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Sample records for fine pore diffuser

  1. DESIGN INFORMATION ON FINE PORE AERATION SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field studies were conducted over several years at municipal wastewater treatment plants employing line pore diffused aeration systems. These studies were designed to produce reliable information on the performance and operational requirements of fine pore devices under process ...

  2. INVESTIGATIONS INTO BIOFOULING PHENOMENA IN FINE PORE AERATION DEVICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbiologically-based procedures were used to describe biofouling phenomena on fine pore aeration devices and to determine whether biofilm characteristics could be related to diffuser process performance parameters. Fine pore diffusers were obtained from five municipal wastewa...

  3. Linking biofilm growth to fouling and aeration performance of fine-pore diffuser in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Baserba, Manel; Asvapathanagul, Pitiporn; McCarthy, Graham W; Gocke, Thomas E; Olson, Betty H; Park, Hee-Deung; Al-Omari, Ahmed; Murthy, Sudhir; Bott, Charles B; Wett, Bernhard; Smeraldi, Joshua D; Shaw, Andrew R; Rosso, Diego

    2016-03-01

    Aeration is commonly identified as the largest contributor to process energy needs in the treatment of wastewater and therefore garners significant focus in reducing energy use. Fine-pore diffusers are the most common aeration system in municipal wastewater treatment. These diffusers are subject to fouling and scaling, resulting in loss in transfer efficiency as biofilms form and change material properties producing larger bubbles, hindering mass transfer and contributing to increased plant energy costs. This research establishes a direct correlation and apparent mechanistic link between biofilm DNA concentration and reduced aeration efficiency caused by biofilm fouling. Although the connection between biofilm growth and fouling has been implicit in discussions of diffuser fouling for many years, this research provides measured quantitative connection between the extent of biofouling and reduced diffuser efficiency. This was clearly established by studying systematically the deterioration of aeration diffusers efficiency during a 1.5 year period, concurrently with the microbiological study of the biofilm fouling in order to understand the major factors contributing to diffuser fouling. The six different diffuser technologies analyzed in this paper included four different materials which were ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM), polyurethane, silicone and ceramic. While all diffusers foul eventually, some novel materials exhibited fouling resistance. The material type played a major role in determining the biofilm characteristics (i.e., growth rate, composition, and microbial density) which directly affected the rate and intensity at what the diffusers were fouled, whereas diffuser geometry exerted little influence. Overall, a high correlation between the increase in biofilm DNA and the decrease in αF was evident (CV aeration efficiency, the research was able to show quantitatively the causal connection between bacterial fouling and energy wastage during

  4. Modelling the link amongst fine-pore diffuser fouling, oxygen transfer efficiency, and aeration energy intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Baserba, Manel; Sobhani, Reza; Asvapathanagul, Pitiporn; McCarthy, Graham W; Olson, Betty H; Odize, Victory; Al-Omari, Ahmed; Murthy, Sudhir; Nifong, Andrea; Godwin, Johnnie; Bott, Charles B; Stenstrom, Michael K; Shaw, Andrew R; Rosso, Diego

    2017-03-15

    This research systematically studied the behavior of aeration diffuser efficiency over time, and its relation to the energy usage per diffuser. Twelve diffusers were selected for a one year fouling study. Comprehensive aeration efficiency projections were carried out in two WRRFs with different influent rates, and the influence of operating conditions on aeration diffusers' performance was demonstrated. This study showed that the initial energy use, during the first year of operation, of those aeration diffusers located in high rate systems (with solids retention time - SRT-less than 2 days) increased more than 20% in comparison to the conventional systems (2 > SRT). Diffusers operating for three years in conventional systems presented the same fouling characteristics as those deployed in high rate processes for less than 15 months. A new procedure was developed to accurately project energy consumption on aeration diffusers; including the impacts of operation conditions, such SRT and organic loading rate, on specific aeration diffusers materials (i.e. silicone, polyurethane, EPDM, ceramic). Furthermore, it considers the microbial colonization dynamics, which successfully correlated with the increase of energy consumption (r(2):0.82 ± 7). The presented energy model projected the energy costs and the potential savings for the diffusers after three years in operation in different operating conditions. Whereas the most efficient diffusers provided potential costs spanning from 4900 USD/Month for a small plant (20 MGD, or 74,500 m(3)/d) up to 24,500 USD/Month for a large plant (100 MGD, or 375,000 m(3)/d), other diffusers presenting less efficiency provided spans from 18,000USD/Month for a small plant to 90,000 USD/Month for large plants. The aim of this methodology is to help utilities gain more insight into process mechanisms and design better energy efficiency strategies at existing facilities to reduce energy consumption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  5. Particle diffusion in complex nanoscale pore networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müter, Dirk; Sørensen, Henning Osholm; Bock, H.

    2015-01-01

    decreased to as much as 60% when particle size increased from 1% to 35% of the average pore diameter. When particles were attracted to the pore surfaces, even very small particles, diffusion was drastically inhibited, by as much as a factor of 100. Thus, the size of particles and their interaction......We studied the diffusion of particles in the highly irregular pore networks of chalk, a very fine-grained rock, by combining three-dimensional X-ray imaging and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. X-ray imaging data were collected at 25 nm voxel dimension for two chalk samples...... with very different porosities (4% and 26%). The three-dimensional pore systems derived from the tomograms were imported into DPD simulations and filled with spherical particles of variable diameter and with an optional attractive interaction to the pore surfaces. We found that diffusion significantly...

  6. Particle diffusion in complex nanoscale pore networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müter, Dirk; Sørensen, Henning Osholm; Bock, H.;

    2015-01-01

    We studied the diffusion of particles in the highly irregular pore networks of chalk, a very fine-grained rock, by combining three-dimensional X-ray imaging and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. X-ray imaging data were collected at 25 nm voxel dimension for two chalk samples with v...

  7. Fines Classification Based on Sensitivity to Pore-Fluid Chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Junbong

    2015-12-28

    The 75-μm particle size is used to discriminate between fine and coarse grains. Further analysis of fine grains is typically based on the plasticity chart. Whereas pore-fluid-chemistry-dependent soil response is a salient and distinguishing characteristic of fine grains, pore-fluid chemistry is not addressed in current classification systems. Liquid limits obtained with electrically contrasting pore fluids (deionized water, 2-M NaCl brine, and kerosene) are combined to define the soil "electrical sensitivity." Liquid limit and electrical sensitivity can be effectively used to classify fine grains according to their fluid-soil response into no-, low-, intermediate-, or high-plasticity fine grains of low, intermediate, or high electrical sensitivity. The proposed methodology benefits from the accumulated experience with liquid limit in the field and addresses the needs of a broader range of geotechnical engineering problems. © ASCE.

  8. Manufacture of Fine-Pored Ceramics by the Gelcasting Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronisław Psiuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The fine-pored materials represent a wide range of applications and searches are being continued to develop methods of their manufacturing. In the article, based on measurements on fine-grained powders of Al2O3, TiO2, and SiO2, it has been demonstrated that gelcasting can be relatively simple method of obtaining of nanoporous materials with high values of both specific surface area and open porosity. The powders were dispersed in silica sol, and the gelling initiator was NH4Cl. The usefulness of experiment design theory for developing of fine-pored materials with high porosity and specific surface area was also shown.

  9. Letter to the editor: Diffusion under pore saturation conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.; van Baten, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the article "Diffusion Under Pore Saturaton Conditions", Lettat et al. (1) presents a model to describe mixture diffusion in MFI zeolite under conditions of pore saturation. As a motivation for developing their model they remark ‘‘the classical adsorbed-phase diffusion models based on the Maxwell

  10. Diffusion in the pore water of compacted crushed salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluegge, Judith; Herr, Sebastian; Lauke, Thomas; Meleshyn, Artur; Miehe, Ruediger; Ruebel, Andre

    2016-07-15

    Diffusion of dissolved radionuclides in the pore water of compacted crushed salt in the long-term is the most relevant process for the release of radionuclides from a dedicated repository for high-level waste in a salt formation as has been shown in latest safety assessments and research projects /BUH 16/. So far, diffusion coefficients for free water have been applied for the diffusion in pore water in models for long-term safety assessments. This conservative assumption was used, because data on the diffusion coefficient of dissolved substances in crushed salt have been missing. Furthermore, the diffusion coefficient in the pore water was assumed to be constant and independent from the degree of compaction of the crushed salt. The work presented in this report was intended to contribute to fill this gap of knowledge about how the diffusion of radionuclides takes place in the compacted backfill of a repository in salt. For the first time, the pore diffusion coefficient as well as its dependence on the porosity of the crushed salt was determined experimentally by means of through-diffusion experiments using caesium as tracer. The results achieved in this project suggest that the diffusion in compacted crushed salt is not fully comparable to that in a homogeneous, temporally stable porous medium like sand or clay. The results obtained from four diffusion experiments show a remarkably different behaviour and all yield unique concentration versus time plots which includes highly temporal variable tracer fluxes with even full interruptions of the flux for longer periods of time. This effect cannot be explained by assuming a tracer transport by diffusion in a temporarily invariant pore space and / or under temporally invariant experimental conditions. From our point of view, a restructuring of the pore space seems to lead to closed areas of pore water in the sample which may open up again after some time, leading to a variable pore space and hence variable diffusive

  11. Diffusion Pore Imaging by Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Kuder, Tristan Anselm; Windschuh, Johannes; Laun, Frederik Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion measurements are widely used to derive parameters indirectly related to the microstructure of biological tissues and porous media. However, a direct imaging of cell or pore shapes and sizes would be of high interest. For a long time, determining pore shapes by NMR diffusion acquisitions seemed impossible, because the necessary phase information could not be preserved. Here we demonstrate experimentally using the measurement technique which we have recently proposed theoretically that the shape of arbitrary closed pores can be imaged by diffusion acquisitions, which yield the phase information. For this purpose, we use hyperpolarized xenon gas in well-defined geometries. The signal can be collected from the whole sample which mainly eliminates the problem of vanishing signal at increasing resolution of conventional NMR imaging. This could be used to non-invasively gain structural information inaccessible so far such as pore or cell shapes, cell density or axon integri...

  12. Hard Sphere Diffusion Behaviour of Polymer Translocating through Interacting Pores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li-Zhen; LUO Meng-Bo

    2008-01-01

    The translocation of polymer chain through a small pore from a high concentration side (cis side) to a low concentration side (trans side) is simulated by using Monte Carlo technique. The effect of the polymer-pore interaction on the translocation is studied. We find a special interaction at which the decay of the number of polymer chain, N, at the cis side obeys Fick's law, i.e. N decreases exponentially with time. The behaviour is analogous to the diffusion of hard sphere.

  13. Nanofiltration Membranes with Narrow Pore Size Distribution via Contra-Diffusion-Induced Mussel-Inspired Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yong; Qiu, Wen-Ze; Lv, Yan; Wu, Jian; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2016-11-02

    Nanofiltration membranes (NFMs) are widely used in saline water desalination, wastewater treatment, and chemical product purification. However, conventional NFMs suffer from broad pore size distribution, which limits their applications for fine separation, especially in complete separation of molecules with slight differences in molecular size. Herein, defect-free composite NFMs with narrow pore size distribution are fabricated using a contra-diffusion method, with dopamine/polyethylenimine solution on the skin side and ammonium persulfate solution on the other side of the ultrafiltration substrate. Persulfate ions can diffuse through the ultrafiltration substrate into the other side and in situ trigger dopamine to form a codeposited coating with polyethylenimine. The codeposition is hindered on those sites completely covered by the polydopamine/polyethylenimine coating, although it is promoted at the defects or highly permeable regions because it is induced by the diffused persulfate ions. Such a "self-completion" process results in NFMs with highly uniform structures and narrow pore size distribution, as determined by their rejection of neutral solutes. These near electrically neutral NFMs show a high rejection of divalent ions with a low rejection of monovalent ions (MgCl2 rejection = 96%, NaCl rejection = 23%), majorly based on a steric hindrance effect. The as-prepared NFMs can be applied in molecular separation such as isolating cellulose hydrogenation products.

  14. Diffusion of Macromolecules across the Nuclear Pore Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, Rajarshi; Sebastian, K L

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are very selective filters that monitor the transport between the cytoplasm and the nucleoplasm. Two models have been suggested for the plug of the NPC. They are (i) it is a reversible hydrogel or (ii) it is a polymer brush. We propose a mesoscopic model for the transport of a protein through the plug, that is general enough to cover both. The protein stretches the plug and creates a local deformation. The bubble so created (prtoein+deformation) executes random walk in the plug. We find that for faster relaxation of the gel, the diffusion of the bubble is greater. Further, on using parameters appropriate for the brush, we find that the diffusion coefficient is much lower. Hence the gel model seems to be more likely explanation for the workings of the plug.

  15. Vibration pore water pressure characteristics of saturated fine sand under partially drained condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王炳辉; 陈国兴

    2008-01-01

    Vibration pore water pressure characteristics of saturated fine sand under partially drained condition were investigated through stress-controlled cyclic triaxial tests employed varied fine content of samples and loading frequency. In order to simulate the partially drained condition, one-way drainage for sample was implemented when cyclic loading was applied. The results show that the vibration pore water pressure’s response leads the axial stress and axial strain responses, and is lagged behind or simultaneous with axial strain-rate’s response for all samples in this research. In addition, the satisfactory linear relationship between vibration pore water pressure amplitude and axial strain-rate amplitude is also obtained. It means that the direct cause of vibration pore water pressure generation under partially drained conditions is not the axial stress or axial strain but the axial strain-rate. The lag-phase between pore water pressure and axial strain-rate increases with the increase of the fine content or the loading frequency.

  16. In-pore exchange and diffusion of carbonate solvent mixtures in nanoporous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Todd M.; Osborn Popp, Thomas M.

    2016-08-01

    High resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) 1H NMR spectroscopy has been used to resolve different surface and in-pore solvent environments of ethylene carbonate (EC) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) mixtures absorbed within nanoporous carbon (NPC). Two dimensional (2D) 1H HRMAS NMR exchange measurements revealed that the inhomogeneous broadened in-pore resonances have pore-to-pore exchange rates on the millisecond timescale. Pulsed-field gradient (PFG) NMR diffusometry revealed the in-pore self-diffusion constants for both EC and DMC were reduced by up to a factor of five with respect to the diffusion in the non-absorbed solvent mixtures.

  17. The Water-Induced Linear Reduction Gas Diffusivity Model Extended to Three Pore Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, T. K. K. Deepagoda; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Kawamoto, Ken

    2015-01-01

    . Characterization of soil functional pore structure is an essential prerequisite to understand key gas transport processes in variably saturated soils in relation to soil ecosystems, climate, and environmental services. In this study, the water-induced linear reduction (WLR) soil gas diffusivity model originally......An existing gas diffusivity model developed originally for sieved, repacked soils was extended to characterize gas diffusion in differently structured soils and functional pore networks. A gas diffusivity-derived pore connectivity index was used as a measure of soil structure development...... developed for sieved, repacked soil was extended to two simple, linear regions to characterize gas diffusion and functional pore-network structure also in intact, structured soil systems. Based on the measurements in soils with markedly different pore regions, we showed that the two linear regions can...

  18. Simulation of levulinic acid adsorption in packed beds using parallel pore/surface diffusion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, L.; Mao, J. [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory for Chemical and Biological Processing Technology of Farm Products, Zhejiang University of Science and Technology, Hangzhou (China); Ren, Q. [National Laboratory of Secondary Resources Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Liu, B.

    2010-07-15

    The adsorption of levulinic acid in fixed beds of basic polymeric adsorbents at 22 C was studied under various operating conditions. A general rate model which considers pore diffusion and parallel pore/surface diffusion was solved numerically by orthogonal collocation on finite elements to describe the experimental breakthrough data. The adsorption isotherms, and the pore and surface diffusion coefficients were determined independently in batch adsorption studies. The external film resistance and the axial dispersion coefficient were estimated by the Wilson-Geankoplis equation and the Chung-Wen equation, respectively. Simulation elucidated that the model which considers parallel diffusion successfully describes the breakthrough behavior and gave a much better prediction than the model which considers pore diffusion. The results obtained in this work are applicable to design and optimizes the separation process. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Influence of Binder Composition and Concrete Pore Structure on Chloride Diffusion Coefficient in Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Pengping; SU Dagen; WANG Shengnian; FAN Zhihong

    2011-01-01

    The influence of binder composition and pore structure of concrete on chloride diffusion coefficient in concrete were investigated by the natural immersion test, MIP test, SEM and EDS test, respectively. The experimental results showed that the effect of binder composition on chloride diffusion coefficient was the comprehensive result of concrete pore structure and binder hydration products, and the porosity and pore size distribution were the main factors that influence the changes of diffusion coefficient. The chloride diffusion coefficient decreased with increasing the curing temperature and the relative humidity. The hydration degree were promoted by improving curing temperatures, and then the porosity of concrete decreased and the proportion of gel pore and transitional pore increased, respectively. But the water evaporation decreased with increasing the relative humidity and then decreased porosity and increased the proportion of gel pore and transitional pore. Additionally, The chloride diffusion coefficient of concrete got the lower value when the appropriate replacement of fly ash in the ranges of 10%-20%, when the double-adding fly ash and slag content was 50%. The porosity increased and the ratio of C/S in C-S-H decreased with further increasing the fly ash content, which led to increase the chloride diffusion coefficient in concrete.

  20. Diffusion and electromigration in clay bricks influenced by differences in the pore system resulting from firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2012-01-01

    Ion transport in porous materials has been subject of study for several decades. However, the interaction between the pores and the overall pore system make it complicated to obtain a clear picture and predict diffusion and electromigration (transport induced by an applied electric field). Specif...

  1. Direct correlation of diffusion and pore size distributions with low field NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2016-08-01

    The time-dependent diffusion coefficient (D) is a powerful tool to probe microstructure in porous media, and can be obtained by the NMR method. In a real porous sample, molecular diffusion is very complex. Here we present a new method which directly measures the relationship between effective diffusion coefficients and pore size distributions without knowing surface relaxivity. This method is used to extract structural information and explore the relationship between D and a in porous media having broad pore size distributions. The diffusion information is encoded by the Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) method and the pore size distributions are acquired by the Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF) method. Two model samples were measured to verify this method. Restricted diffusion was analyzed, and shows that most fluid molecules experience pore wall. The D(a) curves obtained from correlation maps were fitted to the Padé approximant equation and a good agreement was found between the fitting lines and the measured data. Then a sandstone sample with unknown structure was measured. The state of confined fluids was analyzed and structural information, such as pore size distributions, were extracted. The D - T1 correlation maps were also obtained using the same method, which yielded surface relaxivities for different samples. All the experiments were conducted on 2 MHz NMR equipment to obtain accurate diffusion information, where internal gradients can be neglected. This method is expected to have useful applications in the oil industry, particularly for NMR logging in the future.

  2. Anodic aluminum oxide with fine pore size control for selective and effective particulate matter filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Su; Wang, Yang; Tan, Yingling; Zhu, Jianfeng; Liu, Kai; Zhu, Jia

    2016-07-01

    Air pollution is widely considered as one of the most pressing environmental health issues. Particularly, atmospheric particulate matters (PM), a complex mixture of solid or liquid matter suspended in the atmosphere, are a harmful form of air pollution due to its ability to penetrate deep into the lungs and blood streams, causing permanent damages such as DNA mutations and premature death. Therefore, porous materials which can effectively filter out particulate matters are highly desirable. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate that anodic aluminum oxide with fine pore size control fabricated through a scalable process can serve as effective and selective filtering materials for different types of particulate matters (such as PM2.5, PM10). Combining selective and dramatic filtering effect, fine pore size control and a scalable process, this type of anodic aluminum oxide templates can potentially serve as a novel selective filter for different kinds of particulate matters, and a promising and complementary solution to tackle this serious environmental issue.

  3. The fluidity of boulder debris flows is affected by fine sediment in the pore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Norifumi; Kaneko, Takahiro; Iwata, Tomoyuki; Nishimoto, Haruo

    2013-04-01

    Basic equations for debris flows are frequently derived using the simple assumption of monogranular particles. However, actual debris flows include a great diversity of grain sizes, resulting in inherent features such as inverse grading, particle size segregation, and liquefaction of fine sediment. The liquefaction of fine sediment affects the fluidity of debris flows, although the behavior and influence of fine sediment in debris flows have not been examined sufficiently. This study used flume tests to detect the effect of fine sediment on the characteristics of laboratory debris flows consisting of particles with two diameters: one diameter was fixed at a large particle size, while the small diameters were varied with the experimental conditions. From the experiments, the greatest sediment concentration and flow depth were observed in the debris flows mixed with finer sediment, indicating increased flow resistance. Then, the experimental friction coefficient was compared with the theoretical friction coefficient derived by substituting the experimental values into the constitutive equations for debris flow. The theoretical friction coefficient was obtained from two models with different fine-sediment treatments: one assuming that all of the fine sediments were solid particles and the other that the particles consisted of a fluid phase involving pore water liquefaction. A discriminant index was introduced to clarify which contribution from the two models could better explain the experimental results. The comparison of the friction coefficients detected a fully liquefied state for the finest particle mixture with sediment. However, even with the same particle size, the debris flows could be regarded as a liquefied state, a solid state, or a partially liquefied transition state depending on the experimental conditions other than the sediment particle size. These results infer that the liquefaction of fine sediment in debris flows was induced not only by the

  4. Fluids in micropores. II. Self-diffusion in a simple classical fluid in a slit pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, M.; Cushman, J. H.; Diestler, D. J.; Rhykerd, C. L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Self-diffusion coefficients D are computed for a model slit pore consisting of a rare-gas fluid confined between two parallel face-centered cubic (100) planes (walls) of rigidly fixed rare-gas atoms. By means of an optimally vectorized molecular-dynamics program for the CYBER 205, the dependence of D on the thermodynamic state (specified by the chemical potential μ, temperature T, and the pore width h) of the pore fluid has been explored. Diffusion is governed by Fick's law, even in pores as narrow as 2 or 3 atomic diameters. The diffusion coefficient oscillates as a function of h with fixed μ and T, vanishing at critical values of h, where fluid-solid phase transitions occur. A shift of the pore walls relative to one another in directions parallel with the walls can radically alter the structure of the pore fluid and consequently the magnitude of D. Since the pore fluid forms distinct layers parallel to the walls, a local diffusion coefficient D(i)∥ associated with a given layer i can be defined. D(i)∥ is least for the contact layer, even for pores as wide as 30 atomic diameters (˜100 Å). Moreover, D(i)∥ increases with increasing distance of the fluid layer from the wall and, for pore widths between 16 and 30 atomic diameters, D(i)∥ is larger in the center of the pore than in the bulk fluid that is in equilibrium with the pore fluid. The opposite behavior is observed in corresponding smooth-wall pores, in which the discrete fluid-wall interactions have been averaged by smearing the wall atoms over the plane of the wall. The temperature dependence of D for fixed h is determined and the nature of melting of a pore solid is examined. It is found that the solid tends to melt first in the middle of the pore. All of the various results are related to the structural properties of the pore fluid, as manifested by the local density and pair correlation functions.

  5. Diffusion of gases dissolved in peat pore water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Clymo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion is usually thought to be ineffective at transporting solutes over distances of several metres – the depth of many peat deposits. But this is to neglect the importance of time. We derive equations that show that in peat that has accumulated over millennia then diffusion alone can remove to the air about 95 % of the gases carbon dioxide and methane generated by microbial decay within the main peat mass. Gas concentration profiles in simulations of peat grown slice-by-slice over 10,000 years have a smooth convex profile with concentration increasing downwards, as they do in Nature.

  6. Fractal Modeling of Pore Structure and Ionic Diffusivity for Cement Paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pore structure in cement based composites is of paramount importance to ionic diffusivity. In this paper, pore structure in cement paste is modeled by means of the recently proposed solid mass fractal model. Moreover, an enhanced Maxwell homogenization method that incorporates the solid mass fractal model is proposed to determine the associated ionic diffusivity. Experiments are performed to validate the modeling, that is, mercury intrusion porosimetry and rapid chloride migration. Results indicate that modeling agrees well with those obtained from experiments.

  7. A kinetic model for molecular diffusion through pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Tommaso; Salis, Samuele; Ceccarelli, Matteo

    2016-07-01

    The number of pathogens developing multiple drug resistance is ever increasing. The impact on healthcare systems is huge and the need for novel antibiotics as well a new way to develop them is urgent, especially against Gram-negative bacteria. The first defense of these bacteria is the outer membrane, where unspecific protein channels (porins) modulate nutrients passive diffusion. Also polar antibiotics enter through this path and down-regulation and/or mutation of porins are very common in drug resistant strains. Our inability to come up with novel effective antibiotics mostly relies upon the insufficient comprehension of the key molecular features enabling better penetration through porins. Molecular dynamics simulations offer an extraordinary tool in the study of the dynamics of biological systems; however, one of the major drawbacks of this method is that its use is currently restricted to study time scales of the order of microsecond. Enhanced sampling methods like Metadynamics have been recently used to investigate the diffusion of antibiotics through bacterial porins. The main limitation is that dynamical properties cannot be estimated because of the different potential that the systems under study are experiencing. Recently, the scope of Metadynamics has been extended. By applying an a posteriori analysis one can obtain rates of transitions and rate-limiting steps of the process under study, directly comparable with kinetic data extracted from electrophysiology experiments. In this work, we apply this method to the study of the permeability of Escherichia coli's OmpF with respect to Meropenem, finding good agreement with the residence time obtained analyzing experimental current noise. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov.

  8. On the combined effect of moisture diffusion and cyclic pore pressure generation in asphalt concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varveri, A.; Scarpas, A.; Collop, A.; Erkens, S.M.J.G.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a new moisture conditioning protocol which attempts to distinguish the contributions of long- and short-term moisture damage, i.e. moisture diffusion and cyclic pore pressure generation, in asphalt mixtures is presented. The capability of the proposed protocol to rank various aspha

  9. Linking basin-scale and pore-scale gas hydrate distribution patterns in diffusion-dominated marine hydrate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nole, Michael; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann E.; Hillman, Jess I. T.; Malinverno, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this study is to computationally determine the potential distribution patterns of diffusion-driven methane hydrate accumulations in coarse-grained marine sediments. Diffusion of dissolved methane in marine gas hydrate systems has been proposed as a potential transport mechanism through which large concentrations of hydrate can preferentially accumulate in coarse-grained sediments over geologic time. Using one-dimensional compositional reservoir simulations, we examine hydrate distribution patterns at the scale of individual sand layers (1-20 m thick) that are deposited between microbially active fine-grained material buried through the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). We then extrapolate to two-dimensional and basin-scale three-dimensional simulations, where we model dipping sands and multilayered systems. We find that properties of a sand layer including pore size distribution, layer thickness, dip, and proximity to other layers in multilayered systems all exert control on diffusive methane fluxes toward and within a sand, which in turn impact the distribution of hydrate throughout a sand unit. In all of these simulations, we incorporate data on physical properties and sand layer geometries from the Terrebonne Basin gas hydrate system in the Gulf of Mexico. We demonstrate that diffusion can generate high hydrate saturations (upward of 90%) at the edges of thin sands at shallow depths within the GHSZ, but that it is ineffective at producing high hydrate saturations throughout thick (greater than 10 m) sands buried deep within the GHSZ. Furthermore, we find that hydrate in fine-grained material can preserve high hydrate saturations in nearby thin sands with burial.Plain Language SummaryThis study combines one-, two-, and three-dimensional simulations to explore one potential process by which methane dissolved in water beneath the seafloor can be converted into solid methane hydrate. This work specifically examines one end-member methane transport

  10. Ion transport through a charged cylindrical membrane pore contacting stagnant diffusion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Mathias B.; Biesheuvel, P. M.; Bazant, Martin Z.; Mani, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Fundamental understanding of the ion transport in membrane systems by diffusion, electromigration and advection is important in widespread processes such as de-ionization by reverse osmosis and electrodialysis and electro-osmotic micropumps. Here we revisit the classical analysis of a single cylindrical pore, see e.g. Gross and Osterle [J Chem Phys 49, 228 (1968)]. We extend the analysis by including the well-established concept of contacting stagnant diffusion layers on either side of the pore; thus, the pore is not in direct equilibrium with the reservoirs. Inside the pore the ions are assumed to be in quasi-equilibrium in the radial direction with the surface charge on the pore wall and we obtain a 1D model by area-averaging. We demonstrate that in some extreme limits this model reduces to simpler models studied in the literature; see e.g. Yaroshchuk [J Membrane Sci 396, 43 (2012)]. Using our model we present predictions of important transport effects such as variation of transport numbers inside the membrane, onset of limiting current, and transient dynamics described by the method of characteristics.

  11. Relevance of Pore Structure and Diffusion-Accessible Porosity for Calcium-Bromide Diffusion in Na-Montmorillonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinnacher, R. M.; Davis, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Bentonite is an important hydraulic barrier material in many geotechnical applications, such as geosynthetic clay liners at solid waste landfills, or as proposed backfill material in engineered barrier systems at nuclear waste repositories. The limited permeability of bentonite is at least partially the result of its low porosity and the swelling of Na-montmorillonite, its major mineralogical component, in water. Due to these characteristics, the transport of contaminants through bentonite layers is expected to be limited and dominated by diffusion processes. In bentonite, the majority of the connected porosity is associated with montmorillonite particles, which consist of stacks of negatively-charged smectite layers. As a result, compacted smectite has two types of porosities: (1) large pores between clay particles, where diffusion is less affected by electric-double-layer forces, and (2) very thin interlayer spaces within individual clay particles, where diffusion is strongly impacted by surface charge and ionic strength. As diffusion is expected to take place differently in these two volumes, this essentially creates two 'small-scale diffusion pathways', where each may become dominant under different system conditions. Furthermore, for surface-reactive solutes, these two porous regimes differ with regards to surface complexation reactions. Electrostatic and hydration forces only are thought to govern interlayer binding, whereas chemical bonding with surface ligands is dominant for reactions at edge sites of layered clay particles and for iron oxide nanoparticles on outer basal planes. In this presentation, we will demonstrate the relevance of clay pore structure and diffusion-accessible porosity for solute diffusion rates, and hence, contaminant mobility in bentonites. First, we will discuss the effects of chemical solution conditions on montmorillonite properties, such as clay surface charge, diffusion-accessible porosity, clay tortuosity and constrictivity

  12. Quantification of pore size distribution using diffusion NMR: experimental design and physical insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Yaniv; Nevo, Uri

    2014-04-28

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion NMR experiments are sensitive to restricted diffusion within porous media and can thus reveal essential microstructural information about the confining geometry. Optimal design methods of inverse problems are designed to select preferred experimental settings to improve parameter estimation quality. However, in pore size distribution (PSD) estimation using NMR methods as in other ill-posed problems, optimal design strategies and criteria are scarce. We formulate here a new optimization framework for ill-posed problems. This framework is suitable for optimizing PFG experiments for probing geometries that are solvable by the Multiple Correlation Function approach. The framework is based on a heuristic methodology designed to select experimental sets which balance between lowering the inherent ill-posedness and increasing the NMR signal intensity. This method also selects favorable discrete pore sizes used for PSD estimation. Numerical simulations performed demonstrate that using this framework greatly improves the sensitivity of PFG experimental sets to the pores' sizes. The optimization also sheds light on significant features of the preferred experimental sets. Increasing the gradient strength and varying multiple experimental parameters is found to be preferable for reducing the ill-posedness. We further evaluate the amount of pore size information that can be obtained by wisely selecting the duration of the diffusion and mixing times. Finally, we discuss the ramification of using single PFG or double PFG sequences for PSD estimation. In conclusion, the above optimization method can serve as a useful tool for experimenters interested in quantifying PSDs of different specimens. Moreover, the applicability of the suggested optimization framework extends far beyond the field of PSD estimation in diffusion NMR, and reaches design of sampling schemes of other ill-posed problems.

  13. Transport and Deposition of Nanoparticles in the Pore Network of a Reservoir Rock: Effects of Pore Surface Heterogeneity and Radial Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngoc; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios

    2014-03-01

    In this study, transport behavior of nanoparticles under different pore surface conditions of consolidated Berea sandstone is numerically investigated. Micro-CT scanning technique is applied to obtain 3D grayscale images of the rock sample geometry. Quantitative characterization, which is based on image analysis is done to obtain physical properties of the pore network, such as the pore size distribution and the type of each pore (dead-end, isolated, and fully connected pore). Transport of water through the rock is simulated by employing a 3D lattice Boltzmann method. The trajectories of nanopaticles moving under convection in the simulated flow field and due to molecular diffusion are monitored in the Lagrangian framework. It is assumed in the model that the particle adsorption on the pore surface, which is modeled as a pseudo-first order adsorption, is the only factor hindering particle propagation. The effect of pore surface heterogeneity to the particle breakthrough is considered, and the role of particle radial diffusion is also addressed in details. The financial support of the Advanced Energy Consortium (AEC BEG08-022) and the computational support of XSEDE (CTS090017) are acknowledged.

  14. Methanotrophy potential versus methane supply by pore water diffusion in peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornibrook, E. R. C.; Bowes, H. L.; Culbert, A.; Gallego-Sala, A. V.

    2009-08-01

    Low affinity methanotrophic bacteria consume a significant quantity of methane in wetland soils in the vicinity of plant roots and at the oxic-anoxic interface. Estimates of the efficiency of methanotrophy in peat soils vary widely in part because of differences in approaches employed to quantify methane cycling. High resolution profiles of dissolved methane abundance measured during the summer of 2003 were used to quantity rates of upward methane flux in four peatlands situated in Wales, UK. Aerobic incubations of peat from a minerotrophic and an ombrotrophic mire were used to determine depth distributions of kinetic parameters associated with methane oxidation. The capacity for methanotrophy in a 3 cm thick zone immediately beneath the depth of nil methane abundance in pore water was significantly greater than the rate of upward diffusion of methane in all four peatlands. Rates of methane diffusion in pore water at the minerotrophic peatlands were small (consume entirely methane transported by pore water diffusion in the four peatlands with the exception of 4 of the 33 gas profiles sampled. Flux rates to the atmosphere regardless are high because of gas transport through vascular plants, in particular, at the minerotrophic sites. Cumulative rainfall amount 3-days prior to sampling correlated well with the distance between the water table level and the depth of 0 μmol l-1 methane, indicating that precipitation events can impact methane distributions in pore water. Further work is needed to characterise the kinetics of methane oxidation spatially and temporally in different wetland types in order to determine generalized relationships for methanotrophy in peatlands that can be incorporated into process-based models of methane cycling in peat soils.

  15. Synthesis of metal-organic framework films by pore diffusion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Naohiro; Nishimura, Yuki; Kajiro, Hiroshi; Kishida, Satoru; Kinoshita, Kentaro; Tottori Univ Team; Nippon Steel; Sumitomo Metal Co. Collaboration; Tottori Integrated Frontier Resaerch Center (Tifrec) Collaboration; Tottori University Electronic Display Resaerch Center (Tedrec) Collaboration

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) presents high controllability in designing the nano-scale pore, and this enable molecular storages, catalysts, gas sensors, gas separation membranes, and electronic devices for next-generation. Therefore, a simple method for film synthesis of MOFs compared with conventional methods [1] is strongly required. In this paper, we provide pore diffusion method, in which a substrate containing constituent metals of MOF is inserted in solution that includes only linker molecules of MOF. As a result, 2D growth of MOF was effectively enhanced, and the formation of flat and dense MOF films was attained. The growth time, t, dependence of film thickness, d, can be expressed by the relation of d = Aln(t + 1) + B, where A and B are constants. It means that ionized coppers diffuse through the pores of MOFs and the synthesis reaction proceeds at the MOF/solvent interface. We demonstrated the fabrication of a HKUST-1/Cu-TPA hetero structure by synthesizing a Cu-TPA film continuously after the growth of a HKUST-1 film on the CuOx substrate.

  16. Variable pore connectivity model linking gas diffusivity and air-phase tortuosity to soil matric potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per;

    2012-01-01

    of a variable pore connectivity factor, X, as a function of soil matric potential, expressed as pF (=log |−ψ|), for pF values ranging from 1.0 to 3.5. The new model takes the form of X = X* (F/F*)A with F = 1 + pF−1, where X* is the pore network tortuosity at reference F (F*) and A is a model parameter...... that accounts for water blockage. The X–pF relation can be linked to drained pore size to explain the lower probability of the larger but far fewer air-filled pores at lower pF effectively interconnecting and promoting gas diffusion. The model with X* = 2 and A = 0.5 proved promising for generalizing Dp....../Do predictions across soils of wide geographic contrast and yielded results comparable to those from widely used predictive models. The X–pF model additionally proved valuable for differentiating between soils (providing a unique soil structural fingerprint for each soil layer) and also between the inter...

  17. Water transport in the gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell : Dynamic Pore-Network Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, C.

    2015-01-01

    The pore-scale modeling is a powerful tool for increasing our understanding of water transport in the fibrous gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). In this work, a new dynamic pore-network model for air-water flow in the GDL is developed. It incorporates water vapor tr

  18. Measurement of pore diffusion in catalytic materials. Report 1997-07-01--1997-12-31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadias, Dennis; Barbesta, Fabio; Foresti, Laura; Thevenin, Philippe; Bjoernbom, Pehr; Jaeraas, Sven [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Technology

    2000-05-01

    This report covers the work during the period (97-07-01--97-12-31) of NUTEK project P10313-1 'Measurement of pore diffusion in catalytic materials'. The project was carried out at the Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology - Chemical Technology at Kungliga Tekniska Hoegskolan. The performance of heterogeneous catalysts is strongly dependent of the combined rate of pore diffusion and chemical reaction. In order to describe correctly the interactions between physical and chemical phenomena in porous media, it is necessary to know the effective values of the diffusion coefficients in the catalyst. Existing mathematical correlations of the diffusivity coefficients may give misleading results so there is a need to determine those values experimentally. Literature studies and previous work in this laboratory have shown that pulse chromatography is to prefer as a fast and reliable method to measure effective diffusivities. In this study, the pulse chromatographic technique was used to determine the effective diffusivity in commercial cylindrical ring-shaped catalysts in order to validate and further develop this technique. The pellets, approximately 5-mm long, were mounted axially side by side and a dense polymer was shrunk at the outer wall, fastening the catalyst particles in a column of arbitrary length and with a rigid structure. The value of the diffusivity coefficient was determined by matching the experimental response curve by the theoretical one, solved numerically in the time domain using the finite difference method. Two types of model equations relating the transport processes occurring in the column were derived. In both models the stationary phase was treated as homogeneous and the axial diffusion in it was neglected. The more rigorous, or two dimensional model, accounted for radial diffusion in the gas phase, while in the simpler, or one dimensional model, the solute in the gas phase was averaged in terms of a local mean concentration

  19. Three dimensional analysis of the pore space in fine-grained Boom Clay, using BIB-SEM (broad-ion beam scanning electron microscopy), combined with FIB (focused ion-beam) serial cross-sectioning, pore network modeling and Wood's metal injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemes, Susanne; Klaver, Jop; Desbois, Guillaume; Urai, Janos

    2014-05-01

    The Boom Clay is, besides the Ypresian clays, one of the potential host rock materials for radioactive waste disposal in Belgium (Gens et al., 2003; Van Marcke & Laenen, 2005; Verhoef et al., 2011). To access parameters, which are relevant for the diffusion controlled transport of radionuclides in the material, such as porosity, pore connectivity and permeability, it is crucial to characterize the pore space at high resolution (nm-scale) and in 3D. Focused-ion-beam (FIB) serial cross-sectioning in combination with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM), pore network modeling, Wood's metal injection and broad-ion-beam (BIB) milling, constitute a superior set of methods to characterize the 3D pore space in fine-grained, clayey materials, down to the nm-scale resolution. In the present study, we identified characteristic 3D pore space morphologies, determined the 3D volume porosity of the material and applied pore network extraction modeling (Dong and Blunt, 2009), to access the connectivity of the pore space and to discriminate between pore bodies and pore throats. Moreover, we used Wood's metal injection (WMI) in combination with BIB-SEM imaging to assess the pore connectivity at a larger scale and even higher resolution. The FIB-SEM results show a highly (~ 90 %) interconnected pore space in Boom Clay, down to the resolution of ~ 3E+03 nm³ (voxel-size), with a total volume porosity of ~ 20 %. Pore morphologies of large (> 5E+08 nm³), highly interconnected pores are complex, with high surface area to volume ratios (shape factors G ~ 0.01), whereas small (BIB-SEM, down to a resolution of ~ 50 nm² pixel-size, indicates an interconnected porosity fraction of ~ 80 %, of a total measured 2D porosity of ~ 20 %. Determining and distinguishing between pore bodies and pore throats enables us to compare 3D FIB-SEM pore-size distributions to 2D BIB-SEM data, as well as MIP data. Results show a good agreement between the 2D BIB-SEM and 3D FIB-SEM inferred pore

  20. Modeling Solute Diffusion in the Presence of Pore-Scale Heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FLEMING,SEAN W.; HAGGERTY,ROY

    1999-10-21

    A range of pore diffusivities, D{sub p}, is implied by the high degree of pore-scale heterogeneity observed in core samples of the Culebra (dolomite) Member of the Rustler formation, NM. Earlier tracer tests in the culebra at the field-scale have confirmed significant heterogeneity in diffusion rate coefficients (the combination of D{sub p} and matrix block size). In this study, expressions for solute diffusion in the presence of multiple simultaneous matrix diffusivities are presented and used to model data from eight laboratory-scale diffusion experiments performed on five Culebra samples. A lognormal distribution of D{sub p} is assumed within each of the lab samples. The estimated standard deviation ({sigma}{sub d}) of In(D{sub p}) within each sample ranges from 0 to 1, with most values lying between 0.5 and 1. The variability over all samples leads to a combined {sigma}{sub d} in the range of 1.0 to 1.2, which appears to be consistent with a best-fit statistical distribution of formation factor measurements for similar Culebra samples. A comparison of the estimation results to other rock properties suggests that, at the lab-scale, the geometric mean of D{sub p} increases with bulk porosity and the quantity of macroscopic features such as vugs and fractures. However, {sigma}{sub d} appears to be determined by variability within such macroscopic features and/or by micropore-scale heterogeneity. In addition, comparison of these experiments to those at larger spatial scales suggests that increasing sample volume results in an increase in {sigma}{sub d}.

  1. The nuclear pore complex mystery and anomalous diffusion in reversible gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Thomas; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2002-01-01

    The exchange of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and the nucleus of eukaryotic cells takes place through the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which contains a selective permeability barrier. Experiments on the physical properties of this barrier appear to be in conflict with current physical understanding of the rheology of reversible gels. This paper proposes that the NPC gel is anomalous and characterized by connectivity fluctuations. It develops a simplified model to demonstrate the possibility of enhanced diffusion constants of macromolecules trapped in such a gel. PMID:12496079

  2. Modeling diffusion control on organic matter decomposition in unsaturated soil pore space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Laure; Pot, Valérie; Garnier, Patricia; Vieublé-Gonod, Laure; Nunan, Naoise; Raynaud, Xavier; Chenu, Claire

    2014-05-01

    Soil Organic Matter decomposition is affected by soil structure and water content, but field and laboratory studies about this issue conclude to highly variable outcomes. Variability could be explained by the discrepancy between the scale at which key processes occur and the measurements scale. We think that physical and biological interactions driving carbon transformation dynamics can be best understood at the pore scale. Because of the spatial disconnection between carbon sources and decomposers, the latter rely on nutrient transport unless they can actively move. In hydrostatic case, diffusion in soil pore space is thus thought to regulate biological activity. In unsaturated conditions, the heterogeneous distribution of water modifies diffusion pathways and rates, thus affects diffusion control on decomposition. Innovative imaging and modeling tools offer new means to address these effects. We have developed a new model based on the association between a 3D Lattice-Boltzmann Model and an adimensional decomposition module. We designed scenarios to study the impact of physical (geometry, saturation, decomposers position) and biological properties on decomposition. The model was applied on porous media with various morphologies. We selected three cubic images of 100 voxels side from µCT-scanned images of an undisturbed soil sample at 68µm resolution. We used LBM to perform phase separation and obtained water phase distributions at equilibrium for different saturation indices. We then simulated the diffusion of a simple soluble substrate (glucose) and its consumption by bacteria. The same mass of glucose was added as a pulse at the beginning of all simulations. Bacteria were placed in few voxels either regularly spaced or concentrated close to or far from the glucose source. We modulated physiological features of decomposers in order to weight them against abiotic conditions. We could evidence several effects creating unequal substrate access conditions for

  3. 3-D Modeling of Pore Pressure Diffusion Beneath Koyna and Warna Reservoirs, Western India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Amrita; Gahalaut, Kalpna; Purnachandra Rao, N.

    2017-03-01

    The mechanism of reservoir-triggered seismicity is well-understood and explains the earthquake occurrence at different reservoir sites. It can be attributed to the stresses due to water loading and to changes in fluid pressure in pores within the rock matrix. In the present study a 3-D fluid flow numerical model is used to investigate the pore pressure diffusion as a cause for continued seismicity in the Koyna-Warna region in western India. It is shown that reservoir water level fluctuations are sufficient to trigger earthquakes at the seismogenic depths in the region. Our numerical model suggests that a vertical fault with hydraulic conductivity in the range 2-6 m/day facilitates the diffusion of pressure at focal depths of earthquakes in the Koyna-Warna region. Also, for triggering of earthquakes a higher vertical conductivity is required for the Warna region than for the Koyna region. A lag of two months period is found between the maximum water level and the significant hydraulic head required to trigger earthquakes at the focal depth using the appropriate hydraulic conductivity for both the reservoirs.

  4. Diffused phase transition in fine-grained bismuth vanadate ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Shantha, K; Varma, KBR

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline powders of ferroelectric bismuth vanadate, Bi4V2O11 (n-BiV), with crystallite size less than 50 nm, were obtained by mechanical milling of a stoichiometric mixture of bismuth oxide and vanadium pentoxide. The n-BiV powders on sintering yielded high-density, fine-grained ceramics with improved dielectric and polar characteristics. Dielectric studies on samples obtained from milled powders indicated that the ferroelectric-to-paraelectric phase transition temperature is strongly ...

  5. Modification of Aquifer Pore-Water by Static Diffusion Using Nano-Zero-Valent Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David D. J. Antia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixteen static diffusion reactors containing n-ZVM (Fe0, Cu0, Al0 establish a common equilibrium redox (Eh-pH trajectory which is directly linked to the aquifer pore volume, volume of injected n-ZVM, throughflow rate within the aquifer and time. The effect of NaCl and Ca-montmorillonite on the trajectory is considered. The trajectory can be directly linked to TDS (EC and to the equilibrium removal of contaminants. In each example, the progressive oscillation between reduction and oxidation reactions (including Fenton reactions creates the catalytic nuclei (and redox environment required for the decomposition of organic pollutants and their reconstruction as simple alkanes and oxygenates.

  6. Competitive Coordination Strategy to Finely Tune Pore Environment of Zirconium-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ting; Ni, Bing; Xu, Xiaobin; Li, Haoyi; Lin, Haifeng; Yuan, Wenjuan; Luo, Jun; Hu, Wenping; Wang, Xun

    2017-07-12

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of crystalline porous materials with reticular architectures. Precisely tuning pore environment of MOFs has drawn tremendous attention but remains a great challenge. In this work, we demonstrate a competitive coordination approach to synthesize a series of zirconium-metalloporphyrinic MOFs through introducing H2O and monocarboxylic acid as modulating reagents, in which well-ordered mesoporous channels could be observed clearly under conventional transmission electron microscopy. Owing to plenty of unsaturated Lewis acid catalytic sites exposed in the visualized mesoporous channels, these structures exhibit outstanding catalytic activity and excellent stability in the chemical fixation of carbon dioxide to cyclic carbonates. The zirconium-based MOFs with ordered channel structures are expected to pave the way to expand the potential applications of MOFs.

  7. CO2 diffusion into pore spaces limits weathering rate of an experimental basalt landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haren, Joost; Dontsova, Katerina; Barron-Gafford, Greg A.; Troch, Peter A.; Chorover, Jon; DeLong, Stephen B.; Breshears, David D.; Huxman, Travis E.; Pelletier, Jon D.; Saleska, Scott; Zeng, Xubin; Ruiz, Joaquin

    2017-01-01

    Basalt weathering is a key control over the global carbon cycle, though in situ measurements of carbon cycling are lacking. In an experimental, vegetation-free hillslope containing 330 m3 of ground basalt scoria, we measured real-time inorganic carbon dynamics within the porous media and seepage flow. The hillslope carbon flux (0.6–5.1 mg C m–2 h–1) matched weathering rates of natural basalt landscapes (0.4–8.8 mg C m–2 h–1) despite lacking the expected field-based impediments to weathering. After rainfall, a decrease in CO2 concentration ([CO2]) in pore spaces into solution suggested rapid carbon sequestration but slow reactant supply. Persistent low soil [CO2] implied that diffusion limited CO2 supply, while when sufficiently dry, reaction product concentrations limited further weathering. Strong influence of diffusion could cause spatial heterogeneity of weathering even in natural settings, implying that modeling studies need to include variable soil [CO2] to improve carbon cycling estimates associated with potential carbon sequestration methods.

  8. The Pore Size Distribution of Naturally Porous Cigarette Paper and its Relation to Permeability and Diffusion Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eitzinger Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available La distribution de la taille des pores détermine la perméabilité d’air et la capacité de diffusion d’un papier à cigarettes, et par conséquent elle a une influence signifiante sur les échanges gazeux à travers le papier à cigarettes, non seulement d’une cigarette allumée, mais aussi d’une cigarette qui s’éteint. Pour le dessin des cigarettes, et notamment des papiers à cigarettes, il faut comprendre comment la distribution de la taille des pores du papier à cigarettes est influencée par la structure et les qualités du papier, ainsi que comment la distribution de la taille des pores influence la perméabilité d’air et la capacité de diffusion.

  9. Prevention of the water flooding by micronizing the pore structure of gas diffusion layer for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramitsu, Yusuke; Sato, Hitoshi; Hori, Michio

    In polymer electrolyte fuel cells, high humidity must be established to maintain high proton conductivity in the polymer electrolyte. However, the water that is produced electrochemically at the cathode catalyst layer can condense in the cell and cause an obstruction to the diffusion of reaction gas in the gas diffusion layer and the gas channel. This leads to a sudden decrease of the cell voltage. To combat this, strict water management techniques are required, which usually focus on the gas diffusion layer. In this study, the use of specially treated carbon paper as a flood-proof gas diffusion layer under extremely high humidity conditions was investigated experimentally. The results indicated that flooding originates at the interface between the gas diffusion layer and the catalyst layer, and that such flooding could be eliminated by control of the pore size in the gas diffusion layer at this interface.

  10. Nuclear-magnetic-resonance relaxation due to the translational diffusion of fluid confined to quasi-two-dimensional pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faux, D. A.; McDonald, P. J.; Howlett, N. C.

    2017-03-01

    Nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) relaxation experimentation is an effective technique for nondestructively probing the dynamics of proton-bearing fluids in porous media. The frequency-dependent relaxation rate T1-1 can yield a wealth of information on the fluid dynamics within the pore provided data can be fit to a suitable spin diffusion model. A spin diffusion model yields the dipolar correlation function G (t ) describing the relative translational motion of pairs of 1H spins which then can be Fourier transformed to yield T1-1. G (t ) for spins confined to a quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) pore of thickness h is determined using theoretical and Monte Carlo techniques. G (t ) shows a transition from three- to two-dimensional motion with the transition time proportional to h2. T1-1 is found to be independent of frequency over the range 0.01-100 MHz provided h ≳5 nm and increases with decreasing frequency and decreasing h for pores of thickness h <3 nm. T1-1 increases linearly with the bulk water diffusion correlation time τb allowing a simple and direct estimate of the bulk water diffusion coefficient from the high-frequency limit of T1-1 dispersion measurements in systems where the influence of paramagnetic impurities is negligible. Monte Carlo simulations of hydrated Q2D pores are executed for a range of surface-to-bulk desorption rates for a thin pore. G (t ) is found to decorrelate when spins move from the surface to the bulk, display three-dimensional properties at intermediate times, and finally show a bulk-mediated surface diffusion (Lévy) mechanism at longer times. The results may be used to interpret NMR relaxation rates in hydrated porous systems in which the paramagnetic impurity density is negligible.

  11. Hindered Diffusion through an Aqueous Pore Describes Invariant Dye Selectivity of Cx43 Junctions☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Nathanael S.; Burt, Janis M.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The permselectivity (permeance/conductance) of Cx43-comprised gap junctions is a variable parameter of junctional function. To ascertain whether this variability in junctional permselectivity is explained by heterogeneous charge or size selectivity of the comprising channels, the permeance of individual Cx43 gap junctions to combinations of two dyes differing in either size or charge was determined in four cell types: Rin43, NRKe, HeLa43, and cardiac myocytes. The results show that Cx43 junctions are size- but not charge-selective and that both selectivities are constant parameters of junctional function. The consistency of dye selectivities indicates that the large continuum of measured junctional permselectivities cannot be ascribed to an equivalent continuum of individual channel selectivities. Further, the relative dye permeance sequence of NBD-M-TMA ∼ Alexa 350 > Lucifer yellow > Alexa 488 ≫ Alexa 594 (Stokes radii of 4.3 Å, 4.4 Å, 4.9 Å, 5.8 Å, and 7.4 Å, respectively) and the conductance sequence of KCl > TEACl ∼ Kglutamate are well described by hindered diffusion through an aqueous pore with radius ∼10 Å and length 160 Å. The permselectivity and dye selectivity data suggest the variable presence in Cx43-comprised junctions of conductive channels that are either dye-impermeable or dye-permeable. PMID:17921206

  12. A study of fine structure of diffuse aurora with ALIS-FAST measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sergienko

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We present results of an investigation of the fine structure of the night sector diffuse auroral zone, observed simultaneously with optical instruments (ALIS from the ground and the FAST electron spectrometer from space 16 February 1997. Both the optical and particle data show that the diffuse auroral zone consisted of two regions. The equatorward part of the diffuse aurora was occupied by a pattern of regular, parallel auroral stripes. The auroral stripes were significantly brighter than the background luminosity, had widths of approximately 5 km and moved southward with a velocity of about 100 m/s. The second region, located between the region with auroral stripes and the discrete auroral arcs to the north, was filled with weak and almost homogeneous luminosity, against which short-lived auroral rays and small patches appeared chaotically. From analysis of the electron differential fluxes corresponding to the different regions of the diffuse aurora and based on existing theories of the scattering process we conclude the following: Strong pitch angle diffusion by electron cyclotron harmonic waves (ECH of plasma sheet electrons in the energy range from a few hundred eV to 3–4 keV was responsible for the electron precipitation, that produced the background luminosity within the whole diffuse zone. The fine structure, represented by the auroral stripes, was created by precipitation of electrons above 3–4 keV as a result of pitch angle diffusion into the loss cone by whistler mode waves. A so called "internal gravity wave" (Safargaleev and Maltsev, 1986 may explain the formation of the regular spatial pattern formed by the auroral stripes in the equatorward part of the diffuse auroral zone.

  13. A study of fine structure of diffuse aurora with ALIS-FAST measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergienko, T.; Sandahl, I.; Gustavsson, B.; Andersson, L.; Brändström, U.; . Steen, Ã.

    2008-10-01

    We present results of an investigation of the fine structure of the night sector diffuse auroral zone, observed simultaneously with optical instruments (ALIS) from the ground and the FAST electron spectrometer from space 16 February 1997. Both the optical and particle data show that the diffuse auroral zone consisted of two regions. The equatorward part of the diffuse aurora was occupied by a pattern of regular, parallel auroral stripes. The auroral stripes were significantly brighter than the background luminosity, had widths of approximately 5 km and moved southward with a velocity of about 100 m/s. The second region, located between the region with auroral stripes and the discrete auroral arcs to the north, was filled with weak and almost homogeneous luminosity, against which short-lived auroral rays and small patches appeared chaotically. From analysis of the electron differential fluxes corresponding to the different regions of the diffuse aurora and based on existing theories of the scattering process we conclude the following: Strong pitch angle diffusion by electron cyclotron harmonic waves (ECH) of plasma sheet electrons in the energy range from a few hundred eV to 3 4 keV was responsible for the electron precipitation, that produced the background luminosity within the whole diffuse zone. The fine structure, represented by the auroral stripes, was created by precipitation of electrons above 3 4 keV as a result of pitch angle diffusion into the loss cone by whistler mode waves. A so called "internal gravity wave" (Safargaleev and Maltsev, 1986) may explain the formation of the regular spatial pattern formed by the auroral stripes in the equatorward part of the diffuse auroral zone.

  14. An extended anomalous fine structure of X-ray quasi-Bragg diffuse scattering from multilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Chernov, V A; Mytnichenko, S V

    2001-01-01

    An X-ray quasi-Bragg diffuse scattering anomalous fine structure technique was probed near the absorption Ni K-edge to study the interfacial structure of the Ni/C multilayer deposited by the laser ablation. Like other combinations of the EXAFS and diffraction techniques, this method has a spatial selectivity and was shown qualitatively to provide atomic structural information from the mixed interfacial layers. The possibilities and advantages of this technique are discussed.

  15. Nonlinear Porous Diffusion Modeling of Hydrophilic Ionic Agrochemicals in Astomatous Plant Cuticle Aqueous Pores: A Mechanistic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloise C. Tredenick

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The agricultural industry requires improved efficacy of sprays being applied to crops and weeds in order to reduce their environmental impact and deliver improved financial returns. Enhanced foliar uptake is one means of improving efficacy. The plant leaf cuticle is known to be the main barrier to diffusion of agrochemicals within the leaf. The usefulness of a mathematical model to simulate uptake of agrochemicals in plant cuticles has been noted previously in the literature, as the results of each uptake experiment are specific to each formulation of active ingredient, plant species and environmental conditions. In this work we develop a mathematical model and numerical simulation for the uptake of hydrophilic ionic agrochemicals through aqueous pores in plant cuticles. We propose a novel, nonlinear, porous diffusion model for ionic agrochemicals in isolated cuticles, which extends simple diffusion through the incorporation of parameters capable of simulating: plant species variations, evaporation of surface droplet solutions, ion binding effects on the cuticle surface and swelling of the aqueous pores with water. We validate our theoretical results against appropriate experimental data, discuss the key sensitivities in the model and relate theoretical predictions to appropriate physical mechanisms. Major influencing factors have been found to be cuticle structure, including tortuosity and density of the aqueous pores, and to a lesser extent humidity and cuticle surface ion binding effects.

  16. On the importance of diffusion and compound-specific mixing for groundwater transport: an investigation from pore to field scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolle, Massimo; Chiogna, Gabriele; Hochstetler, David L; Kitanidis, Peter K

    2013-10-01

    Mixing processes significantly affect and limit contaminant transport and transformation rates in the subsurface. The correct quantification of mixing in groundwater systems must account for diffusion, local-scale dispersion and the flow variability in heterogeneous flow fields (e.g., flow-focusing in high-conductivity and de-focusing in low-conductivity zones). Recent results of multitracer laboratory experiments revealed the significant effect of compound-specific diffusive properties on the physical displacement of dissolved species across a representative range of groundwater flow velocities. The goal of this study is to investigate the role of diffusion and compound-specific mixing for solute transport across a range of scales including: (i) pore-scale (~10⁻² m), (ii) laboratory bench-scale (~10⁰ m) and (iii) field-scale (~10² m). We investigate both conservative and mixing-controlled reactive transport using pore-scale modeling, flow-through laboratory experiments and simulations, and field-scale numerical modeling of complex heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields with statistical properties similar to the ones reported for the extensively investigated Borden aquifer (Ontario, Canada) and Columbus aquifer (Mississippi, USA, also known as MADE site). We consider different steady-state and transient transport scenarios. For the conservative cases we use as a metric of mixing the exponential of the Shannon entropy to quantify solute dilution either in a given volume (dilution index) or in a given solute flux (flux-related dilution index). The decrease in the mass and the mass-flux of the contaminant plumes is evaluated to quantify reactive mixing. The results show that diffusive processes, occurring at the small-scale of a pore channel, strongly affect conservative and reactive solute transport at larger macroscopic scales. The outcomes of our study illustrate the need to consider and properly account for compound-specific diffusion and mixing

  17. Fine structure at the diffusion welded interface of Fe3Al/Q235 dissimilar materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wang Juan; Li Yajiang; Wu Huiqiang

    2001-12-01

    The interface of Fe3Al/Q235 dissimilar materials joint, which was made by vacuum diffusion welding, combines excellently. There are Fe3Al, FeAl phases and -Fe (Al) solid solution at the interface of Fe3Al/Q235. Aluminum content decreases from 28% to 1.5% and corresponding phase changes from Fe3Al with DO3 type body centred cubic (bcc) structure to -Fe (Al) solid solution with B2 type bcc structure. All phases are present in sub-grain structure level and there is no obvious brittle phases or micro-defects such as pores and cracks at the interface of Fe3Al/Q235 diffusion joint.

  18. A theoretical model describing diffusion of a mixture of different types of ions in pore solution of concrete coupled to moisture transport

    OpenAIRE

    Johannesson, Björn

    2000-01-01

    A theoretical model is established for diffusion of different types of ions in pore solution of concrete and the coupling to moisture flow and moisture content. Mass exchanges between ions in pore solution and solid hydration products in the concrete are also considered. The basic concepts behind the so-called mixture theory are used.

  19. Reverse Smoothing Effects, Fine Asymptotics, and Harnack Inequalities for Fast Diffusion Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonforte Matteo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate local and global properties of positive solutions to the fast diffusion equation in the good exponent range , corresponding to general nonnegative initial data. For the Cauchy problem posed in the whole Euclidean space , we prove sharp local positivity estimates (weak Harnack inequalities and elliptic Harnack inequalities; also a slight improvement of the intrinsic Harnack inequality is given. We use them to derive sharp global positivity estimates and a global Harnack principle. Consequences of these latter estimates in terms of fine asymptotics are shown. For the mixed initial and boundary value problem posed in a bounded domain of with homogeneous Dirichlet condition, we prove weak, intrinsic, and elliptic Harnack inequalities for intermediate times. We also prove elliptic Harnack inequalities near the extinction time, as a consequence of the study of the fine asymptotic behavior near the finite extinction time.

  20. Concentrations, diffusive fluxes and toxicity of heavy metals in pore water of the Fuyang River, Haihe Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenzhong; Duan, Shenghui; Shan, Baoqing; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Wenqiang; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-05-01

    While the concentrations of heavy metals in pore water provide important information about their bioavailability, to date few studies have focused on this topic. In this study, pore water in river sediments collected from nine sampling sites (S1-S9) was examined to determine the concentrations, fluxes, and toxicity of heavy metals in the Fuyang River. The results showed that the average concentrations of Cr, Ni, Cu, As, Zn, and Pb in pore water were 17.06, 15.97, 20.93, 19.08, 43.72, and 0.56μgL(-1), respectively; these concentrations varied as the pore water depth increased. The diffusive fluxes of Cr, Ni, Cu, As, Zn, and Pb were in the following range: (-0.37) to 3.17, (-1.37) to 2.63, (-4.61) to 3.44, 0.17-6.02, (-180.26) to 7.51, and (-0.92) to (-0.29)μg(m(2)day)(-1), respectively. There was a potential risk of toxicity from Cu to aquatic organisms, as indicated by a value of the Interstitial Water Criteria Toxic Units that exceeded 1.0. Values of the Nemeraw Index were 2.06, 0.48, 0.11, 0.20, 1.11, 1.03, 0.99, 0.88, and 0.89 from S1 to S9, respectively. Only S1 was moderately polluted by heavy metals in pore water.

  1. Describing mixture diffusion in microporous materials under conditions of pore saturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.; van Baten, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    In a variety of practical applications involving microporous materials such as zeolites and metal organic frameworks (MOFs), the operating conditions are such that the concentration of guest molecules within the pore space approaches saturation conditions. This situation arises, for example, in CO2

  2. Sorption- and diffusion-associated isotope effects for chlorinated and non chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons in a sediment pore water diffusion sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeport, E.; Chu, K.; Lacrampe Couloume, G.; Landis, R.; Lutz, E. J.; Mack, E. E.; West, K.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

    2013-12-01

    Compound Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) has gained prominence for evaluation of microbial and abiotic degradation processes governing the fate of organic contaminants in groundwater. At the sediment pore water interface, in wetland or river bottom sediments, variations in oxidation-reduction conditions can affect reaction mechanisms and hence the contaminant mass flux discharged to surface waters. Carbon isotope fractionation has been shown to be an important tool in identifying the effects of degradation and differentiating between different degradation pathways. To date, while passive diffusion samplers (commonly called 'peepers') have provided a powerful tool for high spatial resolution sampling for dissolved VOC across the sediment water interface, peepers' compatibility with CSIA has never been evaluated. The operating principle of peepers involves compound diffusion from the sediment pore water to the peeper chambers via a membrane. In this study, we evaluated the isotope effects of diffusion through, and possible adsorption to a polysulfone membrane for priority groundwater contaminants including chlorinated and non-chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. Chlorinated benzenes tend to accumulate in the food web and therefore represent a significant threat to water resources. This is due to their larger sorption coefficients (Koc) and higher hydrophobicity properties (logKow) compared to other commonly-studied compounds (e.g., chlorinated ethenes). Application of CSIA to BTEX and chlorinated ethenes has demonstrated that non-degradative processes (e.g., sorption, volatilization, diffusion) typically result in smaller carbon isotope fractionation compared to degradative processes that involve breaking bonds. The large sorption properties of chlorinated benzenes preclude a direct extrapolation to these compounds of existing data on sorption-associated isotope effects obtained on other compounds. To date, similar studies have not been done for chlorinated aromatics

  3. Fabrication of fine-grain tantalum diffusion barrier tube for Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartwig, K. T.; Balachandran, S.; Mezyenski, R.; Seymour, N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, TX 77843 (United States); Robinson, J.; Barber, R. E. [Shear Form Inc, 207 Dellwood St, Bryan 77801 (United States)

    2014-01-27

    Diffusion barriers used in Nb{sub 3}Sn wire are often fabricated by wrapping Ta sheet into a tube with an overlap seam. A common result of such practice is non-uniform deformation in the Ta sheet as it thins by wire drawing because of non-uniform grain size and texture in the original Ta sheet. Seamless Ta tube with a fine-grain and uniform microstructure would be much better for the diffusion barrier application, but such material is expensive and difficult to manufacture. This report presents results on a new fabrication strategy for Ta tube that shows promise for manufacture of less costly tube with an improved microstructure. The fabrication method begins with seam-welded tube but gives a fine-grain uniform microstructure with little difference between the longitudinal seam weld region and the parent metal after post-weld processing. Severe plastic deformation processing (SPD) applied by area reduction extrusion and tube equal channel angular extrusion (tECAE) are used to refine and homogenize the microstructure. Microstructure and mechanical property results are presented for Ta tubes fabricated by this new processing strategy.

  4. Fabrication of fine-grain tantalum diffusion barrier tube for Nb3Sn conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, K. T.; Balachandran, S.; Mezyenski, R.; Seymour, N.; Robinson, J.; Barber, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion barriers used in Nb3Sn wire are often fabricated by wrapping Ta sheet into a tube with an overlap seam. A common result of such practice is non-uniform deformation in the Ta sheet as it thins by wire drawing because of non-uniform grain size and texture in the original Ta sheet. Seamless Ta tube with a fine-grain and uniform microstructure would be much better for the diffusion barrier application, but such material is expensive and difficult to manufacture. This report presents results on a new fabrication strategy for Ta tube that shows promise for manufacture of less costly tube with an improved microstructure. The fabrication method begins with seam-welded tube but gives a fine-grain uniform microstructure with little difference between the longitudinal seam weld region and the parent metal after post-weld processing. Severe plastic deformation processing (SPD) applied by area reduction extrusion and tube equal channel angular extrusion (tECAE) are used to refine and homogenize the microstructure. Microstructure and mechanical property results are presented for Ta tubes fabricated by this new processing strategy.

  5. Closure to “Fines Classification Based on Sensitivity to Pore-Fluid Chemistry” by Junbong Jang and J. Carlos Santamarina

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Junbong

    2017-03-16

    The proposed new fines classification system is an attempt to address the demands of geotechnical engineers who require a methodology that systematically characterizes fines for diverse geotechnical applications. We received six official discussions, three direct contributions, and several other personal communications regarding procedures and data analysis. Overall, contributors welcomed the proposed methodology for its repeatability, its enhanced discrimination and clustering capabilities, and its ability to identify differences in particle-particle interaction associated with pore-fluid changes. This closure benefits from the input provided by all of these contributions, and is organized in three sections: data, test procedure, and interpretation. - See more at: http://ascelibrary.org/doi/10.1061/%28ASCE%29GT.1943-5606.0001694#sthash.IMgJt2FU.dpuf

  6. Reverse Smoothing Effects, Fine Asymptotics, and Harnack Inequalities for Fast Diffusion Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Luis Vazquez

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate local and global properties of positive solutions to the fast diffusion equation ut=Δum in the good exponent range (d−2+/dfine asymptotics are shown. For the mixed initial and boundary value problem posed in a bounded domain of ℝd with homogeneous Dirichlet condition, we prove weak, intrinsic, and elliptic Harnack inequalities for intermediate times. We also prove elliptic Harnack inequalities near the extinction time, as a consequence of the study of the fine asymptotic behavior near the finite extinction time.

  7. Details and Consequences of Water Vapor Diffusion In The Pore Space of Snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokratov, S. A.; Bartelt, P.; Schneebeli, M.; Lehning, M.

    Despite a long history of extensive experimental and theoretical studies on the process of water vapor diffusion in snow, no quantitative explanation for the observed diffu- sion characteristics such as mass-transfer rates and snow density change is available at present. Results of a detailed investigatation of the process are presented. The pro- posed description of water vapor flux in snow now includes thermal diffusion, grav- itation, convective air flow, and volumetric mass-production. The relative importance of the components in the overall mass-transfer is analyzed. Although experimental data of sufficient detail concerning the individual components are not available, the results of our analysis provide an improved understanding of the sources of discrepan- cies in published experimental results. The consequences of the water vapor transport description for heat transfer and metamorphism are also discussed.

  8. Ionic Diffusion and Kinetic Homogeneous Chemical Reactions in the Pore Solution of Porous Materials with Moisture Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn

    2009-01-01

    Results from a systematic continuum mixture theory will be used to establish the governing equations for ionic diffusion and chemical reactions in the pore solution of a porous material subjected to moisture transport. The theory in use is the hybrid mixture theory (HMT), which in its general form...... general description of chemical reactions among constituents is described. The Petrov – Galerkin approach are used in favour of the standard Galerkin weighting in order to improve the solution when the convective part of the problem is dominant. A modified type of Newton – Raphson scheme is derived...... for the non-linear global matrix formulation. The developed model and its numerical solution procedure are checked by running test examples which results demonstrates robustness of the proposed approach....

  9. Pore-pressure diffusion based on analysis and characterization of microseismicity in central Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogwari, Paul Otieno

    Part 1: Between August 2010 and June 2011, an intense sequence of induced earthquakes occurred along the Guy-Greenbrier fault in central Arkansas due to fluid injection at nearby waste disposal wells. A previous study by Horton (2010) limited to ˜1,000 earthquakes having md > ˜2.0 illuminated the ˜13km fault. We present an updated catalogue of 17,395 earthquakes that appears complete between 0 2 events. During this period of time, the seismicity migrated from north to south enhancing the resolution of three joined sections that form the northern ˜7.3km portion of the fault, which plunges southwards. The seismogenic zone covers the lower portion of the Paleozoic sedimentary layers and extends into the crystalline Precambrian basement (˜3km CERI catalog. We apply the template-matching method to determine relative earthquakes locations using relocated events in the CERI catalog as master events. We locate a total of 387,698 recognizable earthquakes between 07/01/2010 and 09/30/2011, that migrate from north to south as earlier indicated using traditionally located earthquakes. A clear correlation between seismicity rate and well pressure changes shows interaction of pore pressure from the SRE and Edgmon wells. A highly sampled well history provides a powerful tool of analyzing suspected induced seismicity following subsurface injection.

  10. Translational diffusion of cumene and 3-methylpentane on free surfaces and pore walls studied by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souda, Ryutaro

    2010-12-01

    Mobility of molecules in confined geometry has been studied extensively, but the origins of finite size effects on reduction of the glass transition temperature, Tg, are controversial especially for supported thin films. We investigate uptake of probe molecules in vapor-deposited thin films of cumene, 3-methylpentane, and heavy water using secondary ion mass spectrometry and discuss roles of individual molecular motion during structural relaxation and glass-liquid transition. The surface mobility is found to be enhanced for low-density glasses in the sub-Tg region because of the diffusion of molecules on pore walls, resulting in densification of a film via pore collapse. Even for high-density glasses without pores, self-diffusion commences prior to the film morphology change at Tg, which is thought to be related to decoupling between translational diffusivity and viscosity. The diffusivity of deeply supercooled liquid tends to be enhanced when it is confined in pores of amorphous solid water. The diffusivity of molecules is further enhanced at temperatures higher than 1.2-1.3 Tg irrespective of the confinement.

  11. Soil atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) regulated by diffusivity depending on water-filled pore space

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diest, H.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2008-04-01

    The exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) between soil and the atmosphere was investigated for three arable soils from Germany, China and Finland and one forest soil from Siberia for parameterization in the relation to ambient carbonyl sulfide (COS) concentration, soil water content (WC) and air temperature. All investigated soils acted as sinks for COS. A clear and distinct uptake optimum was found for the German, Chinese, Finnish and Siberian soils at 11.5%, 9%, 11.5%, and 9% soil WC, respectively, indicating that the soil WC acts as an important biological and physical parameter for characterizing the exchange of COS between soils and the atmosphere. Different optima of deposition velocities (Vd) as observed for the Chinese, Finnish and Siberian boreal soil types in relation to their soil WC, aligned at 19% in relation to the water-filled pore space (WFPS), indicating the dominating role of gas diffusion. This interpretation was supported by the linear correlation between Vd and bulk density. We suggest that the uptake of COS depends on the diffusivity dominated by WFPS, a parameter depending on soil WC, soil structure and porosity of the soil.

  12. Soil atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS regulated by diffusivity depending on water-filled pore space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Van Diest

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS between soil and the atmosphere was investigated for three arable soils from Germany, China and Finland and one forest soil from Siberia for parameterization in the relation to ambient carbonyl sulfide (COS concentration, soil water content (WC and air temperature. All investigated soils acted as sinks for COS. A clear and distinct uptake optimum was found for the German, Chinese, Finnish and Siberian soils at 11.5%, 9%, 11.5%, and 9% soil WC, respectively, indicating that the soil WC acts as an important biological and physical parameter for characterizing the exchange of COS between soils and the atmosphere. Different optima of deposition velocities (Vd as observed for the Chinese, Finnish and Siberian boreal soil types in relation to their soil WC, aligned at 19% in relation to the water-filled pore space (WFPS, indicating the dominating role of gas diffusion. This interpretation was supported by the linear correlation between Vd and bulk density. We suggest that the uptake of COS depends on the diffusivity dominated by WFPS, a parameter depending on soil WC, soil structure and porosity of the soil.

  13. Soil atmosphere exchange of Carbonyl Sulfide (COS regulated by diffusivity depending on water-filled pore space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Van Diest

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS between soil and the atmosphere was investigated for three arable soils from Germany, China and Finland and one forest soil from Siberia for parameterization in the relation to ambient carbonyl sulfide (COS concentration, soil water content (WC and air temperature. All investigated soils acted as significant sinks for COS. A clear and distinct uptake optimum was found for the German, Chinese, Finnish and Siberian soils at 11.5%, 9%, 11.5%, and 9% soil WC, respectively, indicating that the soil WC acts as an important biological and physical parameter for characterizing the exchange of COS between soils and the atmosphere. Different optima of deposition velocities (Vd as observed for the Chinese, Finnish and Siberian boreal soil types in relation to their soil WC, aligned at 19% in relation to the water-filled pore space (WFPS, indicating the dominating role of gas diffusion. This interpretation was supported by the linear correlation between Vd and bulk density. We suggest that the uptake of COS depends on the diffusivity dominated by WFPS, a parameter depending on soil WC, soil structure and porosity of the soil.

  14. Numerical Calculations of the Effect of Moisture Content and Moisture Flow on Ionic Multi-Species Diffusion in the Pore Solution of Porous Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn; Hosokawa, Yoshifumi; Yamada, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    A method to analyse and calculate concentration profiles of different types of ions in the pore solution of porous materials such as concrete subjected to external wetting and drying is described. The equations in use have a solid theoretical meaning and are derived from a porous media technique......, which is a special branch of the more general mixture theory. The effect of chemical action is ignored making the presented model suitable to be implemented into codes dealing solely with chemical equilibrium. The coupled set of equations for diffusion of ionic species, the internal electrical potential...... on the ionic diffusion resistance in the pore solution of the porous material. The Gauss’ law is included in the model in order to be able to calculate the electrical potential which develops due to small deviations from total charge neutrality among the ionic species in the pore solution. The correctness...

  15. Validation of pore network simulations of ex-situ water distributions in a gas diffusion layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells with X-ray tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaesse, Tristan; Lamibrac, Adrien; Büchi, Felix N.; Pauchet, Joel; Prat, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Understanding and modeling two-phase flows in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of proton exchange membrane fuel cells are important in order to improve fuel cells performance. They are scientifically challenging because of the peculiarities of GDLs microstructures. In the present work, simulations on a pore network model are compared to X-ray tomographic images of water distributions during an ex-situ water invasion experiment. A method based on watershed segmentation was developed to extract a pore network from the 3D segmented image of the dry GDL. Pore network modeling and a full morphology model were then used to perform two-phase simulations and compared to the experimental data. The results show good agreement between experimental and simulated microscopic water distributions. Pore network extraction parameters were also benchmarked using the experimental data and results from full morphology simulations.

  16. Pore-Network Modeling of Water and Vapor Transport in the Micro Porous Layer and Gas Diffusion Layer of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, C.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; van Oosterhout, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the cathode side of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC), a micro porous layer (MPL) added between the catalyst layer (CL) and the gas diffusion layer (GDL) plays an important role in water management. In this work, by using both quasi-static and dynamic pore-network models, water and vapor tra

  17. Discharge mechanism of micro pore gas diffusion electrode%小孔气体扩散电极的放电机理探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴飞; 朱梅; 徐献芝; 宋辉

    2012-01-01

    A kind of gas diffusion electrode was reported by making of nickel film as framework material with different pore sizes. Under the same test condition, the micro pore gas diffusion electrode was compared with nickel foam gas diffusion electrode in the discharge experiment in the zinc-air battery. The discharge polarization curves were drew between electrodes of different size. The results show that the micro pore gas diffusion electrode has a better performance man the nickel foam electrode, reducing the polarization potential under lager current density. The discharge performance has a linear relationship with pore size distribution when the working current density is lower than 1 000 mA/cm2 and exhibits best performance at the pore size about 50 μm. In summary, the discharge performance is improved significantly by changing the inner structure of gas diffusion electrode and shows scale effect with the pore size distribution of electrode. And the intermittent discharge shows little change for its good stability.%借鉴植物叶片高效传输的机理,以包含规则排列的贯通直孔的镍片作为骨架材料,与自制催化剂组成小孔气体扩散电极,在锌空气电池体系下与常规泡沫镍电极的放电性能进行比较,并考察不同孔径的小孔气体扩散电极之间的放电特征.结果表明,小孔气体扩散电极相比泡沫镍电极存在更好的放电性能,降低了电极在大电流密度工作时的极化过电位.当电流密度在低于1 000mA/cm2工作时,放电性能与孔径大小成线性关系,孔径为50μm时,放电效率最佳.总结了小孔气体电极相对泡沫镍气体扩散电极放电效率明显改善,并随着孔径变化放电性能呈现尺度效应,内部结构稳定,间歇放电性能变化较小.

  18. Modeling the diffusion of Na+ in compacted water-saturated Na-bentonite as a function of pore water ionic strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.; Bourg, A.C.M.

    2008-08-15

    Assessments of bentonite barrier performance in waste management scenarios require an accurate description of the diffusion of water and solutes through the barrier. A two-compartment macropore/nanopore model (on which smectite interlayer nanopores are treated as a distinct compartment of the overall pore space) was applied to describe the diffusion of {sup 22}Na{sup +} in compacted, water-saturated Na-bentonites and then compared with the well-known surface diffusion model. The two-compartment model successfully predicted the observed weak ionic strength dependence of the apparent diffusion coefficient (D{sub a}) of Na{sup +}, whereas the surface diffusion model did not, thus confirming previous research indicating the strong influence of interlayer nanopores on the properties of smectite clay barriers. Since bentonite mechanical properties and pore water chemistry have been described successfully with two-compartment models, the results in the present study represent an important contribution toward the construction of a comprehensive two-compartment model of compacted bentonite barriers.

  19. Pore network modeling to explore the effects of compression on multiphase transport in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell gas diffusion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Mohammadreza; Hinebaugh, James; Fishman, Zachary; Tötzke, Christian; Lehnert, Werner; Manke, Ingo; Bazylak, Aimy

    2016-12-01

    Understanding how compression affects the distribution of liquid water and gaseous oxygen in the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell gas diffusion layer (GDL) is vital for informing the design of improved porous materials for effective water management strategies. Pore networks extracted from synchrotron-based micro-computed tomography images of compressed GDLs were employed to simulate liquid water transport in GDL materials over a range of compression pressures. The oxygen transport resistance was predicted for each sample under dry and partially saturated conditions. A favorable GDL compression value for a preferred liquid water distribution and oxygen diffusion was found for Toray TGP-H-090 (10%), yet an optimum compression value was not recognized for SGL Sigracet 25BC. SGL Sigracet 25BC exhibited lower transport resistance values compared to Toray TGP-H-090, and this is attributed to the additional diffusion pathways provided by the microporous layer (MPL), an effect that is particularly significant under partially saturated conditions.

  20. Modeling packed bed sorbent systems with the Pore Surface Diffusion Model: Evidence of facilitated surface diffusion of arsenate in nano-metal (hydr)oxide hybrid ion exchange media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Sachie; Markovski, Jasmina; Hristovski, Kiril D

    2016-09-01

    This study explores the possibility of employing the Pore Surface Diffusion Model (PSDM) to predict the arsenic breakthrough curve of a packed bed system operated under continuous flow conditions with realistic groundwater, and consequently minimize the need to conduct pilot scale tests. To provide the nano-metal (hydr)oxide hybrid ion exchange media's performance in realistic water matrices without engaging in taxing pilot scale testing, the multi-point equilibrium batch sorption tests under pseudo-equilibrium conditions were performed; arsenate breakthrough curve of short bed column (SBC) was predicted by the PSDM in the continuous flow experiments; SBC tests were conducted under the same conditions to validate the model. The overlapping Freundlich isotherms suggested that the water matrix and competing ions did not have any denoting effect on sorption capacity of the media when the matrix was changed from arsenic-only model water to real groundwater. As expected, the PSDM provided a relatively good prediction of the breakthrough profile for arsenic-only model water limited by intraparticle mass transports. In contrast, the groundwater breakthrough curve demonstrated significantly faster intraparticle mass transport suggesting to a surface diffusion process, which occurs in parallel to the pore diffusion. A simple selection of DS=1/2 DP appears to be sufficient when describing the facilitated surface diffusion of arsenate inside metal (hydr)oxide nano-enabled hybrid ion-exchange media in presence of sulfate, however, quantification of the factors determining the surface diffusion coefficient's magnitude under different treatment scenarios remained unexplored.

  1. Product mass transfer resistance directly determined during freeze-drying cycle runs using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and pore diffusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuu, Wei Y; O'Bryan, Kevin R; Hardwick, Lisa M; Paul, Timothy W

    2011-08-01

    The pore diffusion model is used to express the dry layer mass transfer resistance, [Formula: see text], as a function of the ratio r(e)/?, where r(e) is the effective pore radius and ? is the tortuosity factor of the dry layer. Using this model, the effective pore radius of the dry layer can be estimated from the sublimation rate and product temperature profiles measured during primary drying. Freeze-drying cycle runs were performed using the LyoStar II dryer (FTS Systems), with real-time sublimation rate profiles during freeze drying continuously measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). The formulations chosen for demonstration of the proposed approach include 5% mannitol, 5% sucrose, 5% lactose, 3% mannitol plus 2% sucrose, and a parenteral nutrition formulation denoted VitaM12. The three different methods used for determination of the product resistance are: (1) Using both the sublimation rate and product temperature profiles, (2) using the sublimation rate profile alone, and (3) using the product temperate profile alone. Unlike the second and third methods, the computation procedure of first method does not need solution of the complex heat and mass transfer equations.

  2. Pore-water distribution and quantification of diffusive benthic fluxes of nutrients in the Huanghai and East China Seas sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, phosphate and silicate in pore-water and their exchange between sediments and overlying waters (benthic flux) were determined at nine locations on the shelve of Huanghai and East China Seas. On the basis of the redox potential of sediments and nutrients distributions in the pore-waters, it is found that the benthic sediments are being in a suboxic to anoxic environment in the Huanghai and East China Seas. The nutrients distribution in the pore-waters is mainly controlled by the sediment environment, and ammonia is the major inorganic nitrogen in the pore-waters. On the basis of benthic fluxes of untrients calculated using Fick's first law, there is remarkable efflux of ammonia, dissolved inorganic nitrogen(DIN), phosphate and silicate from the sediments to the overlying waters in the study area, and their benthic fluxes are 299.3~2 214.8, 404.4~2 159.5 , 5.5~18.8 and cate for the overlying water. At most stations, the nitrate flux was from the overlying waters to the sediments, which suggests that suboxic organic matter decomposition via denitrification is dominated in the most area of Huanghai and East China Seas. High benthic fluxes appearing in the coastal area and relatively low benthic fluxes occurring in the shelf area are found and are consistent with primary productivity zoning in the study area. On the other hand, the ammonia flux displays an exponential decrease with water depth increase and an exponential increase with the bottom water temperature. However, others do not display this trend.

  3. 1D and 2D diffusion pore imaging on a preclinical MR system using adaptive rephasing: Feasibility and pulse sequence comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertleff, Marco; Domsch, Sebastian; Laun, Frederik B.; Kuder, Tristan A.; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-05-01

    Diffusion pore imaging (DPI) has recently been proposed as a means to acquire images of the average pore shape in an image voxel or region of interest. The highly asymmetric gradient scheme of its sequence makes it substantially demanding in terms of the hardware of the NMR system. The aim of this work is to show the feasibility of DPI on a preclinical 9.4 T animal scanner. Using water-filled capillaries with an inner radius of 10 μm, four different variants of the DPI sequence were compared in 1D and 2D measurements. The pulse sequences applied cover the basic implementation using one long and one temporally narrow gradient pulse, a CPMG-like variant with multiple refocusing RF pulses as well as two variants splitting up the long gradient and distributing it on either side of the refocusing pulse. Substantial differences between the methods were found in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, blurring, deviations from the expected results and sensitivity to gradient imperfections. Each of the tested sequences was found to produce characteristic gradient mismatches dependent on the absolute value, direction and sign of the applied q-value. Read gradients were applied to compensate these mismatches translating them into time shifts, which enabled 1D DPI yielding capillary radius estimations within the tolerances specified by the manufacturer. For a successful DPI application in 2D, a novel gradient amplitude adaption scheme was implemented to correct for the occurring time shifts. Using this adaption, higher conformity to the expected pore shape, reduced blurring and enhanced contrast were achieved. Images of the phantom's pore shape could be acquired with a nominal resolution of 2.2 μm.

  4. Micropore diffusion in coal chars under reactive conditions: Quarterly technical progress report, 15 December 1986-15 March 1987. [Effect of activated diffusion in small pores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calo, J.M.; Perkins, M.T.; Lilly, W.D.

    1987-01-01

    In this second quarterly technical progress report, we present some additional developments concerning the analysis of the effect of activated micropore diffusion on gasification reactivity, and report on progress with the experimental apparatus: (1) The Autoclave Engineers 3'' Berty catalytic reactor has been reassembled and tested, and has been found to function satisfactorily. However, the mass spectrometer malfunctioned and had to be repaired. (2) The effect of sorbate partial pressure on miropore diffusion and gasification reactivity have been examined. It was found that: pressure can have a significant effect on micropore diffusivities; increasing pressure generally increases the microparticle effectiveness factor for pressures far from saturation (while the opposite is true at near-saturation conditions); and the effect of sorbate partial pressure should be considered in conducting and interpreting measurements regarding micropore diffusion. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Preliminary risk assessment of the wet landscape option for reclamation of oil sands mine tailings: bioassays with mature fine tailings pore water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madill, R E; Orzechowski, M T; Chen, G; Brownlee, B G; Bunce, N J

    2001-06-01

    Chemical and biological assays have been carried out on the "pore water" that results from the settling of the tailings that accompany bitumen recovery from the Athabasca oil sands. Examination of the nonacidic extracts of pore water by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy allowed the identification of numerous two- to three-ring polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs), to a total concentration of 2.6 micrograms/L of pore water. The PACs were biodegraded by microflora naturally present in the pore water. Acute toxicity was associated principally with the acidic fraction (naphthenic acids) of pore water extracts according to the Microtox assay; other work has shown that acute toxicity dissipates fairly rapidly. Both individual PACs and concentrated pore water extracts showed minimal levels of binding to the rat Ah receptor and induced minimal ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in primary rat hepatocytes, showing an insignificant risk of inducing monooxygenase activity. Taken together with previous work showing negligible mutagenic activity of these extracts, we conclude that it should be possible to develop tailing slurries into biologically productive artificial lakes.

  6. Field tests of nylon-screen diffusion samplers and pushpoint samplers for detection of metals in sediment pore water, Ashland and Clinton, Massachusetts, 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Marc J.; Vroblesky, Don A.; Campo, Kimberly W.; Massey, Andrew J.; Scheible, Walter

    2005-01-01

    Efficient and economical screening methods are needed to detect and to determine the approximate concentrations of potentially toxic trace-element metals in shallow groundwater- discharge areas (pore water) where the metals may pose threats to aquatic organisms; such areas are likely to be near hazardous-waste sites. Pushpoint and nylon-screen diffusion samplers are two complementary options for use in such environments. The pushpoint sampler, a simple well point, is easy to insert manually and to use. Only 1 day is required to collect samples. The nylon-screen diffusion sampler is well suited for use in sediments that do not allow a pump to draw water into a pushpoint sampler. In this study, both types of devices were used in sediments suitable for the use of the pushpoint sampler. Sampling with the nylon-screen diffusion sampler requires at least two site visits: one to deploy the samplers in the sediment, and a second to retrieve the samplers and collect the samples after a predetermined equilibration period. Extensive laboratory quality-control studies, field testing, and laboratory analysis of samples collected at the Nyanza Chemical Waste Dump Superfund site along the Sudbury River in Ashland, Massachusetts, and at a Superfund site-assessment location on Rigby Brook in Clinton, Massachusetts, indicate that these two devices yield comparable results for most metals and should be effective tools for pore-water studies. The nylon-screen diffusion samplers equilibrated within 1-2 days in homogeneous, controlled conditions in the laboratory. Nylon-screen diffusion samplers that were not purged of dissolved oxygen prior to deployment yielded results similar to those that were purged. Further testing of the nylon-screen diffusion samplers in homogeneous media would help to resolve any ambiguities about the data variability from the field studies. Comparison of data from replicate samples taken in both study areas shows that even samples taken from sites within a

  7. Fine genetic mapping of diffuse non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma to chromosome 12q11-q13: exclusion of the mapped type II keratins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsell, D P; Stevens, H P; Purkis, P E; Talas, U; Rustin, M H; Leigh, I M

    1999-10-01

    Diffuse non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (NEPPK) belongs to the heterogeneous group of skin diseases characterized by thickening of the stratum corneum of the palms and soles (1). This autosomal dominant PPK is characterized by a diffuse pattern of palmar and plantar hyperkeratosis giving the affected areas a thickened yellowish appearance with a marked erythematous edge. Linkage of diffuse NEPPK to chromosome 12q11-q13 has been demonstrated in two independent reports (2, 3). In this study, we describe detailed haplotyping with microsatellite markers mapping to this chromosomal region in three diffuse NEPPK pedigrees from the south of England. Fine mapping of a previously identified recombination event and the identification of a common disease haplotype segregating in the three pedigrees places the diffuse NEPPK locus proximal to the type II keratin gene cluster.

  8. Capillary Phase-Transition and Self-Diffusion of Ethylene in the Slit Carbon Pores%乙烯分子在狭缝炭孔内的毛细相变和自扩散

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘涛; 刘洪来; 袁渭康

    2004-01-01

    The grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC), the canonical Monte Carlo by using equal probability perturbation, and the molecular dynamics (MD) methods were used to study the capillary phase-transition (capillary condensation and evaporation) and self-diffusion for a simple Lennard-Jones model of ethylene confined in slit carbon pores of 2.109 nm at temperatures between 141.26 K and 201.80 K. The critical point of capillary phase-transition was extrapolated by the critical power law and the law of rectilinear diameter from the capillary phase-transition data in the near critical region. The effects of temperature and fluid density on the parallel self-diffusion coefficients of ethylene molecules confined in the slit carbon pores were examined. The results showed that the parallel selfdiffusion coefficients in the capillary phase transition area strongly depended on the fluids local densities in the slit carbon pores.

  9. Unlocking the Physiochemical Controls on Organic Carbon Dynamics from the Soil Pore- to Core-Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. P.; Tfaily, M. M.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Todd-Brown, K. E.; Bailey, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    The physical organization of soil includes pore networks of varying size and connectivity. These networks control microbial access to soil organic carbon (C) by spatially separating microorganisms and C by both distance and size exclusion. The extent to which this spatially isolated C is vulnerable to microbial transformation under hydrologically dynamic conditions is unknown, and limits our ability to predict the source and sink capacity of soils. We investigated the effects of shifting hydrologic connectivity and soil structure on greenhouse gas C emissions from surface soils collected from the Disney Wilderness Preserve (Florida, USA). We subjected intact soil cores and re-packed homogenized soil cores to simulated groundwater rise or precipitation, monitoring their CO2 and CH4 emissions over 24 hours. Soil pore water was then extracted from each core using different suctions to sample water retained by pore throats of different sizes and then characterized by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. Greater respiration rates were observed from homogenized cores compared to intact cores, and from soils wet from below, in which the wetting front is driven by capillary forces, filling fine pores first. This suggests that C located in fine pores may turn over via diffusion processes that lead to the colocation of this C with other resources and microorganisms. Both the complexity and concentration of soluble-C increased with decreasing pore size domains. Pore water extracted from homogenized cores had greater C concentrations than from intact cores, with the greatest concentrations in pore waters sampled from very fine pores, highlighting the importance of soil structure in physically protecting C. These results suggest that the spatial separation of decomposers from C is a key mechanism stabilizing C in these soils. Further research is ongoing to accurately represent this protection mechanism, and the conditions under which it breaks

  10. 孔隙分形修正的混凝土中氯离子扩散系数%Chloride diffusion coefficient modified by pore fractal theory in concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯庆革; 梁正义; 郭建强; 李浩璇

    2015-01-01

    Based on the theory of chloride diffusion and pore fractal theory a new model is proposed on the base that the sinuosity of chloride diffusion characterized by the axis fractal dimension of the small pore and the porosity of concrete modified by the surface fractal dimension of large pore.The model was applied to analyze 14 d and 28 d age concrete with different proportions and the results,showed a linear relationship with those of he Coulomb electric charge determined by The Rapid Chloride Permeability Test (RCPT)—American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM)test method C1202.The Chloride diffusion coefficient modified by pore fractal theory was presented in this study.Two different chloride concentrations in different depths of concrete were calculated by modified Chloride diffusion coefficient and orthodox Chloride diffusion coefficient.The comparison between two different Chloride diffusion coefficient indicated that the chloride concentration calculated by modified Chloride diffusion coefficient agreed better with the measured chloride concentration.%在已有的氯离子扩散理论和孔隙分形理论的基础上,提出小孔的孔轴线分形维数表征氯离子扩散的曲折度、大孔的孔表面分形维数修正孔隙率,并推导得到基于孔隙分形修正的氯离子扩散系数模型。通过分析龄期为14 d 和28 d 不同配比混凝土的基于孔隙分形的氯离子扩散系数模型的计算结果和快速氯离子扩散试验(ASTM C1202)电通量,发现两者之间有良好的线性关系。采用基于孔隙分形修正的氯离子扩散系数代入 Fick 第二定律的解析解,对试验后各组混凝土中不同扩散深度的氯离子浓度进行拟合,计算结果与实测值吻合情况较好。

  11. Adsorption and Diffusion Properties of Ethylene, Benzene and Ethylbenzene in the Cylindrical Pore under Alkylation Reaction near Critical Regions by DCV-GCMD Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘涛; 刘洪来; 袁渭康

    2005-01-01

    A cylindrical pore model was used to represent approximately the pore of β-zeolite catalyst that had been used in the alkylation of benzene with ethylene and spherical Lennard-Jones molecules represented the components of the reaction system-ethylene, benzene and ethylbenzene. The dual control volume-grand canonical molecular dynamics (DCV-GCMD) method was used to simulate the adsorption and transport properties of three components under reaction in the cylindrical pore at 250℃ and 270℃ in the pressure range from 1 MPa to 8 MPa. The state map of the reactant mixture in the bulk phase could be divided into several different regions around its critical points. The simulated adsorption and transport properties in the pore were compared between the different near-critical regions. The thorough analysis suggested that the high pressure liquid region is the most suitable region for the alkylation reaction of benzene under the near-critical condition.

  12. Pore-Like” Effects of Super-Molecular Self-Assembly on Molecular Diffusion of Poly(Ethylene Oxide-Poly(Propylene Oxide-Poly(Ethylene Oxide in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Ulrich

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular diffusion of triblock copolymers poly(ethylene oxide-poly(propylene oxide-poly(ethylene oxide in water was studied with the help of Pulsed Field Gradient NMR in the broad range of polymer weight fractions from 0.09 to 0.8. Owing to amphiphilic nature of the molecules, these block copolymers exhibit rich self-organization properties when mixed with water. In particular, at ambient temperatures they form micelles and three liquid crystalline mesophases: cubic, hexagonal, and lamellar. The corresponding super-molecular structure formations were studied with the same block copolymer and at the same temperature. Self-assembly of molecules was shown to produce “pore-like” effects on their self-diffusion properties by imposing severe constraints on the dimensionality of propagation. Diffusion in the hexagonal phase was shown to be quasi one-dimensional in the direction parallel to the long axis of the ordered molecular rods. In the lamellar phase, diffusion was found to be quasi two-dimensional, in the plane of the lamellar structures. The observed diffusion anisotropy was attributed to the effects of the specific molecular ordering on the mesoscopic length scale.

  13. Concentration profiles for fine and coarse sediments suspended by waves over ripples: An analytical study with the 1-DV gradient diffusion model

    CERN Document Server

    Absi, Rafik

    2010-01-01

    Field and laboratory measurements of suspended sediments over wave ripples show, for time-averaged concentration profiles in semi-log plots, a contrast between upward convex profiles for fine sand and upward concave profiles for coarse sand. Careful examination of experimental data for coarse sand shows a near-bed upward convex profile beneath the main upward concave profile. Available models fail to predict these two profiles for coarse sediments. The 1-DV gradient diffusion model predicts the main upward concave profile for coarse sediments thanks to a suitable $\\beta$(y)-function (where $\\beta$ is the inverse of the turbulent Schmidt number and y is the distance from the bed). In order to predict the near-bed upward convex profile, an additional parameter {\\alpha} is needed. This parameter could be related to settling velocity ($\\alpha$ equal to inverse of dimensionless settling velocity) or to convective sediment entrainment process. The profiles are interpreted by a relation between second derivative of ...

  14. On the diffusion mechanisms of fine-scale γ′ in an advanced Ni-based superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Y.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Size dependent compositional variations for the ordered L12-structure gamma prime (γ′ precipitates in the commercial Ni-based superalloy RR1000 have been investigated using scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM imaging combined with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy. To address the problem of quantitative compositional determination for nanoscale particles within a metal matrix we have applied a novel electrochemical method to extract individual precipitates. The use of a high-efficiency EDX detector enabled compositional measurements to be obtained for particles with diameters as small as 20 nm with acquisition times of the order of a few minutes. We have studied compositional variations across the different size families of γ′ precipitates within a microstructure generated by slow cooling. Our results demonstrate the importance of kinetic factors for determining the precipitates compositions. In particular, we provide new evidence for the role of aluminium antisite atoms on the low-temperature growth kinetics of fine scale γ′ precipitates. Our findings provide valuable structural data towards improving the accuracy of predicting the microstructural evolution in Ni-based superalloys.

  15. Diagnostic value of sonography, ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology, and diffusion-weighted MRI in the characterization of cold thyroid nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: claudia.schueller-weidekamm@meduniwien.ac.at; Schueller, Gerd [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kaserer, Klaus [Department of Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Scheuba, Christian [Department of Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Ringl, Helmut; Weber, Michael; Czerny, Christian; Herneth, Andreas M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-03-15

    Introduction: The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the diagnostic value of different modalities for the characterization of cold thyroid nodules. Methods: In 35 patients with cold nodules, thyroid carcinoma was suspected on scintigraphy. These patients were prospectively investigated with sonography, ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (USgFNA), and quantitative diffusion-weighted imaging magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) (navigated echo-planar imaging; maximum b-value 800 s/mm{sup 2}) prior to surgery. The sonographic findings, USgFNA cytology, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of DWI were correlated with the postoperative histology of benign and malignant lesions. Statistical analysis was performed with the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Fisher's exact test. P < .05 denoted statistical significance. Results: The accuracy of sonography and USgFNA was 64% and 68.8%, respectively. The sensitivity was 86.7% and 80%, respectively. Specificity was only 57.2% and 50%, respectively. The median ADC values for carcinoma and adenoma were 2.73 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s and 1.93 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, respectively (P < .001). There was no significant difference between the median ADC value for Hashimoto thyroiditis (3.46 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) and carcinoma. An ADC value of 2.25 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s or higher was proven to be the cut-off value for differentiating between benign and malignant cold thyroid nodules, with an accuracy of 88%, a sensitivity of 85%, and a specificity of 100%. Conclusions: These results show that quantitative DWI is a more reliable diagnostic method for differentiation between benign and malignant thyroid lesions than sonography or USgFNA. However, further studies including a larger study population are necessary to confirm our study results.

  16. Multi-species Ionic Diffusion in Concrete with Account to Interaction Between Ions in the Pore Solution and the Cement Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn

    2007-01-01

    The penetration and leaching of ionic species in concrete are studied by using a model based on the Nernst-Planck equations. A finite element procedure is used to solve the coupled non-linear governing equations. A numerical example is performed in which the results are compared to measured...... electron probe micro analysis (EPMA) data. A close agreement of the simulated results to measured data is found for the specific studied example. The model includes the ionic species Cl-, Na+, OH-, Ca2+, K+ and SO42- and solid phases with variable composition. From the EPMA measurements the total...... results concerning the multi-species action during chloride penetration. In the model the chemical interaction between ions in solids and in pore solution is assumed governed by simple ion exchange processes only. The drawback using this approach is that the chemical part is lacking important physical...

  17. Tuning the Pore Geometry of Ordered Mesoporous Carbons for Enhanced Adsorption of Bisphenol-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wannes Libbrecht

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous carbons were synthesized via both soft and hard template methods and compared to a commercial powder activated carbon (PAC for the adsorption ability of bisphenol-A (BPA from an aqueous solution. The commercial PAC had a BET-surface of 1027 m2/g with fine pores of 3 nm and less. The hard templated carbon (CMK-3 material had an even higher BET-surface of 1420 m2/g with an average pore size of 4 nm. The soft templated carbon (SMC reached a BET-surface of 476 m2/g and a pore size of 7 nm. The maximum observed adsorption capacity (qmax of CMK-3 was the highest with 474 mg/g, compared to 290 mg/g for PAC and 154 mg/g for SMC. The difference in adsorption capacities was attributed to the specific surface area and hydrophobicity of the adsorbent. The microporous PAC showed the slowest adsorption, while the ordered mesopores of SMC and CMK-3 enhanced the BPA diffusion into the adsorbent. This difference in adsorption kinetics is caused by the increase in pore diameter. However, CMK-3 with an open geometry consisting of interlinked nanorods allows for even faster intraparticle diffusion.

  18. Fractal classification and natural classification of coal pore structure based on migration of coal bed methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Xuehai; QIN Yong; ZHANG Wanhong; WEI Chongtao; ZHOU Rongfu

    2005-01-01

    According to the data of 146 coal samples measured by mercury penetration, coal pores are classified into two levels of <65 nm diffusion pore and >65 nm seeping pore by fractal method based on the characteristics of diffusion, seepage of coal bed methane(CBM) and on the research results of specific pore volume and pore structure. The diffusion pores are further divided into three categories: <8 nm micropore, 8-20 nm transitional pore, and 20-65 nm minipore based on the relationship between increment of specific surface area and diameter of pores, while seepage pores are further divided into three categories: 65-325 nm mesopore,325-1000 nm transitional pore, and >1000 nm macropore based on the abrupt change in the increment of specific pore volume.

  19. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 samples (Haber-Pohlmeier et al. 2010). Third, relaxometric information forms the basis of understanding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. The general difficulty of imaging in soils are the inherent fast T2 relaxation times due to i) the small pore sizes, ii) presence of paramagnetic ions in the solid matrix, and iii) diffusion in internal gradients. The last point is important, since echo times can not set shorter than about 1ms for imaging purposes. The way out is either the usage of low fields for imaging in soils or special ultra-short pulse sequences, which do not create echoes. In this presentation we will give examples on conventional imaging of macropore fluxes in soil cores (Haber-Pohlmeier et al. 2010), and the combination with relaxometric imaging, as well as the advantages and drawbacks of low-field and ultra-fast pulse imaging. Also first results on the imaging of soil columns measured by SIP in Project A3 are given. Haber-Pohlmeier, S., S. Stapf, et al. (2010). "Waterflow Monitored by Tracer Transport in Natural Porous Media Using MRI." Vadose Zone J.: submitted. Haber-Pohlmeier, S., S. Stapf, et al. (2010). "Relaxation in a

  20. Understanding the effect of mean pore size on cell activity in collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, Ciara M; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2010-01-01

    Mean pore size is an essential aspect of scaffolds for tissue-engineering. If pores are too small cells cannot migrate in towards the center of the construct limiting the diffusion of nutrients and removal of waste products...

  1. Pore capillary pressure and saturation of methane hydrate bearing sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Shicai; LIU Changling; YE Yuguang; LIU Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between the pore capillary pressure and hydrate saturation in sedi-ments, a new method was proposed. First, the phase equilibria of methane hydrate in fine-grained silica sands were measured. As to the equilibrium data, the pore capillary pressure and saturation of methane hydrate were calculated. The results showed that the phase equilibria of methane hydrates in fine-grained silica sands changed due to the depressed activity of pore water caused by the surface group and negatively charged characteristic of silica particles as well as the capillary pressure in small pores together. The capil-lary pressure increased with the increase of methane hydrate saturation due to the decrease of the available pore space. However, the capillary-saturation relationship could not yet be described quantitatively because of the stochastic habit of hydrate growth.

  2. On estimating the effective diffusive properties of hardened cement pastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stora, E.; Bary, B. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME, Lab Etud Comportement Betons et Argiles, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Stora, E.; He, Qi-Chang [Univ Paris Est, Lab Paris Est, F-77454 Marne La Vallee 2, (France)

    2008-07-01

    The effective diffusion coefficients of hardened cement pastes can vary between a few orders of magnitude. The paper aims at building a homogenization model to estimate these macroscopic diffusivities and capture such strong variations. For this purpose, a three-scale description of the paste is proposed, relying mainly on the fact that the initial cement grains hydrate forming a complex microstructure with a multi-scale pore structure. In particular, porosity is found to be well connected at a fine scale. However, only a few homogenization schemes are shown to be adequate to account for such connectivity. Among them, the mixed composite spheres assemblage estimate (Stora, E., He, Q.-C., Bary, B.: J. Appl. Phys. 100(8), 084910, 2006a) seems to be the only one that always complies with rigorous bounds and is consequently employed to predict the effects of this fine porosity on the material effective diffusivities. The model proposed provides predictions in good agreement with experimental results and is consistent with the numerous measurements of critical pore diameters issued from mercury intrusion porosimetry tests. The evolution of the effective diffusivities of cement pastes subjected to leaching is also assessed by adopting a simplified scenario of the decalcification process. (authors)

  3. Dilated pore of winer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of dilated pore of Winer were observed. First case had single defined black papule with well defined margin, central pore and discharge of black powdery material from nose since 3 years. The second case had one 9mm, black well-defined papule with central pore discharging black powdery material on right forearm since 9 months and 9 similar smaller papules were seen on forearm and lower abdomen. Histopathologically both revealed greatly dilated infundibulum lined by acanthotic epidermis and atrophic subinfundibular hair structures thus confirming diagnosis of dilated pore of Winer

  4. Water retention, gas transport, and pore network complexity during short-term regeneration of soil structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2013-01-01

    was done using water retention (pore size distribution), soil gas diffusivity, air permeability, and derived pore network complexity parameters. Significant decreases in bulk density (increased total porosity) and increases in pores > 100 1m was observed for incubated samples compared with SR samples....... The proportion of pores > 100 1m increased in order: smectite gas diffusivity, air permeability, and derived pore network indices was greater for incubated samples than SR. For illitic soils...... for convective air transport when analyzing pore network complexity. Overall, our results showed that short-term regeneration...

  5. Fingerprint pores extractor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mngenge, NA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available alone. Sweat pores have been less utilized in the past due to constraints imposed by fingerprint scanning devices and resolution standards. Recently, progress has been made on both scanning devices and resolution standards to support the use of pores...

  6. Pore size distribution mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Strange, John H.; J. Beau W. WEBBER; Schmidt, S.D.

    1996-01-01

    Pore size distribution mapping has been demonstrated using NMR cryoporometry\\ud in the presence of a magnetic field gradient, This novel method is extendable to 2D and 3D mapping. It offers a unique nondestructive method of obtaining full pore-size distributions in the range 3 to 100 nm at any point within a bulk sample. \\ud

  7. Dependence of CO2 Reactivity of Carbon Anodes on Pore Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong; Xue, Jilai; Lang, Guanghui; Liu, Rui; Gao, Shoulei; Wang, Zengjie

    2017-09-01

    The correlation between the CO2 reactivity and pore structure of carbon anodes was experimentally investigated. The pore structures of the anodes before and after CO2 oxidation were characterized using image analysis. The porosity, mean pore diameter, and the number of micro-cracks decreased with increasing anode forming pressure, while they increased with over-compaction. With prolonged CO2 oxidation time, the porosity, pore density, mean pore diameter, pore aspect ratio, and the number of micro-cracks increased due to the merging of small pores, increased pore connectivity, and generation of new pores. The activation energy decreased with increasing porosity of the anodes' pitch phase due to easier CO2 penetration and reaction within the anodes. The results confirm that the fine pitch-coke phase of anodes is preferentially consumed, a cause of carbon dusting. Optimization of the pore structures to balance the pitch, coke, and butt phases may potentially further reduce carbon dusting.

  8. Active Pore Volume in Danish Peat Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsmann, Ditte M.; Kjærgaard, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus release within the soil matrix caused by the changed redox conditions due to re-establishment of a riparian wetland can be critical for the aquatic environment. However, phosphorous released in the soil will not always result in an immediate contribution to this loss to the aquatic...... is not actively transported out of the system, but is only transported via diffusion, which is a very slow process. Thus it is interesting to investigate the size of the active pore volume in peat soils. The hypothesis of this study is that the active pores volume of a peat soil can be expressed using bulk...

  9. Conservation agriculture effects on soil pore characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Abdollahi, Lotfollah

    of quantitative knowledge to support this statement. This study examines the long-term effects of crop rotations, residue management and tillage on soil pore characteristics of two sandy loam soils in Denmark. Results are reported from a split plot field experiment rotation as main plot factor and tillage...... air permeability and pore continuity index. Generally, residue input, especially when combined with direct drilling at the Foulum site, decreased bulk density and the volume of blocked air porosity, and increased air-filled porosity, volumetric water content, air permeability and gas diffusivity. Our...

  10. Quantification of Soil Pore Network Complexity with X-ray Computed Tomography and Gas Transport Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katuwal, Sheela; Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Flow and transport of gases through soils are largely controlled by pore structural attributes. The quantification of pore network characteristics is therefore essential for accurate prediction of air permeability and gas diffusivity. In this study, the pore network characteristics of seven...... different soils subjected to 22 mo of field regeneration were quantified with X-ray computed tomography (CT) and compared with functional pore characteristics estimated from measurements of air permeability and gas diffusivity. Furthermore, predictive models for air permeability and gas diffusivity were...... equivalent pore diameter in predictive gas diffusivity and air permeability models significantly improved their performance. The obtained results suggest that the application of X-ray CT-derived pore-structural parameters has great potential for predicting gas diffusivity and air permeability....

  11. Velocities in Solar Pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  12. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M. (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Webster, I.A. (Unocal Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The molecules comprising coal liquids can range from less than 10 to several hundred [angstrom] in diameter. Their size is, therefore, comparable to the average pore size of most hydroprocessing catalysts. Thus, during processing, transport of these molecules into the catalyst occurs mainly by configurational'' or hindered diffusion,'' which is the result of two phenomena occurring in the pores; the distribution of solute molecules in the pores is affected by the pores and the solute molecules experience an increased hydrodynamic drag. The field of hindered diffusion has been reviewed by Deen [16]. The earliest studies in the filed were by Renkin et al. [17].

  13. Fine-needle aspiration of the diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma masked by florid lymphocytic thyroiditis; A potential pitfall: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiovanni, Massimo; Triponez, Frederic; McKee, Thomas A; Kumar, Neeta; Matthes, Thomas; Meyer, Patrick

    2009-09-01

    The diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (DSV-PTC) is a rare tumor with aggressive behavior that requires aggressive treatment. Despite characteristic clinical and histological features that easily permit diagnosis, pre-operative fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) diagnosis is often challenging and thus delays diagnosis. We describe the cytological features of a case of DSV-PTC diagnosed by FNAC in a 30-year-old woman presenting with an ill-defined mass in her neck lasting for 2 months. Ultrasonograpy revealed a heterogeneous enlargement of both thyroid lobes suspicious for a lymphoproliferative syndrome. Flow cytometry showed a suspect B-lymphocyte population. FNAC showed in five out of six slides an overwhelming presence of slightly atypical monomorphic small lymphocytes. The remaining slide showed syncytial tissue fragments of follicular cells with nuclear enlargement and pleomorphism, irregular nuclear membrane, grooves with scattered intranuclear inclusions, squamous metaplastic epithelium, and abundant psammoma bodies. A diagnosis of DSV-PTC was rendered and confirmed by total thyroidectomy and lymph node dissection. Our report supports the possibility of obtaining a preoperative diagnosis of DSV-PTC by FNAC. In the case of diffuse thyroid enlargement, adequate sampling of the thyroid and the presence of the combination of features described in our case permitted the diagnosis of this PTC variant.

  14. Anne Fine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Gaydon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An interview with Anne Fine with an introduction and aside on the role of children’s literature in our lives and development, and our adult perceptions of the suitability of childhood reading material.Since graduating from Warwick in 1968 with a BA in Politics and History, Anne Fine has written over fifty books for children and eight for adults, won the Carnegie Medal twice (for Goggle-Eyes in 1989 and Flour Babies in 1992, been a highly commended runner-up three times (for Bill’s New Frock in 1989, The Tulip Touch in 1996, and Up on Cloud Nine in 2002, been shortlisted for the Hans Christian Andersen Award (the highest recognition available to a writer or illustrator of children’s books, 1998, undertaken the positon of Children’s Laureate (2001-2003, and been awarded an OBE for her services to literature (2003. Warwick presented Fine with an Honorary Doctorate in 2005.Philip Gaydon’s interview with Anne Fine was recorded as part of the ‘Voices of the University’ oral history project, co-ordinated by Warwick’s Institute of Advanced Study.

  15. Granulation of fine powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ching-Fong

    2016-08-09

    A mixture of fine powder including thorium oxide was converted to granulated powder by forming a first-green-body and heat treating the first-green-body at a high temperature to strengthen the first-green-body followed by granulation by crushing or milling the heat-treated first-green-body. The granulated powder was achieved by screening through a combination of sieves to achieve the desired granule size distribution. The granulated powder relies on the thermal bonding to maintain its shape and structure. The granulated powder contains no organic binder and can be stored in a radioactive or other extreme environment. The granulated powder was pressed and sintered to form a dense compact with a higher density and more uniform pore size distribution.

  16. Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15

    As repositories for CO₂ and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air–water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  17. Low pore connectivity in natural rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15

    As repositories for CO(2) and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air-water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  18. Properties of solar pores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sütterlin, Peter

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of an extensive investigation of the properties of solar pores. Spectra of all 4 Stokes parameters of several magnetic sensitive absorption lines as well as Stokes I only spectra of lines with low or vanishing Landéfactor have been observed. An inversion code based on the Leve

  19. Effective Diffusion Coefficients in Coal Chars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Jensen, Anker

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of effective diffusion coefficients in char particles is important when interpreting experimental reactivity measurements and modeling char combustion or NO and N2O reduction. In this work, NO and N2O reaction with a bituminous coal char was studied in a fixed-bed quartz glass reactor....... The experimental results were compared with theoretical values calculated from the mean pore radius and the cross-linked pore model. The method of mean pore radius underestimated the effective diffusion coefficient more than an order of magnitude. Using the cross-linked pore model, the bimodal pore size...

  20. Effective porosity and pore-throat sizes of mudrock saprolite from the Nolichucky Shale within Bear Creek Valley on the Oak Ridge Reservation: Implications for contaminant transport and retardation through matrix diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorsch, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Katsube, T.J. [Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-05-01

    Specimens of saprolite developed from mudrock of the Nolichucky Shale (Upper Cambrian, Conasauga Group) from the Whiteoak Mountain thrust sheet on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) were analyzed. Petrophysical techniques include helium porosimetry and mercury porosimetry. Petrophysical data obtained from the laboratory experiments include effective porosity, pore-throat sizes and their distribution, specimen bulk-density, and specimen grain-density. It is expected that the data from this study will significantly contribute to constraining the modeling of the hydrologic behavior of saprolite developed from mudrock of the Conasauga Group in general and from the Nolichucky Shale specifically.

  1. A case of composite classical and nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma with progression to diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: Diagnostic difficulty in fine-needle aspiration cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dilip K; Sheikh, Zafar A; Al-Shama'a, Mariam H; John, Bency; Alawi, Abdulla M S; Junaid, Thamradeen A

    2017-03-01

    A small percentage of nodular lymphocytic predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) progresses to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). There have also been rare reports of gray zone lymphoma with features intermediate between classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) and DLBCL. We report a very rare case of composite lymphoma (CHL and NLPHL) progressing to DLBCL, and highlight the diagnostic difficulty faced during its fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology diagnosis. A 65-year-old woman presented with a right axillary swelling which was subjected to FNA cytology. The routine FNA cytology diagnosis was anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) but immunocytochemistry did not support this diagnosis completely. The histopathological diagnosis of the excised lymph node was NLPHL with progression to DLBCL in our hospital but in a hospital abroad where the patient was treated, the reviewed diagnosis was CHL. The patient had a rapid downhill course with development of terminal pleural effusion and died approximately one year from initial diagnosis.The review of the cyto-histologic material along with additional immunocyto/histochemical studies and the clinical course of the disease support the diagnosis of a composite lymphoma (CHL and NLPHL) with progression to DLBCL. It is suggested that all the three lesions were clonally related. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:262-266. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Cleave to Leave : Structural Insights into the Dynamic Organization of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dokudovskaya, Svetlana; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Rout, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the fine structure of the nuclear pore complex has remained elusive. Now, studies on a small protein domain have shed light on the dynamic organization of this massive assembly.

  3. Final Report for Subcontract B541028, Pore-Scale Modeling to Support "Pore Connectivity" Research Work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R P

    2009-02-25

    This report covers modeling aspects of a combined experimental and modeling task in support of the DOE Science and Technology Program (formerly OSTI) within the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). Research Objectives The research for this project dealt with diffusive retardation: solute moving through a fracture diffuses into and out of the rock matrix. This diffusive exchange retards overall solute movement, and retardation both dilutes waste being released, and allows additional decay. Diffusive retardation involves not only fracture conductivity and matrix diffusion, but also other issues and processes: contaminants may sorb to the rock matrix, fracture flow may be episodic, a given fracture may or may not flow depending on the volume of flow and the fracture's connection to the overall fracture network, the matrix imbibes water during flow episodes and dries between episodes, and so on. The objective of the project was to improve understanding of diffusive retardation of radionuclides due to fracture / matrix interactions. Results from combined experimental/modeling work were to (1) determine whether the current understanding and model representation of matrix diffusion is valid, (2) provide insights into the upscaling of laboratory-scale diffusion experiments, and (3) help in evaluating the impact on diffusive retardation of episodic fracture flow and pore connectivity in Yucca Mountain tuffs. Questions explored included the following: (1) What is the relationship between the diffusion coefficient measured at one scale, to that measured or observed at a different scale? In classical materials this relationship is trivial; in low-connectivity materials it is not. (2) Is the measured diffusivity insensitive to the shape of the sample? Again, in classical materials there should be no sample shape effect. (3) Does sorption affect diffusive exchange in low-connectivity media differently than in classical media? (4) What is the effect of

  4. Diffusion in porous crystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2012-04-21

    The design and development of many separation and catalytic process technologies require a proper quantitative description of diffusion of mixtures of guest molecules within porous crystalline materials. This tutorial review presents a unified, phenomenological description of diffusion inside meso- and micro-porous structures. In meso-porous materials, with pore sizes 2 nm < d(p) < 50 nm, there is a central core region where the influence of interactions of the molecules with the pore wall is either small or negligible; meso-pore diffusion is governed by a combination of molecule-molecule and molecule-pore wall interactions. Within micro-pores, with d(p) < 2 nm, the guest molecules are always under the influence of the force field exerted with the wall and we have to reckon with the motion of adsorbed molecules, and there is no "bulk" fluid region. The characteristics and physical significance of the self-, Maxwell-Stefan, and Fick diffusivities are explained with the aid of data obtained either from experiments or molecular dynamics simulations, for a wide variety of structures with different pore sizes and topology. The influence of adsorption thermodynamics, molecular clustering, and segregation on both magnitudes and concentration dependences of the diffusivities is highlighted. In mixture diffusion, correlations in molecular hops have the effect of slowing-down the more mobile species. The need for proper modeling of correlation effects using the Maxwell-Stefan formulation is stressed with the aid of examples of membrane separations and catalytic reactors.

  5. Relevance of pore fluid composition for the drained strength of clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoli, Giovanni; Fernández-Steeger, Tomás.; Arnhardt, Christian; Stanjek, Helge; Azzam, Rafig; Feinendegen, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Classical soil mechanics based on the effective stress concept with water as second phase does not apply anymore for fine-grained materials. Since clays particles are per definition colloidal in size, their properties are determined and dominated by their large surface area and hence, by their surface forces. Therefore, other mechanism plays a role. Geotechnical properties of soils with different pore fluid are especially important for clays used in hydraulic barriers for landfills. Also in the petroleum engineering or in tunnelling engineering the mechanical properties of clays with different pore fluids could be very useful. Since for clays physical and chemical interactions are decisive, the pure mechanical model (e.g. shearing and contact among the particles) is coupled by other forces, typical for colloidal sized materials. If the diffuse double layer develops from the surface of the clay particles, the interactions of the layers should develop a repulsion. That would resist part of the normal stress and producing no shearing resistance. However, the clays show different properties, dependent on their mineralogy, which complicates their behaviour. Several drained shear stress with shear box have been performed on pure Kaolinite, Illite, Na-Smectite and Ca-smectite. Since the shear behaviour of clays is also controlled by chemical interactions, the clays were mixed with pore fluids with different dielectric constant (water, ethanol), electrolyte concentration (NaCl and CaCl2) and pH (ranging from 3 to 8). Different consolidation pressures (from 15 kPa to 400 kPa) have been used in order to better understand the influence of the pore fluids on the drained cohesion (c') and on friction angle (φ'). The materials were mixed with different consistency to form a paste. The consistency ranges from 0.65 to 0.85. The results show how the sensitive the clays to different pore fluids are. Besides, Kaolinite and Illite shows a shearing behaviour almost entirely controlled

  6. The pore space scramble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormally, Alexandra; Bentham, Michelle; Vermeylen, Saskia; Markusson, Nils

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and energy security continue to be the context of the transition to a secure, affordable and low carbon energy future, both in the UK and beyond. This is reflected in for example, binding climate policy targets at the EU level, the introduction of renewable energy targets, and has also led to an increasing interest in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology with its potential to help mitigate against the effects of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning. The UK has proposed a three phase strategy to integrate CCS into its energy system in the long term focussing on off-shore subsurface storage (DECC, 2014). The potential of CCS therefore, raises a number of challenging questions and issues surrounding the long-term storage of CO2 captured and injected into underground spaces and, alongside other novel uses of the subsurface, contributes to opening a new field for discussion on the governance of the subsurface. Such 'novel' uses of the subsurface have lead to it becoming an increasingly contested space in terms of its governance, with issues emerging around the role of ownership, liability and property rights of subsurface pore space. For instance, questions over the legal ownership of pore space have arisen with ambiguity over the legal standpoint of the surface owner and those wanting to utilise the pore space for gas storage, and suggestions of whether there are depths at which legal 'ownership' becomes obsolete (Barton, 2014). Here we propose to discuss this 'pore space scramble' and provide examples of the competing trajectories of different stakeholders, particularly in the off-shore context given its priority in the UK. We also propose to highlight the current ambiguity around property law of pore space in the UK with reference to approaches currently taken in different national contexts. Ultimately we delineate contrasting models of governance to illustrate the choices we face and consider the ethics of these models for the common good

  7. Computational modeling of electrokinetic transport in random networks of micro-pores and nano-pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Shima; Mani, Ali

    2014-11-01

    A reduced order model has been developed to study the nonlinear electrokinetic behaviors emerging in the transport of ionic species through micro-scale and nano-scale porous media. In this approach a porous structure is modeled as a network of long and thin pores. By assuming transport equilibrium in the thin dimensions for each pore, a 1D transport equation is developed in the longitudinal direction covering a wide range of conditions including extreme limits of thick and thin electric double layers. This 1D model includes transport via diffusion, electromigration and wide range of advection mechanisms including pressure driven flow, electroosmosis, and diffusion osmosis. The area-averaged equations governing the axial transport from different pores are coupled at the pore intersections using the proper conservation laws. Moreover, an asymptotic treatment has been included in order to remove singularities in the limit of small concentration. The proposed method provides an efficient framework for insightful simulations of porous electrokinetic systems with applications in water desalination and energy storage. PhD student in Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University. She received her Master's degree in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford at 2013. Her research interests include CFD, high performance computing, and optimization.

  8. Hydrodemetallization of residue (Part 3). Influence of catalyst pore size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinuma, Yutaka; Kushiyama, Akira; Kobayashi, Satoru; Aizawa, Reiji; Inoue, Keiichi; Shimizu, Yoshikazu (National Research Inst. for Pollution and Resources, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1989-03-25

    Influence of catalyst pore size on hydrodemetallization of residues was studied, Starting oils were Khafji atmospheric residue and Morichal crude and two catalysts of alumina which have 93A and 160A mean pore diameters respectively and Mo was supported, were used. The rate at which asphaltene(A) was decomposed to maltene(M), related large to the demetallization of whole heavy oil and larger the pore diameter of catalyst, higher the demetallizing activity. But in the demetallization from A and M, the influence of pore size was different and vanadium(V) removal from A was preferable for larger pore size but was reverse from M. These were caused by the difference of diffusion in their pores. Ni was more difficult to remove than V. Catalyst of small pore size was preferable for simultaneous desulfurization, because sulfur compounds were composed of smaller molecular weight distribution. The decomposition of A started preferentially from part having large number of peripheral carbon in condensed aromatic ring or f{sub a} (aromaticity) and the catalyst of large pore size affected large on the structural change of A. 12 ref., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Simulation of Pore Width and Pore Charge Effects on Selectivities of CO2 vs. H2 from a Syngas-like Mixture in Carbon Mesopores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trinh, T.T.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Hägg, M.B.; Bedeaux, D.; Kjelstrup, S.

    2014-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the effect of pore width and surface charge in carbon mesoporous materials on adsorption and diffusion selectivities of CO2/H2 in a syngas-like mixture (mole fraction of CO2 = 0.30). The pore width of the graphite slit varied from 2.5

  10. Pore dynamics in lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozen, I.; Dommersnes, P.

    2014-09-01

    Transient circular pores can open in plasma membrane of cells due to mechanical stress, and failure to repair such pores lead to cell death. Similar pores in the form of defects also exist among smectic membranes, such as in myelin sheaths or mitochondrial membranes. The formation and growth of membrane defects are associated with diseases, for example multiple sclerosis. A deeper understanding of membrane pore dynamics can provide a more refined picture of membrane integrity-related disease development, and possibly also treatment options and strategies. Pore dynamics is also of great importance regarding healthcare applications such as drug delivery, gene or as recently been implied, cancer therapy. The dynamics of pores significantly differ in stacks which are confined in 2D compared to those in cells or vesicles. In this short review, we will summarize the dynamics of different types of pores that can be observed in biological membranes, which include circular transient, fusion and hemi-fusion pores. We will dedicate a section to floral and fractal pores which were discovered a few years ago and have highly peculiar characteristics. Finally, we will discuss the repair mechanisms of large area pores in conjunction with the current cell membrane repair hypotheses.

  11. Mineral dissolution kinetics at the pore scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.

    2007-05-24

    Mineral dissolution rates in the field have been reported to be orders of magnitude slower than those measured in the laboratory, an unresolved discrepancy that severely limits our ability to develop scientifically defensible predictive or even interpretive models for many geochemical processes in the earth and environmental sciences. One suggestion links this discrepancy to the role of physical and chemical heterogeneities typically found in subsurface soils and aquifers in producing scale-dependent rates where concentration gradients develop. In this paper, we examine the possibility that scale-dependent mineral dissolution rates can develop even at the single pore and fracture scale, the smallest and most fundamental building block of porous media. To do so, we develop two models to analyze mineral dissolution kinetics at the single pore scale: (1) a Poiseuille Flow model that applies laboratory-measured dissolution kinetics at the pore or fracture wall and couples this to a rigorous treatment of both advective and diffusive transport, and (2) a Well-Mixed Reactor model that assumes complete mixing within the pore, while maintaining the same reactive surface area, average flow rate, and geometry as the Poiseuille Flow model. For a fracture, a 1D Plug Flow Reactor model is considered in addition to quantify the effects of longitudinal versus transverse mixing. The comparison of averaged dissolution rates under various conditions of flow, pore size, and fracture length from the three models is used as a means to quantify the extent to which concentration gradients at the single pore and fracture scale can develop and render rates scale-dependent. Three important minerals that dissolve at widely different rates, calcite, plagioclase, and iron hydroxide, are considered. The modeling indicates that rate discrepancies arise primarily where concentration gradients develop due to comparable rates of reaction and advective transport, and incomplete mixing via molecular

  12. UO2 Grain Growth: Developing Phase Field Models for Pore Dragging, Solute Dragging and Anisotropic Grain Boundary Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, K.; Tonks, M.; Zhang, Y.; Biner, B.

    2016-09-28

    A detailed phase field model for the effect of pore drag on grain growth kinetics was implemented in MARMOT. The model takes into consideration both the curvature-driven grain boundary motion and pore migration by surface diffusion. As such, the model accounts for the interaction between pore and grain boundary kinetics, which tends to retard the grain growth process. Our 2D and 3D simulations demonstrate that the model capture all possible pore-grain boundary interactions proposed in theoretical models. For high enough surface mobility, the pores move along with the migrating boundary as a quasi-rigid-body, albeit hindering its migration rate compared to the pore-free case. For less mobile pores, the migrating boundary can separate from the pores. For the pore-controlled grain growth kinetics, the model predicts a strong dependence of the growth rate on the number of pores, pore size, and surface diffusivity in agreement with theroretical models. An evolution equation for the grain size that includes these parameters was derived and showed to agree well with numerical solution. It shows a smooth transition from boundary-controlled kinetics to pore-controlled kinetics as the surface diffusivity decreases or the number of pores or their size increases. This equation can be utilized in BISON to give accurate estimate for the grain size evolution. This will be accomplished in the near future. The effect of solute drag and anisotropy of grain boundary on grain growth will be investigated in future studies.

  13. Mathematical model for radon diffusion in earthen materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.

    1982-10-01

    Radon migration in porous, earthen materials is characterized by diffusion in both the air and water components of the system as well as by the interaction of the radon between the air and water. The size distribution and configuration of the pore spaces and their moisture distributions are key parameters in determining the radon diffusion coefficient for the bulk material. A mathematical model is developed and presented for calculating radon diffusion coefficients solely from the moisture content and pore size distribution of a soil, reducing the need for resorting to radon diffusion measurements. The resulting diffusion coefficients increase with the median pore diameter of the soil and decrease with increasing widths of the pore size distribution. The calculated diffusion coefficients are suitable for use in simple homogeneous-medium diffusion expressions for predicting radon transport and compare well with measured diffusion coefficients and with empirical diffusion coefficient correlations.

  14. Pore network and pore scale modeling of reactive transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, P. M.; Vu, T. M.; Varloteaux, C.; Bekri, S.

    2012-12-01

    The study of the evolution of a porous medium where a reactive fluid flows is conditioned by the accurate determination of three macroscopic parameters governing the solute displacement, namely the solute velocity, dispersion and mean reaction rate. Of course, a possible application of such studies is CO2 sequestration. This presentation proposes to approach the determination of these parameters by two different ways and to compare them; both are on the pore scale. In the first one called PNM (for pore-network model), a pore-network is extracted from micro tomography images of a real porous medium. This network is composed of spherical pores joined by circular tubes; it is used to calculate transport macroscopic parameters and porosity-permeability evolution during the reactive transport flow as functions of dimensionless numbers representing the reaction and flow rate regimes. The flow is calculated by using Kirchhoff laws. Transport is determined in the asymptotic regime where the solute concentration undergoes an exponential evolution with time. In the second approach called PSM (for pore scale model), the pore-network model is used as a three dimensional medium which is discretized by the Level Set Method. The Stokes equations are solved in order to determine the local flow field and the corresponding permeability. The solute concentration is obtained by solving the local convection-diffusion equation in the 3D pore-network; numerical dispersion is reduced by a Flux Limiting Scheme. Two different geometries of porous media are addressed by both numerical codes. The first pore-network geometry is used to validate the PNM assumptions, whereas the second pore-network is defined for a better understanding of the dominant solute distribution. One of the main results obtained with the first pore-network is the dependence of the concentration profile on the Péclet number Pe in the pore-bodies. When this number increases, one has to switch from an assumption of

  15. Effects of Soil Bulk Density on Gas Transport Parameters and Pore-Network Properties across a Sandy Field Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masis Melendez, Federico; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Chamindu, T K K Deepagoda

    2015-01-01

    The gas diffusion coefficient, air permeability, and their interrelations with air-filled porosity are crucial for characterization of diffusive and convective transport of gases in soils. Variations in soil bulk density can affect water retention, air-filled pore space, pore tortuosity...

  16. Size Dependent Pore Formation in Germanium Nanowires Undergoing Reversible Delithiation Observed by In Situ TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaotang; He, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Chong-min; Korgel, Brian A.

    2016-12-22

    Germanium (Ge) nanowires coated with an amorphous silicon (Si) shell undergoing lithiation and delithiation were studied using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Delithiation creates pores in nanowires with diameters larger than ~25 nm, but not in smaller diameter nanowires. The formation of pores in Ge nanowires undergoing delithiation has been observed before in in situ TEM experiments, but there has been no indication that a critical diameter exists below which pores do not form. Pore formation occurs as a result of fast lithium diffusion compared to vacancy migration. We propose that a short diffusion path for vacancies to the nanowire surface plays a role in limiting pore formation even when lithium diffusion is fast.

  17. Determining pore length scales and pore surface relaxivity of rock cores by internal magnetic fields modulation at 2MHz NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huabing; Nogueira d'Eurydice, Marcel; Obruchkov, Sergei; Galvosas, Petrik

    2014-09-01

    Pore length scales and pore surface relaxivities of rock cores with different lithologies were studied on a 2MHz Rock Core Analyzer. To determine the pore length scales of the rock cores, the high eigenmodes of spin bearing molecules satisfying the diffusion equation were detected with optimized encoding periods in the presence of internal magnetic fields Bin. The results were confirmed using a 64MHz NMR system, which supports the feasibility of high eigenmode detection at fields as low as 2MHz. Furthermore, this methodology was combined with relaxometry measurements to a two-dimensional experiment, which provides correlation between pore length and relaxation time. This techniques also yields information on the surface relaxivity of the rock cores. The estimated surface relaxivities were then compared to the results using an independent NMR method.

  18. Fine-grained concrete with organomineral additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solovyov Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issues concerning the formation of the structure and properties of fine-grained concrete with organomineral additive produced through mechanochemical activation of thermal power plant fly ash together with superplasticizer. The additive is produced in a high-speed activator at the collision particles’ speed of about 80 m/s. The use of the additive in fine-grained concrete in the amounts of 0.5-1% increased the strength by 30-50% and reduced the size and volume of pores. The cement consumption in such concrete is close to the cement consumption in common concrete of equal resistance.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of flow in pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blömer, Jan

    2001-08-01

    The gaseous flow in nano-scale pores is of wide interest for many today's industrial applications, e.g., in microelectronics, nano-mechanical devices (Knudsen compressor) and reaction and adsorption at porous surfaces. This can be seen from a variety of papers of recent RGD Symposia. Furthermore it is possible to separate gases by porous membranes. Although the fundamental problem of all these applications is same, namely the important role of the gas-surface interaction in such small structures, we will primarily concentrate on the separation of different gas species by porous membranes. These membranes are typically very robust (temperature, chemical resistance) because they are made from ceramics which offers new application fields. Porous flow can roughly be divided in several flow regimes by the Knudsen number: From viscous flow to Knudsen diffusion to surface diffusion and up to capillary condensation. A Molecular Dynamics (MD) model for the gas as well as the surface is formulated to investigate the interaction of gas atoms or molecules with internal degrees of freedom and the pore. The MD method seems to be well suited to study these phenomena because it can deal with the high density and the many-body-interactions, which occur during the multilayer adsorption and condensation at the surface, although it is clear that it is limited to a small physical space because of its high computational consumption.

  20. A pore water conductivity sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The electrical permittivity and conductivity of the bulk soil are a function of the permittivity and conductivity of the pore water. For soil water contents higher than 0.10 both functions are equal, facilitating in situ conductivity measurements of the pore water. A novel method is described, based

  1. Ion transport across transmembrane pores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leontiadou, Hari; Mark, Alan E.; Marrink, Siewert-Jan

    2007-01-01

    To study the pore-mediated transport of ionic species across a lipid membrane, a series of molecular dynamics simulations have been performed of a dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline bilayer containing a preformed water pore in the presence of sodium and chloride ions. It is found that the stability of

  2. Direct correlation of internal gradients and pore size distributions with low field NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Blümich, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Internal magnetic field gradients Gint, which arise from the magnetic susceptibility difference Δχ between solid matrix and fluid in porous media relate to the pore geometry. However, this relationship is complex and not well understood. Here we correlate internal-gradient distributions to pore-size distributions directly to examine internal gradients in detail at low field NMR. The pore-size distributions were obtained by the method of Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF), and the internal-gradient distributions were measured with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) method. The internal-gradient-pore-size distributions correlation maps were obtained for water in packs of glass beads with different diameter and in a sandstone sample. The relationship between internal gradients and pore structure is analyzed in detail by considering the restricted diffusion of fluids in porous samples. For each case diffusion regimes are assigned by plotting normalized CPMG data and comparing the diffusion lengths, the dephasing lengths and pore diameters. In the free-diffusion limit, the correlation maps reveal the true relationship between pore structure and internal gradients so that Δχ can be approximated from the correlation maps. This limit is met most easily at low field. It provides information about porous media, which is expected to benefit the oil industry, in particular NMR well logging.

  3. Methane adsorption behavior on coal having different pore structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao; Yi; Jiang; Chengfa; Chu; Wei

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption of methane onto five dry coal samples was measured at 298 K over the pressure range from 0 to 3.5 MPa using a volumetric method.The isotherm data were fitted to the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations.The kinetic data were fitted to a pseudo second order equation,the linear driving force equation(LDF),and an intra-particle diffusion model.These results showed that higher methane adsorption is correlated with larger micro-pore volumes and specific surface areas.The adsorption was related to the narrow micro-pore size distribution when the previous two parameters are large.The kinetics study showed that the kinetics of methane adsorption onto these five dry coal samples followed a pseudo second order model very well.Methane adsorption rates are controlled by intra-particle diffusion.The faster the intra-particle diffusion,the faster the methane adsorption rate will be.

  4. Investigation on the origin of diffusion impedance in the porous cathode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainka, J.; Maranzana, G.; Dillet, J.; Didierjean, S.; Lottin, O. [Nancy Univ., Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France). Laboratoire d' Energetique et de Mecanique Theorique et Appliquee

    2009-07-01

    This study provided a preliminary examination of the impact of gas flow rate on the impedance characteristics of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The mass transport phenomena within the porous cathode of PEMFCs can be analyzed through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The geometrical description of the electrodes chosen to complete the EIS interpretations is a form of the agglomerate model, where the agglomerates are a mixture of carbon powder and catalyst particles, whereas the electrolyte is assumed to cover only the pore surfaces. Therefore, the reactants access the active catalyst sites by passing successively through the gas diffusion layer (GDL), the pores of the electrode, and finally through a thin electrolyte layer. The fuel cell equivalent electrical circuit is based on a Butler-Volmer formalism that takes into consideration oxygen diffusion in the pores of the GDL and/or the active layer through a Warburg element. The results reveal that in the cathode, the mass transfer limiting layer is most likely the active layer, provided liquid water is present within the pores. Under normal operating conditions, the mass transport resistance of the gas diffusion layer is negligible, as is the fine electrolyte layer coating the agglomerate.

  5. Pore morphologies of root induced biopores from single pore to network scale investigated by XRCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peth, Stephan; Wittig, Marlen C.; Uteau Puschmann, Daniel; Pagenkemper, Sebastian; Haas, Christoph; Holthusen, Dörthe; Horn, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    Biopores are assumed to be an important factor for nutrient acquisition by providing biologically highly active soil-root interfaces to re-colonizing roots and controlling oxygen and water flows at the pedon scale and within the rhizosphere through the formation of branching channel networks which potentially enhance microbial turnover processes. Characteristic differences in pore morphologies are to be expected depending on the genesis of biopores which, for example, can be earthworm-induced or root-induced or subsequently modified by one of the two. Our understanding of biophysical interactions between plants and soil can be significantly improved by quantifying 3D biopore architectures across scales ranging from single biopores to pedon scale pore networks and linking pore morphologies to microscale measurements of transport processes (e.g. oxygen diffusion). While a few studies in the past have investigated biopore networks on a larger scale yet little is known on the micro-morphology of root-induces biopores and their associated rhizosphere. Also little data is available on lateral transport of oxygen through the rhizosphere which will strongly influence microbial turnover processes and consequently control the release and uptake of nutrients. This paper highlights results gathered within a research unit on nutrient acquisition from the subsoil. Here we focus on X-ray microtomography (XRCT) studies ranging from large soil columns (70 cm length and 20 cm diameter) to individual biopores and its surrounding rhizosphere. Samples were collected from sites with different preceding crops (fescue, chicory, alfalfa) and various cropping durations (1-3 years). We will present an approach for quantitative image analysis combined with micro-sensor measurements of oxygen diffusion and spatial gradients of O2 partial pressures to relate pore structure with transport functions. Implications of various biopore architectures for the accessibility of nutrient resources in

  6. Pore opening dynamics in the exocytosis of serotonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo; Cercos, Montserrat G.; Martinez-Valencia, Alejandro; Salinas Hernandez, Israel; Rodríguez-Sosa, Leonardo; de-Miguel, Francisco F.

    2015-03-01

    The current view of the exocytosis of transmitter molecules is that it starts with the formation of a fusion pore that connects the intravesicular and the extracellular spaces, and is completed by the release of the rest of the transmitter contained in the vesicle upon the full fusion and collapse of the vesicle with the plasma membrane. However, under certain circumstances, a rapid closure of the pore before the full vesicle fusion produces only a partial release of the transmitter. Here we show that whole release of the transmitter occurs through fusion pores that remain opened for tens of milliseconds without vesicle collapse. This was demonstrated through amperometric measurements of serotonin release from electrodense vesicles in the axon of leech Retzius neurons and mathematical modelling. By modeling transmitter release with a diffusion equation subjected to boundary conditions that are defined by the experiment, we showed that those pores with a fast half rise time constant remained opened and allowed the full quantum release without vesicle collapse, whereas pores with a slow rise time constant closed rapidly, thus producing partial release. We conclude that a full transmitter release may occur through the fusion pore in the absence of vesicle collapse. This work was founded by a DGAPA-UNAM grants IN200914 and IN118410 CONACYT GRANT 130031, and CONACyT doctoral fellowships.

  7. Accumulation of formamide in hydrothermal pores to form prebiotic nucleobases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niether, Doreen; Afanasenkau, Dzmitry; Dhont, Jan K. G.

    2016-04-01

    Formamide is one of the important compounds from which prebiotic molecules can be synthesized, provided that its concentration is sufficiently high. For nucleotides and short DNA strands, it has been shown that a high degree of accumulation in hydrothermal pores occurs, so that temperature gradients might play a role in the origin of life [Baaske P, et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104(22):9346-9351]. We show that the same combination of thermophoresis and convection in hydrothermal pores leads to accumulation of formamide up to concentrations where nucleobases are formed. The thermophoretic properties of aqueous formamide solutions are studied by means of Infrared Thermal Diffusion Forced Rayleigh Scattering. These data are used in numerical finite element calculations in hydrothermal pores for various initial concentrations, ambient temperatures, and pore sizes. The high degree of formamide accumulation is due to an unusual temperature and concentration dependence of the thermophoretic behavior of formamide. The accumulation fold in part of the pores increases strongly with increasing aspect ratio of the pores, and saturates to highly concentrated aqueous formamide solutions of ˜85 wt% at large aspect ratios. Time-dependent studies show that these high concentrations are reached after 45-90 d, starting with an initial formamide weight fraction of 10-310-3 wt % that is typical for concentrations in shallow lakes on early Earth.

  8. Shrinkage of large isolated pores during hot isostatic pressing of presintered alumina ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, K.S.; Kim, D.Y. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Inorganic Materials Engineering; Cho, S.J. [Korea Research Inst. of Standards and Science, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-01

    The shrinkage process of large pores during hot isostatic pressing (HIP) of presintered Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} ceramics has been investigated. Large pores were observed to collapse by grain-boundary sliding, and then small pores resulting from the misfit of flowed grains disappeared, mainly by diffusion. Due to the high resistance to grain-boundary sliding, the pores in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} ceramics were hard to eliminate.

  9. Pore-scale supercritical CO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun; Zhou, Quanlin; Oostrom, Mart; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Mehta, Hardeep

    2017-02-01

    Recently, both core- and pore-scale imbibition experiments have shown non-equilibrium dissolution of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2. In this study, pore-scale scCO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions were investigated using a two-dimensional heterogeneous micromodel and a novel fluorescent water dye with a sensitive pH range between 3.7 and 6.5. Drainage experiments were conducted at 9 MPa and 40 °C by injecting scCO2 into the sandstone-analogue pore network initially saturated by water without dissolved CO2 (dsCO2). During the experiments, time-lapse images of dye intensity, reflecting water pH, were obtained. These images show non-uniform pH in individual pores and pore clusters, with average pH levels gradually decreasing with time. Further analysis on selected pores and pore clusters shows that (1) rate-limited mass transfer prevails with slowly decreasing pH over time when the scCO2-water interface area is low with respect to the volume of water-filled pores and pore clusters, (2) fast scCO2 dissolution and phase equilibrium occurs when scCO2 bubbles invade into water-filled pores, significantly enhancing the area-to-volume ratio, and (3) a transition from rate-limited to diffusion-limited mass transfer occurs in a single pore when a medium area-to-volume ratio is prevalent. The analysis also shows that two fundamental processes - scCO2 dissolution at phase interfaces and diffusion of dsCO2 at the pore scale (10-100 μm) observed after scCO2 bubble invasion into water-filled pores without pore throat constraints - are relatively fast. The overall slow dissolution of scCO2 in the millimeter-scale micromodel can be attributed to the small area-to-volume ratios that represent pore-throat configurations and characteristics of phase interfaces. This finding is applicable for the behavior of dissolution at pore, core, and field scales when water-filled pores and pore clusters of varying size are surrounded

  10. Pore-scale supercritical CO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chun; Zhou, Quanlin; Oostrom, Mart; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Mehta, Hardeep

    2017-02-01

    Abstract: Recently, both core- and pore-scale imbibition experiments have shown non-equilibrium dissolution of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2. In this study, pore-scale scCO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions were investigated using a two-dimensional heterogeneous micromodel and a novel fluorescent water dye with a sensitive pH range between 3.7 and 6.5. Drainage experiments were conducted at 9 MPa and 40 °C by injecting scCO2 into the sandstone-analogue pore network initially saturated by water without dissolved CO2 (dsCO2). During the experiments, time-lapse images of dye intensity, reflecting water pH, were obtained. These images show non-uniform pH in individual pores and pore clusters, with average pH levels gradually decreasing with time. Further analysis on selected pores and pore clusters shows that (1) rate-limited mass transfer prevails with slowly decreasing pH over time when the scCO2-water interface area is low with respect to the volume of water-filled pores and pore clusters, (2) fast scCO2 dissolution and phase equilibrium occurs when scCO2 bubbles invade into water-filled pores, significantly enhancing the area-to-volume ratio, and (3) a transition from rate-limited to diffusion-limited mass transfer occurs in a single pore when a medium area-to-volume ratio is prevalent. The analysis also shows that two fundamental processes – scCO2 dissolution at phase interfaces and diffusion of dsCO2 at the pore scale (10-100 µm) observed after scCO2 bubble invasion into water-filled pores without pore throat constraints – are relatively fast. The overall slow dissolution of scCO2 in the millimeter-scale micromodel can be attributed to the small area-to-volume ratios that represent pore-throat configurations and characteristics of phase

  11. Effect of pore packing defects in 2-d ordered mesoporous carbons on ionic transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da-Wei; Li, Feng; Fang, Hai-Tao; Liu, Min; Lu, Gao-Qing; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2006-05-04

    Ordered mesoporous materials show great importance in energy, environmental, and chemical engineering. The diffusion of guest species in mesoporous networks plays an important role in these applications, especially for energy storage, such as supercapacitors based on ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs). The ion diffusion behavior in two different 2-D hexagonal OMCs was investigated by using cyclic voltametry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In addition, transmission electron microscopy, small-angle X-ray diffraction, and nitrogen cryosorption methods were used to study the pore structure variations of these two OMCs. It was found that, for the OMC with defective pore channels (termed as pore packing defects), the gravimetric capacitance was greatly decayed when the voltage scan rate was increased. The experimental results suggest that, for the ion diffusion in 2-D hexagonal OMCs with similar mesopore size distribution, the pore packing defect is a dominant dynamic factor.

  12. Effect of heat treatment on pore structure in nanocrystalline NiO: A small angle neutron scattering study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Bahadur; D Sen; S Mazumder; S Ramanathan

    2008-11-01

    Nanocrystalline nickel oxide powders were calcined at 300, 600 and 900°C and pore structure evolution was followed by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Pore size distributions at two widely separated size ranges have been revealed. Shrinkage of larger-sized pore with reduction in polydispersity has been observed with increasing heat treatment temperature. The pore structures at various heat treatment temperatures do not scale. This has been attributed to the grain boundary diffusion leading to an asymmetric shrinkage of the pores.

  13. A Microfluidic Pore Network Approach to Investigate Water Transport in Fuel Cell Porous Transport Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Bazylak, A; Markicevic, B; Sinton, D; Djilali, N

    2008-01-01

    Pore network modelling has traditionally been used to study displacement processes in idealized porous media related to geological flows, with applications ranging from groundwater hydrology to enhanced oil recovery. Very recently, pore network modelling has been applied to model the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Discrete pore network models have the potential to elucidate transport phenomena in the GDL with high computational efficiency, in contrast to continuum or molecular dynamics modelling that require extensive computational resources. However, the challenge in studying the GDL with pore network modelling lies in defining the network parameters that accurately describe the porous media as well as the conditions of fluid invasion that represent realistic transport processes. In this work, we discuss the first stage of developing and validating a GDL-representative pore network model. We begin with a two-dimensional pore network model with a single mobile pha...

  14. Pore-size distribution and compressibility of coarse sandy subsoil with added biochar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, C. T.; Hansen, E.; Larsen, H. H.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable agricultural production on coarse sandy soil is constrained by the restricted growth of roots, and poor water and nutrient retention. Amending the soil with biochar can reduce these problems, but the processes involved are not known in detail. We investigated in the laboratory...... the effects of two fine-grained gasification biochars made of straw (LTST) and other materials (LTSN) and of one fast pyrolysis straw biochar (FPST) on pore-size distribution and soil compressibility when added to coarse sandy subsoil. Water retention and therefore pore-size distribution were affected...... systematically. All biochars converted drainable pore space with pore diameters in the range 60–300 µm into water-retaining pores of size 0.2–60 µm, which was taken as an estimate of available water capacity (AWC). Effects were linear over the whole range of biochar (0–4% by mass). The effect of LTST and LTSN...

  15. Modification of the Kozeny-Carman equation to quantify formation damage by fines in clean unconsolidated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Eva D.

    Accurately estimating formation permeability as a function of porosity, grain size, and the quantity and structure of fines is important for increasing hydrocarbon extraction from rock formations. Accurate formation permeability estimation can provide insight into the factors that lead to formation damage due to fines deposition. The Kozeny-Carman equation can be used to estimate the permeability of unconsolidated media as a function of porosity and grain size, but does not account for the structure of fines. In this study, I show how incorporating a dimensionless bulk factor into the Kozeny-Carman equation can be used to quantify the permeability reduction resulting from deposition of fines in the pore space. I consider several experimental studies from the literature that use a variety of porosities, fluids, fines (differentiated by diameter and type), porous media, and flow velocities. Results indicate that for all of the experiments analyzed, when other variables are held constant, experiments conducted at higher flow velocity result in less plugging. The bulk value was adjusted in the Kozeny-Carman equation to obtain a line of best fit. The root mean square method was used to obtain the best bulk factor value that calculated a curve which had the best match for the experimental data. Fitted values of the bulk factor were then correlated with the Peclet number to investigate how the structure of fines in the pore space, quantified by the bulk factor, depends on the characteristics of the porous media, the depositing colloids, and the flow velocity. For a particular experimental set, at a lower Peclet Number, higher bulk factors are observed, when diffusive transport dominates, which I speculate results from the presence of more dendritic deposits. At higher Peclet Numbers, lower bulk factors are observed, when advective transport dominates, which I speculate results from deposits that are more compact. By understanding the flow velocity dependence of

  16. Study on pore characteristics and microstructure of sandstones with different grain sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huigui; Li, Huamin; Gao, Baobin; Wang, Wen; Liu, Chuang

    2017-01-01

    The grain sizes have a pronounced influence on the pore characteristics and microstructure of sandstone. This work examined the pore structure and characteristics of three kinds of sandstones with different grain sizes using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods and analyzed their grain size distributions, pore size distributions, T2-distributions, and porosity variations. The experimental results showed that sandstones with different grain sizes have significant differences in the microstructures grain size distribution, pore size distribution, T2-distribution, and porosity variation. The results show that coarse, medium and fine sandstones have two peaks in T2-distributions, mean grain size of 398.5, 145.1 and 25.1 μm, respectively, mean pore size of 46.3, 25.9, and 8.4 μm, respectively, porosity of 7.52%, 5.88% and 1.55%, respectively, indicating that both coarse and medium sandstones contain big pores, while fine sandstone contains small pores. This study is of significance for understanding of water migration characteristics in aquifers and gas in coal seams after the working face exploitation.

  17. Fine sand in motion: the influence of interstitial air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homan, T.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Sand is a granular material, and therefore it consists of individual grains arranged in a packing. The pores in-between the grains are usually filled with a fluid, in this case air. Now, is this interstitial air able to influence the behavior of the sand bed as a whole? When a ball impacts on fine,

  18. Computational simulations of asymmetric fluxes of large molecules through gap junction channel pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Abhijit; Appadurai, Daniel A; Akoum, Nazem W; Sachse, Frank B; Moreno, Alonso P

    2017-01-07

    Gap junction channels are formed out of connexin isoforms, which enable molecule and ion selective diffusion amongst neighboring cells. HeLa cells expressing distinct connexins (Cx) allow the formation of heterotypic channels, where we observed a molecular charge-independent preferential flux of large fluorescent molecules in the Cx45 to Cx43 direction. We hypothesize that the pore's shape is a significant factor along-side charge and transjunctional voltages for this asymmetric flux. To test this hypothesis, we developed a 3D computational model simulating Brownian diffusion of large molecules in a gap junction channel pore. The basic pore contour was derived from x-ray crystallographic structures of Cx43 and Cx26 and approximated using basic geometric shapes. Lucifer yellow dye molecules and cesium counter-ions were modeled as spheres using their respective Stokes radii. Our simulation results from simple diffusion and constant concentration gradient experiments showed that only charged particles yield asymmetric fluxes in heterotypic pores. While increasing the inner mouth size resulted in a near-quadratic rise in flux, the rise was asymptotic for outer mouth radii increase. Probability maps and average force per particle per pore section explain the asymmetric flux with variation in pore shape. Furthermore, the simulation results are in agreement with our in vitro experimental results with HeLa cells in Cx43-Cx45 heterotypic configurations. The presence of asymmetric fluxes can help us to understand effects of the molecular structure of the pore and predict potential differences in vivo.

  19. Quantifying uncertainty and computational complexity for pore-scale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.; Yuan, Z.; Wang, P.; Yang, X.; Zhenyan, L.

    2016-12-01

    Pore-scale simulation is an essential tool to understand the complex physical process in many environmental problems, from multi-phase flow in the subsurface to fuel cells. However, in practice, factors such as sample heterogeneity, data sparsity and in general, our insufficient knowledge of the underlying process, render many simulation parameters and hence the prediction results uncertain. Meanwhile, most pore-scale simulations (in particular, direct numerical simulation) incur high computational cost due to finely-resolved spatio-temporal scales, which further limits our data/samples collection. To address those challenges, we propose a novel framework based on the general polynomial chaos (gPC) and build a surrogate model representing the essential features of the underlying system. To be specific, we apply the novel framework to analyze the uncertainties of the system behavior based on a series of pore-scale numerical experiments, such as flow and reactive transport in 2D heterogeneous porous media and 3D packed beds. Comparing with recent pore-scale uncertainty quantification studies using Monte Carlo techniques, our new framework requires fewer number of realizations and hence considerably reduce the overall computational cost, while maintaining the desired accuracy.

  20. Helium measurements of pore-fluids obtained from SAFOD drillcore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S.; Stute, M.; Torgersen, T.; Winckler, G.; Kennedy, B.M.

    2010-04-15

    {sup 4}He accumulated in fluids is a well established geochemical tracer used to study crustal fluid dynamics. Direct fluid samples are not always collectable; therefore, a method to extract rare gases from matrix fluids of whole rocks by diffusion has been adapted. Helium was measured on matrix fluids extracted from sandstones and mudstones recovered during the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling in California, USA. Samples were typically collected as subcores or from drillcore fragments. Helium concentration and isotope ratios were measured 4-6 times on each sample, and indicate a bulk {sup 4}He diffusion coefficient of 3.5 {+-} 1.3 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} at 21 C, compared to previously published diffusion coefficients of 1.2 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (21 C) to 3.0 x 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (150 C) in the sands and clays. Correcting the diffusion coefficient of {sup 4}He{sub water} for matrix porosity ({approx}3%) and tortuosity ({approx}6-13) produces effective diffusion coefficients of 1 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (21 C) and 1 x 10{sup -7} (120 C), effectively isolating pore fluid {sup 4}He from the {sup 4}He contained in the rock matrix. Model calculations indicate that <6% of helium initially dissolved in pore fluids was lost during the sampling process. Complete and quantitative extraction of the pore fluids provide minimum in situ porosity values for sandstones 2.8 {+-} 0.4% (SD, n=4) and mudstones 3.1 {+-} 0.8% (SD, n=4).

  1. Phase transformation and diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Kale, G B; Dey, G K

    2008-01-01

    Given that the basic purpose of all research in materials science and technology is to tailor the properties of materials to suit specific applications, phase transformations are the natural key to the fine-tuning of the structural, mechanical and corrosion properties. A basic understanding of the kinetics and mechanisms of phase transformation is therefore of vital importance. Apart from a few cases involving crystallographic martensitic transformations, all phase transformations are mediated by diffusion. Thus, proper control and understanding of the process of diffusion during nucleation, g

  2. Resonant diffusion of normal alkanes in zeolites: Effect of the zeolite structure and alkane molecule vibrations

    CERN Document Server

    Tsekov, R

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion of normal alkanes in one-dimensional zeolites is theoretically studied on the basis of the stochastic equation formalism. The calculated diffusion coefficient accounts for the vibrations of the diffusing molecule and zeolite framework, molecule-zeolite interaction, and specific structure of the zeolite. It is shown that when the interaction potential is predominantly determined by the zeolite pore structure, the diffusion coefficient varies periodically with the number of carbon atoms of the alkane molecule, a phenomenon called resonant diffusion. A criterion for observable resonance is obtained from the balance between the interaction potentials of the molecule due to the atomic and pore structures of the zeolite. It shows that the diffusion is not resonant in zeolites without pore structure, such as ZSM-12. Moreover, even in zeolites with developed pore structure no resonant dependence of the diffusion constant can be detected if the pore structure energy barriers are not at least three times high...

  3. Analysis of Erbium and Vanadium Diffusion in Porous Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina G. Mynbaeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental data on diffusion of erbium and vanadium in porous and nonporous silicon carbide at 1700 and 2200°C have been used for modelling diffusion in porous SiC. It is shown that the consideration of pore structure modification under annealing via vacancy redistribution allows for satisfactory description of dopant diffusion. As expected, important contribution to the diffusion in the porous medium is found to be made by the walls of the pores: in SiC, the vacancy surface diffusion coefficient on the walls appears to exceed that in the bulk of the material by an order of magnitude. When thermal treatment transforms pore channels into closed voids, pathways for accelerated diffusion cease to exist and diffusion rates in porous and nonporous SiC become similar.

  4. A random-walk model for pore pressure accumulation in marine soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Cheng, Niang-Sheng

    1999-01-01

    waves. The model will apparently enable the researcher to handle complex geometries (such as a pipeline buried in a soil) relatively easily. Early results with regard to the latter example, namely the buildup of pore pressure around a buried pipeline subject to a progressive wave, are encouraging.......A numerical random-walk model has been developed for the pore-water pressure. The model is based on the analogy between the variation of the pore pressure and the diffusion process of any passive quantity such as concentration. The pore pressure in the former process is analogous...... to the concentration in the latter. In the simulation, particles are released in the soil, and followed as they travel through the statistical field variables. The model has been validated (1) against the Terzaghi consolidation process, and (2) against the process where the pore pressure builds up under progressive...

  5. Pore-scale simulation of calcium carbonate precipitation and dissolution under highly supersaturated conditions in a microfludic pore network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.; Valocchi, A. J.; Werth, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Dissolved CO2 during geological CO2 storage may react with minerals in fractured rocks or confined aquifers and cause mineral precipitation. The overall rate of reaction can be affected by coupled processes among hydrodynamics, transport, and reactions at pore-scale. Pore-scale models of coupled fluid flow, reactive transport, and CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution are applied to account for transient experimental results of CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution under highly supersaturated conditions in a microfluidic pore network (i.e., micromodel). Pore-scale experiments in the micromodel are used as a basis for understanding coupled physics of systems perturbed by geological CO2 injection. In the micromodel, precipitation is induced by transverse mixing along the centerline in pore bodies. Overall, the pore-scale model qualitatively captured the governing physics of reactions such as precipitate morphology, precipitation rate, and maximum precipitation area in first few pore spaces. In particular, we found that proper estimation of the effective diffusion coefficient and the reactive surface area is necessary to adequately simulate precipitation and dissolution rates. As the model domain increases, the effect of flow patterns affected by precipitation on the overall reaction rate also increases. The model is also applied to account for the effect of different reaction rate laws on mineral precipitation and dissolution at pore-scale. Reaction rate laws tested include the linear rate law, nonlinear power law, and newly-developed rate law based on in-situ measurements at nano scale in the literature. Progress on novel methods for upscaling pore-scale models for reactive transport are discussed, and are being applied to mineral precipitation patterns observed in natural analogues. H.Y. and T. D. were supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of

  6. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.; Kim, S.; Hwang, D.; Chen, C.C.; Chiou, Z.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of our research was to obtain fundamental information regarding the functional dependence of the diffusion coefficient of coal molecules on the ratio of molecule to pore diameter. That is, the objective of our study was to examine the effect of molecule size and configuration on hindered diffusion of coal macromolecules through as porous medium. To best accomplish this task, we circumvented the complexities of an actual porous catalyst by using a well defined porous matrix with uniform capillaric pores, i.e., a track-etched membrane. In this way, useful information was obtained regarding the relationship of molecular size and configuration on the diffusion rate of coal derived macromolecules through a pore structure with known geometry. Similar studies were performed using a pellet formed of porous alumina, to provide a link between the idealized membranes and the actual complex pore structure of real catalyst extrudates. The fundamental information from our study will be useful toward the tailoring of catalysts to minimize diffusional influences and thereby increase coal conversion and selectivity for desirable products. (VC)

  7. A pore scale study on turbulent combustion in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouybari, N. F.; Maerefat, M.; Nimvari, M. E.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents pore scale simulation of turbulent combustion of air/methane mixture in porous media to investigate the effects of multidimensionality and turbulence on the flame within the pores of porous media. In order to investigate combustion in the pores of porous medium, a simple but often used porous medium consisting of a staggered arrangement of square cylinders is considered in the present study. Results of turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent viscosity ratio, temperature, flame speed, convective heat transfer and thermal conductivity are presented and compared for laminar and turbulent simulations. It is shown that the turbulent kinetic energy increases from the inlet of burner, because of turbulence created by the solid matrix with a sudden jump or reduction at the flame front due to increase in temperature and velocity. Also, the pore scale simulation revealed that the laminarization of flow occurs after flame front in the combustion zone and turbulence effects are important mainly in the preheat zone. It is shown that turbulence enhances the diffusion processes in the preheat zone, but it is not enough to affect the maximum flame speed, temperature distribution and convective heat transfer in the porous burner. The dimensionless parameters associated with the Borghi-Peters diagram of turbulent combustion have been analyzed for the case of combustion in porous media and it is found that the combustion in the porous burner considered in the present study concerns the range of well stirred reactor very close to the laminar flame region.

  8. a Diffusivity Model for Gas Diffusion in Dry Porous Media Composed of Converging-Diverging Capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shifang; Wu, Tao; Deng, Yongju; Zheng, Qiusha; Zheng, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Gas diffusion in dry porous media has been a hot topic in several areas of technology for many years. In this paper, a diffusivity model for gas diffusion in dry porous media is developed based on fractal theory and Fick’s law, which incorporates the effects of converging-diverging pores and tortuous characteristics of capillaries as well as Knudsen diffusion. The effective gas diffusivity model is expressed as a function of the fluctuation amplitude of the capillary cross-section size variations, the porosity, the pore area fractal dimension and the tortuosity fractal dimension. The results show that the relative diffusivity decreases with the increase of the fluctuation amplitude and increases with the increase of pore area fractal dimension. To verify the validity of the present model, the relative diffusivity from the proposed fractal model is compared with the existing experimental data as well as two available models of Bruggeman and Shou. Our proposed diffusivity model with pore converging-diverging effect included is in good agreement with reported experimental data.

  9. SANS investigation on evolution of pore morphology for varying sintering time in porous ceria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Patra; S Ramanathan; D Sen; S Mazumder

    2004-08-01

    Precipitates of ceria were synthesized by homogeneous precipitation method using cerium nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine at 80°C. The precipitates were ground to fine particles of average size ∼0.7 m. Circular disks with 10 mm diameter, 2 and 3 mm thickness were prepared from the green compacts by sintering at 1300°C for three different sintering times. Evolution of the pore structures in these specimens with sintering time was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results show that the peak of the pore size distribution shifts towards the larger size with increasing sintering time although the extent of porosity decreases. This indicates that finer pores are eliminated from the system at a faster rate than the coarser ones as sintering proceeds and some of the finer pores coalesce to form bigger ones.

  10. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Adsorbed in a Slit Carbon Pore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Both the grand canonical Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation methods are used to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of carbon dioxide confined in a 1.86 nm slit carbon pore at 4 temperatures from subcritical (120 K) to supercritical (313 K) conditions. Layering transition, capillary condensation and adsorption hysteresis are found at 120 K. The microstructure of carbon dioxide fluid in the slit carbon pore is analyzed. The diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide parallel to the slit wall are significantly larger than those normal to the slit wall.

  11. Pore-space distribution and transport properties of an andesitic intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamtveit, Bjørn; Krotkiewski, Marcin; Kobchenko, Maya; Renard, Francois; Angheluta, Luiza

    2014-08-01

    The pore structure of magmatic rocks records processes operating during magma solidification and cooling. It has first order effects on the petrophysical properties of the magmatic rocks, and also influences mass transfer and mineral reactions during subsequent metamorphism or weathering. Here, the pore space characteristics of an andesitic sill intrusion were determined by multiscale resolution computed X-ray microtomography (μ-CT), and the 3D structure was used for transport modeling. Unaltered andesite has a power law distribution of pore volumes over a range of five orders of magnitude. The probability distribution function (PDF) scales with the inverse square of the pore volume (V), PDF∝V-2. This scaling behavior is attributed to the coalescence of pores at crystal-melt boundaries. Large pores are concentrated on the outer margins of amphibole and plagioclase phenocrystals. Incipient weathering of the andesite is associated with preferential growth of weathering products in the largest pores. This can be explained by a model in which diffusion of external components into the porous andesite is controlled by a random network of grain boundaries and/or microfractures. This network preferentially links the larger pores to the system boundaries and it is the major fluid transport pathway, confining incipient weathering into a small fraction of the rock volume only.

  12. Pore formation by Cry toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soberón, Mario; Pardo, Liliana; Muñóz-Garay, Carlos; Sánchez, Jorge; Gómez, Isabel; Porta, Helena; Bravo, Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacteria produce insecticidal Cry and Cyt proteins used in the biological control of different insect pests. In this review, we will focus on the 3d-Cry toxins that represent the biggest group of Cry proteins and also on Cyt toxins. The 3d-Cry toxins are pore-forming toxins that induce cell death by forming ionic pores into the membrane of the midgut epithelial cells in their target insect. The initial steps in the mode of action include ingestion of the protoxin, activation by midgut proteases to produce the toxin fragment and the interaction with the primary cadherin receptor. The interaction of the monomeric CrylA toxin with the cadherin receptor promotes an extra proteolytic cleavage, where helix alpha-1 of domain I is eliminated and the toxin oligomerization is induced, forming a structure of 250 kDa. The oligomeric structure binds to a secondary receptor, aminopeptidase N or alkaline phosphatase. The secondary receptor drives the toxin into detergent resistant membrane microdomains formingpores that cause osmotic shock, burst of the midgut cells and insect death. Regarding to Cyt toxins, these proteins have a synergistic effect on the toxicity of some Cry toxins. Cyt proteins are also proteolytic activated in the midgut lumen of their target, they bind to some phospholipids present in the mosquito midgut cells. The proposed mechanism of synergism between Cry and Cyt toxins is that Cyt1Aa function as a receptor for Cry toxins. The Cyt1A inserts into midgut epithelium membrane and exposes protein regions that are recognized by Cry11Aa. It was demonstrated that this interaction facilitates the oligomerization of Cry11Aa and also its pore formation activity.

  13. Pore scale mechanisms for enhanced vapor transport through partially saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahraeeni, Ebrahim; Or, Dani

    2012-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies of vapor transport through porous media question the existence and significance of vapor transport enhancement mechanisms postulated by Philip and de Vries. Several enhancement mechanisms were proposed to rectify shortcomings of continuum models and to reconcile discrepancies between predicted and observed vapor fluxes. The absence of direct experimental and theoretical confirmation of these commonly invoked pore scale mechanisms prompted alternate explanations considering the (often neglected) role of transport via capillary connected pathways. The objective of this work was to quantify the specific roles of liquid bridges and of local thermal and capillary gradients on vapor transport at the pore scale. We considered a mechanistic pore scale model of evaporation and condensation dynamics as a building block for quantifying vapor diffusion through partially saturated porous media. Simulations of vapor diffusion in the presence of isolated liquid phase bridges reveal that the so-called enhanced vapor diffusion under isothermal conditions reflects a reduced gaseous diffusion path length. The presence of a thermal gradient may augment or hinder this effect depending on the direction of thermal relative to capillary gradients. As liquid phase saturation increases, capillary transport becomes significant and pore scale vapor enhancement is limited to low water contents as postulated by Philip and deVries. Calculations show that with assistance of a mild thermal gradient water vapor flux could be doubled relative to diffusion of an inert gas through the same system.

  14. Study on conglutination model for fine moist material during screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈惜明; 邓凡政; 赵跃民; 朱红; 高庆宇

    2002-01-01

    All coal preparation in which fine coal is handled depends to some extent on the wettability of coal surface by water. The content of external water in fine moist material plays significant role on screening. This article probed into the causations why fine moist materials adhere to the screen deck on common vibrator in the process of screening. Although the wetting that results from interactions between the coal surface and water molecules that are determined by the composition of coal matrix (interrelated with coal rank) and heterogeneous constituents such as oxygen function groups, mineral impurities and pores have something to do with adhering, we found that the effect of wettability is not the key causation to agglomeration, in other words, water bridges among particles are the key causation to the fine moist materials adhesion. This paper also shows how the capillary adhesive forces forms and how to calculate and measure these forces.

  15. Fine Arts Database (FAD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — The Fine Arts Database records information on federally owned art in the control of the GSA; this includes the location, current condition and information on artists.

  16. Fine Needle Aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FNA), also called fine needle biopsy, is a type of biopsy that can be used to diagnose many types ... in which case another FNA or a different type of biopsy procedure may needed. Because the needle is so ...

  17. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  18. Image-based relative permeability upscaling from the pore scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi Apourvari, Saeid; Arns, Christoph H.

    2016-09-01

    High resolution images acquired from X-ray μ-CT are able to map the internal structure of porous media on which multiphase flow properties can be computed. While the resolution of a few micrometers may be sufficient for capturing the pore space of many sandstones, most carbonates exhibit a large amount of microporosity; pores which are below the image resolution and are not resolved at specific resolution. Neglecting the effect of micropores on fluid flow and transport properties of these rocks can cause erroneous results in particular at partial saturations. Current image-based pore scale models typically only consider macropores for simulating fluid flow. In this paper, we quantify the effect of microporosity on the effective permeability of the wetting phase for heterogeneous model structures with varying amount of micro-to-macro porosity. A multi-scale numerical approach is proposed to couple an average effect of micropores with an explicit representation of macropores. The Brinkman equation is solved using a lattice Boltzmann formulation to facilitate the coupling of Darcy and Stokes equations in micropores and macropores, respectively. The results show good agreement between the fine scale solution and the results of the upscaled models in which microporous regions are homogenised. The paper analyses in particular the choice of the momentum sink parameter at low wetting phase saturations. It is shown that this parameter can be found using either a flux-based calculation of permeability of microporous regions or chosen purely on the basis of the effective permeability of these regions.

  19. Transport of reservoir fines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    Modeling transport of reservoir fines is of great importance for evaluating the damage of production wells and infectivity decline. The conventional methodology accounts for neither the formation heterogeneity around the wells nor the reservoir fines’ heterogeneity. We have developed an integral...... dispersion equation in modeling the transport and the deposition of reservoir fines. It successfully predicts the unsymmetrical concentration profiles and the hyperexponential deposition in experiments....

  20. USING A NEW FINITE SLIT PORE MODEL FOR NLDFT ANALYSIS OF CARBON PORE STRUCTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagiello, Jacek [Micromeritics Instrument Corporation; Kenvin, Jeffrey [Micromeritics Instrument Corporation; Oliver, James P [Micromeritics Instrument Corporation; Lupini, Andrew R [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we present a model for analyzing activated carbon micropore structures based on graphene sheet walls of finite thickness and extent. This is a two-dimensional modification of the widely used infinite slit pore model that assumes graphite-like infinitely extended pore walls. The proposed model has two versions: (1) a strip pore constructed with graphene strip walls that have finite length L in the x direction and are infinite in the y direction. Strip pores are open on both sides in the x direction. (2) A channel pore is a strip pore partially closed along one edge by a perpendicularly oriented graphene wall. This more realistic model allows pore termination via both physical pore entrances and pore blockage. The model consequently introduces heterogeneity of the adsorption potential that is reduced near pore entrances and enhanced near corners of pore walls. These energetically heterogeneous structures fill with adsorbate more gradually than homogeneous pores of the same width. As a result, the calculated adsorption isotherms are smoother and less steep for the finite versus the infinite pore model. In the application of this model for carbon characterization it is necessary to make an assumption about the pore length. In this work we made this assumption based on the high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) results. We find the agreement between the experiment and the model significantly better for the finite than for the infinite pore model.

  1. Gas and surface diffusion in modified γ-alumina systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhlhorn, R.J.R.; Keizer, K.; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    The transport of pure gases through a microporous membrane is described. The alumina-based membrane (pores 2.5-4 nm) is suitable for Knudsen diffusion separation. To improve the separation factor, interaction with and mobility on the pore wall of one of the gases of a mixture is necessary. To introd

  2. The mineral dissolution rate conundrum: Insights from reactive transport modeling of U isotopes and pore fluid chemistry in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Kate; Steefel, Carl I.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Viani, Brian E.

    2006-01-01

    Pore water chemistry and 234U/ 238U activity ratios from fine-grained sediment cored by the Ocean Drilling Project at Site 984 in the North Atlantic were used as constraints in modeling in situ rates of plagioclase dissolution with the multicomponent reactive transport code Crunch. The reactive transport model includes a solid-solution formulation to enable the use of the 234U/ 238U activity ratios in the solid and fluid as a tracer of mineral dissolution. The isotopic profiles are combined with profiles of the major element chemistry (especially alkalinity and calcium) to determine whether the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field dissolution rates still exists when a mechanistic reactive transport model is used to interpret rates in a natural system. A suite of reactions, including sulfate reduction and methane production, anaerobic methane oxidation, CaCO 3 precipitation, dissolution of plagioclase, and precipitation of secondary clay minerals, along with diffusive transport and fluid and solid burial, control the pore fluid chemistry in Site 984 sediments. The surface area of plagioclase in intimate contact with the pore fluid is estimated to be 6.9 m 2/g based on both grain geometry and on the depletion of 234U/ 238U in the sediment via α-recoil loss. Various rate laws for plagioclase dissolution are considered in the modeling, including those based on (1) a linear transition state theory (TST) model, (2) a nonlinear dependence on the undersaturation of the pore water with respect to plagioclase, and (3) the effect of inhibition by dissolved aluminum. The major element and isotopic methods predict similar dissolution rate constants if additional lowering of the pore water 234U/ 238U activity ratio is attributed to isotopic exchange via recrystallization of marine calcite, which makes up about 10-20% of the Site 984 sediment. The calculated dissolution rate for plagioclase corresponds to a rate constant that is about 10 2 to 10 5 times smaller than

  3. Adding diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy capability to extended x-ray-absorption fine structure in a new cell to study solid catalysts in combination with a modulation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, Gian Luca; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Marchionni, Valentina; Quaroni, Luca; Ferri, Davide

    2014-07-01

    We describe a novel cell used to combine in situ transmission X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) in a single experiment. The novelty of the cell design compared to current examples is that both radiations are passed through an X-ray and IR transparent window in direct contact with the sample. This innovative geometry also offers a wide surface for IR collection. In order to avoid interference from the crystalline IR transparent materials (e.g., CaF2, MgF2, diamond) a 500 μm carbon filled hole is laser drilled in the center of a CaF2 window. The cell is designed to represent a plug flow reactor, has reduced dead volume in order to allow for fast exchange of gases and is therefore suitable for experiments under fast transients, e.g., according to the concentration modulation approach. High quality time-resolved XAS and DRIFTS data of a 2 wt.% Pt/Al2O3 catalyst are obtained in concentration modulation experiments where CO (or H2) pulses are alternated to O2 pulses at 150 °C. We show that additional information can be obtained on the Pt redox dynamic under working conditions thanks to the improved sensitivity given by the modulation approach followed by Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD) analysis. It is anticipated that the design of the novel cell is likely suitable for a number of other in situ spectroscopic and diffraction methods.

  4. Adding diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy capability to extended x-ray-absorption fine structure in a new cell to study solid catalysts in combination with a modulation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarello, Gian Luca [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via C. Golgi 19, I-20133 Milano, Italy and Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lab. for Solid State Chemistry and Catalysis, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Nachtegaal, Maarten; Marchionni, Valentina; Quaroni, Luca; Ferri, Davide, E-mail: davide.ferri@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    We describe a novel cell used to combine in situ transmission X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) in a single experiment. The novelty of the cell design compared to current examples is that both radiations are passed through an X-ray and IR transparent window in direct contact with the sample. This innovative geometry also offers a wide surface for IR collection. In order to avoid interference from the crystalline IR transparent materials (e.g., CaF{sub 2}, MgF{sub 2}, diamond) a 500 μm carbon filled hole is laser drilled in the center of a CaF{sub 2} window. The cell is designed to represent a plug flow reactor, has reduced dead volume in order to allow for fast exchange of gases and is therefore suitable for experiments under fast transients, e.g., according to the concentration modulation approach. High quality time-resolved XAS and DRIFTS data of a 2 wt.% Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst are obtained in concentration modulation experiments where CO (or H{sub 2}) pulses are alternated to O{sub 2} pulses at 150 °C. We show that additional information can be obtained on the Pt redox dynamic under working conditions thanks to the improved sensitivity given by the modulation approach followed by Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD) analysis. It is anticipated that the design of the novel cell is likely suitable for a number of other in situ spectroscopic and diffraction methods.

  5. Pore-scale analysis on the effects of compound-specific dilution on transient transport and solute breakthrough

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolle, Massimo; Kitanidis, Peter

    Compound-specific diffusivities significantly impact solute transport and mixing at different scales. Although diffusive processes occur at the small pore scale, their effects propagate and remain important at larger macroscopic scales [1]. In this pore-scale modeling study in saturated porous...... media we show that compound-specific effects are important not only at steady-state and for the lateral displacement of solutes with different diffusivities but also for transient transport and solute breakthrough [2]. We performed flow and transport simulations in two-dimensional pore-scale domains...... significant effects of aqueous diffusion on solute breakthrough curves. However, the magnitude of such effects can be masked by the flux-averaging approach used to measure solute breakthrough and can hinder the correct interpretation of the true dilution of different solutes. We propose, as a metric of mixing...

  6. Diffusion MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  7. Microlens arrays with integrated pores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yang

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Microlenses are important optical components that image, detect, and couple light. But most synthetic microlenses have fixed position and shape once they are fabricated, so their possible range of tunability and complexity is rather limited. By comparison, biology provides many varied, new paradigms for the development of adaptive optical networks. Here, we discuss inspirational examples of biological lenses and their synthetic analogs. We focus on the fabrication and characterization of biomimetic microlens arrays with integrated pores, whose appearance and function are similar to highly efficient optical elements formed by brittlestars. The complex design can be created by three-beam interference lithography. The synthetic lens has strong focusing ability for use as an adjustable lithographic mask and a tunable optical device coupled with the microfluidic system. Replacing rigid microlenses with soft hydrogels provides a way of changing the lens geometry and refractive index continuously in response to external stimuli, resulting in intelligent, multifunctional, tunable optics.

  8. Atomic Structure of Graphene Subnanometer Pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Alex W; Lee, Gun-Do; He, Kuang; Gong, Chuncheng; Chen, Qu; Yoon, Euijoon; Kirkland, Angus I; Warner, Jamie H

    2015-12-22

    The atomic structure of subnanometer pores in graphene, of interest due to graphene's potential as a desalination and gas filtration membrane, is demonstrated by atomic resolution aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy. High temperatures of 500 °C and over are used to prevent self-healing of the pores, permitting the successful imaging of open pore geometries consisting of between -4 to -13 atoms, all exhibiting subnanometer diameters. Picometer resolution bond length measurements are used to confirm reconstruction of five-membered ring projections that often decorate the pore perimeter, knowledge which is used to explore the viability of completely self-passivated subnanometer pore structures; bonding configurations where the pore would not require external passivation by, for example, hydrogen to be chemically inert.

  9. Capillary Phase-Transition and Self-Diffusion of Ethylene in the Slit Carbon Pores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘涛; 刘洪来; 袁渭康

    2004-01-01

    The grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC), the canonical Monte Carlo by using equal probability perturbation, and the molecular dynamics (MD) methods were used to study the capillary phase-transition (capillary condensation and evaporation) and self-diffusion for a simple Lennard-Jones model of ethylene confined in slit carbon pores of 2.109 nm at temperatures between 141.26 K and 201.80 K. The critical point of capillary phase-transition was extrapolated by the critical power law and the law of rectilinear diameter from the capillary phase-transition data in the near critical region. The effects of temperature and fluid density on the parallel self-diffusion coefficients of ethylene molecules confined in the slit carbon pores were examined. The results showed that the parallel selfdiffusion coefficients in the capillary phase transition area strongly depended on the fluids local densities in the slit carbon pores.

  10. Deposition of gold and silver on porous silicon and inside the pores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nativ-Roth, Einat [Ilse Katz Institute of Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Be' er Sheva 84105 (Israel); Rechav, Katya [Department of Chemical Research Support, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Porat, Ze' ev, E-mail: poratze@post.bgu.ac.il [Division of Chemistry, Nuclear Research Center–Negev, Be' er Sheva 84190 (Israel); Institutes of Applied research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Be' er Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2016-03-31

    Silver and gold were spontaneously deposited on porous silicon (PSi) by immersion-plating. Each metal formed crystallites of typical shapes on top of the PSi layer. Deposition of these metals inside the pores could be achieved by performing the immersion-plating in an ultrasonic bath. Top view and cross-section scanning electron microscope images show slight penetration of silver into the pores but massive filling of gold, to depth of several hundreds of nanometers. - Highlights: • Spontaneous reduction of Ag and Au ions occurs on porous silicon (immersion plating). • Such deposition inside the pores is prevented by entrapped hydrogen bubbles. • Immersion plating under sonication releases the gas and enhances ions diffusion. • Silver and gold were deposited within the pores by ultrasonic-aided deposition.

  11. Pore structure characteristics after two years biochar application to a sandy loam field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhencai; Arthur, Emmanuel; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

    2015-01-01

    Soil pore structure comprises the size and shape of soil pores and has a major impact on water retention and gas movement. The porous nature of biochar suggests that its application to soil can potentially alter soil pore structure characteristics, and the purpose of this study was to evaluate...... the effects of birch wood biochar (20, 40, and 100 Mg ha−1) applied to a sandy loam on soil total porosity and pore structure indices. Bulk and intact soil samples were collected for physicochemical analyses and water retention and gas diffusivity measurements between pF 1.0 and pF 3.0. Biochar application...... reduced bulk density and increased total porosity especially for soil with 100 Mg ha−1 biochar (16% and 14% reduction in bulk density and total porosity, respectively). Biochar application of more than 20 Mg ha−1 enhanced water retention, and the trend increased with increasing biochar application rate...

  12. Generalized Fick Jacobs Approach for describing Adsorption Desorption Kinetics in Irregular Pores under Non Equilibrium Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Ledesma-Durán, Aldo; Santamaría-Holek, Iván

    2016-01-01

    We present a study exploring the range of applicability of a generalized Fick Jacobs equation in the case when diffusive mass transport of a fluid along a pore includes chemical reactions in the bulk and pore surface. The study contemplates nonequilibrium boundary conditions and makes emphasis on the comparison between the predictions coming from the projected Fick Jacobs description and the corresponding predictions of the original two dimensional mass balance equation, establishing a simple cuantitative criterion of validity of the projected description. For the adsorption desorption process, we demonstrate that the length and the local curvature of the pore are the relevant geometric quantities for its description, allowing for giving very precise predictions of the mass concentration along the pore. Some schematic cases involving adsorption and chemical reaction are used to quantify with detail the concentration profiles in transient and stationary states involving equilibrium and nonequilibrium situation...

  13. Assessment of nitrate transport parameters using the advection-diffusion cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljazzar, Taiseer; Al-Qinna, Mohammed

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to better understand nitrate transport in the soil system in a part of the state of North Rhine-Westphalia, in Germany, and to aid in the development of groundwater protection plans. An advection-diffusion (AD) cell was used in a miscible displacement experiment setup to characterize nitrate transport in 12 different soil samples from the study area. The three nitrate sorption isotherms were tested to define the exact nitrate interaction with the soil matrix. Soils varied in their properties which in its turn explain the variations in nitrate transport rates. Soil texture and organic matter content showed to have the most important effect on nitrate recovery and retardation. The miscible displacement experiment indicated a decrease in retardation by increasing sand fraction, and an increase in retardation by increasing soil organic matter content. Soil samples with high sand fractions (up to 94 %) exhibited low nitrate sorption capacity of less than 10 %, while soils with high organic matter content showed higher sorption of about 30 %. Based on parameterization for nitrate transport equation, the pore water velocity for both sandy and loamy soils were significantly different (P nitrate transport in soils associated with high organic matter was due to fine pore pathways clogged by fine organic colloids. It is expected that the existing micro-phobicity increased the nitrate recovery from 9 to 32 % resulting in maximum diffusion rates of about 3.5 × 10(-5) m/s(2) in sandy soils (sample number CS-04) and about 1.4 × 10(-7) m/s(2) in silt loam soils (sample number FS-02).

  14. Which fine-tuning arguments are fine?

    CERN Document Server

    Grinbaum, Alexei

    2009-01-01

    The argument from naturalness is widely employed in contemporary quantum field theory. Essentially a formalized aesthetic criterion, it received a meaning in the debate on the Higgs mechanism, which goes beyond aesthetics. We follow the history of technical definitions of fine tuning at the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking. It is argued that they give rise to a special interpretation of probability, which we call Gedankenfrequency. By extension of its original meaning, the argument from naturalness is used to compare different models beyond the Standard Model. We show that in this case naturalness cannot be defined objectively. Rather, it functions as socio-historical heuristics in particle physics and it contributes to the advent of a probabilistic version of Popper's falsificationism.

  15. Pore Water Pressure Response of a Soil Subjected to Traffic Loading under Saturated and Unsaturated Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Carlos

    This study presents the results of one of the first attempts to characterize the pore water pressure response of soils subjected to traffic loading under saturated and unsaturated conditions. It is widely known that pore water pressure develops within the soil pores as a response to external stimulus. Also, it has been recognized that the development of pores water pressure contributes to the degradation of the resilient modulus of unbound materials. In the last decades several efforts have been directed to model the effect of air and water pore pressures upon resilient modulus. However, none of them consider dynamic variations in pressures but rather are based on equilibrium values corresponding to initial conditions. The measurement of this response is challenging especially in soils under unsaturated conditions. Models are needed not only to overcome testing limitations but also to understand the dynamic behavior of internal pore pressures that under critical conditions may even lead to failure. A testing program was conducted to characterize the pore water pressure response of a low plasticity fine clayey sand subjected to dynamic loading. The bulk stress, initial matric suction and dwelling time parameters were controlled and their effects were analyzed. The results were used to attempt models capable of predicting the accumulated excess pore pressure at any given time during the traffic loading and unloading phases. Important findings regarding the influence of the controlled variables challenge common beliefs. The accumulated excess pore water pressure was found to be higher for unsaturated soil specimens than for saturated soil specimens. The maximum pore water pressure always increased when the high bulk stress level was applied. Higher dwelling time was found to decelerate the accumulation of pore water pressure. In addition, it was found that the higher the dwelling time, the lower the maximum pore water pressure. It was concluded that upon further

  16. Water diffusion through compacted clays analyzed by neutron scattering and tracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Sanchez, F

    2007-11-15

    Clay minerals are aluminium phyllosilicates, mostly products of the chemical alteration and mechanical breakdown of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Their physical and chemical properties can be directly related to their layered, fine-grained (large surface area) structure. These properties such as large water retention, low hydraulic conductivity, heat resistance and ionic exchange capacities, make clays ideal for many different applications, e.g. as sealing material for the underground disposal of radioactive waste. The long-term disposal of radioactive waste in an underground geological repository is based on a multibarrier concept. In the barrier of highly compacted clay, water is intercalated and confined between the clay layers. The narrow pores are responsible that under natural hydraulic gradients, molecular diffusion through water is the dominant transport mechanism for released radionuclides. The properties of water at the water-clay interface differ from that of bulk water. Therefore, a good and deep understanding of the water structure and dynamics in compacted clay systems is fundamental. This knowledge is the base for the progressing research about transport of pollutants through the compacted clays and argillaceous rock of radioactive waste barriers. This study focusses on four different types of pure clays, two of them charged, namely montmorillonite and illite (both in a Na and Ca form), and two uncharged, namely kaolinite and pyrophyllite. Their structural differences result in a significantly different behaviour in contact with water. In case of montmorillonite, water is located in between particles and in the interlayer space. In illite, water is found only in between particles, because the interlayer surfaces are tightly linked by potassium cations. The layers of kaolinite and pyrophyllite are uncharged and, consequently, water is located only in between particles. The clay powders were compacted to reach a high bulk dry density of about 1.9 g

  17. Different size biomolecules anchoring on porous silicon surface: fluorescence and reflectivity pores infiltration comparative studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovannozzi, Andrea M.; Rossi, Andrea M. [National Institute for Metrological Research, Thermodynamic Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Renacco, Chiara; Farano, Alessandro [Ribes Ricecrhe Srl, Via Lavoratori Vittime del Col du Mont 24, 11100 Aosta (Italy); Derosas, Manuela [Biodiversity Srl, Via Corfu 71, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Enrico, Emanuele [National Institute for Metrological Research, Electromagnetism Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    The performance of porous silicon optical based biosensors strongly depends on material nanomorphology, on biomolecules distribution inside the pores and on the ability to link sensing species to the pore walls. In this paper we studied the immobilization of biomolecules with different size, such as antibody anti aflatoxin (anti Aflatox Ab, {proportional_to}150 KDa), malate dehydrogenase (MDH, {proportional_to}36KDa) and metallothionein (MT, {proportional_to}6KDa) at different concentrations on mesoporous silicon samples ({proportional_to}15 nm pores diameter). Fluorescence measurements using FITC- labeled biomolecules and refractive index analysis based on reflectivity spectra have been employed together to detect the amount of proteins bound to the surface and to evaluate their diffusion inside the pores. Here we suggest that these two techniques should be used together to have a better understanding of what happens at the porous silicon surface. In fact, when pores dimensions are not perfectly tuned to the protein size a higher fluorescence signal doesn't often correspond to a higher biomolecules distribution inside the pores. When a too much higher concentration of biomolecule is anchored on the surface, steric crowd effects and repulsive interactions probably take over and hinder pores infiltration, inducing a small or absent shift in the fringe pattern even if a higher fluorescence signal is registered. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Confined Water Determines Transport Properties of Guest Molecules in Narrow Pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Anh; Cole, David R; Weiß, R Gregor; Dzubiella, Joachim; Striolo, Alberto

    2016-08-23

    We computed the transport of methane through 1 nm wide slit-shaped pores carved out of solid substrates. Models for silica, magnesium oxide, and alumina were used as solid substrates. The pores were filled with water. The results show that the methane permeability through the hydrated pores is strongly dependent on the solid substrate. Detailed analysis of the simulated systems reveals that local properties of confined water, including its structure, and more importantly, evolution of solvation free energy and hydrogen bond structure are responsible for the pronounced differences observed. The simulations are extended to multicomponent systems representative of natural gas, containing methane, ethane, and H2S. The results show that all pores considered have high affinity for H2S, moderate affinity for methane, and low affinity for ethane. The H2S/methane transport selectivity through the hydrated alumina pore is comparable, or superior, to that reported for existing commercial membranes. A multiscale approach was then implemented to demonstrate that a Smoluchowski one-dimensional model is able to reproduce the molecular-level results for short pores when appropriate values for the local self-diffusion coefficients are used as input parameters. We propose that the model can be extended to predict methane transport through uniform hydrated pores of macroscopic length. When verified by experiments, our simulation results could have important implications in applications such as natural gas sweetening and predictions of methane migration through hydraulically fractured shale formations.

  19. Electrically tunable pore morphology in nanoporous gold thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tatiana S. Dorofeeva; Erkin Seker

    2015-01-01

    Nanoporous gold (np-Au) is an emerging nanostructured material that exhibits many desirable properties, including high electrical and thermal conductivity, high surface area-to-volume ratio, tunable pore morphology well-established surface-binding chemistry, and compatibility with microfabrication. These features make np-Au a popular material for use in fuel cells, optical and electrical biosensors, drug delivery vehicles, neural electrode coatings, and as a model system for nanoscale mechanics. In each of its many applications, np-Au morphology plays an essential role in the overall device operation. Therefore, precise morphological control is necessary to attain optimal device performance. Traditionally thermal treatment by furnaces and hot plates is used to obtain np-Au with self-similar but coarser morphologies. However, this approach lacks the ability to create different morphologies on a single substrate and requires high temperatures (〉 250 ℃) incompatible with most plastic substrates. Herein, we report electro-annealing as a novel method that permits control of the extent and location of pore coarsening on a single substrate in one fast treatment step. The electro-annealing entails much lower temperatures (〈 150 ℃) than traditional thermal treatment, putatively due to electrically assisted phenomena contributing to the thermally activated surface diffusion of gold atoms, responsible for coarsening. Overall, this approach is easily scaled to display multiple pore morphologies on a single chip, therefore enabling high-throughput screening of optimal nanostructures for specific applications.

  20. Hydrogeology and hydrodynamics of coral reef pore waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buddemeier, R.W.; Oberdorfer, J.A.

    1988-06-29

    A wide variety of forces can produce head gradients that drive the flow and advective mixing of internal coral reef pore waters. Oscillatory gradients that produce mixing result from wave and tide action. Sustained gradients result from wave and tide-induced setup and ponding, from currents impinging on the reef structure, from groundwater heads, and from density differenced (temperature or salinity gradients). These gradients and the permeabilities and porosities of reef sediments are such that most macropore environments are dominated by advection rather than diffusion. The various driving forces must be analyzed to determine the individual and combined magnitudes of their effects on a specific reef pore-water system. Pore-water movement controls sediment diagenesis, the exchange of nutrients between sediments and benthos, and coastal/island groundwater resources. Because of the complexity of forcing functions, their interactions with specific local reef environments, experimental studies require careful incorporation of these considerations into their design and interpretation. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A vacuum-operated pore-water extractor for estuarine and freshwater sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    A vacuum-operated pore-water extractor for estuarine and freshwater sediments was developed and constructed from a fused-glass air stone attached with aquarium airline tubing to a 30 or 60 cc polypropylene syringe. Pore water is extracted by inserting the air stone into the sediment and creating a vacuum by retracting and bracing the syringe plunger. A hand-operated vacuum pump attached to a filtration flask was also evaluated as an alternative vacuum source. The volume and time to extract pore water varies with the number of devices and the sediment particle size. Extraction time is longer for fine sediments than for sandy sediments. Four liters of sediment generally yield between 500 and 1,500 mL of pore water. The sediment that surrounds and accumulates on the air stone acts as a filter, and, except for the first few milliliters, the collected pore water is clear. Because there is no exposure to air or avenue for escape, volatile compounds andin situ characteristics are retained in the extracted pore water.

  2. Fine 5 lavastab Venemaal

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2013-01-01

    Tantsuteatru Fine 5 koreograafid Tiina Ollesk ja Rene Nõmmik toovad Jekaterinburgis välja lavastuse "... and Red", esitajaks Venemaa nimekas nüüdistantsutrupp Provintsialnõje Tantsõ. Lavastuses kõlab Taavo Remmeli kontrabassiimprovisatsioon "12.12.2006"

  3. A fine art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnabel, G.; Raaff, T. [Andritz AG (Austria)

    2006-07-15

    The paper describes a new dewatering system for coal fines which challenges established processes by using screenbowl centrifuge and hyperbaric filter combinations. Company acquisitions over the past three to four years enabled Andritz AG to develop a new system combining two technologies. The article describes the benefits of the combination process and explains the basic operation of these machines. 4 figs.

  4. The Fine Dutch Tradition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooimeijer, F.L.

    2012-01-01

    Publication of the exhibition and symposium on water adaptive urban planning and architecture in Bangkok. The Urban Fine Dutch Tradition is a dynamic tradition of making urban designs using the parameters of the natural system – incorperating in an efficient way the hydrological cycle, the soil and

  5. Imeilus Fine 5

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2017-01-01

    Vaba Lava teatrikeskuse laval esineb Fine 5 oma lavastusega "Imeilus". Tiina Ollesk ja Renee Nõmmik, tantsulavastuse autorid on koreograafid, õppejõud, lavastajad ja kogemustega tantsijad. 29. jaanuaril korraldavad Tiina Ollesk ja Renee Nõmmik Tallinna Ülikoolis kaasaegse liikumismõtlemise töötoa, mis on pühendatud lavastusele "Imeilus"

  6. Fine 5 lavastab Venemaal

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2013-01-01

    Tantsuteatru Fine 5 koreograafid Tiina Ollesk ja Rene Nõmmik toovad Jekaterinburgis välja lavastuse "... and Red", esitajaks Venemaa nimekas nüüdistantsutrupp Provintsialnõje Tantsõ. Lavastuses kõlab Taavo Remmeli kontrabassiimprovisatsioon "12.12.2006"

  7. Enhanced ionic diffusion in ionomer-filled nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allahyarov, Elshad, E-mail: elshad.allakhyarov@case.edu [Institut für Theoretische Physik II: Weiche Materie, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätstrasse 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7202 (United States); Theoretical Department, Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences (IVTAN), 13/19 Izhorskaya Street, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); International Research Centre, Baku State University, Baku (Azerbaijan); Taylor, Philip L. [Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7079 (United States); Löwen, Hartmut [Institut für Theoretische Physik II: Weiche Materie, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätstrasse 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2015-12-28

    Coarse-grained simulations in the united-atom-model approximation are used to investigate confinement-induced morphological changes in Nafion-like ionomers. The system we study models a cylindrical pore in a hydrophobic matrix of supporting material with pore diameters that vary from 0.7 to 3.96 nm. Simulation results indicate a strong dependence of the equilibrium ionomer structures both on the pore diameter and on the sulfonate concentration in the pore. In the case of larger pores, the ionic clustering has the shape of a branched wire-like network oriented parallel to the pore axis. In the case of narrow pores, the ionic clusters occupy the pore center and exhibit strong density modulations both along the pore axis and across the pore diameter. The calculated diffusion coefficients for the ions indicate a sharp increase within the narrow pores. This finding is explained by ballistic-type ionic motion at shorter times and by the collective motion of ions in hydrophilic clusters. The influence of the hydrophobic walls on the distribution of ions and solvent molecules is discussed.

  8. Laboratory tidal triggering in the presence of pore fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlow, N. M.; Lockner, D. A.; Beeler, N. M.

    2011-12-01

    The physical mechanism by which the low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) that make up tremor are created is poorly understood. In many areas of the world, it is consistently observed that LFEs appear to be strongly tidally modulated, whereas ordinary earthquakes are not (e.g. Thomas et al., Nature, 2009; Vidale et al., JGR, 1998). Here we build upon the work of Lockner and Beeler, JGR, 1999, and Beeler and Lockner, JGR, 2003, which investigated the response of laboratory stick-slip to oscillatory, tide-like loading. These previous experiments determined ranges of amplitude and frequency of the oscillatory loading that resulted in tidally correlated populations, and explained the results in a theoretical framework. Two modes were found: the threshold failure mode in which the necessary amplitude for correlated populations decreased with increasing frequency, and the delayed failure mode in which the amplitude stayed the same or increased with increasing frequency. The frequency of transition between the two modes, which scales with event nucleation time, is predicted to depend on effective stress. This dependence was never tested, since all previous experiments were carried out at one effective stress. The previous experiments were also carried out using room dry samples of Westerly granite. Here we update these results with new experiments on Westerly granite, with the addition of varying effective stress and pore fluid at two pressures. The addition of pore fluid is especially important as pore fluid pressure is thought to be high in LFE regions. We verify the effective stress dependence of the mode transition predicted in Beeler and Lockner, JGR, 2003, allowing extrapolation of the results to other effective stresses. We also find that pore fluid effects become important at high frequencies, when the period of oscillation is comparable to the diffusion time over the sample. These results help constrain the conditions at depth that give rise to tidally modulated LFEs

  9. Diffusion in Altered Tonalite Sample Using Time Domain Diffusion Simulations in Tomographic Images Combined with Lab-scale Diffusion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutilainen, M.; Sardini, P.; Togneri, L.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Timonen, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this work an effect of rock heterogeneity on diffusion was investigated. Time domain diffusion simulations were used to compare behavior of diffusion in homogeneous and heterogeneous 3D media. Tomographic images were used as heterogeneous rock media. One altered tonalite sample from Sievi, Finland, was chosen as test case for introduced analysis procedure. Effective diffusion coefficient of tonalite sample was determined with lab-scale experiments and the same coefficient was used also for homogeneous media. Somewhat technically complicated mathematical solution for analysis of through diffusion experiment is shortly described. Computed tomography (CT) is already quite widely used in many geological, petrological, and paleontological applications when the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the material is of interest, and is an excellent method for gaining information especially about its heterogeneity, grain size, or porosity. In addition to offering means for quantitative characterization, CT provides a lot of qualitative information [1]. A through -diffusion laboratory experiment using radioactive tracer was fitted using the Time Domain Diffusion (TDD) method. This rapid particle tracking method allows simulation of the heterogeneous diffusion based on pore-scale images and local values of diffusivities [2]. As a result we found out that heterogeneity has only a small effect to diffusion coefficient and in-diffusion profile for used geometry. Also direction dependency was tested and was found to be negligible. Whereas significant difference between generally accepted value and value obtained from simulations for constant m in Archie’s law was found. [1] Voutilainen, M., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Sardini, P., and Timonen, J., (2010). On pore-space characterization of an altered tonalite by X-ray µCT and the 14C-PMMA method (in progress). [2] Sardini, P., Robinet, J., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Delay, F., and Hellmuth, K-H, (2007). On direct simulation of heterogeneous

  10. Gas transport and subsoil pore characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berisso, Feto Esimo; Schjønning, Per; Keller, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Arrangements of elementary soil particles during soil deposition and subsequent biological and physical processes in long-term pedogenesis are expected to lead to anisotropy of the non-tilled subsoil pore system. Soil compaction by agricultural machinery is known to affect soil pore characteristi...

  11. Cavitation and pore blocking in nanoporous glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, C; Kalies, G; Enke, D; Klank, D

    2011-09-06

    In gas adsorption studies, porous glasses are frequently referred to as model materials for highly disordered mesopore systems. Numerous works suggest that an accurate interpretation of physisorption isotherms requires a complete understanding of network effects upon adsorption and desorption, respectively. The present article deals with nitrogen and argon adsorption at different temperatures (77 and 87 K) performed on a series of novel nanoporous glasses (NPG) with different mean pore widths. NPG samples contain smaller mesopores and significantly higher microporosity than porous Vycor glass or controlled pore glass. Since the mean pore width of NPG can be tuned sensitively, the evolution of adsorption characteristics with respect to a broadening pore network can be investigated starting from the narrowest nanopore width. With an increasing mean pore width, a H2-type hysteresis develops gradually which finally transforms into a H1-type. In this connection, a transition from a cavitation-induced desorption toward desorption controlled by pore blocking can be observed. Furthermore, we find concrete hints for a pore size dependence of the relative pressure of cavitation in highly disordered pore systems. By comparing nitrogen and argon adsorption, a comprehensive insight into adsorption mechanisms in novel disordered materials is provided.

  12. Diffusion behavior of Nb element in high Nb containing TiAl Alloys by reactive hot pressing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yanhang; LIN Junpin; HE Yuehui; WANG Yanli; CHEN Guoliang

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion behavior of Nb in elemental powder metallurgy high Nb containing TiAl alloys was investigated. The results show that Nb element dissolves into the matrix by diffusion. Pore nests are formed in situ after Nb diffusion. With the increase in hot pressing temperature, the diffusion of Nb will be more sufficient, and the microstructure is more homogeneous. Nb element diffuses completely at 1400℃. Meanwhile, compression deformation and agglomeration phenomena of pores are observed in some pore nests. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) treatment can only efficiently decrease but not eliminate porosity completely.

  13. Coating of silicon pore optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Ackermann, M.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    2009-01-01

    For the International X-ray observatory (IXO), a mirror module with an effective area of 3 m2 at 1.25 keV and at least 0.65 m2 at 6 keV has to be realized. To achieve this goal, coated silicon pore optics has been developed over the last years. One of the challenges is to coat the Si plates...... and still to realize Si-Si bonding. It has been demonstrated that ribbed silicon plates can be produced and assembled into stacks. All previously work has been done using uncoated Si plates. In this paper we describe how to coat the ribbed Si plates with an Ir coating and a top C coating through a mask so...... that there will be coating only between the ribs and not in the area where bonding takes place. The paper includes description of the mounting jig and how to align the mask on top of the plate. We will also present energy scans from Si plates coated through a mask....

  14. FINGERPRINT MATCHING BASED ON PORE CENTROIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Malathi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been exponential growth in the use of bio- metrics for user authentication applications. Automated Fingerprint Identification systems have become popular tool in many security and law enforcement applications. Most of these systems rely on minutiae (ridge ending and bifurcation features. With the advancement in sensor technology, high resolution fingerprint images (1000 dpi pro- vide micro level of features (pores that have proven to be useful fea- tures for identification. In this paper, we propose a new strategy for fingerprint matching based on pores by reliably extracting the pore features The extraction of pores is done by Marker Controlled Wa- tershed segmentation method and the centroids of each pore are con- sidered as feature vectors for matching of two fingerprint images. Experimental results shows that the proposed method has better per- formance with lower false rates and higher accuracy.

  15. Armillaria luteobubalina mycelium develops air pores that conduct oxygen to rhizomorph clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareek, Mamta; Allaway, William G; Ashford, Anne E

    2006-01-01

    Armillaria luteobubalina produces air pores in culture. They consist of two parts: a basal region of tissue elevated to form a mound covered with a rind continuous with that of the colony, but perforated; and an apical region of long parallel hyphae, cemented together by scattered patches of extracellular material. This forms a hydrophobic structure that is elevated above the general level of the mycelial crust and does not easily become waterlogged. Air pores develop near the inoculum plug shortly after inoculation, arising directly from the mycelium, and rhizomorphs are initiated from them. The air pore contains a complex system of gas space connecting the atmosphere with the central canal of each rhizomorph. The tissue beneath the melanised colony crust also contains gas space, especially near air pores. This is also connected with the gas space of each rhizomorph and of each air pore. Measurements with oxygen electrodes show that air pores and their associated rhizomorphs conduct oxygen. The average oxygen conductance of a group of air pores with associated rhizomorphs, within agar blocks, but with rhizomorph apices cut off, was about 700 x 10(-12) m3s(-1), equivalent to about 200 x 10(-12) m3s(-1) for each air-pore. We conclude that the air pores conduct oxygen into the gas space below the pigmented mycelium of the colony, where the rhizomorphs - which also conduct oxygen - originate. A. luteobubalina thus has a complex aerating system which allows efficient diffusion of oxygen into rhizomorphs, and this is likely to facilitate extension of inoculum into low-oxygen environments.

  16. The role of different grain shapes in modifying intra-pore flow and transport phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, K.; Cardenas, B.; Bennett, P.; Ketcham, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Intra-pore (10 -100 µm) fluid flow and mass transport depend on pore geometry. This has implication on microbial and biogeochemical processes within pores and residual trapping of Supercritical CO2. Since effects of grain size and grain sorting are already known, we investigate the effect of grain shapes in modifying intra-pore fluid flow and mass transport both inside and between pores and stagnant zones. Numerical simulations are carried out by solving the Navier-Stokes equations on idealized 2-D domains representing grain shapes such as squares and circles. We conduct a sensitivity study by varying grain angularity and imposing different Reynolds numbers flows to analyze their influence on permeability and distribution of vortices, also known as recirculation zones. We observe that the coupled effects of pore geometries and vortices lead to large variation in the fluid velocity, which consequently leads to non-Fickian transport even though flow can still be described by a continuum-scale Darcy equation. We find that the permeability increases and vorticity decreases with decreasing angularity of the grains. The flow velocities in the stagnant zone increases linearly with higher Reynolds number flows, with the rate of increase largest among the angular grains. The mass transfer mechanism between main pores and stagnant zones is mainly molecular diffusion, but the concentration gradient between the main pore and the stagnant zone is significantly influenced by the mixing effect associated with vortices. The overall effect of an increase in vorticity manifests itself as an increase in the global dispersion of the solute, which results both in an early arrival and a prolonged tail of a solute’s break-through curve. We find that the related effects of grain shapes and vortices are important in understanding pore scale flow and transport processes and may have significant implication on the issues of contaminant transport in aquifers and the geological storage of

  17. Geochemistry of Clayey Aquitard Pore Water as Archive of Paleo-Environment, Western Bohai Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Li; Xing Liang; Menggui Jin; Guoqiang Xiao; Jishan He; Yandong Pei

    2015-01-01

    The record of paleo-environment in clayey aquitard pore water is much more effective relative to aquifer groundwater owing to the low permeability of clayey aquitard. Oxygen-18 (18O), deuterium (D), and chemical patterns were determined in pore water samples extracted from two 500 m depth boreholes, G1 and G2, in western Bohai Bay, China. Shallow pore water samples (depth<102 m) are saline water, with the TDS (total dissolved solids) of 3.69–30.75 g/L, and deeper ones (depth=102–500 m) are fresh water, with the TDS<1 g/L. Content of major ions (i.e., Cl-, Na+, K+, Mg2+, SO42-, Ca2+) is high in marine sediment pore water samples and gradually decrease towards to terre-strial sediment pore water, together with the Cl/Br and Sr/Ba ratios changing significantly in different sedimentary facies along the study profile, indicating that pore water may be paleo-sedimentary water and not replaced by modern water.δ18O profile and positive correlation betweenδ18O and Cl-of shal-low saline pore water indicated diffusion as the main transport mechanism, and distinguished four transgressive layers since Late Quaternary (i.e., Holocene marine unit, two Late Pleistocene marine units and Middle Pleistocene marine unit), further supporting the finding that pore water retained the feature of paleo-sedimentary water. Climate was identified as the main influence on the isotopic signa-ture of aquitard pore water and four climate periods were determined byδ18O profile.

  18. Characterization of Gas Flow Ability and Contribution of Diffusion to Total Mass Flux in the Shale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to search a parameter which characterize the flow ability and analyze the contribution of diffusion to total mass flux of gas flow in pore of shale whose size is as low as nanoscale. The diffusion coefficient of the flow region which was determined by Kundsen number was taken as the diffusion coefficient of system, then it was substituted into the equation which describes gas diffusive and flow in nano-porous media, the apparent permeability and mass flux were calculated and the impacts of the pore radius and gas type were analyzed finally. The result showed that the diffusion of gas in shale was mainly in the transition diffusion or Fick diffusion region; The ratio of the apparent permeability of considering the diffusion and slippage effect to Darcy permeability and the ratio of diffusion mass flux to total mass flux increased with the decreasing of the pore radius; The diffusion ability of the methane was stronger than ethane’s. The present study implied that the calculated results of the diffusion coefficient which considers three kind of diffusion was less than that one considering Knudsen diffusion only; Considering diffusion and slippage effect, the apparent permeability of nanoscale pore of shale was 10-6 μm2 level, not 10-9 μm2 level in general temperature and pressure of shale reservoir.

  19. Characterisation of matrix pore water at the Olkiluoto investigation site, Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichinger, F.L.

    2006-12-15

    Pore water that resides in the interconnected pore space between minerals and along grain boundaries in crystalline rocks of low permeability has been extracted successfully by tested laboratory out-diffusion methods using drillcore samples from borehole KR 39 located in the Olkiluoto subarea. The obtained experiment solutions have been characterised chemically and isotopically and related to the in situ pore water composition of the rock. In addition, the method of extraction, together with interfaced measurements of interconnected porosity, provided the opportunity to derive diffusion coefficient values of potential use in predicting future rates of solute transport. Because of the very small volumes of pore water extracted, and the possibility of rock stress release occurring during drilling which might: (a) lead to contamination by drilling fluid, (b) affect the derivation of rock porosity values, and (c) result in input of fluids from ruptured fluid inclusions, great care was taken to avoid such problems or, at least further understand the repercussions. Interpretations of the extracted pore waters are supported by investigations of the rock mineralogy, mineral chemistry, whole-rock chemistry, mineral fluid inclusions, and crush-leach experiments. (orig.)

  20. Dynamics and free energy of polymers partitioning into a nanoscale pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrukov, S. M.; Vodyanoy, I.; Brutyan, R. A.; Kasianowicz, J. J.

    1997-03-01

    Protein nanoscale pores (mesoscopic ion channels) that penetrate cell membranes provide us with the opportunity to simultaneously observe the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of differently-sized polymers within their narrow confines. We characterize polymer dynamic partitioning and evaluate the free energy of the polymer chain inside the pore by measuring the mean current and current noise of a single open channel formed by Staphylococcus aureus a-toxin in the presence of poly(ethylene glycols) (PEGs). Contrary to predictions of scaling theory, the free energy deduced from the partition coefficient has a sharp dependence on polymer length (or weight). The intensity of polymer-induced current fluctuations shows resonance-like peak as a function of polymer molecular weight. The movement of the polymer inside the pore is characterized by a diffusion coefficient that is orders of magnitude smaller than that for the polymer in the bulk aqueous solution, which suggests that PEG interacts favorably with the pore. We show that a simple molecular weight-dependent modification of the polymer's diffusion coefficient accounts for these results, but only qualitatively. Given that PEG associates with hydrophobic regions in proteins, we also conclude that contrary to the conventional view of ion channels, the aqueous cavity of this pore's interior is to some extent hydrophobic.

  1. Inner/Outer nuclear membrane fusion in nuclear pore assembly: biochemical demonstration and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtman, Boris; Ramos, Corinne; Rasala, Beth; Harel, Amnon; Forbes, Douglass J

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large proteinaceous channels embedded in double nuclear membranes, which carry out nucleocytoplasmic exchange. The mechanism of nuclear pore assembly involves a unique challenge, as it requires creation of a long-lived membrane-lined channel connecting the inner and outer nuclear membranes. This stabilized membrane channel has little evolutionary precedent. Here we mapped inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion in NPC assembly biochemically by using novel assembly intermediates and membrane fusion inhibitors. Incubation of a Xenopus in vitro nuclear assembly system at 14°C revealed an early pore intermediate where nucleoporin subunits POM121 and the Nup107-160 complex were organized in a punctate pattern on the inner nuclear membrane. With time, this intermediate progressed to diffusion channel formation and finally to complete nuclear pore assembly. Correct channel formation was blocked by the hemifusion inhibitor lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), but not if a complementary-shaped lipid, oleic acid (OA), was simultaneously added, as determined with a novel fluorescent dextran-quenching assay. Importantly, recruitment of the bulk of FG nucleoporins, characteristic of mature nuclear pores, was not observed before diffusion channel formation and was prevented by LPC or OA, but not by LPC+OA. These results map the crucial inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion event of NPC assembly downstream of POM121/Nup107-160 complex interaction and upstream or at the time of FG nucleoporin recruitment.

  2. Calculation of effective transport properties of partially saturated gas diffusion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarek, Tomasz; Tsotridis, Georgios

    2017-02-01

    A large number of currently available Computational Fluid Dynamics numerical models of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) are based on the assumption that porous structures are mainly considered as thin and homogenous layers, hence the mass transport equations in structures such as Gas Diffusion Layers (GDL) are usually modelled according to the Darcy assumptions. Application of homogenous models implies that the effects of porous structures are taken into consideration via the effective transport properties of porosity, tortuosity, permeability (or flow resistance), diffusivity, electric and thermal conductivity. Therefore, reliable values of those effective properties of GDL play a significant role for PEMFC modelling when employing Computational Fluid Dynamics, since these parameters are required as input values for performing the numerical calculations. The objective of the current study is to calculate the effective transport properties of GDL, namely gas permeability, diffusivity and thermal conductivity, as a function of liquid water saturation by using the Lattice-Boltzmann approach. The study proposes a method of uniform water impregnation of the GDL based on the "Fine-Mist" assumption by taking into account the surface tension of water droplets and the actual shape of GDL pores.

  3. Restrictive liquid-phase diffusion and reaction in bidispersed catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.Y.; Seader, J.D. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Tsai, C.H.; Massoth, F.E. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Fuels Engineering)

    1991-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of bidispersed pore-size distribution on liquid-phase diffusion and reaction in NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts is investigated by applying two bidispersed-pore-structure models, the random-pore model and a globular-structure model, to extensive experimental data, which were obtained from sorptive diffusion measurements at ambient conditions and catalytic reaction rate measurements on nitrogen-containing compounds. Transport of the molecules in the catalysts was found to be controlled by micropore diffusion, in accordance with the random-pore model, rather than macropore diffusion as predicted by the globular-structure model. A qualitative criterion for micropore-diffusion control is proposed: relatively small macroporosity and high catalyst pellet density. Since most hydrotreating catalysts have high density, diffusion in these types of catalysts may be controlled by micropore diffusion. Accordingly, it is believed in this case that increasing the size of micropores may be more effective to reduce intraparticle diffusion resistance than incorporating macropores alone.

  4. The Impact of Microstructure Geometry on the Mass Transport in Artificial Pores: A Numerical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Galinsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of porous materials used in heterogeneous catalysis determines the mass transport inside networks, which may vary over many length scales. The theoretical prediction of mass transport phenomena in porous materials, however, is incomplete and is still not completely understood. Therefore, experimental data for every specific porous system is needed. One possible experimental technique for characterizing the mass transport in such pore networks is pulse experiments. The general evaluation of experimental outcomes of these techniques follows the solution of Fick’s second law where an integral and effective diffusion coefficient is recognized. However, a detailed local understanding of diffusion and sorption processes remains a challenge. As there is lack of proved models covering different length scales, existing classical concepts need to be evaluated with respect to their ability to reflect local geometries on the nanometer level. In this study, DSMC (Direct Simulation Monte Carlo models were used to investigate the impact of pore microstructures on the diffusion behaviour of gases. It can be understood as a virtual pulse experiment within a single pore or a combination of different pore geometries.

  5. Experimental study on the effects of sediment size and porosity on contaminant adsorption/desorption and interfacial diffusion characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Jing-yu; HE Xiao-yan; WANG Dao-zeng

    2013-01-01

    The joint effects of the sediment size and porosity on the contaminant adsorption/desorption and interracial diffusion characteristics were experimentally investigated.The adsorption of Phosphorus (P) on the natural and artificial sediment suspensions was measured with respect to the P adsorption isotherms and kinetics in the experiment.The obtained adsorption isotherms for different grain-sized sediment suspensions fit well with the Langmuir equation,dependent on the initial aqueous concentration and sediment content.The P kinetic adsorption behaviors for cohesive fine-grained and non-cohesive coarse-grained sediment suspensions clearly show the size-dependent feature.On the other hand,the P kinetic release feature of a porous sediment layer is affected by not only the direct desorption of the uppermost sediments,but also the diffusivity in the pore-water within the underlying sediment layer,characterized by the sediment size and porosity,respectively.Furthermore,the temporal contaminant release from the permeable sediment layer into the overlying water colunm increases with the increasing flow velocity,while this enhancement in mediating the interfacial diffusion flux is somewhat insignificant in an immediate release stage,largely due to the resistance of the diffusive boundary layer on the hydrodynamic disturbance.

  6. Designing Nonwovens to Meet Pore Size Specifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen E. Simmonds

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available New nonwovens applications in areas such as filtration require a media designed to particular pore size specifications in the 3 to 20 micron range. The purpose of this work was to develop a basis by which to design and construct a fabric with given pore size specifications. While doing so we have provided a validation for two different mathematical models. We have also found that bicomponent spunbonded islands-in-the-sea nonwoven fabrics can be designed very precisely to achieve target pore diameters and porosity. Mathematical models can be used to develop fabric specifications in the standard manufacturing terms of basis weight and fiber diameter. Measured mean flow pore diameters for the test fabrics showed excellent correlation to targeted mean flow pore diameters for both models. The experimental fit to the Bryner model is the better of the two, but requires specification of fabric thickness in addition to basis weight and fiber diameter to achieve actual mean pore diameters that closely match target values. Experimental validation of the influence of fabric thickness on the mean flow pore diameter at constant basis weight and fiber diameter remains open for further investigation. In addition, achieving complete separation of the island and sea polymers along with unbundling of the island fibers remain areas for improvement.

  7. Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations: Linking the Chemical and Physical Effects to Elastic and Transport Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavko, G.; Vanorio, T.; Vialle, S.; Saxena, N.

    2014-03-31

    Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities were measured over a range of confining pressures while injecting CO2 and brine into the samples. Pore fluid pressure was also varied and monitored together with porosity during injection. Effective medium models were developed to understand the mechanisms and impact of observed changes and to provide the means for implementation of the interpretation methodologies in the field. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in carbonate rocks show as much as 20-50% decrease after injection of the reactive CO2-brine mixture; the changes were caused by permanent changes to the rock elastic frame associated with dissolution of mineral. Velocity decreases were observed under both dry and fluid-saturated conditions, and the amount of change was correlated with the initial pore fabrics. Scanning Electron Microscope images of carbonate rock microstructures were taken before and after injection of CO2-rich water. The images reveal enlargement of the pores, dissolution of micrite (micron-scale calcite crystals), and pitting of grain surfaces caused by the fluid- solid chemical reactivity. The magnitude of the changes correlates with the rock microtexture – tight, high surface area samples showed the largest changes in permeability and smallest changes in porosity and elastic stiffness compared to those in rocks with looser texture and larger intergranular pore space. Changes to the pore space also occurred from flow of fine particles with the injected fluid. Carbonates with grain-coating materials, such as residual oil, experienced very little permanent change during injection. In the tight micrite/spar cement component, dissolution is controlled by diffusion: the mass transfer of products and reactants is thus slow and the fluid is expected to be close to thermodynamical equilibrium with the calcite, leading to very little dissolution, or even precipitation. In the microporous rounded micrite and macropores, dissolution is controlled by

  8. Superficially porous particles with 1000Å pores for large biomolecule high performance liquid chromatography and polymer size exclusion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Brian M; Schuster, Stephanie A; Boyes, Barry E; Shields, Taylor J; Miles, William L; Haynes, Mark J; Moran, Robert E; Kirkland, Joseph J; Schure, Mark R

    2017-03-17

    To facilitate mass transport and column efficiency, solutes must have free access to particle pores to facilitate interactions with the stationary phase. To ensure this feature, particles should be used for HPLC separations which have pores sufficiently large to accommodate the solute without restricted diffusion. This paper describes the design and properties of superficially porous (also called Fused-Core(®), core shell or porous shell) particles with very large (1000Å) pores specifically developed for separating very large biomolecules and polymers. Separations of DNA fragments, monoclonal antibodies, large proteins and large polystyrene standards are used to illustrate the utility of these particles for efficient, high-resolution applications.

  9. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Lee, Elizabeth (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Kallam, Alekhya (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Majumdar, Partha (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J. (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Celina, Mathias Christopher; Bahr, James (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  10. Analytical applications for pore-forming proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasianowicz, John J; Balijepalli, Arvind K; Ettedgui, Jessica; Forstater, Jacob H; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Huisheng; Robertson, Joseph W F

    2016-03-01

    Proteinaceous nanometer-scale pores are ubiquitous in biology. The canonical ionic channels (e.g., those that transport Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Cl(-) across cell membranes) play key roles in many cellular processes, including nerve and muscle activity. Another class of channels includes bacterial pore-forming toxins, which disrupt cell function, and can lead to cell death. We describe here the recent development of these toxins for a wide range of biological sensing applications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pore-Forming Toxins edited by Mauro Dalla Serra and Franco Gambale.

  11. Pore- and micro-structural characterization of a novel structural binder based on iron carbonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Sumanta, E-mail: Sumanta.Das@asu.edu [School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Stone, David, E-mail: dajstone@gmail.com [Iron Shell LLC, Tucson, AZ (United States); Convey, Diana, E-mail: Diana.Convey@asu.edu [LeRoy Eyring Center for Solid State Science, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Neithalath, Narayanan, E-mail: Narayanan.Neithalath@asu.edu [School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The pore- and micro-structural features of a novel binding material based on the carbonation of waste metallic iron powder are reported in this paper. The binder contains metallic iron powder as the major ingredient, followed by additives containing silica and alumina to facilitate favorable reaction product formation. Compressive strengths sufficient for a majority of concrete applications are attained. The material pore structure is investigated primarily through mercury intrusion porosimetry whereas electron microscopy is used for microstructural characterization. Reduction in the overall porosity and the average pore size with an increase in carbonation duration from 1 day to 4 days is noticed. The pore structure features are used in predictive models for gas and moisture transport (water vapor diffusivity and moisture permeability) through the porous medium which dictates its long-term durability when used in structural applications. Comparisons of the pore structure with those of a Portland cement paste are also provided. The morphology of the reaction products in the iron-based binder, and the distribution of constituent elements in the microstructure are also reported. - Highlights: • Carbonation of iron produces a dense microstructure. • Pore volume in iron carbonate lower, critical size higher than those in OPC pastes • Reaction product contains iron, carbon, silicon, aluminum and calcium. • Power-law for porosity-moisture permeability relationship was established.

  12. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids. Quarterly report No. 1, September 18, 1992--December 17, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Webster, I.A. [Unocal Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The molecules comprising coal liquids can range from less than 10 to several hundred {angstrom} in diameter. Their size is, therefore, comparable to the average pore size of most hydroprocessing catalysts. Thus, during processing, transport of these molecules into the catalyst occurs mainly by ``configurational`` or ``hindered diffusion,`` which is the result of two phenomena occurring in the pores; the distribution of solute molecules in the pores is affected by the pores and the solute molecules experience an increased hydrodynamic drag. The field of hindered diffusion has been reviewed by Deen [16]. The earliest studies in the filed were by Renkin et al. [17].

  13. Virus-sized colloid transport in a single pore: Model development and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetha, N.; Mohan Kumar, M. S.; Majid Hassanizadeh, S.; Raoof, Amir

    2014-08-01

    A mathematical model is developed to simulate the transport and deposition of virus-sized colloids in a cylindrical pore throat considering various processes such as advection, diffusion, colloid-collector surface interactions and hydrodynamic wall effects. The pore space is divided into three different regions, namely, bulk, diffusion and potential regions, based on the dominant processes acting in each of these regions. In the bulk region, colloid transport is governed by advection and diffusion whereas in the diffusion region, colloid mobility due to diffusion is retarded by hydrodynamic wall effects. Colloid-collector interaction forces dominate the transport in the potential region where colloid deposition occurs. The governing equations are non-dimensionalized and solved numerically. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the virus-sized colloid transport and deposition is significantly affected by various pore-scale parameters such as the surface potentials on colloid and collector, ionic strength of the solution, flow velocity, pore size and colloid size. The adsorbed concentration and hence, the favorability of the surface for adsorption increases with: (i) decreasing magnitude and ratio of surface potentials on colloid and collector, (ii) increasing ionic strength and (iii) increasing pore radius. The adsorbed concentration increases with increasing Pe, reaching a maximum value at Pe = 0.1 and then decreases thereafter. Also, the colloid size significantly affects particle deposition with the adsorbed concentration increasing with increasing particle radius, reaching a maximum value at a particle radius of 100 nm and then decreasing with increasing radius. System hydrodynamics is found to have a greater effect on larger particles than on smaller ones. The secondary minimum contribution to particle deposition has been found to increase as the favorability of the surface for adsorption decreases. The sensitivity of the model to a given parameter will be high

  14. Vaneless diffusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoo, Y.

    The influence of vaneless diffusers on flow in centrifugal compressors, particularly on surge, is discussed. A vaneless diffuser can demonstrate stable operation in a wide flow range only if it is installed with a backward leaning blade impeller. The circumferential distortion of flow in the impeller disappears quickly in the vaneless diffuser. The axial distortion of flow at the diffuser inlet does not decay easily. In large specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is distorted axially. Pressure recovery of diffusers at distorted inlet flow is considerably improved by half guide vanes. The best height of the vanes is a little 1/2 diffuser width. In small specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is not much distorted and pressure recovery can be predicted with one-dimensional flow analysis. Wall friction loss is significant in narrow diffusers. The large pressure drop at a small flow rate can cause the positive gradient of the pressure-flow rate characteristic curve, which may cause surging.

  15. DIFFUSIVITY OF ARRE EARTH ION IN POROUS ION EXCHANGE RESINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LingDaren; LiuYucheng; 等

    1997-01-01

    The self-diffusion of Eu3+ ion in porous resins D72 and D751 was studied by isotope exchange reaction.Applying Kataoka's bidisperse pore model,the intraparticle effective diffusivity De were resolved into a solid diffusivity Dg and a macropore diffusivity Dp.The experiments show that De.Dp and Dg all increase with the increase of reaction temperature;the response Dp and Dg of D751 resin is smaller than that of D72 resin;the diffusivity of Eu3+ ion in solution is larger than Dp,which leads to the conclusion that the diffusion of ion in the pore of resin can not completely be equal to that in solution.

  16. Straight Pore Microfilter with Efficient Regeneration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II project is directed toward development of a novel microfiltration filter that has distinctively narrow pore size...

  17. Straight Pore Microfilter with Efficient Regeneration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project is directed toward development of a novel microfiltration filter that has distinctively narrow pore size...

  18. A Potential Model for Cylindrical Pores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张现仁; 汪文川

    2001-01-01

    An analytical potential for cylindrical pores has been derived by introducing a variational method into the integration for the calculation of the interaction energy between the wall molecules and a test molecule, all of which are represented by Lennard-Jones potential. The model proposed gives good fit to the results from the cylindrical surface model and the pseudoatom model. To test the potential proposed rigorously, we have carried out grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo(GCMC) simulation of nitrogen in the MCM-41 pore at 77 K, and compared the simulated adsorption isotherm with the experimental data reported in the literature. The simulated isotherm from our model is in almost qualitative agreement with experiment. Consequently, the model proposed provides an explicit and accurate description of cylindrical pores represented by the Lennard-Jones potential. Moreover, the model can be easily applied to a variety of cylindrical pores, ranging from cylindrical surface to finite thickness walls, in both theoretical studies and computer simulations.

  19. Pore structure in blended cement pastes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canut, Mariana Moreira Cavalcanti

    Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), such as slag and fly ash, are increasingly used as a substitute for Portland cement in the interests of improvement of engineering properties and sustainability of concrete. According to studies improvement of engineering properties can be explained...... supplement each other. Cement pastes (w/b=0.4) with and without slag and fly ash cured at two moisture (sealed and saturated) and temperature (20 and 55ºC) conditions were used to investigate the combined impact of SCMs addition and curing on the pore structure of pastes cured up to two years. Also...... volume and threshold pore size were found when comparing with plain cement paste at the same curing conditions. The porosity methods MIP, LTC and SEM have been shown to be suitable to characterise pore parameters of the pastes. MIP is a simple and fast method which covers a large range of pore sizes...

  20. Analysis of a spatially deconvolved solar pore

    CERN Document Server

    Noda, C Quintero; Cobo, B Ruiz; Suematsu, Y; Katsukawa, Y; Ichimoto, K

    2016-01-01

    Solar pores are active regions with large magnetic field strengths and apparent simple magnetic configurations. Their properties resemble the ones found for the sunspot umbra although pores do not show penumbra. Therefore, solar pores present themselves as an intriguing phenomenon that is not completely understood. We examine in this work a solar pore observed with Hinode/SP using two state of the art techniques. The first one is the spatial deconvolution of the spectropolarimetric data that allows removing the stray light contamination induced by the spatial point spread function of the telescope. The second one is the inversion of the Stokes profiles assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium that let us to infer the atmospheric physical parameters. After applying these techniques, we found that the spatial deconvolution method does not introduce artefacts, even at the edges of the magnetic structure, where large horizontal gradients are detected on the atmospheric parameters. Moreover, we also describe the p...

  1. Imaging pore space in tight gas sandstone reservoir: insights from broad ion beam cross-sectioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, G.; Enzmann, F.; Urai, J. L.; Baerle, C.; Kukla, P. A.; Konstanty, J.

    2010-06-01

    Monetization of tight gas reservoirs, which contain significant gas reserves world-wide, represents a challenge for the entire oil and gas industry. The development of new technologies to enhance tight gas reservoir productivity is strongly dependent on an improved understanding of the rock properties and especially the pore framework. Numerous methods are now available to characterize sandstone cores. However, the pore space characterization at pore scale remains difficult due to the fine pore size and delicate sample preparation, and has thus been mostly indirectly inferred until now. Here we propose a new method of ultra high-resolution petrography combining high resolution SEM and argon ion beam cross sectioning (BIB, Broad Ion Beam) which prepares smooth and damage free surfaces. We demonstrate this method using the example of Permian (Rotliegend) age tight gas sandstone core samples. The combination of Ar-beam cross-sectioning facility and high-resolution SEM imaging has the potential to result in a step change in the understanding of pore geometries, in terms of its morphology, spatial distribution and evolution based on the generation of unprecedented image quality and resolution enhancing the predictive reliability of image analysis.

  2. Imaging pore space in tight gas sandstone reservoir: insights from broad ion beam cross-sectioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstanty J.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Monetization of tight gas reservoirs, which contain significant gas reserves world-wide, represents a challenge for the entire oil and gas industry. The development of new technologies to enhance tight gas reservoir productivity is strongly dependent on an improved understanding of the rock properties and especially the pore framework. Numerous methods are now available to characterize sandstone cores. However, the pore space characterization at pore scale remains difficult due to the fine pore size and delicate sample preparation, and has thus been mostly indirectly inferred until now. Here we propose a new method of ultra high-resolution petrography combining high resolution SEM and argon ion beam cross sectioning (BIB, Broad Ion Beam which prepares smooth and damage free surfaces. We demonstrate this method using the example of Permian (Rotliegend age tight gas sandstone core samples. The combination of Ar-beam cross-sectioning facility and high-resolution SEM imaging has the potential to result in a step change in the understanding of pore geometries, in terms of its morphology, spatial distribution and evolution based on the generation of unprecedented image quality and resolution enhancing the predictive reliability of image analysis.

  3. Modeling intragranular diffusion in low-connectivity granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Robert P.; Liu, Chongxuan; Hu, Qinhong

    2012-03-01

    Characterizing the diffusive exchange of solutes between bulk water in an aquifer and water in the intragranular pores of the solid phase is still challenging despite decades of study. Many disparities between observation and theory could be attributed to low connectivity of the intragranular pores. The presence of low connectivity indicates that a useful conceptual framework is percolation theory. The present study was initiated to develop a percolation-based finite difference (FD) model, and to test it rigorously against both random walk (RW) simulations of diffusion starting from nonequilibrium, and data on Borden sand published by Ball and Roberts (1991a,b) and subsequently reanalyzed by Haggerty and Gorelick (1995) using a multirate mass transfer (MRMT) approach. The percolation-theoretical model is simple and readily incorporated into existing FD models. The FD model closely matches the RW results using only a single fitting parameter, across a wide range of pore connectivities. Simulation of the Borden sand experiment without pore connectivity effects reproduced the MRMT analysis, but including low pore connectivity effects improved the fit. Overall, the theory and simulation results show that low intragranular pore connectivity can produce diffusive behavior that appears as if the solute had undergone slow sorption, despite the absence of any sorption process, thereby explaining some hitherto confusing aspects of intragranular diffusion.

  4. Configurational diffusion of asphaltenes in fresh and aged catalyst extrudates. Final technical report, September 20, 1991--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guin, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    The overall objective of this project was to investigate the diffusion of coal and petroleum asphaltenes in the pores of a supported catalyst. Experimental measurements together with mathematical modeling was conducted to determine how the diffusion rate of asphaltenes, as well as some model compounds, depended on molecule sizes and shapes. The process of diffusion in the pores of a porous medium may occur by several mechanisms. Hindered diffusion occurs when the sizes of the diffusion molecules are comparable to those of the porous pores through which they are diffusing. Hindered diffusion phenomena have been widely observed in catalytic hydrotreatment of asphaltenes, heavy oils, coal derived liquids, etc. Pore diffusion limitations can be greater in spent catalysts due to the deposition of coke and metals in the pores. In this work, a general mathematical model was developed for the hindered diffusion-adsorption of solute in a solvent onto porous materials, e. g. catalysts, from a surrounding bath. This diffusion model incorporated the nonuniformities of pore structures in the porous media. A numerical method called the Method of Lines was used to solve the nonlinear partial differential equations resulting from the mathematical model. The accuracy of the numerical solution was verified by both a mass balance in the diffusion system and satisfactory agreement with known solutions in several special cases.

  5. Very fine Twilights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boico, Vladimir

    1992-04-01

    The author is describing a very fine twilight on 3 January 1992 at 17 h25 m LT (The Sunset was at 16h48m LT) of red - terracotta color. The author is relating this twilight with the volcanic erruption of Pinatubo on the Philipines islands from June 1991. The author is describing the following phenomena related with Volcanic erruption: twilights, the greenish of the Moon's surface, a change in the color of Day Sky to white, Haloes around the Sun. The author is pointing out, that the phenomena mentioned could prolonge in time 2 or 3 years.

  6. Molecular simulation of protein dynamics in nanopores. II. Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidpour, Leili; Tabar, M Reza Rahimi; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2009-02-28

    A novel combination of discontinuous molecular dynamics and the Langevin equation, together with an intermediate-resolution model of proteins, is used to carry out long (several microsecond) simulations in order to study transport of proteins in nanopores. We simulated single-domain proteins with the alpha-helical native structure. Both attractive and repulsive interaction potentials between the proteins and the pores' walls are considered. The diffusivity D of the proteins is computed not only under the bulk conditions but also as a function of their "length" (the number of the amino-acid groups), temperature T, pore size, and interaction potentials with the walls. Compared with the experimental data, the computed diffusivities under the bulk conditions are of the correct order of magnitude. The diffusivities both in the bulk and in the pores follow a power law in the length [script-l] of the proteins and are larger in pores with repulsive walls. D(+)/D(-), the ratio of the diffusivities in pores with attractive and repulsive walls, exhibits two local maxima in its dependence on the pore size h, which are attributed to the pore sizes and protein configurations that induce long-lasting simultaneous interactions with both walls of the pores. Far from the folding temperature T(f), D increases about linearly with T, but due to the thermal fluctuations and their effect on the proteins' structure near T(f), the dependence of D on T in this region is nonlinear. We propose a novel and general "phase diagram," consisting of four regions, that describes qualitatively the effect of h, T, and interaction potentials with the walls on the diffusivity D of a protein.

  7. Influence of the pore size of reversed phase materials on peptide purification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gétaz, David; Dogan, Nihan; Forrer, Nicola; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2011-05-20

    The influence of the pore size of a chromatographic reversed phase material on the adsorption equilibria and diffusion of two industrially relevant peptides (i.e. a small synthetic peptide and insulin) has been studied using seven different reversed phase HPLC materials having pore sizes ranging from 90 Å to 300 Å. The stationary phase pore size distribution was obtained by inverse size exclusion measurement (iSEC). The effect of the pore size on the mass transfer properties of the materials was evaluated from Van Deemter experiments. It has been shown that the lumped mass transfer coefficient increases linearly with the average pore size. The Henry coefficient and the impurity selectivity were determined in diluted conditions. The saturation capacity of the main peptides was determined in overloaded conditions using the inverse method (i.e. peak fitting). It was shown that the adsorption equilibria of the peptides on the seven materials is well described by a surface-specific adsorption isotherm. Based on this a lumped kinetic model has been developed to model the elution profile of the two peptides in overloaded conditions and to simulate the purification of the peptide from its crude mixture. It has been found that the separation of insulin from its main impurity (i.e. desamido-insulin) was not affected by the pore size. On the other hand, in the case of the synthetic peptide, it was found that the adsorption of the most significant impurity decreases with the pore size. This decrease is probably due to an increase in silanol activity with decreasing pore size.

  8. Solid hydrocarbon: a migration-of-fines problem in carbonate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomando, A.J.

    1986-05-01

    The most familiar example of a migration-of-fines problem is authigenic kaolinite, which can detach, migrate through a pore system, and bridge pore throats, thus reducing permeability. under certain conditions, a similar problem is caused by solid hydrocarbon, independent of a mode of origin, which has precipitated in carbonate pore systems. Cores from several reservoirs in the Lower Cretaceous of east Texas were used as the data base in this study. Three morphotypes of solid hydrocarbon have been identified from thin-section and scanning electron microscope observations: droplets, peanut brittle, and carpets. Droplets are small, individual, rounded particles scattered on pore walls. Peanut brittle ranges from a continuous to discontinuous thin coating with random rounded lumps that probably have droplet precursors. Carpets are thick, continuous coatings and, at the extreme, can effectively occlude whole pores. Initially, solid hydrocarbon reduces permeability without necessarily decreasing porosity significantly. Likewise, solid hydrocarbon cannot be detected directly from wireline logs. Acidizing to enhance communication to the well bore is a common completion procedure in limestone and calcareous sandstone reservoirs. In reservoirs containing solid hydrocarbon, acid etches the substrate and releases solid hydrocarbon, which migrates in the pore system and bridges pore throats. Differential well-bore pressure also may cause solid hydrocarbon to migrate. Therefore, wettability, which controls hydrocarbon adhesion to the pore walls, and the dominant morphotype are important factors in the extent of reservoir damage.

  9. Characterization of DPOAE fine structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, Karen; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2005-01-01

    , and has recently been demonstrated to exist in low level equal-loudness contours. The character of the DPOAE fine structure depends on several parameters, i.e., level, frequencies, and frequency of the two primaries, but also level and character of the noise floor. The prevalence and character of the fine......The distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) fine structure is revealed, when measuring DPOAE with a very fine frequency resolution. It is characterized by consistent maxima and minima with notches of up to 20 dB depth. The fine structure is known also from absolute hearing thresholds...... structures are highly individual, and till now no standardized method has been suggested for a consistent categorization. In the present paper a method developed for the categorization of fine structures is presented. The method has been used in two previous studies on the prevalence of fine structures, 1...

  10. Percolation phenomena in diffusion-controlled polymer matrix systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐铜文; 何炳林

    1997-01-01

    The controlled release of two kinds of drugs,5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and hydrocortisonum (Hydro.) loaded in poly(ethylene-vinylalcohol) (EVAL) was dealt with,of which 5-FU/EVAL and Hydro /EVAL matrix systems are composed.The results were analyzed using the pseudo-steady-diffusion models coupled with the fundamental concepts of percolation theory.The percolation thresholds for the two systems were calculated,which could indicate the contributions of pore diffusion and matrix diffusion.

  11. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2015-04-01

    In extremely dynamic microhabitats as bio-pores made by earthworm, the in situ enzyme activities are assumed as a footprint of complex biotic interactions. Our study focused on the effect of earthworm on the enzyme activities inside bio-pores and visualizing the differences between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil by zymography technique (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2013). For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in bio-pores. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworms, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine-aminopeptidase, and phosphatase. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. However, the differences in activity of cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase between bio-pore and bulk soil were less pronounced. This demonstrated an applicability of zymography approach to monitor and to distinguish the in situ activity of hydrolytic enzymes in soil biopores.

  12. Desalination of masonry structures: Fine tuning of pore size distribution of poultices to substrate properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2010-01-01

    Desalination is a relatively new intervention in the field of conservation of architectural heritage. Especially the desalination of immovable objects, such as masonry structures, is still a trial-error practice. In the field, different desalination materials and methods are used, sometimes with

  13. Desalination of masonry structures: Fine tuning of pore size distribution of poultices to substrate properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2010-01-01

    Desalination is a relatively new intervention in the field of conservation of architectural heritage. Especially the desalination of immovable objects, such as masonry structures, is still a trial-error practice. In the field, different desalination materials and methods are used, sometimes with uns

  14. Pore REconstruction and Segmentation (PORES) method for improved porosity quantification of nanoporous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Eyndhoven, G., E-mail: geert.vaneyndhoven@uantwerpen.be [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Kurttepeli, M. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Van Oers, C.J.; Cool, P. [Laboratory of Adsorption and Catalysis, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Bals, S. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Batenburg, K.J. [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, Science Park 123, NL-1090 GB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mathematical Institute, Universiteit Leiden, Niels Bohrweg 1, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Sijbers, J. [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2015-01-15

    Electron tomography is currently a versatile tool to investigate the connection between the structure and properties of nanomaterials. However, a quantitative interpretation of electron tomography results is still far from straightforward. Especially accurate quantification of pore-space is hampered by artifacts introduced in all steps of the processing chain, i.e., acquisition, reconstruction, segmentation and quantification. Furthermore, most common approaches require subjective manual user input. In this paper, the PORES algorithm “POre REconstruction and Segmentation” is introduced; it is a tailor-made, integral approach, for the reconstruction, segmentation, and quantification of porous nanomaterials. The PORES processing chain starts by calculating a reconstruction with a nanoporous-specific reconstruction algorithm: the Simultaneous Update of Pore Pixels by iterative REconstruction and Simple Segmentation algorithm (SUPPRESS). It classifies the interior region to the pores during reconstruction, while reconstructing the remaining region by reducing the error with respect to the acquired electron microscopy data. The SUPPRESS reconstruction can be directly plugged into the remaining processing chain of the PORES algorithm, resulting in accurate individual pore quantification and full sample pore statistics. The proposed approach was extensively validated on both simulated and experimental data, indicating its ability to generate accurate statistics of nanoporous materials. - Highlights: • An electron tomography reconstruction/segmentation method for nanoporous materials. • The method exploits the porous nature of the scanned material. • Validated extensively on both simulation and real data experiments. • Results in increased image resolution and improved porosity quantification.

  15. Prediction total specific pore volume of geopolymers produced from waste ashes by fuzzy logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nazari

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, total specific pore volume of inorganic polymers (geopolymers made from seeded fly ash and rice husk bark ash has been predicted by fuzzy logic. Different specimens, made from a mixture of fly ash and rice husk bark ash in fine and coarse form together with alkali activator made of water glass and NaOH solution, were subjected to porosimetry tests at 7 and 28 days of curing. The curing regime was different: one set of the specimens were cured at room temperature until reaching to 7 and 28 days and the other sets were oven cured for 36 hours at the range of 40-90 °C and then cured at room temperature until 7 and 28 days. A model based on fuzzy logic for predicting the total specific pore volume of the specimens has been presented. To build the model, training and testing using experimental results from 120 specimens were conducted. The used data as the inputs of fuzzy logic models are arranged in a format of six parameters that cover the percentage of fine fly ash in the ashes mixture, the percentage of coarse fly ash in the ashes mixture, the percentage of fine rice husk bark ash in the ashes mixture, the percentage of coarse rice husk bark ash in the ashes mixture, the temperature of curing and the time of water curing. According to the input parameters, in the fuzzy logic model, the pore volume of each specimen was predicted. The training and testing results in the fuzzy logic model have shown a strong potential for predicting the total specific pore volume of the geopolymer specimens in the considered range.

  16. Dynamics of ethanol and water mixtures observed in a self-adjusting molecularly thin slit pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, N; Sokolov, I M; Rabe, J P

    2014-04-01

    The structure of multicomponent fluids in confined geometries is a key to understanding their properties. However, it remains an experimental challenge to gain molecular-scale resolution information on this structure. Here we show that mono- and multilayers of graphene, conforming to heterogeneous monolayers of molecules in a flexible slit pore between a mica surface and the graphene layers, allow for mapping the phase separation of water and ethanol within such a slit pore. Employing scanning force microscopy, we readily distinguish clusters of ethanol and water molecules due their different sizes, and we show that the phase separated water-ethanol structures become coarser under thicker graphenes. Moreover, we obtain a lower bound for the two-dimensional diffusion coefficient of ethanol in water of D ≥ 2 × 10(-14) m(2) s(-1). Thus, the molecularly thin slit pore provides a powerful tool to control and to investigate mixed fluids in self-adjusting nanopores.

  17. Anisotropy of the Subsoil Pore System As Affected by High Mechanical Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berisso, Feto Esimo; Schjønning, Per; Keller, Thomas

    Arrangements of elementary soil particles during soil formation in combination with biological activity by plant roots and earthworms may yield anisotropy of the non-tilled subsoil pore system. Soil compaction by agricultural machinery is known to affect the soil pore characteristics but only few...... studies have addressed its effect on the soil pore anisotropy. We addressed anisotropy in two long-term field compaction experiments in Finland (clay) and Sweden (sandy loam) that were established in 1980 and 1995, respectively. In 2009/2010, soil cores of 100 cm3 were collected vertically...... and horizontally at 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 0.9 m depths (the two lower depths only in Sweden) in two treatments (compacted and control). Water retention, air permeability (ka) and gas diffusivity (Ds/Do) were determined in the laboratory. We defined an anisotropy factor (AF) as the ratio of a certain soil property...

  18. Tumor Microvasculature: Endothelial Leakiness and Endothelial Pore Size Distribution in a Breast Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.E. Uzgiris

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor endothelial leakiness is quantified in a rat mammary adenocarcinoma model using dynamic contrast enhancement MRI and contrast agents of widely varying sizes. The contrast agents were constructed to be of globular configuration and have their uptake rate into tumor interstitium be driven by the same diffusion process and limited only by the availability of endothelial pores of passable size. It was observed that the endothelial pore distribution has a steep power law dependence on size, r−β, with an exponent of −4.1. The model of large pore dominance in tumor leakiness as reported in some earlier investigation with fluorescent probes and optical chamber methods is rejected for this tumor model and a number of other tumor types including chemically induced tumors. This steep power law dependence on size is also consistent with observations on human breast cancer.

  19. Comparison of Pore Water Chemical Extracted by Different Forces with In-situ Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, N.; Machida, I.; Marui, A.; Scheytt, T.; Hebig, K. H.

    2010-12-01

    Due to the difficulty involved for in-situ sampling of groundwater, pore water was extracted from rock core samples for chemical analysis. Available literature indicated that, the chemical constituents of pore water are affected by large extraction force. This study is therefore aimed at discussing the reason behind the change in pore water chemistry when samples are subjected to different extraction forces. The process involved extraction of pore water from sandstone core samples at different pF values by centrifuge method. The pF expresses the tension of water, retained in soil. It is the base 10 logarithm of tension, which is measured as a head of water head in centimeters. The samples of lengths 100 m each were obtained from three locations. Tracer test using Iodine was also conducted to remove pore water polluted by drilling water. Pore water was extracted from a total of 63 samples at three different values of pF (low: up to pF 2.3, medium: pF 2.3 - 3.9, high: pF 3.9 - 4.3). For each pF range the pore water was analyzed for major anions and cations. Results showed variation of ionic concentrations with pF and depth. The average concentrations rose with increase of pF in all ions except for potassium. Based on the concentration distribution of Ca2+, three zones could be defined: (1) Ca2+ concentration, which does not depend on pF, (2) Ca2+ concentration, which increases with the value of pF and (3) Ca2+ showing the same value for medium and high pF values. It is thus concluded that, water chemistry of deep pore water is likely to have reached equilibrium due to almost stagnant flow conditions, whereas shallow water is likely to participate in chemical interactions due to the relatively high flow velocity. The depths of the interfaces of these three zones are almost consistent with geological boundaries of weathered and fine sandstone and there is evidence of a relationship between pore water chemistry and physical rock properties. Using this knowledge, we

  20. Energetics of Transport through the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ghavami

    Full Text Available Molecular transport across the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells is solely controlled by the nuclear pore complex (NPC. The NPC provides two types of nucleocytoplasmic transport: passive diffusion of small molecules and active chaperon-mediated translocation of large molecules. It has been shown that the interaction between intrinsically disordered proteins that line the central channel of the NPC and the transporting cargoes is the determining factor, but the exact mechanism of transport is yet unknown. Here, we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to quantify the energy barrier that has to be overcome for molecules to pass through the NPC. We focus on two aspects of transport. First, the passive transport of model cargo molecules with different sizes is studied and the size selectivity feature of the NPC is investigated. Our results show that the transport probability of cargoes is significantly reduced when they are larger than ∼5 nm in diameter. Secondly, we show that incorporating hydrophobic binding spots on the surface of the cargo effectively decreases the energy barrier of the pore. Finally, a simple transport model is proposed which characterizes the energy barrier of the NPC as a function of diameter and hydrophobicity of the transporting particles.

  1. The effect of pore fluid on seismicity: a computer model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The influence of fluid on seismicity of a computerized system is analyzed in this paper. The diffusion equation of fluid in a crustal fault area is developed and used in the calculation of a spring-slide-damper model. With mirror imagin boundary condition and three initial conditions, the equation is solved for a dynamic model that consists of six seismic belts and eight seismogenous sources in each belt with both explicit algorithm and implicit algorithm. The analysis of the model with water sources shows that the implicit algorithm is better to be used to calculate the model. Taking a constant proportion of the pore pressure of a broken element to that of its neighboring elements, the seismicity of the model is calculated with mirror boundary condition and no-water-source initial condition. The results shows that the frequency and magnitude of shocks are both higher than those in the model with no water pore pressure, which provides more complexity to earthquake prediction.

  2. Characterization of Microbial Transport in Cylindrical Pores%微生物在毛细圆孔中运移的模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刚洪泽; 刘梅堂; 牟伯中

    2006-01-01

    The mathematical model to characterize the transport of microorganisms in a finite-length cylindrical pore with the inside surface rich in microbial nutrients is developed, and the transport behavior of microorganisms in such a pore is discussed. Incorporated with key parameters such as microbial chemotaxis, diffusion, in-situ propagation and water flooding, this model is focused on the concentration profile of microorganisms in both radial and axial directions in the cylindrical pore during microbial transport under these parameters. Prediction by simulation based on the model shows that higher concentration of microorganism at and near the pore inside surface occurred during water flooding, and the radial concentration gradient in the cylindrical pore was consequently formed mainly due to microbial chemotaxis. Prediction also provides better understanding on the transport mechanism of microorganism in cylindrical pores, which is believed to be significant in the process of microbial enhanced oil recovery.

  3. Pore Structure Characterization of Indiana Limestone and Pink Dolomite from Pore Network Reconstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freire-Gormaly Marina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon sequestration in deep underground saline aquifers holds significant promise for reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions (CO2. However, challenges remain in predicting the long term migration of injected CO2. Addressing these challenges requires an understanding of pore-scale transport of CO2 within existing brine-filled geological reservoirs. Studies on the transport of fluids through geological porous media have predominantly focused on oil-bearing formations such as sandstone. However, few studies have considered pore-scale transport within limestone and other carbonate formations, which are found in potential storage sites. In this work, high-resolution micro-Computed Tomography (microCT was used to obtain pore-scale structural information of two model carbonates: Indiana Limestone and Pink Dolomite. A modified watershed algorithm was applied to extract pore network from the reconstructed microCT volumetric images of rock samples and compile a list of pore-scale characteristics from the extracted networks. These include statistical distributions of pore size and radius, pore-pore separation, throat radius, and network coordination. Finally, invasion percolation algorithms were applied to determine saturation-pressure curves for the rock samples. The statistical distributions were comparable to literature values for the Indiana Limestone. This served as validation for the network extraction approach for Pink Dolomite, which has not been considered previously. Based on the connectivity and the pore-pore separation, formations such as Pink Dolomite may present suitable storage sites for carbon storage. The pore structural distributions and saturation curves obtained in this study can be used to inform core- and reservoir-scale modeling and experimental studies of sequestration feasibility.

  4. Controlled synthesis of ordered mesoporous TiO{sub 2}-supported on activated carbon and pore-pore synergistic photocatalytic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chen; Li, Youji, E-mail: bcclyj@163.com; Xu, Peng; Li, Ming; Zeng, Mengxiong

    2015-01-15

    Ordered mesoporous titania/activated carbon (OMTAC) were prepared by the template technique with the aid of an ultrasonic method. To explore the relationship between the structure and properties of OMTAC, the ultrasonic-sol-gel technique was applied to synthesize titania dioxide/activated carbon (USTAC). The obtained material structure was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption – desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV diffuse reflectance (DRS) and Photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra. OMTAC photocatalytic performance was evaluated by means of acid red B (ARB) degradation. The pore-pore synergistic amplification mechanism of photocatalysis was proposed and the effects of catalytic conditions on synergistic amplification were explored. The results show that compared to OMT, OMTAC has a small particle size, low electron-hole recombination rate and high surface areas, due to the hindering effect of activated carbon on crystalline grain growth and an ordered mesoporous structure of titania. OMTAC has higher catalytic activity than USTAC, OMT and P25, due to pore-pore synergistic amplification effect of photocatalysis. The OMT content is strongly affected OMTAC photocatalytic activity, and OMTAC-3 (loading 3 times of OMT on AC) has the highest photocatalytic activity due to high hydroxyl concentration, surface area and low electron-hole recombination rate. When ARB is degraded by OMTAC-3, the optimum catalytic conditions are a catalyst concentration of 1 g/L, an ARB concentration of 15 mg/L and a pH of 5. - Graphical abstract: We investigate the influence of mesoporous titania content upon the photocatalytic performance of OMTAC in acid red B degradation. - Highlights: • OMTAC were fabricated by a template technique with the aid of an ultrasonic method. • OMTAC show high photoactivity for acid red B (ARB) degradation. • OMTAC also show pore-pore synergistic photocatalytic

  5. Exact calculation of the tortuosity in disordered linear pores in the Knudsen regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Stefanie

    2009-12-01

    The squared reciprocal tortuosity kappa-2=D/D0 for linear diffusion on lattices and in pores in the Knudsen regime is calculated analytically for a large variety of disordered systems. Here, D0 and D are the self-diffusion coefficients of the smooth and the corresponding disordered system, respectively. To this end, a building-block principle is developed that composes the systems into substructures without cross correlations between them. It is shown how the solutions of the different building blocks can be combined to gain D/D0 for pores of high complexity from the geometrical properties of the systems, i.e., from the volumes of the different substructures. As a test, numerical simulations are performed that agree perfectly with the theory.

  6. Linking particle and pore-size distribution parameters to soil gas transport properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    Accurate estimation of soil gas diffusivity (Dp/Do, the ratio of gas diffusion coefficients in soil and free air) and air permeability (ka) from basic texture and pore characteristics will be highly valuable for modeling soil gas transport and emission and their field-scale variations. From......, respectively) and the Campbell water retention parameter b were used to characterize particle and pore size distributions, respectively. Campbell b yielded a wide interval (4.6–26.2) and was highly correlated with α, β, and volumetric clay content. Both Dp/Do and ka followed simple power-law functions (PLFs...... also well (but relatively more weakly) correlated with the basic soil characteristics, again with the best correlations to volumetric clay content and b. As a first attempt at developing a simple Dp/Do model useful at the field scale, we extended the classical Buckingham Dp/Do model (εa2) by a scaling...

  7. Modeling branching pore structures in membrane filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaei, Pejman; Cummings, Linda J.

    2016-11-01

    Membrane filters are in widespread industrial use, and mathematical models to predict their efficacy are potentially very useful, as such models can suggest design modifications to improve filter performance and lifetime. Many models have been proposed to describe particle capture by membrane filters and the associated fluid dynamics, but most such models are based on a very simple structure in which the pores of the membrane are assumed to be simple circularly-cylindrical tubes spanning the depth of the membrane. Real membranes used in applications usually have much more complex geometry, with interconnected pores which may branch and bifurcate. Pores are also typically larger on the upstream side of the membrane than on the downstream side. We present an idealized mathematical model, in which a membrane consists of a series of bifurcating pores, which decrease in size as the membrane is traversed. Feed solution is forced through the membrane by applied pressure, and particles are removed from the feed either by sieving, or by particle adsorption within pores (which shrinks them). Thus the membrane's permeability decreases as the filtration progresses, ultimately falling to zero. We discuss how filtration efficiency depends on the characteristics of the branching structure. Partial support from NSF DMS 1261596 is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Performance of Small Pore Microchannel Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Gummin, M. A.; Ravinett, T.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Edgar, M.

    1995-01-01

    Small pore size microchannel plates (MCP's) are needed to satisfy the requirements for future high resolution small and large format detectors for astronomy. MCP's with pore sizes in the range 5 micron to 8 micron are now being manufactured, but they are of limited availability and are of small size. We have obtained sets of Galileo 8 micron and 6.5 micron MCP's, and Philips 6 micron and 7 micron pore MCP's, and compared them to our larger pore MCP Z stacks. We have tested back to back MCP stacks of four of these MCP's and achieved gains greater than 2 x 1O(exp 7) with pulse height distributions of less than 40% FWHM, and background rates of less than 0.3 events sec(exp -1) cm(exp -2). Local counting rates up to approx. 100 events/pore/sec have been attained with little drop of the MCP gain. The bare MCP quantum efficiencies are somewhat lower than those expected, however. Flat field images are characterized by an absence of MCP fixed pattern noise.

  9. Modeling Tissue Growth Within Nonwoven Scaffolds Pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jeffrey S.; Alexander, David L.J.; Russell, Stephen J.; Ingham, Eileen; Ramshaw, John A.M.; Werkmeister, Jerome A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we present a novel approach for predicting tissue growth within the pores of fibrous tissue engineering scaffolds. Thin nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate scaffolds were prepared to characterize tissue growth within scaffold pores, by mouse NR6 fibroblast cells. On the basis of measurements of tissue lengths at fiber crossovers and along fiber segments, mathematical models were determined during the proliferative phase of cell growth. Tissue growth at fiber crossovers decreased with increasing interfiber angle, with exponential relationships determined on day 6 and 10 of culture. Analysis of tissue growth along fiber segments determined two growth profiles, one with enhanced growth as a result of increased tissue lengths near the fiber crossover, achieved in the latter stage of culture. Derived mathematical models were used in the development of a software program to visualize predicted tissue growth within a pore. This study identifies key pore parameters that contribute toward tissue growth, and suggests models for predicting this growth, based on fibroblast cells. Such models may be used in aiding scaffold design, for optimum pore infiltration during the tissue engineering process. PMID:20687775

  10. Analysis of a spatially deconvolved solar pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Noda, C.; Shimizu, T.; Ruiz Cobo, B.; Suematsu, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ichimoto, K.

    2016-08-01

    Solar pores are active regions with large magnetic field strengths and apparent simple magnetic configurations. Their properties resemble the ones found for the sunspot umbra although pores do not show penumbra. Therefore, solar pores present themselves as an intriguing phenomenon that is not completely understood. We examine in this work a solar pore observed with Hinode/SP using two state of the art techniques. The first one is the spatial deconvolution of the spectropolarimetric data that allows removing the stray light contamination induced by the spatial point spread function of the telescope. The second one is the inversion of the Stokes profiles assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium that let us to infer the atmospheric physical parameters. After applying these techniques, we found that the spatial deconvolution method does not introduce artefacts, even at the edges of the magnetic structure, where large horizontal gradients are detected on the atmospheric parameters. Moreover, we also describe the physical properties of the magnetic structure at different heights finding that, in the inner part of the solar pore, the temperature is lower than outside, the magnetic field strength is larger than 2 kG and unipolar, and the line-of-sight velocity is almost null. At neighbouring pixels, we found low magnetic field strengths of same polarity and strong downward motions that only occur at the low photosphere, below the continuum optical depth log τ = -1. Finally, we studied the spatial relation between different atmospheric parameters at different heights corroborating the physical properties described before.

  11. Modeling of gas phase diffusion transport during chemical vapor infiltration process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖鹏; 李娣; 徐永东; 黄伯云

    2002-01-01

    In order to improve the uniformity of both the concentration of gaseous reagent and the deposition of matrix within micro-pores during the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process, a calculation modeling of gas phase diffusion transport within micro-pores was established. Taken CH3SiCl3 as precursor for depositing SiC as example, the diffusion coefficient, decomposing reaction rate, concentration within the reactor, and concentration distributing profiling of MTS within micro-pore were accounted, respectively. The results indicate that, increasing the ratio of diffusion coefficient to decomposition rate constant of precursor MTS is propitious to decrease the densification gradient of parts, and decreasing the aspect ratio (L/D) of micro-pore is favorable to make the concentration uniform within pores.

  12. Role of tentacles and protein loading on pore accessibility and mass transfer in cation exchange materials for proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Helen; Coquebert de Neuville, Bertrand; Storti, Giuseppe; Morbidelli, Massimo; Joehnck, Matthias; Schulte, Michael

    2013-04-12

    In protein chromatography, the size of the protein determines which fraction of pores it can access within a resin and at which rate of diffusion. Moreover, in the presence of grafted polymers like in advanced materials, adsorbed proteins and electrolytes complicate the interaction pore-protein. In this study, we evaluated in a comparative way the behavior of Fractogel EMD SO3 (M) and (S), "tentacle"-type, strong cation exchangers, as well as a reference material without tentacles, all of which are commonly used for protein purification. ISEC experiments were carried out with a set of Dextran tracers of largely different molecular size covering the typical range of protein sizes. Experimental values of porosity (internal and external to the particles) as well as of pore diffusion coefficients have been measured at different NaCl concentrations and under protein loading. These results provide useful insights into the complex interplay among mentioned factors: first, the presence of tentacles induces size exclusion selectivity in the materials; second, the salt induces conformational changes of the tentacles, leading to porosities larger than expected in tentacle materials; third, protein adsorption mainly leads to a reduction of porosity due to pore space occupied by the protein and to a decrease of pore diffusion coefficient.

  13. TIG Dressing Effects on Weld Pores and Pore Cracking of Titanium Weldments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jun Yi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Weld pores redistribution, the effectiveness of using tungsten inert gas (TIG dressing to remove weld pores, and changes in the mechanical properties due to the TIG dressing of Ti-3Al-2.5V weldments were studied. Moreover, weld cracks due to pores were investigated. The results show that weld pores less than 300 μm in size are redistributed or removed via remelting due to TIG dressing. Regardless of the temperature condition, TIG dressing welding showed ductility, and there was a loss of 7% tensile strength of the weldments. Additionally, it was considered that porosity redistribution by TIG dressing was due to fluid flow during the remelting of the weld pool. Weld cracks in titanium weldment create branch cracks around pores that propagate via the intragranular fracture, and oxygen is dispersed around the pores. It is suggested that the pore locations around the LBZ (local brittle zone and stress concentration due to the pores have significant effects on crack initiation and propagation.

  14. Chromatographic performance of large-pore versus small-pore columns in micellar liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Timothy J; Foley, Joe P; Lloyd, David K

    2003-02-25

    Micellar liquid chromatography (MLC) is useful in bioanalysis because proteinaceous biofluids can be directly injected onto the column. The technique has been limited in part because of the apparently weak eluting power of micellar mobile phases. It has recently been shown [Anal. Chem. 72 (2000) 294] that this may be overcome by the use of large pore size stationary phases. In this work, large-pore (1000 A) C(18) stationary phases were evaluated relative to conventional small-pore (100 A) C(18) stationary phases for the direct sample injection of drugs in plasma. Furthermore, the difference between the large and small pore phases in gradient elution separations of mixtures of widely varying hydrophobicities was investigated. Large-pore stationary phases were found to be very effective for eluting moderately to highly hydrophobic compounds such as ibuprofen, crotamiton, propranolol, and dodecanophenone, which were highly retained on the small-pore stationary phases typically used in MLC. The advantages of direct introduction of biological samples (drugs in plasma) and rapid column re-equilibration after gradient elution in MLC were maintained with large-pore phases. Finally, recoveries, precision, linearity, and detection limits for the determination of quinidine and DPC 961 in spiked bovine plasma were somewhat better using MLC with wide pore phases.

  15. Modeling of N2 adsorption in MCM-41 materials: hexagonal pores versus cylindrical pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, Eugene A

    2009-07-07

    Low-temperature nitrogen adsorption in hexagonal pores and equivalent cylindrical pores is analyzed using nonlocal density functional theory extended to amorphous solids (NLDFT-AS). It is found that, despite significant difference of the density distribution over the cross-section of the pore, the capillary condensation/evaporation pressure is not considerably affected by the pore shape being slightly lower in the case of hexagonal geometry. However, the condensation/evaporation step in the hexagonal pore is slightly larger than that in the equivalent cylindrical pore because in the latter case the pore wall surface area and, hence, the amount adsorbed at pressures below the evaporation pressure are underestimated by 5%. We show that a dimensionless parameter defined as the ratio of the condensation/evaporation step and the upper value of the amount adsorbed at the condensation/evaporation pressure can be used as an additional criterion of the correct choice of the gas-solid molecular parameters along with the dependence of condensation/evaporation pressure on the pore diameter. Application of the criteria to experimental data on nitrogen adsorption on a series of MCM-41 silica at 77 K corroborates some evidence that the capillary condensation occurs at equilibrium conditions.

  16. Diffuse scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostorz, G. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Angewandte Physik, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    While Bragg scattering is characteristic for the average structure of crystals, static local deviations from the average lattice lead to diffuse elastic scattering around and between Bragg peaks. This scattering thus contains information on the occupation of lattice sites by different atomic species and on static local displacements, even in a macroscopically homogeneous crystalline sample. The various diffuse scattering effects, including those around the incident beam (small-angle scattering), are introduced and illustrated by typical results obtained for some Ni alloys. (author) 7 figs., 41 refs.

  17. CO{sub 2} Geologic Storage: Coupled Hydro-Chemo-Thermo-Mechanical Phenomena - From Pore-scale Processes to Macroscale Implications -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamarina, J. Carlos

    2013-05-31

    Global energy consumption will increase in the next decades and it is expected to largely rely on fossil fuels. The use of fossil fuels is intimately related to CO{sub 2} emissions and the potential for global warming. Geological CO{sub 2} storage aims to mitigate the global warming problem by sequestering CO{sub 2} underground. Coupled hydro-chemo-mechanical phenomena determine the successful operation and long term stability of CO{sub 2} geological storage. This research explores coupled phenomena, identifies different zones in the storage reservoir, and investigates their implications in CO{sub 2} geological storage. In particular, the research: Explores spatial patterns in mineral dissolution and precipitation (comprehensive mass balance formulation); experimentally determines the interfacial properties of water, mineral, and CO{sub 2} systems (including CO{sub 2}-water-surfactant mixtures to reduce the CO{sub 2}- water interfacial tension in view of enhanced sweep efficiency); analyzes the interaction between clay particles and CO{sub 2}, and the response of sediment layers to the presence of CO{sub 2} using specially designed experimental setups and complementary analyses; couples advective and diffusive mass transport of species, together with mineral dissolution to explore pore changes during advection of CO{sub 2}-dissolved water along a rock fracture; upscales results to a porous medium using pore network simulations; measures CO{sub 2} breakthrough in highly compacted fine-grained sediments, shale and cement specimens; explores sealing strategies; and experimentally measures CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} replacement in hydrate-bearing sediments during. Analytical, experimental and numerical results obtained in this study can be used to identify optimal CO{sub 2} injection and reservoir-healing strategies to maximize the efficiency of CO{sub 2} injection and to attain long-term storage.

  18. Moving Magnetic Features around a Pore

    CERN Document Server

    Kaithakkal, A J; Solanki, S K; Lagg, A; Barthol, P; Gandorfer, A; Gizon, L; Hirzberger, J; vanNoort, M; Rodríguez, J Blanco; Iniesta, J C Del Toro; Suárez, D Orozco; Schmidt, W; Pillet, V Martínez; Knölker, M

    2016-01-01

    Spectropolarimetric observations from Sunrise II/IMaX obtained in June 2013 are used for a statistical analysis to determine the physical properties of moving magnetic features (MMFs) observed near a pore. MMFs of the same and opposite polarity with respect to the pore are found to stream from its border at an average speed of 1.3 km s$^{-1}$ and 1.2 km s$^{-1}$ respectively, with mainly same-polarity MMFs found further away from the pore. MMFs of both polarities are found to harbor rather weak, inclined magnetic fields. Opposite-polarity MMFs are blue-shifted, while same-polarity MMFs do not show any preference for up- or downflows. Most of the MMFs are found to be of sub-arcsecond size and carry a mean flux of $\\sim$ 1.2$\\times 10^{17}$ Mx.

  19. Optical detection of pores in adipocyte membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanina, I. Yu.; Doubrovski, V. A.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    Structures that can be interpreted as cytoplasm droplets leaking through the membrane are experimentally detected on the membranes of adipocytes using optical digital microscopy. The effect of an aqueous alcohol solution of brilliant green on the amount and sizes of structures is studied. It is demonstrated that the optical irradiation of the adipocytes that are sensitized with the aid of the brilliant green leads to an increase in the amount of structures (pores) after the irradiation. The experimental results confirm the existence of an earlier-proposed effect of photochemical action on the sensitized cells of adipose tissue that involves additional formation of pores in the membrane of the sensitized cell under selective optical irradiation. The proposed method for the detection of micropores in the membrane of adipose tissue based on the detection of the cytoplasm droplets leaking from the cell can be considered as a method for the optical detection of nanosized pores.

  20. Nanomodified compositions based on finely dispersed binders for soil reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimov Lev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical prerequisites on the possibility of improvement of physical and mechanical properties of soils at underground space development, their stability at different aggressive actions by means of their structure impregnation with nanomodified suspensions on the basis of especially finely dispersed mineral binders are developed. The features of influence of plasticizers on penetration ability and sedimentation stability of suspensions are revealed. Soil body reinforcement after its impregnation may achieve considerable values, which is related to the features of interaction of components of impregnating composition with extended surface of soil pore space.

  1. Chaotic advection at the pore scale: Mechanisms, upscaling and implications for macroscopic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, D. R.; Trefry, M. G.; Metcalfe, G.

    2016-11-01

    The macroscopic spreading and mixing of solute plumes in saturated porous media is ultimately controlled by processes operating at the pore scale. Whilst the conventional picture of pore-scale mechanical dispersion and molecular diffusion leading to persistent hydrodynamic dispersion is well accepted, this paradigm is inherently two-dimensional (2D) in nature and neglects important three-dimensional (3D) phenomena. We discuss how the kinematics of steady 3D flow at the pore scale generate chaotic advection-involving exponential stretching and folding of fluid elements-the mechanisms by which it arises and implications of microscopic chaos for macroscopic dispersion and mixing. Prohibited in steady 2D flow due to topological constraints, these phenomena are ubiquitous due to the topological complexity inherent to all 3D porous media. Consequently 3D porous media flows generate profoundly different fluid deformation and mixing processes to those of 2D flow. The interplay of chaotic advection and broad transit time distributions can be incorporated into a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) framework to predict macroscopic solute mixing and spreading. We show how these results may be generalised to real porous architectures via a CTRW model of fluid deformation, leading to stochastic models of macroscopic dispersion and mixing which both honour the pore-scale kinematics and are directly conditioned on the pore-scale architecture.

  2. A Pore-Centric Model for Combined Shrinkage and Gas Porosity in Alloy Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalajzadeh, Vahid; Carlson, Kent D.; Backman, Daniel G.; Beckermann, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    A unified model has been developed for combined gas- and shrinkage-induced pore formation during solidification of metal alloys. The model is based on a pore-centric approach, in which the temporal evolution of the pore radius is calculated as a function of cooling rate, thermal gradient, gas diffusion, and shrinkage. It accounts for the effect of porosity formation on the liquid velocity within the mushy zone. Simulations for an aluminum alloy show that the porosity transitions smoothly from shrinkage-induced to gas-induced as the Niyama value is increased. A Blake (cavitation) instability is observed to occur when the porosity is both gas- and shrinkage-driven. A revised dimensionless Niyama curve for pure shrinkage is presented. The experimentally observed gas porosity trend that the pore volume decreases with increasing cooling rate is well predicted. The pore-centric formulation allows the present model to be solved locally, at any point in a casting, during a regular casting simulation.

  3. Limestone characterization to model damage from acidic precipitation: Effect of pore structure on mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leith, S.D.; Reddy, M.M.; Irez, W.F.; Heymans, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    The pore structure of Salem limestone is investigated, and conclusions regarding the effect of the pore geometry on modeling moisture and contaminant transport are discussed based on thin section petrography, scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, and nitrogen adsorption analyses. These investigations are compared to and shown to compliment permeability and capillary pressure measurements for this common building stone. Salem limestone exhibits a bimodal pore size distribution in which the larger pores provide routes for convective mass transfer of contaminants into the material and the smaller pores lead to high surface area adsorption and reaction sites. Relative permeability and capillary pressure measurements of the air/water system indicate that Salem limestone exhibits high capillarity end low effective permeability to water. Based on stone characterization, aqueous diffusion and convection are believed to be the primary transport mechanisms for pollutants in this stone. The extent of contaminant accumulation in the stone depends on the mechanism of partitioning between the aqueous and solid phases. The described characterization techniques and modeling approach can be applied to many systems of interest such as acidic damage to limestone, mass transfer of contaminants in concrete and other porous building materials, and modeling pollutant transport in subsurface moisture zones.

  4. Eutrophication in the northern Adriatic Sea: Pore water and sediment studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, D.E.; Berelson, W.M. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)); Giordani, P.; Langone, L.; Frignani, M.; Ravaioli, M. (Inst. di Geologia Marina, CNR, Bologna (Italy))

    1990-01-09

    The northern Adriatic Sea has been plagued by problems of eutrophication. This area is relatively shallow (maximum depth = 60m), becoming stratified during the summer months which inhibits oxygen transport to bottom waters. Anthropogenic nutrient loading in rivers entering the northern Adriatic (Po River being the largest) has increased nutrient input to this system and stimulated algal growth. Cores were collected for studies of pore water and solid phase chemistry at 6 stations in this region. [sup 210]Pb was used to constrain sediment accumulation rates and a range of 0-0.5 cm/yr was determined at different stations. Excess [sup 234]Th was only found in the upper 1-2 cm, suggesting that bioturbation is largely restricted to shallow depths. Pore water profiles show evidence of irrigation, and mean diffusive fluxes for oxygen, silica phosphate and ammonia are generally 20-90% of the fluxes obtained from benthic chamber measurements. This is consistent with previous work in this area in which studies of radon fluxes indicated that irrigation plays an important role in sediment-water exchange. Pore water profiles in the northern portion of the study area (near the Po River Delta) were markedly different than profiles in the south; sediments in the north are substantially more acidic and have high concentrations of dissolved iron and phosphate. From the alkalinity vs. TCO[sub 2] relationship in sediment pore waters it appears that differences in reactions involving the reduction of iron oxides and the exchange of magnesium for iron in clays are responsible for this regional difference in pore water properties. Sediments close to the Po apparently undergo more iron-magnesium exchange, while more distal sediments are limited in their ability to do so. Other pore water observations are limited in their ability to do so. Other pore water observations and trends regarding the shape of the silica profiles (which show shallow maxima) will be discussed.

  5. Transient pore pressure response to confining stress excursions in Berea sandstone flooded with an aqueous solution of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Jackson B.; Cooper, Clay A.

    2014-06-01

    We measured the pore pressure response due to carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubble nucleation and growth in a Berea sandstone core flooded with an initially subsaturated aqueous solution of CO2, in response to a rapid drop in confining stress, under conditions representative of a confined aquifer. A portion of the CO2 in the Earth's crust, derived from volcanic, magmatic, and biogenic sources, dissolves in groundwater. Sudden reductions in confining stress in the Earth's crust occur due to dilational strain generated by the propagation of seismic Rayleigh and P waves, or aseismic slip in the near field of earthquakes. A drop in confining stress produces a proportional drop in pore fluid pressure. When the pore fluid contains dissolved CO2, the pore pressure responds to a drop in confining stress like it does in the dissolved gas-free case, until the pore pressure falls below the bubble pressure. Gas bubble nucleation and diffusive growth in the pore space trigger spontaneous, transient buildup of the pore fluid pressure, and reduction of effective stress. We measured the rate of pore fluid pressure buildup in the 100 s immediately following the confining stress drop, as a function of the saturation with respect to CO2 at the lowest pore pressure realized during the confining stress drop, using five different CO2 partial pressures. The rate scales with the saturation with respect to dissolved CO2, from 10 kPa/min at 1.25 to 166 kPa/min at 1.8. The net pore pressure rise was as large as 0.7 MPa (100 psi) over 5 h.

  6. Pore Pressure Measurements Inside Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgason, Einar; Burcharth, H. F.; Grüne, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    The present paper presents pore pressure measurements from large scale model tests performed at the Large Wave Channel, Hannover, Germany and small scale model test performed at the Hydraulic & Coastal Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University, Denmark. Information on pore pressure attenuation......, and compared to a damping model presented by Burcharth et al. (1999). Reasonable agreement is found when considering the difference in the grading and uniformity of the model core materials. Comparison between results obtained from small and large scale model tests showed no clear evidence of scale effects....

  7. Porous media fluid transport and pore structure

    CERN Document Server

    Dullien, F A L

    1992-01-01

    This book examines the relationship between transport properties and pore structure of porous material. Models of pore structure are presented with a discussion of how such models can be used to predict the transport properties of porous media. Portions of the book are devoted to interpretations of experimental results in this area and directions for future research. Practical applications are given where applicable, and are expected to be useful for a large number of different fields, including reservoir engineering, geology, hydrogeology, soil science, chemical process engineering, biomedica

  8. Diffusion and emissions of 1,3-dichloro propene in Florida sandy soil in microplots affected by soil moisture, organic matter, and plastic film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John E; Allen, L Hartwell; McCormack, Leslie A; Vu, Joseph C; Dickson, Donald W; Ou, Li-Tse

    2004-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the influence of soil moisture, organic matter amendment and plastic cover (a virtually impermeable film, VIF) on diffusion and emissions of (Z)- and (E)-1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) in microplots of Florida sandy soil (Arredondo fine sand). Upward diffusion of the two isomers in the Arredondo soil without a plastic cover was greatly influenced by soil-water content and (Z)-1,3-D diffused faster than (E)-1,3-D. In less than 5 h after 1,3-D injection to 30 cm depth, (Z)- and (E)-1,3-D in air dry soil had diffused to a 10 cm depth, whereas diffusion for the two isomers was negligible in near-water-saturated soil, even 101 h after injection. The diffusion rate of (Z)- and (E)-1,3-D in near-field-capacity soil was between the rates in the two water regimes. Yard waste compost (YWC) amendment greatly reduced diffusion of (Z)- and (E)-1,3-D, even in air-dry soil. Although upward diffusion of (Z)- and (E)-1,3-D in soil with VIF cover was slightly less than in the corresponding bare soil; the cover promoted retention of vapors of the two isomers in soil pore air in the shallow subsurface. More (Z)-1,3-D vapor was found initially in soil pore air than (E)-1,3-D although the difference declined thereafter. As a result of rapid upward movement in air-dry bare soil, (Z)- and (E)-1,3-D were rapidly volatilized into the atmosphere, but emissions from the near-water-saturated soil were minimal. Virtually impermeable film and YWC amendment retarded emissions. This study indicated that adequate soil water in this sandy soil is needed to prevent rapid emissions, but excess soil water slows diffusion of (Z)- and (E)-1,3-D. Thus, management for optimum water in soil is critical for pesticidal efficacy and the environment.

  9. Dendrimer-like hybrid particles with tunable hierarchical pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xin; Li, Xiaoyu; Huang, Hongwei; He, Junhui; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-03-01

    Dendrimer-like silica particles with a center-radial dendritic framework and a synergistic hierarchical porosity have attracted much attention due to their unique open three-dimensional superstructures with high accessibility to the internal surface areas; however, the delicate regulation of the hierarchical porosity has been difficult to achieve up to now. Herein, a series of dendrimer-like amino-functionalized silica particles with tunable hierarchical pores (HPSNs-NH2) were successfully fabricated by carefully regulating and optimizing the various experimental parameters in the ethyl ether emulsion systems via a one-pot sol-gel reaction. Interestingly, the simple adjustment of the stirring rate or reaction temperature was found to be an easy and effective route to achieve the controllable regulation towards center-radial large pore sizes from ca. 37-267 (148 +/- 45) nm to ca. 8-119 (36 +/- 21) nm for HPSNs-NH2 with particle sizes of 300-700 nm and from ca. 9-157 (52 +/- 28) nm to ca. 8-105 (30 +/- 16) nm for HPSNs-NH2 with particle sizes of 100-320 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful regulation towards center-radial large pore sizes in such large ranges. The formation of HPSNs-NH2 may be attributed to the complex cross-coupling of two processes: the dynamic diffusion of ethyl ether molecules and the self-assembly of partially hydrolyzed TEOS species and CTAB molecules at the dynamic ethyl ether-water interface of uniform small quasi-emulsion droplets. Thus, these results regarding the elaborate regulation of center-radial large pores and particle sizes not only help us better understand the complicated self-assembly at the dynamic oil-water interface, but also provide a unique and ideal platform as carriers or supports for adsorption, separation, catalysis, biomedicine, and sensor.Dendrimer-like silica particles with a center-radial dendritic framework and a synergistic hierarchical porosity have attracted much attention due to their

  10. Effects of the Use of Pore Formers on Performance of an Anode supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haslam, J J; Pham, A; Chung, B W; DiCarlo, J F; Glass, R S

    2003-12-04

    The effects of amount of pore former used to produce porosity in the anode of an anode supported planar solid oxide fuel cell were examined. The pore forming material utilized was rice starch. The reduction rate of the anode material was measured by Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) to qualitatively characterize the gas transport within the porous anode materials. Fuel cells with varying amounts of porosity produced by using rice starch as a pore former were tested. The performance of the fuel cell was the greatest with an optimum amount of pore former used to create porosity in the anode. This optimum is believed to be related to a trade off between increasing gas diffusion to the active three-phase boundary region of the anode and the loss of performance due to the replacement of active three-phase boundary regions of the anode with porosity.

  11. Mesoporous ethanesilica materials with bimodal and trimodal pore-size distributions synthesised in the presence of cobalt ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alufelwi M. Tshavhungwe

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous organosilica materials containing ethane groups in their framework were formed with two and three pore sizes (i.e. bimodal and trimodal pores when synthesised by the sol-gel method in the presence of cobalt ions. The compounds 1,2-bistrimethoxysilylethane and tetraethylorthosilicate were used as silicon sources and the reactions were done in the presence of a surfactant, which served as a template. Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy revealed that organic functional groups were incorporated into the ethanesilica. Powder X-ray diffraction and nitrogen adsorption data indicated that the mesophase and textural properties (surface area, pore volume, pore diameter of the materials were dependent on the ageing temperature, the amount/ratio of silica precursors and cobalt ion incorporation. Secondary mesopores were drastically reduced by changing the ratio of silicon precursors.

  12. Relativistic diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Z

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed.

  13. Cold seeps in Monterey Bay, California: Geochemistry of pore waters and relationship to benthic foraminiferal calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieskes, Joris, E-mail: jgieskes@ucsd.edu [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States); Rathburn, Anthony E. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States)] [Indiana State University, Department of Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, IN 47809 (United States); Martin, Jonathan B. [University of Florida, Department of Geological Sciences, Gainesville, FL 32611-2120 (United States); Perez, M. Elena [Indiana State University, Department of Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, IN 47809 (United States)] [The Natural History Museum, Department of Palaeontology, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Mahn, Chris [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States); Bernhard, Joan M. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Geology and Geophysics Department, MS52, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Day, Shelley [University of Florida, Department of Geological Sciences, Gainesville, FL 32611-2120 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: > We describe the geochemistry of pore waters in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay. > The geochemical data are compared with the {delta}{sup 13}C chemistry of benthic foraminifera. > Living foraminifera indicate little effects of pore water low {delta}{sup 13}C (DIC) in the clam bed. > This phenomenon and its implications are discussed in detail. > Implications with regards to paleo-methane seepage are discussed. - Abstract: An extensive geochemical and biogeochemical examination of CH{sub 4} seeps in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay provides insight into the character of relationships between seep geochemistry and benthic foraminiferal geochemistry. The area is characterized by sulfide-rich fluids. Sulfide increases are associated with large increases in alkalinity, as well as small decreases in dissolved Ca and Mg. In addition, only small increases in NH{sub 4} are observed, but values of {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic C are as low as -60 per mille at shallow depths (<3 cm). These observations indicate that all these processes are related to the bacterial oxidation of CH{sub 4}, which is transported upward by slow seepage of pore fluids. The geochemistry of the pore fluids should be relevant to the geochemistry of the carbonate tests of living and dead foraminifera. However, a profound disequilibrium of approximately an order of magnitude occurs between the {delta}{sup 13}C values of stained (cytoplasm-containing) foraminiferal carbonate and the C isotope values of ambient pore water dissolved inorganic C. Reasons are unclear for this isotopic disequilibrium, but have important implications for interpretations of foraminiferal carbonate as a paleoenvironmental proxy. Much fine scale work is needed to fully understand the relationships between the biogeochemistry of benthic foraminifera and the geochemistry of the pore waters where they live.

  14. Production of multi-, oligo- and single-pore membranes using a continuous ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, P.Yu., E-mail: apel@nrmail.jinr.ru [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie Str. 6, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Dubna International University, Universitetskaya Str. 19, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Ivanov, O.M.; Lizunov, N.E.; Mamonova, T.I.; Nechaev, A.N. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie Str. 6, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Olejniczak, K. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie Str. 6, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarina Str. 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Vacik, J. [Nuclear Physics Institute, ASCR, v.v.i., 25068 Řež (Czech Republic); Dmitriev, S.N. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie Str. 6, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Ion track membranes (ITM) have attracted significant interest over the past two decades due to their numerous applications in physical, biological, chemical, biochemical and medical experimental works. A particular feature of ITM technology is the possibility to fabricate samples with a predetermined number of pores, including single-pore membranes. The present report describes a procedure that allowed for the production of multi-, oligo- and single-pore membranes using a continuous ion beam from an IC-100 cyclotron. The beam was scanned over a set of small diaphragms, from 17 to ∼1000 μm in diameter. Ions passed through the apertures and impinged two sandwiched polymer foils, with the total thickness close to the ion range in the polymer. The foils were pulled across the ion beam at a constant speed. The ratio between the transport speed and the scanning frequency determined the distance between irradiation spots. The beam intensity and the aperture diameters were adjusted such that either several, one or no ions passed through the diaphragms during one half-period of scanning. After irradiation, the lower foil was separated from the upper foil and was etched to obtain pores 6–8 μm in diameter. The pores were found using a color chemical reaction between two reagents placed on opposite sides of the foil. The located pores were further confirmed using SEM and optical microscopy. The numbers of tracks in the irradiation spots were consistent with the Poisson statistics. Samples with single or few tracks obtained in this way were employed to study fine phenomena in ion track nanopores.

  15. Ion diffusion in compacted bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehikoinen, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    In the study, a two-dimensional molecular-level diffusion model, based on a modified form of the Gouy-Chapman (GC) theory of the electrical double layers, for hydrated ionic species in compacted bentonite was developed. The modifications to the GC theory, which forms the very kernel of the diffusion model, stem from various non-conventional features: ionic hydration, dielectric saturation, finite ion-sizes and specific adsorption. The principal objectives of the study were met. With the aid of the consistent diffusion model, it is a relatively simple matter to explain the experimentally observed macroscopic exclusion for anions as well as the postulated, but greatly controversial, surface diffusion for cations. From purely theoretical grounds, it was possible to show that the apparent diffusivities of cations, anions and neutral molecules (i) do not exhibit order-or-magnitude differences, and (ii) are practically independent of the solution ionic strength used and, consequently, of the distribution coefficient, K{sub d}, unless they experience specific binding onto the substrate surface. It was also of interest to investigate the equilibrium anionic concentration distribution in the pore geometry of the GMM model as a function of the solution ionic strength, and to briefly speculate its consequences to diffusion. An explicit account of the filter-plate effect was taken by developing a computerised macroscopic diffusion model, which is based upon the very robust and efficient Laplace Transform Finite-Difference technique. Finally, the inherent limitations as well as the potential fields of applications of the models were addressed. (orig.) 45 refs.

  16. Influence of Calcium Sulfate State and Fineness of Cement on Hydration of Portland Cements Using Electrical Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Xiaosheng; LI Zongjin; XIAO Lianzhen; THONG Wangfai

    2006-01-01

    The influence of calcium sulfate state and fineness of cement on hydration of Portland cement was studied using electrical resistivity measurement. The bulk resistivity curve of the paste from the abnormal cement mainly with hemihydrate had a characteristic abnormal peak and rapid increase in early period. The resistivity measurement technique can be used to discriminate abnormal setting. For normal cement with gypsum, the increase in fineness of the Portland cement decreases the minimum resistivity due to a higher ionic concentration and increases the 24 hour resistivity due to a reduction in macroscopic pore size. Thesetting time, compressive strength, pore structure of pastes made from different cements were carried out to compare the influence of water to cement ratio, calcium sulfate state and fineness. It is found that the electrical and mechanical properties are strongly affected by the initial porosity, the presence of hemihydrate or gypsum, and the fineness of cement.

  17. Effects of pore topology and iron oxide core on doxorubicin loading and release from mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronhovde, Cicily J.; Baer, John; Larsen, Sarah C.

    2017-06-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have a network of pores that give rise to extremely high specific surface areas, making them attractive materials for applications such as adsorption and drug delivery. The pore topology can be readily tuned to achieve a variety of structures such as the hexagonally ordered Mobil Crystalline Material 41 (MCM-41) and the disordered "wormhole" (WO) mesoporous silica (MS) structure. In this work, the effects of pore topology and iron oxide core on doxorubicin loading and release were investigated using MSNs with pore diameters of approximately 3 nm and sub-100 nm particle diameters. The nanoparticles were loaded with doxorubicin, and the drug release into phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, 10 mM, pH 7.4) at 37 °C was monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy. The release profiles were fit using the Peppas model. The results indicated diffusion-controlled release for all samples. Statistically significant differences were observed in the kinetic host-guest parameters for each sample due to the different pore topologies and the inclusion of an iron oxide core. Applying a static magnetic field to the iron oxide core WO-MS shell materials did not have a significant impact on the doxorubicin release. This is the first time that the effects of pore topology and iron oxide core have been isolated from pore diameter and particle size for these materials.

  18. Solvothermal Metal Metathesis on a Metal-Organic Framework with Constricted Pores and the Study of Gas Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liangjun; Xue, Haitao; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Pinhui; Zhu, Dandan; Jiang, Min; Zhao, Xuebo

    2015-11-18

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with constricted pores can increase the adsorbate density of gas and facilitate effective CO2 separation from flue gas or natural gas due to their enhanced overlapping of potential fields of the pores. Herein, an MOF with constricted pores, which was formed by narrow channels and blocks of functional groups, was fabricated from the assembly of a methyl-functionalized ligand and Zn(II) centers (termed NPC-7-Zn). Structural analysis of the as-synthesized NPC-7-Zn reveals a series of zigzag pores with pore diameters of ∼0.7 nm, which could be favorable for CO2 traps. For reinforcing the framework stability, a solvothermal metal metathesis on the pristine MOF NPC-7-Zn was performed, and a new Cu(II) MOF (termed NPC-7-Cu) with an identical framework was produced. The influence of the reaction temperatures on the metal metathesis process was investigated. The results show that the constricted pores in NPC-7-Zn can induce kinetic issues that largely slow the metal metathesis process at room temperature. However, this kinetic issue can be solved by applying higher reaction temperatures. The modified MOF NPC-7-Cu exhibits significant improvements in framework stability and thus leads to a permanent porosity for this framework. The constricted pore structure enables enhanced potential fields for these pores, rendering this MOF with high adsorbate densities for CO2 and high adsorption selectivity for a CO2/N2 gas mixture. The adsorption kinetic studies reveal that CH4 has a faster diffusion rate constant than CO2, showing a surface diffusion controlled mechanism for CO2 and CH4 adsorption.

  19. The Properties of Cement Mortars Modified by Emulsified Epoxy and Micro-fine Slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN You-zhi; WANG Hong-xi; MA Zhi-yong; LI Qing-hua

    2003-01-01

    The epoxy resin polymer cement mortars with excellent performances were made up through modifying ordinary Portland cement with emulsified epoxy and micro-fine slag.The microstructure of the epoxy resin polymer cement materials was studied and their hydration and hardening characteristics were discussed by means of modern analysis measures such as SEM,XRD and Hg-intrusion micromeritics.The experimental results indicate that the series effects of water-reducing,density,pozzolanicity,filling and solidification crosslinking through the action together with epoxy organism and micro-fine slag endowed cement-based materials with perfect performances.The main hydration products in the system are C-S-H gel and hydrated calcium aluminate.At later age,AFt can be in existence,and no Ca(OH)2 is found.When epoxy resin is solidified,the organism is in a network structure.In the micro-pore structure of hydrated cement with modified epoxy and fine slag,big harmful pores were fewer,more harmless abundant micro pores were and the possible pore radius was smaller than that of ordinary Portland cement.

  20. Fluctuations of a fluid inside a pore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zvelindovsky, AV; Zatovsky, AV

    The correlation theory of the thermal hydrodynamic fluctuations of compressible viscous fluids within a spherical pore has been developed. The fluctuation motions ape described by the linearized Navier-Stokes and heat transfer equations, containing spontaneous viscous stresses and heat fluxes. The

  1. Induction of nano pore in Agrobacterial hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Tousheh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A variety of oxygen-transport and -binding proteins exist in organisms including bacteria, protozoans, and fungi all have hemoglobin-like proteins. In addition to dealing with transport and sensing of oxygen, they may also deal with NO2, CO2, sulfide compounds, and even O2 scavenging in environments. Also they detoxified chlorinated materials like P450 enzymes and peroxidases and use as a detector of nitrate and hydrogen peroxide. Pore-forming bacterial globins are interested for filtration. Materials and methods: Although there are data for bacterial toxin as a filter, here we used Agrobacterial hem to induce nano pore in the heme structure using point mutation. Results: Investigations showed that three amino acids leucine 76, alanine 83 and histidine 80 are important for pore formation in Agrobacterium hemoglobin. A point mutation on leucine 76 to glycine, histidine 80 to asparagine and alanine 83 to lysine step by step led to create the nano pore 0.7- 0.8 nm in the globin. Discussion and conclusion: These mutations in bacterial hemoglobin increase the stability when mutation is with it’s at pH7. This mutation decreases the aliphatic index however increase the stability index.

  2. Maximal pore size in UF membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arkhangelsky, E.; Duek, A.; Gitis, V.

    2012-01-01

    The ultrafiltration membrane rejection capability is most often characterized by molecular weight cutoff (MWCO). The value is found by rejection of organic solutes and the evaluation of particle retention requires a conversion of either MWCO to pore size or particle diameter to molecular weight. The

  3. Silicon Pore Optics development for ATHENA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collon, Maximilien J.; Vacanti, Giuseppe; Guenther, Ramses

    2015-01-01

    ) to meet the science requirements of large effective area (1-2 m(2) at a few keV) at a focal length of 12 m. To meet the high angular resolution (5 arc seconds) requirement the X-ray lens will also need to be very accurate. Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) technology has been invented to enable building...

  4. Observations of sausage modes in magnetic pores

    CERN Document Server

    Morton, R J; Jess, D B; Mathioudakis, M

    2010-01-01

    We present here evidence for the observation of the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) sausage modes in magnetic pores in the solar photosphere. Further evidence for the omnipresent nature of acoustic global modes is also found. The empirical decomposition method of wave analysis is used to identify the oscillations detected through a 4170 {\\AA} 'blue continuum' filter observed with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) instrument. Out of phase, periodic behavior in pore size and intensity is used as an indicator of the presence of magneto-acoustic sausage oscillations. Multiple signatures of the magneto-acoustic sausage mode are found in a number of pores. The periods range from as short as 30 s up to 450 s. A number of the magneto-acoustic sausage mode oscillations found have periods of 3 and 5 minutes, similar to the acoustic global modes of the solar interior. It is proposed that these global oscillations could be the driver of the sausage type magneto-acoustic MHD wave modes in pores.

  5. Fluctuations of a fluid inside a pore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zvelindovsky, AV; Zatovsky, AV

    1997-01-01

    The correlation theory of the thermal hydrodynamic fluctuations of compressible viscous fluids within a spherical pore has been developed. The fluctuation motions ape described by the linearized Navier-Stokes and heat transfer equations, containing spontaneous viscous stresses and heat fluxes. The e

  6. Fluctuations of a fluid inside a pore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zvelindovsky, AV; Zatovsky, AV

    1997-01-01

    The correlation theory of the thermal hydrodynamic fluctuations of compressible viscous fluids within a spherical pore has been developed. The fluctuation motions ape described by the linearized Navier-Stokes and heat transfer equations, containing spontaneous viscous stresses and heat fluxes. The e

  7. Pore-Forming Toxins Trigger the Purge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfini, Alessandro; Buchon, Nicolas

    2016-12-14

    The intestinal epithelium responds to pathogens by coordinating microbial elimination with tissue repair, both required to survive an infection. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Lee et al. (2016) discover a rapid and evolutionarily conserved response to pore-forming toxins in the gut, involving cytoplasm ejection and enterocyte regrowth.

  8. Silicon Pore Optics development for ATHENA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collon, Maximilien J.; Vacanti, Giuseppe; Guenther, Ramses;

    2015-01-01

    ) to meet the science requirements of large effective area (1-2 m(2) at a few keV) at a focal length of 12 m. To meet the high angular resolution (5 arc seconds) requirement the X-ray lens will also need to be very accurate. Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) technology has been invented to enable building...

  9. Super-Diffusive Gas Recovery from Nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Haiyi; Qiao, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the recovery of gas from reservoirs featuring pervasive nanopores is essential for effective shale gas extraction. Classical theories cannot accurately predict such gas recovery and many experimental observations are not well understood. Here we report molecular simulations of the recovery of gas from single nanopores, explicitly taking into account molecular gas-wall interactions. We show that, in very narrow pores, the strong gas-wall interactions are essential in determining the gas recovery behavior both quantitatively and qualitatively. These interactions cause the total diffusion coefficients of the gas molecules in nanopores to be smaller than those predicted by kinetic theories, hence slowing down the rate of gas recovery. These interactions also lead to significant adsorption of gas molecules on the pore walls. Because of the desorption of these gas molecules during gas recovery, the gas recovery from the nanopore does not exhibit the usual diffusive scaling law (i.e., the accumulative ...

  10. Suppressing pore-boundary separation during spark plasma sintering of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Junzhan [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Liu, Wei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China); Shen, Zhijian, E-mail: shen@mmk.su.se [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China)

    2013-07-15

    A tungsten powder with bimodal particle size distribution is consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Effects are made for understanding the densification and grain growth mechanisms and their relations to the SPS processing parameters. By holding the sample at an intermediate temperature, i.e., 1200 °C for 5 min, where the densification is enhanced by particle close packing, the pore-boundary separation that yields the formation of entrapped pores inside individual grains at final stage of sintering is suppressed. This optimization of the SPS process is beneficial for preparing fine grained bulk tungsten with homogeneous microstructure from the powders produced in industrial-scale. The prepared tungsten with minimized porosity appears a potential candidate for plasma-facing materials in the divertor region in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

  11. Facial skin pores: a multiethnic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, Frederic; Francois, Ghislain; Qiu, Huixia; Ye, Chengda; Hanaya, Tomoo; Batisse, Dominique; Cointereau-Chardon, Suzy; Seixas, Mirela Donato Gianeti; Dal Belo, Susi Elaine; Bazin, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Skin pores (SP), as they are called by laymen, are common and benign features mostly located on the face (nose, cheeks, etc) that generate many aesthetic concerns or complaints. Despite the prevalence of skin pores, related literature is scarce. With the aim of describing the prevalence of skin pores and anatomic features among ethnic groups, a dermatoscopic instrument, using polarized lighting, coupled to a digital camera recorded the major features of skin pores (size, density, coverage) on the cheeks of 2,585 women in different countries and continents. A detection threshold of 250 μm, correlated to clinical scorings by experts, was input into a specific software to further allow for automatic counting of the SP density (N/cm2) and determination of their respective sizes in mm2. Integrating both criteria also led to establishing the relative part of the skin surface (as a percentage) that is actually covered by SP on cheeks. The results showed that the values of respective sizes, densities, and skin coverage: 1) were recorded in all studied subjects; 2) varied greatly with ethnicity; 3) plateaued with age in most cases; and 4) globally refected self-assessment by subjects, in particular those who self-declare having “enlarged pores” like Brazilian women. Inversely, Chinese women were clearly distinct from other ethnicities in having very low density and sizes. Analyzing the present results suggests that facial skin pore’s morphology as perceived by human eye less result from functional criteria of associated appendages such as sebaceous glands. To what extent skin pores may be viewed as additional criteria of a photo-altered skin is an issue to be further addressed. PMID:25733918

  12. Some characteristics of fine beryllium particle combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, D. A.; Kholopova, O. V.; Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-08-01

    Beryllium dust will be produced under plasma interaction with beryllium armor of the first wall in ITER. Exothermal reaction of this dust with water steam or air, which can leak into the reactor vacuum chamber in some accidents, gives concern in respect to reactor safety. Results of studies devoted to combustion of fine beryllium particles are reviewed in the paper. A chemically active medium and elevated temperature are prerequisite to the combustion of beryllium particles. Their ignition is hampered by oxide films, which form a diffusion barrier on the particle surface as a result of pre-flame oxidation. The temperature to initiate combustion of particles depends on flame temperature, particle size, composition of combustible mixture, heating rate and other factors. In mixtures enriched with combustible, the flame temperature necessary to ignite individual particles approaches the beryllium boiling temperature.

  13. NMR-Based Diffusion Lattice Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Laun, Frederik Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion experiments are widely employed as they yield information about structures hindering the diffusion process, e.g. about cell membranes. While it has been shown in recent articles, that these experiments can be used to determine the exact shape of closed pores averaged over a volume of interest, it is still an open question how much information can be gained in open systems. In this theoretical work, we show that the full structure information of periodic open systems is accessible. To this end, the so-called 'SEquential Rephasing by Pulsed field-gradient Encoding N Time-intervals' (SERPENT) sequence is used, which employs several diffusion weighting gradient pulses with different amplitudes. The structural information is obtained by an iterative technique relying on a Gaussian envelope model of the diffusion propagator. Two solid matrices that are surrounded by an NMR-visible medium are considered: a hexagonal lattice of cylinders and a cubic lattice of triangles.

  14. Pore Structure of Cement Pastes Blended with Volcanic Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Lehua; ZHOU Shuangxi; LI Liling

    2016-01-01

    The pore parameters of cement pastes blended with volcanic rock at the curing age of 1, 28 and 90 d were de-termined by a mercury intrusion porosimetry. The pore structure of the pastes was characterized through the analysis of porosity, average pore diameter, the most probable pore aperture, pore size distribution, as well as total pore volume. For the improvement of mechanical property and durability of cement-based material, the correlation of the formed pore structure with hydration time and replacement level of volcanic rock for cement was revealed. The results indicate that volcanic rock can diminish porosity and reduce pore size in cement paste when curing time prolongs, which is particu-larly prominent with replacement level of less than 20% in late period. The more harmful pores (i.e., capillary pore) are gradually transformed into harmless pore (i.e., gel pores or micropore), even fully filled and disappeared when hydration products increase. The pore structure of the cement paste is thus refined. The beneficial effect of volcanic rock on the pore structure of cement paste could enhance the mechanical property and durability of cement-based material.

  15. Diffuse anterior retinoblastoma: current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Jing Yang,1–3 Yalong Dang,1–3 Yu Zhu,1 Chun Zhang2,3 1Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou City, Henan Province, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Third Hospital, 3Clinical Stem Cell Research Center, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Diffuse anterior retinoblastoma is a rare variant of retinoblastoma seeding in the area of the vitreous base and anterior chamber. Patients with diffuse anterior retinoblastoma are older than those with the classical types, with the mean age being 6.1 years. The original cells of diffuse anterior retinoblastoma are supposed to be cone precursor. Patients most commonly present with pseudouveitis, pseudohypopyon, and increased intraocular pressure. The retina under fundus examination is likely to be normal, and the clinical features mimic the inflammation progress, which can often lead to misdiagnosis. The published diffuse anterior retinoblastoma cases were diagnosed after fine-needle aspiration biopsy running the potential risk of inducing metastasis. The most common treatment for diffuse anterior retinoblastoma is enucleation followed by systematic chemotherapy according to the patient’s presentation and clinical course. This review summarizes the recent advances in etiology (including tumorigenesis and cell origin, pathology, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and new treatment. The challenges of early diagnosis and prospects are also discussed. Keywords: pathology, microenvironment, treatment, diagnosis 

  16. Hydrogen Reduction of Hematite Ore Fines to Magnetite Ore Fines at Low Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenguang Du

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surplus coke oven gases (COGs and low grade hematite ores are abundant in Shanxi, China. Our group proposes a new process that could simultaneously enrich CH4 from COG and produce separated magnetite from low grade hematite. In this work, low-temperature hydrogen reduction of hematite ore fines was performed in a fixed-bed reactor with a stirring apparatus, and a laboratory Davis magnetic tube was used for the magnetic separation of the resulting magnetite ore fines. The properties of the raw hematite ore, reduced products, and magnetic concentrate were analyzed and characterized by a chemical analysis method, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results indicated that, at temperatures lower than 400°C, the rate of reduction of the hematite ore fines was controlled by the interfacial reaction on the core surface. However, at temperatures higher than 450°C, the reaction was controlled by product layer diffusion. With increasing reduction temperature, the average utilization of hydrogen initially increased and tended to a constant value thereafter. The conversion of Fe2O3 in the hematite ore played an important role in the total iron recovery and grade of the concentrate. The grade of the concentrate decreased, whereas the total iron recovery increased with the increasing Fe2O3 conversion.

  17. Study of pores produced in underwater wet welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Xiaoqin; Liu Shiming

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of water depth in the range of 10 m to 80 m upon the formation of pores produced during underwater wet welding. The results show that it is easy for the inner pores to occur owing to the particularity of the molten metal solidification that the outer pores begin to appear when the water depth increases to about 60 m, that the porosity increases and pore grows up as the water depth increases, and that pores are all hydrogen-cont aining ones through the examination of the variation of number of pores with the residual hydrogen and oxygen content in the weld metal.

  18. Granular mechanics of normally consolidated fine soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanqui, Calixtro

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, duality is demonstrated to be one of the inherent properties of granular packings, by mapping the stress-strain curve into the diagram that relates the pore ratio and the localization of the contact point. In this way, it is demonstrated that critical state is not related to the maximum void ratio, but to a unique value related to two different angles of packing, one limiting the domain of the dense state, and other limiting the domain of the loose state. As a consequence, packings can be dilative or contractive, as mutually exclusive states, except by the critical state point, where equations for both granular packings are equally valid. Further analysis shows that stresses, in a dilative packing, are transmitted by chains of contact forces, and, in a contractive packing, by shear forces. So that, stresses, for the first case, depend on the initial void ratio, and, for the second case, are independent. As it is known, normally consolidated and lightly overconsolidated fine soils are in loose state, and, hence, their strength is constant, because it does not depend on their initial void ratio; except at the critical state, for which, the consolidated-drained angle of friction is related to the plasticity index or the liquid limit. In this fashion, experimental results reported by several authors around the world are confronted with the theory, showing a good agreement.

  19. Combining local scaling and global methods to detect soil pore space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Sotoca, Juan Jose; Saa-Requejo, Antonio; Grau, Juan B.; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2017-04-01

    The characterization of the spatial distribution of soil pore structures is essential to obtain different parameters that will influence in several models related to water flow and/or microbial growth processes. The first step in pore structure characterization is obtaining soil images that best approximate reality. Over the last decade, major technological advances in X-ray computed tomography (CT) have allowed for the investigation and reconstruction of natural porous media architectures at very fine scales. The subsequent step is delimiting the pore structure (pore space) from the CT soil images applying a thresholding. Many times we could find CT-scan images that show low contrast at the solid-void interface that difficult this step. Different delimitation methods can result in different spatial distributions of pores influencing the parameters used in the models. Recently, new local segmentation method using local greyscale value (GV) concentration variabilities, based on fractal concepts, has been presented. This method creates singularity maps to measure the GV concentration at each point. The C-A method was combined with the singularity map approach (Singularity-CA method) to define local thresholds that can be applied to binarize CT images. Comparing this method with classical methods, such as Otsu and Maximum Entropy, we observed that more pores can be detected mainly due to its ability to amplify anomalous concentrations. However, it delineated many small pores that were incorrect. In this work, we present an improve version of Singularity-CA method that avoid this problem basically combining it with the global classical methods. References Martín-Sotoca, J.J., A. Saa-Requejo, J.B. Grau, A.M. Tarquis. New segmentation method based on fractal properties using singularity maps. Geoderma, 287, 40-53, 2017. Martín-Sotoca, J.J, A. Saa-Requejo, J.B. Grau, A.M. Tarquis. Local 3D segmentation of soil pore space based on fractal properties using singularity

  20. Survival and relaxation time, pore size distribution moments, and viscous permeability in random unidirectional fiber structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomadakis, Manolis M.; Robertson, Teri J.

    2005-03-01

    Computer simulation results are presented for the mean survival time, principal relaxation time, mean pore size, and mean square pore size, for random porous structures consisting of parallel nonoverlapping or partially overlapping fibers. The numerical procedure is based on a discrete step-by-step random walk mechanism simulating the Brownian diffusion trajectories of molecules in the porous media. Numerical results on the viscous permeability of these structures are computed with a method based on electrical conduction principles and compared to a variational bound derived from the mean survival time. The results show that nonoverlapping fiber structures exhibit lower values of the dimensionless mean survival time, principal relaxation time, mean pore size, and mean square pore size than randomly overlapping fiber structures of the same porosity, while partially overlapping fiber structures show behavior intermediate to those of the two extreme cases. The mean square pore size (second moment of the pore size distribution) is found to be a very good predictor of the mean survival time for non-, partially, and randomly overlapping fiber structures. Dimensionless groups representing the deviation of variational bounds from our simulation results vary in practically the same range as the corresponding values reported earlier for beds of spherical particles. A universal scaling expression of the literature relating the mean survival time to structural properties [S. Torquato and C. L. Y. Yeong, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8814 (1997)] agrees very well with our results for all examined fiber structures, thus validated for the first time for porous media formed by partially overlapping particles. The permeability behavior of partially overlapping fiber structures resembles that of nonoverlapping fiber structures for flow parallel to the fibers, but not for transverse flow, where percolation phenomena prevail. The permeability results for beds of unidirectional partially

  1. Release of Escherichia coli from Foreshore Sand and Pore Water during Intensified Wave Conditions at a Recreational Beach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Laura J; O'Carroll, Denis M; Edge, Thomas A; Robinson, Clare E

    2016-06-01

    Foreshore beach sands and pore water may act as a reservoir and nonpoint source of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) to surface waters. This paper presents data collected at a fine sand beach on Lake Huron, Canada over three field events. The data show that foreshore sand erosion as wave height increases results in elevated Escherichia coli concentrations in surface water, as well as depletion of E. coli from the foreshore sand and pore water. E. coli initially attached to foreshore sand rather than initially residing in the pore water was found to be the main contributor to elevated surface water concentrations. Surface water E. coli concentrations were a function of not only wave height (and associated sand erosion) but also the time elapsed since a preceding period of high wave intensity. This finding is important for statistical regression models used to predict beach advisories. While calculations suggest that foreshore sand erosion may be the dominant mechanism for releasing E. coli to surface water during intensified wave conditions at a fine sand beach, comparative characterization of the E. coli distribution at a coarse sand-cobble beach suggests that interstitial pore water flow and discharge may be more important for coarser sand beaches.

  2. Nitramine Drying & Fine Grinding Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Nitramine Drying and Fine Grinding Facility provides TACOM-ARDEC with a state-of-the-art facility capable of drying and grinding high explosives (e.g., RDX and...

  3. Fine 5 kolib Kumu lavale

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Kumu kunstimuuseumi auditooriumis toimub 21. veebruaril Fine 5 kaasaegse tantsu etendus "Panus". Esinevad Tiina Ollesk, Irina Pähn, žonglöör Dimitri Kruus, disainer Rain Saukas ja muusik Mattias Siitan

  4. Briquetting anthracite fines for recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, S.; Price, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    A laboratory study of the briquetting of anthracite fines (recovered from a dryer) with pitch is reported, and a proposed plant flowsheet is discussed. The briquettes would be used with the coarser anthracite in electric furnace smelting of ilmenite.

  5. Fine 5 kolib Kumu lavale

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Kumu kunstimuuseumi auditooriumis toimub 21. veebruaril Fine 5 kaasaegse tantsu etendus "Panus". Esinevad Tiina Ollesk, Irina Pähn, žonglöör Dimitri Kruus, disainer Rain Saukas ja muusik Mattias Siitan

  6. Application of a drainage film reduces fibroblast ingrowth into large-pored polyurethane foam during negative-pressure wound therapy in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Cornelia; Springer, Steffen; Abel, Martin; Wesarg, Falko; Ruth, Peter; Hipler, Uta-Christina

    2013-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is an advantageous treatment option in wound management to promote healing and reduce the risk of complications. NPWT is mainly carried out using open-cell polyurethane (PU) foams that stimulate granulation tissue formation. However, growth of wound bed tissue into foam material, leading to disruption of newly formed tissue upon dressing removal, has been observed. Consequently, it would be of clinical interest to preserve the positive effects of open-cell PU foams while avoiding cellular ingrowth. The study presented analyzed effects of NPWT using large-pored PU foam, fine-pored PU foam, and the combination of large-pored foam with drainage film on human dermal fibroblasts grown in a collagen matrix. The results showed no difference between the dressings in stimulating cellular migration during NPWT. However, when NPWT was applied using a large-pored PU foam, the fibroblasts continued to migrate into the dressing. This led to significant breaches in the cell layers upon removal of the samples after vacuum treatment. In contrast, cell migration stopped at the collagen matrix edge when fine-pored PU foam was used, as well as with the combination of PU foam and drainage film. In conclusion, placing a drainage film between collagen matrix and the large-pored PU foam dressing reduced the ingrowth of cells into the foam significantly. Moreover, positive effects on cellular migration were not affected, and the effect of the foam on tissue surface roughness in vitro was also reduced.

  7. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/2015 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited ...

  8. Evolution of Pore Size Distribution and Mean Pore Size in Lotus-type Porous Magnesium Fabricated with Gasar Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan LIU; Yanxiang LI; Huawei ZHANG; Jiang WAN

    2006-01-01

    The effect of gas pressures on the mean pore size, the porosity and the pore size distribution of lotus-type porous magnesium fabricated with Gasar process were investigated. The theoretical analysis and the experimental results all indicate that there exists an optimal ratio of the partial pressures of hydrogen pH2 to argon pAr for producing lotus-type structures with narrower pore size distribution and smaller pore size. The effect of solidification mode on the pore size distribution and pore size was also discussed.

  9. Induction of nano pore in Agrobacterial hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Mojtaba Tousheh; Giti Emtiazi; Peyman Derikvand

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A variety of oxygen-transport and -binding proteins exist in organisms including bacteria, protozoans, and fungi all have hemoglobin-like proteins. In addition to dealing with transport and sensing of oxygen, they may also deal with NO2, CO2, sulfide compounds, and even O2 scavenging in environments. Also they detoxified chlorinated materials like P450 enzymes and peroxidases and use as a detector of nitrate and hydrogen peroxide. Pore-forming bacterial globins are interested fo...

  10. Effect of sparse distribution pores in a Soret-driven ferro thermohaline convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekar, R. [Department of Mathematics, Pondicherry Engineering College, Pondicherry 605014 (India); Vaidyanathan, G. [Department of Physics, Pondicherry Engineering College, Pondicherry 605014 (India)]. E-mail: gvn_pec@yahoo.com; Hemalatha, R. [Department of Mathematics, Bharathidassan Govt.College for Women, Pondicherry 605003 (India); Sendhilnathan, S. [Department of Physics, Sri Manakula Vinayagar Engineering College, Pondicherry 605107 (India)

    2006-07-15

    Thermoconvective instability in a multicomponent fluid has very wide applications in industrial, ionospheric and geothermal systems. More often, it is found that the thermal diffusivity and mass diffusivity interact with each other in fluid systems. But in a liquid system, the effect of heat transport on mass transport is pronounced. In a ferrofluid system which is a synthesized liquid, it is often found that more than one component co-exists in the fluid system contributing to interactive diffusion. In the present analysis, it is intended to study the Soret effect on multicomponent ferrofluid saturating a porous medium with large variation in permeabilities. Linear stability analysis is used. Normal mode technique is applied. The numerical results are presented for both stationary and oscillatory instabilities. It is found that stationary instability is preferred irrespective of values of permeability of pores.

  11. Surface sealing using self-assembled monolayers and its effect on metal diffusion in porous low-k dielectrics studied using monoenergetic positron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira, E-mail: uedono.akira.gb@u.tsukuba.ac.jp [Division of Applied Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Armini, Silvia; Zhang, Yu [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Kakizaki, Takeaki [Division of Applied Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard [Department of Physics, Martin Luther University Halle, 06099 Halle (Germany); Anwand, Wolfgang; Wagner, Andreas [Institute for Radiation Physics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pores with cubic pore side lengths of 1.1 and 3.1 nm coexisted in the low-k film. • For the sample without the SAM sealing process, metal atoms diffused from the top Cu/MnN layer into the OSG film and were trapped by the pores. Almost all pore interiors were covered by those metals. • For the sample damaged by a plasma etch treatment before the SAM sealing process, self-assembled molecules diffused into the OSG film, and they were preferentially trapped by larger pores. - Abstract: Surface sealing effects on the diffusion of metal atoms in porous organosilicate glass (OSG) films were studied by monoenergetic positron beams. For a Cu(5 nm)/MnN(3 nm)/OSG(130 nm) sample fabricated with pore stuffing, C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasma etch, unstuffing, and a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) sealing process, it was found that pores with cubic pore side lengths of 1.1 and 3.1 nm coexisted in the OSG film. For the sample without the SAM sealing process, metal (Cu and Mn) atoms diffused from the top Cu/MnN layer into the OSG film and were trapped by the pores. As a result, almost all pore interiors were covered with those metals. For the sample damaged by an Ar/C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasma etch treatment before the SAM sealing process, SAMs diffused into the OSG film, and they were preferentially trapped by larger pores. The cubic pore side length in these pores containing self-assembled molecules was estimated to be 0.7 nm. Through this work, we have demonstrated that monoenergetic positron beams are a powerful tool for characterizing capped porous films and the trapping of atoms and molecules by pores.

  12. Biomimetic collagen scaffolds with anisotropic pore architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidenko, N; Gibb, T; Schuster, C; Best, S M; Campbell, J J; Watson, C J; Cameron, R E

    2012-02-01

    Sponge-like matrices with a specific three-dimensional structural design resembling the actual extracellular matrix of a particular tissue show significant potential for the regeneration and repair of a broad range of damaged anisotropic tissues. The manipulation of the structure of collagen scaffolds using a freeze-drying technique was explored in this work as an intrinsically biocompatible way of tailoring the inner architecture of the scaffold. The research focused on the influence of temperature gradients, imposed during the phase of crystallisation of collagen suspensions, upon the degree of anisotropy in the microstructures of the scaffolds produced. Moulding technology was employed to achieve differences in heat transfer rates during the freezing processes. For this purpose various moulds with different configurations were developed with a view to producing uniaxial and multi-directional temperature gradients across the sample during this process. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of different cross-sections (longitudinal and horizontal) of scaffolds revealed that highly aligned matrices with axially directed pore architectures were obtained where single unidirectional temperature gradients were induced. Altering the freezing conditions by the introduction of multiple temperature gradients allowed collagen scaffolds to be produced with complex pore orientations, and anisotropy in pore size and alignment.

  13. Pore morphology study of silica aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, D.W.; Anderson, J.; Haereid, S.; Smith, D.M. [UNM/NSF Center for Micro-Engineered Ceramics, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Beaucage, G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Silica aerogels have numerous properties which suggest applications such as ultra high efficiency thermal insulation. These properties relate directly to the aerogel`s pore size distribution. The micro and meso pore size ranges can be investigated by normal small angle x-ray scattering and possibly, nitrogen adsorption. However, the measurement of larger pores (> 250 {angstrom}) is more difficult. Due to their limited mechanical strength, mercury porosimetry and nitrogen condensation can disrupt the gel structure and electron microscopy provides only limited large scale structure information. The use of small angle light scattering techniques seems to have promise, the only hurdle is that aerogels exhibit significant multiple scattering. This can be avoided if one observes the gels in the wet stage since the structure of the aerogel should be very similar to the wet gel (as the result of supercritical drying). Thus, if one can match the refractive index, the morphology can be probed. The combination of certain alcoholic solvents fit this index matching criteria. Preliminary results for the gel network (micron range) and primary particle structure (manometer) are reported by using small angle light scattering and ultra-small angle x-ray scattering. The effects on structure over the length scale range of <1 nm to >5 {mu}m under different conditions (precursors, pH, etc.) are presented. The change in structure of an aerogel during isostatic compaction to 228 MPa (to simulate drying from wetting solvents) are also discussed.

  14. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles with tunable pore size for tailored gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponchia, G.; Marin, R.; Freris, I.; Marchiori, M.; Moretti, E.; Storaro, L.; Canton, P.; Lausi, A.; Benedetti, A.; Riello, P.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this paper was to verify a possible correlation between the pore-size of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) and the sizes of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) obtained by an impregnation of gold(III) chloride hydrate solution in the MSNs, followed by a specific thermal treatment. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles with tunable pore diameter were synthesized via a surfactant-assisted method. Tetraethoxysilane as silica precursor, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant and toluene as swelling agent were used. By varying the CTAB-toluene molar ratio, the average dimension of the pores could be tuned from 2.8 to 5.5 nm. Successively, thiol groups were grafted on the surface of the MSNs. Finally, the thermal evolution of the gold salt, followed by "in situ" X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), revealed an evident correlation among the degradation of the thiol groups, the pore dimension of the MSNs and the size of the AuNPs. The samples were characterized by means of nitrogen adsorption-desorption, transmission electron microscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, XRPD "in situ" by synchrotron radiation, and "ex situ" by conventional techniques, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, and TGA.

  15. Role of pore size and morphology in musculo-skeletal tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Roman A., E-mail: romanp@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Nanobiomedical Science & BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Mestres, Gemma [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, 751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-04-01

    Biomaterials in the form of scaffolds hold great promise in the regeneration of diseased tissues. The scaffolds stimulate cellular adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. While the scaffold composition will dictate their biocompatibility, their porosity plays a key role in allowing proper cell penetration, nutrient diffusion as well as bone ingrowth. Porous scaffolds are processed with the help of a wide variety of techniques. Designing scaffolds with the appropriate porosity is a complex issue since this may jeopardize other physico-chemical properties. From a macroscopic point of view, parameters such as the overall architecture, pore morphology, interconnectivity and pore size distribution, have unique roles in allowing bone ingrowth to take place. From a microscopic perspective, the adsorption and retention of proteins in the microporosities of the material will dictate the subsequent cell adhesion. Therefore, the microstructure of the substrate can determine cell proliferation as well as the expression of specific osteogenic genes. This review aims at discussing the effect of micro- and macroporosity on the physico-chemical and biological properties of scaffolds for musculo-skeletal tissue regeneration. - Highlights: • Osteoconduction and osteoinduction of a biomaterial relies on its pattern of micro/macroporosity. • Size, morphology, distribution and interconnection of the pores influence both mechanical and biological properties. • Macroporosity (pores > 50 μm) determines cell colonization and therefore growth of vascular and bone tissue. • Micropores (< 50 μm) are crucial for proteins adsorption, which in turn can determine cell fate.

  16. Modeling multiphase, multicomponent flows at the pore scale: Wetting phenomena and non-equilibrium phase behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Fu, X.; Juanes, R.

    2016-12-01

    The description of multicomponent flows with complex phase behavior remains an open challenge in pore-scale modeling. Darcy-scale general purpose simulators assume local thermodynamic equilibrium, and perform equation-of-state-based calculations to make phase equilibrium predictions; that is, to determine the phase volume fractions and their compositions from overall component mole fractions. What remains unclear is whether the thermodynamic equilibrium assumption is valid given the flow conditions, complex structure of the pore space and characteristic time scales for flow. Diffuse-interface theories of multiphase flow have recently emerged as promising tools to understand and simulate complex processes involving the simultaneous flow of two or more immiscible fluid phases. The common goal in these approaches is to formulate thermodynamically consistent stress tensors and mesoscale balance laws, including the impact of surface tension on the momentum balance, as well as properly tracking interfacial dynamics and mass transfer. We propose a phase-field model of multiphase, multicomponent flow, which we use to address the following research questions: What is the impact of the wetting conditions at the pore scale on upscaled descriptions of multiphase flow? What is the impact of the displacement dynamics, pore space structure and wetting conditions on the phase behavior of multicomponent mixtures? We finally investigate upscaling procedures to incorporate non-equilibrium phase behavior at the continuum scale.

  17. Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon Spheres with Extra-Large Pores through Assembly of Diblock Copolymer Micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jing [Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan; Liu, Jiang [Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia; Li, Cuiling [KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; Li, Yunqi [Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan; Tade, Moses O. [Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Yamauchi, Yusuke [Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the synthesis of highly nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon spheres (NMCS) is reported. The large pores of the NMCS were obtained through self-polymerization of dopamine (DA) and spontaneous co-assembly of diblock copolymer micelles. The resultant narrowly dispersed NMCS possess large mesopores (ca. 16 nm) and small particle sizes (ca. 200 nm). Lastly, the large pores and small dimensions of the N-heteroatom-doped carbon spheres contribute to the mass transportation by reducing and smoothing the diffusion pathways, leading to high electrocatalytic activity.

  18. Optical study of the ultrasonic formation process of noble metal nanoparticles dispersed inside the pores of monolithic mesoporous silica

    CERN Document Server

    Fu Gan Hua; Kan Cai Xia; Li Cun Cheng; Fang Qi

    2003-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles dispersed inside the pores of monolithic mesoporous silica were prepared by soaking the silica in a gold (III) ion solution and subsequent ultrasound irradiation. The formation process of gold nanoparticles in the pores of mesoporous silica was investigated based on optical measurements of wrapped and naked soaked silica after ultrasonic irradiation, and the reduction rate effect in solution and pre-soaking effect. It has been shown that acoustic cavitation cannot occur in nano-sized pores. The gold nanoparticles in silica are not formed in situ within the pores but produced mainly by diffusion of the gold clusters formed in the solution during irradiation into the pores. The radicals formed in solution are exhausted before entering the pores of silica. There exists a critical reduction rate in solution, at which the yield of gold nanoparticles in silica reaches a maximum, and above which there is a decrease in the yield. This is attributed to too quick a growth or aggregation of gold clust...

  19. Diffusion coefficient in photon diffusion theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, R; Ten Bosch, JJ

    2000-01-01

    The choice of the diffusion coefficient to be used in photon diffusion theory has been a subject of discussion in recent publications on tissue optics. We compared several diffusion coefficients with the apparent diffusion coefficient from the more fundamental transport theory, D-app. Application to

  20. Diffusion coefficient in photon diffusion theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, R; Ten Bosch, JJ

    2000-01-01

    The choice of the diffusion coefficient to be used in photon diffusion theory has been a subject of discussion in recent publications on tissue optics. We compared several diffusion coefficients with the apparent diffusion coefficient from the more fundamental transport theory, D-app. Application to

  1. Dendritic silica nanomaterials (KCC-1) with fibrous pore structure possess high DNA adsorption capacity and effectively deliver genes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoxi; Tao, Zhimin; Praskavich, John C; Goswami, Anandarup; Al-Sharab, Jafar F; Minko, Tamara; Polshettiwar, Vivek; Asefa, Tewodros

    2014-09-16

    The pore size and pore structure of nanoporous materials can affect the materials' physical properties, as well as potential applications in different areas, including catalysis, drug delivery, and biomolecular therapeutics. KCC-1, one of the newest members of silica nanomaterials, possesses fibrous, large pore, dendritic pore networks with wide pore entrances, large pore size distribution, spacious pore volume and large surface area--structural features that are conducive for adsorption and release of large guest molecules and biomacromolecules (e.g., proteins and DNAs). Here, we report the results of our comparative studies of adsorption of salmon DNA in a series of KCC-1-based nanomaterials that are functionalized with different organoamine groups on different parts of their surfaces (channel walls, external surfaces or both). For comparison the results of our studies of adsorption of salmon DNA in similarly functionalized, MCM-41 mesoporous silica nanomaterials with cylindrical pores, some of the most studied silica nanomaterials for drug/gene delivery, are also included. Our results indicate that, despite their relatively lower specific surface area, the KCC-1-based nanomaterials show high adsorption capacity for DNA than the corresponding MCM-41-based nanomaterials, most likely because of KCC-1's large pores, wide pore mouths, fibrous pore network, and thereby more accessible and amenable structure for DNA molecules to diffuse through. Conversely, the MCM-41-based nanomaterials adsorb much less DNA, presumably because their outer surfaces/cylindrical channel pore entrances can get blocked by the DNA molecules, making the inner parts of the materials inaccessible. Moreover, experiments involving fluorescent dye-tagged DNAs suggest that the amine-grafted KCC-1 materials are better suited for delivering the DNAs adsorbed on their surfaces into cellular environments than their MCM-41 counterparts. Finally, cellular toxicity tests show that the KCC-1-based

  2. New ultrasonic technique for the study of the pore shape of track-etched pores in polymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Alvarez-Arenas, T.E., E-mail: tgomez@ia.cetef.csic.e [Instituto de Acustica, CSIC, Serrano 144, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Apel, P.Yu.; Orelovitch, O.L. [Flerov Lab. of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Munoz, M. [Institute of Applied Physics, CSIC, Serrano 144, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    A new technique for the study of the pore shape of track-etched pores in polymer films is presented. This technique is based on the use of air-coupled ultrasounds and phase and magnitude spectral analysis. Transmission of ultrasounds through these membranes is made up of two contributions: propagation through the solid part and propagation along the pore channels. A time-domain procedure to separate these to contributions is presented. Sensitivity of ultrasounds propagation in the pore channels to variations of pore shape is studied. Membranes with similar properties (gas flow rate values) but slight differences in the pore shape are studied. The proposed technique reveals to be sensitive to such differences; unlike other techniques, it is capable to provide information in a separate way about pore aperture at the surface and pore diameter inside the membrane, in addition the technique is non-destructive.

  3. Fine structural analysis of the stinger in venom apparatus of the scorpion Euscorpius mingrelicus (Scorpiones: Euscorpiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Yigit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the morphology, histology and fine structure of the stinger, a part of the venom apparatus of Euscorpius mingrelicus (Kessler, 1874 (Scorpiones: Euscorpiidae were studied by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The stinger, located at the end section of the telson, is sickle-shaped. The venom is ejected through a pair of venom pores on its subterminal portion. Both venom ducts extend along the stinger without contact with each other since they are separated by connective tissue cells. The stinger cuticle is composed of two layers. Additionally, there are many pore canals and some hemolymph vessels in the cuticle. This work constitutes the first histological and fine structure study on Euscorpius mingrelicus stinger.

  4. Polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) copolymers as templates for stacked, spherical large-mesopore silica coatings: dependence of silica pore size on the PS/PEO ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisticò, Roberto; Magnacca, Giuliana; Jadhav, Sushilkumar A; Scalarone, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Large-mesopore silica films with a narrow pore size distribution and high porosity have been obtained by a sol-gel reaction of a silicon oxide precursor (TEOS) and using polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) copolymers as templates in an acidic environment. PS-b-PEO copolymers with different molecular weight and composition have been studied in order to assess the effects of the block length on the pore size of the templated silica films. The changes in the morphology of the porous systems have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and a systematic analysis has been carried out, evidencing the dependence between the hydrophilic/hydrophobic ratio of the two polymer blocks and the size of the final silica pores. The obtained results prove that by tuning the PS/PEO ratio, the pore size of the templated silica films can be easily and finely predicted.

  5. Pore-space alteration in source rock (shales) during hydrocarbons generation: X-ray microtomography and pore-scale modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korost, Dmitry; Gerke, Kirill; Akhmanov, Grigory; Vasilyev, Roman; Čapek, Pavel; Karsanina, Marina; Nadezhkin, Dmitry

    2013-04-01

    free and adsorbed HC and water; (3) 300-400˚? - initial stage of HC formation owing to high-temperature pyrolysis of the solid organic matter and discharge of the chemically bound water; (4) 400-470˚? - temperature interval fitting the most intense stage of HC formation; (5) 470-510˚? - final stage of HC formation. Maximum sample heating in the experiment was determined as temperature of the onset of active decomposition of carbonates, i.e., in essence, irreversible metamorphism of the rock. An additional experiment was accomplished to assess dependence of the thermal expansion and contraction of sample during experiments with the rock structure. After the first microtomographic measurement, the sample was placed into the pyrolyser furnace and heated to 470˚? in 10 min, which resulted in the cracks' network similar to step-by-step heating structure formation: i.e., rock with cracks along and perpendicular to bedding direction. To quantify pore space alteration at each stage we use cluster analysis, correlation functions, local porosity analysis and pore-size distributions. Permeability measurements using conventional laboratory techniques are not possible between stepwise heatings. We used pore-scale modeling approach to determine this property numerically based on the 3D pore space information obtained with microtomography. The results of our experiment confirmed the possibility of vertical migration of fluids in the initially impermeable source rocks. They also revealed that pore space of the finely dispersed organic-rich rock changes during its controlled heating for HC generation according to the following scenario: (a) pores in the initial rock are small and isolated; (b) after some heating, pores at first are bound with each other due to the propagation of fractures along bedding, resulting in the formation of isolated filtration intervals; (c) further heating provokes the formation of bedding-perpendicular fractures that connect the isolated filtration

  6. Diffusive Silicon Nanopore Membranes for Hemodialysis Applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Kim

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis using hollow-fiber membranes provides life-sustaining treatment for nearly 2 million patients worldwide with end stage renal disease (ESRD. However, patients on hemodialysis have worse long-term outcomes compared to kidney transplant or other chronic illnesses. Additionally, the underlying membrane technology of polymer hollow-fiber membranes has not fundamentally changed in over four decades. Therefore, we have proposed a fundamentally different approach using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS fabrication techniques to create thin-flat sheets of silicon-based membranes for implantable or portable hemodialysis applications. The silicon nanopore membranes (SNM have biomimetic slit-pore geometry and uniform pores size distribution that allow for exceptional permeability and selectivity. A quantitative diffusion model identified structural limits to diffusive solute transport and motivated a new microfabrication technique to create SNM with enhanced diffusive transport. We performed in vitro testing and extracorporeal testing in pigs on prototype membranes with an effective surface area of 2.52 cm2 and 2.02 cm2, respectively. The diffusive clearance was a two-fold improvement in with the new microfabrication technique and was consistent with our mathematical model. These results establish the feasibility of using SNM for hemodialysis applications with additional scale-up.

  7. The Fine-Tuning Argument

    CERN Document Server

    Landsman, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    Our laws of nature and our cosmos appear to be delicately fine-tuned for life to emerge, in way that seems hard to attribute to chance. In view of this, some have taken the opportunity to revive the scholastic Argument from Design, whereas others have felt the need to explain this apparent fine-tuning of the clockwork of the Universe by proposing the existence of a `Multiverse'. We analyze this issue from a sober perspective. Having reviewed the literature and having added several observations of our own, we conclude that cosmic fine-tuning supports neither Design nor a Multiverse, since both of these fail at an explanatory level as well as in a more quantitative context of Bayesian confirmation theory (although there might be other reasons to believe in these ideas, to be found in religion and in inflation and/or string theory, respectively). In fact, fine-tuning and Design even seem to be at odds with each other, whereas the inference from fine-tuning to a Multiverse only works if the latter is underwritten...

  8. A Tracer investigation Into the Importance of Diffusive Exchange in the Unsaturated Zone of the British Chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Daele, G. F.; Connell, L. D.; Atkinson, T. C.

    2002-12-01

    The Chalk is an economically and ecologically important aquifer in England and in other countries of North-West Europe. Its susceptibility to pollution is a source of ongoing concern and the pathway of pollutants through the unsaturated zone is not fully understood. The chalk medium is characterized by a fine-grained porous matrix intersected by extensive fractures. An important question is whether in the unsaturated zone the water flow and transport passes through the fractures or through the intergranular pores in the matrix. In general it is assumed that a substantial part of the flow goes through the matrix pores as piston displacement and that fracture flow is only generated during periods of high recharge rates. During fracture flow there is diffusion of contaminants between the mobile fracture-water and the nearly static matrix-water. The extent of the diffusive exchange between fractures and matrix is largely determined by the fracture flow velocity, ranging from complete diffusive equilibrium between fractures and matrix for low velocities to an effective bypass of the matrix for high fracture flow velocities. A comparative tracer test is being carried out on the Middle Chalk in Cambridgeshire, Eastern England, to analyze the conditions that trigger fracture flow and diffusive exchange between fractures and matrix. The experiment runs under natural rainfall conditions on a large (5x5m), grass-covered lysimeter and the tracers used are deuterium and bromide. After one winter recharge season, none of the tracer has penetrated to any great depth. Vertical core profiles show that the bulk of the tracer has migrated very little but there is some evidence of fracture flow with partial diffusion into the surrounding matrix. The experiment highlights the high attenuation capacity of the soil cover and the chalk unsaturated zone but demonstrates that even for moderate rainfall conditions some rapid bypass flow is possible. The results of the tracer test will aid in

  9. Halogens in pore water of peat bogs – the role of peat decomposition and dissolved organic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Biester

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Halogens are strongly enriched in peat and peatlands and such they are one of their largest active terrestrial reservoir. The enrichment of halogens in peat is mainly attributed to the formation of organohalogens and climatically controlled humification processes. However, little is known about release of halogens from the peat substrate and the distribution of halogens in the peat pore water. In this study we have investigated the distribution of chlorine, bromine and iodine in pore water of three pristine peat bogs located in the Magellanic Moorlands, southern Chile. Peat pore waters were collected using a sipping technique, which allows in situ sampling down to a depth greater than 6m. Halogens and halogen species in pore water were determined by ion-chromatography (IC (chlorine and IC-ICP-MS (bromine and iodine. Results show that halogen concentrations in pore water are 15–30 times higher than in rainwater. Mean concentrations of chlorine, bromine and iodine in pore water were 7–15 mg l−1, 56–123 μg l−1, and 10–20 μg l−1, which correspond to mean proportions of 10–15%, 1–2.3% and 0.5–2.2% of total concentrations in peat, respectively. Organobromine and organoiodine were the predominant species in pore waters, whereas chlorine in pore water was mostly chloride. Advection and diffusion of halogens were found to be generally low and halogen concentrations appear to reflect release from the peat substrate. Release of bromine and iodine from peat depend on the degree of peat degradation, whereas this relationship is weak for chlorine. Relatively higher release of bromine and iodine was observed in less degraded peat sections, where the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC was also the most intensive. It has been concluded that the release of halogenated dissolved organic matter (DOM is the predominant mechanism of iodine and bromine release from peat.

  10. Kinetic study of CO2 reaction with CaO by a modified random pore model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouri S.M.M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a modified random pore model was developed to study the kinetics of the carbonation reaction of CaO. Pore size distributions of the CaO pellets were measured by nitrogen adsorption and mercury porosimetry methods. The experiments were carried out in a thermogravimeter at different isothermal temperatures and CO2 partial pressures. A fractional concentration dependency function showed the best accuracy for predicting the intrinsic rate of reaction. The activation energy was determined as 11 kcal/mole between 550–700°C. The effect of product layer formation was also taken into account by using the variable product layer diffusivity. Also, the model was successfully predicted the natural lime carbonation reaction data extracted from the literature.

  11. Anisotropy of the Subsoil Pore System As Affected by High Mechanical Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berisso, Feto Esimo; Schjønning, Per; Keller, Thomas

    Arrangements of elementary soil particles during soil formation in combination with biological activity by plant roots and earthworms may yield anisotropy of the non-tilled subsoil pore system. Soil compaction by agricultural machinery is known to affect the soil pore characteristics but only few...... and horizontally at 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 0.9 m depths (the two lower depths only in Sweden) in two treatments (compacted and control). Water retention, air permeability (ka) and gas diffusivity (Ds/Do) were determined in the laboratory. We defined an anisotropy factor (AF) as the ratio of a certain soil property...... measured in the horizontal direction to the same property measured in vertical direction. For both soils and both treatments, ka at -100 hPa was higher in vertical direction than in horizontal direction (AF

  12. Chaotic Advection at the Pore Scale: Mechanisms, Upscaling and Implications for Macroscopic Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Lester, D R; Metcalfe, Guy

    2016-01-01

    The macroscopic spreading and mixing of solute plumes in saturated porous media is ultimately controlled by processes operating at the pore scale. Whilst the conventional picture of pore-scale mechanical dispersion and molecular diffusion leading to persistent hydrodynamic dispersion is well accepted, this paradigm is inherently two-dimensional (2D) in nature and neglects important three-dimensional (3D) phenomena. We discuss how the kinematics of steady 3D flow at the porescale generate chaotic advection, involving exponential stretching and folding of fluid elements,the mechanisms by which it arises and implications of microscopic chaos for macroscopic dispersion and mixing. Prohibited in steady 2D flow due to topological constraints, these phenomena are ubiquitous due to the topological complexity inherent to all 3D porous media. Consequently 3D porous media flows generate profoundly different fluid deformation and mixing processes to those of 2D flow. The interplay of chaotic advection and broad transit t...

  13. Isoreticular Expansion of Metal-Organic Frameworks with Multiple Functionalities and Controlled Pore Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hexiang

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are made by linking organic and inorganic molecular building blocks into extended structures through strong bonds. With a judicious choice of inorganic joints and various functional groups available in organic links, a large number of MOFs have been synthesized in the past decade. Along with the fast expansion of the family of MOFs, important applications emerge including hydrogen storage and carbon dioxide capture, both of which address the most pressing societal demand for clean and sustainable energy resources. Although numerous MOFs are now known and they have found widespread applications, the introduction of more than one kind of building block into their crystal structures remains challenging. One of the main objectives of this study is to demonstrate the successful incorporating of multiple functional groups into MOFs. Here, a new strategy has been developed to achieve the synthesis of a series of eighteen multivariate MOFs (MTV-MOFs) containing up to eight distinct functional groups, while their parent topologies were fully preserved. The backbone of these MTV-MOFs was found to be ordered, while the orientation, number, relative position and ratio of the functionalities along the backbone could be controlled by virtue of the unchanged length of the link and its unaltered connectivity. This strategy allows us to endow the pores of these MOFs with a new level of complexity which far exceeds any held by that of the original mono-functional MOFs---an aspect that makes it possible to fine-tune the pore environment of a porous crystal with favorable implications. Indeed, one member of these MTV-MOFs has already shown an 87% improvement of the hydrogen uptake while another member demonstrated a 400% increase in CO2 selectivity comparing to their mono-functional counterparts. Another goal of this study has been to maximize MOF porosity and pore size. There were three major obstacles against expanding the pore size of porous crystals

  14. Soil Pore Network Visualisation and Quantification using ImageJ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garbout, Amin; Pajor, Radoslaw; Otten, Wilfred

    Computed Tomography data. We used ImageJ to analyze images of pore geometries in soils generated by X-ray micro Computed Tomography. Soil samples were scanned at 30 μm resolution, and we produced replicated samples with different pore geometries by packing different sized soil aggregates at pre......-defined densities. First, scanned grayscale data of soil volumes were thresholded to separate solid and pore phases. Then, pore networks were extracted with the Skeletonize3D plug-in (Ignacio Arganda-Carreras), exploiting an ITK algorithm: binary thinning was used for finding the centerlines (”skeleton”) of pores...

  15. Energy conversion device with support member having pore channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routkevitch, Dmitri [Longmont, CO; Wind, Rikard A [Johnstown, CO

    2014-01-07

    Energy devices such as energy conversion devices and energy storage devices and methods for the manufacture of such devices. The devices include a support member having an array of pore channels having a small average pore channel diameter and having a pore channel length. Material layers that may include energy conversion materials and conductive materials are coaxially disposed within the pore channels to form material rods having a relatively small cross-section and a relatively long length. By varying the structure of the materials in the pore channels, various energy devices can be fabricated, such as photovoltaic (PV) devices, radiation detectors, capacitors, batteries and the like.

  16. Matrix diffusion in crystalline rocks: coupling of anion exclusion, surface diffusion and surface complexation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olin, M.; Valkiainen, M.; Aalto, H. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    This report includes both experimental and modelling parts. Also, a novel approach to the diffusion experiments is introduced, where ions of the same electric charge diffuse in opposite directions through the same rock sample. Six rock-types from Olkiluoto radioactive waste disposal investigation site were used in the experiments: granite, weathered granite, mica gneiss, weathered mica gneiss, tonalite and altered mica gneiss/migmatite. The experiments consisted of the determination of the effective diffusion coefficient and the rock capacity factor for tritium, chloride (Cl-36) and sodium (Na-22). The modelling consisted of a chemical model for small pores (< 100 nm), a model for counter ion diffusion and models for the laboratory experiments. 21 refs.

  17. The effect of moiture transport and sorption hystersis on ionic multispecies diffusion in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn; Hosokawa, Y.; Yamada, K.

    2008-01-01

    the diffusion of ions in the pore system. Mainly this is due to the moisture content, that is, an increased diffusion resistance at low moisture contents (and the other way around) as predicted by the hysteresis model during cases with variation of the ambient relative humidity. Further, discussions...

  18. The Maxwell-Stefan description of mixture diffusion in nanoporous crystalline materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of nanoporous crystalline materials in separation applications is often influenced to a significant extent by diffusion of guest molecules within the pores of the structural frameworks. The Maxwell-Stefan (M-S) equations provide a fundamental and convenient description of mixture diffus

  19. Displacement of soil pore water by trichloroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wershaw, R. L.; Aiken, G.R.; Imbrigiotta, T.E.; Goldberg, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLS) are important pollutants because of their widespread use as chemical and industrial solvents. An example of the pollution caused by the discharge of DNAPLs is found at the Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, where trichloroethylene (TCE) has been discharged directly into the unsaturated zone. This discharge has resulted in the formation of a plume of TCE-contaminated water in the aquifer downgradient of the discharge. A zone of dark-colored groundwater containing a high dissolved organic C content has been found near the point of discharge of the TCE. The colored-water plume extends from the point of discharge at least 30 m (100 feet) downgradient. Fulvic acids isolated from the colored-waters plume, from water from a background well that has not been affected by the discharge of chlorinated solvents, and from soil pore water collected in a lysimeter installed at an uncontaminated site upgradient of the study area have been compared. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the fulvic acids from the colored waters and from the lysimeter are very similar, but are markedly different from the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the fulvic acid from the background well. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectrum and the DOC fractionation profile of the colored groundwater and the soil pore water are very similar to each other, but quite different from those of the background water. It is proposed from these observations that this colored water is soil pore water that has been displaced by a separate DNAPL liquid phase downward to the saturated zone.

  20. 34 CFR 668.84 - Fine proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fine proceedings. 668.84 Section 668.84 Education... Proceedings § 668.84 Fine proceedings. (a) Scope and consequences. (1) The Secretary may impose a fine of up... any institution that contracts with the servicer. (2) If the Secretary begins a fine...

  1. The care of fine books

    CERN Document Server

    Greenfield, Jane; Basbanes, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    The Care of Fine Books is a thorough, readable guide to caring for books of value. From a discussion of the various techniques and materials used in bookbinding to advice on handling and storage, Jane Greenfield has created a succinct yet complete resource for anyone who wants to preserve and protect their fine books. Whether you are a collector, a librarian, or a conservation professional, you will benefit from this expert advice. Learn about appropriate levels of light, temperature, relative humidity, and pollution; how to secure a collection against fire, insect infestation, flood, and theft; and methods for cleaning and repairing books that have already been damaged. Always practical and amply illustrated, this is a must-have reference for anyone who loves fine books.

  2. Silicon pore optics developments and status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric; Wallace, Kotska;

    2012-01-01

    Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) is a lightweight high performance X-ray optics technology being developed in Europe, driven by applications in observatory class high energy astrophysics missions. An example of such application is the former ESA science mission candidate ATHENA (Advanced Telescope...... of the SPO technology. The technology development programme has succeeded in maturing the SPO further and achieving important milestones, in each of the main activity streams: environmental compatibility, industrial production and optical performance. In order to accurately characterise the increasing...... performance of this innovative optical technology, the associated X-ray test facilities and beam-lines have been refined and upgraded. © 2012 SPIE....

  3. Viral Subversion of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Le Sage

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear pore complex (NPC acts as a selective barrier between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and is responsible for mediating communication by regulating the transport of RNA and proteins. Numerous viral pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to hijack the NPC in order to regulate trafficking of viral proteins, genomes and even capsids into and out of the nucleus thus promoting virus replication. The present review examines the different strategies and the specific nucleoporins utilized during viral infections as a means of promoting their life cycle and inhibiting host viral defenses.

  4. Nanoscopic Characterization of DNA within Hydrophobic Pores:Thermodynamics and Kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz, Fernando J A L; Mota, José P B

    2016-01-01

    The energetic and transport properties of a double-stranded DNA dodecamer encapsulated in hydrophobic carbon nanotubes are probed employing two limiting nanotube diameters, D=4 nm and D=3 nm, corresponding to (51,0) and (40,0) zig-zag topologies, respectively. It is observed that the thermodynamically spontaneous encapsulation in the 4 nm nanopore (40 kJ/mol) is annihilated when the solid diameter narrows down to 3 nm, and that the confined DNA termini directly contact the hydrophobic walls with no solvent slab in-between. During the initial moments after confinement (2-3 ns),the biomolecule translocates along the nano pore's inner volume according to Fick's law (t) with a self-diffusion coefficient D=1.713 x 10-9m2/s, after which molecular diffusion assumes a single-file type mechanism (t1/2). As expected, diffusion is anisotropic, with the pore main axis as the preferred direction, but an in-depth analysis shows that the instantaneous velocity probabilities are essentially identical along the x, y and z dir...

  5. Analysis of quantitative pore features based on mathematical morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Heng-nian; CHEN Feng-nong; WANG Hang-jun

    2008-01-01

    Wood identification is a basic technique of wood science and industry. Pore features are among the most important identification features for hardwoods. We have used a method based on an analysis of quantitative pore feature, which differs from traditional qualitative methods. We applies mathematical morphology methods such as dilation and erosion, open and close transformation of wood cross-sections, image repairing, noise filtering and edge detection to segment the pores from their background. Then the mean square errors (MSE) of pores were computed to describe the distribution of pores. Our experiment shows that it is easy to classift the pore features into three basic types, just as in traditional qualitative methods, but with the use of MSE of pores. This quantitative method improves wood identification considerably.

  6. Quantifying similarity of pore-geometry in nanoporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongjin; Barthel, Senja D.; Dłotko, Paweł; Moosavi, S. Mohamad; Hess, Kathryn; Smit, Berend

    2017-05-01

    In most applications of nanoporous materials the pore structure is as important as the chemical composition as a determinant of performance. For example, one can alter performance in applications like carbon capture or methane storage by orders of magnitude by only modifying the pore structure. For these applications it is therefore important to identify the optimal pore geometry and use this information to find similar materials. However, the mathematical language and tools to identify materials with similar pore structures, but different composition, has been lacking. We develop a pore recognition approach to quantify similarity of pore structures and classify them using topological data analysis. This allows us to identify materials with similar pore geometries, and to screen for materials that are similar to given top-performing structures. Using methane storage as a case study, we also show that materials can be divided into topologically distinct classes requiring different optimization strategies.

  7. Gas diffusion, non-darcy air permeability and CT-scans for a traffic-affected clay subsoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Schjønning, Per; Berisso, Feto Esimo

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term effect of compaction on the pore system at 0.5 m depth of a heavy clay soil in Jokioinen, Finland. Gas diffusion and air permeability measurements were combined with pycnometer-estimated air-filled pore volumes. We wanted to evaluate, to w...

  8. Predicting Soil-Water Characteristics from Volumetric Contents of Pore-Size Analogue Particle Fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus

    (organic matter, clay, silt, fine and coarse sand), variably included in the model depending on the pF value. The volumetric content of a particular soil particle size fraction was included in the model if it was assumed to contribute to the pore size fraction still occupied with water at the given p......F value. Hereby, the Xw*-model implicitly assumes that a given particle size fraction creates an analogue pore size fraction and, also, is based on the validity of the well-known capillary law equation relating equivalent drained pore size to the soil-water matric potential. The Xw*-model was found...... and clay). It performed reasonably well for the dry-end (above a pF value of 2.0; pF = log(|Ψ|), where Ψ is the matric potential in cm), but did not do as well closer to saturated conditions. The Xw*-model gives the volumetric water content as a function of volumetric content of particle size fractions...

  9. Water diffusion to assess meat microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laghi, Luca; Venturi, Luca; Dellarosa, Nicolò; Petracci, Massimiliano

    2017-12-01

    In the quest for setting up rapid methods to evaluate water retention ability of meat microstructures, time domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) has gained a prominent role, due to the possibility to observe water located outside the myofibrils, easily lost upon storage or cooking. Diffusion weighted signals could be used to monitor the shape and dimension of the pores in which water is confined, thus boosting the information offered by TD-NMR. The work outlines a parsimonious model to describe relative abundance and diffusion coefficient of intra and extra myofibrillar water populations, exchange rate between them, diameter of the myofibrillar cells. To test our model, we registered diffusion and T2 weighted NMR signals at 20MHz on fresh meat from pectoralis major muscle of 100days old female turkey. We then purposely altered water distribution and myofibrils shape by means of freezing. The model predicted nicely the consequences of the imposed modifications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Fine bubble generator and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagat, P.M.; Koros, R.M.

    1990-10-09

    This patent describes a method of forming fine gaseous bubbles in a liquid ambient. It comprises: forcing a gas through orifices located in the liquid ambient while simultaneously forcing a liquid through liquid orifices at a velocity sufficient to form jet streams of liquid, the liquid orifices being equal in number to the gas orifices and so oriented that each jet stream of liquid intersects the gas forced through each gas orifice and creates sufficient turbulence where the gas and jet stream of liquid intersect, whereby fine gaseous bubbles are formed.

  11. Gas diffusion, non-darcy air permeability and CT-scans for a traffic-affected clay subsoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Schjønning, Per; Berisso, Feto Esimo

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term effect of compaction on the pore system at 0.5 m depth of a heavy clay soil in Jokioinen, Finland. Gas diffusion and air permeability measurements were combined with pycnometer-estimated air-filled pore volumes. We wanted to evaluate...... pressure drops. Compaction at 50 cm depth was persistent 29 years after the compaction event. Compaction diminished the size of vertical macropores that served as arterial pores, while the volume and role of marginal pores branching from the arterial pores were diminished. Compacted soil had...... the significantly lowest volume of blocked pores not in contact to the surrounding atmosphere. For this clay-holding soil, the long-term compaction effect is interpreted as a serious reduction of the aeration potential of the bulk soil matrix in between the vertical, arterial pores. Our data indicate a high degree...

  12. Preparation, characterization, and condensation of copper tellurolate clusters in the pores of periodic mesoporous silica MCM-41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalchuk, Collin M; Schmid, Günter; Meyer-Zaika, Wolfgang; Huang, Yining; Corrigan, John F

    2004-01-12

    The copper-tellurolate cluster [(Cu(6)(TePh)(6)(PPh(2)Et)(5)] has been loaded into the pores of MCM-41 by solid-state impregnation techniques. It was found that the best loading conditions are 110 degrees C and 10(-)(3) Torr static vacuum. The resulting material was analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), nitrogen adsorption isotherms, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), (31)P CP MAS NMR spectroscopy, and TEM. It was observed that loading is accompanied by loss of the phosphine shell, with retention of the copper-tellurium core. Condensation of the impregnated material may proceed thermally or photochemically. Thermal condensation results in the formation of Cu(2)Te nanoparticles as demonstrated by PXRD, and TEM data suggests that the process has taken place inside the pores of MCM-41. Photochemical condensation yields larger metal-chalcogen clusters in the pores as suggested by the result of UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and TEM measurements.

  13. Change of microstructure of clays due to the presence of heavy metal ions in pore water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiyouri N.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The compressibility of engineered barrier clays is, to a large extent, controlled by microstructure change due to the presence of chemical ions in clay-water system. This paper aims to investigate the change of microstructure of clays due to the presence of heavy metal ions in pore water. We use two pure clays (kaolinite and bentonite in the study. One-dimensional consolidation tests were performed on reconstituted samples, which are prepared with distilled water and three types of heavy metal solutions (Pb(NO32, Cu(NO32, Zn(NO32,. In order to better understand the impact of chemical pore fluid on microstructure of the two clays, following the consolidation test, scanning electron microscope (SEM observations and mercury intrusion pore size distribution measurements (MIP were conducted. Due to the measurement range of MIP, which is only allowed to measure the minimal pore size 20 Å, BET method by gas sorption, whose measurement pore size range is from 3.5 Å to 500 Å, is used to measure the micropore size distribution. By this method, specific surface area of the soils can be also determined. It can be employed to demonstrate the difference of creep performance between the soils. Furthermore, a series of batch equilibrium tests were conducted to better understand the physical-chemical interactions between the particles of soils and the heavy metal ions. With the further consideration of the interparticle electrical attractive and repulsive force, an attempt has been made to predict the creep behaviour by using the modified Gouy-Chapman double layer theory. The results of calculation were compared with that of tests. The comparison shows that the prediction of compressibility of the clays according to the modified double diffuse layer theory can be reasonably agreement with the experimental data.

  14. Developing an Effective Model for Shale Gas Flow in Nano-scale Pore Clusters based on FIB-SEM Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, W. B.; Lin, M.; Yi, Z. X.; Li, H. S.

    2016-12-01

    Nano-scale pores existed in the form of clusters are the controlling void space in shale gas reservoir. Gas transport in nanopores which has a significant influence on shale gas' recoverability displays multiple transport regimes, including viscous, slippage flow and Knudsen diffusion. In addition, it is also influenced by pore space characteristics. For convenience and efficiency consideration, it is necessary to develop an upscaling model from nano pore to pore cluster scale. Existing models are more like framework functions that provide a format, because the parameters that represent pore space characteristics are underdetermined and may have multiple possibilities. Therefore, it is urgent to make them clear and obtained a model that is closer to reality. FIB-SEM imaging technology is able to acquire three dimensional images with nanometer resolution that nano pores can be visible. Based on the images of two shale samples, we used a high-precision pore network extraction algorithm to generate equivalent pore networks and simulate multiple regime (non-Darcy) flow in it. Several structural parameters can be obtained through pore network modelling. It is found that although the throat-radius distributions are very close, throat flux-radius distributions of different samples can be divided into two categories. The variation of tortuosity with pressure and the overall trend of throat-flux distribution changes with pressure are disclosed. A deeper understanding of shale gas flow in nano-scale pore clusters is obtained. After all, an upscaling model that connects absolute permeability, apparent permeability and other characteristic parameters is proposed, and the best parameter scheme considering throat number-radius distribution and flowing porosity for this model is selected out of three schemes based on pore scale results, and it can avoid multiple-solution problem and is useful in reservoir modelling and experiment result analysis, etc. This work is supported by

  15. Temperature induced pore fluid pressurization in geomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Ghabezloo, Siavash

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical basis of the thermal response of the fluid-saturated porous materials in undrained condition is presented. It has been demonstrated that the thermal pressurization phenomenon is controlled by the discrepancy between the thermal expansion of the pore fluid and of the solid phase, the stress-dependency of the compressibility and the non-elastic volume changes of the porous material. For evaluation of the undrained thermo-poro-elastic properties of saturated porous materials in conventional triaxial cells, it is important to take into account the effect of the dead volume of the drainage system. A simple correction method is presented to correct the measured pore pressure change and also the measured volumetric strain during an undrained heating test. It is shown that the porosity of the tested material, its drained compressibility and the ratio of the volume of the drainage system to the one of the tested sample, are the key parameters which influence the most the error induced on the measuremen...

  16. Atmosphere above a large solar pore

    CERN Document Server

    Sobotka, M; Jurcak, J; Heinzel, P; Del Moro, D

    2013-01-01

    A large solar pore with a granular light bridge was observed on October 15, 2008 with the IBIS spectrometer at the Dunn Solar Telescope and a 69-min long time series of spectral scans in the lines Ca II 854.2 nm and Fe I 617.3 nm was obtained. The intensity and Doppler signals in the Ca II line were separated. This line samples the middle chromosphere in the core and the middle photosphere in the wings. Although no indication of a penumbra is seen in the photosphere, an extended filamentary structure, both in intensity and Doppler signals, is observed in the Ca II line core. An analysis of morphological and dynamical properties of the structure shows a close similarity to a superpenumbra of a sunspot with developed penumbra. A special attention is paid to the light bridge, which is the brightest feature in the pore seen in the Ca II line centre and shows an enhanced power of chromospheric oscillations at 3-5 mHz. Although the acoustic power flux in the light bridge is five times higher than in the "quiet" chr...

  17. Pore formation in lipid membrane I: Continuous reversible trajectory from intact bilayer through hydrophobic defect to transversal pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, Sergey A; Volynsky, Pavel E; Galimzyanov, Timur R; Kuzmin, Peter I; Pavlov, Konstantin V; Batishchev, Oleg V

    2017-09-22

    Lipid membranes serve as effective barriers allowing cells to maintain internal composition differing from that of extracellular medium. Membrane permeation, both natural and artificial, can take place via appearance of transversal pores. The rearrangements of lipids leading to pore formation in the intact membrane are not yet understood in details. We applied continuum elasticity theory to obtain continuous trajectory of pore formation and closure, and analyzed molecular dynamics trajectories of pre-formed pore reseal. We hypothesized that a transversal pore is preceded by a hydrophobic defect: intermediate structure spanning through the membrane, the side walls of which are partially aligned by lipid tails. This prediction was confirmed by our molecular dynamics simulations. Conversion of the hydrophobic defect into the hydrophilic pore required surmounting some energy barrier. A metastable state was found for the hydrophilic pore at the radius of a few nanometers. The dependence of the energy on radius was approximately quadratic for hydrophobic defect and small hydrophilic pore, while for large radii it depended on the radius linearly. The pore energy related to its perimeter, line tension, thus depends of the pore radius. Calculated values of the line tension for large pores were in quantitative agreement with available experimental data.

  18. Novel effective fuzzy diffusion algorithm for noise removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingtao; Cheng, Heng-Da; Huang, Jianhua; Tang, Xianglong

    2010-12-01

    Anisotropic diffusion is widely used for noise reduction. The performance of anisotropic diffusion, in general, depends on the shape of the energy surface. The partial differential equation model is established and analyzed in the continuous domain while is implemented in the discrete domain. Therefore, the anisotropic diffusion bears some fuzziness due to the approximation. We present a novel noise removal algorithm based on fuzzy logic and anisotropic diffusion theory. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method has the advantage of maximizing noise reduction and preserving fine details of the images. In addition, the method can enhance the contrast of the images well.

  19. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring - perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data.

  20. An emerging pore-making strategy: confined swelling-induced pore generation in block copolymer materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Li, Fengbin

    2011-05-17

    Block copolymers (BCPs) composed of two or more thermodynamically incompatible homopolymers self-assemble into periodic microdomains. Exposing self-assembled BCPs with solvents selective to one block causes a swelling of the domains composed of this block. Strong swelling in the confinement imposed by the matrix of the other glassy block leads to well-defined porous structures via morphology reconstruction. This confined swelling-induced pore-making process has emerged recently as a new strategy to produce porous materials due to synergic advantages that include extreme simplicity, high pore regularity, involvement of no chemical reactions, no weight loss, reversibility of the pore forming process, etc. The mechanism, kinetics, morphology, and governing parameters of the confined swelling-induced pore-making process in BCP thin films are discussed, and the main applications of nanoporous thin films in the fields of template synthesis, surface patterning, and guidance for the areal arrangements of nanomaterials and biomolecules are summarized. Recent, promising results of extending this mechanism to produce BCP nanofibers or nanotubes and bulk materials with well-defined porosity, which makes this strategy also attractive to researchers outside the nanocommunity, are also presented. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Structure and mechanism of peptide-induced membrane pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shuo

    This thesis reports the studies of the structure and mechanism of peptide-induced membrane pores by antimicrobial peptide alamethicin and by a peptide named Baxalpha5, which is derived from Bax protein. Alamethicin is one of best known antimicrobial peptides, which are ubiquitous throughout the biological world. Bax-alpha5 peptide is the pore-forming domain of apoptosis regulator protein Bax, which activates pore formation on outer mitochondrial membrane to release cytochrome c to initiate programmed cell death. Both peptides as well as many other pore-forming peptides, induce pores in membrane, however the structure and mechanism of the pore formation were unknown. By utilizing grazing angle x-ray diffraction, I was able to reconstruct the electron density profile of the membrane pores induced by both peptides. The fully hydrated multiple bilayers of peptide-lipid mixture on solid substrate were prepared in the condition that pores were present, as established previously by neutron in-plane scattering and oriented circular dichroism. At dehydrated conditions, the inter bilayer distance of the sample shortened and the interactions between bilayers caused the membrane pores to become long-ranged correlated and formed a periodically ordered lattice of rhombohedral symmetry, so that x-ray diffraction can be applied. To help solving the phase problem of diffraction, a brominated lipid was used and multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction was performed below the bromine K-edge. The reconstructed electron density profiles unambiguously revealed that the alamethicin-induced membrane pore is of barrel-stave type, while the Bax-alpha5 induced pore is of lipidic toroidal (wormhole) type. The underlying mechanism of pore formation was resolved by observing the time-dependent process of pore formation in vesicles exposed to Bax-alpha5 solutions, as well as the membrane thinning experiment. This demonstrated that Bax-alpha5 exhibited the same sigmoidal concentration dependence as

  2. Molecular Simulation of Shale Gas Adsorption and Diffusion in Clay Nanopores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongguang Sui

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to study the adsorption behavior and dynamical properties of CH4 in clay slit pore with or without cation exchange structures at sizes of 1.0 nm–4.0 nm using grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC and molecular dynamics (MD methods. The adsorption isotherms of CH4 have been investigated by GCMC simulations at different temperatures and various pore sizes. In the montmorillonite (MMT clays without a cation exchange structure, from the density profile, we find the molecules preferentially adsorb onto the surface, and only an obvious single layer was observed. The general trend within slit pores is that with increasing pore width, the adsorbed amount will increase. However, the larger pores exhibit lower excess density and the smaller pores exhibit higher excess density. The preloaded water will reduce CH4 sorption. The in plane self-diffusion coefficient of CH4 which is investigated by MD simulations combined with Einstein fluid equation increases rapidly with the pore size increasing at low pressure. Under these given conditions, the effect of temperature has little influence on the in-plane self-diffusion coefficient. In the MMT clays with cation exchange structure, cation exchange has little effect on CH4 adsorption and self-diffusion.

  3. Mathematical models of a diffusion-convection in porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anvarbek M. Meirmanov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models of a diffusion-convection in porous media are derived from the homogenization theory. We start with the mathematical model on the microscopic level, which consist of the Stokes system for a weakly compressible viscous liquid occupying a pore space, coupled with a diffusion-convection equation for the admixture. We suppose that the viscosity of the liquid depends on a concentration of the admixture and for this nonlinear system we prove the global in time existence of a weak solution. Next we rigorously fulfil the homogenization procedure as the dimensionless size of pores tends to zero, while the porous body is geometrically periodic. As a result, we derive new mathematical models of a diffusion-convection in absolutely rigid porous media.

  4. Characterization of gas diffusion electrodes for metal-air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Timo; Eswara, Santhana; Schulz, Volker P.; Latz, Arnulf

    2016-08-01

    Gas diffusion electrodes are commonly used in high energy density metal-air batteries for the supply of oxygen. Hydrophobic binder materials ensure the coexistence of gas and liquid phase in the pore network. The phase distribution has a strong influence on transport processes and electrochemical reactions. In this article we present 2D and 3D Rothman-Keller type multiphase Lattice-Boltzmann models which take into account the heterogeneous wetting behavior of gas diffusion electrodes. The simulations are performed on FIB-SEM 3D reconstructions of an Ag model electrode for predefined saturation of the pore space with the liquid phase. The resulting pressure-saturation characteristics and transport correlations are important input parameters for modeling approaches on the continuum scale and allow for an efficient development of improved gas diffusion electrodes.

  5. Water diffusion through compacted clays analyzed by neutron scattering and tracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Sanchez, F

    2007-11-15

    Clay minerals are aluminium phyllosilicates, mostly products of the chemical alteration and mechanical breakdown of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Their physical and chemical properties can be directly related to their layered, fine-grained (large surface area) structure. These properties such as large water retention, low hydraulic conductivity, heat resistance and ionic exchange capacities, make clays ideal for many different applications, e.g. as sealing material for the underground disposal of radioactive waste. The long-term disposal of radioactive waste in an underground geological repository is based on a multibarrier concept. In the barrier of highly compacted clay, water is intercalated and confined between the clay layers. The narrow pores are responsible that under natural hydraulic gradients, molecular diffusion through water is the dominant transport mechanism for released radionuclides. The properties of water at the water-clay interface differ from that of bulk water. Therefore, a good and deep understanding of the water structure and dynamics in compacted clay systems is fundamental. This knowledge is the base for the progressing research about transport of pollutants through the compacted clays and argillaceous rock of radioactive waste barriers. This study focusses on four different types of pure clays, two of them charged, namely montmorillonite and illite (both in a Na and Ca form), and two uncharged, namely kaolinite and pyrophyllite. Their structural differences result in a significantly different behaviour in contact with water. In case of montmorillonite, water is located in between particles and in the interlayer space. In illite, water is found only in between particles, because the interlayer surfaces are tightly linked by potassium cations. The layers of kaolinite and pyrophyllite are uncharged and, consequently, water is located only in between particles. The clay powders were compacted to reach a high bulk dry density of about 1.9 g

  6. A Stereolithography Pore-Throat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, D.; Ahmadi, G.; Ferer, M.; Smith, D. H.

    2007-12-01

    A new experimental, heterogeneous pore-throat model has been designed and fabricated using stereolithography (SL). In SL production, a laser cures a thin layer of photo-sensitive resin on the surface of a vat of liquid resin; a moveable platform then submerges the cured layer and a new layer is cured on top of the previous one, creating a physical model from a computer generated model. This layered fabrication of a computer generated model has enabled the production of an experimental porous medium with improved fluid resistance properties, as compared to previously studied, constant-height etched cells. A uniform distribution of throat widths was randomly placed throughout the pore-throat matrix and the throat height of each throat was assigned to increase the range of viscous and capillary resistances within the physical model. This variation in both throat height and width generated a porous medium with fairly low porosity (43%), permeability (~400 D), and wide range of geometric resistance properties. Experimental, two-phase immiscible drainage studies in the porous flowcell were performed. Analysis of the captured images was performed with open-source image processing software. These analysis techniques utilized the capability of both ImageJ and the Gnu Image Manipulation Program to be customized with ancillary codes. This enabled batch procedures to be created that converted the original grey-scale bitmaps to binary data sets, which were then analyzed with in-house codes. The fractal dimension, Df, (measured with box-counting) and percent saturation of these experiments were calculated and shown to compare favorably to fractal predictions and previous flowcell studies. Additionally, using the computer generated pore-throat geometry, a computational fluid dynamics model of two- phase flow through the porous medium was created. This model was created using FLUENT code and the Volume of Fluid method. The percent saturation of the less-viscous invading fluid

  7. Pore structure and carbonation in blended lime-cement pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez, J. I.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to gain a fuller understandingof the curing process in lime pastes (100, 90, 80, 70,60, 50 and 40% lime blended with cement by analyzingcarbonation in these materials. A hydrated, airslaked lime powder and CEM II A/L 32.5 Portlandcement were used for the blends. These materialswere singled out for research primarily because theymay be used in the restoration of heritage monuments.Variation in weight was used as an indicator for carbonation.A new parameter, A, was found to vary inverselywith the percentage of the cement because of theprevalence of Knudsen diffusion in the paste, in turndue to the characteristics of the pore structure, whichwas studied by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP.The hygroscopic study conducted on the different pastesprovided information on water content at a givenhumidity and its location, i.e., adsorbed on the surfaceof the pores or condensed inside them, obstructing thediffusion of CO2. The conclusion drawn from this studyof the curing process was that neither drying nor C3Shydration retarded lime carbonation.En este trabajo se estudia el proceso de carbonatacionen pastas mixtas de cal y cemento (100, 90, 80, 70, 60,50 y 40% de cal con el objeto de obtener un mejorconocimiento del proceso de curado en estos materiales.Para ello se ha empleado una cal aerea hidratada en polvoy un cemento Portland del tipo CEM II A/L 32,5. Enparticular, este estudio investiga estos materiales ya quepueden ser utilizados en la restauracion del PatrimonioCultural. Se ha utilizado la variacion de peso como indicadordel proceso de carbonatacion. Se ha establecidoun nuevo parametro, A, que varia inversamente con elporcentaje de cemento en la pasta, debido al predominiode la difusion de Knudsen como consecuencia de laestructura porosa, que ha sido estudiada por medio deporosimetria de intrusion de mercurio (PIM. El estudiohigroscopico realizado sobre las diversas pastas permiteconocer el contenido en agua a una

  8. PERMEATION OF POLYELECTROLYTES AND OTHER SOLUTES INTO THE PORE SPACES OF WATER-SWOLLEN CELLULOSE: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Ning Wu; Martin A. Hubbe; Rojas, Orlando J.; Sunkyu Park

    2009-01-01

    The rate and extent of transport of macromolecules and other solutes into cellulosic materials and fibers have important applications in such fields as papermaking, textiles, medicine, and chromatography. This review considers how diffusion and flow affect permeation into wood, paper, and other lignocellulosic materials. Because pore sizes within such materials can range from nanometers to millimeters, a broad perspective will be used, also considering some publications related to other por...

  9. Pore size matters for potassium channel conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldenhauer, Hans; Pincuntureo, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that mediate efficient ion transport across the hydrophobic core of cell membranes, an unlikely process in their absence. K+ channels discriminate K+ over cations with similar radii with extraordinary selectivity and display a wide diversity of ion transport rates, covering differences of two orders of magnitude in unitary conductance. The pore domains of large- and small-conductance K+ channels share a general architectural design comprising a conserved narrow selectivity filter, which forms intimate interactions with permeant ions, flanked by two wider vestibules toward the internal and external openings. In large-conductance K+ channels, the inner vestibule is wide, whereas in small-conductance channels it is narrow. Here we raise the idea that the physical dimensions of the hydrophobic internal vestibule limit ion transport in K+ channels, accounting for their diversity in unitary conductance. PMID:27619418

  10. Silicon pore optics development for ATHENA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collon, Maximilien J.; Vacanti, Giuseppe; Günther, Ramses; Yanson, Alex; Barrière, Nicolas; Landgraf, Boris; Vervest, Mark; Chatbi, Abdelhakim; Beijersbergen, Marco W.; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric; Haneveld, Jeroen; Koelewijn, Arenda; Leenstra, Anne; Wijnperle, Maurice; van Baren, Coen; Müller, Peter; Krumrey, Michael; Burwitz, Vadim; Pareschi, Giovanni; Conconi, Paolo; Christensen, Finn E.

    2015-09-01

    The ATHENA mission, a European large (L) class X-ray observatory to be launched in 2028, will essentially consist of an X-ray lens and two focal plane instruments. The lens, based on a Wolter-I type double reflection grazing incidence angle design, will be very large (~ 3 m in diameter) to meet the science requirements of large effective area (1-2 m2 at a few keV) at a focal length of 12 m. To meet the high angular resolution (5 arc seconds) requirement the X-ray lens will also need to be very accurate. Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) technology has been invented to enable building such a lens and thus enabling the ATHENA mission. We will report in this paper on the latest status of the development, including details of X-ray test campaigns.

  11. Silicon pore optics for the ATHENA telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collon, Maximilien J.; Vacanti, Giuseppe; Günther, Ramses; Yanson, Alex; Barriere, Nicolas; Landgraf, Boris; Vervest, Mark; Chatbi, Abdelhakim; van der Hoeven, Roy; Beijersbergen, Marco W.; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric; Shortt, Brian; Haneveld, Jeroen; Koelewijn, Arenda; van Baren, Coen; Eigenraam, Alexander; Müller, Peter; Krumrey, Michael; Burwitz, Vadim; Pareschi, Giovanni; Conconi, Paolo; Massahi, Sonny; Christensen, Finn E.; Valsecchi, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Silicon Pore Optics is a high-energy optics technology, invented to enable the next generation of high-resolution, large area X-ray telescopes such as the ATHENA observatory, a European large (L) class mission with a launch date of 2028. The technology development is carried out by a consortium of industrial and academic partners and focuses on building an optics with a focal length of 12 m that shall achieve an angular resolution better than 5". So far we have built optics with a focal length of 50 m and 20 m. This paper presents details of the work carried out to build silicon stacks for a 12 m optics and to integrate them into mirror modules. It will also present results of x-ray tests taking place at PTB's XPBF with synchrotron radiation and the PANTER test facility.

  12. Distributed Pore Chemistry in Porous Organic Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for making a biocompatible polymer article using a uniform atomic oxygen treatment is disclosed. The substrate may be subsequently optionally grated with a compatibilizing compound. Compatibilizing compounds may include proteins, phosphorylcholine groups, platelet adhesion preventing polymers, albumin adhesion promoters, and the like. The compatibilized substrate may also have a living cell layer adhered thereto. The atomic oxygen is preferably produced by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge. wherein the substrate resides in a sidearm out of the plasma. Also, methods for culturing cells for various purposes using the various membranes are disclosed as well. Also disclosed are porous organic polymers having a distributed pore chemistry (DPC) comprising hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. and a method for making the DPC by exposing the polymer to atomic oxygen wherein the rate of hydrophilization is greater than the rate of mass loss.

  13. Evaluating transport in irregular pore networks

    CERN Document Server

    Klimenko, Dimitri A; Klimenko, Alexander Y; 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.011112

    2012-01-01

    A general approach for investigating transport phenomena in porous media is presented. This approach has the capacity to represent various kinds of irregularity in porous media without the need for excessive detail or computational effort. The overall method combines a generalized Effective Medium Approximation (EMA) with a macroscopic continuum model in order to derive a transport equation with explicit analytical expressions for the transport coefficients. The proposed form of the EMA is an anisotropic and heterogeneous extension of Kirkpatrick's EMA [Rev. Mod. Phys. 45, 574 (1973)] which allows the overall model to account for microscopic alterations in connectivity (with the locations of the pores and the orientation and length of the throat) as well as macroscopic variations in transport properties. A comparison to numerical results for randomly generated networks with different properties is given, indicating the potential for this methodology to handle cases that would pose significant difficulties to ...

  14. Characterisation of matrix pore water and fluid inclusions in Olkiluoto bedrock from drilling OL-KR47

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichinger, F.; Haemmerli, J.; Waber, H.N.; Diamond, L.W. (Bern Univ., Inst. of Geological Sciences (Switzerland)); Smellie, J.A.T. (Conterra AB, Luleaa (Sweden))

    2010-10-15

    Matrix pore water from core samples from drilling OL-KR47 was chemically and isotopically successfully characterised. Matrix pore water that resides in the intragranular and intergranular connected pore space of low permeable crystalline rocks was extracted by indirect laboratory methods applied to naturally saturated core samples. The derivation of the composition of matrix pore water by indirect methods depends on an accurate determination of the connected porosity. Connected porosity values were determined by two independent methods based on the water content of the naturally saturated core samples, i.e. by gravimetric determination of the water content and by diffusive isotope exchange. For the two major lithologies, intercepted by borehole OLKR47, connected porosities vary between 0.26 and 1.37 Vol.% for veined gneiss and between 0.62 and 0.88 Vol.% for pegmatitic granite. Based on a detailed evaluation, it can be inferred that porosity values are representative for in situ conditions within the uncertainty ranges. Variations in connected porosity within the same lithologies along the depth profile are partly attributed to variations in the degree of alteration of the main rock forming minerals. Within this work, solute transport properties of the crystalline rock samples used for pore water investigations were characterised

  15. Measurements of Ultra-fine and Fine Aerosol Particles over Siberia: Large-scale Airborne Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshinov, Mikhail; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Stohl, Andreas; Belan, Boris; Ciais, Philippe; Nédélec, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we discuss the results of in-situ measurements of ultra-fine and fine aerosol particles carried out in the troposphere from 500 to 7000 m in the framework of several International and Russian State Projects. Number concentrations of ultra-fine and fine aerosol particles measured during intensive airborne campaigns are presented. Measurements carried over a great part of Siberia were focused on particles with diameters from 3 to 21 nm to study new particle formation in the free/upper troposphere over middle and high latitudes of Asia, which is the most unexplored region of the Northern Hemisphere. Joint International airborne surveys were performed along the following routes: Novosibirsk-Salekhard-Khatanga-Chokurdakh-Pevek-Yakutsk-Mirny-Novosibirsk (YAK-AEROSIB/PLARCAT2008 Project) and Novosibirsk-Mirny-Yakutsk-Lensk-Bratsk-Novosibirsk (YAK-AEROSIB Project). The flights over Lake Baikal was conducted under Russian State contract. Concentrations of ultra-fine and fine particles were measured with automated diffusion battery (ADB, designed by ICKC SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia) modified for airborne applications. The airborne ADB coupled with CPC has an additional aspiration unit to compensate ambient pressure and changing flow rate. It enabled to classify nanoparticles in three size ranges: 3-6 nm, 6-21 nm, and 21-200 nm. To identify new particle formation events we used similar specific criteria as Young et al. (2007): (1) N3-6nm >10 cm-3, (2) R1=N3-6/N621 >1 and R2=N321/N21200 >0.5. So when one of the ratios R1 or R2 tends to decrease to the above limits the new particle formation is weakened. It is very important to notice that space scale where new particle formation was observed is rather large. All the events revealed in the FT occurred under clean air conditions (low CO mixing ratios). Measurements carried out in the atmospheric boundary layer over Baikal Lake did not reveal any event of new particle formation. Concentrations of ultra-fine

  16. Crossed and Linked Histories of Tetrapyrrolic Macrocycles and Their Use for Engineering Pores within Sol-Gel Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. García-Sánchez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The crossed and linked histories of tetrapyrrolic macrocycles, interwoven with new research discoveries, suggest that Nature has found in these structures a way to ensure the continuity of life. For diverse applications porphyrins or phthalocyanines must be trapped inside solid networks, but due to their nature, these compounds cannot be introduced by thermal diffusion; the sol-gel method makes possible this insertion through a soft chemical process. The methodologies for trapping or bonding macrocycles inside pristine or organo-modified silica or inside ZrO2 xerogels were developed by using phthalocyanines and porphyrins as molecular probes. The sizes of the pores formed depend on the structure, the cation nature, and the identities and positions of peripheral substituents of the macrocycle. The interactions of the macrocyclic molecule and surface Si-OH groups inhibit the efficient displaying of the macrocycle properties and to avoid this undesirable event, strategies such as situating the macrocycle far from the pore walls or to exchange the Si-OH species by alkyl or aryl groups have been proposed. Spectroscopic properties are better preserved when long unions are established between the macrocycle and the pore walls, or when oligomeric macrocyclic species are trapped inside each pore. When macrocycles are trapped inside organo-modified silica, their properties result similar to those displayed in solution and their intensities depend on the length of the alkyl chain attached to the matrix. These results support the prospect of tuning up the pore size, surface area, and polarity inside the pore cavities in order to prepare efficient catalytic, optical, sensoring, and medical systems. The most important feature is that research would confirm again that tetrapyrrolic macrocycles can help in the development of the authentic pore engineering in materials science.

  17. Factors Determining the Pore Shape in Polycarbonate Track Membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, P Yu; Orelovich, O L; Akimenko, S N; Sartowska, B; Dmitriev, S N

    2004-01-01

    The process of pore formation in ion-irradiated polycarbonate films on treatment with alkali solutions in the presence of a surfactant is studied. It is found that the pore shape depends on both the structure of the initial films and the peculiarities of the interaction of the surfactant with the polymer surface and the transport of the surfactant into tracks. Due to heterogeneity of the films the cross-section of a track pore channel changes along its length. The presence of the surfactant results in a further effect. Surfactant molecules adsorb on the polymer surface at the pore entries and reduce the etch rate which leads to formation of cigar-like pore channels. The use of surfactant as a component of chemical etchant enables one to control the pore shape in track membranes thus optimizing their retention and permeation characteristics.

  18. Experimental study on pore water pressure dissipation of mucky soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianwei ZHANG; Changming WANG; Junxia LI; Bin WANG

    2008-01-01

    Pore water pressure has an important influence on mechanical properties of soil. The authors studied the characteristics of pore water pressure dissipating of mucky soil under consolidated-drained condition by using refitted triaxial instrument and analyzed the variation of pore pressure coefficient with consolidation pressure. The results show that the dissipating of pore water pressure behaves in different ways depends on different styles of loading. What is more, the pore water pressure coefficient of mucky soil is less than 1. As the compactness of soil increases and moisture content reduces, the value of B reduces. There is a staggered dissipating in the process of consolidation, in which it is a mutate point when U/P is 80%. It is helpful to establish the pore water pressure model and study the strength-deformation of soil in process of consolidation.

  19. Exploitation of 3D face-centered cubic mesoporous silica as a carrier for a poorly water soluble drug: influence of pore size on release rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenquan; Wan, Long; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Yikun; Zheng, Xin; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the present work were to explore the potential application of 3D face-centered cubic mesoporous silica (FMS) with pore size of 16.0nm as a delivery system for poorly soluble drugs and investigate the effect of pore size on the dissolution rate. FMS with different pore sizes (16.0, 6.9 and 3.7nm) was successfully synthesized by using Pluronic block co-polymer F127 as a template and adjusting the reaction temperatures. Celecoxib (CEL), which is a BCS class II drug, was used as a model drug and loaded into FMS with different pore sizes by the solvent deposition method at a drug-silica ratio of 1:4. Characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to systematically investigate the drug loading process. The results obtained showed that CEL was in a non-crystalline state after incorporation of CEL into the pores of FMS-15 with pore size of 16.0nm. In vitro dissolution was carried out to demonstrate the effects of FMS with different pore sizes on the release of CEL. The results obtained indicated that the dissolution rate of CEL from FMS-15 was significantly enhanced compared with pure CEL. This could be explained by supposing that CEL encountered less diffusion resistance and its crystallinity decreased due to the large pore size of 16.0nm and the nanopore channels of FMS-15. Moreover, drug loading and pore size both play an important role in enhancing the dissolution properties for the poorly water-soluble drugs. As the pore size between 3.7 and 16.0nm increased, the dissolution rate of CEL from FMS gradually increased.

  20. Vapor intrusion in soils with multimodal pore-size distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Alfaro Soto Miguel; Hung Kiang Chang

    2016-01-01

    The Johnson and Ettinger [1] model and its extensions are at this time the most widely used algorithms for estimating subsurface vapor intrusion into buildings (API [2]). The functions which describe capillary pressure curves are utilized in quantitative analyses, although these are applicable for porous media with a unimodal or lognormal pore-size distribution. However, unaltered soils may have a heterogeneous pore distribution and consequently a multimodal pore-size distribution [3], which ...

  1. Synthesis of LiBOB Fine Powder to Increase Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etty Marti Wigayati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Lithium bis (oxalate borate or LiBOB compound has captured interest of researchers, because it is potentially viable to be used as electrolyte salt in lithium-ion battery system. This compound is easy to synthesize and considered to be more environmentally friendly compared to conventional electrolyte salt because LiBOB does not contain halogen element. This research focused on the synthesis of LiBOB fine powder, which main purpose is improving LiBOB salt solubility in liquid electrolyte solution. This will aid the ion transfer between electrodes which in turn will increase the electrolyte performance. Solid state reaction was employed in this experiment. Synthesis of LiBOB compound was performed by reacting oxalic acid dihydrate, lithium hydroxide monohydrate, and boric acid. The resulting powder was then processed into fine powder using ball milling technique with varying milling time (0, 6, 10, and 13 hour. Microstructure of the sample was then analyzed to obtain information regarding phase formation, functional groups, grain surface morphology, surface area, pore volume, solubility, and ionic conductivity. The analysis shown that LiBOB and LiBOB hydrate phase was formed during the reaction, there was no changed in existing phase during milling process, crystallinity index was shifted to lower value but there was no difference in functional groups. Highest value in surface area was found to be 83.11 m2/g, with pore volume of 1.21311e+02 A at 10 hours milling. Smaller powder size resulted in higher solubility, unfortunately the ionic conductivity was found to be decreased.

  2. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  3. Fusion Pore Diameter Regulation by Cations Modulating Local Membrane Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doron Kabaso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fusion pore is an aqueous channel that is formed upon the fusion of the vesicle membrane with the plasma membrane. Once the pore is open, it may close again (transient fusion or widen completely (full fusion to permit vesicle cargo discharge. While repetitive transient fusion pore openings of the vesicle with the plasma membrane have been observed in the absence of stimulation, their frequency can be further increased using a cAMP-increasing agent that drives the opening of nonspecific cation channels. Our model hypothesis is that the openings and closings of the fusion pore are driven by changes in the local concentration of cations in the connected vesicle. The proposed mechanism of fusion pore dynamics is considered as follows: when the fusion pore is closed or is extremely narrow, the accumulation of cations in the vesicle (increased cation concentration likely leads to lipid demixing at the fusion pore. This process may affect local membrane anisotropy, which reduces the spontaneous curvature and thus leads to the opening of the fusion pore. Based on the theory of membrane elasticity, we used a continuum model to explain the rhythmic opening and closing of the fusion pore.

  4. Enzyme screening with synthetic multifunctional pores: Focus on biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordé, Nathalie; Das, Gopal; Matile, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    This report demonstrates that a single set of identical synthetic multifunctional pores can detect the activity of many different enzymes. Enzymes catalyzing either synthesis or degradation of DNA (exonuclease III or polymerase I), RNA (RNase A), polysaccharides (heparinase I, hyaluronidase, and galactosyltransferase), and proteins (papain, ficin, elastase, subtilisin, and pronase) are selected to exemplify this key characteristic of synthetic multifunctional pore sensors. Because anionic, cationic, and neutral substrates can gain access to the interior of complementarily functionalized pores, such pores can be the basis for very user-friendly screening of a broad range of enzymes. PMID:14530413

  5. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga`s mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  6. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga's mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  7. Ultrafast laser fabrication of submicrometer pores in borosilicate glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ran; Uram, Jeffrey D; Yusko, Erik C; Ke, Kevin; Mayer, Michael; Hunt, Alan J

    2008-05-15

    We demonstrate rapid fabrication of submicrometer-diameter pores in borosilicate glass using femtosecond laser machining and subsequent wet-etch techniques. This approach allows direct and repeatable fabrication of high-quality pores with diameters of 400-800 nm. Such small pores coupled with the desirable electrical and chemical properties of glass enable sensitive resistive-pulse analysis to determine the size and concentration of macromolecules and nanoparticles. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition allows further reduction of pore diameters to below 300 nm.

  8. Relationship between elastic moduli and pore radius in clay aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2011-01-01

    Available experimental data on elastic velocities of clay-air mixtures and clay-brine mixtures as a function of porosity are re-interpreted. Pore radius as calculated from porosity and specific surface measured by BET seems to be the factor controlling stiffness of these un-cemented sediments....... For each of the two pore fluids: air or brine smectitic clay and kaolinitic clay seem to have similar power law relationships between a given elastic modulus and pore radius. These results indicate that pore radius and thus permeability of shale in the depth interval of mechanical compaction may...

  9. Tension-induced vesicle fusion: pathways and pore dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2008-01-01

    and eventually opens a pore to complete the fusion process. In pathway II, at higher tension, a stalk is formed during the fusion process that is then transformed by transmembrane pore formation into a fusion pore. Whereas the latter pathway II resembles stalk pathways as observed in other simulation studies...... fusion time on membrane tension implies that the fusion process is completed by overcoming two energy barriers with scales of 13kBT and 11kBT. The fusion pore radius as a function of time has also been extracted from the simulations, and provides a quantitative measure of the fusion dynamics which...

  10. Digital volume imaging of the PEFC gas diffusion layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukherjee, Partha [ORNL; Shim, Eunkyoung [NC ST

    2010-01-01

    The gas diffusion layer (GDL) plays a key role in the overall performance/durability of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Of profound importance, especially in the context of water management and flooding phenomena, is the influence of the underlying pore morphology and wetting characteristics Of the GDL microstructure. In this article, we present the digital volumetric imaging (DVI) technique in order to generate the 3-D carbon paper GDL microstructure. The internal pore structure and the local microstructural variations in terms of fiber alignment and fiber/binder distributions are investigated using the several 3-D thin sections of the sample obtained from DVI.

  11. Modeling of the interplay between single-file diffusion and conversion reaction in mesoporous systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-11

    We analyze the spatiotemporal behavior of species concentrations in a diffusion-mediated conversion reaction which occurs at catalytic sites within linear pores of nanometer diameter. A strict single-file (no passing) constraint occurs in the diffusion within such narrow pores. Both transient and steady-state behavior is precisely characterized by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of a spatially discrete lattice–gas model for this reaction–diffusion process considering various distributions of catalytic sites. Exact hierarchical master equations can also be developed for this model. Their analysis, after application of mean-field type truncation approximations, produces discrete reaction–diffusion type equations (mf-RDE). For slowly varying concentrations, we further develop coarse-grained continuum hydrodynamic reaction–diffusion equations (h-RDE) incorporating a precise treatment of single-file diffusion (SFD) in this multispecies system. Noting the shortcomings of mf-RDE and h-RDE, we then develop a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) formulation of appropriate gh-RDE which incorporates an unconventional description of chemical diffusion in mixed-component quasi-single-file systems based on a refined picture of tracer diffusion for finite-length pores. The gh-RDE elucidate the non-exponential decay of the steady-state reactant concentration into the pore and the non-mean-field scaling of the reactant penetration depth. Then an extended model of a catalytic conversion reaction within a functionalized nanoporous material is developed to assess the effect of varying the reaction product – pore interior interaction from attractive to repulsive. The analysis is performed utilizing the generalized hydrodynamic formulation of the reaction-diffusion equations which can reliably capture the complex interplay between reaction and restricted transport for both irreversible and reversible reactions.

  12. Derivation of the fine structure constant using fractional dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfain, E

    2003-01-01

    Both classical and quantum electrodynamics assume that random fluctuations are absent from the steady-state evolution of the underlying physical system. Our work goes beyond this approximation and accounts for the continuous exposure to stochastic fluctuations. It is known that the asymptotic limit of quantum field dynamics, dominated by large and persistent perturbations, may be described as an anomalous diffusion process. We use fractional calculus as an appropriate tool to handle this highly non-trivial regime. It is shown that the fine structure constant can be recovered from the fractional evolution equation of the density matrix under standard normalization conditions.

  13. NMR studies of organic liquids confined in mesoporous materials: (1) Pore size distribution and (2) Phase behaviour and dynamic studies in restricted geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerland, Kjersti

    2005-07-01

    In the thesis NMR spectroscopy is used for studying liquids confined in various porous materials. In the first part, pore size distributions of mesoporous silicas and controlled pore glasses were determined by measuring the 1H NMR signal from the non-frozen fraction of the confined liquid as a function of temperature, using benzene, acetonitrile and HMDS as probe molecules. In the second part, the molecular dynamics of acetonitrile, hexamethyldisilane, cyclohexane and cyclopentane confined in mesoporous materials were studied as a function of temperature. 6 papers are included with titles: 1) Pore-size determination of mesoporous materials by 1H NMR spectroscopy. 2) Pore-size distribution in mesoporous materials as studied by 1H NMR. 3) Dynamic 1H and 2H NMR investigations of acetonitrile confined in porous silica. 4) NMR investigations of hexamethyldisilane confined in controlled pore glasses: Pore size distribution and molecular dynamics studies. 5) 1H and 2H NMR studies of cyclohexane nano crystals in controlled pore glasses. 6) 1H NMR relaxation and diffusion studies of cyclohexane and cyclopentane confined in MCM-41.

  14. Scaffolds and cells for tissue regeneration: different scaffold pore sizes-different cell effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bružauskaitė, Ieva; Bironaitė, Daiva; Bagdonas, Edvardas; Bernotienė, Eiva

    2016-05-01

    During the last decade biomaterial sciences and tissue engineering have become new scientific fields supplying rising demand of regenerative therapy. Tissue engineering requires consolidation of a broad knowledge of cell biology and modern biotechnology investigating biocompatibility of materials and their application for the reconstruction of damaged organs and tissues. Stem cell-based tissue regeneration started from the direct cell transplantation into damaged tissues or blood vessels. However, it is difficult to track transplanted cells and keep them in one particular place of diseased organ. Recently, new technologies such as cultivation of stem cell on the scaffolds and subsequently their implantation into injured tissue have been extensively developed. Successful tissue regeneration requires scaffolds with particular mechanical stability or biodegradability, appropriate size, surface roughness and porosity to provide a suitable microenvironment for the sufficient cell-cell interaction, cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. Further functioning of implanted cells highly depends on the scaffold pore sizes that play an essential role in nutrient and oxygen diffusion and waste removal. In addition, pore sizes strongly influence cell adhesion, cell-cell interaction and cell transmigration across the membrane depending on the various purposes of tissue regeneration. Therefore, this review will highlight contemporary tendencies in application of non-degradable scaffolds and stem cells in regenerative medicine with a particular focus on the pore sizes significantly affecting final recover of diseased organs.

  15. Transmission of Helium Isotopes through Graphdiyne Pores: Tunneling versus Zero Point Energy Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Marta I; Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Campos-Martínez, José

    2015-10-29

    Recent progress in the production of new two-dimensional (2D) nanoporous materials is attracting considerable interest for applications to isotope separation in gases. In this paper we report a computational study of the transmission of (4)He and (3)He through the (subnanometer) pores of graphdiyne, a recently synthesized 2D carbon material. The He-graphdiyne interaction is represented by a force field parametrized upon ab initio calculations, and the (4)He/(3)He selectivity is analyzed by tunneling-corrected transition state theory. We have found that both zero point energy (of the in-pore degrees of freedom) and tunneling effects play an extraordinary role at low temperatures (≈20-30 K). However, both quantum features work in opposite directions in such a way that the selectivity ratio does not reach an acceptable value. Nevertheless, the efficiency of zero point energy is in general larger, so that (4)He tends to diffuse faster than (3)He through the graphdiyne membrane, with a maximum performance at 23 K. Moreover, it is found that the transmission rates are too small in the studied temperature range, precluding practical applications. It is concluded that the role of the in-pore degrees of freedom should be included in computations of the transmission probabilities of molecules through nanoporous materials.

  16. Experimental Study on Mechanism of Depressurizing Dissociation of Methane Hydrate under Saturated Pore Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Youhong; Su Kai; Guo Wei; Li Bing; Jia Rui

    2016-01-01

    Sediment-hosted hydrate reservoir often contains saturated pore lfuid, which changes the heat transfer and mass transfer characteristics of the hydrate reservoir. The exploitation of hydrate under saturated pore lfuid using depressurization is simulated experimentally to investigate the inlfuence of particle size of porous media, dissociation temperature, pressure drop and injected lfuid type on gas production behavior. Homogeneous methane hydrate was ifrstly formed in frozen quartz sand. With the formed hydrate sample, hydrate dissociation experiments by depressurization were conducted. The test results showed that the gas production rate of hydrate under saturated pore lfuid was substantially inlfuenced by the particle size, the pressure drop and the injected lfuid type, while it was inlfuenced little by the dissociation temperature. The hydrate dissociates faster under larger pressure drop and in the presence of smaller porous media within the experimental region. The dissociation rate increases with an increasing lfuid salinity in the initial stage, while it decreases in the later stage. The increase of gas diffusion resistance resulted from ionic hydration atmosphere in saturated chloride solution impeded the dissociation of hydrate. It can be solved by increasing the pressure drop and decreasing the lfuid salinity in the process of gas recovery from hydrate reservoir.

  17. Observations of substorm fine structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Lazutin

    Full Text Available Particle and magnetic field measurements on the CRRES satellite were used, together with geosynchronous satellites and ground-based observations, to investigate the fine structure of a magnetospheric substorm on February 9, 1991. Using the variations in the electron fluxes, the substorm activity was divided into several intensifications lasting about 3–15 minutes each. The two main features of the data were: (1 the intensifications showed internal fine structure in the time scale of about 2 minutes or less. We call these shorter periods activations. Energetic electrons and protons at the closest geosynchronous spacecraft (1990 095 were found to have comparable activation structure. (2 The energetic (>69 keV proton injections were delayed with respect to electron injections, and actually coincided in time with the end of the intensifications and partial returns to locally more stretched field line configuration. We propose that the energetic protons could be able to control the dynamics of the system locally be quenching the ongoing intensification and possibly preparing the final large-scale poleward movement of the activity. It was also shown that these protons originated from the same intensification as the preceeding electrons. Therefore, the substorm instability responsible for the intensifications could introduce a negative feedback loop into the system, creating the observed fine structure with the intensification time scales.

    Key words. Magnetospheric Physics (Storms and substorms.

  18. Rock Physics of Reservoir Rocks with Varying Pore Water Saturation and Pore Water Salinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina

    be performed on specific geological structures and why it is sometimes successful; has yet to be established. The presence of both oil and water in the pore space, several different ions present in the injected water that contact the pore walls, possible changes in the fluid wetting the surface of the grains......Advanced waterflooding (injection of water with selective ions in reservoirs) is a method of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) that has attracted the interest of oil and gas companies that exploit the Danish oil and gas reservoirs. This method has been applied successfully in oil reservoirs...... and in the Smart Water project performed in a laboratory scale in order to evaluate the EOR processes in selected core plugs. A major step towards this evaluation is to identify the composition of the injected water that leads to increased oil recovery in reservoirs and to define changes in the petrophysical...

  19. Entropy of Shortest Distance (ESD as Pore Detector and Pore-Shape Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudia Oleschko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The entropy of shortest distance (ESD between geographic elements (“elliptical intrusions”, “lineaments”, “points” on a map, or between "vugs", "fractures" and "pores" in the macro- or microscopic images of triple porosity naturally fractured vuggy carbonates provides a powerful new tool for the digital processing, analysis, classification and space/time distribution prognostic of mineral resources as well as the void space in carbonates, and in other rocks. The procedure is applicable at all scales, from outcrop photos, FMI, UBI, USI (geophysical imaging techniques to micrographs, as we shall illustrate through some examples. Out of the possible applications of the ESD concept, we discuss in details the sliding window entropy filtering for nonlinear pore boundary enhancement, and propose this procedure as unbiased thresholding technique.

  20. CDC WONDER: Daily Fine Particulate Matter

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Daily Fine Particulate Matter data available on CDC WONDER are geographically aggregated daily measures of fine particulate matter in the outdoor air, spanning...

  1. CDC WONDER: Daily Fine Particulate Matter

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Daily Fine Particulate Matter data available on CDC WONDER are geographically aggregated daily measures of fine particulate matter in the outdoor air, spanning...

  2. A conceptual model of pore-space blockage in mixed sediments using a new numerical approach, with implications for sediment bed stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartzke, Gerhard; Huhn, Katrin

    2015-06-01

    In mixed sediment beds, erosion resistance can change relative to that of beds composed of a uniform sediment because of varying textural and/or other grain-size parameters, with effects on pore water flow that are difficult to quantify by means of analogue techniques. To overcome this difficulty, a three-dimensional numerical model was developed using a finite difference method (FDM) flow model coupled with a distinct element method (DEM) particle model. The main aim was to investigate, at a high spatial resolution, the physical processes occurring during the initiation of motion of single grains at the sediment-water interface and in the shallow subsurface of simplified sediment beds under different flow velocities. Increasing proportions of very fine sand (D50=0.08 mm) were mixed into a coarse sand matrix (D50=0.6 mm) to simulate mixed sediment beds, starting with a pure coarse sand bed in experiment 1 (0 wt% fines), and proceeding through experiment 2 (6.5 wt% fines), experiment 3 (10.5 wt% fines), and experiment 4 (28.7 wt% fines). All mixed beds were tested for their erosion behavior at predefined flow velocities varying in the range of U 1-5=10-30 cm/s. The experiments show that, with increasing fine content, the smaller particles increasingly fill the spaces between the larger particles. As a consequence, pore water inflow into the sediment is increasingly blocked, i.e., there is a decrease in pore water flow velocity and, hence, in the flow momentum available to entrain particles. These findings are portrayed in a new conceptual model of enhanced sediment bed stabilization.

  3. Real diffusion-weighted MRI enabling true signal averaging and increased diffusion contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Cornelius; Cauley, Stephen F; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Möller, Harald E; Turner, Robert; Setsompop, Kawin; Wald, Lawrence L

    2015-11-15

    This project aims to characterize the impact of underlying noise distributions on diffusion-weighted imaging. The noise floor is a well-known problem for traditional magnitude-based diffusion-weighted MRI (dMRI) data, leading to biased diffusion model fits and inaccurate signal averaging. Here, we introduce a total-variation-based algorithm to eliminate shot-to-shot phase variations of complex-valued diffusion data with the intention to extract real-valued dMRI datasets. The obtained real-valued diffusion data are no longer superimposed by a noise floor but instead by a zero-mean Gaussian noise distribution, yielding dMRI data without signal bias. We acquired high-resolution dMRI data with strong diffusion weighting and, thus, low signal-to-noise ratio. Both the extracted real-valued and traditional magnitude data were compared regarding signal averaging, diffusion model fitting and accuracy in resolving crossing fibers. Our results clearly indicate that real-valued diffusion data enables idealized conditions for signal averaging. Furthermore, the proposed method enables unbiased use of widely employed linear least squares estimators for model fitting and demonstrates an increased sensitivity to detect secondary fiber directions with reduced angular error. The use of phase-corrected, real-valued data for dMRI will therefore help to clear the way for more detailed and accurate studies of white matter microstructure and structural connectivity on a fine scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fine Spectra of Symmetric Toeplitz Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Altun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fine spectra of 2-banded and 3-banded infinite Toeplitz matrices were examined by several authors. The fine spectra of n-banded triangular Toeplitz matrices and tridiagonal symmetric matrices were computed in the following papers: Altun, “On the fine spectra of triangular toeplitz operators” (2011 and Altun, “Fine spectra of tridiagonal symmetric matrices” (2011. Here, we generalize those results to the (2+1-banded symmetric Toeplitz matrix operators for arbitrary positive integer .

  5. Temperature dependence of the positron diffusion constant in the matrix of an Al-Ca-Zn alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diego, N. de; Rio, J. del [Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica de Mater.; Dupasquier, A.; Folegati, P.; Somoza, A.; Valli, M.

    1997-12-31

    Positron lifetime spectra in fine-grained specimens of an Al-Ca-Zn alloy were measured at temperatures between 15 K and 295 K. The interpretation of the experimental data according to the diffusion trapping model (A. Dupasquier (1993)) leads to the determination of the positron diffusion constant. The diffusion-limiting mechanisms are discussed. (orig.) 6 refs.

  6. Quasisolitons in self-diffusive excitable systems, or Why asymmetric diffusivity obeys the Second Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biktashev, V. N.; Tsyganov, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Solitons, defined as nonlinear waves which can reflect from boundaries or transmit through each other, are found in conservative, fully integrable systems. Similar phenomena, dubbed quasi-solitons, have been observed also in dissipative, “excitable” systems, either at finely tuned parameters (near a bifurcation) or in systems with cross-diffusion. Here we demonstrate that quasi-solitons can be robustly observed in excitable systems with excitable kinetics and with self-diffusion only. This includes quasi-solitons of fixed shape (like KdV solitons) or envelope quasi-solitons (like NLS solitons). This can happen in systems with more than two components, and can be explained by effective cross-diffusion, which emerges via adiabatic elimination of a fast but diffusing component. We describe here a reduction procedure can be used for the search of complicated wave regimes in multi-component, stiff systems by studying simplified, soft systems.

  7. Effects of supersaturation on pore shape in solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, P. S.; Hsiao, S. Y.

    2017-02-01

    The shape of a pore resulting from a bubble entrapped by a solidification front with different supersaturation ratios is predicted in this work. Supersaturation ratio, representing the ratio between solute concentration and saturation solute concentration, determines nucleation of a bubble and development of the pore shape in the early stage. Pore formation and its shape in solid influence contemporary issues of biology, engineering, foods, geophysics and climate change, etc. This work extends and combines previous models accounting for realistic mass and momentum transport, and physico-chemical equilibrium of solute gas across the bubble cap to self-consistently determine shape of the bubble cap beyond the solidification front and the pore shape in solid. The study also deal with that pore formation can be resulted from three different mechanisms, depending on the directions and magnitude of solute gas transport across the bubble cap. Case 1 is subject to solute transport from the pore across the cap into the surrounding liquid in the early stage. Cases 2a and 2b indicate opposite direction of solute transport. In contrast to Case 2b, the effect of solute transport on solute gas pressure in the pore in Case 2a is stronger than that of pore volume expansionin the last stage. The results find that an increase in supersaturation ratio decreases pore radius and time for bubble entrapment in Case 1. The bubble cannot be entrapped in Case 2. The predicted pore shape in solid agrees with experimental data. Understanding, prediction and control of the growth of the pore shape have therefore been obtained.

  8. Considering Fine Art and Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Frank

    2015-01-01

    There has been a close association between picturebook illustrations and works of fine art since the picturebook was first conceived, and many ways these associations among works of fine art and picturebook illustrations and design play out. To make sense of all the various ways picturebook illustrations are associated with works of fine art,…

  9. 36 CFR 910.35 - Fine arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fine arts. 910.35 Section 910... DEVELOPMENT AREA Standards Uniformly Applicable to the Development Area § 910.35 Fine arts. Fine arts... of art which are appropriate for the development. For information and guidance, a...

  10. Cosmic-ray induced diffusion in interstellar ices

    CERN Document Server

    Kalvans, Juris

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic rays are able to heat interstellar dust grains. This may enhance molecule mobility in icy mantles that have accumulated on the grains in dark cloud cores. A three-phase astrochemical model was used to investigate the molecule mobility in interstellar ices. Specifically, diffusion through pores in ice between the subsurface mantle and outer surface, assisted by whole-grain heating, was considered. It was found that the pores can serve as an efficient transport route for light species. The diffusion of chemical radicals from the mantle to the outer surface are most effective. These species accumulate in the mantle because of photodissociation by the cosmic-ray induced photons. The faster diffusion of hydrogen within the warm ice enhances the hydrogenation of radicals on pore surfaces. The overall result of the whole grain heating-induced radial diffusion in ice are higher abundances of the ice species whose synthesis involve light radicals. Examples of stable species synthesized this way include the comp...

  11. Hindered Diffusion through an Aqueous Pore Describes Invariant Dye Selectivity of Cx43 Junctions☆

    OpenAIRE

    Heyman, Nathanael S.; Burt, Janis M.

    2008-01-01

    The permselectivity (permeance/conductance) of Cx43-comprised gap junctions is a variable parameter of junctional function. To ascertain whether this variability in junctional permselectivity is explained by heterogeneous charge or size selectivity of the comprising channels, the permeance of individual Cx43 gap junctions to combinations of two dyes differing in either size or charge was determined in four cell types: Rin43, NRKe, HeLa43, and cardiac myocytes. The results show that Cx43 junct...

  12. On the complex structural diffusion of proton holes in nanoconfined alkaline solutions within slit pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Santiburcio, Daniel; Marx, Dominik

    2016-08-01

    The hydroxide anion OH-(aq) in homogeneous bulk water, that is, the solvated proton hole, is known to feature peculiar properties compared with excess protons solvated therein. In this work, it is disclosed that nanoconfinement of such alkaline aqueous solutions strongly affects the key structural and dynamical properties of OH-(aq) compared with the bulk limit. The combined effect of the preferred hypercoordinated solvation pattern of OH-(aq), its preferred perpendicular orientation relative to the confining surfaces, the pronounced layering of nanoconfined water and the topology of the hydrogen bond network required for proton hole transfer lead to major changes of the charge transport mechanism, in such a way that the proton hole migration mechanism depends exquisitely on the width of the confined space that hosts the water film. Moreover, the anionic Zundel complex, which is of transient nature in homogeneous bulk solutions, can be dynamically trapped as a shallow intermediate species by suitable nanoconfinement conditions.

  13. A voltage-gated pore for translocation of tRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koley, Sandip; Adhya, Samit, E-mail: nilugrandson@gmail.com

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •A tRNA translocating complex was assembled from purified proteins. •The complex translocates tRNA at a membrane potential of ∼60 mV. •Translocation requires Cys and His residues in the Fe–S center of RIC6 subunit. -- Abstract: Very little is known about how nucleic acids are translocated across membranes. The multi-subunit RNA Import Complex (RIC) from mitochondria of the kinetoplastid protozoon Leishmania tropica induces translocation of tRNAs across artificial or natural membranes, but the nature of the translocation pore remains unknown. We show that subunits RIC6 and RIC9 assemble on the membrane in presence of subunit RIC4A to form complex R3. Atomic Force Microscopy of R3 revealed particles with an asymmetric surface groove of ∼20 nm rim diameter and ∼1 nm depth. R3 induced translocation of tRNA into liposomes when the pH of the medium was lowered to ∼6 in the absence of ATP. R3-mediated tRNA translocation could also be induced at neutral pH by a K{sup +} diffusion potential with an optimum of 60–70 mV. Point mutations in the Cys{sub 2}–His{sub 2} Fe-binding motif of RIC6, which is homologous to the respiratory Complex III Fe–S protein, abrogated import induced by low pH but not by K{sup +} diffusion potential. These results indicate that the R3 complex forms a pore that is gated by a proton-generated membrane potential and that the Fe–S binding region of RIC6 has a role in proton translocation. The tRNA import complex of L. tropica thus contains a novel macromolecular channel distinct from the mitochondrial protein import pore that is apparently involved in tRNA import in some species.

  14. Diffusion and sorption properties of radionuclides in compacted bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Ji-Wei; Neretnieks, I. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    1997-07-01

    In this report, recent studies on sorption and diffusion of radionuclides in compacted bentonite have been reviewed. The sorption distribution coefficient and diffusion coefficient data obtained from experiments in the literature have been compiled. Based on these experimental data and the report SKB-TR--91-16 (Brandberg and Skagius, 1991), this report proposes a set of sorption distribution coefficient and diffusion coefficient values for modelling purpose for safety analysis of nuclear waste repositories. The variability and uncertainty of the diffusivity data span somewhat more than an order or magnitude up and down. Most of the nuclides have an effective diffusivity in around 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s. Ion exclusion effects are observed for C, Cl and for Tc in oxidizing waters. Effective diffusivities are nearly tow orders of magnitude lower for these elements and of the order of 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}/s. Surface diffusion effects are found for Cs, Ni, Pa, Pb, Ra, Sn, Sr and Zr. Effective diffusivities for these elements are of the order of 10{sup -8} m{sup 2}/s. The surface diffusion effect should decrease in saline waters which is seen for Cs and Sr where there are data available. It is also deemed that Ra will have this effect because of its similarity with Sr. The other nuclides should also show this decrease but no data is available. Sorption and diffusion mechanisms in compacted bentonite are discussed in the report. In highly compacted bentonite, sorption and hence its distribution coefficient is not well defined, and a pore diffusion coefficient or a surface diffusion coefficient is not well defined either. Therefore, an apparent diffusion coefficient and a total concentration gradient should be more relevant in describing the diffusion process in compacted bentonite. 99 refs.

  15. 深部细粒碎屑岩储层成岩作用研究--以苏北盆地张家垛油田阜三段为例%Diagenesis of the deep-seated fine-grained clastic reservoirs:An example from the 3rd member of the Funing Formation in the Zhangjiaduo Oil Field,Subei Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩玫梅; 丁晓琪; 张哨楠; 陈倩倩

    2015-01-01

    the pores slows down the convective velocity and diffusive velocity of pore fluids,and may be unfavourable for the formation of the secondary pores. The study of the diagenesis of the fine-grained clastic reservoirs in this paper is of both theoretical and practical values.

  16. Microbial sulfur metabolism evidenced from pore fluid isotope geochemistry at Site U1385

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Antler, Gilad; Byrne, David; Miller, Madeline; Hodell, David A.

    2016-06-01

    At Site U1385, drilled during IODP Expedition 339 off the coast of Portugal on the continental slope, high-resolution sulfate concentration measurements in the pore fluids display non-steady-state behavior. At this site there is a zone of sulfate reduction in the uppermost seven meters of sediment, followed by a 38-meter interval where sulfate concentrations do not change, and finally sulfate concentrations are depleted to zero between 45 and 55 meters below seafloor. Below the sulfate minimum zone, there is abundant methane, suggesting that the lower sulfate consumption zone is coupled to anaerobic methane oxidation. We analyze pore water samples from IODP Site U1385 for sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios of dissolved sulfate, as well as the sulfur isotope composition of sedimentary pyrite. The sulfur isotopes in pore fluid sulfate display similar non-steady-state behavior similar to that of the sulfate concentrations, increasing over the uppermost zone of sulfate reduction and again over the lower zone of sulfate-driven anaerobic methane oxidation. The oxygen isotopes in sulfate increase to the 'apparent equilibrium' value in the uppermost zone of sulfate reduction and do not change further. Our calculations support the idea that sulfite to sulfide reduction is the limiting step in microbial sulfate reduction, and that the isotope fractionation expressed in the residual pore water sulfate pool is inversely proportional to the net sulfate reduction rate. The sulfur isotope composition of pyrite acquires one value in the uppermost sediments, which may be overprinted by a second value in the deeper sediments, possibly due to iron release during anaerobic methane oxidation or iron diffusion from a higher zone of bacterial iron reduction. Our results have implications for modeling the sulfur isotope composition of the pyrite burial flux in the global biogeochemical sulfur cycle.

  17. Controlling drug delivery kinetics from mesoporous titania thin films by pore size and surface energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Johan; Atefyekta, Saba; Andersson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The osseointegration capacity of bone-anchoring implants can be improved by the use of drugs that are administrated by an inbuilt drug delivery system. However, to attain superior control of drug delivery and to have the ability to administer drugs of varying size, including proteins, further material development of drug carriers is needed. Mesoporous materials have shown great potential in drug delivery applications to provide and maintain a drug concentration within the therapeutic window for the desired period of time. Moreover, drug delivery from coatings consisting of mesoporous titania has shown to be promising to improve healing of bone-anchoring implants. Here we report on how the delivery of an osteoporosis drug, alendronate, can be controlled by altering pore size and surface energy of mesoporous titania thin films. The pore size was varied from 3.4 nm to 7.2 nm by the use of different structure-directing templates and addition of a swelling agent. The surface energy was also altered by grafting dimethylsilane to the pore walls. The drug uptake and release profiles were monitored in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and it was shown that both pore size and surface energy had a profound effect on both the adsorption and release kinetics of alendronate. The QCM-D data provided evidence that the drug delivery from mesoporous titania films is controlled by a binding-diffusion mechanism. The yielded knowledge of release kinetics is crucial in order to improve the in vivo tissue response associated to therapeutic treatments.

  18. Hydration State and Aqueous Phase Connectivity Shape Microbial Dispersal Rates in Unsaturated Angular Pore Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Or, D.; Ebrahimi, A.

    2014-12-01

    The limited dispersal of self-propelled microorganisms and constrained nutrient transport in unsaturated soils are considered key factors in the promotion and maintenance of soil microbial diversity. Despite the importance of microbial dispersal to biogeochemical and ecological functioning of soil, little is known about how pore spaces and hydration conditions affect dispersal ranges and rates of motile bacteria. To address these questions quantitatively, we developed a novel 3-D pore network model (PNM) composed of triangular bonds connected to cubic (volumeless) bonds to mimic the salient geometrical and physical properties of natural pore spaces. Within this abstracted physical domain we employed individual based models for motile microorganisms that are capable of motion, nutrient consumption, growth and cell division. We focused on dispersal rates through the network as a function of hydration conditions through its impact on aqueous phase fragmentation that suppress nutrient diffusion (hence growth rates) and dispersal rates in good agreement with limited experimental data. Chemotactically-biased mean travel rates of microbial cells across the saturated PNM was ~3 mm/hr and decreased exponentially to 0.45 mm/hr for matric potential of (at dispersal practically ceases and cells are pinned by capillary forces). Individual-based results were upscaled to describe population scale dispersal rates, and PNM predictions considering different microbial cell sizes were in good agreement with experimental results for unsaturated soils. The role of convection for most unsaturated conditions was negligible relative to self-motility highlighting the need to constrain continuum models with respect to cell size and motility to imporve predictions of transport of motile microorganisms. The modeling platform confirms universal predictions based on percolation theory for the onset of aqueous phase fragmentation that limit dispersal and provide niches essential for species

  19. Diffusion-controlled cementation experiments in porous rock analogues using potash alum and halite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hufe, A.; Hilgers, C. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Reservoir-Petrology; Stanjek, H. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Interface and Clay Mineralogy

    2013-08-01

    A good understanding of cementation is critical for reservoir quality predictions. However, studies of core material have shown that cementation may be driven by variations in pore size of the host rock. To better understand the underlying process, we developed a transparent microreactor for diffusion-controlled cementation experiments under the microscope. We studied the effect of different pore sizes and surface charges of solid material at different pH, using rock analogs. High-resolution videos allowed to analyze the nucleation from solution, pore cementation and growth rates of cements. Diffusion - considered the major mass transport during burial diagenesis - was driven along a temperature gradient across the microreactor. Pores were cemented with salt, which is well known to form pore-size dependent seals in silicilastic reservoirs. While halite precipitated primarily in pores bigger than 200 {mu}m, alum nucleated in smaller pores. The growth rate of alum (10{sup -5} mm/s) was one order of magnitude higher than that of halite. However, the dissolution rates of both minerals was similar at about 10{sup -6} mm/s. Authigenic euhdral halite migrated against the bulk diffusion transport and towards the higher-temperature reservoir. Halite growth rates increased by one order of magnitude to 1.8 x 10{sup -5} mm/s, if the phase boundary was vapor-liquid. A comparison nucleation in a 2-phase porous rock analog showed no difference in cementation pattern at a pH 7. However, at a pH of 10.5 the surface energies of the two different solids are altered, and porosity was reduced 60% more by cements in the phase-1 porous layers. Our experiments showed that pore size dependent nucleation and cementation is a process, which may also take place in complex reservoirs. With the successful pore clogging of halite we can now bring our experimental setup to reservoir conditions and establish the processes at elevated p-T conditions. (orig.)

  20. CO diffusion into amorphous H2O ices

    CERN Document Server

    Lauck, Trish; Shulenberger, Katherine; Rajappan, Mahesh; Oberg, Karin I; Cuppen, Herma M

    2015-01-01

    The mobility of atoms, molecules and radicals in icy grain mantles regulate ice restructuring, desorption, and chemistry in astrophysical environments. Interstellar ices are dominated by H2O, and diffusion on external and internal (pore) surfaces of H2O-rich ices is therefore a key process to constrain. This study aims to quantify the diffusion kinetics and barrier of the abundant ice constituent CO into H2O dominated ices at low temperatures (15-23 K), by measuring the mixing rate of initially layered H2O(:CO2)/CO ices. The mixed fraction of CO as a function of time is determined by monitoring the shape of the infrared CO stretching band. Mixing is observed at all investigated temperatures on minute time scales, and can be ascribed to CO diffusion in H2O ice pores. The diffusion coefficient and final mixed fraction depend on ice temperature, porosity, thickness and composition. The experiments are analyzed by applying Fick's diffusion equation under the assumption that mixing is due to CO diffusion into an i...

  1. Fast diffusion in a room-temperature ionic liquid confined in mesoporous carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Fulvio, Pasquale F [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We report a quasielastic neutron scattering study in the temperature range of 290 to 350 K of a room temperature ionic liquid, [bmim+][Tf2N-], in the bulk form and confined in the 8.8 2.1 nm diameter pores of a mesoporous carbon matrix. In both bulk and confined liquids, our measurements, which are sensitive to the dynamics of the hydrogen-bearing cations, detect two distinct relaxation processes related to the diffusion of the cations. We have found that the cations that do not become immobilized near the pore walls exhibit an enhanced rather than suppressed diffusivity compared to the cation diffusivity in bulk liquid. Our results provide first experimental observation of molecular diffusion in a room temperature ionic liquid in confinement which is faster than diffusion in the bulk liquid.

  2. Reversible Self-Actuated Thermo-Responsive Pore Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Younggeun; Gutierrez, Maria Paz; Lee, Luke P.

    2016-12-01

    Smart membranes, which can selectively control the transfer of light, air, humidity and temperature, are important to achieve indoor climate regulation. Even though reversible self-actuation of smart membranes is desirable in large-scale, reversible self-regulation remains challenging. Specifically, reversible 100% opening/closing of pore actuation showing accurate responsiveness, reproducibility and structural flexibility, including uniform structure assembly, is currently very difficult. Here, we report a reversible, thermo-responsive self-activated pore membrane that achieves opening and closing of pores. The reversible, self-actuated thermo-responsive pore membrane was fabricated with hybrid materials of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), (PNIPAM) within polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to form a multi-dimensional pore array. Using Multiphysics simulation of heat transfer and structural mechanics based on finite element analysis, we demonstrated that pore opening and closing dynamics can be self-activated at environmentally relevant temperatures. Temperature cycle characterizations of the pore structure revealed 100% opening ratio at T = 40 °C and 0% opening ratio at T = 20 °C. The flexibility of the membrane showed an accurate temperature-responsive function at a maximum bending angle of 45°. Addressing the importance of self-regulation, this reversible self-actuated thermo-responsive pore membrane will advance the development of future large-scale smart membranes needed for sustainable indoor climate control.

  3. The Pore Structure of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Peter Brilner

    2005-01-01

    The pore structure and morphology of direct methanol fuel cell electrodes are characterized using mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that the pore size distributions of printed primer and catalyst layers are largely dictated by the powders used to make the...

  4. Reversible Self-Actuated Thermo-Responsive Pore Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Younggeun; Gutierrez, Maria Paz; Lee, Luke P

    2016-12-19

    Smart membranes, which can selectively control the transfer of light, air, humidity and temperature, are important to achieve indoor climate regulation. Even though reversible self-actuation of smart membranes is desirable in large-scale, reversible self-regulation remains challenging. Specifically, reversible 100% opening/closing of pore actuation showing accurate responsiveness, reproducibility and structural flexibility, including uniform structure assembly, is currently very difficult. Here, we report a reversible, thermo-responsive self-activated pore membrane that achieves opening and closing of pores. The reversible, self-actuated thermo-responsive pore membrane was fabricated with hybrid materials of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), (PNIPAM) within polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to form a multi-dimensional pore array. Using Multiphysics simulation of heat transfer and structural mechanics based on finite element analysis, we demonstrated that pore opening and closing dynamics can be self-activated at environmentally relevant temperatures. Temperature cycle characterizations of the pore structure revealed 100% opening ratio at T = 40 °C and 0% opening ratio at T = 20 °C. The flexibility of the membrane showed an accurate temperature-responsive function at a maximum bending angle of 45°. Addressing the importance of self-regulation, this reversible self-actuated thermo-responsive pore membrane will advance the development of future large-scale smart membranes needed for sustainable indoor climate control.

  5. A FILTRATION METHOD AND APPARATUS INCLUDING A ROLLER WITH PORES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention offers a method for separating dry matter from a medium. A separation chamber is at least partly defined by a plurality of rollers (2,7) and is capable of being pressure regulated. At least one of the rollers is a pore roller (7) having a surface with pores allowing permeabi...

  6. Bacteriocins : mechanism of membrane insertion and pore formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, Gert N.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria produce several types of pore forming peptides. Class I bacteriocins are lantibiotics that contain (methyl)lanthionine residues that may form intramolecular thioether rings. These peptides generally have a broad spectrum of activity and form unstable pores. Class II bacteriocins

  7. Pore size distribution in tablets measured with a morphological sieve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Yu San; van Vliet, Lucas J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2007-01-01

    Porosity and pore structure are important characteristics of tablets, since they influence mechanical strength and many other proper-ties. This paper proposes an alternative method for the characterization of pore structure based on image analysis of SEM micrographs. SEM images were made of sodium c

  8. Pore structure and growth kinetics in carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, S.

    1978-04-01

    Pore structure of glassy carbon (GC) and pyrolytic graphite (PG) have been investigated. GC is one of the most impervious of solids finding applications in prosthetic devices and fuel cells while PG is used extensively in the aerospace industry. One third of the microstructure of GC consists of closed pores inaccessible to fluids. The microstructure of this material has been characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution electron microscopy. Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) has been used to measure the angstrom sized pores and to follow the evolution of pore surface area as a function of heat treatment temperature (HTT) and heat treatment time (HTt) at constant temperature. From these measurements an analysis of the surface area kinetics was made to find out if rate processes are involved and to locate graphitization occurring at pore surfaces. PG on the other hand has been found to have larger sized pores that comprise five percent of its volume. In addition to being closed these pores are oriented. Some pore models are proposed for PG and the existing scattering theory from oriented ellipsoids is modified to include the proposed shapes.

  9. Bacteriocins : mechanism of membrane insertion and pore formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, G.N.; Konings, W.N; Driessen, A.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria produce several types of pore forming peptides. Class I bacteriocins are lantibiotics that contain (methyl)lanthionine residues that may form intramolecular thioether rings. These peptides generally have a broad spectrum of activity and form unstable pores. Class II bacteriocins

  10. Two-Region Extended Archie's Law Model for Soil Air Permeability and Gas Diffusivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Møldrup, Per; Kawamoto, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The air permeability (ka) and soil gas diffusion coefficients (Dp) are controlling factors for gas transport and fate in variably saturated soils. We developed a unified model for ka and Dp based on the classical Archie's law, extended by: (i) allowing for two-region gas transport behavior...... for structured soils, with the natural field moisture condition (set at −100 cm H2O matric potential [pF 2]) as the reference (spliced) point between the large-pore (drained pore diameter ≥30 μm at pF ≤ 2) and the small-pore (subsequently drained pores 2) regions, and (ii) including a percolation...... threshold, set as 10% of the total porosity for structureless porous media or 10% of the porosity in the large-pore region for structured soils. The resulting extended Archie's law with reference point (EXAR) models for ka and Dp were fitted to the measured data. For both structureless and structured porous...

  11. Porous Boron Nitride with Tunable Pore Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jun; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2014-01-16

    On the basis of a global structural search and first-principles calculations, we predict two types of porous boron-nitride (BN) networks that can be built up with zigzag BN nanoribbons (BNNRs). The BNNRs are either directly connected with puckered B (N) atoms at the edge (type I) or connected with sp(3)-bonded BN chains (type II). Besides mechanical stability, these materials are predicted to be thermally stable at 1000 K. The porous BN materials entail large surface areas, ranging from 2800 to 4800 m(2)/g. In particular, type-II BN material with relatively large pores is highly favorable for hydrogen storage because the computed hydrogen adsorption energy (-0.18 eV) is very close to the optimal adsorption energy (-0.15 eV) suggested for reversible hydrogen storage at room temperature. Moreover, the type-II materials are semiconductors with width-dependent direct bandgaps, rendering the type-II BN materials promising not only for hydrogen storage but also for optoelectronic and photonic applications.

  12. Freezing of charged colloids in slit pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandner, Stefan; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2008-12-28

    Using Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical and isobaric ensembles we investigate freezing phenomena in a charged colloidal suspension confined to narrow slit pores. Our model involves only the macroions which interact via a Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) potential supplemented by a soft-sphere potential. We focus on DLVO parameters typical for moderately charged silica particles (with charges Z approximately 35) in solvents of low ionic strengths. The corresponding DLVO interactions are too weak to drive a (bulk) freezing transition. Nevertheless, for sufficiently small surface separations L(z) the confined systems display not only layering but also significant in-plane crystalline order at chemical potentials where the bulk system is a globally stable fluid (capillary freezing). At confinement conditions related to two-layer systems the observed in-plane structures are consistent with those detected in ground state calculations for perfect Yukawa bilayers [R. Messina and H. Lowen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 146101 (2003)]. Here we additionally observe (at fixed L(z)) a compression-induced first-order phase transition from a two-layer to a three-layer system with different in-plane structure, in agreement with previous findings for pure hard spheres.

  13. Silicon pore optics developments and status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric; Wallace, Kotska; Shortt, Brian; Collon, Maximilien; Ackermann, Marcelo; Olde Riekerink, Mark; Haneveld, Jeroen; van Baren, Coen; Erhard, Markus; Christensen, Finn; Krumrey, Michael; Burwitz, Vadim

    2012-09-01

    Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) is a lightweight high performance X-ray optics technology being developed in Europe, driven by applications in observatory class high energy astrophysics missions. An example of such application is the former ESA science mission candidate ATHENA (Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics), which uses the SPO technology for its two telescopes, in order to provide an effective area exceeding 1 m2 at 1 keV, and 0.5 m2 at 6 keV, featuring an angular resolution of 10” or better [1 to 24]. This paper reports on the development activities led by ESA, and the status of the SPO technology. The technology development programme has succeeded in maturing the SPO further and achieving important milestones, in each of the main activity streams: environmental compatibility, industrial production and optical performance. In order to accurately characterise the increasing performance of this innovative optical technology, the associated X-ray test facilities and beam-lines have been refined and upgraded.

  14. Evaluating transport in irregular pore networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, Dimitri A.; Hooman, Kamel; Klimenko, Alexander Y.

    2012-07-01

    A general approach for investigating transport phenomena in porous media is presented. This approach has the capacity to represent various kinds of irregularity in porous media without the need for excessive detail or computational effort. The overall method combines a generalized effective medium approximation (EMA) with a macroscopic continuum model in order to derive a transport equation with explicit analytical expressions for the transport coefficients. The proposed form of the EMA is an anisotropic and heterogeneous extension of Kirkpatrick's EMA [Rev. Mod. Phys.RMPHAT0034-686110.1103/RevModPhys.45.574 45, 574 (1973)] which allows the overall model to account for microscopic alterations in connectivity (with the locations of the pores and the orientation and length of the throat) as well as macroscopic variations in transport properties. A comparison to numerical results for randomly generated networks with different properties is given, indicating the potential for this methodology to handle cases that would pose significant difficulties to many other analytical models.

  15. Influence of pore structure on compressive strength of cement mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haitao; Xiao, Qi; Huang, Donghui; Zhang, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation into the pore structure of cement mortar using mercury porosimeter. Ordinary Portland cement, manufactured sand, and natural sand were used. The porosity of the manufactured sand mortar is higher than that of natural sand at the same mix proportion; on the contrary, the probable pore size and threshold radius of manufactured sand mortar are finer. Besides, the probable pore size and threshold radius increased with increasing water to cement ratio and sand to cement ratio. In addition, the existing models of pore size distribution of cement-based materials have been reviewed and compared with test results in this paper. Finally, the extended Bhattacharjee model was built to examine the relationship between compressive strength and pore structure.

  16. Vapor intrusion in soils with multimodal pore-size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfaro Soto Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Johnson and Ettinger [1] model and its extensions are at this time the most widely used algorithms for estimating subsurface vapor intrusion into buildings (API [2]. The functions which describe capillary pressure curves are utilized in quantitative analyses, although these are applicable for porous media with a unimodal or lognormal pore-size distribution. However, unaltered soils may have a heterogeneous pore distribution and consequently a multimodal pore-size distribution [3], which may be the result of specific granulometry or the formation of secondary porosity related to genetic processes. The present paper was designed to present the application of the Vapor Intrusion Model (SVI_Model to unsaturated soils with multimodal pore-size distribution. Simulations with data from the literature show that the use of a multimodal model in soils with such pore distribution characteristics could provide more reliable results for indoor air concentration, rather than conventional models.

  17. Role of pore-forming toxins in neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Henneke, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Protein toxins are important virulence factors contributing to neonatal sepsis. The major pathogens of neonatal sepsis, group B Streptococci, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, secrete toxins of different molecular nature, which are key for defining the disease. Amongst these toxins are pore-forming exotoxins that are expressed as soluble monomers prior to engagement of the target cell membrane with subsequent formation of an aqueous membrane pore. Membrane pore formation is not only a means for immediate lysis of the targeted cell but also a general mechanism that contributes to penetration of epithelial barriers and evasion of the immune system, thus creating survival niches for the pathogens. Pore-forming toxins, however, can also contribute to the induction of inflammation and hence to the manifestation of sepsis. Clearly, pore-forming toxins are not the sole factors that drive sepsis progression, but they often act in concert with other bacterial effectors, especially in the initial stages of neonatal sepsis manifestation.

  18. Surface pore tension and adsorption characteristics of polluted sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Most natural sediment particles have numerous pores and a complex surface texture which facilitates their adsorption of contaminants. Particle surface structure,therefore,is an important instrumental factor in the transport of contaminants,especially in water environments. This paper reports on the results of adsorption-desorption experiments to analyze polluted sediment surface pore tension characteristics performed on samples from the bottom of Guanting Reservoir. In our analysis,the Frenkel-Halsey-Hill(FHH) equation is applied to calculate the fractal dimensions of particles to quantify the surface roughness and pore tension characteristics. The results show that the surface fractal dimensions of sediment particle surfaces normally measure from 2.6 to 2.85. The volume of pores smaller than 10 nm changes significantly after being contaminated with pollutants and the fractal dimension decreases because the pores adsorb the contaminants.

  19. Measurements of pore-scale flow through apertures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojnicki, Kirsten

    2017-09-01

    Pore-scale aperture effects on flow in pore networks was studied in the laboratory to provide a parameterization for use in transport models. Four cases were considered: regular and irregular pillar/pore alignment with and without an aperture. The velocity field of each case was measured and simulated, providing quantitatively comparable results. Two aperture effect parameterizations were considered: permeability and transmission. Permeability values varied by an order of magnitude between the cases with and without apertures. However, transmission did not correlate with permeability. Despite having much greater permeability the regular aperture case permitted less transmission than the regular case. Moreover, both irregular cases had greater transmission than the regular cases, a difference not supported by the permeabilities. Overall, these findings suggest that pore-scale aperture effects on flow though a pore-network may not be adequately captured by properties such as permeability for applications that are interested in determining particle transport volume and timing.

  20. Soil-gas diffusivity fingerprints of the dual porosity system in fractured limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claes, Niels; Chamindu, D.T.K.K.; Jensen, Jacob Birk;

    2010-01-01

    The presence of fractured vadose zones (e.g., limestone or clay tills) may potentially pose significant environmental concerns due to the rapid, preferential migration of gaseous plumes through interconnected pore networks. However, recent modelling studies related to fractured vadose zone...... processes are mostly limited to hydrogeological (water and solute) transport studies with very poor attention to the gaseous phase transport studies (Kristensen et al. 2010). This study characterizes fractured limestone soils for gas diffusion based on three different gas diffusivity fingerprints. The first...... fingerprint is a two-parameter exponential model, which mainly describes the gas diffusivity in the limestone matrix while taking both fracture connectivity and matrix pore connectivity into account. With the second fingerprint, we make a close observation of the tortuous matrix pore network by means...

  1. Partially restricted diffusion in a permeable sandstone: observations by stimulated echo PFG NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordham, E J; Gibbs, S J; Hall, L D

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrate a variant, insensitive to eddy current effects, of an alternating pulsed field gradient technique designed to null the effect of background gradients in liquid-saturated porous media, using a 38 mm diameter sample of a natural sandstone. Measurements of the effective diffusivity confirm predictions of a decline as the square root of an effective diffusion time. A value of the ratio S/Vp for the dominant pores is extracted, yielding with T1 a value for the surface relaxivity. We test also a geometry-dependent data collapse recently suggested for a range of diffusion times and wavenumbers. The data agree with a sheet-like pore model for this granular sandstone, and fail to agree with a tube-like model; a pore length scale is also extracted.

  2. Permeability prediction of organic shale with generalized lattice Boltzmann model considering surface diffusion effect

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Junjian; Kang, Qinjun; Rahman, Sheik S

    2016-01-01

    Gas flow in shale is associated with both organic matter (OM) and inorganic matter (IOM) which contain nanopores ranging in size from a few to hundreds of nanometers. In addition to the noncontinuum effect which leads to an apparent permeability of gas higher than the intrinsic permeability, the surface diffusion of adsorbed gas in organic pores also can influence the apparent permeability through its own transport mechanism. In this study, a generalized lattice Boltzmann model (GLBM) is employed for gas flow through the reconstructed shale matrix consisting of OM and IOM. The Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm is used to assign the pore size distribution to each component, and the dusty gas model (DGM) and generalized Maxwell-Stefan model (GMS) are adopted to calculate the apparent permeability accounting for multiple transport mechanisms including viscous flow, Knudsen diffusion and surface diffusion. Effects of pore radius and pressure on permeability of both IOM and OM as well as effects of Langmuir ...

  3. Branched pore kinetic model analysis of geosmin adsorption on super-powdered activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ando, Naoya; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2009-07-01

    Super-powdered activated carbon (S-PAC) is activated carbon of much finer particle size than powdered activated carbon (PAC). Geosmin is a naturally occurring taste and odor compound that impairs aesthetic quality in drinking water. Experiments on geosmin adsorption on S-PAC and PAC were conducted, and the results using adsorption kinetic models were analyzed. PAC pulverization, which produced the S-PAC, did not change geosmin adsorption capacity, and geosmin adsorption capacities did not differ between S-PAC and PAC. Geosmin adsorption kinetics, however, were much higher on S-PAC than on PAC. A solution to the branched pore kinetic model (BPKM) was developed, and experimental adsorption kinetic data were analyzed by BPKM and by a homogeneous surface diffusion model (HSDM). The HSDM describing the adsorption behavior of geosmin required different surface diffusivity values for S-PAC and PAC, which indicated a decrease in surface diffusivity apparently associated with activated carbon particle size. The BPKM, consisting of macropore diffusion followed by mass transfer from macropore to micropore, successfully described the batch adsorption kinetics on S-PAC and PAC with the same set of model parameter values, including surface diffusivity. The BPKM simulation clearly showed geosmin removal was improved as activated carbon particle size decreased. The simulation also implied that the rate-determining step in overall mass transfer shifted from intraparticle radial diffusion in macropores to local mass transfer from macropore to micropore. Sensitivity analysis showed that adsorptive removal of geosmin improved with decrease in activated carbon particle size down to 1microm, but further particle size reduction produced little improvement.

  4. Biophysics, Pathophysiology and Pharmacology of Ion Channel Gating Pores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien eMoreau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Voltage sensor domain (VSDs are a feature of voltage gated ion channel (VGICs and voltage sensitive proteins. They are composed of four transmembrane (TM segments (S1 to S4. Currents leaking through VSDs are called omega or gating pore currents.Gating pores are caused by mutations of the highly conserved positively charged amino acids in the S4 segment that disrupt interactions between the S4 segment and the gating charge transfer center (GCTC. The GCTC separates the intracellular and extracellular water crevices. The disruption of S4–GCTC interactions allows these crevices to communicate and create a fast activating and non-inactivating alternative cation-selective permeation pathway of low conductance, or a gating pore.Gating pore currents have recently been shown to cause periodic paralysis phenotypes. There is also increasing evidence that gating pores are linked to several other familial diseases. For example, gating pores in Nav1.5 and Kv7.2 channels may underlie mixed arrhythmias associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM phenotypes and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH respectively. There is little evidence for the existence of gating pore blockers. Moreover, it is known that a number of toxins bind to the VSD of a specific domain of Na+ channels. These toxins may thus modulate gating pore currents. This focus on the VSD motif opens up a new area of research centered on developing molecules to treat a number of cell excitability disorders such as epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmias, and pain.The purpose of the present review is to summarize existing knowledge of the pathophysiology, biophysics, and pharmacology of gating pore currents and to serve as a guide for future studies aimed at improving our understanding of gating pores and their pathophysiological roles.

  5. X-ray CT analysis of pore structure in sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukunoki, Toshifumi; Miyata, Yoshihisa; Mikami, Kazuaki; Shiota, Erika

    2016-06-01

    The development of microfocused X-ray computed tomography (CT) devices enables digital imaging analysis at the pore scale. The applications of these devices are diverse in soil mechanics, geotechnical and geoenvironmental engineering, petroleum engineering, and agricultural engineering. In particular, the imaging of the pore space in porous media has contributed to numerical simulations for single-phase and multiphase flows or contaminant transport through the pore structure as three-dimensional image data. These obtained results are affected by the pore diameter; therefore, it is necessary to verify the image preprocessing for the image analysis and to validate the pore diameters obtained from the CT image data. Moreover, it is meaningful to produce the physical parameters in a representative element volume (REV) and significant to define the dimension of the REV. This paper describes the underlying method of image processing and analysis and discusses the physical properties of Toyoura sand for the verification of the image analysis based on the definition of the REV. On the basis of the obtained verification results, a pore-diameter analysis can be conducted and validated by a comparison with the experimental work and image analysis. The pore diameter is deduced from Young-Laplace's law and a water retention test for the drainage process. The results from previous study and perforated-pore diameter originally proposed in this study, called the voxel-percolation method (VPM), are compared in this paper. In addition, the limitations of the REV, the definition of the pore diameter, and the effectiveness of the VPM for an assessment of the pore diameter are discussed.

  6. Configurational diffusion of asphaltenes in fresh and aged catalyst extrudates. Quarterly progress report, June 20, 1995--September 20, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guin, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the relationship between the size and shape of coal and petroleum macromolecules and their diffusion rates i.e., effective diffusivities, in catalyst pore structures. This quarter, three petroleum and two coal asphaltenes were prepared from petroleum asphalts and coal derived solids separately by solvent extraction.

  7. An undulation theory for condensation in open end slit pores: critical hysteresis temperature & critical hysteresis pore size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chunyan; Zeng, Yonghong; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2014-06-28

    A new theory of condensation in an open end slit pore, based on the concept of temperature dependent undulation, at the interface separating the adsorbed phase and the gas-like region, is presented. The theory, describes, for the first time, the microscopic origin of the critical hysteresis temperature and the critical hysteresis pore size, properties which are not accessible to any classical theories.

  8. Investigating Hydrophilic Pores in Model Lipid Bilayers Using Molecular Simulations: Correlating Bilayer Properties with Pore-Formation Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan; Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-06-23

    Cell-penetrating and antimicrobial peptides show a remarkable ability to translocate across physiological membranes. Along with factors such as electric-potential-induced perturbations of membrane structure and surface tension effects, experiments invoke porelike membrane configurations during the solute transfer process into vesicles and cells. The initiation and formation of pores are associated with a nontrivial free-energy cost, thus necessitating a consideration of the factors associated with pore formation and the attendant free energies. Because of experimental and modeling challenges related to the long time scales of the translocation process, we use umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulations with a lipid-density-based order parameter to investigate membrane-pore-formation free energy employing Martini coarse-grained models. We investigate structure and thermodynamic features of the pore in 18 lipids spanning a range of headgroups, charge states, acyl chain lengths, and saturation. We probe the dependence of pore-formation barriers on the area per lipid, lipid bilayer thickness, and membrane bending rigidities in three different lipid classes. The pore-formation free energy in pure bilayers and peptide translocating scenarios are significantly coupled with bilayer thickness. Thicker bilayers require more reversible work to create pores. The pore-formation free energy is higher in peptide-lipid systems than in peptide-free lipid systems due to penalties to maintain the solvation of charged hydrophilic solutes within the membrane environment.

  9. Investigation on characteristics of liquid self-diffusion in slit nanopores using simple quasicrystal model of liquid☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangze Han; Xiaoyan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Dynamical properties of liquid in nano-channels attract much interest because of their applications in engineer-ing and biological systems. The transfer behavior of liquid confined within nanopores differs significantly from that in the bulk. Based on the simple quasicrystal model of liquid, analytical expressions of self-diffusion coeffi-cient both in bulk and in slit nanopore are derived from the Stokes–Einstein equation and the modified Eyring's equation for viscosity. The local self-diffusion coefficient in different layers of liquid and the global self-diffusion coefficient in the slit nanopore are deduced from these expressions. The influences of confinement by pore wal s, pore widths, liquid density, and temperature on the self-diffusion coefficient are investigated. The results indicate that the self-diffusion coefficient in nanopore increases with the pore width and approaches the bulk value as the pore width is sufficiently large. Similar to that in bulk state, the self-diffusion coefficient in nanopore decreases with the increase of density and the decrease of temperature, but these dependences are weaker than that in bulk state and become even weaker as the pore width decreases. This work provides a simple method to capture the physical behavior and to investigate the dynamic properties of liquid in nanopores.

  10. Assessing sulfate reduction and methane cycling in a high salinity pore water system in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, J.W.; Ruppel, C.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Downer, R.; Coffin, R.B.

    2008-01-01

    Pore waters extracted from 18 piston cores obtained on and near a salt-cored bathymetric high in Keathley Canyon lease block 151 in the northern Gulf of Mexico contain elevated concentrations of chloride (up to 838 mM) and have pore water chemical concentration profiles that exhibit extensive departures (concavity) from steady-state (linear) diffusive equilibrium with depth. Minimum ??13C dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) values of -55.9??? to -64.8??? at the sulfate-methane transition (SMT) strongly suggest active anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) throughout the study region. However, the nonlinear pore water chemistry-depth profiles make it impossible to determine the vertical extent of active AOM or the potential role of alternate sulfate reduction pathways. Here we utilize the conservative (non-reactive) nature of dissolved chloride to differentiate the effects of biogeochemical activity (e.g., AOM and/or organoclastic sulfate reduction) relative to physical mixing in high salinity Keathley Canyon sediments. In most cases, the DIC and sulfate concentrations in pore waters are consistent with a conservative mixing model that uses chloride concentrations at the seafloor and the SMT as endmembers. Conservative mixing of pore water constituents implies that an undetermined physical process is primarily responsible for the nonlinearity of the pore water-depth profiles. In limited cases where the sulfate and DIC concentrations deviated from conservative mixing between the seafloor and SMT, the ??13C-DIC mixing diagrams suggest that the excess DIC is produced from a 13C-depleted source that could only be accounted for by microbial methane, the dominant form of methane identified during this study. We conclude that AOM is the most prevalent sink for sulfate and that it occurs primarily at the SMT at this Keathley Canyon site.

  11. Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley Williamson

    2003-05-31

    This final project report presents experimental details, results and analysis of continuous onsite ambient fine particulate data at the North Birmingham sampling site during the October, 2001-September, 2002 study period.The host site for these measurement activities is the North Birmingham PM monitoring station by the Jefferson County Health Department in Birmingham, AL.The continuous data include PM{sub 2.5} mass concentrations measured by TEOM, particle sulfate using the R&P 8400S monitor, particle size distributions measured by SMPS and APS monitors, and PM{sub 2.5} light scattering extinction coefficient as measured by nephelometer. During the course of the project, measurement intercomparison data were developed for these instruments and several complementary measurements at the site. The report details the instrument set and operating procedures and describes the resulting data. Report subsections present an overview summary of the data, followed by detailed description of the systematic time behavior of PM{sub 2.5} and other specific particulate size fractions. Specific subsections are included for particle size distribution, light scattering, and particle sulfate data. The final subsection addresses application of the measurements to the practical questions of fine PM generation and transport, source attribution, and PM{sub 2.5} management strategies.

  12. Pore Scale Dynamics of Microemulsion Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsal, Evren; Broens, Marc; Armstrong, Ryan T

    2016-07-19

    Experiments in various porous media have shown that multiple parameters come into play when an oleic phase is displaced by an aqueous solution of surfactant. In general, the displacement efficiency is improved when the fluids become quasi-miscible. Understanding the phase behavior oil/water/surfactant systems is important because microemulsion has the ability to generate ultralow interfacial tension (formation and the resulting properties under equilibrium conditions. However, the majority of applications where microemulsion is present also involve flow, which has received relatively less attention. It is commonly assumed that the characteristics of an oil/water/surfactant system under flowing conditions are identical to the one under equilibrium conditions. Here, we show that this is not necessarily the case. We studied the equilibrium phase behavior of a model system consisting of n-decane and an aqueous solution of olefin sulfonate surfactant, which has practical applications for enhanced oil recovery. The salt content of the aqueous solution was varied to provide a range of different microemulsion compositions and oil-water interfacial tensions. We then performed microfluidic flow experiments to study the dynamic in situ formation of microemulsion by coinjecting bulk fluids of n-decane and surfactant solution into a T-junction capillary geometry. A solvatochromatic fluorescent dye was used to obtain spatially resolved compositional information. In this way, we visualized the microemulsion formation and the flow of it along with the excess phases. A complex interaction between the flow patterns and the microemulsion properties was observed. The formation of microemulsion influenced the flow regimes, and the flow regimes affected the characteristics of the microemulsion formation. In particular, at low flow rates, slug flow was observed, which had profound consequences on the pore scale mixing behavior and resulting microemulsion properties.

  13. Surface area, porosity and water adsorption properties of fine volcanic ash particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmelle, Pierre; Villiéras, Frédéric; Pelletier, Manuel

    2005-02-01

    Our understanding on how ash particles in volcanic plumes react with coexisting gases and aerosols is still rudimentary, despite the importance of these reactions in influencing the chemistry and dynamics of a plume. In this study, six samples of fine ash (500 Å. All the specimens had similar pore size distributions, with a small peak centered around 50 Å. These findings suggest that fine ash particles have relatively undifferentiated surface textures, irrespective of the chemical composition and eruption type. Adsorption isotherms for water vapour revealed that the capacity of the ash samples for water adsorption is systematically larger than predicted from the nitrogen adsorption as values. Enhanced reactivity of the ash surface towards water may result from (i) hydration of bulk ash constituents; (ii) hydration of surface compounds; and/or (iii) hydroxylation of the surface of the ash. The later mechanism may lead to irreversible retention of water. Based on these experiments, we predict that volcanic ash is covered by a complete monolayer of water under ambient atmospheric conditions. In addition, capillary condensation within ash pores should allow for deposition of condensed water on to ash particles before water reaches saturation in the plume. The total mass of water vapour retained by 1 g of fine ash at 0.95 relative water vapour pressure is calculated to be ~10-2 g. Some volcanic implications of this study are discussed.

  14. Undrained dynamical behavior of Nanjing flake-shaped fine sand under cyclic loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国兴; 刘雪珠; 战吉艳

    2008-01-01

    A series of dynamic behavior tests on Nanjing flake-shaped fine sand were performed by using the WFI cyclic triaxial apparatus made in England. The dynamic behaviors of Nanjing flake-shaped fine sand under different static deviator stress levels and cyclic stress ratios were studied. Through comparing the effective stress path under cyclic loading with static loading, the processes of liquefaction of saturated Nanjing flake-shaped fine sand with development of dynamic pore-water pressure, including the initial compact state, compression state and dilative state, were investigated. The variation of the shear stiffness with the number of cycles and cyclic strain was investigated by analyzing the secant shear modulus in each unload-reload loop of dynamic stress-strain relationship. And by means of the exponential function, the empirical equations of the relationship between secant shear modulus Gsec, shear modulus ratio Gsec/Gmax and cyclic strain ε were established based on series of test results. The results show that according to different combinations of static deviator stress and cyclic stress, two kinds of failure patterns with deviator stress reversal or no deviator stress reversal are observed in the samples tested in this series, including cyclic mobility and the failure of accumulation residual strain. In addition, the degradation of dynamic shear modulus is due to the development of vibration pore-water pressure and it is observed that the shear modulus reduces with the progressive number of cycles.

  15. Development of tailored ceramic microstructures using recycled marble processing residue as pore-former

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domopoulou, A.; Spiliotis, X.; Charalampides, G.; Baklavaridis, A.; Papapolymerou, G.; Karayannis, V.

    2016-06-01

    Recycling of marble processing residue is significant since marble processing constitutes an important industrial sector. Therefore, the sustainable management and the valorisation, in an economically profitable manner, of this industrial by-product should be considered. In this work, the potential use of marble residue as pore-former into clayey mixtures for the production of lightweight, porous and thermal insulating ceramics is investigated. Four samples consisting of clayey ceramic body incorporating up to 50 wt.% fine marble residue powder were produced. The final ceramic products were produced upon firing (sintering) at 950oC. Porosity and thermal conductivity measurements were carried out in order to assess the thermal insulating behavior of the produced sintered ceramics. The porosity of the sintered ceramics increases substantially by increasing the marble residue admixture loading. This, in turn, leads to a decrease in thermal conductivity. Consequently, the marble residue can be successfully employed as pore-forming agent, in order to improve the insulating behavior of the ceramic materials.

  16. Enhanced Retention of Chemotactic Bacteria in a Pore Network with Residual NAPL Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaopu; Lanning, Larry M; Ford, Roseanne M

    2016-01-01

    Nonaqueous-phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants are difficult to eliminate from natural aquifers due, in part, to the heterogeneous structure of the soil. Chemotaxis enhances the mixing of bacteria with contaminant sources in low-permeability regions, which may not be readily accessible by advection and dispersion alone. A microfluidic device was designed to mimic heterogeneous features of a contaminated groundwater aquifer. NAPL droplets (toluene) were trapped within a fine pore network, and bacteria were injected through a highly conductive adjacent macrochannel. Chemotactic bacteria (Pseudomonas putida F1) exhibited greater accumulation near the pore network at 0.5 m/day than both the nonchemotactic control and the chemotactic bacteria at a higher groundwater velocity of 5 m/day. Chemotactic bacteria accumulated in the vicinity of NAPL droplets, and the accumulation was 15% greater than a nonchemotactic mutant. Indirect evidence showed that chemotactic bacteria were retained within the contaminated low-permeability region longer than nonchemotactic bacteria at 0.25 m/day. This retention was diminished at 5 m/day. Numerical solutions of the bacterial-transport equations were consistent with the experimental results. Because toluene is degraded by P. putida F1, the accumulation of chemotactic bacteria around NAPL sources is expected to increase contaminant consumption and improve the efficiency of bioremediation.

  17. Diffusion on spatial network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Zi; Tang, Xiaoyue; Li, Wei; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Wang, Qiuping A.

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we study the problem of diffusing a product (idea, opinion, disease etc.) among agents on spatial network. The network is constructed by random addition of nodes on the planar. The probability for a previous node to be connected to the new one is inversely proportional to their spatial distance to the power of α. The diffusion rate between two connected nodes is inversely proportional to their spatial distance to the power of β as well. Inspired from the Fick's first law, we introduce the diffusion coefficient to measure the diffusion ability of the spatial network. Using both theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulation, we get the fact that the diffusion coefficient always decreases with the increasing of parameter α and β, and the diffusion sub-coefficient follows the power-law of the spatial distance with exponent equals to -α-β+2. Since both short-range diffusion and long-range diffusion exist, we use anomalous diffusion method in diffusion process. We get the fact that the slope index δ in anomalous diffusion is always smaller that 1. The diffusion process in our model is sub-diffusion.

  18. Multiscale modelling of dual-porosity porous media; a computational pore-scale study for flow and solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Enno T.; Raoof, Amir; van Genuchten, Martinus Th.

    2017-07-01

    Many environmental and agricultural applications involve the transport of water and dissolved constituents through aggregated soil profiles, or porous media that are structured, fractured or macroporous in other ways. During the past several decades, various process-based macroscopic models have been used to simulate contaminant transport in such media. Many of these models consider advective-dispersive transport through relatively large inter-aggregate pore domains, while exchange with the smaller intra-aggregate pores is assumed to be controlled by diffusion. Exchange of solute between the two domains is often represented using a first-order mass transfer coefficient, which is commonly obtained by fitting to observed data. This study aims to understand and quantify the solute exchange term by applying a dual-porosity pore-scale network model to relatively large domains, and analysing the pore-scale results in terms of the classical dual-porosity (mobile-immobile) transport formulation. We examined the effects of key parameters (notably aggregate porosity and aggregate permeability) on the main dual-porosity model parameters, i.e., the mobile water fraction (ϕm) and the mass transfer coefficient (α). Results were obtained for a wide range of aggregate porosities (between 0.082 and 0.700). The effect of aggregate permeability was explored by varying pore throat sizes within the aggregates. Solute breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained with the pore-scale network model at several locations along the domain were analysed using analytical solutions of the dual-porosity model to obtain estimates of ϕm and α. An increase in aggregate porosity was found to decrease ϕm and increase α, leading to considerable tailing in the BTCs. Changes in the aggregate pore throat size affected the relative flow velocity between the intra- and inter-aggregate domains. Higher flow velocities within the aggregates caused a change in the transport regime from diffusion dominated to more

  19. Pore geometry as a control on rock strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubeck, A.; Walker, R. J.; Healy, D.; Dobbs, M.; Holwell, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    The strength of rocks in the subsurface is critically important across the geosciences, with implications for fluid flow, mineralisation, seismicity, and the deep biosphere. Most studies of porous rock strength consider the scalar quantity of porosity, in which strength shows a broadly inverse relationship with total porosity, but pore shape is not explicitly defined. Here we use a combination of uniaxial compressive strength measurements of isotropic and anisotropic porous lava samples, and numerical modelling to consider the influence of pore shape on rock strength. Micro computed tomography (CT) shows that pores range from sub-spherical to elongate and flat ellipsoids. Samples that contain flat pores are weaker if compression is applied parallel to the short axis (i.e. across the minimum curvature), compared to compression applied parallel to the long axis (i.e. across the maximum curvature). Numerical models for elliptical pores show that compression applied across the minimum curvature results in relatively broad amplification of stress, compared to compression applied across the maximum curvature. Certain pore shapes may be relatively stable and remain open in the upper crust under a given remote stress field, while others are inherently weak. Quantifying the shape, orientations, and statistical distributions of pores is therefore a critical step in strength testing of rocks.

  20. Impedance nanopore biosensor: influence of pore dimensions on biosensing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Krishna; Yu, Jingxian; Priest, Craig; Shapter, Joe G; Losic, Dusan

    2014-03-07

    Knowledge about electrochemical and electrical properties of nanopore structures and the influence of pore dimensions on these properties is important for the development of nanopore biosensing devices. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of nanopore dimensions (diameter and length) on biosensing performance using non-faradic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Nanoporous alumina membranes (NPAMs) prepared by self-ordered electrochemical anodization of aluminium were used as model nanopore sensing platforms. NPAMs with different pore diameters (25-65 nm) and lengths (4-18 μm) were prepared and the internal pore surface chemistry was modified by covalently attaching streptavidin and biotin. The performance of this antibody nanopore biosensing platform was evaluated using various concentrations of biotin as a model analyte. EIS measurements of pore resistivity and conductivity were carried out for pores with different diameters and lengths. The results showed that smaller pore dimensions of 25 nm and pore lengths up to 10 μm provide better biosensing performance.

  1. Superplastically foaming method to make closed pores inclusive porous ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, Akira; Hayashi, Hidetaka, E-mail: kishim-a@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Division of Molecular and Material Science, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University Okayama (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Porous ceramics incorporates pores to improve several properties including thermal insulation maintaining inherenet ceramic properties such as corrosion resistance and large mechanical strength. Conventional porous ceramics is usually fabricated through an insufficient sintering. Since the sintering accompanies the exclusion of pores, it must be terminated at the early stage to maintain the high porosity, leading to degraded strength and durability. Contrary to this, we have innovated superplastically foaming method to make ceramic foams only in the solid state. In this method, the previously inserted foam agent evaporates after the full densification of matrix at around the sintering temperature. Closed pores expand utilizing the superplastic deformation driven by the evolved gas pressure. The typical features of this superplastically foaming method are listed as follows, 1. The pores are introduced after sintering the solid polycrystal. 2. Only closed pores are introduced, improving the insulation of gas and sound in addition to heat. 3. The pore walls are fully densified expecting a large mechanical strength. 4. Compared with the melt foaming method, this method is practical because the fabrication temperature is far below the melting point and it does not need molds. 5. The size and the location pores can be controlled by the amount and position of the foam agent.

  2. Clostridial pore-forming toxins: powerful virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoff, Michel R

    2014-12-01

    Pore formation is a common mechanism of action for many bacterial toxins. More than one third of clostridial toxins are pore-forming toxins (PFTs) belonging to the β-PFT class. They are secreted as soluble monomers rich in β-strands, which recognize a specific receptor on target cells and assemble in oligomers. Then, they undergo a conformational change leading to the formation of a β-barrel, which inserts into the lipid bilayer forming functional pore. According to their structure, clostridial β-PFTs are divided into several families. Clostridial cholesterol-dependent cytolysins form large pores, which disrupt the plasma membrane integrity. They are potent virulence factors mainly involved in myonecrosis. Clostridial heptameric β-PFTs (aerolysin family and staphylococcal α-hemolysin family) induce small pores which trigger signaling cascades leading to different cell responses according to the cell types and toxins. They are mainly responsible for intestinal diseases, like necrotic enteritis, or systemic diseases/toxic shock from intestinal origin. Clostridial intracellularly active toxins exploit pore formation through the endosomal membrane to translocate the enzymatic component or domain into the cytosol. Single chain protein toxins, like botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins, use hydrophobic α-helices to form pores, whereas clostridial binary toxins encompass binding components, which are structurally and functionally related to β-PFTs, but which have acquired the specific activity to internalize their corresponding enzymatic components. Structural analysis suggests that β-PFTs and binding components share a common evolutionary origin.

  3. Nuclear Pore-Like Structures in a Compartmentalized Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagulenko, Evgeny; Green, Kathryn; Yee, Benjamin; Morgan, Garry; Leis, Andrew; Lee, Kuo-Chang; Butler, Margaret K.; Chia, Nicholas; Pham, Uyen Thi Phuong; Lindgreen, Stinus; Catchpole, Ryan; Poole, Anthony M.; Fuerst, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Planctomycetes are distinguished from other Bacteria by compartmentalization of cells via internal membranes, interpretation of which has been subject to recent debate regarding potential relations to Gram-negative cell structure. In our interpretation of the available data, the planctomycete Gemmata obscuriglobus contains a nuclear body compartment, and thus possesses a type of cell organization with parallels to the eukaryote nucleus. Here we show that pore-like structures occur in internal membranes of G.obscuriglobus and that they have elements structurally similar to eukaryote nuclear pores, including a basket, ring-spoke structure, and eight-fold rotational symmetry. Bioinformatic analysis of proteomic data reveals that some of the G. obscuriglobus proteins associated with pore-containing membranes possess structural domains found in eukaryote nuclear pore complexes. Moreover, immunogold labelling demonstrates localization of one such protein, containing a β-propeller domain, specifically to the G. obscuriglobus pore-like structures. Finding bacterial pores within internal cell membranes and with structural similarities to eukaryote nuclear pore complexes raises the dual possibilities of either hitherto undetected homology or stunning evolutionary convergence. PMID:28146565

  4. Morphological Characterization of the Polyflux 210H Hemodialysis Filter Pores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hedayat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Morphological characterization of hemodialysis membranes is necessary to improve pore design. Aim. To delineate membrane pore structure of a high flux filter, Polyflux 210H. Methods. We used a Joel JSM-6010LV scanning electron microscope (SEM and a SU6600 Hitachi field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM to characterize the pore and fiber morphology. The maximal diameters of selected uremic toxins were calculated using the macromolecular modeling Crystallographic Object-Oriented Toolkit (COOT software. Results. The mean pore densities on the outermost and innermost surfaces of the membrane were 36.81% and 5.45%, respectively. The membrane exhibited a tortuous structure with poor connection between the inner and outer pores. The aperture’s width in the inner surface ranged between 34 and 45 nm, which is 8.76–11.60 times larger than the estimated maximum diameter of β2-microglobulin (3.88 nm. Conclusion. The results suggest that the diameter size of inner pore apertures is not a limiting factor to middle molecules clearance, the extremely diminished density is. Increasing inner pore density and improving channel structure are strategies to improve clearance of middle molecules.

  5. Size dependent pore size distribution of shales by gas physisorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, Hamid; Andersen, Martin S.; Yu, Lu; Masoumi, Hossein; Arandian, Hamid

    2017-04-01

    Gas physisorption, in particular nitrogen adsorption-desorption, is a traditional technique for characterization of geomaterials including the organic rich shales. The low pressure nitrogen is used together with adsorption-desorption physical models to study the pore size distribution (PSD) and porosity of the porous samples. The samples are usually crushed to a certain fragment size to measure these properties however there is not yet a consistent standard size proposed for sample crushing. Crushing significantly increases the surface area of the fragments e.g. the created surface area is differentiated from that of pores using BET technique. In this study, we show that the smaller fragment sizes lead to higher cumulative pore volume and smaller pore diameters. It is also shown that some of the micro-pores are left unaccounted because of the correction of the external surface area. In order to illustrate this, the nitrogen physisorption is first conducted on the identical organic rich shale samples with different sizes: 20-25, 45-50 and 63-71 µm. We then show that such effects are not only a function of pore structure changes induced by crushing, but is linked to the inability of the physical models in differentiating between the external surface area (BET) and micro-pores for different crushing sizes at relatively low nitrogen pressure. We also discuss models currently used in nano-technology such as t-method to address this issue and their advantages and shortcoming for shale rock characterization.

  6. Escape of DNA from a weakly biased thin nanopore: Experimental evidence for a universal diffusive behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogerheide, David P.; Albertorio, Fernando; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2014-01-01

    We report experimental escape time distributions of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules initially threaded halfway through a thin solid-state nanopore. We find a universal behavior of the escape time distributions consistent with a one-dimensional first passage formulation notwithstanding the geometry of the experiment and the potential role of complex molecule-liquid-pore interactions. Diffusion constants that depend on the molecule length and pore size are determined. Also discussed are the practical implications of long time diffusive molecule trapping in the nanopore. PMID:24483704

  7. Many-body dissipative particle dynamics modeling of fluid flow in fine-grained nanoporous shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yidong; Goral, Jan; Huang, Hai; Miskovic, Ilija; Meakin, Paul; Deo, Milind

    2017-05-01

    A many-body dissipative particle dynamics model, namely, MDPD, is applied for simulation of pore-scale, multi-component, multi-phase fluid flows in fine-grained, nanoporous shales. Since this model is able to simultaneously capture the discrete features of fluid molecules in nanometer size pores and continuum fluid dynamics in larger pores, and is relatively easy to parameterize, it has been recognized as being particularly suitable for simulating complex fluid flow in multi-length-scale nanopore networks of shales. A remarkable feature of this work is the integration of a high-resolution FIB-SEM (focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy) digital imaging technique to the MDPD model for providing 3D voxel data that contain the invaluable geometrical and compositional information of shale samples. This is the first time that FIB-SEM is seamlessly linked to a Lagrangian model like MDPD for fluid flow simulation, which offers a robust approach to bridging gaps between the molecular- and continuum-scales, since the relevant spatial and temporal scales are too big for molecular dynamics, and too small for computational fluid dynamics with known constitutive models. Simulations ranging from a number of benchmark problems to a forced two-fluid flow in a Woodford shale sample are presented. Results indicate that this model can be used to deliver reasonable simulations for multi-component, multi-phase fluid flows in arbitrarily complex pore networks in shales.

  8. Novel Techniques to Characterize Pore Size of Porous Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulghani, Ali J.

    2016-04-24

    Porous materials are implemented in several industrial applications such as water desalination, gas separation and pharmaceutical care which they are mainly governed by the pore size and the PSD. Analyzing shale reservoirs are not excluded from these applications and numerous advantages can be gained by evaluating the PSD of a given shale reservoir. Because of the limitations of the conventional characterization techniques, novel methods for characterizing the PSD have to be proposed in order to obtain better characterization results for the porous materials, in general, and shale rocks in particular. Thus, permporosimetry and evapoporometry (EP) technologies were introduced, designed and utilized for evaluating the two key parameters, pore size and pore size distribution. The pore size and PSD profiles of different shale samples from Norway and Argentina were analyzed using these technologies and then confirmed by mercury intrusion porosimeter (MIP). Norway samples showed an average pore diameter of 12.94 nm and 19.22 nm with an average diameter of 13.77 nm and 23.23 nm for Argentina samples using permporosimetry and EP respectively. Both techniques are therefore indicative of the heterogeneity of the shales. The results from permporosimetry are in good agreement with those obtained from MIP technique, but EP for most part over-estimates the average pore size. The divergence of EP results compared to permporosimetry results is referred to the fact that the latter technique measures only the active pores which is not the case with the former technique. Overall, both techniques are complementary to each other which the results from both techniques seem reasonable and reliable and provide two simple techniques to estimate the pore size and pore size distributions for shale rocks.

  9. Fine structure of the epidermal Leydig cells in the axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum in relation to their function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarial, M S

    1989-12-01

    The fine structure of the Leydig cells in the epidermis of the strictly aquatic adult axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum resembles that of similar cells in larval salamanders. The major finding of this study is that the mucous secretion of the Leydig cells is released into the intercellular spaces from which it is discharged through pores onto the surface of the epidermis where it forms a mucous layer to protect the skin.

  10. In situ investigation of pore clogging during discharge of a Li/O2 battery by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardenhagen, Ingo; Yezerska, Olga; Augustin, Matthias; Fenske, Daniela; Wittstock, Arne; Bäumer, Marcus

    2015-03-01

    The behavior of three gas diffusion electrodes (GDE) with macro- and mesopores is investigated by in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in the Li/O2 battery system while discharging. Using a three electrode setup the current response from the anode (Li metal) and cathode (GDE) can be separated and the changes of the electrochemical processes at the GDE during discharge can be observed, exclusively. We identify up to four processes with different time constants which we assign to the lithium ion migration through a surface layer, the charge-transfer from the carbon surface to the molecular oxygen, the lithium ion and oxygen diffusion towards the cathode surface and, in case of the mesoporous materials, the lithium ion movement inside the pores, along the pore axis. The latter finding reflects that pore clogging of such is a limiting factor for the discharge of the Li/O2 battery. A large mesopore volume as in the xerogel electrode, however, allows for a high storage capability and a long and constant oxygen reduction. We demonstrate that the three electrode EIS proves to be a powerful in situ diagnostic tool to determine the state and, hence, the reversibility of the reactions at the cathode.

  11. Proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells on alginate-gelatine-hydroxyapatite scaffolds with anisotropic pore structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, A; Despang, F; Lode, A; Demmler, A; Hanke, T; Gelinsky, M

    2009-01-01

    Porous mineralized scaffolds are required for various applications in bone engineering. In particular, tube-like pores with controlled orientation inside the scaffold may support homogeneous cell seeding as well as sufficient nutrient supply and may facilitate blood vessel ingrowth. Scaffolds with parallely orientated tube-like pores were generated by diffusion-controlled ionotropic gelation of alginate. Incorporation of hydroxyapatite (HA) during the gelation process yielded stable scaffolds with an average pore diameter of approximately 90 microm. To evaluate the potential use of alginate-gelatine-HA scaffolds for bone tissue engineering, in vitro tests with human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) were carried out. We analysed biocompatibility and cell penetration into the capillary pores by microscopic methods. hBMSCs were also cultivated on alginate-gelatine-HA scaffolds for 3 weeks in the presence and absence of osteogenic supplements. We studied proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in terms of total lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, DNA content and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and found a 10-14-fold increase of cell number after 2 weeks of cultivation, as well as an increase of specific ALP activity for osteogenic-induced hBMSCs. Furthermore, the expression of bone-related genes [ALP, bone sialoprotein II (BSPII)] was analysed. We found an increase of ALP as well as BSPII expression for osteogenic-induced hBMSCs on alginate-gelatin-HA scaffolds. 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  12. Characterization of the intragranular water regime within subsurface sediments: Pore volume, surface area, and mass transfer limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Michael B.; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Davis, James A.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-10-01

    Although "intragranular" pore space within grain aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral surface coatings may contain a relatively small fraction of the total porosity within a porous medium, it often contains a significant fraction of the reactive surface area, and can thus strongly affect the transport of sorbing solutes. In this work, we demonstrate a batch experiment procedure using tritiated water as a high-resolution diffusive tracer to characterize the intragranular pore space. The method was tested using uranium-contaminated sediments from the vadose and capillary fringe zones beneath the former 300A process ponds at the Hanford site (Washington). Sediments were contacted with tracers in artificial groundwater, followed by a replacement of bulk solution with tracer-free groundwater and the monitoring of tracer release. From these data, intragranular pore volumes were calculated and mass transfer rates were quantified using a multirate first-order mass transfer model. Tritium-hydrogen exchange on surface hydroxyls was accounted for by conducting additional tracer experiments on sediment that was vacuum dried after reaction. The complementary ("wet" and "dry") techniques allowed for the simultaneous determination of intragranular porosity and surface area using tritium. The Hanford 300A samples exhibited intragranular pore volumes of ˜1% of the solid volume and intragranular surface areas of ˜20%-35% of the total surface area. Analogous experiments using bromide ion as a tracer yielded very different results, suggesting very little penetration of bromide into the intragranular porosity.

  13. Characterization of the intragranular water regime within subsurface sediments: pore volume, surface area, and mass transfer limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Michael B.; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Davis, James A.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Although "intragranular" pore space within grain aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral surface coatings may contain a relatively small fraction of the total porosity within a porous medium, it often contains a significant fraction of the reactive surface area, and can thus strongly affect the transport of sorbing solutes. In this work, we demonstrate a batch experiment procedure using tritiated water as a high-resolution diffusive tracer to characterize the intragranular pore space. The method was tested using uranium-contaminated sediments from the vadose and capillary fringe zones beneath the former 300A process ponds at the Hanford site (Washington). Sediments were contacted with tracers in artificial groundwater, followed by a replacement of bulk solution with tracer-free groundwater and the monitoring of tracer release. From these data, intragranular pore volumes were calculated and mass transfer rates were quantified using a multirate first-order mass transfer model. Tritium-hydrogen exchange on surface hydroxyls was accounted for by conducting additional tracer experiments on sediment that was vacuum dried after reaction. The complementary ("wet" and "dry") techniques allowed for the simultaneous determination of intragranular porosity and surface area using tritium. The Hanford 300A samples exhibited intragranular pore volumes of ~1% of the solid volume and intragranular surface areas of ~20%–35% of the total surface area. Analogous experiments using bromide ion as a tracer yielded very different results, suggesting very little penetration of bromide into the intragranular porosity.

  14. Two-dimensional NMR relaxometry study of pore space characteristics of carbonate rocks from a Permian aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Wiete; Gläser, Hans-Reinhard; Mitreiter, Ivonne; Stallmach, Frank

    2008-06-01

    Limestones and karstified limestones (dolostones) from a Permian aquifer in Central Germany were studied by 1H 2D NMR relaxometry and PFG NMR diffusometry, aiming at a non-destructive characterization of the pore space. Information concerning pore size distribution and water diffusion were in accord for different samples of each type of rock, but differed fundamentally between limestones and dolostones. The results of the 2D relaxometry measurements revealed a ratio of surface relaxation times Ts1/ Ts2 of about 2 for the limestones and about 4.5 for the dolostones, mirroring the different content of iron and manganese in the solid pore walls. In consideration of thin section interpretation, the corresponding fraction in the T1- T2 relaxation time distributions was attributed to interparticle porosity. Porosity of large vugs is clearly displayed by relaxation times longer than 1 s in the dolostones only. A third fraction of the total water-saturated pore space in the dolostones, which is clearly displayed in the 2D relaxation time distributions at the smallest relaxation times and a Ts1/ Ts2 ratio of about 12, is attributed to intrafossil porosity. The porosity classification, basing on non-destructive NMR experiments, is verified by mercury intrusion porosimetry and thin section interpretation.

  15. Multiphase Reactive Transport modeling of Stable Isotope Fractionation of Infiltrating Unsaturated Zone Pore Water and Vapor Using TOUGHREACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, Michael J.; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2003-08-28

    Numerical simulations of transport and isotope fractionation provide a method to quantitatively interpret vadose zone pore water stable isotope depth profiles based on soil properties, climatic conditions, and infiltration. We incorporate the temperature-dependent equilibration of stable isotopic species between water and water vapor, and their differing diffusive transport properties into the thermodynamic database of the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. These simulations are used to illustrate the evolution of stable isotope profiles in semiarid regions where recharge during wet seasons disturbs the drying profile traditionally associated with vadose zone pore waters. Alternating wet and dry seasons lead to annual fluctuations in moisture content, capillary pressure, and stable isotope compositions in the vadose zone. Periodic infiltration models capture the effects of seasonal increases in precipitation and predict stable isotope profiles that are distinct from those observed under drying (zero infiltration) conditions. After infiltration, evaporation causes a shift to higher 18O and D values, which are preserved in the deeper pore waters. The magnitude of the isotopic composition shift preserved in deep vadose zone pore waters varies inversely with the rate of infiltration.

  16. Simple model of capillary condensation in cylindrical pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szybisz, Leszek; Urrutia, Ignacio

    2002-11-01

    A simple model based on an approximation of the dropletlike model is formulated for studying adsorption of fluids into cylindrical pores. This model yields a nearly universal description of capillary condensation transitions for noble gases confined by alkali metals. The system's thermodynamical behavior is predicted from the values of two dimensionless parameters: D* (the reduced asymptotic strength of the fluid-adsorber interaction, a function of temperature) and R* (the reduced radius of the pore). The phenomenon of hysteresis inherently related to capillary condensation is discussed. The connection to a previously proposed universality for cylindrical pores is also established.

  17. Pore structure of SWNTs with high hydrogen storage capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨全红; 刘畅; 刘敏; 樊彦贞; 成会明; 王茂章

    2002-01-01

    This paper reveals, by analyses of nitrogen cryo-adsorption isotherm, the energetic and structural heterogeneity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) which has a high hydrogen storage capacity. It was found that SWNTs had manifold pore structures and distributed surface energy. By comparison of the pore structures and energy distributions of SWNTs before and after hydrogen adsorption, it is preliminarily indicated that hydrogen adsorption occurred in micropores and mesopores with smaller diameter, and that the pores of different diameters determined different hydrogen adsorption processes and underwent different structure changes during hydrogen adsorption.

  18. A Student Diffusion Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, Mickey; Pearson, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    Diffusion is a truly interdisciplinary topic bridging all areas of STEM education. When biomolecules are not being moved through the body by fluid flow through the circulatory system or by molecular motors, diffusion is the primary mode of transport over short distances. The direction of the diffusive flow of particles is from high concentration…

  19. Acoustic diffusers III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidondo, Alejandro

    2002-11-01

    This acoustic diffusion research presents a pragmatic view, based more on effects than causes and 15 very useful in the project advance control process, where the sound field's diffusion coefficient, sound field diffusivity (SFD), for its evaluation. Further research suggestions are presented to obtain an octave frequency resolution of the SFD for precise design or acoustical corrections.

  20. A Student Diffusion Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, Mickey; Pearson, Bryan

    2017-02-01

    Diffusion is a truly interdisciplinary topic bridging all areas of STEM education. When biomolecules are not being moved through the body by fluid flow through the circulatory system or by molecular motors, diffusion is the primary mode of transport over short distances. The direction of the diffusive flow of particles is from high concentration toward low concentration.