased randomly from different drug stores operating in Abakaliki metropolis were assessed. They were analyzed by pour plate method. Their microbial load was determined using the viable cell count ...

  10. Microbiological quality assessment of facial cosmetics | Stanley ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cosmetics are beauty enhancing agents for which microbial quality concerns have been neglected by users who often see them as innocuous. The aim of this study was to investigate the microbiological quality of selected facial cosmetic products. Thirty (30) samples each of in-use and unused cosmetics were obtained from ...

  11. Examination of reproducibility in microbiological degredation experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Helle Mølgaard; Spliid, Henrik; Holst, Helle

    1998-01-01

    Experimental data indicate that certain microbiological degradation experiments have a limited reproducibility. Nine identical batch experiments were carried out on 3 different days to examine reproducibility. A pure culture, isolated from soil, grew with toluene as the only carbon and energy...

  12. Microbiological methods for assessing soil quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, J.; Hopkins, D.W.; Benedetti, A.

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a selection of microbiological methods that are already applied in regional or national soil quality monitoring programs. It is split into two parts: part one gives an overview of approaches to monitoring, evaluating and managing soil quality. Part two provides a selection of

  13. Microbiological, physicochemical properties and biogenic amine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty three strained yoghurt samples were collected from local open markets in different provinces of Turkey (Afyon [AF], Aydın [AY], Burdur [B], Isparta [I] and Muğla [M]). Physicochemical and microbiological properties, as well as biogenic amine content, were examined in each of the samples. The dry matter (17.90 to ...

  14. Microbiological and physicochemical characterization of the natural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    Sep 1, 2009 ... Bacterial counts were relatively low, indicating a good hygienic quality of meat raw mate- rials and spices. The results of the microbiological analy- sis of the naturally fermented sausage (Table 2) showed that the lactic acid bacteria constituted the major micro- flora of the sausages, since the cell numbers of ...

  15. Microbiological quality of pediatric oral liquid formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Josep Cabañas Poy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The oral administration of drugs to the pediatric population involves the extemporaneous preparation of liquid formulations. These formulations have studies on their physicochemical stability, but they often lack microbiological studies. The objective of this study is to check the microbiological quality of five oral liquid formulations prepared with different excipients, which represent five major combinations, in two conditions: kept unopened until the day of the test, and in a multi-dose vial opened daily. The formulations were prepared according to standard operating procedures. Half of each batch was packaged in vials that remained closed until the day of testing, and the other half in a single container which was opened daily. Both the vials and the containers had been previously sterilized. Microbiological tests were performed weekly during the first month of the study, and then every two weeks, until the expiration date. The microbiological quality of oral liquid formulations is determined by the Royal Spanish Pharmacopoeia. The conclusion was that none of the formulations prepared that were packaged in sterilized containers became contaminated, either in unopened vials or in multi-dose containers when they were opened daily

  16. Managing the microbiological risks of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krewski, Daniel; Balbus, John; Butler-Jones, David; Haas, Charles; Isaac-Renton, Judith; Roberts, Kenneth; Sinclair, Martha

    The microbiological contamination of drinking water supplies can have serious health consequences for consumers, and this has been dramatically illustrated in recent years by two disease outbreaks in Canada. In this paper, some factors that can influence the microbiological quality of drinking water and its management are examined. Frameworks have been proposed that help to clarify the main elements of health risk assessment and risk management, and, in accordance with these, risks can be logically characterized, evaluated and controlled. A protocol has been developed for microbiological risk assessment and a risk management framework now guides the development of Canada's national guidelines for drinking-water quality. Monitoring of indicator organisms and the application of adequate water treatment are the primary means recommended in the Canadian guidelines to safeguard health from the presence of water-borne pathogens. Understanding the biological characteristics of microbial pathogens is necessary for assessing their impact on community health and appraising the rationale behind drinking-water testing methods and their limitations. Improvements in health surveillance, monitoring, and risk characterization and application of concepts such as multiple barriers (source-to-tap) and total quality management should contribute to better management of the microbiological quality of drinking water.

  17. Predictive microbiology in food packaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predictive microbiology including growth, inactivation, surface transfer (or cross-contamination), and survival, plays important roles in understanding microbial food safety. Growth models may involve the growth potential of a specified pathogen under different stresses, e.g., temperature, pH, wate...

  18. Reasons for Suboptimal Learning in Medical Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struwig, Magdalena C.; Beylefeld, Adriana A.; Joubert, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    Medical microbiology presents a challenge to undergraduate students, mostly due to its extensive content and complexity of unfamiliar terminology. In addition to a narrative review of the literature, we report findings on students' motivation for and approach to learning in the Infections module of an undergraduate medical curriculum, and their…

  19. African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed the importance of Staphylococcus aureus as a urinary pathogen and the incidence of multidrug resistant (MDR), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A total of 86 staphylococcal isolates made up of 50 clinical isolates from urine samples submitted to the Medical Microbiology Laboratory ...

  20. Tuberculosis 2: Pathophysiology and microbiology of pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-08-01

    Aug 1, 2005 ... February 2013 Downloaded from www.southsudanmedicaljournal.com. MaIN arTIClES. 10. Tuberculosis 2: Pathophysiology and microbiology of pulmonary tuberculosis. Robert L. Serafino Wania MBBS, MrCP, MSc (Trop Med). Pathophysiology. Inhalation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis leads to one of.

  1. Developing virtual patients for medical microbiology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, David; O'Gorman, Ciaran; Gormley, Gerry J

    2013-12-01

    The landscape of medical education is changing as students embrace the accessibility and interactivity of e-learning. Virtual patients are e-learning resources that may be used to advance microbiology education. Although the development of virtual patients has been widely considered, here we aim to provide a coherent approach for clinical educators. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Microbiological implications of the food irradiation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teufel, P.

    1981-01-01

    The Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Expert Committee on the wholesomeness of irradiated food which met in 1976 concluded after a detailed and critical review of the available information, that the microbiological aspects of food irradiation were fully comparable to those of conventional processes used in modern food technology. Processing of food by irradiation may be considered from the microbiological point of view as separate procedures: high dose treatment (> 10 kGy), for sterilisation (radappertization) and low dose treatment (< 10 kGy) for pasteurisation (radicidation, radurization), (for definitions see p. 43), disinfestation, or inhibition of sprouting. No public health hazards related to micro-organisms arise from high dose irradiation because this process results in commercially sterile products. On the other hand, it is important to consider the possible microbiological hazards when food is irradiated with a low dose. The microbiological implications relate to the natural radiation resistance of bacteria, yeasts, fungi and viruses or to the mutagenic effects of ionising radiation in micro-organisms. Both areas of concern were reviewed in detail by Ingram and Ingram and Farkas. (orig.)

  3. Assessment of microbiological and physicochemical parameters of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objective of our study was to determine the physicochemical and microbiological characteristics of two water samples: river and ground water, in Gikondo industrial park, compared to the tap water. Samples were collected from the main three sources: industrial park effluent water (river water), industrial spring ...

  4. Nutritional composition, phytochemicals and microbiological quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional and phytochemical compositions and microbiological quality of seeds of the legume Mucuna pruriens (MP) grown in northeastern Brazil. MP flour and extract were produced and evaluated for proximate, mineral, and phytochemical compositions, fatty acid profile, and ...

  5. Effect of degradation on microbiological and physiochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of degradation on microbiological and physiochemical parameters of domestic wastewaters from the Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria. ... The coliform was highest in sample from Akindeko hostel with a microbial load of 1.85 x 107 cfu/ml. A total of sixteen bacterial isolates were identified among which ...

  6. Microbiological and therapeutic challenges in infectious spondylodiscitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Theis; Roed-Petersen, Casper; Dragsted, Casper

    2013-01-01

    The microbiological diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis is often difficult to establish and the disease requires prolonged antibiotic treatment. We analyzed the medical records of 100 patients admitted for infectious spondylodiscitis from 2006 to 2011 with an emphasis on (1) the diagnostic...

  7. Microbiological Assessment of Commercially Available Quinine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    preceded by 24 - 48 h incubation at 37 ºC, and the microbial contaminants were expressed as colony forming unit per millilitre (cfu/ml). Microbiological identification of contaminants was performed by examination of colony ..... Toure Y. Malaria in Africa - Emerging prevention and control strategies. Report from a symposium ...

  8. Investigating the sourdough potential for enhance microbiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... survival of indicator microorganisms in finished-products were decreased. But intensity of crust roasty aroma did not have the same profile. Therefore, process requirements for optimum microbiological shelf life and roasty aroma were different, which should be taken into account in designing sourdough baking processes.

  9. Evaluation of microbiological and chemical parameters during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Devika

    1 -Corresponding Author: Dr. EdrissBazrafshan, Department of Environmental Health, school of Health, Zahedan. University of Medical ... Evaluation of microbiological and chemical parameters during wastewater Sludge and. Sawdust Co- .... composition of the starting substrate biomass must be taken into account.

  10. Processing, screening and microbiological characterization of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) obtained from the fresh stem of Laccosperma opacum (Rattan) found in coastal region of Niger Delta forest zones of West Africa was investigated to ascertain its microbiological standard for use as a potential pharmaceutical excipient. The product, coded LO-MCC, was prepared by treating ...

  11. Sensory, physicochemical and microbiological characteristics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For protein, Greek style yogurt with 2% pequi pulp showed the highest values. Clear yellowish color was observed in yogurts, with a tendency to red and green. All yogurt samples prepared with up to 22 days of storage showed pH and acidity values in accordance with Brazilian legislation. Microbiologically, yogurts were ...

  12. Applications for predictive microbiology to food packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predictive microbiology has been used for several years in the food industry to predict microbial growth, inactivation and survival. Predictive models provide a useful tool in risk assessment, HACCP set-up and GMP for the food industry to enhance microbial food safety. This report introduces the c...

  13. Carotenoid content, sensory properties and microbiological quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The carotenoid content, sensory properties and microbiological assessment of stored cassava fufu from two cultivars of yellow cassava (TMS 01/1368 and TMS 01/1412) being multiplied for distribution in South-East and South-South Nigeria were investigated using standard techniques. There is scanty information on ...

  14. Numerical simulation of double-diffusive finger convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J.D.; Sanford, W.E.; Vacher, H.L.

    2005-01-01

    A hybrid finite element, integrated finite difference numerical model is developed for the simulation of double-diffusive and multicomponent flow in two and three dimensions. The model is based on a multidimensional, density-dependent, saturated-unsaturated transport model (SUTRA), which uses one governing equation for fluid flow and another for solute transport. The solute-transport equation is applied sequentially to each simulated species. Density coupling of the flow and solute-transport equations is accounted for and handled using a sequential implicit Picard iterative scheme. High-resolution data from a double-diffusive Hele-Shaw experiment, initially in a density-stable configuration, is used to verify the numerical model. The temporal and spatial evolution of simulated double-diffusive convection is in good agreement with experimental results. Numerical results are very sensitive to discretization and correspond closest to experimental results when element sizes adequately define the spatial resolution of observed fingering. Numerical results also indicate that differences in the molecular diffusivity of sodium chloride and the dye used to visualize experimental sodium chloride concentrations are significant and cause inaccurate mapping of sodium chloride concentrations by the dye, especially at late times. As a result of reduced diffusion, simulated dye fingers are better defined than simulated sodium chloride fingers and exhibit more vertical mass transfer. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Online Signature Verification on MOBISIG Finger-Drawn Signature Corpus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Antal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present MOBISIG, a pseudosignature dataset containing finger-drawn signatures from 83 users captured with a capacitive touchscreen-based mobile device. The database was captured in three sessions resulting in 45 genuine signatures and 20 skilled forgeries for each user. The database was evaluated by two state-of-the-art methods: a function-based system using local features and a feature-based system using global features. Two types of equal error rate computations are performed: one using a global threshold and the other using user-specific thresholds. The lowest equal error rate was 0.01% against random forgeries and 5.81% against skilled forgeries using user-specific thresholds that were computed a posteriori. However, these equal error rates were significantly raised to 1.68% (random forgeries case and 14.31% (skilled forgeries case using global thresholds. The same evaluation protocol was performed on the DooDB publicly available dataset. Besides verification performance evaluations conducted on the two finger-drawn datasets, we evaluated the quality of the samples and the users of the two datasets using basic quality measures. The results show that finger-drawn signatures can be used by biometric systems with reasonable accuracy.

  16. ZifBASE: a database of zinc finger proteins and associated resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punetha Ankita

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on the occurrence of zinc finger protein motifs in genomes is crucial to the developing field of molecular genome engineering. The knowledge of their target DNA-binding sequences is vital to develop chimeric proteins for targeted genome engineering and site-specific gene correction. There is a need to develop a computational resource of zinc finger proteins (ZFP to identify the potential binding sites and its location, which reduce the time of in vivo task, and overcome the difficulties in selecting the specific type of zinc finger protein and the target site in the DNA sequence. Description ZifBASE provides an extensive collection of various natural and engineered ZFP. It uses standard names and a genetic and structural classification scheme to present data retrieved from UniProtKB, GenBank, Protein Data Bank, ModBase, Protein Model Portal and the literature. It also incorporates specialized features of ZFP including finger sequences and positions, number of fingers, physiochemical properties, classes, framework, PubMed citations with links to experimental structures (PDB, if available and modeled structures of natural zinc finger proteins. ZifBASE provides information on zinc finger proteins (both natural and engineered ones, the number of finger units in each of the zinc finger proteins (with multiple fingers, the synergy between the adjacent fingers and their positions. Additionally, it gives the individual finger sequence and their target DNA site to which it binds for better and clear understanding on the interactions of adjacent fingers. The current version of ZifBASE contains 139 entries of which 89 are engineered ZFPs, containing 3-7F totaling to 296 fingers. There are 50 natural zinc finger protein entries ranging from 2-13F, totaling to 307 fingers. It has sequences and structures from literature, Protein Data Bank, ModBase and Protein Model Portal. The interface is cross linked to other public

  17. Commutability of food microbiology proficiency testing samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmassih, M; Polet, M; Goffaux, M-J; Planchon, V; Dierick, K; Mahillon, J

    2014-03-01

    Food microbiology proficiency testing (PT) is a useful tool to assess the analytical performances among laboratories. PT items should be close to routine samples to accurately evaluate the acceptability of the methods. However, most PT providers distribute exclusively artificial samples such as reference materials or irradiated foods. This raises the issue of the suitability of these samples because the equivalence-or 'commutability'-between results obtained on artificial vs. authentic food samples has not been demonstrated. In the clinical field, the use of noncommutable PT samples has led to erroneous evaluation of the performances when different analytical methods were used. This study aimed to provide a first assessment of the commutability of samples distributed in food microbiology PT. REQUASUD and IPH organized 13 food microbiology PTs including 10-28 participants. Three types of PT items were used: genuine food samples, sterile food samples and reference materials. The commutability of the artificial samples (reference material or sterile samples) was assessed by plotting the distribution of the results on natural and artificial PT samples. This comparison highlighted matrix-correlated issues when nonfood matrices, such as reference materials, were used. Artificially inoculated food samples, on the other hand, raised only isolated commutability issues. In the organization of a PT-scheme, authentic or artificially inoculated food samples are necessary to accurately evaluate the analytical performances. Reference materials, used as PT items because of their convenience, may present commutability issues leading to inaccurate penalizing conclusions for methods that would have provided accurate results on food samples. For the first time, the commutability of food microbiology PT samples was investigated. The nature of the samples provided by the organizer turned out to be an important factor because matrix effects can impact on the analytical results. © 2013

  18. [Medical microbiology laboratories in Dutch hospitals: essential for safe patient care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonten, M J M

    2008-12-06

    The Netherlands Health Care Inspectorate investigated the quality of medical microbiology laboratories in Dutch hospitals. By and large the laboratories fulfilled the requirements for appropriate care, although some processes were unsatisfactory and some were insufficiently formalised. In the Netherlands, laboratories for medical microbiology are integrated within hospitals and medical microbiologists are responsible for the diagnostic processes as well as for co-treatment of patients, infection prevention and research. This integrated model contrasts to the more industrialised model in many other countries, where such laboratories are physically distinct from hospitals with a strong focus on diagnostics. The Inspectorate also concludes that the current position of medical microbiology in Dutch hospitals is necessary for patient safety and that outsourcing of these facilities is considered unacceptable.

  19. Evaluation of wearable haptic systems for the fingers in Augmented Reality applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chinello, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    real-time sign interpretation app. Even if AR applications are already quite compelling and widespread, users are still not able to physically interact with the computer-generated reality. In this respect, wearable haptics can provide the compelling illusion of touching the superimposed virtual objects...... without constraining the motion or the workspace of the user. In this paper, we present the experimental evaluation of two wearable haptic interfaces for the fingers in three AR scenarios, enrolling 38 participants. In the first experiment, subjects were requested to write on a virtual board using a real......Although Augmented Reality (AR) has been around for almost five decades, only recently we have witnessed AR systems and applications entering in our everyday life. Representative examples of this technological revolution are the smartphone games “Pok´emon GO” and “Ingress” or the Google Translate...

  20. Transfer of noroviruses between fingers and fomites and food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuladhar, Era; Hazeleger, Wilma C; Koopmans, Marion; Zwietering, Marcel H; Duizer, Erwin; Beumer, Rijkelt R

    2013-11-01

    Human norovirus (NoV) contaminated hands are important routes for transmission. Quantitative data on transfer during contact with surfaces and food are scarce but necessary for a quantitative risk assessment. Therefore, transfer of MNV1 and human NoVs GI.4 and GII.4 was studied by artificially contaminating human finger pads, followed by pressing on stainless steel and Trespa® surfaces and also on whole tomatoes and cucumber slices. In addition, clean finger pads were pressed on artificially contaminated stainless steel and Trespa® surfaces. The transfers were performed at a pressure of 0.8-1.9 kg/cm(2) for approximately 2s up to 7 sequential transfers either to carriers or to food products. MNV1 infectivity transfer from finger pads to stainless steel ranged from 13 ± 16% on the first to 0.003 ± 0.009% on the sixth transfer on immediate transfer. After 10 min of drying, transfer was reduced to 0.1 ± 0.2% on the first transfer to 0.013 ± 0.023% on the fifth transfer. MNV1 infectivity transfer from stainless steel and Trespa® to finger pads after 40 min of drying was 2.0 ± 2.0% and 4.0 ± 5.0% respectively. MNV1 infectivity was transferred 7 ± 8% to cucumber slices and 0.3 ± 0.5% to tomatoes after 10 min of drying, where the higher transfer to cucumber was probably due to the higher moisture content of the cucumber slices. Similar results were found for NoVs GI.4 and GII.4 transfers measured in PCR units. The results indicate that transfer of the virus is possible even after the virus is dried on the surface of hands or carriers. Furthermore, the role of fingers in transmission of NoVs was quantified and these data can be useful in risk assessment models and to establish target levels for efficacy of transmission intervention methods. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 21 CFR 866.2900 - Microbiological specimen collection and transport device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices... microbiological specimen collection and transport device is a specimen collecting chamber intended for medical...

  2. African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology: Editorial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology is published quarterly. It includes original research papers covering all aspects of Medical Microbiology – Bacteriology, Virology, Rickettsiology, Chlamydiology, Mycology, Mycobacteriology, and Actinomycetales, Parasitology, Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases, ...

  3. [The opportunities, challenges and trends in the rejuvenation of microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ping; Chen, Xiangdong

    2010-01-01

    In history, the development of microbiology had undergone two golden ages and some depression time as well. In the last two decades, the application of many physiochemical technologies including genomics, structural biology, bioinformatics, PCR, and high-resolution microscopy has led to a series of breakthroughs in microbiology. Microbiology has now awakened and entered its third golden age for development. This review discusses our view of the opportunities, challenges, and trends in the current advancement of microbiology. The topics include: (1) The two golden ages for microbiology in history. (2) The opportunities and challenges in the rejuvenation of microbiology. (3) The characteristics and trends of the current development of microbiology. (4) Integral microbiology--the hallmark of the third golden age.

  4. Microbiological aspects of safety in radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, B.G.; Safonov, A.V.; Nazina, T.N.; Gorbunova, O.A.

    2012-01-01

    In long-term storage and/or disposal of radioactive waste, microbiological processes play an important, and in some cases a vital role. The article discusses the issues of microbiological processes in underground liquid LLW repositories and microbiological destruction of cemented radwaste. It is shown that biological additives to cement matrices can be used to effectively prevent the occurrence of microbiological processes, increasing reliability of engineering barriers that block release of radionuclides into the areas adjacent to the repositories [ru

  5. Effects of Finger Counting on Numerical Development – The Opposing Views of Neurocognition and Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Korbinian; Martignon, Laura; Wessolowski, Silvia; Engel, Joachim; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Children typically learn basic numerical and arithmetic principles using finger-based representations. However, whether or not reliance on finger-based representations is beneficial or detrimental is the subject of an ongoing debate between researchers in neurocognition and mathematics education. From the neurocognitive perspective, finger counting provides multisensory input, which conveys both cardinal and ordinal aspects of numbers. Recent data indicate that children with good finger-based numerical representations show better arithmetic skills and that training finger gnosis, or “finger sense,” enhances mathematical skills. Therefore neurocognitive researchers conclude that elaborate finger-based numerical representations are beneficial for later numerical development. However, research in mathematics education recommends fostering mentally based numerical representations so as to induce children to abandon finger counting. More precisely, mathematics education recommends first using finger counting, then concrete structured representations and, finally, mental representations of numbers to perform numerical operations. Taken together, these results reveal an important debate between neurocognitive and mathematics education research concerning the benefits and detriments of finger-based strategies for numerical development. In the present review, the rationale of both lines of evidence will be discussed. PMID:22144969

  6. Blood pressure measurement of all five fingers by strain gauge plethysmography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirai, M; Nielsen, S L; Lassen, N A

    1976-01-01

    The aim of the present paper was to study the methodological problems involved in measuring systolic blood pressure in all five fingers by the strain gauge technique. In 24 normal subjects, blood pressure at the proximal phalanx of finger I and both at the proximal and the intermediate phalanx...... of the other fingers was measured using a 24-mm-wide cuff. Blood pressure at the proximal phalanx was higher than that at the intermediate phalanx in all fingers except finger V. The difference of blood pressure values corresponded well with circumference of the finger. In 15 normal subjects, blood pressure...... of the mean values was larter with the 27-mm-wide cuff than with the 24-mm-wide cuff, the 24-mm-wide cuff was considered to be most suitable for clinical use in fingers I, II, III, and IV. By using the 20-mm-wide cuff in finger V and the 24-mm-wide cuff in the other fingers, normal value of finger blood...

  7. Undergraduate Laboratory Exercises Specific to Food Spoilage Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Abigail B.; Worobo, Randy W.; Orta-Ramirez, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Food spoilage has an enormous economic impact, and microbial food spoilage plays a significant role in food waste and loss; subsequently, an equally significant portion of undergraduate food microbiology instruction should be dedicated to spoilage microbiology. Here, we describe a set of undergraduate microbiology laboratory exercises that focus…

  8. Practical microbiology in schools: a survey of UK teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, James; Burdass, Dariel; Verran, Joanna

    2013-11-01

    A survey of secondary school teachers investigated practical microbiology in the classroom. The results were heartening (practical microbiology was common), but concerns were expressed regarding equipment, time, cost, and expertise. Microbiologists should engage more with school education to support teachers and maintain the health of microbiology for future generations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Danish Microbiology Database (MiBa) 2010 to 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldstedlund, M; Haarh, M; Mølbak, K

    2014-01-01

    The Danish Microbiology Database (MiBa) is a national database that receives copies of reports from all Danish departments of clinical microbiology. The database was launched in order to provide healthcare personnel with nationwide access to microbiology reports and to enable real-time surveillance...

  10. Quality control for diagnostic oral microbiology laboratories in European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rautemaa-Richardson, R.; van der Reijden, W.A.; Dahlen, G.; Smith, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Participation in diagnostic microbiology internal and external quality control (QC) processes is good laboratory practice and an essential component of a quality management system. However, no QC scheme for diagnostic oral microbiology existed until 2009 when the Clinical Oral Microbiology (COMB)

  11. Study of the effects of the hand grip and finger strengths on the friction and petrissage - the massage manipulations - of the students who take massage courses: Kütahya City example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erzeybek Mustafa Said

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effect of the hand grip and finger strengths on the power development between the friction and petrissage techniques - the massage manipulations - have been studied. To the study that has been structured as a single group pretest/post test, 36 healthy males who are the students of the University of Dumlupınar, Academy of Physical Education and Sports and who take massage courses (age = 19.72 ± 1.56 years (average ± Sd have been included. The practical massage course has continued for 12 weeks, two days a week for a total of one hour and the hand grip strength of both hands (right hand grip strength = RHG, left hand grip strength = LHG and the grip strength of both fingers (right finger strength = RF, left finger strength = LF have been recorded at the beginning. For the measurements carried out before and later of the study with regard to the hand grip strength, a Takkei branded hand dynamometer and with regard to the finger grip strength a (baseline branded pinch meter have been used. All measurements have been repeated twice and for the analysis, the average values obtained from two deads have been used. For statistical analysis, with regard to the changes in the pre test-post test finger strength and hand grip strength, paired-samples t test has been used. The significance limit has been defined as p0.05. It is possible to report that massaging regularly with both hands is efficient for the development of the finger and hand grip strengths; especially, with regard to the friction (circular movements that are generally carried out with fingers and petrissage (kneading that is generally carried out with the palm techniques.

  12. Efeito da radiação gama nas características físico-químicas e microbiológicas do queijo prato durante a maturação Effects of gamma radiation on the physical-chemical and microbiological characteristics in the prato cheese ripening period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika Maria Roel Gutierrez

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available O Prato, queijo de pasta lavada, é um dos mais populares do Brasil e deve ser maturado para atingir as características de sabor, aroma e textura. O presente trabalho teve por objetivo estudar o efeito da radiação gama no período de maturação do queijo Prato. Dois períodos para a irradiação foram testados, no 1º dia e no 15º dia de maturação. Os queijos Prato foram irradiados com as doses 0 (controle, 1, 2, 3 e 4kGy nos períodos citados, em irradiador de cobalto-60 Gammabeam 650 da Atomic Energy do Canadá, com taxa de dose 0,9696kGy/h e armazenados a 10-12ºC e ± 85% UR, por 60 dias. As análises físico-químicas e microbiológicas foram realizadas de 15 em 15 dias até completar 60 dias de maturação. Através dos resultados observou-se que, com o aumento da dose de radiação, diminuiu a flora microbiana do queijo e, que a irradiação retardou a maturação, conforme se aumentou a dose. Isto se deve provavelmente, pela destruição das bactérias láticas.The Prato, cheese washed dough, is one of Brazil's most popular cheeses. This cheese must be ripened the desirable characteristics of flavors and texture. The present work studied the influence of gamma radiation in the ripening period of Prato cheese. The cheese was ripened at 10-12ºC and at ± 80% RH for 60 days. At the 1st and at 15th day of ripening, sample were irradiated to 0 (control, 1, 2, 3 and 4kGy at a rate of 0.9696kGy/h. The cobalto-60 source used was a Gammabeam 650 from Atomic Energy of Canada. Physical-chemical and microbiological characteristics were analyzed every each 15 days of ripening. The results showed that the total microbial count decreased as increased the dose of irradiation of the cheese. The ripening of the cheese was delayed by irradiation, probability due to the inactivation of the lactic bacteria by radiation.

  13. Impact of soil types and management practices on soil microbiological properties - a case study in salt affected area of Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwar, Ravi Kumar; Makádi, Marianna; Michéli, Erika; Weldmichael, Tsedekech G.; Szegi, Tamás

    2017-04-01

    The impact of different land use systems on soil microbiological properties in salt affected soils were investigated in the Nádudvar region of Hajdu-Bihar County, Hungary. The study area is characterized by associations of Solonetz and Chernozem soils. Soils were collected from both arable (cultivated) and pasture (non-cultivated) land from the upper 15 cm, in May, 2016. Besides soil physical and chemical properties (SOM, pH, CaCO3, EC, E4/E6, available macro, meso and micro nutrients and moisture content), soil microbiological properties were also investigated, phosphatase and dehydrogenase activities of the samples were measured, as well as soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and soil microbiological respiration. The results were statistically compared on the different soil types and land uses. It was concluded that land management has greater impact on soil microbiology than inherent properties or soil types.

  14. Researches on Physico-Chemical and Microbiological Characteristics of Sheep and Cow Milk from Cristian Farm, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popa Ionuţ Radu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted over a period of three month in the Cristian farm, Sibiu. For the physical, chemical and microbiological analyzes were taken a number of 15 samples per month. From physico-chemical point of view the content evolution of fat, not fat solid substance, density, protein, freezing point, temperature, lactose, conductivity, pH, water addition was followed. Samples were analyzed using the milk analyzer Ekomilk Total of the Research Centre in Biotechnology and Microbiology of the "Lucian Blaga" University. The microbiological contamination of milk was done by determining the total number of bacteria and coliform bacteria. From microbiological point of view it was observed that these conditions are largely met, but a more rigorous control on the cleanliness of utensils and of the staff is required.

  15. Recent applications of hyperspectral imaging in microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowen, Aoife A; Feng, Yaoze; Gaston, Edurne; Valdramidis, Vasilis

    2015-05-01

    Hyperspectral chemical imaging (HSI) is a broad term encompassing spatially resolved spectral data obtained through a variety of modalities (e.g. Raman scattering, Fourier transform infrared microscopy, fluorescence and near-infrared chemical imaging). It goes beyond the capabilities of conventional imaging and spectroscopy by obtaining spatially resolved spectra from objects at spatial resolutions varying from the level of single cells up to macroscopic objects (e.g. foods). In tandem with recent developments in instrumentation and sampling protocols, applications of HSI in microbiology have increased rapidly. This article gives a brief overview of the fundamentals of HSI and a comprehensive review of applications of HSI in microbiology over the past 10 years. Technical challenges and future perspectives for these techniques are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Microbiological decontamination of natural honey by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdal, W.; Owczarczyk, H.B.; Kedzia, B.; Holderna-Kedzia, E.; Madajczyk, D.

    2000-01-01

    Degree of microbiological decontamination, organoleptic and physico-chemical properties of natural honeys were investigated after radiation treatment. Seven kinds of honeys were irradiated with the beams of 10 MeV electrons from a 10 kW linear accelerator ''Elektronika 10-10'' at the dose 10 kGy. It was shown, that after irradiation, the total count of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and moulds decrease by 99%. The antibiotic value in investigated honeys increased in turn from 1.67 to 2.67 after irradiation. Such factors and parameters of investigated honeys as their consistency, content of water and saccharose, acidity, the diastase and 5-HMF values were not changed significantly after irradiation. Decontamination by irradiation is a process which allows us to obtain high microbiological purity of honeys. It is especially needed, when honeys are used in surgical treatment of injuries and in nutrition of babies with food deficiency

  17. Inflammation, suppuration, putrefaction, fermentation: Joseph Lister's microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on Lister's inaugural lecture at King's College, London, in October 1877. As the new Professor of Clinical Surgery, Lister had much to report, including impressively high survival rates from complex operations previously regarded as foolhardy. Instead, he chose to address the processes of fermentation in wine, blood and milk. His reasons are not obvious to a modern audience, just as they probably were not to those who heard him in the Great Hall at King's. Having brought microbiological apparatus from his laboratory to the lecture theatre and presented proof of bacterial variety and specificity, Lister publicly demonstrated the creation of the first pure bacterial culture in the history of microbiology. It was an ingenious and well-thought-out strategy designed to generate a frame of mind among his new colleagues and future students, receptive to the causative role of bacteria in septic diseases. His timing was impeccable.

  18. Microbiological synthesis of methyl ethyl ketone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astashkina Anna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimal conditions for the microbiological synthesis of methyl ethyl ketone (MEK on the mineral medium with butanol-1, butanol-2, 2-methylpropanol-2 by hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas spp. were chosen. Optimal conditions for microbiological synthesis are liquid mineral Adkins’ medium containing 3% (vol. of the substrate, stirring speed – 80-100 rev/min, temperature – 37° C, and synthesis time 24-48 hours. The specific growth rate and time of culture generation during the microbial synthesis were determined. It was found that methyl ethyl ketone is formed in the reaction mixture after 8, 48 and 72 hours when using 2-methylpropanol-2, butanol-2, butanol-1 as substrates, respectively. Maximum methyl ethyl ketone yield in the reaction mixture is observed after 12 hours in the case of using 2-methylpropanol-2 as a carbon source and accounts for 10%.

  19. [Microbiological diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Estévez, Marta; Reina González, Gabriel; Aguilera Guirao, Antonio; Rodríguez Martín, Carmen; García García, Federico

    2015-10-01

    This document attempts to update the main tasks and roles of the Clinical Microbiology laboratory in HIV diagnosis and monitoring. The document is divided into three parts. The first deals with HIV diagnosis and how serological testing has changed in the last few years, aiming to improve diagnosis and to minimize missed opportunities for diagnosis. Technological improvements for HIV Viral Load are shown in the second part of the document, which also includes a detailed description of the clinical significance of low-level and very low-level viremia. Finally, the third part of the document deals with resistance to antiretroviral drugs, incorporating clinical indications for integrase and tropism testing, as well as the latest knowledge on minority variants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  20. Rheological and microbiological study of flour treated by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laabidi, Othmen

    2007-01-01

    the aim this work is to study the effectiveness of radio treatment and its effect on the conservation of flour and their various parameters (physico-chemical and rheological). The flour has been treated with different doses (0, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 kGy), physico-chemical, rheological, microbiological and sensory analyses were made.The results show that the irradiation as a treatment for decontamination gave a highly effective. Indeed, a dose of 1.5 kGy allows a total destruction of yeasts and molds. Thus, from the point of view physico-chemical, increasing the dose of radiation causes a change in physical and chemical properties and rheological of flour. for the characteristics of bread, increasing the dose of radiation affects the quality of bread. (Author). 38 refs