WorldWideScience

Sample records for final flood elevation

  1. 75 FR 69892 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ...: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding Location Depth... county +899 City of Norwich, Town boundary. of Greene, Town of North Norwich, Town of Oxford, Town of...). Susquehanna River At the downstream county +965 Town of Afton, Town of boundary. Bainbridge, Village of Afton...

  2. 77 FR 6980 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding Location Depth in feet above ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Unincorporated Areas of Nowata County... Bayou An area bounded by the +100 Town of Mayersville, county boundary to the Unincorporated Areas of...

  3. 76 FR 1535 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-11

    ... in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding Location Depth in feet above ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Unincorporated Areas of Poinsett County... with the St. Francis River...... +212 Areas of Poinsett County. Approximately 0.45 mile downstream of...

  4. 75 FR 68710 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ...: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding Location Depth... County, California Docket Nos.: FEMA-B-7762, FEMA-B-7795, and FEMA-B-1053 California Unincorporated Oregon Slough..... City of Montague +2503 Areas of Siskiyou and County. Unincorporated Siskiyou County...

  5. 76 FR 50918 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) Depth in feet State City/town/county Source of flooding... affected [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Jones County, Texas, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1122 Lake Fort Phantom Hill Just downstream of County +1642 City of Abilene, Highway 1082...

  6. 77 FR 49379 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding Location Depth in feet above ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Unincorporated Areas of Washington County... of the +35 Areas of railroad. Washington County. Approximately 2.1 miles upstream of the railroad...

  7. 75 FR 43418 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... follows: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) State City/town/county Source of flooding... +869 Town of Peoria, upstream of Main Street. Unincorporated Areas of Ottawa County. Approximately 1.... Town of Peoria Maps are available for inspection at the Ottawa County Courthouse, 102 East Central...

  8. 76 FR 68107 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... environmental impact assessment has not been prepared. Regulatory Flexibility Act. As flood elevation..., Illinois, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1134 Beaver Creek Approximately 1.58 miles +366... of Main Street extended (River Mile 887). Unnamed Tributary to Beaver Creek Approximately 1,500 feet...

  9. 76 FR 3531 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... proof Flood Insurance Study and FIRM available at the address cited below for each community. The BFEs... (All Jurisdictions) Docket No.: FEMA-B-1085 Duck Lake Entire shoreline within +930 Township of Clarence...

  10. 75 FR 34381 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    .... Interested lessees and owners of real property are encouraged to review the proof Flood Insurance Study and... Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1035 Duck Creek At the mouth of the +891 City of Warren. Mahoning River...

  11. 77 FR 3625 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... encouraged to review the proof Flood Insurance Study and FIRM available at the address cited below for each... Duck Pond Unincorporated Areas of Road (at Junction Hernando County. 1NP0170). Approximately 100 feet...

  12. 77 FR 30220 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... proof Flood Insurance Study and FIRM available at the address cited below for each community. The BFEs... Areas of 175. Kaufman County. Approximately 1 mile +342 downstream of State Highway 274. Duck Creek...

  13. 76 FR 21664 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... proof Flood Insurance Study and FIRM available at the address cited below for each community. The BFEs... 2,100 feet +861 upstream of 11th Street. Big Duck Creek At South P Street........ +843 City of...

  14. 77 FR 46980 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... Executive Order 12988. List of Subjects in 44 CFR Part 67 Administrative practice and procedure, Flood... upstream of Northeast 152nd Avenue. Whipple Creek Just downstream of +28 Unincorporated Areas of Northwest...

  15. 78 FR 14697 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... Communities affected elevation above ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Cecil County, Maryland... 1 to Stone Run At the Stone Run +271 Town of Rising Sun, confluence. Unincorporated Areas of Cecil County. Approximately 460 feet +359 downstream of Pierce Road. Tributary 2 to Stone Run At the Stone Run...

  16. 78 FR 10066 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... follows: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) Depth in feet State City/town/county Source...). Scriba Creek Approximately 0.90 mile +546 Town of Amboy. upstream of County Route 23 (Potter Road.... Town of Palermo Maps are available for inspection at the Palermo Town Municipal Offices, 53 County...

  17. 78 FR 21272 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... below for the modified BFEs for each community listed. These modified elevations have been published in... [Amended] 0 2. The tables published under the authority of Sec. 67.11 are amended as follows: * Elevation... Austin. upstream of 29th Avenue Southwest (County Highway 28). At the downstream side of +1205 I and M...

  18. 77 FR 21471 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... elevations have been published in newspapers of local circulation and ninety (90) days have elapsed since... School Creek. Approximately 0.61 mile +605 upstream of the confluence with School Creek. Arkansas River...

  19. 76 FR 3524 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... effects from Kentucky River). the Kentucky River to Garrard County. approximately 932 feet upstream of Old..., City of The Colony, Town of Hebron, Unincorporated Areas of Denton County. Approximately 2,940 feet... Communities affected [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Ashley County, Arkansas, and Incorporated...

  20. FEMA DFIRM Base Flood Elevations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The Base Flood Elevation (BFE) table is required for any digital data where BFE lines will be shown on the corresponding Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). Normally,...

  1. Base Flood Elevation (BFE) Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Base Flood Elevation (BFE) table is required for any digital data where BFE lines will be shown on the corresponding Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). Normally if...

  2. Base Flood Elevation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  3. 76 FR 40670 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ...) Depth in feet above State City/town/county Source of flooding Location ** ground [caret] Elevation in... Contentnea Creek +76 +77 Town of Black Creek, confluence. Unincorporated Areas of Wilson County... +63 Town of Stantonsburg, confluence. Unincorporated Areas of Wilson County. Approximately 0.8 mile...

  4. 76 FR 66887 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ...) Depth in feet above State City/town/county Source of flooding Location** ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Existing Modified Town of Richmond, Vermont Vermont Town of Richmond........ Winooski River... Incorporated Areas Little Thompson River At the downstream side None +4935 Town of Berthoud, of Weld County...

  5. 76 FR 8978 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    .../town/county Source of flooding Location ** ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Existing Modified Unincorporated Areas of Yolo County, California California Unincorporated Areas of Cache Creek Settling Basin At........ Entire None +901 Town of shoreline Wolcottvill e, Unincorpora ted Areas of LaGrange County. * National...

  6. 76 FR 36482 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    .../town/county Source of flooding Location ** ground [caret] Elevation in meters (MSL) Existing Modified City of Colonial Heights, Virginia Virginia City of Colonial Heights Old Town Creek Approximately 0.63... for inspection at 202 James Avenue, Colonial Heights, VA 23834. Unincorporated Areas of Halifax County...

  7. 75 FR 29268 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... impact assessment has not been prepared. Regulatory Flexibility Act. As flood elevation determinations.... Approximately 1.7 mile None +714 upstream of Due West Highway. Beaver Creek At the confluence with None +571... confluence with Beaver Creek Tributary 15. Beaver Creek Tributary 1 At the confluence with None +572...

  8. Assessing uncertainty in SRTM elevations for global flood modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawker, L. P.; Rougier, J.; Neal, J. C.; Bates, P. D.

    2017-12-01

    The SRTM DEM is widely used as the topography input to flood models in data-sparse locations. Understanding spatial error in the SRTM product is crucial in constraining uncertainty about elevations and assessing the impact of these upon flood prediction. Assessment of SRTM error was carried out by Rodriguez et al (2006), but this did not explicitly quantify the spatial structure of vertical errors in the DEM, and nor did it distinguish between errors over different types of landscape. As a result, there is a lack of information about spatial structure of vertical errors of the SRTM in the landscape that matters most to flood models - the floodplain. Therefore, this study attempts this task by comparing SRTM, an error corrected SRTM product (The MERIT DEM of Yamazaki et al., 2017) and near truth LIDAR elevations for 3 deltaic floodplains (Mississippi, Po, Wax Lake) and a large lowland region (the Fens, UK). Using the error covariance function, calculated by comparing SRTM elevations to the near truth LIDAR, perturbations of the 90m SRTM DEM were generated, producing a catalogue of plausible DEMs. This allows modellers to simulate a suite of plausible DEMs at any aggregated block size above native SRTM resolution. Finally, the generated DEM's were input into a hydrodynamic model of the Mekong Delta, built using the LISFLOOD-FP hydrodynamic model, to assess how DEM error affects the hydrodynamics and inundation extent across the domain. The end product of this is an inundation map with the probability of each pixel being flooded based on the catalogue of DEMs. In a world of increasing computer power, but a lack of detailed datasets, this powerful approach can be used throughout natural hazard modelling to understand how errors in the SRTM DEM can impact the hazard assessment.

  9. 76 FR 58436 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... +725 feet upstream of the U.S. Route 50 West exit ramp. Dickerson Creek Tributary 1......... At the... Flooding Approximately 1,025 None 2 Hawaii County. feet west of the intersection of Waikoloa Beach Drive... intersection of West Kawailani Street and Launa Street. Shallow Flooding Approximately 3.6 miles None 1 Hawaii...

  10. 77 FR 46994 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ..., it addresses the following flooding sources: Jones Bayou, Mississippi River, and Porter Bayou. DATES... Incorporated Areas'' addressed the following flooding sources: Jones Bayou, Mississippi River, and Porter Bayou.... Approximately 8.1 miles None +162 upstream of the Arkansas River confluence. Porter Bayou Approximately 0.8 mile...

  11. 75 FR 67317 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... buildings. Comments on any aspect of the Flood Insurance Study and FIRM, other than the proposed BFEs, will... Approximately 700 feet None +41 City of Brooksville, downstream of Duck Unincorporated Areas Pond Road (at...

  12. 75 FR 62057 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... buildings. Comments on any aspect of the Flood Insurance Study and FIRM, other than the proposed BFEs, will... State Highway 274. Duck Creek Approximately 925 feet None +458 Unincorporated Areas of downstream of...

  13. 76 FR 8965 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... buildings. Comments on any aspect of the Flood Insurance Study and FIRM, other than the proposed BFEs, will.... Approximately 1,320 None +410 feet upstream of Uncle Duck Road. Hall Branch At the Shaws Creek None +426...

  14. 75 FR 81957 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... of Subjects in 44 CFR Part 67 Administrative practice and procedure, Flood insurance, Reporting and.... Whipple Creek Just downstream of None +28 Unincorporated Areas Northwest Krieger Road. of Clark County...

  15. The 3D Elevation Program—Flood risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J.; Lukas, Vicki

    2018-01-25

    Flood-damage reduction in the United States has been a longstanding but elusive societal goal. The national strategy for reducing flood damage has shifted over recent decades from a focus on construction of flood-control dams and levee systems to a three-pronged strategy to (1) improve the design and operation of such structures, (2) provide more accurate and accessible flood forecasting, and (3) shift the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) National Flood Insurance Program to a more balanced, less costly flood-insurance paradigm. Expanding the availability and use of high-quality, three-dimensional (3D) elevation information derived from modern light detection and ranging (lidar) technologies to provide essential terrain data poses a singular opportunity to dramatically enhance the effectiveness of all three components of this strategy. Additionally, FEMA, the National Weather Service, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have developed tools and joint program activities to support the national strategy.The USGS 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) has the programmatic infrastructure to produce and provide essential terrain data. This infrastructure includes (1) data acquisition partnerships that leverage funding and reduce duplicative efforts, (2) contracts with experienced private mapping firms that ensure acquisition of consistent, low-cost 3D elevation data, and (3) the technical expertise, standards, and specifications required for consistent, edge-to-edge utility across multiple collection platforms and public access unfettered by individual database designs and limitations.High-quality elevation data, like that collected through 3DEP, are invaluable for assessing and documenting flood risk and communicating detailed information to both responders and planners alike. Multiple flood-mapping programs make use of USGS streamflow and 3DEP data. Flood insurance rate maps, flood documentation studies, and flood-inundation map libraries are products of these

  16. 76 FR 32896 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ... buildings. Comments on any aspect of the Flood Insurance Study and FIRM, other than the proposed BFEs, will... Creek confluence. At the downstream side +489 +491 of Oak Gate Lane. Long Branch (of Duck Creek) Bypass.. At the upstream side of +498 +490 City of Mesquite. the Long Branch (of Duck Creek) confluence...

  17. 75 FR 31361 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... source(s) elevation ground [caret] Elevation Communities affected in meters (MSL) Effective Modified... American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. [caret] Mean Sea Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1.... Stone County, Mississippi, and Incorporated Areas Church House Branch Approximately 0.5 mile None +211...

  18. 75 FR 29253 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ...: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) Depth in feet above State City/town/county Source of... +21 Town of Ebro, upstream of the Unincorporated Areas confluence with the of Washington County. East... County, Colorado, and Incorporated Areas Willow Creek At the confluence with None +8,154 Unincorporated...

  19. 75 FR 22699 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... La Vista. At South 168th Street.... +1100 Approximately 300 feet +1177 upstream of South 204th Street.... upstream of the Sarpy County, City of La confluence with South Vista, City of Papillion Creek. Papillion... Creek (with levees)..... Just downstream of South +999 City of Bellevue, City of 48th Street. La Vista...

  20. 75 FR 52868 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... Highway. Turkey Creek Approximately 0.7 mile +565 City of Center Point, downstream of Old City of Clay... inspection at 6757 Old Springville Road, Pinson, AL 35126. City of Homewood Maps are available for inspection.... downstream of South Lone Tree Road. Approximately 1,800 feet +6,949 upstream of Lake Mary Road. Peak View...

  1. 78 FR 45877 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    .... Approximately 0.23 mile [caret] 31 upstream of Egan Drive. Lemon Creek Approximately 0.27 mile [caret] 23 City... American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. [caret] Mean Lower Low Water. ADDRESSES City and...

  2. 76 FR 79098 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... of North Eagle Drive. Oak Creek Just upstream of the +5253 Town of Rockvale, Town of unnamed railroad... Channel....... At the confluence with +1758 City of Abilene. Cat Claw Creek. Just upstream of Nonesuch...

  3. 77 FR 49367 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... within the scope of the Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 601- 612, a regulatory flexibility analysis... shoreline......... +67 Unincorporated Areas of Polk County. London Creek Watershed Unnamed Pond-- Entire shoreline......... +70 Unincorporated Areas of ICPR Node 28A1. Polk County. London Creek Watershed Unnamed...

  4. 77 FR 49360 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... confluence. Casey Branch (backwater effects from From the Dale Hollow Lake +663 Unincorporated Areas of Dale Hollow Lake). confluence to Cumberland County. approximately 0.5 mile upstream of the Dale Hollow Lake.... Dale Hollow Lake (Obey River) Entire shoreline within +663 Unincorporated Areas of community...

  5. 75 FR 77762 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    .... approximately 1.1 mile upstream of the confluence with Green River Lake. Snake Creek (backwater effects from... Mason Road. Pine Run Approximately 400 feet +752 City of Mason. downstream of Kings Mill Road...

  6. 77 FR 76420 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... Road. Salt Lick Branch (backwater effects At the Licking River +924 Unincorporated Areas from Licking... +3206 At the intersection of Slide Road and 58th Street......... +3256 * National Geodetic Vertical...). confluence. of Magoffin County. Approximately 355 feet +901 upstream of Clyde Holliday Cemetery Road. [[Page...

  7. 75 FR 18091 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1032 Salt Branch Intersection of Unnamed +163 Unincorporated Areas of Road and... Huntsville. upstream of Green Cove Road. Approximately 75 feet +682 downstream of Drake Avenue. * National.... Approximately 180 feet +575 downstream of Hester Cut Road. Heartsill Creek Tributary 1 At the confluence with...

  8. 76 FR 72627 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ... addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering.... Paul, Unincorporated Areas of Dakota County. Approximately 10,200 feet +714 upstream of I-35. Mud Creek..., Rosemount, MN 55068. [[Page 72634

  9. 76 FR 35111 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering... downstream of Saint Paul of Blackstone, Town of Street. Grafton, Town of Millbury, Town of Millville, Town of... Blackstone Maps are available for inspection at the Town Hall, 15 Saint Paul Street, Blackstone, MA 01504...

  10. 75 FR 59989 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... Road. Caracol Creek Approximately 600 feet +770 City of San Antonio. upstream of the confluence with... Stage Road. Leon Creek Tributary M Approximately 1,300 feet +1,202 City of San Antonio. downstream of... Northwest Loop 1604. Unnamed Tributary 5 to Caracol......... Approximately 900 feet +828 City of San Antonio...

  11. 76 FR 8906 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ...-B-1014 Sugar Creek Approximately 2,000 feet +469 Town of West Terre Haute, downstream of Conrail... Approximately 1,214 feet +470 Town of West Terre Haute, upstream of I-70. Unincorporated Areas of Vigo County... West Terre Haute Maps are available for inspection at the Town Hall, 500 National Avenue, West Terre...

  12. 78 FR 48813 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... Road. Approximately 1.16 miles +292 upstream of Giffords Church Road. Poentic Kill At the Mohawk River... mile upstream of Johnson Cemetery Road. Big Reedy Creek (Backwater effects from From the confluence.... approximately 935 feet upstream of Penrod Road. Deerlick Creek Tributary 6 (Backwater From the confluence with...

  13. 75 FR 3171 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order... Street, Baldwyn, MS 38824. City of Tupelo Maps are available for inspection at the Planning Department... Maps are available for inspection at City Hall, 120 Miner Avenue West, Ladysmith, WI 54848...

  14. 76 FR 54134 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... under the criteria of section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning... Unincorporated Areas of Pacific Railroad. Park County. Approximately 4.14 miles +4953 downstream of Tom Miner...

  15. 75 FR 23595 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... 72482. Mesa County, Colorado, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1049 Gold Star Canyon Just above... Middlesex Maps are available for inspection at 1200 Mountain Avenue, Middlesex, NJ 08846. City of New... Indian upstream of the southern Reservation (Turtle corporate limit of Mountain Band). Belcourt...

  16. 75 FR 44155 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    .... Approximately 1,400 feet +7776 upstream of West Grimes Creek Road. Junction Creek At Pleasant Drive in Durango.... Unincorporated Areas of La Plata County Maps are available for inspection at 1060 East 2nd Avenue, Durango, CO.... Pepin County. Approximately 6,000 feet +717 upstream of the confluence with Bear Creek. Mississippi...

  17. 77 FR 26959 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... River At the Mississippi County +335 Unincorporated Areas of boundary. Scott County. At the Alexander... 75110. Preston County, West Virginia, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1166 Back Run At the...

  18. 77 FR 46972 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... Division, 2400 Broadway Southeast, Albuquerque, NM 87102. Le Flore County, Oklahoma, and Incorporated Areas.... Unincorporated Areas of Le Flore County. At the downstream side of +490 U.S. Route 59. Caston Creek Approximately.... Areas of Le Flore County. Approximately 500 feet +470 upstream of the confluence with Mountain Creek...

  19. 75 FR 23608 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... Potter County. 287 and South Parsley Road. Playa Lake 6 Approximately 1,000 feet +3624 City of Amarillo... feet +3596 City of Amarillo, northeast of the Unincorporated Areas of intersection of Parsley Potter... County. intersection of Highway 287 and South Parsley Road. Playa Lake 4 At the intersection of +3699...

  20. 77 FR 73324 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ..., Tulip Avenue to the south, and Apricot Avenue to the west. Ponding Area Area bound by East +51... south, and Balsam Street to the west. Ponding Area Area bound by East Thyme +51 Unincorporated Areas of... Street to the west. Ponding Area Area bound by Verano +51 Unincorporated Areas of Drive to the north...

  1. 77 FR 49373 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... under the criteria of section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning... with +829 Unincorporated Areas of Taylor Fork). Taylor Fork to Madison County. approximately 1,950 feet upstream of the confluence with Taylor Fork. Otter Creek Approximately 0.7 mile +800 City of Richmond...

  2. 76 FR 39011 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... Dam No. 11. Approximately 7.4 miles + 625 Village of Bagley. upstream of Lock and Dam No. 10... Jefferson Street, Lancaster, WI 53813. Village of Bagley Maps are available for inspection at 400 South Jackley Lane, Bagley, WI 53801. Village of Potosi Maps are available for inspection at 105 North Main...

  3. 77 FR 76929 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... Rocky Shelby County. Hollow Lane. Approximately 416 feet +464 upstream of Rocky Hollow Lane. Ivy Branch... of County Road 280 (Old Highway 280). Lee Branch Approximately 884 feet +553 City of Birmingham, City... +608 upstream of Hugh Daniel Drive. Lee Brook At the upstream side of +417 City of Helena. County Road...

  4. 78 FR 10072 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... River. Approximately 250 feet +12 upstream of Grace Terrace. Cedar Swamp Creek At the confluence with +9.... Ninemile Creek. Approximately 1,600 feet +14 upstream of Old Kings Road. Ninemile Creek Tributary 2 At the.... Approximately 2,100 feet +22 upstream of Old Kings Road. North Fork Sixmile Creek At the confluence with +20...

  5. 76 FR 35119 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... inspection at 301 King Street, Alexandria, VA 22314. Town of Ennis, Montana Docket No.: FEMA-B-1083 Montana... downstream of Grace Avenue. Lancaster County. Approximately 1.0 mile +433 downstream of Old Lansford Road...

  6. 76 FR 39305 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... Town of Middlebury, upstream of the Unincorporated Areas of confluence with the Elkhart County. Little... Ditch At the confluence with +810 Town of Wakarusa, Baugo Creek. Unincorporated Areas of Elkhart County... 52601. Iowa County, Iowa, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1089 Old Mans Creek Approximately 1...

  7. 76 FR 76055 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... from the requirements of 44 CFR part 10, Environmental Consideration. An environmental impact... Whiting Main Beaver Dam Ditch Just downstream of +684 Town of Merrillville. Broadway. Approximately 1,000... downstream of 91st +689 Avenue. Main Beaver Dam Ditch Approximately 730 feet +690 Town of Schererville west...

  8. 75 FR 19895 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... CFR part 10, Environmental Consideration. An environmental impact assessment has not been prepared... Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1032 Beaver Dam Lake Entire shoreline +874 City of Beaver Dam, City of Fox Lake, Unincorporated Areas of Dodge County. Beaver Dam River Approximately 377 feet +841 City of Beaver Dam, downstream...

  9. 77 FR 76916 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... from the requirements of 44 CFR part 10, Environmental Consideration. An environmental impact... upstream of State Route 166. Beaver Creek At the Sweetwater Creek +871 Unincorporated Areas of confluence. Douglas County. Approximately 500 feet +1006 upstream of Patty Court. Beaver Creek Tributary A At the...

  10. 78 FR 36099 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... within the scope of the Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 601- 612, a regulatory flexibility analysis... Surprise, the Central Arizona Unincorporated Areas of Project Canal. Maricopa County. Stage Coach Pass Wash...

  11. 78 FR 5738 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... newspapers of local circulation and ninety (90) days have elapsed since that publication. The Deputy... Town of Moultonborough, confluence. Town of Sandwich. Approximately 1.70 miles +587 upstream of School... for inspection at the Town Hall, 68 School Street, Effingham, NH 03882. Town of Hart's Location Maps...

  12. 75 FR 68714 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... available for inspection at 6622 Wilson Mills Road, Mayfield, OH 44143. Village of Moreland Hills Maps are available for inspection at 4350 S.O.M. Center Road, Moreland Hills, OH 44022. Kent County, Rhode Island... Village of Moreland upstream of Woodland Hills. Road. Approximately 1,200 feet +789 upstream of Woodland...

  13. 77 FR 26968 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... upstream of Port-Hudson Pride Road. Sheet flow between McCarroll Drive and At North Jefferson Place 1 City.... Road. Approximately 0.9 mile +335 upstream of Wagener Trail Road. Dry Branch At the Hollow Creek West +217 Unincorporated Areas of confluence. Aiken County. Approximately 1,200 feet +318 upstream of Dry...

  14. 77 FR 71702 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    .... Antores confluence. Approximately 1,000 feet +6802 upstream of Rodeo Road. Arroyo De La Piedra... Piedra confluence. Approximately 600 feet +7320 upstream of Camino Encantado. Arroyo Saiz At the upstream.... Approximately 0.3 mile +7780 upstream of La Entrada. East Arroyo De La Piedra At the Arroyo De La +7199 City of...

  15. 77 FR 21476 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... State Highway 115. Black River Approximately 9,000 feet +268 City of Pocahontas, downstream of the... the confluence with +269 City of Pocahontas, the Black River. Unincorporated Areas of Randolph County...). Swan Creek At the confluence with +69 City of Lambertville. the Delaware River. Approximately 40 feet...

  16. 76 FR 69665 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    .... Alpena County, Michigan (All Jurisdictions) Docket No.: FEMA-B-1151 Lake Huron From approximately 1.3 + 583 City of Alpena, Township miles northwest of the of Alpena. intersection of Rockport Road and Old... Road and Brousseau Road. [[Page 69669

  17. 76 FR 36373 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... confluence with Cedar Oglesby, City of Ottawa, Creek. City of Peru, Unincorporated Areas of La Salle County..., Ottawa, IL 61350. City of Peru Maps are available for inspection at City Hall, 1727 4th Street, Peru, IL... available for inspection at 220 Clay Street, Cedar Falls, IA 50613. City of Dunkerton [[Page 36379

  18. 75 FR 11468 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... feet +44 upstream of Wolf Ridge Road. Gum Tree Branch Approximately 100 feet +25 City of Prichard... Approximately 2,600 feet +153 Unincorporated Areas of upstream of Snow Road. Mobile County. Approximately 12,420 feet +183 upstream of Snow Road. Unnamed Branch Approximately 100 feet +88 City of Prichard. downstream...

  19. 77 FR 21485 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ..., Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad. Clear Creek At the confluence with + 1180 City of Clear Lake... City of Mason City, upstream of Chicago, Unincorporated Areas of Milwaukee, St. Paul and Cerro Gordo... at the Chariton County Courthouse, 306 South Cherry Street, Keytesville, MO 65261. Village of Dalton...

  20. 76 FR 50920 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... Butternut Lake Entire shoreline......... + 1216 Unincorporated Areas of Polk County, Village of Luck. Clam............ + 1210 Unincorporated Areas of Polk County, Village of Luck. Sand Lake Entire shoreline......... + 1124... Village Hall, 404 Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. Village of Luck Maps are available for inspection at...

  1. 76 FR 43923 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... Approximately 30 feet downstream of I-64 +22 *National Geodetic Vertical Datum. +North American Vertical Datum... Center Street. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above... +864 upstream of Wallace Street. Moon and Hamilton County Drain......... At the Detention Area F +861...

  2. 76 FR 76060 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... Illinois Route 34. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above... Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. [caret] Mean Sea Level..., Michigan (All Jurisdictions) Docket No.: FEMA-B-1089 Alward Drain At the confluence with +615 Charter...

  3. 77 FR 45262 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ..., 450 Bastion Road, Halifax, PA 17032. Township of Lower Paxton Maps are available for inspection at the... downstream side of +609 Borough of Tunkhannock, the railroad bridge. Township of Tunkhannock. Approximately 0.7 mile +655 upstream of Bridge Street. Tributary No. 1 to Swale Brook......... At the Swale Brook...

  4. 75 FR 23600 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... feet +571 upstream of the confluence with Millers Creek. Dale Hollow Lake (Wolf River) At the... upstream of the confluence with Spring Creek. Lake Cumberland Just upstream of the Wolf +760 Unincorporated...

  5. 75 FR 8814 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... Approximately 118 feet +190 City of Hattiesburg. downstream of Spring Hill Drive. Approximately 1,460 feet +208... 1.280 mile upstream of Hollow Road. Approximately 1.288 mile +1204 upstream of Hollow Road. Tully...

  6. 77 FR 66555 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ... Jefferson City. confluence. Approximately 80 feet +606 upstream of Mesa Avenue. Frog Hollow Tributary At the... the confluence with Newport Creek. Spring Run Approximately 110 feet +576 Borough of Ashley. upstream...

  7. 78 FR 6745 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ...,250 feet +635 upstream of Spring Mountain Lane. Cranberry Creek at Paradise At the upstream side of +715 Township of Paradise. Browns Hill Road. Approximately 200 feet +1092 upstream of Snowbird Lane..., Schoonover Municipal Building, 25 Municipal Drive, East Stroudsburg, PA 18301. Township of Paradise Maps are...

  8. 75 FR 78617 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    .... Rockport Creek Approximately 2,300 feet +260 Unincorporated Areas of downstream of Martin Hot Spring County. Luther King Boulevard. Approximately 1,300 feet +263 downstream of Martin Luther King Boulevard. Town...

  9. 76 FR 10253 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Room 310, Evansville, IN 47708. Marion County, Kansas, and Incorporated... at the Evansville Civic Center Complex, Building Commission Department, 1 Northwest Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Room 310, Evansville, IN 47708. Unincorporated Areas of Vanderburgh County Maps are...

  10. 77 FR 66737 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... confluence. Williamsburg County. Approximately 0.9 mile +33 upstream of Hemingway Highway. Boggy Swamp B... Town of Hemingway, confluence. Unincorporated Areas of Williamsburg County. Approximately 0.3 mile +50... Unincorporated Areas of confluence. Williamsburg County. Approximately 1.3 miles +35 upstream of Hemingway...

  11. 75 FR 14091 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... approximately 0.65 mile Rock Island County, City upstream of the Mercer/ of East Moline, City of Rock Island county Moline, City of Rock boundary and 1.7 mile Island, Village of downstream of the Andalusia, Village... Byron, Village of Rapids City. The Whitside/Rock Island + 588 county boundary (River Mile 512.25...

  12. 75 FR 59634 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... Courthouse, 100 East Springfield Street, Virginia, IL 62691. Adams County, Indiana, and Incorporated Areas... Unnamed Stream off of Turkey Creek..... At the confluence with +329 City of Henderson. Turkey Creek.... ADDRESSES City of Henderson Maps are available for inspection at City Hall, 400 West Main Street, Henderson...

  13. 77 FR 19112 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Township of Lima, River. Township of Scio, Township of Webster, Village of Dexter. Just upstream of North... Webster Maps are available for inspection at 5665 Webster Church Road, Dexter, MI 48130. Village of Barton... Dexter Maps are available for inspection at 6880 Dexter-Pinckney Road, Dexter, MI 48130. Meeker County...

  14. 77 FR 41323 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... upstream of Westbrook Loop. Shaw Creek-Wide Hollow Creek Walmart At the Wide Hollow Creek +1151 City of...-Wide Hollow Creek Walmart At the Wide Hollow Creek +1149 City of Yakima. Overflow 2. confluence...

  15. 76 FR 29656 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ..., Unincorporated Areas of Canyon County. Just upstream of Lone +2450 Tree Lane/Ustick Road. Renshaw Canal Just... with +632 Unincorporated Areas of Kentucky River). Cow Creek to Estill County. approximately 0.7 mile... of Clearcreek Road. Cow Creek (backwater effects from From the confluence with +632 Unincorporated...

  16. 78 FR 9831 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... downstream of Nahunta Greene County. Road. Approximately 0.4 mile +75 upstream of Apple Tree Road. Bear Creek... upstream of Beaman Old Creek Road. Cow Branch At the Nahunta Swamp +60 Unincorporated Areas of confluence. Greene County. Approximately 2.1 miles +114 upstream of Cow Branch Road. [[Page 9839

  17. 77 FR 66785 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 67 [Docket ID FEMA... Elevation Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Proposed rule; correction... sources: Acadiana Coulee, Anselm Coulee, Bayou Carencro, Bayou Parc Perdue, Bayou Queue De Tortue, Beau...

  18. 77 FR 66788 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... Town of Clarkstown. Old Mill Road. Approximately 600 feet +150 +151 downstream of Rockland Lake. Golf..., Orangetown/Town of Town of Orangetown. Clarkstown corporate limit. At the downstream side +67 +66 of Old Mill... and modified elevations, and communities affected for Rockland County, New York (All Jurisdictions...

  19. NOAA predicts moderate flood potential in Midwest, elevated risk of ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    March 20, 2014 U.S. Spring Flood Risk Map for 2014. U.S. Spring Flood Risk Map for 2014. (Credit: NOAA moderate flood potential in Midwest, elevated risk of ice jams; California and Southwest stuck with drought minor or moderate risk of exceeding flood levels this spring with the highest threat in the southern

  20. 46 CFR 174.080 - Flooding on self-elevating and surface type units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flooding on self-elevating and surface type units. 174... Drilling Units § 174.080 Flooding on self-elevating and surface type units. (a) On a surface type unit or... superstructure deck where superstructures are fitted must be assumed to be subject to simultaneous flooding. (b...

  1. 78 FR 28780 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Beaver County, Pennsylvania (All Jurisdictions)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ...-2013-0002; Internal Agency Docket No. FEMA-B-1147] Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Beaver... proposed rule concerning proposed flood elevation determinations for Beaver County, Pennsylvania (All... Beaver County, Pennsylvania. Because FEMA has or will be issuing a Revised Preliminary Flood Insurance...

  2. 78 FR 78808 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Pierce County, Washington, and Incorporated Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ...-2013-0002; Internal Agency Docket No. FEMA-B-7748] Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Pierce... proposed rule concerning proposed flood elevation determinations for Pierce County, Washington, and... sources in Pierce County, Washington. On April 16, 2012, FEMA published a proposed rulemaking at 77 FR...

  3. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) - Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM), Published in 2011, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Polk County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset current as of 2011. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) - Flood Insurance Rate...

  4. 78 FR 28779 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Armstrong County, Pennsylvania (All Jurisdictions)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... Armstrong County, Pennsylvania (All Jurisdictions) AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION... proposed rule concerning proposed flood elevation determinations for Armstrong County, Pennsylvania (All... sources in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. Because FEMA has or [[Page 28780

  5. Productivity responses of Acer rubrum and Taxodium distichum seedlings to elevated CO2 and flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, C.D.; Megonigal, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    Elevated levels of atmospheric CO2 are expected to increase photosynthetic rates of C3 tree species, but it is uncertain whether this will result in an increase in wetland seedling productivity. Separate short-term experiments (12 and 17 weeks) were performed on two wetland tree species, Taxodium distichum and Acer rubrum, to determine if elevated CO2 would influence the biomass responses of seedlings to flooding. T. distichum were grown in replicate glasshouses (n = 2) at CO2 concentrations of 350 or 700 ppm, and A. rubrum were grown in growth chambers at CO2 concentrations of 422 or 722 ppm. Both species were grown from seed. The elevated CO2 treatment was crossed with two water table treatments, flooded and non-flooded. Elevated CO2 increased leaf-level photosynthesis, whole-plant photosynthesis, and trunk diameter of T. distichum in both flooding treatments, but did not increase biomass of T. distichum or A. rubrum. Flooding severely reduced biomass, height, and leaf area of both T. distichum and A. rubrum. Our results suggest that the absence of a CO2-induced increase in growth may have been due to an O2 limitation on root production even though there was a relatively deep (??? 10 cm) aerobic soil surface in the non-flooded treatment. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 44 CFR 65.5 - Revision to special hazard area boundaries with no change to base flood elevation determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... zones and floodways) it may be feasible to elevate areas with engineered earthen fill above the base... area boundaries with no change to base flood elevation determinations. 65.5 Section 65.5 Emergency... § 65.5 Revision to special hazard area boundaries with no change to base flood elevation determinations...

  7. Towards the optimal fusion of high-resolution Digital Elevation Models for detailed urban flood assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, J. P.; de Sousa, L. M.

    2018-06-01

    Newly available, more detailed and accurate elevation data sets, such as Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) generated on the basis of imagery from terrestrial LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) systems or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), can be used to improve flood-model input data and consequently increase the accuracy of the flood modelling results. This paper presents the first application of the MBlend merging method and assesses the impact of combining different DEMs on flood modelling results. It was demonstrated that different raster merging methods can have different and substantial impacts on these results. In addition to the influence associated with the method used to merge the original DEMs, the magnitude of the impact also depends on (i) the systematic horizontal and vertical differences of the DEMs, and (ii) the orientation between the DEM boundary and the terrain slope. The greater water depth and flow velocity differences between the flood modelling results obtained using the reference DEM and the merged DEMs ranged from -9.845 to 0.002 m, and from 0.003 to 0.024 m s-1 respectively; these differences can have a significant impact on flood hazard estimates. In most of the cases investigated in this study, the differences from the reference DEM results were smaller for the MBlend method than for the results of the two conventional methods. This study highlighted the importance of DEM merging when conducting flood modelling and provided hints on the best DEM merging methods to use.

  8. 75 FR 29211 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ..., Regulatory Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order 13132, Federalism. This final rule involves no...-0320P). 21, 2009; Rock Kaumo, Mayor, City of Springs Daily Rock Springs, 212 D Rocket[dash]Miner. Street...

  9. FINAL DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, GREENWOOD COUNTY, SC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  10. Comparing the Performance of Commonly Available Digital Elevation Models in GIS-based Flood Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybanez, R. L.; Lagmay, A. M. A.; David, C. P.

    2016-12-01

    With climatological hazards increasing globally, the Philippines is listed as one of the most vulnerable countries in the world due to its location in the Western Pacific. Flood hazards mapping and modelling is one of the responses by local government and research institutions to help prepare for and mitigate the effects of flood hazards that constantly threaten towns and cities in floodplains during the 6-month rainy season. Available digital elevation maps, which serve as the most important dataset used in 2D flood modelling, are limited in the Philippines and testing is needed to determine which of the few would work best for flood hazards mapping and modelling. Two-dimensional GIS-based flood modelling with the flood-routing software FLO-2D was conducted using three different available DEMs from the ASTER GDEM, the SRTM GDEM, and the locally available IfSAR DTM. All other parameters kept uniform, such as resolution, soil parameters, rainfall amount, and surface roughness, the three models were run over a 129-sq. kilometer watershed with only the basemap varying. The output flood hazard maps were compared on the basis of their flood distribution, extent, and depth. The ASTER and SRTM GDEMs contained too much error and noise which manifested as dissipated and dissolved hazard areas in the lower watershed where clearly delineated flood hazards should be present. Noise on the two datasets are clearly visible as erratic mounds in the floodplain. The dataset which produced the only feasible flood hazard map is the IfSAR DTM which delineates flood hazard areas clearly and properly. Despite the use of ASTER and SRTM with their published resolution and accuracy, their use in GIS-based flood modelling would be unreliable. Although not as accessible, only IfSAR or better datasets should be used for creating secondary products from these base DEM datasets. For developing countries which are most prone to hazards, but with limited choices for basemaps used in hazards

  11. The Importance of Precise Digital Elevation Models (DEM) in Modelling Floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Gokben; Akyurek, Zuhal

    2016-04-01

    Digital elevation Models (DEM) are important inputs for topography for the accurate modelling of floodplain hydrodynamics. Floodplains have a key role as natural retarding pools which attenuate flood waves and suppress flood peaks. GPS, LIDAR and bathymetric surveys are well known surveying methods to acquire topographic data. It is not only time consuming and expensive to obtain topographic data through surveying but also sometimes impossible for remote areas. In this study it is aimed to present the importance of accurate modelling of topography for flood modelling. The flood modelling for Samsun-Terme in Blacksea region of Turkey is done. One of the DEM is obtained from the point observations retrieved from 1/5000 scaled orthophotos and 1/1000 scaled point elevation data from field surveys at x-sections. The river banks are corrected by using the orthophotos and elevation values. This DEM is named as scaled DEM. The other DEM is obtained from bathymetric surveys. 296 538 number of points and the left/right bank slopes were used to construct the DEM having 1 m spatial resolution and this DEM is named as base DEM. Two DEMs were compared by using 27 x-sections. The maximum difference at thalweg of the river bed is 2m and the minimum difference is 20 cm between two DEMs. The channel conveyance capacity in base DEM is larger than the one in scaled DEM and floodplain is modelled in detail in base DEM. MIKE21 with flexible grid is used in 2- dimensional shallow water flow modelling. The model by using two DEMs were calibrated for a flood event (July 9, 2012). The roughness is considered as the calibration parameter. From comparison of input hydrograph at the upstream of the river and output hydrograph at the downstream of the river, the attenuation is obtained as 91% and 84% for the base DEM and scaled DEM, respectively. The time lag in hydrographs does not show any difference for two DEMs and it is obtained as 3 hours. Maximum flood extents differ for the two DEMs

  12. Analysis the Accuracy of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) for Flood Modelling on Lowland Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainol Abidin, Ku Hasna Zainurin Ku; Razi, Mohd Adib Mohammad; Bukari, Saifullizan Mohd

    2018-04-01

    Flood is one type of natural disaster that occurs almost every year in Malaysia. Commonly the lowland areas are the worst affected areas. This kind of disaster is controllable by using an accurate data for proposing any kinds of solutions. Elevation data is one of the data used to produce solutions for flooding. Currently, the research about the application of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) in hydrology was increased where this kind of model will identify the elevation for required areas. University of Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia is one of the lowland areas which facing flood problems on 2006. Therefore, this area was chosen in order to produce DEM which focussed on University Health Centre (PKU) and drainage area around Civil and Environment Faculty (FKAAS). Unmanned Aerial Vehicle used to collect aerial photos data then undergoes a process of generating DEM according to three types of accuracy and quality from Agisoft PhotoScan software. The higher the level of accuracy and quality of DEM produced, the longer time taken to generate a DEM. The reading of the errors created while producing the DEM shows almost 0.01 different. Therefore, it has been identified there are some important parameters which influenced the accuracy of DEM.

  13. Predicted high-water elevations for selected flood events at the Albert Pike Recreation Area, Ouachita National Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.A. Marion

    2012-01-01

    The hydraulic characteristics are determined for the June 11, 2010, flood on the Little Missouri River at the Albert Pike Recreation Area in Arkansas. These characteristics are then used to predict the high-water elevations for the 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year flood events in the Loop B, C, and D Campgrounds of the recreation area. The peak discharge and related...

  14. FINAL DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, TEXAS COUNTY, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  15. FINAL DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, WOODWARD COUNTY, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  16. Development of cost-effective surfactant flooding technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1996-11-01

    Task 1 of this research was the development of a high-resolution, fully implicit, finite-difference, multiphase, multicomponent, compositional simulator for chemical flooding. The major physical phenomena modeled in this simulator are dispersion, heterogeneous permeability and porosity, adsorption, interfacial tension, relative permeability and capillary desaturation, compositional phase viscosity, compositional phase density and gravity effects, capillary pressure, and aqueous-oleic-microemulsion phase behavior. Polymer and its non-Newtonian rheology properties include shear-thinning viscosity, permeability reduction, inaccessible pore volume, and adsorption. Options of constant or variable space grids and time steps, constant-pressure or constant-rate well conditions, horizontal and vertical wells, and multiple slug injections are also available in the simulator. The solution scheme used in this simulator is fully implicit. The pressure equation and the mass-conservation equations are solved simultaneously for the aqueous-phase pressure and the total concentrations of each component. A third-order-in-space, second-order-in-time finite-difference method and a new total-variation-diminishing (TVD) third-order flux limiter are used that greatly reduce numerical dispersion effects. Task 2 was the optimization of surfactant flooding. The code UTCHEM was used to simulate surfactant polymer flooding.

  17. Floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floods are common in the United States. Weather such as heavy rain, thunderstorms, hurricanes, or tsunamis can ... is breached, or when a dam breaks. Flash floods, which can develop quickly, often have a dangerous ...

  18. Merging LIDAR digital terrain model with direct observed elevation points for urban flood numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Chiara; Campo, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    In last years, the concern about the economical and lives loss due to urban floods has grown hand in hand with the numerical skills in simulating such events. The large amount of computational power needed in order to address the problem (simulating a flood in a complex terrain such as a medium-large city) is only one of the issues. Among them it is possible to consider the general lack of exhaustive observations during the event (exact extension, dynamic, water level reached in different parts of the involved area), needed for calibration and validation of the model, the need of considering the sewers effects, and the availability of a correct and precise description of the geometry of the problem. In large cities the topographic surveys are in general available with a number of points, but a complete hydraulic simulation needs a detailed description of the terrain on the whole computational domain. LIDAR surveys can achieve this goal, providing a comprehensive description of the terrain, although they often lack precision. In this work an optimal merging of these two sources of geometrical information, measured elevation points and LIDAR survey, is proposed, by taking into account the error variance of both. The procedure is applied to a flood-prone city over an area of 35 square km approximately starting with a DTM from LIDAR with a spatial resolution of 1 m, and 13000 measured points. The spatial pattern of the error (LIDAR vs points) is analysed, and the merging method is tested with a series of Jackknife procedures that take into account different densities of the available points. A discussion of the results is provided.

  19. The influence of digital elevation model resolution on overland flow networks for modelling urban pluvial flooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, J P; Boonya-Aroonnet, S; Prodanović, D; Maksimović, C

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the developments towards the next generation of overland flow modelling of urban pluvial flooding. Using a detailed analysis of the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) the developed GIS tools can automatically generate surface drainage networks which consist of temporary ponds (floodable areas) and flow paths and link them with the underground network through inlets. For different commercially-available Rainfall-Runoff simulation models, the tool will generate the overland flow network needed to model the surface runoff and pluvial flooding accurately. In this paper the emphasis is placed on a sensitivity analysis of ponds and preferential overland flow paths creation. Different DEMs for three areas were considered in order to compare the results obtained. The DEMs considered were generated using different acquisition techniques and hence represent terrain with varying levels of resolution and accuracy. The results show that DEMs can be used to generate surface flow networks reliably. As expected, the quality of the surface network generated is highly dependent on the quality and resolution of the DEMs and successful representation of buildings and streets.

  20. Morphological Analyses and Simulated Flood Elevations in a Watershed with Dredged and Leveed Stream Channels, Wheeling Creek, Eastern Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, James M.; Huitger, Carrie A.; Ebner, Andrew D.; Koltun, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    The USGS, in cooperation with the Ohio Emergency Management Agency, conducted a study in the Wheeling Creek Basin to (1) evaluate and contrast land-cover characteristics from 2001 with characteristics from 1979 and 1992; (2) compare current streambed elevation, slope, and geometry with conditions present in the late 1980s; (3) look for evidence of channel filling and over widening in selected undredged reaches; (4) estimate flood elevations for existing conditions in both undredged and previously dredged reaches; (5) evaluate the height of the levees required to contain floods with selected recurrence intervals in previously dredged reaches; and (6) estimate flood elevations for several hypothetical dredging and streambed aggradation scenarios in undredged reaches. The amount of barren land in the Wheeling Creek watershed has decreased from 20 to 1 percent of the basin area based on land-cover characteristics from 1979 and 2001. Barren lands appear to have been converted primarily to pasture, presumably as a result of surface-mine reclamation. Croplands also decreased from 13 to 8 percent of the basin area. The combined decrease in barren lands and croplands is approximately offset by the increase in pasture. Stream-channel surveys conducted in 1987 and again in 2006 at 21 sites in four previously dredged reaches of Wheeling Creek indicate little change in the elevation, slope, and geometry of the channel at most sites. The mean change in width-averaged bed and thalweg elevations for the 21 cross sections was 0.1 feet. Bankfull widths, mean depths, and cross-sectional areas measured at 12 sites in undredged reaches were compared to estimates determined from regional equations. The mean percentage difference between measured and estimated bankfull widths was -0.2 percent, suggesting that bankfull widths in the Wheeling Creek Basin are generally about the same as regional averages for undisturbed basins of identical drainage area. For bankfull mean depth and cross

  1. Inundation Analysis of Reservoir Flood Based on Computer Aided Design (CAD and Digital Elevation Model (DEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiqing Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available GIS (Geographic Information System can be used to combine multiple hydrologic data and geographic data for FIA (Flood Impact Assessment. For a developing country like China, a lot of geographic data is in the CAD (Computer Aided Design format. The commonly used method for converting CAD into DEM may result in data loss. This paper introduces a solution for the conversion between CAD data and DEM data. The method has been applied to the FIA based on the topographic map of CAD in Hanjiang River. When compared with the other method, the new method solves the data loss problem. Besides, the paper use GIS to simulate the inundation range, area, and the depth distribution of flood backwater. Based on the analysis, the author concludes: (1 the differences of the inundation areas between the flood of HQ100 and the flood of HQ50 are small. (2 The inundation depth shows a decreasing trend along the upstream of the river. (3 The inundation area less than 4 m in flood of HQ50 is larger than that in flood of HQ100, the result is opposite when the inundation depth is greater than 4 m. (4 The flood loss is 392.32 million RMB for flood of HQ50 and 610.02 million RMB for flood of HQ100. The method can be applied to FIA.

  2. Congeneration feasibility: Otis Elevator Company and Polychrome Corporation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, H.

    1982-05-01

    This report summarizes an investigation of the technical and economic feasibility of cogenerating electric and thermal power at two manufacturing plants (Otis Elevator Company and Polychrome Corporation) located on neighboring properties in Yonkers, NY. Existing electrical- and steam-producing equipment and energy consumption date are summarized. Alternative cases examined include electrical energy generation, electrical energy generation with waste heat recovery and a combined cycle case. Also reported are life cycle cost economic evaluations including simple payback period and return-on-investment indices. While it was concluded that cogeneration of heat and electricity at these industrial plant sites would not be economically viable, this detailed study provides valuable insight into the types of problems encountered when considering cogeneration feasibility.

  3. Cogeneration feasibility: Otis Elevator Company and Polychrome Corporation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of cogeneration at Otis Elevator Company and Polychrome Corporation located in Westchester County, New York. Each plant and its associated thermal and electrical load is reviewed. Three basic cycles for the cogeneration are investigated: power only, power generation with waste heat recovery, and combined cycle. Each case was assessed economically, beginning with a screening method to suggest those configurations most likely to be implemented and continuing through an assessment of the regulatory environment for cogeneration and an analysis of rate structures for buy back power, displaced power, and supplementing service. It is concluded that: for a plant designed to supply the combined loads of the two corporations, interconnection costs coupled to the coincidence of load result in unfavorable economics; for separate cogeneration plants, owned and operated by each individual corporation, energy consumption patterns and the current regulatory environment, in particular the existing and proposed cogeneration system rate structures, do not permit viable economics for the proposed plants; but if the proposed cycle were owned and operated by a new entity (neither Otis/Polychrome nor the utility), an economic scheme with marginal financial benefits can be developed and may be worthy of further study. (LEW)

  4. Updating flood maps efficiently using existing hydraulic models, very-high-accuracy elevation data, and a geographic information system; a pilot study on the Nisqually River, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Joseph L.; Haluska, Tana L.; Kresch, David L.

    2001-01-01

    A method of updating flood inundation maps at a fraction of the expense of using traditional methods was piloted in Washington State as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Urban Geologic and Hydrologic Hazards Initiative. Large savings in expense may be achieved by building upon previous Flood Insurance Studies and automating the process of flood delineation with a Geographic Information System (GIS); increases in accuracy and detail result from the use of very-high-accuracy elevation data and automated delineation; and the resulting digital data sets contain valuable ancillary information such as flood depth, as well as greatly facilitating map storage and utility. The method consists of creating stage-discharge relations from the archived output of the existing hydraulic model, using these relations to create updated flood stages for recalculated flood discharges, and using a GIS to automate the map generation process. Many of the effective flood maps were created in the late 1970?s and early 1980?s, and suffer from a number of well recognized deficiencies such as out-of-date or inaccurate estimates of discharges for selected recurrence intervals, changes in basin characteristics, and relatively low quality elevation data used for flood delineation. FEMA estimates that 45 percent of effective maps are over 10 years old (FEMA, 1997). Consequently, Congress has mandated the updating and periodic review of existing maps, which have cost the Nation almost 3 billion (1997) dollars. The need to update maps and the cost of doing so were the primary motivations for piloting a more cost-effective and efficient updating method. New technologies such as Geographic Information Systems and LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) elevation mapping are key to improving the efficiency of flood map updating, but they also improve the accuracy, detail, and usefulness of the resulting digital flood maps. GISs produce digital maps without manual estimation of inundated areas between

  5. Final DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, RANDOLPH COUNTY, ILLINOIS USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  6. Final DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, McLean County, ILLINOIS USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  7. Final Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map Database, Lubbock County, TX, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  8. FINAL DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, SAN DIEGO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA (AND INCORPORATED AREAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  9. Effects of selected thermophilic microorganisms on crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1995-07-01

    During the past several years, a considerable amount of work has been carried out showing that microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is promising and the resulting biotechnology may be deliverable. At the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), systematic studies have been conducted which dealt with the effects of thermophilic and thermoadapted bacteria on the chemical and physical properties of selected types of crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Particular attention was paid to heavy crude oils from Venezuela, California, Alabama, Arkansas, Wyoming, Alaska, and other oil producing areas. Current studies indicate that during the biotreatment several chemical and physical properties of crude oils are affected. The oils are (1) emulsified; (2) acidified; (3) there is a qualitative and quantitative change in light and heavy fractions of the crudes; (4) there are chemical changes in fractions containing sulfur compounds; (5) there is an apparent reduction in the concentration of trace metals; (6) the qualitative and quantitative changes appear to be microbial species dependent; and (7) there is a distinction between {open_quotes}biodegraded{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}biotreated{close_quotes} oils. Preliminary results indicate the introduced microorganisms may become the dominant species in the bioconversion of oils. These studies also indicate the biochemical interactions between crude oils and microorganisms follow distinct trends, characterized by a group of chemical markers. Core-flooding experiments have shown significant additional crude oil recoveries are achievable with thermophilic microorganisms at elevated temperatures similar to those found in oil reservoirs. In addition, the biochemical treatment of crude oils has technological applications in downstream processing of crude oils such as in upgrading of low grade oils and the production of hydrocarbon based detergents.

  10. Swiss Re Global Flood Hazard Zones: Know your flood risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinukollu, R. K.; Castaldi, A.; Mehlhorn, J.

    2012-12-01

    Floods, among all natural disasters, have a great damage potential. On a global basis, there is strong evidence of increase in the number of people affected and economic losses due to floods. For example, global insured flood losses have increased by 12% every year since 1970 and this is expected to further increase with growing exposure in the high risk areas close to rivers and coastlines. Recently, the insurance industry has been surprised by the large extent of losses, because most countries lack reliable hazard information. One example has been the 2011 Thailand floods where millions of people were affected and the total economic losses were 30 billion USD. In order to assess the flood risk across different regions and countries, the flood team at Swiss Re based on a Geomorphologic Regression approach, developed in house and patented, produced global maps of flood zones. Input data for the study was obtained from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) elevation data, Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) and HydroSHEDS. The underlying assumptions of the approach are that naturally flowing rivers shape their channel and flood plain according to basin inherent forces and characteristics and that the flood water extent strongly depends on the shape of the flood plain. On the basis of the catchment characteristics, the model finally calculates the probability of a location to be flooded or not for a defined return period, which in the current study was set to 100 years. The data is produced at a 90-m resolution for latitudes 60S to 60N. This global product is now used in the insurance industry to inspect, inform and/or insure the flood risk across the world.

  11. FINAL DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, PONTOTOC COUNTY, OKLAHOMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  12. 75 FR 18238 - United States Section; Final Environmental Impact Statement, Flood Control Improvements and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... engineering alternatives for long-term improvement of the Presidio FCP flood containment capacity. The EIS... Federal Register on February 26, 2010 for a 30-day wait period. Finding: Based on engineering, economic... existing levee and provide protection to the City of Presidio and adjacent agricultural areas from a 25...

  13. Simulated and observed 2010 flood-water elevations in selected river reaches in the Moshassuck and Woonasquatucket River Basins, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Straub, David E.; Westenbroek, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy persistent rains from late February through March 2010 caused severe flooding and set, or nearly set, peaks of record for streamflows and water levels at many long-term U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in Rhode Island. In response to this flood, hydraulic models were updated for selected reaches covering about 33 river miles in Moshassuck and Woonasquatucket River Basins from the most recent approved Federal Emergency Management Agency flood insurance study (FIS) to simulate water-surface elevations (WSEs) from specified flows and boundary conditions. Reaches modeled include the main stem of the Moshassuck River and its main tributary, the West River, and three tributaries to the West River—Upper Canada Brook, Lincoln Downs Brook, and East Branch West River; and the main stem of the Woonasquatucket River. All the hydraulic models were updated to Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) version 4.1.0 and incorporate new field-survey data at structures, high-resolution land-surface elevation data, and flood flows from a related study. The models were used to simulate steady-state WSEs at the 1- and 2-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flows, which is the estimated AEP of the 2010 flood in the Moshassuck River Basin and the Woonasquatucket River, respectively. The simulated WSEs were compared to the high-water mark (HWM) elevation data obtained in these basins in a related study following the March–April 2010 flood, which included 18 HWMs along the Moshassuck River and 45 HWMs along the Woonasquatucket River. Differences between the 2010 HWMs and the simulated 2- and 1-percent AEP WSEs from the FISs and the updated models developed in this study varied along the reach. Most differences could be attributed to the magnitude of the 2- and 1-percent AEP flows used in the FIS and updated model flows. Overall, the updated model and the FIS WSEs were not appreciably different when compared to the observed 2010 HWMs along the

  14. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix E: Flood control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The Corps of Engineers, Bonneville Power Administration, and Bureau of Reclamation conducted a scoping process consisting of a series of regionwide public meetings and solicitation of written comments in the summer of 1990. Comments on flood control issues were received from all parts of the Columbia river basin. This appendix includes issues raised in the public scoping process, as well as those brought for consideration by members of the Flood Control Work Group

  15. Impact of Aluminum on Anticipated Corrosion in a Flooded SNF Multi Canister Overpack (MCO); FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    Corrosion reactions in a flooded MCO are examined to determine the impact of aluminum corrosion products (from aluminum basket grids and spacers) on bound water estimates and subsequent fuel/environment reactions during storage. The mass and impact of corrosion products were determined to be insignificant, validating the choice of aluminum as an MCO component and confirming expectations that no changes to the Technical Databook or particulate mass or water content are necessary

  16. Green River Formation Water Flood Demonstration Project: Final report. [October 21, 1992-April, 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deo, M.D. [Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (US); Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D. [Inland Resources, Inc., Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (US); Nielson, D.L.; Lutz, S.J. [Energy and Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City (US)

    1996-11-01

    The objectives were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. Comprehensive reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations of the Monument Butte, Travis and Boundary units were presented in the two published project yearly reports. The primary and the secondary production from the Monument Butte unit were typical of oil production from an undersaturated oil reservoir close to its bubble point. The water flood in the smaller Travis unit appeared affected by natural and possibly by large interconnecting hydraulic fractures. Water flooding the boundary unit was considered more complicated due to the presence of an oil water contact in one of the wells. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter c ore, Formation Micro Imaging logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir characterization efforts identified new reservoirs in the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2000 barrels per day.

  17. Green River Formation Water Flood Demonstration Project: Final report, October 21, 1992-April, 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deo, M.D.; Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D.; Nielson, D.L.; Lutz, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    The objectives were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. Comprehensive reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations of the Monument Butte, Travis and Boundary units were presented in the two published project yearly reports. The primary and the secondary production from the Monument Butte unit were typical of oil production from an undersaturated oil reservoir close to its bubble point. The water flood in the smaller Travis unit appeared affected by natural and possibly by large interconnecting hydraulic fractures. Water flooding the boundary unit was considered more complicated due to the presence of an oil water contact in one of the wells. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter c ore, Formation Micro Imaging logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir characterization efforts identified new reservoirs in the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2000 barrels per day

  18. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Final report 1994--1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasan, D.T.

    1995-12-01

    In this report, the authors present the results of their experimental and theoretical studies in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. The overall objective of this work is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12.0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultralow interfacial tension. In addition, the authors have (1) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, (2) investigated the mechanisms for spontaneous emulsification, (3) developed a technique to monitor low water content in oil, and (4) developed a technique to study water-in-oil emulsion film properties, (5) investigated the effect of surfactant on the equilibrium and transient interfacial tension, (6) investigated the kinetics of oil removal from a silica surface, and (7) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, accounting for added surfactant. The results of the studies conducted during the course of this project are summarized.

  19. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasan, D.T.

    1996-05-01

    In this report, we present the results of our experimental and theoretical studies in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. The overall objective of this work is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12. 0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultralow interfacial tension. In addition, we have (1) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, (2) investigated the mechanisms for spontaneous emulsification, (3) developed a technique to monitor low water content in oil and (4) developed a technique to study water-in-oil emulsion film properties, (5) investigated the effect of surfactant on the equilibrium and transient interfacial tension, (6) investigated the kinetics of oil removal from a silica surface, and (7) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, accounting for added surfactant. The results of the studies conducted during the course of this project are discussed.

  20. Optimization of the resolution of remotely sensed digital elevation model to facilitate the simulation and spatial propagation of flood events in flat areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetsas, Nikolaos; Skoulikaris, Charalampos; Katsogiannos, Fotis; Zalidis, George; Alexandridis, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The use of satellite remote sensing products, such as Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), under specific computational interfaces of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has fostered and facilitated the acquisition of data on specific hydrologic features, such as slope, flow direction and flow accumulation, which are crucial inputs to hydrology or hydraulic models at the river basin scale. However, even though DEMs of different resolution varying from a few km up to 20m are freely available for the European continent, these remotely sensed elevation data are rather coarse in cases where large flat areas are dominant inside a watershed, resulting in an unsatisfactory representation of the terrain characteristics. This scientific work aims at implementing a combing interpolation technique for the amelioration of the analysis of a DEM in order to be used as the input ground model to a hydraulic model for the assessment of potential flood events propagation in plains. More specifically, the second version of the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM2), which has an overall accuracy of around 20 meters, was interpolated with a vast number of aerial control points available from the Hellenic Mapping and Cadastral Organization (HMCO). The uncertainty that was inherent in both the available datasets (ASTER & HMCO) and the appearance of uncorrelated errors and artifacts was minimized by incorporating geostatistical filtering. The resolution of the produced DEM was approximately 10 meters and its validation was conducted with the use of an external dataset of 220 geodetic survey points. The derived DEM was then used as an input to the hydraulic model InfoWorks RS, whose operation is based on the relief characteristics contained in the ground model, for defining, in an automated way, the cross section parameters and simulating the flood spatial distribution. The plain of Serres, which is located in the downstream part of the Struma/Strymon transboundary river basin shared

  1. The catastrophic final flooding of Doggerland by the Storegga Slide tsunami

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Weninger

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Around 8200 calBP, large parts of the now submerged North Sea continental shelf (‘Doggerland’ were catastrophically flooded by the Storegga Slide tsunami, one of the largest tsunamis known for the Holocene, which was generated on the Norwegian coastal margin by a submarine landslide. In the present paper, we derive a precise calendric date for the Storegga Slide tsunami, use this date for reconstruction of contemporary coastlines in the North Sea in relation to rapidly rising sea-levels, and discuss the potential effects of the tsunami on the contemporaneous Mesolithic population. One main result of this study is an unexpectedly high tsunami impact assigned to the western regions of Jutland.

  2. Floods and Flash Flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floods and flash flooding Now is the time to determine your area’s flood risk. If you are not sure whether you ... If you are in a floodplain, consider buying flood insurance. Do not drive around barricades. If your ...

  3. Investigations of processes relevant to final storage before, during and after flooding of the Hope salt mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    Due to the measurement and monitoring program in the partly flooded former Hope salt mine it is possible to obtain considerable new knowledge for the theoretical case of 'access of water or alkaline solution in the post-operation phase' for a final store in a salt deposit. An important part of the Hope research and development project was the selection and testing of suitable measuring equipment, data collection and transmission devices in difficult working conditions. The purpose of this seminar was to introduce the Hope research and development project and the results obtained so far to all the authorities and institutions taking part. 9 lectures recorded separately in data bases were held for this purpose. (orig./PW) [de

  4. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1996-04-01

    Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of gas injection processes are reported. The research examines how the physical mechanisms at work during a gas injection project interact to determine process performance. In particular, the authors examine: the interactions of equilibrium phase behavior and two-phase flow that determine local displacement efficiency and minimum miscibility pressure, the combined effects of viscous fingering, gravity segregation and heterogeneity that control sweep efficiency in 2- and 3-dimensional porous media, the use of streamtube/streamline methods to create very efficient simulation technique for multiphase compositional displacements, the scaling of viscous, capillary and gravity forces for heterogeneous reservoirs, and the effects of the thin films and spreading behavior on three-phase flow. The following key results are documented: rigorous procedures for determination of minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) or minimum miscibility enrichment (MME) for miscibility have been developed for multicomponent systems; the complex dependence of MMP`s for nitrogen/methane floods on oil and injection gas composition observed experimentally is explained for the first time; the presence of layer-like heterogeneities strongly influences the interplay of gravity segregation and viscous fingering, as viscous fingers adapt to preferential flow paths and low permeability layers restrict vertical flow; streamtube/streamline simulation techniques are demonstrated for a variety of injection processes in 2 and 3 dimensions; quantitative scaling estimates for the transitions from capillary-dominated to gravity-dominated to viscous-dominated flows are reported; experimental results are given that demonstrate that high pressure CO{sub 2} can be used to generate low IFT gravity drainage in fractured reservoirs if fractures are suitably connected; and the effect of wetting and spreading behavior on three-phase flow is described. 209 refs.

  5. Flooding and Flood Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, K.N.; Fallon, J.D.; Lorenz, D.L.; Stark, J.R.; Menard, Jason; Easter, K.W.; Perry, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Floods result in great human disasters globally and nationally, causing an average of $4 billion of damages each year in the United States. Minnesota has its share of floods and flood damages, and the state has awarded nearly $278 million to local units of government for flood mitigation projects through its Flood Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. Since 1995, flood mitigation in the Red River Valley has exceeded $146 million. Considerable local and state funding has been provided to manage and mitigate problems of excess stormwater in urban areas, flooding of farmlands, and flood damages at road crossings. The cumulative costs involved with floods and flood mitigation in Minnesota are not known precisely, but it is safe to conclude that flood mitigation is a costly business. This chapter begins with a description of floods in Minneosta to provide examples and contrasts across the state. Background material is presented to provide a basic understanding of floods and flood processes, predication, and management and mitigation. Methods of analyzing and characterizing floods are presented because they affect how we respond to flooding and can influence relevant practices. The understanding and perceptions of floods and flooding commonly differ among those who work in flood forecasting, flood protection, or water resource mamnagement and citizens and businesses affected by floods. These differences can become magnified following a major flood, pointing to the need for better understanding of flooding as well as common language to describe flood risks and the uncertainty associated with determining such risks. Expectations of accurate and timely flood forecasts and our ability to control floods do not always match reality. Striving for clarity is important in formulating policies that can help avoid recurring flood damages and costs.

  6. Medical Devices; Obstetrical and Gynecological Devices; Classification of the Fetal Head Elevator. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-19

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is classifying the fetal head elevator into class II (special controls). The special controls that apply to the device type are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the fetal head elevator's classification. We are taking this action because we have determined that classifying the device into class II (special controls) will provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. We believe this action will also enhance patients' access to beneficial innovative devices, in part by reducing regulatory burdens.

  7. Medical devices; exemption from premarket notification; class II devices; wheelchair elevator. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is publishing an order granting a petition requesting exemption from premarket notification requirements for wheelchair elevator devices commonly known as inclined platform lifts and vertical platform lifts. These devices are used to provide a means for a person with a mobility impairment caused by injury or other disease to move from one level to another, usually in a wheelchair. This order exempts wheelchair elevators, class II devices, from premarket notification and establishes conditions for exemption for this device that will provide a reasonable assurance of the safety and effectiveness of the device without submission of a premarket notification (510(k)). This exemption from 510(k), subject to these conditions, is immediately in effect for wheelchair elevators. All other devices classified under FDA's wheelchair elevator regulations, including attendant-operated stair climbing devices for wheelchairs and portable platform lifts, continue to require submission of 510(k)s. FDA is publishing this order in accordance with the section of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) permitting the exemption of a device from the requirement to submit a 510(k).

  8. Real-time flood extent maps based on social media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilander, Dirk; van Loenen, Arnejan; Roskam, Ruud; Wagemaker, Jurjen

    2015-04-01

    During a flood event it is often difficult to get accurate information about the flood extent and the people affected. This information is very important for disaster risk reduction management and crisis relief organizations. In the post flood phase, information about the flood extent is needed for damage estimation and calibrating hydrodynamic models. Currently, flood extent maps are derived from a few sources such as satellite images, areal images and post-flooding flood marks. However, getting accurate real-time or maximum flood extent maps remains difficult. With the rise of social media, we now have a new source of information with large numbers of observations. In the city of Jakarta, Indonesia, the intensity of unique flood related tweets during a flood event, peaked at 8 tweets per second during floods in early 2014. A fair amount of these tweets also contains observations of water depth and location. Our hypothesis is that based on the large numbers of tweets it is possible to generate real-time flood extent maps. In this study we use tweets from the city of Jakarta, Indonesia, to generate these flood extent maps. The data-mining procedure looks for tweets with a mention of 'banjir', the Bahasa Indonesia word for flood. It then removes modified and retweeted messages in order to keep unique tweets only. Since tweets are not always sent directly from the location of observation, the geotag in the tweets is unreliable. We therefore extract location information using mentions of names of neighborhoods and points of interest. Finally, where encountered, a mention of a length measure is extracted as water depth. These tweets containing a location reference and a water level are considered to be flood observations. The strength of this method is that it can easily be extended to other regions and languages. Based on the intensity of tweets in Jakarta during a flood event we can provide a rough estimate of the flood extent. To provide more accurate flood extend

  9. Preventive maintenance basis: Volume 24 -- Battery -- flooded lead-acid (lead-calcium, lead antimony, plante). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worledge, D.; Hinchcliffe, G.

    1997-12-01

    US nuclear power plants are implementing preventive maintenance (PM) tasks with little documented basis beyond fundamental vendor information to support the tasks or their intervals. The Preventive Maintenance Basis project provides utilities with the technical basis for PM tasks and task intervals associated with 40 specific components such as valves, electric motors, pumps, and HVAC equipment. This document provides a program of preventive maintenance tasks suitable for application to flooded lead-acid batteries. The PM tasks that are recommended provide a cost-effective way to intercept the causes and mechanisms that lead to degradation and failure. They can be used in conjunction with material from other sources, to develop a complete PM program or to improve an existing program. This document provides a program of preventive maintenance (PM) tasks suitable for application to flooded lead-acid batteries. The PM tasks that are recommended provide a cost-effective way to intercept the causes and mechanisms that lead to degradation and failure. They can be used, in conjunction with material from other sources, to develop a complete PM program or to improve an existing program. Users of this information will be utility managers, supervisors, system engineers, craft technicians, and training instructors responsible for developing, optimizing, or fine-tuning PM programs

  10. Elevation data for floodplain mapping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Floodplain Mapping Technologies; National Research Council; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council

    2007-01-01

    .... Elevation Data for Floodplain Mapping shows that there is sufficient two-dimensional base map imagery to meet FEMA's flood map modernization goals, but that the three-dimensional base elevation data...

  11. Exploitation of Documented Historical Floods for Achieving Better Flood Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Kolaković

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Establishing Base Flood Elevation for a stream network corresponding to a big catchment is feasible by interdisciplinary approach, involving stochastic hydrology, river hydraulics, and computer aided simulations. A numerical model calibrated by historical floods has been exploited in this study. The short presentation of the catchment of the Tisza River in this paper is followed by the overview of historical floods which hit the region in the documented period of 130 years. Several well documented historical floods provided opportunity for the calibration of the chosen numerical model. Once established, the model could be used for investigation of different extreme flood scenarios and to establish the Base Flood Elevation. The calibration has shown that the coefficient of friction in case of the Tisza River is dependent both on the actual water level and on the preceding flood events. The effect of flood plain maintenance as well as the activation of six potential detention ponds on flood mitigation has been examined. Furthermore, the expected maximum water levels have also been determined for the case if the ever observed biggest 1888 flood hit the region again. The investigated cases of flood superposition highlighted the impact of tributary Maros on flood mitigation along the Tisza River.

  12. Final infarct size measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction predicts long-term clinical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob Thomsen; Vejlstrup, Niels Grove; Kelbæk, Henning Skov

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: Tailored heart failure treatment and risk assessment in patients following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is mainly based on the assessment of the left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF). Assessment of the final infarct size in addition to the LVEF may improve...

  13. 78 FR 52955 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... community that the Deputy Associate Administrator for Mitigation reconsider the changes. The flood hazard...; Internal Agency Docket No. FEMA-B-1349] Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency... modification of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) boundaries or...

  14. Establishment and Practical Application of Flood Warning Stage in Taiwan's River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng-Hsueh; Chia Yeh, Keh-

    2017-04-01

    In the face of extreme flood events or the possible impact of climate change, non-engineering disaster prevention and early warning work is particularly important. Taiwan is an island topography with more than 3,900 meters of high mountains. The length of the river is less than 100 kilometers. Most of the watershed catchment time is less than 24 hours, which belongs to the river with steep slope and rapid flood. Every year in summer and autumn, several typhoon events invade Taiwan. Typhoons often result in rainfall events in excess of 100 mm/hr or 250 mm/3hr. In the face of Taiwan's terrain and extreme rainfall events, flooding is difficult to avoid. Therefore, most of the river has embankment protection, so that people do not have to face every year flooding caused by economic and life and property losses. However, the river embankment protection is limited. With the increase of the hydrological data, the design criteria for the embankment protection standards in the past was 100 year of flood return period and is now gradually reduced to 25 or 50 year of flood return period. The river authorities are not easy to rise the existing embankment height. The safety of the river embankment in Taiwan is determined by the establishment of the flood warning stage to cope with the possible increase in annual floods and the impact of extreme hydrological events. The flood warning stage is equal to the flood control elevation minus the flood rise rate multiply by the flood early warning time. The control elevation can be the top of the embankment, the design flood level of the river, the embankment gap of the river section, the height of the bridge beam bottom, etc. The flood rise rate is consider the factors such as hydrological stochastic and uncertain rainfall and the effect of flood discharge operation on the flood in the watershed catchment area. The maximum value of the water level difference between the two hours or five hours before the peak value of the analysis

  15. Analysis of Hydrological Sensitivity for Flood Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kumar Sharma

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In order for the Indian government to maximize Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM, the Brahmaputra River has played an important role in the undertaking of the Pilot Basin Study (PBS due to the Brahmaputra River’s annual regional flooding. The selected Kulsi River—a part of Brahmaputra sub-basin—experienced severe floods in 2007 and 2008. In this study, the Rainfall-Runoff-Inundation (RRI hydrological model was used to simulate the recent historical flood in order to understand and improve the integrated flood risk management plan. The ultimate objective was to evaluate the sensitivity of hydrologic simulation using different Digital Elevation Model (DEM resources, coupled with DEM smoothing techniques, with a particular focus on the comparison of river discharge and flood inundation extent. As a result, the sensitivity analysis showed that, among the input parameters, the RRI model is highly sensitive to Manning’s roughness coefficient values for flood plains, followed by the source of the DEM, and then soil depth. After optimizing its parameters, the simulated inundation extent showed that the smoothing filter was more influential than its simulated discharge at the outlet. Finally, the calibrated and validated RRI model simulations agreed well with the observed discharge and the Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS-detected flood extents.

  16. Does an elevated CO2 concentration decrease dark respiration in trees? Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Stephen [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2003-12-31

    Averaged across many previous investigations, doubling the CO2 concentration ([CO2]) has frequently been reported to cause an instantaneous reduction of leaf dark respiration measured as CO2 efflux. No known mechanism accounts for this effect. While four recent studies have shown that the measurement of respiratory CO2 efflux is prone to experimental artifacts that could account for the reported response, papers published since the start of the current research continue to report an instantaneous depression of respiratory CO2 efflux by elevation of [CO2]. Here, these artifacts are avoided by use of a high-resolution dual channel oxygen analyzer within an open gas exchange system to measure respiratory 02 uptake in normal air. Leaf 02 uptake was determined in response to instantaneous elevation of [CO2] in nine contrasting species and to long-term elevation in seven species from four of the DOE-sponsored long-term elevated [CO2] field experiments. Over one thousand separate measurements of respiration failed to reveal any decrease in respiratory 02 uptake with an instantaneous increase in [CO2]. Respiration was found insensitive not only to doubling [CO2], but also to a five-fold increase and to decrease to zero.

  17. Predicting location-specific extreme coastal floods in the future climate by introducing a probabilistic method to calculate maximum elevation of the continuous water mass caused by a combination of water level variations and wind waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijala, Ulpu; Björkqvist, Jan-Victor; Johansson, Milla M.; Pellikka, Havu

    2017-04-01

    Future coastal management continuously strives for more location-exact and precise methods to investigate possible extreme sea level events and to face flooding hazards in the most appropriate way. Evaluating future flooding risks by understanding the behaviour of the joint effect of sea level variations and wind waves is one of the means to make more comprehensive flooding hazard analysis, and may at first seem like a straightforward task to solve. Nevertheless, challenges and limitations such as availability of time series of the sea level and wave height components, the quality of data, significant locational variability of coastal wave height, as well as assumptions to be made depending on the study location, make the task more complicated. In this study, we present a statistical method for combining location-specific probability distributions of water level variations (including local sea level observations and global mean sea level rise) and wave run-up (based on wave buoy measurements). The goal of our method is to obtain a more accurate way to account for the waves when making flooding hazard analysis on the coast compared to the approach of adding a separate fixed wave action height on top of sea level -based flood risk estimates. As a result of our new method, we gain maximum elevation heights with different return periods of the continuous water mass caused by a combination of both phenomena, "the green water". We also introduce a sensitivity analysis to evaluate the properties and functioning of our method. The sensitivity test is based on using theoretical wave distributions representing different alternatives of wave behaviour in relation to sea level variations. As these wave distributions are merged with the sea level distribution, we get information on how the different wave height conditions and shape of the wave height distribution influence the joint results. Our method presented here can be used as an advanced tool to minimize over- and

  18. Data Elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-04-29

    Data Elevator: Efficient Asynchronous Data Movement in Hierarchical Storage Systems Multi-layer storage subsystems, including SSD-based burst buffers and disk-based parallel file systems (PFS), are becoming part of HPC systems. However, software for this storage hierarchy is still in its infancy. Applications may have to explicitly move data among the storage layers. We propose Data Elevator for transparently and efficiently moving data between a burst buffer and a PFS. Users specify the final destination for their data, typically on PFS, Data Elevator intercepts the I/O calls, stages data on burst buffer, and then asynchronously transfers the data to their final destination in the background. This system allows extensive optimizations, such as overlapping read and write operations, choosing I/O modes, and aligning buffer boundaries. In tests with large-scale scientific applications, Data Elevator is as much as 4.2X faster than Cray DataWarp, the start-of-art software for burst buffer, and 4X faster than directly writing to PFS. The Data Elevator library uses HDF5's Virtual Object Layer (VOL) for intercepting parallel I/O calls that write data to PFS. The intercepted calls are redirected to the Data Elevator, which provides a handle to write the file in a faster and intermediate burst buffer system. Once the application finishes writing the data to the burst buffer, the Data Elevator job uses HDF5 to move the data to final destination in an asynchronous manner. Hence, using the Data Elevator library is currently useful for applications that call HDF5 for writing data files. Also, the Data Elevator depends on the HDF5 VOL functionality.

  19. Flood Disaster Mitigation as Revealed by Cawang-Manggarai River Improvement of Ciliwung River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airlangga Mardjono

    2015-06-01

    The final result of this simulation shows that Scenario 3 gives the lowest water surface elevation profile. Scenario 3 is subjected to river normalization, revetment works along the river, and also flood control structure improvement through the additional sluice gate on Manggarai Barrage. This scenario results 167 cm, 163 cm, 172 cm, 179 cm, 167 cm and 171 cm or 17,60%, 17,16%, 18,09%, 18,76%, 17,38% and 17,72% of maximum water level reduction respectively over cross section number S 20 to S 25, for several simulations with 100 year of design discharge. Keywords: Simulation, river improvement, flood water surface elevation.

  20. Scenario-based tsunami risk assessment using a static flooding approach and high-resolution digital elevation data: An example from Muscat in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bastian; Hoffmann, Gösta; Reicherter, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of tsunami risk and vulnerability is essential to establish a well-adapted Multi Hazard Early Warning System, land-use planning and emergency management. As the tsunami risk for the coastline of Oman is still under discussion and remains enigmatic, various scenarios based on historical tsunamis were created. The suggested inundation and run-up heights were projected onto the modern infrastructural setting of the Muscat Capital Area. Furthermore, possible impacts of the worst-case tsunami event for Muscat are discussed. The approved Papathoma Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment Model was used to model the structural vulnerability of the infrastructure for a 2 m tsunami scenario, depicting the 1945 tsunami and a 5 m tsunami in Muscat. Considering structural vulnerability, the results suggest a minor tsunami risk for the 2 m tsunami scenario as the flooding is mainly confined to beaches and wadis. Especially traditional brick buildings, still predominant in numerous rural suburbs, and a prevalently coast-parallel road network lead to an increased tsunami risk. In contrast, the 5 m tsunami scenario reveals extensively inundated areas and with up to 48% of the buildings flooded, and therefore consequently a significantly higher tsunami risk. We expect up to 60000 damaged buildings and up to 380000 residents directly affected in the Muscat Capital Area, accompanied with a significant loss of life and damage to vital infrastructure. The rapid urbanization processes in the Muscat Capital Area, predominantly in areas along the coast, in combination with infrastructural, demographic and economic growth will additionally increase the tsunami risk and therefore emphasizes the importance of tsunami risk assessment in Oman.

  1. Final Report: Archiving Data to Support Data Synthesis of DOE Sponsored Elevated CO2 Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megonigal, James [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD (United States); Lu, Meng [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD (United States)

    2017-09-05

    Over the last three decades DOE made a large investment in field-scale experiments in order to understand the role of terrestrial ecosystems in the global carbon cycle, and forecast how carbon cycling will change over the next century. The Smithsonian Environmental Research Center received one of the first awards in this program and managed two long-term studies (25 years and 10 years) with a total of approximately $10 million of support from DOE, and many more millions leveraged from the Smithsonian Institution and agencies such as NSF. The present DOE grant was based on the premise that such a large investment demands a proper synthesis effort so that the full potential of these experiments are realized through data analysis and modeling. The goal of the this grant was to archive legacy data from two major elevated carbon dioxide experiments in DOE databases, and to engage in synthesis activities using these data. Both goals were met. All datasets deemed a high priority for data synthesis and modeling were prepared for archiving and analysis. Many of these datasets were deposited in DOE’s CDIAC, while others are being held at the Oak Ridge National Lab and the Smithsonian Institution until they can be received by DOE’s new ESS-DIVE system at Berkeley Lab. Most of the effort was invested in researching and re-constituting high-quality data sets from a 30-year elevated CO2 experiment. Using these data, the grant produced products that are already benefiting climate change science, including the publication of new coastal wetland allometry equations based on 9,771 observations, public posting of dozens of datasets, metadata and supporting codes from long-term experiments at the Global Change Research Wetland, and publication of two synthetic data papers on scrub oak forest responses to elevated CO2. In addition, three papers are in review or nearing submission reporting unexpected long-term patterns in ecosystem responses to elevated CO

  2. A Study on Integrated Community Based Flood Mitigation with Remote Sensing Technique in Kota Bharu, Kelantan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainullotfi, A A; Ibrahim, A L; Masron, T

    2014-01-01

    This study is conducted to establish a community based flood management system that is integrated with remote sensing technique. To understand local knowledge, the demographic of the local society is obtained by using the survey approach. The local authorities are approached first to obtain information regarding the society in the study areas such as the population, the gender and the tabulation of settlement. The information about age, religion, ethnic, occupation, years of experience facing flood in the area, are recorded to understand more on how the local knowledge emerges. Then geographic data is obtained such as rainfall data, land use, land elevation, river discharge data. This information is used to establish a hydrological model of flood in the study area. Analysis were made from the survey approach to understand the pattern of society and how they react to floods while the analysis of geographic data is used to analyse the water extent and damage done by the flood. The final result of this research is to produce a flood mitigation method with a community based framework in the state of Kelantan. With the flood mitigation that involves the community's understanding towards flood also the techniques to forecast heavy rainfall and flood occurrence using remote sensing, it is hope that it could reduce the casualties and damage that might cause to the society and infrastructures in the study area

  3. Impact of elevated CO2 and temperature on soil C and N dynamics in relation to CH4 and N2O emissions from tropical flooded rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, P; Roy, K S; Neogi, S; Dash, P K; Nayak, A K; Mohanty, S; Baig, M J; Sarkar, R K; Rao, K S

    2013-09-01

    A field experiment was carried out to investigate the impact of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) (CEC, 550 μmol mol(-1)) and elevated CO2+elevated air temperature (CECT, 550 μmol mol(-1) and 2°C more than control chamber (CC)) on soil labile carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) pools, microbial populations and enzymatic activities in relation to emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in a flooded alluvial soil planted with rice cv. Naveen in open top chambers (OTCs). The labile soil C pools, namely microbial biomass C, readily mineralizable C, water soluble carbohydrate C and potassium permanganate oxidizable C were increased by 27, 23, 38 and 37% respectively under CEC than CC (ambient CO2, 394 μmol mol(-1)). The total organic carbon (TOC) in root exudates was 28.9% higher under CEC than CC. The labile N fractions were also increased significantly (29%) in CEC than CC. Methanogens and denitrifier populations in rhizosphere were higher under CEC and CECT. As a result, CH4 and N2O-N emissions were enhanced by 26 and 24.6% respectively, under CEC in comparison to open field (UC, ambient CO2, 394 μmol mol(-1)) on seasonal basis. The global warming potential (GWP) was increased by 25% under CEC than CC. However, emissions per unit of grain yield under elevated CO2 and temperature were similar to those observed at ambient CO2. The stimulatory effect on CH4 and N2O emissions under CEC was linked with the increased amount of soil labile C, C rich root exudates, lowered Eh, higher Fe(+2) concentration and increased activities of methanogens and extracellular enzymes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Flood susceptibility analysis through remote sensing, GIS and frequency ratio model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sailesh; Pal, Dilip Kumar; Palsamanta, Babita

    2018-05-01

    Papua New Guinea (PNG) is saddled with frequent natural disasters like earthquake, volcanic eruption, landslide, drought, flood etc. Flood, as a hydrological disaster to humankind's niche brings about a powerful and often sudden, pernicious change in the surface distribution of water on land, while the benevolence of flood manifests in restoring the health of the thalweg from excessive siltation by redistributing the fertile sediments on the riverine floodplains. In respect to social, economic and environmental perspective, flood is one of the most devastating disasters in PNG. This research was conducted to investigate the usefulness of remote sensing, geographic information system and the frequency ratio (FR) for flood susceptibility mapping. FR model was used to handle different independent variables via weighted-based bivariate probability values to generate a plausible flood susceptibility map. This study was conducted in the Markham riverine precinct under Morobe province in PNG. A historical flood inventory database of PNG resource information system (PNGRIS) was used to generate 143 flood locations based on "create fishnet" analysis. 100 (70%) flood sample locations were selected randomly for model building. Ten independent variables, namely land use/land cover, elevation, slope, topographic wetness index, surface runoff, landform, lithology, distance from the main river, soil texture and soil drainage were used into the FR model for flood vulnerability analysis. Finally, the database was developed for areas vulnerable to flood. The result demonstrated a span of FR values ranging from 2.66 (least flood prone) to 19.02 (most flood prone) for the study area. The developed database was reclassified into five (5) flood vulnerability zones segmenting on the FR values, namely very low (less that 5.0), low (5.0-7.5), moderate (7.5-10.0), high (10.0-12.5) and very high susceptibility (more than 12.5). The result indicated that about 19.4% land area as `very high

  5. Entrained-flow gasification at elevated pressure: Volume 1: Final technical report, March 1, 1985-April 30,1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedman, P.O.; Smoot, L.D.; Smith, P.J.; Blackham, A.U.

    1987-10-15

    The general purpose of this research program was to develop a basic understanding of the physical and chemical processes in entrained coal gasification and to use the results to improve and evaluate an entrained gasification computer model. The first task included the collection and analysis of in-situ gasifier data at elevated pressures with three coal types (North Dakota lignite, Wyoming subbituminous and Illinois bituminous), the design, construction, and testing of new coal/oxygen/steam injectors with a fourth coal type (Utah bituminous), the collection of supporting turbulent fluid dynamic (LDV) data from cold-flow studies, and the investigation of the feasibility of using laser-based (CARS) daignostic instruments to make measurements in coal flames. The second task included improvements to the two-dimensional gasifier submodels, tabulation and evaluation of new coal devolatilization and char oxidation data for predictions, fundamental studies of turbulent particle dispersion, the development of improved numerical methods, and validation of the comprehensive model through comparison of predictions with experimental results. The third task was to transfer technical advances to industry and to METC through technical seminars, production of a detailed data book, code placement, and publication of results. Research results for these three tasks are summarized briefly here and presented in detail in the body of the report and in supporting references. 202 refs., 73 figs., 23 tabs.

  6. Final Technical Report: Response of Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and Associated Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oechel, Walter C

    2002-08-15

    This research incorporated an integrated hierarchical approach in space, time, and levels of biological/ecological organization to help understand and predict ecosystem response to elevated CO{sub 2} and concomitant environmental change. The research utilized a number of different approaches, and collaboration of both PER and non-PER investigators to arrive at a comprehensive, integrative understanding. Central to the work were the CO{sub 2}-controlled, ambient Lit, Temperature controlled (CO{sub 2}LT) null-balance chambers originally developed in the arctic tundra, which were re-engineered for the chaparral with treatment CO{sub 2} concentrations of from 250 to 750 ppm CO{sub 2} in 100 ppm increments, replicated twice to allow for a regression analysis. Each chamber was 2 meters on a side and 2 meters tall, which were installed over an individual shrub reprouting after a fire. This manipulation allowed study of the response of native chaparral to varying levels of CO{sub 2}, while regenerating from an experimental burn. Results from these highly-controlled manipulations were compared against Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) manipulations, in an area adjacent to the CO{sub 2}LT null balance greenhouses. These relatively short-term results (5-7 years) were compared to long-term results from Mediterranean-type ecosystems (MTEs) surrounding natural CO{sub 2} springs in northern Italy, near Laiatico, Italy. The springs lack the controlled experimental rigor of our CO{sub 2}LT and FACE manipulation, but provide invaluable validation of our long-term predictions.

  7. Elevating your elevator talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    An important and often overlooked item that every early career researcher needs to do is compose an elevator talk. The elevator talk, named because the talk should not last longer than an average elevator ride (30 to 60 seconds), is an effective method to present your research and yourself in a clea...

  8. Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1996-11-01

    The overall objective of this research was to document current patterns of CO{sub 2} flux in selected locations of the circumpolar arctic, and to develop the information necessary to predict how these fluxes may be affected by climate change. In fulfillment of these objectives, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured at several sites on the North Slope of Alaska during the 1990--94 growing season (June--August) to determine the local and regional patterns of seasonal CO{sub 2} exchange. In addition, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured in the Russian and Icelandic Arctic to determine if the patterns of CO{sub 2} exchange observed in Arctic Alaska were representative of the circumpolar Arctic, while cold-season CO{sub 2} flux measurements were carried out during the 1993--94 winter season to determine the magnitude of CO{sub 2} efflux not accounted for by the growing season measurements. Manipulations of soil water table depth and surface temperature, which were identified from the extensive measurements as being the most important variables in determining the magnitude and direction of net CO{sub 2} exchange, were carried out during the 1993--94 growing seasons in tussock and wet sedge tundra ecosystems. Finally, measurements of CH{sub 4} flux were also measured at several of the North Slope study sites during the 1990--91 growing seasons.

  9. Response of a tundra ecosytem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO2-induced climate change. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1996-11-01

    The overall objective of this research was to document current patterns of CO 2 flux in selected locations of the circumpolar arctic, and to develop the information necessary to predict how these fluxes may be affected by climate change. In fulfillment of these objectives, net CO 2 flux was measured at several sites on the North Slope of Alaska during the 1990-94 growing season (June-August) to determine the local and regional patterns, of seasonal CO 2 exchange. In addition, net CO 2 flux was measured in the Russian and Icelandic Arctic to determine if the patterns of CO 2 exchange observed in Arctic Alaska were representative of the circumpolar arctic, while cold-season CO 2 flux measurements were carried out during the 1993-94 winter season to determine the magnitude of CO 2 efflux not accounted for by the growing season measurements. Manipulations of soil water table depth and surface temperature, which were identified from the extensive measurements as being the most important variables in determining the magnitude and direction of net CO 2 exchange, were carried out during the 1993-94 growing seasons in tussock and wet sedge tundra ecosystems. Finally, measurements of CH 4 flux were also measured at several of the North Slope study sites during the 1990-91 growing seasons. Measurements were made on small (e.g. 0.5 m 2 ) plots using a portable gas-exchange system and cuvette. The sample design allowed frequent measurements of net CO 2 exchange and respiration over diurnal and seasonal cycles, and a large spatial extent that incorporated both locally and regionally diverse tundra surface types. Measurements both within and between ecosystem types typically extended over soil water table depth and temperature gradients, allowing for the indirect analysis of the effects of anticipated climate change scenarios on net CO 2 exchange. In situ experiments provided a direct means for testing hypotheses

  10. Response of a tundra ecosytem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1996-11-01

    The overall objective of this research was to document current patterns of CO{sub 2} flux in selected locations of the circumpolar arctic, and to develop the information necessary to predict how these fluxes may be affected by climate change. In fulfillment of these objectives, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured at several sites on the North Slope of Alaska during the 1990-94 growing season (June-August) to determine the local and regional patterns, of seasonal CO{sub 2} exchange. In addition, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured in the Russian and Icelandic Arctic to determine if the patterns of CO{sub 2} exchange observed in Arctic Alaska were representative of the circumpolar arctic, while cold-season CO{sub 2} flux measurements were carried out during the 1993-94 winter season to determine the magnitude of CO{sub 2} efflux not accounted for by the growing season measurements. Manipulations of soil water table depth and surface temperature, which were identified from the extensive measurements as being the most important variables in determining the magnitude and direction of net CO{sub 2} exchange, were carried out during the 1993-94 growing seasons in tussock and wet sedge tundra ecosystems. Finally, measurements of CH{sub 4} flux were also measured at several of the North Slope study sites during the 1990-91 growing seasons. Measurements were made on small (e.g. 0.5 m{sup 2}) plots using a portable gas-exchange system and cuvette. The sample design allowed frequent measurements of net CO{sub 2} exchange and respiration over diurnal and seasonal cycles, and a large spatial extent that incorporated both locally and regionally diverse tundra surface types. Measurements both within and between ecosystem types typically extended over soil water table depth and temperature gradients, allowing for the indirect analysis of the effects of anticipated climate change scenarios on net CO{sub 2} exchange. In situ experiments provided a direct means for testing hypotheses.

  11. Post Waterflood CO2 Miscible Flood in Light Oil, Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoir (Pre-Work and Project Proposal - Appendix); FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bou-Mikael, Sami

    2002-01-01

    The main objective of the Port Neches Project was to determine the feasibility and producibility of CO2 miscible flooding techniques enhanced with horizontal drilling applied to a Fluvial Dominated Deltaic reservoir. The second was to disseminate the knowledge gained through established Technology Transfer mechanisms to support DOE's programmatic objectives of increasing domestic oil production and reducing abandonment of oil fields

  12. Post Waterflood CO2 Miscible Flood in Light Oil, Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoir (Pre-Work and Project Proposal), Class I; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bou-Mikael, Sami

    2002-01-01

    This project outlines a proposal to improve the recovery of light oil from waterflooded fluvial dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoir through a miscible carbon dioxide (CO2) flood. The site is the Port Neches Field in Orange County, Texas. The field is well explored and well exploited. The project area is 270 acres within the Port Neches Field

  13. 76 FR 62006 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ...,485 None +13 Unincorporated Areas of feet downstream of Clay County. Fern Avenue. Approximately 150... upstream of Reinhold Tree Farm Road. South Prong Double Branch Approximately 0.6 mile None +59...

  14. 76 FR 46705 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... of State Lake County. Route 40. Approximately 2.6 miles +6 +7 upstream of State Route 44. Vista Lake... at 705 West University Avenue, Lafayette, LA 70506. City of Youngsville Maps are available for inspection at 305 Iberia Street, Youngsville, LA 70592. Town of Broussard Maps are available for inspection...

  15. 76 FR 8984 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    .... Lemon Creek Approximately 0.27 mile None [caret]23 City and Borough of downstream of Glacier Juneau... Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. [caret] Mean Lower Low Water. ** BFEs to be changed include the...

  16. 76 FR 70397 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... Branch Road. Salt Lick Branch (backwater effects At the Licking River None +924 Unincorporated Areas of... upstream of West County Road 100 North. Goose Creek At the upstream side of None +591 City of Logansport.... Approximately 355 feet None +901 upstream of Clyde Holliday Cemetery Road. Brushy Fork (backwater effects from...

  17. 75 FR 62048 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... Brown Street, Runnells, IA 50237. Unincorporated Areas of Polk County Maps are available for inspection... Sugar Creek Approximately 250 feet None +1080 Township of Wayne. downstream of U.S. Route 322... Addison. upstream of Robert Brown Road. Approximately 1.25 mile None +1386 upstream of Robert Brown Road...

  18. 76 FR 45485 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... Creek (backwater effects from Tennessee River), McCormick Creek (backwater effects from Ohio River... effects from Tennessee River), Lee Creek (backwater effects from Tennessee River), McCormick Creek... Tennessee River confluence. McCormick Creek (backwater effects From the Cumberland None +343 Unincorporated...

  19. 75 FR 6600 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... Main Street, Lexington, OH 44904. McCormick County, South Carolina, and Incorporated Areas Clark Hill Reservoir/Lake Thurmond.. Entire shoreline None +339 Unincorpo rated Areas (within county). of McCormick... inspection at the County Administrator's Office, 362 Airport Road, McCormick, SC 29835. Unincorporated Areas...

  20. 75 FR 77598 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1167, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal.... Paul, Tributary 12 Peruque Creek. Unincorporated Areas of St. Charles County. Approximately 0.4 mile...

  1. 75 FR 50955 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... community may at any time enact stricter requirements of its own or pursuant to policies established by... terminus of Halcyon Drive. Coffin Brook Just upstream of the None +133 Town of Berwick. confluence with... Brook Tributary 1 Just upstream of the None +141 Town of Berwick. confluence with Coffin Brook. Just...

  2. 76 FR 23528 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... Kill Approximately 1.15 None +276 Town of Princetown. miles downstream of Giffords Church Road. Approximately 1.16 None +292 miles upstream of Giffords Church Road. Poentic Kill At the Mohawk River None +231... Plank Unincorporated Areas Road. of East Baton Rouge Parish. Approximately 500 feet None +101 upstream...

  3. 75 FR 29238 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... City, Cow Creek. City of Richmond, City of Rosenberg, City of Sugar Land, Fort Bend County L.I.D. 2... available for inspection at 402 Morton Street, Richmond, TX 77469. City of Rosenberg Maps are available for inspection at 2110 4th Street, Rosenberg, TX 77471. City of Sugar Land Maps are available for inspection at...

  4. 76 FR 39800 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... Planning and Review. This proposed rule is not a significant regulatory action under the criteria of... Idaho Springs Maps are available for inspection at City Hall, 1711 Miner Street, Idaho Springs, CO 80452.... Town of Macclesfield Maps are available for inspection at the Edgecombe County Planning Department, 201...

  5. 75 FR 60013 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... Planning and Review. This proposed rule is not a significant regulatory action under the criteria of.... Approximately 4.14 None +4953 miles downstream of Tom Miner Creek Road. Yellowstone River East Branch...

  6. 76 FR 70386 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ..., Alabama, and Incorporated Areas Audubon Ditch At the upstream side of +185 +184 City of Montgomery. Norman... available for inspection at 36535 Green Street, New Baltimore, MI 48047. Township of Chesterfield Maps are...

  7. 76 FR 26976 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1193, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal... comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation...

  8. 76 FR 9714 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1170, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation...

  9. 78 FR 14738 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1145, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch... CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering...

  10. 77 FR 51744 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... may submit comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1083, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and...

  11. 76 FR 12665 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1069, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation...

  12. 78 FR 8089 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    .... FEMA-B- 1233, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... (email) [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief... comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation...

  13. 75 FR 75949 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1161, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal... changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and...

  14. 76 FR 8986 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1176, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal... comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation...

  15. 75 FR 78664 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... submit comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1169, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management... INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation...

  16. 76 FR 26981 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    .... ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1175, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief... . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and...

  17. 76 FR 50952 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1210, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal... repository (see below) for exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief...

  18. 77 FR 51743 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management... of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch...

  19. 77 FR 15664 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... submit comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1207, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management... INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering...

  20. 76 FR 13569 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1155, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal...

  1. 76 FR 13571 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch... exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering...

  2. 76 FR 73534 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... submit comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1230, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management... INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal...

  3. 77 FR 50665 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ...-B- 1127, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... (email) [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief... repository (see below) for exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief...

  4. 76 FR 46701 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1207, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal... repository (see below) for exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief...

  5. 77 FR 67324 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1233, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch... CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Mitigation Directorate, Federal Emergency...

  6. 76 FR 26982 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ...- 1021, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... (e- mail) [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief... locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch...

  7. 76 FR 13570 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch... to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Mitigation Directorate, Federal Emergency...

  8. 76 FR 46715 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1101, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal... repository (see below) for exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief...

  9. 76 FR 45215 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1075, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal...: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration... changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and...

  10. 76 FR 61649 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... submit comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1221, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management... INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and...

  11. 75 FR 78647 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1163, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal... below) for exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief...

  12. 76 FR 3590 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B-1171, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal... changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and...

  13. 77 FR 50667 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ...-B- 1104, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... (email) [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief... below) for exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. [[Page 50668

  14. 77 FR 67325 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1229, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch... CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch...

  15. 76 FR 50960 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... Whaley Road. Taylors Branch At the Briery Run +64 +61 City of Kinston, confluence. Unincorporated Areas.... Approximately 0.5 mile None +81 upstream of Stantonsburg Road. Swift Creek Approximately 0.4 mile None +59 City... Areas of Pitt County. Approximately 360 feet None +68 upstream of Thomas Langston Road. Swift Creek...

  16. 75 FR 68738 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... +156 +155 upstream of Taylors Store Road (Secondary Road 1004). Polecat Branch At the confluence with...). Just upstream of U.S. +151 +152 Route 64. Swift Creek Approximately 1.8 miles +90 +88 City of Rocky...

  17. 78 FR 78993 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency [Docket ID FEMA-2013-0002... Insurance Study (FIS) report for each community are available for inspection at both the online location and... effective FIRM and FIS report for each community are accessible online through the FEMA Map Service Center...

  18. 75 FR 29264 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... upstream of the Wake County. confluence with the Little River. At the Wake County +306 +307 boundary. Horse... None +605 upstream of the confluence with School Creek. Salt Creek Approximately 0.60 mile None +557..., Stephenville, TX 76401. Limestone County, Texas, and Incorporated Areas Salt River Just upstream of State None...

  19. 75 FR 55515 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... Road. Township of Hollenback, Township of Rice, Township of Wright. Approximately 535 feet None +1526 upstream of Dale Drive. Black Creek Approximately 910 feet None +1461 Borough of West upstream of Hazleton.... Township of Rice Maps are available for inspection at the Rice Township Building, 3000 Church Road...

  20. 75 FR 78650 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    .... west and south, the William M. Whittington Channel Levee to the east, and the confluence with Silver.... north, west, and south, and the William M. Whittington Canal Levee to the east. Yazoo River (backwater...

  1. 75 FR 23642 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... available for inspection at the Douglas County Courthouse, 401 South Center Street, Tuscola, IL 61953. Mason... of drive approximately Mason County. 230 feet north of north entrance to Linwood Lake Estates Road...: None +471 Unincorporated Areas of Approximately 2,470 Mason County. feet north of County Highway 1/East...

  2. 76 FR 59361 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... Castle Maps are available for inspection at 32535 Bowie Street, White Castle, LA 70788. Le Flore County.... Unincorporated Areas of Le Flore County. At the downstream side None +490 of U.S. Route 59. Caston Creek... City of Poteau, downstream of Kansas Unincorporated Areas City Southern Railroad. of Le Flore County...

  3. 75 FR 59184 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    .... Ponding Area 17 Ponding area bounded by None *51 City of Deltona. Applegate Terrace to the north, East... south. Ponding Area 20 Ponding area bounded by None *51 City of Deltona. Gallagher Avenue to the north... Road to the east. Ponding Area 33 Ponding area bounded by None *51 City of Deltona. Coventry Street to...

  4. 75 FR 29290 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... rule is not a significant regulatory action under the criteria of section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866... the confluence None +829 Unincorporated Areas of from Taylor Fork). with Taylor Fork to Madison County. approximately 1,950 feet upstream of the confluence with Taylor Fork. Otter Creek Approximately 0.7 mile None...

  5. 75 FR 32684 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... feet downstream of Duff Road. West Cane Run (Backwater effects From the confluence None +466 Unincorpor... Building, Leitchfield, KY 42754. Baltimore County, Maryland, and Incorporated Areas Gwynns Falls Just...

  6. 75 FR 29296 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... Tanana An area north of the Tanana +431 +432 Fairbanks-North Star River and Chena River. River levee and... of Old Airport Road and Mitchell Expressway to the west. An area north of the Tanana None +446 River...)....... Approximately 460 feet None +1004 Unincorporated Areas upstream of West Charles of Fayette County. Street. City...

  7. 76 FR 73537 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... Hollow Lane. Ivy Branch (backwater effects from At the downstream side None +683 City of Chelsea, North.... Approximately 469 feet None +683 upstream of County Road 280 (Old Highway 280). Lee Branch Approximately 884... of Shelby County. Approximately 350 feet None +608 upstream of Hugh Daniel Drive. Lee Brook At the...

  8. 75 FR 31347 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... River. Approximately 250 feet +10 +12 upstream of Grace Terrace. Cedar Swamp Creek At the confluence... Jacksonville. Ninemile Creek. Approximately 1,600 None +14 feet upstream of Old Kings Road. Ninemile Creek... Jacksonville. Ninemile Creek. Approximately 2,100 None +22 feet upstream of Old Kings Road. North Fork Sixmile...

  9. 77 FR 51745 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... of downstream of 2nd Street. Cecil County. Approximately 1,136 feet None +11 upstream of Old... of the Chester County boundary. Dogwood Run At the Little Elk Creek +21 +22 Town of Elkton... Creek). downstream of Old Elk Neck Cecil County. Road. Approximately 1,939 feet None +11 upstream of Old...

  10. 75 FR 55507 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... County, New York (All Jurisdictions) Berricks Creek Approximately 45 feet None +753 Town of Hamburg... Unincorporated Areas of the Broad River. Cherokee County. Approximately 0.9 mile None +493 upstream of Old... confluence with None +575 Town of Eleanor, the Kanawha River. Unincorporated Areas of Putnam County...

  11. 75 FR 43479 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... at the Lyme Town Hall, 480 Hamburg Road, Old Lyme, CT 06371. Town of Old Lyme Maps are available for inspection at the Old Lyme Town Hall, 52 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, CT 06371. Barnstable County, Massachusetts... Road. Four Mile River Just upstream of +9 +10 Town of Old Lyme. railroad. Approximately 1,200 +9 +10...

  12. 75 FR 61377 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ..., Environmental Consideration. An environmental impact assessment has not been prepared. Regulatory Flexibility..., OK 73075. Beaver County, Pennsylvania (All Jurisdictions) Beaver River Approximately 50 feet None... upstream of Angela Drive. North Fork Little Beaver Creek...... At the confluence with None +911 Township of...

  13. 75 FR 75945 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... CFR part 10, Environmental Consideration. An environmental impact assessment has not been prepared... mile of Skagit County. east of Beaver Marsh Road. Approximately 1,600 feet 3 +19 east of the intersection of Beaver Marsh Road and Marsh Road. [[Page 75948

  14. 76 FR 5769 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... Ridge Way. At the upstream side of None +1313 Mills Lane. Cross Creek Tributary 1 At the Cross Creek... +1355 feet upstream of West Easy Street. Unnamed Tributary to Puppy Creek.... Approximately 370 feet.... Blair Gap Run Approximately 0.59 mile None +1136 Township of Allegheny. upstream of Mill Road...

  15. 76 FR 56724 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... Town of Clarkstown. Hackensack River confluence. At the upstream side of +248 +247 Little Tor Road... Emergency Management Agency. [FR Doc. 2011-23413 Filed 9-13-11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9110-12-P ...

  16. 75 FR 5930 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... include BFEs located on the stream reach between the referenced locations above. Please refer to the... 20472. ADDRESSES City of Fort Ransom Maps are available for inspection at P.O. Box 17, Fort Ransom, ND 58033. City of Lisbon Maps are available for inspection at P.O. Box 1079, Lisbon, ND 58054...

  17. 76 FR 59960 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... Areas Agua Caliente Split Flow Approximately 1,500 +2584 +2583 Unincorporated Areas of feet upstream of... Agua Caliente Wash divergence. Agua Caliente Spur Flow Approximately 0.5 mile +2594 +2593... upstream of East Tanque Verde Road. Agua Caliente Wash Approximately 130 feet +2566 +2567 City of Tucson...

  18. 75 FR 29219 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... County. approximately 268 feet upstream of Robbin Lane. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North... Judge, 516 Fairway Drive, Brandenburg, KY 40108. Scott County, Kentucky, and Incorporated Areas Dry Run...

  19. 76 FR 39063 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ...,000 None +6802 feet upstream of Rodeo Road. Arroyo De La Piedra Approximately 300 feet +7099 +7103... +7043 City of Santa Fe. upstream of the Arroyo De La Piedra confluence. Approximately 600 feet None.... Approximately 0.3 mile None +7780 upstream of La Entrada. East Arroyo De La Piedra At the Arroyo De La None...

  20. 75 FR 62751 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ..., Naples, FL 34112. Alpena County, Michigan (All Jurisdictions) Lake Huron From approximately 1.3 None +583 City of Alpena, miles northwest of the Township of Alpena. intersection of Rockport Road and Old Grade... and Brousseau Road. Long Lake Entire shoreline within None +651 Township of Alpena. Alpena County...

  1. 75 FR 78654 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... Approximately 1,400 None +611 City of Miami, Town of feet upstream of the Arrow Rock, Town of Cooper County... Street, New Cordell, OK 73632. Bedford County, Pennsylvania (All Jurisdictions) Georges Creek...

  2. 76 FR 26968 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ... upstream side of +745 +759 City of Avondale, City Armour Road. of North Kansas City. Approximately 150 feet.... Rock Creek Tributary 11.2 At the upstream side of +752 +758 City of North Kansas Armour Road. City...

  3. 75 FR 62061 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... extending approximately 510 feet east along Sandy Drive. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. + North American Vertical Datum. [caret] Mean Sea Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter... Club Drain. [[Page 62063

  4. 76 FR 70403 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    .... Littlefield Lake Entire shoreline....... None +911 Township of Gilmore. Scott Lake Drain Entire shoreline... +913 Township of Broomfield, community. Township of Deerfield. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. [caret] Mean Sea Level, rounded to the...

  5. 75 FR 31377 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... that the community is required either to adopt or to show evidence of having in effect in order to... (Backwater effects from Walnut with Walnut Creek. of Fairfield County, Creek). Village of Thurston... County. Approximately 250 None +918 feet downstream of Refugee Road. Wilson Creek At the confluence None...

  6. 76 FR 21695 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... County. At the Betts Spring None +571 Branch and Bradford Creek confluence. Big Cove Creek Approximately.... Approximately 0.7 mile None +677 upstream of the Big Cove Creek confluence. Blue Spring Creek Approximately 400... Road. Approximately 450 feet None +748 upstream of Spragins Hollow Road Northwest. East Fork Pinhook...

  7. 76 FR 72661 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ... Smithfield, Township of Stroud. Approximately 1,250 None +635 feet upstream of Spring Mountain Lane... upstream of Steam Hollow Road. Dundaff Creek At the East Branch +1052 +1047 Township of Clifford...

  8. 75 FR 59181 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... of Cold State Route 9D. Spring, Village of Nelsonville. Approximately 852 feet None +369 upstream of... Approximately 500 feet +218 +219 Town of Putnam Valley. upstream of the confluence with Peekskill Hollow Creek... Philipstown Maps are available for inspection at the Philipstown Town Hall, 238 Main Street, Cold Spring, NY...

  9. 77 FR 76998 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... Spring Hollow (backwater effects from Green River), Pitman Creek (backwater effects from Green River... (backwater effects from Green River), Pipe Spring Hollow (backwater effects from Green River), Pitman Creek... Butler County. to approximately 1,550 feet downstream of G. Southerland Road. Pipe Spring Hollow...

  10. 75 FR 5925 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... Spring County. Martin Luther King Boulevard. Approximately 1,300 None +263 feet downstream of Martin Luther King Boulevard. Town Creek Approximately 2,300 None +253 Unincorporated Areas of feet downstream...

  11. 76 FR 19007 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... County. Approximately 0.9 mile None +33 upstream of Hemingway Highway. Boggy Swamp B Approximately 0.9... +74 upstream of Old Forreston Road. Muddy Creek At the Clarks Creek None +29 Town of Hemingway.... Approximately 1.3 miles None +35 upstream of Hemingway Highway. Spring Branch A At the Clapps Swamp None +65...

  12. 76 FR 19018 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ...). confluence. At the downstream side +179 +181 of National Avenue. Coffee Creek (backwater effects from At the..., Centralia, WA 98531. City of Chehalis Maps are available for inspection at 1321 South Market Boulevard...

  13. 76 FR 20606 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Loop. Shaw Creek--Wide Hollow Creek At the Wide Hollow None +1151 City of Yakima. Walmart Overflow 1... Hollow Creek At the Wide Hollow None +1149 City of Yakima. Walmart Overflow 2. Creek confluence...

  14. Land Use Measures are Underused in Flood Risk Mitigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, van den A.; Neuvel, J.J.M. (Jeroen)

    2010-01-01

    New research in the Netherlands indicates that spatial planning to manage flood risk, such as the elevation of residential areas and the exclusion of vulnerable land uses from flood-prone areas, is underused. Its use appears to depend on governmental requirements, previous experience of flooding and

  15. Study to determine the technical and economic feasibility of reclaiming chemicals used in micellar polymer and low tension surfactant flooding. Final report. [Ultrafiltration membranes and reverse osmosis membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, R.H.; Himmelblau, A.; Donnelly, R.G.

    1978-02-01

    Energy Resources Company has developed a technology for use with enhanced oil recovery to achieve emulsion breaking and surfactant recovery. By using ultrafiltration membranes, the Energy Resources Company process can dewater an oil-in-water type emulsion expected from enhanced oil recovery projects to the point where the emulsion can be inverted and treated using conventional emulsion-treating equipment. By using a tight ultrafiltration membrane or a reverse osmosis membrane, the Energy Resources Company process is capable of recovering chemicals such as surfactants used in micellar polymer flooding.

  16. Flood Hazard Assessment for the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.

    1999-01-01

    'A method was developed to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curves for certain Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities. This paper presents the method used to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curve for F-Area due to runoff from the Upper Three Runs basin. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 420.1, Facility Safety, outlines the requirements for Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation for new and existing DOE facilities. The NPH considered in this paper is flooding. The facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curve defines as a function of water elevation the annual probability of occurrence or the return period in years. Based on facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curves and the nature of facility operations (e.g., involving hazardous or radioactive materials), facility managers can design permanent or temporary devices to prevent the propagation of flood on site, and develop emergency preparedness plans to mitigate the consequences of floods.'

  17. Composite Flood Risk for Virgin Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Composite Flood Risk layer combines flood hazard datasets from Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) flood zones, NOAA's Shallow Coastal Flooding, and the National Hurricane Center SLOSH model for Storm Surge inundation for category 1, 2, and 3 hurricanes.Geographic areas are represented by a grid of 10 by 10 meter cells and each cell has a ranking based on variation in exposure to flooding hazards: Moderate, High and Extreme exposure. Geographic areas in each input layers are ranked based on their probability of flood risk exposure. The logic was such that areas exposed to flooding on a more frequent basis were given a higher ranking. Thus the ranking incorporates the probability of the area being flooded. For example, even though a Category 3 storm surge has higher flooding elevations, the likelihood of the occurrence is lower than a Category 1 storm surge and therefore the Category 3 flood area is given a lower exposure ranking. Extreme exposure areas are those areas that are exposed to relatively frequent flooding.The ranked input layers are then converted to a raster for the creation of the composite risk layer by using cell statistics in spatial analysis. The highest exposure ranking for a given cell in any of the three input layers is assigned to the corresponding cell in the composite layer.For example, if an area (a cell) is rank as medium in the FEMA layer, moderate in the SLOSH layer, but extreme in the SCF layer, the cell will be considere

  18. Probabilistic Flood Defence Assessment Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slomp Robert

    2016-01-01

    institutions managing flood the defences, and not by just a small number of experts in probabilistic assessment. Therefore, data management and use of software are main issues that have been covered in courses and training in 2016 and 2017. All in all, this is the largest change in the assessment of Dutch flood defences since 1996. In 1996 probabilistic techniques were first introduced to determine hydraulic boundary conditions (water levels and waves (wave height, wave period and direction for different return periods. To simplify the process, the assessment continues to consist of a three-step approach, moving from simple decision rules, to the methods for semi-probabilistic assessment, and finally to a fully probabilistic analysis to compare the strength of flood defences with the hydraulic loads. The formal assessment results are thus mainly based on the fully probabilistic analysis and the ultimate limit state of the strength of a flood defence. For complex flood defences, additional models and software were developed. The current Hydra software suite (for policy analysis, formal flood defence assessment and design will be replaced by the model Ringtoets. New stand-alone software has been developed for revetments, geotechnical analysis and slope stability of the foreshore. Design software and policy analysis software, including the Delta model, will be updated in 2018. A fully probabilistic method results in more precise assessments and more transparency in the process of assessment and reconstruction of flood defences. This is of increasing importance, as large-scale infrastructural projects in a highly urbanized environment are increasingly subject to political and societal pressure to add additional features. For this reason, it is of increasing importance to be able to determine which new feature really adds to flood protection, to quantify how much its adds to the level of flood protection and to evaluate if it is really worthwhile. Please note: The Netherlands

  19. GIS-based flood risk model evaluated by Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process (FAHP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukcharoen, Tharapong; Weng, Jingnong; Teetat, Charoenkalunyuta

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 2-3 decades, the economy of many countries around the world has been developed rapidly but it was unbalanced development because of expecting on economic growth only. Meanwhile it lacked of effective planning in the use of natural resources. This can significantly induce climate change which is major cause of natural disaster. Hereby, Thailand has also suffered from natural disaster for ages. Especially, the flood which is most hazardous disaster in Thailand can annually result in the great loss of life and property, environment and economy. Since the flood management of country is inadequate efficiency. It is unable to support the flood analysis comprehensively. This paper applied Geographic Information System and Multi-Criteria Decision Making to create flood risk model at regional scale. Angthong province in Thailand was used as the study area. In practical process, Fuzzy logic technique has been used to improve specialist's assessment by implementing with Fuzzy membership because human decision is flawed under uncertainty then AHP technique was processed orderly. The hierarchy structure in this paper was categorized the spatial flood factors into two levels as following: 6 criteria (Meteorology, Geology, Topography, Hydrology, Human and Flood history) and 8 factors (Average Rainfall, Distance from Stream, Soil drainage capability, Slope, Elevation, Land use, Distance from road and Flooded area in the past). The validity of the pair-wise comparison in AHP was shown as C.R. value which indicated that the specialist judgment was reasonably consistent. FAHP computation result has shown that the first priority of criteria was Meteorology. In addition, the Rainfall was the most influencing factor for flooding. Finally, the output was displayed in thematic map of Angthong province with flood risk level processed by GIS tools. The map was classified into: High Risk, Moderate Risk and Low Risk (13.20%, 75.58%, and 11.22% of total area).

  20. Forecasted Flood Depth Grids Providing Early Situational Awareness to FEMA during the 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M.; Longenecker, H. E., III

    2017-12-01

    The 2017 hurricane season brought the unprecedented landfall of three Category 4 hurricanes (Harvey, Irma and Maria). FEMA is responsible for coordinating the federal response and recovery efforts for large disasters such as these. FEMA depends on timely and accurate depth grids to estimate hazard exposure, model damage assessments, plan flight paths for imagery acquisition, and prioritize response efforts. In order to produce riverine or coastal depth grids based on observed flooding, the methodology requires peak crest water levels at stream gauges, tide gauges, high water marks, and best-available elevation data. Because peak crest data isn't available until the apex of a flooding event and high water marks may take up to several weeks for field teams to collect for a large-scale flooding event, final observed depth grids are not available to FEMA until several days after a flood has begun to subside. Within the last decade NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) has implemented the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS), a web-based suite of accurate forecast products that provide hydrograph forecasts at over 3,500 stream gauge locations across the United States. These forecasts have been newly implemented into an automated depth grid script tool, using predicted instead of observed water levels, allowing FEMA access to flood hazard information up to 3 days prior to a flooding event. Water depths are calculated from the AHPS predicted flood stages and are interpolated at 100m spacing along NHD hydrolines within the basin of interest. A water surface elevation raster is generated from these water depths using an Inverse Distance Weighted interpolation. Then, elevation (USGS NED 30m) is subtracted from the water surface elevation raster so that the remaining values represent the depth of predicted flooding above the ground surface. This automated process requires minimal user input and produced forecasted depth grids that were comparable to post

  1. Flood model for Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palán, Ladislav; Punčochář, Petr

    2017-04-01

    Looking on the impact of flooding from the World-wide perspective, in last 50 years flooding has caused over 460,000 fatalities and caused serious material damage. Combining economic loss from ten costliest flood events (from the same period) returns a loss (in the present value) exceeding 300bn USD. Locally, in Brazil, flood is the most damaging natural peril with alarming increase of events frequencies as 5 out of the 10 biggest flood losses ever recorded have occurred after 2009. The amount of economic and insured losses particularly caused by various flood types was the key driver of the local probabilistic flood model development. Considering the area of Brazil (being 5th biggest country in the World) and the scattered distribution of insured exposure, a domain covered by the model was limited to the entire state of Sao Paolo and 53 additional regions. The model quantifies losses on approx. 90 % of exposure (for regular property lines) of key insurers. Based on detailed exposure analysis, Impact Forecasting has developed this tool using long term local hydrological data series (Agencia Nacional de Aguas) from riverine gauge stations and digital elevation model (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística). To provide most accurate representation of local hydrological behaviour needed for the nature of probabilistic simulation, a hydrological data processing focused on frequency analyses of seasonal peak flows - done by fitting appropriate extreme value statistical distribution and stochastic event set generation consisting of synthetically derived flood events respecting realistic spatial and frequency patterns visible in entire period of hydrological observation. Data were tested for homogeneity, consistency and for any significant breakpoint occurrence in time series so the entire observation or only its subparts were used for further analysis. The realistic spatial patterns of stochastic events are reproduced through the innovative use of d-vine copula

  2. DEM-based Approaches for the Identification of Flood Prone Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samela, Caterina; Manfreda, Salvatore; Nardi, Fernando; Grimaldi, Salvatore; Roth, Giorgio; Sole, Aurelia

    2013-04-01

    The remarkable number of inundations that caused, in the last decades, thousands of deaths and huge economic losses, testifies the extreme vulnerability of many Countries to the flood hazard. As a matter of fact, human activities are often developed in the floodplains, creating conditions of extremely high risk. Terrain morphology plays an important role in understanding, modelling and analyzing the hydraulic behaviour of flood waves. Research during the last 10 years has shown that the delineation of flood prone areas can be carried out using fast methods that relay on basin geomorphologic features. In fact, the availability of new technologies to measure surface elevation (e.g., GPS, SAR, SAR interferometry, RADAR and LASER altimetry) has given a strong impulse to the development of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) based approaches. The identification of the dominant topographic controls on the flood inundation process is a critical research question that we try to tackle with a comparative analysis of several techniques. We reviewed four different approaches for the morphological characterization of a river basin with the aim to provide a description of their performances and to identify their range of applicability. In particular, we explored the potential of the following tools. 1) The hydrogeomorphic method proposed by Nardi et al. (2006) which defines the flood prone areas according to the water level in the river network through the hydrogeomorphic theory. 2) The linear binary classifier proposed by Degiorgis et al. (2012) which allows distinguishing flood-prone areas using two features related to the location of the site under exam with respect to the nearest hazard source. The two features, proposed in the study, are the length of the path that hydrologically connects the location under exam to the nearest element of the drainage network and the difference in elevation between the cell under exam and the final point of the same path. 3) The method by

  3. Challenges of Modeling Flood Risk at Large Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guin, J.; Simic, M.; Rowe, J.

    2009-04-01

    algorithm propagates the flows for each simulated event. The model incorporates a digital terrain model (DTM) at 10m horizontal resolution, which is used to extract flood plain cross-sections such that a one-dimensional hydraulic model can be used to estimate extent and elevation of flooding. In doing so the effect of flood defenses in mitigating floods are accounted for. Finally a suite of vulnerability relationships have been developed to estimate flood losses for a portfolio of properties that are exposed to flood hazard. Historical experience indicates that a for recent floods in Great Britain more than 50% of insurance claims occur outside the flood plain and these are primarily a result of excess surface flow, hillside flooding, flooding due to inadequate drainage. A sub-component of the model addresses this issue by considering several parameters that best explain the variability of claims off the flood plain. The challenges of modeling such a complex phenomenon at a large scale largely dictate the choice of modeling approaches that need to be adopted for each of these model components. While detailed numerically-based physical models exist and have been used for conducting flood hazard studies, they are generally restricted to small geographic regions. In a probabilistic risk estimation framework like our current model, a blend of deterministic and statistical techniques have to be employed such that each model component is independent, physically sound and is able to maintain the statistical properties of observed historical data. This is particularly important because of the highly non-linear behavior of the flooding process. With respect to vulnerability modeling, both on and off the flood plain, the challenges include the appropriate scaling of a damage relationship when applied to a portfolio of properties. This arises from the fact that the estimated hazard parameter used for damage assessment, namely maximum flood depth has considerable uncertainty. The

  4. An operational procedure for rapid flood risk assessment in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dottori, Francesco; Kalas, Milan; Salamon, Peter; Bianchi, Alessandra; Alfieri, Lorenzo; Feyen, Luc

    2017-07-01

    The development of methods for rapid flood mapping and risk assessment is a key step to increase the usefulness of flood early warning systems and is crucial for effective emergency response and flood impact mitigation. Currently, flood early warning systems rarely include real-time components to assess potential impacts generated by forecasted flood events. To overcome this limitation, this study describes the benchmarking of an operational procedure for rapid flood risk assessment based on predictions issued by the European Flood Awareness System (EFAS). Daily streamflow forecasts produced for major European river networks are translated into event-based flood hazard maps using a large map catalogue derived from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations. Flood hazard maps are then combined with exposure and vulnerability information, and the impacts of the forecasted flood events are evaluated in terms of flood-prone areas, economic damage and affected population, infrastructures and cities.An extensive testing of the operational procedure has been carried out by analysing the catastrophic floods of May 2014 in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia. The reliability of the flood mapping methodology is tested against satellite-based and report-based flood extent data, while modelled estimates of economic damage and affected population are compared against ground-based estimations. Finally, we evaluate the skill of risk estimates derived from EFAS flood forecasts with different lead times and combinations of probabilistic forecasts. Results highlight the potential of the real-time operational procedure in helping emergency response and management.

  5. Flood Hazard Assessment for the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.

    2000-01-01

    A method was developed to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curves for certain Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities. This paper presents the method used to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curve for F-Area due to runoff from the Upper Three Runs basin. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 420.1, Facility Safety, outlines the requirements for Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation for new and existing DOE facilities. The NPH considered in this paper is flooding. The facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curve defines as a function of water elevation the annual probability of occurrence or the return period in years. Based on facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curves and the nature of facility operations (e.g., involving hazardous or radioactive materials), facility managers can design permanent or temporary devices to prevent the propagation of flood on site, and develop emergency preparedness plans to mitigate the consequences of floods. A method was developed to determine the probabilistic flood hazard curves for SRS facilities. The flood hazard curves for the SRS F-Area due to flooding in the Upper Three Runs basin are presented in this paper

  6. TIME SERIES CHARACTERISTIC ANALYSIS OF RAINFALL, LAND USE AND FLOOD DISCHARGE BASED ON ARIMA BOX-JENKINS MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abror Abror

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia located in tropic area consists of wet season and dry season. However, in last few years, in river discharge in dry season is very little, but in contrary, in wet season, frequency of flood increases with sharp peak and increasingly great water elevation. The increased flood discharge may occur due to change in land use or change in rainfall characteristic. Both matters should get clarity. Therefore, a research should be done to analyze rainfall characteristic, land use and flood discharge in some watershed area (DAS quantitatively from time series data. The research was conducted in DAS Gintung in Parakankidang, DAS Gung in Danawarih, DAS Rambut in Cipero, DAS Kemiri in Sidapurna and DAS Comal in Nambo, located in Tegal Regency and Pemalang Regency in Central Java Province. This research activity consisted of three main steps: input, DAS system and output. Input is DAS determination and selection and searching secondary data. DAS system is early secondary data processing consisting of rainfall analysis, HSS GAMA I parameter, land type analysis and DAS land use. Output is final processing step that consisting of calculation of Tadashi Tanimoto, USSCS effective rainfall, flood discharge, ARIMA analysis, result analysis and conclusion. Analytical calculation of ARIMA Box-Jenkins time series used software Number Cruncher Statistical Systems and Power Analysis Sample Size (NCSS-PASS version 2000, which result in time series characteristic in form of time series pattern, mean square errors (MSE, root mean square ( RMS, autocorrelation of residual and trend. Result of this research indicates that composite CN and flood discharge is proportional that means when composite CN trend increase then flood discharge trend also increase and vice versa. Meanwhile, decrease of rainfall trend is not always followed with decrease in flood discharge trend. The main cause of flood discharge characteristic is DAS management characteristic, not change in

  7. Bayesian flood forecasting methods: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shasha; Coulibaly, Paulin

    2017-08-01

    Over the past few decades, floods have been seen as one of the most common and largely distributed natural disasters in the world. If floods could be accurately forecasted in advance, then their negative impacts could be greatly minimized. It is widely recognized that quantification and reduction of uncertainty associated with the hydrologic forecast is of great importance for flood estimation and rational decision making. Bayesian forecasting system (BFS) offers an ideal theoretic framework for uncertainty quantification that can be developed for probabilistic flood forecasting via any deterministic hydrologic model. It provides suitable theoretical structure, empirically validated models and reasonable analytic-numerical computation method, and can be developed into various Bayesian forecasting approaches. This paper presents a comprehensive review on Bayesian forecasting approaches applied in flood forecasting from 1999 till now. The review starts with an overview of fundamentals of BFS and recent advances in BFS, followed with BFS application in river stage forecasting and real-time flood forecasting, then move to a critical analysis by evaluating advantages and limitations of Bayesian forecasting methods and other predictive uncertainty assessment approaches in flood forecasting, and finally discusses the future research direction in Bayesian flood forecasting. Results show that the Bayesian flood forecasting approach is an effective and advanced way for flood estimation, it considers all sources of uncertainties and produces a predictive distribution of the river stage, river discharge or runoff, thus gives more accurate and reliable flood forecasts. Some emerging Bayesian forecasting methods (e.g. ensemble Bayesian forecasting system, Bayesian multi-model combination) were shown to overcome limitations of single model or fixed model weight and effectively reduce predictive uncertainty. In recent years, various Bayesian flood forecasting approaches have been

  8. Flood loss reduction of private households due to building precautionary measures -- lessons learned from the Elbe flood in August 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kreibich

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Building houses in inundation areas is always a risk, since absolute flood protection is impossible. Where settlements already exist, flood damage must be kept as small as possible. Suitable means are precautionary measures such as elevated building configuration or flood adapted use. However, data about the effects of such measures are rare, and consequently, the efficiency of different precautionary measures is unclear. To improve the knowledge about efficient precautionary measures, approximately 1200 private households, which were affected by the 2002 flood at the river Elbe and its tributaries, were interviewed about the flood damage of their buildings and contents as well as about their precautionary measures. The affected households had little flood experience, i.e. only 15% had experienced a flood before. 59% of the households stated that they did not know, that they live in a flood prone area. Thus, people were not well prepared, e.g. just 11% had used and furnished their house in a flood adapted way and only 6% had a flood adapted building structure. Building precautionary measures are mainly effective in areas with frequent small floods. But also during the extreme flood event in 2002 building measures reduced the flood loss. From the six different building precautionary measures under study, flood adapted use and adapted interior fitting were the most effective ones. They reduced the damage ratio for buildings by 46% and 53%, respectively. The damage ratio for contents was reduced by 48% due to flood adapted use and by 53% due to flood adapted interior fitting. The 2002 flood motivated a relatively large number of people to implement private precautionary measures, but still much more could be done. Hence, to further reduce flood losses, people's motivation to invest in precaution should be improved. More information campaigns and financial incentives should be issued to encourage precautionary measures.

  9. Modeling Waves and Coastal Flooding along the Connecticut Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-Lorenzen, A.; Howard-Strobel, M. M.; Fake, T.; McCardell, G.; O'Donnell, J.; Asthita, M.

    2015-12-01

    We have used a hydrodynamic- wave coupled numerical model (FVCOM-SWAVE) to simulate flooding at the Connecticut coastline during severe storms. The model employed a one-way nesting scheme and an unstructured grid. The parent domain spanned most of the southern New England shelf and the fine resolution grid covered Long Island Sound (LIS) and extended across the Connecticut coast to the 10m elevation contour. The model results for sea level, current and wave statistics from the parent grid have been tested with data from several field campaigns at different locations spanning the western, central and eastern portions of LIS. Waves are fetch limited and improvements to the model-data comparison required modifications to spectral coefficients in the wave model. Finally, the nested results were validated with two field campaigns in shallow water environments (i.e. New Haven and Old Saybrook). To assess the spatial variability of storm wave characteristics the domain was forced with the hindcast winds obtained from meteorological models (NAM and WRF) for 13 severe weather events that affected LIS in the past 15 years. We have also forced the system with a simulation of Superstorm Sandy in a warmer climate to assess the impact a climate change on the character of flooding. The nested grid is currently being used to map flooding risks under severe weather events including the effects of precipitation on river flow and discharge.

  10. Social media for disaster response during floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilander, D.; van de Vries, C.; Baart, F.; van Swol, R.; Wagemaker, J.; van Loenen, A.

    2015-12-01

    During floods it is difficult to obtain real-time accurate information about the extent and severity of the hazard. This information is very important for disaster risk reduction management and crisis relief organizations. Currently, real-time information is derived from few sources such as field reports, traffic camera's, satellite images and areal images. However, getting a real-time and accurate picture of the situation on the ground remains difficult. At the same time, people affected by natural hazards increasingly share their observations and their needs through digital media. Unlike conventional monitoring systems, Twitter data contains a relatively large number of real-time ground truth observations representing both physical hazard characteristics and hazard impacts. In the city of Jakarta, Indonesia, the intensity of unique flood related tweets during a flood event, peaked at almost 900 tweets per minute during floods in early 2015. Flood events around the world in 2014/2015 yielded large numbers of flood related tweets: from Philippines (85.000) to Pakistan (82.000) to South-Korea (50.000) to Detroit (20.000). The challenge here is to filter out useful content from this cloud of data, validate these observations and convert them to readily usable information. In Jakarta, flood related tweets often contain information about the flood depth. In a pilot we showed that this type of information can be used for real-time mapping of the flood extent by plotting these observations on a Digital Elevation Model. Uncertainties in the observations were taken into account by assigning a probability to each observation indicating its likelihood to be correct based on statistical analysis of the total population of tweets. The resulting flood maps proved to be correct for about 75% of the neighborhoods in Jakarta. Further cross-validation of flood related tweets against (hydro-) meteorological data is to likely improve the skill of the method.

  11. Hydrochemical aspects of the Aue pit flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.; Jenk, U.; Schuppan, W.; Knappik, R.

    1998-01-01

    WISMUT is conducting controlled flooding of underground mines at the Schlema-Alberoda and Poehla sites. Flooding of the Poehla mine lasted from January 1992 through September 1995. Flooding at the Niederschlema-Alberoda site began in July 1990 and will continue to approximately 2002. In mid-1998 the flood level had reached the - 420 m level which is about 1,400 m above the lowest mine level. Only ground waters with low mineral and pollutant content are used for flooding purposes. Typically, the flooding process results in elevated levels of mineral salts and of uranium, radium, arsenic, iron, and manganese in flooding waters. However, the mobilised part of these contaminants represents only a small fraction of potential concentrations contained in the surrounding rock. Geochemical and hydrochemical conditions at both mines are characterised by the presence of carbonate buffers and by neutral pH and intermediate to low Eh. Decrease due to oxidation of sulphides in the long term is unlikely. Environmentally relevant metals in flooding waters may be dissolved, colloidal, or suspended solids with uranium present as uranyl carbonate complexes. Intensity of mobilisation is primarily a function of kinetic processes. Post flooding conditions at the Poehla subsite exhibit specific hydrochemical phenomena such as extremely reduced SO 4 concentrations and an increase in Ra concentrations over time. Continued flood monitoring will provide the basis for more in-depth interpretation and prognosis of contaminant mobilisation. Current investigations focus on technically feasible in situ control of mine flooding at the Schlema-Alberoda site to reduce contaminant mobilisation. At both sites water treatment plants are either on stream or under construction. (orig.)

  12. Flood Resilient Systems and their Application for Flood Resilient Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojlovic, N.; Gabalda, V.; Antanaskovic, D.; Gershovich, I.; Pasche, E.

    2012-04-01

    SMARTeST. A web based three tier advisory system FLORETO-KALYPSO (http://floreto.wb.tu-harburg.de/, Manojlovic et al, 2009) devoted to support decision-making process at the building level has been further developed to support multi-scale decision making on resilient systems, improving the existing data mining algorithms of the Business Logic tier. Further tuning of the algorithms is to be performed based on the new developments and findings in applicability and efficiency of different FRe Technology for different flood typologies. The first results obtained at the case studies in Greater Hamburg, Germany indicate the potential of this approach to contribute to the multiscale resilient planning on the road to flood resilient cities. FIAC (2007): "Final report form the Awareness and Assistance Sub-committee", FIAC, Scottish Government Zevenbergen C. et al (2008) "Challenges in urban flood management: travelling across spatial and temporal scales", Journal of FRM Volume 1 Issue 2, p 81-88 Manojlovic N., et al (2009): "Capacity Building in FRM through a DSS Utilising Data Mining Approach", Proceed. 8th HIC, Concepcion, Chile, January, 2009

  13. Using WorldView-2 Imagery to Track Flooding in Thailand in a Multi-Asset Sensorweb

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, David; Doubleday, Joshua; Chien, Steve

    2012-01-01

    For the flooding seasons of 2011-2012 multiple space assets were used in a "sensorweb" to track major flooding in Thailand. Worldview-2 multispectral data was used in this effort and provided extremely high spatial resolution (2m / pixel) multispectral (8 bands at 0.45-1.05 micrometer spectra) data from which mostly automated workflows derived surface water extent and volumetric water information for use by a range of NGO and national authorities. We first describe how Worldview-2 and its data was integrated into the overall flood tracking sensorweb. We next describe the use of Support Vector Machine learning techniques that were used to derive surface water extent classifiers. Then we describe the fusion of surface water extent and digital elevation map (DEM) data to derive volumetric water calculations. Finally we discuss key future work such as speeding up the workflows and automating the data registration process (the only portion of the workflow requiring human input).

  14. Flooding and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, flooding is the nation's most common natural disaster. Some floods develop slowly during an extended period of rain or in a warming trend following a heavy snow. Flash floods can occur quickly, without any visible sign of rain. Catastrophic floods are associated with burst dams and levees,…

  15. CO{sub 2} exchange environmental productivity indices, and productivity of agaves and cacti under current and elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobel, P.S.

    1994-12-31

    The research described in the proposal investigated net CO{sub 2} uptake and biomass accumulation for an extremely productive CAM plant, the prickly pear cactus Opuntia ficus-indica, under conditions of elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations for relatively long periods. The influences of soil water status, air temperature, and the photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) on net CO{sub 2} uptake over 24-h periods were evaluated to enable predictions to be made based on an Environmental Productivity Index (EPI). Specifically, EPI predicts the fraction of maximal daily net CO{sub 2} uptake based on prevailing environmental conditions. It is the product of indices for temperature, soil water, and intercepted PPF, each of which range from 0.00 when that index factor completely inhibits net CO{sub 2} uptake to 1.00 when no limitation occurs. For instance, the Water Index is 1.00 under wet conditions and decreases to 0.00 during prolonged drought. Although the major emphasis of the research was on net C0{sub 2} uptake and the resulting biomass production for O. ficus-indica, effects of elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations on root: shoot ratios and on the activities of the two carboxylating enzymes were also investigated. Moreover, experiments were also done on other CAM plants, including Agave deserti, Agave salmiana, and Hylocereus undatus, and Stenocereus queretaroensis.

  16. Decision Support for Flood Event Prediction and Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mioc, Darka; Anton, François; Liang, Gengsheng

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the development of Web GIS based decision support system for flood events is presented. To improve flood prediction we developed the decision support system for flood prediction and monitoring that integrates hydrological modelling and CARIS GIS. We present the methodology for data...... integration, floodplain delineation, and online map interfaces. Our Web-based GIS model can dynamically display observed and predicted flood extents for decision makers and the general public. The users can access Web-based GIS that models current flood events and displays satellite imagery and digital...... elevation model integrated with flood plain area. The system can show how the flooding prediction based on the output from hydrological modeling for the next 48 hours along the lower Saint John River Valley....

  17. Street floods in Metro Manila and possible solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagmay, Alfredo Mahar; Mendoza, Jerico; Cipriano, Fatima; Delmendo, Patricia Anne; Lacsamana, Micah Nieves; Moises, Marc Anthony; Pellejera, Nicanor; Punay, Kenneth Niño; Sabio, Glenn; Santos, Laurize; Serrano, Jonathan; Taniza, Herbert James; Tingin, Neil Eneri

    2017-09-01

    Urban floods from thunderstorms cause severe problems in Metro Manila due to road traffic. Using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)-derived topography, flood simulations and anecdotal reports, the root of surface flood problems in Metro Manila is identified. Majority of flood-prone areas are along the intersection of creeks and streets located in topographic lows. When creeks overflow or when rapidly accumulated street flood does not drain fast enough to the nearest stream channel, the intersecting road also gets flooded. Possible solutions include the elevation of roads or construction of well-designed drainage structures leading to the creeks. Proposed solutions to the flood problem of Metro Manila may avoid paralyzing traffic problems due to short-lived rain events, which according to Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) cost the Philippine economy 2.4billionpesos/day. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Flood Hazard Recurrence Frequencies for the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.

    2001-01-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) regulations outline the requirements for Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation for new and existing DOE facilities. The NPH considered in this report is flooding. The facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curve defines, as a function of water elevation, the annual probability of occurrence or the return period in years. The facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curves provide basis to avoid unnecessary facility upgrades, to establish appropriate design criteria for new facilities, and to develop emergency preparedness plans to mitigate the consequences of floods. A method based on precipitation, basin runoff and open channel hydraulics was developed to determine probabilistic flood hazard curves for the Savannah River Site. The calculated flood hazard curves show that the probabilities of flooding existing SRS major facilities are significantly less than 1.E-05 per year

  19. Flood of July 21, 1975 in Mercer County, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankowski, Stephen J.; Schopp, Robert D.; Velnich, Anthony J.

    1975-01-01

    Intense rainfall during the evening of July 20 and early morning hours of July 21, 1975 caused flooding of unprecedented magnitude in highly urbanized Mercer County, New Jersey. Over 6 inches (152 millimetres) of rainfall was recorded during a 10-hour period at Trenton, the capital of New Jersey. No lives were lost but damages to highways and bridges, to industrial, business, and residential buildings, to farmlands and crops, and to water supply systems were severe. This report illustrates the magnitude of the flood and provides hydrologic data needed for planning and design to control or lessen damages from future floods. It includes discussions of the antecedent conditions and meteorological aspects of the storm; a description of the flood and comparison to previous floods; a summary of flood stages and discharges; a discussion of flood frequency; and photomosaics which show inundated areas. More than 200 high-water marks are described as to location and elevation above mean sea level.

  20. Flood hazard assessment for the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.

    2000-01-01

    A method was developed to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curves for certain Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities. This paper presents the method used to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curve for F-Area due to runoff from the Upper Three Runs basin. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 420.1, Facility Safety, outlines the requirements for Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation for new and existing DOE facilities. The NPH considered in this paper is flooding. The facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curve defines as a function of water elevation the annual probability of occurrence or the return period in years. Based on facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curves and the nature of facility operations (e.g., involving hazardous or radioactive materials), facility managers can design permanent or temporary devices to prevent the propagation of flood on site, and develop emergency preparedness plans to mitigate the consequences of floods. The flood hazard curves for the SRS F-Area due to flooding in the Upper Three Runs basin are presented in this paper

  1. River flooding due to intense precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, James C.

    2014-01-01

    River stage can rise and cause site flooding due to local intense precipitation (LIP), dam failures, snow melt in conjunction with precipitation or dam failures, etc. As part of the re-evaluation of the design basis as well as the PRA analysis of other external events, the likelihood and consequence of river flooding leading to the site flooding need to be examined more rigorously. To evaluate the effects of intense precipitation on site structures, the site watershed hydrology and pond storage are calculated. To determine if river flooding can cause damage to risk-significant systems, structures, and components (SSC), water surface elevations are analyzed. Typically, the amount and rate of the input water is determined first. For intense precipitation, the fraction of the rainfall in the watershed drainage area not infiltrated into the ground is collected in the river and contributes to the rise of river water elevation. For design basis analysis, the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) is evaluated using the Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP) based on the site topography/configuration. The peak runoff flow rate and water surface elevations resulting from the precipitation induced flooding can then be estimated. The runoff flow hydrograph and peak discharge flows can be developed using the synthetic hydrograph method. The standard step method can then be used to determine the water surface elevations along the river channel. Thus, the flood water from the local intense precipitation storm and excess runoff from the nearby river can be evaluated to calculate the water surface elevations, which can be compared with the station grade floor elevation to determine the effects of site flooding on risk-significant SSCs. The analysis needs to consider any possible diversion flow and the effects of changes to the site configurations. Typically, the analysis is performed based on conservative peak rainfall intensity and the assumptions of failure of the site drainage facilities

  2. An Agent-Based Model of Evolving Community Flood Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonn, Gina L; Guikema, Seth D

    2017-11-17

    Although individual behavior plays a major role in community flood risk, traditional flood risk models generally do not capture information on how community policies and individual decisions impact the evolution of flood risk over time. The purpose of this study is to improve the understanding of the temporal aspects of flood risk through a combined analysis of the behavioral, engineering, and physical hazard aspects of flood risk. Additionally, the study aims to develop a new modeling approach for integrating behavior, policy, flood hazards, and engineering interventions. An agent-based model (ABM) is used to analyze the influence of flood protection measures, individual behavior, and the occurrence of floods and near-miss flood events on community flood risk. The ABM focuses on the following decisions and behaviors: dissemination of flood management information, installation of community flood protection, elevation of household mechanical equipment, and elevation of homes. The approach is place based, with a case study area in Fargo, North Dakota, but is focused on generalizable insights. Generally, community mitigation results in reduced future damage, and individual action, including mitigation and movement into and out of high-risk areas, can have a significant influence on community flood risk. The results of this study provide useful insights into the interplay between individual and community actions and how it affects the evolution of flood risk. This study lends insight into priorities for future work, including the development of more in-depth behavioral and decision rules at the individual and community level. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  3. After the flood is before the next flood - post event review of the Central European Floods of June 2013. Insights, recommendations and next steps for future flood prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szoenyi, Michael; Mechler, Reinhard; McCallum, Ian

    2015-04-01

    perception and understanding of risk in the population. • Residual risk and the levee shadow effect - why the population "felt safe." • What is the overload case and how to implement it in flood protection systems? • Decision-making for the future under uncertainty - how to design to acceptable flood protection levels if we haven't seen yet what's physically possible. 3. How to protect - practical examples Finally, we outline practical examples for reducing the loss burden and risk over time. • "Flood protection hierarchy" - from location choice under a hazard perspective to mobile flood protection. • Risk-based approach and identification of critical infrastructure. • Integrated flood risk management in theory and practical application. • Role of insurance.

  4. Geomorphic Flood Area (GFA): a QGIS tool for a cost-effective delineation of the floodplains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samela, Caterina; Albano, Raffaele; Sole, Aurelia; Manfreda, Salvatore

    2017-04-01

    The importance of delineating flood hazard and risk areas at a global scale has been highlighted for many years. However, its complete achievement regularly encounters practical difficulties, above all the lack of data and implementation costs. In conditions of scarce data availability (e.g. ungauged basins, large-scale analyses), a fast and cost-effective floodplain delineation can be carried out using geomorphic methods (e.g., Manfreda et al., 2011; 2014). In particular, an automatic DEM-based procedure has been implemented in an open-source QGIS plugin named Geomorphic Flood Area - tool (GFA - tool). This tool performs a linear binary classification based on the recently proposed Geomorphic Flood Index (GFI), which exhibited high classification accuracy and reliability in several test sites located in Europe, United States and Africa (Manfreda et al., 2015; Samela et al., 2016, 2017; Samela, 2016). The GFA - tool is designed to make available to all users the proposed procedure, that includes a number of operations requiring good geomorphic and GIS competences. It allows computing the GFI through terrain analysis, turning it into a binary classifier, and training it on the base of a standard inundation map derived for a portion of the river basin (a minimum of 2% of the river basin's area is suggested) using detailed methods of analysis (e.g. flood hazard maps produced by emergency management agencies or river basin authorities). Finally, GFA - tool allows to extend the classification outside the calibration area to delineate the flood-prone areas across the entire river basin. The full analysis has been implemented in this plugin with a user-friendly interface that should make it easy to all user to apply the approach and produce the desired results. Keywords: flood susceptibility; data scarce environments; geomorphic flood index; linear binary classification; Digital elevation models (DEMs). References Manfreda, S., Di Leo, M., Sole, A., (2011). Detection of

  5. Geomorphic changes caused by the 2011 flood at selected sites along the lower Missouri River and comparison to historical floods: Chapter H in 2011 floods of the central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of recent and historical U.S. Geological Survey streamgage information was used to assess geomorphic changes caused by the 2011 flood, in comparison to selected historical floods, at three streamgage sites along the lower Missouri River—Sioux City, Iowa; Omaha, Nebraska; and Kansas City, Missouri. Channel-width change was not evident at the three streamgage sites following the 2011 flood and likely was inhibited by bank stabilization. Pronounced changes in channel-bed elevation were indicated. At Sioux City and Omaha, the geomorphic effects of the 2011 flood were similar in terms of the magnitude of channelbed scour and recovery. At both sites, the 2011 flood caused pronounced scour (about 3 feet) of the channel bed; however, at Omaha, most of the channel-bed scour occurred after the flood had receded. More than 1 year after the flood, the channel bed had only partially recovered (about 1 foot) at both sites. Pronounced scour (about 3 feet at Sioux City and about 1.5 feet at Omaha) also was caused by the 1952 flood, which had a substantially larger peak discharge but was much shorter in duration at both sites. Again, at Omaha, most of the channel- bed scour occurred after the flood had receded. At Sioux City, substantial recovery of the channel bed (about 2.5 feet) was documented 1 year after the 1952 flood. Recovery to the pre-flood elevation was complete by April 1954. The greater recovery following the 1952 flood, compared to the 2011 flood, likely was related to a more abundant sediment supply because the flood predated the completion of most of the main-stem dam, channelization, and bank stabilization projects. At Omaha, following the 1952 flood, the channel bed never fully recovered to its pre-flood elevation. The geomorphic effect of the 2011 flood at Kansas City was fill (about 1 foot) on the channel bed followed by relative stability. The 1952 flood, which had a substantially larger peak discharge but was much shorter in duration, caused

  6. HYDRAULIC SIMULATION OF FLASH FLOOD AS TRIGGERED BY NATURAL DAM BREAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanuar Tri Kurniawan

    2015-05-01

    Calibration model result showed that the height of natural dam significantly influence changes of water surface elevation at control point. Tracing of flood result in reconstruction of January 2006 flood showed the conformity with the real event. It was observed from the arrival time of flood at certain location. From obtained results, it can be concluded that simulation modeling gave the acceptable results.

  7. Commonalities and Differences in Flood-Generating Processes across the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Troy, T. J.

    2017-12-01

    There is significant damage caused by flood, and the flood risk is increasing in the future, but there is large uncertainty in future decadal projections of flooding. In order to improve these projections, we must first turn to the past to understand the physical mechanisms that lead to flooding in basins across spatial scales and elevation ranges. To do this, we calculated the seasonality of annual maximum flows and other climatic factors to identify the flood-generating process in 2566 basins across the continental US. For most regions, the seasonality of heavy precipitation is not in phase with the seasonality of flooding, pointing to the importance of antecedent soil moisture and snow in determining flooding over much of the US. To determine the characteristic conditions leading to a flood, we classified all floods into those with different rainfall durations and with/without snow presence. Analyzing the influence of elevation, slope and drainage area, we identified patterns: the probability of flooding due to long duration precipitation increases as drainage area increases and snow present during a flood becomes increasingly likely as average basin elevation increases. To better understand the relationship between heavy rainfall and high streamflow, we calculated conditioned probability of occurrence. The southeastern US has a higher probability of occurrence for extreme Q with the same level of extreme precipitation in winter and spring than the northern US. This work is the first to look at how flood mechanisms vary across the continental US with drainage area, climate, and elevation.

  8. Assessing infrastructure vulnerability to major floods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenssen, Lars

    1998-12-31

    This thesis proposes a method for assessing the direct effects of serious floods on a physical infrastructure or utility. This method should be useful in contingency planning and in the design of structures likely to be damaged by flooding. A review is given of (1) methods of floodplain management and strategies for mitigating floods, (2) methods of risk analysis that will become increasingly important in flood management, (3) methods for hydraulic computations, (4) a variety of scour assessment methods and (5) applications of geographic information systems (GIS) to the analysis of flood vulnerability. Three computer codes were developed: CULVCAP computes the headwater level for circular and box culverts, SCOUR for assessing riprap stability and scour depths, and FASTFLOOD prepares input rainfall series and input files for the rainfall-runoff model used in the case study. A road system in central Norway was chosen to study how to analyse the flood vulnerability of an infrastructure. Finally, the thesis proposes a method for analysing the flood vulnerability of physical infrastructure. The method involves a general stage that will provide data on which parts of the infrastructure are potentially vulnerable to flooding and how to analyse them, and a specific stage which is concerned with analysing one particular kind of physical infrastructure in a study area. 123 refs., 59 figs., 17 tabs= .

  9. Characterization of remarkable floods in France, a transdisciplinary approach applied on generalized floods of January 1910

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudou, Martin; Lang, Michel; Vinet, Freddy; Coeur, Denis

    2014-05-01

    emphasize one flood typology or one flood dynamic (for example flash floods are often over-represented than slow dynamic floods in existing databases). Thus, the selected criteria have to introduce a general overview of flooding risk in France by integrating all typologies: storm surges, torrential floods, rising groundwater level and resulting to flood, etc. The methodology developed for the evaluation grid is inspired by several scientific works related to historical hydrology (Bradzil, 2006; Benito et al., 2004) or extreme floods classification (Kundzewics et al. 2013; Garnier E., 2005). The referenced information are mainly issued from investigations realized for the PFRA (archives, local data),from internet databases on flooding disasters, and from a complementary bibliography (some scientists such as Maurice Pardé a geographer who largely documented French floods during the 20th century). The proposed classification relies on three main axes. Each axis is associated to a set of criteria, each one related to a score (from 0.5 to 4 points), and pointing out a final remarkability score. • The flood intensity characterizing the flood's hazard level. It is composed of the submersion duration, important to valorize floods with slow dynamics as flooding from groundwater, the event peak discharge's return period, and the presence of factors increasing significantly the hazard level (dykes breaks, log jam, sediment transport…) • The flood severity focuses on economic damages, social and political repercussions, media coverage of the event, fatalities number or eventual flood warning failures. Analyzing the flood consequences is essential in order to evaluate the vulnerability of society at disaster date. • The spatial extension of the flood, which contributes complementary information to the two first axes. The evaluation grid was tested and applied on the sample of 176 remarkable events. Around twenty events (from 1856 to 2010) come out with a high remarkability rate

  10. The impact of bathymetry input on flood simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanam, M.; Cohen, S.

    2017-12-01

    Flood prediction and mitigation systems are inevitable for improving public safety and community resilience all over the worldwide. Hydraulic simulations of flood events are becoming an increasingly efficient tool for studying and predicting flood events and susceptibility. A consistent limitation of hydraulic simulations of riverine dynamics is the lack of information about river bathymetry as most terrain data record water surface elevation. The impact of this limitation on the accuracy on hydraulic simulations of flood has not been well studies over a large range of flood magnitude and modeling frameworks. Advancing our understanding of this topic is timely given emerging national and global efforts for developing automated flood predictions systems (e.g. NOAA National Water Center). Here we study the response of flood simulation to the incorporation of different bathymetry and floodplain surveillance source. Different hydraulic models are compared, Mike-Flood, a 2D hydrodynamic model, and GSSHA, a hydrology/hydraulics model. We test a hypothesis that the impact of inclusion/exclusion of bathymetry data on hydraulic model results will vary in its magnitude as a function of river size. This will allow researcher and stake holders more accurate predictions of flood events providing useful information that will help local communities in a vulnerable flood zone to mitigate flood hazards. Also, it will help to evaluate the accuracy and efficiency of different modeling frameworks and gage their dependency on detailed bathymetry input data.

  11. An elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loginovskiy, V.I.; Medinger, N.V.; Rasskazov, V.A.; Solonitsyn, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    An elevator is proposed which includes a body, spring loaded cams and a shut-off ring. To increase the reliability of the elevator by eliminating the possibility of spontaneous shifting of the shut-off ring, the latter is equipped with handles hinged to it and is made with evolvent grooves. The cams are equipped with rollers installed in the evolvent grooves of the shut off ring, where the body is made with grooves for the handles.

  12. Impacts of repetitive floods and satisfaction with flood relief efforts: A case study of the flood-prone districts in Thailand’s Ayutthaya province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawhath Thanvisitthpon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates the impacts of the repetitive flooding on the inhabitants of the four flood-prone districts in Thailand’s central province of Ayutthaya: Pranakorn Si Ayutthaya, Sena, Bang Ban, and Pak Hai. In addition, the residents’ satisfaction levels with the flood relief efforts and operations of the local authorities were examined and analyzed. The research revealed that most local residents have adapted to co-exist with the repetitive floods, an example of which is the elevation of the houses a few meters above the ground where the living quarter is on the upper level. The findings also indicated that the repetitive flooding incurred substantial post-flood repair costs, in light of the low income-earning capabilities of the locals. However, the flood-recovery financial aids was incommensurate with the actual expenditures, contributing to the lowest average satisfaction score among the inhabitants with regard to the adequacy of the post-flood repair and restoration financial aid. Furthermore, the research identified the differences between districts on the satisfaction with the flood relief efforts. The disparity could be attributed to the extent of coordination and participation of the local residents and their local leaders in the flood-related measures.

  13. 78 FR 29760 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... above. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal... Municipal Offices, 8801 Paul Becker Road, Marcy, NY 13403. Town of Marshall Marshall Town Hall, 2651 State...

  14. 78 FR 8175 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ..., Crested Butte, CO 81224. Town of Marble Blackstock Government Center, 221 North Wisconsin Street, Gunnison... Building, 462 Pine Drive, Pine Lake, GA 30072. City of Stone Mountain City Hall, 922 Main Street, Stone...

  15. 78 FR 14577 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ..., 2 Renshaw Road, Darien, CT 06820. Town of Fairfield John J. Sullivan Independence Hall, 725 Old Post.... Town of North Haven Town Hall, 18 Church Street, North Haven, CT 06473. Androscoggin County, Maine (All... County, Connecticut (All Jurisdictions) Docket No.: FEMA-B-1247 City of Bridgeport City Hall Annex, 999...

  16. 78 FR 48882 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ....: FEMA-B-1272 Town of Brookville Franklin County Government Center, Area Planning Office, 1010 Franklin Avenue, Brookville, IN 47012. Town of Cedar Grove Franklin County Government Center, Area Planning Office..., SC 29048. Town of Holly Hill Town Hall, 8807 Old State Road, Holly Hill, SC 29059. Town of Norway...

  17. 78 FR 32678 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... Washington County, Rhode Island (All Jurisdictions) Docket No.: FEMA-B-1255 Town of Charlestown Town Hall, Planning Office, 4540 South County Trail, Charlestown, RI 02813. Town of Narragansett Town Hall... Old Town Road, Block Island, RI 02807. Town of North Kingstown Department of Public Works and...

  18. 78 FR 29763 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... newspapers of local circulation and ninety (90) days have elapsed since that publication. The Deputy... School Street, Fisher, IL 61843. Village of Ivesdale Village Hall, 406 Third Street, Ivesdale, IL 61851...

  19. 78 FR 45937 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... repository Community address Mason County, West Virginia, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1270 City..., 133 2nd Street, Hartford, WV 25247. Town of Henderson Town Hall, 1 Railroad Street, Henderson, WV...

  20. Assessment of Three Flood Hazard Mapping Methods: A Case Study of Perlis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizat, Nazirah; Omar, Wan Mohd Sabki Wan

    2018-03-01

    Flood is a common natural disaster and also affect the all state in Malaysia. Regarding to Drainage and Irrigation Department (DID) in 2007, about 29, 270 km2 or 9 percent of region of the country is prone to flooding. Flood can be such devastating catastrophic which can effected to people, economy and environment. Flood hazard mapping can be used is an important part in flood assessment to define those high risk area prone to flooding. The purposes of this study are to prepare a flood hazard mapping in Perlis and to evaluate flood hazard using frequency ratio, statistical index and Poisson method. The six factors affecting the occurrence of flood including elevation, distance from the drainage network, rainfall, soil texture, geology and erosion were created using ArcGIS 10.1 software. Flood location map in this study has been generated based on flooded area in year 2010 from DID. These parameters and flood location map were analysed to prepare flood hazard mapping in representing the probability of flood area. The results of the analysis were verified using flood location data in year 2013, 2014, 2015. The comparison result showed statistical index method is better in prediction of flood area rather than frequency ratio and Poisson method.

  1. Flood Hazard Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  2. Flood Hazard Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  3. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  4. Flood Risk Regional Flood Defences : Technical report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M.; Jonkman, S.N.; Lendering, K.T.

    2015-01-01

    Historically the Netherlands have always had to deal with the threat of flooding, both from the rivers and the sea as well as from heavy rainfall. The country consists of a large amount of polders, which are low lying areas of land protected from flooding by embankments. These polders require an

  5. Flood Hazard Recurrence Frequencies for C-, F-, E-, S-, H-, Y-, and Z-Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.

    1999-01-01

    A method was developed to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curves for Savannah River Site facilities. This report presents the method used to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curves for C-, F-, E-, H-, S-, Y-, and Z-Areas due to runoff from the Upper Three Runs and Fourmile Branch basins

  6. Hydrological simulation of flood transformations in the upper Danube River: Case study of large flood events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitková Veronika Bačová

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of understand natural processes as factors that restrict, limit or even jeopardize the interests of human society is currently of great concern. The natural transformation of flood waves is increasingly affected and disturbed by artificial interventions in river basins. The Danube River basin is an area of high economic and water management importance. Channel training can result in changes in the transformation of flood waves and different hydrographic shapes of flood waves compared with the past. The estimation and evolution of the transformation of historical flood waves under recent river conditions is only possible by model simulations. For this purpose a nonlinear reservoir cascade model was constructed. The NLN-Danube nonlinear reservoir river model was used to simulate the transformation of flood waves in four sections of the Danube River from Kienstock (Austria to Štúrovo (Slovakia under relatively recent river reach conditions. The model was individually calibrated for two extreme events in August 2002 and June 2013. Some floods that occurred on the Danube during the period of 1991–2002 were used for the validation of the model. The model was used to identify changes in the transformational properties of the Danube channel in the selected river reach for some historical summer floods (1899, 1954 1965 and 1975. Finally, a simulation of flood wave propagation of the most destructive Danube flood of the last millennium (August 1501 is discussed.

  7. Assessment of channel changes, model of historical floods, and effects of backwater on flood stage, and flood mitigation alternatives for the Wichita River at Wichita Falls, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Karl E.; Baldys, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    In cooperation with the City of Wichita Falls, the U.S. Geological Survey assessed channel changes on the Wichita River at Wichita Falls, Texas, and modeled historical floods to investigate possible causes and potential mitigation alternatives to higher flood stages in recent (2007 and 2008) floods. Extreme flooding occurred on the Wichita River on June 30, 2007, inundating 167 homes in Wichita Falls. Although a record flood stage was reached in June 2007, the peak discharge was much less than some historical floods at Wichita Falls. Streamflow and stage data from two gages on the Wichita River and one on Holliday Creek were used to assess the interaction of the two streams. Changes in the Wichita River channel were evaluated using historical aerial and ground photography, comparison of recent and historical cross sections, and comparison of channel roughness coefficients with those from earlier studies. The floods of 2007 and 2008 were modeled using a one-dimensional step-backwater model. Calibrated channel roughness was larger for the 2007 flood compared to the 2008 flood, and the 2007 flood peaked about 4 feet higher than the 2008 flood. Calibration of the 1941 flood yielded a channel roughness coefficient (Manning's n) of 0.030, which represents a fairly clean natural channel. The step-backwater model was also used to evaluate the following potential mitigation alternatives: (1) increasing the capacity of the bypass channel near River Road in Wichita Falls, Texas; (2) removal of obstructions near the Scott Avenue and Martin Luther King Junior Boulevard bridges in Wichita Falls, Texas; (3) widening of aggraded channel banks in the reach between Martin Luther King Junior Boulevard and River Road; and (4) reducing channel bank and overbank roughness. Reductions in water-surface elevations ranged from 0.1 foot to as much as 3.0 feet for the different mitigation alternatives. The effects of implementing a combination of different flood-mitigation alternatives were

  8. Characterizing Global Flood Wave Travel Times to Optimize the Utility of Near Real-Time Satellite Remote Sensing Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, G. H.; David, C. H.; Andreadis, K. M.; Emery, C. M.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2017-12-01

    Earth observing satellites provide valuable near real-time (NRT) information about flood occurrence and magnitude worldwide. This NRT information can be used in early flood warning systems and other flood management applications to save lives and mitigate flood damage. However, these NRT products are only useful to early flood warning systems if they are quickly made available, with sufficient time for flood mitigation actions to be implemented. More specifically, NRT data latency, or the time period between the satellite observation and when the user has access to the information, must be less than the time it takes a flood to travel from the flood observation location to a given downstream point of interest. Yet the paradigm that "lower latency is always better" may not necessarily hold true in river systems due to tradeoffs between data latency and data quality. Further, the existence of statistical breaks in the global distribution of flood wave travel time (i.e. a jagged statistical distribution) would represent preferable latencies for river-observation NRT remote sensing products. Here we present a global analysis of flood wave velocity (i.e. flow celerity) and travel time. We apply a simple kinematic wave model to a global hydrography dataset and calculate flow wave celerity and travel time during bankfull flow conditions. Bankfull flow corresponds to the condition of maximum celerity and thus we present the "worst-case scenario" minimum flow wave travel time. We conduct a similar analysis with respect to the time it takes flood waves to reach the next downstream city, as well as the next downstream reservoir. Finally, we conduct these same analyses, but with regards to the technical capabilities of the planned Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission, which is anticipated to provide waterbody elevation and extent measurements at an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. We validate these results with discharge records from paired

  9. Magnitude of flood flows for selected annual exceedance probabilities for streams in Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.

    2017-05-11

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, determined the magnitude of flood flows at selected annual exceedance prob­abilities (AEPs) at streamgages in Massachusetts and from these data developed equations for estimating flood flows at ungaged locations in the State. Flood magnitudes were deter­mined for the 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent AEPs at 220 streamgages, 125 of which are in Massachusetts and 95 are in the adjacent States of Connecticut, New Hamp­shire, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont. AEP flood flows were computed for streamgages using the expected moments algorithm weighted with a recently computed regional skew­ness coefficient for New England.Regional regression equations were developed to estimate the magnitude of floods for selected AEP flows at ungaged sites from 199 selected streamgages and for 60 potential explanatory basin characteristics. AEP flows for 21 of the 125 streamgages in Massachusetts were not used in the final regional regression analysis, primarily because of regulation or redundancy. The final regression equations used general­ized least squares methods to account for streamgage record length and correlation. Drainage area, mean basin elevation, and basin storage explained 86 to 93 percent of the variance in flood magnitude from the 50- to 0.2-percent AEPs, respec­tively. The estimates of AEP flows at streamgages can be improved by using a weighted estimate that is based on the magnitude of the flood and associated uncertainty from the at-site analysis and the regional regression equations. Weighting procedures for estimating AEP flows at an ungaged site on a gaged stream also are provided that improve estimates of flood flows at the ungaged site when hydrologic characteristics do not abruptly change.Urbanization expressed as the percentage of imperviousness provided some explanatory power in the regional regression; however, it was not statistically

  10. Two-dimensional Model of Ciliwung River Flood in DKI Jakarta for Development of the Regional Flood Index Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Formánek

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to present a sophisticated method of developing supporting material for flood control implementation in DKI Jakarta. High flow rates in the Ciliwung River flowing through Jakarta regularly causes extensive flooding in the rainy season. The affected area comprises highly densely populated villages. For developing an efficient early warning system in view of decreasing the vulnerability of the locations a flood index map has to be available. This study analyses the development of a flood risk map of the inundation area based on a two-dimensional modeling using FESWMS. The reference event used for the model was the most recent significant flood in 2007. The resulting solution represents flood characteristics such as inundation area, inundation depth and flow velocity. Model verification was performed by confrontation of the results with survey data. The model solution was overlaid with a street map of Jakarta. Finally, alternatives for flood mitigation measures are discussed.

  11. Urban pluvial flood prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk; Jensen, David Getreuer

    2016-01-01

    Flooding produced by high-intensive local rainfall and drainage system capacity exceedance can have severe impacts in cities. In order to prepare cities for these types of flood events – especially in the future climate – it is valuable to be able to simulate these events numerically both...... historically and in real-time. There is a rather untested potential in real-time prediction of urban floods. In this paper radar data observations with different spatial and temporal resolution, radar nowcasts of 0–2 h lead time, and numerical weather models with lead times up to 24 h are used as inputs...... to an integrated flood and drainage systems model in order to investigate the relative difference between different inputs in predicting future floods. The system is tested on a small town Lystrup in Denmark, which has been flooded in 2012 and 2014. Results show it is possible to generate detailed flood maps...

  12. FLOOD MENACE IN KADUNA METROPOLIS: IMPACTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr A.B.Ahmed

    damage, causes of flooding, human response to flooding and severity of ... from moving out. Source of ... Man responds to flood hazards through adjustment, flood abatement ... action to minimize or ameliorate flood hazards; flood abatement.

  13. Impacts of 21st century sea-level rise on a Danish major city - an assessment based on fine-resolution digital topography and a new flooding algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeslund, Jesper Erenskjold; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Boecher, Peder Klith; Moelhave, Thomas; Arge, Lars

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the potential impact of 21st century sea-level rise on Aarhus, the second largest city in Denmark, emphasizing the economic risk to the city's real estate. Furthermore, it assesses which possible adaptation measures that can be taken to prevent flooding in areas particularly at risk from flooding. We combine a new national Digital Elevation Model in very fine resolution (∼2 meter), a new highly computationally efficient flooding algorithm that accurately models the influence of barriers, and geospatial data on real-estate values to assess the economic real-estate risk posed by future sea-level rise to Aarhus. Under the A2 and A1FI (IPCC) climate scenarios we show that relatively large residential areas in the northern part of the city as well as areas around the river running through the city are likely to become flooded in the event of extreme, but realistic weather events. In addition, most of the large Aarhus harbour would also risk flooding. As much of the area at risk represent high-value real estate, it seems clear that proactive measures other than simple abandonment should be taken in order to avoid heavy economic losses. Among the different possibilities for dealing with an increased sea level, the strategic placement of flood-gates at key potential water-inflow routes and the construction or elevation of existing dikes seems to be the most convenient, most socially acceptable, and maybe also the cheapest solution. Finally, we suggest that high-detail flooding models similar to those produced in this study will become an important tool for a climate-change-integrated planning of future city development as well as for the development of evacuation plans.

  14. Impacts of 21st century sea-level rise on a Danish major city - an assessment based on fine-resolution digital topography and a new flooding algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeslund, Jesper Erenskjold; Svenning, Jens-Christian [Ecoinformatics and Biodiversity Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Aarhus University (Denmark); Boecher, Peder Klith [Department of Agroecology and Environment, Aarhus University (Denmark); Moelhave, Thomas; Arge, Lars, E-mail: jesper.moeslund@biology.au.d [MADALGO - Center for Massive Data Algorithmics, Aarhus University (Denmark)

    2009-11-01

    This study examines the potential impact of 21st century sea-level rise on Aarhus, the second largest city in Denmark, emphasizing the economic risk to the city's real estate. Furthermore, it assesses which possible adaptation measures that can be taken to prevent flooding in areas particularly at risk from flooding. We combine a new national Digital Elevation Model in very fine resolution ({approx}2 meter), a new highly computationally efficient flooding algorithm that accurately models the influence of barriers, and geospatial data on real-estate values to assess the economic real-estate risk posed by future sea-level rise to Aarhus. Under the A2 and A1FI (IPCC) climate scenarios we show that relatively large residential areas in the northern part of the city as well as areas around the river running through the city are likely to become flooded in the event of extreme, but realistic weather events. In addition, most of the large Aarhus harbour would also risk flooding. As much of the area at risk represent high-value real estate, it seems clear that proactive measures other than simple abandonment should be taken in order to avoid heavy economic losses. Among the different possibilities for dealing with an increased sea level, the strategic placement of flood-gates at key potential water-inflow routes and the construction or elevation of existing dikes seems to be the most convenient, most socially acceptable, and maybe also the cheapest solution. Finally, we suggest that high-detail flooding models similar to those produced in this study will become an important tool for a climate-change-integrated planning of future city development as well as for the development of evacuation plans.

  15. Flash flood forecasting, warning and risk management: the HYDRATE project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borga, M.; Anagnostou, E.N.; Bloeschl, G.; Creutin, J.-D.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We characterize flash flood events in various regions of Europe. → We provide guidance to improve observations and monitoring of flash floods. → Flash floods are associated to orography and are influenced by initial soil moisture conditions. → Models for flash flood forecasting and flash flood hazard assessment are illustrated and discussed. → We examine implications for flood risk policy and discuss recommendations received from end users. - Abstract: The management of flash flood hazards and risks is a critical component of public safety and quality of life. Flash-floods develop at space and time scales that conventional observation systems are not able to monitor for rainfall and river discharge. Consequently, the atmospheric and hydrological generating mechanisms of flash-floods are poorly understood, leading to highly uncertain forecasts of these events. The objective of the HYDRATE project has been to improve the scientific basis of flash flood forecasting by advancing and harmonising a European-wide innovative flash flood observation strategy and developing a coherent set of technologies and tools for effective early warning systems. To this end, the project included actions on the organization of the existing flash flood data patrimony across Europe. The final aim of HYDRATE was to enhance the capability of flash flood forecasting in ungauged basins by exploiting the extended availability of flash flood data and the improved process understanding. This paper provides a review of the work conducted in HYDRATE with a special emphasis on how this body of research can contribute to guide the policy-life cycle concerning flash flood risk management.

  16. Flood maps in Europe - methods, availability and use

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moel, H.; van Alphen, J.; Aerts, J. C. J. H.

    2009-03-01

    To support the transition from traditional flood defence strategies to a flood risk management approach at the basin scale in Europe, the EU has adopted a new Directive (2007/60/EC) at the end of 2007. One of the major tasks which member states must carry out in order to comply with this Directive is to map flood hazards and risks in their territory, which will form the basis of future flood risk management plans. This paper gives an overview of existing flood mapping practices in 29 countries in Europe and shows what maps are already available and how such maps are used. Roughly half of the countries considered have maps covering as good as their entire territory, and another third have maps covering significant parts of their territory. Only five countries have very limited or no flood maps available yet. Of the different flood maps distinguished, it appears that flood extent maps are the most commonly produced floods maps (in 23 countries), but flood depth maps are also regularly created (in seven countries). Very few countries have developed flood risk maps that include information on the consequences of flooding. The available flood maps are mostly developed by governmental organizations and primarily used for emergency planning, spatial planning, and awareness raising. In spatial planning, flood zones delimited on flood maps mainly serve as guidelines and are not binding. Even in the few countries (e.g. France, Poland) where there is a legal basis to regulate floodplain developments using flood zones, practical problems are often faced which reduce the mitigating effect of such binding legislation. Flood maps, also mainly extent maps, are also created by the insurance industry in Europe and used to determine insurability, differentiate premiums, or to assess long-term financial solvency. Finally, flood maps are also produced by international river commissions. With respect to the EU Flood Directive, many countries already have a good starting point to map

  17. Flood maps in Europe – methods, availability and use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. J. H. Aerts

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available To support the transition from traditional flood defence strategies to a flood risk management approach at the basin scale in Europe, the EU has adopted a new Directive (2007/60/EC at the end of 2007. One of the major tasks which member states must carry out in order to comply with this Directive is to map flood hazards and risks in their territory, which will form the basis of future flood risk management plans. This paper gives an overview of existing flood mapping practices in 29 countries in Europe and shows what maps are already available and how such maps are used. Roughly half of the countries considered have maps covering as good as their entire territory, and another third have maps covering significant parts of their territory. Only five countries have very limited or no flood maps available yet. Of the different flood maps distinguished, it appears that flood extent maps are the most commonly produced floods maps (in 23 countries, but flood depth maps are also regularly created (in seven countries. Very few countries have developed flood risk maps that include information on the consequences of flooding. The available flood maps are mostly developed by governmental organizations and primarily used for emergency planning, spatial planning, and awareness raising. In spatial planning, flood zones delimited on flood maps mainly serve as guidelines and are not binding. Even in the few countries (e.g. France, Poland where there is a legal basis to regulate floodplain developments using flood zones, practical problems are often faced which reduce the mitigating effect of such binding legislation. Flood maps, also mainly extent maps, are also created by the insurance industry in Europe and used to determine insurability, differentiate premiums, or to assess long-term financial solvency. Finally, flood maps are also produced by international river commissions. With respect to the EU Flood Directive, many countries already have a good starting

  18. Estimating design flood and HEC-RAS modelling approach for flood analysis in Bojonegoro city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prastica, R. M. S.; Maitri, C.; Hermawan, A.; Nugroho, P. C.; Sutjiningsih, D.; Anggraheni, E.

    2018-03-01

    Bojonegoro faces flood every year with less advanced prevention development. Bojonegoro city development could not peak because the flood results material losses. It affects every sectors in Bojonegoro: education, politics, economy, social, and infrastructure development. This research aims to analyse and to ensure that river capacity has high probability to be the main factor of flood in Bojonegoro. Flood discharge analysis uses Nakayasu synthetic unit hydrograph for period of 5 years, 10 years, 25 years, 50 years, and 100 years. They would be compared to the water maximum capacity that could be loaded by downstream part of Bengawan Solo River in Bojonegoro. According to analysis result, Bengawan Solo River in Bojonegoro could not able to load flood discharges. Another method used is HEC-RAS analysis. The conclusion that shown by HEC-RAS analysis has the same view. It could be observed that flood water loading is more than full bank capacity elevation in the river. To conclude, the main factor that should be noticed by government to solve flood problem is river capacity.

  19. Elevator wheel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhornik, V.I.; Cherkov, Ye.M.; Simonov, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    An elevator wheel is suggested for unloading a sunken product from a bath of a heavy-average separator including discs of a bucket with inner walls, and covering sheets hinged to the buckets. In order to improve the degree of dehydration of the removed product, the inner wall of each bucket is made of sheets installed in steps with gaps of one in relation to the other.

  20. An Approach to Flooding Inundation Combining the Streamflow Prediction Tool (SPT) and Downscaled Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterman, K. A.; Follum, M. L.; Pradhan, N. R.; Niemann, J. D.

    2017-12-01

    Flooding impacts numerous aspects of society, from localized flash floods to continental-scale flood events. Many numerical flood models focus solely on riverine flooding, with some capable of capturing both localized and continental-scale flood events. However, these models neglect flooding away from channels that are related to excessive ponding, typically found in areas with flat terrain and poorly draining soils. In order to obtain a holistic view of flooding, we combine flood results from the Streamflow Prediction Tool (SPT), a riverine flood model, with soil moisture downscaling techniques to determine if a better representation of flooding is obtained. This allows for a more holistic understanding of potential flood prone areas, increasing the opportunity for more accurate warnings and evacuations during flooding conditions. Thirty-five years of near-global historical streamflow is reconstructed with continental-scale flow routing of runoff from global land surface models. Elevation data was also obtained worldwide, to establish a relationship between topographic attributes and soil moisture patterns. Derived soil moisture data is validated against observed soil moisture, increasing confidence in the ability to accurately capture soil moisture patterns. Potential flooding situations can be examined worldwide, with this study focusing on the United States, Central America, and the Philippines.

  1. Flood plain analysis for Petris, , Troas, and Monoros, tia watersheds, the Arad department, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Győri, M.-M.; Haidu, I.

    2012-04-01

    The present study sets out to determine the flood plains corresponding to flood discharges having 10, 50 and 100 year recurrence intervals on the Monoroštia, Petriš and Troaš Rivers, located in Western Romania, the Arad department. The data of the study area is first collected and pre-processed in ArcGIS. It consists of land use data, soil data, the DEM, stream gauges' and meteorological stations' locations, on the basis of which the watersheds' hydrologic parameters' are computed using the Geospatial Hydrologic Modelling Extension (HEC Geo-HMS). HEC Geo-HMS functions as an interface between ArcGIS and HEC-HMS (Hydrologic Engineering Centre- Hydrologic Modelling System) and converts the data collected and generated in ArcGIS to data useable by HEC-HMS. The basin model component in HEC-HMS represents the physical watershed. It facilitates the effective rainfall computation on the basis of the input hyetograph, passing the results to a transform function that converts the excess precipitation into runoff at the subwatersheds' outlet. This enables the estimation and creation of hydrographs for the ungauged watersheds. In the present study, the results are achieved through the SCS CN loss method and the SCS Unit hydrograph transform method. The simulations use rainfall data that is registered at the stations situated in the catchments' vicinity, data that spans over two decades (1989-2009) and which allows the rainfall hyetographs to be determined for the above mentioned return periods. The model will be calibrated against measured streamflow data from the gauging stations on the main rivers, leading to the adjustment of watershed parameters, such as the CN parameter. As the flood discharges for 10, 50 and 100 year return periods have been determined, the profile of the water surface elevation along the channel will be computed through a steady flow analysis, with HEC-RAS (Hydrologic Engineering Centre- River Analysis System). For each of the flood frequencies, a

  2. An elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusev, A.S.; Peshkov, L.P.; Rozin, M.M.; Shestov, A.G.

    1983-01-01

    An elevator is proposed which includes a body, a flap, a lock with a catch and a spring-loaded shut-off clamp in the form of upper and lower horizontal levers which are connected by a handle and an axle and one end of which is made in the form of an eccentric cam. The size of the eccentricity of the cam of the levers is increased toward the handle of the clamp in order to increase the operational reliability and to extend the service life.

  3. An elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastorguyev, M.A.; Maloyarovslavtesv, D.A.; Prokopov, O.I.; Tukayev, Sh.V.; Zanilov, I.F.

    1983-01-01

    An elevator is proposed which includes a body with a turning collar locking device and a rod with longitudinal grooves, which are flexibly linked with jaws positioned in grooves in the body. To increase safety through ensuring automatic locking of the jaws in the closed position, the locking device is made in the form of head on wedges, spring loaded relative to the collar and made with cams and positioned with the capability of interacting with the grooves of the rod and through the cams with the collar.

  4. Revision to flood hazard evaluation for the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Werth, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-08-25

    Requirements for the Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation for new and existing Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are outlined in DOE Order 420.1. This report examines the hazards posed by potential flooding and represents an update to two previous reports. The facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curve is defined as the water elevation for each annual probability of precipitation occurrence (or inversely, the return period in years). New design hyetographs for both 6-hr and 24-hr precipitation distributions were used in conjunction with hydrological models of various basins within the Savannah River Site (SRS). For numerous locations of interest, peak flow discharge and flood water elevation were determined. In all cases, the probability of flooding of these facilities for a 100,000 year precipitation event is negligible.

  5. Bucket elevator

    OpenAIRE

    Chromek, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Cílem této bakalářské práce je návrh svislého korečkového elevátoru, který má sloužit k dopravě obilovin s dopravní výškou 19 m a dopravovaným množstvím 100 t/hod. Práce se skládá z popisu korečkového elevátoru a jeho hlavních částí, zmiňující se v úvodní rešerši. Tato práce je zaměřena na funkční a kapacitní výpočet, určení pohonu a napínacího zařízení. Další výpočet je kontrolní, skládající se z pevnostní kontroly hnacího hřídele, výpočtu pera, životnosti ložisek a výpočtu napínacího zaříze...

  6. Indirect Damage of Urban Flooding: Investigation of Flood-Induced Traffic Congestion Using Dynamic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxuan Zhu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In many countries, industrialization has led to rapid urbanization. Increased frequency of urban flooding is one consequence of the expansion of urban areas which can seriously affect the productivity and livelihoods of urban residents. Therefore, it is of vital importance to study the effects of rainfall and urban flooding on traffic congestion and driver behavior. In this study, a comprehensive method to analyze the influence of urban flooding on traffic congestion was developed. First, a flood simulation was conducted to predict the spatiotemporal distribution of flooding based on Storm Water Management Model (SWMM and TELAMAC-2D. Second, an agent-based model (ABM was used to simulate driver behavior during a period of urban flooding, and a car-following model was established. Finally, in order to study the mechanisms behind how urban flooding affects traffic congestion, the impact of flooding on urban traffic was investigated based on a case study of the urban area of Lishui, China, covering an area of 4.4 km2. It was found that for most events, two-hour rainfall has a certain impact on traffic congestion over a five-hour period, with the greatest impact during the hour following the cessation of the rain. Furthermore, the effects of rainfall with 10- and 20-year return periods were found to be similar and small, whereas the effects with a 50-year return period were obvious. Based on a combined analysis of hydrology and transportation, the proposed methods and conclusions could help to reduce traffic congestion during flood seasons, to facilitate early warning and risk management of urban flooding, and to assist users in making informed decisions regarding travel.

  7. Hydrological and hydraulic models for determination of flood-prone and flood inundation areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Hafzullah; Sadan Ozgur Kirca, Veysel; Burgan, Halil Ibrahim; Kellecioglu, Dorukhan

    2016-05-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are widely used in most studies on water resources. Especially, when the topography and geomorphology of study area are considered, GIS can ease the work load. Detailed data should be used in this kind of studies. Because of, either the complication of the models or the requirement of highly detailed data, model outputs can be obtained fast only with a good optimization. The aim in this study, firstly, is to determine flood-prone areas in a watershed by using a hydrological model considering two wetness indexes; the topographical wetness index, and the SAGA (System for Automated Geoscientific Analyses) wetness index. The wetness indexes were obtained in the Quantum GIS (QGIS) software by using the Digital Elevation Model of the study area. Flood-prone areas are determined by considering the wetness index maps of the watershed. As the second stage of this study, a hydraulic model, HEC-RAS, was executed to determine flood inundation areas under different return period-flood events. River network cross-sections required for this study were derived from highly detailed digital elevation models by QGIS. Also river hydraulic parameters were used in the hydraulic model. Modelling technology used in this study is made of freely available open source softwares. Based on case studies performed on watersheds in Turkey, it is concluded that results of such studies can be used for taking precaution measures against life and monetary losses due to floods in urban areas particularly.

  8. Hydrological and hydraulic models for determination of flood-prone and flood inundation areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Aksoy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Geographic Information Systems (GIS are widely used in most studies on water resources. Especially, when the topography and geomorphology of study area are considered, GIS can ease the work load. Detailed data should be used in this kind of studies. Because of, either the complication of the models or the requirement of highly detailed data, model outputs can be obtained fast only with a good optimization. The aim in this study, firstly, is to determine flood-prone areas in a watershed by using a hydrological model considering two wetness indexes; the topographical wetness index, and the SAGA (System for Automated Geoscientific Analyses wetness index. The wetness indexes were obtained in the Quantum GIS (QGIS software by using the Digital Elevation Model of the study area. Flood-prone areas are determined by considering the wetness index maps of the watershed. As the second stage of this study, a hydraulic model, HEC-RAS, was executed to determine flood inundation areas under different return period-flood events. River network cross-sections required for this study were derived from highly detailed digital elevation models by QGIS. Also river hydraulic parameters were used in the hydraulic model. Modelling technology used in this study is made of freely available open source softwares. Based on case studies performed on watersheds in Turkey, it is concluded that results of such studies can be used for taking precaution measures against life and monetary losses due to floods in urban areas particularly.

  9. May flood-poor periods be more dangerous than flood-rich periods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Jose Luis; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Viglione, Alberto; Kuil, Linda; Bloeschl, Guenter

    2014-05-01

    perception of risk and, consequently, people preparedness remains high. Conversely, long periods without floods will serve to diminish awareness, since the memory of floods tends to be short (i.e., people tend to forget quickly), finally leading communities to take too high risks. Di Baldassarre, G., A. Viglione, G. Carr, L. Kuil, J.L. Salinas and G. Blöschl (2013) Socio-hydrology: conceptualising human-flood interactions, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 17, 3295-3303, doi:10.5194/hess-17-3295-2013. Viglione, A., G. Di Baldassarre, L. Brandimarte, L. Kuil, G. Carr, J.L. Salinas, A. Scolobig and G. Blöschl (2013) Insights from socio-hydrology modelling on dealing with flood risk: roles of collective memory, risk-taking attitude and trust, Journal of Hydrology, accepted.

  10. Flood Hazard Mapping by Using Geographic Information System and Hydraulic Model: Mert River, Samsun, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahdettin Demir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, flood hazard maps were prepared for the Mert River Basin, Samsun, Turkey, by using GIS and Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System (HEC-RAS. In this river basin, human life losses and a significant amount of property damages were experienced in 2012 flood. The preparation of flood risk maps employed in the study includes the following steps: (1 digitization of topographical data and preparation of digital elevation model using ArcGIS, (2 simulation of flood lows of different return periods using a hydraulic model (HEC-RAS, and (3 preparation of flood risk maps by integrating the results of (1 and (2.

  11. A methodology for urban flood resilience assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhomme, Serge; Serre, Damien; Diab, Youssef; Laganier, Richard

    2010-05-01

    In Europe, river floods have been increasing in frequency and severity [Szöllösi-Nagy and Zevenbergen, 2005]. Moreover, climate change is expected to exacerbate the frequency and intensity of hydro meteorological disaster [IPCC, 2007]. Despite efforts made to maintain the flood defense assets, we often observe levee failures leading to finally increase flood risk in protected area. Furthermore, flood forecasting models, although benefiting continuous improvements, remain partly inaccurate due to uncertainties arising all along data calculation processes. In the same time, the year 2007 marks a turning point in history: half of the world population now lives in cities (UN-Habitat, 2007). Moreover, the total urban population is expected to double from two to four billion over the next 30 to 35 years (United Nations, 2006). This growing rate is equivalent to the creation of a new city of one million inhabitants every week, and this during the next four decades [Flood resilience Group]. So, this quick urban development coupled with technical failures and climate change have increased flood risk and corresponding challenges to urban flood risk management [Ashley et al., 2007], [Nie et al., 2009]. These circumstances oblige to manage flood risk by integrating new concepts like urban resilience. In recent years, resilience has become a central concept for risk management. This concept has emerged because a more resilient system is less vulnerable to risk and, therefore, more sustainable [Serre et al., 2010]. But urban flood resilience is a concept that has not yet been directly assessed. Therefore, when decision makers decide to use the resilience concept to manage urban flood, they have no tool to help them. That is why this paper proposes a methodology to assess urban flood resilience in order to make this concept operational. Networks affect the well-being of the people and the smooth functioning of services and, more generally, of economical activities. Yet

  12. A complete CFD tool for flooding forecasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, V.T.; Eberl, H.

    2004-01-01

    Every year, flooding does not only cause property damage of billions of dollars, but also threats to millions of human life around the world. The ability to accurately predict the extreme flooding in urban areas is of obvious importance in order to reduce flooding risks and to improve public safety. In this paper, a complete computational tool is presented that includes pre-processing, meshing, calculating and post-processing modules. The pre-processing procedure is used to interpolate the geometry of the river and floodplains where the data can not be obtained directly from measurements. The meshing procedure is implemented by a triangle mesh generator. The computational procedure is based on a Finite Element Method to discretize the two-dimensional depth-averaged equations for shallow water flow. The post-processing procedure, finally, is interfaced with Geographic Information Systems (GIS), which can serve as a tool for monitoring and as an early warning system. The numerical model is verified and calibrated through many practical projects of flood protection for rivers in Germany. The numerical results show a very good agreement with data from the field survey, as well as data from past flood events. Thus the numerical model can be used as an important tool for flood prediction. (author)

  13. On the reliable use of satellite-derived surface water products for global flood monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirpa, F. A.; Revilla-Romero, B.; Thielen, J.; Salamon, P.; Brakenridge, R.; Pappenberger, F.; de Groeve, T.

    2015-12-01

    Early flood warning and real-time monitoring systems play a key role in flood risk reduction and disaster response management. To this end, real-time flood forecasting and satellite-based detection systems have been developed at global scale. However, due to the limited availability of up-to-date ground observations, the reliability of these systems for real-time applications have not been assessed in large parts of the globe. In this study, we performed comparative evaluations of the commonly used satellite-based global flood detections and operational flood forecasting system using 10 major flood cases reported over three years (2012-2014). Specially, we assessed the flood detection capabilities of the near real-time global flood maps from the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS), and from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and the operational forecasts from the Global Flood Awareness System (GloFAS) for the major flood events recorded in global flood databases. We present the evaluation results of the global flood detection and forecasting systems in terms of correctly indicating the reported flood events and highlight the exiting limitations of each system. Finally, we propose possible ways forward to improve the reliability of large scale flood monitoring tools.

  14. Intercomparison of DEM-based approaches for the identification of flood-prone areas in different geomorphologic and climatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samela, Caterina; Nardi, Fernando; Grimaldi, Salvatore; De Paola, Francesco; Sole, Aurelia; Manfreda, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    Floods represent the most critical natural hazard for many countries and their frequency appears to be increasing in recent times. The legal constraints of public administrators and the growing interest of private companies (e.g., insurance companies) in identifying the areas exposed to the flood risk, is determining the necessity of developing new tools for the risk classification over large areas. Nowadays, among the numerous hydrologic and hydraulic methods regularly used for practical applications, 2-D hydraulic modeling represents the most accurate approach for deriving detailed inundation maps. Nevertheless, data requirement for these modeling approaches is certainly onerous, limiting their applicability over large areas. On this issue, the terrain morphology may provide an extraordinary amount of information useful to detect areas that are particularly prone to serious flooding. In the present work, we compare the reliability of different DEM-derived quantitative morphologic descriptors in characterizing the relationships between geomorphic attributes and flood exposure. The tests are carried out using techniques of pattern classification, such as linear binary classifiers (Degiorgis et al., 2012), whose ability is evaluated through performance measures. Simple and composed morphologic features are taken into account. The morphological features are: the upslope contributing area (A), the local slope (S), the length of the path that hydrologically connects the location under exam to the nearest element of the drainage network (D), the difference in elevation between the cell under exam and the final point of the same path (H), the curvature (downtriangle2H). In addition to the mentioned features, the study takes into consideration a number of composed indices, such as: the modified topographic index (Manfreda et al., 2011), the downslope index (DI) proposed by Hjerdt et al. (2004), the ratio between the elevation difference H and the distance to the network D

  15. Multi-temporal clustering of continental floods and associated atmospheric circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianyu; Zhang, Yongqiang

    2017-12-01

    Investigating clustering of floods has important social, economic and ecological implications. This study examines the clustering of Australian floods at different temporal scales and its possible physical mechanisms. Flood series with different severities are obtained by peaks-over-threshold (POT) sampling in four flood thresholds. At intra-annual scale, Cox regression and monthly frequency methods are used to examine whether and when the flood clustering exists, respectively. At inter-annual scale, dispersion indices with four-time variation windows are applied to investigate the inter-annual flood clustering and its variation. Furthermore, the Kernel occurrence rate estimate and bootstrap resampling methods are used to identify flood-rich/flood-poor periods. Finally, seasonal variation of horizontal wind at 850 hPa and vertical wind velocity at 500 hPa are used to investigate the possible mechanisms causing the temporal flood clustering. Our results show that: (1) flood occurrences exhibit clustering at intra-annual scale, which are regulated by climate indices representing the impacts of the Pacific and Indian Oceans; (2) the flood-rich months occur from January to March over northern Australia, and from July to September over southwestern and southeastern Australia; (3) stronger inter-annual clustering takes place across southern Australia than northern Australia; and (4) Australian floods are characterised by regional flood-rich and flood-poor periods, with 1987-1992 identified as the flood-rich period across southern Australia, but the flood-poor period across northern Australia, and 2001-2006 being the flood-poor period across most regions of Australia. The intra-annual and inter-annual clustering and temporal variation of flood occurrences are in accordance with the variation of atmospheric circulation. These results provide relevant information for flood management under the influence of climate variability, and, therefore, are helpful for developing

  16. Discover Floods Educators Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project WET Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Now available as a Download! This valuable resource helps educators teach students about both the risks and benefits of flooding through a series of engaging, hands-on activities. Acknowledging the different roles that floods play in both natural and urban communities, the book helps young people gain a global understanding of this common--and…

  17. The Upper Mississippi River floodscape: spatial patterns of flood inundation and associated plant community distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJager, Nathan R.; Rohweder, Jason J.; Yin, Yao; Hoy, Erin E.

    2016-01-01

    Questions How is the distribution of different plant communities associated with patterns of flood inundation across a large floodplain landscape? Location Thirty-eight thousand nine hundred and seventy hectare of floodplain, spanning 320 km of the Upper Mississippi River (UMR). Methods High-resolution elevation data (Lidar) and 30 yr of daily river stage data were integrated to produce a ‘floodscape’ map of growing season flood inundation duration. The distributions of 16 different remotely sensed plant communities were quantified along the gradient of flood duration. Results Models fitted to the cumulative frequency of occurrence of different vegetation types as a function of flood duration showed that most types exist along a continuum of flood-related occurrence. The diversity of community types was greatest at high elevations (0–10 d of flooding), where both upland and lowland community types were found, as well as at very low elevations (70–180 d of flooding), where a variety of lowland herbaceous communities were found. Intermediate elevations (20–60 d of flooding) tended to be dominated by floodplain forest and had the lowest diversity of community types. Conclusions Although variation in flood inundation is often considered to be the main driver of spatial patterns in floodplain plant communities, few studies have quantified flood–vegetation relationships at broad scales. Our results can be used to identify targets for restoration of historical hydrological regimes or better anticipate hydro-ecological effects of climate change at broad scales.

  18. Flood action plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slopek, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    Safe operating procedures developed by TransAlta Utilities for dealing with flooding, resulting from upstream dam failures or extreme rainfalls, were presented. Several operating curves developed by Monenco AGRA were described, among them the No Overtopping Curve (NOC), the Safe Filling Curve (SFC), the No Spill Curve (NSC) and the Guaranteed Fill Curve (GFC). The concept of an operational comfort zone was developed and defined. A flood action plan for all operating staff was created as a guide in case of a flooding incident. Staging of a flood action plan workshop was described. Dam break scenarios pertinent to the Bow River were developed for subsequent incorporation into a Flood Action Plan Manual. Evaluation of the technical presentations made during workshops were found them to have been effective in providing operating staff with a better understanding of the procedures that they would perform in an emergency. 8 figs

  19. Validation of individual and aggregate global flood hazard models for two major floods in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigg, M.; Bernhofen, M.; Whyman, C.

    2017-12-01

    A recent intercomparison of global flood hazard models undertaken by the Global Flood Partnership shows that there is an urgent requirement to undertake more validation of the models against flood observations. As part of the intercomparison, the aggregated model dataset resulting from the project was provided as open access data. We compare the individual and aggregated flood extent output from the six global models and test these against two major floods in the African Continent within the last decade, namely severe flooding on the Niger River in Nigeria in 2012, and on the Zambezi River in Mozambique in 2007. We test if aggregating different number and combination of models increases model fit to the observations compared with the individual model outputs. We present results that illustrate some of the challenges of comparing imperfect models with imperfect observations and also that of defining the probability of a real event in order to test standard model output probabilities. Finally, we propose a collective set of open access validation flood events, with associated observational data and descriptions that provide a standard set of tests across different climates and hydraulic conditions.

  20. Spatial Analysis of Land Subsidence and Flood Pattern Based on DInSAR Method in Sentinel Sar Imagery and Weighting Method in Geo-Hazard Parameters Combination in North Jakarta Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, Y.; Yuwono, B. D.; Ramadhanis, Z.

    2018-02-01

    The reclamation program carried out in most cities in North Jakarta is directly adjacent to the Jakarta Bay. Beside this program, the density of population and development center in North Jakarta office has increased the need for underground water excessively. As a result of these things, land subsidence in North Jakarta area is relatively high and so intense. The research methodology was developed based on the method of remote sensing and geographic information systems, expected to describe the spatial correlation between the land subsidence and flood phenomenon in North Jakarta. The DInSAR (Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) method with satellite image data Radar (SAR Sentinel 1A) for the years 2015 to 2016 acquisitions was used in this research. It is intended to obtain a pattern of land subsidence in North Jakarta and then combined with flood patterns. For the preparation of flood threat zoning pattern, this research has been modeling in spatial technique based on a weighted parameter of rainfall, elevation, flood zones and land use. In the final result, we have obtained a flood hazard zonation models then do the overlap against DInSAR processing results. As a result of the research, Geo-hazard modelling has a variety results as: 81% of flood threat zones consist of rural area, 12% consists of un-built areas and 7% consists of water areas. Furthermore, the correlation of land subsidence to flood risk zone is divided into three levels of suitability with 74% in high class, 22% in medium class and 4% in low class. For the result of spatial correlation area between land subsidence and flood risk zone are 77% detected in rural area, 17% detected in un-built area and 6% detected in a water area. Whereas the research product is the geo-hazard maps in North Jakarta as the basis of the spatial correlation analysis between the land subsidence and flooding phenomena.double point.

  1. Missoula flood dynamics and magnitudes inferred from sedimentology of slack-water deposits on the Columbia Plateau, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    Sedimentological study of late Wisconsin, Missoula-flood slack-water sediments deposited along the Columbia and Tucannon Rivers in southern Washington reveals important aspects of flood dynamics. Most flood facies were deposited by energetic flood surges (velocities>6 m/sec) entering protected areas along the flood tract, or flowing up and then directly out of tributary valleys. True still-water facies are less voluminous and restricted to elevations below 230 m. High flood stages attended the initial arrival of the flood wave and were not associated with subsequent hydraulic ponding upslope from channel constrictions. Among 186 flood beds studied in 12 sections, 57% have bioturbated tops, and about half of these bioturbated beds are separated from overlying flood beds by nonflood sediments. A single graded flood bed was deposited at most sites during most floods. Sequences in which 2-9 graded beds were deposited during a single flood are restricted to low elevations. These sequences imply complex, multi-peaked hydrographs in which the first flood surge was generally the largest, and subsequent surges were attenuated by water already present in slack-water areas. Slack-water - sediment stratigraphy suggests a wide range of flood discharges and volumes. Of >40 documented late Wisconsin floods that inundated the Pasco Basin, only about 20 crossed the Palouse-Snake divide. Floods younger than the set-S tephras from Mount St.Helens were generally smaller than earlier floods of late Wisconsin age, although most still crossed the Palouse-Snake divide. These late floods primarily traversed the Cheney-Palouse scabland because stratigraphy of slack-water sediment along the Columbia River implies that the largest flood volumes did not enter the Pasco Basin by way of the Columbia River. 47 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Flood extent and water level estimation from SAR using data-model integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajadi, O. A.; Meyer, F. J.

    2017-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images have long been recognized as a valuable data source for flood mapping. Compared to other sources, SAR's weather and illumination independence and large area coverage at high spatial resolution supports reliable, frequent, and detailed observations of developing flood events. Accordingly, SAR has the potential to greatly aid in the near real-time monitoring of natural hazards, such as flood detection, if combined with automated image processing. This research works towards increasing the reliability and temporal sampling of SAR-derived flood hazard information by integrating information from multiple SAR sensors and SAR modalities (images and Interferometric SAR (InSAR) coherence) and by combining SAR-derived change detection information with hydrologic and hydraulic flood forecast models. First, the combination of multi-temporal SAR intensity images and coherence information for generating flood extent maps is introduced. The application of least-squares estimation integrates flood information from multiple SAR sensors, thus increasing the temporal sampling. SAR-based flood extent information will be combined with a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) to reduce false alarms and to estimate water depth and flood volume. The SAR-based flood extent map is assimilated into the Hydrologic Engineering Center River Analysis System (Hec-RAS) model to aid in hydraulic model calibration. The developed technology is improving the accuracy of flood information by exploiting information from data and models. It also provides enhanced flood information to decision-makers supporting the response to flood extent and improving emergency relief efforts.

  3. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23

    The Flooding Predictor™ is a patented advanced control technology proven in research at the Separations Research Program, University of Texas at Austin, to increase distillation column throughput by over 6%, while also increasing energy efficiency by 10%. The research was conducted under a U. S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement awarded to George Dzyacky of 2ndpoint, LLC. The Flooding Predictor™ works by detecting the incipient flood point and controlling the column closer to its actual hydraulic limit than historical practices have allowed. Further, the technology uses existing column instrumentation, meaning no additional refining infrastructure is required. Refiners often push distillation columns to maximize throughput, improve separation, or simply to achieve day-to-day optimization. Attempting to achieve such operating objectives is a tricky undertaking that can result in flooding. Operators and advanced control strategies alike rely on the conventional use of delta-pressure instrumentation to approximate the column’s approach to flood. But column delta-pressure is more an inference of the column’s approach to flood than it is an actual measurement of it. As a consequence, delta pressure limits are established conservatively in order to operate in a regime where the column is never expected to flood. As a result, there is much “left on the table” when operating in such a regime, i.e. the capacity difference between controlling the column to an upper delta-pressure limit and controlling it to the actual hydraulic limit. The Flooding Predictor™, an innovative pattern recognition technology, controls columns at their actual hydraulic limit, which research shows leads to a throughput increase of over 6%. Controlling closer to the hydraulic limit also permits operation in a sweet spot of increased energy-efficiency. In this region of increased column loading, the Flooding Predictor is able to exploit the benefits of higher liquid

  4. Future trends in flood risk in Indonesia - A probabilistic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muis, Sanne; Guneralp, Burak; Jongman, Brenden; Ward, Philip

    2014-05-01

    Indonesia is one of the 10 most populous countries in the world and is highly vulnerable to (river) flooding. Catastrophic floods occur on a regular basis; total estimated damages were US 0.8 bn in 2010 and US 3 bn in 2013. Large parts of Greater Jakarta, the capital city, are annually subject to flooding. Flood risks (i.e. the product of hazard, exposure and vulnerability) are increasing due to rapid increases in exposure, such as strong population growth and ongoing economic development. The increase in risk may also be amplified by increasing flood hazards, such as increasing flood frequency and intensity due to climate change and land subsidence. The implementation of adaptation measures, such as the construction of dykes and strategic urban planning, may counteract these increasing trends. However, despite its importance for adaptation planning, a comprehensive assessment of current and future flood risk in Indonesia is lacking. This contribution addresses this issue and aims to provide insight into how socio-economic trends and climate change projections may shape future flood risks in Indonesia. Flood risk were calculated using an adapted version of the GLOFRIS global flood risk assessment model. Using this approach, we produced probabilistic maps of flood risks (i.e. annual expected damage) at a resolution of 30"x30" (ca. 1km x 1km at the equator). To represent flood exposure, we produced probabilistic projections of urban growth in a Monte-Carlo fashion based on probability density functions of projected population and GDP values for 2030. To represent flood hazard, inundation maps were computed using the hydrological-hydraulic component of GLOFRIS. These maps show flood inundation extent and depth for several return periods and were produced for several combinations of GCMs and future socioeconomic scenarios. Finally, the implementation of different adaptation strategies was incorporated into the model to explore to what extent adaptation may be able to

  5. Iowa Flood Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, I.; Krajewski, W. F.; Goska, R.; Mantilla, R.; Weber, L. J.; Young, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Iowa Flood Information System (IFIS) is a web-based platform developed by the Iowa Flood Center (IFC) to provide access to flood inundation maps, real-time flood conditions, flood forecasts both short-term and seasonal, flood-related data, information and interactive visualizations for communities in Iowa. The key element of the system's architecture is the notion of community. Locations of the communities, those near streams and rivers, define basin boundaries. The IFIS provides community-centric watershed and river characteristics, weather (rainfall) conditions, and streamflow data and visualization tools. Interactive interfaces allow access to inundation maps for different stage and return period values, and flooding scenarios with contributions from multiple rivers. Real-time and historical data of water levels, gauge heights, and rainfall conditions are available in the IFIS by streaming data from automated IFC bridge sensors, USGS stream gauges, NEXRAD radars, and NWS forecasts. Simple 2D and 3D interactive visualizations in the IFIS make the data more understandable to general public. Users are able to filter data sources for their communities and selected rivers. The data and information on IFIS is also accessible through web services and mobile applications. The IFIS is optimized for various browsers and screen sizes to provide access through multiple platforms including tablets and mobile devices. The IFIS includes a rainfall-runoff forecast model to provide a five-day flood risk estimate for around 500 communities in Iowa. Multiple view modes in the IFIS accommodate different user types from general public to researchers and decision makers by providing different level of tools and details. River view mode allows users to visualize data from multiple IFC bridge sensors and USGS stream gauges to follow flooding condition along a river. The IFIS will help communities make better-informed decisions on the occurrence of floods, and will alert communities

  6. Outburst Flood Simulation Model for Optimizing the Solo River Floods Emergency Response Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Priyana

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop flood inundation based on several flood level. The results of this study are: (a land use in the study area is divided into (1 urban area (the Business Area which includes regional administrative center, shopping area, and office area, (2 residential areas (single home region, the region multi- unit house (residence, settlement areas and apartments, (3 industrial estate (industrial estates are less dense and dense industrial area, (4 the surface area covered with vegetation (forest - thicket, meadow area, and the area of land productive rice fields and fields, (5 the area of open land and vacant land that is intended (the city park , cemetery and park area, and (6 transportation area and the pavement surface area (area train station and bus terminal region, (b the preparation of spatial database in this study in the form of data or data vector altitude of Digital Elevation Model (DEM. District of Jebres there are 56 points of elevation and District of Pasar Kliwon there are 48 points of elevation. Elevation of the study area ranged from 88,9 mpdal up to 127.65 mdpal and (c the higher the flood inundation scenarios impact on land use in the study area are also getting bigger. Most obvious impact under scenario 2 m area of 296 601 m , while the smallest impact under scenario 1 m with an area of 77 693 m 2 2 impact. Extensive simulation results based on the total impact amounts to 544 756 m.

  7. Quantification of uncertainty in flood risk assessment for flood protection planning: a Bayesian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittes, Beatrice; Špačková, Olga; Ebrahimian, Negin; Kaiser, Maria; Rieger, Wolfgang; Disse, Markus; Straub, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Flood risk estimates are subject to significant uncertainties, e.g. due to limited records of historic flood events, uncertainty in flood modeling, uncertain impact of climate change or uncertainty in the exposure and loss estimates. In traditional design of flood protection systems, these uncertainties are typically just accounted for implicitly, based on engineering judgment. In the AdaptRisk project, we develop a fully quantitative framework for planning of flood protection systems under current and future uncertainties using quantitative pre-posterior Bayesian decision analysis. In this contribution, we focus on the quantification of the uncertainties and study their relative influence on the flood risk estimate and on the planning of flood protection systems. The following uncertainty components are included using a Bayesian approach: 1) inherent and statistical (i.e. limited record length) uncertainty; 2) climate uncertainty that can be learned from an ensemble of GCM-RCM models; 3) estimates of climate uncertainty components not covered in 2), such as bias correction, incomplete ensemble, local specifics not captured by the GCM-RCM models; 4) uncertainty in the inundation modelling; 5) uncertainty in damage estimation. We also investigate how these uncertainties are possibly reduced in the future when new evidence - such as new climate models, observed extreme events, and socio-economic data - becomes available. Finally, we look into how this new evidence influences the risk assessment and effectivity of flood protection systems. We demonstrate our methodology for a pre-alpine catchment in southern Germany: the Mangfall catchment in Bavaria that includes the city of Rosenheim, which suffered significant losses during the 2013 flood event.

  8. Health impacts of floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Weiwei; FitzGerald, Gerard Joseph; Clark, Michele; Hou, Xiang-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Floods are the most common hazard to cause disasters and have led to extensive morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The impact of floods on the human community is related directly to the location and topography of the area, as well as human demographics and characteristics of the built environment. The aim of this study is to identify the health impacts of disasters and the underlying causes of health impacts associated with floods. A conceptual framework is developed that may assist with the development of a rational and comprehensive approach to prevention, mitigation, and management. This study involved an extensive literature review that located >500 references, which were analyzed to identify common themes, findings, and expert views. The findings then were distilled into common themes. The health impacts of floods are wide ranging, and depend on a number of factors. However, the health impacts of a particular flood are specific to the particular context. The immediate health impacts of floods include drowning, injuries, hypothermia, and animal bites. Health risks also are associated with the evacuation of patients, loss of health workers, and loss of health infrastructure including essential drugs and supplies. In the medium-term, infected wounds, complications of injury, poisoning, poor mental health, communicable diseases, and starvation are indirect effects of flooding. In the long-term, chronic disease, disability, poor mental health, and poverty-related diseases including malnutrition are the potential legacy. This article proposes a structured approach to the classification of the health impacts of floods and a conceptual framework that demonstrates the relationships between floods and the direct and indirect health consequences.

  9. Nogales flood detention study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura M.; Levick, Lainie; Guertin, D. Phillip; Callegary, James; Guadarrama, Jesus Quintanar; Anaya, Claudia Zulema Gil; Prichard, Andrea; Gray, Floyd; Castellanos, Edgar; Tepezano, Edgar; Huth, Hans; Vandervoet, Prescott; Rodriguez, Saul; Nunez, Jose; Atwood, Donald; Granillo, Gilberto Patricio Olivero; Ceballos, Francisco Octavio Gastellum

    2010-01-01

    Flooding in Ambos Nogales often exceeds the capacity of the channel and adjacent land areas, endangering many people. The Nogales Wash is being studied to prevent future flood disasters and detention features are being installed in tributaries of the wash. This paper describes the application of the KINEROS2 model and efforts to understand the capacity of these detention features under various flood and urbanization scenarios. Results depict a reduction in peak flow for the 10-year, 1-hour event based on current land use in tributaries with detention features. However, model results also demonstrate that larger storm events and increasing urbanization will put a strain on the features and limit their effectiveness.

  10. Development of flood index by characterisation of flood hydrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Biswa; Suman, Asadusjjaman

    2015-04-01

    In recent years the world has experienced deaths, large-scale displacement of people, billions of Euros of economic damage, mental stress and ecosystem impacts due to flooding. Global changes (climate change, population and economic growth, and urbanisation) are exacerbating the severity of flooding. The 2010 floods in Pakistan and the 2011 floods in Australia and Thailand demonstrate the need for concerted action in the face of global societal and environmental changes to strengthen resilience against flooding. Due to climatological characteristics there are catchments where flood forecasting may have a relatively limited role and flood event management may have to be trusted upon. For example, in flash flood catchments, which often may be tiny and un-gauged, flood event management often depends on approximate prediction tools such as flash flood guidance (FFG). There are catchments fed largely by flood waters coming from upstream catchments, which are un-gauged or due to data sharing issues in transboundary catchments the flow of information from upstream catchment is limited. Hydrological and hydraulic modelling of these downstream catchments will never be sufficient to provide any required forecasting lead time and alternative tools to support flood event management will be required. In FFG, or similar approaches, the primary motif is to provide guidance by synthesising the historical data. We follow a similar approach to characterise past flood hydrographs to determine a flood index (FI), which varies in space and time with flood magnitude and its propagation. By studying the variation of the index the pockets of high flood risk, requiring attention, can be earmarked beforehand. This approach can be very useful in flood risk management of catchments where information about hydro-meteorological variables is inadequate for any forecasting system. This paper presents the development of FI and its application to several catchments including in Kentucky in the USA

  11. Legitimizing differentiated flood protection levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, Hartmann; Spit, Tejo

    2016-01-01

    The European flood risk management plan is a new instrument introduced by the Floods Directive. It introduces a spatial turn and a scenario approach in flood risk management, ultimately leading to differentiated flood protection levels on a catchment basis. This challenges the traditional sources of

  12. Flood Inundation Modelling in the Kuantan River Basin using 1D-2D Flood Modeller coupled with ASTER-GDEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Z. F.; Gisen, J. I.; Akbari, A.

    2018-03-01

    Topography dataset is an important input in performing flood inundation modelling. However, it is always difficult to obtain high resolution topography that provide accurate elevation information. Fortunately, there are some open source topography datasets available with reasonable resolution such as SRTM and ASTER-GDEM. In Malaysia particularly in Kuantan, the modelling research on the floodplain area is still lacking. This research aims to: a) to investigate the suitability of ASTER-GDEM to be applied in the 1D-2D flood inundation modelling for the Kuantan River Basin; b) to generate flood inundation map for Kuantan river basin. The topography dataset used in this study is ASTER-GDEM to generate physical characteristics of watershed in the basin. It is used to perform rainfall runoff modelling for hydrological studies and to delineate flood inundation area in the Flood Modeller. The results obtained have shown that a 30m resolution ASTER-GDEM is applicable as an input for the 1D-2D flood modelling. The simulated water level in 2013 has NSE of 0.644 and RSME of 1.259. As a conclusion, ASTER-GDEM can be used as one alternative topography datasets for flood inundation modelling. However, the flood level obtained from the hydraulic modelling shows low accuracy at flat urban areas.

  13. Nuclear reactor equipped with a flooding tank and a residual heat removal and emergency cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Winkler, F.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor such as a pressurized-water reactor or the like which is equipped with a flooding tank and a residual heat removal and emergency cooling system. The flooding tank is arranged within the containment shell at an elevation above the upper edge of the reactor core and contains a liquid for flooding the reactor core in the event of a loss of coolant

  14. Flood-proof motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Marcus [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Even before the Fukushima event occurred some German nuclear power plants (NPP) have considered flooding scenarios. As a result of one of these studies, AREVA performed an upgrade project in NPP Isar 1 with flood-proof motors as a replacement of existing air-cooled low-voltage and high-voltage motors of the emergency cooling chain. After the Fukushima event, in which the cooling chains failed, the topic flood-proof equipment gets more and more into focus. This compact will introduce different kinds of flood-proof electrical motors which are currently installed or planned for installation into NPPs over the world. Moreover the process of qualification, as it was performed during the project in NPP Isar 1, will be shown. (orig.)

  15. Floods and Mold Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold growth may be a problem after flooding. Excess moisture in the home is cause for concern about indoor air quality primarily because it provides breeding conditions for pests, molds and other microorganisms.

  16. FLOODPLAIN, FLOOD COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  17. Flood-proof motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Even before the Fukushima event occurred some German nuclear power plants (NPP) have considered flooding scenarios. As a result of one of these studies, AREVA performed an upgrade project in NPP Isar 1 with flood-proof motors as a replacement of existing air-cooled low-voltage and high-voltage motors of the emergency cooling chain. After the Fukushima event, in which the cooling chains failed, the topic flood-proof equipment gets more and more into focus. This compact will introduce different kinds of flood-proof electrical motors which are currently installed or planned for installation into NPPs over the world. Moreover the process of qualification, as it was performed during the project in NPP Isar 1, will be shown. (orig.)

  18. Flood hazard assessment in areas prone to flash flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvočka, Davor; Falconer, Roger A.; Bray, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Contemporary climate projections suggest that there will be an increase in the occurrence of high-intensity rainfall events in the future. These precipitation extremes are usually the main cause for the emergence of extreme flooding, such as flash flooding. Flash floods are among the most unpredictable, violent and fatal natural hazards in the world. Furthermore, it is expected that flash flooding will occur even more frequently in the future due to more frequent development of extreme weather events, which will greatly increase the danger to people caused by flash flooding. This being the case, there will be a need for high resolution flood hazard maps in areas susceptible to flash flooding. This study investigates what type of flood hazard assessment methods should be used for assessing the flood hazard to people caused by flash flooding. Two different types of flood hazard assessment methods were tested: (i) a widely used method based on an empirical analysis, and (ii) a new, physically based and experimentally calibrated method. Two flash flood events were considered herein, namely: the 2004 Boscastle flash flood and the 2007 Železniki flash flood. The results obtained in this study suggest that in the areas susceptible to extreme flooding, the flood hazard assessment should be conducted using methods based on a mechanics-based analysis. In comparison to standard flood hazard assessment methods, these physically based methods: (i) take into account all of the physical forces, which act on a human body in floodwater, (ii) successfully adapt to abrupt changes in the flow regime, which often occur for flash flood events, and (iii) rapidly assess a flood hazard index in a relatively short period of time.

  19. Analysis and GIS Mapping of Flooding Hazards on 10 May 2016, Guangzhou, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Min Lyu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available On 10 May 2016, Guangdong Province, China, suffered a heavy rainstorm. This rainstorm flooded the whole city of Guangzhou. More than 100,000 people were affected by the flooding, in which eight people lost their lives. Subway stations, cars, and buses were submerged. In order to analyse the influential factors of this flooding, topographical characteristics were mapped using Digital Elevation Model (DEM by the Geographical Information System (GIS and meteorological conditions were statistically summarised at both the whole city level and the district level. To analyse the relationship between flood risk and urbanization, GIS was also adopted to map the effect of the subway system using the Multiple Buffer operator over the flooding distribution area. Based on the analyses, one of the significant influential factors of flooding was identified as the urbanization degree, e.g., construction of a subway system, which forms along flood-prone areas. The total economic loss due to flooding in city centers with high urbanization has become very serious. Based on the analyses, the traditional standard of severity of flooding hazards (rainfall intensity grade was modified. Rainfall intensity for severity flooding was decreased from 50 mm to 30 mm in urbanized city centers. In order to protect cities from flooding, a “Sponge City” planning approach is recommended to increase the temporary water storage capacity during heavy rainstorms. In addition, for future city management, the combined use of GIS and Building Information Modelling (BIM is recommended to evaluate flooding hazards.

  20. Flood hazard zoning in Yasooj region, Iran, using GIS and multi-criteria decision analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Rahmati

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Flood is considered to be the most common natural disaster worldwide during the last decades. Flood hazard potential mapping is required for management and mitigation of flood. The present research was aimed to assess the efficiency of analytical hierarchical process (AHP to identify potential flood hazard zones by comparing with the results of a hydraulic model. Initially, four parameters via distance to river, land use, elevation and land slope were used in some part of the Yasooj River, Iran. In order to determine the weight of each effective factor, questionnaires of comparison ratings on the Saaty's scale were prepared and distributed to eight experts. The normalized weights of criteria/parameters were determined based on Saaty's nine-point scale and its importance in specifying flood hazard potential zones using the AHP and eigenvector methods. The set of criteria were integrated by weighted linear combination method using ArcGIS 10.2 software to generate flood hazard prediction map. The inundation simulation (extent and depth of flood was conducted using hydrodynamic program HEC-RAS for 50- and 100-year interval floods. The validation of the flood hazard prediction map was conducted based on flood extent and depth maps. The results showed that the AHP technique is promising of making accurate and reliable prediction for flood extent. Therefore, the AHP and geographic information system (GIS techniques are suggested for assessment of the flood hazard potential, specifically in no-data regions.

  1. LiDAR and IFSAR-Based Flood Inundation Model Estimates for Flood-Prone Areas of Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. C.; Goldade, M. M.; Kastens, J.; Dobbs, K. E.; Macpherson, G. L.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme flood events are not unusual in semi-arid to hyper-arid regions of the world, and Afghanistan is no exception. Recent flashfloods and flashflood-induced landslides took nearly 100 lives and destroyed or damaged nearly 2000 homes in 12 villages within Guzargah-e-Nur district of Baghlan province in northeastern Afghanistan. With available satellite imagery, flood-water inundation estimation can be accomplished remotely, thereby providing a means to reduce the impact of such flood events by improving shared situational awareness during major flood events. Satellite orbital considerations, weather, cost, data licensing restrictions, and other issues can often complicate the acquisition of appropriately timed imagery. Given the need for tools to supplement imagery where not available, complement imagery when it is available, and bridge the gap between imagery based flood mapping and traditional hydrodynamic modeling approaches, we have developed a topographic floodplain model (FLDPLN), which has been used to identify and map river valley floodplains with elevation data ranging from 90-m SRTM to 1-m LiDAR. Floodplain "depth to flood" (DTF) databases generated by FLDPLN are completely seamless and modular. FLDPLN has been applied in Afghanistan to flood-prone areas along the northern and southern flanks of the Hindu Kush mountain range to generate a continuum of 1-m increment flood-event models up to 10 m in depth. Elevation data used in this application of FLDPLN included high-resolution, drone-acquired LiDAR (~1 m) and IFSAR (5 m; INTERMAP). Validation of the model has been accomplished using the best available satellite-derived flood inundation maps, such as those issued by Unitar's Operational Satellite Applications Programme (UNOSAT). Results provide a quantitative approach to evaluating the potential risk to urban/village infrastructure as well as to irrigation systems, agricultural fields and archaeological sites.

  2. Pluvial, urban flood mechanisms and characteristics - Assessment based on insurance claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörensen, Johanna; Mobini, Shifteh

    2017-12-01

    Pluvial flooding is a problem in many cities and for city planning purpose the mechanisms behind pluvial flooding are of interest. Previous studies seldom use insurance claim data to analyse city scale characteristics that lead to flooding. In the present study, two long time series (∼20 years) of flood claims from property owners have been collected and analysed in detail to investigate the mechanisms and characteristics leading to urban flooding. The flood claim data come from the municipal water utility company and property owners with insurance that covers property loss from overland flooding, groundwater intrusion through basement walls and flooding from the drainage system. These data are used as a proxy for flood severity for several events in the Swedish city of Malmö. It is discussed which rainfall characteristics give most flooding and why some rainfall events do not lead to severe flooding, how city scale topography and sewerage system type influence spatial distribution of flood claims, and which impact high sea level has on flooding in Malmö. Three severe flood events are described in detail and compared with a number of smaller flood events. It was found that the main mechanisms and characteristics of flood extent and its spatial distribution in Malmö are intensity and spatial distribution of rainfall, distance to the main sewer system as well as overland flow paths, and type of drainage system, while high sea level has little impact on the flood extent. Finally, measures that could be taken to lower the flood risk in Malmö, and other cities with similar characteristics, are discussed.

  3. 75 FR 29201 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... 23, 2009 080046 1070). Denver (09-08-0620P). 9, 2009; Denver Hickenlooper, Mayor, Post. City and... 9, 2009 180057 1070). 05-0815P). 10, 2009; The Miller, Mayor, City of Elkhart Truth. Elkhart...; The Rodino, President, (09-05-0815P). Elkhart Truth. Elkhart County Board of Commissioners, 117 North...

  4. 76 FR 68325 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ..., Orlando, FL 32801. Pasco (FEMA Docket No.: B- Unincorporated areas May 6, 2011; May 13, The Honorable Ann... September 21, 2010 480131 1205). 0342P). October 7, 2010; Terrell, Mayor, City of The Allen American. Allen...

  5. 76 FR 77155 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... respective addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief... Honorable Paul June 30, 2011 421847 03-0172P). March 2, 2011; The Wentzler, Chairman, Williamsport Sun...

  6. 75 FR 82275 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... respective addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief..., CA 95110. Ventura City of Simi Valley July 9, 2010; July The Honorable Paul November 15, 2010 060421...

  7. 76 FR 20554 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering... Honorable Paul February 14, 2011 460180 1165). 08-0469P). 15, 2010, The Argus Zimmer, Mayor, City of Leader...

  8. 76 FR 21660 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... respective addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief...: Adams City of Commerce City February 1, 2011; The Honorable Paul June 8, 2011 080006 (10-08-0226P...

  9. 75 FR 78613 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... respective addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief..., The Honorable Paul Zimmer, February 14, 2011.... 460180 (10-08-0469P)........ October 15, 2010, Mayor...

  10. 76 FR 50913 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... respective addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief..., Huntsville, AL 35801. Madison City of Madison (10- June 30, 2011; July The Honorable Paul November 4, 2011... Paul September 12, 2011 450170 of Richland County 2011; The Columbia Livingston, Chairman, (11-04-1879P...

  11. 76 FR 60748 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... respective addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief...: Linn City of Marion (11-07- August 11, 2011; The Honorable Paul Rehn, December 16, 2011 190191 1284P...

  12. 75 FR 82274 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... respective addresses are listed in the table below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief..., Currituck, NC 27929. South Carolina: Richland Unincorporated areas May 28, 2010; June The Honorable Paul...

  13. 75 FR 7955 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Honorable James A. December 31, 2008 390348 2056P) January 19, 2009; Smith, Mayor, City of Morning Journal...; August The Honorable Jeff December 4, 2009 481028 (09-06-0609P) 6, 2009; Austin Coleman, Mayor, City...; Austin T. Biscoe, Travis 0609P) American Statesman. County Judge, 314 West 11th Street, Suite 520, Austin...

  14. 75 FR 18074 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ...). Marietta Daily County Board of Journal. Commissioners, 100 Cherokee Street, Marietta, GA 30090. Illinois...). Sun Journal. 406 Craven Street, New Bern, NC 28560. Durham City of Durham (08-04- August 27, 2009; The..., 1001 Preston Street, Suite 911, Houston, TX 77002. Travis City of Austin (09-06- October 12, 2009; The...

  15. 75 FR 29195 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ..., City of Lubbock, Lubbock Avalanche- P.O. Box 2000, Lubbock, Journal. TX 79457. Travis City of Austin..., Mayor, City Austin American of Austin, P.O. Box Statesman. 1088, Austin, TX 78767. Virginia: City of...

  16. 76 FR 43194 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ..., Supervisor, Town The Journal News. of Orangetown, 26 Orangeburg Road, Orangeburg, NY 10962. Oklahoma..., Saginaw, TX 76179. Travis City of Austin (10-06- January 19, 2011; The Honorable Lee May 20, 2011 480624 1794P). January 26, 2011; Leffingwell, Mayor, City The Austin American- of Austin, P.O. Box Statesman...

  17. 76 FR 68322 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... 10, 2011; The Honorable David September 6, 2011 010217 of Jefferson County August 17, 2011... 420417 Haverford (11-03- 12, 2011; The Daily Wechsler, President, 0098P). Times. Township of Haverford...

  18. 76 FR 39009 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ..., 2011; Ruane, Mayor, City of The News-Press. Sanibel, 800 Dunlop Road, Sanibel, FL 33957. Lee, (FEMA... No.: B- Town of Kill Devil November 9, 2010; The Honorable Raymond October 29, 2010 375353 1191). Hills (10-04-3184P). November 16, 2010; Sturza, Mayor, Town of The Coastland Times. Kill Devil Hills, P...

  19. 76 FR 21662 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... of The Arizona Cave Creek, 37622 Cave Business Gazette. Creek Road, Cave Creek, AZ 85331. California... Kill Devil November 9, 2010; The Honorable Raymond October 29, 2010 375353 Hills, (10-04-3184P). November 16, 2010; Sturza, Mayor, Town of The Coastland Times. Kill Devil Hills, P.O. Box 1719, Kill Devil...

  20. 76 FR 26943 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ... under the criteria of section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning...-0509P). March 29, 2011; The Demshar, Mayor, City of Rocket-Miner. Rock Springs, 212 D Street, Rock... 560087 of Sweetwater County March 29, 2011; The Dellai Boese, Chairman, (10-08-0509P). Rocket-Miner...

  1. 75 FR 7956 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order... Springs, 212 D Rocket Miner. Street, Rock Springs, WY 82901. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance No...

  2. 75 FR 78606 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... under the criteria of section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning... Reservation, 500 Miner. Merriman Avenue, Needles, CA 92363. Arizona: Pinal Town of Florence..... September 24...

  3. 76 FR 8900 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    .... Burleyson Drive, Dalton, GA 30720. Hawaii: Hawaii (FEMA Docket No.: B- Unincorporated areas April 30, 2010; May The Honorable William P. September 7, 2010 155166 1135). of Hawaii County (09- 7, 2010; Hawaii Kenoi, Mayor, Hawaii 09-1789P). Tribune-Herald. County, 25 Aupuni Street, Hilo, HI 96720. Hawaii (FEMA...

  4. 75 FR 18082 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Democrat. Adams Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301. Hawaii: Hawaii Unincorporated areas August 12, 2009; The Honorable William P. December 17, 2009 155166 of Hawaii County (08- August 19, 2009; Kenoi, Mayor, Hawaii 09-1858P). Hawaii Tribune- County, 25 Aupuni Herald. Street, Hilo, HI 96720. Kansas: Johnson City of...

  5. 75 FR 81892 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ..., 500 San Sebastian View, St. Augustine, FL 32084. Hawaii: Hawaii (FEMA Docket No.: B- Unincorporated areas April 16, 2010; The Honorable William P. August 23, 2010 155166 1124) of Hawaii County (09- April 23, 2010; Kenoi, Mayor, Hawaii 09-1398P). Hawaii Tribune- County, 25 Aupuni Herald. Street, Hilo, HI...

  6. 75 FR 78610 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ...)........ Citizen. County, 1407 Burleyson Drive, Dalton, GA 30720. Hawaii: Hawaii Unincorporated areas April 30, 2010, May The Honorable William P. September 7, 2010.... 155166 of Hawaii County. 7, 2010, Hawaii Kenoi, Mayor, County of (09-09-1789P)........ Tribune-Herald. Hawaii, 25 Aupuni Street, Hilo, HI 96720. Idaho...

  7. 75 FR 11744 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Aupuni Street, Hilo, HI 96720. Hawaii (FEMA Docket No: B- Unincorporated areas March 12, 2009; The... 09-1568P). Hawaii Tribune- County, 25 Aupuni Herald. Street, Hilo, HI 96720. Idaho: Blaine (FEMA.... Chairperson, Henry County Board of Commissioners, 140 Henry Parkway, McDonough, GA 30253. Hawaii: Hawaii (FEMA...

  8. 75 FR 35672 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... of Commissioners, P.O. Box 398, Fort Myers, FL 33902. Hawaii: Hawaii Unincorporated areas April 16, 2010; The Honorable William P. August 23, 2010 155166 of Hawaii County (09- April 23, 2010; Kenoi, Mayor, Hawaii 09-1398P). Hawaii Tribune- County, 25 Aupuni Herald. Street, Hilo, HI 96720. Illinois: St...

  9. 76 FR 43603 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    .... Hawaii: Hawaii (FEMA Docket No.: B- Unincorporated areas January 3, 2011; The Honorable William P. May 10, 2011 155166 1191). of Hawaii County (10- January 10, 2011; Kenoi, Mayor, Hawaii 09-3793P). The Hawaii Tribune- County, 25 Aupuni Herald. Street, Hilo, HI 96720. North Carolina: Alamance (FEMA Docket No.: B...

  10. 75 FR 78615 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... East Avenue, Cedartown, GA 30125. Hawaii: Hawaii Unincorporated areas June 10, 2010, June The Honorable William P. October 15, 2010..... 155166 of Hawaii County. 17, 2010, Hawaii Kenoi, Mayor, Hawaii (09-09-2120P)........ Tribune-Herald. County, 25 Aupuni Street, Hilo, HI 96720. Kansas: Johnson City of Fairway...

  11. 77 FR 55785 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ...-B- 1145, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... (email) [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief... comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation...

  12. 77 FR 55784 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... comments, identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1110, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch... CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation...

  13. 76 FR 58411 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ..., Mayor, City of Antonio Express- San Antonio, P.O. Box News. 839966, San Antonio, TX 78283. Collin (FEMA.... Potter and Randall (FEMA City of Amarillo (10- August 20, 2010; The Honorable Debra August 13, 2010...- Amarillo, P.O. Box 1971, News. Amarillo, TX 79105. Rockwall (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Rockwall (10...

  14. 75 FR 82272 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... West Valley Forge Road, King of Prussia, PA 19406. Texas: Potter and Randall City of Amarillo (10..., City of The Amarillo Globe- Amarillo, P.O. Box 1971, News. Amarillo, TX 79105. Brazoria Unincorporated... 480076 1185P). August 16, 2010; Martin, Mayor, City of The Alvin Sun. Manvel, P.O. Box 187, Manvel, TX...

  15. 77 FR 425 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    .... Johns Unincorporated areas October 5, 2011; The Honorable Joseph February 9, 2012 125147 of St. Johns... Journal. South, Willard, UT 84340. Wyoming: Campbell City of Gillette (11- October 18, 2011; The Honorable...-Record. 201 East 5th Street, Gillette, WY 82717. Campbell Unincorporated areas October 18, 2011; The...

  16. 76 FR 20553 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... 170480 (10-05-2793P). 30, 2010, The Saas, Mayor, Village of Northwest Herald. Huntley, 10987 Main Street... 170480 (10-05-2799P). 23, 2010, The Saas, Mayor, Village of Northwest Herald. Huntley, 10987 Main Street...

  17. 77 FR 50626 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    .... Street, Peoria, AZ 85345. Colorado: Arapahoe (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Centennial December 8, 2011... of The Littleton Centennial, 13133 East Independent. Arapahoe Road, Centennial, CO 80112. Arapahoe (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Centennial December 8, 2011; The Honorable Cathy Noon, April 13, 2012...

  18. 77 FR 12501 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... Monroe Business Gazette. Street, Peoria, AZ 85345. Colorado: Arapahoe City of Centennial December 8, 2011... Littleton Centennial, 13133 East Independent. Arapahoe Road, Centennial, CO 80112. Arapahoe City of Centennial December 8, 2011; The Honorable Cathy Noon, April 13, 2012 080315 (11-08-1095P). December 15, 2011...

  19. 75 FR 35682 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ...; The Honorable Fran Cook, March 26, 2010 080073 1096). (10-08-0009P)........ November 26, 2009; Mayor... Ramsey (09-05- November 20, 2009; The Honorable Thomas G. December 14, 2009 270681 B-1096). 4652P...

  20. 76 FR 79093 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ..., 2011; The Honorable Thomas E. June 2, 2011 350146 1203). (10-06-2588P). February 2, 2011; Swisstack..., 2011 480214 1205). 06-2130P). February 8, 2011; Cook, Mayor, City of El The El Paso Times. Paso, 2...; May The Honorable John F. May 13, 2011 480214 1205). 06-3638P). 27, 2011; The El Cook, Mayor, City of...

  1. 77 FR 20994 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ...; Thomas, Jr., Mayor, City The Coastal Courier. of Hinesville, 115 East Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive...). August 18, 2011; Cook, Mayor, City of El The El Paso Times. Paso, 2 Civic Center Plaza, 10th Floor, El...

  2. 76 FR 50915 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... Honorable Thomas E. August 26, 2010 350146 No.: B-1124). (10-06-0995P). April 28, 2010; The Swisstack, Mayor..., July 20, 2010; July The Honorable David Cook, November 24, 2010 480606 1162). (10-06-0427P). 27, 2010...

  3. 75 FR 23593 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... Fran Cook, March 26, 2010 080073 08-0009P). November 26, 2009; Mayor, Town of Fraser, Middle Park Times... (09- November 20, 2009; The Honorable Thomas G. December 14, 2009 270681 05-4652P). November 27, 2009...

  4. 75 FR 18088 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... 0491P). November 17, 2009; Nolan, Mayor, City of Press-Enterprise. Corona, 400 South Vincentia Avenue..., City of Casper Star-Tribune. Casper, 200 North David Street, Casper, WY 82601. Natrona Unincorporated...

  5. 75 FR 29205 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... Business Review. Collins Avenue, Suite 250, Sunny Isles Beach, FL 33160. Osceola City of St. Cloud (09... Morrow (09-04- February 12, 2010; The Honorable Jim June 21, 2010 130045 4735P). Februrary 19, 2010...

  6. 76 FR 8905 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ...- December 8, 2010; The Honorable Jim December 24, 2010 060766 3624P). December 15, 2010; Frazier, Mayor...- December 15, 2010; The Honorable Joe December 8, 2010 375350 04-8305P). December 22, 2010; Collins, Mayor...

  7. 76 FR 18938 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... Isles Beach, 18070 Review. Collins Avenue, Sunny Isles Beach, FL 33160. Monroe (FEMA Docket No.: B.... Jim Schmidt, December 24, 2010 460277 No.: B-1156) of Lincoln County August 26, 2010; Chairman...

  8. 75 FR 81484 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ...: Arapahoe (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Englewood (10- February 25, 2010; The Honorable Jim February 18, 2010..., 18070 Business Review. Collins Avenue, Suite 250, Sunny Isles Beach, FL 33160. Monroe (FEMA Docket No...: Clayton (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Morrow (09-04- February 12, 2010; The Honorable Jim June 21, 2010...

  9. 75 FR 29199 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ..., February 25, 2010; The Honorable Jim February 18, 2010 085074 (10-08-0001P). March 5, 2010; The Woodward.... Commissioners, P.O. Box 850, Eagle, CO 81631. Larimer City of Fort Collins, February 8, 2010; The Honorable Doug February 24, 2010 080102 (09-08-0465P). February 15, 2010; Hutchinson, Mayor, City Fort Collins of Fort...

  10. 78 FR 49121 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ..., 2011; June Mr. Raymond E. Sines, July 01, 2011 390771 of Lake County (10- 21, 2011; The News President.... Sines, December 16, 2011 390771 of Lake County (11- August 18, 2011; President, Lake County 05-2150P...

  11. 77 FR 1884 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ... County August 12, 2011; Craft, Chairman, St. (11-04-4362P). The St. Lucie News- Lucie County Board of... Sun-News. Miyagishima, Mayor, City of Las Cruces, 700 North Main Street, Las Cruces, NM 88004. New.... June 16, 2011 360497 02-2163P). December 31, 2010; Bloomberg, Mayor, City The Chief. of New York, City...

  12. 76 FR 58409 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ...). 30, 2011; The Las Daniel Gallegos Cruces Sun-News. Miyagishima, Mayor, City of Las Cruces, 700 North... Honorable Michael R. June 16, 2011 360497 02-2163P). December 31, 2010; Bloomberg, Mayor, City The Chief. of... News. Drive, Thorndale, PA 19372. Chester Township of West March 4, 2011; March The Honorable Edward G...

  13. 76 FR 20551 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Daily Schillerstrom, Chairman, 05-1256P). Herald. DuPage County Board, Jack T. Knuepfer Administration... Chairman, Board of Spectator. Selectmen, Swansea Town Hall Annex, 68 Stevens Road, Swansea, MA 02777...). 8, 2010, The Easton Administrator, Enterprise News. 136 Elm Street, Easton, MA 02356. Bristol Town...

  14. 76 FR 50420 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... 20, 2010, Schillerstrom, Chairman, (10-05-1256P). The Daily Herald. DuPage County Board, Jack T..., Easton Administrator, The Enterprise News. 136 Elm Street, Easton, MA 02356. Bristol (FEMA Docket No. B...-0021P). November 22, 2010, Easton Administrator, The Enterprise News. 136 Elm Street, Easton, MA 02356...

  15. 77 FR 3391 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ..., City 3899P). The Honolulu Star- and County of Honolulu, Advertiser. 530 South King Street, Room 300... Stephen F. February 27, 2012 560081 of Campbell County October 28, 2011; Hughes, Chairman, (11-08-0781P...

  16. 76 FR 17 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ...: Collier (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Marco Island February 19, 2010; Mr. Stephen T. Thompson, February 9... & Advance. Lynchburg, 900 Church Street, Lynchburg, VA 24504. Washington: King (FEMA Docket No.: B-1121.... King (FEMA Docket No.: B-1121) Unincorporated areas February 5, 2010; The Honorable Dow February 26...

  17. 76 FR 79090 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... changes in a newspaper of local circulation, any person has ninety (90) days in which to request through... and name of State and county Location and case No. newspaper where Chief executive, officer Effective..., Gettysburg Times. Township of Franklin Board of Supervisors, 55 Scott School Road, Cashtown, PA 17310...

  18. 77 FR 44498 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... Avenue, Colorado Springs, CO 80903. Routt (FEMA Docket No.: B- Town of Hayden (11-08- Nov. 6, 2011, Nov... Pilot & Hayden, 178 West Today. Jefferson Avenue, Hayden, CO 81639. Weld (FEMA Docket No.: B-1244) City...

  19. 75 FR 18084 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Street SW., Washington, DC 20472, (202) 646-2820, or (e-mail) [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY....; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376..., 2009; Wasserman, Mayor, City The Argus. of Freemont, 3300 Capitol Avenue, Fremont, CA 94538. San Diego...

  20. 75 FR 35674 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ..., DC 20472, (202) 646-2820, or (e-mail) [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal... 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p.376. Sec. 65.4 [Amended... Argus. of Freemont, 3300 Capitol Avenue, Fremont, CA 94538. Riverside (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of...

  1. 76 FR 2837 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... Herald-Gazette. Barnesville, 109 Forsyth Street, Barnesville, GA 30204. Georgia: Tift City of Tifton (09..., Chairman, Tift County The Tifton Gazette. Board of Commissioners, P.O. Box 229, Tifton, GA 31793. Georgia... Tift Avenue, Tifton, GA 31794. [[Page 2839

  2. 76 FR 40815 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    ...). November 26, 2010; Cater, Jr., Mayor, City The Tifton Gazette. of Tifton, P.O. Box 229, Tifton, GA 31793.... Commission, 225 North Tift Avenue, Tifton, GA 31794. Mississippi: DeSoto (FEMA Docket City of Olive Branch... Broad Street, Winder, GA 30680. Bryan (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Richmond Hill November 3, 2010; The...

  3. 75 FR 18076 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ...; Chairman, Coconino (08-09-1418P). Arizona Daily Sun. County Board of Supervisors, 219 East Cherry Avenue... February 13, 2009; The Honorable Paul Biane, June 19, 2009 060270 No: B-1044). of San Bernardino February...

  4. 76 FR 23 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    .... Street, Suite 301, Lincoln, NE 68508. Virginia: City of Fairfax City of Fairfax (10- June 14, 2010; June.... June 24, 2010 230169 01-1532P). 19, 2010; The Times- Henderson, Chairman, Record. Board of Selectman, P...

  5. 77 FR 31216 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ..., Building B, 2nd Floor, Evans, GA 30809. Nevada: Clark (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Henderson (11- October 6..., City of The Las Vegas Henderson, 240 Water Review-Journal. Street, Henderson, NV 89015. Clark (FEMA... 50 Journal. South, Willard, UT 84340. Virginia: Fauquier (FEMA Docket No.: B- Unincorporated areas...

  6. 76 FR 22054 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    .... June 24, 2010 230169 1143). 01-1532P). 19, 2010; The Times Henderson, Chairman, Record. Board of.... Selectboard, P.O. Box 217, Wilmington, VT 05363. Virginia: Independent City of City of Fairfax (10-03- June 14...

  7. 76 FR 76052 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... City of Orlando (11- June 30, 2011; July The Honorable Buddy Dyer, November 4, 2011 120186 04-2561P). 7, 2011; The Mayor, City of Orlando, Orlando Weekly. 400 South Orange Avenue, 3rd Floor, Orlando, FL 32808. Orange City of Orlando (11- September 29, 2011; The Honorable Buddy Dyer, September 20, 2011 120186 04...

  8. 76 FR 44276 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    ...] 0 2. The tables published under the authority of Sec. 65.4 are amended as follows: Date and name of... modification Community No. notice was published of community No. Delaware: New Castle Town of Odessa (11-03..., Richland Hills, TX 76182. Travis City of Austin (10-06- December 30, 2010; The Honorable Lee December 23...

  9. 75 FR 18090 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ...] 0 2. The tables published under the authority of Sec. 65.4 are amended as follows: Date and name of... modification Community notice was published of community No. New York: Suffolk Town of Southampton March 4... Austin (09-06- March 10, 2010; The Honorable Lee July 15, 2010 480624 3398P). March 17, 2010; Leffingwell...

  10. The role of interactions along the flood process chain and implications for risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorogushyn, Sergiy; Apel, Heiko; Viet Nguyen, Dung; Guse, Björn; Kreibich, Heidi; Lüdtke, Stefan; Schröter, Kai; Merz, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    Floods with their manifold characteristics are shaped by various processes along the flood process chain - from triggering meteorological extremes through catchment and river network process down to impacts on societies. In flood risk systems numerous interactions and feedbacks along the process chain may occur which finally shape spatio-temporal flood patterns and determine the ultimate risk. In this talk, we review some important interactions in the atmosphere-catchment, river-dike-floodplain and vulnerability compartments of the flood risk system. We highlight the importance of spatial interactions for flood hazard and risk assessment. For instance, the role of spatial rainfall structure or wave superposition in river networks is elucidated with selected case studies. In conclusion, we show the limits of current methods in assessment of large-scale flooding and outline the approach to more comprehensive risk assessment based on our regional flood risk model (RFM) for Germany.

  11. Assessment of flooding in a best estimate thermal hydraulic code (WCOBRA/TRAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, K.; Young, M.Y.

    1998-01-01

    The performance of WCOBRA/TRAC code in predicting the flooding, the counter-current flow limit, is evaluated in three geometries important to nuclear reactor loss-of-coolant accident evaluation; a vertical pipe, a perforated plate, and a downcomer annulus. These flow limits are computationally evaluated through transient conditions. The flooding in the vertical pipe is compared with the classical Wallis flooding limit. The flooding on the perforated plate is compared with the Northwestern flooding data correlation. The downcomer flooding in 1/15th and 1/5th scale model is compared with the Creare data. Finally, full scale downcomer flooding is compared with the UPTF test data. The prediction capability of the code for the flooding is found to be very good. (orig.)

  12. Estimation of Damage Costs Associated with Flood Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, T. A.; Wauthier, C.; Zipp, K.

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates the possibility of creating a mathematical function that enables the estimation of flood-damage costs. We begin by examining the costs associated with past flood events in the United States. The data on these tropical storms and hurricanes are provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. With the location, extent of flooding, and damage reparation costs identified, we analyze variables such as: number of inches rained, land elevation, type of landscape, region development in regards to building density and infrastructure, and population concentration. We seek to identify the leading drivers of high flood-damage costs and understand which variables play a large role in the costliness of these weather events. Upon completion of our mathematical analysis, we turn out attention to the 2017 natural disaster of Texas. We divide the region, as we did above, by land elevation, type of landscape, region development in regards to building density and infrastructure, and population concentration. Then, we overlay the number of inches rained in those regions onto the divided landscape and apply our function. We hope to use these findings to estimate the potential flood-damage costs of Hurricane Harvey. This information is then transformed into a hazard map that could provide citizens and businesses of flood-stricken zones additional resources for their insurance selection process.

  13. How frequently will the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) observe floods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, R. P. M.; Schumann, G.

    2017-12-01

    The SWOT mission will measure river width and water surface elevations of rivers wider than 100 m. As the data gathered by this mission will be freely available, it can be of great use for flood modeling, especially in areas where streamgage networks are exceedingly sparse, or when data sharing barriers prevent the timely access to information. Despite having world-wide coverage, SWOT's temporal sampling is limited, with most locations being revisited once or twice every 21 days. Our objective is to evaluate which fraction of world-wide floods SWOT will observe and how many observations per event the satellite will likely obtain. We take advantage of the extensive database of floods constructed by the Dartmouth Flood Observatory, who, since 1985, searches through news sources and governmental agencies, and more recently remote sensing imagery for flood information, including flood duration, location and affected area. We cross-referenced the flood locations in the DFO archive with the SWOT prototype prior database of river centerlines and the anticipated satellite's orbit to identify how many of the SWOT swaths were located within 10 km, 20 km, and 50 km from a flood centroid. Subsequently, we estimated the probability that SWOT would have at least one observation of a flood event per distance bin by multiplying the number of swaths in the distance bin by the flood duration divided by the SWOT orbit repeat period. Our analysis contemplated 132 world-wide floods recorded between May 2016 and May 2017. From these, 29, 52, and 86 floods had at least a 50% probability of having one overpass within 10 km, 20 km, and 50 km respectively. Moreover, after excluding flood events with no river centerlines within 10 km of its centroid, the average number of swaths within 10 km of a flood centroid was 1.79, indicating that in the 37 flood events that were likely caused by river flooding, at least one measurement was guaranteed to happen during the event.

  14. High-resolution flood modeling of urban areas using MSN_Flood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hartnett

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although existing hydraulic models have been used to simulate and predict urban flooding, most of these models are inadequate due to the high spatial resolution required to simulate flows in urban floodplains. Nesting high-resolution subdomains within coarser-resolution models is an efficient solution for enabling simultaneous calculation of flooding due to tides, surges, and high river flows. MSN_Flood has been developed to incorporate moving boundaries around nested domains, permitting alternate flooding and drying along the boundary and in the interior of the domain. Ghost cells adjacent to open boundary cells convert open boundaries, in effect, into internal boundaries. The moving boundary may be multi-segmented and non-continuous, with recirculating flow across the boundary. When combined with a bespoke adaptive interpolation scheme, this approach facilitates a dynamic internal boundary. Based on an alternating-direction semi-implicit finite difference scheme, MSN_Flood was used to hindcast a major flood event in Cork City resulting from the combined pressures of fluvial, tidal, and storm surge processes. The results show that the model is computationally efficient, as the 2-m high-resolution nest is used only in the urban flooded region. Elsewhere, lower-resolution nests are used. The results also show that the model is highly accurate when compared with measured data. The model is capable of incorporating nested sub-domains when the nested boundary is multi-segmented and highly complex with lateral gradients of elevation and velocities. This is a major benefit when modelling urban floodplains at very high resolution.

  15. Combining Satellite Measurements and Numerical Flood Prediction Models to Save Lives and Property from Flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, F.; Garambois, P. A.; Biancamaria, S.

    2017-12-01

    Floods are considered the major natural threats to human societies across all continents. Consequences of floods in highly populated areas are more dramatic with losses of human lives and substantial property damage. This risk is projected to increase with the effects of climate change, particularly sea-level rise, increasing storm frequencies and intensities and increasing population and economic assets in such urban watersheds. Despite the advances in computational resources and modeling techniques, significant gaps exist in predicting complex processes and accurately representing the initial state of the system. Improving flood prediction models and data assimilation chains through satellite has become an absolute priority to produce accurate flood forecasts with sufficient lead times. The overarching goal of this work is to assess the benefits of the Surface Water Ocean Topography SWOT satellite data from a flood prediction perspective. The near real time methodology is based on combining satellite data from a simulator that mimics the future SWOT data, numerical models, high resolution elevation data and real-time local measurement in the New York/New Jersey area.

  16. Mitigating flood exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, James M; McLean, Andrew; Herberman Mash, Holly B; Rosen, Alexa; Kelly, Fiona; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Youngs Jr, Georgia A; Jensen, Jessica; Bernal, Oscar; Neria, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. In 2011, following heavy winter snowfall, two cities bordering two rivers in North Dakota, USA faced major flood threats. Flooding was foreseeable and predictable although the extent of risk was uncertain. One community, Fargo, situated in a shallow river basin, successfully mitigated and prevented flooding. For the other community, Minot, located in a deep river valley, prevention was not possible and downtown businesses and one-quarter of the homes were inundated, in the city’s worst flood on record. We aimed at contrasting the respective hazards, vulnerabilities, stressors, psychological risk factors, psychosocial consequences, and disaster risk reduction strategies under conditions where flood prevention was, and was not, possible. Methods. We applied the “trauma signature analysis” (TSIG) approach to compare the hazard profiles, identify salient disaster stressors, document the key components of disaster risk reduction response, and examine indicators of community resilience. Results. Two demographically-comparable communities, Fargo and Minot, faced challenging river flood threats and exhibited effective coordination across community sectors. We examined the implementation of disaster risk reduction strategies in situations where coordinated citizen action was able to prevent disaster impact (hazard avoidance) compared to the more common scenario when unpreventable disaster strikes, causing destruction, harm, and distress. Across a range of indicators, it is clear that successful mitigation diminishes both physical and psychological impact, thereby reducing the trauma signature of the event. Conclusion. In contrast to experience of historic flooding in Minot, the city of Fargo succeeded in reducing the trauma signature by way of reducing risk through mitigation. PMID:28228985

  17. Floods of 1971 and 1972 on Glover Creek and Little River in southeastern Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Wilbert O.; Corley, Robert K.

    1973-01-01

    Heavy rains of December 9-10, 1971, and Oct. 30-31, 1972, caused outstanding floods on Glover Creek and Little River in McCurtain County in southeastern Oklahoma. This report presents hydrologic data that document the extent of flooding, flood profiles, and frequency of flooding on reaches of both streams. The data presented provide a technical basis for formulating effective flood-plain zoning that will minimize existing and future flood problems. The report also can be useful for locating waste-disposal and water-treatment facilities, and for the development of recreational areas. The area studied includes the reach of Little River on the Garvin and Idabel 7 1/2-minute quadrangles (sheet 1) and the reach of Glover Creek on the southwest quarter of the Golden 15-minute quadrangle (sheet 2). The flood boundaries delineated on the maps are the limits of flooding during the December 1971 and October 1972 floods. Any attempt to delineate the flood boundaries on streams in the study area other than Glover Creek and Little River was considered to be beyond the scope of this report. The general procedure used in defining the flood boundaries was to construct the flood profiles from high-water marks obtained by field surveys and by records at three stream-gaging stations (two on Little River and one on Glover Creek.). The extent of flooding was delineated on the topographic maps by using the flood profiles to define the flood elevations at various points along the channel and locating the elevations on the map by interpolating between contours (lines of equal ground elevation). In addition, flood boundaries were defined in places by field survey, aerial photographs, and information from local residents. The accuracy of the flood boundaries is consistent with the scale and contour interval of the maps (1 inch = 2,000 feet; contour interval 10 and 20 feet), which means the flood boundaries are drawn as accurately as possible on maps having 10- and 20-foot contour intervals.

  18. Application of Flood Nomograph for Flood Forecasting in Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eui Hoon Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Imperviousness has increased due to urbanization, as has the frequency of extreme rainfall events by climate change. Various countermeasures, such as structural and nonstructural measures, are required to prepare for these effects. Flood forecasting is a representative nonstructural measure. Flood forecasting techniques have been developed for the prevention of repetitive flood damage in urban areas. It is difficult to apply some flood forecasting techniques using training processes because training needs to be applied at every usage. The other flood forecasting techniques that use rainfall data predicted by radar are not appropriate for small areas, such as single drainage basins. In this study, a new flood forecasting technique is suggested to reduce flood damage in urban areas. The flood nomograph consists of the first flooding nodes in rainfall runoff simulations with synthetic rainfall data at each duration. When selecting the first flooding node, the initial amount of synthetic rainfall is 1 mm, which increases in 1 mm increments until flooding occurs. The advantage of this flood forecasting technique is its simple application using real-time rainfall data. This technique can be used to prepare a preemptive response in the process of urban flood management.

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations of the Late Pleistocene Lake Bonneville Flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril-Hernández, José M.; Periáñez, Raúl; O'Connor, Jim E.; Garcia-Castellanos, Daniel

    2018-06-01

    At approximately 18.0 ka, pluvial Lake Bonneville reached its maximum level. At its northeastern extent it was impounded by alluvium of the Marsh Creek Fan, which breached at some point north of Red Rock Pass (Idaho), leading to one of the largest floods on Earth. About 5320 km3 of water was discharged into the Snake River drainage and ultimately into the Columbia River. We use a 0D model and a 2D non-linear depth-averaged hydrodynamic model to aid understanding of outflow dynamics, specifically evaluating controls on the amount of water exiting the Lake Bonneville basin exerted by the Red Rock Pass outlet lithology and geometry as well as those imposed by the internal lake geometry of the Bonneville basin. These models are based on field evidence of prominent lake levels, hypsometry and terrain elevations corrected for post-flood isostatic deformation of the lake basin, as well as reconstructions of the topography at the outlet for both the initial and final stages of the flood. Internal flow dynamics in the northern Lake Bonneville basin during the flood were affected by the narrow passages separating the Cache Valley from the main body of Lake Bonneville. This constriction imposed a water-level drop of up to 2.7 m at the time of peak-flow conditions and likely reduced the peak discharge at the lake outlet by about 6%. The modeled peak outlet flow is 0.85·106 m3 s-1. Energy balance calculations give an estimate for the erodibility coefficient for the alluvial Marsh Creek divide of ∼0.005 m y-1 Pa-1.5, at least two orders of magnitude greater than for the underlying bedrock at the outlet. Computing quasi steady-state water flows, water elevations, water currents and shear stresses as a function of the water-level drop in the lake and for the sequential stages of erosion in the outlet gives estimates of the incision rates and an estimate of the outflow hydrograph during the Bonneville Flood: About 18 days would have been required for the outflow to grow from 10

  20. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of the Late Pleistocene Lake Bonneville flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril-Hernández, José M.; Periáñez, Raúl; O'Connor, Jim E.; Garcia-Castellanos, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    At approximately 18.0 ka, pluvial Lake Bonneville reached its maximum level. At its northeastern extent it was impounded by alluvium of the Marsh Creek Fan, which breached at some point north of Red Rock Pass (Idaho), leading to one of the largest floods on Earth. About 5320 km3 of water was discharged into the Snake River drainage and ultimately into the Columbia River. We use a 0D model and a 2D non-linear depth-averaged hydrodynamic model to aid understanding of outflow dynamics, specifically evaluating controls on the amount of water exiting the Lake Bonneville basin exerted by the Red Rock Pass outlet lithology and geometry as well as those imposed by the internal lake geometry of the Bonneville basin. These models are based on field evidence of prominent lake levels, hypsometry and terrain elevations corrected for post-flood isostatic deformation of the lake basin, as well as reconstructions of the topography at the outlet for both the initial and final stages of the flood. Internal flow dynamics in the northern Lake Bonneville basin during the flood were affected by the narrow passages separating the Cache Valley from the main body of Lake Bonneville. This constriction imposed a water-level drop of up to 2.7 m at the time of peak-flow conditions and likely reduced the peak discharge at the lake outlet by about 6%. The modeled peak outlet flow is 0.85·106 m3 s−1. Energy balance calculations give an estimate for the erodibility coefficient for the alluvial Marsh Creek divide of ∼0.005 m y−1 Pa−1.5, at least two orders of magnitude greater than for the underlying bedrock at the outlet. Computing quasi steady-state water flows, water elevations, water currents and shear stresses as a function of the water-level drop in the lake and for the sequential stages of erosion in the outlet gives estimates of the incision rates and an estimate of the outflow hydrograph during the Bonneville Flood: About 18 days would have been required for the

  1. Estimating floodwater depths from flood inundation maps and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Sagy; Brakenridge, G. Robert; Kettner, Albert; Bates, Bradford; Nelson, Jonathan M.; McDonald, Richard R.; Huang, Yu-Fen; Munasinghe, Dinuke; Zhang, Jiaqi

    2018-01-01

    Information on flood inundation extent is important for understanding societal exposure, water storage volumes, flood wave attenuation, future flood hazard, and other variables. A number of organizations now provide flood inundation maps based on satellite remote sensing. These data products can efficiently and accurately provide the areal extent of a flood event, but do not provide floodwater depth, an important attribute for first responders and damage assessment. Here we present a new methodology and a GIS-based tool, the Floodwater Depth Estimation Tool (FwDET), for estimating floodwater depth based solely on an inundation map and a digital elevation model (DEM). We compare the FwDET results against water depth maps derived from hydraulic simulation of two flood events, a large-scale event for which we use medium resolution input layer (10 m) and a small-scale event for which we use a high-resolution (LiDAR; 1 m) input. Further testing is performed for two inundation maps with a number of challenging features that include a narrow valley, a large reservoir, and an urban setting. The results show FwDET can accurately calculate floodwater depth for diverse flooding scenarios but also leads to considerable bias in locations where the inundation extent does not align well with the DEM. In these locations, manual adjustment or higher spatial resolution input is required.

  2. Large Scale Processes and Extreme Floods in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro Lima, C. H.; AghaKouchak, A.; Lall, U.

    2016-12-01

    Persistent large scale anomalies in the atmospheric circulation and ocean state have been associated with heavy rainfall and extreme floods in water basins of different sizes across the world. Such studies have emerged in the last years as a new tool to improve the traditional, stationary based approach in flood frequency analysis and flood prediction. Here we seek to advance previous studies by evaluating the dominance of large scale processes (e.g. atmospheric rivers/moisture transport) over local processes (e.g. local convection) in producing floods. We consider flood-prone regions in Brazil as case studies and the role of large scale climate processes in generating extreme floods in such regions is explored by means of observed streamflow, reanalysis data and machine learning methods. The dynamics of the large scale atmospheric circulation in the days prior to the flood events are evaluated based on the vertically integrated moisture flux and its divergence field, which are interpreted in a low-dimensional space as obtained by machine learning techniques, particularly supervised kernel principal component analysis. In such reduced dimensional space, clusters are obtained in order to better understand the role of regional moisture recycling or teleconnected moisture in producing floods of a given magnitude. The convective available potential energy (CAPE) is also used as a measure of local convection activities. We investigate for individual sites the exceedance probability in which large scale atmospheric fluxes dominate the flood process. Finally, we analyze regional patterns of floods and how the scaling law of floods with drainage area responds to changes in the climate forcing mechanisms (e.g. local vs large scale).

  3. Crowdsourcing detailed flood data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walliman, Nicholas; Ogden, Ray; Amouzad*, Shahrzhad

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade the average annual loss across the European Union due to flooding has been 4.5bn Euros, but increasingly intense rainfall, as well as population growth, urbanisation and the rising costs of asset replacements, may see this rise to 23bn Euros a year by 2050. Equally disturbing are the profound social costs to individuals, families and communities which in addition to loss of lives include: loss of livelihoods, decreased purchasing and production power, relocation and migration, adverse psychosocial effects, and hindrance of economic growth and development. Flood prediction, management and defence strategies rely on the availability of accurate information and flood modelling. Whilst automated data gathering (by measurement and satellite) of the extent of flooding is already advanced it is least reliable in urban and physically complex geographies where often the need for precise estimation is most acute. Crowdsourced data of actual flood events is a potentially critical component of this allowing improved accuracy in situations and identifying the effects of local landscape and topography where the height of a simple kerb, or discontinuity in a boundary wall can have profound importance. Mobile 'App' based data acquisition using crowdsourcing in critical areas can combine camera records with GPS positional data and time, as well as descriptive data relating to the event. This will automatically produce a dataset, managed in ArcView GIS, with the potential for follow up calls to get more information through structured scripts for each strand. Through this local residents can provide highly detailed information that can be reflected in sophisticated flood protection models and be core to framing urban resilience strategies and optimising the effectiveness of investment. This paper will describe this pioneering approach that will develop flood event data in support of systems that will advance existing approaches such as developed in the in the UK

  4. Floods in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follansbee, Robert; Sawyer, Leon R.

    1948-01-01

    The first records of floods in Colorado antedated the settlement of the State by about 30 years. These were records of floods on the Arkansas and Republican Rivers in 1826. Other floods noted by traders, hunters and emigrants, some of whom were on their way to the Far West, occurred in 1844 on the Arkansas River, and by inference on the South Platte River. Other early floods were those on the Purgatoire, the Lower Arkansas, and the San Juan Rivers about 1859. The most serious flood since settlement began was that on the Arkansas River during June 1921, which caused the loss of about 100 lives and an estimated property loss of $19,000,000. Many floods of lesser magnitude have occurred, and some of these have caused loss of life and very considerable property damage. Topography is the chief factor in determining the location of storms and resulting floods. These occur most frequently on the eastern slope of the Front Range. In the mountains farther west precipitation is insufficient to cause floods except during periods of melting snow, in June. In the southwestern part of the State, where precipitation during periods of melting snow is insufficient to cause floods, the severest floods yet experienced resulted from heavy rains in September 1909 and October 1911. In the eastern foothills region, usually below an altitude of about 7,500 feet and extending for a distance of about 50 miles east of the mountains, is a zone subject to rainfalls of great intensity known as cloudbursts. These cloudbursts are of short duration and are confined to very small areas. At times the intensity is so great as to make breathing difficult for those exposed to a storm. The areas of intense rainfall are so small that Weather Bureau precipitation stations have not been located in them. Local residents, being cloudburst conscious, frequently measure the rainfall in receptacles in their yards, and such records constitute the only source of information regarding the intensity. A flood

  5. Flood Hazard Recurrence Frequencies for A-, K- and L-Areas, and Revised Frequencies for C-, F-, E-, S-, H-, Y- and Z-Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.

    2000-01-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) Order 420.1, Facility Safety, outlines the requirements for Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation for new and existing DOE facilities. The NPH considered in this report is flooding. The facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curve defines as a function of water elevation the annual probability of occurrence or the return period in years. Based on facility-specific probabilistic flood hazard curves and the nature of facility operations (e.g., involving hazardous or radioactive materials), facility managers can design permanent or temporary devices to prevent the propagation of flood on site, and develop emergency preparedness plans to mitigate the consequences of floods. Methods were developed to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curves for Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities. This report presents the methods used to determine the probabilistic flood elevation curves for A-, K-, C-, F-, E-, H-, S-, Y-, Z- and L-Areas

  6. 76 FR 33121 - List of Approved Spent Fuel Storage Casks: HI-STORM Flood/Wind Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... Storage Casks: HI-STORM Flood/Wind Addition AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Direct final... regulations to add the Holtec HI-STORM Flood/Wind cask system to the ``List of Approved Spent Fuel Storage... Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Section 72.214 to add the Holtec HI- STORM Flood/Wind cask...

  7. Intermittent Flooding of Arctic Lagoon Wet Sedge Areas: an investigation of past and future conditions at Arey Lagoon, Eastern Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, A.; Erikson, L. H.; Richmond, B. M.

    2017-12-01

    Arctic lagoons and mainland coasts support highly productive ecosystems, where soft substrate and coastal wet sedge fringing the shores act as feeding grounds and nurseries for a variety of marine fish and waterfowl. Much tundra vegetation is intolerant to saltwater flooding, but some vegetation cherished by geese for example, is maintained by flooding one to two times per month. The balance of northern ecosystems such as these may be in jeopardy as the Arctic climate is rapidly changing. In this study, sea level rise and 21st century storms are simulated with a numerical model to evaluate changes in ocean-driven flooding of low-lying tundra and coastal wet sedge that fringe the shores of Arey Lagoon, located in eastern Arctic Alaska. Numerically modeled extreme surge levels are projected to increase from a historical range of 0.5 m - 1.3 m (1976-2010) to 1.0 m - 2.0 m by end-of-century (2011-2100). The maximum storm surge of the projected time-period translates to > 6 km2 of flooded tundra, much of which consists of salt-intolerant vegetation. Monthly flood extents that might be expected to maintain halophytic vegetation were calculated by extracting the maximum monthly water levels of months that had more than 21 days ( 70%) of ice-free conditions. Median monthly water levels are shown to range from 0.46 m in 1981-1990 to 0.91 m by the final decades of the 21st century. The temporal trend is strongly linear (r2 = 0.82). An overlay of these water elevations onto a 10 m resolution elevation model shows that monthly flood extents will increase by 26% by the end of the century compared to the present decade (2011 to 2020) (from 2.86 km2 to 3.60 km2). The rate at which the flood extents are projected to increase will dictate if inland succession of salt-tolerant vegetation will survive. By combining the frequency and magnitude of extreme storm surge events with the progression of modeled monthly inland flood extents, it might be possible to identify areas along this

  8. Probable maximum flood control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGabriele, C.E.; Wu, C.L.

    1991-11-01

    This study proposes preliminary design concepts to protect the waste-handling facilities and all shaft and ramp entries to the underground from the probable maximum flood (PMF) in the current design configuration for the proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) repository protection provisions were furnished by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR) or developed from USSR data. Proposed flood protection provisions include site grading, drainage channels, and diversion dikes. Figures are provided to show these proposed flood protection provisions at each area investigated. These areas are the central surface facilities (including the waste-handling building and waste treatment building), tuff ramp portal, waste ramp portal, men-and-materials shaft, emplacement exhaust shaft, and exploratory shafts facility

  9. Lessons Learned from Missing Flooding Barriers Operating Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simic, Z.; Veira, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Flooding hazard is highly significant for nuclear power plant safety because of its potential for common cause impact on safety related systems, and because operating experience reviews regularly identify flooding as a cause of concern. Source of the flooding could be external (location) or internal (plant design). The amount of flooding water could vary but even small amount might suffice to affect redundant trains of safety related systems for power supply and cooling. The protection from the flooding is related to the design-basis flood level (DBFL) and it consists of three elements: structural, organizational and accessibility. Determination of the DBFL is critical, as Fukushima Daiichi accident terribly proved. However, as the topic of flooding is very broad, the scope of this paper is focused only on the issues related to the missing flood barriers. Structural measures are physically preventing flooding water to reach or damage safety related system, and they could be permanent or temporary. For temporary measures it is important to have necessary material, equipment and organizational capacity for the timely implementation. Maintenance is important for permanent protection and periodical review is important for assuring readiness and feasibility of temporary flooding protection. Final flooding protection element is assured accessibility to safety related systems during the flooding. Appropriate flooding protection is based on the right implementation of design requirements, proper maintenance and periodic reviews. Operating experience is constantly proving how numerous water sources and systems interactions make flooding protection challenging. This paper is presenting recent related operating experience feedback involving equipment, procedures and analysis. Most frequent deficiencies are: inadequate, degraded or missing seals that would allow floodwaters into safety related spaces. Procedures are inadequate typically because they underestimate necessary

  10. Probabilistic flood extent estimates from social media flood observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Tom; Eilander, Dirk; Van Loenen, Arnejan; Booij, Martijn J.; Wijnberg, Kathelijne M.; Verkade, Jan S.; Wagemaker, Jurjen

    2017-01-01

    The increasing number and severity of floods, driven by phenomena such as urbanization, deforestation, subsidence and climate change, create a growing need for accurate and timely flood maps. In this paper we present and evaluate a method to create deterministic and probabilistic flood maps from

  11. Probabilistic flood extent estimates from social media flood observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Tom; Eilander, Dirk; Van Loenen, Arnejan; Booij, Martijn J.; Wijnberg, Kathelijne M.; Verkade, Jan S.; Wagemaker, Jurjen

    2017-01-01

    The increasing number and severity of floods, driven by phenomena such as urbanization, deforestation, subsidence and climate change, creates a growing need for accurate and timely flood maps. This research focussed on creating flood maps using user generated content from Twitter. Twitter data has

  12. Mapping flood hazards under uncertainty through probabilistic flood inundation maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, T.; Bledsoe, B. P.; Miller, A. J.; Lee, G.

    2017-12-01

    Changing precipitation, rapid urbanization, and population growth interact to create unprecedented challenges for flood mitigation and management. Standard methods for estimating risk from flood inundation maps generally involve simulations of floodplain hydraulics for an established regulatory discharge of specified frequency. Hydraulic model results are then geospatially mapped and depicted as a discrete boundary of flood extents and a binary representation of the probability of inundation (in or out) that is assumed constant over a project's lifetime. Consequently, existing methods utilized to define flood hazards and assess risk management are hindered by deterministic approaches that assume stationarity in a nonstationary world, failing to account for spatio-temporal variability of climate and land use as they translate to hydraulic models. This presentation outlines novel techniques for portraying flood hazards and the results of multiple flood inundation maps spanning hydroclimatic regions. Flood inundation maps generated through modeling of floodplain hydraulics are probabilistic reflecting uncertainty quantified through Monte-Carlo analyses of model inputs and parameters under current and future scenarios. The likelihood of inundation and range of variability in flood extents resulting from Monte-Carlo simulations are then compared with deterministic evaluations of flood hazards from current regulatory flood hazard maps. By facilitating alternative approaches of portraying flood hazards, the novel techniques described in this presentation can contribute to a shifting paradigm in flood management that acknowledges the inherent uncertainty in model estimates and the nonstationary behavior of land use and climate.

  13. Flood Risk Management In Europe: European flood regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegger, D.L.T.; Bakker, M.H.; Green, C.; Driessen, Peter; Delvaux, B.; Rijswick, H.F.M.W. van; Suykens, C.; Beyers, J-C.; Deketelaere, K.; Doorn-Hoekveld, W. van; Dieperink, C.

    2013-01-01

    In Europe, water management is moving from flood defense to a risk management approach, which takes both the probability and the potential consequences of flooding into account. In this report, we will look at Directives and (non-)EU- initiatives in place to deal with flood risk in Europe indirectly

  14. Improving Global Flood Forecasting using Satellite Detected Flood Extent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revilla Romero, B.

    2016-01-01

    Flooding is a natural global phenomenon but in many cases is exacerbated by human activity. Although flooding generally affects humans in a negative way, bringing death, suffering, and economic impacts, it also has potentially beneficial effects. Early flood warning and forecasting systems, as well

  15. The Global Flood Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P.; Huddelston, M.; Michel, G.; Thompson, S.; Heynert, K.; Pickering, C.; Abbott Donnelly, I.; Fewtrell, T.; Galy, H.; Sperna Weiland, F.; Winsemius, H.; Weerts, A.; Nixon, S.; Davies, P.; Schiferli, D.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, a Global Flood Model (GFM) initiative has been proposed by Willis, UK Met Office, Esri, Deltares and IBM. The idea is to create a global community platform that enables better understanding of the complexities of flood risk assessment to better support the decisions, education and communication needed to mitigate flood risk. The GFM will provide tools for assessing the risk of floods, for devising mitigation strategies such as land-use changes and infrastructure improvements, and for enabling effective pre- and post-flood event response. The GFM combines humanitarian and commercial motives. It will benefit: - The public, seeking to preserve personal safety and property; - State and local governments, seeking to safeguard economic activity, and improve resilience; - NGOs, similarly seeking to respond proactively to flood events; - The insurance sector, seeking to understand and price flood risk; - Large corporations, seeking to protect global operations and supply chains. The GFM is an integrated and transparent set of modules, each composed of models and data. For each module, there are two core elements: a live "reference version" (a worked example) and a framework of specifications, which will allow development of alternative versions. In the future, users will be able to work with the reference version or substitute their own models and data. If these meet the specification for the relevant module, they will interoperate with the rest of the GFM. Some "crowd-sourced" modules could even be accredited and published to the wider GFM community. Our intent is to build on existing public, private and academic work, improve local adoption, and stimulate the development of multiple - but compatible - alternatives, so strengthening mankind's ability to manage flood impacts. The GFM is being developed and managed by a non-profit organization created for the purpose. The business model will be inspired from open source software (eg Linux): - for non-profit usage

  16. Camp Marmal Flood Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    was simulated by means of a broad - crested weir built into the topography of the mesh. There is 0.5 m of freeboard and the width of the weir is 30 m...ER D C/ CH L TR -1 2- 5 Camp Marmal Flood Study Co as ta l a nd H yd ra ul ic s La bo ra to ry Jeremy A. Sharp , Steve H. Scott...Camp Marmal Flood Study Jeremy A. Sharp , Steve H. Scott, Mark R. Jourdan, and Gaurav Savant Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer

  17. 2013 FEMA Flood Hazard Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  18. FEMA DFIRM Flood Hazard Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — FEMA flood hazard delineations are used by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to designate the Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) and for insurance rating...

  19. National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) is a compilation of GIS data that comprises a nationwide digital Flood Insurance Rate Map. The GIS data and services are...

  20. FEMA 100 year Flood Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The Q3 Flood Data product is a digital representation of certain features of FEMA's Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) product, intended for use with desktop mapping...

  1. 2013 FEMA Flood Control Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  2. FEMA Q3 Flood Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Q3 Flood Data are derived from the Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMS) published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The file is georeferenced to...

  3. Simulation of Columbia River Floods in the Hanford Reach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Serkowski, John A.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2017-01-30

    Columbia River water elevations and flows in the Hanford Reach affect the environment and facilities along the shoreline, including movement of contaminants in groundwater, fish habitat, and infrastructure subject to flooding. This report describes the hydraulic simulation of hypothetical flood flows using the best available topographic and bathymetric data for the Hanford Reach and the Modular Aquatic Simulation System in 1 Dimension (MASS1) hydrodynamic model. The MASS1 model of the Hanford Reach was previously calibrated to field measurements of water surface elevations. The current model setup can be used for other studies of flow, water levels, and temperature in the Reach. The existing MASS1 channel geometry and roughness and other model configuration inputs for the Hanford Reach were used for this study, and previous calibration and validation results for the model are reprinted here for reference. The flood flows for this study were simulated by setting constant flow rates obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for the Columbia, Snake, and Yakima Rivers, and a constant water level at McNary Dam, and then running the model to steady state. The discharge levels simulated were all low-probability events; for example, a 100-year flood is one that would occur on average every 100 years, or put another way, in any given year there is a 1% chance that a discharge of that level or higher will occur. The simulated floods and their corresponding Columbia River discharges were 100-year (445,000 cfs), 500-year (520,000 cfs), and the USACE-defined Standard Project Flood (960,000 cfs). The resulting water levels from the steady-state floods can be viewed as “worst case” outcomes for the respective discharge levels. The MASS1 output for water surface elevations was converted to the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 and projected across the channel and land surface to enable mapping of the floodplain for each scenario. Floodplain maps show that for

  4. National Elevation Dataset (NED)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a National Elevation Database (NED). The NED is a seamless mosaic of best-available elevation data. The 7.5-minute elevation...

  5. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  6. Multivariate pluvial flood damage models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ootegem, Luc; Verhofstadt, Elsy; Van Herck, Kristine; Creten, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Depth–damage-functions, relating the monetary flood damage to the depth of the inundation, are commonly used in the case of fluvial floods (floods caused by a river overflowing). We construct four multivariate damage models for pluvial floods (caused by extreme rainfall) by differentiating on the one hand between ground floor floods and basement floods and on the other hand between damage to residential buildings and damage to housing contents. We do not only take into account the effect of flood-depth on damage, but also incorporate the effects of non-hazard indicators (building characteristics, behavioural indicators and socio-economic variables). By using a Tobit-estimation technique on identified victims of pluvial floods in Flanders (Belgium), we take into account the effect of cases of reported zero damage. Our results show that the flood depth is an important predictor of damage, but with a diverging impact between ground floor floods and basement floods. Also non-hazard indicators are important. For example being aware of the risk just before the water enters the building reduces content damage considerably, underlining the importance of warning systems and policy in this case of pluvial floods. - Highlights: • Prediction of damage of pluvial floods using also non-hazard information • We include ‘no damage cases’ using a Tobit model. • The damage of flood depth is stronger for ground floor than for basement floods. • Non-hazard indicators are especially important for content damage. • Potential gain of policies that increase awareness of flood risks

  7. Multivariate pluvial flood damage models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ootegem, Luc [HIVA — University of Louvain (Belgium); SHERPPA — Ghent University (Belgium); Verhofstadt, Elsy [SHERPPA — Ghent University (Belgium); Van Herck, Kristine; Creten, Tom [HIVA — University of Louvain (Belgium)

    2015-09-15

    Depth–damage-functions, relating the monetary flood damage to the depth of the inundation, are commonly used in the case of fluvial floods (floods caused by a river overflowing). We construct four multivariate damage models for pluvial floods (caused by extreme rainfall) by differentiating on the one hand between ground floor floods and basement floods and on the other hand between damage to residential buildings and damage to housing contents. We do not only take into account the effect of flood-depth on damage, but also incorporate the effects of non-hazard indicators (building characteristics, behavioural indicators and socio-economic variables). By using a Tobit-estimation technique on identified victims of pluvial floods in Flanders (Belgium), we take into account the effect of cases of reported zero damage. Our results show that the flood depth is an important predictor of damage, but with a diverging impact between ground floor floods and basement floods. Also non-hazard indicators are important. For example being aware of the risk just before the water enters the building reduces content damage considerably, underlining the importance of warning systems and policy in this case of pluvial floods. - Highlights: • Prediction of damage of pluvial floods using also non-hazard information • We include ‘no damage cases’ using a Tobit model. • The damage of flood depth is stronger for ground floor than for basement floods. • Non-hazard indicators are especially important for content damage. • Potential gain of policies that increase awareness of flood risks.

  8. Risk reduction by combining nature values with flood protection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Loon-Steensma Jantsje M.

    2016-01-01

    foreland into the dike design does not automatically mean that nature values and flood protection are well integrated. Flood protection imposes rather different requirements on the extent and features of marshes than nature conservation and development. Wave damping is most effective with a high and stable marsh, while nature thrives with dynamic processes and differences in elevation. Therefore, only a design that allows natural marsh dynamics and includes different marsh zones could combine nature values with flood protection. In practice, this means a dike design with an uncertain foreland, that offers space for natural processes. The uncertainty in foreland development reduces the possible flood risk reduction. In our paper we describe the critical points of interest concerning risk reduction in this system.

  9. Flood-Inundation Maps for Sugar Creek at Crawfordsville, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Zachary W.

    2016-06-06

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.5-mile reach of Sugar Creek at Crawfordsville, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 03339500, Sugar Creek at Crawfordsville, Ind. Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (NWS site CRWI3).Flood profiles were computed for the USGS streamgage 03339500, Sugar Creek at Crawfordsville, Ind., reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater hydraulic modeling software developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated using the current stage-discharge rating at the USGS streamgage 03339500, Sugar Creek at Crawfordsville, Ind., and high-water marks from the flood of April 19, 2013, which reached a stage of 15.3 feet. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 13 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum ranging from 4.0 ft (the NWS “action stage”) to 16.0 ft, which is the highest stage interval of the current USGS stage-discharge rating curve and 2 ft higher than the NWS “major flood stage.” The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging [lidar]) data having a 0.49-ft root mean squared error and 4.9-ft horizontal resolution) to delineate the area flooded at each stage.The availability

  10. Flash Flood Type Identification within Catchments in Beijing Mountainous Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, W.

    2017-12-01

    Flash flood is a common type of disaster in mountainous area, Flash flood with the feature of large flow rate, strong flushing force, destructive power, has periodically caused loss to life and destruction to infrastructure in mountainous area. Beijing as China's political, economic and cultural center, the disaster prevention and control work in Beijing mountainous area has always been concerned widely. According to the transport mechanism, sediment concentration and density, the flash flood type identification within catchment can provide basis for making the hazards prevention and mitigation policy. Taking Beijing as the study area, this paper extracted parameters related to catchment morphological and topography features respectively. By using Bayes discriminant, Logistic regression and Random forest, the catchments in Beijing mountainous area were divided into water floods process, fluvial sediment transport process and debris flows process. The results found that Logistic regression analysis showed the highest accuracy, with the overall accuracy of 88.2%. Bayes discriminant and Random forest had poor prediction effects. This study confirmed the ability of morphological and topography features to identify flash flood process. The circularity ratio, elongation ratio and roughness index can be used to explain the flash flood types effectively, and the Melton ratio and elevation relief ratio also did a good job during the identification, whereas the drainage density seemed not to be an issue at this level of detail. Based on the analysis of spatial patterns of flash flood types, fluvial sediment transport process and debris flow process were the dominant hazards, while the pure water flood process was much less. The catchments dominated by fluvial sediment transport process were mainly distributed in the Yan Mountain region, where the fault belts were relatively dense. The debris flow process prone to occur in the Taihang Mountain region thanks to the abundant

  11. Modelling farm vulnerability to flooding: A step toward vulnerability mitigation policies appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brémond, P.; Abrami, G.; Blanc, C.; Grelot, F.

    2009-04-01

    flood. In the case of farm activities, vulnerability mitigation consists in implementing measures which can be: physical (equipment or electric power system elevation), organizational (emergency or recovery plan) or financial (insurance). These measures aim at decreasing the total damage incurred by farmers in case of flooding. For instance, if equipment is elevated, it will not suffer direct damage such as degradation. As a consequence, equipment will be available to continue production or recovery tasks, thus, avoiding indirect damage such as delays, indebtedness… The effects of these policies on farms, in particular vulnerability mitigation cannot be appraised using current methodologies mainly because they do not consider farm as a whole and focus on direct damage at the land plot scale (loss of yield). Moreover, since vulnerability mitigation policies are quite recent, few examples of implementation exist and no feedback experience can be processed. Meanwhile, decision makers and financial actors require more justification of the efficiency of public fund by economic appraisal of the projects. On the Rhône River, decision makers asked for an economic evaluation of the program of farm vulnerability mitigation they plan to implement. This implies to identify the effects of the measures to mitigate farm vulnerability, and to classify them by comparing their efficacy (avoided damage) and their cost of implementation. In this presentation, we propose and discuss a conceptual model of vulnerability at the farm scale. The modelling, in Unified Modelling Language, enabled to represent the ties between spatial, organizational and temporal dimensions, which are central to understanding of farm vulnerability and resilience to flooding. Through this modelling, we encompass three goals: To improve the comprehension of farm vulnerability and create a framework that allow discussion with experts of different disciplines as well as with local farmers; To identify data which

  12. Analysis of regional natural flow for evaluation of flood risk according to RCP climate change scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. Y.; Chae, B. S.; Wi, S.; KIm, T. W.

    2017-12-01

    Various climate change scenarios expect the rainfall in South Korea to increase by 3-10% in the future. The future increased rainfall has significant effect on the frequency of flood in future as well. This study analyzed the probability of future flood to investigate the stability of existing and new installed hydraulic structures and the possibility of increasing flood damage in mid-sized watersheds in South Korea. To achieve this goal, we first clarified the relationship between flood quantiles acquired from the flood-frequency analysis (FFA) and design rainfall-runoff analysis (DRRA) in gauged watersheds. Then, after synthetically generating the regional natural flow data according to RCP climate change scenarios, we developed mathematical formulas to estimate future flood quantiles based on the regression between DRRA and FFA incorporated with regional natural flows in unguaged watersheds. Finally, we developed a flood risk map to investigate the change of flood risk in terms of the return period for the past, present, and future. The results identified that the future flood quantiles and risks would increase in accordance with the RCP climate change scenarios. Because the regional flood risk was identified to increase in future comparing with the present status, comprehensive flood control will be needed to cope with extreme floods in future.

  13. Floods in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theresa K. Andersen; Marshall J. Shepherd

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric warming and associated hydrological changes have implications for regional flood intensity and frequency. Climate models and hydrological models have the ability to integrate various contributing factors and assess potential changes to hydrology at global to local scales through the century. This survey of floods in a changing climate reviews flood...

  14. Ohio River backwater flood-inundation maps for the Saline and Wabash Rivers in southern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Sharpe, Jennifer B.; Soong, David T.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for the Saline and Wabash Rivers referenced to elevations on the Ohio River in southern Illinois were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The inundation maps, accessible through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (gage heights) at the USGS streamgage at Ohio River at Old Shawneetown, Illinois-Kentucky (station number 03381700). Current gage height and flow conditions at this USGS streamgage may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/usa/nwis/uv?03381700. In addition, this streamgage is incorporated into the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/) by the National Weather Service (NWS). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often co-located at USGS streamgages. That NWS forecasted peak-stage information, also shown on the Ohio River at Old Shawneetown inundation Web site, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, eight water-surface elevations were mapped at 5-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum ranging from just above the NWS Action Stage (31 ft) to above the maximum historical gage height (66 ft). The elevations of the water surfaces were compared to a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) by using a Geographic Information System (GIS) in order to delineate the area flooded at each water level. These maps, along with information on the Internet regarding current gage heights from USGS streamgages and forecasted stream stages from the NWS, provide emergency management personnel and residents with information that is critical for flood response activities such as evacuations and road closures, as well as for post-flood recovery efforts.

  15. Sea-Level Rise and Flood Potential along the California Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delepine, Q.; Leung, C.

    2013-12-01

    Sea-level rise is becoming an ever-increasing problem in California. Sea-level is expected to rise significantly in the next 100 years, which will raise flood elevations in coastal communities. This will be an issue for private homeowners, businesses, and the state. One study suggests that Venice Beach could lose a total of at least $440 million in tourism spending and tax dollars from flooding and beach erosion if sea level rises 1.4 m by 2100. In addition, several airports, such as San Francisco International Airport, are located in coastal regions that have flooded in the past and will likely be flooded again in the next 30 years, but sea-level rise is expected to worsen the effects of flooding in the coming decades It is vital for coastal communities to understand the risks associated with sea-level rise so that they can plan to adapt to it. By obtaining accurate LiDAR elevation data from the NOAA Digital Coast Website (http://csc.noaa.gov/dataviewer/?keyword=lidar#), we can create flood maps to simulate sea level rise and flooding. The data are uploaded to ArcGIS and contour lines are added for different elevations that represent future coastlines during 100-year flooding. The following variables are used to create the maps: 1. High-resolution land surface elevation data - obtained from NOAA 2. Local mean high water level - from USGS 3. Local 100-year flood water level - from the Pacific Institute 4. Sea-level rise projections for different future dates (2030, 2050, and 2100) - from the National Research Council The values from the last three categories are added to represent sea-level rise plus 100-year flooding. These values are used to make the contour lines that represent the projected flood elevations, which are then exported as KML files, which can be opened in Google Earth. Once these KML files are made available to the public, coastal communities will gain an improved understanding of how flooding and sea-level rise might affect them in the future

  16. A GIS based approach for the prediction of the dam break flood hazard – A case study of Zardezas reservoir “Skikda, Algeria”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derdous Oussama

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction of dams in rivers can offer many advantages, however the consequences resulting from their failure could result in major damage, including loss of life and property destruction. To mitigate the threats of dam break it is essential to appreciate the characteristics of the potential flood in realistic manner. In this study an approach based on the integration of hydraulic modelling and GIS has been used to assess the risks resulting from a potential failure of Zardezas dam, a concrete dam located in Skikda, in the North East of Algeria. HEC-GeoRAS within GIS was used to extract geometric information from a digital elevation model and then imported into HEC-RAS. Flow simulation of the dam break was performed using HEC-RAS and results were mapped using the GIS. Finally, a flood hazard map based on water depth and flow velocity maps was created in GIS environment. According to this map the potential failure of Zardezas dam will place a large number in people in danger. The present study has shown that Application of Geographical Information System (GIS techniques in integration with hydraulic modelling can significantly reduce the time and the resources required to forecast potential dam break flood hazard which can play a crucial role in improving both flood disaster management and land use planning downstream of dams.

  17. Math Fights Flooding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besseling, Niels; Bokhove, Onno; Kolechkina, Alla; Molenaar, Jaap; van Nooyen, Ronald; Rottschäfer, Vivi; Stein, Alfred; Stoorvogel, Anton

    2008-01-01

    Due to climate changes that are expected in the coming years, the characteristics of the rainfall will change. This can potentially cause flooding or have negative influences on agriculture and nature. In this research, we study the effects of this change in rainfall and investigate what can be done

  18. Effective delineation of urban flooded areas based on aerial ortho-photo imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Guindon, Bert; Raymond, Don; Hong, Gang

    2016-10-01

    The combination of rapid global urban growth and climate change has resulted in increased occurrence of major urban flood events across the globe. The distribution of flooded area is one of the key information layers for applications of emergency planning and response management. While SAR systems and technologies have been widely used for flood area delineation, radar images suffer from range ambiguities arising from corner reflection effects and shadowing in dense urban settings. A new mapping framework is proposed for the extraction and quantification of flood extent based on aerial optical multi-spectral imagery and ancillary data. This involves first mapping of flood areas directly visible to the sensor. Subsequently, the complete area of submergence is estimated from this initial mapping and inference techniques based on baseline data such as land cover and GIS information such as available digital elevation models. The methodology has been tested and proven effective using aerial photography for the case of the 2013 flood in Calgary, Canada.

  19. Flood damage: a model for consistent, complete and multipurpose scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menoni, Scira; Molinari, Daniela; Ballio, Francesco; Minucci, Guido; Mejri, Ouejdane; Atun, Funda; Berni, Nicola; Pandolfo, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    Effective flood risk mitigation requires the impacts of flood events to be much better and more reliably known than is currently the case. Available post-flood damage assessments usually supply only a partial vision of the consequences of the floods as they typically respond to the specific needs of a particular stakeholder. Consequently, they generally focus (i) on particular items at risk, (ii) on a certain time window after the occurrence of the flood, (iii) on a specific scale of analysis or (iv) on the analysis of damage only, without an investigation of damage mechanisms and root causes. This paper responds to the necessity of a more integrated interpretation of flood events as the base to address the variety of needs arising after a disaster. In particular, a model is supplied to develop multipurpose complete event scenarios. The model organizes available information after the event according to five logical axes. This way post-flood damage assessments can be developed that (i) are multisectoral, (ii) consider physical as well as functional and systemic damage, (iii) address the spatial scales that are relevant for the event at stake depending on the type of damage that has to be analyzed, i.e., direct, functional and systemic, (iv) consider the temporal evolution of damage and finally (v) allow damage mechanisms and root causes to be understood. All the above features are key for the multi-usability of resulting flood scenarios. The model allows, on the one hand, the rationalization of efforts currently implemented in ex post damage assessments, also with the objective of better programming financial resources that will be needed for these types of events in the future. On the other hand, integrated interpretations of flood events are fundamental to adapting and optimizing flood mitigation strategies on the basis of thorough forensic investigation of each event, as corroborated by the implementation of the model in a case study.

  20. Floods characterization: from impact data to quantitative assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llasat, Maria-Carmen; Gilabert, Joan; Llasat-Botija, Montserrat; Marcos, Raül; Quintana-Seguí, Pere; Turco, Marco

    2015-04-01

    This study is based on the following flood databases from Catalonia: INUNGAMA (1900-2010) which considers 372 floods (Llasat et al, 2014), PRESSGAMA (1981-2010) and HISTOGAMA (from XIV Century on) - built as part of SPHERE project and recently updated. These databases store information about flood impacts (among others) and classify them by their severity (catastrophic, extraordinary and ordinary) by means of an indicators matrix based on other studies (i.e. Petrucci et al, 2013; Llasat et al, 2013). On this research we present a comparison between flood impacts, flow data and rainfall data on a Catalan scale and particularly for the basins of Segre, Muga, Ter and Llobregat (Western Mediterranean). From a bottom-up approach, a statistical methodology has been built (trend analysis, measures of position, cumulative distribution functions and geostatistics) in order to identify quantitative thresholds that will make possible to classify the floods. The purpose of this study is to establish generic thresholds for the whole Catalan region, for this we have selected rainfall maximums of flooding episodes stored at INUNGAMA and they have been related to flood categories by boxplot diagrams. Regarding the stream flow, we have established a relation between impacts and return periods at the day when the flow is maximum. The aim is to homogenize and compare the different drainage basins and to obtain general thresholds. It is also presented detailed analyses of relations between flooding episodes, flood classification and weather typing schemes - based in Jenkinson and Collison classification (applied to the Iberian Peninsula by Spellmann, 2000). In this way it could be analyzed whether patterns for the different types of floods exist or not. Finally, this work has pointed out the need of defining a new category for the most severe episodes.

  1. FLOOD SUSCEPTIBILITY ASSESSMENT IN THE NIRAJ BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANDA ROŞCA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Flood susceptibility assessment in the Niraj basin. In the context of global warming and the increasing frequency of extreme weather events, it becomes evident that we have to face natural hazards, such as floods. In the area of Niraj basin this phenomenon is specific both in the spring, because of the snow melting and of the precipitations which come along with the season, and then in the summer because of the torrential precipitations but rarely in autumn and winter. The aim of this paper is to determinate the susceptibility of the zone and obtain a map which will take into consideration the possibility of a flooding. Defining vulnerability can help us understand this type of natural disasters and find the best ways to reduce it. For this purpose we use thematic layers, morphological characteristics (slope and depth fragmentation, hydrological characteristics, geology, pedology (permeability and soil texture, landuse, precipitation data, and human interventions because in this way we have the possibility to use data mining for this purpose. Data mining will allow us to extract new information based on the existing sets of data.The final result will be a thematic map that highlights the areas which are exposed to the flood. Therefore, this map can be used as a support decision for local government or business purposes.

  2. Influence of Flood Detention Capability in Flood Prevention for Flood Disaster of Depression Area

    OpenAIRE

    Chia Lin Chan; Yi Ju Yang; Chih Chin Yang

    2011-01-01

    Rainfall records of rainfall station including the rainfall potential per hour and rainfall mass of five heavy storms are explored, respectively from 2001 to 2010. The rationalization formula is to investigate the capability of flood peak duration of flood detention pond in different rainfall conditions. The stable flood detention model is also proposed by using system dynamic control theory to get the message of flood detention pond in this research. When rainfall freque...

  3. INFLUENCE OF DEM IN WATERSHED MANAGEMENT AS FLOOD ZONATION MAPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alrajhi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite of valuable efforts from working groups and research organizations towards flood hazard reduction through its program, still minimal diminution from these hazards has been realized. This is mainly due to the fact that with rapid increase in population and urbanization coupled with climate change, flood hazards are becoming increasingly catastrophic. Therefore there is a need to understand and access flood hazards and develop means to deal with it through proper preparations, and preventive measures. To achieve this aim, Geographical Information System (GIS, geospatial and hydrological models were used as tools to tackle with influence of flash floods in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia due to existence of large valleys (Wadis which is a matter of great concern. In this research paper, Digital Elevation Models (DEMs of different resolution (30m, 20m,10m and 5m have been used, which have proven to be valuable tool for the topographic parameterization of hydrological models which are the basis for any flood modelling process. The DEM was used as input for performing spatial analysis and obtaining derivative products and delineate watershed characteristics of the study area using ArcGIS desktop and its Arc Hydro extension tools to check comparability of different elevation models for flood Zonation mapping. The derived drainage patterns have been overlaid over aerial imagery of study area, to check influence of greater amount of precipitation which can turn into massive destructions. The flow accumulation maps derived provide zones of highest accumulation and possible flow directions. This approach provide simplified means of predicting extent of inundation during flood events for emergency action especially for large areas because of large coverage area of the remotely sensed data.

  4. Elevation uncertainty in coastal inundation hazard assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesch, Dean B.; Cheval, Sorin

    2012-01-01

    Coastal inundation has been identified as an important natural hazard that affects densely populated and built-up areas (Subcommittee on Disaster Reduction, 2008). Inundation, or coastal flooding, can result from various physical processes, including storm surges, tsunamis, intense precipitation events, and extreme high tides. Such events cause quickly rising water levels. When rapidly rising water levels overwhelm flood defenses, especially in heavily populated areas, the potential of the hazard is realized and a natural disaster results. Two noteworthy recent examples of such natural disasters resulting from coastal inundation are the Hurricane Katrina storm surge in 2005 along the Gulf of Mexico coast in the United States, and the tsunami in northern Japan in 2011. Longer term, slowly varying processes such as land subsidence (Committee on Floodplain Mapping Technologies, 2007) and sea-level rise also can result in coastal inundation, although such conditions do not have the rapid water level rise associated with other flooding events. Geospatial data are a critical resource for conducting assessments of the potential impacts of coastal inundation, and geospatial representations of the topography in the form of elevation measurements are a primary source of information for identifying the natural and human components of the landscape that are at risk. Recently, the quantity and quality of elevation data available for the coastal zone have increased markedly, and this availability facilitates more detailed and comprehensive hazard impact assessments.

  5. iFLOOD: A Real Time Flood Forecast System for Total Water Modeling in the National Capital Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, S. J.; Ferreira, C.

    2017-12-01

    Extreme flood events are the costliest natural hazards impacting the US and frequently cause extensive damages to infrastructure, disruption to economy and loss of lives. In 2016, Hurricane Matthew brought severe damage to South Carolina and demonstrated the importance of accurate flood hazard predictions that requires the integration of riverine and coastal model forecasts for total water prediction in coastal and tidal areas. The National Weather Service (NWS) and the National Ocean Service (NOS) provide flood forecasts for almost the entire US, still there are service-gap areas in tidal regions where no official flood forecast is available. The National capital region is vulnerable to multi-flood hazards including high flows from annual inland precipitation events and surge driven coastal inundation along the tidal Potomac River. Predicting flood levels on such tidal areas in river-estuarine zone is extremely challenging. The main objective of this study is to develop the next generation of flood forecast systems capable of providing accurate and timely information to support emergency management and response in areas impacted by multi-flood hazards. This forecast system is capable of simulating flood levels in the Potomac and Anacostia River incorporating the effects of riverine flooding from the upstream basins, urban storm water and tidal oscillations from the Chesapeake Bay. Flood forecast models developed so far have been using riverine data to simulate water levels for Potomac River. Therefore, the idea is to use forecasted storm surge data from a coastal model as boundary condition of this system. Final output of this validated model will capture the water behavior in river-estuary transition zone far better than the one with riverine data only. The challenge for this iFLOOD forecast system is to understand the complex dynamics of multi-flood hazards caused by storm surges, riverine flow, tidal oscillation and urban storm water. Automated system

  6. 3D Elevation Program: summary for Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevation data are essential to a broad range of applications, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. For the State of Vermont, elevation data are critical for hazard mitigation, geologic resource assessment, natural resources conservation, agriculture and precision farming, flood risk management, infrastructure and construction management, and other business uses. Today, high-density light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the primary sources for deriving elevation models and other datasets. Federal, State, Tribal, and local agencies work in partnership to (1) replace data that are older and of lower quality and (2) provide coverage where publicly accessible data do not exist. A joint goal of State and Federal partners is to acquire consistent, statewide coverage to support existing and emerging applications enabled by lidar data.

  7. 3D Elevation Program: summary for Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevation data are essential to a broad range of applications, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. For the State of Nebraska, elevation data are critical for agriculture and precision farming, natural resources conservation, flood risk management, infrastructure and construction management, geologic resource assessment and hazard mitigation, and other business uses. Today, high-density light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the primary sources for deriving elevation models and other datasets. Federal, State, Tribal, and local agencies work in partnership to (1) replace data that are older and of lower quality and (2) provide coverage where publicly accessible data do not exist. A joint goal of State and Federal partners is to acquire consistent, statewide coverage to support existing and emerging applications enabled by lidar data.

  8. GIS Support for Flood Rescue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Gengsheng; Mioc, Darka; Anton, François

    2007-01-01

    Under flood events, the ground traffic is blocked in and around the flooded area due to damages to roads and bridges. The traditional transportation network may not always help people to make a right decision for evacuation. In order to provide dynamic road information needed for flood rescue, we...... to retrieve the shortest and safest route in Fredericton road network during flood event. It enables users to make a timely decision for flood rescue. We are using Oracle Spatial to deal with emergency situations that can be applied to other constrained network applications as well....... developed an adaptive web-based transportation network application using Oracle technology. Moreover, the geographic relationships between the road network and flood areas are taken into account. The overlay between the road network and flood polygons is computed on the fly. This application allows users...

  9. Numerical simulation of flood barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srb, Pavel; Petrů, Michal; Kulhavý, Petr

    This paper deals with testing and numerical simulating of flood barriers. The Czech Republic has been hit by several very devastating floods in past years. These floods caused several dozens of causalities and property damage reached billions of Euros. The development of flood measures is very important, especially for the reduction the number of casualties and the amount of property damage. The aim of flood control measures is the detention of water outside populated areas and drainage of water from populated areas as soon as possible. For new flood barrier design it is very important to know its behaviour in case of a real flood. During the development of the barrier several standardized tests have to be carried out. Based on the results from these tests numerical simulation was compiled using Abaqus software and some analyses were carried out. Based on these numerical simulations it will be possible to predict the behaviour of barriers and thus improve their design.

  10. Flood Risk Management in Remote and Impoverished Areas—A Case Study of Onaville, Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Heimhuber

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, geographic information system (GIS-based hydrologic and hydraulic modeling was used to perform a flood risk assessment for Onaville, which is a fairly new, rapidly growing informal settlement that is exposed to dangerous flash-flood events. Since records of historic floods did not exist for the study area, design storms with a variety of significant average return intervals (ARIs were derived from intensity-duration-frequency (IDF curves and transformed into design floods via rainfall-runoff modeling in hydrologic engineering center’s hydrologic modeling system (HEC-HMS. The hydraulic modeling software hydrologic engineering center’s river analysis system (HEC-RAS was used to perform one-dimensional, unsteady-flow simulations of the design floods in the Ravine Lan Couline, which is the major drainage channel of the area. Topographic data comprised a 12 m spatial resolution TanDEM-X digital elevation model (DEM and a 30 cm spatial resolution DEM created with mapping drones. The flow simulations revealed that large areas of the settlement are currently exposed to flood hazard. The results of the hydrologic and hydraulic modeling were incorporated into a flood hazard map which formed the basis for flood risk management. We present a grassroots approach for preventive flood risk management on a community level, which comprises the elaboration of a neighborhood contingency plan and a flood risk awareness campaign together with representatives of the local community of Onaville.

  11. Numerical modeling techniques for flood analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anees, Mohd Talha; Abdullah, K.; Nawawi, M. N. M.; Ab Rahman, Nik Norulaini Nik; Piah, Abd. Rahni Mt.; Zakaria, Nor Azazi; Syakir, M. I.; Mohd. Omar, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    Topographic and climatic changes are the main causes of abrupt flooding in tropical areas. It is the need to find out exact causes and effects of these changes. Numerical modeling techniques plays a vital role for such studies due to their use of hydrological parameters which are strongly linked with topographic changes. In this review, some of the widely used models utilizing hydrological and river modeling parameters and their estimation in data sparse region are discussed. Shortcomings of 1D and 2D numerical models and the possible improvements over these models through 3D modeling are also discussed. It is found that the HEC-RAS and FLO 2D model are best in terms of economical and accurate flood analysis for river and floodplain modeling respectively. Limitations of FLO 2D in floodplain modeling mainly such as floodplain elevation differences and its vertical roughness in grids were found which can be improve through 3D model. Therefore, 3D model was found to be more suitable than 1D and 2D models in terms of vertical accuracy in grid cells. It was also found that 3D models for open channel flows already developed recently but not for floodplain. Hence, it was suggested that a 3D model for floodplain should be developed by considering all hydrological and high resolution topographic parameter's models, discussed in this review, to enhance the findings of causes and effects of flooding.

  12. Pittsfield Local Flood Protection, West Branch and Southwest Branch, Housatonic River, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. Detailed Project Report for Water Resources Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    a bakery , a gas station, and the Linden Street bridge were flooded during the March 1977 storm. Flooding also occurred on the Southwest Branch...and service station, one bakery , and five other commercial establishments. Most of these structures are not suited to being elevated above the design...of a shopping plaza and a fast-food franchise in the flood plain on West Housatonic Street (Route 20). The following three alternate plans of

  13. Citizen involvement in flood risk governance: flood groups and networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twigger-Ross Clare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade has been a policy shift withinUK flood risk management towards localism with an emphasis on communities taking ownership of flood risk. There is also an increased focus on resilience and, more specifically, on community resilience to flooding. This paper draws on research carried out for UK Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs to evaluate the Flood Resilience Community Pathfinder (FRCP scheme in England. Resilience is conceptualised as multidimensional and linked to exisiting capacities within a community. Creating resilience to flooding is an ongoing process of adaptation, learning from past events and preparing for future risks. This paper focusses on the development of formal and informal institutions to support improved flood risk management: institutional resilience capacity. It includes new institutions: e.g. flood groups, as well as activities that help to build inter- and intra- institutional resilience capacity e.g. community flood planning. The pathfinder scheme consisted of 13 projects across England led by local authorities aimed at developing community resilience to flood risk between 2013 – 2015. This paper discusses the nature and structure of flood groups, the process of their development, and the extent of their linkages with formal institutions, drawing out the barriers and facilitators to developing institutional resilience at the local level.

  14. Estimated flood-inundation maps for Cowskin Creek in western Wichita, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studley, Seth E.

    2003-01-01

    The October 31, 1998, flood on Cowskin Creek in western Wichita, Kansas, caused millions of dollars in damages. Emergency management personnel and flood mitigation teams had difficulty in efficiently identifying areas affected by the flooding, and no warning was given to residents because flood-inundation information was not available. To provide detailed information about future flooding on Cowskin Creek, high-resolution estimated flood-inundation maps were developed using geographic information system technology and advanced hydraulic analysis. Two-foot-interval land-surface elevation data from a 1996 flood insurance study were used to create a three-dimensional topographic representation of the study area for hydraulic analysis. The data computed from the hydraulic analyses were converted into geographic information system format with software from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Hydrologic Engineering Center. The results were overlaid on the three-dimensional topographic representation of the study area to produce maps of estimated flood-inundation areas and estimated depths of water in the inundated areas for 1-foot increments on the basis of stream stage at an index streamflow-gaging station. A Web site (http://ks.water.usgs.gov/Kansas/cowskin.floodwatch) was developed to provide the public with information pertaining to flooding in the study area. The Web site shows graphs of the real-time streamflow data for U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations in the area and monitors the National Weather Service Arkansas-Red Basin River Forecast Center for Cowskin Creek flood-forecast information. When a flood is forecast for the Cowskin Creek Basin, an estimated flood-inundation map is displayed for the stream stage closest to the National Weather Service's forecasted peak stage. Users of the Web site are able to view the estimated flood-inundation maps for selected stages at any time and to access information about this report and about flooding in general. Flood

  15. Urbanism, climate change and floods: Case of Tlemcen city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayat Adjim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available After a drought during the 1990s, Tlemcen has experienced heavy rainfall in recent years which caused several floods. They have become frequent and usually cause large damage. We then asked ourselves questions about the reasons for this deregulation of rainfall and floods. We have assumed that climate change has led to deregulation of precipitation and that the urbanization and morphology of the site are the causes of the floods. For this, we analyzed the rainfall data and study the configuration of the town of Tlemcen. We noticed then that Tlemcen town undergoes the climate changes effects per a diminution of the multi-annual mean of rainfall between 1974 and 2008, and a slight displacement of the rainfall from April to November after 2008. Finally, the principal reason of floods is the thoughtless urban sprawl on the water courses also favored by an unfavourable topography.

  16. Forecast-based Integrated Flood Detection System for Emergency Response and Disaster Risk Reduction (Flood-FINDER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcorace, Mauro; Silvestro, Francesco; Rudari, Roberto; Boni, Giorgio; Dell'Oro, Luca; Bjorgo, Einar

    2016-04-01

    image processing. Flood-FINDER aims to pre-empt this process and to provide preliminary analyses where no field data is available. In the early 2015, the Flood-FINDER's forecast along the Shire River has been used to guide the rapid mapping activities in Southern Malawi and Northern Mozambique. It proved efficient support providing timely information about the evolution of the flood event over an area lacking of field data. Regarding in-country capacity building, Flood-FINDER allowed UNOSAT to set up in middle 2015 a flood early warning system in Chad along the Chari River basin with the collaboration of Chadian Ministry of hydraulics and livestock. Weekly flood bulletins have been shared with local authorities and UN agencies over the entire rainy season. Finally, an experimental version of the global web alerting platform has been recently developed for supporting the El Nino flood preparedness in the Horn of Africa. Flood-FINDEŔs mission is to support decision makers throughout all the disaster management cycle with flood alerts, modelled scenarios, EO-based impact assessments and with direct support at country level to implement disaster mitigation strategies. The aim for the future is to seek funding for having the global system fully operational using CERN's supercomputing facilities and to establish new in-country projects with local authorities.

  17. Floods and tsunamis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Mark

    2006-06-01

    Floods and tsunamis cause few severe injuries, but those injuries can overwhelm local areas, depending on the magnitude of the disaster. Most injuries are extremity fractures, lacerations, and sprains. Because of the mechanism of soft tissue and bone injuries, infection is a significant risk. Aspiration pneumonias are also associated with tsunamis. Appropriate precautionary interventions prevent communicable dis-ease outbreaks. Psychosocial health issues must be considered.

  18. Identification of flood-rich and flood-poor periods in flood series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediero, Luis; Santillán, David; Garrote, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Recently, a general concern about non-stationarity of flood series has arisen, as changes in catchment response can be driven by several factors, such as climatic and land-use changes. Several studies to detect trends in flood series at either national or trans-national scales have been conducted. Trends are usually detected by the Mann-Kendall test. However, the results of this test depend on the starting and ending year of the series, which can lead to different results in terms of the period considered. The results can be conditioned to flood-poor and flood-rich periods located at the beginning or end of the series. A methodology to identify statistically significant flood-rich and flood-poor periods is developed, based on the comparison between the expected sampling variability of floods when stationarity is assumed and the observed variability of floods in a given series. The methodology is applied to a set of long series of annual maximum floods, peaks over threshold and counts of annual occurrences in peaks over threshold series observed in Spain in the period 1942-2009. Mediero et al. (2014) found a general decreasing trend in flood series in some parts of Spain that could be caused by a flood-rich period observed in 1950-1970, placed at the beginning of the flood series. The results of this study support the findings of Mediero et al. (2014), as a flood-rich period in 1950-1970 was identified in most of the selected sites. References: Mediero, L., Santillán, D., Garrote, L., Granados, A. Detection and attribution of trends in magnitude, frequency and timing of floods in Spain, Journal of Hydrology, 517, 1072-1088, 2014.

  19. Investigating flood susceptible areas in inaccessible regions using remote sensing and geographic information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joongbin; Lee, Kyoo-Seock

    2017-03-01

    Every summer, North Korea (NK) suffers from floods, resulting in decreased agricultural production and huge economic loss. Besides meteorological reasons, several factors can accelerate flood damage. Environmental studies about NK are difficult because NK is inaccessible due to the division of Korea. Remote sensing (RS) can be used to delineate flood inundated areas in inaccessible regions such as NK. The objective of this study was to investigate the spatial characteristics of flood susceptible areas (FSAs) using multi-temporal RS data and digital elevation model data. Such study will provide basic information to restore FSAs after reunification. Defining FSAs at the study site revealed that rice paddies with low elevation and low slope were the most susceptible areas to flood in NK. Numerous sediments from upper streams, especially streams through crop field areas on steeply sloped hills, might have been transported and deposited into stream channels, thus disturbing water flow. In conclusion, NK floods may have occurred not only due to meteorological factors but also due to inappropriate land use for flood management. In order to mitigate NK flood damage, reforestation is needed for terraced crop fields. In addition, drainage capacity for middle stream channel near rice paddies should be improved.

  20. Vistula River bed erosion processes and their influence on Warsaw’s flood safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Magnuszewski

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Large cities have historically been well protected against floods as a function of their importance to society. In Warsaw, Poland, located on a narrow passage of the Vistula River valley, urban flood disasters were not unusual. Beginning at the end of the 19th century, the construction of river embankment and training works caused the narrowing of the flood passage path in the downtown reach of the river. The process of bed erosion lowered the elevation of the river bed by 205 cm over the 20th century, and the consequences of bed lowering are reflected by the rating curve change. Conditions of the flood passage have been analysed by the CCHE2D hydrodynamic model both in retro-modelling and scenario simulation modelling. The high water mark of the 1844 flood and iterative calculations in retro-modelling made possible estimation of the discharge, Q = 8250 m3 s−1. This highest observed historical flood in a natural river has been compared to recent conditions of the Vistula River in Warsaw by scenario modelling. The result shows dramatic changes in water surface elevation, velocities, and shear stress. The vertical velocity in the proximity of Port Praski gauge at km 513 can reach 3.5 m s−1, a very high value for a lowland river. The average flow conveyance is improving due to channel erosion but also declining in the case of extreme floods due to high resistance from vegetation on the flood plains.