WorldWideScience

Sample records for final report-passive safety

  1. Final report-passive safety optimization in liquid sodium-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahalana, J. E.; Hahn, D.

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a three-year collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to identify and quantify the performance of innovative design features in metallic-fueled, sodium-cooled fast reactor designs. The objective of the work was to establish the reliability and safety margin enhancements provided by design innovations offering significant potential for construction, maintenance, and operating cost reductions. The project goal was accomplished with a combination of advanced model development (Task 1), analysis of innovative design and safety features (Tasks 2 and 3), and planning of key safety experiments (Task 4). Task 1--Computational Methods for Analysis of Passive Safety Design Features: An advanced three-dimensional subassembly thermal-hydraulic model was developed jointly and implemented in ANL and KAERI computer codes. The objective of the model development effort was to provide a high-accuracy capability to predict fuel, cladding, coolant, and structural temperatures in reactor fuel subassemblies, and thereby reduce the uncertainties associated with lower fidelity models previously used for safety and design analysis. The project included model formulation, implementation, and verification by application to available reactor tests performed at EBR-II. Task 2--Comparative Analysis and Evaluation of Innovative Design Features: Integrated safety assessments of innovative liquid metal reactor designs were performed to quantify the performance of inherent safety features. The objective of the analysis effort was to identify the potential safety margin enhancements possible in a sodium-cooled, metal-fueled reactor design by use of passive safety mechanisms to mitigate low-probability accident consequences. The project included baseline analyses using state-of-the-art computational models and advanced analyses using the new model developed in Task 1. Task 3--Safety

  2. National Safety Council Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, Karen; Shannon, Tom

    2005-01-01

    In December 1995, the National Safety Council (NSC) entered into Cooperative Agreement No.DE-FC02-96EW 12729 with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to work together over the next few years on safety and health initiatives surrounding the management of radioactive materials. As a result, three publications, including print and non-print deliverables, were developed and distributed: (1) Series of Backgrounders, Web Services for WIPP; (2) A Guide to Foreign Research Reactor Spent Fuel; and (3) A Guide to the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Radioactive Waste. DOE and its predecessor agencies have maintained a record of safe transportation of radioactive materials for more than 50 years. Thousands of shipments involving three million packages of radioactive materials are shipped each year in the United States. Historically, DOE shipments constitute less than one percent of the total radioactive material shipments; however, they comprise a significant portion (approaching 75 percent) of the curies, or amounts of radioactivity shipped annually. DOE operations and field offices are responsible for detailed planning and for ensuring full regulatory compliance for their shipments. Packaging is designed to protect workers and limit the risk to the public during transportation. DOE headquarters and program offices provide policy direction and oversight for packaging and transportation activities for their respective offices. The publications NSC produced under the agreement also included primary points of contact for external audiences, including the press, the public, and stakeholders who would not have access to DOE regulations, manuals, and practices

  3. Convention on nuclear safety. Final act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Diplomatic Conference, which was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency at its Headquarters from 14 to 17 June 1994, adopted the Convention on Nuclear Safety reproduced in document INFCIRC/449 and the Final Act of the Conference. The text of the Final Act of the Conference, including an annexed document entitled ''Some clarification with respect to procedural and financial arrangements, national reports, and the conduct of review meetings, envisaged in the Convention on Nuclear Safety'', is reproduced in the Attachment hereto for the information of all Member States

  4. Manpower analysis in transportation safety. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, C.S.; Bowden, H.M.; Colford, C.A.; DeFilipps, P.J.; Dennis, J.D.; Ehlert, A.K.; Popkin, H.A.; Schrader, G.F.; Smith, Q.N.

    1977-05-01

    The project described provides a manpower review of national, state and local needs for safety skills, and projects future manning levels for transportation safety personnel in both the public and private sectors. Survey information revealed that there are currently approximately 121,000 persons employed directly in transportation safety occupations within the air carrier, highway and traffic safety, motor carrier, pipeline, rail carrier, and marine carrier transportation industry groups. The projected need for 1980 is over 145,000 of which over 80 percent will be in highway safety. An analysis of transportation tasks is included, and shows ten general categories about which the majority of safety activities are focused. A skills analysis shows a generally high level of educational background and several years of experience are required for most transportation safety jobs. An overall review of safety programs in the transportation industry is included, together with chapters on the individual transportation modes.

  5. Strategies for reactor safety. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, K

    1997-12-01

    The NKS/RAK-1 project formed part of a four-year nuclear research program (1994-1997) in the Nordic countries, the NKS Programme. The project aims were to investigate and evaluate the safety work, to increase realism and reliability of the safety analysis, and to give ideas for how safety can be improved in selected areas. An evaluation of the safety work in nuclear installations in Finland and Sweden was made, and a special effort was devoted to plant modernisation and to see how modern safety standards can be met up with. A combination of more resources and higher efficiency is recommended to meet requirements from plant modernisation and plant renovations. Both the utilities and the safety authorities are recommended to actively follow the evolving safety standards for new reactors. Various approaches to estimating LOCA frequencies have been explored. In particular, a probabilistic model for pipe ruptures due to intergranular stress corrosion has been developed. A survey has been done over methodologies for integrated sequence analysis (ISA), and different approaches have been developed and tested on four sequences. Structured frameworks for integration between PSA and behavioural sciences have been developed, which e.g. have improved PSA. The status of maintenance strategies in Finland and Sweden has been studied and a new maintenance data information system has been developed. (au) 41 refs.

  6. Strategies for reactor safety. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, K.

    1997-12-01

    The NKS/RAK-1 project formed part of a four-year nuclear research program (1994-1997) in the Nordic countries, the NKS Programme. The project aims were to investigate and evaluate the safety work, to increase realism and reliability of the safety analysis, and to give ideas for how safety can be improved in selected areas. An evaluation of the safety work in nuclear installations in Finland and Sweden was made, and a special effort was devoted to plant modernisation and to see how modern safety standards can be met up with. A combination of more resources and higher efficiency is recommended to meet requirements from plant modernisation and plant renovations. Both the utilities and the safety authorities are recommended to actively follow the evolving safety standards for new reactors. Various approaches to estimating LOCA frequencies have been explored. In particular, a probabilistic model for pipe ruptures due to intergranular stress corrosion has been developed. A survey has been done over methodologies for integrated sequence analysis (ISA), and different approaches have been developed and tested on four sequences. Structured frameworks for integration between PSA and behavioural sciences have been developed, which e.g. have improved PSA. The status of maintenance strategies in Finland and Sweden has been studied and a new maintenance data information system has been developed. (au)

  7. Chapter 8: Final thought on safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2018-04-01

    The chapter presents the objective of implementing and maintaining a good safety system: to prevent the occurrence of accidents and incidents (the abnormalities must be the exception) and if they occur their consequences should be mitigated. And make other considerations.

  8. Safety culture in design. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macchi, L.; Pietikaeinen, E.; Liinasuo, M.; Savioja, P.; Reiman, T.; Wahlstroem, M.; Kahlbom, U.; Rollenhagen, C.

    2013-04-01

    In this report we approach design from a safety culture approach As this research area is new and understudied, we take a wide scope on the issue. Different theoretical perspectives that can be taken when improving safety of the design process are considered in this report. We suggest that in the design context the concept of safety culture should be expanded from an organizational level to the level of the network of organizations involved in the design activity. The implication of approaching the design process from a safety culture perspective are discussed and the results of the empirical part of the research are presented. In the interview study in Finland and Sweden we identified challenges and opportunities in the design process from safety culture perspective. Also, a small part of the interview study concentrated on state of the art human factors engineering (HFE) practices in Finland and the results relating to that are presented. This report provide a basis for future development of systematic good design practices and for providing guidelines that can lead to safe and robust technical solutions. (Author)

  9. Safety culture in design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macchi, L.; Pietikaeinen, E.; Liinasuo, M.; Savioja, P.; Reiman, T.; Wahlstroem, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Kahlbom, U. [Risk Pilot AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Rollenhagen, C. [Vattenfall, Stockholm, (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    In this report we approach design from a safety culture approach As this research area is new and understudied, we take a wide scope on the issue. Different theoretical perspectives that can be taken when improving safety of the design process are considered in this report. We suggest that in the design context the concept of safety culture should be expanded from an organizational level to the level of the network of organizations involved in the design activity. The implication of approaching the design process from a safety culture perspective are discussed and the results of the empirical part of the research are presented. In the interview study in Finland and Sweden we identified challenges and opportunities in the design process from safety culture perspective. Also, a small part of the interview study concentrated on state of the art human factors engineering (HFE) practices in Finland and the results relating to that are presented. This report provide a basis for future development of systematic good design practices and for providing guidelines that can lead to safe and robust technical solutions. (Author)

  10. Safety in the final disposal of radioactive waste. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broden, K.; Carugati, S.; Brodersen, K. [and others

    1997-12-01

    During 1994-1997 a project on the disposal of radioactive waste was carried out as part of the NKS program. The objective of the project was to give authorities and waste producers in the Nordic countries background material for determinations about the management and disposal of radioactive waste. The project NKS/AFA-1 was divided into three sub-projects: AFA-1.1, AFA-1.2 and AFA-1.3. AFA-1.1 dealt with waste characterisation, AFA-1.2 dealt with performance assessment for repositories and AFA-1.3 dealt with Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). The studies mainly focused on the management of long-lived low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste from research, hospitals and industry. The AFA-1.1 study included an overview on waste categories in the Nordic countries and methods to determine or estimate the waste content. The results from the AFA-1.2 study include a short overview of different waste management systems existing and planned in the Nordic countries. However, the main emphasis of the study was a general discussion of methodologies developed and employed for performance assessments of waste repositories. Some of the phenomena and interactions relevant for generic types of repository were discussed as well. Among the different approaches for the development of scenarios for safety and performance assessments one particular method, the Rock Engineering System (RES), was chosen to be tested by demonstration. The possible interactions and their safety significance were discussed, employing a simplified and generic Nordic repository system as the reference system. New regulations for the inventory of a repository may demand new assessments of old radioactive waste packages. The existing documentation of a waste package is then the primary information source although additional measurements may be necessary. (EG) 33 refs.

  11. Safety in the final disposal of radioactive waste. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broden, K.; Carugati, S.; Brodersen, K.

    1997-12-01

    During 1994-1997 a project on the disposal of radioactive waste was carried out as part of the NKS program. The objective of the project was to give authorities and waste producers in the Nordic countries background material for determinations about the management and disposal of radioactive waste. The project NKS/AFA-1 was divided into three sub-projects: AFA-1.1, AFA-1.2 and AFA-1.3. AFA-1.1 dealt with waste characterisation, AFA-1.2 dealt with performance assessment for repositories and AFA-1.3 dealt with Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). The studies mainly focused on the management of long-lived low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste from research, hospitals and industry. The AFA-1.1 study included an overview on waste categories in the Nordic countries and methods to determine or estimate the waste content. The results from the AFA-1.2 study include a short overview of different waste management systems existing and planned in the Nordic countries. However, the main emphasis of the study was a general discussion of methodologies developed and employed for performance assessments of waste repositories. Some of the phenomena and interactions relevant for generic types of repository were discussed as well. Among the different approaches for the development of scenarios for safety and performance assessments one particular method, the Rock Engineering System (RES), was chosen to be tested by demonstration. The possible interactions and their safety significance were discussed, employing a simplified and generic Nordic repository system as the reference system. New regulations for the inventory of a repository may demand new assessments of old radioactive waste packages. The existing documentation of a waste package is then the primary information source although additional measurements may be necessary. (EG)

  12. Alcator C-MOD final safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiore, C.L.

    1989-06-01

    This document is designed to address the safety issues involved with the Alcator C-Mod project. This report will begin with a brief description of the experimental objectives which will be followed by information concerning the site. The Alcator C-Mod experiment is a pulsed fusion experiment in which a plasma formed from small amounts of hydrogen or deuterium gas is confined in a magnetic field for short periods (∼1 s). No radioactive fuels or fissile materials are used in the device, so that no criticality hazard exists and no credible nuclear accident can occur. During deuterium operation, the production of a small number of neutrons from a short pulse could result in a small amount of short- and intermediate-lived radioactive isotopes being produced inside the experimental cell. This report will demonstrate that this does not pose an additional hazard to the general population. The health and safety hazards resulting from Alcator C-Mod occur to the workers on the experiment, each of which is described in its own chapter with the steps taken to minimize the risk to employees. These hazards include fire, chemicals and cryogenics, air quality, electrical, electromagnetic radiation, ionizing radiation, and mechanical and natural phenomena. None of these hazards is unique to the facility, and methods of protection from them are well defined and are discussed in the chapter which describes each hazard. The quality assurance program, critical to ensuring the safety aspects of the program, will also be described

  13. Rankine bottoming cycle safety analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewandowski, G.A.

    1980-02-01

    Vector Engineering Inc. conducted a safety and hazards analysis of three Rankine Bottoming Cycle Systems in public utility applications: a Thermo Electron system using Fluorinal-85 (a mixture of 85 mole % trifluoroethanol and 15 mole % water) as the working fluid; a Sundstrand system using toluene as the working fluid; and a Mechanical Technology system using steam and Freon-II as the working fluids. The properties of the working fluids considered are flammability, toxicity, and degradation, and the risks to both plant workers and the community at large are analyzed.

  14. Hawaii State Plan for Occupational Safety and Health. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    This document announces the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) decision to modify the Hawaii State Plan's ``final approval'' determination under Section 18(e) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (the Act) and to transition to ``initial approval'' status. OSHA is reinstating concurrent federal enforcement authority over occupational safety and health issues in the private sector, which have been solely covered by the Hawaii State Plan since 1984.

  15. Improving the safety of LWR power plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Study to identify current, potential research issues and efforts for improving the safety of Light Water Reactor (LWR) power plants. This final report describes the work accomplished, the results obtained, the problem areas, and the recommended solutions. Specifically, for each of the issues identified in this report for improving the safety of LWR power plants, a description is provided in detail of the safety significance, the current status (including information sources, status of technical knowledge, problem solution and current activities), and the suggestions for further research and development. Further, the issues are ranked for action into high, medium, and low priority with respect to primarily (a) improved safety (e.g. potential reduction in public risk and occupational exposure), and secondly (b) reduction in safety-related costs

  16. SKB's safety case for a final repository license application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedin, Allan; Andersson, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The safety assessment SR-Site is a main component in SKB's license application, submitted in March 2011, to construct and operate a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark in the municipality of Oesthammar, Sweden. Its role in the application is to demonstrate long-term safety for a repository at Forsmark. The assessment relates to the KBS-3 disposal concept in which copper canisters with a cast iron insert containing spent nuclear fuel are surrounded by bentonite clay and deposited at approximately 500 m depth in saturated, granitic rock. The principal regulatory acceptance criterion, issued by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM), requires that the annual risk of harmful effects after closure not exceed 10 -6 for a representative individual in the group exposed to the greatest risk. SSM's regulations also imply that the assessment time for a repository of this type is one million years after closure. The licence applied for is one in a stepwise series of permits, each requiring a safety report. The next step concerns a permit to start excavation of the repository and requires a preliminary safety assessment report (PSAR) covering both operational and post-closure safety. Later steps include permission to commence trial operation, to commence regular operation and to close the final repository. (authors)

  17. Using of BEPU methodology in a final safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, Francine; Sabundjian, Gaiane; D'auria, Francesco; Madeira, Alzira A.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS) has been established since the discovery of nuclear fission, and the occurrence of accidents in Nuclear Power Plants worldwide has contributed for its improvement. The Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) must contain complete information concerning safety of the plant and plant site, and must be seen as a compendium of NRS. The FSAR integrates both the licensing requirements and the analytical techniques. The analytical techniques can be applied by using a realistic approach, addressing the uncertainties of the results. This work aims to show an overview of the main analytical techniques that can be applied with a Best Estimated Plus Uncertainty (BEPU) methodology, which is 'the best one can do', as well as the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle. Moreover, the paper intends to demonstrate the background of the licensing process through the main licensing requirements. (author)

  18. Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for Building 332, Increment III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odell, B. N.; Toy, Jr., A. J.

    1977-08-31

    This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) supplements the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR), dated January 18, 1974, for Building 332, Increment III of the Plutonium Materials Engineering Facility located at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL). The FSAR, in conjunction with the PSAR, shows that the completed increment provides facilities for safely conducting the operations as described. These documents satisfy the requirements of ERDA Manual Appendix 6101, Annex C, dated April 8, 1971. The format and content of this FSAR complies with the basic requirements of the letter of request from ERDA San to LLL, dated March 10, 1972. Included as appendices in support of th FSAR are the Building 332 Operational Safety Procedure and the LLL Disaster Control Plan.

  19. Using of BEPU methodology in a final safety analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, Francine; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: fmenzel@ipen.br, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); D' auria, Francesco, E-mail: f.dauria@ing.unipi.it [Universita degli Studi di Pisa, Gruppo di Ricerca Nucleare San Piero a Grado (GRNSPG), Pisa (Italy); Madeira, Alzira A., E-mail: alzira@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS) has been established since the discovery of nuclear fission, and the occurrence of accidents in Nuclear Power Plants worldwide has contributed for its improvement. The Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) must contain complete information concerning safety of the plant and plant site, and must be seen as a compendium of NRS. The FSAR integrates both the licensing requirements and the analytical techniques. The analytical techniques can be applied by using a realistic approach, addressing the uncertainties of the results. This work aims to show an overview of the main analytical techniques that can be applied with a Best Estimated Plus Uncertainty (BEPU) methodology, which is 'the best one can do', as well as the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle. Moreover, the paper intends to demonstrate the background of the licensing process through the main licensing requirements. (author)

  20. Ferrocyanide safety project ferrocyanide aging studies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Alderson, E.V.

    1996-06-01

    This final report gives the results of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) from FY 1992 to FY 1996 on the Ferrocyanide Aging Studies, part of the Ferrocyanide Safety Project. The Ferrocyanide Safety Project was initiated as a result of concern raised about the safe storage of ferrocyanide waste intermixed with oxidants, such as nitrate and nitrite salts, in Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs). In the laboratory, such mixtures can be made to undergo uncontrolled or explosive reactions by heating dry reagents to over 200 degrees C. In 1987, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), published by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Final Environmental Impact Statement, Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level Transuranic and Tank Waste, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, included an environmental impact analysis of potential explosions involving ferrocyanide-nitrate mixtures. The EIS postulated that an explosion could occur during mechanical retrieval of saltcake or sludge from a ferrocyanide waste tank, and concluded that this worst-case accident could create enough energy to release radioactive material to the atmosphere through ventilation openings, exposing persons offsite to a short-term radiation dose of approximately 200 mrem. Later, in a separate study (1990), the General Accounting Office postulated a worst-case accident of one to two orders of magnitude greater than that postulated in the DOE EIS. The uncertainties regarding the safety envelope of the Hanford Site ferrocyanide waste tanks led to the declaration of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) in October 1990

  1. HERBE final safety report; HERBE Finalni sigurnosni izvestaj

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-07-01

    The Final safety report of HERBE system constructed at the RB reactor consists of 13 chapters, as follows. Chapter 0 includes a summary and the contents of the Final safety report, fundamental characteristics of the system and conclusion remarks, with the license agreement of the Safety Committee of the Boris Kidric Institute. Chapter 1 describes and analyzes the site of the HERBE system, including demography, topography, meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismicity, ecology. Chapter 3 covers technical characteristics of the system, Chapter 4 deals with safety analysis, Chapter 5 describes organisation of construction and preliminary operational testing of the system. Chapter 6 deals with organisation and program of test and regular operation, relevant procedures. Chapter 7 defines operational conditions and constraints, Chapter 8 and describe methods and means of radiation protection and radioactive materials management respectively. Chapter 10 contains a review of emergency plans, measures and procedures for nuclear accident protection. Chapters 11 and 12 are concerned with quality assurance program and physical protection of the HERBE system and related nuclear material.

  2. 76 FR 17808 - Final Vehicle Safety Rulemaking and Research Priority Plan 2011-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... [Docket No. NHTSA-2009-0108] Final Vehicle Safety Rulemaking and Research Priority Plan 2011- 2013 AGENCY... availability. SUMMARY: This document announces the availability of the Final NHTSA Vehicle Safety and Fuel.... This Priority Plan is an update to the Final Vehicle Safety Rulemaking and Research Priority Plan 2009...

  3. 10 CFR 52.157 - Contents of applications; technical information in final safety analysis report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; technical information in final safety analysis report. The application must contain a final safety analysis... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contents of applications; technical information in final safety analysis report. 52.157 Section 52.157 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES...

  4. 10 CFR 52.79 - Contents of applications; technical information in final safety analysis report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; technical information in final safety analysis report. (a) The application must contain a final safety... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contents of applications; technical information in final safety analysis report. 52.79 Section 52.79 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES...

  5. LOFT integral test system final safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-03-01

    Safety analyses are presented for the following LOFT Reactor systems: engineering safety features; support buildings and facilities; instrumentation and controls; electrical systems; and auxiliary systems. (JWR)

  6. Fast Flux Test Facility final safety analysis report. Amendment 72

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantt, D. A.

    1992-08-01

    This document provides the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) Amendment 72 for incorporation into the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) FSAR set. This amendment change incorporates Engineering Change Notices issued subsequent to Amendment 71 and approved for incorporation before June 24, 1992. These include changes in: Chapter 2, Site Characteristics; Chapter 3, Design Criteria Structures, Equipment, and Systems; Chapter 5B, Reactor Coolant System; Chapter 7, Instrumentation and Control Systems; Chapter 8, Electrical Systems - The description of the Class 1E, 125 Vdc systems is updated for the higher capacity of the newly installed, replacement batteries; Chapter 9, Auxiliary Systems - The description of the inert cell NASA systems is corrected to list the correct number of spare sample points; Chapter 11, Reactor Refueling System; Chapter 12, Radiation Protection and Waste Management; Chapter 13, Conduct of Operations; Chapter 16, Quality Assurance; Chapter 17, Technical Specifications; Chapter 19, FFTF Fire Specifications for Fire Detection, Alarm, and Protection Systems; Chapter 20, FFTF Criticality Specifications; and Appendix B, Primary Piping Integrity Evaluation.

  7. Safety performance evaluation of converging chevron pavement markings : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to perform a detailed safety analysis of converging chevron : pavement markings, quantifying the potential safety benefits and developing an understanding of the : incident types addressed by the treatment, and (...

  8. 78 FR 27419 - Final Safety Culture Policy Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... organizational characteristics are present in a culture that promotes safety and environmental responsibility. A characteristic, in this case, is a pattern of thinking, feeling, and behaving that emphasizes safety...

  9. DOE Defense Program (DP) safety programs. Final report, Task 003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The overall objective of the work on Task 003 of Subcontract 9-X52-W7423-1 was to provide LANL with support to the DOE Defense Program (DP) Safety Programs. The effort included the identification of appropriate safety requirements, the refinement of a DP-specific Safety Analysis Report (SAR) Format and Content Guide (FCG) and Comprehensive Review Plan (CRP), incorporation of graded approach instructions into the guidance, and the development of a safety analysis methodologies document. All tasks which were assigned under this Task Order were completed. Descriptions of the objectives of each task and effort performed to complete each objective is provided here

  10. Training Course for Compliance Safety and Health Officers. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, A. James; And Others

    The report describes revision of the Compliance Safety and Health Officers (CSHO) course for the Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The CSHO's job was analyzed in depth, in accord with OSHA standards, policies, and procedures. A listing of over 1,700 violations of OSHA standards was prepared, and specialists…

  11. An assessment of traffic safety culture related to engagement in efforts to improve traffic safety : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This final report summarizes the methods, results, conclusions, and recommendations derived from a survey conducted to understand values, beliefs, and attitudes regarding engagement in behaviors that impact the traffic safety of others. Results of th...

  12. Systems Analysis of NASA Aviation Safety Program: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sharon M.; Reveley, Mary S.; Withrow, Colleen A.; Evans, Joni K.; Barr, Lawrence; Leone, Karen

    2013-01-01

    A three-month study (February to April 2010) of the NASA Aviation Safety (AvSafe) program was conducted. This study comprised three components: (1) a statistical analysis of currently available civilian subsonic aircraft data from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the Aviation Safety Information Analysis and Sharing (ASIAS) system to identify any significant or overlooked aviation safety issues; (2) a high-level qualitative identification of future safety risks, with an assessment of the potential impact of the NASA AvSafe research on the National Airspace System (NAS) based on these risks; and (3) a detailed, top-down analysis of the NASA AvSafe program using an established and peer-reviewed systems analysis methodology. The statistical analysis identified the top aviation "tall poles" based on NTSB accident and FAA incident data from 1997 to 2006. A separate examination of medical helicopter accidents in the United States was also conducted. Multiple external sources were used to develop a compilation of ten "tall poles" in future safety issues/risks. The top-down analysis of the AvSafe was conducted by using a modification of the Gibson methodology. Of the 17 challenging safety issues that were identified, 11 were directly addressed by the AvSafe program research portfolio.

  13. 76 FR 53051 - Safety Zone; ISAF Nations Cup Grand Final Fireworks Display, Sheboygan, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-25

    ... display. DATES: This rule is effective from 7:45 until 8:45 p.m. on September 13, 2011. ADDRESSES...-AA00 Safety Zone; ISAF Nations Cup Grand Final Fireworks Display, Sheboygan, WI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on...

  14. Application of demographic analysis to pedestrian safety : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, many departments of transportation in the US have invested additional resources to enhance : pedestrian safety. However, there is still a need to effectively and systematically address the pedestrian experience : in low-income areas....

  15. Evaluation of safety assessment methodologies in Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide (1985) and Building 707 Final Safety Analysis Report (1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, B.; Fisher, C.; Zigler, G.; Clark, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    FSARs. Rockwell International, as operating contractor at the Rocky Flats plant, conducted a safety analysis program during the 1980s. That effort resulted in Final Safety Analysis Reports (FSARs) for several buildings, one of them being the Building 707 Final Safety Analysis Report, June 87 (707FSAR) and a Plant Safety Analysis Report. Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide, March 1985 (RFRAG85) documents the methodologies that were used for those FSARs. Resources available for preparation of those Rocky Flats FSARs were very limited. After addressing the more pressing safety issues, some of which are described below, the present contractor (EG ampersand G) intends to conduct a program of upgrading the FSARs. This report presents the results of a review of the methodologies described in RFRAG85 and 707FSAR and contains suggestions that might be incorporated into the methodology for the FSAR upgrade effort

  16. Fast flux test facility final safety analysis report amendment 79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dautel, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    This document is provided to replace, remove, or add applicable pages to the chapters on: Heat Transport System; Containment and Structures; Auxiliary Systems; Reactor Refueling System; Conduct of Operations; Safety Analysis; Quality Assurance; FFTF Criticality Specifications; and Appendix H's TRIGA Fuel Storage System

  17. 76 FR 34773 - Final Safety Culture Policy Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    .... For example, industry representatives could begin to identify tacit organizational and personal goals... with NRC-regulated activities. Experience has shown that certain personal and organizational traits are present in a positive safety culture. A trait, in this case, is a pattern of thinking, feeling, and...

  18. Probabilistic safety considerations for the final disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, H.P.; Gruendler, D.; Wurtinger, W.

    1992-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the safety-related balanced concept of the plant design with respect to the operational phase, probabilistic safety considerations were made for the planned German repository for radioactive wastes, the Konrad repository. These considerations are described with respect to the handling and transfer system in the above-ground and underground facility. The operational sequences and the features of a repository are similar to those of conventional transportation and loading facilities and mining techniques. Hence, failure sequences and probability data were derived from these conventional areas. Incidents taken into consideration are e. g. collision of vehicles, fires, drop of waste packages due to failures of lifting equipment. The statistical data used were made available by authorities, insurance companies, and expert organizations. These data have been converted into probability data which were used for the determination of the frequencies for all radiologically relevant incidents. (author)

  19. Evaluation of safety-parameter display concepts. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.D.; Wise, J.A.; Hanes, L.F.

    1982-02-01

    New control room equipment designed to improve operator performance must be evaluated before adoption and installation. Two experimental concepts for a Safety Parameters Display System (SPDS) were evaluated to assess benefits and potential problems associated with the SPDS concept and its integration into control room operations. Participants were licensed utility operators undergoing retraining on a nuclear power plant simulator. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed on crew response to seven simulated accident conditions

  20. Nuclear Power Safety Reporting System. Final evaluation results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finlayson, F.C.; Newton, R.D.

    1986-02-01

    This document presents the results of a study conducted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission of an unobtrusive, voluntary, anonymous third-party managed, nonpunitive human factors data gathering system (the Nuclear power Safety Reporting System - NPSRS) for the nuclear electric power production industry. The data to be gathered by the NPSRS are intended for use in identifying and quantifying the factors that contribute to the occurrence of significant safety incidents involving humans in nuclear power plants. The NPSRS has been designed to encourage participation in the System through guarantees of reporter anonymity provided by a third-party organization that would be responsible for NPSRS management. As additional motivation to reporters for contributing data to the NPSRS, conditional waivers of NRC disciplinary action would be provided to individuals. These conditional waivers of immunity would apply to potential violations of NRC regulations that might be disclosed through reports submitted to the System about inadvertent, noncriminal incidents in nuclear plants. This document summarizes the overall results of the study of the NPSRS concept. In it, a functional description of the NPSRS is presented together with a review and assessment of potential problem areas that might be met if the System were implemented. Conclusions and recommendations resulting from the study are also presented. A companion volume (NUREG/CR-4133, Nuclear Power Safety Reporting System: Implementation and Operational Specifications'') presented in detail the elements, requirements, forms, and procedures for implementing and operating the System. 13 refs

  1. Prioritization of tasks in the draft LWR safety technology program plan. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, E.Y.; Miller, W.J.; Parkinson, W.J.; Ritzman, R.L.; vonHerrmann, J.L.; Wood, P.J.

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe both the approach taken and the results produced in the SAI effort to prioritize the tasks in the Sandia draft LWR Safety Technology Program Plan. This work used the description of important safety issues developed in the Reactor Safety Study (2) to quantify the effect of safety improvements resulting from a research and development program on the risk from nuclear power plants. Costs of implementation of these safety improvements were also estimated to allow a presentation of the final results in a value (i.e., risk reduction) vs. impact (i.e., implementation costs) matrix

  2. Evaluation of safety parameter display concepts. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.D.; Wise, J.A.; Hanes, L.F.

    1982-02-01

    New control room equipment designed to improve operator performance must be evaluated before adoption and installation. Two experimental concept for a Safety Parameters Display System (SPDS) were evaluated to assess benefits and potential problems associated with the SPDS concept and its integration into control room operations. Participants were licensed utility operators undergoing retraining on a nuclear power plant simulator. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed on crew response to seven simulated accident conditions. Data on operator decisions and actions have been organized into timelines. Analysis of the timelines and observations collected during testing provide important insights about the potential impact of the SPDS concept on control room operations

  3. Ferrocyanide Safety Program cyanide speciation studies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pool, K.H.; Bryan, S.L.

    1995-07-01

    This report summarizes Pacific Northwest Laboratory's fiscal year (FY) 1995 progress toward developing and implementing methods to identify and quantify cyanide species in ferrocyanide tank waste. This work was conducted for Westinghouse Hanfbrd Company's (WHC's) Ferrocyanide Safety Program. Currently, there are 18 high-level waste storage tanks at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site that are on a Ferrocyanide Tank Watchlist because they contain an estimated 1000 g-moles or more of precipitated ferrocyanide. In the presence of oxidizing material such as sodium nitrate or nitrite, ferrocyanide can be made to react exothermally by heating it to high temperatures or by applying an electrical spark of sufficient energy (Cady 1993). However, fuel, oxidizers, and temperature are all important parameters. If fuel, oxidizers, or high temperatures (initiators) are not present in sufficient amounts, then a runaway or propagating reaction cannot occur. To bound the safety concern, methods are needed to definitively measure and quantitate ferrocyanide concentration present within the actual waste. The target analyte concentration for cyanide in waste is approximately 0.1 to 15 wt % (as cyanide) in the original undiluted sample. After dissolution of the original sample and appropriate dilutions, the concentration range of interest in the analytical solutions can vary between 0.001 to 0.1 wt % (as cyanide). In FY 1992, 1993, and 1994, two solution (wet) methods were developed based on Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and ion chromatography (IC); these methods were chosen for further development activities. The results of these activities are described

  4. Sensitivity analysis of the reactor safety study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, W.J.; Rasmussen, N.C.; Hinkle, W.D.

    1979-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Study (RSS) or Wash 1400 developed a methodology estimating the public risk from light water nuclear reactors. In order to give further insights into this study, a sensitivity analysis has been performed to determine the significant contributors to risk for both the PWR and BWR. The sensitivity to variation of the point values of the failure probabilities reported in the RSS was determined for the safety systems identified therein, as well as for many of the generic classes from which individual failures contributed to system failures. Increasing as well as decreasing point values were considered. An analysis of the sensitivity to increasing uncertainty in system failure probabilities was also performed. The sensitivity parameters chosen were release category probabilities, core melt probability, and the risk parameters of early fatalities, latent cancers and total property damage. The latter three are adequate for describing all public risks identified in the RSS. The results indicate reductions of public risk by less than a factor of two for factor reductions in system or generic failure probabilities as high as one hundred. There also appears to be more benefit in monitoring the most sensitive systems to verify adherence to RSS failure rates than to backfitting present reactors. The sensitivity analysis results do indicate, however, possible benefits in reducing human error rates

  5. Seismic safety margins research program. Phase I final report - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.D.; Dong, R.G.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Bohn, M.P.; Chuang, T.Y.; Cummings, G.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Mensing, R.W.; Wells, J.E.

    1981-04-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a multiyear, multiphase program whose overall objective is to develop improved methods for seismic safety assessments of nuclear power plants, using a probabilistic computational procedure. The program is being carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Phase I of the SSMRP was successfully completed in January 1981: A probabilistic computational procedure for the seismic risk assessment of nuclear power plants has been developed and demonstrated. The methodology is implemented by three computer programs: HAZARD, which assesses the seismic hazard at a given site, SMACS, which computes in-structure and subsystem seismic responses, and SEISIM, which calculates system failure probabilities and radioactive release probabilities, given (1) the response results of SMACS, (2) a set of event trees, (3) a family of fault trees, (4) a set of structural and component fragility descriptions, and (5) a curve describing the local seismic hazard. The practicality of this methodology was demonstrated by computing preliminary release probabilities for Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant north of Chicago, Illinois. Studies have begun aimed at quantifying the sources of uncertainty in these computations. Numerous side studies were undertaken to examine modeling alternatives, sources of error, and available analysis techniques. Extensive sets of data were amassed and evaluated as part of projects to establish seismic input parameters and to produce the fragility curves. (author)

  6. Final disposal in deep boreholes using multiple geological barriers. Digging deeper for safety. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracke, Guido; Hurst, Stephanie; Merkel, Broder; Mueller, Birgit; Schilling, Frank

    2016-03-15

    The proceedings of the workshop on final disposal in deep boreholes using multiple geological barriers - digging deeper for safety include contributions on the following topics: international status and safety requirements; geological and physical barriers; deep drilling - shaft building; technical barriers and emplacement technology for high P/T conditions; recovery (waste retrieval); geochemistry and monitoring.

  7. Safety against releases in severe accidents. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, I.; Berg, Oe.; Nonboel, E.

    1997-12-01

    The work scope of the RAK-2 project has involved research on quantification of the effects of selected severe accident phenomena for Nordic nuclear power plants, development and testing of a computerised accident management support system and data collection and description of various mobile reactors and of different reactor types existing in the UK. The investigations of severe accident phenomena focused mainly on in-vessel melt progression, covering a numerical assessment of coolability of a degraded BWR core, the possibility and consequences of a BWR reactor to become critical during reflooding and the core melt behavior in the reactor vessel lower plenum. Simulant experiments were carried out to investigate lower head hole ablation induced by debris discharge. In addition to the in-vessel phenomena, a limited study on containment response to high pressure melt ejection in a BWR and a comparative study on fission product source term behaviour in a Swedish PWR were performed. An existing computerised accident management support system (CAMS) was further developed in the area of tracking and predictive simulation, signal validation, state identification and user interface. The first version of a probabilistic safety analysis module was developed and implemented in the system. CAMS was tested in practice with Barsebaeck data in a safety exercise with the Swedish nuclear authority. The descriptions of the key features of British reactor types, AGR, Magnox, FBR and PWR were published as data reports. Separate reports were issued also on accidents in nuclear ships and on description of key features of satellite reactors. The collected data were implemented in a common Nordic database. (au)

  8. Safety against releases in severe accidents. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, I.; Berg, Oe.; Nonboel, E. [eds.

    1997-12-01

    The work scope of the RAK-2 project has involved research on quantification of the effects of selected severe accident phenomena for Nordic nuclear power plants, development and testing of a computerised accident management support system and data collection and description of various mobile reactors and of different reactor types existing in the UK. The investigations of severe accident phenomena focused mainly on in-vessel melt progression, covering a numerical assessment of coolability of a degraded BWR core, the possibility and consequences of a BWR reactor to become critical during reflooding and the core melt behavior in the reactor vessel lower plenum. Simulant experiments were carried out to investigate lower head hole ablation induced by debris discharge. In addition to the in-vessel phenomena, a limited study on containment response to high pressure melt ejection in a BWR and a comparative study on fission product source term behaviour in a Swedish PWR were performed. An existing computerised accident management support system (CAMS) was further developed in the area of tracking and predictive simulation, signal validation, state identification and user interface. The first version of a probabilistic safety analysis module was developed and implemented in the system. CAMS was tested in practice with Barsebaeck data in a safety exercise with the Swedish nuclear authority. The descriptions of the key features of British reactor types, AGR, Magnox, FBR and PWR were published as data reports. Separate reports were issued also on accidents in nuclear ships and on description of key features of satellite reactors. The collected data were implemented in a common Nordic database. (au) 39 refs.

  9. Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor evaluation study: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This report presents the results of an independent study by United Engineers and Constructors (UNITED) of the SECURE-P Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) Reactor Concept which is presently under development by the Swedish light water reactor vendor ASEA-ATOM of Vasteras, Sweden. This study was performed to investigate whether there is any realistic basis for believing that the PIUS reactor could be a viable competitor in the US energy market in the future. Assessments were limited to the technical, economic and licensing aspects of PIUS. Socio-political issues, while certainly important in answering this question, are so broad and elusive that it was considered that addressing them with the limited perspective of one small group from one company would be of questionable value and likely be misleading. Socio-political issues aside, the key issue is economics. For this reason, the specific objectives of this study were to determine if the estimated PIUS plant cost will be competitive in the US market and to identify and evaluate the technical and licensing risks that might make PIUS uneconomical or otherwise unacceptable

  10. Final safety analysis report for the atmospheric protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    An Atmospheric Protection System (APS) has been constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant to minimize the release of radioactive particulate material to the atmosphere from nonroutine occurrences. Existing off-gas cleanup systems remove radioactive particulates to well below allowable limits for controlled areas before release to the plant stack. Previously all ventilation air from process cells was discharged to the stack without treatment. The APS provides continuous filtration of all ventilation air from process cells and backup filtration of all process off gases before they are released to the atmosphere. A safety analysis of the potential hazards associated with the APS has been completed. The review indicates that the system is capable of withstanding design basis natural phenomena including a flood, tornado, and earthquake without releasing unacceptable amounts of radioactive particulate from the filters to the environment. An in-cell explosion, fire, mechanical damage, and other postulated accident situations were investigated. From these, the design basis accident postulated for the facility is complete release of the maximum amount of radioactive particulate collected on the 104 ventilation air HEPA filters to the atmosphere via the 250-foot high stack. Even though the release of all the radioactive particulate contained on the filters is hardly credible, it would not present an unacceptable hazard to personnel on or offsite

  11. Fire safety of LPG in marine transportation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinsen, W.E.; Johnson, D.W.; Welker, J.R.

    1980-06-01

    This report contains an analytical examination of cargo spill and fire hazard potential associated with the marine handling of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as cargo. Principal emphasis was on cargo transfer operations for ships unloading at receiving terminals, and barges loading or unloading at a terminal. Major safety systems, including emergency shutdown systems, hazard detection systems, and fire extinguishment and control systems were included in the analysis. Spill probabilities were obtained from fault tree analyses utilizing composite LPG tank ship and barge designs. Failure rates for hardware in the analyses were generally taken from historical data on similar generic classes of hardware, there being very little historical data on the specific items involved. Potential consequences of cargo spills of various sizes are discussed and compared to actual LPG vapor cloud incidents. The usefulness of hazard mitigation systems (particularly dry chemical fire extinguishers and water spray systems) in controlling the hazards posed by LPG spills and spill fires is also discussed. The analysis estimates the probability of fatality for a terminal operator is about 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -5/ per cargo transfer operation. The probability of fatality for the general public is substantially less.

  12. SAFETY OF PASSIVE HOUSES SUBJECTED TO EARTHQUAKE, FINAL REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojko Kilar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available he topic researched within the applied project. "Safety of passive houses subjected to earthquake" stemmed from two otherwise quite unrelated fields, i.e. seismic resistance and energy efficiency that in European countries do not frequently appear together. Just in Slovenia these two fields join each other, so identifying the problem and establishment of research right in Slovenia represents uniqueness and specificity. The majority of Slovenia is situated in area of moderate seismic risk. In order to ensure adequate mechanical resistance and stability of structures constructed in such area, the consideration of seismic effects is required by law. In Slovenia the number of passive houses and energy efficient buildings increases rapidly. However, for the time being the structural solutions that have been developed and broadly applied mainly in the areas with low seismicity (where the structural control to vertical static loads is sufficient are used. In earthquake-prone areas also adequate resistance to dynamic seismic effects have to be assured.

  13. Final Safety Assessment of Coal Tar as Used in Cosmetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Coal Tar is a semisolid by-product obtained in the destructive distillation of bituminous coal, which functions in cosmetic products as a cosmetic biocide and denaturant-antidandruff agent is also listed as a function, but this is considered an over-the-counter (OTC) drug use. In 2002, Coal Tar was reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be used in four formulations, all of which appear to be OTC drug products. Coal Tar is monographed by the FDA as Category I (safe and effective) OTC drug ingredient for use in the treatment of dandruff, seborrhoea, and psoriasis. Coal Tar is absorbed through the skin of animals and humans and is systemically distributed. Although the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel believes that Coal Tar use as an antidandruff ingredient in OTC drug preparations is adequately addressed by the FDA regulations, the Panel also believes that the appropriate concentration of use of Coal Tar in cosmetic formulations should be that level that does not have a biological effect in the user. Additional data needed to make a safety assessment include product types in which Coal Tar is used (other than as an OTC drug ingredient), use concentrations, and the maximum concentration that does not induce a biological effect in users.

  14. Safety criteria for spent-fuel transport. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldmann, K.; Gekler, W.C.

    1986-10-01

    The focus of this study is on the question, ''Do current regulations provide reasonable assurance of safety for a transport scenario of spent fuel, as presently anticipated by the Department of Energy, under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act.'' This question has been addressed by developing a methodology for identifying the expected frequency of Accidents Which Exceed Regulatory Conditions in Severity (AWERCS) for spent fuel transport casks and then assessing the health effects resulting from that frequency. By applying the methodology to an illustrative case of road transports, it was found that the accidental release of radioactive material from impact AWERCS would make negligible contributions to health effects associated with spent fuel transports by road. It is also concluded that the current regulatory drop test requirements in 10 CFR 71.51 which form the basis for cask design and were used to establish AWERCS screening criteria for this study are adequate, and that no basis was found to conclude that cask performance under expected road accident conditions represents an undue risk to the public

  15. 75 FR 61619 - Safety Zone; IJSBA World Finals, Lower Colorado River, Lake Havasu, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... Sports Boating Association (IJSBA) World Finals. This temporary safety zone is necessary to provide for... International Jet Sports Boating Association (IJSBA) is sponsoring the IJSBA World Finals. The event will... 13211. Technical Standards The National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act (NTTAA) (15 U.S.C. 272...

  16. Upgrade Uranium Recovery Project No. 34110: final safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    The accident analysis of the upgrade uranium recovery system indicated three potential hazards: (1) criticality, (2) toxic fumes from nitric acid solutions, and (3) release of toxic uranyl nitrate solutions. Any of these are capable of causing the death of one or more employees; therefore, they form the basis for the residual risks identified below. The analysis found no hazardous energies or substances capable of causing irreversible injury to, or the death of, any members of the public. The following residual risks will be controlled administratively by procedural constraints: An operator or maintenance error will cause 235 U to be transferred into an unsafe container and cause a criticality. An operator or maintenance error will cause containers of 235 U bearing material to be improperly spaced and cause a criticality. Extensive corrosion will cause a hole to form in a calciner tube, the corrosion will go undetected, and a criticality will result, and a loss of system and/or building solution containment will occur concurrent with a drain being open resulting in a criticality and/or release of toxic material. Additional residual risks that have a small probability are that an earthquake or tornado will affect the building, alter the system geometry, and initiate a criticality; that the compressed-gas (nitrogen) cylinder valve will be sheared off, become airborne, and alter the system geometry; and that loss of system and/or building solution containment may occur concurrently with fire sprinkler system actuation causing a criticality and/or release of toxic material. The following residual risks will be addressed in the Safety Study of the existing X-705 Building: that a spill of raffinate highly contaminated with 99 Tc will occur due to operator error or incorrect lab analysis and that a gaseous or liquid effluent release of small amounts of transuranic elements will occur

  17. Safety Culture Enhancement Project. Final Report. A Field Study on Approaches to Enhancement of Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, Andrew; Hayward, Brent

    2006-08-01

    This report documents a study with the objective of enhancing safety culture in the Swedish nuclear power industry. A primary objective of this study was to ensure that the latest thinking on human factors principles was being recognised and applied by nuclear power operators as a means of ensuring optimal safety performance. The initial phase of the project was conducted as a pilot study, involving the senior management group at one Swedish nuclear power-producing site. The pilot study enabled the project methodology to be validated after which it was repeated at other Swedish nuclear power industry sites, providing a broad-ranging analysis of opportunities across the industry to enhance safety culture. The introduction to this report contains an overview of safety culture, explains the background to the project and sets out the project rationale and objectives. The methodology used for understanding and analysing the important safety culture issues at each nuclear power site is then described. This section begins with a summary of the processes used in the information gathering and data analysis stage. The six components of the Management Workshops conducted at each site are then described. These workshops used a series of presentations, interactive events and group exercises to: (a) provide feedback to site managers on the safety culture and safety leadership issues identified at their site, and (b) stimulate further safety thinking and provide 'take-away' information and leadership strategies that could be applied to promote safety culture improvements. Section 3, project Findings, contains the main observations and output from the project. These include: - a brief overview of aspects of the local industry operating context that impinge on safety culture; - a summary of strengths or positive attributes observed within the safety culture of the Swedish nuclear industry; - a set of identified opportunities for further improvement; - the aggregated results of the

  18. Safety Culture Enhancement Project. Final Report. A Field Study on Approaches to Enhancement of Safety Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Andrew; Hayward, Brent (Dedale Asia Pacific, Albert Park VIC 3206 (Australia))

    2006-08-15

    This report documents a study with the objective of enhancing safety culture in the Swedish nuclear power industry. A primary objective of this study was to ensure that the latest thinking on human factors principles was being recognised and applied by nuclear power operators as a means of ensuring optimal safety performance. The initial phase of the project was conducted as a pilot study, involving the senior management group at one Swedish nuclear power-producing site. The pilot study enabled the project methodology to be validated after which it was repeated at other Swedish nuclear power industry sites, providing a broad-ranging analysis of opportunities across the industry to enhance safety culture. The introduction to this report contains an overview of safety culture, explains the background to the project and sets out the project rationale and objectives. The methodology used for understanding and analysing the important safety culture issues at each nuclear power site is then described. This section begins with a summary of the processes used in the information gathering and data analysis stage. The six components of the Management Workshops conducted at each site are then described. These workshops used a series of presentations, interactive events and group exercises to: (a) provide feedback to site managers on the safety culture and safety leadership issues identified at their site, and (b) stimulate further safety thinking and provide 'take-away' information and leadership strategies that could be applied to promote safety culture improvements. Section 3, project Findings, contains the main observations and output from the project. These include: - a brief overview of aspects of the local industry operating context that impinge on safety culture; - a summary of strengths or positive attributes observed within the safety culture of the Swedish nuclear industry; - a set of identified opportunities for further improvement; - the aggregated

  19. Task Group on Safety Margins Action Plan (SMAP). Safety Margins Action Plan - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrehor, Miroslav; Gavrilas, Mirela; Belac, Josef; Sairanen, Risto; Bruna, Giovanni; Reocreux, Michel; Touboul, Francoise; Krzykacz-Hausmann, B.; Park, Jong Seuk; Prosek, Andrej; Hortal, Javier; Sandervaag, Odbjoern; Zimmerman, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The international nuclear community has expressed concern that some changes in existing plants could challenge safety margins while fulfilling all the regulatory requirements. In 1998, NEA published a report by the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities on Future Nuclear Regulatory Challenges. The report recognized 'Safety margins during more exacting operating modes' as a technical issue with potential regulatory impact. Examples of plant changes that can cause such exacting operating modes include power up-rates, life extension or increased fuel burnup. In addition, the community recognized that the cumulative effects of simultaneous changes in a plant could be larger than the accumulation of the individual effects of each change. In response to these concerns, CSNI constituted the safety margins action plan (SMAP) task group with the following objectives: 'To agree on a framework for integrated assessments of the changes to the overall safety of the plant as a result of simultaneous changes in plant operation / condition; To develop a CSNI document which can be used by member countries to assess the effect of plant change on the overall safety of the plant; To share information and experience.' The two approaches to safety analysis, deterministic and probabilistic, use different methods and have been developed mostly independently of each other. This makes it difficult to assure consistency between them. As the trend to use information on risk (where the term risk means results of the PSA/PRA analysis) to support regulatory decisions is growing in many countries, it is necessary to develop a method of evaluating safety margin sufficiency that is applicable to both approaches and, whenever possible, integrated in a consistent way. Chapter 2 elaborates on the traditional view of safety margins and the means by which they are currently treated in deterministic analyses. This chapter also discusses the technical basis for safety limits as they are used today

  20. Final report of the safety assessment of Urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    alone or with other agents in treatment of diseased skin. Overall, there are few reports of sensitization among the many clinical studies that report use of Urea in treatment of diseased skin. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel determined the data provided in this report to be sufficient to assess the safety of Urea. The Panel did note that Urea can cause uncoiling of DNA, a property used in many DNA studies, but concluded that this in vitro activity is not linked to any in vivo genotoxic activity. Although noting that formulators should be aware that Urea can increase the percutaneous absorption of other chemicals, the CIR Expert Panel concluded that Urea is safe as used in cosmetic products.

  1. Final safety and hazards analysis for the Battelle LOCA simulation tests in the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, D.J.; Martin, I.C.; McAuley, S.J.

    1981-04-01

    This is the final safety and hazards report for the proposed Battelle LOCA simulation tests in NRU. A brief description of equipment test design and operating procedure precedes a safety analysis and hazards review of the project. The hazards review addresses potential equipment failures as well as potential for a metal/water reaction and evaluates the consequences. The operation of the tests as proposed does not present an unacceptable risk to the NRU Reactor, CRNL personnel or members of the public. (author)

  2. A feasibility study for Arizona's roadway safety management process using the Highway Safety Manual and SafetyAnalyst : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    To enable implementation of the American Association of State Highway Transportation (AASHTO) Highway Safety Manual using : SaftetyAnalyst (an AASHTOWare software product), the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) studied the data assessment :...

  3. Project Guarantee 1985. Final repository for high-level radioactive wastes: The system of safety barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Final disposal of radioactive waste involves preventing the waste from returning from the repository location into the biosphere by means of successively arranged containment measures known as safety barriers. In the present volume NGB 85-04 of the series of reports for Project 'Guarantee' 1985, the safety barrier system for the type C repository for high-level waste is described. The barrier parameters which are relevant for safety analysis are quantified and associated error limits and data scatter are given. The aim of the report is to give a summary documentation of the safety analysis input data and their scientific background. For secure containment of radioactive waste safety barriers are used which effectively limit the release of radioactive material from the repository (release barriers) and effectively retard the entry of the original radioactive material into the biosphere (time barriers). Safety barriers take the form of both technically constructed containment measures and the siting of the repository in suitable geological formations. The technical safety barrier system in the case of high-level waste comprises: the waste solidification matrix (borosilicate glass), massive steel canisters, encasement of the waste canisters, encasement of the waste canisters in highly compacted bentonite, sealing of vacant storage space and access routes on repository closure. The natural geological safety barriers - the host rock and overlying formations provide sufficiently long deep groundwater flow times from the repository location to the earth's surface and for additional lengthening of radionuclide migration times by means of various chemical and physical retardation mechanisms. The stability of the geological formations is so great that hydrogeological system is protected for a sufficient length of time from deterioration caused, in particular, by erosion. Observations in the final section of the report indicate that input data for the type C repository safety

  4. Chronic beryllium disease prevention program; worker safety and health program. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-09

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is today publishing a final rule to implement the statutory mandate of section 3173 of the Bob Stump National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2003 to establish worker safety and health regulations to govern contractor activities at DOE sites. This program codifies and enhances the worker protection program in operation when the NDAA was enacted.

  5. Radiation protection and safety for final disposal of radioactive wastes stored in Abadia de Goias, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This standard aims to satisfy the radiation protection and safety conditions required by Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) for final disposal of radioactive wastes stored in Abadia de Goias. These wastes are products of the accident happened in 1987 caused by the Cs-137 source violation. (M.V.M.)

  6. ITER final design report, cost review and safety analysis (FDR) and relevant documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains the fourth major milestone report and documents associated with its acceptance, review and approval. This ITER Final Design Report, Cost Review and Safety Analysis was presented to the ITER Council at its 13th meeting in February 1998 and was approved at its extraordinary meeting on 25 June 1998. The contents include an outline of the ITER objectives, the ITER parameters and design overview as well as operating scenarios and plasma performance. Furthermore, design features, safety and environmental characteristics and schedule and cost estimates are given

  7. Final Hazard Classification and Auditable Safety Analysis for the N Basin Segment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloster, G.L.

    1998-08-01

    The purposes of this report are to serve as the auditable safety analysis (ASA) for the N Basin Segment, during surveillance and maintenance preceding decontamination and decommissioning; to determine and document the final hazard classification (FHC) for the N Basin Segment. The result of the ASA evaluation are: based on hazard analyses and the evaluation of accidents, no activity could credibly result in an unacceptable exposure to an individual; controls are identified that serve to protect worker health and safety. The results of the FHC evaluation are: potential exposure is much below 10 rem (0.46 rem), and the FHC for the N Basin Segment is Radiological

  8. Denying a patient's final will: public safety vs. medical confidentiality and patient autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Jan; Vent, Julia; Greinwald, Ralf; Rothschild, Markus A; Ostgathe, Christoph; Kessel, Rene; Voltz, Raymond

    2011-12-01

    Especially when caring for patients approaching the end of life, physicians and nursing staff feel committed to fulfilling as many patient desires as possible. However, sometimes a patient's "final will" may threaten public safety. This can lead to severe conflicts, outweighing the physician's obligation and dedication to care for the patient and to respect his autonomy. Yet, public safety can be threatened if confidentiality is not broken. This article provides a concise summary of the medicolegal and ethical fundamentals concerning this difficult situation. If the patient's and others' health and safety are at risk, physicians may (and in some countries must) break medical confidentiality and disclose confidential patient information to the police and other authorities. Physicians should be able to professionally deal with such a conflict in all patients, not only in patients with advanced illness. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Final hazard classification and auditable safety analysis for the 105-C Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodovsky, T.J.; Larson, A.R.; Dexheimer, D.

    1996-12-01

    This document summarizes the inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials present in the 105-C Reactor Facility and the operations associated with the Interim Safe Storage Project which includes decontamination and demolition and interim safe storage of the remaining facility. This document also establishes a final hazard classification and verifies that appropriate and adequate safety functions and controls are in place to reduce or mitigate the risk associated with those operations

  10. Project Guarantee 1985. Final repository for low- and intermediate level radioactive wastes: Safety report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Storage of radioactive waste must delay the return of radionuclides to the biosphere for a long period of time and must maintain the release rates at a sufficiently low level for all time. This is achieved with the aid of a series of safety barriers which consist, on the one hand, of technical barriers in the repository and, on the other hand , of natural geological barriers as they occur at the repository location. In order to assess the efficiency of the barriers, the working methods of the technical barriers and the host rock must be understood. This understanding is transferred into quantitative models in order to calculate the safety of the repository. The individual barriers and the methods used to modelling their functions were described in volume NGB 85-07 of the Project Guarantee 1985 report series and the data necessary for modelling were given. The models and data are used in the safety analysis, the results of which are contained in the present report. Safety considerations show that models are available in Switzerland which allow, in principle, an assessment of the long-term behaviour of a repository for low- and intermediate-level waste. The evaluation of earlier studies and experimental work, suitable laboratory measurements and results from field research enable compilation of a representative data-set so that the requirements for quantitative statements on safety of final disposal are met from this side also. The safety calculations show that the radiation doses calculated for a base case scenario with realistic/conservative parameter values are negligibly low. Also, radiation doses which are clearly under the protection standard of 10 mrem per year result for conservative values and the cumulation of several conservative assumptions. Even assuming exposure of the repository by erosion, a radiotoxicity of the soil formed results which is under natural values

  11. Probabilistic Safety Goals for Nuclear Power Plants; Phases 2-4 / Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, Lisa; Knochenhauer, Michael; Holmberg, Jan-Erik; Rossi, Jukka

    2011-05-01

    identified, such as the problem of consistency in judgement, comparability of safety goals used in different industries, the relationship between criteria on different levels, and relations between criteria for level 2 and 3 PSA. In parallel, additional context information has been provided. This was achieved by extending the international overview by contributing to and benefiting from a survey on PSA safety criteria which was initiated in 2006 within the OECD/NEA Working Group Risk. Finally, a separate report has been issued providing general guidance concerning the formulation, application and interpretation of probabilistic criteria. The results from the project can be used as a platform for discussions at the utilities on how to define and use quantitative safety goals. The results can also be used by safety authorities as a reference for risk-informed regulation. The outcome can have an impact on the requirements on PSA, e.g., regarding quality, scope, level of detail, and documentation. Finally, the results can be expected to support on-going activities concerning risk-informed applications

  12. Nuclear emergency preparedness. Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research Project BOK-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, B.

    2002-01-01

    Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-1. The BOK-1 project, “Nuclear Emergency Preparedness”, was carried out in 1998-2001 with participants from the Nordic and Baltic Sea regions. The project consists of six sub-projects:Laboratory measurements and quality assurance (BOK-1.......1); Mobile measurements and measurement strategies (BOK-1.2); Field measurements and data assimilation (BOK-1.3); Countermeasures in agriculture and forestry (BOK-1.4); Emergency monitoring in theNordic and Baltic Sea countries (BOK-1.5); and Nuclear exercises (BOK-1.6). For each sub-project, the project...

  13. Technical basis for the ITER final design report, cost review and safety analysis (FDR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The ITER final design report, cost review and safety analysis (FDR) is the 4th major milestone, representing the progress made in the ITER Engineering Design Activities. With the approval of the Detailed Design Report (DDR), the design work was concentrated on the requirements of operation, with only relatively minor changes to design concepts of major components. The FDR is the culmination of almost 6 years collaborative design and supporting technical work by the ITER Joint Central Team and Home Teams under the terms of the ITER EDA Agreement. Refs, figs, tabs

  14. Technical basis for the ITER final design report, cost review and safety analysis (FDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The ITER final design report, cost review and safety analysis (FDR) is the 4th major milestone, representing the progress made in the ITER Engineering Design Activities. With the approval of the Detailed Design Report (DDR), the design work was concentrated on the requirements of operation, with only relatively minor changes to design concepts of major components. The FDR is the culmination of almost 6 years collaborative design and supporting technical work by the ITER Joint Central Team and Home Teams under the terms of the ITER EDA Agreement

  15. Auditable safety analysis and final hazard classification for Buildings 1310-N and 1314-N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloster, G.L.

    1997-05-01

    This document is a graded auditable safety analysis (ASA) of the deactivation activities planned for the 100-N facility segment comprised of the Building 1310-N pump silo (part of the Liquid Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility) and 1314-N Building (Liquid Waste Disposal Building).The ASA describes the hazards within the facility and evaluates the adequacy of the measures taken to reduce, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. This document also serves as the Final Hazard Classification (FHC) for the 1310-N pump silo and 1314-N Building segment. The FHC is radiological based on the Preliminary Hazard Classification and the total inventory of radioactive and hazardous materials in the segment

  16. Waste compatibility safety issues and final results for tank 241-T-110 push mode samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-T-110. Push mode core segments were removed from risers 2 and 6 between January 29, 1997, and February 7, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-T-110 Push Mode Core Sampling and analysis Plan (TSAP) and Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT) or differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses exceeded the notification limits stated in DQO

  17. Full-Length High-Temperature Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 5: Final safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanning, D.D.; Lombardo, N.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the final safety analysis for the preparation, conduct, and post-test discharge operation for the Full-Length High Temperature Experiment-5 (FLHT-5) to be conducted in the L-24 position of the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), Ontario, Canada. The test is sponsored by an international group organized by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The test is designed and conducted by staff from Pacific Northwest Laboratory with CRNL staff support. The test will study the consequences of loss-of-coolant and the progression of severe fuel damage

  18. Investigational new drug safety reporting requirements for human drug and biological products and safety reporting requirements for bioavailability and bioequivalence studies in humans. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations governing safety reporting requirements for human drug and biological products subject to an investigational new drug application (IND). The final rule codifies the agency's expectations for timely review, evaluation, and submission of relevant and useful safety information and implements internationally harmonized definitions and reporting standards. The revisions will improve the utility of IND safety reports, reduce the number of reports that do not contribute in a meaningful way to the developing safety profile of the drug, expedite FDA's review of critical safety information, better protect human subjects enrolled in clinical trials, subject bioavailability and bioequivalence studies to safety reporting requirements, promote a consistent approach to safety reporting internationally, and enable the agency to better protect and promote public health.

  19. Methodology and applicability of a safety and demonstration concept for a HAW final repository on clays. Safety concept and verification strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebel, Andre; Meleshyn, Artur

    2014-08-01

    The report describes the site independent frame for a safety concept and verification strategy for a final repository for heat generating wastes in clay rock. In the safety concept planning specifications and technical measures are summarized that are supposed to allow a safe inclusion of radionuclides in the host rock. The verification strategy defines the systematic procedures for the development of fundamentals and scenarios as basis for the demonstration of the safety case and to allow the prognosis of appropriateness. The report includes the boundary conditions, the safety concept for the post-closure phase and the verification strategy for the post-closure phase.

  20. 78 FR 16208 - Safety Zone; V. I. Carnival Finale; St. Thomas Harbor; St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; V. I. Carnival Finale; St. Thomas Harbor; St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands AGENCY... establish a safety zone on the waters of St. Thomas Harbor in St. Thomas, U. S. Virgin Islands during the V... between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except federal holidays. The telephone number is 202-366...

  1. 78 FR 16211 - Safety Zone, Corp. Event Finale UHC, St. Thomas Harbor; St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Corp. Event Finale UHC, St. Thomas Harbor; St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands... establish a temporary safety zone on the waters of St. Thomas Harbor in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands... through Friday, except federal holidays. The telephone number is 202-366-9329. See the ``Public...

  2. SKB 91. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Importance of the bedrock for safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    The safety of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel has been assessed in this report. The spent fuel is assumed to be encapsulated in a copper canister and deposited at a depth of 600 m in the bedrock. The primary purpose has been to shed light on the importance of the geological features of the site for the safety of a final repository. The assessment shows that the encapsulated fuel will, in all likelihood, be kept isolated from the groundwater for millions of years. This is considerably longer than the more than 100 000 years that are required in order for the toxicity of the waste to have declined to a level equivalent to that of rich uranium ores. However, in order to be able to study the role of the rock as a barrier to the dispersal of radioactive materials, calculations have been carried out under the assumption that waste canisters leak. The results show that the safety of a carefully designed repository is only affected to a small extent by the ability of the rock to retain the escaping radionuclides. The primary role of the rock is to provide stable mechanical and chemical conditions in the repository over a long period of time so that the function of the engineered barriers is not jeopardized. (187 refs.) (au)

  3. Transuranic-contaminated solid waste Treatment Development Facility. Final safety analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, C.L. (comp.)

    1979-07-01

    The Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Transuranic-Contaminated Solid-Waste Treatment Facility has been prepared in compliance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual Chapter 0531, Safety of Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities. The Treatment Development Facility (TDF) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is a research and development facility dedicated to the study of radioactive-waste-management processes. This analysis addresses site assessment, facility design and construction, and the design and operating characteristics of the first study process, controlled air incineration and aqueous scrub off-gas treatment with respect to both normal and accident conditions. The credible accidents having potentially serious consequences relative to the operation of the facility and the first process have been analyzed and the consequences of each postulated credible accident are presented. Descriptions of the control systems, engineered safeguards, and administrative and operational features designed to prevent or mitigate the consequences of such accidents are presented. The essential features of the operating and emergency procedures, environmental protection and monitoring programs, as well as the health and safety, quality assurance, and employee training programs are described.

  4. Transuranic-contaminated solid waste Treatment Development Facility. Final safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, C.L.

    1979-07-01

    The Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Transuranic-Contaminated Solid-Waste Treatment Facility has been prepared in compliance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual Chapter 0531, Safety of Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities. The Treatment Development Facility (TDF) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is a research and development facility dedicated to the study of radioactive-waste-management processes. This analysis addresses site assessment, facility design and construction, and the design and operating characteristics of the first study process, controlled air incineration and aqueous scrub off-gas treatment with respect to both normal and accident conditions. The credible accidents having potentially serious consequences relative to the operation of the facility and the first process have been analyzed and the consequences of each postulated credible accident are presented. Descriptions of the control systems, engineered safeguards, and administrative and operational features designed to prevent or mitigate the consequences of such accidents are presented. The essential features of the operating and emergency procedures, environmental protection and monitoring programs, as well as the health and safety, quality assurance, and employee training programs are described

  5. Probabilistic safety goals for nuclear power plants; Phases 2-4. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtsson, L.; Knochenhauer, M. (Scandpower AB (Sweden)); Holmberg, J.-E.; Rossi, J. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland))

    2011-05-15

    safety authorities as a reference for risk-informed regulation. The outcome can have an impact on the requirements on PSA, e.g., regarding quality, scope, level of detail, and documentation. Finally, the results can be expected to support on-going activities concerning risk-informed applications. The project provides a comprehensive state-of-the-art description and has contributed to clarifying the history of safety goals both nationally and internationally, the concepts involved in defining and applying probabilistic safety criteria, and the international status and trends in general. It has identified critical issues and the main problem areas. Finally, the project provides useful recommendations and guidance on the definition and application of criteria. Furthermore, the project makes it possible to define criteria stringently, improving the possibilities of argumentation on safety. Generally, this supports efficient use of criteria, yielding more useful PSA results. In this connection, the introduction of ALARP type criteria is judged to provide a very useful way of balancing stringency with the necessary flexibility. There is a possibility of making more active use of lower level criteria. This makes the connection to defence in depth more evident, and opens the perspective of increased control of defence in depth by use of probabilistic methods, including the use as design tools. There is an opportunity for comparison of risk of different NPPs, as well as of comparison of NPP risk with other risks in society. This is judged to provide an opportunity for improved communication on risks with non-PSA experts and with the public in general. However, a necessary condition for meaningful comparisons is to agree on the scope of PSA and methods applied. Obviously, there will also be challenges in the future definition and application of probabilistic safety criteria. These include very general aspects, such as the interpretation of the probability, quality aspects of PSA

  6. Probabilistic safety goals for nuclear power plants; Phases 2-4. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, L.; Knochenhauer, M.; Holmberg, J.-E.; Rossi, J.

    2011-05-01

    safety authorities as a reference for risk-informed regulation. The outcome can have an impact on the requirements on PSA, e.g., regarding quality, scope, level of detail, and documentation. Finally, the results can be expected to support on-going activities concerning risk-informed applications. The project provides a comprehensive state-of-the-art description and has contributed to clarifying the history of safety goals both nationally and internationally, the concepts involved in defining and applying probabilistic safety criteria, and the international status and trends in general. It has identified critical issues and the main problem areas. Finally, the project provides useful recommendations and guidance on the definition and application of criteria. Furthermore, the project makes it possible to define criteria stringently, improving the possibilities of argumentation on safety. Generally, this supports efficient use of criteria, yielding more useful PSA results. In this connection, the introduction of ALARP type criteria is judged to provide a very useful way of balancing stringency with the necessary flexibility. There is a possibility of making more active use of lower level criteria. This makes the connection to defence in depth more evident, and opens the perspective of increased control of defence in depth by use of probabilistic methods, including the use as design tools. There is an opportunity for comparison of risk of different NPPs, as well as of comparison of NPP risk with other risks in society. This is judged to provide an opportunity for improved communication on risks with non-PSA experts and with the public in general. However, a necessary condition for meaningful comparisons is to agree on the scope of PSA and methods applied. Obviously, there will also be challenges in the future definition and application of probabilistic safety criteria. These include very general aspects, such as the interpretation of the probability, quality aspects of PSA

  7. Patient safety competence for final-year health professional students: Perceptions of effectiveness of an interprofessional education course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jee-In; Yoon, Tai-Young; Jin, Hyeon-Jeong; Park, Yikyun; Park, Ju-Young; Lee, Beom-Joon

    2016-11-01

    As final-year medical and nursing students will soon play key roles in frontline patient care, their preparedness for safe, reliable care provision is of special importance. We assessed patient safety competencies of final-year health profession students, and the effect of a 1-day patient safety education programme on these competencies. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 233 students in three colleges of medicine, nursing, and traditional medicine in Seoul. A before-and-after study followed to evaluate the effectiveness of the curriculum. Patient safety competency was measured using the Health-Professional Education for Patients Safety Survey (H-PEPSS) and an objective patient safety knowledge test. The mean scores were 3.4 and 1.7 out of 5.0, respectively. The communication domain was rated the highest and the teamwork domain was rated the lowest. H-PEPSS scores significantly differed between the students from three colleges. The 1-day patient safety education curriculum significantly improved H-PEPSS and knowledge test scores. These results indicated that strengthening patient safety competencies, especially teamwork, of students is required in undergraduate healthcare curricula. A 1-day interprofessional patient safety education programme may be a promising strategy. The findings suggest that interprofessional patient safety education needs to be implemented as a core undergraduate course to improve students' safety competence.

  8. Organisational factors. Their definition and influence on nuclear safety. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumont, G.; Wahlstroem, B.; Sola, R.; Williams, J.; Frischknecht, A.; Wilpert, B.; Rollenhagen, C.

    2000-12-01

    The importance of organisational factors in the operational safety and efficiency of nuclear power plants (NPP) has been recognised by many organisations around the world. Despite this recognition, however, there are as yet very few methods by which organisational factors can be systematically assessed and improved. The majority of research efforts applied so far have tended to be modest and scattered. The ORFA project was created as a remedy to these problems. The objective of the project is to create a better understanding of how organisation and management factors influence nuclear safety. A key scientific objective of the project is to identify components of a theoretical framework, which would help in understanding the relationships between organisational factors and nuclear safety. Three work packages were planned. First, a review of literature listed out the identified factors and methods for assessing them. Then, a draft version of the present report was prepared to clarify the environment context and the main issues of the topics. This draft was discussed at the ORFA seminar in Madrid 21-22 October 1999. During the seminar views and comments were collected on preliminary results of the project. Finally, this information has been integrated in the present and other reports and will be used to give further guidance to the European Commission in the development of forthcoming research programmes in the field. The project has addressed nuclear safety taking a broad perspective, which reflected and took into account the views of senior NPP management and regulators. The questions discussed during the project have been: how can organisational factors be included in safety assessments, how can good and bad operational practices be identified, which methods can be used for detecting weak signals of deteriorating performance, how should incidents be analysed with respect to organisational factors to give the largest learning benefit, how can data on organisational

  9. Site safety progress review of spent fuel central interim storage facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurpinar, A.; Serva, L.; Giuliani

    1995-01-01

    Following the request of the Czech Power Board (CEZ) and within the scope of the Technical Cooperation Project CZR/9/003, a progress review of the site safety of the Spent Fuel Central Interim Storage Facility (SFCISF) was performed. The review involved the first two stages of the works comprising the regional survey and identification of candidate sites for the underground and surface storage options. Five sites have been identified as a result of the previous works. The following two stages will involved the identification of the preferred candidate sites for the two options and the final site qualification. The present review had the purpose of assessing the work already performed and making recommendations for the next two stages of works

  10. Radiological and environmental consequences. Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palsson, S.E.

    2002-11-01

    Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-2, Radiological and Environmental Consequences. The project was carried out 1998-2001 with participants from all the Nordic countries. Representatives from the Baltic States were also invited to some of the meetings and seminars. The project consisted of work on terrestrial and marine radioecology and had a broad scope in order to enable participation of research groups with various fields of interest. This report focuses on the project itself and gives a general summary of the studies undertaken. A separate technical report summarises the work done by each research group and gives references to papers published in scientific journals. The topics in BOK-2 included improving assessment of old and recent fallout, use of radionuclides as tracers in Nordic marine areas, improving assessment of internal doses and use of mass spectrometry in radioecology. (au)

  11. Nuclear emergency preparedness. Final report of the Nordic nuclear safety research project BOK-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, Bent [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2002-02-01

    Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-1. The BOK-1 project, 'Nuclear Emergency Preparedness', was carried out in 1998-2001 with participants from the Nordic and Baltic Sea regions. The project consists of six sub-projects: Laboratory measurements and quality assurance (BOK-1.1); Mobile measurements and measurement strategies (BOK-1.2); Field measurement and data assimilation (BOK-1.3); Countermeasures in agriculture and forestry (BOK-1.4); Emergency monitoring in the Nordic and Baltic Sea countries (BOK-1.5); and Nuclear exercises (BOK-1.6). For each sub-project, the project outline, objectives and organization are described and main results presented. (au)

  12. Nuclear emergency preparedness. Final report of the Nordic nuclear safety research project BOK-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, Bent

    2002-02-01

    Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-1. The BOK-1 project, 'Nuclear Emergency Preparedness', was carried out in 1998-2001 with participants from the Nordic and Baltic Sea regions. The project consists of six sub-projects: Laboratory measurements and quality assurance (BOK-1.1); Mobile measurements and measurement strategies (BOK-1.2); Field measurement and data assimilation (BOK-1.3); Countermeasures in agriculture and forestry (BOK-1.4); Emergency monitoring in the Nordic and Baltic Sea countries (BOK-1.5); and Nuclear exercises (BOK-1.6). For each sub-project, the project outline, objectives and organization are described and main results presented. (au)

  13. Final hazard classification and auditable safety analysis for the N basin segment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloster, G.; Smith, R.I.; Larson, A.R.; Duncan, G.M.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the following: To serve as the auditable safety analysis (ASA) for the N Basin Segment, including both the quiescent state and planned intrusive activities. The ASA is developed through the realistic evaluation of potential hazards that envelope the threat to personnel. The ASA also includes the specification of the programmatic, baseline, and activity- specific controls that are necessary for the protection of workers. To determine and document the final hazard classification (FHC) for the N Basin Segment. The FHC is developed through the use of bounding accident analyses that envelope the potential exposures to personnel. The FHC also includes the specification of the special controls that are necessary to remain within the envelope of those accident analyses

  14. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) [SEC 1 THRU 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ULLAH, M K

    2001-02-26

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. The DOE Richland Operations (DOE-RL) Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) is with Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH). Westinghouse Safety Management Systems (WSMS) provides management support to the PFP facility. Since 1991, the mission of the PFP has changed from plutonium material processing to preparation for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The PFP is in transition between its previous mission and the proposed D and D mission. The objective of the transition is to place the facility into a stable state for long-term storage of plutonium materials before final disposition of the facility. Accordingly, this update of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) reflects the current status of the buildings, equipment, and operations during this transition. The primary product of the PFP was plutonium metal in the form of 2.2-kg, cylindrical ingots called buttoms. Plutonium nitrate was one of several chemical compounds containing plutonium that were produced as an intermediate processing product. Plutonium recovery was performed at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) and plutonium conversion (from a nitrate form to a metal form) was performed at the Remote Mechanical C (RMC) Line as the primary processes. Plutonium oxide was also produced at the Remote Mechanical A (RMA) Line. Plutonium processed at the PFP contained both weapons-grade and fuels-grade plutonium materials. The capability existed to process both weapons-grade and fuels-grade material through the PRF and only weapons-grade material through the RMC Line although fuels-grade material was processed through the line before 1984. Amounts of these materials exist in storage throughout the facility in various residual forms left from previous years of operations.

  15. Developing a smartphone based warning system application to enhance the safety at work zones : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Collisions in the work zone have always been a contributing factor to compromising safety on urban roadways. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the State Transportation Authorities have implemented many safety countermeasu...

  16. Final safety analysis report (FSAR) for waste receiving and processing (WRAP) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidert, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    This safety analysis report provides a summary description of the WRAP Facility, focusing on significant safety-related characteristics of the location and facility design. This report demonstrates that adherence to the safety basis wi11 ensure necessary operational safety considerations have been addressed sufficiently and justifies the adequacy of the safety basis in protecting the health and safety of the public, workers, and the environment

  17. Strategies for reactor safety: Preventing loss of coolant accidents. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lydell, B.O.Y.

    1997-12-01

    This final report on the NKS/RAK-1.2 summarizes the main features of the PIFRAP PC-program and its intended implementation. Regardless of the preferred technical approach to LOCA frequency estimation, the analysis approach must include recognition of the following technical issues: a) Degradation and failure mechanisms potentially affecting piping systems within the reactor coolant pressure boundary (RCPB) and the potential consequences; b) In-service inspection practices and how they influence piping reliability; and c) The service experience with piping systems. The report consists of six sections and one appendix. A Nordic perspective on LOCA and nuclear safety is given. It includes summaries of results from research in material sciences and current regulatory philosophies regarding piping reliability. A summary of the LOCA concept is applied in Nordic PSA studies. It includes a discussion on deterministic and probabilistic views on LOCA. The R and D on piping reliability by SKI and the PIFRAP model is summarized. Next, Section 6 presents conclusion and recommendations. Finally, Appendix A contains a list of abbreviations and acronyms, together with a glossary of technical terms. (EG)

  18. Building the safety case for a hypothetical underground repository in crystalline rock. Final report. Vol. 2. Safety file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biurrun, E.; Engelmann, H.J.; Jobmann, M.; Lommerzheim, A.; Popp, W.; Frentz, R.R. v.; Wahl, A.

    1996-10-01

    The study was intended as a desk simulation of the process of preparing a licensing application for a deep repository for spent fuel and high level waste in crystalline rock. After clarifying of organizational aspects of table of contents specifying all aspects in a safety life for license application were considered. The volume II is subdivided in two parts. Part A describes the general information, waste description, site characteristics, disposal facility design, reporitory construction and operation, quality assurance, operational safety, repository closure, organization and financial aspects, and long-term safety assessment. Part B deals with the impact of retrievability. (DG)

  19. Safety requirements of the BMU to be met in final storage of heat-producing waste: An evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomauske, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    On August 12, 2008, The German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, and Nuclear Safety (BMU) published a draft of July 29, 2008 of the ''Safety Requirements to Be Met in Final Storage of Heat-producing Radioactive Waste.'' As announced by the BMU, these safety requirements are to bring up to the state of the art the safety criteria of 1983. Over a couple of years, efforts had been made to adapt the criteria to the internationally accepted standard as demanded by the Advisory Committees on Reactor Safeguards (RSK) and Radiation Protection (SSK). There is no waste management concept underlying the safety requirements. As a consequence, the draft should be withdrawn by the Federal Ministry for the Environment and replaced by a version revised from scratch and offering assured quality. (orig./GL)

  20. Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARRELL, R.D.

    2002-01-01

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft 2 and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available

  1. Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 & 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARRELL, R D

    2002-07-16

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft{sup 2} and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available.

  2. Solar passive ceiling system. Final report. [Passive solar heating system with venetian blind reflectors and latent heat storage in ceiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    The construction of a 1200 square foot building, with full basement, built to be used as a branch library in a rural area is described. The primary heating source is a passive solar system consisting of a south facing window system. The system consists of: a set of windows located in the south facing wall only, composed of double glazed units; a set of reflectors mounted in each window which reflects sunlight up to the ceiling (the reflectors are similar to venetian blinds); a storage area in the ceiling which absorbs the heat from the reflected sunlight and stores it in foil salt pouches laid in the ceiling; and an automated curtain which automatically covers and uncovers the south facing window system. The system is totally passive and uses no blowers, pumps or other active types of heat distribution equipment. The building contains a basement which is normally not heated, and the north facing wall is bermed four feet high around the north side.

  3. Project Guarantee 1985. Final repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes: The system of safety barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The safety barrier system for the type B repository for low- and intermediate-level waste is described. The barrier parameters which are relevant for safety analysis are quantified and associated error limits and data scatter are given. The aim of the report is to give a summary documentation of the safety analysis input data and their scientific background. For secure containment of radioactive waste safety barriers are used which effectively limit the release of radioactive material from the repository (release barriers) and effectively retard the entry of the original radioactive material into the biosphere (time barriers). In the case of low- and intermediate-level waste the technical safety barrier system comprises: waste solidification matrix (cement, bitumen and resin), immobilisation of the waste packages in containers using liquid cement, concrete repository containers, backfilling of remaining vacant storage space with special concrete, concrete lining of the repository caverns, sealing of access tunnels on final closure of the repository. Natural geological safety barriers - host rock and overlying formations - have the following important functions. Because of its stability, the host rock in the repository zone protects the technical safety barrier system from destruction caused by climatic effects and erosion for a sufficient length of time. It also provides for low water flow and favourable chemistry (reducing conditions)

  4. Nevada State plan; final approval determination. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor. Final State plan approval--Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-04-18

    This document amends OSHA's regulations to reflect the Assistant Secretary's decision granting final approval to the Nevada State plan. As a result of this affirmative determination under section 18(e) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Federal OSHA's standards and enforcement authority no longer apply to occupational safety and health issues covered by the Nevada plan, and authority for Federal concurrent jurisdiction is relinquished. Federal enforcement jurisdiction is retained over any private sector maritime employment, private sector employers on Indian land, and any contractors or subcontractors on any Federal establishment where the land is exclusive Federal jurisdiction. Federal jurisdiction remains in effect with respect to Federal government employers and employees. Federal OSHA will also retain authority for coverage of the United States Postal Service (USPS), including USPS employees, contract employees, and contractor-operated facilities engaged in USPS mail operations.

  5. Improving the regulation of safety at DOE nuclear facilities. Final report: Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The report strongly recommends that, with the end of the Cold War, safety and health at DOE facilities should be regulated by outside agencies rather than by any regulatory scheme, DOE must maintain a strong internal safety management system; essentially all aspects of safety at DOE's nuclear facilities should be externally regulated; and existing agencies rather than a new one should be responsible for external regulation

  6. Safety studies project on waste management. Final report. Chapters 2 and 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The report presents, in summary form, a mode of procedure for accident analysis in nuclear waste management facilities. New instruments for safety analysis have been developed and tested. The report describes exemplary safety analyses with the new instrumentation. The safety analyses were carried out in surface systems, i.e. reprocessing and waste treatment systems, and in underground nuclear waste storage road and rail transport of radioactive materials have been investigated. (EF) [de

  7. Improving the regulation of safety at DOE nuclear facilities. Final report: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The report strongly recommends that, with the end of the Cold War, safety and health at DOE facilities should be regulated by outside agencies rather than by any regulatory scheme, DOE must maintain a strong internal safety management system; essentially all aspects of safety at DOE`s nuclear facilities should be externally regulated; and existing agencies rather than a new one should be responsible for external regulation.

  8. Improving the regulation of safety at DOE nuclear facilities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The report strongly recommends that, with the end of the Cold War, safety and health at DOE facilities should be regulated by outside agencies rather than by DOE itself. The three major recommendations are: under any regulatory scheme, DOE must maintain a strong internal safety management system; essentially all aspects of safety at DOE's nuclear facilities should be externally regulated; and existing agencies rather than a new one should be responsible for external regulation

  9. Some safety considerations in laser-controlled thermonuclear reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botts, T.E.; Breton, D.; Chan, C.K.; Levy, S.I.; Sehnert, M.; Ullman, A.Z.

    1978-07-01

    A major objective of this study was to identify potential safety questions for laser controlled thermonuclear reactors. From the safety viewpoint, it does not appear that the actual laser controlled thermonuclear reactor conceptual designs present hazards very different than those of magnetically confined fusion reactors. Some aspects seem beneficial, such as small lithium inventories, and the absence of cryogenic devices, while other aspects are new, for example the explosion of pressure vessels and laser hazards themselves. Major aspects considered in this report include: (a) general safety considerations, (b) tritium inventories, (c) system behavior during loss of flow accidents, and (d) safety considerations of laser related penetrations

  10. DOE high-level waste tank safety program Final report, Task 002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The overall objective of the work on Task 002 was to provide LANL with support to the DOE High-Level Waste Tank Safety program. The objective of the work was to develop safety documentation in support of the unsafe tank mitigation activities at Hanford. The work includes the development of safety assessment and an environmental assessment. All tasks which were assigned under this Task Order were completed. Descriptions of the objectives of each task and effort performed to complete each objective are provided. The two tasks were: Task 2.1--safety assessment for instrumentation insertion; and Task 2.2--environmental assessment

  11. Intergrated plant safety assessment. Systematic evaluation program. Palisades plant, Consumers Power Company, Docket No. 50-255. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has published its Final Integrated Plant Safety Assessment Report (IPSAR) (NUREG-0820), under the scope of the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP), for Consumers Power Company's Palisades Plant located in Covert, Van Buren County, Michigan. The SEP was initiated by the NRC to review the design of older operating nuclear reactor plants to reconfirm and document their safety. This report documents the review completed under the SEP for the Palisades Plant. The review has provided for (1) as assessment of the significance of differences between current technical positions on selected safety issues and those that existed when the Palisades Plant was licensed, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety when all supplements to the Final IPSAR and the Safety Evaluation Report for converting the license from a provisional to a full-term license have been issued. The report also addresses the comments and recommendations made by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards in connection with its review of the Draft Report, issued in April 1982

  12. EU DEMO blanket concepts safety assessment. Final report of Working Group 6a of the Blanket Concept Selection Exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleefeldt, K.; Porfiri, T.

    1996-06-01

    The European Union has been engaged since 1989 in a programme to develop tritium breeding blankets for application in a fusion power reactor. There are four blanket concepts under development. Two of them use lithium ceramics, the other two concepts employ an eutectic lead-lithium alloy (Pb-17Li) as breeder material. The two most promising concepts were to select in 1995 for further development. In order to prepare the selection, a Blanket Concept Selection Exercise (BCSE) has been inititated by the participating associations under the auspices of the European Commission. This BCSE has been performed in 14 working groups which, in a comparative evaluation of the four blanket concepts, addressed specific fields. The working group safety addressed the safety implications. This report describes the methodology adopted, the safety issues identified, their comparative evaluation for the four concepts, and the results and conclusions of the working group to be entered into the overall evaluation. There, the results from all 14 working groups have been combined to yield a final ranking as a basis for the selection. In summary, the safety assessment showed that the four European blanket concepts can be considered as equivalent in terms of the safety rating adopted, each concept, however, rendering safety concerns of different quality in different areas which are substantiated in this report. (orig.) [de

  13. Development and validation of three-dimensional CFD techniques for reactor safety applications. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, Sebastian; Palazzo, Simone; Papukchiev, Angel; Scheurer Martina

    2016-12-01

    The overall goal of the project RS 1506 ''Development and Validation of Three Dimensional CFD Methods for Reactor Safety Applications'' is the validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software for the simulation of three -dimensional thermo-hydraulic heat and fluid flow phenomena in nuclear reactors. For this purpose a wide spectrum of validation and test cases was selected covering fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena in the downcomer and in the core of pressurized water reactors. In addition, the coupling of the system code ATHLET with the CFD code ANSYS CFX was further developed and validated. The first choice were UPTF experiments where turbulent single- and two-phase flows were investigated in a 1:1 scaled model of a German KONVOI reactor. The scope of the CFD calculations covers thermal mixing and stratification including condensation in single- and two-phase flows. In the complex core region, the flow in a fuel assembly with spacer grid was simulated as defined in the OECD/NEA Benchmark MATIS-H. Good agreement are achieved when the geometrical and physical boundary conditions were reproduced as realistic as possible. This includes, in particular, the consideration of heat transfer to walls. The influence of wall modelling on CFD results was investigated on the TALL-3D T01 experiment. In this case, the dynamic three dimensional fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena were simulated in a Generation IV liquid metal cooled reactor. Concurrently to the validation work, the coupling of the system code ATHLET with the ANSYS CFX software was optimized and expanded for two-phase flows. Different coupling approaches were investigated, in order to overcome the large difference between CPU-time requirements of system and CFD codes. Finally, the coupled simulation system was validated by applying it to the simulation of the PSI double T-junction experiment, the LBE-flow in the MYRRA Spallation experiment and a demonstration test case simulating a pump trip

  14. Lessons learned in demonstration projects regarding operational safety during final disposal of vitrified waste and spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filbert, Wolfgang; Herold, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    The paper summarizes the lessons learned in demonstration projects regarding operational safety during the final disposal of vitrified waste and spent fuel. The three demonstration projects for the direct disposal of vitrified waste and spent fuel are described. The first two demonstration projects concern the shaft transport of heavy payloads of up to 85 t and the emplacement operations in the mine. The third demonstration project concerns the borehole emplacement operation. Finally, open issues for the next steps up to licensing of the emplacement and disposal systems are summarized.

  15. Development of safety-relevant components for the transport and handling of final storage casks for waste from decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruening, D.; Geiser, H.; Kloeckner, F.; Rittscher, D.; Schlesinger, H.J.

    1992-10-01

    The aim of the study was the development, construction and testing of a transportation system that is able to transport cylindrical waste containers as well as containers from the deliverer to the 'KONRAD' final repository. A transport palette has been developed that can carry two cylindrical waste containers with type B requirement or classification II. An Open-All-Container for the transport of palettes and 'KONRAD' containers has been developed. A storage of cylindrical waste containers and containers in the final repository is possible with the newly developed transportation system. Safety specifications of the transportation system have been passed successfully. (orig.). 30 refs., 8 tabs., 74 figs [de

  16. Safety analysis of fusion reactors pertaining to nuclear incidents and accidents. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raeder, J.; Weller, A.; Wolf, R.; Jin, X.; Boccaccini, L.V.; Stieglitz, R.; Carloni, D.; Pistner, C.; Herb, J.

    2013-11-01

    The BfS gave the projekt partners IPP, KIT, Oeko-Institut e. V., and GRS the order to carry out a literature study on the topic of safety of fusion power plants regarding nuclear incidents and accidents. In the framework of this study the actual status of science and technology of the safety concept of fusion power plants should be determined and the applicability of the nuclear safety regulations hitherto developed for nuclear power plants checked. For future commercial fusion power plants today only conceptional designs exist. The most advanced conceptual study for a future fusion power plant is the European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS) from the year 2005, which is based on the tokamak principle. In this study also fundamental aspects of the safety concept of nuclear fusion are treated. Hereby several different conceptual approaches are discussed, which differ among others also in the lay-out approaches relevant for the safety of a facility like for instance the choice of the breeding concept or the materials for the blanket/divertor structure and the coolants. The safety concept of nuclear fusion is oriented on safety concepts for facilities with radioactive inventory. It is based on the concept of tiered safety levels. In order to check whether for the nuclear fusion a safety concept comparable with the nuclear fission at all is necessary, in a first step it was considered, which consequences are possible at a postulated release o large parts of the radioactive inventory of a fusion power plant. Such a worst-case scenario was compared with a corresponding, postulated release of large parts of the radioactive inventory of a nuclear power plant. As scale hereby served the radiological criterion, at the transgression of which in the environment of the facility an evacuation would be necessary. In a next step the transferability of the safety concept of the tiered safety levels of nuclear technology to the fusion was checked. Beside events transferable from

  17. Management of radioactive material safety programs at medical facilities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camper, L.W.; Schlueter, J.; Woods, S.

    1997-05-01

    A Task Force, comprising eight US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and two Agreement State program staff members, developed the guidance contained in this report. This report describes a systematic approach for effectively managing radiation safety programs at medical facilities. This is accomplished by defining and emphasizing the roles of an institution's executive management, radiation safety committee, and radiation safety officer. Various aspects of program management are discussed and guidance is offered on selecting the radiation safety officer, determining adequate resources for the program, using such contractual services as consultants and service companies, conducting audits, and establishing the roles of authorized users and supervised individuals; NRC's reporting and notification requirements are discussed, and a general description is given of how NRC's licensing, inspection and enforcement programs work

  18. U27 : real-time commercial vehicle safety & security monitoring final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Accurate real-time vehicle tracking has a wide range of applications including fleet management, drug/speed/law enforcement, transportation planning, traffic safety, air quality, electronic tolling, and national security. While many alternative track...

  19. Proving autonomous vehicle and advanced driver assistance systems safety : final research report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The main objective of this project was to provide technology for answering : crucial safety and correctness questions about verification of autonomous : vehicle and advanced driver assistance systems based on logic. : In synergistic activities, we ha...

  20. Management of radioactive material safety programs at medical facilities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camper, L.W.; Schlueter, J.; Woods, S. [and others

    1997-05-01

    A Task Force, comprising eight US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and two Agreement State program staff members, developed the guidance contained in this report. This report describes a systematic approach for effectively managing radiation safety programs at medical facilities. This is accomplished by defining and emphasizing the roles of an institution`s executive management, radiation safety committee, and radiation safety officer. Various aspects of program management are discussed and guidance is offered on selecting the radiation safety officer, determining adequate resources for the program, using such contractual services as consultants and service companies, conducting audits, and establishing the roles of authorized users and supervised individuals; NRC`s reporting and notification requirements are discussed, and a general description is given of how NRC`s licensing, inspection and enforcement programs work.

  1. Consideration of social scientific issues in a safety case. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sailer, Michael; Kallenbach-Herbert, Beate; Brohmann, Bettina; Spieth-Achtnich, Angelika

    2010-01-01

    The research outcome presented here - a model for identifying and describing safety-relevant social scientific issues - provides a scientific basis for addressing these issues in a safety case. In order for them to be implemented in a repository process, it would be necessary to elaborate in greater detail the initial conceptual foundations that have been laid in this research project in line with the project's terms of reference. The requisite elaboration relates to binding rules for designing the repository process, particularly with regard to the stages in which the safety case is to be developed during planning, approval, construction and operation through to repository closure. Such detailed elaboration also needs to involve specifying the extent to which each social scientific issue and sub-issue is to be addressed in the different stages. Consideration would need to be given not only to the relevance of the issue for a given stage but also to the various options and methods for providing proof of safety. It would be possible to draw on experiences with handling safety management in nuclear power plants - a sphere in which over the last ten years efforts have been ongoing to develop methods for presentation by the operator and review by the authorities. Furthermore, it is likely that the social scientific issues relevant to a safety case cannot be defined once and for all in a single process, but that the need for continual revision and adaptation will arise due to both the increasing knowledge acquired during the course of the repository process and the experiences and expectations of stakeholders (similarly to experiences in the sphere of scientific-technological requirements). Appropriate conditions need to be defined for such a process. This process could be supported by implementing the option mentioned above whereby a regulatory definition of safety management for geological disposal is formulated which encompasses all safety-relevant social scientific

  2. Safety case for license application for a final repository: The French example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissier, Fabrice; Voinis, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    The reversible repository in a deep geological formation is the French reference solution for the long-term management of high-level and intermediate-level long-lived radioactive waste (HLW and ILW). Twenty years of R and D work and conceptual and basic studies since the first French Act of 1991 led, in particular, to a feasibility demonstration in 2005. According to the French Act on Radioactive Waste of 28 of June 2006, Andra shall design a reversible repository in order to apply for license in 2015. In response to this demand, Andra developed the industrial project known as 'Cigeo', a reversible geological disposal facility for HLW and ILW located in Meuse/Haute-Marne. Two years before applying for authorisation, Andra's project is now focusing on three main targets: developing Cigeo's industrial design, preparing the authorisation process through increased exchanges with stakeholders and the preparation of a safety case to support authorisation application. The latter draws on the previous safety cases of 2005 and 2009, which give a sound basis to assess Cigeo's safety, both for the operational and post-closure periods. In this new stage of the project, the challenging issues for the preparation of the safety case are the following: - to identify the various regulatory frameworks (nuclear and non-nuclear) and guides applicable to the facility; - to ensure that the industrial design complies in particular with the safety requirements as presented in the safety case and its supporting safety assessment; - to identify crucial inputs (R and D, tests,...) needed to support the authorisation application, in particular, to bring convincing arguments to assess the technical feasibility of the design and when appropriate its ability to meet the safety requirements; - to ensure that all the requirements from previous regulatory and peer reviews (national and international?) are taken into account. (authors)

  3. Final disposal of spent fuel in the Finnish bedrock. Scope and requirements for site-specific safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    The report is a summary of the research conducted in the period 1993 to 1996 into safety of spent fuel final disposal. The principal goal of the research in this period, as set in 1993, was to develop a strategy for site-specific safety analysis. At the same time efforts were to be continued to gather data and validate the technical approach for the analysis. The work aimed at having the data needed for the analysis available at the end of year 1998. A safety assessment update, TILA-96, prepared by VTT Energy, is published as a separate report. The assessment is based on the TVO-92 safety analysis, but takes into account the knowledge acquired after 1992 on safety aspects of the disposal system and the data gathered from the site investigations made by TVO and from the beginning of 1996, by Posiva. Since the site investigations are still ongoing and much of the data gathered still pending interpretation, only limited amount of new site-specific information has been available for the present assessment. (172 refs.)

  4. Final Safety Analysis Document for Building 693 Chemical Waste Storage Building at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, R.J.; Lane, S.

    1992-02-01

    This Safety Analysis Document (SAD) for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Building 693, Chemical Waste Storage Building (desipated as Building 693 Container Storage Unit in the Laboratory's RCRA Part B permit application), provides the necessary information and analyses to conclude that Building 693 can be operated at low risk without unduly endangering the safety of the building operating personnel or adversely affecting the public or the environment. This Building 693 SAD consists of eight sections and supporting appendices. Section 1 presents a summary of the facility designs and operations and Section 2 summarizes the safety analysis method and results. Section 3 describes the site, the facility desip, operations and management structure. Sections 4 and 5 present the safety analysis and operational safety requirements (OSRs). Section 6 reviews Hazardous Waste Management's (HWM) Quality Assurance (QA) program. Section 7 lists the references and background material used in the preparation of this report Section 8 lists acronyms, abbreviations and symbols. Appendices contain supporting analyses, definitions, and descriptions that are referenced in the body of this report

  5. Safety research experiment facilities, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Final environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liverman, J.L.

    1977-09-01

    This environmental statement was prepared for the Safety Research Experiment Facilities (SAREF) Project. The purpose of the proposed project is to modify some existing facilities and provide a new test facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for conducting fast breeder reactor (FBR) safety experiments. The SAREF Project proposal has been developed after an extensive study which identified the FBR safety research needs requiring in-reactor experiments and which evaluated the capability of various existing and new facilities to meet these needs. The proposed facilities provide for the in-reactor testing of large bundles of prototypical FBR fuel elements under a wide variety of conditions, ranging from those abnormal operating conditions which might be expected to occur during the life of an FBR power plant to the extremely low probability, hypothetical accidents used in the evaluation of some design options and in the assessment of the long-term potential risk associated with wide-acale deployment of the FBR

  6. Final Report of the NASA Office of Safety and Mission Assurance Agile Benchmarking Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherholt, Martha

    2016-01-01

    To ensure that the NASA Safety and Mission Assurance (SMA) community remains in a position to perform reliable Software Assurance (SA) on NASAs critical software (SW) systems with the software industry rapidly transitioning from waterfall to Agile processes, Terry Wilcutt, Chief, Safety and Mission Assurance, Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (OSMA) established the Agile Benchmarking Team (ABT). The Team's tasks were: 1. Research background literature on current Agile processes, 2. Perform benchmark activities with other organizations that are involved in software Agile processes to determine best practices, 3. Collect information on Agile-developed systems to enable improvements to the current NASA standards and processes to enhance their ability to perform reliable software assurance on NASA Agile-developed systems, 4. Suggest additional guidance and recommendations for updates to those standards and processes, as needed. The ABT's findings and recommendations for software management, engineering and software assurance are addressed herein.

  7. Commercial-grade motors in safety-related applications: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzman, P.M.

    1988-04-01

    The objective of this project was to discuss the process necessary to utilize commercial grade equipment in safety related applications and to provide utilities with guidance for accepting commercial grade motors for safety-related applications. The generic commercial-grade concepts presented in this report can be successfully applied to motors. Commercial grade item utilization has the greatest applicability to motors in ''mild'' environments, because these motors are essentially similar to commercial grade motors in materials, construction methods, and capabilities. The acceptance process is less applicable to motors that are subject to ''harsh'' environments during postulated accidents, because of the unique design features and testing required to qualify these motors

  8. Feasibility studies of safety assessment methods for programmable automation systems. Final report of the AVV project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapanen, P.; Maskuniitty, M.; Pulkkinen, U.; Heikkinen, J.; Korhonen, J.; Tuulari, E.

    1995-10-01

    Feasibility studies of two different groups of methodologies for safety assessment of programmable automation systems has been executed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). The studies concerned the dynamic testing methods and the fault tree (FT) and failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) methods. In order to get real experience in the application of these methods, an experimental testing of two realistic pilot systems were executed and a FT/FMEA analysis of a programmable safety function accomplished. The purpose of the studies was not to assess the object systems, but to get experience in the application of methods and assess their potentials and development needs. (46 refs., 21 figs.)

  9. Fluor Daniel Hanford Inc. integrated safety management system phase 1 verification final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSONS, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to verify the adequacy of documentation as submitted to the Approval Authority by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH). This review is not only a review of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) System Description documentation, but is also a review of the procedures, policies, and manuals of practice used to implement safety management in an environment of organizational restructuring. The FDH ISMS should support the Hanford Strategic Plan (DOE-RL 1996) to safely clean up and manage the site's legacy waste; deploy science and technology while incorporating the ISMS theme to ''Do work safely''; and protect human health and the environment

  10. Final summary report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research Program 1998-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennerstedt, T.

    2002-11-01

    The results of the 1998 - 2001 NKS program are presented in the form of executive summaries, highlighting the conclusions, recommendations and other findings and results of the six projects carried out during that period. The titles of the six projects are: Risk assessment and strategies for safety (NKS/SOS-1); Reactor safety (NKS/SOS-2); Radioactive waste (NKS/SOS-3); Nuclear Emergency preparedness (NKS/BOK-1); Radiological and environmental consequences (NKS/BOK-2); Nuclear threats from Nordic surroundings (NKS/SBA-1) (ln)

  11. Review guidelines on software languages for use in nuclear power plant safety systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, H.; Hecht, M.; Graff, S.; Green, W.; Lin, D.; Koch, S.; Tai, A.; Wendelboe, D.

    1996-06-01

    Guidelines for the programming and auditing of software written in high level languages for safety systems are presented. The guidelines are derived from a framework of issues significant to software safety which was gathered from relevant standards and research literature. Language-specific adaptations of these guidelines are provided for the following high level languages: Ada, C/C++, Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) Ladder Logic, International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Standard 1131-3 Sequential Function Charts, Pascal, and PL/M. Appendices to the report include a tabular summary of the guidelines and additional information on selected languages.s

  12. Project Guarantee 1985. Final repository for high-level radioactive wastes: Safety report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Disposal of radioactive was involves preventing releases to the biosphere for a long period of time and subsequently limiting the magnitude of releases by means of a series of safety barriers: the waste solidification matrix (borosilicate glass), massive steel canisters in highly compacted bentonite, sealing of void spacer and access routes on repository closure. The geological barriers are formed by the crystalline bed-rock and the overlying sedimentary layers. In order to perform a safety assessment the behaviour of these technical barriers and of the host rock must be understood and this understanding must be translated into quantitative models which allow calculation of repository performance. For the particular case of a Swiss repository, the main criterion is the individual dose limit of 10 mrem/year, which is given in the safety guidelines of the Swiss authorities. The procedure for the safety analysis involves examination of all scenarios which could give rise to radionuclide release from the repository. Qualitative considerations of both the magnitude of their consequences and their likelihood are used in order to identify a restricted number of scenarios for quantitative analysis

  13. Safety analysis of final disposal of nuclear waste - significance, development and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Kjell; Norrby, Soeren; Simic, Eva; Wene, Clas-Otto

    2007-05-01

    The report starts with a review of the role and development of safety assessments from the middle of the 70's up until today. Then follows a section on how the assessment is performed today. The demands from the licensing authorities is then described. The report ends with a chapter on conclusions and reflections

  14. Impact of cruise control on traffic safety, energy consumption and environmental pollution : final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedemaeker, D.M.; Brouwer, R.F.T.; Malone, K.; Klunder, G.; et al

    2006-01-01

    In this subproject, the impact of Cruise Control (CC) was analysed with respect to traffic safety, energy consumption, and environmental pollution. In order to work on this topic from a European perspective, a team of European experts in the fields of driver assistance systems, human factors,

  15. Project CHERISH (Children in Home Environments: Regulation To Improve Safety and Health). Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, Paul Dallas

    In 1990, Project CHERISH (Children in Home Environments: Regulation to Increase Safety and Health) enabled the Texas Department of Human Services to implement and evaluate several innovative strategies to strengthen regulation of family day care homes. This report contains descriptions of those strategies, an evaluation of their efficacy, and…

  16. Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA)/Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavich, Antoinette; Daust, James E.

    1999-01-01

    This S and T product is a culmination of the activities, including research of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) in developing and implementing inspection procedures and the out-of-service criteria for states and tribes to use when inspecting HRCQ and Transuranic shipments of radioactive materials. The report also contains the results of a pilot study to test the procedures

  17. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This document is the second volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of failure modes and effects analysis; accident analysis; operational safety requirements; quality assurance program; ES&H management program; environmental, safety, and health systems critical to safety; summary of waste-management program; environmental monitoring program; facility expansion, decontamination, and decommissioning; summary of emergency response plan; summary plan for employee training; summary plan for operating procedures; glossary; and appendices A and B.

  18. RETU The Finnish research programme on reactor safety 1995-1998. Final Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanttola, T.

    1998-01-01

    The Reactor Safety (RETU, 1995-1998) research programme concentrated on search of safe limits for nuclear fuel and the reactor core, accident management methods and risk management of nuclear power plants. The total volume of the programme was 100 person years and funding FIM 58 million. This symposium report summarises the research fields, the objectives and the main results obtained. In the field of operational margins of a nuclear reactor, the behaviour of high burnup nuclear fuel was studied both in normal operation and during power transients. The static and dynamic reactor analysis codes were developed and validated to cope with new fuel designs and complicated three-dimensional reactivity transients. Advanced flow models and numerical solution methods for the dynamics codes were developed and tested. Research on accident management developed and validated calculation methods needed to plan preventive measures and to train the personnel to severe accident mitigation. Efforts were made to reduce uncertainties in phenomena important in severe accidents and to study actions planned for accident management. The programme included experimental work, but also participation in large international tests. The Finnish thermal-hydraulic test facility PACTEL was used extensively for the evaluation of the VVER-440 plant accident behaviour, for the validation of the accident analysis computer codes and for the testing of passive safety system concepts for future plant designs. In risk management probabilistic methods were developed for safety related decision making and for complex event sequences. Effects of maintenance on safety were studied and effective methods for assessment of human reliability and safety critical organisations were searched. To enhance human competencies in control of complex environments, practical tools for training and continuous learning were worked out, and methods to evaluate appropriateness of control room design were developed. (orig)

  19. Integrated plant safety assessment. Systematic evaluation program, Big Rock Point Plant (Docket No. 50-155). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    The Systematic Evaluation Program was initiated in February 1977 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to reconfirm and document their safety. The review provides (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with current licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues, (2) a basis for deciding how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety when the supplement to the Final Integrated Plant Safety Assessment Report has been issued. This report documents the review of the Big Rock Point Plant, which is one of ten plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. It also addresses a majority of the pending licensing actions for Big Rock Point, which include TMI Action Plan requirements and implementation criteria for resolved generic issues. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review

  20. Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear power plants Jaslovske Bohunice in 1997 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Nuclear safety; (2) Industrial and health safety; (3) Radiation safety; and Fire protection

  1. Fluor Daniel Hanford Inc. integrated safety management system phase 1 verification final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PARSONS, J.E.

    1999-10-28

    The purpose of this review is to verify the adequacy of documentation as submitted to the Approval Authority by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH). This review is not only a review of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) System Description documentation, but is also a review of the procedures, policies, and manuals of practice used to implement safety management in an environment of organizational restructuring. The FDH ISMS should support the Hanford Strategic Plan (DOE-RL 1996) to safely clean up and manage the site's legacy waste; deploy science and technology while incorporating the ISMS theme to ''Do work safely''; and protect human health and the environment.

  2. Minimizing risks of maritime oil transport by holistic safety strategies (MIMIC) Final report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haapasaari, Päivi Elisabet; Dahlbo, Kim; Aps, Robert

    the costeffectiveness of different types of risk control options in reducing the risks of oil accidents. The cost-effectiveness of the ENSI (Enhanced Navigation Support Information) service, compulsory pilotage, and improved crashworthiness of ships was evaluated. According to the results, the ENSI service is the most......, and the consequent oil outflow  - evaluated optional measures to control oil accident risks and produced a related decision support model  - developed tools for estimating the length of oiled shoreline after an accident  - developed tools for examining the recovery efficiency and optimal disposition of Finnish...... oil combating vessels and for forecasting the clean-up costs of oil spills  - improved operational tools for guiding oil combating activities  - identified and assessed security threats and pondered their connection to safety - analysed the prevailing regulatory system related to maritime safety...

  3. Follow-up of foreign safety studies of final storage of nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelin, R.

    1985-04-01

    The development of mathematical models and calculation programs for estimating radionuclide migration from radioactive waste storage is continuing. Detailed site studies are in progress in the United States. The Swiss investigation which has been recently published, recommends waste storage in granite at the depth of 1200 m. The safety analysis is similar to the one of the Swedish KBS-3 study. 68 references. (G.B.)

  4. Safety and risk questions following the nuclear incidents and accidents in Japan. Summary final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mildenberger, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    After the nuclear accidents in Japan, GRS has carried out in-depth investigations of the events. On the one hand, the accident sequences in the affected units have been analysed from various viewpoints. On the other hand, the transferability of the findings to German plants has been examined to possibly make recommendations for safety improvements. The accident sequences at Fukushima Daiichi have been traced with as much detail as possible based on all available information. Additional insights have been drawn from thermohydraulic analyses with the GRS code system ATHLET-CD/COCOSYS focusing on the events in units 2 and 3, e.g. with regard to core damage and the state of the containments in the first days of the accident sequence. In-depth investigations have also been carried out on topics such as natural external hazards, electrical power supply or organizational measures. In addition, methodological studies on further topics related with the accidents have been performed. Through a detailed analysis of the relevant data from the events in Japan, the basis for an in-depth examination of the transferability to German plants was created. It was found that an implementation of most of the insights gained from the investigations had already been initiated as part of the GRS information notice 2012/02. Further findings have been communicated to the federal government and introduced into other relevant bodies, e.g. the Nuclear Safety Standards Committee (KTA) or the Reactor Safety Commission (RSK).

  5. ORSERG resource book. Operational reactor safety engineering and review group. Final report, March 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    EPRI has prepared this resource book to help utilities with their Self-Assessment Programs at nuclear power plants. Self-assessments are reviews performed by nuclear power plant utilities to monitor plant performance status and adequacy, identify trends in operational activities important to safety, and assess the impact of these trends on plant safety. Activities performed as self-assessments include reviews and evaluations of plant performance and abnormal events, technical evaluations of plant activities to identify potential problem areas, and reviews of other sources of plant design and operating experience for applicability to safety. This resource book is based on information obtained from utilities and includes examples of activities and methods that have proven effective. The resource book includes a summary of NRC requirements, guidelines for self-assessment program planning, descriptions and examples of investigative techniques, and key references that can be consulted for additional information. It can serve as a training guide for plant staff members who are assigned to self-assessment activities. (author)

  6. Final Hazard Classification and Auditable Safety Analysis for the 105-F Building Interim Safe Storage Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodovsky, T.J.; Bond, S.L.

    1998-07-01

    The auditable safety analysis (ASA) documents the authorization basis for the partial decommissioning and facility modifications to place the 105-F Building into interim safe storage (ISS). Placement into the ISS is consistent with the preferred alternative identified in the Record of Decision (58 FR). Modifications will reduce the potential for release and worker exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials, as well as lower surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) costs. This analysis includes the following: A description of the activities to be performed in the course of the 105-F Building ISS Project. An assessment of the inventory of radioactive and other hazardous materials within the 105-F Building. Identification of the hazards associated with the activities of the 105-F Building ISS Project. Identification of internally and externally initiated accident scenarios with the potential to produce significant local or offsite consequences during the 105-F Building ISS Project. Bounding evaluation of the consequences of the potentially significant accident scenarios. Hazard classification based on the bounding consequence evaluation. Associated safety function and controls, including commitments. Radiological and other employee safety and health considerations

  7. Safety requirements to be met in final storage of heat-producing waste an evaluation of the BMU draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomauske, B.

    2008-01-01

    The German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, and Nuclear Safety (BMU) on August 12, 2008 published a July 29, 2008 draft of the ''Safety Requirements to Be Met in Final Storage of Heat-producing Radioactive Waste.'' As announced by the BMU, these safety requirements are to bring up to the state of the art the safety criteria of 1983. Over a couple of years, efforts had been made to adapt the criteria to the internationally accepted standard as demanded by the Advisory Committees on Reactor Safeguards (RSK) and Radiation Protection (SSK). The main changes made by the BMU are the introduction of a phased procedure in building repositories. A phased plans approval procedure under the Atomic Energy Act has been foreseen by the Ministry for this purpose. In addition, the draft provides for the introduction of a risk-based goal of protection. To ensure retrievability of the waste, the casks are to have a demonstrated service life of 500 years. The BMU draft safety requirements are unable to bring the safety criteria of 1983 up to the current state of the art. Here are the key points of criticism: - A risk-based goal of protection is introduced. The yardstick to be applied is to be defined in a guideline yet to be elaborated. As a consequence, the draft lacks substance. - As in licensing of nuclear facilities, the licensing procedure provides for a phased plans approval procedure for exploration. This analogy does not exist, as exploration is not the first phase of the plant to be built but a measure which is a precondition for obtaining a permit for construction and operation. - The information contained in the draft indicates that, contrary to international recommendations, it tightens the goal of protection by more than one order of magnitude. - The requirements to be met by the casks because of retrievability impose constraints on solutions optimized for safety in emplacement technology. - The risk-based approach is not mature and is

  8. 76 FR 61261 - Safety Zone; IJSBA World Finals; Lower Colorado River, Lake Havasu, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... navigable waters of Lake Havasu on the lower Colorado River in support of the International Jet Sports... The International Jet Sports Boating Association is sponsoring the IJSBA World Finals. The event will... National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act (NTTAA) (15 U.S.C. 272 note) directs agencies to use...

  9. Final summary report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research Program 1994 - 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennerstedt, T.; Lemmens, A.

    1999-11-01

    This is a summary report of the NKS research program carried out 1994 - 1997. It is basically a compilation of the executive summaries of the final reports on the nine scientific projects carried out during that period. It highlights the conclusions, recommendations and other results of the projects. (au)

  10. SSI and SKI's Review of SKB's Updated Final Safety Report for SFR 1. Review Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    The Repository for Radioactive Operational Waste (SFR 1) is now the object of a new review by the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) and the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI). One of the stipulations for operating SFR 1 was that a new assessment of the long-term performance and environmental consequences of the repository should be conducted once every 10 years by the licensee, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB). During the time that SFR 1 has been in operation, experience has been gained of operating the facility and new knowledge of long-term performance of SFR 1 has been obtained. New regulations for nuclear facilities have been promulgated since SFR 1 was taken into operation (1988). A review committee comprising employees from SKI and SSI has conducted the review of SSR 2001. This review report has resulted in the committee's evaluation of the safety of SFR 1 and is the basis of the regulatory authorities' decision concerning any amendments to the stipulations for the operation of SFR 1. However, the review has found deficiencies in the follow up of the development of design basis norms since the facility was constructed as well as deficiencies in learning from operating experience. However, the overall evaluation is that the facility is being operated in an acceptable manner from the standpoint of safety. With respect to the long-term performance of the repository, it is a deficiency that SSR 2001 does not describe how compliance with the stipulated radiation protection requirements on optimisation and use of the best available technology (BAT) is achieved during operation. In the opinion of the review committee, issues relating to occupational radiation protection are being handled satisfactorily and the operational releases of radioactive substances are very small. Safety and Radiation Protection after Closure SKB's long-term repository performance assessment contains essential updates and improvements compared with the

  11. Safety-evaluation report related to the final design of the Standard Nuclear Steam Supply Reference System - CESSAR System 80. Docket No. STN 50-470

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    Supplement No. 1 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Combustion Engineering, Inc. for a Final Design Approval for the Combustion Engineering Standard Safety Analysis Report (STN 50-470) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation by providing: (1) the evaluation of additional information submitted by the applicant since the Safety Evaluation Report was issued, (2) the evaluation of the matters the staff had under review when the Safety Evaluation Report was issued, and (3) the response to comments made by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards

  12. Code development incorporating environmental, safety, and economic aspects of fusion reactors (FY 92--94). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, S.K.; Fowler, T.K.; Holdren, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    This is the Final Report for a three-year (FY 92--94) study of the Environmental, Safety, and Economic (ESE) aspects of fusion energy systems, emphasizing development of computerized approaches suitable for incorporation as modules in fusion system design codes. First, as is reported in Section 2, the authors now have operating a simplified but complete environment and safety evaluation code, BESAFE. The first tests of BESAFE as a module of the SUPERCODE, a design optimization systems code at LLNL, are reported in Section 3. Secondly, as reported in Section 4, the authors have maintained a strong effort in developing fast calculational schemes for activation inventory evaluation. In addition to these major accomplishments, considerable progress has been made on research on specific topics as follows. A tritium modeling code TRIDYN was developed in collaboration with the TSTA group at LANL and the Fusion Nuclear Technology group at UCLA. A simplified algorithm has been derived to calculate the transient temperature profiles in the blanket during accidents. The scheme solves iteratively a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations describing about 10 regions of the blanket by preserving energy balance. The authors have studied the physics and engineering aspects of divertor modeling for safety applications. Several modifications in the automation and characterization of environmental and safety indices have been made. They have applied this work to the environmental and safety comparisons of stainless steel with alternative structural materials for fusion reactors. A methodology in decision analysis utilizing influence and decision diagrams has been developed to model fusion reactor design problems. Most of the work during this funding period has been reported in 26 publications including theses, journal publications, conference papers, and technical reports, as listed in Section 11

  13. Review and assessments of potential environmental, health and safety impacts of MHD technology. Final draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to develop an environmental, health and safety (EH and S) assessment and begin a site - specific assessment of these and socio - economic impacts for the magnetohydrodynamics program of the United States Department of Energy. This assessment includes detailed scientific and technical information on the specific EH and S issues mentioned in the MHD Environmental Development Plan. A review of current literature on impact-related subjects is also included. This document addresses the coal-fired, open-cycle MHD technology and reviews and assesses potential EH and S impacts resulting from operation of commercially-installed technology.

  14. Critical review of the reactor-safety study radiological health effects model. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, D.W.; Evans, J.S.; Jacob, N.; Kase, K.R.; Maletskos, C.J.; Robertson, J.B.; Smith, D.G.

    1983-03-01

    This review of the radiological health effects models originally presented in the Reactor Safety Study (RSS) and currently used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was undertaken to assist the NRC in determining whether or not to revise the models and to aid in the revision, if undertaken. The models as presented in the RSS and as implemented in the CRAC (Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences) Code are described and critiqued. The major elements analyzed are those concerning dosimetry, early effects, and late effects. The published comments on the models are summarized, as are the important findings since the publication of the RSS

  15. Some safety studies for conceptual fusion--fission hybrid reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Okrent, D.

    1978-07-01

    The objective of this study was to make a preliminary examination of some potential safety questions for conceptual fusion-fission hybrid reactors. The study and subsequent analysis was largely based upon reference to one design, a conceptual mirror fusion-fission reactor, operating on the deuterium-tritium plasma fusion fuel cycle and the uranium-plutonium fission fuel cycle. The blanket is a fast-spectrum, uranium carbide, helium cooled, subcritical reactor, optimized for the production of fissile fuel. An attempt was made to generalize the results wherever possible

  16. Safety research needs for carbide and nitride fueled LMFBR's. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study initiated at UCLA during the academic year 1974--1975 to evaluate and review the potential safety related research needs for carbide and nitride fueled LMFBR's are presented. The tasks included the following: (1) Review Core and primary system designs for any significant differences from oxide fueled reactors, (2) Review carbide (and nitride) fuel element irradiation behavior, (3) Review reactor behavior in postulated accidents, (4) Examine analytical methods of accident analysis to identify major gaps in models and data, and (5) Examine post accident heat removal. (TSS)

  17. Critical review of the reactor-safety study radiological health effects model. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, D.W.; Evans, J.S.; Jacob, N.; Kase, K.R.; Maletskos, C.J.; Robertson, J.B.; Smith, D.G.

    1983-03-01

    This review of the radiological health effects models originally presented in the Reactor Safety Study (RSS) and currently used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was undertaken to assist the NRC in determining whether or not to revise the models and to aid in the revision, if undertaken. The models as presented in the RSS and as implemented in the CRAC (Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences) Code are described and critiqued. The major elements analyzed are those concerning dosimetry, early effects, and late effects. The published comments on the models are summarized, as are the important findings since the publication of the RSS.

  18. Final disposal of high-level radioactive waste. State of knowledge and development for safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Seichi; Muraoka, Susumu; Murano, Toru

    1995-01-01

    In Europe and USA, the formation disposal of high level radioactive waste entered the stage of doing the activities aiming at its execution. Also in Japan, the storage of high level waste began in the spring of 1995. Regarding the utilization of nuclear power, the establishment of the technology for disposing radioactive waste is the subject of fist priority, and the stage that requires its social recognition has set in. There are the features of formation disposal in that the disposal is in the state of confining extremely large amount of radioactivity, and that the assessment of long term safety exceeding tens of thousands years is demanded. The amount of occurrence and the main nuclides of high level radioactive waste, the disposal as seen in the Coady report and in the IAEA standard, the selection of dispersion or confinement and the selection of passive system or long term human participation, the reason why formation disposal is selected, the features of formation disposal and the way of advancing the research, the general techniques of safety assessment, artificial barriers and natural barriers for formation disposal, and the subjects of formation disposal are described. (K.I.) 57 refs

  19. PROSA PRObabilistic Safety Assessment: Dutch summary of the ECN/RIVM/RGD final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prij, J.; Laheij, G.M.H.; Oostrom, M.; Van Rheenen, W.; Uffink, G.J.M.; Uijt de Haag, P.; Wildenborg, A.F.B.

    1994-05-01

    In the PROSA project the safety of radioactive waste in salt caverns is investigated systematically. PROSA is carried out within the framework of the phase 1A program of the Committee Land Storage (OPLA, abbreviated in Dutch) and is a follow-up of the safety study VEOS. PROSA is focused on improving some aspects of VEOS, in particular the systematic selection of scenarios and determining and calculating the uncertainties. For the scenario selection a system has been developed that takes into account the multi-barrier system and all the possible FEPs (features, events and processes). As a result of the method 22 scenarios were identified. For seven scenarios the radiological consequences have been analyzed by means of a computer model that differs from the model, applied in the VEOS study. The parameters, necessary for the analyses are determined by means of the sources VEOS, PAGIS and PACOMA. The stochastic parameters for the groundwater compartment are calculated with MiniBIOS analyses. Probabilistic calculations were made for the subrosion scenarios, and deterministic calculations are made for the water intrusion scenarios. Of the human intrusion scenarios it appeared that the calculated risk is much lower than has been calculated in VEOS. From the calculated results of the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis it appeared that there is a very large distribution of risks. 10 figs., 10 tabs

  20. Final report of the 'Nordic thermal-hydraulic and safety network (NOTNET)' - Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuunanen, J.; Tuomainen, M.

    2005-04-01

    A Nordic network for thermal-hydraulics and nuclear safety research was started. The idea of the network is to combine the resources of different research teams in order to carry out more ambitious and extensive research programs than would be possible for the individual teams. From the very beginning, the end users of the research results have been integrated to the network. Aim of the network is to benefit the partners involved in nuclear energy in the Nordic Countries (power companies, reactor vendors, safety regulators, research units). First task within the project was to describe the resources (personnel, know-how, simulation tools, test facilities) of the various teams. Next step was to discuss with the end users about their research needs. Based on these steps, few most important research topics with defined goals were selected, and coarse road maps were prepared for reaching the targets. These road maps will be used as a starting point for planning the actual research projects in the future. The organisation and work plan for the network were established. National coordinators were appointed, as well as contact persons in each participating organisation, whether research unit or end user. This organisation scheme is valid for the short-term operation of NOTNET when only Nordic organisations take part in the work. Later on, it is possible to enlarge the network e.g. within EC framework programme. The network can now start preparing project proposals and searching funding for the first common research projects. (au)

  1. Evaluation of methods and tools to develop safety concepts and to demonstrate safety for an HLW repository in salt. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollingerfehr, W.; Buhmann, D.; Doerr, S.; and others

    2017-03-15

    safety demonstration are the integrity proofs for the geological and geotechnical barriers and analysis of backfill compaction. In addition, any possible radionuclide release from the repository to the environment has also to be assessed. The safety and demonstration concept developed in the course of the ISIBEL project was further evolved and applied in the course of the R and D project ''Vorlaeufige Sicherheitsanalyse Gorleben - VSG'' (preliminary safety analysis Gorleben) as an example for an HLW repository in a domal salt structure. The repository concepts also consider the requirement for retrievability of stored waste during the operational phase of the repository. The results of the R and D project VSG provide evidence that a safe HLW repository within a salt dome of a suitable geologic structure is feasible. The long-term safety can be ensured using state-of-the-art science and technology. In 2010, the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) issued new safety requirements for the disposal of heat-generating radioactive waste. These requirements have been included in the analysis. After completion of the VSG project in 2013 complementary work has been performed within the framework of the ISIBEL programme. In this context e.g. potential contributions of natural and antropogenic analogs to confidence building were addressed as well as the feasibility and limits of deriving a repository conc ept strictly from requirements. The report in hands provides a comprehensive summary of the results of R and D work regarding HLW disposal in domal salt formations that has been performed after launching the ISIBEL programme in 2005. This study shows the depth of the geological and technical knowledge on final disposal of HLW in a salt dome with a suitable geologic structure that had been gained up to now and demonstrates that the tools required for safety evaluations are available and allow reliable safety

  2. Evaluation of methods and tools to develop safety concepts and to demonstrate safety for an HLW repository in salt. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollingerfehr, W.; Buhmann, D.; Doerr, S.

    2017-03-01

    safety demonstration are the integrity proofs for the geological and geotechnical barriers and analysis of backfill compaction. In addition, any possible radionuclide release from the repository to the environment has also to be assessed. The safety and demonstration concept developed in the course of the ISIBEL project was further evolved and applied in the course of the R and D project ''Vorlaeufige Sicherheitsanalyse Gorleben - VSG'' (preliminary safety analysis Gorleben) as an example for an HLW repository in a domal salt structure. The repository concepts also consider the requirement for retrievability of stored waste during the operational phase of the repository. The results of the R and D project VSG provide evidence that a safe HLW repository within a salt dome of a suitable geologic structure is feasible. The long-term safety can be ensured using state-of-the-art science and technology. In 2010, the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) issued new safety requirements for the disposal of heat-generating radioactive waste. These requirements have been included in the analysis. After completion of the VSG project in 2013 complementary work has been performed within the framework of the ISIBEL programme. In this context e.g. potential contributions of natural and antropogenic analogs to confidence building were addressed as well as the feasibility and limits of deriving a repository conc ept strictly from requirements. The report in hands provides a comprehensive summary of the results of R and D work regarding HLW disposal in domal salt formations that has been performed after launching the ISIBEL programme in 2005. This study shows the depth of the geological and technical knowledge on final disposal of HLW in a salt dome with a suitable geologic structure that had been gained up to now and demonstrates that the tools required for safety evaluations are available and allow reliable safety assessments of HLW

  3. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This document is the first volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of an introduction, summary/conclusion, site description and assessment, description of facility, and description of operation.

  4. Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas. Final Environmental Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) of the construction and operation of an Environmental Safety and Health (ES ampersand H) Analytical Laboratory and subsequent demolition of the existing Analytical Chemistry Laboratory building at Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. In accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality requirements contained in 40 CFR 1500--1508.9, the Environmental Assessment examined the environmental impacts of the Proposed Action and discussed potential alternatives. Based on the analysis of impacts in the EA, conducting the proposed action, construction of an analytical laboratory and demolition of the existing facility, would not significantly effect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality regulations in 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27

  5. Experience with the use of programmable logic controllers in nuclear safety applications. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, E.M.; Stofko, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    This report describes the implementation and experience with Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) for nuclear safety applications. Two applications are described. The first is an Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) mitigation system provided as a Diverse Auxiliary Feedwater Actuation System (DAFAS). It was implemented at Arizona Public Service's Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station and has been in commercial operation since early 1992. The second system described is an Emergency Diesel Generator Bus Load Sequencer installed at Florida Power and Light's Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant. This system was installed as part of an upgrade to the emergency power system in 1988. The experience gained in the design, development, implementation and qualification of these systems will be beneficial to utilities that are considering the utilization of PLCs for their plant applications

  6. Ferrocyanide tank safety program: Cesium uptake capacity of simulated ferrocyanide tank waste. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgeson, I.E.; Bryan, S.A.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the capacity for 137 Cs uptake by mixed metal ferrocyanides present in Hanford Site waste tanks, and to assess the potential for aggregation of these 137 Cs-exchanged materials to form ''hot-spots'' in the tanks. This research, performed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company, stems from concerns regarding possible localized radiolytic heating within the tanks. After ferrocyanide was added to 18 high-level waste tanks in the 1950s, some of the ferrocyanide tanks received considerable quantities of saltcake waste that was rich in 137 Cs. If radioactive cesium was exchanged and concentrated by the nickel ferrocyanide present in the tanks, the associated heating could cause tank temperatures to rise above the safety limits specified for the ferrocyanide-containing tanks, especially if the supernate in the tanks is pumped out and the waste becomes drier

  7. RATU Nuclear power plant structural safety research programme 1990-1994. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintamaa, R.; Sarkimo, M.

    1995-12-01

    The major part of nuclear energy research in Finland has been organized as five-year nationally coordinated research programmes. The research programme on the Nuclear Power Plant Structural Safety was carried out during the period from 1990 to 1994. The total volume was about 76 person-years and the expenditure about 49 million FIM. Studies on the structural materials in nuclear power plants created the experimental data and background information necessary for the structural integrity assessments of mechanical components. The research was carried out by developing experimental fracture mechanics methods including statistical analysis methods of material property data, and by studying material ageing and, in particular, mechanisms of material deterioration due to neutron irradiation, corrosion and water chemistry. Besides material studies, new testing methods and sensors for the measurement of loading and water chemistry parameters have been developed

  8. Final report on the safety assessment of Cocos nucifera (coconut) oil and related ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Christina L; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Klaassen, Curtis D; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2011-05-01

    Cocos nucifera (coconut) oil, oil from the dried coconut fruit, is composed of 90% saturated triglycerides. It may function as a fragrance ingredient, hair conditioning agent, or skin-conditioning agent and is reported in 626 cosmetics at concentrations from 0.0001% to 70%. The related ingredients covered in this assessment are fatty acids, and their hydrogenated forms, corresponding fatty alcohols, simple esters, and inorganic and sulfated salts of coconut oil. The salts and esters are expected to have similar toxicological profiles as the oil, its hydrogenated forms, and its constituent fatty acids. Coconut oil and related ingredients are safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration described in this safety assessment.

  9. Seismic safety review mission Almaty WWR 10 MW research reactor Almaty, Kazakhstan. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurpinar, A.; Slemmons, D.B.; David, M.; Masopust, R.

    1995-06-01

    On the request of the government of Kazakhstan and within the scope of the TC project KAZ/0/004, a seismic safety review mission was conducted in Almaty, 8-19 May 1995 for the WWR 10 Mw research reactor. This review followed the fact finding mission which visited Almaty in November 1993 together with an INSARR mission. At that time some information regarding the seismotectonic setting of the site as well as the seismic capacity of the facility was obtained. This document presents the results of further work carried out on both the issues. It discusses technical session findings on geology, seismology, structures and equipments. In the end conclusions and recommendations of the mission are given. 4 refs, figs, tabs, 18 photos

  10. Final report of the amended safety assessment of Dioscorea Villosa (Wild Yam) root extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    ; irritation in the iris and cornea was mild and transient. Undiluted extract was not irritating during the induction phase of a guinea pig sensitization study, nor did challenge with a 25% dilution elicit any sensitization. The specified extract at concentrations up to 500 mg/kg/day did not have any estrogenic activity in the juvenile rat uterotrophic assay. Genotoxicity assays in bacterial and mammalian systems were negative, except that Ames test strain TA 1537 was positive at one dose level using the plate incorporation method, but not using a preincubation method. Although the concentration at which the actual plant extract is used in cosmetic products is low, one of the primary safety concerns with this plant extract is the possible metabolic/endocrine activity, e.g., estrogen-like or progesterone-like activity as a result of the presence of small amounts of plant phytosterols such as diosgenin. Extracts prepared as described in this safety assessment, with an upper limit of 3.5% diosgenin, did not have any estrogenic activity, demonstrating that it is possible to produce material that does not present this specific safety concern. Although extracts from pesticide-free plants were not considered genotoxic and it was the view of the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel that there do not appear to be any components that could be carcinogenic, pesticide residues could raise this issue. It was urged that manufacturers limit pesticide residues to the limit previously used for lanolin of not more than 40 ppm (with not more than 10 ppm for any one residue). Based on these data, it was concluded that Dioscorea Villosa (Wild Yam) Root Extract is safe as used in cosmetic formulations. This conclusion regarding safety, however, is valid only for extracts prepared in a manner that produces a similar chemical profile as that described in this report, particularly as regards diosgenin. Extracts not prepared in a manner that produces a similar chemical profile would be

  11. Reliability analysis and computation of computer-based safety instrumentation and control used in German nuclear power plant. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Yongjian; Krause, Ulrich; Gu, Chunlei

    2014-01-01

    extended according to cope with special needs of the digital safety I and C system. The new modelling method based on fault tree analysis (FTA) combined with MCBFR model is provided and validated by a real example system from an industrial partner. The reliability data are taken from a platform specific data base of the industrial partner and an international generic data base. The results demonstrate the applicability of the new approach although the modelling quality is strongly dependent on the observed failure cases from the plant operation. Therefore more failure data of safety I and C should be collected in the future. This report is the final project report.

  12. Amended final report of the safety assessment of Drometrizole as used in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Drometrizole is used in cosmetics as an ultraviolet (UV) light absorber and stabilizer. In an earlier safety assessment, the available data were found insufficient to support the safety of this ingredient, but new data have been provided and assessed. In voluntary industry reports to the Food and Drug Administration, this ingredient is reported to be used in noncoloring hair care products, and in an industry use concentration survey, uses in nail care products at 0.07% were reported. Drometrizole has absorbance maxima at 243, 298, and 340 nm. Drometrizole is used widely as a UV absorber and stabilizer in plastics, polyesters, celluloses, acrylates, dyes, rubber, synthetic and natural fibers, waxes, detergent solutions, and orthodontic adhesives. It is similarly used in agricultural products and insecticides. Drometrizole is approved as an indirect food additive for use as an antioxidant and/or stabilizer in polymers. Short-term studies using rats reported liver weight increases, increases in the activities of enzymes aminopyrine N-demethylase, and UDP glucuronosyl transferase, but no significant effects were noted in the activities of acid hydrolases or in hepatocyte organelles. Although Drometrizole is insoluble in water and soluble in a wide range of organic solvents, a distribution and elimination study using rats indicated that some Drometrizole was absorbed, then metabolized and excreted in the urine. Drometrizole and products containing Drometrizole were nontoxic in acute oral, inhalation, and dermal studies using animals. No increase in mortality or local and/or systemic toxicity were observed in a 13-week oral toxicity study using dogs; the no observed effect level (NOEL) was 31.75 mg/kg day(- 1) for males and 34.6 mg/kg day(-1) for females. In a 2-year feeding study using rats, a NOEL of 47 to 58 mg/kg day(- 1) was reported. Developmental studies of Drometrizole in rats and mice found no teratogenic effects and a NOEL of 1000 mg/kg day(- 1) was reported

  13. Final report on the safety assessment of Calendula officinalis extract and Calendula officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Calendula Officinalis Extract is an extract of the flowers of Calendula officinalis, the common marigold, whereas Calendula Officinalis is described as plant material derived from the flowers of C. officinalis. Techniques for preparing Calendula Officinalis Extract include gentle disintegration in soybean oil. Propylene glycol and butylene glycol extractions were also reported. Components of these ingredients are variously reported to include sugars, carotenoids, phenolic acids, sterols, saponins, flavonoids, resins, sterins, quinones, mucilages, vitamins, polyprenylquinones, and essential oils. Calendula Officinalis Extract is reported to be used in almost 200 cosmetic formulations, over a wide range of product categories. There are no reported uses of Calendula Officinalis. Acute toxicity studies in rats and mice indicate that the extract is relatively nontoxic. Animal tests showed at most minimal skin irritation, and no sensitization or phototoxicity. Minimal ocular irritation was seen with one formulation and no irritation with others. Six saponins isolated from C. officinalis flowers were not mutagenic in an Ames test, and a tea derived from C. officinalis was not genotoxic in Drosophila melanogaster. No carcinogenicity or reproductive and developmental toxicity data were available. Clinical testing of cosmetic formulations containing the extract elicited little irritation or sensitization. Absent any basis for concluding that data on one member of a botanical ingredient group can be extrapolated to another in a group, or to the same ingredient extracted differently, these data were not considered sufficient to assess the safety of these ingredients. Additional data needs include current concentration of use data; function in cosmetics; ultraviolet (UV) absorption data; if absorption occurs in the UVA or UVB range, photosensitization data are needed; gross pathology and histopathology in skin and other major organ systems associated with repeated dermal

  14. An innovative fuel design concept for improved light water reactor performance and safety. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulenko, J.S.; Connell, R.G.

    1995-07-01

    Light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance is limited by thermal and mechanical constraints associated with the design, fabrication, and operation of fuel in a nuclear reactor. The purpose of this research was to explore a technique for extending fuel performance by thermally bonding LWR fuel with a non-alkaline liquid metal alloy. Current LWR fuel rod designs consist of enriched uranium oxide (UO 2 ) fuel pellets enclosed in a zirconium alloy cylindrical clad. The space between the pellets and the clad is filled by an inert gas. Due to the thermal conductivity of the gas, the gas space thermally insulates the fuel pellets from the reactor coolant outside the fuel rod, elevating the fuel temperatures. Filling the gap between the fuel and clad with a high conductivity liquid metal thermally bonds the fuel to the cladding, and eliminates the large temperature change across the gap, while preserving the expansion and pellet loading capabilities. The resultant lower fuel temperature directly impacts fuel performance limit margins and also core transient performance. The application of liquid bonding techniques to LWR fuel was explored for the purposes of increasing LWR fuel performance and safety. A modified version of the ESCORE fuel performance code (ESBOND) has been developed under the program to analyze the in-reactor performance of the liquid metal bonded fuel. An assessment of the technical feasibility of this concept for LWR fuel is presented, including the results of research into materials compatibility testing and the predicted lifetime performance of Liquid Metal Bonded LWR fuel

  15. Safety analysis report for packages: packaging of fissile and other radioactive materials. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalfant, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    The 9965, 9966, 9967, and 9968 packages are designed for surface shipment of fissile and other radioactive materials where a high degree of containment (either single or double) is required. Provisions are made to add shielding material to the packaging as required. The package was physically tested to demonstrate that it meets the criteria specified in USDOE Order No. 5480.1, chapter III, dated 5/1/81, which invokes Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10 CFR 71), Packing and Transportation of Radioactive Material, and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 100-179, Transportation. By restricting the maximum normal operating pressure of the packages to less than 7 kg/cm 2 (gauge) (99 to 54 psig), the packages will comply with Type B(U) regulations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in its Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials, Safety Series No. 6, 1973 Revised Edition, and may be used for export and import shipments. These packages have been assessed for transport of up to 14.5 kilograms of uranium, excluding uranium-233, or 4.4 kilograms of plutonium metal, oxides, or scrap having a maximum radioactive decay energy of 30 watts. Specific maximum package contents are given. This quantity and the configuration of uranium or plutonium metal cannot be made critical by any combination of hydrogeneous reflection and moderation regardless of the condition of the package. For a uranium-233 shipment, a separate criticality evaluation for the specific package is required

  16. Automotive Airbag Safety Enhancement Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1165-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutting, Jack [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Durrell, Robert [Quantic Industries, Inc., San Carlos, CA (United States)

    2017-11-09

    The Vehicle Safety systems (VSS) Division of Quantic Industries, Inc. (QII) manufactured automotive airbag components. When both the driver and the passenger side airbags inflated in a tightly sealed passenger compartment, the compression of the surrounding air could and, in some instances, would cause damage to the eardrums of the occupants. The Aerospace and Division (ADD) of QII had partially developed the technology to fracture the canopy of a jet aircraft at the time of pilot ejection. The technical problem was how to adapt the canopy fracturing technology to the rear window of a motor vehicle in a safe and cost effective manner. The existing approach was to replace the embedded rear window defroster with a series-parallel network of exploding bridge wires (EBWs). This would still provide the defrost function at low voltage/ current, but would cause fracturing of the window when a high current/voltage pulse was applied without pyrotechnics or explosives. The elements of this system were the embedded EBW network and a trunk-mounted fireset. The fireset would store the required energy to fire the network upon the receipt of a trigger signal from the existing air bag crash sensor.

  17. Safety evaluation report related to Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group Plant Reassessment Program: [Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    After the accident of Three Mile Island, Unit 2, nuclear power plant owners made a number of improvements to their nuclear facilities. Despite these improvements, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff is concerned that the number and complexity of events at Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) nuclear plants have not decreased as expected. This concern was reinforced by the June 9, 1985 total-loss-of-feedwater event at Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station and the December 26, 1985 overcooling transient at Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station. By letter dated January 24, 1986, the Executive Director for Operations (EDO) informed the Chairman of the B and W Owners Group (BWOG) that a number of recent events at B and W-designed reactors have led the NRC staff to conclude that the basic requirements for B and W reactors need to be reexamined. In its February 13, 1986 response to the EDO's letter, the BWOG committed to lead an effort to define concerns relative to reducing the frequency of reactor trips and the complexity of post-trip response in B and W plants. The BWOG submitted a description of the B and W program entitled ''Safety and Performance Improvement Program'' (BAW-1919) on May 15, 1986. Five revisions to BAW-1919 have also been submitted. The NRC staff has reviewed BAW-1919 and its revisions and presents its evaluation in this report. 2 figs., 34 tabs

  18. Responsibility, safety and certainty. A new consensus on nuclear waste disposal. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-05-25

    With the consent of all parties represented in the Bundestag, the Federal Republic of Germany resolved to properly end the use of nuclear energy for power generation. The legal framework for the energy transition is provided by the consensus reached on nuclear energy in 2001 and the Nuclear Power Phase-Out Act (Atomgesetz, hereinafter: Atomic Energy Act) passed in 2002 and amended in 2011, together with the Renewable Energy Sources Act (Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz, hereinafter: Renewable Energy Act), the Energy Industry Act (Energiewirtschaftsgesetz) and extensive provisions on accelerating the construction of power lines in Germany. Nuclear energy plants will have gradually phased out their power generation operations by the end of the year 2022. The decision to phase out nuclear power plants has entailed major changes in radioactive waste management - dismantling, packaging spent fuel in containers, and interim storage and final disposal. For one thing, the amount of radioactive waste requiring final storage is now easier to calculate and to limit, in contrast with periods of indefinite operation. Limiting the operating lives of nuclear plants also shortens the period in which assets can be generated for the decreased amounts of high-level, intermediate-level and low-level waste. Along with the phase-out, the rapidly expanding renewable energy market and continued integration into the European Single Market has changed market conditions for nuclear power plant operators. Not only have new market participants joined the competition for power generation - due to a surplus and, ultimately, to price erosion in the international fuel markets, stock market prices for power have dropped dramatically. This has affected nuclear power plant operators in particular, because of their large share in conventional power generation.

  19. Safety-technical characteristics of biomass, coal and straw. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilen, C.; Rautalin, A.

    1995-12-31

    Safety-technical factors related to spontaneous ignition and dust explosions of biomasses were investigated. Parametres of dust explosions and effect of inertisation on the maximum pressure (pmax) and the maximum rate of pressure rise (Kstmax) were studied at elevated initial pressure (1-9 bar). The level of inertisation required to prevent dust explosions totally was determined at different initial pressures. The sensitivity of fuels to spontaneous ignition and the effect of pressure on the sensitivity to and temperature of spontaneous ignition were studied on a pressurised dynamic self-ignition equipment. The effect of inertisation on the self-ignition temperature and alternatives of preventing spontaneous ignition by effective inertisation in the pressure ranges of 1 and 25 bar were investigated. As an example of application, results obtained with the laboratory test equipment were extrapolated to bin sizes used in practice. As a factor contributing to spontaneous ignition, the flowability of different fuels in bins and lock-hoppers (stagnant fuel layers are especially sensitive to spontaneous ignition) in continuous flow and in flow stopped for a storage time of 1 hour was also studied. Walker`s rotating ring shear equipment and Jenike`s linear shear equipment based on shearing the fuel were used in the flowability measurements. The effect of fuel temperature (22 deg C, 40 deg C) on flowability was determined for forest residue chips. Dynamic friction coefficients between fuels and handling equipment were determined for stainless steel and rusty metal surface. As an example of application, results obtained with laboratory test equipment were extrapolated to a bin size of 21 m{sup 3} by calculating the size of the minimum discharge opening required by mass flow of different coals and forest residue chips and the minimum angle of repose of the conical part for a bin of stainless steel

  20. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Phase I final report - Subsystem response (Project V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, L.C.; Chuang, T.Y.; O'Connell, W.J.

    1981-10-01

    This document reports on (1) the computation of the responses of subsystems, given the input subsystem support motion for components and systems whose failure can lead to an accident sequence (radioactive release), and (2) the results of a sensitivity study undertaken to determine the contributions of the several links in the seismic methodology chain (SMC) - seismic input (SI), soil-structure interaction (SSI), structure response (STR), and subsystem response (SUB) - to the uncertainty in subsystem response. For the singly supported subsystems (e.g., pumps, turbines, electrical control panels, etc.), we used the spectral acceleration response of the structure at the point where the subsystem components were mounted. For the multiple supported subsystems, we developed 13 piping models of five safety-related systems, and then used the pseudostatic-mode method with multisupport input motion to compute the response parameters in terms of the parameters used in the fragility descriptions (i.e., peak resultant accelerations for valves and peak resultant moments for piping). Damping and frequency were varied to represent the sources of modeling and random uncertainty. Two codes were developed: a modified version of SAPIV which assembles the piping supports into groups depending on the support's location relative to the attached structure, and SAPPAC a stand-alone modular program from which the time-history analysis module is extracted. On the basis of our sensitivity study, we determined that the variability in the combined soil-structure interaction, structural response, and subsystem response areas contribute more to uncertainty in subsystem response than does the variability in the seismic input area, assuming an earthquake within the limited peak ground acceleration range, i.e., 0.15 to 0.30g. The seismic input variations were in terms of different earthquake time histories. (author)

  1. Safety-technical characteristics of biomass, coal and straw. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilen, C; Rautalin, A

    1996-12-31

    Safety-technical factors related to spontaneous ignition and dust explosions of biomasses were investigated. Parametres of dust explosions and effect of inertisation on the maximum pressure (pmax) and the maximum rate of pressure rise (Kstmax) were studied at elevated initial pressure (1-9 bar). The level of inertisation required to prevent dust explosions totally was determined at different initial pressures. The sensitivity of fuels to spontaneous ignition and the effect of pressure on the sensitivity to and temperature of spontaneous ignition were studied on a pressurised dynamic self-ignition equipment. The effect of inertisation on the self-ignition temperature and alternatives of preventing spontaneous ignition by effective inertisation in the pressure ranges of 1 and 25 bar were investigated. As an example of application, results obtained with the laboratory test equipment were extrapolated to bin sizes used in practice. As a factor contributing to spontaneous ignition, the flowability of different fuels in bins and lock-hoppers (stagnant fuel layers are especially sensitive to spontaneous ignition) in continuous flow and in flow stopped for a storage time of 1 hour was also studied. Walker`s rotating ring shear equipment and Jenike`s linear shear equipment based on shearing the fuel were used in the flowability measurements. The effect of fuel temperature (22 deg C, 40 deg C) on flowability was determined for forest residue chips. Dynamic friction coefficients between fuels and handling equipment were determined for stainless steel and rusty metal surface. As an example of application, results obtained with laboratory test equipment were extrapolated to a bin size of 21 m{sup 3} by calculating the size of the minimum discharge opening required by mass flow of different coals and forest residue chips and the minimum angle of repose of the conical part for a bin of stainless steel

  2. ORNL Evaluation of Electrabel Safety Cases for Doel 3 / Tihange 2: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL; Dickson, Terry L [ORNL; Gorti, Sarma B [ORNL; Klasky, Hilda B [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL; Server, W. L. [ATI Consulting, Pinehurst, NC

    2015-11-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed a detailed technical review of the 2015 Electrabel (EBL) Safety Cases prepared for the Belgium reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) at Doel 3 and Tihange 2 (D3/T2). The Federal Agency for Nuclear Control (FANC) in Belgium commissioned ORNL to provide a thorough assessment of the existing safety margins against cracking of the RPVs due to the presence of almost laminar flaws found in each RPV. Initial efforts focused on surveying relevant literature that provided necessary background knowledge on the issues related to the quasilaminar flaws observed in D3/T2 reactors. Next, ORNL proceeded to develop an independent quantitative assessment of the entire flaw population in the two Belgian reactors according to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Criteria for Protection Against Failure, New York (1992 and 2004). That screening assessment of all EBL-characterized flaws in D3/T2 used ORNL tools, methodologies, and the ASME Code Case N-848, Alternative Characterization Rules for QuasiLaminar Flaws . Results and conclusions from the ORNL flaw acceptance assessments of D3/T2 were compared with those from the 2015 EBL Safety Cases. Specific findings of the ORNL evaluation of that part of the EBL structural integrity assessment focusing on stability of the flaw population subjected to primary design transients include the following: ORNL s analysis results were similar to those of EBL in that very few characterized flaws were found not compliant with the ASME (1992) acceptance criterion. ORNL s application of the more recent ASME Section XI (2004) produced only four noncompliant flaws, all due to LOCAs. The finding of a greater number of non-compliant flaws in the EBL screening assessment is due principally to a significantly more restrictive (conservative) criterion for flaw size acceptance used by EBL. ORNL s screening assessment results

  3. Safety Evaluation Report related to the final design approval of the GESSAR II BWR/6 Nuclear Island design, Docket No. 50-447

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    The Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by General Electric Company for the Final Design Approval for the General Electric Standard Safety Analysis Report (GESSAR II FSAR) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report summarizes the results of the staff's safety review of the GESSAR II BWR/6 Nuclear Island Design. Subject to favorable resolution of items discussed in the Safety Evaluation Report, the staff concludes that the facilities referencing GESSAR II, subject to approval of the balance-of-plant design, can conform with the provisions of the Act and the regulations of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  4. Organic tanks safety program waste aging studies. Final report, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    Uranium and plutonium production at the Hanford Site produced large quantities of radioactive byproducts and contaminated process chemicals that are stored in underground tanks awaiting treatment and disposal. Having been made strongly alkaline and then subjected to successive water evaporation campaigns to increase storage capacity, the wastes now exist in the physical forms of saltcakes, metal oxide sludges, and aqueous brine solutions. Tanks that contain organic process chemicals mixed with nitrate/nitrite salt wastes might be at risk for fuel-nitrate combustion accidents. This project started in fiscal year 1993 to provide information on the chemical fate of stored organic wastes. While historical records had identified the organic compounds originally purchased and potentially present in wastes, aging experiments were needed to identify the probable degradation products and evaluate the current hazard. The determination of the rates and pathways of degradation have facilitated prediction of how the hazard changes with time and altered storage conditions. Also, the work with aged simulated waste contributed to the development of analytical methods for characterizing actual wastes. Finally, the results for simulants provide a baseline for comparing and interpreting tank characterization data

  5. Organic tanks safety program waste aging studies. Final report, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C. [and others

    1998-09-01

    Uranium and plutonium production at the Hanford Site produced large quantities of radioactive byproducts and contaminated process chemicals that are stored in underground tanks awaiting treatment and disposal. Having been made strongly alkaline and then subjected to successive water evaporation campaigns to increase storage capacity, the wastes now exist in the physical forms of saltcakes, metal oxide sludges, and aqueous brine solutions. Tanks that contain organic process chemicals mixed with nitrate/nitrite salt wastes might be at risk for fuel-nitrate combustion accidents. This project started in fiscal year 1993 to provide information on the chemical fate of stored organic wastes. While historical records had identified the organic compounds originally purchased and potentially present in wastes, aging experiments were needed to identify the probable degradation products and evaluate the current hazard. The determination of the rates and pathways of degradation have facilitated prediction of how the hazard changes with time and altered storage conditions. Also, the work with aged simulated waste contributed to the development of analytical methods for characterizing actual wastes. Finally, the results for simulants provide a baseline for comparing and interpreting tank characterization data.

  6. Safety analysis of the transportation of radioactive waste to the Konrad final repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sentuc, F.N.; Bruecher, W.

    2010-01-01

    A transport risk assessment study has been conducted for transport of radioactive waste with negligible heat-generation to the German final repository Konrad. This study is a revision of the former Konrad Transport Study performed by GRS in 1991 implementing updated waste data among other improved methods and assumptions for the purpose of a more realistic approach to risk assessment. The first part of the transport risk assessment study concerns the radiological consequences from normal (accident-free) transportation of radioactive material, i.e. the radiation exposure of transport personnel and the public. Based on the assessed detailed information on transport arrangements and on the average number and radiological characteristics of waste packages the maximum annual effective doses for the representative persons were estimated. The risk associated with transport incidents and accidents has been quantified for the area within a radius of 25 km around the repository site. The probabilistic method adopted in this study considers parameters as the frequency and severity of railway or road accidents, characteristics of radioactive waste and transport packagings and the frequency of atmospheric dispersion conditions. From a large set of parameter combinations the spectrum of potential radiological consequences and of the associated probability of occurrence was assessed. (orig.)

  7. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    Niels Dupont

    2013-01-01

    CERN Safety rules and Radiation Protection at CMS The CERN Safety rules are defined by the Occupational Health & Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE Unit), CERN’s institutional authority and central Safety organ attached to the Director General. In particular the Radiation Protection group (DGS-RP1) ensures that personnel on the CERN sites and the public are protected from potentially harmful effects of ionising radiation linked to CERN activities. The RP Group fulfils its mandate in collaboration with the CERN departments owning or operating sources of ionising radiation and having the responsibility for Radiation Safety of these sources. The specific responsibilities concerning "Radiation Safety" and "Radiation Protection" are delegated as follows: Radiation Safety is the responsibility of every CERN Department owning radiation sources or using radiation sources put at its disposition. These Departments are in charge of implementing the requi...

  8. Seismic safety margins research program. Phase I final report - Major structure response (Project IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benda, B.J.; Johnson, J.J.; Lo, T.Y.

    1981-08-01

    The primary task of the Major Structure Response Project within the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was to develop detailed finite element models of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant's containment building and auxiliary-fuel-turbine (AFT) complex. The resulting models served as input to the seismic methodology analysis chain. The containment shell was modeled as a series of beam elements with the shear and bending characteristics of a circular cylindrical shell. Masses and rotary inertias were lumped at nodal points; thirteen modes were included in the analysis. The internal structure was modeled with three-dimensional finite elements, with masses again lumped at selected nodes; sixty modes were included in the analysis. The model of the AFT complex employed thin plate and shell elements to represent the concrete shear walls and floor diaphragms, and beam and truss elements to model the braced frames. Because of the size and complexity of the model, and the potentially large number of degrees of freedom, masses were lumped at a limited number of node points. These points were selected so as to minimize the effect of the discrete mass distribution on structural response. One hundred and thirteen modes were extracted. A second objective of Project IV was to investigate the effects of uncertainty and variability on structural response. To this end, four side studies were conducted. Three of them, briefly summarized in this volume, addressed themselves respectively to an investigation of sources of random variability in the dynamic response of nuclear power plant structures; formulation of a methodology for modeling and evaluating the effects of structural uncertainty on predicted modal characteristics of major nuclear power plant structures and substructures; and a preliminary evaluation of nonlinear responses in shear-wall structures. A fourth side study, reported in detail in this volume, quantified variations in dynamic characteristics and seismic

  9. Amended final report of the safety assessment of dibutyl adipate as used in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Alan

    2006-01-01

    irritation, no comedogenicity, and no genotoxicity. Combined with the data demonstrating little acute toxicity, no skin or ocular irritation, and no reproductive or developmental toxicity, these data form an adequate basis for reaching a conclusion that Dibutyl Adipate is safe as a cosmetic ingredient in the practices of use and concentrations as reflected in this safety assessment.

  10. Final report on the safety assessment of Triethylene Glycol and PEG-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    and PEG-4 also would not be irritants or sensitizers, and the absence of any reported reactions in the case literature and the professional experience of the Expert Panel further supported the absence of any significant sensitization potential. The need for additional data to demonstrate the safety of PEGs Cocamine was related to the Cocamine moiety and is not relevant here. The Panel reminded formulators of cosmetic products that, as with other PEG compounds, Triethylene Glycol and PEG-4 should not be used on damaged skin because of cases of systemic toxicity and contact dermatitis in burn patients have been attributed to a PEG-based topical ointment. Based on its consideration of the available information, the CIR Expert Panel concluded that Triethylene Glycol and PEG-4 are safe as cosmetic ingredients in the present practices and concentrations of use as described in this safety assessment.

  11. Auditable Safety Analysis and Final Hazard Classification for the 105-N Reactor Zone and 109-N Steam Generator Zone Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloster, G.L.

    1998-07-01

    This document is a graded auditable safety analysis (ASA) and final hazard classification (FHC) for the Reactor/Steam Generator Zone Segment. The Reactor/Steam Generator Zone Segment, part of the N Reactor Complex, that is also known as the Reactor Building and Steam Generator Cells. The installation of the modifications described within to support surveillance and maintenance activities are to be completed by July 1, 1999. The surveillance and maintenance activities addressed within are assumed to continue for the next 15- 20 years, until the initiation of facility D ampersand D (i.e., Interim Safe Storage). The graded ASA in this document is in accordance with EDPI-4.30-01, Rev. 1, Safety Analysis Documentation, (BHI-DE-1) and is consistent with guidance provided by the U.S. Department of Energy. This ASA describes the hazards within the facility and evaluates the adequacy of the measures taken to reduce, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. This document also serves as the FHC for the Reactor/Steam Generator Zone Segment. This FHC is developed through the use of bounding accident analyses that envelope the potential exposures to personnel

  12. Final report of the safety assessment of methacrylate ester monomers used in nail enhancement products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Methacrylate ester monomers are used in as artificial nail builders in nail enhancement products. They undergo rapid polymerization to form a hard material on the nail that is then shaped. While Ethyl Methacrylate is the primary monomer used in nail enhancement products, other methacrylate esters are also used. This safety assessment addresses 22 other methacrylate esters reported by industry to be present in small percentages as artificial nail builders in cosmetic products. They function to speed up polymerization and/or form cross-links. Only Tetrahydrofurfuryl Methacrylate was reported to the FDA to be in current use. The polymerization rates of these methacrylate esters are within the same range as Ethyl Methacrylate. While data are not available on all of these methacrylate esters, the available data demonstrated little acute oral, dermal, or i.p. toxicity. In a 28-day inhalation study on rats, Butyl Methacrylate caused upper airway irritation; the NOAEL was 1801 mg/m3. In a 28-day oral toxicity study on rats, t-Butyl Methacrylate had a NOAEL of 20 mg/kg/day. Beagle dogs dosed with 0.2 to 2.0 g/kg/day of C12 to C18 methacrylate monomers for 13 weeks exhibited effects only in the highest dose group: weight loss, emesis, diarrhea, mucoid feces, or salivation were observed. Butyl Methacrylate (0.1 M) and Isobutyl Methacrylate (0.1 M) are mildly irritating to the rabbit eye. HEMA is corrosive when instilled in the rabbit eye, while PEG-4 Dimethacrylate and Trimethylolpropane Trimethacrylate are minimally irritating to the eye. Dermal irritation caused by methacrylates is documented in guinea pigs and rabbits. In guinea pigs, HEMA, Isopropylidenediphenyl Bisglycidyl Methacrylate, Lauryl Methacrylate, and Trimethylolpropane Trimethacrylate are strong sensitizers; Butyl Methacrylate, Cyclohexyl Methacrylate, Hexyl Methacrylate, and Urethane Methacrylate are moderate sensitizers; Hydroxypropyl Methacrylate is a weak sensitizer; and PEG-4 Dimethacrylate and

  13. Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This annual report of the Senior Inspector for the Nuclear Safety, analyses the nuclear safety at EDF for the year 1999 and proposes twelve subjects of consideration to progress. Five technical documents are also provided and discussed concerning the nuclear power plants maintenance and safety (thermal fatigue, vibration fatigue, assisted control and instrumentation of the N4 bearing, 1300 MW reactors containment and time of life of power plants). (A.L.B.)

  14. Amended final report on the safety assessment of polyacrylamide and acrylamide residues in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    to human health and safety. Based on the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity data, the Panel does not believe that acrylamide is a genotoxic carcinogen in the usual manner and that several of the risk assessment approaches have overestimated the human cancer risk. The Panel did conclude, however, that it was appropriate to limit acrylamide levels to 5 ppm in cosmetic formulations.

  15. Final report on the safety assessment of potassium silicate, sodium metasilicate, and sodium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Amy R

    2005-01-01

    Metasilicate, and Sodium Silicate ranged from negligible to severe, depending on the species tested and the molar ratio and concentration tested. Sodium Metasilicate was negative in the local lymph node assay (LLNA), but a delayed-type hypersensitivity response was observed in mice. Potassium Silicate was nonirritating in two acute eye irritation studies in rabbits. Sodium Metasilicate (42.4% H2O) was corrosive to the rabbit eye. Sodium Silicate was a severe eye irritant in some eye irritation studies, but was irritating or nonirritating in others. A skin freshener containing Sodium Silicate was nonirritating. Sodium Metasilicate was nonmutagenic in bacterial cells. Rats given Sodium Silicate (600 and 1200 ppm of added silica) in the drinking water in reproductive studies produced a reduced number of offspring: to 67% of controls at 600 ppm and to 80% of controls at 1200 ppm. Three adult rats injected intratesticularly and subcutaneously with 0.8 mM/kg of Sodium Silicate showed no morphological changes in the testes and no effect on the residual spermatozoa in the ductus deferens. Sodium Metasilicate (37% in a detergent) mixed with water was a severe skin irritant when tested on intact and abraded human skin, but 6%, 7%, and 13% Sodium Silicate were negligible skin irritants to intact and abraded human skin. Sodium Silicate (10% of a 40% aqueous solution) was negative in a repeat-insult predictive patch test in humans. The same aqueous solution of Sodium Silicate was considered a mild irritant under normal use conditions in a study of cumulative irritant properties. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel recognized the irritation potential of these ingredients, especially in leave-on products. However, because these ingredients have limited dermal absorption and Sodium Metasilicate is a GRAS direct food substance, the Panel deemed the ingredients safe for use in cosmetic products in the practices of use and concentration described in this safety assessment, when

  16. Final characterization and safety screen report of double shell tank 241-AP-105 for evaporator campaign 97-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    Evaporator candidate feed from tank 241-AP-105 (hereafter referred to as AP-105) was characterized for physical, inorganic, organic and radiochemical parameters by the 222-S Laboratory as directed by the Tank Sample and Analysis Plan (TSAP), References 1 through 4, and Engineering Change Notice, number 635332, Reference 5. This data package satisfies the requirement for a format IV, final report as described in Reference 1. This data package is also a follow-up to the 45-Day safety screen results for tank AP-105, Reference 8, which was issued on November 5, 1996, and is attached as Section II to this report. Preliminary data in the form of summary analytical tables were provided to the project in advance of this final report to enable early estimation of evaporator operational parameters, using the Predict modeling program. Analyses were performed at the 222-S Laboratory as defined and specified in the TSAP and the Laboratory's Quality Assurance P1an, References 6 and 7. Any deviations from the instructions documented in the TSAP are discussed in this narrative and are supported with additional documentation

  17. A report on developing a checklist to assess company plans focused on improving safety awareness, safe behaviour and safety culture: final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijger, N.; Starren, H.; Keus, M.; Gort, J.; Vervoort, M.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the process of developing a checklist to asses company plans focused on improving safety awareness, safe behaviour and safety culture. These plans are part of a programme initiated by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment aiming at improving the safety performance of

  18. Information need about the safety of the final disposal of nuclear waste. Information receiver's views in Eurajoki, Kuhmo and Aeaenekoski municipalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautakangas, H.

    1997-03-01

    The study analyses the public's information need about the safety issues related to the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel generated by the Finnish nuclear power stations. Locals in three municipalities that are studied as possible sites for final disposal were interviewed for the study. Earlier studies made in Finland had indicated that the public's knowledge about safety issues related to the final disposal was almost opposite to the findings of the natural sciences. Also, the public had expressed a wish to receive more information from the safety authority, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). This study therefore had two basic objectives: To find out what kind of safety information the locals need and what the safety authority's role could be in providing information. The main results show interest and need especially for information concerning the disposal phases taking place on the ground level, such as nuclear waste transportation and encapsulation. Also, the interviews show a clear need and desire for an impartial actor such as STUK in the information and communication process. (author) (107 refs.)

  19. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor design. Supplement 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This report supplements the final safety evaluation report (FSER) for the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design. The FSER was issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff as NUREG-1503 in July 1994 to document the NRC staff's review of the US ABWR design. The US ABWR design was submitted by GE Nuclear Energy (GE) in accordance with the procedures of Subpart B to Part 52 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This supplement documents the NRC staff's review of the changes to the US ABWR design documentation since the issuance of the FSER. GE made these changes primarily as a result of first-of-a-kind-engineering (FOAKE) and as a result of the design certification rulemaking for the ABWR design. On the basis of its evaluations, the NRC staff concludes that the confirmatory issues in NUREG-1503 are resolved, that the changes to the ABWR design documentation are acceptable, and that GE's application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B to 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR design

  20. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the System 80+ design: Docket Number 52-002. Supplement 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This report supplements the final safety evaluation report (FSER) for the System 80+ standard design. The FSER was issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff as NUREG-1462 in August 1994 to document the NRC staff's review of the System 80+ design. The System 80+ design was submitted by Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE), in accordance with the procedures of Subpart B to Part 52 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This supplement documents the NRC staff's review of the changes to the System 80+ design documentation since the issuance of the FSER. ABB-CE made these changes as a result of its review of the System 80+ design details. The NRC staff concludes that the changes to the System 80+ design documentation are acceptable, and that ABB-CE's application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B to 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the System 80+ design

  1. Efficacy and safety of fasudil in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Final results of a randomized trial of fasudil versus nimodipine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jizong; Zhou Dingbiao; Guo Jing

    2011-01-01

    Fasudil is believed to be at least equally effective as nimodipine for the prevention of cerebral vasospasm and subsequent ischemic injury in patients undergoing surgery for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We report the final results of a randomized, open trial to compare the efficacy and safety of fasudil with nimodipine. A total of 63 patients undergoing surgery for SAH received fasudil and 66 received nimodipine between 1998 and 2004. Symptomatic vasospasm, low density areas on computed tomography (CT), clinical outcomes, and adverse events were all recorded, and the results were compared between the fasudil and nimodipine groups. Absence of symptomatic vasospasm, occurrence of low density areas associated with vasospasm on CT, and occurrence of adverse events were similar between the two groups. The clinical outcomes were more favorable in the fasudil group than in the nimodipine group (p=0.040). The proportion of patients with good clinical outcome was 74.5% (41/55) in the fasudil group and 61.7% (37/60) in the nimodipine group. There were no serious adverse events reported in the fasudil group. The present results suggest that fasudil is equally or more effective than nimodipine for the prevention of cerebral vasospasm and subsequent ischemic injury in patients undergoing surgery for SAH. (author)

  2. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor design. Supplement 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report supplements the final safety evaluation report (FSER) for the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design. The FSER was issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff as NUREG-1503 in July 1994 to document the NRC staff`s review of the US ABWR design. The US ABWR design was submitted by GE Nuclear Energy (GE) in accordance with the procedures of Subpart B to Part 52 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This supplement documents the NRC staff`s review of the changes to the US ABWR design documentation since the issuance of the FSER. GE made these changes primarily as a result of first-of-a-kind-engineering (FOAKE) and as a result of the design certification rulemaking for the ABWR design. On the basis of its evaluations, the NRC staff concludes that the confirmatory issues in NUREG-1503 are resolved, that the changes to the ABWR design documentation are acceptable, and that GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B to 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR design.

  3. TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) integrated control decision team (ICDT) meetings January 22 - 31,1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saladin, V.L.

    1997-01-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) letter 97-MSD-163 dated January 15, 1997, directed the Project Hanford Management Contractor (Contractor), Fluor Daniel Hanford, inc., to form a joint RL-Contractor Integrated Control Decision Team (ICDT) to evaluate the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) accident scenarios that were identified to be above the risk evaluation guidelines (radiological and/or toxicological) defined by the April 8, 1996, letter from J. Kinzer, RL-TWRS (96-MSO-069) to Dr. A. L. Trego, Westinghouse Hanford Company. The ICDT evaluated six postulated accidents from the draft FSAR which had analyzed consequences above the DOE directed risk evaluation guidelines after controls were applied. The accidents were: (1) Organic Solvent Fires; (2) Organic Salt-Nitrate Fire; (3) Spray Leak; (4) Flammable Gas; (5) Steam Intrusion; and (6) Seismic Event. Five of the postulated accidents exceed radiological risk guidelines. Although the postulated steam intrusion accident does not exceed the radiological risk guidelines, it was considered in the ICDT evaluation because its calculated consequences exceed toxicological risk evaluation guidelines. Figure 1 delineates the mitigated and unmitigated risk evaluations performed for the FSAR

  4. Final hazard classification and auditable safety analysis for the 308 Building Complex during post-deactivation surveillance and maintenance mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexheimer, D.

    1996-11-01

    This document summarizes the inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials present within the 308 Building Complex, and presents the hazard evaluation methodology used to prepare the hazard classification for the Complex. The complex includes the 308 Building (process area and office facilities) and the 308 Building Annex, which includes the former Neutron Radiography Facility containing a shutdown (and partially decommissioned) reactor. This document applies to the post-deactivation surveillance and maintenance mode only, and provides an authorization basis limited to surveillance and maintenance activities. This document does not authorize decommissioning and decontamination activities, movement of fissile materials, modification to facility confinement structures, nor the introduction or storage of additional radionuclides in the 308 Building Complex. This document established a final hazard classification and identifies appropriate and adequate safety functions and controls to reduce or mitigate the risk associated with the surveillance and maintenance mode. The most consequential hazard event scenario is a postulated unmitigated release from an earthquake event involving the entire complex. That release is equivalent to 30% of the Nuclear Category 3 threshold adjusted as allowed by DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE 1992). The dominant isotopes are 239 Pu, 240 Pu, and 241 Am in the gloveboxes

  5. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Deliverable 0.1: Final project report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, P. Hill, J. Morris, A.P. Welsh, R. Talbot, R. Muhlrad, N. Vallet, G. Yannis, G. Papadimitriou, E. Evgenikos, P. Dupont, E. Martensen, H. Hermitte, T. Bos, N. & Aarts, L.

    2015-01-01

    The European Road Safety Observatory was established European Commission and first announced in the 2001 Transport White Paper1. It was further developed in the 2003 Road Safety Action Plan 2 where the Commission announced it was to establish a new European Road Safety Observatory (ERSO) to

  6. Application of the new requirements of safety of the IAEA for the previous management to the final disposal of radioactive waste in the region: a personal vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sed, Luis Andres Jova

    2013-01-01

    The work includes the requirements for the responsibilities associated with the management prior to the final disposal of radioactive waste and as they are referred to in the Region. Also discusses the requirements for the main stages of the management prior to the final disposal of radioactive waste. A very important section of the new requirements is that establish requirements for safe operation of facilities management prior to the final disposal of radioactive wastes and the implementation of activities under conditions of safety and development. The work is emphatic on the importance of safety justification since the beginning of the development of a facility as a basis for the decision-making and approval process. Emphasis is also on the gradual approach which should provide for the collection, analysis and interpretation of the relevant technical data, plans for the design and operation, and the formulation of the justification of the security. This paper gives a personal view of the situation in the Region

  7. Increased component safety through improved methods for residual stress analysis. Subprojects. Consideration of real component geometries (phase 1). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nau, Andreas; Scholtes, B.

    2014-01-01

    Residual stresses can be result in both detrimental as well as beneficial consequences on the component's strength and lifetime. A most detailed knowledge of the residual stress state is a pre-requisite for the assessment of the component's performance. The mechanical methods for residual stress measurements are classified in non-destructive, destructive and semi-destructive methods. The two commonly used (semi-destructive) mechanical methods are the hole drilling and the ring core method. In the context of reactor safety research of the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi), two fundamental and interacting weak points of the hole drilling as well as of the ring core method are investigated. On the one hand, there are effects concerning geometrical boundary conditions of the components and on the other hand, there are influences of plasticity due to notch effects. Both aspects affect the released strain field, when the material is removed and finally, the calculated residual stresses. The first issue mentioned above is under the responsibility of Institute of Materials Engineering - Metallic Materials (Kassel University) and the last one will be investigated by University of Stuttgart-Otto-Graf-Institut - materials testing institute. Within the framework of this project it could be demonstrated that updated calibration coefficients lead to more reliable residual stress calculation in contrast to existing ones. These findings are valid for points of measurements on components without geometrical boundary effects like edges or shoulders. Reasons are high developed Finite-Element software packages and the opportunity of modelling the point of measurement (hole geometry, layout of the strain gauges) and its vicinity more in detail. Special challenges are multi-axial residual stress depth distributions and the geometry of components composing edges and claddings. Unlike existing analyses considering uni-axial and homogeneous stress states, bi

  8. Annex D 200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report Volume 5 (FSAR) (Section 1 and 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARRELL, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft 2 and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped offsite to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the FFTF SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF)TRIGA--One Rad-Vault container stores two DOT-6M 3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-1 cask with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, are used for storing commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available

  9. Additional guidance for including nuclear safety equivalency in the Canister Storage Building and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility final safety analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garvin, L.J.

    1997-05-20

    This document provides guidance for the production of safety analysis reports that must meet both DOE Order 5480.23 and STD 3009, and be in compliance with the DOE regulatory policy that imposes certain NRC requirements.

  10. Additional guidance for including nuclear safety equivalency in the Canister Storage Building and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility final safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvin, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    This document provides guidance for the production of safety analysis reports that must meet both DOE Order 5480.23 and STD 3009, and be in compliance with the DOE regulatory policy that imposes certain NRC requirements

  11. Application and further development of models for the final repository safety analyses on the clearance of radioactive materials for disposal. Final report; Anwendung und Weiterentwicklung von Modellen fuer Endlagersicherheitsanalysen auf die Freigabe radioaktiver Stoffe zur Deponierung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artmann, Andreas; Larue, Juergen; Seher, Holger; Weiss, Dietmar

    2014-08-15

    The project of application and further development of models for the final repository safety analyses on the clearance of radioactive materials for disposal is aimed to study the long-term safety using repository-specific simulation programs with respect to radiation exposure for different scenarios. It was supposed to investigate whether the 10 micro Sv criterion can be guaranteed under consideration of human intrusion scenarios. The report covers the following issues: selection and identification of models and codes and the definition of boundary conditions; applicability of conventional repository models for long-term safety analyses; modeling results for the pollutant release and transport and calculation of radiation exposure; determination of the radiation exposure.

  12. Safety Evaluation Report related to the final design approval of the GESSAR II BWR/6 Nuclear Island Design (Docket No. 50-447). Supplement No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Supplement 3 to the Safety Evaluation Report (SER) for the application filed by General Electric Company for the final design approval for the GE BWR/6 nuclear island design has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report supplements the GESSAR II SER (NUREG-0979), issued in April 1983, summarizing the results of the staff's safety review of the GESSAR II BWR/6 nuclear island design. Subject to favorable resolution of the items discussed in this supplement, the staff concludes that the GESSAR II design satisfactorily addresses the severe-accident concerns described in draft NUREG-1070

  13. 75 FR 51818 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health; Final Effect of Designation of a Class of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health...: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS... a number of work days aggregating at least 250 work days, occurring either solely under this...

  14. 76 FR 62409 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health; Final Effect of Designation of a Class of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health...: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS..., from January 1, 1961 through June 30, 1970, for a number of work days aggregating at least 250 work...

  15. 75 FR 74733 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health; Final Effect of Designation of a Class of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health...: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS... aggregating at least 250 work days, occurring either solely under this employment, or in combination with work...

  16. 75 FR 51816 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health; Final Effect of Designation of a Class of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health...: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS... number of work days aggregating at least 250 work days, occurring either solely under this employment or...

  17. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Plagge, C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

    Fire Safety – Essential for a particle detector The CMS detector is a marvel of high technology, one of the most precise particle measurement devices we have built until now. Of course it has to be protected from external and internal incidents like the ones that can occur from fires. Due to the fire load, the permanent availability of oxygen and the presence of various ignition sources mostly based on electricity this has to be addressed. Starting from the beam pipe towards the magnet coil, the detector is protected by flooding it with pure gaseous nitrogen during operation. The outer shell of CMS, namely the yoke and the muon chambers are then covered by an emergency inertion system also based on nitrogen. To ensure maximum fire safety, all materials used comply with the CERN regulations IS 23 and IS 41 with only a few exceptions. Every piece of the 30-tonne polyethylene shielding is high-density material, borated, boxed within steel and coated with intumescent (a paint that creates a thick co...

  18. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

      “Safety is the highest priority”: this statement from CERN is endorsed by the CMS management. An interpretation of this statement may bring you to the conclusion that you should stop working in order to avoid risks. If the safety is the priority, work is not! This would be a misunderstanding and misinterpretation. One should understand that “working safely” or “operating safely” is the priority at CERN. CERN personnel are exposed to different hazards on many levels on a daily basis. However, risk analyses and assessments are done in order to limit the number and the gravity of accidents. For example, this process takes place each time you cross the road. The hazard is the moving vehicle, the stake is you and the risk might be the risk of collision between both. The same principle has to be applied during our daily work. In particular, keeping in mind the general principles of prevention defined in the late 1980s. These principles wer...

  19. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Deliverable 1.6: Final Report of WP1 – road safety policy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muhlrad, N. Papadimitriou, E. & Yannis, G.

    2015-01-01

    The ‘Policy’ Work Package of DaCoTA was designed to fill in the gap in knowledge on road safety policy making processes, their institutional framework and the data, methods and technical tools needed to base policy formulation and adoption on scientifically-established evidence. More specifically,

  20. 45-Day safety screen results and final report for Tank 241-SX-113, Auger samples 94-AUG-028 and 95-AUG-029

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    This document serves as the 45-day report deliverable for tank 241-SX-113 auger samples collected on May 9 and 10, 1995. The samples were extruded, and analyzed by the 222-S Laboratory. Laboratory procedures completed include: differential scanning calorimetry; thermogravimetric analysis; and total alpha analysis. This report incudes the primary safety screening results obtained from the analyses. As the final report, the following are also included: chains of custody; the extrusion logbook; sample preparation data; and total alpha analysis raw data

  1. Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1987-01-01

    Aspects of fission reactors are considered - control, heat removal and containment. Brief descriptions of the reactor accidents at the SL-1 reactor (1961), Windscale (1957), Browns Ferry (1975), Three Mile Island (1979) and Chernobyl (1986) are given. The idea of inherently safe reactor designs is discussed. Safety assessment is considered under the headings of preliminary hazard analysis, failure mode analysis, event trees, fault trees, common mode failure and probabalistic risk assessments. These latter can result in a series of risk distributions linked to specific groups of fault sequences and specific consequences. A frequency-consequence diagram is shown. Fatal accident incidence rates in different countries including the United Kingdom for various industries are quoted. The incidence of fatal cancers from occupational exposure to chemicals is tabulated. Human factors and the acceptability of risk are considered. (U.K.)

  2. Generic requirements specification for qualifying a commercially available PLC for safety-related applications in nuclear power plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostenso, A.; May, R.

    1996-12-01

    This is a specification for qualifying a commercially available PLC for application to safety systems in nuclear power plants. The specifications are suitable for evaluating a particular PLC product line as a platform for safety-related applications, establishing a suitable qualification test program, and confirming that the manufacturer has a quality assurance program that is adequate for safety-related applications or is sufficiently complete that, with a reasonable set of compensatory actions, it can be brought into conformance. The specification includes requirements for: (1) quality assurance measures applied to the qualification activities, (2) documentation to support the qualification, and (3) documentation to provide the information needed for applying the qualified PLC platform to a specific application. The specifications are designed to encompass a broad range of safety applications; however, qualifying a particular platform for a different range of applications can be accomplished by appropriate adjustments to the requirements

  3. SCOPE safety-controls optimization by performance evaluation: A systematic approach for safety-related decisions at the Hanford Tank Remediation System. Phase 1, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, K.D.; Williams, D.C.; Slezak, S.E.; Young, M.L. [and others

    1996-12-01

    The Department of Energy`s Hanford Tank Waste Remediation system poses a significant challenge for hazard management because of the uncertainty that surrounds many of the variables that must be considered in decisions on safety and control strategies. As a result, site managers must often operate under excessively conservative and expensive assumptions. This report describes a systematic approach to quantifying the uncertainties surrounding the critical parameters in control decisions (e.g., condition of the tanks, kinds of wastes, types of possible accidents) through the use of expert elicitation methods. The results of the elicitations would then be used to build a decision support system and accident analysis model that would allow managers to see how different control strategies would affect the cost and safety of a facility configuration.

  4. SCOPE safety-controls optimization by performance evaluation: A systematic approach for safety-related decisions at the Hanford Tank Remediation System. Phase 1, final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, K.D.; Williams, D.C.; Slezak, S.E.; Young, M.L.

    1996-12-01

    The Department of Energy's Hanford Tank Waste Remediation system poses a significant challenge for hazard management because of the uncertainty that surrounds many of the variables that must be considered in decisions on safety and control strategies. As a result, site managers must often operate under excessively conservative and expensive assumptions. This report describes a systematic approach to quantifying the uncertainties surrounding the critical parameters in control decisions (e.g., condition of the tanks, kinds of wastes, types of possible accidents) through the use of expert elicitation methods. The results of the elicitations would then be used to build a decision support system and accident analysis model that would allow managers to see how different control strategies would affect the cost and safety of a facility configuration

  5. Final disposal of spent fuel in the Finnish bedrock. Scope and requirements for site-specific safety analysis; Kaeytetyn polttoaineen loppusijoitus Suomen kallioperaeaen. Paikkakohtaisen turvallisuusanalyysin edellytykset ja mahdollisuudet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The report is a summary of the research conducted in the period 1993 to 1996 into safety of spent fuel final disposal. The principal goal of the research in this period, as set in 1993, was to develop a strategy for site-specific safety analysis. At the same time efforts were to be continued to gather data and validate the technical approach for the analysis. The work aimed at having the data needed for the analysis available at the end of year 1998. A safety assessment update, TILA-96, prepared by VTT Energy, is published as a separate report. The assessment is based on the TVO-92 safety analysis, but takes into account the knowledge acquired after 1992 on safety aspects of the disposal system and the data gathered from the site investigations made by TVO and from the beginning of 1996, by Posiva. Since the site investigations are still ongoing and much of the data gathered still pending interpretation, only limited amount of new site-specific information has been available for the present assessment. (172 refs.).

  6. Study on the safety and on international developments of small modular reactors (SMR). Final report; Studie zur Sicherheit und zu internationalen Entwicklungen von Small Modular Reactors (SMR). Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, Sebastian; Kruessenberg, Anne; Schaffrath, Andreas; Zipper, Reinhard

    2015-05-15

    This report documents the work and results of the project RS1521 Study of Safety and International Development of Small Modular Reactors (SMR). The aims of this study can be summarized as - setting-up of a sound overview on SMR, - identification of essential issues of reactor safety research and future R and D projects, - identification of needs for adaption of system codes of GRS used in reactor safety research. The sound overview consists of the descriptions of in total 69 SMR (Small and Medium Sized Rector) concepts (32 light water reactors (LWR), 22 liquid metal cooled reactors (LMR), 2 heavy water reactors, 9 gas cooled reactors (GCR) and 4 molten salt reactors (MSR)). It provides information about the core, the cooling circuits and the safety systems. The quality of the given specifications depends on their availability and public accessibility. Using the safety requirements for nuclear power plants and the fundamental safety functions, the safety relevant issues of the described SMR concepts were identified. The systems and measures used in the safety requirements were summarized in table form. Finally it was evaluated whether these systems and measures can be already simulated with the nuclear simulation chain of GRS and where further code development and validation is necessary. The results of this study can be summarized as follows: Many of the current SMR concepts are based on integral design. Here the main components like steam generators, intermediate heat exchangers or - in case of forced convection core cooling - main cooling pumps are located within the reactor pressure vessel. Most of the SMR fulfil highest safety standards and their safety concepts are mainly based on passive safety systems. The safety of theses reactors is achieved indefinitely without energy supply or additional measures of the operators. Since SMR's aim is not only to produce electricity but also couple them with chemical or physical process plants, the safety aspects of

  7. Final report on the safety assessment of sodium cetearyl sulfate and related alkyl sulfates as used in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Monice; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Klaassen, Curtis D; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Alan Andersen, F

    2010-05-01

    Sodium cetearyl sulfate is the sodium salt of a mixture of cetyl and stearyl sulfate. The other ingredients in this safety assessment are also alkyl salts, including ammonium coco-sulfate, ammonium myristyl sulfate, magnesium coco-sulfate, sodium cetyl sulfate, sodium coco/hydrogenated tallow sulfate, sodium coco-sulfate, sodium decyl sulfate, sodium ethylhexyl sulfate, sodium myristyl sulfate, sodium oleyl sulfate, sodium stearyl sulfate, sodium tallow sulfate, sodium tridecyl sulfate, and zinc coco-sulfate. These ingredients are surfactants used at concentrations from 0.1% to 29%, primarily in soaps and shampoos. Many of these ingredients are not in current use. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel previously completed a safety assessment of sodium and ammonium lauryl sulfate. The data available for sodium lauryl sulfate and ammonium lauryl sulfate provide sufficient basis for concluding that sodium cetearyl sulfate and related alkyl sulfates are safe in the practices of use and concentration described in the safety assessment.

  8. Survey on the use of configuration risk and safety management tools at nuclear power plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, K.N.; Read, J.W.; Dagan, W.J.; Bidwell, D.A.

    1998-09-01

    In order to provide input to Electricite de France's (EDF) evaluation of the use of configuration safety and risk management tools in the French plants and to collect information to guide the EPRI efforts to provide useful tools for the EPRI member utilities and international partners, a joint effort to survey US and selected non-US nuclear power stations was conducted. This survey examined the use of various approaches, techniques, and software tools that are being used to evaluate the safety and risk aspects of plant configuration changes and configuration changes during plant outages as well as during power operation. The use of these tools has increased in recent years as a result of efforts to optimize plant maintenance programs, improve plant safety, and increase plant reliability and availability. This report provides the results of the survey of 37 organizations covering 54 nuclear plant sites and 97 reactor units

  9. Review guidelines for software languages for use in nuclear power plant safety systems: Final report. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, M.; Decker, D.; Graff, S.; Green, W.; Lin, D.; Dinsmore, G.; Koch, S. [SoHaR, Inc., Beverly Hills, CA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Guidelines for the programming and auditing of software written in high level languages for safety systems are presented. The guidelines are derived from a framework of issues significant to software safety which was gathered from relevant standards and research literature. Language-specific adaptations of these guidelines are provided for the following high level languages: Ada83 and Ada95; C and C++; International Electrochemical Commission (IEC) Standard 1131-3 Ladder Logic, Sequential Function Charts, Structured Text, and Function Block Diagrams; Pascal; and PL/M. Appendices to the report include a tabular summary of the guidelines and additional information on selected languages.

  10. Pantex Plant final safety analysis report, Zone 4 magazines. Staging or interim storage for nuclear weapons and components: Issue D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) contains a detailed description and evaluation of the significant environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) issues associated with the operations of the Pantex Plant modified-Richmond and steel arch construction (SAC) magazines in Zone 4. It provides (1) an overall description of the magazines, the Pantex Plant, and its surroundings; (2) a systematic evaluations of the hazards that could occur as a result of the operations performed in these magazines; (3) descriptions and analyses of the adequacy of the measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards; and (4) analyses of potential accidents and their associated risks.

  11. Review guidelines for software languages for use in nuclear power plant safety systems: Final report. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, M.; Decker, D.; Graff, S.; Green, W.; Lin, D.; Dinsmore, G.; Koch, S.

    1997-10-01

    Guidelines for the programming and auditing of software written in high level languages for safety systems are presented. The guidelines are derived from a framework of issues significant to software safety which was gathered from relevant standards and research literature. Language-specific adaptations of these guidelines are provided for the following high level languages: Ada83 and Ada95; C and C++; International Electrochemical Commission (IEC) Standard 1131-3 Ladder Logic, Sequential Function Charts, Structured Text, and Function Block Diagrams; Pascal; and PL/M. Appendices to the report include a tabular summary of the guidelines and additional information on selected languages

  12. SUNflower +6 : a comparative study of the development of road safety in the SUNflower +6 countries : final report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegman, F.C.M. Eksler, V. Hayes, S. Lynam, D. Morsink, P. & Oppe, S. (eds.)

    2006-01-01

    This project has developed the SUNflower approach, originally used to assess Sweden, Great Britain and the Netherlands, for comparing safety programmes and records between countries. The approach has been applied to nine countries, adding three Central European countries (the Czech Republic, Hungary

  13. Safety analysis report: packages 238Pu oxide shipping cask (packaging of fissile and other radioactive materials). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.E.; Gates, A.A.

    1975-06-01

    Plutonium-238 (as PuO 2 powder) is shipped in triple-container stainless steel shipping casks in compliance with ERDA Manual Chapter 0529 (ERDAM 0529), Safety Standards for the Packaging of Fissile and Other Radioactive Materials. (U.S.)

  14. A Fire Safety Certification System for Board and Care Operators and Staff. SBIR Phase II: Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bonnie L.

    This report describes Phase II of a project which developed a system for delivering fire safety training to board and care providers who serve adults with developmental disabilities. Phase II focused on developing and pilot testing a "train the trainers" workshop for instructors and field testing the provider's workshop. Evaluation of…

  15. A Fire Safety Certification System for Board and Care Operators and Staff. SBIR Phase I: Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bonnie L.

    This report describes the development and pilot testing of a fire safety certification system for board and care operators and staff who serve clients with developmental disabilities. During Phase 1, training materials were developed, including a trainer's manual, a participant's coursebook a videotape, an audiotape, and a pre-/post test which was…

  16. Basic Program Elements for Federal employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and related matters; Subpart I for Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    OSHA is issuing a final rule amending the Basic Program Elements to require Federal agencies to submit their occupational injury and illness recordkeeping information to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and OSHA on an annual basis. The information, which is already required to be created and maintained by Federal agencies, will be used by BLS to aggregate injury and illness information throughout the Federal government. OSHA will use the information to identify Federal establishments with high incidence rates for targeted inspection, and assist in determining the most effective safety and health training for Federal employees. The final rule also interprets several existing basic program elements in our regulations to clarify requirements applicable to Federal agencies, amends the date when Federal agencies must submit to the Secretary of Labor their annual report on occupational safety and health programs, amends the date when the Secretary of Labor must submit to the President the annual report on Federal agency safety and health, and clarifies that Federal agencies must include uncompensated volunteers when reporting and recording occupational injuries and illnesses.

  17. Safe China final report. Promoting the EU and German standards and practices of environmental protection and industrial safety in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, A.; Guntrum, R.; Liu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    This document presents the results of the international technology transfer and cooperation project SafeChina (''Promoting the EU and German standards and practices of Environmental Protection and Industrial Safety in China'', www.safechina.risk-technologies.com). The purpose of the project was to build an education, training and certification infrastructure and to offer to Chinese engineers and other professionals the possibility to learn about the EU HSE practices and regulation and qualify as Environmental- and Safety engineers according to the EU criteria, guidelines and practice. The main partners in the project have been Steinbeis University Berlin/Steinbeis Transfer Institute Advanced Risk Technologies, and the OEG mbH (Deutsche lnvestitions- und Entwicklungsgesellschaft mbH), subsidiary of KfW Banking Group, Germany. Main Chinese partners were Beijing Municipal Institute of Labour Protection and Capital University of Economics and Business, Beijing.

  18. Safe China final report. Promoting the EU and German standards and practices of environmental protection and industrial safety in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, A.; Guntrum, R.; Liu, Y. (eds.)

    2013-07-01

    This document presents the results of the international technology transfer and cooperation project SafeChina (''Promoting the EU and German standards and practices of Environmental Protection and Industrial Safety in China'', www.safechina.risk-technologies.com). The purpose of the project was to build an education, training and certification infrastructure and to offer to Chinese engineers and other professionals the possibility to learn about the EU HSE practices and regulation and qualify as Environmental- and Safety engineers according to the EU criteria, guidelines and practice. The main partners in the project have been Steinbeis University Berlin/Steinbeis Transfer Institute Advanced Risk Technologies, and the OEG mbH (Deutsche lnvestitions- und Entwicklungsgesellschaft mbH), subsidiary of KfW Banking Group, Germany. Main Chinese partners were Beijing Municipal Institute of Labour Protection and Capital University of Economics and Business, Beijing.

  19. Engineering safety review mission Krsko NPP external events PSA. Ljubljana, Slovenia 19-23 February 1996. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnitz, R.J.; Smith, P.

    1996-01-01

    Within the scope of the TC Project RER/9/035, a review mission visited Ljubljana, Slovenia, 19-23 February 1996. Two outside experts, Messrs. R.J. Budnitz (USA) and Paul Smith (USA), as well as a staff member, A. Guerpinar (ESS-NSNI) took part in the review. The purpose of the mission was to assist the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration to review the external events PSA prepared by Krsko NPP consultants Westinghouse Energy Systems Europe and EQE International. Another seismic safety review was performed concurrently in Ljubljana involving the investigations in relation to the tectonic stability and reassessment of the design basis ground motion characterization for the Krsko NPP site

  20. ITER Safety Task NID-5A, Subtask 1-1: Source terms and energies - initial tritium source terms. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, C.; Kalyanam, K.M.; Tanaka, M.R.; Sood, S.; Natalizio, A.; Delisle, M.

    1995-02-01

    The overall objective of the Early Safety and Environmental Characterization Study (ESECS) is to assess the environmental impact of tritium using appropriate assumptions on a hypothetical site for ITER, having the r eference s ite characteristics as proposed by the JCT. The objective of this work under the above subtask 1-1, NID-5a, is to determine environmental source terms (i.e., process source term x containment release fraction) for the fuel cycle and cooling systems. The work is based on inventories and process source terms (i.e., inventory x mobilization fraction), provided by others (under Task NID 3b). The results of this work form the basis for the determination, by others, of the off-site dose (i.e., environmental source term x dose/release ratio). For the determination of the environmental source terms, the TMAP4 code has been utilized (ref 1). This code is approved by ITER for safety assessment. 6 refs

  1. Safety analysis report: packages. LP-50 tritium package (packaging of fissile and other radioactive materials). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, A.A.; McCarthy, P.G.; Edl, J.W.

    1975-04-01

    Elemental tritium is shipped at low pressure in a stainless steel container (LP-50) sealed within an aluminum vessel and surrounded by a minimum of 4-in. thick Celotex insulation in a steel drum. The structural, thermal, containment, shielding, and criticality safety aspects of this package are evaluated. Procedures for loading and unloading, empty cask transport, acceptance testing and maintenance, and quality assurance requirements for the LP-50 package are described in detail. (U.S.)

  2. Safety analysis report; packages LP-50 tritium package. (Packaging of fissile and other radioactive materials). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, A.A.; McCarthy, P.G.; Edl, J.W.; Chalfant, G.G.

    1975-05-01

    Elemental tritium is shipped at low pressure in a stainless steel container (LP-50) surrounded by an aluminum vessel and Celotex insulation at least 4 in. thick in a steel drum. The total weight of the package is 260 lbs maximum. The various components that constitute the package are described and are shown in 7 figures. The safety analysis includes: structural evaluations; thermal evaluations; containment; operating procedures; acceptance tests and maintenance program; and design review

  3. DASS: A decision aid integrating the safety parameter display system and emergency functional recovery procedures. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.E.

    1984-08-01

    Using a stand-alone developmental test-bed consisting of a minicomputer and a high-resolution color graphics computer, displays and supporting software incorporating advanced on-line decision-aid concepts were developed and evaluated. The advanced concepts embodied in displays designed for the operating crew of a PWR plant include: (1) an integrated display format which supports a top-down approach to problem detection, recovery planning, and control; (2) introduction of nonobservable plant parameters derived from first principles mass and energy balances as part of the displayed information; and (3) systematic processing and display of key success path (plant safety system) attributes. The prototype system, referred to as the PWR-DASS (Disturbance Analysis and Surveillance System), consists of 18 displays targeted for principal use by the control room systems manager. PWR-DASS was conceived to fulfill an operational void not fully supported by safety parameter display systems or reformulated emergency procedure guidelines. The results from the evaluation by licensed operators suggest that organization and display of desired critical safety function and success path information as incorporated in the PWR-DASS prototype can support the systems manager's overview. The results also point to the need for several refinements required for a field grade system, and to the need for a simulator-based evaluation of the prototype or its successor. (author)

  4. Final Report: Safety of Plasma Components and Aerosol Transport During Hard Disruptions and Accidental Energy Release in Fusion Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourham, Mohamed A.; Gilligan, John G.

    1999-08-14

    Safety considerations in large future fusion reactors like ITER are important before licensing the reactor. Several scenarios are considered hazardous, which include safety of plasma-facing components during hard disruptions, high heat fluxes and thermal stresses during normal operation, accidental energy release, and aerosol formation and transport. Disruption events, in large tokamaks like ITER, are expected to produce local heat fluxes on plasma-facing components, which may exceed 100 GW/m{sup 2} over a period of about 0.1 ms. As a result, the surface temperature dramatically increases, which results in surface melting and vaporization, and produces thermal stresses and surface erosion. Plasma-facing components safety issues extends to cover a wide range of possible scenarios, including disruption severity and the impact of plasma-facing components on disruption parameters, accidental energy release and short/long term LOCA's, and formation of airborne particles by convective current transport during a LOVA (water/air ingress disruption) accident scenario. Study, and evaluation of, disruption-induced aerosol generation and mobilization is essential to characterize database on particulate formation and distribution for large future fusion tokamak reactor like ITER. In order to provide database relevant to ITER, the SIRENS electrothermal plasma facility at NCSU has been modified to closely simulate heat fluxes expected in ITER.

  5. Safety and environmental impact of the dual coolant blanket concept. SEAL subtask 6.2, final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleefeldt, K.; Dammel, F.; Gabel, K.; Jordan, T.; Schmuck, I.

    1996-03-01

    The European Union has been engaged since 1989 in a programme to develop tritium breeding blankets for application in a fusion power reactor. There are four concepts under development, namely two of the solid breeder type and two of the liquid breeder type. At the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe one blanket concept of each line has been pursued so far with the so-called dual coolant type representing the liquid breeder line. In the dual coolant concept the breeder material (Pb-17Li) is circulated to external heat exchangers to carry away the bulk of the generated heat and to extract the tritium. Additionally, the heavily loaded first wall is cooled by high pressure helium gas. The safety and environmental impact of the dual coolant blanket concept has been assessed as part of the blanket concept selection excercise, a European concerted action, aiming at selecting the two most promising concepts for futher development. The topics investigated are: (a) Blanket materials and toxic materials inventory, (b) energy sources for mobilisation, (c) fault tolerance, (d) tritium and activation products release, and (e) waste generation and management. No insurmountable safety problems have been identified for the dual coolant blanket. The results of the assessment are described in this report. The information collected is also intended to serve as input to the EU 'Safety and Environmental Assessment of Fusion longterm Programme' (SEAL). The unresolved issues pertaining to the dual coolant blanket which would need further investigations in future programmes are outlined herein. (orig.) [de

  6. Final Report: Weatherization and Energy Conservation Education and Home Energy and Safety Review in the Aleutian Islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce Wright

    2011-08-30

    Aleutian/Pribilof Islands Association, Inc. (APIA) hired three part-time local community members that desire to be Energy Technicians. The energy technicians were trained in methods of weatherization assistance, energy conservation and home safety. They developed a listing of homes in the region that required weatherization, and conducted on-site weatherization and energy conservation education and a home energy and safety reviews in the communities of Akutan, False Pass, King Cove and Nelson Lagoon. Priority was given to these smaller communities as they tend to have the residences most in need of weatherization and energy conservation measures. Local residents were trained to provide all three aspects of the project: weatherization, energy conservation education and a home energy and safety review. If the total energy saved by installing these products is a 25% reduction (electrical and heating, both of which are usually produced by combustion of diesel fuel), and the average Alaska home produces 32,000 pounds of CO2 each year, so we have saved about: 66 homes x 16 tons of CO2 each year x .25 = 264 tons of CO2 each year.

  7. Final summary report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research Program 1994 - 1997; Sammanfattning av det nordiska forskningsprogrammet foer kaernsaekerhet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennerstedt, T.; Lemmens, A. [eds.

    1999-11-01

    This is a summary report of the NKS research program carried out 1994 - 1997. It is basically a compilation of the executive summaries of the final reports on the nine scientific projects carried out during that period. It highlights the conclusions, recommendations and other results of the projects. (au)

  8. 78 FR 23489 - Safety Zone; V.I. Carnival Finale, St. Thomas Harbor; St. Thomas, U.S.V.I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... waters of St. Thomas Harbor in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands during the V.I. Carnival Finale, a... through Friday, except Federal holidays. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have questions on this... event. The event will be held on the waters of St. Thomas Harbor, St. Thomas, U. S. Virgin Islands...

  9. 78 FR 22778 - Safety Zone; Corp. Event Finale UHC, St. Thomas Harbor; St. Thomas, U.S.V.I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... waters of St. Thomas Harbor in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands during the Corp. Event Finale UHC, a.... and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you..., St. Thomas, U. S. Virgin Islands. The fireworks will be launched from a barge stationed near the St...

  10. Preapplication safety evaluation report for the Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-metal reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoghue, J.E.; Donohew, J.N.; Golub, G.R.; Kenneally, R.M.; Moore, P.B.; Sands, S.P.; Throm, E.D.; Wetzel, B.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Associate Directorate for Advanced Reactors and License Renewal

    1994-02-01

    This preapplication safety evaluation report (PSER) presents the results of the preapplication desip review for die Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Project No. 674. The PRISM conceptual desip was submitted by the US Department of Energy in accordance with the NRC`s ``Statement of Policy for the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants`` (51 Federal Register 24643). This policy provides for the early Commission review and interaction with designers and licensees. The PRISM reactor desip is a small, modular, pool-type, liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor. The standard plant design consists of dim identical power blocks with a total electrical output rating of 1395 MWe- Each power block comprises three reactor modules, each with a thermal rating of 471 MWt. Each module is located in its own below-grade silo and is co to its own intermediate heat transport system and steam generator system. The reactors utilize a metallic-type fuel, a ternary alloy of U-Pu-Zr. The design includes passive reactor shutdown and passive decay heat removal features. The PSER is the NRC`s preliminary evaluation of the safety features in the PRISM design, including the projected research and development programs required to support the design and the proposed testing needs. Because the NRC review was based on a conceptual design, the PSER did not result in an approval of the design. Instead it identified certain key safety issues, provided some guidance on applicable licensing criteria, assessed the adequacy of the preapplicant`s research and development programs, and concluded that no obvious impediments to licensing the PRISM design had been identified.

  11. DFN Modeling for the Safety Case of the Final Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Olkiluoto, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhanarkaus, O.

    2017-12-01

    Olkiluoto Island is a site in SW Finland chosen to host a deep geological repository for high-level nuclear waste generated by nuclear power plants of power companies TVO and Fortum. Posiva, a nuclear waste management organization, submitted a construction license application for the Olkiluoto repository to the Finnish government in 2012. A key component of the license application was an integrated geological, hydrological and biological description of the Olkiluoto site. After the safety case was reviewed in 2015 by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority in Finland, Posiva was granted a construction license. Posiva is now preparing an updated safety case for the operating license application to be submitted in 2022, and an update of the discrete fracture network (DFN) model used for site characterization is part of that. The first step describing and modelling the network of fractures in the Olkiluoto bedrock was DFN model version 1 (2009), which presented an initial understanding of the relationships between rock fracturing and geology at the site and identified the important primary controls on fracturing. DFN model version 2 (2012) utilized new subsurface data from additional drillholes, tunnels and excavated underground facilities in ONKALO to better understand spatial variability of the geological controls on geological and hydrogeological fracture properties. DFN version 2 connected fracture geometric and hydraulic properties to distinct tectonic domains and to larger-scale hydraulically conductive fault zones. In the version 2 DFN model, geological and hydrogeological models were developed along separate parallel tracks. The version 3 (2017) DFN model for the Olkiluoto site integrates geological and hydrogeological elements into a single consistent model used for geological, rock mechanical, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical studies. New elements in the version 3 DFN model include a stochastic description of fractures within Brittle Fault Zones (BFZ

  12. Regulator and industry Co-operation on safety research: challenges and opportunities. Final report and answers to questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    A Group has been set up by the CSNI to identify and review the issues which hinder closer co-operation on research between regulators and industry, and to propose possible ways for resolving such issues while maintaining regulatory independence in decision-making. The Group has analyzed the potential advantages and disadvantages of regulator-industry collaboration in safety research and has also provided indications on how to overcome possible difficulties that can arise from such collaboration. The Group focused in particular on the issue of regulator independence, on means to preserve it and ways to demonstrate it to the public while undertaking collaboration with industry

  13. Energy. Health, environment, and safety hazards. Final report from the Energy Commission. Energi. Haelso- miljoe- och saekerhetsrisker. Slutbetaenkande av energikommissionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The Swedish Energy Commission in its main report (''Energy'', SOU 1978:17) presented its considerations and put forward its proposals for a Swedish Energy policy for the next decade. This report contains complementary information on health hazards, risks of major accidents and sabotage, and problems of waste management. The presentation takes the form of a comparison of such risks in relation to different sources of energy. The Commission is not unanimous in its estimates of the relative hazards of different energysystems. The Commission recommends the initiation of a large number of studies concerning the possible ways the increase the safety and reduce the adverse effects of energy production.

  14. Identification of the impacts of maintenance and testing upon the safety of LWR power plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husseiny, A.A.; Sabri, Z.A.; Turnage, J.J.

    1980-04-01

    The present study was designed to identify the impact of maintenance and testing (M and T) upon the safety of LWR power plants. The study involved data extraction from various sources reporting safety-related and operation-related nuclear power plant experience. Primary sources reviewed, including Licensee Event Reports (LER's) submitted to the NRC, revealed that only ten percent of events reported could be identified as M and T problems. The collected data were collated in a manner that would allow identification of principal types of problems which are associated with the performance of M and T tasks in LWR power plants. Frequencies of occurrence of events and their general endemic nature were analyzed using data clustering and pattern recognition techniques, as well as chi-square analyses for sparse contingency tables. The results of these analyses identified seven major categories of M and T error modes which were related to individual facilities and reactor type. Data review indicated that few M and T problems were directly related to procedural inadequacies, with the majority of events being attributable to human error

  15. ITER Safety Task NID-5A, Subtask 1-1: Source terms and energies - initial tritium source terms. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, C.; Kalyanam, K.M.; Tanaka, M.R.; Sood, S.; Natalizio, A.; Delisle, M.

    1995-02-01

    The overall objective of the Early Safety and Environmental Characterization Study (ESECS) is to assess the environmental impact of tritium using appropriate assumptions on a hypothetical site for ITER, having the r eference s ite characteristics as proposed by the JCT. The objective of this work under the above subtask 1-1, NID-5a, is to determine environmental source terms (i.e., process source term x containment release fraction) for the fuel cycle and cooling systems. The work is based on inventories and process source terms (i.e., inventory x mobilization fraction), provided by others (under Task NID 3b). The results of this work form the basis for the determination, by others, of the off-site dose (i.e., environmental source term x dose/release ratio). For the determination of the environmental source terms, the TMAP4 code has been utilized (ref 1). This code is approved by ITER for safety assessment. Volume 3 is a compilation of appendices giving detailed results of the study

  16. Final report of the 'Nordic thermal-hydraulic and safety network (NOTNET)' - Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuunanen, J.; Tuomainen, M. [VTT Processes (Finland)

    2005-04-01

    A Nordic network for thermal-hydraulics and nuclear safety research was started. The idea of the network is to combine the resources of different research teams in order to carry out more ambitious and extensive research programs than would be possible for the individual teams. From the very beginning, the end users of the research results have been integrated to the network. Aim of the network is to benefit the partners involved in nuclear energy in the Nordic Countries (power companies, reactor vendors, safety regulators, research units). First task within the project was to describe the resources (personnel, know-how, simulation tools, test facilities) of the various teams. Next step was to discuss with the end users about their research needs. Based on these steps, few most important research topics with defined goals were selected, and coarse road maps were prepared for reaching the targets. These road maps will be used as a starting point for planning the actual research projects in the future. The organisation and work plan for the network were established. National coordinators were appointed, as well as contact persons in each participating organisation, whether research unit or end user. This organisation scheme is valid for the short-term operation of NOTNET when only Nordic organisations take part in the work. Later on, it is possible to enlarge the network e.g. within EC framework programme. The network can now start preparing project proposals and searching funding for the first common research projects. (au)

  17. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 1: Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR section 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE's application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design

  18. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 2: Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR section 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE's application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design

  19. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 1: Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design.

  20. Site-specific evaluation of safety issues for high-level waste disposal in crystalline rocks. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobmann, M. (ed.) [DBE Technology GmbH, Peine (Germany)

    2016-03-31

    In the past, German research and development (R and D) activities regarding the disposal of radioactive waste, including spent nuclear fuel, focused mainly on domal rock salt because rock salt was the preferred host rock formation. In addition, generic R and D work regarding alternative host rocks (crystalline rocks and claystones) had been performed as well for a long time but with lower intensity. Around the year 2000, as a consequence of the moratorium on the Gorleben site, the Federal Government decided to have argillaceous rocks and crystalline rocks investigated in more detail. As Germany does not have any underground research and host rock characterization facilities, international cooperation received a high priority in the German R and D programme for high-level waste (HLW) disposal in order to increase the knowledge regarding alternative host rocks. Major cornerstones of the cooperation are joint projects and experiments conducted especially in underground research laboratories (URL) in crystalline rocks at the Grimsel Test Site (Switzerland) and the Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) Aespoe(Sweden) and in argillaceous rocks at the URL Mont Terri (Switzerland) and Bure (France). In 2001, the topic of radioactive waste disposal was integrated into the agreement between the former Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy (Minatom, now Rosatom) and the German Ministry of Labor (BMWA), now Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi), on cooperation regarding R and D on the peaceful utilization of nuclear power (agreement on ''Wirtschaftlich-Technische Zusammenarbeit'' WTZ). The intention was to have a new and interesting opportunity for international R and D cooperation regarding HLW disposal in crystalline rocks and the unique possibility to perform site-specific work, to test the safety demonstration tools available, and to expand the knowledge to all aspects specific to these host rocks. Another motivation for joining this cooperation was the

  1. ITER Safety Task NID-5A, Subtask 1-1: Source terms and energies - initial tritium source terms. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, C.; Kalyanam, K.M.; Tanaka, M.R.; Sood, S.; Natalizio, A.; Delisle, M.

    1995-02-01

    The overall objective of the Early Safety and Environmental Characterization Study (ESECS) is to assess the environmental impact of tritium using appropriate assumptions on a hypothetical site for ITER, having the r eference s ite characteristics as proposed by the JCT. The objective of this work under the above subtask 1-1, NID-5a, is to determine environmental source terms (i.e., process source term x containment release fraction) for the fuel cycle and cooling systems. The work is based on inventories and process source terms (i.e., inventory x mobilization fraction), provided by others (under Task NID 3b). The results of this work form the basis for the determination, by others, of the off-site dose (i.e., environmental source term x dose/release ratio). For the determination of the environmental source terms, the TMAP4 code has been utilized (ref 1). This code is approved by ITER for safety assessment. Volume 2 is a compilation of appendices giving detailed results of the study. 5 figs

  2. Nature of local benefits to communities impacted by sour gas development : Public safety and sour gas recommendation 79 : Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    The Provincial Advisory Committee on Public Safety and Sour Gas of Alberta issued a report in December 2002, in which recommendations were made on how to improve the sour gas regulatory system and reduce the impacts of sour gas on public safety and health. Recommendation 79 of this report called for a study to determine the nature of local benefits such as property taxes and local business opportunities, to communities affected by sour gas development. The present document was prepared by a multi-stake holder committee consisting of representatives from municipal government, academia, industry associations, the provincial government, and the public. One of its objectives was to identify matters of importance to stake holders concerning the study. The committee examined three major areas: economic benefit, net financial benefit to municipalities, and impact of sour gas development on local residents. The results indicated that the province and municipalities in which sour gas activities take place benefit from these activities. All Albertans benefit somewhat, and those living in areas where the sour gas industry operates might benefit through employment or the net benefit accrued to municipal government. A detailed quantification of local benefits at the municipal level for individuals was provided in this document. A full accounting of costs or negative impacts that may affect some individuals was not provided. refs., 6 tabs

  3. Investigation of lithium-thionyl chloride battery safety hazards. Final report 28 Sep 81-31 Dec 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attia, A.I.; Gabriel, K.A.; Burns, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    In the ten years since the feasibility of a lithium-thionyl chloride cell was first recognized (1) remarkable progress has been made in hardware development. Cells as large as 16,000 Ah (2) and batteries of 10.8 MWh (3) have been demonstrated. In a low rate configuration, energy densities of 500 to 600 Wh/kg are easily achieved. Even in the absence of reported explosions, safety would be a concern for such a dense energetic package; the energy density of a lithium-thionyl chloride cell is approaching that of dynamite (924 Wh/kg). In fact explosions have occurred. In general the hazards associated with lithium-thionyl chloride batteries may be divided into four categories: Explosions as a result of an error in battery design. Very large cells were in prototype development prior to a full appreciation of the hazards of the system. It is possible that some of the remaining safety issues are related to cell design; Explosions as a result of external physical abuse such as cell incineration and puncture; Explosions due to short circuiting which could lead to thermal runaway reactions. These problems appear to have been solved by changes in the battery design (4); and Expolsions due to abnormal electrical operation (i.e., charging (5) and overdischarging (6) and in partially or fully discharged cells on storage (7 and 8).

  4. Final Technical Report on Quantifying Dependability Attributes of Software Based Safety Critical Instrumentation and Control Systems in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smidts, Carol; Huang, Fuqun; Li, Boyuan; Li, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    With the current transition from analog to digital instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants, the number and variety of software-based systems have significantly increased. The sophisticated nature and increasing complexity of software raises trust in these systems as a significant challenge. The trust placed in a software system is typically termed software dependability. Software dependability analysis faces uncommon challenges since software systems' characteristics differ from those of hardware systems. The lack of systematic science-based methods for quantifying the dependability attributes in software-based instrumentation as well as control systems in safety critical applications has proved itself to be a significant inhibitor to the expanded use of modern digital technology in the nuclear industry. Dependability refers to the ability of a system to deliver a service that can be trusted. Dependability is commonly considered as a general concept that encompasses different attributes, e.g., reliability, safety, security, availability and maintainability. Dependability research has progressed significantly over the last few decades. For example, various assessment models and/or design approaches have been proposed for software reliability, software availability and software maintainability. Advances have also been made to integrate multiple dependability attributes, e.g., integrating security with other dependability attributes, measuring availability and maintainability, modeling reliability and availability, quantifying reliability and security, exploring the dependencies between security and safety and developing integrated analysis models. However, there is still a lack of understanding of the dependencies between various dependability attributes as a whole and of how such dependencies are formed. To address the need for quantification and give a more objective basis to the review process -- therefore reducing regulatory uncertainty

  5. Final Technical Report on Quantifying Dependability Attributes of Software Based Safety Critical Instrumentation and Control Systems in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smidts, Carol [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Huang, Funqun [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Li, Boyuan [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Li, Xiang [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-03-25

    With the current transition from analog to digital instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants, the number and variety of software-based systems have significantly increased. The sophisticated nature and increasing complexity of software raises trust in these systems as a significant challenge. The trust placed in a software system is typically termed software dependability. Software dependability analysis faces uncommon challenges since software systems’ characteristics differ from those of hardware systems. The lack of systematic science-based methods for quantifying the dependability attributes in software-based instrumentation as well as control systems in safety critical applications has proved itself to be a significant inhibitor to the expanded use of modern digital technology in the nuclear industry. Dependability refers to the ability of a system to deliver a service that can be trusted. Dependability is commonly considered as a general concept that encompasses different attributes, e.g., reliability, safety, security, availability and maintainability. Dependability research has progressed significantly over the last few decades. For example, various assessment models and/or design approaches have been proposed for software reliability, software availability and software maintainability. Advances have also been made to integrate multiple dependability attributes, e.g., integrating security with other dependability attributes, measuring availability and maintainability, modeling reliability and availability, quantifying reliability and security, exploring the dependencies between security and safety and developing integrated analysis models. However, there is still a lack of understanding of the dependencies between various dependability attributes as a whole and of how such dependencies are formed. To address the need for quantification and give a more objective basis to the review process -- therefore reducing regulatory uncertainty

  6. Development of a safety case for the use of current limiting devices to manage short circuit currents on electrical distribution networks. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The original objective of this study was to review the safety issues associated with the use of current limiting devices and to write a risk assessment in accordance with good practice. But, when legislative procedures became apparent, the scope was changed to include involvement with the HSE, the DTI and Ofgem. It turned out that it would have been very difficult to write a safety case that would satisfy all of the agencies, or a risk assessment that would cover all applications. The scope of the study was therefore changed to focus on how the existing barriers should be tackled and the implications of the existing legislation. The approach to the study is described; it included reviews of background information and literature, questionnaires to manufacturers, a review of the reliability and hazards of the devices, and a review of UK safety legislation. The Final Report describes all this and includes discussion on the consequences of failure of fault current limiting devices, control measures which could be used to minimise risk, and recommendations for a way forward.

  7. Safety analysis report, packages. Drath and Schrader Double Lidded Drum (packaging of fissile and other radioactive materials). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalfant, G.G.

    1985-07-01

    The preceding Safety Analysis Report - Packages qualifies the Drath and Schrader Double Lidded Drum (see appendix E) as a Department of Transportation DOT 7A Type A packaging and/or ''Type A'' foreign made packaging. The allowable contents shall be: in solid form; non-fissile or exempt fissile material (as defined by 49 CFR 173.453); less than 700 pounds (318 kg) in weight; equal to or less than the A 1 or A 2 quantities of radioactive material as appropriate (see 49 CFR 173.435 for tables of A 1 /A 2 values); and hydrogen gas generation in radioactive waste shall be limited to a maximum of 2-1/2% and total gas pressure limited to 5 psig. Package marking shall be as specified in 49 CFR 178.350-3 or as specified by the foreign country of origin

  8. Final report of the Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel amended safety assessment of Calendula officinalis-derived cosmetic ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, F Alan; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W

    2010-01-01

    Calendula officinalis extract, C officinalis flower, C officinalis flower extract, C officinalis flower oil, and C officinalis seed oil are cosmetic ingredients derived from C officinalis. These ingredients may contain minerals, carbohydrates, lipids, phenolic acids, flavonoids, tannins, coumarins, sterols and steroids, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, triterpenes, tocopherols, quinones, amino acids, and resins. These ingredients were not significantly toxic in single-dose oral studies using animals. The absence of reproductive/developmental toxicity was inferred from repeat-dose studies of coriander oil, with a similar composition. Overall, these ingredients were not genotoxic. They also were not irritating, sensitizing, or photosensitizing in animal or clinical tests but may be mild ocular irritants. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe for use in cosmetics in the practices of use and concentration given in this amended safety assessment.

  9. Application of space and aviation technology to improve the safety and reliability of nuclear power plant operations. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-04-01

    This report investigates various technologies that have been developed and utilized by the aerospace community, particularly the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the aviation industry, that would appear to have some potential for contributing to improved operational safety and reliability at commercial nuclear power plants of the type being built and operated in the United States today. The main initiator for this study, as well as many others, was the accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant in March 1979. Transfer and application of technology developed by NASA, as well as other public and private institutions, may well help to decrease the likelihood of similar incidents in the future

  10. Development of safety analysis codes and experimental validation for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh

    2006-01-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 900 C and operational fuel temperatures above 1250 C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR's higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of toxic gases (CO and CO2) and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. Research Objectives As described above, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release in the VHTR. The objectives of this Korean/United States collaboration were to develop and validate advanced computational methods for VHTR safety analysis. The methods that have been developed are now

  11. Development of safety analysis codes and experimental validation for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh

    2006-03-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of toxic gasses (CO and CO2) and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. Research Objectives As described above, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release in the VHTR. The objectives of this Korean/United States collaboration were to develop and validate advanced computational methods for VHTR safety analysis. The methods that have been developed are now

  12. YKAe Research programme on nuclear power plant systems behaviour and operational aspects of safety 1990-1994, Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattila, L.; Vanttola, T.

    1995-04-01

    The research programme on Nuclear Power Plant Systems Behaviour and Operational Aspects of Safety was carried out between 1990 and 1994. In the field of Safe operational margins of nuclear fuel and reactor core, an up-to-date steady-state fuel performance model was validated for higher burn-ups and well-characterized VVER fuel experiments were carried out. A comprehensive reactor analysis code system was extended and validated for complex 3-D phenomena, such as ATWS and boron dilution transients. Advanced hydraulics methods were added to the dynamics codes. Experiments were carried out with PACTEL, the most comprehensive thermal-hydraulic test facility for VVER-440-type reactors worldwide. For example, a series of natural circulation tests were provided for the first VVER-related international standard problem of the OECD/NEA. Advanced foreign computer codes for severe accidents were evaluated and modified for the needs of Finnish power plants. Specific progress was made in modelling the reflooding of an overheated core and in the structural analysis of a pressure vessel under corium load, as well as in experimental and theoretical studies of aerosol and hydrogen behaviour. Fire modelling was improved by implementing advanced calculation methods and by validating them against our own experiments and international test data. Techniques in living probabilistic safety assessment and risk decision-making were refined in pilot applications for continuous monitoring, follow-up and management of risks of an operating power plant. In the area of human reliability and organizational performance, factors important for the continuous development of the competence of control room operator teams and plant maintenance staff were identified. (237 refs., 75 figs., 13 tabs.)

  13. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo mission: Volume 3 (Book 2), Nuclear risk analysis document: Appendices: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-25

    It is the purpose of the NRAD to provide an analysis of the range of potential consequences of accidents which have been identified that are associated with the launching and deployment of the Galileo mission spacecraft. The specific consequences analyzed are those associated with the possible release of radioactive material (fuel) of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). They are in terms of radiation doses to people and areas of deposition of radioactive material. These consequence analyses can be used in several ways. One way is to identify the potential range of consequences which might have to be dealt with if there were to be an accident with a release of fuel, so as to assure that, given such an accident, the health and safety of the public will be reasonably protected. Another use of the information, in conjunction with accident and release probabilities, is to estimate the risks associated with the mission. That is, most space launches occur without incident. Given an accident, the most probable result relative to the RTGs is complete containment of the radioactive material. Only a small fraction of accidents might result in a release of fuel and subsequent radiological consequences. The combination of probability with consequence is risk, which can be compared to other human and societal risks to assure that no undue risks are implied by undertaking the mission. Book 2 contains eight appendices.

  14. Seismic safety margins research program. Phase I final report - Plant/site selection and data collection (Project I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, T.Y.

    1981-07-01

    Project I of Phase I of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) comprised two parts: the selection of a representative nuclear power plant/site for study in Phase I and the collection of data needed by the other SSMRP projects. Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in Zion, Illinois, was selected for the SSMRP Phase I studies. Unit 1 of the Zion plant has been validated as a good choice for the Phase I study plant. Although no single nuclear power plant can represent all such plants equally well, selection criteria were developed to maximize the generic implications of Phase I of the SSMRP. On the basis of the selection criteria, the Zion plant and its site were found to be reasonably representative of operating and future plants with regard to its nuclear steam supply system; the type of containment structure (prestressed concrete); its electrical capacity (1100 MWe); its location (the Midwest); the peak seismic acceleration used for design (0.17g); and the properties of the underlying soil (the low-strain shear-wave velocity is 1650 ft/s in a 50- to 100-ft-thick layer of soil overlying sedimentary bedrock). (author)

  15. Spent fuel verification options for final repository safeguards in Finland. A study on verification methods, their feasibility and safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautamaeki, J.; Tiitta, A.

    2000-12-01

    The verification possibilities of the spent fuel assemblies from the Olkiluoto and Loviisa NPPs and the fuel rods from the research reactor of VTT are contemplated in this report. The spent fuel assemblies have to be verified at the partial defect level before the final disposal into the geologic repository. The rods from the research reactor may be verified at the gross defect level. Developing a measurement system for partial defect verification is a complicated and time-consuming task. The Passive High Energy Gamma Emission Tomography and the Fork Detector combined with Gamma Spectrometry are the most potential measurement principles to be developed for this purpose. The whole verification process has to be planned to be as slick as possible. An early start in the planning of the verification and developing the measurement devices is important in order to enable a smooth integration of the verification measurements into the conditioning and disposal process. The IAEA and Euratom have not yet concluded the safeguards criteria for the final disposal. E.g. criteria connected to the selection of the best place to perform the verification. Measurements have not yet been concluded. Options for the verification places have been considered in this report. One option for a verification measurement place is the intermediate storage. The other option is the encapsulation plant. Crucial viewpoints are such as which one offers the best practical possibilities to perform the measurements effectively and which would be the better place in the safeguards point of view. Verification measurements may be needed both in the intermediate storages and in the encapsulation plant. In this report also the integrity of the fuel assemblies after wet intermediate storage period is assessed, because the assemblies have to stand the handling operations of the verification measurements. (orig.)

  16. Final report of the addendum to the safety assessment of n-butyl alcohol as used in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, Valerie C

    2008-01-01

    nonimmunological contact urticaria was negative in 105 subjects. Repeat-insult patch test (RIPT) studies of nail colors and enamels containing 3% n-Butyl Alcohol in one study produced reactions on challenge, but further study linked significant positive reactions to another solvent. In other RIPT studies, only minimal reactions were reported. A photopatch test demonstrated that a nail enamel containing 3% n-Butyl Alcohol resulted in no reactions. Workers complained of ocular irritation, disagreeable odor, slight headache and vertigo, slight irritation of nose and throat, and dermatitis of the fingers and hands when the air concentration of n-Butyl Alcohol was greater than 50 ppm, as compared to an odor threshold in air of 0.83 ppm. The available safety test data were considered adequate to support the safety of n-Butyl Alcohol in all cosmetic product categories in which it is currently used.

  17. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Parts 2--5: Final report; Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed the IPE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants. This report is divided into three volumes containing six parts. Part 1 is a summary report of the key perspectives gained in each of the areas identified above, with a discussion of the NRC's overall conclusions and observations. Part 2 discusses key perspectives regarding the impact of the IPE Program on reactor safety. Part 3 discusses perspectives gained from the IPE results regarding CDF, containment performance, and human actions. Part 4 discusses perspectives regarding the IPE models and methods. Part 5 discusses additional IPE perspectives. Part 6 contains Appendices A, B and C which provide the references of the information from the IPEs, updated PRA results, and public comments on draft NUREG-1560 respectively

  18. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Part 1: Final summary report; Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed the IPE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants. This report is divided into three volumes containing six parts. Part 1 is a summary report of the key perspectives gained in each of the areas identified above, with a discussion of the NRC's overall conclusions and observations. Part 2 discusses key perspectives regarding the impact of the IPE Program on reactor safety. Part 3 discusses perspectives gained from the IPE results regarding CDF, containment performance, and human actions. Part 4 discusses perspectives regarding the IPE models and methods. Part 5 discusses additional IPE perspectives. Part 6 contains Appendices A, B and C which provide the references of the information from the IPEs, updated PRA results, and public comments on draft NUREG-1560 respectively

  19. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Parts 2--5: Final report; Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed the IPE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants. This report is divided into three volumes containing six parts. Part 1 is a summary report of the key perspectives gained in each of the areas identified above, with a discussion of the NRC`s overall conclusions and observations. Part 2 discusses key perspectives regarding the impact of the IPE Program on reactor safety. Part 3 discusses perspectives gained from the IPE results regarding CDF, containment performance, and human actions. Part 4 discusses perspectives regarding the IPE models and methods. Part 5 discusses additional IPE perspectives. Part 6 contains Appendices A, B and C which provide the references of the information from the IPEs, updated PRA results, and public comments on draft NUREG-1560 respectively.

  20. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the System 80{sup +} design (Docket No. 52-002). Volume 2, Chapters 15--22 and appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This final safety evaluation report (FSER) documents the technical review of the System 80+ standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the system 80+ design was submitted by Combustion Engineering, Inc., now Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. System 80+ is a pressurized water reactor with a rated power of 3914 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 3992 MWt at which accidents are analyzed. Many features of the System 80+ are similar to those of ABB-CE`s System 80 design from which it evolved. Unique features of the System 80+ design include: a large spherical, steel containment; an in-containment refueling water storage tank; a reactor cavity flooding system, hydrogen ignitors and a safety depressurization system for severe accident mitigation; a combustion gas turbine for an alternate ac source; and an advanced digitally based control room. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that ABB-CE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the System 80+ standard design. This document, Volume 2, contains Chapters 15 through 22 and Appendices A through E.

  1. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the System 80{sup +} design (Docket No. 52-002). Volume 1, Chapters 1--14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This final safety evaluation report (FSER) documents the technical review of the System 80+ standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the System 80+ design was submitted by Combustion Engineering, Inc., now Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. System 80+ is a pressurized water reactor with a rated power of 3914 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 3992 MWt at which accidents are analyzed. Many features of the System 80+ are similar to those of Abb-CE`s System 80 design from which it evolved. Unique features of the System 80+ design included: a large spherical, steel containment; an in-containment refueling water storage tank; a reactor cavity flooding system, hydrogen ignitors, and a safety depressurization system for severe accident mitigation; a combustion gas turbine for an alternate ac source; and an advanced digitally based control room. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that ABB-CE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the System 80+ standard design. This document, Volume 1, contains Chapters 1 through 14 of this report.

  2. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the System 80+ design (Docket No. 52-002). Volume 2, Chapters 15--22 and appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This final safety evaluation report (FSER) documents the technical review of the System 80+ standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the system 80+ design was submitted by Combustion Engineering, Inc., now Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR section 52.45. System 80+ is a pressurized water reactor with a rated power of 3914 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 3992 MWt at which accidents are analyzed. Many features of the System 80+ are similar to those of ABB-CE's System 80 design from which it evolved. Unique features of the System 80+ design include: a large spherical, steel containment; an in-containment refueling water storage tank; a reactor cavity flooding system, hydrogen ignitors and a safety depressurization system for severe accident mitigation; a combustion gas turbine for an alternate ac source; and an advanced digitally based control room. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that ABB-CE's application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the System 80+ standard design. This document, Volume 2, contains Chapters 15 through 22 and Appendices A through E

  3. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the System 80+ design (Docket No. 52-002). Volume 1, Chapters 1--14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This final safety evaluation report (FSER) documents the technical review of the System 80+ standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the System 80+ design was submitted by Combustion Engineering, Inc., now Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR section 52.45. System 80+ is a pressurized water reactor with a rated power of 3914 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 3992 MWt at which accidents are analyzed. Many features of the System 80+ are similar to those of Abb-CE's System 80 design from which it evolved. Unique features of the System 80+ design included: a large spherical, steel containment; an in-containment refueling water storage tank; a reactor cavity flooding system, hydrogen ignitors, and a safety depressurization system for severe accident mitigation; a combustion gas turbine for an alternate ac source; and an advanced digitally based control room. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that ABB-CE's application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the System 80+ standard design. This document, Volume 1, contains Chapters 1 through 14 of this report

  4. TIBER II/ETR final design report: Volume 3, 5.0 Radiation safety and environment; 6.0 Physics and technology R and D needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1987-09-01

    This paper discusses the design of the TIBER II Tokamak. This particular volume discusses: safety and environmental requirements and design targets; accident analyses; personnel safety and maintenance exposure; effluent control; waste management and decommissioning; safety considerations in building design; and safety and environmental conclusions and recommendations

  5. Information need about the safety of the final disposal of nuclear waste. Information receiver`s views in Eurajoki, Kuhmo and Aeaenekoski municipalities; Tiedontarve ydinjaetteen loppusijoituksen turvallisuudesta. Vastaanottajan naekoekulmia Eurajoella, Kuhmossa ja Aeaenekoskella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hautakangas, H

    1997-03-01

    The study analyses the public`s information need about the safety issues related to the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel generated by the Finnish nuclear power stations. Locals in three municipalities that are studied as possible sites for final disposal were interviewed for the study. Earlier studies made in Finland had indicated that the public`s knowledge about safety issues related to the final disposal was almost opposite to the findings of the natural sciences. Also, the public had expressed a wish to receive more information from the safety authority, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). This study therefore had two basic objectives: To find out what kind of safety information the locals need and what the safety authority`s role could be in providing information. The main results show interest and need especially for information concerning the disposal phases taking place on the ground level, such as nuclear waste transportation and encapsulation. Also, the interviews show a clear need and desire for an impartial actor such as STUK in the information and communication process. (author) (107 refs.).

  6. Final characterization and safety screen report of double shell tank 241-AP-104 for 242-A evaporator, campaign 96-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    This data package satisfies the requirement for a format IV, final report. It is a follow-up to the 45-day safety screen report for tank AP-104. Evaporator candidate feed from tank 241-AP-104 (hereafter referred to as AP-104) was characterized for physical, inorganic, organic and radiochemical parameters by the Westinghouse Hanford Company, 222-S Laboratory, and by the Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) as directed by the Tank Sample and Analysis Plan (TSAP), References 1 through 4. Preliminary data in the form of summary analytical tables were provided to the project in advance of this final report to enable early estimation of evaporator operational parameters, using the Predict modeling program. Laboratory analyses at ACL Laboratory was performed according to the TSAP. Analyses were performed at the 222-S Laboratory as defined and specified in the TSAP and the Laboratory's Quality Assurance Plan, References 5 and 6. Any deviations from the instructions documented in the TSAP are discussed in this narrative and are supported with additional documentation. SAMPLING The TSAP, section 2, provided sampling information for waste samples collected from tank AP-104. The bottle-on-a-string method was used to collect liquid grab samples from the tank. Each glass sample bottle was amber, precleaned, and contained approximately 100 milliliters. Each bottle was closed with a teflon seal cap (or teflon septum for volatile organic analysis samples). Field blank samples were prepared by placing deionized water into sampling bottles, lowering the unclosed bottles into the riser for a period of time, retrieving them from the riser, and then closing the bottles with the same types of caps used for the tank samples. None of the samples were preserved by acidification. Upon receipt, the sample bottles destined for organic analyses were placed in a refrigerator. No attempt was made during sampling to assure the complete

  7. Requirements for a long-term safety certification for chemotoxic substances stored in a final storage facility for high radioactive and heat-generating radioactive waste in rock salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tholen, M.; Hippler, J.; Herzog, C.

    2007-01-01

    Within the scope of a project funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (Bundesministerium fuer Wirtschaft und Technologie, BMWi), a safety certification concept for a future permanent final storage for high radioactive and heat-generating radioactive waste (HAW disposal facility) in rock salt formations is being prepared. For a reference concept, compliance with safety requirements in regard to operational safety as well as radiological and non-radiological protection objectives related to long-term safety, including ground water protection, will be evaluated. This paper deals with the requirements for a long-term safety certification for the purpose of protecting ground water from chemotoxic substances. In particular, longterm safety certifications for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste in a HAW disposal facility in rock salt formations and for the dumping of hazardous waste in underground storage facilities in rock salt formations are first discussed, followed by an evaluation as to whether these methods can be applied to the long-term safety certification for chemotoxic substances. The authors find it advisable to apply the long-term safety certification for underground storage facilities to the long-term safety certification for chemotoxic substances stored in a HAW disposal facility in rock salt formations. In conclusion, a corresponding certification concept is introduced. (orig.)

  8. The relevance of axial burn-up profiles for the criticality safety analysis of spent nuclear fuel in a final repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilger, R.; Gmal, B.; Moser, E.F.

    2008-01-01

    Due to inhomogeneous neutron flux and moderator density distributions in the reactor core, the burn-up of a nuclear fuel assembly is not homogeneous but shows an axial distribution, typically with lower partial burn-up and thus higher remaining reactivity at the fuel ends in particular at the assembly top end. Beyond a burn-up of about 15 to 20 GWd/tHM, the multiplication factor K of the whole assembly is dominated by this lower-burnt end regions, and is usually higher than for assuming a homogeneous uniform distribution of the averaged burn-up. This behaviour commonly referred to as positive ''end effect'' is well known in burn-up credit considerations for transportation and storage casks and is being investigated also in the context of criticality analyses for final disposition of spent nuclear fuel. Sign and value of the end effect depend on several parameters. Based on a generic model one may not conclude that criticality in a final repository is a likely or expected event, but nevertheless it draws the attention to the fact that criticality is not excluded per se but has to be considered in the analysis and probably has to be encountered by certain appropriate measures, maybe e.g. by limitation of the amount of fissile material inside one single cask, or a rigorous prove for prevention of water ingress. The authors also conclude that the higher partial reactivity of the fuel ends has to be accounted for carefully in more realistic analyses of post-closure scenarios with respect to criticality safety.

  9. Safety aspects of long term operation of water moderated reactors. Recommendations on the scope and content of programmes for safe long term operation. Final report of the extrabudgetary programme on safety aspects long term operation of water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    During the last two decades, the number of IAEA Member States giving high priority to continuing the operation of nuclear power plants beyond the time frame originally anticipated is increasing. This is related to the age of nuclear power plants connected to the grid worldwide. The IAEA started to develop guidance on the safety aspects of ageing management in the 1990s. Recognizing the development in a number of its Member States, the IAEA initiated this Extrabudgetary Programme on Safety Aspects of Long Term Operation of Water Moderated Reactors in 2003. The objective of the Programme was to establish recommendations on the scope and content of activities to ensure safe long term operation of water moderated reactors. The term long term operation is used to accommodate various approaches in Member States and is defined as operation beyond an initial time frame set forth in design, standards, licence, and/or regulations, that is justified by safety assessment, considering life limiting processes and features for systems, structures and components. The scope of the Programme included general long term operation framework, mechanical components and materials, electrical components and instrumentation and control, and structural components and structures. The scope of the Programme was limited to physical structures of the NPPs. Four working groups addressed the above indicated technical areas. The Programme steering committee provided coordination and guidance and served as a forum for the exchange of information. The Programme implementation relied on voluntary in kind and financial contributions from the Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovakia, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the USA as well as in kind contributions from Bulgaria, Finland, the Netherlands, the Russian Federation, Spain, the Ukraine, and the European Commission. This report summarizes the main results, conclusions and recommendations of this Programme and provides in the Appendices I-IV detailed

  10. Conceptual and safety-related questions in the final storage of radioactive waste - a comparison of various types of host rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleemann, U.

    2005-01-01

    The German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) in early November published the synthesis report (BfS 2005) about the conceptual and safety-related specific questions associated with the final storage of radioactive waste. In addition to a condensed version of twelve individual projects, the report contains a description of the results of the peer review and the workshops carried out, in particular an evaluation comparing different types of host rock in Germany. The whole project constitutes a comprehensive documentation of the current state of the art. Findings are expressed at a general level referring neither to the suitability of any specific repository site nor to that of salts as a repository formation, but covering all potential repository formations in deep geologic strata in Germany. The limits to and possibilities of, generic comparisons of various types of host rock are shown. It si seen that, in principle, none of the host rock varieties in Germany would be preferable to others. Numerous problems can be solved only for specific sites, thus requiring site comparisons. While some questions indicate a need for regulatory treatment, the need for basic research is considered to be low. The contribution presents the main findings made in each of the specific projects and the evaluations by the Office. (orig.)

  11. Impact Assessment Road Safety Action Programme : assessment for mid term review : final report. Report on behalf of the European Commission, Directorate-General Energy and Transport.

    OpenAIRE

    ECORYS Transport & SWOV Institute for Road Safety Research

    2006-01-01

    In 2003 the Commission published Saving 20000 lives on our roads, a shared responsibility, also known as the third European Road Safety Action Programme (RSAP). The RSAP describes concrete actions and proposals for actions by the Commission aimed at realising the target for improving road safety as set in the White Paper (European Transport Policy for 2010: time to decide, 2001), namely halving the number of road deaths by 2010. Improving road safety in the EU is clearly a joint responsibilit...

  12. Final report of the programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    The review of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants focuses on the wide scope of the activities aimed at identifying safety deficiencies, ranking their importance on the results of safety improvement programmes and on areas where future work is necessary. The information in the report reflects to a large extent, the situation as it stood when individual IAEA tasks actually took place. It deals with the IAEA activities and it discusses selected safety issues and safety review results as they apply to each reactor type. The results, recommendations and conclusions resulting from the IAEA Programme are intended to assist national decision makers who have the sole responsibilities for the regulation and safety operation of their nuclear power plants

  13. Application of the new requirements of safety of the IAEA for the previous management to the final disposal of radioactive waste in the region: a personal vision; Aplicacion de los nuevos requisitos de seguridad del OIEA para la gestion previa a la disposicion final de desechos radiactivos en la region: una vision personal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sed, Luis Andres Jova, E-mail: jovaluis@gmail.com [Centro Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear (CNSN), La Habana (Cuba)

    2013-07-01

    The work includes the requirements for the responsibilities associated with the management prior to the final disposal of radioactive waste and as they are referred to in the Region. Also discusses the requirements for the main stages of the management prior to the final disposal of radioactive waste. A very important section of the new requirements is that establish requirements for safe operation of facilities management prior to the final disposal of radioactive wastes and the implementation of activities under conditions of safety and development. The work is emphatic on the importance of safety justification since the beginning of the development of a facility as a basis for the decision-making and approval process. Emphasis is also on the gradual approach which should provide for the collection, analysis and interpretation of the relevant technical data, plans for the design and operation, and the formulation of the justification of the security. This paper gives a personal view of the situation in the Region.

  14. Impact Assessment Road Safety Action Programme : assessment for mid term review : final report. Report on behalf of the European Commission, Directorate-General Energy and Transport.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ECORYS Transport & SWOV Institute for Road Safety Research

    2006-01-01

    In 2003 the Commission published Saving 20000 lives on our roads, a shared responsibility, also known as the third European Road Safety Action Programme (RSAP). The RSAP describes concrete actions and proposals for actions by the Commission aimed at realising the target for improving road safety as

  15. Safety balance: Analysis of safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delage, M.; Giroux, C.

    1990-12-01

    Safety analysis, and particularly analysis of exploitation of NPPs is constantly affected by EDF and by the safety authorities and their methodologies. Periodic safety reports ensure that important issues are not missed on daily basis, that incidents are identified and that relevant actions are undertaken. French safety analysis method consists of three principal steps. First type of safety balance is analyzed at the normal start-up phase for each unit including the final safety report. This enables analysis of behaviour of units ten years after their licensing. Second type is periodic operational safety analysis performed during a few years. Finally, the third step consists of safety analysis of the oldest units with the aim to improve the safety standards. The three steps of safety analysis are described in this presentation in detail with the aim to present the objectives and principles. Examples of most recent exercises are included in order to illustrate the importance of such analyses

  16. Development and validation of three-dimensional CFD techniques for reactor safety applications. Final report; Entwicklung und Validierung dreidimensionaler CFD Verfahren fuer Anwendungen in der Reaktorsicherheit. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, Sebastian; Palazzo, Simone; Papukchiev, Angel; Scheurer Martina

    2016-12-15

    The overall goal of the project RS 1506 ''Development and Validation of Three Dimensional CFD Methods for Reactor Safety Applications'' is the validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software for the simulation of three -dimensional thermo-hydraulic heat and fluid flow phenomena in nuclear reactors. For this purpose a wide spectrum of validation and test cases was selected covering fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena in the downcomer and in the core of pressurized water reactors. In addition, the coupling of the system code ATHLET with the CFD code ANSYS CFX was further developed and validated. The first choice were UPTF experiments where turbulent single- and two-phase flows were investigated in a 1:1 scaled model of a German KONVOI reactor. The scope of the CFD calculations covers thermal mixing and stratification including condensation in single- and two-phase flows. In the complex core region, the flow in a fuel assembly with spacer grid was simulated as defined in the OECD/NEA Benchmark MATIS-H. Good agreement are achieved when the geometrical and physical boundary conditions were reproduced as realistic as possible. This includes, in particular, the consideration of heat transfer to walls. The influence of wall modelling on CFD results was investigated on the TALL-3D T01 experiment. In this case, the dynamic three dimensional fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena were simulated in a Generation IV liquid metal cooled reactor. Concurrently to the validation work, the coupling of the system code ATHLET with the ANSYS CFX software was optimized and expanded for two-phase flows. Different coupling approaches were investigated, in order to overcome the large difference between CPU-time requirements of system and CFD codes. Finally, the coupled simulation system was validated by applying it to the simulation of the PSI double T-junction experiment, the LBE-flow in the MYRRA Spallation experiment and a demonstration test case

  17. The project ANSICHT. Safety and demonstration methodology for a final repository in clay formations in Germany; Projekt ANSICHT. Sicherheits- und Nachweismethodik fuer ein Endlager im Tongestein in Deutschland. Synthesebericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobmann, Michael; Bebiolka, Anke; Jahn, Steffen; and others

    2017-03-30

    Based on the status of science and technology and under consideration of international repository concepts the fundamental methodology for safety demonstration for a high-level radioactive waste final repository in clay formations Germany was developed. Basic elements of the safety concept are the geological site description and the geo-scientific long-term prognosis on future performance. Another important section is the closure and sealing concept for the mine shafts. In the frame of the project the fundamental elements were developed and documented for model regions in northern and southern Germany. Three independent safety proofs have to be performed: the demonstration of the geological barrier integrity (clay), the demonstration of the geo-technical barrier system integrity - i.e. closure constructions and backfilling of the shafts, and the radiological demonstration that the radionuclide release in the area is lower than the respective limiting value.

  18. Consequences of the safety requirement retrieval on existing disposal concepts and requirements to new concepts. Final report; Auswirkungen der Sicherheitsanforderungen Rueckholbarkeit auf existierende Einlagerungskonzepte und Anforderungen an neue Konzepte. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollingerfehr, W.; Herold, P.; Doerr, S.; Filbert, W. [DBE Technology GmbH, Peine (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    In summer 2013 the German Federal Parliament (Bundestag) has restarted the search or a final repository site for high-level radioactive wastes by law. The study is concerned with the consequences of retrieval as additional safety requirement for disposal concepts. Based to the actual knowledge the study concludes that for all possible host rocks (salt, clay and crystalline rock) retrieval is technically possible. Considerable planning effort will be necessary to allow the demonstration of technical feasibility and the reliability of retrieval concepts.

  19. Final Hazard Categorization and Auditable Safety Analysis for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2 and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. J. Rodovsky

    2006-03-01

    This report presents the initial hazard categorization, final hazard categorization and auditable safety analysis for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

  20. Investigation of the impact of the I-94 ATM system on the safety of the I-94 commons high crash area : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Active Traffic Management (ATM) strategies are being deployed in major cities worldwide to deal with pervasive system : congestion and safety concerns. While such strategies include a diverse array of components, in the Twin Cities metropolitan : are...

  1. State safety oversight program : audit of the tri-state oversight committee and the Washington metropolitan area transit authority, final audit report, March 4, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) conducted an on-site audit of the safety program implemented by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and overseen by the Tri-State Oversight Committee (TOC) between December 14 and 17, 20...

  2. Integrated Plant Safety Assessment: Systematic Evaluation Program. Yankee Nuclear Power Station, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Docket No. 50-29. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    The Systematic Evaluation program was initiated in February 1977 by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to confirm and document their safety. The review provides: (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with current licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. This report documents the review of Yankee Nuclear Power Station, operated by Yankee Atomic Electric Company. The Yankee plant is one of 10 plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review

  3. Integrated plant safety assessment. Systematic Evaluation Program. La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor. Dairyland Power Cooperative, Docket No. 50-409. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    The Systematic Evaluation Program was initiated in February 1977 by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to confirm and document their safety. The review provides (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with current licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. This report documents the review of the La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor, operated by Dairyland Power Cooperative. The La Crosse plant is one of 10 plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review

  4. Integrated Plant Safety Assessment: Systematic Evaluation Program. Haddam Neck Plant, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, Docket No. 50-213. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Systematic Evaluation Progam was initiated in February 1977 by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to confirm and document their safety. The review provides: (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with curent licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. This report documents the review of Haddam Neck Plant, operated by Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company. The Haddam Neck Plant is one of 10 plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review

  5. Long-term safety for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark. Main report of the SR-Site project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-03-15

    The central conclusion of the safety assessment SR-Site is that a KBS-3 repository that fulfils long-term safety requirements can be built at the Forsmark site. This conclusion is reached because the favourable properties of the Forsmark site ensure the required long-term durability of the barriers of the KBS-3 repository. In particular, the copper canisters with their cast iron inserts have been demonstrated to provide a sufficient resistance to the mechanical and chemical loads to which they may be subjected in the repository environment. The conclusion is underpinned by: - The reliance of the KBS-3 repository on i) a geological environment that exhibits long-term stability with respect to properties of importance for long-term safety, i.e. mechanical stability, low groundwater flow rates at repository depth and the absence of high concentrations of detrimental components in the groundwater, and ii) the choice of naturally occurring materials (copper and bentonite clay) for the engineered barriers that are sufficiently durable in the repository environment to provide the barrier longevity required for safety. - The understanding, through decades of research at SKB and in international collaboration, of the phenomena that affect long-term safety, resulting in a mature knowledge base for the safety assessment. - The understanding of the characteristics of the site through several years of surface-based investigations of the conditions at depth and of scientific interpretation of the data emerging from the investigations, resulting in a mature model of the site, adequate for use in the safety assessment. - The detailed specifications of the engineered parts of the repository and the demonstration of how components fulfilling the specifications are to be produced in a quality assured manner, thereby providing a quality assured initial state for the safety assessment. The detailed analyses demonstrate that canister failures in a one million year perspective are rare

  6. Final summary report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research Program 1998-2001; Sammanfattning av det nordiska forsknings-programmet for karnsakerhet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennerstedt, T. (ed.)

    2002-11-01

    The results of the 1998 - 2001 NKS program are presented in the form of executive summaries, highlighting the conclusions, recommendations and other findings and results of the six projects carried out during that period. The titles of the six projects are: Risk assessment and strategies for safety (NKS/SOS-1); Reactor safety (NKS/SOS-2); Radioactive waste (NKS/SOS-3); Nuclear Emergency preparedness (NKS/BOK-1); Radiological and environmental consequences (NKS/BOK-2); Nuclear threats from Nordic surroundings (NKS/SBA-1) (ln)

  7. Long-term safety for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark. Main report of the SR-Site project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    The central conclusion of the safety assessment SR-Site is that a KBS-3 repository that fulfils long-term safety requirements can be built at the Forsmark site. This conclusion is reached because the favourable properties of the Forsmark site ensure the required long-term durability of the barriers of the KBS-3 repository. In particular, the copper canisters with their cast iron inserts have been demonstrated to provide a sufficient resistance to the mechanical and chemical loads to which they may be subjected in the repository environment. The conclusion is underpinned by: - The reliance of the KBS-3 repository on i) a geological environment that exhibits long-term stability with respect to properties of importance for long-term safety, i.e. mechanical stability, low groundwater flow rates at repository depth and the absence of high concentrations of detrimental components in the groundwater, and ii) the choice of naturally occurring materials (copper and bentonite clay) for the engineered barriers that are sufficiently durable in the repository environment to provide the barrier longevity required for safety. - The understanding, through decades of research at SKB and in international collaboration, of the phenomena that affect long-term safety, resulting in a mature knowledge base for the safety assessment. - The understanding of the characteristics of the site through several years of surface-based investigations of the conditions at depth and of scientific interpretation of the data emerging from the investigations, resulting in a mature model of the site, adequate for use in the safety assessment. - The detailed specifications of the engineered parts of the repository and the demonstration of how components fulfilling the specifications are to be produced in a quality assured manner, thereby providing a quality assured initial state for the safety assessment. The detailed analyses demonstrate that canister failures in a one million year perspective are rare

  8. Traffic enforcement in Europe: effects, measures, needs and future. Final report of the ESCAPE Consortium. (The acroynm ESCAPE stands for Enhanced Safety Coming from Appropriate Police Enforcement).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mäkinen, T. Zaidel, D.M. Andersson, G. Biecheler-Fretel, M.-B. Christ, R. Cauzard, J.-P. Elvik, R. Goldenbeld, C. Gelau, C. Heidstra, J. Jayet, M.-C. Nilsson, G. Papaioanou, P. Quimby, A. Rehnova, V. & Vaa, T.

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of the project were to identify important issues of traffic law enforcement in the EU, examine traditional and innovative enforcement approaches and tools, and assess their potential to improve compliance for increased safety on roads. The following main issues were addressed: the

  9. Safety analysis of final disposal of nuclear waste - significance, development and challenges; Saekerhetsanalys av slutfoervaring av kaernavfall - roll, utveckling och utmaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Kjell; Norrby, Soeren; Simic, Eva; Wene, Clas-Otto

    2007-05-15

    The report starts with a review of the role and development of safety assessments from the middle of the 70's up until today. Then follows a section on how the assessment is performed today. The demands from the licensing authorities is then described. The report ends with a chapter on conclusions and reflections.

  10. Basic consideration on safety of facilities for final disposal of radioactive wastes, in particular for wastes stored in Abadia de Goias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xavier, A.M.; Mezrahi, A.; Heilbron Filho, P.F.L.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this work is to contribute to the best understanding of aspects related to the safety criteria applied to repositories for radioactive wastes, in particular for wastes from the radiological accident occured in Goiania (Brazil) in September, 1987. (E.O.)

  11. 60-day safety screen results and final report for tank 241-C-111, auger samples 95-Aug-002, 95-Aug-003, 95-Aug-016, and 95-Aug-017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, A.D.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the details of the auger sampling events for underground waste tank C-111. The samples were shipped to the 222-S laboratories were they underwent safety screening analysis and primary ferricyanide analysis. The samples were analyzed for alpha total, total organic carbon, cyanide, Ni, moisture, and temperature differentials. The results of this analysis are presented in this document

  12. An approach to the efficient assessment of safety and usability of computer based control systems, VeNuS 2. Global final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelke, T.; Dlugosch, C.; Olaverri Monreal, C.; Sachse, K.; Thuering, M.

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the use of computer-based instrumentation and control the evidence of sufficient safety, development methods and the suitability of man-machine interface must be provided. For this purpose, validation methods must be available, if possible supported by appropriate tools. Based on the multitude of the data which has to be taken into account it is important to generate technical documentation, to realize efficient operation and to prevent human based errors. An approach for computer based generation of user manuals for the operation of technical systems was developed in the VeNuS 2 project. A second goal was to develop an approach to evaluate the usability of safety relevant digital human-machine-interfaces (e.g. for nuclear industries). Therefore a software tool has been developed to assess aspects of usability of user interfaces by considering safety-related priorities. Additionally new or well known methods for provision of evidence of sufficient safety and usability for computer based systems shall be developed in a prototyped way.

  13. Case studies in the application of probabilistic safety assessment techniques to radiation sources. Final report of a coordinated research project 2001-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    Radiation sources are used worldwide in many industrial and medical applications. In general, the safety record associated with their use has been very good. However, accidents involving these sources have occasionally resulted in unplanned exposures to individuals. When assessed prospectively, this type of exposure is termed a 'potential exposure'. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recommended the assessment of potential exposures that may result from radiation sources and has suggested that probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) techniques may be used in this process. Also, Paragraph 2.13 of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) requires that the authorization process for radiation sources include an assessment of all exposures, including potential exposures, which may result from the use of a radiation source. In light of the ICRP's work described above, and the possibility that PSA techniques could be used in exposure assessments that are required by the BSS, the IAEA initiated a coordinated research project (CRP) to study the benefits and limitations of the application of PSA techniques to radiation sources. The results of this CRP are presented in this publication. It should be noted that these results are based solely on the work performed, and the conclusions drawn, by the research teams involved in this CRP. It is intended that international organizations involved in radiation protection will review the information in this report and will take account of it during the development of guidance and requirements related to the assessment of potential exposures from radiation sources. Also, it is anticipated that the risk insights obtained through the studies will be considered by medical practitioners, facility staff and management, equipment designers, and regulators in their safety management and risk evaluation activities. A draft

  14. Implications of the accident at Chernobyl for safety regulation of commercial nuclear power plants in the United States: Volume 1, Main report: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    This report was prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff to assess the implications of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant as they relate to reactor safety regulation for commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. The facts used in this assessment have been drawn from the US fact-finding report (NUREG-1250) and its sources. The general conclusions of the document are that there are generic lessons to be learned but that no changes in regulations are needed due to the substantial differences in the design, safety features and operation of US plants as compared to those in the USSR. Given these general conclusions, further consideration of certain specific areas is recommended by the report. These include: administrative controls over reactor regulation, reactivity accidents, accidents at low or zero power, multi-unit protection, fires, containment, emergency planning, severe accident phenomena, and graphite-moderated reactors

  15. Summary final report: Contract between the Japan atomic power company and the U.S. Department of Energy Improvement of core safety - study on GEM (III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, T.M.; Lucoff, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a summary of activities associated with the technical exchange between representatives of the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the development and testing of Gas Expansion Modules (GEM) at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Issuance of this report completes the scope of work defined in the original contract between JAPC and DOE titled ''Study on Improvement of Core Safety - Study on GEM (III).'' Negotiations related to potential modification of the contract are in progress. Under the proposed contract modification, DOE would provide an additional report documenting FFTF pump start tests with GEMs and answer additional JAPC questions related to core safety with and without GEMs

  16. Summary final report: Contract between the Japan atomic power company and the U.S. Department of Energy Improvement of core safety - study on GEM (III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, T.M.; Lucoff, D.M.

    1997-03-18

    This report provides a summary of activities associated with the technical exchange between representatives of the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the development and testing of Gas Expansion Modules (GEM) at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Issuance of this report completes the scope of work defined in the original contract between JAPC and DOE titled ''Study on Improvement of Core Safety - Study on GEM (III).'' Negotiations related to potential modification of the contract are in progress. Under the proposed contract modification, DOE would provide an additional report documenting FFTF pump start tests with GEMs and answer additional JAPC questions related to core safety with and without GEMs.

  17. Implications of the accident at Chernobyl for safety regulation of commercial nuclear power plants in the United Sates: Volume 2, Appendix - Public comments and their disposition: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    This report was prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff to assess the implications of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant as they relate to reactor safety regulation for commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. The facts used in this assessment have been drawn from the US fact-finding report(NUREG-1250) and its sources. The general conclusions of the document are that there are generic lessons to be learned but that no changes in regulations are needed due to the substantial differences in the design, safety features and operation of US plants as compared to those in the USSR. Given these general conclusions, further consideration of certain specific areas is recommended by the report. These include: administrative controls over reactor regulation, reactivity accidents, accidents at low or zero power, multi-unit protection, fires, containment, emergency planning, severe accident phenomena, and graphite-moderated reactors

  18. Safety analysis report: packages. GPHS shipping package supplement 2 to the PISA shipping package (packaging of fissile and other radioactive materials). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalfant, G. G.

    1981-06-01

    Safety Analysis Report DPST-78-124-1 is amended to permit shipment of 6 General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) capsules (max.). Each capsule contains an average of 2330 curies of 238 Pu, and each pair of capsules is contained in a welded stainless steel primary containment vessel, all of which are doubly contained in a flanged secondary containment vessel. This is in addition to the forms discussed in DPST-78-124-1 and Supplement 1

  19. Integrated plant safety assessment: Systematic Evaluation Program, San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (Docket No. 50-206): Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    The Systematic Evaluation Program was initiated in February 1977 by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to reconfirm and document their safety. The review provides: (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with current licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues; (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review; and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. This report documents the review of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1, operated by Southern California Edison Company. The San Onofre plant is one of ten plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review. This report will be one of the bases in considering the issuance of a full-term operating license in place of the existing provisional operating license. This report also addresses the comments and recommendations made by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards in connection with its review of the draft report issued in April 1985

  20. Guidance for the design and management of a maintenance plan to assure safety and improve the predictability of a DOE nuclear irradiation facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, R.S.; Kryter, R.C.; Shepard, R.L.; Smith, O.L.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Rowan, W.J.

    1994-10-01

    A program is recommended for planning the maintenance of DOE nuclear facilities that will help safety and enhance availability throughout a facility's life cycle. While investigating the requirements for maintenance activities, a major difference was identified between the strategy suitable for a conventional power reactor and one for a research reactor facility: the latter should provide a high degree of predicted availability (referred to hereafter as ''predictability'') to its users, whereas the former should maximize total energy production. These differing operating goals necessitate different maintenance strategies. A strategy for scheduling research reactor facility operation and shutdown for maintenance must balance safety, reliability,and predicted availability. The approach developed here is based on three major elements: (1) a probabilistic risk analysis of the balance between assured reliability and predictability (presented in Appendix C), (2) an assessment of the safety and operational impact of maintenance activities applied to various components of the facility, and (3) a data base of historical and operational information on the performance and requirements for maintenance of various components. These factors are integrated into a set of guidelines for designing a new highly maintainable facility, for preparing flexible schedules for improved maintenance of existing facilities, and for anticipating the maintenance required to extend the life of an aging facility. Although tailored to research reactor facilities, the methodology has broader applicability and may therefore be used to improved the maintenance of power reactors, particularly in anticipation of peak load demands

  1. Final Report: Safety of Plasma-Facing Components and Aerosol Transport During Hard Disruptions and Accidental Energy Release in Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourham, Mohamed A.; Gilligan, John G.

    1999-01-01

    Safety considerations in large future fusion reactors like ITER are important before licensing the reactor. Several scenarios are considered hazardous, which include safety of plasma-facing components during hard disruptions, high heat fluxes and thermal stresses during normal operation, accidental energy release, and aerosol formation and transport. Disruption events, in large tokamaks like ITER, are expected to produce local heat fluxes on plasma-facing components, which may exceed 100 GW/m 2 over a period of about 0.1 ms. As a result, the surface temperature dramatically increases, which results in surface melting and vaporization, and produces thermal stresses and surface erosion. Plasma-facing components safety issues extends to cover a wide range of possible scenarios, including disruption severity and the impact of plasma-facing components on disruption parameters, accidental energy release and short/long term LOCA's, and formation of airborne particles by convective current transport during a LOVA (water/air ingress disruption) accident scenario. Study, and evaluation of, disruption-induced aerosol generation and mobilization is essential to characterize database on particulate formation and distribution for large future fusion tokamak reactor like ITER. In order to provide database relevant to ITER, the SIRENS electrothermal plasma facility at NCSU has been modified to closely simulate heat fluxes expected in ITER

  2. Long-Term, Open-Label Safety and Efficacy of Atomoxetine in Adults with ADHD: Final Report of a 4-Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Lenard A.; Spencer, Thomas J.; Williams, David W.; Moore, Rodney J.; Michelson, David

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Previously, data from 97 weeks of open-label atomoxetine treatment of adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were reported. This final report of that study presents results from over 4 years of treatment. Method: Results were derived from the study of 384 patients (125 patients remaining in the open-label trial…

  3. Human factors in safety assessment. Safety culture assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Deng Zhiliang; Wang Yiqun; Huang Weigang

    1996-01-01

    This paper analyses the present conditions and problems in enterprises safety assessment, and introduces the characteristics and effects of safety culture. The authors think that safety culture must be used as a 'soul' to form the pattern of modern safety management. Furthermore, they propose that the human safety and synthetic safety management assessment in a system should be changed into safety culture assessment. Finally, the assessment indicators are discussed

  4. Generic safety issues. Evaluation of international surveys, studies and expert reports in other countries. Final report; Generische Sicherheitsfragen. Auswertungen von internationalen Untersuchungen, Studien und Gutachten anderer Staaten. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eismar, Shanna; Wenke, Rainer

    2017-09-15

    The GeSi and GeSi-International databases developed in the predecessor projects were continued to be maintained and developed further in this project. The GeSi database serves on the one hand for reflecting the current state of the art in science and technology in the field of generic issues and also as a tool in the area of knowledge management. Hence the database can also be used very well as a steering instrument for project planning at GRS and BMUB. Within the term of the project, four issues from national and international operating experience, research results and events or accidents that occurred have been included in the database. The review of the issues contained in the database showed up the more or less strong need for revision or adaptation of a range of generic issues to the state of the art in science and technology. Due to the limited volume of the project, only those issues could be dealt with which were most in need of revision. As a result, 23 issues were subjected to a more detailed review during the project. The 7th review meeting of the contracting parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety (CNS) was held close to the ending of this project. The national reports of the 5th, 6th and as far as possible from the 7th CNS meeting have been evaluated with respect to important generic safety issues. Within the project 13 issues could be integrated into already existing ones. Eight issues have been removed from the database. Therefore at present (September 2017), there are 288 generic safety issues in the GeSi database.

  5. Safety and environmental impact of the BOT helium cooled solid breeder blanket for DEMO. SEAL subtask 6.2, final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleefeldt, K.; Dammel, F.; Gabel, K.

    1996-03-01

    The European Union has been engaged since 1989 in a programme to develop tritium breeding blankets for application in a fusion power reactor. There are four concepts under development, namely two of the solid breeder type and two of the liquid breeder type. At the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe one blanket concept of each line has been pursued so far with the so-called breeder outside tube (BOT) type representing the solid breeder line. In the BOT concept, Li 4 SiO 4 is used as ceramic breeding material in the form of pebble beds in combination with beryllium pebbles serving as neutron multiplier. Breeder and multiplier materials are arranged in radial-toroidal layers, separated by cooling plates. The coolant is high pressure helium which is circulated in series, at first through the first wall structure and subsequently through the cooling plates. The safety and environmental impact of the BOT blanket concept has been assessed as part of the blanket concept selection exercise, a European concerted action aiming at selecting the two most promising concepts for further development. The topics investigated are: (a) Blanket materials and toxic materials inventory, (b) energy sources for mobilisation, (c) fault tolerance, (d) tritium and activation product release, and (e) waste generation. No insurmountable safety problems have been identified for the BOT concept. The results of the assessment are described in this report. The information collected is also intended to serve as input to the EU 'Safety and Environmental Assessment of Fusion long-term Programme' (SEAL). The unresolved issues pertaining to the BOT blanket which need further investigations in future programmes are outlined herein. (orig.) [de

  6. Final quality of life and safety data for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with cabazitaxel in the UK Early Access Programme (EAP) (NCT01254279).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Amit; Masson, Susan; Malik, Zafar; Birtle, Alison J; Sundar, Santhanam; Jones, Rob J; James, Nicholas D; Mason, Malcolm D; Kumar, Satish; Bottomley, David; Lydon, Anna; Chowdhury, Simon; Wylie, James; de Bono, Johann S

    2015-12-01

    To compile the safety profile and quality of life (QoL) data for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with cabazitaxel in the UK Early Access Programme (UK EAP). A total of 112 patients participated at 12 UK cancer centres. All had mCRPC with disease progression during or after docetaxel. Patients received cabazitaxel 25 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks with prednisolone 10 mg daily for up to 10 cycles. Safety assessments were performed before each cycle and QoL was recorded at alternate cycles using the EQ-5D-3L questionnaire and visual analogue scale (VAS). The safety profile was compiled after completion of the UK EAP and QoL measures were analysed to record trends. No formal statistical analysis was carried out. The incidences of neutropenic sepsis (6.3%), grade 3 and 4 diarrhoea (4.5%) and grade 3 and 4 cardiac toxicity (0%) were low. Neutropenic sepsis episodes, though low, occurred only in patients who did not receive prophylactic granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. There were trends towards improved VAS and EQ-5D-3L pain scores during treatment. The UK EAP experience indicates that cabazitaxel might improve QoL in mCRPC and represents an advance and a useful addition to the armamentarium of treatment for patients whose disease has progressed during or after docetaxel. In view of the potential toxicity, careful patient selection is important. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Disposal of high active nuclear fuel waste. A critical review of the Nuclear Fuel Safety (KBS) project on final disposal of vitrified high active nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Swedish Energy Commission's working group for Safety and Environment. The main contributions are by profs. Jan Rydberg of Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden and John W Winchester of Florida State University, USA. The aim of the report is to discuss weather the KBS-project fullfills the Swedish ''Stipulations Act'', that a absolutely safe way of disposing of the nuclear waste must have been demonstrated before any new reactors are allowed to be taken inot use. Rydberg and Winchester do not arrive at similar conclusions. (L.E.)

  8. 45-day safety screen results and final report for tank 241-C-202, auger samples 95-Aug-026 and 95-Aug-027

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    Two auger samples from tank 241-C-202 (C-202) were received at the 222-S Laboratories and underwent safety screening analysis, consisting of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and total alpha activity. Two samples were submitted for energetics determination by DSC. Within the triplicate analyses of each sample, one of the results for energetics exceeded the notification limit. The sample and duplicate analyses for both augers exceeded the notification limit for TGA. As required by the Tank Characterization Plan, the appropriate notifications were made within 24 hours of official confirmation that the limits were violated

  9. ORNL necessary and sufficient standards for environment, safety, and health. Final report of the Identification Team for other industrial, radiological, and non-radiological hazard facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    This Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) set of standards is for Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These facility classifications are based on a laboratory-wide approach to classify facilities by hazard category. An analysis of the hazards associated with the facilities at ORNL was conducted in 1993. To identify standards appropriate for these Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities, the activities conducted in these facilities were assessed, and the hazards associated with the activities were identified. A preliminary hazards list was distributed to all ORNL organizations. The hazards identified in prior hazard analyses are contained in the list, and a category of other was provided in each general hazard area. A workshop to assist organizations in properly completing the list was held. Completed hazard screening lists were compiled for each ORNL division, and a master list was compiled for all Other Industrial, Radiological Hazard, and Non-Radiological facilities and activities. The master list was compared against the results of prior hazard analyses by research and development and environment, safety, and health personnel to ensure completeness. This list, which served as a basis for identifying applicable environment, safety, and health standards, appears in Appendix A

  10. Collection and classification of human reliability data for use in probabilistic safety assessments. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1995-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    One of the most important lessons from abnormal events in NPPs is that they often result from incorrect human action. The awareness of the importance of human factors and human reliability has increased significantly over 10-15 years primarily owing to the fact that some major incidents (nuclear or non-nuclear) have had significant human error contributions. Each of these incidents have revealed different types of human errors, some of which were not generally recognized prior to the incident. The analysis of these events led to wide recognition of the fact that more information about human actions and errors is needed to improve the safety and operation of nuclear power plants. At the same time, the need or proper human reliability data was recognised in view of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). No PSA study can be regarded as complete and accurate without adequate incorporation of human reliability analysis (HRA). In order to support incorporation of human reliability data into PSA the IAEA established a coordinated research programme with the objective to develop a common data base structure for human errors that might have important contributions to risk in different types of reactors. This report is a product of four years of coordinated research and describes the data collection and classification schemes currently in use in Member States as well as an outlook into future, discussing what types of data might be needed to support the new improved HRA methods which are currently under development

  11. ORNL necessary and sufficient standards for environment, safety, and health. Final report of the Identification Team for other industrial, radiological, and non-radiological hazard facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) set of standards is for Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These facility classifications are based on a laboratory-wide approach to classify facilities by hazard category. An analysis of the hazards associated with the facilities at ORNL was conducted in 1993. To identify standards appropriate for these Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities, the activities conducted in these facilities were assessed, and the hazards associated with the activities were identified. A preliminary hazards list was distributed to all ORNL organizations. The hazards identified in prior hazard analyses are contained in the list, and a category of other was provided in each general hazard area. A workshop to assist organizations in properly completing the list was held. Completed hazard screening lists were compiled for each ORNL division, and a master list was compiled for all Other Industrial, Radiological Hazard, and Non-Radiological facilities and activities. The master list was compared against the results of prior hazard analyses by research and development and environment, safety, and health personnel to ensure completeness. This list, which served as a basis for identifying applicable environment, safety, and health standards, appears in Appendix A.

  12. Uranium systems to enhance benchmarks for use in the verification of criticality safety computer models. Final report, February 16, 1990--December 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    Dr. Robert Busch of the Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering was the principal investigator on this project with technical direction provided by the staff in the Nuclear Criticality Safety Group at Los Alamos. During the period of the contract, he had a number of graduate and undergraduate students working on subtasks. The objective of this work was to develop information on uranium systems to enhance benchmarks for use in the verification of criticality safety computer models. During the first year of this project, most of the work was focused on setting up the SUN SPARC-1 Workstation and acquiring the literature which described the critical experiments. By august 1990, the Workstation was operational with the current version of TWODANT loaded on the system. MCNP, version 4 tape was made available from Los Alamos late in 1990. Various documents were acquired which provide the initial descriptions of the critical experiments under consideration as benchmarks. The next four years were spent working on various benchmark projects. A number of publications and presentations were made on this material. These are briefly discussed in this report

  13. Nuclear safety analyses and core design calculations to convert the Texas A & M University Nuclear Science Center reactor to low enrichment uranium fuel. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parish, T.A.

    1995-03-02

    This project involved performing the nuclear design and safety analyses needed to modify the license issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to allow operation of the Texas A& M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) with a core containing low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. The specific type of LEU fuel to be considered was the TRIGA 20-20 fuel produced by General Atomic. Computer codes for the neutronic analyses were provided by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the assistance of William Woodruff of ANL in helping the NSCR staff to learn the proper use of the codes is gratefully acknowledged. The codes applied in the LEU analyses were WIMSd4/m, DIF3D, NCTRIGA and PARET. These codes allowed full three dimensional, temperature and burnup dependent calculations modelling the NSCR core to be performed for the first time. In addition, temperature coefficients of reactivity and pulsing calculations were carried out in-house, whereas in the past this modelling had been performed at General Atomic. In order to benchmark the newly acquired codes, modelling of the current NSCR core with highly enriched uranium fuel was also carried out. Calculated results were compared to both earlier licensing calculations and experimental data and the new methods were found to achieve excellent agreement with both. Therefore, even if an LEU core is never loaded at the NSCR, this project has resulted in a significant improvement in the nuclear safety analysis capabilities established and maintained at the NSCR.

  14. Assessment of passive safety injection systems of ALWRs. Final report of the European Commission 4th framework programme. Project FI4I-CT95-004 (APSI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuunanen, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Nuclear Energy; Vihavainen, J. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology (Finland); D' Auria, F. [Univ. of Pisa (Italy); Kimber, G. [AEA Technology (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-01

    The European Commission 4th Framework Programme project 'Assessment of Passive Safety Injection Systems of Advanced Light Water Reactors (FI4I-CT95-0004)' involved experiments on the PACTEL test facility and computer simulations of selected experiments. The experiments focused on the performance of Passive Safety Injection Systems (PSIS) of Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) in Small Break Loss-Of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) conditions. The PSIS consisted of a Core Make-up Tank (CMT) and two pipelines. A pressure balancing line (PBL) connected the CMT to one cold leg. The injection line (IL) connected it to the downcomer. The project involved 15 experiments in three series. The experiments provided valuable information about condensation and heat transfer processes in the CMT, thermal stratification of water in the CMT, and natural circulation flow through the PSIS lines. The experiments showed the examined PSIS works efficiently in SBLOCAs although the flow through the PSIS may stop in very small SBLOCAs, when the hot water fills the CMT. The experiments also demonstrated the importance of flow distributor (sparger) in the CMT to limit rapid condensation. The project included validation of three thermal-hydraulic computer codes (APROS, CATHARE and RELAP5). The analyses showed the codes are capable of simulating the overall behaviour of the transients. The codes predicted accurately the core heatup, which occurred when the primary coolant inventory was reduced so much that the core top became free of water. The detailed analyses of the calculation results showed that some models in the codes still need improvements. Especially, further development of models for thermal stratification, condensation and natural circulation flow with small driving forces would be necessary for accurate simulation of phenomena in the PSIS. (orig.)

  15. Final Results of the Telaprevir Access Program: FibroScan Values Predict Safety and Efficacy in Hepatitis C Patients with Advanced Fibrosis or Cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Lepida

    Full Text Available Liver stiffness determined by transient elastography is correlated with hepatic fibrosis stage and has high accuracy for detecting severe fibrosis and cirrhosis in chronic hepatitis C patients. We evaluated the clinical value of baseline FibroScan values for the prediction of safety and efficacy of telaprevir-based therapy in patients with advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis in the telaprevir Early Access Program HEP3002.1,772 patients with HCV-1 and bridging fibrosis or cirrhosis were treated with telaprevir plus pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin (PR for 12 weeks followed by PR alone, the total treatment duration depending on virological response and previous response type. Liver fibrosis stage was determined either by liver biopsy or by non-invasive markers. 1,282 patients (72% had disease stage assessed by FibroScan; among those 46% were classified as Metavir F3 at baseline and 54% as F4.Overall, 1,139 patients (64% achieved a sustained virological response (SVR by intention-to-treat analysis. Baseline FibroScan values were tested for association with SVR and the occurrence of adverse events. By univariate analysis, higher baseline FibroScan values were predictive of lower sustained virological response rates and treatment-related anemia. By multivariate analysis, FibroScan was no longer statistically significant as an independent predictor, but higher FibroScan values were correlated with the occurrence of infections and serious adverse events.FibroScan has a limited utility as a predictor of safety and efficacy in patients treated with telaprevir-based triple therapy. Nevertheless it can be used in association with other clinical and biological parameters to help determine patients who will benefit from the triple regiments.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01508286.

  16. Preliminary safety assessments in construction of the pilot industrial facility for final disposal of low and intermediate radioactive waste in the archipelago Novaya Zemlya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopatin, V.V.; Lobanov, N.F.; Mankin, V.I.; Karamushka, V.P.; Ostroborodov, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses a preliminary safety evaluation of radioactive waste burial at the experimental plant located on Novaya Zemlya. The issues considered are (1) the main provisions on radioactive waste burial in permafrost rock, (2) mining, geological and geocryological conditions at the experimental works' operating site, (3) the main properties of solid and solidified radioactive wastes, (4) the main parameters of the experimental works, (5) preliminary evaluation of safety. The evaluation includes the main requirements to geocryologic characteristics of the permafrost rock intended for waste burial and analyses the seasonal mining-geological and geocryological conditions in the area of the experimental works. The area is situated within the limits of the southern Novozemelsky anticlinorium composed of the Silurian, Devonian and carboniferous rocks of the Paleozoic group. It is mainly limestone and dolomite, showing in rock sequence the layers, benches and horizons of clay shales, aleurolites, conglomerates and magmatic rocks covered with a thin Quaternary sedimentary mantle on the surface. The area is characterised by a confluent continuous layer no less than 300 m thick, seasonal thawing depth 0.5-2.0 m, annual zero temperature variations 10-15 m by the depth, and mean annual rock temperature of -4.5 - 5.0 C. The plant is an independent enterprise supplied with all the required services for industrial and communal/living purposes. The evaluation studies two possible scenarios for accidents during transport of waste to Novaya Zemlya, and the consequences of damage to the plant caused by the impact of a celestial body/flying object, by a catastrophic earthquake, and the effect of global climate warming in the Arctic area

  17. Assessment of passive safety injection systems of ALWRs. Final report of the European Commission 4th framework programme. Project FI4I-CT95-004 (APSI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuunanen, J.; D'Auria, F.; Kimber, G.

    1999-01-01

    The European Commission 4th Framework Programme project 'Assessment of Passive Safety Injection Systems of Advanced Light Water Reactors (FI4I-CT95-0004)' involved experiments on the PACTEL test facility and computer simulations of selected experiments. The experiments focused on the performance of Passive Safety Injection Systems (PSIS) of Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) in Small Break Loss-Of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) conditions. The PSIS consisted of a Core Make-up Tank (CMT) and two pipelines. A pressure balancing line (PBL) connected the CMT to one cold leg. The injection line (IL) connected it to the downcomer. The project involved 15 experiments in three series. The experiments provided valuable information about condensation and heat transfer processes in the CMT, thermal stratification of water in the CMT, and natural circulation flow through the PSIS lines. The experiments showed the examined PSIS works efficiently in SBLOCAs although the flow through the PSIS may stop in very small SBLOCAs, when the hot water fills the CMT. The experiments also demonstrated the importance of flow distributor (sparger) in the CMT to limit rapid condensation. The project included validation of three thermal-hydraulic computer codes (APROS, CATHARE and RELAP5). The analyses showed the codes are capable of simulating the overall behaviour of the transients. The codes predicted accurately the core heatup, which occurred when the primary coolant inventory was reduced so much that the core top became free of water. The detailed analyses of the calculation results showed that some models in the codes still need improvements. Especially, further development of models for thermal stratification, condensation and natural circulation flow with small driving forces would be necessary for accurate simulation of phenomena in the PSIS. (orig.)

  18. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a refernce boiling water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

    1988-07-01

    Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies of conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference boiling water reactor (BWR) described in the earlier study; and defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in three areas concerning decommissioning of the reference BWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation

  19. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

    1988-07-01

    Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies on conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference pressurized water reactor (PWR) described in the earlier study; defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs; and completing a study of recent PWR steam generator replacements to determine realistic estimates for time, costs and doses associated with steam generator removal during decommissioning. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in four areas concerning decommissioning of the reference PWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; assessing the cost and dose impacts of recent steam generator replacements; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation

  20. Reliability analysis and computation of computer-based safety instrumentation and control used in German nuclear power plant. Final report; Zuverlaessigkeitsuntersuchung und -berechnung rechnerbasierter Sicherheitsleittechnik zum Einsatz in deutschen Kernkraftwerken. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yongjian [Hochschule Magdeburg-Stendal, Magdeburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Elektrotechnik; Krause, Ulrich [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Apparate- und Umwelttechnik; Gu, Chunlei

    2014-08-21

    extended according to cope with special needs of the digital safety I and C system. The new modelling method based on fault tree analysis (FTA) combined with MCBFR model is provided and validated by a real example system from an industrial partner. The reliability data are taken from a platform specific data base of the industrial partner and an international generic data base. The results demonstrate the applicability of the new approach although the modelling quality is strongly dependent on the observed failure cases from the plant operation. Therefore more failure data of safety I and C should be collected in the future. This report is the final project report.

  1. Increased component safety through improved methods for residual stress analysis. Subprojects. Consideration of the elastic-plastic material properties (Phase 2). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirbach, David von

    2015-01-01

    Residual stresses in mechanical components can result in both detrimental but also beneficial effects on the strength and lifetime of the components. The most detailed knowledge of the residual stress state is of advantage or a pre-requisite for the assessment of the component performance. Two commonly used methods for determination of residual stresses are the hole drilling method and the ring core method which can be regarded to the mechanical methods. In the context of reactor safety research of the German Federal Ministry of Economic and Energy (BMWi) two fundamental and interacting weak points of the hole drilling method as well as of the ring core method, respectively, in order to determine residual stresses are going to be investigated. As a consequence reliability of the methods will be improved in this joint research project. On the one hand there are effects of geometrical boundary conditions of the components and on the other hand there is the influence of plasticity due to notch effects both affecting the released strain field after removing material and after all the calculated residual stresses. The first issue mentioned above is under the responsibility of the Institute of Materials Engineering (Kassel University) and the last one is investigated by materials testing institute university Stuttgart. As a consequence of a successful project the knowledge base will be considerably improved resulting in benefits for various engineering fields. Especially the quantitative consideration of real residual stress states for optimized component designs will be possible and after all the consequences of residual stresses on safety of components which are used in nuclear facilities can be evaluated. In this second experimental research chapter (phase 2) the findings of the first numerical and theoretical research chapter (phase 1) where proofed. The developed differential calculation method with the method of adaptive calibration functions were compared with the

  2. Increased component safety through improved methods for residual stress analysis. Subprojects. Consideration of the elastic-plastic material properties (phase 1). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirbach, David von

    2014-01-01

    Residual stresses in mechanical components can result in both detrimental but also beneficial effects on the strength and lifetime of the components. The most detailed knowledge of the residual stress state is of advantage or a pre-requisite for the assessment of the component performance. The mechanical methods for residual stress measurement are divided into the groups of non-destructive and destructive methods. Two commonly used mechanical methods for determination of residual stresses are the hole drilling method and the ring core method which can be regarded as semi-destructive methods. In the context of reactor safety research of the German Federal Ministry of Economic and Technology (BMWi) two fundamental and interacting weak points of the hole drilling method as well as of the ring core method, respectively, in order to determine residual stresses are going to be investigated. As a consequence reliability of the methods will be improved in this joint research project. On the one hand there are effects of geometrical boundary conditions of the components and on the other hand there is the influence of plasticity due to notch effects both affecting the released strain field after removing material and after all the calculated residual stresses. The first issue mentioned above is under the responsibility of the Institute of Materials Engineering (Kassel University) and the last one is investigated by Universitaet of Stuttgart-Otto-Graf-Institut - materials testing institute. As a consequence of a successful project the knowledge base will be considerably improved resulting in benefits for various engineering fields. Especially the quantitative consideration of real residual stress states for optimized component designs will be possible and after all the consequences of residual stresses on safety of components which are used in nuclear facilities can be evaluated. The state of art was reground in the first research chapter and the analysed strain gauges where

  3. Accident and safety analyses for the HTR-modul. Partial project 1: Computer codes for system behaviour calculation. Final report. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohnert, G.; Becker, D.; Dilcher, L.; Doerner, G.; Feltes, W.; Gysler, G.; Haque, H.; Kindt, T.; Kohtz, N.; Lange, L.; Ragoss, H.

    1993-08-01

    The project encompasses the following project tasks and problems: (1) Studies relating to complete failure of the main heat transfer system; (2) Pebble flow; (3) Development of computer codes for detailed calculation of hypothetical accidents; (a) the THERMIX/RZKRIT temperature buildup code (covering a.o. a variation to include exothermal heat sources); (b) the REACT/THERMIX corrosion code (variation taking into account extremely severe air ingress into the primary loop); (c) the GRECO corrosion code (variation for treating extremely severe water ingress into the primary loop); (d) the KIND transients code (for treating extremely fast transients during reactivity incidents. (4) Limiting devices for safety-relevant quantities. (5) Analyses relating to hypothetical accidents. (a) hypothetical air ingress; (b) effects on the fuel particles induced by fast transients. The problems of the various tasks are defined in detail and the main results obtained are explained. The contributions reporting the various project tasks and activities have been prepared for separate retrieval from the database. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Accident and safety analyses for the HTR-modul. Partial project 1: Computer codes for system behaviour calculation. Final report. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohnert, G.; Becker, D.; Dilcher, L.; Doerner, G.; Feltes, W.; Gysler, G.; Haque, H.; Kindt, T.; Kohtz, N.; Lange, L.; Ragoss, H.

    1993-08-01

    The project encompasses the following project tasks and problems: (1) Studies relating to complete failure of the main heat transfer system; (2) Pebble flow; (3) Development of computer codes for detailed calculation of hypothetical accidents; (a) the THERMIX/RZKRIT temperature buildup code (covering a.o. a variation to include exothermal heat sources); (b) the REACT/THERMIX corrosion code (variation taking into account extremely severe air ingress into the primary loop); (c) the GRECO corrosion code (variation for treating extremely severe water ingress into the primary loop); (d) the KIND transients code (for treating extremely fast transients during reactivity incidents. (4) Limiting devices for safety-relevant quantities. (5) Analyses relating to hypothetical accidents. (a) hypothetical air ingress; (b) effects on the fuel particles induced by fast transients. The problems of the various tasks are defined in detail and the main results obtained are explained. The contributions reporting the various project tasks and activities have been prepared for separate retrieval from the database. (orig./HP) [de

  5. NRC integrated program for the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issues A-3, A-4 and A-5 regarding steam generator tube integrity: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC integrated program for the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issues (USIs) A-3, A-4, and A-5 regarding steam generator tube integrity. A generic risk assessment is provided and indicates that risk from steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) events is not a significant contributor to total risk at a given site, nor to the total risk to which the general public is routinely exposed. This finding is considered to be indicative of the effectiveness of licensee programs and regulatory requirements for ensuring steam generator tube integrity in accordance with 10 CFR 50, Appendices A and B. This report also identifies a number of staff-recommended actions that the staff finds can further improve the effectiveness of licensee programs in ensuring the integrity of steam generator tubes and in mitigating the consequences of an SGTR. As part of the integrated program, the staff issued Generic Letter 85-02 encouraging licensees of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) to upgrade their programs, as necessary, to meet the intent of the staff-recommended actions; however, such actions do not constitute NRC requirements. In addition, this report describes a number of ongoing staff actions and studies involving steam generator issues which are being pursued to provide added assurance that risk from SGTR events will continue to be small. 146 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs

  6. A review of the current state-of-the-art methodology for handling bias and uncertainty in performing criticality safety evaluations. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, R.K.

    1994-10-01

    The methodology for handling bias and uncertainty when calculational methods are used in criticality safety evaluations (CSE's) is a rapidly evolving technology. The changes in the methodology are driven by a number of factors. One factor responsible for changes in the methodology for handling bias and uncertainty in CSE's within the overview of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is a shift in the overview function from a ''site'' perception to a more uniform or ''national'' perception. Other causes for change or improvement in the methodology for handling calculational bias and uncertainty are; (1) an increased demand for benchmark criticals data to expand the area (range) of applicability of existing data, (2) a demand for new data to supplement existing benchmark criticals data, (3) the increased reliance on (or need for) computational benchmarks which supplement (or replace) experimental measurements in critical assemblies, and (4) an increased demand for benchmark data applicable to the expanded range of conditions and configurations encountered in DOE site restoration and remediation

  7. Final efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety analyses of a nine-valent human papillomavirus vaccine in women aged 16-26 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huh, Warner K; Joura, Elmar A; Giuliano, Anna R

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary analyses of a study in young women aged 16-26 years showed efficacy of the nine-valent human papillomavirus (9vHPV; HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58) vaccine against infections and disease related to HPV 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58, and non-inferior HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18...... antibody responses when compared with quadrivalent HPV (qHPV; HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18) vaccine. We aimed to report efficacy of the 9vHPV vaccine for up to 6 years following first administration and antibody responses over 5 years. METHODS: We undertook this randomised, double-blind, efficacy, immunogenicity......, and safety study of the 9vHPV vaccine study at 105 study sites in 18 countries. Women aged 16-26 years old who were healthy, with no history of abnormal cervical cytology, no previous abnormal cervical biopsy results, and no more than four lifetime sexual partners were randomly assigned (1:1) by central...

  8. Review of methodologies for analysis of safety incidents at NPPs. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1998-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    The safe operation of nuclear power plants around the world and the prevention of incidents in these installations remain key concerns for the nuclear community. In this connection, the feedback of operating experience plays a major role: every nuclear power plant or nuclear utility needs to have a system in place for collecting information on unusual events, whether these are incidents or merely deviations from normal operation. Reporting to the regulatory body of important events and lessons learned is normally carried out through the national reporting schemes based on regulatory reporting requirements. The most important lessons learned are further shared internationally, through, for example, the Joint IAEA/NEA Incident Reporting System (IRS) or the event information exchange of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO). In order to properly assess the event, an adequate event investigation methodology has to be applied, which leads to the identification of correct root causes. Once these root causes have been ascertained, appropriate corrective actions can be established and corresponding lessons can be drawn. The overall goal of root cause analysis is the prevention of events or their recurrence and thus the overall improvement in plant safety. In 1998, the IAEA established a co-ordinated research project with the objective of exploring root cause methodologies and techniques currently in use in Member States, evaluating their strengths and limitations and developing criteria for appropriate event investigation methodologies. This report is the outcome of four years of co-ordinated research which involved 15 national and international research organizations

  9. Final report of the cosmetic ingredient review expert panel on the safety assessment of Polyisobutene and Hydrogenated Polyisobutene as used in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    controls. Neither Polyisobutene nor Hydrogenated Polyisobutene were ocular irritants, nor were they dermal irritants or sensitizers. Polyisobutene was not comedogenic in a rabbit ear study. Polyisobutene did not induce transformation in the Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell transformation assay, but did enhance 3-methylcholanthrene-induced transformation of C3H/10T1/2 cells. In a carcinogenicity study in mice, Polyisobutene was not carcinogenic, nor did it promote the carcinogenicity of 7,12-dimethylbenz(alpha)anthracene. Clinical patch tests uncovered no evidence of dermal irritation and repeat-insult patch tests with a product containing 4% Hydrogenated Polyisobutene or 1.44% Hydrogenated Polyisobutene found no reactions greater than slight erythema. These products also were not phototoxic or photoallergenic. The product containing 4% Hydrogenated Polyisobutene was not an ocular irritant in a clinical test. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel recognized that there are data gaps regarding use and concentration of these ingredients. However, the overall information available on the types of products in which these ingredients are used and at what concentrations indicate a pattern of use, which was considered by the Expert Panel in assessing safety. Although there is an absence of dermal absorption data for Polyisobutene and Hydrogenated Polyisobutene, the available octanol water partition coefficient data and the low solubility in water suggest very slow absorption, so additional data are not needed. Gastrointestinal absorption is also not a major concern due to the low solubility of these chemicals. Although one in vitro study did report that Polyisobutene did promote cellular transformation, a mouse study did not find evidence of tumor promotion. Because lifetime exposure studies using rats and dogs exposed to Polybutene failed to demonstrate any carcinogenic or tumor promotion effect, and a three-generation reproductive/developmental toxicity study produced

  10. Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale facility implementation -- excavation -- storage technology -- safety analysis and review statement. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, H.R.; Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Koperna, G.J. Jr.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the state-of-the-art of excavation technology as related to environmental remediation applications. A further purpose is to determine which of the excavation technologies reviewed could be used by the US Corp of Engineers in remediating contaminated soil to be excavated in the near future for construction of a new Lock and Dam at Winfield, WV. The study is designed to identify excavation methodologies and equipment which can be used at any environmental remediation site but more specifically at the Winfield site on the Kanawha River in Putnam County, West Virginia. A technical approach was determined whereby a functional analysis was prepared to determine the functions to be conducted during the excavation phase of the remediation operations. A number of excavation technologies were identified from the literature. A set of screening criteria was developed that would examine the utility and ranking of the technologies with respect to the operations that needed to be conducted at the Winfield site. These criteria were performance, reliability, implementability, environmental safety, public health, and legal and regulatory compliance. The Loose Bulk excavation technology was ranked as the best technology applicable to the Winfield site. The literature was also examined to determine the success of various methods of controlling fugitive dust. Depending upon any changes in the results of chemical analyses, or prior remediation of the VOCs from the vadose zone, consideration should be given to testing a new ``Pneumatic Excavator`` which removes the VOCs liberated during the excavation process as they outgas from the soil. This equipment however would not be needed on locations with low levels of VOC emissions.

  11. Real-world efficacy and safety of ritonavir-boosted paritaprevir, ombitasvir, dasabuvir ± ribavirin for hepatitis C genotype 1 - final results of the REV1TAL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubel, John; Strasser, Simone; Stuart, Katherine A; Dore, Gregory; Thompson, Alexander; Pianko, Stephen; Bollipo, Steven; Mitchell, Joanne L; Fragomeli, Vincenzo; Jones, Tracey; Chivers, Sarah; Gow, Paul; Iser, David; Levy, Miriam; Tse, Edmund; Gazzola, Alessia; Cheng, Wendy; Nazareth, Saroj; Galhenage, Sam; Wade, Amanda; Weltman, Martin; Wigg, Alan; MacQuillan, Gerry; Sasadeusz, Joe; George, Jacob; Zekry, Amany; Roberts, Stuart K

    2017-01-01

    Limited data exist on the outcomes of ritonavir-boosted paritaprevir with ombitasvir and dasabuvir (PrOD) ± ribavirin in a real-world setting. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of PrOD-based therapy in hepatitis C genotype 1 patients with and without cirrhosis, and to explore pre-treatment factors predictive of sustained viral response (SVR) and serious adverse events (SAEs) on treatment. 451 patients with hepatitis C genotype 1 treated in 20 centres across Australia were included. Baseline demographic, clinical and laboratory information, on-treatment biochemical, virological and haematological indices and details on serious adverse events were collected locally. Cirrhosis was present in 340 patients (75.4%). Overall SVR was 95.1% with no differences in SVR between the cirrhosis and non-cirrhosis groups (94.7% versus 96.4%). SVR in subgenotypes 1a and 1b was 93.1% and 99.2%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, baseline bilirubin level and early treatment cessation predicted SVR. SAEs occurred in 10.9% of patients including hepatic decompensation (2.7%) and hepatocellular carcinoma (1.8%). On multivariate analysis of factors predictive of SAEs in the overall group, Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) B was the only significant factor, while in those with cirrhosis, baseline albumin and creatinine levels were significant. In this large real-world cohort of HCV genotype 1 subjects, treatment with PrOD was highly effective and similar to clinical trials. Important determinants of reduced SVR include early cessation of therapy and baseline bilirubin concentration. SAEs were not infrequent with CTP B patients being at greatest risk.

  12. Long-term safety of radioactive waste disposal: Chemical reaction of fabricated and high burnup spent UO2 fuel with saline brines. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grambow, B.; Casas, I.; Pablo, J. de; Gimenez, J.; Torrero, M.E.

    1996-03-01

    This is the final report of a large EU-research project on spent fuel stability in saline repository environments. Static dissolution experiments with high burnup spent fuel samples and unirradiated UO 2 were performed for about two years in anaerobic NaCl solutions and deionized water with and without container material (iron) being present. Experiments performed at 25 and 150 C gave similar results. Dissolution rates were similar to those measured in the Swedish, or Canadian program for granite media. Rates are strongly influenced by the specific sample surface area, probably related to the mass balance of consumption and production of radiolytic oxidants. In the competition between the oxidizing effect of radiolysis and the reducing effect of iron, the metal corrosion process dominates. Processes controlling radionuclide release are matrix dissolution, solubility, coprecipitation sorption phenomena and colloid formation. In the absence of iron release rates of Sr90, Tc99, Np237, Sb125 and at low reaction progress Ru106 were controlled by matrix dissolution whereas concentrations of tetra-, hexa-, and trivalent actinides (U, Pu, Am, Cm) were controlled by solubility or coprecipitation. The presence of iron did effectively reduce the rates of fuel dissolution and the concentration of many, though not all radionuclides. Solubilities of U were similar for uniradiated UO 2 and for spent fuel both in the case of oxidizing and reducing conditions. In contrast, due to the effect of radiolysis, reaction rates of spent fuel were higher than UO 2 dissolution rates. (orig.) [de

  13. Playground Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Fall Prevention Playground Safety Poisoning Prevention Road Traffic Safety Sports Safety Get Email Updates To receive ... at the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s Playground Safety website . References U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Injuries and ...

  14. Increased component safety through improved methods for residual stress analysis. Subprojects. Consideration of real component geometries (phase 2). Final report; Erhoehung der Komponentensicherheit durch verbesserte Verfahren zur Eigenspannungsanalyse. Teilvorhaben. Beruecksichtigung realer Komponentengeometrien (Phase 2). Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholtes, B.; Nau, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Residual stresses can be result in both detrimental as well as beneficial consequences on the component's strength and lifetime. A most detailed knowledge of the residual stress state is a pre-requisite for the assessment of the component's performance. The mechanical methods for residual stress measurements are classified in non-destructive, destructive and semi-destructive methods. The two commonly used (semi-destructive) mechanical methods are the hole drilling and the ring core method. In the context of reactor safety research of the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi), two fundamental and interacting weak points of the hole drilling as well as ofthe ring core method are investigated. On the one hand, there are effects concerning geometricalboundary conditions of the components and on the other hand, there are influences of plasticity due to notch effects. Both aspects affect the released strain field, when the material is removed and finally, the calculated residual stresses. The first issue mentioned above is under the responsibility of Institute of Materials Engineering - Metallic Materials (KasselUniversity) and the last one will be investigated by University of Stuttgart-Otto-Graf-Institut - materials testing institute. As a consequence of a successful project, the present knowledgebase will be considerably improved and will be available for various engineering fields. Especially,the quantitative consideration of real residual stress states for optimized component designs will be feasible and finally the consequences of residual stresses on the component's safety, which are used in nuclear facilities, can be evaluated. The findings of the application-oriented research period (phase 2) at Kassel University are documented in this report.

  15. Final Safety Evaluation Report to license the construction and operation of a facility to receive, store, and dispose of 11e.(2) byproduct material near Clive, Utah (Docket No. 40-8989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) summarizes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff's review of Envirocare of Utah, Inc.'s (Envirocare's) application for a license to receive, store, and dispose of uranium and thorium byproduct material (as defined in Section 11e.(2) of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended) at a site near Clive, Utah. Envirocare proposes to dispose of high-volume, low-activity Section 11e.(2) byproduct material in separate earthen disposal cells on a site where the applicant currently disposes of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), low-level waste, and mixed waste under license by the Utah Department of Environmental Quality. The NRC staff review of the December 23, 1991, license application, as revised by page changes dated July 2 and August 10, 1992, April 5, 7, and 10, 1993, and May 3, 6, 7, 11, and 21, 1993, has identified open issues in geotechnical engineering, water resources protection, radon attenuation, financial assurance, and radiological safety. The NRC will not issue a license for the proposed action until Envirocare adequately resolves these open issues

  16. Final Safety Evaluation Report to license the construction and operation of a facility to receive, store, and dispose of 11e.(2) byproduct material near Clive, Utah (Docket No. 40-8989)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) summarizes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff`s review of Envirocare of Utah, Inc.`s (Envirocare`s) application for a license to receive, store, and dispose of uranium and thorium byproduct material (as defined in Section 11e.(2) of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended) at a site near Clive, Utah. Envirocare proposes to dispose of high-volume, low-activity Section 11e.(2) byproduct material in separate earthen disposal cells on a site where the applicant currently disposes of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), low-level waste, and mixed waste under license by the Utah Department of Environmental Quality. The NRC staff review of the December 23, 1991, license application, as revised by page changes dated July 2 and August 10, 1992, April 5, 7, and 10, 1993, and May 3, 6, 7, 11, and 21, 1993, has identified open issues in geotechnical engineering, water resources protection, radon attenuation, financial assurance, and radiological safety. The NRC will not issue a license for the proposed action until Envirocare adequately resolves these open issues.

  17. Final amended report on the safety assessment of Methylparaben, Ethylparaben, Propylparaben, Isopropylparaben, Butylparaben, Isobutylparaben, and Benzylparaben as used in cosmetic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    , demonstrate a low order of parabens' toxicity at concentrations that would be used in cosmetics. Parabens are rarely irritating or sensitizing to normal human skin at concentrations used in cosmetics. Although parabens do penetrate the stratum corneum, metabolism of parabens takes place within viable skin, which is likely to result in only 1% unmetabolized parabens available for absorption into the body. The Expert Panel did consider data in the category of endocrine disruption, including male reproductive toxicity and various estrogenic activity studies. The CIR Expert Panel compared exposures to parabens resulting from use of cosmetic products to a no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of 1000 mg/kg day(- 1) based on the most statistically powerful and well-conducted study of the effects of Butylparabens on the male reproductive system. The CIR Expert Panel considered exposures to cosmetic products containing a single parabens preservative (use level of 0.4%) separately from products containing multiple parabens (use level of 0.8%) and infant exposures separately from adult exposures in determining margins of safety (MOS). The MOS for infants ranged from approximately 6000 for single paraben products to approximately 3000 for multiple paraben products. The MOS for adults ranged from 1690 for single paraben products to 840 for multiple paraben products. The Expert Panel considers that these MOS determinations are conservative and likely represent an overestimate of the possibility of an adverse effect (e.g., use concentrations may be lower, penetration may be less) and support the safety of cosmetic products in which parabens preservatives are used.

  18. Innovative small and medium sized reactors: Design features, safety approaches and R and D trends. Final report of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-05-01

    meeting and presents its final report, which summarizes the major features and identifies the technology and infrastructure development needs common to certain groups of the SMR concepts and designs considered at the meeting

  19. Final report of the safety assessment of L-Ascorbic Acid, Calcium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate, Sodium Ascorbate, and Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate as used in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Amy R

    2005-01-01

    acting as antioxidants in cosmetic formulations. The Panel believed that the clinical experience in which Ascorbic Acid was used on damaged skin with no adverse effects and the repeat-insult patch test (RIPT) using 5% Ascorbic Acid with negative results supports the finding that this group of ingredients does not present a risk of skin sensitization. These data coupled with an absence of reports in the clinical literature of Ascorbic Acid sensitization strongly support the safety of these ingredients.

  20. Nuclear safety in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of the main safety aspects of the French nuclear energy programme and of the general safety organization is followed by a discussion on the current thinking in CEA on some important safety issues. As far as methodology is concerned, the use of probabilistic analysis in the licensing procedure is being extensively developed. Reactor safety research is aimed at a better knowledge of the safety margins involved in the present designs of both PWRs and LMFBRs. A greater emphasis should be put during the next years in the safety of the nuclear fuel cycle installations, including waste disposals. Finally, it is suggested that further international cooperation in the field of nuclear safety should be developed in order to insure for all countries the very high safety level which has been achieved up till now. (author)

  1. Nuclear safety code study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, C.; Abumansoor, K.; Myers, E.; Jespersen, D.; Cramer, E.; O'Reilly, B.; Carmichael, B.

    1980-06-01

    An unprotected overpower accident in a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor is studied. A mathematical model and a system of partial differential equations for the temperature are derived. After spatial discretization, a large system of ordinary differential equations is obtained. The steady state version of the equations is solved analytically

  2. Nuclear safety code study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, C.; Abumansoor, K.; Myers, E.; Jesperson, D.; Cramer, E.; O'Reilly, B.; Carmichael, B.

    1980-06-01

    An unprotected overpower accident in a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor is studied. We construct a mathematical model and derive a system of partial differential equations for the temperature. After spatial discretization, we have a large system of ordinary differential equations; the system is stiff. We solve the steady state version of our equations analytically and obtain good agreement with other work. Then we solve the time-dependent problem numerically, using two stiff techniques and one non-stiff technique. The stiff techniques are vastly more efficient than the non-stiff technique. Between the two stiff techniques, the Gear backward differentiation formulas are more efficient than an implicit Runge-Kutta type method. We also compare the use of the full neutron kinetics equations to an approximation called the zero-lifetime system. Use of the zero-lifetime system is thought to make the problem easier to solve. Results indicate this is not true when a good stiff method is used. Thus use of the zero-lifetime system is probably not necessary, and should be avoided

  3. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurney, Kevin R. [Arizona Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  4. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  5. Nuclear safety legislation and supervision in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shiguan

    1991-02-01

    The cause for the urgent need of nuclear safety legislation and supervision in China is firstly described, and then a brief introduction to the basic principle and guideline of nuclear safety is presented. Finally the elaboration on the establishment of nuclear safety regulatory system, the enactment of a series of regulations and safety guides, and the implementation of licencing, nuclear safety supervision and research for ensuring the safety of nuclear energy, since the founding of the National Nuclear Safety Administration, are introduced

  6. Auto Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Auto Safety KidsHealth / For Parents / Auto Safety What's in this ... by teaching some basic rules. Importance of Child Safety Seats Using a child safety seat (car seat) ...

  7. Safety KPIs - Monitoring of safety performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Lališ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to provide brief overview of aviation safety development focusing on modern trends represented by implementation of Safety Key Performance Indicators. Even though aviation is perceived as safe means of transport, it is still struggling with its complexity given by long-term growth and robustness which it has reached today. Thus nowadays safety issues are much more complex and harder to handle than ever before. We are more and more concerned about organizational factors and control mechanisms which have potential to further increase level of aviation safety. Within this paper we will not only introduce the concept of Key Performance Indicators in area of aviation safety as an efficient control mechanism, but also analyse available legislation and documentation. Finally we will propose complex set of indicators which could be applied to Czech Air Navigation Service Provider.

  8. Narrative Finality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armine Kotin Mortimer

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available The cloturai device of narration as salvation represents the lack of finality in three novels. In De Beauvoir's Tous les hommes sont mortels an immortal character turns his story to account, but the novel makes a mockery of the historical sense by which men define themselves. In the closing pages of Butor's La Modification , the hero plans to write a book to save himself. Through the thrice-considered portrayal of the Paris-Rome relationship, the ending shows the reader how to bring about closure, but this collective critique written by readers will always be a future book. Simon's La Bataille de Pharsale , the most radical attempt to destroy finality, is an infinite text. No new text can be written. This extreme of perversion guarantees bliss (jouissance . If the ending of De Beauvoir's novel transfers the burden of non-final world onto a new victim, Butor's non-finality lies in the deferral to a future writing, while Simon's writer is stuck in a writing loop, in which writing has become its own end and hence can have no end. The deconstructive and tragic form of contemporary novels proclaims the loss of belief in a finality inherent in the written text, to the profit of writing itself.

  9. Final remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the fulfilling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 7 of the document refers to the achievement and maintenance of a high level in the Brazilian nuclear installations, the establishment and maintenance of effective defenses against potential radiological hazards, the ability to prevent accidents with radiological consequences and preparedness for mitigating the consequences of such accidents should they occur

  10. Increased component safety through improved methods for residual stress analysis. Subprojects. Consideration of real component geometries (phase 1). Final report; Erhoehung der Komponentensicherheit durch verbesserte Verfahren zur Eigenspannungsanalyse. Teilvorhaben. Beruecksichtigung realer Komponentengeometrien (Phase 1). Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nau, Andreas; Scholtes, B.

    2014-07-24

    Residual stresses can be result in both detrimental as well as beneficial consequences on the component's strength and lifetime. A most detailed knowledge of the residual stress state is a pre-requisite for the assessment of the component's performance. The mechanical methods for residual stress measurements are classified in non-destructive, destructive and semi-destructive methods. The two commonly used (semi-destructive) mechanical methods are the hole drilling and the ring core method. In the context of reactor safety research of the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi), two fundamental and interacting weak points of the hole drilling as well as of the ring core method are investigated. On the one hand, there are effects concerning geometrical boundary conditions of the components and on the other hand, there are influences of plasticity due to notch effects. Both aspects affect the released strain field, when the material is removed and finally, the calculated residual stresses. The first issue mentioned above is under the responsibility of Institute of Materials Engineering - Metallic Materials (Kassel University) and the last one will be investigated by University of Stuttgart-Otto-Graf-Institut - materials testing institute. Within the framework of this project it could be demonstrated that updated calibration coefficients lead to more reliable residual stress calculation in contrast to existing ones. These findings are valid for points of measurements on components without geometrical boundary effects like edges or shoulders. Reasons are high developed Finite-Element software packages and the opportunity of modelling the point of measurement (hole geometry, layout of the strain gauges) and its vicinity more in detail. Special challenges are multi-axial residual stress depth distributions and the geometry of components composing edges and claddings. Unlike existing analyses considering uni-axial and homogeneous stress states, bi

  11. Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    This final report for the Hybrid Ventilation Centre at Aalborg University describes the activities and research achievement in the project period from August 2001 to August 2006. The report summarises the work performed and the results achieved with reference to articles and reports published...

  12. Discussion on building safety culture inside a nuclear safety regulatory body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Yumao

    2013-01-01

    A strong internal safety culture plays a key role in improving the performance of a nuclear regulatory body. This paper discusses the definition of internal safety culture of nuclear regulatory bodies, and explains the functions that the safety culture to facilitate the nuclear safety regulation and finally puts forward some thoughts about building internal safety culture inside regulatory bodies. (author)

  13. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinis, Panos [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-07

    This is the final report for the work conducted at the University of Minnesota (during the period 12/01/12-09/18/14) by PI Panos Stinis as part of the "Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials" (CM4). CM4 is a multi-institution DOE-funded project whose aim is to conduct basic and applied research in the emerging field of mesoscopic modeling of materials.

  14. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This book reviews the accomplishments, operations, and problems faced by the defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. Specifically, it discusses the recommendations that the Safety Board made to improve safety and health conditions at the Department of Energy's defense nuclear facilities, problems the Safety Board has encountered in hiring technical staff, and management problems that could affect the Safety Board's independence and credibility

  15. Drug Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  16. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarride, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    The author proposes an overview of methods and concepts used in the nuclear industry, at the design level as well as at the exploitation level, to ensure an acceptable safety level, notably in the case of nuclear reactors. He first addresses the general objectives of nuclear safety and the notion of acceptable risk: definition and organisation of nuclear safety (relationships between safety authorities and operators), notion of acceptable risk, deterministic safety approach and main safety principles (safety functions and confinement barriers, concept of defence in depth). Then, the author addresses the safety approach at the design level: studies of operational situations, studies of internal and external aggressions, safety report, design principles for important-for-safety systems (failure criterion, redundancy, failure prevention, safety classification). The next part addresses safety during exploitation and general exploitation rules: definition of the operation domain and of its limits, periodic controls and tests, management in case of incidents, accidents or aggressions

  17. Development of the status of W and T for the realization of a long-term safety demonstration for the final repository using the examples VSG and Konrad. Report on the Working package 2. Review and development of safety-related assessments of disposal facilities of wastes with negligible heat generation; development and provision of the necessary set of tools using the example of the final repository Konrad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larue, Juergen; Fischer-Appelt, Klaus; Hartwig-Thurat, Eva

    2015-09-01

    In the research project on the ''Review and development of safety-related assessments of disposal facilities with negligible heat generation; development and provision of the necessary set of tools, using the example of the Konrad disposal facility'' (3612R03410), the state of the art in science and technology of the safety-related assessments and sets of tools for building a safety case was examined. The reports pertaining to the two work packages described the further development of the methodology for accident analyses (WP 1) and of building a safety case (WP 2); also, comparisons were drawn on a national and international scale with the methods applied in the licensing procedure of the Konrad disposal facility. A safety case as well as its underlying analyses and methods always has to be brought up to date with the development of the state of the art in science and technology. In Germany, two safety cases regarding the long-term safety of disposal facilities have been prepared. These are the licensing documentation for the Konrad disposal facility in the year 1990 and the research project regarding the preliminary safety case for the Gorleben site (Vorlaeufige Sicherheitsanalyse Gorleben - VSG) in the year 2013, both reflecting the state of development of building a safety case at the respective time. Comparing the two above-mentioned examples of safety cases and taking recent international recommendations and national regulations into account, this report on Work Package 2 presents the development of the international state of the art in science and technology. This has been done by summarising the essential differences and similarities of each element of the safety case for the Konrad disposal facility on the one hand and the VSG and the international status on the other hand.

  18. Safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    Safety culture has become a topic of increasing interest for industry and regulators as issues are raised on safety problems around the world. The keys to safety culture are organizational effectiveness, effective communications, organizational learning, and a culture that encourages the identification and resolution of safety issues. The necessity of a strong safety culture places an onus on all of us to continually question whether the safety measures already in place are sufficient, and are being applied. (author)

  19. HSE's safety assessment principles for criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simister, D N; Finnerty, M D; Warburton, S J; Thomas, E A; Macphail, M R

    2008-01-01

    The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) published its revised Safety Assessment Principles for Nuclear Facilities (SAPs) in December 2006. The SAPs are primarily intended for use by HSE's inspectors when judging the adequacy of safety cases for nuclear facilities. The revised SAPs relate to all aspects of safety in nuclear facilities including the technical discipline of criticality safety. The purpose of this paper is to set out for the benefit of a wider audience some of the thinking behind the final published words and to provide an insight into the development of UK regulatory guidance. The paper notes that it is HSE's intention that the Safety Assessment Principles should be viewed as a reflection of good practice in the context of interpreting primary legislation such as the requirements under site licence conditions for arrangements for producing an adequate safety case and for producing a suitable and sufficient risk assessment under the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999 (SI1999/3232 www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si1999/uksi_19993232_en.pdf). (memorandum)

  20. Development of computational methods for the safety assessment of gas-cooled high-temperature and supercritical light-water reactors. Final report; Rechenmethoden zur Bewertung der Sicherheit von gasgekuehlten Hochtemperaturreaktoren und superkritischen Leichtwasserreaktoren. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, S.; Cron, D. von der; Hristov, H.; Lerchl, G.; Papukchiev, A.; Seubert, A.; Sureda, A.; Weis, J.; Weyermann, F.

    2012-12-15

    This report documents developments and results in the frame of the project RS1191 ''Development of computational methods for the safety assessment of gas-cooled high temperature and supercritical light-water reactors''. The report is structured according to the five work packages: 1. Reactor physics modeling of gas-cooled high temperature reactors; 2. Coupling of reactor physics and 3-D thermal hydraulics for the core barrel; 3. Extension of ATHLET models for application to supercritical reactors (HPLWR); 4. Further development of ATHLET for application to HTR; 5. Further development and validation of ANSYS CFX for application to alternative reactor concepts. Chapter 4 describes the extensions made in TORT-TD related to the simulation of pebble-bed HTR, e.g. spectral zone buckling, Iodine-Xenon dynamics, nuclear decay heat calculation and extension of the cross section interpolation algorithms to higher dimensions. For fast running scoping calculations, a time-dependent 3-D diffusion solver has been implemented in TORT-TD. For the PBMR-268 and PBMR-400 as well as for the HTR-10 reactor, appropriate TORT-TD models have been developed. Few-group nuclear cross sections have been generated using the spectral codes MICROX- 2 and DRAGON4. For verification and validation of nuclear cross sections and deterministic reactor models, MCNP models of reactor core and control rod of the HTR-10 have been developed. Comparisons with experimental data have been performed for the HTR-10 first criticality and control rod worth. The development of the coupled 3-D neutron kinetics and thermal hydraulics code system TORT-TD/ATTICA3D is documented in chapter 5. Similar to the couplings with ATHLET and COBRA-TF, the ''internal'' coupling approach has been implemented. Regarding the review of experiments and benchmarks relevant to HTR for validation of the coupled code system, the PBMR-400 benchmarks and the HTR-10 test reactor have been selected

  1. MINIMARS conceptual design: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1986-09-01

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) fueling systems; (2) blanket; (3) alternative blanket concepts; (4) halo scraper/direct converter system study and final conceptual design; (5) heat-transport and power-conversion systems; (6) tritium systems; (7) minimars air detritiation system; (8) appropriate radiological safety design criteria; and (9) cost estimate

  2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    This is the final report of our research program on electronic transport experiments on Topological Insulator (TI) devices, funded by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences. TI-based electronic devices are attractive as platforms for spintronic applications, and for detection of emergent properties such as Majorana excitations , electron-hole condensates , and the topological magneto-electric effect . Most theoretical proposals envision geometries consisting of a planar TI device integrated with materials of distinctly different physical phases (such as ferromagnets and superconductors). Experimental realization of physics tied to the surface states is a challenge due to the ubiquitous presence of bulk carriers in most TI compounds as well as degradation during device fabrication.

  3. Nuclear safety in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servant, J.

    1979-12-01

    The main areas of nuclear safety are considered in this paper, recalling the laws and resolutions in force and also the appropriate authority in each case. The following topics are reviewed: radiological protection, protection of workers, measures to be taken in case of an accident, radioactive effluents, impact on the environment of non-nuclear pollution, nuclear plant safety, protection against malicious acts, control and safeguard of nuclear materials, radioisotopes, transport of radioactive substances, naval propulsion, waste management, nuclear plant decommissioning and export of nuclear equipment and materials. Finally, the author describes the role of the general Secretariat of the Interdepartmental Committee on Nuclear Safety

  4. RepoTREND. The program package for the integrated long term safety analysis of final repository systems. Version 4.5 (State March 2016); RepoTREND. Das Programmpaket zur integrierten Langzeitsicherheitsanalyse von Endlagersystemen. Version 4.5 (Stand Maerz 2016)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiche, Tatiana

    2016-04-15

    The long-term safety analysis is the analysis of final repository behavior after closure includes the spreading of pollutants into the biosphere (mobilization and release of pollutants into the near field, radionuclide migration through the geosphere, radiation exposure in the biosphere) and the radiological consequences. The report describes the program package RepoTREND, the respective modules (near field, GeoTREND, BioTREND and probabilistic analyses), sequencing and postprocessing and the quality management.

  5. [Safety culture: definition, models and design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Holger; Hammer, Antje; Ernstmann, Nicole; Kowalski, Christoph; Ommen, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Safety culture is a multi-dimensional phenomenon. Safety culture of a healthcare organization is high if it has a common stock in knowledge, values and symbols in regard to patients' safety. The article intends to define safety culture in the first step and, in the second step, demonstrate the effects of safety culture. We present the model of safety behaviour and show how safety culture can affect behaviour and produce safe behaviour. In the third step we will look at the causes of safety culture and present the safety-culture-model. The main hypothesis of this model is that the safety culture of a healthcare organization strongly depends on its communication culture and its social capital. Finally, we will investigate how the safety culture of a healthcare organization can be improved. Based on the safety culture model six measures to improve safety culture will be presented.

  6. An International Peer Review of the Safety Options Dossier of the Project for Disposal of Radioactive Waste in Deep Geological Formations (Cigéo). Final Report of the IAEA International Review Team November 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-07-01

    The French Nuclear Safety Authority (Autorité de sûreté nucléaire, ASN) is preparing the evaluation of a licence application for the creation of a deep geological disposal facility in 2018, called Cigéo, for intermediate level, high level and long lived radioactive waste. This licence is preceded by the submission of a Safety Options Dossier to ASN, which provides the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Agence nationale pour la gestion des déchets radioactifs, Andra) the possibility to receive advice from ASN on the preparation of the licence application on the safety principles and approach. The Safety Options Dossier sets out the chosen objectives, concepts and principles for ensuring the safety of the facility. ASN requested the IAEA to organize an international peer review of the Safety Options Dossier. This publication presents the consensus view of the international group of experts convened by the IAEA to conduct the review against the relevant IAEA safety standards and proven international practice and experience. The experts acted in a personal capacity and the views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the IAEA, the governments of the nominating Member States or the nominating organizations. The basis of this peer review is the set of documents provided by Andra, as the agency responsible for the development of the Cigéo project and for its safety. Consequently, the findings of the reviews are addressed directly to Andra. This publication, however, is primarily submitted to ASN to review the outcomes of the Andra project.

  7. Is road safety management linked to road safety performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Eleonora; Yannis, George

    2013-10-01

    This research aims to explore the relationship between road safety management and road safety performance at country level. For that purpose, an appropriate theoretical framework is selected, namely the 'SUNflower' pyramid, which describes road safety management systems in terms of a five-level hierarchy: (i) structure and culture, (ii) programmes and measures, (iii) 'intermediate' outcomes'--safety performance indicators (SPIs), (iv) final outcomes--fatalities and injuries, and (v) social costs. For each layer of the pyramid, a composite indicator is implemented, on the basis of data for 30 European countries. Especially as regards road safety management indicators, these are estimated on the basis of Categorical Principal Component Analysis upon the responses of a dedicated road safety management questionnaire, jointly created and dispatched by the ETSC/PIN group and the 'DaCoTA' research project. Then, quasi-Poisson models and Beta regression models are developed for linking road safety management indicators and other indicators (i.e. background characteristics, SPIs) with road safety performance. In this context, different indicators of road safety performance are explored: mortality and fatality rates, percentage reduction in fatalities over a given period, a composite indicator of road safety final outcomes, and a composite indicator of 'intermediate' outcomes (SPIs). The results of the analyses suggest that road safety management can be described on the basis of three composite indicators: "vision and strategy", "budget, evaluation and reporting", and "measurement of road user attitudes and behaviours". Moreover, no direct statistical relationship could be established between road safety management indicators and final outcomes. However, a statistical relationship was found between road safety management and 'intermediate' outcomes, which were in turn found to affect 'final' outcomes, confirming the SUNflower approach on the consecutive effect of each layer

  8. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butz, H.P.; Heuser, F.W.; May, H.

    1985-01-01

    The paper comprises an introduction into nuclear physics bases, the safety concept generally speaking, safety devices of pwr type reactors, accident analysis, external influences, probabilistic safety assessment and risk studies. It further describes operational experience, licensing procedures under the Atomic Energy Law, research in reactor safety and the nuclear fuel cycle. (DG) [de

  9. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Robert C. [Texas A& M University; Kamon, Teruki [Texas A& M University; Toback, David [Texas A& M University; Safonov, Alexei [Texas A& M University; Dutta, Bhaskar [Texas A& M University; Dimitri, Nanopoulos [Texas A& M University; Pope, Christopher [Texas A& M University; White, James [Texas A& M University

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  10. Critical operator actions: human reliability modeling and data issues. Principal Working Group No. 5 - Task 94-1. Final Task Report prepared by a Group of Experts of the NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmart, P.; Grant, A.; Raina, V.M.; Patrik, M.; Cacciabue, P.C.; Cojazzi, G.; Reiman, L.; Virolainen, R.; Lanore, J.M.; Poidevin, S.; Herttrich, P.M.; Mertens, J.; Reer, B.; Straeter, O.; Bareith, A.; Hollo, E.; Traini, E.; Fukuda, M.; Hirano, M.; Kani, Y.; Muramatsu, K.; Versteeg, M.F.; Kim, T.W.; Calvo, J.; Gil, B.; Dang, V.N.; Hirschberg, S.; Meyer, P.; Schmocker, U.; Andrews, R.; Coxson, B.; Shepherd, C.H.; Murphy, J.A.; Parry, G.W.; Ramey-Smith, A.; Siu, N.O.

    1998-01-01

    The treatment of human interactions is considered one of the major limitations in the context of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA).While the results of many PSAs show a very significant contribution of human errors, large uncertainties are normally associated with the quantitative estimates of these contributors. This problem becomes even more significant when analysing human interactions under special conditions, for example in accident scenarios for external events or for the shutdown and low power conditions. Any improvement in the current state of knowledge with respect to the data for human interactions would have a positive impact on the confidence in PSA results, including correct ranking of the dominant accident scenarios. At the same time many PSAs have been successful at identifying critical operator actions; in most cases the benefits of these qualitative insights are not jeopardised by lack of numerical precision in the estimates. The present HRA approaches as generally applied in PSAs are also limited in scope; for instance, they either ignore errors of commissions or treat these superficially. New, dynamic methods, primarily aiming at the resolution of the issues of cognitive errors including errors of commission are emerging but their full-scope applications within the PSA framework belong to the future. In the context of data, some progress has been observed partially due to use of simulators to support the human reliability analysis (HRA). These applications have been rather concentrated (but not limited) to France and USA. Recently, a very promising program has been established in Hungary. The experiences from such applications are not widely known and dissemination of the relevant insights to the PSA community has some definite merits. With respect to the identification of critical operator actions there is in some cases clear evidence and in others a good potential that the existing PSA studies may provide useful, partially generic

  11. Safety analysis procedures for PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Byung Joo; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Yoo, Kun Joong

    2004-03-01

    The methodology of safety analyses for CANDU reactors in Canada, a vendor country, uses a combination of best-estimate physical models and conservative input parameters so as to minimize the uncertainty of the plant behavior predictions. As using the conservative input parameters, the results of the safety analyses are assured the regulatory requirements such as the public dose, the integrity of fuel and fuel channel, the integrity of containment and reactor structures, etc. However, there is not the comprehensive and systematic procedures for safety analyses for CANDU reactors in Korea. In this regard, the development of the safety analyses procedures for CANDU reactors is being conducted not only to establish the safety analyses system, but also to enhance the quality assurance of the safety assessment. In the first phase of this study, the general procedures of the deterministic safety analyses are developed. The general safety procedures are covered the specification of the initial event, selection of the methodology and accident sequences, computer codes, safety analysis procedures, verification of errors and uncertainties, etc. Finally, These general procedures of the safety analyses are applied to the Large Break Loss Of Coolant Accident (LBLOCA) in Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for Wolsong units 2, 3, 4

  12. The SSI and SKI review of the updated Final Safety Report for SFR 1 issued by SKB. Review report; SSI:s och SKI:s granskning av SKB:s uppdaterade Slutlig Saekerhetsrapport foer SFR 1. Granskningsrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Rodolfo; Jensen, Mikael; Larsson, Carl-Magnus; Lund, Ingemar; Loefgren, Tomas; Moberg, Leif; Norden, Maria; Wiebert, Anders [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden); Berglund, Thomas; Dverstorp, Bjoern; Hedberg, Bengt; Kautsky, Fritz; Lilja, Christina; Simic, Eva; Stroemberg, Bo; Sundstroem, Benny; Toverud, Oeivind; Wingefors, Stig; Zika, Helmuth [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-11-01

    The repository for operational radioactive wastes in Sweden, SFR1, has been the object for a new safety assessment study by SKB (The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co.). The findings of the review group will form the basis for decisions by the authorities on the provisions for the future operation of the repository.

  13. 78 FR 25454 - Issuance of Final Guidance Publication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... NIOSH-161-A] Issuance of Final Guidance Publication AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety... Human Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice of issuance of final guidance publication. SUMMARY: The National...), announces the availability of the following publication: ``NIOSH Current Intelligence Bulletin 65...

  14. 77 FR 74194 - Issuance of Final Guidance Publication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... NIOSH-238] Issuance of Final Guidance Publication AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and... Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice of issuance of final guidance publication. SUMMARY: The National Institute...), announces the availability of the following publication: NIOSH Alert entitled ``Preventing Occupational...

  15. Chernobyl: the final warning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, R.P.; Hauser, Thomas.

    1988-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident in 1986, a book has been written with firstly an introduction to the basic principles and development of nuclear power, followed by a brief review of previous nuclear power plant accidents and then a short account of the Chernobyl accident itself. The main text of the book however contains the personal story of Dr. Robert Peter Yale, head of the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit at the UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles who travelled to Russia six times to help the victims of the Chernobyl accident. The final part of the book discusses the safety of nuclear power and the dangers of the proliferation of nuclear weapons. (U.K.)

  16. Safety case plan 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-07-01

    Following the guidelines set forth by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (now Ministry of Employment and Economy) Posiva is preparing to submit the construction license application for a spent fuel repository by the end of the year 2012. The long-term safety section supporting the license application is based on a safety case, which, according to the internationally adopted definition, is a compilation of the evidence, analyses and arguments that quantify and substantiate the safety and the level of expert confidence in the safety of the planned repository. In 2005, Posiva presented a plan to prepare such a safety case. The present report provides a revised plan of the safety case contents mentioned above. The update of the safety case plan takes into account the recommendations made by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) about improving the focus and further developing the plan. Accordingly, particular attention is given to the quality management of the safety case work, the management of uncertainties and the scenario methodology. The quality management is based on the ISO 9001:2000 standard process thinking enhanced with special features arising from STUK's YVL Guides. The safety case production process is divided into four main sub-processes. The conceptualisation and methodology sub-process defines the framework for the assessment. The critical data handling and modelling sub-process links Posiva's main technical and scientific activities to the production of the safety case. The assessment sub-process analyses the consequences of the evolution of the disposal system in various scenarios, classified either as part of the expected evolution or as disruptive scenarios. The compliance and confidence sub-process is responsible for final evaluation of compliance of the assessment results with the regulatory criteria and the overall confidence in the safety case. As in the previous safety case plan, the safety case will be based on several reports, but

  17. Vaccine Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... During Pregnancy Frequently Asked Questions about Vaccine Recalls Historical Vaccine Safety Concerns FAQs about GBS and Menactra ... CISA Resources for Healthcare Professionals Evaluation Current Studies Historical Background 2001-12 Publications Technical Reports Vaccine Safety ...

  18. SAFETY FIRST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ensuring safety while peacefully utilizing nuclear energy is a top priority for China A fter a recent earthquake in Japan caused radioactive leaks at a nuclear power plant in Tokyo, the safety of nuclear energy has again aroused public attention.

  19. ITER safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raeder, J.; Piet, S.; Buende, R.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the series of publications by the IAEA that summarize the results of the Conceptual Design Activities for the ITER project, this document describes the ITER safety analyses. It contains an assessment of normal operation effluents, accident scenarios, plasma chamber safety, tritium system safety, magnet system safety, external loss of coolant and coolant flow problems, and a waste management assessment, while it describes the implementation of the safety approach for ITER. The document ends with a list of major conclusions, a set of topical remarks on technical safety issues, and recommendations for the Engineering Design Activities, safety considerations for siting ITER, and recommendations with regard to the safety issues for the R and D for ITER. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Water Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Water Safety KidsHealth / For Parents / Water Safety What's in ... remains your best measure of protection. Making Kids Water Wise It's important to teach your kids proper ...

  1. Food safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... safety URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002434.htm Food safety To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Food safety refers to the conditions and practices that preserve the quality of food. These practices prevent contamination and foodborne ...

  2. Safety first. Yes, but which safety?; Primat der Sicherheit. Ja, aber welche Sicherheit ist gemeint?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehlig, Klaus-Juergen [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Endlagerforschung; Eckhardt, Anne [risicare GmbH, Zollikerberg (Switzerland)

    2017-09-01

    The site selection law in Germany and the final report of the final repository commission state the central objective to find a repository site that will guarantee safety for the next million of years. Decision makers, concerned and interested people have obviously different opinions and acceptance criteria with respect to the tools for the demonstration of safety (safety case). Possible solutions for a broad acceptance of safety definitions are discussed.

  3. Is Safety in Danger?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broncano-Berrocal, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    In “Knowledge Under Threat” (Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 2012), Tomas Bogardus proposes a counterexample to the safety condition for knowledge. Bogardus argues that the case demonstrates that unsafe knowledge is possible. I argue that the case just corroborates the well-known require......In “Knowledge Under Threat” (Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 2012), Tomas Bogardus proposes a counterexample to the safety condition for knowledge. Bogardus argues that the case demonstrates that unsafe knowledge is possible. I argue that the case just corroborates the well......-known requirement that modal conditions like safety must be relativized to methods of belief formation. I explore several ways of relativizing safety to belief-forming methods and I argue that none is adequate: if methods were individuated in those ways, safety would fail to explain several much-discussed cases. I...... then propose a plausible externalist principle of method individuation. On the one hand, relativizing safety to belief-forming methods in the way suggested allows the defender of safety to account for the cases. On the other hand, it shows that the target known belief of Bogardus’s example is safe. Finally, I...

  4. Study on the safety during transport of radioactive materials. Pt. 4. Events during transport. Final report work package 6; Untersuchungen zur Sicherheit bei der Befoerderung radioaktiver Stoffe. T. 4. Ereignisse bei der Befoerderung. Abschlussbericht zum Arbeitspaket 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentuc, Florence-Nathalie

    2014-09-15

    This report presents the results from a data collection and an evaluation of the safety significance of events in the transportation of radioactive material by all modes on public routes in Germany. Systems for reporting and evaluation of the safety significance of events encountered in the transport of radioactive material are a central element in monitoring and judging the adequacy and effectiveness of the transport regulations and their underlying safety philosophy, this allows for revision by experience feedback (lessons learned). The nationwide survey performed covering the period from the mid 1990s through 2013 identified and analysed a total of 670 transport events varying in type and severity. The vast majority of recorded transport events relate to minor deviations from the provisions of the transport regulations (e.g. improper markings and error in transport documents) or inappropriate practices and operational procedures resulting in material damage of packages and equipment such as handling incidents. Severe traffic accidents and fires represented only a small fraction (ca. 3 percent) of the recorded transport events. Four transport events were identified in the reporting period to have given rise to environmental radioactive releases. Three transport events have reportedly resulted in minor radiation exposures to the transport personnel; in one case an exposure in excess of the statutory annual dose limit for the public seems possible. Based on the EVTRAM scale, with seven significance levels, the broad majority of transport events has been classified as ''non-incidents'' (Level 0) and ''events without affecting the safety functions of the package'' (Level 1). On the INES scale most transport events would be classified as events with ''no safety significance'' (Below Scale/Level 0). The survey results show no serious deficiencies in the transport of radioactive material, supporting the

  5. Final disposal of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroebel, R [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.). Projekt Wiederaufarbeitung und Abfallbehandlung; Krause, H [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. zur Behandlung Radioaktiver Abfaelle

    1978-08-01

    This paper discusses the final disposal possibilities for radioactive wastes in the Federal Republic of Germany and the related questions of waste conditioning, storage methods and safety. The programs in progress in neighbouring CEC countries and in the USA are also mentioned briefly. The autors conclude that the existing final disposal possibilities are sufficiently well known and safe, but that they could be improved still further by future development work. The residual hazard potential of radioactive wastes from fuel reprocessing after about 1000 years of storage is lower that of known inorganic core deposits.

  6. Project CHRISTA. Feasibility study on the development of a safety demonstration methodology for a final repository for heat generating radioactive wastes in crystalline rock formations in Germany; Projekt CHRISTA. Machbarkeitsuntersuchung zur Entwicklung einer Sicherheits- und Nachweismethodik fuer ein Endlager fuer Waerme entwickelnde radioaktive Abfaelle im Kristallingestein in Deutschland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobmann, Michael (ed.)

    2016-10-24

    In the frame of CHRISTA several options with different safety concepts for the final disposal of heat generating radioactive wastes were studied. The German safety requirements and the demonstration of the geological barrier integrity are based on an enclosure concept (ewG) that was developed primarily for salt and clay formations. The applicability of these requirements for crystalline host rocks had to be investigated. The enclosure functio0n is based on low hydraulic permeability of the host rock in combination with geotechnical barriers closing the access. With respect to the transferability of the Swedish/Finnish KBS-3 concept it has to be remarked, that the national standards in Sweden and Finland require the safety demonstration for 100.000 years (in Germany 1 million years). The Swedish/Finish container concept is based on a copper sheathed container with adjacent buffer; MOX fuel elements are not foreseen. The report concludes that the actual German safety concept based on geological barriers is to be preferred compared to technical barriers.

  7. Study on the KALIMER safety approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eui Kwang; Han, Do Hee; Kim, Young Cheol.

    1997-01-01

    This study describes KALIMER's safety approach, how to establish the safety criteria and temperature limit, how to define safety evaluation events, and some safety research and development needs items. It is recommended that the KALIMER's approach to safety use seven levels of safety design and a defense-in-depth design approach with particular emphasis on inherent passive features. In order to establish as set DBEs for KALIMER safety evaluation, the procedure is explained how to define safety evaluation events. Final selection is to be determined later with the final establishment of design concepts. On the basis of preliminary studies and evaluation of the plant safety related areas, the KALIMER and PRISM have following three main difference that may require special research and development for KALIMER. (author). 7 refs., 6 tabs., 6 figs

  8. Safety handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization's Safety Handbook is to outline simply the fundamental procedures and safety precautions which provide an appropriate framework for safe working with any potential hazards, such as fire and explosion, welding, cutting, brazing and soldering, compressed gases, cryogenic liquids, chemicals, ionizing radiations, non-ionising radiations, sound and vibration, as well as safety in the office. It also specifies the organisation for safety at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories and the responsibilities of individuals and committees. It also defines the procedures for the scrutiny and review of all operations and the resultant setting of safety rules for them. ills

  9. Environment, Health, and Safety | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    -Wide Environmental Assessment 2014 (DOE/EA-1914). Final EA and FONSI Appendices. Natural and Cultural property, and the environment. View the Environmental Stewardship, Health, Safety, and Quality Management Environmental Assessment 2014. Final EA and FONSI Appendices. Download the National Wind Technology Center Site

  10. Safety design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Shiozawa, Shusaku

    2004-01-01

    JAERI established the safety design philosophy of the HTTR based on that of current reactors such as LWR in Japan, considering inherent safety features of the HTTR. The strategy of defense in depth was implemented so that the safety engineering functions such as control of reactivity, removal of residual heat and confinement of fission products shall be well performed to ensure safety. However, unlike the LWR, the inherent design features of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) enables the HTTR meet stringent regulatory criteria without much dependence on active safety systems. On the other hand, the safety in an accident typical to the HTGR such as the depressurization accident initiated by a primary pipe rupture shall be ensured. The safety design philosophy of the HTTR considers these unique features appropriately and is expected to be the basis for future Japanese HTGRs. This paper describes the safety design philosophy and safety evaluation procedure of the HTTR especially focusing on unique considerations to the HTTR. Also, experiences obtained from an HTTR safety review and R and D needs for establishing the safety philosophy for the future HTGRs are reported

  11. Safety and risk questions following the nuclear incidents and accidents in Japan. Summary final report; Sicherheits- und Risikofragen im Nachgang zu den nuklearen Stoer- und Unfaellen in Japan. Zusammenfassender Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mildenberger, Oliver

    2015-03-15

    After the nuclear accidents in Japan, GRS has carried out in-depth investigations of the events. On the one hand, the accident sequences in the affected units have been analysed from various viewpoints. On the other hand, the transferability of the findings to German plants has been examined to possibly make recommendations for safety improvements. The accident sequences at Fukushima Daiichi have been traced with as much detail as possible based on all available information. Additional insights have been drawn from thermohydraulic analyses with the GRS code system ATHLET-CD/COCOSYS focusing on the events in units 2 and 3, e.g. with regard to core damage and the state of the containments in the first days of the accident sequence. In-depth investigations have also been carried out on topics such as natural external hazards, electrical power supply or organizational measures. In addition, methodological studies on further topics related with the accidents have been performed. Through a detailed analysis of the relevant data from the events in Japan, the basis for an in-depth examination of the transferability to German plants was created. It was found that an implementation of most of the insights gained from the investigations had already been initiated as part of the GRS information notice 2012/02. Further findings have been communicated to the federal government and introduced into other relevant bodies, e.g. the Nuclear Safety Standards Committee (KTA) or the Reactor Safety Commission (RSK).

  12. Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    In this short paper it has only been possible to deal in a rather general way with the standards of safety used in the UK nuclear industry. The record of the industry extending over at least twenty years is impressive and, indeed, unique. No other industry has been so painstaking in protection of its workers and in its avoidance of damage to the environment. Headings are: introduction; how a nuclear power station works; radiation and its effects (including reference to ICRP, the UK National Radiological Protection Board, and safety standards); typical radiation doses (natural radiation, therapy, nuclear power programme and other sources); safety of nuclear reactors - design; key questions (matters of concern which arise in the public mind); safety of operators; safety of people in the vicinity of a nuclear power station; safety of the general public; safety bodies. (U.K.)

  13. Safety balance: Analysis of safety systems; Bilans de surete: analyse par les organismes de surete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delage, M; Giroux, C

    1990-12-01

    Safety analysis, and particularly analysis of exploitation of NPPs is constantly affected by EDF and by the safety authorities and their methodologies. Periodic safety reports ensure that important issues are not missed on daily basis, that incidents are identified and that relevant actions are undertaken. French safety analysis method consists of three principal steps. First type of safety balance is analyzed at the normal start-up phase for each unit including the final safety report. This enables analysis of behaviour of units ten years after their licensing. Second type is periodic operational safety analysis performed during a few years. Finally, the third step consists of safety analysis of the oldest units with the aim to improve the safety standards. The three steps of safety analysis are described in this presentation in detail with the aim to present the objectives and principles. Examples of most recent exercises are included in order to illustrate the importance of such analyses.

  14. 77 FR 21311 - Locomotive Safety Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ... preparedness, alcohol and drug testing, locomotive engineer certification, and workplace safety. In 1980, FRA... Association (ATDA) Amtrak AAR Association of Railway Museums (ARM) Association of State Rail Safety Managers... Administration 49 CFR Parts 229 and 238 Locomotive Safety Standards; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77...

  15. National HTGR safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, D.E.; Kelley, A.P. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the National HTGR Program in the US with emphasis on the safety and licensing strategy being pursued. This strategy centers upon the development of an integrated approach to organizing and classifying the functions needed to produce safe and economical nuclear power production. At the highest level, four plant goals are defined - Normal Operation, Core and Plant Protection, Containment Integrity and Emergency Preparedness. The HTGR features which support the attainment of each goal are described and finally a brief summary is provided of the current status of the principal safety development program supporting the validation of the four plant goals

  16. Safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The response to a previous publication by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG), indicated a broad international interest in expansion of the concept of Safety Culture, in such a way that its effectiveness in particular cases may be judged. This report responds to that need. In its manifestation, Safety Culture has two major components: the framework determined by organizational policy and by managerial action, and the response of individuals in working within and benefiting by the framework. 1 fig

  17. Safety; Avertissement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This annual report of the Senior Inspector for the Nuclear Safety, analyses the nuclear safety at EDF for the year 1999 and proposes twelve subjects of consideration to progress. Five technical documents are also provided and discussed concerning the nuclear power plants maintenance and safety (thermal fatigue, vibration fatigue, assisted control and instrumentation of the N4 bearing, 1300 MW reactors containment and time of life of power plants). (A.L.B.)

  18. Visit safety

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Experiment areas, offices, workshops: it is possible to have co-workers or friends visit these places.     You already know about the official visits service, the VIP office, and professional visits. But do you know about the safety instruction GSI-OHS1, “Visits on the CERN site”? This is a mandatory General Safety Instruction that was created to assist you in ensuring safety for all your visits, whatever their nature—especially those that are non-official. Questions? The HSE Unit will be happy to answer them. Write to safety-general@cern.ch.   The HSE Unit

  19. Work safety and sustainable development in enterprise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Min-kang; ZHOU Yue; XU Jian-hong

    2005-01-01

    The nature of work safety and the way insisting on sustainable development in enterprise were analyzed. It indicates that problem of work safety in enterprise is closely related to the public's consciousness, to the development of science and technology, and to the weakening of safety management during the economic transition period. However, it is the people's questions concerned in the final analysis for the forming and development of the problem of work safety. Therefore, in order to solve the problem of work safety radically, the most basic way of insisting on the sustainable development in safety administration is to do a good job of every aspect about people. We should improve all people quality in science and culture and strengthen their safety and legal consciousness to form correct safety value concept. We should fortify safety legislation and bring close attention to approach and apply new safety technology.

  20. Development of the probabilistic exposure modeling in the frame of the radioactive residues final repository long-term safety analysis; Weiterentwicklung der probabilistischen Expositionsmodellierung im Rahmen der Langzeitsicherheitsanalyse von Endlagern fuer radioaktive Reststoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciecior, Willy

    2017-04-28

    The long-term safety analysis of repositories for radioactive waste is based on the modeling of the releases of nuclides from the waste matrix and the subsequent transport through the near and far field of the repository system to the living part of the environment (biosphere). For the conversion of the nuclide release into a potential hazard (e. g. into an effective dose), a conceptual biosphere model and a mathematical exposure model is used. The parametrization of the mathematical model can be carried out deterministic as well as probabilistic using distributions and Monte Carlo simulation. However, to date, particularly in the context of the probabilistic safety analysis for deep-geological repositories, there is no uniform procedure for the derivation of the distributions to be used. The distributions used by the analyst are mostly chosen according to personal conviction and often illogical with respect to the underlying nature of the actual model parameter, but model results are in part very dependent on the type of the selected distributions of the input parameters. Furthermore, there less studies available on the influence of interactions and correlations or other dependencies between the radiological input parameters of the model. Therefore, the impact of different types of distributions (empirical, parametric) for different input parameters as well as the influence of interactions and correlations between input parameters on the results of the mathematical exposure modeling were analyzed in the present study. The influence of the type of distribution for the representation of the variability of the physical input parameter as well as their interactions and dependencies could be identified as less relevant. However, by means of Monte Carlo simulation of the second order, the composition of the corresponding samples or the condition of the sample moments to be used for the construction of parametric distributions were determined as the essential factors for

  1. Final environmental impact statement for the Nevada test site and off-site locations in the State of Nevada. Human health risks and safety impacts study, Volume 1, Appendix H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    Proposed changes in the Nevada Test Site (NTS) operations, as well as the US Department of Energy (DOE) policy of reviewing sitewide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents, have resulted in the need for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Operations Office to prepare a new Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the NTS. This report has been prepared to assess the human health and safety impacts from operations expected to be carried out under each of the four alternatives defined in the NTS EIS. These alternatives are: Alternative 1, Continue Current Operations (No Action); Alternative 2, Discontinue Operations; Alternative 3, Expanded Use; and Alternative 4, Alternate Use of Withdrawn Lands

  2. Report by the parliamentary mission on nuclear safety, the role and future of the nuclear sector - Final report: the future of the nuclear sector in France - National Assembly report nr 4097, Senate report nr 199

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birraux, Claude; Bataille, Christian; Sido, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    This large report first outlines the fact that the French nuclear sector is adapted to the national context while discussing the difference with other countries and the French strategic priorities. It describes the constraints another approach would have regarding the objective of a controlled consumption, the exploitation of renewable energies, and the remanence of the burden related to nuclear energy (culture of safety, the waste management issue). It proposes a prospective vision for the nuclear sector with respect with technological perspectives, and analyses three scenarios. The document also contains reports of visits in Germany and in Fukushima. A second part proposes the contents of hearings and meetings, as well as reports of other visits on French nuclear sites

  3. Safety Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Grinenko

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The offered material in the article is picked up so that the reader could have a complete representation about concept “safety”, intrinsic characteristics and formalization possibilities. Principles and possible strategy of safety are considered. A material of the article is destined for the experts who are taking up the problems of safety.

  4. Safety Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halligan, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Colleges across the country are rising to the task by implementing safety programs, response strategies, and technologies intended to create a secure environment for teachers and students. Whether it is preparing and responding to a natural disaster, health emergency, or act of violence, more schools are making campus safety a top priority. At…

  5. Safety First

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Darryl

    2011-01-01

    Ned Miller does not take security lightly. As director of campus safety and emergency management at the Des Moines Area Community College (DMACC), any threat requires serious consideration. As community college administrators adopt a more proactive approach to campus safety, many institutions are experimenting with emerging technologies, including…

  6. Geological basis and data set for assessing the long-term safety of the final repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes at the Wellenberg site (Community of Wolfenschiessen, NW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This report forms part of the supporting documentation for the low- and intermediate-level waste repository site selection procedure. The aim of the report is to present the site-specific geological data, and the geosphere database derived therefrom, which were used as a basis for evaluating the long-term safety of a repository at Wellenberg. These data also form a key component of other reports appearing simultaneously with the present one, first on the intercomparison of the four potential sites, (NTB 93-02) and second, on the safety assessment of the Wellenberg site itself (NTB 93-26). The level of detail of the present report is determined by the requirements of the other two reports mentioned, which would include presenting, discussing and justifying the geosphere dataset used in the performance assessment model calculations. The introductory chapter discusses procedures and goals. The second chapter provides an overview of the geographical and geological situation at Wellenberg. Chapter 3 then discusses the planning and progress of the field programme, and the current status of investigations is presented. The fourth chapter presents the geological situation at the Wellenberg site and describes the concept and models formulated on the basis of this information. Chapter 5 derives the performance assessment and engineering datasets, based on the investigations, concepts and modelling exercises described in chapter 4. In summary, it can be said that, to date, the investigation results from Wellenberg have confirmed predictions in all relevant respects and, in some cases, have even exceeded expectations (e.g. in relation to the available volume of host rock). (author) figs., tabs., 141 refs

  7. Amended final report on the safety assessment of PPG-40 butyl ether with an addendum to include PPG-2, -4, -5, -9, -12, -14, -15, -16, -17, -18, -20, -22, -24, -26, -30, -33, -52, and -53 butyl ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanigan, R S

    2001-01-01

    The Polypropylene Glycol (PPG) Butyl Ethers function as skinand hair-conditioning agents in cosmetics. Intestinal absorption of the PPG Butyl Ethers was inversely proportional to the molecular weight. In general, the toxicity of the PPG Butyl Ethers decreased as the molecular weight increased. In acute studies, moderate intraperitoneal (IP) doses of various PPG Butyl Ethers caused convulsive seizures in mice and anesthetized dogs, and large oral doses caused decreased activity, anuria, renal tubular swelling and necrosis, and hepatic swelling and necrosis. PPG-2 Butyl Ether vapors were nontoxic by the inhalation route. PPG-2 Butyl Ether was nontoxic in short-term feeding and dermal exposure studies in rats. In animal irritation studies, PPG-2 Butyl Ether caused minor, transient erythema and desquamation; in addition, erythema, edema, ecchymosis, necrosis, and other changes were observed during an acute percutaneous study. PPG-2 Butyl Ether also caused minor to moderate conjunctival irritation and minor corneal injury. PPG-2 Butyl Ether when dermally applied was nontoxic to pregnant rats and was nonteratogenic at doses up to 1.0 ml/kg/day. PPG BE800 at concentrations of 0.001% to 0.26% in feed was noncarcinogenic to rats after 2 years of treatment. In clinical studies, PPG BE800 was nonirritating and nonsensitizing to the skin when tested using 200 subjects. PPG-40 Butyl Ether was neither an irritant nor a sensitizer in a repeat-insult patch test using 112 subjects. Although clinical testing did not indicate significant skin irritation is produced by these ingredients, the animal test data did indicate the potential that these ingredients can be irritating. Therefore, it was concluded that the PPG Butyl Ethers can be used safely in cosmetic products if they are formulated to avoid irritation. Data on the component ingredients, Propylene Glycol, PPG, and n-Butyl Alcohol, from previous cosmetic ingredient safety assessments were also considered and found to support

  8. 77 FR 53164 - Railroad Workplace Safety; Adjacent-Track On-Track Safety for Roadway Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ...-0059, Notice No. 6] RIN 2130-AC37 Railroad Workplace Safety; Adjacent-Track On-Track Safety for Roadway... complex issues raised in both the petitions for reconsideration of the final rule published November 30... issues. One of the Petitions included a request for a delay in the effective date of the final rule until...

  9. Disentangling the roles of safety climate and safety culture: Multi-level effects on the relationship between supervisor enforcement and safety compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitta, Laura; Probst, Tahira M; Barbaranelli, Claudio; Ghezzi, Valerio

    2017-02-01

    Despite increasing attention to contextual effects on the relationship between supervisor enforcement and employee safety compliance, no study has yet explored the conjoint influence exerted simultaneously by organizational safety climate and safety culture. The present study seeks to address this literature shortcoming. We first begin by briefly discussing the theoretical distinctions between safety climate and culture and the rationale for examining these together. Next, using survey data collected from 1342 employees in 32 Italian organizations, we found that employee-level supervisor enforcement, organizational-level safety climate, and autocratic, bureaucratic, and technocratic safety culture dimensions all predicted individual-level safety compliance behaviors. However, the cross-level moderating effect of safety climate was bounded by certain safety culture dimensions, such that safety climate moderated the supervisor enforcement-compliance relationship only under the clan-patronage culture dimension. Additionally, the autocratic and bureaucratic culture dimensions attenuated the relationship between supervisor enforcement and compliance. Finally, when testing the effects of technocratic safety culture and cooperative safety culture, neither safety culture nor climate moderated the relationship between supervisor enforcement and safety compliance. The results suggest a complex relationship between organizational safety culture and safety climate, indicating that organizations with particular safety cultures may be more likely to develop more (or less) positive safety climates. Moreover, employee safety compliance is a function of supervisor safety leadership, as well as the safety climate and safety culture dimensions prevalent within the organization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fundamental safety principles. Safety fundamentals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This publication states the fundamental safety objective and ten associated safety principles, and briefly describes their intent and purpose. The fundamental safety objective - to protect people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation - applies to all circumstances that give rise to radiation risks. The safety principles are applicable, as relevant, throughout the entire lifetime of all facilities and activities - existing and new - utilized for peaceful purposes, and to protective actions to reduce existing radiation risks. They provide the basis for requirements and measures for the protection of people and the environment against radiation risks and for the safety of facilities and activities that give rise to radiation risks, including, in particular, nuclear installations and uses of radiation and radioactive sources, the transport of radioactive material and the management of radioactive waste

  11. Fundamental safety principles. Safety fundamentals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This publication states the fundamental safety objective and ten associated safety principles, and briefly describes their intent and purpose. The fundamental safety objective - to protect people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation - applies to all circumstances that give rise to radiation risks. The safety principles are applicable, as relevant, throughout the entire lifetime of all facilities and activities - existing and new - utilized for peaceful purposes, and to protective actions to reduce existing radiation risks. They provide the basis for requirements and measures for the protection of people and the environment against radiation risks and for the safety of facilities and activities that give rise to radiation risks, including, in particular, nuclear installations and uses of radiation and radioactive sources, the transport of radioactive material and the management of radioactive waste

  12. KHNP special safety review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Lee, Bang-Jin; Lee, Soung-Hee; Park, Goon-Cherl

    2009-01-01

    Commemorating the 30 year anniversary of commercial nuclear power plant operation in KOREA, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) has conducted a Special Safety Review (SSR) of its 20 operating units to understand their safety performance and to identify any areas that need improvement. The SSR reviewed all 20 operating units for 2 weeks per site. Areas that were reviewed are Safety Margins, Plant Performance, Employee Safety, Employee Performance and Performance Improvement Process. Each review team consisted of international and domestic members. The international reviewers were from IAEA, WANO and INPO. The domestic reviewers consisted of professors, Engineering Company, Research Institute and KHNP experts. The review confirmed safe and reliable operations of the 20 nuclear units. The common understanding resulted from the SSR is as follows. Firstly, KHNP corporate and its plants confirmed and shared mutual understanding on recurring areas for improvements, especially in the areas of Organizational Effectiveness, Industrial Safety, Human Performance, Configuration Management, Operations, Equipment Performance and Material Condition. Secondly, KHNP understood that plant and department level performances are directly related to the leadership and competency of the management team including supervisors. Thirdly, the strengths of individual stations that consistently have produced good results need to be shared with the other KHNP stations. Finally, KHNP learned that strong corporate leadership and support are needed to resolve most of the areas for improvement since they are common to all KHNP stations. (author)

  13. Waste management safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, H.

    1983-01-01

    All studies carried out by competent authors of the safety of a waste management concept on the basis of reprocessing of the spent fuel elements and storage in the deep underground of the radioactive waste show that only a minor technical risk is involved in this step. This also holds true when evaluating the accidents which have occurred in waste management facilities. To explain the risk, first the completely different safety aspects of nuclear power plants, reprocessing plants and repositories are outlined together with the safety related characteristics of these plants. Also this comparison indicates that the risk of waste management facilities is considerably lower than the, already very small, risk of nuclear power plants. For the final storage of waste from reprocessing and for the direct storage of fuel elements, the results of safety analyses show that the radiological exposure following an accident with radioactivity releases, even under conservative assumptions, is considerably below the natural radiation exposure. The very small danger to the environment arising from waste management by reprocessing clearly indicates that aspects of technical safety alone will hardly be a major criterion for the decision in favor of one or the other waste management approach. (orig.) [de

  14. Safety strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultheiss, G.F.

    1980-01-01

    The basis for safety strategy in nuclear industry and especially nuclear power plants is the prevention of radioactivity release inside or outside of the technical installation. Therefore either technical or administrative measures are combined to a general strategy concept. This introduction will explain in more detail the following topics: - basic principles of safety - lines of assurance (LOA) - defense in depth - deterministic and probabilistic methods. This presentation is seen as an introduction to the more detailed discussion following in this course, nevertheless some selected examples will be used to illustrate the aspects of safety strategy development although they might be repeated later on. (orig.)

  15. Safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukraroff, C.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of Safety Culture was defined after Chernobyl's nuclear accident in 1986. It has not been exempt from discussion interpretations, adding riders, etc..., over the last 24 years because it has to do with human behavior and performance in the organizations. Safety Culture is not an easy task to define, assess and monitor. The proof of it is that today we still discussing and writing about it. How has been the evolution of Safety Culture at the Juzbado Factory since 1985 to today?. What is the strategy that we will be following in the future. (Author)

  16. Radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    Most of the ionizing radiation that people are exposed to in day-to-day activities comes from natural, rather than manmade, sources. The health effects of radiation - both natural and artificial - are relatively well understood and can be effectively minimized through careful safety measures and practices. The IAEA, together with other international and expert organizations, is helping to promote and institute Basic Safety Standards on an international basis to ensure that radiation sources and radioactive materials are managed for both maximum safety and human benefit

  17. Nuclear Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, E G [ed.

    1989-01-01

    This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  18. 76 FR 7854 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Lumetra PSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety... Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act... delivery. The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Final Rule (Patient Safety Rule), 42 CFR part 3...

  19. Final Action Plan to Tiger Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document presents planned actions, and their associated costs, for addressing the findings in the Environmental, Safety and Health Tiger Team Assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, May 1991, hereafter called the Assessment. This Final Action Plan should be read in conjunction with the Assessment to ensure full understanding of the findings addressed herein. The Assessment presented 353 findings in four general categories: (1)Environmental (82 findings); (2) Safety and Health (243 findings); (3) Management and Organization (18 findings); and (4) Self-Assessment (10 findings). Additionally, 436 noncompliance items with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards were addressed during and immediately after the Tiger Team visit

  20. Status of the safety certification process of the TRANSRAPID system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomerius, J [TUEV Rheinland, Koeln (Germany). Inst. fuer Software, Elektronik, Bahntechnik

    1996-12-31

    Since 20 years TUeV Rheinland is involved in safety certification of maglev technology of the TRANSRAPID type. The process applied is called PASC (Programm Accompanying Safety Certification). The paper reports on safety assessment of relevant subsystems and components (TR07, OCS, guideway components) as well as safety certification in the final program. (HW)

  1. Sixth ITER technical meeting on safety and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, G.; Baker, D.

    1997-01-01

    The article summarizes the topics of the Sixth Technical Meeting on Safety and Environment which was held to review the first draft of the Non-Site Specific Safety Report (NSSR-2) and the draft of the ITER Final Design Report Safety Assessment (FDR-Safety) during October 27 - November 4, 1997 at the ITER San Diego Joint Work Site

  2. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneley, D.A.

    The people of Ontario have begun to receive the benefits of a low cost, assured supply of electrical energy from CANDU nuclear stations. This indigenous energy source also has excellent safety characteristics. Safety has been one of the central themes of the CANDU development program from its very beginning. A great deal of work has been done to establish that public risks are small. However, safety design criteria are now undergoing extensive review, with a real prospect of more stringent requirements being applied in the future. Considering the newness of the technology it is not surprising that a consensus does not yet exist; this makes it imperative to discuss the issues. It is time to examine the policies and practice of reactor safety management in Canada to decide whether or not further restrictions are justified in the light of current knowledge

  3. Safety first!

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Among the many duties I assumed at the beginning of the year was the ultimate responsibility for Safety at CERN: the responsibility for the physical safety of the personnel, the responsibility for the safe operation of the facilities, and the responsibility to ensure that CERN acts in accordance with the highest standards of radiation and environmental protection.   The Safety Policy document drawn up in September 2014 is an excellent basis for the implementation of Safety in all areas of CERN’s work. I am happy to commit during my mandate to help meet its objectives, not least by ensuring the Organization makes available the necessary means to achieve its Safety objectives. One of the main objectives of the HSE (Occupational Health and Safety and Environmental Protection) unit in the coming months is to enhance the measures to minimise CERN’s impact on the environment. I believe CERN should become a role model for an environmentally-aware scientific research laboratory. Risk ...

  4. Radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Priyanka

    2014-01-01

    The use of radiation sources is a privilege; in order to retain the privilege, all persons who use sources of radiation must follow policies and procedures for their safe and legal use. The purpose of this poster is to describe the policies and procedures of the Radiation Protection Program. Specific conditions of radiation safety require the establishment of peer committees to evaluate proposals for the use of radionuclides, the appointment of a radiation safety officer, and the implementation of a radiation safety program. In addition, the University and Medical Centre administrations have determined that the use of radiation producing machines and non-ionizing radiation sources shall be included in the radiation safety program. These Radiation Safety policies are intended to ensure that such use is in accordance with applicable State and Federal regulations and accepted standards as directed towards the protection of health and the minimization of hazard to life or property. It is the policy that all activities involving ionizing radiation or radiation emitting devices be conducted so as to keep hazards from radiation to a minimum. Persons involved in these activities are expected to comply fully with the Canadian Nuclear Safety Act and all it. The risk of prosecution by the Department of Health and Community Services exists if compliance with all applicable legislation is not fulfilled. (author)

  5. Safety assessment and verification for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    culture and achieve good performance in terms of safety. This publication identifies the main safety objectives and responsibilities of management with respect to the safe operation of nuclear power plants and associated corporate roles of the operating organization. This Safety Guide discusses the factors to be considered in (a) structuring the operating organization to meet these main safety objectives, (b) setting up management programmes that ensure that the safety tasks are performed, (c) establishing services and facilities that are intended to meet the above requirements and (d) maintaining a strong safety culture within the organization. This Safety Guide primarily addresses safety matters directly related to the operation of nuclear power plants. It assumes that the safety aspects of siting, design, manufacturing and construction have been resolved. It also covers the internal interrelationships between operations and design, construction and commissioning and other organizational units, and deals with the involvement of the operating organization in reviews of safety issues, bearing in mind future operation. Finally, this publication discusses the relationship between the operating organization, the regulatory body and the general public. Section 2 focuses on the operating organization and its structure. Section 3 discusses the functions, responsibilities, goals and objectives of the operating organization that ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Section 4 gives guidance on the interface between the operating organization and external organizations. Section 5 covers safety management aspects. Section 6 provides guidance on the major management programmes that should be established to ensure the safe operation of a nuclear power plant. Section 7 discusses additional services that are needed to support the functioning of plant operation management programmes. Section 8 provides general guidance on the communication and liaison matters that are

  6. Safety assessment and verification for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    culture and achieve good performance in terms of safety. This publication identifies the main safety objectives and responsibilities of management with respect to the safe operation of nuclear power plants and associated corporate roles of the operating organization. This Safety Guide discusses the factors to be considered in (a) structuring the operating organization to meet these main safety objectives, (b) setting up management programmes that ensure that the safety tasks are performed, (c) establishing services and facilities that are intended to meet the above requirements and (d) maintaining a strong safety culture within the organization. This Safety Guide primarily addresses safety matters directly related to the operation of nuclear power plants. It assumes that the safety aspects of siting, design, manufacturing and construction have been resolved. It also covers the internal interrelationships between operations and design, construction and commissioning and other organizational units, and deals with the involvement of the operating organization in reviews of safety issues, bearing in mind future operation. Finally, this publication discusses the relationship between the operating organization, the regulatory body and the general public. Section 2 focuses on the operating organization and its structure. Section 3 discusses the functions, responsibilities, goals and objectives of the operating organization that ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Section 4 gives guidance on the interface between the operating organization and external organizations. Section 5 covers safety management aspects. Section 6 provides guidance on the major management programmes that should be established to ensure the safe operation of a nuclear power plant. Section 7 discusses additional services that are needed to support the functioning of plant operation management programmes. Section 8 provides general guidance on the communication and liaison matters that are

  7. Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements. Volume 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CASH, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    The Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) define the acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, basis thereof, and controls to ensure safe operation during authorized activities, for facilities within the scope of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR)

  8. Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements [VOL 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CASH, R.J.

    2000-12-28

    The Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) define the acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, basis thereof, and controls to ensure safe operation during authorized activities, for facilities within the scope of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR).

  9. Final disposal of radioactive waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freiesleben H.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the origin and properties of radioactive waste as well as its classification scheme (low-level waste – LLW, intermediate-level waste – ILW, high-level waste – HLW are presented. The various options for conditioning of waste of different levels of radioactivity are reviewed. The composition, radiotoxicity and reprocessing of spent fuel and their effect on storage and options for final disposal are discussed. The current situation of final waste disposal in a selected number of countries is mentioned. Also, the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency with regard to the development and monitoring of international safety standards for both spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management is described.

  10. Nuclear safety policy statement in korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W.S.; Kim, H.J.; Choi, K.S.; Choi, Y.S.; Park, D.K.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Wide varieties of programs to enhance nuclear safety have been established and implemented by the Korean government in accordance with the Nuclear Safety Policy Statement announced in September 1994. The policy statement was intended to set the long-term policy goals for maintaining and achieving high-level of nuclear safety and also help the public understand the national policy and a strong will of the government toward nuclear safety. It has been recognized as very effective in developing safety culture in nuclear-related organizations and also enhancing nuclear safety in Korea. However, ageing of operating nuclear power plants and increasing of new nuclear facilities have demanded a new comprehensive national safety policy to cover the coming decade, taking the implementation results of the policy statement of 1994 and the changing environment of nuclear industries into consideration. Therefore, the results of safety policy implementation have been reviewed and, considering changing environment and future prospects, a new nuclear safety policy statement as a highest level national policy has been developed. The implementation results of 11 regulatory policy directions such as the use of Probabilistic Safety Assessment, introduction of Periodic Safety Review, strengthening of safety research, introduction of Risk Based Regulation stipulated in the safety policy statement of 1994 were reviewed and measures taken after various symposia on nuclear safety held in Nuclear Safety Days since 1995 were evaluated. The changing international and domestic environment of nuclear industry were analysed and future prospects were explored. Based on the analysis and review results, a draft of new nuclear safety policy statement was developed. The draft was finalized after the review of many prominent experts in Korea. Considering changing environment and future prospects, new policy statement that will show government's persistent will for nuclear safety has been

  11. SAFETY INSTRUCTION AND SAFETY NOTE

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS Secretariat

    2002-01-01

    Please note that the SAFETY INSTRUCTION N0 49 (IS 49) and the SAFETY NOTE N0 28 (NS 28) entitled respectively 'AVOIDING CHEMICAL POLLUTION OF WATER' and 'CERN EXHIBITIONS - FIRE PRECAUTIONS' are available on the web at the following urls: http://edms.cern.ch/document/335814 and http://edms.cern.ch/document/335861 Paper copies can also be obtained from the TIS Divisional Secretariat, email: TIS.Secretariat@cern.ch

  12. System safety education focused on flight safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, E.

    1971-01-01

    The measures necessary for achieving higher levels of system safety are analyzed with an eye toward maintaining the combat capability of the Air Force. Several education courses were provided for personnel involved in safety management. Data include: (1) Flight Safety Officer Course, (2) Advanced Safety Program Management, (3) Fundamentals of System Safety, and (4) Quantitative Methods of Safety Analysis.

  13. 77 FR 2126 - Pipeline Safety: Implementation of the National Registry of Pipeline and Liquefied Natural Gas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-13

    ... Natural Gas Operators AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No...: ``Pipeline Safety: Updates to Pipeline and Liquefied Natural Gas Reporting Requirements.'' The final rule...

  14. 76 FR 28326 - Pipeline Safety: National Pipeline Mapping System Data Submissions and Submission Dates for Gas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR 191... Reports AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Issuance of... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) published a final rule on November 26, 2010...

  15. ITER Safety and Licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, J-.P; Taylor, N.; Garin, P.; Uzan-Elbez, J.; GULDEN, W.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.

    2006-01-01

    The site for the construction of ITER has been chosen in June 2005. The facility will be implemented in Europe, south of France close to Marseille. The generic safety scheme is now under revision to adapt the design to the host country regulation. Even though ITER will be an international organization, it will have to comply with the French requirements in the fields of public and occupational health and safety, nuclear safety, radiation protection, licensing, nuclear substances and environmental protection. The organization of the central team together with its partners organized in domestic agencies for the in-kind procurement of components is a key issue for the success of the experimentation. ITER is the first facility that will achieve sustained nuclear fusion. It is both important for the experimental one-of-a-kind device, ITER itself, and for the future of fusion power plants to well understand the key safety issues of this potential new source of energy production. The main safety concern is confinement of the tritium, activated dust in the vacuum vessel and activated corrosion products in the coolant of the plasma-facing components. This is achieved in the design through multiple confinement barriers to implement the defence in depth approach. It will be demonstrated in documents submitted to the French regulator that these barriers maintain their function in all postulated incident and accident conditions. The licensing process started by examination of the safety options. This step has been performed by Europe during the candidature phase in 2002. In parallel to the final design, and taking into account the local regulations, the Preliminary Safety Report (RPrS) will be drafted with support of the European partner and others in the framework of ITER Task Agreements. Together with the license application, the RPrS will be forwarded to the regulatory bodies, which will launch public hearings and a safety review. Both processes must succeed in order to

  16. Nuclear Safety Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosel, N.; Prah, M.

    2008-01-01

    Beside new Ordinance on the control of nuclear material and special equipment ('Official Gazette' No. 15/08), from 2006 State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) adopted Ordinance on performing nuclear activities ('Official Gazette' No. 74/06) and Ordinance on special requirements which expert organizations must fulfil in order to perform certain activities in the field of nuclear safety ('Official Gazette' No. 74/06), based on Nuclear Safety Act ('Official Gazette' No. 173/03). The Ordinance on performing nuclear activities regulates the procedure of notification of the intent to perform nuclear activities, submitting the application for the issue of a licence to perform nuclear activities, and the procedure for issuing decisions on granting a licence to perform a nuclear activity. The Ordinance also regulates the content of the forms for notification of the intent to perform nuclear activities, as well as of the application for the issue of a licence to perform the nuclear activity and the method of keeping the register of nuclear activities. According to the Nuclear Safety Act, nuclear activities are the production, processing, use, storage, disposal, transport, import, export, possession or other handling of nuclear material or specified equipment. The Ordinance on special requirements which expert organizations must fulfil in order to perform certain activities in the field of nuclear safety regulates these mentioned conditions, whereas compliance is established by a decision passed by the SONS. Special requirements which expert organizations must fulfil in order to perform certain activities in the field of nuclear safety are organizational, technical, technological conditions and established system of quality assurance. In 2007, State Office for Nuclear Safety finalized the text of new Ordinance on conditions for nuclear safety and protection with regard to the siting, design, construction, use and decommissioning of a facility in which a nuclear activity is

  17. Scientific-technical cooperation with foreign (esp. Europe and INSC partner countries) nuclear regulatory authorities and their technical support organizations in the fields of nuclear safety of operating nuclear power plants and on the concept evaluation of generation 3+ plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Holger

    2016-09-01

    The BMUB/BfS-Project 3614I01512 forms the frame of the GRS for the scientific-technical cooperation with Technical Support Organisations and Nuclear Regulatory Authorities in the field of nuclear safety in operating NPPs and for the concept evaluation of generation 3 + plants in Europe and INSC Partner Countries. In the present final project report results are described which were gained within the project duration 15.10.2014 up to the 30.09.2016 in the following working packages: Investigations following the catastrophe of Fukushima Daiichi, Evaluation of selected National Action Plans, DBA and severe accident analyses for NPP with PWR (WWER-440, WWER-1000), cooperation with INSC partner countries on DBA, BDBA and severe accident analyses for WWER plants of generation 3 + and building NRA and safety evaluation capacities and decommissioning of nuclear facilities and disposal of radioactive waste. The results are preceded by an outline on the activities related to the project management and to the planning of the bilateral work.

  18. Radioactive waste products - suitability for final disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, E.; Odoj, R.; Warnecke, E.

    1985-06-01

    48 papers were read at the conference. Separate records are available for all of them. The main problem in radioactive waste disposal was the long-term sealing to prevent pollution of the biosphere. Problems of conditioning, acceptance, and safety measures were discussed. Final disposal models and repositories were presented. (PW) [de

  19. Radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Riessen, A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Experience has shown that modem, fully enclosed, XRF and XRD units are generally safe. This experience may lead to complacency and ultimately a lowering of standards which may lead to accidents. Maintaining awareness of radiation safety issues is thus an important role for all radiation safety officers. With the ongoing progress in technology, a greater number of radiation workers are more likely to use a range of instruments/techniques - eg portable XRF, neutron beam analysis, and synchrotron radiation analysis. The source for each of these types of analyses is different and necessitates an understanding of the associated dangers as well as use of specific radiation badges. The trend of 'suitcase science' is resulting in scientists receiving doses from a range of instruments and facilities with no coordinated approach to obtain an integrated dose reading for an individual. This aspect of radiation safety needs urgent attention. Within Australia a divide is springing up between those who work on Commonwealth property and those who work on State property. For example a university staff member may operate irradiating equipment on a University campus and then go to a CSIRO laboratory to operate similar equipment. While at the University State regulations apply and while at CSIRO Commonwealth regulations apply. Does this individual require two badges? Is there a need to obtain two licences? The application of two sets of regulations causes unnecessary confusion and increases the workload of radiation safety officers. Radiation safety officers need to introduce risk management strategies to ensure that both existing and new procedures result in risk minimisation. A component of this strategy includes ongoing education and revising of regulations. AXAA may choose to contribute to both of these activities as a service to its members as well as raising the level of radiation safety for all radiation workers. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical

  20. Integrated Safety Culture Model and Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪磊; 孙瑞山; 刘汉辉

    2009-01-01

    A new safety culture model is constructed and is applied to analyze the correlations between safety culture and SMS. On the basis of previous typical definitions, models and theories of safety culture, an in-depth analysis on safety culture's structure, composing elements and their correlations was conducted. A new definition of safety culture was proposed from the perspective of sub-cuhure. 7 types of safety sub-culture, which are safety priority culture, standardizing culture, flexible culture, learning culture, teamwork culture, reporting culture and justice culture were defined later. Then integrated safety culture model (ISCM) was put forward based on the definition. The model divided safety culture into intrinsic latency level and extrinsic indication level and explained the potential relationship between safety sub-culture and all safety culture dimensions. Finally in the analyzing of safety culture and SMS, it concluded that positive safety culture is the basis of im-plementing SMS effectively and an advanced SMS will improve safety culture from all around.

  1. New trends in pile safety instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furet, J.

    1961-01-01

    This report addresses the protection of nuclear piles against damages due to operation incidents. The author discusses the current trends in the philosophy of safety of atomic power piles, identifies the parameters which define safety systems, presents tests to be performed on safety chains, comments the relationship between safety and the decrease of the number of pile inadvertent shutdowns, discusses the issues of instrument failures and chain multiplicity, comments the possible improvement of the operation of elements which build up safety chains (design simplification, development of semiconductors, replacement of electromechanical relays by static relays), the role of safety logical computers and the development of automatics in pile safety, presents automatic control as a safety factor (example of automatic start-up), and finally comments the use of fuses

  2. The IAEA safety standards for radiation, waste and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Abel J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the standards for radiation, waste and nuclear safety established by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). It provides a historical overview of their development and also summarizes the standards' current preparation and review process. The final paragraphs offer an outlook on future developments. (author)

  3. Safety organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, M.

    1984-06-01

    After a rapid definition of a nuclear basis installation, the national organization of nuclear safety in France is presented, as also the main organizations concerned and their functions. This report shows how the licensing procedure leading to the construction and exploitation of such installations is applied in the case of nuclear laboratories of research and development: examinations of nuclear safety problems are carried out at different levels: - centralized to define the frame out of which the installation has not to operate, - decentralized to follow in a more detailed manner its evolution [fr

  4. Operational safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The PNL Safety, Standards and Compliance Program contributed to the development and issuance of safety policies, standards, and criteria; for projects in the nuclear and nonnuclear areas. During 1976 the major emphasis was on developing criteria, instruments and methods to assure that radiation exposure to occupational personnel and to people in the environs of nuclear-related facilities is maintained at the lowest level technically and economically practicable. Progress in 1976 is reported on the preparation of guidelines for radiation exposure; Pu dosimetry studies; the preparation of an environmental monitoring handbook; and emergency instrumentation preparedness

  5. Ethical aspects of final disposal. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltes, B.; Leder, W.; Achenbach, G.B.; Spaemann, R.; Gerhardt, V.

    2003-01-01

    In fulfilment of this task the Federal Environmental Ministry has commissioned GRS to summarise the current national and international status of ethical aspects of the final disposal of radioactive wastes as part of the project titled ''Final disposal of radioactive wastes as seen from the viewpoint of ethical objectives''. The questions arising from the opinions, positions and publications presented in the report by GRS were to serve as a basis for an expert discussion or an interdisciplinary discussion forum for all concerned with the ethical aspects of an answerable approach to the final disposal of radioactive wastes. In April 2001 GRS held a one-day seminar at which leading ethicists and philosophers offered statements on the questions referred to above and joined in a discussion with experts on issues of final disposal. This report documents the questions that arose ahead of the workshop, the specialist lectures held there and a summary of the discussion results [de

  6. Patient safety

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Page 1 .... BMJ 2012;344:e832. Table 2. Unsafe medical care. Structural factors. Organisational determinants. Structural accountability (accreditation and regulation). Safety culture. Training, education and human resources. Stress and fatigue .... for routine take-off and landing, yet doctors feel that it is demeaning to do so?

  7. Sun Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children from the Sun? Are There Benefits to Spending Time Outdoors? The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer Related Resources Sun Safety Tips for Men Tips for Families Tips for Schools Tips for Employers Tips for ...

  8. Establishment and cultivation of the radiation safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhigang; Fan Yumao

    2010-01-01

    Safety culture is the cure of the corporate culture for nuclear technology application unit's. This article introduces the definition, connotation and levels of safety culture, and discusses the requirements of safety culture for organization and individuals in the area of technology application. Finally, key practical issues for the cultivation of safety culture are explained and some ideas about the construction of safety culture are proposed. (authors)

  9. Further development and data basis for safety and accident analyses of nuclear front end and back end facilities and actualization and revision of calculation methods for nuclear safety analyses. Final report; Weiterentwicklung von Methoden und Datengrundlagen zu Sicherheits- und Stoerfallanalysen fuer Anlagen der nuklearen Ver- und Entsorgung sowie Aktualisierung und Ueberpruefung von Rechenmethoden zu nuklearen Sicherheitsanalysen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilger, Robert; Peters, Elisabeth; Sommer, Fabian; Moser, Eberhard-Franz; Kessen, Sven; Stuke, Maik

    2016-07-15

    This report briefly describes the activities carried out under the project 3613R03350 on the GRS ''Handbook on Accident Analysis for Nuclear Front and Back End Facilities'', and in detail the continuing work on the revision and updating of the GRS ''Handbook on Criticality'', which here focused on fissile systems with plutonium and {sup 233}U. The in previous projects started and ongoing literature study on innovative fuel concepts is continued. Also described are the review and qualification of computational methods by research and active benchmark participation, and the results of tracking the state of science and technology in the field of computational methods for criticality safety analysis. Special in-depth analyzes of selected criticality-relevant occurrences in the past are also documented.

  10. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuur, Edward [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Luo, Yiqi [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This final grant report is a continuation of the final grant report submitted for DE-SC0006982 as the Principle Investigator (Schuur) relocated from the University of Florida to Northern Arizona University. This report summarizes the original project goals, as well as includes new project activities that were completed in the final period of the project.

  11. Safety in the Transport Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    In EU the transport sector has an incident rate of accidents at work at 40 pr 1000 employees. The Danish insurance company CODAN has insured a big part of this sector concerning transport of gods on shore. The purpose of the project is to document the safety problems in the sector and to develop...... a strategy for a preventive intervention in transport enterprises. The results will in the end be included in a new strategy for the insurance company and the transport sectores organization towards a better safety performance. The safety problems for the employees are the activities carried out by loading......, unloading or work with transport equipment carried out at many different work places. The main safety problems are falls, heavy lifting, poor ergonomic working conditions, hits or collisions with gods, equipments or falling objects, the traffic risk situations, work with animals and finally the risk...

  12. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohdan W. Oppenheim; Rudolf Marloth

    2007-10-26

    Executive Summary The document contains Final Technical Report on the Industrial Assessment Center Program at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, covering the contract period of 9/1/2002 to 11/30/2006, under the contract DE-FC36-02GO 12073. The Report describes six required program tasks, as follows: TASK 1 is a summary of the assessments performed over the life of the award: 77 assessments were performed, 595 AR were recommended, covering a very broad range of manufacturing plants. TASK 2 is a description of the efforts to promote and increase the adoption of assessment recommendations and employ innovative methods to assist in accomplishing these goals. The LMU IAC has been very successful in accomplishing the program goals, including implemented savings of $5,141,895 in energy, $10,045,411 in productivity and $30,719 in waste, for a total of $15,218,025. This represents 44% of the recommended savings of $34,896,392. TASK 3 is a description of the efforts promoting the IAC Program and enhancing recruitment efforts for new clients and expanded geographic coverage. LMU IAC has been very successful recruiting new clients covering Southern California. Every year, the intended number of clients was recruited. TASK 4 describes the educational opportunities, training, and other related activities for IAC students. A total of 38 students graduated from the program, including 2-3 graduate students every semester, and the remainder undergraduate students, mostly from the Mechanical Engineering Department. The students received formal weekly training in energy (75%) and productivity (25). All students underwent extensive safety training. All students praised the IAC experience very highly. TASK 5 describes the coordination and integration of the Center activities with other Center and IAC Program activities, and DOE programs. LMU IAC worked closely with MIT, and SDSU IAC and SFSU IAC, and enthusiastically supported the SEN activities. TASK 6 describes other tasks

  13. Disposal safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, J.W.

    International consensus does not seem to be necessary or appropriate for many of the issues concerned with the safety of nuclear waste disposal. International interaction on the technical aspects of disposal has been extensive, and this interaction has contributed greatly to development of a consensus technical infrastructure for disposal. This infrastructure provides a common and firm base for regulatory, political, and social actions in each nation

  14. Safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wider, H.U.

    1997-01-01

    It is assumed that in an accelerator-driven system (ADS) the same type of accidents can be envisaged as in critical reactors. After briefly describing the basic safety features of ADS, the first investigations of the behaviour of an accelerator driven fast oxide reactor during an unprotected loss-of-flow accident and the investigation of reactivity accidents in a large sodium-cooled ADS are presented

  15. Cryogenics safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reider, R.

    1977-01-01

    The safety hazards associated with handling cryogenic fluids are discussed in detail. These hazards include pressure buildup when a cryogenic fluid is heated and becomes a gas, potential damage to body tissues due to surface contact, toxic risk from breathing air altered by cryogenic fluids, dangers of air solidification, and hazards of combustible cryogens such as liquified oxygen, hydrogen, or natural gas or of combustible mixtures. Safe operating procedures and emergency planning are described

  16. Safety Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    given prior to issuing or renewing an OF 346? 13. Are operators’ DA Forms 348 reviewed annually for— a. Safety awards? b. Expiration of permits...place oily polishing rags or waste in covered metal cans? d. Store paint in tightly closed containers? e. Warn family members to never use gasoline...15 cream or lotion on exposed skin (face, hands, feet)? 3. Avoid extended periods of unprotected exposure to the sun? Heat cramp, heat exhaustion

  17. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Program on Nuclear Safety comprehends Radioprotection, Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Material Control. These activities are developed at the Nuclear Safety Directory. The Radioactive Waste Management Department (GRR) was formally created in 1983, to promote research and development, teaching and service activities in the field of radioactive waste. Its mission is to develop and employ technologies to manage safely the radioactive wastes generated at IPEN and at its customer’s facilities all over the country, in order to protect the health and the environment of today's and future generations. The Radioprotection Service (GRP) aims primarily to establish requirements for the protection of people, as workers, contractors, students, members of the general public and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, it also aims to establish the primary criteria for the safety of radiation sources at IPEN and planning and preparing for response to nuclear and radiological emergencies. The procedures about the management and the control of exposures to ionizing radiation are in compliance with national standards and international recommendations. Research related to the main activities is also performed. The Nuclear Material Control has been performed by the Safeguard Service team, which manages the accountability and the control of nuclear material at IPEN facilities and provides information related to these activities to ABACC and IAEA. (author)

  18. Hydrogen safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA experience with hydrogen began in the 1950s when the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) research on rocket fuels was inherited by the newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Initial emphasis on the use of hydrogen as a fuel for high-altitude probes, satellites, and aircraft limited the available data on hydrogen hazards to small quantities of hydrogen. NASA began to use hydrogen as the principal liquid propellant for launch vehicles and quickly determined the need for hydrogen safety documentation to support design and operational requirements. The resulting NASA approach to hydrogen safety requires a joint effort by design and safety engineering to address hydrogen hazards and develop procedures for safe operation of equipment and facilities. NASA also determined the need for rigorous training and certification programs for personnel involved with hydrogen use. NASA's current use of hydrogen is mainly for large heavy-lift vehicle propulsion, which necessitates storage of large quantities for fueling space shots and for testing. Future use will involve new applications such as thermal imaging

  19. Nuclear safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Program on Nuclear Safety comprehends Radioprotection, Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Material Control. These activities are developed at the Nuclear Safety Directory. The Radioactive Waste Management Department (GRR) was formally created in 1983, to promote research and development, teaching and service activities in the field of radioactive waste. Its mission is to develop and employ technologies to manage safely the radioactive wastes generated at IPEN and at its customer’s facilities all over the country, in order to protect the health and the environment of today's and future generations. The Radioprotection Service (GRP) aims primarily to establish requirements for the protection of people, as workers, contractors, students, members of the general public and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, it also aims to establish the primary criteria for the safety of radiation sources at IPEN and planning and preparing for response to nuclear and radiological emergencies. The procedures about the management and the control of exposures to ionizing radiation are in compliance with national standards and international recommendations. Research related to the main activities is also performed. The Nuclear Material Control has been performed by the Safeguard Service team, which manages the accountability and the control of nuclear material at IPEN facilities and provides information related to these activities to ABACC and IAEA. (author)

  20. 76 FR 60494 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From HPI-PSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety... a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient... delivery. The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Final Rule (Patient Safety Rule), 42 CFR Part 3...

  1. 76 FR 71346 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Peminic Inc. dba The Peminic-Greeley PSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety... Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety.... The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Final Rule (Patient Safety Rule), 42 CFR part 3, authorizes...

  2. New Nuclear Safety Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosel, N.; Prah, M.; Cizmek, A.

    2008-01-01

    Beside new Ordinance on the control of nuclear material and special equipment (Official Gazette No. 15/08), from 2006 State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) adopted Ordinance on performing nuclear activities (Official Gazette No. 74/06) and Ordinance on special conditions for individual activities to be performed by expert organizations which perform activities in the area of nuclear safety (Official Gazette No. 74/06), based on Nuclear Safety Act (Official Gazette No. 173/03). The Ordinance on performing nuclear activities regulates the procedure of announcing the intention to perform nuclear activity, submitting an application for the issue of a license to perform nuclear activity, and the procedure for adoption a decision on issuing a nuclear activity license. The Ordinance also regulates the contents of the application form for the announcement of the intention to perform nuclear activity, as well as of the application for the issue of a nuclear activity license and the method of keeping a nuclear activity register. The Ordinance on special conditions for individual activities to be performed by expert organizations which perform activities in the area of nuclear safety regulates these mentioned conditions, whereas compliance is established by a decision passed by the SONS. Special conditions for individual activities to be performed by expert organizations which perform activities in the area of nuclear safety are organizational, technical, technological conditions and established system of quality assurance. In 2007, SONS finalized the text of new Ordinance on nuclear safety and protection conditions for location, design, construction, operation and decommissioning of facility in which nuclear activity is performed. This Ordinance regulates nuclear safety and protection conditions for location, design, construction, operation and decommissioning of facility in which nuclear activity is performed. This Ordinance defines facilities in which nuclear activity is

  3. Nuclear safety culture and nuclear safety supervision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Jianshe

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the author reviews systematically and summarizes up the development process and stage characteristics of nuclear safety culture, analysis the connotation and characteristics of nuclear safety culture, sums up the achievements of our country's nuclear safety supervision, dissects the challenges and problems of nuclear safety supervision. This thesis focused on the relationship between nuclear safety culture and nuclear safety supervision, they are essential differences, but there is a close relationship. Nuclear safety supervision needs to introduce some concepts of nuclear safety culture, lays emphasis on humanistic care and improves its level and efficiency. Nuclear safety supervision authorities must strengthen nuclear safety culture training, conduct the development of nuclear safety culture, make sure that nuclear safety culture can play significant roles. (author)

  4. Operator Actions Within a Safety Instrumented Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suttinger, L.T.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the factors that should be considered when crediting operator action for performing a safety function or being a part of the process of enabling a safety function. Criteria for evaluating operator action, such as required time response and operator training among others, are discussed. The paper will address these and other factors that should be considered when determining the reliability of the operator to respond and perform his/her part of the safety function. The entire safety function includes the operator and the reliability of the instrumented system that provides the alarm or indication, the final control element, and support systems. The integration of the operator performance with the hardware safety availability, including the effects of the supporting systems is discussed. The analysis of these factors will provide the justification for the amount of risk reduction or safety integrity level that can be credited for the Safety Instrumented Function (SIF), including operator action

  5. A risk informed safety classification for a Nordic NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaenkaelae, K.

    2002-01-01

    The report describes a study to develop a safety classification proposal or classi- fication recommendations based on risks for selected equipment of a nuclear power plant. The application plant in this work is Loviisa NPP unit 1. The safety classification proposals are to be considered as an exercise in this pilot study and do not necessarily represent final proposals in a real situation. Comparisons to original safety classifications and technical specifications were made. The study concludes that it is possible to change safety classes or safety signifi- cances as considered in technical specifications and in in-service-inspections into both directions without endangering the safety or even by improving the safety. (au)

  6. Preliminary study on improving safety culture in Malaysian nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Sabariah Kader; Lee, Y. E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary study on safety culture and its implementation in Malaysian nuclear industries by realizing the importance of safety culture; identification of important safety culture attributes; safety culture assessment and the practices to incorporate the identified safety culture attributes in organization. The first section of this paper explains the terms and definitions related to safety culture. Second, for the realization of importance of safety culture in organization, the international operational experiences emphasizing the importance of safety culture are described. Third, important safety culture attributes which are frequently cited in literature are provided. Fourth, methods to assess safety culture in operating organization are described. Finally, the practices to enhance the safety culture in an organization are discussed

  7. Preliminary study on improving safety culture in Malaysian nuclear industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Sabariah Kader [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y. E. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    This paper presents preliminary study on safety culture and its implementation in Malaysian nuclear industries by realizing the importance of safety culture; identification of important safety culture attributes; safety culture assessment and the practices to incorporate the identified safety culture attributes in organization. The first section of this paper explains the terms and definitions related to safety culture. Second, for the realization of importance of safety culture in organization, the international operational experiences emphasizing the importance of safety culture are described. Third, important safety culture attributes which are frequently cited in literature are provided. Fourth, methods to assess safety culture in operating organization are described. Finally, the practices to enhance the safety culture in an organization are discussed.

  8. Plutonium safety training course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moe, H.J.

    1976-03-01

    This course seeks to achieve two objectives: to provide initial safety training for people just beginning work with plutonium, and to serve as a review and reference source for those already engaged in such work. Numerous references have been included to provide information sources for those wishing to pursue certain topics more fully. The first part of the course content deals with the general safety approach used in dealing with hazardous materials. Following is a discussion of the four properties of plutonium that lead to potential hazards: radioactivity, toxicity, nuclear properties, and spontaneous ignition. Next, the various hazards arising from these properties are treated. The relative hazards of both internal and external radiation sources are discussed, as well as the specific hazards when plutonium is the source. Similarly, the general hazards involved in a criticality, fire, or explosion are treated. Comments are made concerning the specific hazards when plutonium is involved. A brief summary comparison between the hazards of the transplutonium nuclides relative to 239 Pu follows. The final portion deals with control procedures with respect to contamination, internal and external exposure, nuclear safety, and fire protection. The philosophy and approach to emergency planning are also discussed

  9. Safety and radiation protection in waste management. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broden, K.; Carugati, S.; Brodersen, K.; Lipponen, M.; Vuori, S.; Ruokola, E.; Palsson, S.E.; Sekse, T.; Ramsoey, T.

    2001-12-01

    During 1998-2001, a project on the management of radioactive waste was carried out as part of the NKS programme. The project was called NKS/SOS-3 and was divided into three sub-projects: SOS-3.1 (Environmental Impact Assessment; EIA), SOS-3.2 (Intermediate storage) and SOS-3.3 (Contamination levels in metals). SOS-3.1 included four EIA seminars on the use of EIA in the Nordic countries. The seminars were held in Norway in 1998, Denmark in 1999, Iceland in 2000 and Finland in 2001. (The last seminar was performed in co-operation with the NKS project SOS-1.) The seminars focused on experiences from EIA procedures for the disposal of radioactive waste, and other experiences from EIA processes. SOS-3.2 included a study on intermediate storage of radioactive waste packages in the Nordic countries. An overview of experiences was compiled and recommendations were made regarding different intermediate storage options as well as control and supervision. SOS-3.3 included investigation of contamination levels in steel, aluminium and magnesium samples from smelting facilities and an overview of current practice for clearance in the Nordic countries. Clearance, clearance levels, naturally occurring radioactive materials, radioactive waste, radioactive material, intermediate storage, waste disposal, environmental impact assessment, gamma spectrometric measurements, beta measurements, neutron activation analyses. (au)

  10. Final safety analysis report for the irradiated fuels storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, G.E.; Evans, T.K.

    1976-01-01

    A fuel storage facility has been constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant to provide safe storage for spent fuel from two commercial HTGR's, Fort St. Vrain and Peach Bottom, and from the Rover nuclear rocket program. The new facility was built as an addition to the existing fuel storage basin building to make maximum use of existing facilities and equipment. The completed facility provides dry storage for one core of Peach Bottom fuel (804 elements), 1 1 / 2 cores of Fort St. Vrain fuel (2200 elements), and the irradiated fuel from the 20 reactors in the Rover program. The facility is designed to permit future expansion at a minimum cost should additional storage space for graphite-type fuels be required. A thorough study of the potential hazards associated with the Irradiated Fuels Storage Facility has been completed, indicating that the facility is capable of withstanding all credible combinations of internal accidents and pertinent natural forces, including design basis natural phenomena of a 10,000 year flood, a 175-mph tornado, or an earthquake having a bedrock acceleration of 0.33 g and an amplification factor of 1.3, without a loss of integrity or a significant release of radioactive materials. The design basis accident (DBA) postulated for the facility is a complete loss of cooling air, even though the occurrence of this situation is extremely remote, considering the availability of backup and spare fans and emergency power. The occurrence of the DBA presents neither a radiation nor an activity release hazard. A loss of coolant has no effect upon the fuel or the facility other than resulting in a gradual and constant temperature increase of the stored fuel. The temperature increase is gradual enough that ample time (28 hours minimum) is available for corrective action before an arbitrarily imposed maximum fuel centerline temperature of 1100 0 F is reached

  11. Sandis irradiator for dried sewage solids. Final safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, M.

    1980-07-01

    Analyses of the hazards associated with the operation of the Sandia irradiator for dried sewage solids, as well as methods and design considerations to minimize these hazards, are presented in accordance with DOE directives

  12. 75 FR 35265 - Safety Standard for Infant Walkers: Final Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... are walking (usually 6 to 15 months old). ASTM F 977-07 defines ``walker'' as ``a mobile unit that... attached to rigid trays. The trays are fastened to bases that have wheels or casters to make them mobile.../jumping. Occupant retention--intended to prevent entrapment by setting requirements for leg openings. The...

  13. HVAC systems and nuclear plant safety. Final report, May 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    The primary objective of this study was to provide perspective on the overall risk impact of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system problems. Industry experience with HVAC system problems is documented and analyzed. In addition, the results of 10 plant-specific probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) were reviewed to determine the contribution of HVAC systems to the risk of core damage. The PRAs included in this review cover a broad range of plant types and operating conditions. The review found that the impact of HVAC systems on risk is plant specific. These results exhibit a broad range of frequencies for HVAC contribution to risk, and the percentage of total core damage due to HVAC problems also had a wide variability. Plant-specific differences in design, environment, operation, and maintenance are the primary factors in determining the risk contribution of HVAC systems. (author)

  14. Maximizing investments in work zone safety in Oregon : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Due to the federal stimulus program and the 2009 Jobs and Transportation Act, the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) anticipates that a large increase in highway construction will occur. There is the expectation that, since transportation saf...

  15. Safety training

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2009-01-01

    Habilitation électrique A course entitled "Habilitation électrique pour personnel de laboratoire" (electrical safety qualification for laboratory personnel) will be held on 22 and 23 June. Registration by e-mail to isabelle.cusato@cern.ch. Explosion Hazards in the handling of flammable solvents and gases A course entitled "Explosion Hazards in the handling of flammable solvents and gases" given in French will be held on 18-19 June 2009. This course is obligatory for all FGSOs at CERN, and it is recommended for anyone handling flammable gas or solvents. To sign up please visit this page. For more information please contact Isabelle Cusato, tel. 73811.

  16. SAFETY NOTES

    CERN Document Server

    TIS Secretariat

    2001-01-01

    Please note that the revisions of safety notes no 3 (NS 3 Rev. 2) and no 24 (NS 24 REV.) entitled respectively 'FIRE PREVENTION FOR ENCLOSED SPACES IN LARGE HALLS' and 'REMOVING UNBURIED ELV AND LVA ELECTRIC CONDUITS' are available on the web at the following urls: http://edmsoraweb.cern.ch:8001/cedar/doc.download?document_id=322811&version=1&filename=version_francaise.pdf http://edmsoraweb.cern.ch:8001/cedar/doc.download?document_id=322861&version=2&filename=version_francaise.pdf Paper copies can also be obtained from the TIS Divisional Secretariat, email tis.secretariat@cern.ch

  17. ESRS guidelines for software safety reviews. Reference document for the organization and conduct of Engineering Safety Review Services (ESRS) on software important to safety in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The IAEA provides safety review services to assist Member States in the application of safety standards and, in particular, to evaluate and facilitate improvements in nuclear power plant safety performance. Complementary to the Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) and the International Regulatory Review Team (IRRT) services are the Engineering Safety Review Services (ESRS), which include reviews of siting, external events and structural safety, design safety, fire safety, ageing management and software safety. Software is of increasing importance to safety in nuclear power plants as the use of computer based equipment and systems, controlled by software, is increasing in new and older plants. Computer based devices are used in both safety related applications (such as process control and monitoring) and safety critical applications (such as reactor protection). Their dependability can only be ensured if a systematic, fully documented and reviewable engineering process is used. The ESRS on software safety are designed to assist a nuclear power plant or a regulatory body of a Member State in the review of documentation relating to the development, application and safety assessment of software embedded in computer based systems important to safety in nuclear power plants. The software safety reviews can be tailored to the specific needs of the requesting organization. Examples of such reviews are: project planning reviews, reviews of specific issues and reviews prior final acceptance. This report gives information on the possible scope of ESRS software safety reviews and guidance on the organization and conduct of the reviews. It is aimed at Member States considering these reviews and IAEA staff and external experts performing the reviews. The ESRS software safety reviews evaluate the degree to which software documents show that the development process and the final product conform to international standards, guidelines and current practices. Recommendations are

  18. National report of Brazil. Nuclear Safety Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This document represents the national report prepared as a fulfillment of the brazilian obligations related to the Convention on Nuclear Safety. In chapter 2 some details are given about the existing nuclear installations. Chapter 3 provides details about the legislation and regulations, including the regulatory framework and the regulatory body. Chapter 4 covers general safety considerations as described in articles 10 to 16 of the Convention. Chapter 5 addresses to the safety of the installations during siting, design, construction and operation. Chapter 6 describes planned activities to further enhance nuclear safety. Chapter 7 presents the final remarks related to the degree of compliance with the Convention obligations

  19. Nuclear safety review for the year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-08-01

    The Nuclear Safety Review reports on worldwide efforts to strengthen nuclear, radiation and transport safety and the safety of radioactive waste management. The final version of the Nuclear Safety Review for the Year 2002 was prepared in the light of the discussion by the Board of Governors in March 2002. This report presents an overview of the current issues and trends in nuclear, radiation, transport and radioactive waste safety at the end of 2002. This overview is supported by a more detailed factual account of safety-related events and issues worldwide during 2002. National authorities and the international community continued to reflect and act upon the implications of the events of II September 2001 for nuclear, radiation, transport and waste safety. In the light of this, the Agency has decided to transfer the organizational unit on nuclear security from the Department of Safeguards to the Department of Nuclear Safety (which thereby becomes the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security). By better exploiting the synergies between safety and security and promoting further cross-fertilization of approaches, the Agency is trying to help build up mutually reinforcing global regimes of safety and security. However, the Nuclear Safety Review for the Year 2002 addresses only those areas already in the safety programme. This short analytical overview is supported by a second part (corresponding to Part I of the Nuclear Safety Reviews of previous years), which describes significant safety-related events and issues worldwide during 2002. A Draft Nuclear Safety Review for the Year 2002 was submitted to the March 2003 session of the Board of Governors in document GOV/2003/6.

  20. Nuclear safety review for the year 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    The Nuclear Safety Review reports on worldwide efforts to strengthen nuclear, radiation and transport safety and the safety of radioactive waste management. The final version of the Nuclear Safety Review for the Year 2002 was prepared in the light of the discussion by the Board of Governors in March 2002. This report presents an overview of the current issues and trends in nuclear, radiation, transport and radioactive waste safety at the end of 2002. This overview is supported by a more detailed factual account of safety-related events and issues worldwide during 2002. National authorities and the international community continued to reflect and act upon the implications of the events of II September 2001 for nuclear, radiation, transport and waste safety. In the light of this, the Agency has decided to transfer the organizational unit on nuclear security from the Department of Safeguards to the Department of Nuclear Safety (which thereby becomes the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security). By better exploiting the synergies between safety and security and promoting further cross-fertilization of approaches, the Agency is trying to help build up mutually reinforcing global regimes of safety and security. However, the Nuclear Safety Review for the Year 2002 addresses only those areas already in the safety programme. This short analytical overview is supported by a second part (corresponding to Part I of the Nuclear Safety Reviews of previous years), which describes significant safety-related events and issues worldwide during 2002. A Draft Nuclear Safety Review for the Year 2002 was submitted to the March 2003 session of the Board of Governors in document GOV/2003/6