WorldWideScience

Sample records for final flood elevation

  1. 75 FR 8814 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ...Base (1% annual-chance) Flood Elevations (BFEs) and modified BFEs are made final for the communities listed below. The BFEs and modified BFEs are the basis for the floodplain management measures that each community is required either to adopt or to show evidence of being already in effect in order to qualify or remain qualified for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program...

  2. 75 FR 59989 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... Lufkin. downstream of Bonita Street. Approximately 230 feet +304 upstream of Martin Luther King Drive... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 67 Final Flood Elevation Determinations AGENCY... (FEMA) makes the final determinations listed below for the modified BFEs for each community...

  3. 76 FR 8906 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ....: FEMA-B-1014 Sugar Creek Approximately 2,000 feet +469 Town of West Terre Haute, downstream of Conrail... Mexico Base Flood Elevation +6-17 City of Lake Charles, changes ranging from 6 City of Sulphur, City...

  4. 76 FR 43923 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... participation in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). DATES: The date of issuance of the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) showing BFEs and modified BFEs for each community. This date may be obtained by... Approximately 275 feet downstream of Big Bethel +9 Road. Approximately 20 feet upstream of the confluence...

  5. 75 FR 14091 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... participation in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). DATES: The date of issuance of the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) showing BFEs and modified BFEs for each community. This date may be obtained by...-1035 Big Creek South Ely Street......... + 713 City of Bertram. Big Creek Road + 719 Cedar Lake...

  6. 75 FR 68714 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... Docket No.: FEMA-B-1069 Arroyo Hermanos At the confluence with +6448 City of Las Vegas. Gallinas Creek... Domestic Assistance No. 97.022, ``Flood Insurance.'') Dated: October 29, 2010. Sandra K. Knight, Deputy...

  7. 78 FR 29652 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... referenced Depth in feet Communities affected elevation above ground Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified.... Burns Bayou Approximately 1,860 feet +76 Unincorporated Areas of upstream of Collins Lane. Richland Parish. Just upstream of U.S. +79 Route 80. Burns Bayou Tributary No. 1 At the lower confluence +77 Town...

  8. 75 FR 3171 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Elevation in meters (MSL) Modified Washington County, Minnesota, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B..., City of Lakeland Shores, City of Marine on St. Croix, City of Oak Park Heights, City of St. Mary's... Washington County. West Metcalf Marsh Entire shoreline......... +813 City of Afton. White Rock Lake...

  9. 75 FR 23600 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order 13132, Federalism. This final rule involves no policies that... 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376. Sec. 67.11 0 2... Hannibal, Unincorporated Areas of Marion County. At Veterans Road......... +685 Mississippi...

  10. FEMA DFIRM Base Flood Elevations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The Base Flood Elevation (BFE) table is required for any digital data where BFE lines will be shown on the corresponding Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). Normally,...

  11. Base Flood Elevation (BFE) Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Base Flood Elevation (BFE) table is required for any digital data where BFE lines will be shown on the corresponding Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). Normally if...

  12. Base Flood Elevation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  13. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE - MO 2014 Springfield FEMA Base Flood Elevations (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — This polyline layer indicates the approximate effective FEMA Base Flood Elevation (BFE) associated with the corresponding Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA). Each line...

  14. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE - MO 2010 Springfield FEMA Base Flood Elevations (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This polyline layer indicates the approximate effective FEMA Base Flood Elevations (BFE) associated with the corresponding Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA). Each...

  15. 2013 FEMA Base Flood Elevation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  16. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE - MO 2014 Springfield FEMA Base Flood Elevations (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This polyline layer indicates the approximate effective FEMA Base Flood Elevation (BFE) associated with the corresponding Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA). Each line...

  17. 78 FR 8089 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... represents the flooding sources, location of referenced elevations, effective and modified elevations, and... the floodplain management criteria required by 44 CFR 60.3, are the minimum that are required. They... Creek, and Muncy Creek. Those tables contained inaccurate information as to the location of...

  18. Sensitivity of Coastal Flood Risk Assessments to Digital Elevation Models

    OpenAIRE

    Bas van de Sande; Claartje Hoyng; Joost Lansen

    2012-01-01

    Most coastal flood risk studies make use of a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) in addition to a projected flood water level in order to estimate the flood inundation and associated damages to property and livelihoods. The resolution and accuracy of a DEM are critical in a flood risk assessment, as land elevation largely determines whether a location will be flooded or will remain dry during a flood event. Especially in low lying deltaic areas, the land elevation variation is usually in the order...

  19. 77 FR 59767 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ..., Mayor, The Chapel Hill Town of Chapel Hill, 405 Herald. Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard, Chapel Hill... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 65 Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations... final determinations listed below of the modified BFEs for each community listed. These modified...

  20. 75 FR 5925 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... 2,300 None +260 Unincorporated Areas of feet downstream of Hot Spring County. Martin Luther King Boulevard. Approximately 1,300 None +263 feet downstream of Martin Luther King Boulevard. Town Creek... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 67 Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations...

  1. 76 FR 39063 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... City Hall, 100 North Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, Waukegan, IL 60085. City of Zion Maps are available... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 67 Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations AGENCY... make determinations of BFEs and modified BFEs for each community listed below, in accordance...

  2. 75 FR 62061 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ..., these elevations, once finalized, will be used by insurance agents and others to calculate appropriate... Cecil County. Egypt Road. Approximately 977 feet +259 +260 downstream of Elbow Road. Dogwood Run At...

  3. 75 FR 75945 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ..., these elevations, once finalized, will be used by insurance agents and others to calculate appropriate... 2nd Street and of Skagit County. 3rd Street. At the intersection of 1 +39 Freeway Drive and Cameron...

  4. 75 FR 61377 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ..., these elevations, once finalized, will be used by insurance agents and others to calculate appropriate... Cameron Ditch At the confluence with +1007 +1009 City of Blair. the Missouri River. Just downstream of...

  5. 75 FR 29219 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ..., these elevations, once finalized, will be used by insurance agents and others to calculate appropriate... South Van Dorn Street. Approximately +94 +95 600 feet upstream of South Van Dorn Street. Cameron Run... +84 +90 of I-395. Hooffs Run At the +11 +12 confluence with Cameron Run. Approximately None +18 260...

  6. Sensitivity of Coastal Flood Risk Assessments to Digital Elevation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas van de Sande

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Most coastal flood risk studies make use of a Digital Elevation Model (DEM in addition to a projected flood water level in order to estimate the flood inundation and associated damages to property and livelihoods. The resolution and accuracy of a DEM are critical in a flood risk assessment, as land elevation largely determines whether a location will be flooded or will remain dry during a flood event. Especially in low lying deltaic areas, the land elevation variation is usually in the order of only a few decimeters, and an offset of various decimeters in the elevation data has a significant impact on the accuracy of the risk assessment. Publicly available DEMs are often used in studies for coastal flood risk assessments. The accuracy of these datasets is relatively low, in the order of meters, and is especially low in comparison to the level of accuracy required for a flood risk assessment in a deltaic area. For a coastal zone area in Nigeria (Lagos State an accurate LiDAR DEM dataset was adopted as ground truth concerning terrain elevation. In the case study, the LiDAR DEM was compared to various publicly available DEMs. The coastal flood risk assessment using various publicly available DEMs was compared to a flood risk assessment using LiDAR DEMs. It can be concluded that the publicly available DEMs do not meet the accuracy requirement of coastal flood risk assessments, especially in coastal and deltaic areas. For this particular case study, the publically available DEMs highly overestimated the land elevation Z-values and thereby underestimated the coastal flood risk for the Lagos State area. The findings are of interest when selecting data sets for coastal flood risk assessments in low-lying deltaic areas.

  7. 76 FR 72961 - Flood Hazard Determinations (Including Flood Elevation Determinations)-Change in Notification and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ..., etc.) and provide both a physical address and an internet address where the specific flood elevations... both a physical address and an internet address where the specific flood hazards (as shown in a Flood... published in the Federal Register on or after December 1, 2011. ADDRESSES: The docket for this notice...

  8. 77 FR 46994 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ..., it addresses the following flooding sources: Jones Bayou, Mississippi River, and Porter Bayou. DATES... Incorporated Areas'' addressed the following flooding sources: Jones Bayou, Mississippi River, and Porter Bayou.... Approximately 8.1 miles None +162 upstream of the Arkansas River confluence. Porter Bayou Approximately 0.8 mile...

  9. 77 FR 423 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 65 Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations... participation in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). These modified BFEs, together with the floodplain...). Asheville Citizen- 205 College Street, Times. Suite 300, Asheville, NC 28801. Davidson (FEMA Docket...

  10. 76 FR 26980 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ... Lake Michigan and White Ditch in La Porte County, Indiana. The City of Michiana Shores should have been... Porte County, Indiana, and Incorporated Areas'' addressed several flooding sources, including...

  11. 76 FR 19007 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    .... Williamsburg County. Approximately 0.4 mile None +21 upstream of the Big Dam Swamp confluence. Smith Swamp At... section 110 of the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973, 42 U.S.C. 4104, and 44 CFR 67.4(a). These.... Sec. 67.4 2. The tables published under the authority of Sec. 67.4 are proposed to be amended...

  12. 75 FR 43479 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... section 110 of the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973, 42 U.S.C. 4104, and 44 CFR 67.4(a). These.... Sec. 67.4 2. The tables published under the authority of Sec. 67.4 are proposed to be amended as... Street. Summet Brook (Backwater effects from Approximately 2,800 None +363 Town of Shrewsbury. Big...

  13. 76 FR 61649 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... Planning and Review. This proposed rule is not a significant regulatory action under the criteria of... follows: * Elevation in feet (NGVD) + Elevation in feet (NAVD) Depth in feet above State City/town/county... City of Lubbock......... Playa System E1 At the intersection of Avenue T and 40th Street +3208 +3206 At...

  14. 75 FR 64165 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... Approximately 265 feet +269 City of Kenedy. downstream of South 2nd Street. Ojo de Agua Creek Approximately 1... 860 feet +287 upstream of the confluence with Tributary 9 to Ojo de Agua Watershed. San Antonio...

  15. 75 FR 5894 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ..., Unincorporated Areas of Colbert County. 0.5 mile downstream of +515 Pepi Drive. Sink Hole 10 South of 6th Street, +493 City of Muscle Shoals. between Elledge Lane and Industrial Drive. Sink Hole 10A At Oak Villa Drive, +494 City of Muscle Shoals. approximately 550 feet west of Elledge Lane. Sink Hole 10B Bordered by...

  16. 77 FR 45262 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... the Village Hall, 170 Monroe Street, East Brooklyn, IL 60474. Village of Seneca ] Maps are available... Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-7753 Kelly Ditch Approximately 900 feet +388 City of Boonville, upstream.... Kelly Creek Tributary Approximately 0.45 mile +1365 Unincorporated Areas of downstream of Farm...

  17. 77 FR 49367 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... confluence. At the Lake Marion Creek +67 Outlet and Snell Creek confluence. Lake Marion Creek Outlet At the Lake Marion Creek +67 Unincorporated Areas of and Snell Creek Polk County. confluence. At the Lake... Unincorporated Areas of Area--ICPR Node 28W91. Polk County. Snell Creek At the Lake Marion Creek +67...

  18. 76 FR 79098 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... boundary: +468 City of Havana. Approximately 470 feet north of Mason Street/ East boundary: Approximately 1...: +472 City of Havana. Approximately 80 feet south of intersection of Tinkham Street and Lincoln Street... Promenade Street. Ponding North boundary: +469 City of Havana. Approximately 810 feet south of Wagner Avenue...

  19. 78 FR 9831 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... Unincorporated Areas of Craven County Maps are available for inspection at the Craven County GIS/Mapping... ground. Mean Sea Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter. ADDRESSES City of Lincoln Maps are available... inspection at the Planning Department, 301 South Brooks Street, 3rd Floor, Wake Forest, NC...

  20. 77 FR 26959 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ...,875 feet +1249 City of Rogers. downstream of Willow Ridge Way. At the upstream side of Mills +1313... Tributary to Puppy Creek........ Approximately 370 feet upstream +1273 City of Lowell. of West Monroe Avenue... Jonestown Maps are available for inspection at the Borough Building, 295 South Mill Street, Jonestown,...

  1. 78 FR 10066 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... downstream of Greenpasture Road (State Route 1141). ] Swift Creek Approximately 0.6 mile +78 Unincorporated.... Approximately 0.4 mile +155 upstream of Taylors Store Road (Secondary Road 1004). ] Polecat Branch At the... downstream of Red Oak of Nashville. Road (Secondary Road 1003). Just upstream of U.S. +152 Route 64. Swift...

  2. 76 FR 49676 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... Scott Road (at the Borough of Franklin corporate limit). * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North... County, South Carolina, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1115 Bailey Creek Approximately 600... Creek. Anderson County. Approximately 100 feet +692 downstream of Scotts Bridge Road. Jones Creek...

  3. 78 FR 45879 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... Porte County, Indiana, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1155 Lake Michigan Entire shoreline within + 585 Town of Michiana Shores, community. Unincorporated Areas of La Porte County. Lake Michigan... Shores, downstream of Michiana City of Michigan City, Drive. Unincorporated Areas of La Porte...

  4. 77 FR 76916 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... Office, 2800 King Street, Smyrna, GA 30080. Unincorporated Areas of Cobb County Maps are available for... Unincorporated Areas of King Drive. Gwinnett County. Approximately 0.43 mile +1082 upstream of East Rock Quarry... confluence with Peekskill Hollow Creek. At the county boundary... +393 Stephens Brook Approximately 250...

  5. 75 FR 59634 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    .... upstream of the confluence with Goodwin Hallow. Approximately 3,150 feet +1170 upstream of the confluence with Goodwin Hallow. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in...

  6. 77 FR 3625 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... FEMA-B-1164 Apple Run/Horner Drain At the confluence with +688 Township of Canton, Sines Drain.... Approximately 1,650 feet +586 southwest of the intersection of Woodruff Road and Torry Avenue. Sines Drain At...

  7. 76 FR 272 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... River Forest +787 Unincorporated Areas of Rd. Spartanburg County. Approximately 400 feet +864 upstream... with Little Buck Creek. Maple Creek Just upstream of New Woodruff +854 City of Greer, Road...

  8. 77 FR 41323 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... downstream of the Maple Street Bridge. Matfield River At the Bridge Street +33 Town of East Bridgewater... Forest Road Bridge. At the Hockomock River +63 confluence. Tributary A Just upstream of the +71 Town of...

  9. 75 FR 69892 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... CONTACT: Roy E. Wright, Deputy Director, Risk Analysis Division, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 601- 612, a regulatory flexibility analysis is not required. Regulatory... feet downstream of U.S. Route *339 Brookport. 45. Approximately 2,460 feet upstream of U.S. Route 45...

  10. 78 FR 6745 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... for inspection at the Jackson Township Municipal Building, 2162 State Route 715, Stroudsburg, PA 18360....S.C. 601- 612, a regulatory flexibility analysis is not required. Regulatory Classification. This... +323 Township of Smithfield. confluence. Approximately 0.5 mile +323 upstream of State Route 2028. Buck...

  11. 77 FR 46972 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ....S.C. 601- 612, a regulatory flexibility analysis is not required. Regulatory Classification. This... at the Planning Department, Development and Building Services Division, 600 2nd Street Northwest... +490 U.S. Route 59. Caston Creek Approximately 100 feet +463 City of Poteau, Town of upstream of the...

  12. 78 FR 48813 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... with Tallow Branch. Little Reedy Creek (Backwater effects From the confluence with +429 Unincorporated... Dunbar- Leetown Road. Tallow Branch (Backwater effects from From the confluence with +426...

  13. 76 FR 29656 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... County. approximately 1.2 miles upstream of the confluence with Robinson Creek. ] Tallow Creek Tributary 4 (backwater From the confluence with +831 Unincorporated Areas of effects from Tallow Creek). Tallow Creek to Taylor County. approximately 920 feet upstream of Bradfordsville Road. Wilson...

  14. 76 FR 21664 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... North.. +805 City of Anderson, Town of Chesterfield, Town of Country Club Heights, Town of River Forest..., 100 West State Street, Pendleton, IN 46064. Town of River Forest Maps are available for inspection at 53 River Forest Street, Anderson, IN 46011. Town of Woodlawn Heights Maps are available...

  15. 77 FR 73324 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... to the south, and Royal Trails Road to the west. Multiple Ponding Areas Area bound by Saffron +45... west. Multiple Ponding Areas Area bound by Saffron +48 Unincorporated Areas of Avenue to the north... Ponding Areas Area bound by Saffron +49 Unincorporated Areas of Avenue to the north, Lake...

  16. 75 FR 22699 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... +582 upstream of South Riverside Avenue. Robbins Drain At the confluence with +580 Township of the St. Clair River. Cottrellville. Approximately 500 feet +580 downstream of Nautical Lane. Robbins Drain... +581 Robbins Drain. South Channel/St. Clair River At the confluence with +579 City of Algonac, City of...

  17. 75 FR 55480 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... Diversion.. Just upstream of Porter +582 Town of Niagara. Road. At the confluence with +582 Cayuga Creek... Boulevard. Twelvemile Creek Approximately 2.0 miles +300 Town of Porter, Town of upstream of Fitch Road..., 6570 Campbell Boulevard, Lockport, NY 14094. Town of Porter Maps are available for inspection at the...

  18. 76 FR 76060 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    .... Approximately 125 feet +607 upstream of James Street. County Drain No. 4 & 43 At the confluence with +597... 1515 Baldwin Street, Jenison, MI 49429. Charter Township of Holland Maps are available for...

  19. 76 FR 36373 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... FEMA-B-1139 Browns River Approximately 1,500 feet +354 Town of Essex, Town of upstream of Brown River.... Town of Bolton Maps are available for inspection at the Town Hall, 3045 Theodore Roosevelt...

  20. 77 FR 26968 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... 71282. Village of Richmond Maps are available for inspection at 598 Wood Street, Richmond, LA 71282.... downstream of the confluence with Bear Rock Run. Approximately 1,480 feet +1862 downstream of the confluence with Bear Rock Run. Little Paint Creek Approximately 0.77 mile +1734 Township of Richland. upstream...

  1. 76 FR 39011 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... Unincorporated Areas of Highway 6. Wood County. Approximately 1,650 feet + 678 upstream of State Highway 25. Rock...-B-1115 Birch Creek-Pouges Run Approximately 720 feet + 624 City of Brazil, downstream of White Rock Unincorporated Areas of Road. Clay County. Approximately 1.29 miles + 652 upstream of White Rock Road. *...

  2. 75 FR 18091 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. Mean Sea Level, rounded to the... ground. Mean Sea Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter. ADDRESSES City of Barling Maps are available... Highway 19. Whittenburg Creek Approximately 120 feet +725 Unincorporated Areas of downstream of Snake Road...

  3. 75 FR 44155 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... of Durand, downstream of the new U.S. Unincorporated Areas of Route 10 bridge. Pepin County.... ADDRESSES City of Durand Maps are available for inspection at City Hall, 104 East Main Street, Durand,...

  4. 77 FR 21476 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... 30 feet +771 downstream of Durand Avenue (State Highway 11). Unnamed Tributary No. 18 to Kilbourn... +762 upstream of Durand Avenue (State Highway 11). Unnamed Tributary No. 39 to Des Plaines At the... at the Mount Pleasant Village Hall, 6126 Durand Avenue, Racine, Wisconsin 53406. Village...

  5. 78 FR 29654 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... mile +336 upstream of the Brono Road bridge. Resurrection River At the confluence with +16 City of Seward, Kenai Resurrection Bay. Peninsula Borough. Approximately 1.6 mile +74 upstream of the Alaskan... +16 City of Seward, Kenai Resurrection Bay. Peninsula Borough. At the confluence with +189 Grouse...

  6. 75 FR 52868 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... Green Crest Drive. Valley Creek Approximately 0.5 mile +431 City of Bessemer, downstream of Power Unincorporated Areas of Plant Road. Jefferson County. Approximately 0.5 mile +440 upstream of Power Plant Road. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. Mean Sea...

  7. 77 FR 19112 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Sumter County. approximately 7.3 miles upstream of County Road 85. Sandy Creek Approximately 1 mile +115... Maps are available for inspection at 199 Barton Shore Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48105. Village of Dexter... Approximately 1,000 feet +852 Unincorporated Areas of upstream of the Garvin County. confluence with Keel Sandy...

  8. 78 FR 10072 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    .... upstream of Blue Eagle Way. At the confluence with +26 Mount Pleasant Creek. Mount Pleasant Creek Tributary... of Jacksonville. the Ortega River. Just downstream of Connie +71 Jean Road. Ortega River Tributary...

  9. 75 FR 43418 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ....: FEMA-B-1021 Northeast Drain Approximately 5,276 feet +4,216 City of Clovis, downstream of Humphry... Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter. ADDRESSES City of Clovis Maps are available for inspection at 321 Connelly Street, Clovis, NM 88101. Unincorporated Areas of Curry County Maps are available...

  10. 77 FR 30220 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    .... Jackman Brook (backwater effects from Just upstream of Parish +18 Town of Georgetown. Parker River). Road.... Charlie Creek At the Cane Creek +377 City of Camden, confluence. Unincorporated Areas of Benton...

  11. 77 FR 66555 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ... Approximately 590 feet +1098 Township of Lehman. downstream of Shady Lane. Approximately 410 feet +1099... Township of Lehman. downstream of State Route 29. Approximately 700 feet +1127 downstream of State Route 29... at City Hall, 40 East Market Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711. Township of Lehman Maps are available...

  12. 78 FR 43821 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    ... community. LaGrange County. Little Turkey Lake Entire shoreline......... +930 Unincorporated Areas of La... County. Pigeon Lake Entire shoreline......... +848 Unincorporated Areas of LaGrange County. Pretty Lake... +882 upstream of County Highway V. Little Baraboo River (backwater effects At the Baraboo River...

  13. 75 FR 34381 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... east of County Road 88. Zone AE Area Area north of King Road, +23 Unincorporated Areas of south of... above Holcomb Bridge +884 City of Berkeley Lake, Road. City of Duluth, City of Sugar Hill, City of... of Sugar Hill Maps are available for inspection at 4988 West Broad Street, Sugar Hill, GA 30518. City...

  14. 76 FR 35119 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... for inspection at 301 King Street, Alexandria, VA 22314. Town of Ennis, Montana Docket No.: FEMA-B... the confluence with Catawba River Tributary 11. Sugar Creek At the confluence with the +486...

  15. 78 FR 14700 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... of Seaforth, City of Vesta, Unincorporated Areas of Redwood County. Approximately 0.88 mile +1,067... Maps are available for inspection at 414 Dewey Street, Seaforth, MN 56287. City of Vesta Maps are available for inspection at 150 Front Street West, Vesta, MN 56292. Unincorporated Areas of Redwood...

  16. 76 FR 3531 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order....C. 4001 et seq.; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR.... Approximately 4.15 miles +861 upstream of Spring Street. Turton Creek Approximately 100 feet +730 City...

  17. 78 FR 36098 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... 510 North Broadway, 4th Floor, Billings, MT 59101. Unincorporated Areas of Yellowstone County Maps are available for inspection at 217 North 27th Street, Billings, MT 59101. (Catalog of Federal Domestic... 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order...

  18. 77 FR 49360 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... confluence. Mud Camp Creek (backwater effects from From the Cumberland River +539 Unincorporated Areas of... Salem Road. Red Creek Approximately 1.8 miles +37 Unincorporated Areas of downstream of Red Creek George County. Road. Approximately 2.9 miles +46 upstream of Red Creek Road. * National Geodetic Vertical...

  19. 77 FR 71702 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... Mascaras confluence. Approximately 100 feet +7338 upstream of Camino Del Norte. Arroyo De La Paz At the... +7320 upstream of Camino Encantado. Arroyo Saiz At the upstream side of +7191 City of Santa Fe. Avenida...

  20. 76 FR 72627 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ... confluence with +929 Unincorporated Areas of Chub Creek. Dakota County. Approximately 1,250 feet +944... inspection at City Hall, 1011 Sibley Memorial Highway, Lilydale, MN 55118. City of Mendota Maps are available... Maps are available for inspection at City Hall, 1011 Victoria Curve, Mendota Heights, MN 55118. City...

  1. 78 FR 45877 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... Trinity Drive. Fritz Cove At the southern end of 23 City and Borough of Mendenhall Peninsula. Juneau... Mendenhall Peninsula Road. Approximately 0.5 mile 26 southwest of the intersection of Point Lena Loop Road... Juneau. Highway. Approximately 1.4 miles 106 upstream of Glacier Highway. Mendenhall River Approximately...

  2. 76 FR 54134 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... +550 Prairie Dell Road. Busch Creek At the confluence with +480 City of Washington, Dubois Creek. Unincorporated Areas of Franklin County. Approximately 460 feet +582 upstream of Schroeder Lane. Dubois Creek...

  3. 77 FR 7540 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... inspection at the Engineering Department, 623 Garrison Avenue, Suite 409, Fort Smith, AR 72901.... upstream of the confluence with Wolf Camp Run. Approximately 1.32 miles +1215 upstream of the...

  4. 77 FR 76929 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation..., Unincorporated Areas of Shelby County. Approximately 0.9 mile +567 upstream of County Road 340. Camp...

  5. 75 FR 78617 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... downstream of Martin Hot Spring County. Luther King Boulevard. Approximately 1,300 feet +263 downstream of Martin Luther King Boulevard. Town Creek Approximately 2,300 feet +253 Unincorporated Areas of...

  6. 76 FR 10253 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... Department, 1 Northwest Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Room 310, Evansville, IN 47708. Unincorporated..., Building Commission Department, 1 Northwest Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Room 310, Evansville, IN... Street. Bunch Creek At Martin Tram Road +37 Unincorporated Areas of Allen Parish. Approximately...

  7. 76 FR 68107 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... of Lee County Maps are available for inspection at 909 Avenue A, Opelika, AL 36801. Hardin County... Unincorporated Areas of upstream of IL-1. Hardin County. Approximately 1.92 miles +366 upstream of IL-1. Ohio... extended (River Mile Hardin County, Village 894). of Elizabethtown. Approximately 1.97 miles +359...

  8. 77 FR 21485 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... Creek (backwater effects from From the Doxies Creek + 631 Unincorporated Areas of Missouri River.... Highway VV to approximately 225 feet downstream of U.S. Route 24. Doxies Creek (backwater effects from...

  9. 76 FR 50920 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... Approximately 1,219 feet + 355 Town of Great Falls, downstream of U.S. Route Unincorporated Areas of 21. Chester... + 297 Town of Great Falls, downstream of Brooklyn Unincorporated Areas of Road. Chester County... for inspection at City Hall, 100 West End Street, Chester, SC 29706. Town of Great Falls Maps...

  10. 75 FR 23608 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... floodprone areas in accordance with 44 CFR part 60. Interested lessees and owners of real property are... Lake County/New +311 Madrid County, Missouri/ Fulton County, Kentucky, boundary (River Mile...

  11. 76 FR 35111 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order....C. 4001 et seq.; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR... River Just downstream of State +385 Town of Shrewsbury. Highway 140. At the Town of Grafton...

  12. 77 FR 21471 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... the +883 City of Georgetown, Red River of the North. Unincorporated Areas of Clay County. Just... Unincorporated Areas of Red River of the North. Clay County. Approximately 2,500 feet +896 downstream of Wall... +888 Unincorporated Areas of Red River of the North. Clay County. At the divergence from County +893...

  13. 75 FR 19895 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... Red Clay Road. Bates Creek At the confluence with +1529 Eastern Band of Cherokee Hanging Dog Creek.... Approximately 130 feet +2233 upstream of Red Clay Road. Alarka Creek At the confluence with the +1710...

  14. 75 FR 77762 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... (e-mail) luis.rodriguez1@dhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal Emergency Management Agency... Docket No.: FEMA-B-1080 Dasher Creek Approximately 0.51 mile +47 City of Rincon, upstream of...

  15. 77 FR 49379 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... Creek. Juniata River Approximately 1.72 miles +638 Township of Porter. upstream of Bridge Street... Maps are available for inspection at the Logan Township Building, 7228 Diamond Valley, Alexandria, PA... Road, Huntingdon, PA 16652. Township of Porter Maps are available for inspection at the Porter...

  16. 76 FR 3524 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... Approximately 1,250 feet +825 City of Amazonia, upstream of the Buchanan Unincorporated Areas of County boundary..., rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter. ADDRESSES City of Amazonia Maps are available for inspection at 441 Spring Street, Amazonia, MO 64421. Unincorporated Areas of Andrew County Maps are available...

  17. Optimal house elevation for reducing flood-related losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Siyuan; Lin, Ning; Kunreuther, Howard

    2017-05-01

    FEMA recommends that houses in coastal flood zones be elevated to at least 1 foot above the base flood elevation (BFE). However, this guideline is not specific and ignores characteristics of houses that affect their vulnerability. An economically optimal elevation level (OEL) is proposed that minimizes the combined cost of elevation and cumulative insurance premiums over the lifespan of the house. As an illustration, analysis is performed for various coastal houses in Ortley Beach, NJ. Compared with the strategy of raising houses to 1 foot above BFE, the strategy of raising houses to their OELs is much more economical for the homeowners. Elevating to the OELs also significantly reduces government spending on subsidizing low-income homeowners through, for example, a voucher program, to mitigate flood risk. These results suggest that policy makers should consider vulnerability factors in developing risk-reduction strategies. FEMA may recommend OELs to homeowners based on their flood hazards as well as house characteristics or at least providing more information and tools to homeowners to assist them in making more economical decisions. The OEL strategy can also be coupled with a voucher program to make the program more cost-effective.

  18. 75 FR 29253 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    .... Washington County. Approximately 100 feet None +109 downstream of State Road 77. Flat Creek At the confluence... Elevation in meters (MSL) Existing Modified City of Hampton, Virginia Virginia City of Hampton... ground. Mean Sea Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter. ** BFEs to be changed include the...

  19. 77 FR 12501 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... Herald. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Chapel Hill, NC 27514. Stanly City of Albemarle (11- November 3... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 65 Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations... to this determination for the listed communities. From the date of the second publication of...

  20. 76 FR 22054 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 65 Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations... Smart Sr., Chairman, Board of Shopper. Selectmen, 34 Town Farm Road, P.O. Box 9, Hollis, ME...

  1. 76 FR 23 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency 44 CFR Part 65 Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations... 0538P). 20, 2010; The Smart Sr., Chairman, Board of Shopper. Selectman, 34 Town Farm Road, Hollis,...

  2. 78 FR 9406 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... Georgetown......... Georgetown Township Office, 1515 Baldwin Street, Jenison, MI 49428. Charter Township of... Domestic Assistance No. 97.022, ``Flood Insurance.'') James A. Walke, Acting Deputy Associate...

  3. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, flood plains, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Box Elder County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other...

  4. 44 CFR 65.12 - Revision of flood insurance rate maps to reflect base flood elevations caused by proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Revision of flood insurance rate maps to reflect base flood elevations caused by proposed encroachments. 65.12 Section 65.12... INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program IDENTIFICATION AND MAPPING OF...

  5. Final Report, Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George E. Dzyacky

    2003-05-31

    The Flooding Predictor is an advanced process control strategy comprising a patented pattern-recognition methodology that identifies pre-flood patterns discovered to precede flooding events in distillation columns. The grantee holds a U.S. patent on the modeling system. The technology was validated at the Separations Research Program, The University of Texas at Austin under a grant from the U. S. Department of Energy, Inventions & Innovation Program. Distillation tower flooding occurs at abnormally high vapor and/or liquid rates. The loss in tray efficiencies is attributed to unusual behavior of liquid inventories inside the column leading to conditions of flooding of the space in between trays with liquid. Depending on the severity of the flood condition, consequences range from off spec products to equipment damage and tower shutdown. This non-intrusive pattern recognition methodology, processes signal data obtained from existing column instrumentation. Once the pattern is identified empirically, it is modeled and coded into the plant's distributed control system. The control system is programmed to briefly "unload" the tower each time the pattern appears. The unloading takes the form of a momentary reduction in column severity, e.g., decrease bottom temperature, reflux or tower throughput. Unloading the tower briefly at the pre-flood state causes long-term column operation to become significantly more stable - allowing an increase in throughput and/or product purity. The technology provides a wide range of value between optimization and flooding. When a distillation column is not running at capacity, it should be run in such a way ("pushed") that optimal product purity is achieved. Additional benefits include low implementation and maintenance costs, and a high level of console operator acceptance. The previous commercial applications experienced 98% uptime over a four-year period. Further, the technology is unique in its ability to distinguish between

  6. Simplified Flood Inundation Mapping Based On Flood Elevation-Discharge Rating Curves Using Satellite Images in Gauged Watersheds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younghun Jung

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study suggests an approach to obtain flood extent boundaries using spatial analysis based on Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper imageries and the digital elevation model. The suggested approach firstly extracts the flood inundation areas using the ISODATA image-processing algorithm from four Landsat 5TM imageries. Then, the ground elevations at the intersections of the extracted flood extent boundaries and the specified river cross sections are read from the digital elevation to estimate the elevation-discharge relationship. Lastly, the flood extent is generated based on the estimated elevation-discharge relationship. The methodology was tested over two river reaches in Indiana, United States. The estimated elevation-discharge relationship showed a good match with the correlation coefficients varying between 0.82 and 0.99. In addition, self-validation was also performed for the estimated spatial extent of the flood by comparing it to the waterbody extracted from the Landsat images used to develop the elevation-discharge relationship. The result indicated that the match between the estimated and the extracted flood extents was better with higher flood magnitude. We expect that the suggested methodology will help under-developed and developing countries to obtain flood maps, which have difficulties getting flood maps through traditional approaches based on computer modeling.

  7. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, FEMA Base Flood Elevations - line shapefile, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Board Of Commissioners.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published...

  8. Improved estimation of flood parameters by combining space based SAR data with very high resolution digital elevation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zwenzner

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe flood events turned out to be the most devastating catastrophes for Europe's population, economy and environment during the past decades. The total loss caused by the August 2002 flood is estimated to be 10 billion Euros for Germany alone. Due to their capability to present a synoptic view of the spatial extent of floods, remote sensing technology, and especially synthetic aperture radar (SAR systems, have been successfully applied for flood mapping and monitoring applications. However, the quality and accuracy of the flood masks and derived flood parameters always depends on the scale and the geometric precision of the original data as well as on the classification accuracy of the derived data products. The incorporation of auxiliary information such as elevation data can help to improve the plausibility and reliability of the derived flood masks as well as higher level products. This paper presents methods to improve the matching of flood masks with very high resolution digital elevation models as derived from LiDAR measurements for example. In the following, a cross section approach is presented that allows the dynamic fitting of the position of flood mask profiles according to the underlying terrain information from the DEM. This approach is tested in two study areas, using different input data sets. The first test area is part of the Elbe River (Germany where flood masks derived from Radarsat-1 and IKONOS during the 2002 flood are used in combination with a LiDAR DEM of 1 m spatial resolution. The other test data set is located on the River Severn (UK and flood masks derived from the TerraSAR-X satellite and aerial photos acquired during the 2007 flood are used in combination with a LiDAR DEM of 2 m pixel spacing. By means of these two examples the performance of the matching technique and the scaling effects are analysed and discussed. Furthermore, the systematic flood mapping capability of the different imaging systems are

  9. Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures, Building Dept has required elevation certs when house falls inside flood zone - paper copies only, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures dataset current as of 2010. Building Dept has required elevation certs when house falls inside flood zone - paper...

  10. Flood Damage Analysis: First Floor Elevation Uncertainty Resulting from LiDAR-Derived Digital Surface Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Bodoque

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of high resolution ground-based light detection and ranging (LiDAR datasets provides spatial density and vertical precision for obtaining highly accurate Digital Surface Models (DSMs. As a result, the reliability of flood damage analysis has improved significantly, owing to the increased accuracy of hydrodynamic models. In addition, considerable error reduction has been achieved in the estimation of first floor elevation, which is a critical parameter for determining structural and content damages in buildings. However, as with any discrete measurement technique, LiDAR data contain object space ambiguities, especially in urban areas where the presence of buildings and the floodplain gives rise to a highly complex landscape that is largely corrected by using ancillary information based on the addition of breaklines to a triangulated irregular network (TIN. The present study provides a methodological approach for assessing uncertainty regarding first floor elevation. This is based on: (i generation an urban TIN from LiDAR data with a density of 0.5 points·m−2, complemented with the river bathymetry obtained from a field survey with a density of 0.3 points·m−2. The TIN was subsequently improved by adding breaklines and was finally transformed to a raster with a spatial resolution of 2 m; (ii implementation of a two-dimensional (2D hydrodynamic model based on the 500-year flood return period. The high resolution DSM obtained in the previous step, facilitated addressing the modelling, since it represented suitable urban features influencing hydraulics (e.g., streets and buildings; and (iii determination of first floor elevation uncertainty within the 500-year flood zone by performing Monte Carlo simulations based on geostatistics and 1997 control elevation points in order to assess error. Deviations in first floor elevation (average: 0.56 m and standard deviation: 0.33 m show that this parameter has to be neatly characterized in order

  11. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, From FEMA, Published in 2007, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Town of Cary NC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from LIDAR...

  12. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, contract to updata FEMA data due 2009, Published in unknown, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset as of unknown. It is described as 'contract to updata FEMA data due 2009'. Data by...

  13. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, contract to updata FEMA data due 2009, Published in 2009, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset as of 2009. It is described as 'contract to updata FEMA data due 2009'. Data by...

  14. Base (100-year) flood elevations for selected sites in Marion County, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southard, Rodney E.; Wilson, Gary L.

    1998-01-01

    The primary requirement for community participation in the National Flood Insurance Program is the adoption and enforcement of floodplain management requirements that minimize the potential for flood damages to new construction and avoid aggravating existing flooding conditions. This report provides base flood elevations (BFE) for a 100-year recurrence flood for use in the management and regulation of 14 flood-hazard areas designated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency as approximate Zone A areas in Marion County, Missouri. The one-dimensional surface-water flow model, HEC-RAS, was used to compute the base (100-year) flood elevations for the 14 Zone A sites. The 14 sites were located at U.S., State, or County road crossings and the base flood elevation was determined at the upstream side of each crossing. The base (100-year) flood elevations for BFE 1, 2, and 3 on the South Fork North River near Monroe City, Missouri, are 627.7, 579.2, and 545.9 feet above sea level. The base (100-year) flood elevations for BFE 4, 5, 6, and 7 on the main stem of the North River near or at Philadelphia and Palmyra, Missouri, are 560.5, 539.7, 504.2, and 494.4 feet above sea level. BFE 8 is located on Big Branch near Philadelphia, a tributary to the North River, and the base (100-year) flood elevation at this site is 530.5 feet above sea level. One site (BFE 9) is located on the South River near Monroe City, Missouri. The base (100-year) flood elevation at this site is 619.1 feet above sea level. Site BFE 10 is located on Bear Creek near Hannibal, Missouri, and the base (100-year) elevation is 565.5 feet above sea level. The four remaining sites (BFE 11, 12, 13, and 14) are located on the South Fabius River near Philadelphia and Palmyra, Missouri. The base (100-year) flood elevations for BFE 11, 12, 13, and 14 are 591.2, 578.4, 538.7, and 506.9 feet above sea level.

  15. Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures, Published in unknown, Sauk County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures dataset as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Sauk County Coordinate System coordinate...

  16. 78 FR 28779 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Armstrong County, Pennsylvania (All Jurisdictions)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... Armstrong County, Pennsylvania (All Jurisdictions) AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION... proposed rule concerning proposed flood elevation determinations for Armstrong County, Pennsylvania (All... sources in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. Because FEMA has or ] will be issuing a Revised...

  17. 76 FR 49674 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ...; The Enslow, Mayor, City of News Tribune. Sumner, City Hall, 1104 Maple Street, Sumner, WA 98390. King... Forest Home Avenue, Greenfield, WI 53220. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance No. 97.022, ``Flood...

  18. 78 FR 8416 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... 1244). 06-1933P). December 5, 2011; Baldwin, Mayor, City of The Daily Commercial Schertz, 1400 Schertz... Assistance No. 97.022, ``Flood Insurance.'') James A. Walke, Acting Deputy Associate Administrator...

  19. 77 FR 50626 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order 13132... seq.; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR... be used to calculate flood insurance premium rates for new buildings and their contents. DATES:...

  20. 76 FR 58411 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... 12866 of September 30, 1993, Regulatory Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order 13132... et seq.; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR... be used to calculate flood insurance premium rates for new buildings and their contents. DATES:...

  1. Hydrologic analysis of a flood based on a new Digital Elevation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, M.; Mori, M.

    2015-06-01

    These The present study aims to simulate the hydrologic processes of a flood, based on a new, highly accurate Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The DEM is provided by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) of Japan, and has a spatial resolution of five meters. It was generated by the new National Project in 2012. The Hydrologic Engineering Center - Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC-HMS) is used to simulate the hydrologic process of a flood of the Onga River in Iizuka City, Japan. A large flood event in the typhoon season in 2003 caused serious damage around the Iizuka City area. Precise records of rainfall data from the Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System (AMeDAS) were input into the HEC-HMS. The estimated flood area of the simulation results by HEC-HMS was identical to the observed flood area. A watershed aggregation map is also generated by HEC-HMS around the Onga River.

  2. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Maps, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Lafayette County Land Records.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other...

  3. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Data Q3 Flood Data, Published in 2006, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from LIDAR...

  4. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) - Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM), Published in 2011, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Polk County, Wisconsin.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other...

  5. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, FEMA Floodway and Flood Boundary Maps, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Lafayette County Land Records.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other...

  6. FINAL DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, CHEROKEE COUNTY, SC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  7. FINAL DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, INYO COUNTY, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  8. FINAL DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, GREENWOOD COUNTY, SC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  9. 78 FR 78808 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Pierce County, Washington, and Incorporated Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... Pierce County, Washington, and Incorporated Areas AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS... its proposed rule concerning proposed flood elevation determinations for Pierce County, Washington... sources in Pierce County, Washington. On April 16, 2012, FEMA published a proposed rulemaking at 77 FR...

  10. Improved mapping of flood extent and flood depth using space based SAR data in combination with very high resolution digital elevation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwenzner, H.

    2009-04-01

    than a few pixels. Major causes are flooded vegetation or urban structures which lead to an underestimation of the true water level because of higher backscatter values than a plain specular water surface. Also a rough water surface caused by wind or precipitation can result in higher backscatter values and thus misclassification of land instead of water. In these cases the water level can not be retrieved in a reliable manner. In the averaged water surface of the longitudinal profile, variations in the successive water levels due to small scale thematic/geometric errors could be balanced and a smooth and more realistic water surface was generated. Subsequently, each of the cross section flood profiles were trimmed or extended according to the modified water level from the longitudinal profile, and thereby the remotely sensed flood profiles were fitted onto the underlying topography. Having achieved coherence between the water surface and the topography, the flood depth could be derived and mapped. The resulting flood extent was compared against aerial photography taken 15 hours prior to the satellite pass and showed good agreement. Finally, the performance of the matching technique and scaling effects as well as the potential and the constraints of the approach are evaluated and discussed. In this context the demand for satellite-based high resolution SAR data and high resolution elevation data are stressed. The proposed semi-automatic method has been developed in the context of the rapid mapping of flood parameters, such as flood extent and flood depth, as contribution for disaster management operations or the rapid estimation of flood damages. The requirements of such applications are fulfilled by the fact that computation time is negligible and data requirements are low, i.e. only remote sensing data and high resolution topographic data are needed. The proposed method stands in contrast to hydrological modeling approaches which are more complex with respect to data

  11. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, Kent County Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map Database (DFIRM); DFIRM_Kent10; he Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data., Published in 2011, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other...

  12. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, Newport County Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map Database (DFIRM); DFIRM_Newport10; The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data., Published in 2011, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other...

  13. The Importance of Precise Digital Elevation Models (DEM) in Modelling Floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Gokben; Akyurek, Zuhal

    2016-04-01

    Digital elevation Models (DEM) are important inputs for topography for the accurate modelling of floodplain hydrodynamics. Floodplains have a key role as natural retarding pools which attenuate flood waves and suppress flood peaks. GPS, LIDAR and bathymetric surveys are well known surveying methods to acquire topographic data. It is not only time consuming and expensive to obtain topographic data through surveying but also sometimes impossible for remote areas. In this study it is aimed to present the importance of accurate modelling of topography for flood modelling. The flood modelling for Samsun-Terme in Blacksea region of Turkey is done. One of the DEM is obtained from the point observations retrieved from 1/5000 scaled orthophotos and 1/1000 scaled point elevation data from field surveys at x-sections. The river banks are corrected by using the orthophotos and elevation values. This DEM is named as scaled DEM. The other DEM is obtained from bathymetric surveys. 296 538 number of points and the left/right bank slopes were used to construct the DEM having 1 m spatial resolution and this DEM is named as base DEM. Two DEMs were compared by using 27 x-sections. The maximum difference at thalweg of the river bed is 2m and the minimum difference is 20 cm between two DEMs. The channel conveyance capacity in base DEM is larger than the one in scaled DEM and floodplain is modelled in detail in base DEM. MIKE21 with flexible grid is used in 2- dimensional shallow water flow modelling. The model by using two DEMs were calibrated for a flood event (July 9, 2012). The roughness is considered as the calibration parameter. From comparison of input hydrograph at the upstream of the river and output hydrograph at the downstream of the river, the attenuation is obtained as 91% and 84% for the base DEM and scaled DEM, respectively. The time lag in hydrographs does not show any difference for two DEMs and it is obtained as 3 hours. Maximum flood extents differ for the two DEMs

  14. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE - FLOODPLAINS_BFE_DFIRM_IDNR_IN: DFIRM Floodplain Base Flood Elevation Lines for 86 of 92 Counties in Indiana (Indiana Department of Natural Resources, 1:12,000, Line Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This line layer represents base flood elevations (BFEs) created from FEMA Flood Rate Insurance Maps (FIRM). BFE lines indicate the rounded whole-foot water surface...

  15. Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures, Building Dept has required elevation certs when house falls inside flood zone - paper copies only, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Board Of Commissioners.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information...

  16. FINAL DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, TEXAS COUNTY, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  17. Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures, Published in 1995, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, County of Lexington.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as...

  18. Perspectives on open access high resolution digital elevation models to produce global flood hazard layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Christopher; Smith, Andrew; Bates, Paul; Neal, Jeffrey; Trigg, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Global flood hazard models have recently become a reality thanks to the release of open access global digital elevation models, the development of simplified and highly efficient flow algorithms, and the steady increase in computational power. In this commentary we argue that although the availability of open access global terrain data has been critical in enabling the development of such models, the relatively poor resolution and precision of these data now limit significantly our ability to estimate flood inundation and risk for the majority of the planet's surface. The difficulty of deriving an accurate 'bare-earth' terrain model due to the interaction of vegetation and urban structures with the satellite-based remote sensors means that global terrain data are often poorest in the areas where people, property (and thus vulnerability) are most concentrated. Furthermore, the current generation of open access global terrain models are over a decade old and many large floodplains, particularly those in developing countries, have undergone significant change in this time. There is therefore a pressing need for a new generation of high resolution and high vertical precision open access global digital elevation models to allow significantly improved global flood hazard models to be developed.

  19. Contribution of river floods, hurricanes, and cold fronts to elevation change in a deltaic floodplain, northern Gulf of Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevington, Azure E.; Twilley, Robert R.; Sasser, Charles E.; Holm, Guerry O.

    2017-05-01

    Deltas are globally important locations of diverse ecosystems, human settlement, and economic activity that are threatened by reductions in sediment delivery, accelerated sea level rise, and subsidence. Here we investigated the relative contribution of river flooding, hurricanes, and cold fronts on elevation change in the prograding Wax Lake Delta (WLD). Sediment surface elevation was measured across 87 plots, eight times from February 2008 to August 2011. The high peak discharge river floods in 2008 and 2011 resulted in the greatest mean net elevation gain of 5.4 to 4.9 cm over each flood season, respectively. The highest deltaic wetland sediment retention (13.5% of total sediment discharge) occurred during the 2008 river flood despite lower total and peak discharge compared to 2011. Hurricanes Gustav and Ike resulted in a total net elevation gain of 1.2 cm, but the long-term contribution of hurricane derived sediments to deltaic wetlands was estimated to be just 22% of the long-term contribution of large river floods. Winter cold front passage resulted in a net loss in elevation that is equal to the elevation gain from lower discharge river floods and was consistent across years. This amount of annual loss in elevation from cold fronts could effectively negate the long-term land building capacity within the delta without the added elevation gain from both high and low discharge river floods. The current lack of inclusion of cold front elevation loss in most predictive numerical models likely overestimates the land building capacity in areas that experience similar forcings to WLD.

  20. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, DFIRM's from NC Floodplain Mapping Program, Published in 2009, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Iredell County GIS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from LIDAR...

  1. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, s_bfe.shp; FEMA; Update Frequency is every five or ten years, Published in 2008, Athens-Clarke County Planning Department.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2008. It is...

  2. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, FEMA FIRM Boundary, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Board Of Commissioners.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published...

  3. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, FEMA DFIRM preliminary map out now, published in 2009, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Brown County, WI.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other...

  4. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, FEMA Product, Published in 2009, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Jefferson County Land Information Office.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published...

  5. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, SummitCoBFE-The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data., Published in 2006, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other...

  6. Development of cost-effective surfactant flooding technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1996-11-01

    Task 1 of this research was the development of a high-resolution, fully implicit, finite-difference, multiphase, multicomponent, compositional simulator for chemical flooding. The major physical phenomena modeled in this simulator are dispersion, heterogeneous permeability and porosity, adsorption, interfacial tension, relative permeability and capillary desaturation, compositional phase viscosity, compositional phase density and gravity effects, capillary pressure, and aqueous-oleic-microemulsion phase behavior. Polymer and its non-Newtonian rheology properties include shear-thinning viscosity, permeability reduction, inaccessible pore volume, and adsorption. Options of constant or variable space grids and time steps, constant-pressure or constant-rate well conditions, horizontal and vertical wells, and multiple slug injections are also available in the simulator. The solution scheme used in this simulator is fully implicit. The pressure equation and the mass-conservation equations are solved simultaneously for the aqueous-phase pressure and the total concentrations of each component. A third-order-in-space, second-order-in-time finite-difference method and a new total-variation-diminishing (TVD) third-order flux limiter are used that greatly reduce numerical dispersion effects. Task 2 was the optimization of surfactant flooding. The code UTCHEM was used to simulate surfactant polymer flooding.

  7. Development of cost-effective surfactant flooding technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1996-11-01

    Task 1 of this research was the development of a high-resolution, fully implicit, finite-difference, multiphase, multicomponent, compositional simulator for chemical flooding. The major physical phenomena modeled in this simulator are dispersion, heterogeneous permeability and porosity, adsorption, interfacial tension, relative permeability and capillary desaturation, compositional phase viscosity, compositional phase density and gravity effects, capillary pressure, and aqueous-oleic-microemulsion phase behavior. Polymer and its non-Newtonian rheology properties include shear-thinning viscosity, permeability reduction, inaccessible pore volume, and adsorption. Options of constant or variable space grids and time steps, constant-pressure or constant-rate well conditions, horizontal and vertical wells, and multiple slug injections are also available in the simulator. The solution scheme used in this simulator is fully implicit. The pressure equation and the mass-conservation equations are solved simultaneously for the aqueous-phase pressure and the total concentrations of each component. A third-order-in-space, second-order-in-time finite-difference method and a new total-variation-diminishing (TVD) third-order flux limiter are used that greatly reduce numerical dispersion effects. Task 2 was the optimization of surfactant flooding. The code UTCHEM was used to simulate surfactant polymer flooding.

  8. Floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floods are common in the United States. Weather such as heavy rain, thunderstorms, hurricanes, or tsunamis can ... is breached, or when a dam breaks. Flash floods, which can develop quickly, often have a dangerous ...

  9. 75 FR 7522 - United States Section; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Flood...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Environmental Impact Statement, Flood Control Improvements and Partial Levee Relocation, Presidio Flood Control... EIS) for flood control improvements to the Presidio Flood Control Project, Presidio, Texas (Presidio... Impact Statement, Flood Control Improvements and Partial Levee Relocation, USIBWC Presidio Flood......

  10. Merging LIDAR digital terrain model with direct observed elevation points for urban flood numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Chiara; Campo, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    In last years, the concern about the economical and lives loss due to urban floods has grown hand in hand with the numerical skills in simulating such events. The large amount of computational power needed in order to address the problem (simulating a flood in a complex terrain such as a medium-large city) is only one of the issues. Among them it is possible to consider the general lack of exhaustive observations during the event (exact extension, dynamic, water level reached in different parts of the involved area), needed for calibration and validation of the model, the need of considering the sewers effects, and the availability of a correct and precise description of the geometry of the problem. In large cities the topographic surveys are in general available with a number of points, but a complete hydraulic simulation needs a detailed description of the terrain on the whole computational domain. LIDAR surveys can achieve this goal, providing a comprehensive description of the terrain, although they often lack precision. In this work an optimal merging of these two sources of geometrical information, measured elevation points and LIDAR survey, is proposed, by taking into account the error variance of both. The procedure is applied to a flood-prone city over an area of 35 square km approximately starting with a DTM from LIDAR with a spatial resolution of 1 m, and 13000 measured points. The spatial pattern of the error (LIDAR vs points) is analysed, and the merging method is tested with a series of Jackknife procedures that take into account different densities of the available points. A discussion of the results is provided.

  11. The influence of digital elevation model resolution on overland flow networks for modelling urban pluvial flooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, J P; Boonya-Aroonnet, S; Prodanović, D; Maksimović, C

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the developments towards the next generation of overland flow modelling of urban pluvial flooding. Using a detailed analysis of the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) the developed GIS tools can automatically generate surface drainage networks which consist of temporary ponds (floodable areas) and flow paths and link them with the underground network through inlets. For different commercially-available Rainfall-Runoff simulation models, the tool will generate the overland flow network needed to model the surface runoff and pluvial flooding accurately. In this paper the emphasis is placed on a sensitivity analysis of ponds and preferential overland flow paths creation. Different DEMs for three areas were considered in order to compare the results obtained. The DEMs considered were generated using different acquisition techniques and hence represent terrain with varying levels of resolution and accuracy. The results show that DEMs can be used to generate surface flow networks reliably. As expected, the quality of the surface network generated is highly dependent on the quality and resolution of the DEMs and successful representation of buildings and streets.

  12. Green River Formation water flood demonstration project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, B.I.; Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D. [Inland Resources, Inc. (United States)]|[Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Deo, M.D. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering

    1996-11-01

    The objectives of the project were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter core, Formation Micro Imaging (FMI) logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using high-temperature gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2,000 barrels per day.

  13. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE - MO 2010 Greene County Special Flood Hazard Area Lines (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This polyline layer represents the approximate effective Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) boundary for Greene County Missouri. This boundary became effective in...

  14. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE - MO 2014 Greene County Special Flood Hazard Area Lines (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This polyline layer represents the approximate effective Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) boundary for Greene County Missouri. This boundary became effective in...

  15. Morphological Analyses and Simulated Flood Elevations in a Watershed with Dredged and Leveed Stream Channels, Wheeling Creek, Eastern Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, James M.; Huitger, Carrie A.; Ebner, Andrew D.; Koltun, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    The USGS, in cooperation with the Ohio Emergency Management Agency, conducted a study in the Wheeling Creek Basin to (1) evaluate and contrast land-cover characteristics from 2001 with characteristics from 1979 and 1992; (2) compare current streambed elevation, slope, and geometry with conditions present in the late 1980s; (3) look for evidence of channel filling and over widening in selected undredged reaches; (4) estimate flood elevations for existing conditions in both undredged and previously dredged reaches; (5) evaluate the height of the levees required to contain floods with selected recurrence intervals in previously dredged reaches; and (6) estimate flood elevations for several hypothetical dredging and streambed aggradation scenarios in undredged reaches. The amount of barren land in the Wheeling Creek watershed has decreased from 20 to 1 percent of the basin area based on land-cover characteristics from 1979 and 2001. Barren lands appear to have been converted primarily to pasture, presumably as a result of surface-mine reclamation. Croplands also decreased from 13 to 8 percent of the basin area. The combined decrease in barren lands and croplands is approximately offset by the increase in pasture. Stream-channel surveys conducted in 1987 and again in 2006 at 21 sites in four previously dredged reaches of Wheeling Creek indicate little change in the elevation, slope, and geometry of the channel at most sites. The mean change in width-averaged bed and thalweg elevations for the 21 cross sections was 0.1 feet. Bankfull widths, mean depths, and cross-sectional areas measured at 12 sites in undredged reaches were compared to estimates determined from regional equations. The mean percentage difference between measured and estimated bankfull widths was -0.2 percent, suggesting that bankfull widths in the Wheeling Creek Basin are generally about the same as regional averages for undisturbed basins of identical drainage area. For bankfull mean depth and cross

  16. Parallel Priority-Flood depression filling for trillion cell digital elevation models on desktops or clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Algorithms for extracting hydrologic features and properties from digital elevation models (DEMs) are challenged by large datasets, which often cannot fit within a computer's RAM. Depression filling is an important preconditioning step to many of these algorithms. Here, I present a new, linearly scaling algorithm which parallelizes the Priority-Flood depression-filling algorithm by subdividing a DEM into tiles. Using a single-producer, multi-consumer design, the new algorithm works equally well on one core, multiple cores, or multiple machines and can take advantage of large memories or cope with small ones. Unlike previous algorithms, the new algorithm guarantees a fixed number of memory access and communication events per subdivision of the DEM. In comparison testing, this results in the new algorithm running generally faster while using fewer resources than previous algorithms. For moderately sized tiles, the algorithm exhibits ∼60% strong and weak scaling efficiencies up to 48 cores, and linear time scaling across datasets ranging over three orders of magnitude. The largest dataset on which I run the algorithm has 2 trillion (2×1012) cells. With 48 cores, processing required 4.8 h wall-time (9.3 compute-days). This test is three orders of magnitude larger than any previously performed in the literature. Complete, well-commented source code and correctness tests are available for download from a repository.

  17. Effect of elevated pressure on fluidization phenomena. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, W. C.; Keairns, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    This program consists of five tasks: (1) review of literature on fluidization velocities; (2) extension of existing fluidization correlations; (3) state-of-the-art review concerning flow regime transitions; (4) flow regime data analysis; and (5) identification of data gaps. This report summarizes the results obtained during the contract period. A critical review of the literature concerning the effect of elevated pressure and particle characteristics on minimum fluidization velocity, beginning fluidization velocity, minimum bubbling velocity, total fluidization velocity, and complete fluidization velocity was performed. Fluidization data from various sources were compiled and compared. A fundamental correlation with improved methodology was developed for estimating the minimum fluidization velocity at elevated pressure with good agreement. The developed correlation was found to be applicable at elevated temperature as well. The state-of-the-art of the effect of pressure and particle characteristics on flow regime transitions from bubbling to turbulent fluidization and from turbulent to fast fluidization were reviewed. Available data on the effect of elevated pressure and particle characteristics on flow regime transitions were analyzed, however, the information available in the literature was meager at best. The critical fluidization development areas were identified as the instrumentation development and the experiments carried out with reactive systems, under elevated temperature and pressure, and in large scale fluidization units. Potential research areas which are within the capability of the existing PETC high pressure test facility were also summarized. This was compiled on the basis of a literature survey on currently available literature information in those areas. 54 references, 10 figures, 7 tables.

  18. Priority-flood: An optimal depression-filling and watershed-labeling algorithm for digital elevation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Richard; Lehman, Clarence; Mulla, David

    2014-01-01

    Depressions (or pits) are areas within a digital elevation model that are surrounded by higher terrain, with no outlet to lower areas. Filling them so they are level, as fluid would fill them if the terrain was impermeable, is often necessary in preprocessing DEMs. The depression-filling algorithm presented here - called Priority-Flood - unifies and improves the work of a number of previous authors who have published similar algorithms. The algorithm operates by flooding DEMs inwards from their edges using a priority queue to determine the next cell to be flooded. The resultant DEM has no depressions or digital dams: every cell is guaranteed to drain. The algorithm is optimal for both integer and floating-point data, working in O(n) and O(n log2 n) time, respectively. It is shown that by using a plain queue to fill depressions once they have been found, an O(m log2 m) time-complexity can be achieved, where m does not exceed the number of cells n. This is the lowest time complexity of any known floating-point depression-filling algorithm. In testing, this improved variation of the algorithm performed up to 37% faster than the original. Additionally, a parallel version of an older, but widely used, depression-filling algorithm required six parallel processors to achieve a run-time on par with what the newer algorithm's improved variation took on a single processor. The Priority-Flood Algorithm is simple to understand and implement: the included pseudocode is only 20 lines and the included C++ reference implementation is under a hundred lines. The algorithm can work on irregular meshes as well as 4-, 6-, 8-, and n-connected grids. It can also be adapted to label watersheds and determine flow directions through either incremental elevation changes or depression carving. In the case of incremental elevation changes, the algorithm includes safety checks not present in prior works.

  19. Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures, FEMA FIRM panels & Q3 data;contract to update in progress, Published in unknown, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Elevation Certificates for Flood Prone Structures dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of unknown. It is described as 'FEMA...

  20. 75 FR 18238 - United States Section; Final Environmental Impact Statement, Flood Control Improvements and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ..., Flood Control Improvements and Partial Levee Relocation, United States Section, International Boundary and Water Commission (USIBWC) Presidio Flood Control Project (FCP), Presidio, TX AGENCY: United States... potential consequences of each action alternative in reference to flood control improvements. Following...

  1. Elevation trends and shrink-swell response of wetland soils to flooding and drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, Donald R.; Perez, Brian C.; Segura, Bradley D.; Lynch, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Given the potential for a projected acceleration in sea-level rise to impact wetland sustainability over the next century, a better understanding is needed of climate-related drivers that influence the processes controlling wetland elevation. Changes in local hydrology and groundwater conditions can cause short-term perturbations to marsh elevation trends through shrink—swell of marsh soils. To better understand the magnitude of these perturbations and their impacts on marsh elevation trends, we measured vertical accretion and elevation dynamics in microtidal marshes in Texas and Louisiana during and after the extreme drought conditions that existed there from 1998 to 2000. In a Louisiana marsh, elevation was controlled by subsurface hydrologic fluxes occurring below the root zone but above the 4 m depth (i.e., the base of the surface elevation table benchmark) that were related to regional drought and local meteorological conditions, with marsh elevation tracking water level variations closely. In Texas, a rapid decline in marsh elevation was related to severe drought conditions, which lowered local groundwater levels. Unfragmented marshes experienced smaller water level drawdowns and more rapid marsh elevation recovery than fragmented marshes. It appears that extended drawdowns lead to increased substrate consolidation making it less resilient to respond to future favorable conditions. Overall, changes in water storage lead to rapid and large short-term impacts on marsh elevation that are as much as five times greater than the long-term elevation trend, indicating the importance of long-term, high-resolution elevation data sets to understand the prolonged effects of water deficits on marsh elevation change.

  2. FINAL DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, LOGAN COUNTY, OK USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  3. FINAL DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  4. FINAL DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, SAN DIEGO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA (AND INCORPORATED AREAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  5. Final DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, McLean County, ILLINOIS USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  6. FINAL DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY, OK, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  7. FINAL DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  8. FINAL DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, TULSA COUNTY, OKLAHOMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  9. FINAL DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, PONTOTOC COUNTY, OKLAHOMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  10. Tonawanda Creek, Genesee County, New York, Regional Flood Control. Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    several hours. Turbidity and 3uspended solids concentrations lower than those necessary to cause death or physiological injury may also produce other...water, DC proved to be more effective since the fish were attracted to the anode and could be seen and captured by the netters . One person carried the...intermittent flooding. Teskey and Hinckley (1977)1/ give a good review of both short-term and long-term impacts of flooding on vegetation. Physiological

  11. River bed Elevation Changes and Increasing Flood Hazards in the Nisqually River at Mount Rainier National Park, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmon, S.; Kennard, P.; Beason, S.; Beaulieu, E.; Mitchell, L.

    2006-12-01

    Mount Rainier, located in Southwestern Washington, is the most heavily glaciated volcano of the Cascade Mountain Range. Due to the large quantities of glaciers, Mount Rainier also has a large number of braided rivers, which are formed by a heavy sediment load being released from the glaciers. As sediment builds in the river, its bed increases, or aggrades,its floodplain changes. Some contributions to a river's increased sediment load are debris flows, erosion, and runoff, which tend to carry trees, boulders, and sediment downstream. Over a period of time, the increased sediment load will result in the river's rise in elevation. The purpose of this study is to monitor aggradation rates, which is an increase in height of the river bed, in one of Mount Rainier's major rivers, the Nisqually. The studied location is near employee offices and visitor attractions in Longmire. The results of this study will also provide support to decision makers regarding geological hazard reduction in the area. The Nisqually glacier is located on the southern side of the volcano, which receives a lot of sunlight, thus releasing large amounts of snowmelt and sediment in the summer. Historical data indicate that several current features which may contribute to future flooding, such as the unnatural uphill slope to the river, which is due to a major depositional event in the late 1700s where 15 ft of material was deposited in this area. Other current features are the glaciers surrounding the Nisqually glacier, such as the Van Trump and Kaultz glaciers that produced large outbursts, affecting the Nisqually River and the Longmire area in 2001, 2003, and 2005. In an effort to further explore these areas, the research team used a surveying device, total station, in the Nisqually River to measure elevation change and angles of various positions within ten cross sections along the Longmire area. This data was then put into GIS for analyzation of its current sediment level and for comparison to

  12. Simulated and observed 2010 flood-water elevations in selected river reaches in the Moshassuck and Woonasquatucket River Basins, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Straub, David E.; Westenbroek, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy persistent rains from late February through March 2010 caused severe flooding and set, or nearly set, peaks of record for streamflows and water levels at many long-term U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in Rhode Island. In response to this flood, hydraulic models were updated for selected reaches covering about 33 river miles in Moshassuck and Woonasquatucket River Basins from the most recent approved Federal Emergency Management Agency flood insurance study (FIS) to simulate water-surface elevations (WSEs) from specified flows and boundary conditions. Reaches modeled include the main stem of the Moshassuck River and its main tributary, the West River, and three tributaries to the West River—Upper Canada Brook, Lincoln Downs Brook, and East Branch West River; and the main stem of the Woonasquatucket River. All the hydraulic models were updated to Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) version 4.1.0 and incorporate new field-survey data at structures, high-resolution land-surface elevation data, and flood flows from a related study. The models were used to simulate steady-state WSEs at the 1- and 2-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flows, which is the estimated AEP of the 2010 flood in the Moshassuck River Basin and the Woonasquatucket River, respectively. The simulated WSEs were compared to the high-water mark (HWM) elevation data obtained in these basins in a related study following the March–April 2010 flood, which included 18 HWMs along the Moshassuck River and 45 HWMs along the Woonasquatucket River. Differences between the 2010 HWMs and the simulated 2- and 1-percent AEP WSEs from the FISs and the updated models developed in this study varied along the reach. Most differences could be attributed to the magnitude of the 2- and 1-percent AEP flows used in the FIS and updated model flows. Overall, the updated model and the FIS WSEs were not appreciably different when compared to the observed 2010 HWMs along the

  13. Elevations and discharges produced by a simulated flood wave on the lower Sabine River, Louisiana and Texas, caused by a theoretical dam failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Braxtel L.; Stiltner, Gloria J.

    1979-01-01

    The Toledo Bend Reservoir is located on the lower Sabine River between Louisiana and Texas. Two mathematical models were coupled to calculate the flood wave that would result from the theoretical failure of 25 percent of Toledo Bend Dam and route the wave downstream to Orange, Tex. Computations assumed failure (1) at the peak of the 100-year flood when discharge of the Sabine River is 102,000 cubic feet per second and (2) when the average discharge is 10,000 cubic feet per second. Two techniques were used in the dam-break model. The method of characteristics was used to propagate the shock wave following dam failure. The linear implicit finite-difference solution was used to route the flood wave following shock wave dissipation. The magnitude of the flow was determined for Burkeville, Bon Wier, Ruliff, and Orange, Tex., along the lower Sabine River. For these sites, respectively, the following peak elevations were calculated: 119, 82, 31, and 13 feet for the 100-year flood and 110, 75, 27, and 9 feet for the average discharge. (Woodard-USGS)

  14. Minnesota River at Chaska, Minnesota, Flood Control. Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    would divert flood waters into a bypass channel which would lead first to the east and then southward just west of the Gedney Pickle Factory. Water...Under disturbed conditions a variety of species is found such as the wild cucumber (Echinocystis lobata), an indicator of floodplain conditions in the...surrounding farmlands, and some objectionable odors are occasionally emitted from the Gedney pickle plant. SOLID WASTE Solid wastes generated in

  15. Green River Formation Water Flood Demonstration Project: Final report. [October 21, 1992-April, 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deo, M.D. [Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (US); Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D. [Inland Resources, Inc., Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (US); Nielson, D.L.; Lutz, S.J. [Energy and Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City (US)

    1996-11-01

    The objectives were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. Comprehensive reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations of the Monument Butte, Travis and Boundary units were presented in the two published project yearly reports. The primary and the secondary production from the Monument Butte unit were typical of oil production from an undersaturated oil reservoir close to its bubble point. The water flood in the smaller Travis unit appeared affected by natural and possibly by large interconnecting hydraulic fractures. Water flooding the boundary unit was considered more complicated due to the presence of an oil water contact in one of the wells. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter c ore, Formation Micro Imaging logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir characterization efforts identified new reservoirs in the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2000 barrels per day.

  16. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasan, D.T.

    1996-05-01

    In this report, we present the results of our experimental and theoretical studies in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. The overall objective of this work is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12. 0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultralow interfacial tension. In addition, we have (1) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, (2) investigated the mechanisms for spontaneous emulsification, (3) developed a technique to monitor low water content in oil and (4) developed a technique to study water-in-oil emulsion film properties, (5) investigated the effect of surfactant on the equilibrium and transient interfacial tension, (6) investigated the kinetics of oil removal from a silica surface, and (7) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, accounting for added surfactant. The results of the studies conducted during the course of this project are discussed.

  17. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Final report 1994--1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasan, D.T.

    1995-12-01

    In this report, the authors present the results of their experimental and theoretical studies in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. The overall objective of this work is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12.0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultralow interfacial tension. In addition, the authors have (1) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, (2) investigated the mechanisms for spontaneous emulsification, (3) developed a technique to monitor low water content in oil, and (4) developed a technique to study water-in-oil emulsion film properties, (5) investigated the effect of surfactant on the equilibrium and transient interfacial tension, (6) investigated the kinetics of oil removal from a silica surface, and (7) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, accounting for added surfactant. The results of the studies conducted during the course of this project are summarized.

  18. The catastrophic final flooding of Doggerland by the Storegga Slide tsunami

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Weninger

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Around 8200 calBP, large parts of the now submerged North Sea continental shelf (‘Doggerland’ were catastrophically flooded by the Storegga Slide tsunami, one of the largest tsunamis known for the Holocene, which was generated on the Norwegian coastal margin by a submarine landslide. In the present paper, we derive a precise calendric date for the Storegga Slide tsunami, use this date for reconstruction of contemporary coastlines in the North Sea in relation to rapidly rising sea-levels, and discuss the potential effects of the tsunami on the contemporaneous Mesolithic population. One main result of this study is an unexpectedly high tsunami impact assigned to the western regions of Jutland.

  19. Floods and Flash Flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floods and flash flooding Now is the time to determine your area’s flood risk. If you are not sure whether you ... If you are in a floodplain, consider buying flood insurance. Do not drive around barricades. If your ...

  20. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1996-04-01

    Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of gas injection processes are reported. The research examines how the physical mechanisms at work during a gas injection project interact to determine process performance. In particular, the authors examine: the interactions of equilibrium phase behavior and two-phase flow that determine local displacement efficiency and minimum miscibility pressure, the combined effects of viscous fingering, gravity segregation and heterogeneity that control sweep efficiency in 2- and 3-dimensional porous media, the use of streamtube/streamline methods to create very efficient simulation technique for multiphase compositional displacements, the scaling of viscous, capillary and gravity forces for heterogeneous reservoirs, and the effects of the thin films and spreading behavior on three-phase flow. The following key results are documented: rigorous procedures for determination of minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) or minimum miscibility enrichment (MME) for miscibility have been developed for multicomponent systems; the complex dependence of MMP`s for nitrogen/methane floods on oil and injection gas composition observed experimentally is explained for the first time; the presence of layer-like heterogeneities strongly influences the interplay of gravity segregation and viscous fingering, as viscous fingers adapt to preferential flow paths and low permeability layers restrict vertical flow; streamtube/streamline simulation techniques are demonstrated for a variety of injection processes in 2 and 3 dimensions; quantitative scaling estimates for the transitions from capillary-dominated to gravity-dominated to viscous-dominated flows are reported; experimental results are given that demonstrate that high pressure CO{sub 2} can be used to generate low IFT gravity drainage in fractured reservoirs if fractures are suitably connected; and the effect of wetting and spreading behavior on three-phase flow is described. 209 refs.

  1. [Plant responses to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and transmission to other trophic levels]. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lincoln, D.E.

    1995-10-01

    This program investigated how host plant responses to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide may be transmitted to other trophic levels, especially leaf eating insects, and alter consumption of leaves and impare their function. Study results included the following findings: increased carbon dioxide to plants alters feeding by insect herbivores; leaves produced under higher carbon conditions contain proportionally less nitrogen; insect herbivores may have decreased reproduction under elevated carbon dioxide.

  2. Flooding and Flood Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, K.N.; Fallon, J.D.; Lorenz, D.L.; Stark, J.R.; Menard, Jason; Easter, K.W.; Perry, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Floods result in great human disasters globally and nationally, causing an average of $4 billion of damages each year in the United States. Minnesota has its share of floods and flood damages, and the state has awarded nearly $278 million to local units of government for flood mitigation projects through its Flood Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. Since 1995, flood mitigation in the Red River Valley has exceeded $146 million. Considerable local and state funding has been provided to manage and mitigate problems of excess stormwater in urban areas, flooding of farmlands, and flood damages at road crossings. The cumulative costs involved with floods and flood mitigation in Minnesota are not known precisely, but it is safe to conclude that flood mitigation is a costly business. This chapter begins with a description of floods in Minneosta to provide examples and contrasts across the state. Background material is presented to provide a basic understanding of floods and flood processes, predication, and management and mitigation. Methods of analyzing and characterizing floods are presented because they affect how we respond to flooding and can influence relevant practices. The understanding and perceptions of floods and flooding commonly differ among those who work in flood forecasting, flood protection, or water resource mamnagement and citizens and businesses affected by floods. These differences can become magnified following a major flood, pointing to the need for better understanding of flooding as well as common language to describe flood risks and the uncertainty associated with determining such risks. Expectations of accurate and timely flood forecasts and our ability to control floods do not always match reality. Striving for clarity is important in formulating policies that can help avoid recurring flood damages and costs.

  3. Quality control of the RMS US flood model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowfsky, Sonja; Hilberts, Arno; Mortgat, Chris; Li, Shuangcai; Rafique, Farhat; Rajesh, Edida; Xu, Na; Mei, Yi; Tillmanns, Stephan; Yang, Yang; Tian, Ye; Mathur, Prince; Kulkarni, Anand; Kumaresh, Bharadwaj Anna; Chaudhuri, Chiranjib; Saini, Vishal

    2016-04-01

    The RMS US flood model predicts the flood risk in the US with a 30 m resolution for different return periods. The model is designed for the insurance industry to estimate the cost of flood risk for a given location. Different statistical, hydrological and hydraulic models are combined to develop the flood maps for different return periods. A rainfall-runoff and routing model, calibrated with observed discharge data, is run with 10 000 years of stochastic simulated precipitation to create time series of discharge and surface runoff. The 100, 250 and 500 year events are extracted from these time series as forcing for a two-dimensional pluvial and fluvial inundation model. The coupling of all the different models which are run on the large area of the US implies a certain amount of uncertainty. Therefore, special attention is paid to the final quality control of the flood maps. First of all, a thorough quality analysis of the Digital Terrain model and the river network was done, as the final quality of the flood maps depends heavily on the DTM quality. Secondly, the simulated 100 year discharge in the major river network (600 000 km) is compared to the 100 year discharge derived using extreme value distribution of all USGS gauges with more than 20 years of peak values (around 11 000 gauges). Thirdly, for each gauge the modelled flood depth is compared to the depth derived from the USGS rating curves. Fourthly, the modelled flood depth is compared to the base flood elevation given in the FEMA flood maps. Fifthly, the flood extent is compared to the FEMA flood extent. Then, for historic events we compare flood extents and flood depths at given locations. Finally, all the data and spatial layers are uploaded on geoserver to facilitate the manual investigation of outliers. The feedback from the quality control is used to improve the model and estimate its uncertainty.

  4. Medical devices; exemption from premarket notification; class II devices; wheelchair elevator. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is publishing an order granting a petition requesting exemption from premarket notification requirements for wheelchair elevator devices commonly known as inclined platform lifts and vertical platform lifts. These devices are used to provide a means for a person with a mobility impairment caused by injury or other disease to move from one level to another, usually in a wheelchair. This order exempts wheelchair elevators, class II devices, from premarket notification and establishes conditions for exemption for this device that will provide a reasonable assurance of the safety and effectiveness of the device without submission of a premarket notification (510(k)). This exemption from 510(k), subject to these conditions, is immediately in effect for wheelchair elevators. All other devices classified under FDA's wheelchair elevator regulations, including attendant-operated stair climbing devices for wheelchairs and portable platform lifts, continue to require submission of 510(k)s. FDA is publishing this order in accordance with the section of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) permitting the exemption of a device from the requirement to submit a 510(k).

  5. Determining the Optimum Post Spacing of LIDAR-Derived Elevation Data in Varying Terrain for Flood Hazard Mapping Purposes in North Carolina and Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Judith; Davis, Bruce; Estep, Lee

    2004-01-01

    The major flood events in the United States in the past few years have made it apparent that many floodplain maps being used by State governments are outdated and inaccurate. In response, many Stated have begun to update their Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Digital Flood Insurance Rate Maps. Accurate topographic data is one of the most critical inputs for floodplain analysis and delineation. Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) altimetry is one of the primary remote sensing technologies that can be used to obtain high-resolution and high-accuracy digital elevation data suitable for hydrologic and hydraulic (H&H) modeling, in part because of its ability to "penetrate" various cover types and to record geospatial data from the Earth's surface. However, the posting density or spacing at which LIDAR collects the data will affect the resulting accuracies of the derived bare Earth surface, depending on terrain type and land cover type. For example, flat areas are thought to require higher or denser postings than hilly areas to capture subtle changes in the topography that could have a significant effect on flooding extent. Likewise, if an area has dense understory and overstory, it may be difficult to receive LIDAR returns from the Earth's surface, which would affect the accuracy of that bare Earth surface and thus would affect flood model results. For these reasons, NASA and FEMA have partnered with the State of North Carolina and with the U.S./Mexico Foundation in Texas to assess the effect of LIDAR point density on the characterization of topographic variation and on H&H modeling results for improved floodplain mapping. Research for this project is being conducted in two areas of North Carolina and in the City of Brownsville, Texas, each with a different type of terrain and varying land cover/land use. Because of various project constraints, LIDAR data were acquired once at a high posting density and then decimated to coarser postings or densities. Quality

  6. The New Global Digital Elevation Model : TanDEM-X DEM and its Final Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Carolina; Rizzoli, Paola; Martone, Michele; Wecklich, Christopher; Borla Tridon, Daniela; Bachmann, Markus; Fritz, Thomas; Wessel, Birgit; Krieger, Gerhard; Zink, Manfred

    2017-04-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) have become widely used in many scientific and commercial applications and there are several local products have been developed in the last years. They provide a representation of the topographic features of the landscape. The importance of them is known and valued in every geoscience field, but they have also vast use in navigation and in other commercial areas. The main goal of the TanDEM-X (TerraSARX add-on for Digital Elevation Measurements) mission is the generation of a global DEM, homogeneous in quality with unprecedented global accuracy and resolution, which has been completed in mid-2016. For over four years, the almost identical satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X acquired single-pass interferometric SAR image pairs, from which is it possible to derive the topographic height by unwrapping the interferometric phase, unaffected by temporal decorrelation. Both satellites have been flying in close formation with a flexible geometric configuration. An optimized acquisition strategy aimed at achieving an absolute vertical accuracy much better than 10 meters and a relative vertical accuracy of 2 m and 4 m for flat and steep terrain, respectively, within a horizontal raster of 12 m x 12 m, which slightly varies depending on the geographic latitude. In this paper, we assess the performance of the global Tandem-X DEM, characterized in terms of relative and absolute vertical accuracy. The coverage statistics are also discussed in comparison to the previous almost global but with lower resolution DEM provided by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The exceptional quality of the global DEM is confirmed by the obtained results and the global TanDEM-X DEM is now ready to be distributed to the scientific and commercial community.

  7. Improved efficiency of miscible CO2 floods and enhanced prospects for CO2 flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. Final report, April 17, 1991--May 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, R.B.; Schechter, D.S.

    1998-02-01

    From 1986 to 1996, oil recovery in the US by gas injection increased almost threefold, to 300,000 bbl/day. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection projects make up three-quarters of the 191,139 bbl/day production increase. This document reports experimental and modeling research in three areas that is increasing the number of reservoirs in which CO{sub 2} can profitably enhance oil recovery: (1) foams for selective mobility reduction (SMR) in heterogeneous reservoirs, (2) reduction of the amount of CO{sub 2} required in CO{sub 2} floods, and (3) low interfacial tension (97) processes and the possibility of CO{sub 2} flooding in naturally fractured reservoirs. CO{sub 2} injection under miscible conditions can effectively displace oil, but due to differences in density and viscosity the mobility of CO{sub 2} is higher than either oil or water. High CO{sub 2} mobility causes injection gas to finger through a reservoir, causing such problems as early gas breakthrough, high gas production rates, excessive injection gas recycling, and bypassing of much of the reservoir oil. These adverse effects are exacerbated by increased reservoir heterogeneity, reaching an extreme in naturally fractured reservoirs. Thus, many highly heterogeneous reservoirs have not been considered for CO{sub 2} injection or have had disappointing recoveries. One example is the heterogeneous Spraberry trend in west Texas, where only 10% of its ten billion barrels of original oil in place (OOIP) are recoverable by conventional methods. CO{sub 2} mobility can be reduced by injecting water (brine) alternated with CO{sub 2} (WAG) and then further reduced by adding foaming agents-surfactants. In Task 1, we studied a unique foam property, selective mobility reduction (SMR), that effectively reduces the effects of reservoir heterogeneity. Selective mobility reduction creates a more uniform displacement by decreasing CO{sub 2} mobility in higher permeability zones more than in lower permeability zones.

  8. Real-time flood extent maps based on social media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilander, Dirk; van Loenen, Arnejan; Roskam, Ruud; Wagemaker, Jurjen

    2015-04-01

    During a flood event it is often difficult to get accurate information about the flood extent and the people affected. This information is very important for disaster risk reduction management and crisis relief organizations. In the post flood phase, information about the flood extent is needed for damage estimation and calibrating hydrodynamic models. Currently, flood extent maps are derived from a few sources such as satellite images, areal images and post-flooding flood marks. However, getting accurate real-time or maximum flood extent maps remains difficult. With the rise of social media, we now have a new source of information with large numbers of observations. In the city of Jakarta, Indonesia, the intensity of unique flood related tweets during a flood event, peaked at 8 tweets per second during floods in early 2014. A fair amount of these tweets also contains observations of water depth and location. Our hypothesis is that based on the large numbers of tweets it is possible to generate real-time flood extent maps. In this study we use tweets from the city of Jakarta, Indonesia, to generate these flood extent maps. The data-mining procedure looks for tweets with a mention of 'banjir', the Bahasa Indonesia word for flood. It then removes modified and retweeted messages in order to keep unique tweets only. Since tweets are not always sent directly from the location of observation, the geotag in the tweets is unreliable. We therefore extract location information using mentions of names of neighborhoods and points of interest. Finally, where encountered, a mention of a length measure is extracted as water depth. These tweets containing a location reference and a water level are considered to be flood observations. The strength of this method is that it can easily be extended to other regions and languages. Based on the intensity of tweets in Jakarta during a flood event we can provide a rough estimate of the flood extent. To provide more accurate flood extend

  9. Saugus River and Tributaries Flood Damage Reduction Study; Lynn, Malden, Revere and Saugus, Massachusetts. Section 2. Final Environmental Impact Statement and Final Environmental Impact Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    of chromium Table i (Continued) 6.35 Inclusion of sea level rise 6.36 Editorial 6.54 Editorial 6.55 Editorial 6.61 Editorial 6.65 Editorial 6.68...Malden, Revere and Saugus causing tide water to overflow riverbanks and flood low lying areas bordering marshland . Problems also result from tides...municipal mainten- ance and expansion project at the Saugus Lobstermans Landing. These sediments would also be taken to the Massachusetts Bay Site for

  10. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE - FLOODPLAINS_CROSSSECTION_DFIRM_IDNR_IN: DFIRM Floodplain Cross section Lines for 86 of 92 Counties in Indiana (Indiana Department of Natural Resources, 1:12,000, Line Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This line layer represents cross sections (XS) created from FEMA Flood Rate Insurance Maps (FIRM). These lines represent the locations of channel surveys performed...

  11. Definite Project Report for Section 205 Flood Control, Illinois River, Liverpool, Illinois, with Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    maintains a flat pool elevation of 429.0 feet for the 9-foot navigation channel. The levee is above the normal pool elevation, although sections are...STUDIES: .... J/ck Carr SOCIAL ANALYSIS: 4 ,.-I . - Patricia Risser / / ,, ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES: (Nf &t’ LL r2 Ron Klump CULTURAL RESOURCES: 9~.t Ken...gravity outlet and a pump station for interior drainage, three road ramps, raising a parking area, and approximately 4,395 feet of levee ranging in height

  12. Flood Risk Analysis and Flood Potential Losses Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The heavy floods in the Taihu Basin showed increasing trend in recent years. In thiswork, a typical area in the northern Taihu Basin was selected for flood risk analysis and potentialflood losses assessment. Human activities have strong impact on the study area' s flood situation (asaffected by the polders built, deforestation, population increase, urbanization, etc. ), and havemade water level higher, flood duration shorter, and flood peaks sharper. Five years of differentflood return periods [(1970), 5 (1962), 10 (1987), 20 (1954), 50 (1991)] were used to cal-culate the potential flood risk area and its losses. The potential flood risk map, economic losses,and flood-impacted population were also calculated. The study's main conclusions are: 1 ) Humanactivities have strongly changed the natural flood situation in the study area, increasing runoff andflooding; 2) The flood risk area is closely related with the precipitation center; 3) Polder construc-tion has successfully protected land from flood, shortened the flood duration, and elevated waterlevel in rivers outside the polders; 4) Economic and social development have caused flood losses toincrease in recent years.

  13. Probabilistic flood extent estimates from social media flood observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Tom; Eilander, Dirk; van Loenen, Arnejan; Booij, Martijn J.; Wijnberg, Kathelijne M.; Verkade, Jan S.; Wagemaker, Jurjen

    2017-05-01

    The increasing number and severity of floods, driven by phenomena such as urbanization, deforestation, subsidence and climate change, create a growing need for accurate and timely flood maps. In this paper we present and evaluate a method to create deterministic and probabilistic flood maps from Twitter messages that mention locations of flooding. A deterministic flood map created for the December 2015 flood in the city of York (UK) showed good performance (F(2) = 0.69; a statistic ranging from 0 to 1, with 1 expressing a perfect fit with validation data). The probabilistic flood maps we created showed that, in the York case study, the uncertainty in flood extent was mainly induced by errors in the precise locations of flood observations as derived from Twitter data. Errors in the terrain elevation data or in the parameters of the applied algorithm contributed less to flood extent uncertainty. Although these maps tended to overestimate the actual probability of flooding, they gave a reasonable representation of flood extent uncertainty in the area. This study illustrates that inherently uncertain data from social media can be used to derive information about flooding.

  14. Establishment and Practical Application of Flood Warning Stage in Taiwan's River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng-Hsueh; Chia Yeh, Keh-

    2017-04-01

    In the face of extreme flood events or the possible impact of climate change, non-engineering disaster prevention and early warning work is particularly important. Taiwan is an island topography with more than 3,900 meters of high mountains. The length of the river is less than 100 kilometers. Most of the watershed catchment time is less than 24 hours, which belongs to the river with steep slope and rapid flood. Every year in summer and autumn, several typhoon events invade Taiwan. Typhoons often result in rainfall events in excess of 100 mm/hr or 250 mm/3hr. In the face of Taiwan's terrain and extreme rainfall events, flooding is difficult to avoid. Therefore, most of the river has embankment protection, so that people do not have to face every year flooding caused by economic and life and property losses. However, the river embankment protection is limited. With the increase of the hydrological data, the design criteria for the embankment protection standards in the past was 100 year of flood return period and is now gradually reduced to 25 or 50 year of flood return period. The river authorities are not easy to rise the existing embankment height. The safety of the river embankment in Taiwan is determined by the establishment of the flood warning stage to cope with the possible increase in annual floods and the impact of extreme hydrological events. The flood warning stage is equal to the flood control elevation minus the flood rise rate multiply by the flood early warning time. The control elevation can be the top of the embankment, the design flood level of the river, the embankment gap of the river section, the height of the bridge beam bottom, etc. The flood rise rate is consider the factors such as hydrological stochastic and uncertain rainfall and the effect of flood discharge operation on the flood in the watershed catchment area. The maximum value of the water level difference between the two hours or five hours before the peak value of the analysis

  15. RASOR flood modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Joost; Buckman, Lora; Bachmann, Daniel; Visser, Martijn; Tollenaar, Daniel; Vatvani, Deepak; Kramer, Nienke; Goorden, Neeltje

    2015-04-01

    Decision making in disaster management requires fast access to reliable and relevant information. We believe that online information and services will become increasingly important in disaster management. Within the EU FP7 project RASOR (Rapid Risk Assessment and Spatialisation of Risk) an online platform is being developed for rapid multi-hazard risk analyses to support disaster management anywhere in the world. The platform will provide access to a plethora of GIS data that are relevant to risk assessment. It will also enable the user to run numerical flood models to simulate historical and newly defined flooding scenarios. The results of these models are maps of flood extent, flood depths and flow velocities. The RASOR platform will enable to overlay historical event flood maps with observations and Earth Observation (EO) imagery to fill in gaps and assess the accuracy of the flood models. New flooding scenarios can be defined by the user and simulated to investigate the potential impact of future floods. A series of flood models have been developed within RASOR for selected case study areas around the globe that are subject to very different flood hazards: • The city of Bandung in Indonesia, which is prone to fluvial flooding induced by heavy rainfall. The flood hazard is exacerbated by land subsidence. • The port of Cilacap on the south coast of Java, subject to tsunami hazard from submarine earthquakes in the Sunda trench. • The area south of city of Rotterdam in the Netherlands, prone to coastal and/or riverine flooding. • The island of Santorini in Greece, which is subject to tsunamis induced by landslides. Flood models have been developed for each of these case studies using mostly EO data, augmented by local data where necessary. Particular use was made of the new TanDEM-X (TerraSAR-X add-on for Digital Elevation Measurement) product from the German Aerospace centre (DLR) and EADS Astrium. The presentation will describe the flood models and the

  16. Predicting location-specific extreme coastal floods in the future climate by introducing a probabilistic method to calculate maximum elevation of the continuous water mass caused by a combination of water level variations and wind waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijala, Ulpu; Björkqvist, Jan-Victor; Johansson, Milla M.; Pellikka, Havu

    2017-04-01

    Future coastal management continuously strives for more location-exact and precise methods to investigate possible extreme sea level events and to face flooding hazards in the most appropriate way. Evaluating future flooding risks by understanding the behaviour of the joint effect of sea level variations and wind waves is one of the means to make more comprehensive flooding hazard analysis, and may at first seem like a straightforward task to solve. Nevertheless, challenges and limitations such as availability of time series of the sea level and wave height components, the quality of data, significant locational variability of coastal wave height, as well as assumptions to be made depending on the study location, make the task more complicated. In this study, we present a statistical method for combining location-specific probability distributions of water level variations (including local sea level observations and global mean sea level rise) and wave run-up (based on wave buoy measurements). The goal of our method is to obtain a more accurate way to account for the waves when making flooding hazard analysis on the coast compared to the approach of adding a separate fixed wave action height on top of sea level -based flood risk estimates. As a result of our new method, we gain maximum elevation heights with different return periods of the continuous water mass caused by a combination of both phenomena, "the green water". We also introduce a sensitivity analysis to evaluate the properties and functioning of our method. The sensitivity test is based on using theoretical wave distributions representing different alternatives of wave behaviour in relation to sea level variations. As these wave distributions are merged with the sea level distribution, we get information on how the different wave height conditions and shape of the wave height distribution influence the joint results. Our method presented here can be used as an advanced tool to minimize over- and

  17. Exenatide reduces final infarct size in patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction and short-duration of ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob Thomsen; Kelbæk, Henning Skov; Vejlstrup, Niels Grove

    2012-01-01

    Exenatide has been demonstrated to be cardioprotective as an adjunct to primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of the post hoc analysis study was to evaluate the effect of exenatide in relation to system delay, defin...

  18. Does an elevated CO2 concentration decrease dark respiration in trees? Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Stephen [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2003-12-31

    Averaged across many previous investigations, doubling the CO2 concentration ([CO2]) has frequently been reported to cause an instantaneous reduction of leaf dark respiration measured as CO2 efflux. No known mechanism accounts for this effect. While four recent studies have shown that the measurement of respiratory CO2 efflux is prone to experimental artifacts that could account for the reported response, papers published since the start of the current research continue to report an instantaneous depression of respiratory CO2 efflux by elevation of [CO2]. Here, these artifacts are avoided by use of a high-resolution dual channel oxygen analyzer within an open gas exchange system to measure respiratory 02 uptake in normal air. Leaf 02 uptake was determined in response to instantaneous elevation of [CO2] in nine contrasting species and to long-term elevation in seven species from four of the DOE-sponsored long-term elevated [CO2] field experiments. Over one thousand separate measurements of respiration failed to reveal any decrease in respiratory 02 uptake with an instantaneous increase in [CO2]. Respiration was found insensitive not only to doubling [CO2], but also to a five-fold increase and to decrease to zero.

  19. A Study on Integrated Community Based Flood Mitigation with Remote Sensing Technique in Kota Bharu, Kelantan

    Science.gov (United States)

    'Ainullotfi, A. A.; Ibrahim, A. L.; Masron, T.

    2014-02-01

    This study is conducted to establish a community based flood management system that is integrated with remote sensing technique. To understand local knowledge, the demographic of the local society is obtained by using the survey approach. The local authorities are approached first to obtain information regarding the society in the study areas such as the population, the gender and the tabulation of settlement. The information about age, religion, ethnic, occupation, years of experience facing flood in the area, are recorded to understand more on how the local knowledge emerges. Then geographic data is obtained such as rainfall data, land use, land elevation, river discharge data. This information is used to establish a hydrological model of flood in the study area. Analysis were made from the survey approach to understand the pattern of society and how they react to floods while the analysis of geographic data is used to analyse the water extent and damage done by the flood. The final result of this research is to produce a flood mitigation method with a community based framework in the state of Kelantan. With the flood mitigation that involves the community's understanding towards flood also the techniques to forecast heavy rainfall and flood occurrence using remote sensing, it is hope that it could reduce the casualties and damage that might cause to the society and infrastructures in the study area.

  20. Final infarct size measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction predicts long-term clinical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob Thomsen; Vejlstrup, Niels Grove; Kelbæk, Henning Skov

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: Tailored heart failure treatment and risk assessment in patients following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is mainly based on the assessment of the left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF). Assessment of the final infarct size in addition to the LVEF may improve...... the prognostic evaluation. To evaluate the prognostic importance of the final infarct size measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with STEMI. METHODS AND RESULTS: In an observational study the final infarct size was measured by late gadolinium enhancement CMR 3 months after initial...... admission in 309 patients with STEMI. The clinical endpoint was a composite of all-cause mortality and admission for heart failure. During the follow-up period of median 807 days (IQR: 669-1117) 35 events (5 non-cardiac deaths, 3 cardiac deaths, and 27 admissions for heart failure) were recorded. Patients...

  1. Scenario-based tsunami risk assessment using a static flooding approach and high-resolution digital elevation data: An example from Muscat in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bastian; Hoffmann, Gösta; Reicherter, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of tsunami risk and vulnerability is essential to establish a well-adapted Multi Hazard Early Warning System, land-use planning and emergency management. As the tsunami risk for the coastline of Oman is still under discussion and remains enigmatic, various scenarios based on historical tsunamis were created. The suggested inundation and run-up heights were projected onto the modern infrastructural setting of the Muscat Capital Area. Furthermore, possible impacts of the worst-case tsunami event for Muscat are discussed. The approved Papathoma Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment Model was used to model the structural vulnerability of the infrastructure for a 2 m tsunami scenario, depicting the 1945 tsunami and a 5 m tsunami in Muscat. Considering structural vulnerability, the results suggest a minor tsunami risk for the 2 m tsunami scenario as the flooding is mainly confined to beaches and wadis. Especially traditional brick buildings, still predominant in numerous rural suburbs, and a prevalently coast-parallel road network lead to an increased tsunami risk. In contrast, the 5 m tsunami scenario reveals extensively inundated areas and with up to 48% of the buildings flooded, and therefore consequently a significantly higher tsunami risk. We expect up to 60000 damaged buildings and up to 380000 residents directly affected in the Muscat Capital Area, accompanied with a significant loss of life and damage to vital infrastructure. The rapid urbanization processes in the Muscat Capital Area, predominantly in areas along the coast, in combination with infrastructural, demographic and economic growth will additionally increase the tsunami risk and therefore emphasizes the importance of tsunami risk assessment in Oman.

  2. Flood hazard and management: a UK perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheater, Howard S

    2006-08-15

    This paper discusses whether flood hazard in the UK is increasing and considers issues of flood risk management. Urban development is known to increase fluvial flood frequency, hence design measures are routinely implemented to minimize the impact. Studies suggest that historical effects, while potentially large at small scale, are not significant for large river basins. Storm water flooding within the urban environment is an area where flood hazard is inadequately defined; new methods are needed to assess and manage flood risk. Development on flood plains has led to major capital expenditure on flood protection, but government is attempting to strengthen the planning role of the environmental regulator to prevent this. Rural land use management has intensified significantly over the past 30 years, leading to concerns that flood risk has increased, at least at local scale; the implications for catchment-scale flooding are unclear. New research is addressing this issue, and more broadly, the role of land management in reducing flood risk. Climate change impacts on flooding and current guidelines for UK practice are reviewed. Large uncertainties remain, not least for the occurrence of extreme precipitation, but precautionary guidance is in place. Finally, current levels of flood protection are discussed. Reassessment of flood hazard has led to targets for increased flood protection, but despite important developments to communicate flood risk to the public, much remains to be done to increase public awareness of flood hazard.

  3. Impact of elevated CO2 and temperature on soil C and N dynamics in relation to CH4 and N2O emissions from tropical flooded rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, P; Roy, K S; Neogi, S; Dash, P K; Nayak, A K; Mohanty, S; Baig, M J; Sarkar, R K; Rao, K S

    2013-09-01

    A field experiment was carried out to investigate the impact of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) (CEC, 550 μmol mol(-1)) and elevated CO2+elevated air temperature (CECT, 550 μmol mol(-1) and 2°C more than control chamber (CC)) on soil labile carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) pools, microbial populations and enzymatic activities in relation to emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in a flooded alluvial soil planted with rice cv. Naveen in open top chambers (OTCs). The labile soil C pools, namely microbial biomass C, readily mineralizable C, water soluble carbohydrate C and potassium permanganate oxidizable C were increased by 27, 23, 38 and 37% respectively under CEC than CC (ambient CO2, 394 μmol mol(-1)). The total organic carbon (TOC) in root exudates was 28.9% higher under CEC than CC. The labile N fractions were also increased significantly (29%) in CEC than CC. Methanogens and denitrifier populations in rhizosphere were higher under CEC and CECT. As a result, CH4 and N2O-N emissions were enhanced by 26 and 24.6% respectively, under CEC in comparison to open field (UC, ambient CO2, 394 μmol mol(-1)) on seasonal basis. The global warming potential (GWP) was increased by 25% under CEC than CC. However, emissions per unit of grain yield under elevated CO2 and temperature were similar to those observed at ambient CO2. The stimulatory effect on CH4 and N2O emissions under CEC was linked with the increased amount of soil labile C, C rich root exudates, lowered Eh, higher Fe(+2) concentration and increased activities of methanogens and extracellular enzymes.

  4. General Reevaluation Report for Flood Control Project: Raccoon River and Walnut Creek, West Des Moines-Des Moines, Iowa with Final Supplement Number 1 to the Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    properties amount others: 1. Pal Joey’s 2. IMT Insurance 3. Phillips Service Station 4. McDonald’s Restaurant 5. Pizza Hut Restaurant 6. Kentucky Fried ... Chicken Restaurant 7. A&D Kwik Kar Wash 8. Des Moines Seed and Nursery By the elimination of these flooding pockets, flood cresting j1 could occur at a

  5. Development and verification of simplified prediction models for enhanced oil recovery applications. CO/sub 2/ (miscible flood) predictive model. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, G.W.

    1984-10-01

    A screening model for CO/sub 2/ miscible flooding has been developed consisting of a reservoir model for oil rate and recovery and an economic model. The reservoir model includes the effects of viscous fingering, reservoir heterogeneity, gravity segregation and areal sweep. The economic model includes methods to calculate various profitability indices, the windfall profits tax, and provides for CO/sub 2/ recycle. The model is applicable to secondary or tertiary floods, and to solvent slug or WAG processes. The model does not require detailed oil-CO/sub 2/ PVT data for execution, and is limited to five-spot patterns. A pattern schedule may be specified to allow economic calculations for an entire project to be made. Models of similar architecture have been developed for steam drive, in-situ combustion, surfactant-polymer flooding, polymer flooding and waterflooding. 36 references, 41 figures, 4 tables.

  6. Final Technical Report: Response of Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and Associated Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oechel, Walter C

    2002-08-15

    This research incorporated an integrated hierarchical approach in space, time, and levels of biological/ecological organization to help understand and predict ecosystem response to elevated CO{sub 2} and concomitant environmental change. The research utilized a number of different approaches, and collaboration of both PER and non-PER investigators to arrive at a comprehensive, integrative understanding. Central to the work were the CO{sub 2}-controlled, ambient Lit, Temperature controlled (CO{sub 2}LT) null-balance chambers originally developed in the arctic tundra, which were re-engineered for the chaparral with treatment CO{sub 2} concentrations of from 250 to 750 ppm CO{sub 2} in 100 ppm increments, replicated twice to allow for a regression analysis. Each chamber was 2 meters on a side and 2 meters tall, which were installed over an individual shrub reprouting after a fire. This manipulation allowed study of the response of native chaparral to varying levels of CO{sub 2}, while regenerating from an experimental burn. Results from these highly-controlled manipulations were compared against Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) manipulations, in an area adjacent to the CO{sub 2}LT null balance greenhouses. These relatively short-term results (5-7 years) were compared to long-term results from Mediterranean-type ecosystems (MTEs) surrounding natural CO{sub 2} springs in northern Italy, near Laiatico, Italy. The springs lack the controlled experimental rigor of our CO{sub 2}LT and FACE manipulation, but provide invaluable validation of our long-term predictions.

  7. Mapping flood prone areas in southern Brazil: a combination of frequency analysis, HAND algorithm and remote sensing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabris Goerl, Roberto; Borges Chaffe, Pedro Luiz; Marcel Pellerin, Joel Robert; Altamirano Flores, Juan Antonio; Josina Abreu, Janete; Speckhann, Gustavo Andrei; Mattos Sanchez, Gerly

    2015-04-01

    Floods disaster damages several people around the world. There is a worldwide increasing trend of natural disasters frequency and their negative impacts related to the population growth and high urbanization in natural hazards zones. In Santa Catarina state, such as almost all southern Brazilian territory, floods are a frequent hydrological disaster. In this context, flood prone areas map is a important tool to avoid the construction of new settlements in non-urbanizations areas. The present work aimed to map flood prone areas in Palhoça City, Southern Brazil combining high resolution digital elevations data, remote sensing information, frequency analysis and High Above Nearest Drainage (HAND) algorithm. We used 17 years of daily discharge and stage data to calculate flood probability and return period. Remote Sensing (RS) with CBERS HRC image with 2,7m resolution was used. This image was taken one day after one flood occurrence and a band difference was used to extract the flood extent. HAND using DEM to calculate the altimetric difference between channel pixel and adjacent terrain values. All morphometric attributes used in HAND were extracted directly from the high resolution DEM (1m). Through CBERS image areas where flood level was higher than 0.5m were mapped. There is some kind of uncertain in establish HAND classes, since only distance to the channel was take in account. Thus, using other hydrological or spatial information can reduce this uncertain. To elaborate the final flood prone map, all this methods were combined. This map was classified in three main classes based on return period. It was notices that there is a strong spatial correlation between high susceptibility flood areas and geomorphological features like floodplains and Holocene beach ridges, places where water table emerges frequently. The final map was classified using three different colors (red, yellow and green) related to high, medium an law susceptibility flood areas. This mapping

  8. 44 CFR 60.3 - Flood plain management criteria for flood-prone areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... without causing collapse, displacement, or other structural damage to the elevated portion of the building...) The elevated portion of the building and supporting foundation system shall not be subject to collapse... proposed building sites will be reasonably safe from flooding. If a proposed building site is in a flood...

  9. Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1996-11-01

    The overall objective of this research was to document current patterns of CO{sub 2} flux in selected locations of the circumpolar arctic, and to develop the information necessary to predict how these fluxes may be affected by climate change. In fulfillment of these objectives, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured at several sites on the North Slope of Alaska during the 1990--94 growing season (June--August) to determine the local and regional patterns of seasonal CO{sub 2} exchange. In addition, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured in the Russian and Icelandic Arctic to determine if the patterns of CO{sub 2} exchange observed in Arctic Alaska were representative of the circumpolar Arctic, while cold-season CO{sub 2} flux measurements were carried out during the 1993--94 winter season to determine the magnitude of CO{sub 2} efflux not accounted for by the growing season measurements. Manipulations of soil water table depth and surface temperature, which were identified from the extensive measurements as being the most important variables in determining the magnitude and direction of net CO{sub 2} exchange, were carried out during the 1993--94 growing seasons in tussock and wet sedge tundra ecosystems. Finally, measurements of CH{sub 4} flux were also measured at several of the North Slope study sites during the 1990--91 growing seasons.

  10. Elevating your elevator talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    An important and often overlooked item that every early career researcher needs to do is compose an elevator talk. The elevator talk, named because the talk should not last longer than an average elevator ride (30 to 60 seconds), is an effective method to present your research and yourself in a clea...

  11. Response of a tundra ecosytem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1996-11-01

    The overall objective of this research was to document current patterns of CO{sub 2} flux in selected locations of the circumpolar arctic, and to develop the information necessary to predict how these fluxes may be affected by climate change. In fulfillment of these objectives, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured at several sites on the North Slope of Alaska during the 1990-94 growing season (June-August) to determine the local and regional patterns, of seasonal CO{sub 2} exchange. In addition, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured in the Russian and Icelandic Arctic to determine if the patterns of CO{sub 2} exchange observed in Arctic Alaska were representative of the circumpolar arctic, while cold-season CO{sub 2} flux measurements were carried out during the 1993-94 winter season to determine the magnitude of CO{sub 2} efflux not accounted for by the growing season measurements. Manipulations of soil water table depth and surface temperature, which were identified from the extensive measurements as being the most important variables in determining the magnitude and direction of net CO{sub 2} exchange, were carried out during the 1993-94 growing seasons in tussock and wet sedge tundra ecosystems. Finally, measurements of CH{sub 4} flux were also measured at several of the North Slope study sites during the 1990-91 growing seasons. Measurements were made on small (e.g. 0.5 m{sup 2}) plots using a portable gas-exchange system and cuvette. The sample design allowed frequent measurements of net CO{sub 2} exchange and respiration over diurnal and seasonal cycles, and a large spatial extent that incorporated both locally and regionally diverse tundra surface types. Measurements both within and between ecosystem types typically extended over soil water table depth and temperature gradients, allowing for the indirect analysis of the effects of anticipated climate change scenarios on net CO{sub 2} exchange. In situ experiments provided a direct means for testing hypotheses.

  12. Long term post-flood damage assessments to analyze the strategies of adaptation at individual scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brémond, Pauline; Bonte, Bruno; Erdlenbruch, Katrin; Grelot, Frédéric; Richert, Claire

    2015-04-01

    RETINA is a project which studies the opportunity for adaptation in the aftermath of flood events. To handle this research question, we consider adaptation to flood risk at individual and collective scale as well as the influence of the urban planning regulation (Flood risk mapping). For the purpose of this research, collective adaptation means actions that are undertaken at collective scale such as dikes, relocation of collective infrastructures (roads, treatment plant...) and individual adaptation means actions decided at individual level (households, enterprises or farmers) such as relocation, elevation of critical components, new organization.... In this presentation, we focus on individual adaptation and analyse which are the mechanisms that incite or constrain the adaptation to flood risk of individual assets considering their own trajectory. The originality of our approach is to carry out long term post-flood assessments and comprehensive interviews at individual scale. To catch the drivers of adaptation, we sequenced the interview guide in three periods: 1/ the situation before the reference event occurred, 2/ what happened during and just after the flood event, 3/ what happened from the flood event until the moment of the interview. Two case studies have been chosen. The first case study is the Aude department where an exceptional flooding occurred in 1999. The second case study is the Var department where more recent and frequent flood events occurred in 2010, 2011, 2014. On each case study, we plan to conduct about fifty interviews including households and economic activities. In this presentation, we will develop methodological aspects on long term post-flood damage assessments. Carrying out a long term post-flood assessment enabled us to consider adaptation to flood risk among the whole of strategic decisions a household or an enterprise has to take. Moreover, we found out that contrary to what is usually assumed, the fact that the reference event was

  13. Using LiDAR surveys to document floods: A case study of the 2008 Iowa flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Krajewski, Witold F.; Goska, Radek; Young, Nathan

    2017-10-01

    Can we use Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), an emergent remote sensing technology with wide applications, to document floods with high accuracy? To explore the feasibility of this application, we propose a method to extract distributed inundation depths from a LiDAR survey conducted during flooding. This method consists of three steps: (1) collecting LiDAR data during flooding; (2) classifying the LiDAR observational points as flooded water surface points and non-flooded points, and generating a floodwater surface elevation model; and (3) subtracting the bare earth Digital Terrain Model (DTM) from the flood surface elevation model to obtain a flood depth map. We applied this method to the 2008 Iowa flood in the United States and evaluated the results using the high-water mark measurements, flood extent extracted from SPOT (Small Programmable Object Technology) imagery, and the near-simultaneously acquired aerial photography. The root mean squared error of the LiDAR-derived floodwater surface profile to high-water marks was 30 cm, the consistency between the two flooded areas derived from LiDAR and SPOT imagery was 72% (81% if suspicious isolated ponds in the SPOT-derived extent were removed), and LiDAR-derived flood extent had a horizontal resolution of ∼3 m. This work demonstrates that LiDAR technology has the potential to provide calibration and validation reference data with appreciable accuracy for improved flood inundation modeling.

  14. Flooding On

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN PUMIN

    2010-01-01

    @@ Drenched riverside towns in central and south parts of China were preparing for even worse flooding as water levels in the country's huge rivers surged and rainstorms continued. As of July 27,accumulated precipitation since June 16 in 70 percent of the drainage areas of the Yangtze River had exceeded 50 mm,after three rounds of rainstorms,said Cai Qihua,Deputy Director of the Yangtze River Flood Control and Drought Relief Headquarters.

  15. 78 FR 78995 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... determinations, which may include additions or modifications of any Base Flood Elevation (BFE), base flood depth... Beverly Shores Town Hall, 500 South Broadway, Beverly Shores, IN 46301. Town of Burns Harbor Building Department, 1240 North Boo Road, Burns Harbor, IN 46304. Town of Chesterton Building Department, 726 Broadway...

  16. Geomorphological factors of flash floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Yulia

    2016-04-01

    Growing anthropogenic load, rise of extreme meteorological events frequency and total precipitation depth often lead to increasing danger of catastrophic fluvial processes worldwide. Flash floods are one of the most dangerous and less understood types of them. Difficulties of their study are mainly related to short duration of single events, remoteness and hard access to origin areas. Most detailed researches of flash floods focus on hydrological parameters of the flow itself and its meteorological factors. At the same time, importance of the basin geological and geomorphological structure for flash floods generation and the role they play in global sediment redistribution is yet poorly understood. However, understanding and quantitative assessment of these features is a real basis for a complete concept of factors, characteristics and dynamics of flash floods. This work is a review of published data on flash floods, and focuses on the geomorphological factors of the phenomenon. We consider both individual roles and interactions between different geomorphological features (the whole basin parameters, characteristics of the single slopes and valley bottom). Special attention is paid to critical values of certain factors. This approach also highlights the gaps or less studied factors of flash floods. Finally, all data is organized into a complex diagram that may be used for flash floods modeling. This also may help to reach a new level of flash flood predictions and risk assessment.

  17. 76 FR 59960 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ..., Arizona, and Incorporated Areas Agua Caliente Split Flow Approximately 1,500 +2584 +2583 Unincorporated... +2593 downstream of the Agua Caliente Wash divergence. Agua Caliente Spur Flow Approximately 0.5 mile... mile +2623 +2624 upstream of East Tanque Verde Road. Agua Caliente Wash Approximately 130 feet...

  18. 76 FR 23528 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... Outlet and Snell Creek confluence. Lake Marion Creek Outlet At the Lake Marion None +67 Unincorporated Areas of Creek and Snell Creek Polk County. confluence. At the Lake Marion None +68 confluence. Lake...--ICPR Node 28W91. Polk County. Snell Creek At the Lake Marion None +67 Unincorporated Areas of Creek and...

  19. 75 FR 23642 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... Havana. Approximately 600 feet north of Hurst Street/ East boundary: Approximately 125 feet west of... 330 feet east of Pearl Street extended. Ponding North boundary: None +460 City of Havana... Street and Hurst Street. Ponding North boundary: None +460 City of Havana. Approximately 100 feet south...

  20. 76 FR 5769 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... +1249 City of Rogers. feet downstream of Willow Ridge Way. At the upstream side of None +1313 Mills Lane... Street. Unnamed Tributary to Puppy Creek.... Approximately 370 feet None +1273 City of Lowell. upstream... Township of Allegheny. upstream of Mill Road. Approximately 0.69 mile None +1141 upstream of Mill...

  1. 75 FR 68744 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... the Gilmer County Courthouse, 1 Broad Street, Ellijay, GA 30540. La Porte County, Indiana, and..., Unincorporated Areas of La Porte County. Lake Michigan Entire shoreline within +587 +585 Town of Long Beach... Shores, City of Drive. Michigan City, Unincorporated Areas of La Porte County. Approximately 1,840...

  2. 75 FR 62048 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... ground. Mean Sea Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter. ** BFEs to be changed include the listed... the I-35 Polk County. crossing. Approximately 1.6 mile +831 +833 upstream of the I-35 crossing... Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter. ** BFEs to be changed include the listed downstream...

  3. 75 FR 67304 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... Street, Rockvale, CO 81244. Town of Williamsburg Maps are available for inspection at 1 John Street..., City of Lambertville, Township of Alexandria, Township of Delaware, Township of Holland, Township of.... Musconetcong River At the confluence with +158 +159 Township of Holland. the Delaware River. Approximately 1...

  4. 76 FR 45485 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ...Gilligan Creek (backwater effects from Ohio River), Ohio River, Phelps Creek (backwater effects from Ohio River), Phelps Creek Tributary 2 (backwater effects from Ohio River), Sandy Creek (backwater effects... (backwater effects from Ohio River), McGilligan Creek (backwater effects from Ohio River), Phelps...

  5. 76 FR 50443 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... feet downstream of the Maple Street Bridge. Matfield River At the Bridge Street None +33 Town of East... Forest Road Bridge. At the Hockomock River None +63 confluence. Tributary A Just upstream of the None +71...

  6. 75 FR 29238 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    .... Approximately 125 feet None +1,412 downstream of Forest Avenue. West Branch Susquehanna River... Maple Pierce County. Avenue (County Highway S). At Maple Avenue (County None +833 Highway S). * National...

  7. 76 FR 73537 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... Pelham, Unincorporated Forest Circle. Areas of Shelby County. Approximately 730 feet None +499 upstream... Newnan. confluence. Approximately 700 feet +931 +928 upstream of Maple Drive. Tributary 2 to Wahoo Creek...

  8. 75 FR 28511 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    .... approximately 340 feet upstream of Forest Oak Church Road. Cypress Creek (Backwater effects From approximately 0... Maple Street. Approximately 1,500 None +764 feet upstream of Maple Street. Shiawassee River...

  9. 76 FR 20606 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ....; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376... Yakima. Walmart Overflow 1. Creek confluence. Approximately 1,307 None +1158 feet upstream of South 64th Avenue. Shaw Creek--Wide Hollow Creek At the Wide Hollow None +1149 City of Yakima. Walmart Overflow...

  10. 77 FR 76998 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... River), Tallow Branch (backwater effects from Green River), Welch Creek (backwater effects from Green... effects from Green River), Tallow Branch (backwater effects from Green River), Welch Creek (backwater... Butler County. to approximately 0.6 mile upstream of the confluence with Tallow Branch. Little...

  11. 75 FR 31368 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... Old Unincorporated Areas Tucson Road. of Santa Cruz County. Approximately 100 feet +3873 +3872... Main Street, Danville, KY 40422. ] Logan County, Kentucky, and Incorporated Areas Proctor Branch Approximately 400 feet None +525 City of Russellville, upstream of Bismarck Unincorporated Areas Lane. of...

  12. 76 FR 70386 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... feet +226 +225 City of Montgomery. effects from Camp Creek). upstream of the Camp Creek confluence... that the community is required either to adopt or to show evidence of having in effect in order to... None +196 City of Montgomery. (backwater effects from Baldwin confluence. Slough). At the...

  13. 76 FR 50960 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... 1.5 miles None +65 upstream of Beaman Old Creek Road. Cow Branch At the Nahunta Swamp +61 +60 Unincorpo rated Areas confluence. of Greene County. Approximately 2.1 miles None +114 upstream of Cow Branch... County. Approximately 0.4 mile None +54 upstream of Jolly Road. Indian Well Swamp Approximately 0.8 mile...

  14. 76 FR 46705 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... Saffron None +45 Unincorporated Areas of Avenue to the north, Lake County. State Route 44 to the east, and... west. Multiple Ponding Areas Area bound by Saffron None +48 Unincorporated Areas of Avenue to the north... Ponding Areas Area bound by Saffron None +49 Unincorporated Areas of Avenue to the north, Lake...

  15. 76 FR 26968 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ....; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376.... Approximately 0.5 mile None +860 downstream of North Home Avenue. Holmes Creek At the Fishing River +770 +763... +865 +863 upstream of County Road BB. Old Maids Creek Approximately 980 feet None +896 City...

  16. 75 FR 55515 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... feet None +1098 Town of Lehman. downstream of Shady Lane. Approximately 410 feet None +1099 downstream... downstream of I-81. Pikes Creek Approximately 815 feet None +1127 Town of Lehman. downstream of State Route... inspection at City Hall, 40 East Market Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711. Town of Lehman Maps are available...

  17. 75 FR 67317 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... County Courthouse, 208 Main Street, Newport, AR 72112. Hernando County, Florida, and Incorporated Areas... Unincorporated Areas Pond Road (at Junction of Hernando County. 1NP0170). Approximately 100 feet None +236... +56 City of Brooksville, downstream of Unincorporated Areas Weatherly Road (at of Hernando...

  18. 76 FR 21693 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... Grove. Approximately 30 feet None +771 downstream of Durand Avenue (State Highway 11). Unnamed Tributary... Plaines River. Racine County. Approximately 2,750 None +762 feet upstream of Durand Avenue (State Highway... Hall, 6126 Durand Avenue, Racine, Wisconsin 53406. Village of Sturtevant Maps are available...

  19. 75 FR 31347 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... +336 upstream of the Brono Road bridge. Resurrection River At the confluence with +17 +16 City of Seward, Kenai Resurrection Bay. Peninsula Borough. Approximately 1.6 mile +75 +74 upstream of the Alaskan... +17 +16 City of Seward, Kenai Resurrection Bay. Peninsula Borough. At the confluence with None +189...

  20. 75 FR 62057 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    .... feet downstream of the Access Road Bridge. Approximately 100 feet None +647 downstream of the Access Road Bridge. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above... Brooklyn Branch At the confluence with None +457 City of Forney. Mustang Creek. Approximately 1,382 None...

  1. 76 FR 8965 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... Unincorporated Areas of feet downstream of Platte County. Water Treatment Plant Road. Approximately 1,400 None +822 feet downstream of Water Treatment Plant Road. Walnut Creek At the Rush Creek +764 +768 City of... Road. Hunter Branch At the South Fork None +235 Unincorporated Areas of Edisto River Aiken County...

  2. 75 FR 55507 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... Shore Road Village of Blasdell. culvert. At the upstream Village None +591 of Blasdell/City of... Approximately 260 feet None +1,220 Township of Rose. upstream of the confluence with Sandy Lick Creek... mile None +1,212 downstream of White Street. Sandy Lick Creek Approximately 0.28 mile None +1,216...

  3. 75 FR 68738 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    .... Township of Hopewell. Approximately 0.4 mile +47 +46 upstream of State Route 29 (River Road). Miry Run At... within None +605 City of Bayfield, City community. of Washburn, Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa... Maps are available for inspection at 119 Washington Avenue, Washburn, WI 54891. Red Cliff Band of...

  4. 75 FR 5909 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... City of Crossett. feet downstream of Main Street. Approximately 1,200 None +131 feet downstream of Main...., Washington, DC 20472. ADDRESSES City of Crossett Maps are available for inspection at City Hall, Main Street, Crossett, AR 71635. Hempstead County, Arkansas, and Incorporated Areas Black Branch Approximately 0.60...

  5. 76 FR 1121 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... Falls, confluence. City of Seaforth, City of Vesta, Unincorporated Areas of Redwood County... Seaforth Maps are available for inspection at 205 Oak Street, Seaforth, MN 56287. City of Vesta Maps are available for inspection at 150 Front Street West, Vesta, MN 56292. Unincorporated Areas of Redwood...

  6. 75 FR 31377 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ..., Bozeman, MT 59771. ] Lincoln County, New Mexico, and Incorporated Areas Brady Canyon At the confluence... Unincorporated Areas Sugar Grove Road. of Fairfield County. Approximately 650 None +886 feet upstream of...

  7. 76 FR 36044 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... County. Approximately 1.0 mile None +606 upstream of Ghost Creek Road. Little River Tributary 1 At the.... Approximately 0.6 mile None +670 upstream of Pamela Lane. Shell Creek Approximately 1,330 None +541 City...

  8. 76 FR 8984 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... downstream of Trinity Drive. Fritz Cove At the southern end of None 23 City and Borough of Mendenhall... of the Juneau. intersection of Engineers Cutoff Road and Mendenhall Peninsula Road. Approximately 0.5... miles None 106 upstream of Glacier Highway. Mendenhall River Approximately 1.14 None 23 City and Borough...

  9. 77 FR 73394 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... + 1226 downstream of the intersection of Craig Street and Garden Avenue. Approximately 0.2 mile None + 1226 downstream of the intersection of Craig Street and Garden Avenue. Approximately 0.38 mile None.... * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. Mean...

  10. 78 FR 22222 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... downstream of the intersection of Craig Street and Garden Avenue. Approximately 0.2 mile None +1226 downstream of the intersection of Craig Street and Garden Avenue. Approximately 0.38 mile None +1226.... * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. Mean...

  11. 76 FR 13572 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... County. Road and Calhoun Road. Approximately 400 feet 3 +30 south of the levee between Moores Garden Road... Vertical Datum. + North American Vertical Datum. Depth in feet above ground. Mean Sea Level, rounded to...

  12. 75 FR 59181 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... Philipstown. downstream of U.S. Route 9. Approximately 1.6 mile None +517 upstream of Briars Road. Croton.... Croton Falls Reservoir Entire shoreline....... None +311 Town of Carmel, Town of Southeast. East Branch Croton River At the confluence with +311 +310 Town of Southeast, the Croton Falls Village of...

  13. 77 FR 50668 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... Creek Tributary M-C.2, Wiggins Creek, and Willow Creek. DATES: Comments are to be submitted on or before... Creek Tributary M-C.2, Wiggins Creek, and Willow Creek. That table contained inaccurate information as... Old Bullard Road. Wiggins Creek At the downstream side None +327 Unincorporated Areas of of...

  14. 75 FR 31361 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... Incorporated Areas Church House Branch Approximately 0.5 mile None +211 City of Wiggins. downstream of East 5th... feet None +171 City of Wiggins, downstream of Unincorporated Areas Clubhouse Drive. of Stone County... None +174 City of Wiggins. Flint Creek. Approximately 350 feet None +254 upstream of Annis Lane....

  15. 77 FR 73393 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ..., Hazel Creek (backwater effects from Ohio River), Humphrey Creek (backwater effects from Ohio River..., Hazel Creek (backwater effects from Ohio River), Humphrey Creek (backwater effects from Ohio River... upstream of confluence with Shawnee Creek Slough. Hazel Creek (backwater effects from From the confluence...

  16. 76 FR 54415 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ... River), Mud Camp Creek (backwater effects from Cumberland River), Otter Creek (backwater effects from... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal....rodriguez1@dhs.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management...

  17. 75 FR 29268 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... the Buchanan County, confluence with Village of Lewis And Blacksnake Creek. Clark. Mitchell Avenue... Street, St. Joseph, MO 64501. Village of Lewis And Clark Maps are available for inspection at the Village.... Anderson County. Approximately 2,900 None +620 feet upstream of Gene Forester Road. Canoe Creek Tributary 6...

  18. 75 FR 59184 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... by None *31 City of Deltona. Leland Drive to the north and west, Fisher Drive to the south, and..., Parma Drive to the west, Lake Helen Osteen Road to the south, and Snow Drive to the east. Ponding Area... Boulevard to the south, and Lake Helen Osteen Road to the east. Ponding Area 33 Ponding area bounded by...

  19. 76 FR 58436 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... to Cole County. River). approximately 0.58 mile upstream of State Route 179. Moreau River (backwater... approximately 750 feet downstream of Missouri Pacific Railroad. Moreau River Tributary 6 At the upstream side...

  20. 78 FR 78993 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... location and the respective Community Map Repository address listed in the table below. Additionally, the..., together with the floodplain management criteria required by 44 CFR 60.3, are the minimum that are required... each community are available for inspection at both the online location and the respective...

  1. 75 FR 61373 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... inspection at the Old Shawneetown Village Hall, 332 Washington Street, Shawneetown, IL 62984. ] Hardin County... upstream of IL-1. Hardin County. Approximately 1.92 mile None +366 upstream of IL-1. Ohio River... (River of Hardin County, Mile 894). Village of Elizabethtown. Approximately 1.97 mile +358 +359...

  2. 76 FR 8978 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... Unincorpora (backwater Doxies ted Areas effects from Creek of Chariton Missouri River). confluence County. to... ly 225 feet downstream of U.S. Route 24 Doxies Creek From +633 +631 Unincorpora (backwater...

  3. 77 FR 67324 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... provides corrections to that table, to be used in lieu of the information published at 76 FR 73537. The... In the proposed rule published at 76 FR 73537, in the November 29, 2011, issue of the Federal... +787 +783 Township of Davidson, Tributary 1 confluence. Township of Shrewsbury. Approximately 0.76...

  4. 75 FR 29290 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... with the floodplain management criteria required by 44 CFR 60.3, are the minimum that are required... rule is not a significant regulatory action under the criteria of section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866.... ] Approximately 0.57 mile None +166 upstream of Disney Road. * National Geodetic Vertical Datum. + North...

  5. 75 FR 81957 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... the confluence with Shaver Creek. Juniata River Approximately 1.72 miles None +638 Township of Porter... are available for inspection at the Logan Township Building, 7228 Diamond Valley, Alexandria, PA 16611..., Huntingdon, PA 16652. Township of Porter Maps are available for inspection at the Porter Township...

  6. 76 FR 46701 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... Town Hall, 6 Holland Street, Moultonborough, NH 03254. Town of Ossipee Maps are available for..., Mitigation, Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency. BILLING CODE 9110-12-P ...

  7. 75 FR 6600 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... Andrew County, City Buchanan County of Amazonia. boundary. Approximately 1,200 *831 +833 feet downstream... Street, SW., Washington, DC 20472. ADDRESSES City of Amazonia Maps are available for inspection at 441 Spring Street, Amazonia, MO 64421. ] Unincorporated Areas of Andrew County Maps are available...

  8. Study to determine the technical and economic feasibility of reclaiming chemicals used in micellar polymer and low tension surfactant flooding. Final report. [Ultrafiltration membranes and reverse osmosis membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, R.H.; Himmelblau, A.; Donnelly, R.G.

    1978-02-01

    Energy Resources Company has developed a technology for use with enhanced oil recovery to achieve emulsion breaking and surfactant recovery. By using ultrafiltration membranes, the Energy Resources Company process can dewater an oil-in-water type emulsion expected from enhanced oil recovery projects to the point where the emulsion can be inverted and treated using conventional emulsion-treating equipment. By using a tight ultrafiltration membrane or a reverse osmosis membrane, the Energy Resources Company process is capable of recovering chemicals such as surfactants used in micellar polymer flooding.

  9. Composite Flood Risk for Virgin Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Composite Flood Risk layer combines flood hazard datasets from Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) flood zones, NOAA's Shallow Coastal Flooding, and the National Hurricane Center SLOSH model for Storm Surge inundation for category 1, 2, and 3 hurricanes.Geographic areas are represented by a grid of 10 by 10 meter cells and each cell has a ranking based on variation in exposure to flooding hazards: Moderate, High and Extreme exposure. Geographic areas in each input layers are ranked based on their probability of flood risk exposure. The logic was such that areas exposed to flooding on a more frequent basis were given a higher ranking. Thus the ranking incorporates the probability of the area being flooded. For example, even though a Category 3 storm surge has higher flooding elevations, the likelihood of the occurrence is lower than a Category 1 storm surge and therefore the Category 3 flood area is given a lower exposure ranking. Extreme exposure areas are those areas that are exposed to relatively frequent flooding.The ranked input layers are then converted to a raster for the creation of the composite risk layer by using cell statistics in spatial analysis. The highest exposure ranking for a given cell in any of the three input layers is assigned to the corresponding cell in the composite layer.For example, if an area (a cell) is rank as medium in the FEMA layer, moderate in the SLOSH layer, but extreme in the SCF layer, the cell will be considere

  10. Combating Floods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    In summer and autumn of 1998, the river vatleys of the Changjiang, Songhua and Nenjiang rivers were stricken by exceptionally serious floods, As of the, 22nd of August, the flooded areas stretched over 52.4 million acres. More than 223 million people were affected by the flood. 4.97 million houses were ruined, economic losses totaled RMB 166 billion, and most tragically, 3,004 people lost their byes. It was one of the costliest disasters in Chinese history. Millions of People’s Liberation Army soldiers and local people joined hands to battle the floodwaters. Thanks to their unified efforts and tenacious struggle, they successfully withstood the rising, water, resumed production and began to rebuild their homes.

  11. User`s guide for UTCHEM-5.32m a three dimensional chemical flood simulator. Final report, September 30, 1992--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    UTCHEM is a three-dimensional chemical flooding simulator. The solution scheme is analogous to IMPES, where pressure is solved for implicitly, but concentrations rather than saturations are then solved for explicitly. Phase saturations and concentrations are then solved in a flash routine. An energy balance equation is solved explicitly for reservoir temperature. The energy balance equation includes heat flow between the reservoir and the over-and under-burden rocks. The major physical phenomena modeled in the simulator are: dispersion; dilution effects; adsorption; interfacial tension; relative permeability; capillary trapping; cation exchange; phase density; compositional phase viscosity; phase behavior (pseudoquaternary); aqueous reactions; partitioning of chemical species between oil and water; dissolution/precipitation; cation exchange reactions involving more than two cations; in-situ generation of surfactant from acidic crude oil; pH dependent adsorption; polymer properties: shear thinning viscosity; inaccessible pore volume; permeability reduction; adsorption; gel properties: viscosity; permeability reduction; adsorption; tracer properties: partitioning; adsorption; radioactive decay; reaction (ester hydrolization); temperature dependent properties: viscosity; tracer reaction; gel reactions The following options are available with UTCHEM: isothermal or non-isothermal conditions, a constant or variable time-step, constant pressure or constant rate well conditions, horizontal and vertical wells, and a radial or Cartesian geometry. Please refer to the dissertation {open_quotes}Field Scale Simulation of Chemical Flooding{close_quotes} by Naji Saad, August, 1989, for a more detailed discussion of the UTCHEM simulator and its formulation.

  12. Probabilistic Flood Defence Assessment Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slomp Robert

    2016-01-01

    institutions managing flood the defences, and not by just a small number of experts in probabilistic assessment. Therefore, data management and use of software are main issues that have been covered in courses and training in 2016 and 2017. All in all, this is the largest change in the assessment of Dutch flood defences since 1996. In 1996 probabilistic techniques were first introduced to determine hydraulic boundary conditions (water levels and waves (wave height, wave period and direction for different return periods. To simplify the process, the assessment continues to consist of a three-step approach, moving from simple decision rules, to the methods for semi-probabilistic assessment, and finally to a fully probabilistic analysis to compare the strength of flood defences with the hydraulic loads. The formal assessment results are thus mainly based on the fully probabilistic analysis and the ultimate limit state of the strength of a flood defence. For complex flood defences, additional models and software were developed. The current Hydra software suite (for policy analysis, formal flood defence assessment and design will be replaced by the model Ringtoets. New stand-alone software has been developed for revetments, geotechnical analysis and slope stability of the foreshore. Design software and policy analysis software, including the Delta model, will be updated in 2018. A fully probabilistic method results in more precise assessments and more transparency in the process of assessment and reconstruction of flood defences. This is of increasing importance, as large-scale infrastructural projects in a highly urbanized environment are increasingly subject to political and societal pressure to add additional features. For this reason, it is of increasing importance to be able to determine which new feature really adds to flood protection, to quantify how much its adds to the level of flood protection and to evaluate if it is really worthwhile. Please note: The Netherlands

  13. GIS-based flood risk model evaluated by Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process (FAHP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukcharoen, Tharapong; Weng, Jingnong; Teetat, Charoenkalunyuta

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 2-3 decades, the economy of many countries around the world has been developed rapidly but it was unbalanced development because of expecting on economic growth only. Meanwhile it lacked of effective planning in the use of natural resources. This can significantly induce climate change which is major cause of natural disaster. Hereby, Thailand has also suffered from natural disaster for ages. Especially, the flood which is most hazardous disaster in Thailand can annually result in the great loss of life and property, environment and economy. Since the flood management of country is inadequate efficiency. It is unable to support the flood analysis comprehensively. This paper applied Geographic Information System and Multi-Criteria Decision Making to create flood risk model at regional scale. Angthong province in Thailand was used as the study area. In practical process, Fuzzy logic technique has been used to improve specialist's assessment by implementing with Fuzzy membership because human decision is flawed under uncertainty then AHP technique was processed orderly. The hierarchy structure in this paper was categorized the spatial flood factors into two levels as following: 6 criteria (Meteorology, Geology, Topography, Hydrology, Human and Flood history) and 8 factors (Average Rainfall, Distance from Stream, Soil drainage capability, Slope, Elevation, Land use, Distance from road and Flooded area in the past). The validity of the pair-wise comparison in AHP was shown as C.R. value which indicated that the specialist judgment was reasonably consistent. FAHP computation result has shown that the first priority of criteria was Meteorology. In addition, the Rainfall was the most influencing factor for flooding. Finally, the output was displayed in thematic map of Angthong province with flood risk level processed by GIS tools. The map was classified into: High Risk, Moderate Risk and Low Risk (13.20%, 75.58%, and 11.22% of total area).

  14. Flooding On

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Drenched riverside towns in central and south parts of China were preparing for even worse flooding aswater levels in the country’s huge rivers surged and rainstorms continued.As of July 27,accumulated precipitation since June 16 in 70 percent of the drainage

  15. Adapting flood preparedness tools to changing flood risk conditions: the situation in Poland⁎ The preparation of this paper was funded from the EU FP7 STAR-FLOOD Project (STrengthening And Redesigning European FLOOD risk practices: Towards appropriate and resilient flood risk governance arrangements. This project also provided funding for the author’s participation at the BALTEX Conference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew W. Kundzewicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flooding is the most destructive natural hazard in the Baltic Sea Basin in general and in Poland in particular. The notion includes floods from rivers and mountain torrents, as well as floods from sea surges in coastal areas, and floods from sewage systems. There have been several large floods in Poland in the last century and in recent decades, with damage exceeding 1% of the Polish GDP. The spatial and temporal characteristics of the flood risk in Poland are reviewed and observations and projections of changes in the flood hazard in the country are discussed. Furthermore, flood defences and flood preparedness systems in Poland are examined, with particular reference to the European Union (EU Floods Directive, which is being implemented in Poland, an EU country. Finally, the public debate on flood risk and flood preparedness is reviewed.

  16. Flood model for Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palán, Ladislav; Punčochář, Petr

    2017-04-01

    Looking on the impact of flooding from the World-wide perspective, in last 50 years flooding has caused over 460,000 fatalities and caused serious material damage. Combining economic loss from ten costliest flood events (from the same period) returns a loss (in the present value) exceeding 300bn USD. Locally, in Brazil, flood is the most damaging natural peril with alarming increase of events frequencies as 5 out of the 10 biggest flood losses ever recorded have occurred after 2009. The amount of economic and insured losses particularly caused by various flood types was the key driver of the local probabilistic flood model development. Considering the area of Brazil (being 5th biggest country in the World) and the scattered distribution of insured exposure, a domain covered by the model was limited to the entire state of Sao Paolo and 53 additional regions. The model quantifies losses on approx. 90 % of exposure (for regular property lines) of key insurers. Based on detailed exposure analysis, Impact Forecasting has developed this tool using long term local hydrological data series (Agencia Nacional de Aguas) from riverine gauge stations and digital elevation model (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística). To provide most accurate representation of local hydrological behaviour needed for the nature of probabilistic simulation, a hydrological data processing focused on frequency analyses of seasonal peak flows - done by fitting appropriate extreme value statistical distribution and stochastic event set generation consisting of synthetically derived flood events respecting realistic spatial and frequency patterns visible in entire period of hydrological observation. Data were tested for homogeneity, consistency and for any significant breakpoint occurrence in time series so the entire observation or only its subparts were used for further analysis. The realistic spatial patterns of stochastic events are reproduced through the innovative use of d-vine copula

  17. Visual Sensing for Urban Flood Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shi-Wei; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Lin, Fang-Pang; Hsu, Ching-Han

    2015-08-14

    With the increasing climatic extremes, the frequency and severity of urban flood events have intensified worldwide. In this study, image-based automated monitoring of flood formation and analyses of water level fluctuation were proposed as value-added intelligent sensing applications to turn a passive monitoring camera into a visual sensor. Combined with the proposed visual sensing method, traditional hydrological monitoring cameras have the ability to sense and analyze the local situation of flood events. This can solve the current problem that image-based flood monitoring heavily relies on continuous manned monitoring. Conventional sensing networks can only offer one-dimensional physical parameters measured by gauge sensors, whereas visual sensors can acquire dynamic image information of monitored sites and provide disaster prevention agencies with actual field information for decision-making to relieve flood hazards. The visual sensing method established in this study provides spatiotemporal information that can be used for automated remote analysis for monitoring urban floods. This paper focuses on the determination of flood formation based on image-processing techniques. The experimental results suggest that the visual sensing approach may be a reliable way for determining the water fluctuation and measuring its elevation and flood intrusion with respect to real-world coordinates. The performance of the proposed method has been confirmed; it has the capability to monitor and analyze the flood status, and therefore, it can serve as an active flood warning system.

  18. Visual Sensing for Urban Flood Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Wei Lo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing climatic extremes, the frequency and severity of urban flood events have intensified worldwide. In this study, image-based automated monitoring of flood formation and analyses of water level fluctuation were proposed as value-added intelligent sensing applications to turn a passive monitoring camera into a visual sensor. Combined with the proposed visual sensing method, traditional hydrological monitoring cameras have the ability to sense and analyze the local situation of flood events. This can solve the current problem that image-based flood monitoring heavily relies on continuous manned monitoring. Conventional sensing networks can only offer one-dimensional physical parameters measured by gauge sensors, whereas visual sensors can acquire dynamic image information of monitored sites and provide disaster prevention agencies with actual field information for decision-making to relieve flood hazards. The visual sensing method established in this study provides spatiotemporal information that can be used for automated remote analysis for monitoring urban floods. This paper focuses on the determination of flood formation based on image-processing techniques. The experimental results suggest that the visual sensing approach may be a reliable way for determining the water fluctuation and measuring its elevation and flood intrusion with respect to real-world coordinates. The performance of the proposed method has been confirmed; it has the capability to monitor and analyze the flood status, and therefore, it can serve as an active flood warning system.

  19. Tsunami flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eric; Jones, Henry; McBride, Mark; Fedors, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Panel 5 focused on tsunami flooding with an emphasis on Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) as derived from its counterpart, Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) that determines seismic ground-motion hazards. The Panel reviewed current practices in PTHA and determined the viability of extending the analysis to extreme design probabilities (i.e., 10-4 to 10-6). In addition to earthquake sources for tsunamis, PTHA for extreme events necessitates the inclusion of tsunamis generated by submarine landslides, and treatment of the large attendant uncertainty in source characterization and recurrence rates. Tsunamis can be caused by local and distant earthquakes, landslides, volcanism, and asteroid/meteorite impacts. Coastal flooding caused by storm surges and seiches is covered in Panel 7. Tsunamis directly tied to earthquakes, the similarities with (and path forward offered by) the PSHA approach for PTHA, and especially submarine landslide tsunamis were a particular focus of Panel 5.

  20. Flood Vulnerability Assessment in Iskandar Malaysia Using Multi-criteria Evaluation and Fuzzy Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Yeganeh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most significant natural disasters in South-east Asia, is flooding. In Malaysia, for instance, Iskandar Malaysia region as a rapid urbanizing context located in southern peninsula has been affected by several flood events during last decade. Severe rainfall, natural situation, new unplanned developments and insufficient drainage systems mad the situation more considerable. This study seeks to address the crucial variables which contribute to the risk of flooding based on the characteristics of the region and develop a GIS-aided urban flood susceptibility map. The methodology emphasizes on uncertainty and multi-criteria which contribute to the risk of flood and increase the risk. As such, the Fuzzy logic, Multi-criteria ranking and Weighted Linear Combination (WLC methods in Geographic Information System (GIS are used to achieve the objectives. Distances from main stream, river and discharge channels, as well as other variables such as elevation, slope and land use are recognized as effective variables within the region. Final susceptibility map indicates that around 658 km2 out of 1,614 km2 within the region is under the high level of flooding risk. Different districts within the region include Pulai, Senai-Kulai, Tebrau and Johor Bahru can be considered as areas with a high risk of flooding. Natural and man-made situation influence the level of risk in each area. Generally the southern part of the region has a high level of risk as the consequence of conjunction between location of stream, lowland and land use type. Finally the situation in 2025 is investigated based on the proposed plan for 2025.

  1. DEM-based Approaches for the Identification of Flood Prone Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samela, Caterina; Manfreda, Salvatore; Nardi, Fernando; Grimaldi, Salvatore; Roth, Giorgio; Sole, Aurelia

    2013-04-01

    The remarkable number of inundations that caused, in the last decades, thousands of deaths and huge economic losses, testifies the extreme vulnerability of many Countries to the flood hazard. As a matter of fact, human activities are often developed in the floodplains, creating conditions of extremely high risk. Terrain morphology plays an important role in understanding, modelling and analyzing the hydraulic behaviour of flood waves. Research during the last 10 years has shown that the delineation of flood prone areas can be carried out using fast methods that relay on basin geomorphologic features. In fact, the availability of new technologies to measure surface elevation (e.g., GPS, SAR, SAR interferometry, RADAR and LASER altimetry) has given a strong impulse to the development of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) based approaches. The identification of the dominant topographic controls on the flood inundation process is a critical research question that we try to tackle with a comparative analysis of several techniques. We reviewed four different approaches for the morphological characterization of a river basin with the aim to provide a description of their performances and to identify their range of applicability. In particular, we explored the potential of the following tools. 1) The hydrogeomorphic method proposed by Nardi et al. (2006) which defines the flood prone areas according to the water level in the river network through the hydrogeomorphic theory. 2) The linear binary classifier proposed by Degiorgis et al. (2012) which allows distinguishing flood-prone areas using two features related to the location of the site under exam with respect to the nearest hazard source. The two features, proposed in the study, are the length of the path that hydrologically connects the location under exam to the nearest element of the drainage network and the difference in elevation between the cell under exam and the final point of the same path. 3) The method by

  2. Development of a flood-warning network and flood-inundation mapping for the Blanchard River in Ottawa, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Matthew T.

    2011-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps of the Blanchard River in Ottawa, Ohio, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Village of Ottawa, Ohio. The maps, which correspond to water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Ottawa (USGS streamgage site number 04189260), were provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into a Web-based flood-warning Network that can be used in conjunction with NWS flood-forecast data to show areas of predicted flood inundation associated with forecasted flood-peak stages. Flood profiles were computed by means of a step-backwater model calibrated to recent field measurements of streamflow. The step-backwater model was then used to determine water-surface-elevation profiles for 12 flood stages with corresponding streamflows ranging from less than the 2-year and up to nearly the 500-year recurrence-interval flood. The computed flood profiles were used in combination with digital elevation data to delineate flood-inundation areas. Maps of the Village of Ottawa showing flood-inundation areas overlain on digital orthophotographs are presented for the selected floods. As part of this flood-warning network, the USGS upgraded one streamgage and added two new streamgages, one on the Blanchard River and one on Riley Creek, which is tributary to the Blanchard River. The streamgage sites were equipped with both satellite and telephone telemetry. The telephone telemetry provides dual functionality, allowing village officials and the public to monitor current stage conditions and enabling the streamgage to call village officials with automated warnings regarding flood stage and/or predetermined rates of stage increase. Data from the streamgages serve as a flood warning that emergency management personnel can use in conjunction with the flood-inundation maps by to determine a course of action when flooding is imminent.

  3. Flooding in Illinois, April-June 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Charles; Smith, D.F.

    2002-01-01

    Widespread flooding occurred throughout most of Illinois in spring 2002 as a result of multiple intense rainstorms that moved through the State during an extended 2-month period from the third week in April through the month of May in central and southern Illinois, the first week in June in northern Illinois, and the second week in June in west-central Illinois. The scale of flooding was highly variable in time and intensity throughout the State. A Federal disaster was declared for central and southern Illinois to deal with the extensive damage incurred during the severe weather, and to provide emergency aid relief. Discharge and stage records for the flood periods described above are presented for 193 streamflow-gaging stations throughout Illinois and in drainages just upstream of the State. New maximum instantaneous discharge was recorded at 12 stations during this flood period, and new maximum stage was recorded at 15 stations. Flood stage was exceeded for at least 1 day during this 2-month period at 67 of the 82 stations with established flood-stage elevations given by the National Weather Service. Of the 162 streamflowgaging stations with an established flood-frequency distribution, a 5-year or greater flood discharge was recorded at 87 stations, and a 100-year or greater flood discharge occurred at six stations.

  4. An operational procedure for rapid flood risk assessment in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dottori, Francesco; Kalas, Milan; Salamon, Peter; Bianchi, Alessandra; Alfieri, Lorenzo; Feyen, Luc

    2017-07-01

    The development of methods for rapid flood mapping and risk assessment is a key step to increase the usefulness of flood early warning systems and is crucial for effective emergency response and flood impact mitigation. Currently, flood early warning systems rarely include real-time components to assess potential impacts generated by forecasted flood events. To overcome this limitation, this study describes the benchmarking of an operational procedure for rapid flood risk assessment based on predictions issued by the European Flood Awareness System (EFAS). Daily streamflow forecasts produced for major European river networks are translated into event-based flood hazard maps using a large map catalogue derived from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations. Flood hazard maps are then combined with exposure and vulnerability information, and the impacts of the forecasted flood events are evaluated in terms of flood-prone areas, economic damage and affected population, infrastructures and cities.An extensive testing of the operational procedure has been carried out by analysing the catastrophic floods of May 2014 in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia. The reliability of the flood mapping methodology is tested against satellite-based and report-based flood extent data, while modelled estimates of economic damage and affected population are compared against ground-based estimations. Finally, we evaluate the skill of risk estimates derived from EFAS flood forecasts with different lead times and combinations of probabilistic forecasts. Results highlight the potential of the real-time operational procedure in helping emergency response and management.

  5. Challenges of Modeling Flood Risk at Large Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guin, J.; Simic, M.; Rowe, J.

    2009-04-01

    algorithm propagates the flows for each simulated event. The model incorporates a digital terrain model (DTM) at 10m horizontal resolution, which is used to extract flood plain cross-sections such that a one-dimensional hydraulic model can be used to estimate extent and elevation of flooding. In doing so the effect of flood defenses in mitigating floods are accounted for. Finally a suite of vulnerability relationships have been developed to estimate flood losses for a portfolio of properties that are exposed to flood hazard. Historical experience indicates that a for recent floods in Great Britain more than 50% of insurance claims occur outside the flood plain and these are primarily a result of excess surface flow, hillside flooding, flooding due to inadequate drainage. A sub-component of the model addresses this issue by considering several parameters that best explain the variability of claims off the flood plain. The challenges of modeling such a complex phenomenon at a large scale largely dictate the choice of modeling approaches that need to be adopted for each of these model components. While detailed numerically-based physical models exist and have been used for conducting flood hazard studies, they are generally restricted to small geographic regions. In a probabilistic risk estimation framework like our current model, a blend of deterministic and statistical techniques have to be employed such that each model component is independent, physically sound and is able to maintain the statistical properties of observed historical data. This is particularly important because of the highly non-linear behavior of the flooding process. With respect to vulnerability modeling, both on and off the flood plain, the challenges include the appropriate scaling of a damage relationship when applied to a portfolio of properties. This arises from the fact that the estimated hazard parameter used for damage assessment, namely maximum flood depth has considerable uncertainty. The

  6. Bayesian flood forecasting methods: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shasha; Coulibaly, Paulin

    2017-08-01

    Over the past few decades, floods have been seen as one of the most common and largely distributed natural disasters in the world. If floods could be accurately forecasted in advance, then their negative impacts could be greatly minimized. It is widely recognized that quantification and reduction of uncertainty associated with the hydrologic forecast is of great importance for flood estimation and rational decision making. Bayesian forecasting system (BFS) offers an ideal theoretic framework for uncertainty quantification that can be developed for probabilistic flood forecasting via any deterministic hydrologic model. It provides suitable theoretical structure, empirically validated models and reasonable analytic-numerical computation method, and can be developed into various Bayesian forecasting approaches. This paper presents a comprehensive review on Bayesian forecasting approaches applied in flood forecasting from 1999 till now. The review starts with an overview of fundamentals of BFS and recent advances in BFS, followed with BFS application in river stage forecasting and real-time flood forecasting, then move to a critical analysis by evaluating advantages and limitations of Bayesian forecasting methods and other predictive uncertainty assessment approaches in flood forecasting, and finally discusses the future research direction in Bayesian flood forecasting. Results show that the Bayesian flood forecasting approach is an effective and advanced way for flood estimation, it considers all sources of uncertainties and produces a predictive distribution of the river stage, river discharge or runoff, thus gives more accurate and reliable flood forecasts. Some emerging Bayesian forecasting methods (e.g. ensemble Bayesian forecasting system, Bayesian multi-model combination) were shown to overcome limitations of single model or fixed model weight and effectively reduce predictive uncertainty. In recent years, various Bayesian flood forecasting approaches have been

  7. Flood loss reduction of private households due to building precautionary measures -- lessons learned from the Elbe flood in August 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kreibich

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Building houses in inundation areas is always a risk, since absolute flood protection is impossible. Where settlements already exist, flood damage must be kept as small as possible. Suitable means are precautionary measures such as elevated building configuration or flood adapted use. However, data about the effects of such measures are rare, and consequently, the efficiency of different precautionary measures is unclear. To improve the knowledge about efficient precautionary measures, approximately 1200 private households, which were affected by the 2002 flood at the river Elbe and its tributaries, were interviewed about the flood damage of their buildings and contents as well as about their precautionary measures. The affected households had little flood experience, i.e. only 15% had experienced a flood before. 59% of the households stated that they did not know, that they live in a flood prone area. Thus, people were not well prepared, e.g. just 11% had used and furnished their house in a flood adapted way and only 6% had a flood adapted building structure. Building precautionary measures are mainly effective in areas with frequent small floods. But also during the extreme flood event in 2002 building measures reduced the flood loss. From the six different building precautionary measures under study, flood adapted use and adapted interior fitting were the most effective ones. They reduced the damage ratio for buildings by 46% and 53%, respectively. The damage ratio for contents was reduced by 48% due to flood adapted use and by 53% due to flood adapted interior fitting. The 2002 flood motivated a relatively large number of people to implement private precautionary measures, but still much more could be done. Hence, to further reduce flood losses, people's motivation to invest in precaution should be improved. More information campaigns and financial incentives should be issued to encourage precautionary measures.

  8. Considering historical flood events in flood frequency analysis: Is it worth the effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendel, Thomas; Thongwichian, Rossukon

    2017-07-01

    Information about historical floods can be useful in reducing uncertainties in flood frequency estimation. Since the start of the historical record is often defined by the first known flood, the length of the true historical period M remains unknown. We have expanded a previously published method of estimating M to the case of several known floods within the historical period. We performed a systematic evaluation of the usefulness of including historical flood events into flood frequency analysis for a wide range of return periods and studied bias as well as relative root mean square error (RRMSE). Since we used the generalized extreme value distribution (GEV) as parent distribution, we were able to investigate the impact of varying the skewness on RRMSE. We confirmed the usefulness of historical flood data regarding the reduction of RRMSE, however we found that this reduction is less pronounced the more positively skewed the parent distribution was. Including historical flood information had an ambiguous effect on bias: depending on length and number of known floods of the historical period, bias was reduced for large return periods, but increased for smaller ones. Finally, we customized the test inversion bootstrap for estimating confidence intervals to the case that historical flood events are taken into account into flood frequency analysis.

  9. Big Blue River at Shelbyville, Indiana flood-inundation geospatial datasets​

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2017-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 4.1-mile reach of the Big Blue River at Shelbyville, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the Big Blue River at Shelbyville, Indiana (station number 03361500). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (SBVI3).Flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at the Big Blue River at Shelbyville, Ind., streamgage. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to compute 12 water-surface profiles for flood stages referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from 9.0 feet, or near bankfull, to 19.4 feet, the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging [lidar] data having a 0.98-foot vertical accuracy and 4.9-foot horizontal resolution) to delineate the area flooded at each water level.The attached files on this landing page are the inputs and outputs for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers HEC-RAS model used to create flood-inundation maps for the referenced report, https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20165166. There are two child items that contain final geospatial datasets for the flood-inundation maps

  10. Flood of April 2007 in Southern Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2009-01-01

    Up to 8.5 inches of rain fell from April 15 through 18, 2007, in southern Maine. The rain - in combination with up to an inch of water from snowmelt - resulted in extensive flooding. York County, Maine, was declared a presidential disaster area following the event. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), determined peak streamflows and recurrence intervals at 24 locations and peak water-surface elevations at 63 sites following the April 2007 flood. Peak streamflows were determined with data from continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations where available and through hydraulic models where station data were not available. The flood resulted in peak streamflows with recurrence intervals greater than 100 years throughout most of York County, and recurrence intervals up to 50 years in Cumberland County. Peak flows for selected recurrence intervals varied from less than 10 percent to greater than 100 percent different than those in the current FEMA flood-insurance studies due to additional data or newer regression equations. Water-surface elevations observed during the April 2007 flood were bracketed by elevation profiles in FEMA flood-insurance studies with the same recurrence intervals as the recurrence intervals bracketing the observed peak streamflows at seven sites, with higher elevation-profile recurrence intervals than streamflow recurrence intervals at six sites, and with lower elevation-profile recurrence intervals than streamflow recurrence intervals at one site. The April 2007 flood resulted in higher peak flows and water-surface elevations than the flood of May 2006 in coastal locations in York County, and lower peak flows and water-surface elevations than the May 2006 flood further from the coast and in Cumberland County. The Mousam River watershed with over 13 dams and reservoirs was severely impacted by both events. Analyses indicate that the April 2007 peak streamflows in the Mousam River watershed

  11. Assessment of Flooded Areas Projections and Floods Potential Impacts Applying Remote Sensing Imagery and Demographic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, D. A.; Carriello, F.; Fernandes, P. J. F.; Garofolo Lopes, L.; Siqueira Júnior, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Assessing vulnerability and potential impacts associated with extreme discharges requires an accurate topographic description in order to estimate the extension of flooded areas. However, in most populated regions, topographic data obtained by in-situ measurements is not available. In this case, digital elevation models derived from remote sensing date are usually applied. Moreover, this digital elevation models have intrinsic errors that introduce bigger uncertainty in results than the associated to hydrological projections. On the other hand, estimations of flooded areas through remote sensing images provide accurate information, which could be used for the construction of river level-flooded area relationships regarding vulnerability assessment. In this work, this approach is applied for the city of Porto Velho in the Brazilian Amazonia to assess potential vulnerability to floods associated with climate change projections. The approach is validated using census data, provided by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, and information about socio-economical injuries associated to historical floods, provided by the Brazilian Civil Defence. Hydrological projections under climate change are carried out using several downscaling of climate projections as inputs in a hydrological model. Results show more accurate estimation of flood impacts than the obtained using digital elevation models derivate from remote sensing data. This reduces uncertainties in the assessment of vulnerability to floods associated with climate change in the region.

  12. Potential and limitations of 1D modelling of urban flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Ole; Weesakul, Sutat; Apirumanekul, Chusit; Aroonnet, Surajate Boonya; Djordjević, Slobodan

    2004-12-01

    Urban flooding is an inevitable problem for many cities around the world. In the present paper, modelling approaches and principles for analyses of urban flooding are outlined. The paper shows how urban flooding can be simulated by one-dimensional hydrodynamic modelling incorporating the interaction between (i) the buried pipe system, (ii) the streets (with open channel flow) and (iii) the areas flooded with stagnant water. The modelling approach is generic in the sense that it handles both urban flooding with and without flood water entry into houses. In order to visualize flood extent and impact, the modelling results are presented in the form of flood inundation maps produced in GIS. In this paper, only flooding from local rainfall is considered together with the impact in terms of flood extent, flood depth and flood duration. Finally, the paper discusses the data requirement for verification of urban flood models together with an outline of a simple cost function for estimation of the cost of the flood damages.

  13. Flood Resilient Systems and their Application for Flood Resilient Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojlovic, N.; Gabalda, V.; Antanaskovic, D.; Gershovich, I.; Pasche, E.

    2012-04-01

    SMARTeST. A web based three tier advisory system FLORETO-KALYPSO (http://floreto.wb.tu-harburg.de/, Manojlovic et al, 2009) devoted to support decision-making process at the building level has been further developed to support multi-scale decision making on resilient systems, improving the existing data mining algorithms of the Business Logic tier. Further tuning of the algorithms is to be performed based on the new developments and findings in applicability and efficiency of different FRe Technology for different flood typologies. The first results obtained at the case studies in Greater Hamburg, Germany indicate the potential of this approach to contribute to the multiscale resilient planning on the road to flood resilient cities. FIAC (2007): "Final report form the Awareness and Assistance Sub-committee", FIAC, Scottish Government Zevenbergen C. et al (2008) "Challenges in urban flood management: travelling across spatial and temporal scales", Journal of FRM Volume 1 Issue 2, p 81-88 Manojlovic N., et al (2009): "Capacity Building in FRM through a DSS Utilising Data Mining Approach", Proceed. 8th HIC, Concepcion, Chile, January, 2009

  14. Social media for disaster response during floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilander, D.; van de Vries, C.; Baart, F.; van Swol, R.; Wagemaker, J.; van Loenen, A.

    2015-12-01

    During floods it is difficult to obtain real-time accurate information about the extent and severity of the hazard. This information is very important for disaster risk reduction management and crisis relief organizations. Currently, real-time information is derived from few sources such as field reports, traffic camera's, satellite images and areal images. However, getting a real-time and accurate picture of the situation on the ground remains difficult. At the same time, people affected by natural hazards increasingly share their observations and their needs through digital media. Unlike conventional monitoring systems, Twitter data contains a relatively large number of real-time ground truth observations representing both physical hazard characteristics and hazard impacts. In the city of Jakarta, Indonesia, the intensity of unique flood related tweets during a flood event, peaked at almost 900 tweets per minute during floods in early 2015. Flood events around the world in 2014/2015 yielded large numbers of flood related tweets: from Philippines (85.000) to Pakistan (82.000) to South-Korea (50.000) to Detroit (20.000). The challenge here is to filter out useful content from this cloud of data, validate these observations and convert them to readily usable information. In Jakarta, flood related tweets often contain information about the flood depth. In a pilot we showed that this type of information can be used for real-time mapping of the flood extent by plotting these observations on a Digital Elevation Model. Uncertainties in the observations were taken into account by assigning a probability to each observation indicating its likelihood to be correct based on statistical analysis of the total population of tweets. The resulting flood maps proved to be correct for about 75% of the neighborhoods in Jakarta. Further cross-validation of flood related tweets against (hydro-) meteorological data is to likely improve the skill of the method.

  15. Flooding and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, flooding is the nation's most common natural disaster. Some floods develop slowly during an extended period of rain or in a warming trend following a heavy snow. Flash floods can occur quickly, without any visible sign of rain. Catastrophic floods are associated with burst dams and levees,…

  16. Using WorldView-2 imagery to track flooding in Thailand in a multi-asset sensorweb

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, David; Doubleday, Joshua; Chien, Steve

    2012-06-01

    For the flooding seasons of 2011-2012 multiple space assets were used in a "sensorweb" to track major flooding in Thailand. Worldview-2 multispectral data was used in this effort and provided extremely high spatial resolution (2m / pixel) multispectral (8 bands at 0.45-1.05 μ m spectra) data from which mostly automated workflows derived surface water extent and volumetric water information for use by a range of NGO and national authorities. We first describe how Worldview-2 and its data was integrated into the overall flood tracking sensorweb. We next describe the use of Support Vector Machine learning techniques that were used to derive surface water extent classifiers. Then we describe the fusion of surface water extent and digital elevation map (DEM) data to derive volumetric water calculations. Finally we discuss key future work such as speeding up the workflows and automating the data registration process (the only portion of the workflow requiring human input).

  17. Requirements for Notification, Evaluation and Reduction of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Federally Owned Residential Property and Housing Receiving Federal Assistance; Response to Elevated Blood Lead Levels. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-13

    This final rule amends HUD's lead-based paint regulations to reduce blood lead levels in children under age six (6) who reside in federally-owned or -assisted pre-1978 housing, formally adopting a revised definition of "elevated blood lead level" (EBLL) in children under the age of six (6), in accordance with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance. It also establishes more comprehensive testing and evaluation procedures for the housing where such children reside. This final rule also addresses certain additional elements of the CDC guidance pertaining to assisted housing and makes technical corrections and clarifications. This final rule, which follows HUD's September 1, 2016, proposed rule, takes into consideration public comments submitted in response to the proposed rule.

  18. Street floods in Metro Manila and possible solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagmay, Alfredo Mahar; Mendoza, Jerico; Cipriano, Fatima; Delmendo, Patricia Anne; Lacsamana, Micah Nieves; Moises, Marc Anthony; Pellejera, Nicanor; Punay, Kenneth Niño; Sabio, Glenn; Santos, Laurize; Serrano, Jonathan; Taniza, Herbert James; Tingin, Neil Eneri

    2017-09-01

    Urban floods from thunderstorms cause severe problems in Metro Manila due to road traffic. Using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)-derived topography, flood simulations and anecdotal reports, the root of surface flood problems in Metro Manila is identified. Majority of flood-prone areas are along the intersection of creeks and streets located in topographic lows. When creeks overflow or when rapidly accumulated street flood does not drain fast enough to the nearest stream channel, the intersecting road also gets flooded. Possible solutions include the elevation of roads or construction of well-designed drainage structures leading to the creeks. Proposed solutions to the flood problem of Metro Manila may avoid paralyzing traffic problems due to short-lived rain events, which according to Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) cost the Philippine economy 2.4billionpesos/day. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Decision Support for Flood Event Prediction and Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mioc, Darka; Anton, François; Liang, Gengsheng

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the development of Web GIS based decision support system for flood events is presented. To improve flood prediction we developed the decision support system for flood prediction and monitoring that integrates hydrological modelling and CARIS GIS. We present the methodology for data...... integration, floodplain delineation, and online map interfaces. Our Web-based GIS model can dynamically display observed and predicted flood extents for decision makers and the general public. The users can access Web-based GIS that models current flood events and displays satellite imagery and digital...... elevation model integrated with flood plain area. The system can show how the flooding prediction based on the output from hydrological modeling for the next 48 hours along the lower Saint John River Valley....

  20. Uncertainty in flood risk mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Luisa M. S.; Fonte, Cidália C.; Gomes, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    A flood refers to a sharp increase of water level or volume in rivers and seas caused by sudden rainstorms or melting ice due to natural factors. In this paper, the flooding of riverside urban areas caused by sudden rainstorms will be studied. In this context, flooding occurs when the water runs above the level of the minor river bed and enters the major river bed. The level of the major bed determines the magnitude and risk of the flooding. The prediction of the flooding extent is usually deterministic, and corresponds to the expected limit of the flooded area. However, there are many sources of uncertainty in the process of obtaining these limits, which influence the obtained flood maps used for watershed management or as instruments for territorial and emergency planning. In addition, small variations in the delineation of the flooded area can be translated into erroneous risk prediction. Therefore, maps that reflect the uncertainty associated with the flood modeling process have started to be developed, associating a degree of likelihood with the boundaries of the flooded areas. In this paper an approach is presented that enables the influence of the parameters uncertainty to be evaluated, dependent on the type of Land Cover Map (LCM) and Digital Elevation Model (DEM), on the estimated values of the peak flow and the delineation of flooded areas (different peak flows correspond to different flood areas). The approach requires modeling the DEM uncertainty and its propagation to the catchment delineation. The results obtained in this step enable a catchment with fuzzy geographical extent to be generated, where a degree of possibility of belonging to the basin is assigned to each elementary spatial unit. Since the fuzzy basin may be considered as a fuzzy set, the fuzzy area of the basin may be computed, generating a fuzzy number. The catchment peak flow is then evaluated using fuzzy arithmetic. With this methodology a fuzzy number is obtained for the peak flow

  1. CO{sub 2} exchange environmental productivity indices, and productivity of agaves and cacti under current and elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobel, P.S.

    1994-12-31

    The research described in the proposal investigated net CO{sub 2} uptake and biomass accumulation for an extremely productive CAM plant, the prickly pear cactus Opuntia ficus-indica, under conditions of elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations for relatively long periods. The influences of soil water status, air temperature, and the photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) on net CO{sub 2} uptake over 24-h periods were evaluated to enable predictions to be made based on an Environmental Productivity Index (EPI). Specifically, EPI predicts the fraction of maximal daily net CO{sub 2} uptake based on prevailing environmental conditions. It is the product of indices for temperature, soil water, and intercepted PPF, each of which range from 0.00 when that index factor completely inhibits net CO{sub 2} uptake to 1.00 when no limitation occurs. For instance, the Water Index is 1.00 under wet conditions and decreases to 0.00 during prolonged drought. Although the major emphasis of the research was on net C0{sub 2} uptake and the resulting biomass production for O. ficus-indica, effects of elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations on root: shoot ratios and on the activities of the two carboxylating enzymes were also investigated. Moreover, experiments were also done on other CAM plants, including Agave deserti, Agave salmiana, and Hylocereus undatus, and Stenocereus queretaroensis.

  2. After the flood is before the next flood - post event review of the Central European Floods of June 2013. Insights, recommendations and next steps for future flood prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szoenyi, Michael; Mechler, Reinhard; McCallum, Ian

    2015-04-01

    perception and understanding of risk in the population. • Residual risk and the levee shadow effect - why the population "felt safe." • What is the overload case and how to implement it in flood protection systems? • Decision-making for the future under uncertainty - how to design to acceptable flood protection levels if we haven't seen yet what's physically possible. 3. How to protect - practical examples Finally, we outline practical examples for reducing the loss burden and risk over time. • "Flood protection hierarchy" - from location choice under a hazard perspective to mobile flood protection. • Risk-based approach and identification of critical infrastructure. • Integrated flood risk management in theory and practical application. • Role of insurance.

  3. Geomorphic Flood Area (GFA): a QGIS tool for a cost-effective delineation of the floodplains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samela, Caterina; Albano, Raffaele; Sole, Aurelia; Manfreda, Salvatore

    2017-04-01

    The importance of delineating flood hazard and risk areas at a global scale has been highlighted for many years. However, its complete achievement regularly encounters practical difficulties, above all the lack of data and implementation costs. In conditions of scarce data availability (e.g. ungauged basins, large-scale analyses), a fast and cost-effective floodplain delineation can be carried out using geomorphic methods (e.g., Manfreda et al., 2011; 2014). In particular, an automatic DEM-based procedure has been implemented in an open-source QGIS plugin named Geomorphic Flood Area - tool (GFA - tool). This tool performs a linear binary classification based on the recently proposed Geomorphic Flood Index (GFI), which exhibited high classification accuracy and reliability in several test sites located in Europe, United States and Africa (Manfreda et al., 2015; Samela et al., 2016, 2017; Samela, 2016). The GFA - tool is designed to make available to all users the proposed procedure, that includes a number of operations requiring good geomorphic and GIS competences. It allows computing the GFI through terrain analysis, turning it into a binary classifier, and training it on the base of a standard inundation map derived for a portion of the river basin (a minimum of 2% of the river basin's area is suggested) using detailed methods of analysis (e.g. flood hazard maps produced by emergency management agencies or river basin authorities). Finally, GFA - tool allows to extend the classification outside the calibration area to delineate the flood-prone areas across the entire river basin. The full analysis has been implemented in this plugin with a user-friendly interface that should make it easy to all user to apply the approach and produce the desired results. Keywords: flood susceptibility; data scarce environments; geomorphic flood index; linear binary classification; Digital elevation models (DEMs). References Manfreda, S., Di Leo, M., Sole, A., (2011). Detection of

  4. HYDRAULIC SIMULATION OF FLASH FLOOD AS TRIGGERED BY NATURAL DAM BREAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanuar Tri Kurniawan

    2015-05-01

    Calibration model result showed that the height of natural dam significantly influence changes of water surface elevation at control point. Tracing of flood result in reconstruction of January 2006 flood showed the conformity with the real event. It was observed from the arrival time of flood at certain location. From obtained results, it can be concluded that simulation modeling gave the acceptable results.

  5. An Integrated Urban Flood Analysis System in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Young-Il; Kim, Min-Seok; Yoon, Tae-Hyung; Choi, Ji-Hyeok

    2017-04-01

    Due to climate change and the rapid growth of urbanization, the frequency of concentrated heavy rainfall has caused urban floods. As a result, we studied climate change in Korea and developed an integrated flood analysis system that systematized technology to quantify flood risk and flood forecasting in urban areas. This system supports synthetic decision-making through real-time monitoring and prediction on flash rain or short-term rainfall by using radar and satellite information. As part of the measures to deal with the increase of inland flood damage, we have found it necessary to build a systematic city flood prevention system that systematizes technology to quantify flood risk as well as flood forecast, taking into consideration both inland and river water. This combined inland-river flood analysis system conducts prediction on flash rain or short-term rainfall by using radar and satellite information and performs prompt and accurate prediction on the inland flooded area. In addition, flood forecasts should be accurate and immediate. Accurate flood forecasts signify that the prediction of the watch, warning time and water level is precise. Immediate flood forecasts represent the forecasts lead time which is the time needed to evacuate. Therefore, in this study, in order to apply rainfall-runoff method to medium and small urban stream for flood forecasts, short-term rainfall forecasting using radar is applied to improve immediacy. Finally, it supports synthetic decision-making for prevention of flood disaster through real-time monitoring. Keywords: Urban Flood, Integrated flood analysis system, Rainfall forecasting, Korea Acknowledgments This research was supported by a grant (16AWMP-B066744-04) from Advanced Water Management Research Program (AWMP) funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government.

  6. Assessing infrastructure vulnerability to major floods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenssen, Lars

    1998-12-31

    This thesis proposes a method for assessing the direct effects of serious floods on a physical infrastructure or utility. This method should be useful in contingency planning and in the design of structures likely to be damaged by flooding. A review is given of (1) methods of floodplain management and strategies for mitigating floods, (2) methods of risk analysis that will become increasingly important in flood management, (3) methods for hydraulic computations, (4) a variety of scour assessment methods and (5) applications of geographic information systems (GIS) to the analysis of flood vulnerability. Three computer codes were developed: CULVCAP computes the headwater level for circular and box culverts, SCOUR for assessing riprap stability and scour depths, and FASTFLOOD prepares input rainfall series and input files for the rainfall-runoff model used in the case study. A road system in central Norway was chosen to study how to analyse the flood vulnerability of an infrastructure. Finally, the thesis proposes a method for analysing the flood vulnerability of physical infrastructure. The method involves a general stage that will provide data on which parts of the infrastructure are potentially vulnerable to flooding and how to analyse them, and a specific stage which is concerned with analysing one particular kind of physical infrastructure in a study area. 123 refs., 59 figs., 17 tabs= .

  7. Characterization of remarkable floods in France, a transdisciplinary approach applied on generalized floods of January 1910

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudou, Martin; Lang, Michel; Vinet, Freddy; Coeur, Denis

    2014-05-01

    emphasize one flood typology or one flood dynamic (for example flash floods are often over-represented than slow dynamic floods in existing databases). Thus, the selected criteria have to introduce a general overview of flooding risk in France by integrating all typologies: storm surges, torrential floods, rising groundwater level and resulting to flood, etc. The methodology developed for the evaluation grid is inspired by several scientific works related to historical hydrology (Bradzil, 2006; Benito et al., 2004) or extreme floods classification (Kundzewics et al. 2013; Garnier E., 2005). The referenced information are mainly issued from investigations realized for the PFRA (archives, local data),from internet databases on flooding disasters, and from a complementary bibliography (some scientists such as Maurice Pardé a geographer who largely documented French floods during the 20th century). The proposed classification relies on three main axes. Each axis is associated to a set of criteria, each one related to a score (from 0.5 to 4 points), and pointing out a final remarkability score. • The flood intensity characterizing the flood's hazard level. It is composed of the submersion duration, important to valorize floods with slow dynamics as flooding from groundwater, the event peak discharge's return period, and the presence of factors increasing significantly the hazard level (dykes breaks, log jam, sediment transport…) • The flood severity focuses on economic damages, social and political repercussions, media coverage of the event, fatalities number or eventual flood warning failures. Analyzing the flood consequences is essential in order to evaluate the vulnerability of society at disaster date. • The spatial extension of the flood, which contributes complementary information to the two first axes. The evaluation grid was tested and applied on the sample of 176 remarkable events. Around twenty events (from 1856 to 2010) come out with a high remarkability rate

  8. Concepts of Urban Drainage and Flood Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harremoës, Poul

    1990-01-01

    to calculate surcharging and flooding, rather than just relating to pipe capacity performance criteria; the capability of calculating long series of rain record in order to derive proper statistics on the pollutional load on the environment; and finally the capability of dynamically controlling the system...... in real time in order to decrease the pollutional load by optimization of the usage of storage at rains smaller than the design rain, without increasing the risk of floods....

  9. Concepts of Urban Drainage and Flood Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harremoës, Poul

    1990-01-01

    to calculate surcharging and flooding, rather than just relating to pipe capacity performance criteria; the capability of calculating long series of rain record in order to derive proper statistics on the pollutional load on the environment; and finally the capability of dynamically controlling the system...... in real time in order to decrease the pollutional load by optimization of the usage of storage at rains smaller than the design rain, without increasing the risk of floods....

  10. 78 FR 14577 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance ] and Mitigation Administration, FEMA... Road, Minot, ME 04258. Town of Poland Town Office, 1231 Maine Street, Poland, ME 04274. Town...

  11. 78 FR 48882 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... 47012. Miami County, Kansas, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1270 City of Fontana City Hall, 204 East North Street, Fontana, KS 66026. City of Louisburg City Hall, 5 South Peoria Street,...

  12. 78 FR 5821 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... County, New Mexico, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1242 City of Clovis Administrative Office, 321 North Connelly Street, Clovis, NM 88101. Unincorporated Areas of Curry County. Curry County Administrative Office, 700 North Main Street, Clovis, NM 88101. ] (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance No....

  13. 78 FR 36220 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... Tupelo City Hall, Planning Department, 71 East Troy Street, Tupelo, MS 38804. City of Saltillo 142 Front Avenue, Saltillo, MS 38866. Town of Verona City Hall, 194 Main Street, Verona, MS 38879. Unincorporated...

  14. 78 FR 29763 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    .... Department of Planning Services, 200 East Berry Street, Suite 150, Fort Wayne, IN 46802. Tate County.... Unincorporated Areas of Tate County.. Tate County Courthouse, 201 South Ward Street, Senatobia, MS...

  15. 78 FR 29760 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ..., 9544 Depot Street, Holland Patent, NY 13354. Village of New Hartford Village Codes Department, Butler..., NY 13502. Town of Annsville Annsville Code Enforcement Office, 9042 Meadows Road, Taberg, NY 13471..., 2651 State Route 12B, Deansboro, NY 13328. Town of New Hartford Codes and Zoning Office, 111 New...

  16. South China Flooded

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Vehicles traverse a flooded street in Liuzhou, guangxi zhuang Autonomous Region, on May 19.heavy rainstorms repeatedly struck China this month, triggering floods, mudflows and landslides. hunan, guangdong and Jiangxi provinces and Chongqing Municipality were the worst hit.

  17. Flood Control Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  18. Flooding: Prioritizing protection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peduzzi, Pascal

    2017-09-01

    With climate change, urban development and economic growth, more assets and infrastructures will be exposed to flooding. Now research shows that investments in flood protection are globally beneficial, but have varied levels of benefit locally.

  19. Flood Hazard Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  20. Flood Hazard Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  1. Identifying how the strategies used to evaluate flood damages can affect the results of the evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleutério, Julian; Rozan, Anne; Mosé, Robert

    2010-05-01

    The evaluation of flood damages is a complex interdisciplinary task which demands great efforts on assessment and modelling processes. Several methods and models can be used in practice to evaluate flood damages. On the one hand, hydrological and hydrodynamic aspects of floods shall be modelled in order to forecast different characteristics of floods, e.g. return period, flood extent, water depth, duration of submersion and flow speed. Different hydrological assumptions can take place when determining return periods of extreme events. Several hydrodynamic models can be used to simulate floods. These models have different levels of complexity and different acquisition, implementation and maintenance costs. On the other hand, geographic, engineering, social and economic aspects of the system exposed to floods shall be assessed, e.g. assets location, vulnerability characteristics, susceptibility to suffer damages. Once again, several methods and datasets with different liability and different levels of feasibility can be used to assess these characteristics. Uncertainty exists all over the evaluation process. When reducing uncertainty on the evaluation results by improving the strategies used, we could generate the elevation of the costs of the evaluation and compromise its feasibility. To deal with feasibility of the evaluation process and with uncertainty on the evaluation results is a big scientific and operational challenge. The aim of this paper is to develop a research framework to analyze the impact of different strategies used to evaluate flood damages on the feasibility of the evaluation and on the liability of its results. The two main parts of the evaluation process are discussed: (1) the hydrodynamic simulation of flood events and its hydrological components and (2) the assessment of assets vulnerability to floods. The framework compares two aspects of the evaluation: uncertainty - variability of the evaluation results according to the choice of models and

  2. Hydrological simulation of flood transformations in the upper Danube River: Case study of large flood events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitková Veronika Bačová

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of understand natural processes as factors that restrict, limit or even jeopardize the interests of human society is currently of great concern. The natural transformation of flood waves is increasingly affected and disturbed by artificial interventions in river basins. The Danube River basin is an area of high economic and water management importance. Channel training can result in changes in the transformation of flood waves and different hydrographic shapes of flood waves compared with the past. The estimation and evolution of the transformation of historical flood waves under recent river conditions is only possible by model simulations. For this purpose a nonlinear reservoir cascade model was constructed. The NLN-Danube nonlinear reservoir river model was used to simulate the transformation of flood waves in four sections of the Danube River from Kienstock (Austria to Štúrovo (Slovakia under relatively recent river reach conditions. The model was individually calibrated for two extreme events in August 2002 and June 2013. Some floods that occurred on the Danube during the period of 1991–2002 were used for the validation of the model. The model was used to identify changes in the transformational properties of the Danube channel in the selected river reach for some historical summer floods (1899, 1954 1965 and 1975. Finally, a simulation of flood wave propagation of the most destructive Danube flood of the last millennium (August 1501 is discussed.

  3. Flood Risk Regional Flood Defences: Technical report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lendering, K.T.

    2015-01-01

    Historically the Netherlands have always had to deal with the threat of flooding, both from the rivers and the sea as well as from heavy rainfall. The country consists of a large amount of polders, which are low lying areas of land protected from flooding by embankments. These polders require an

  4. Flood Risk Regional Flood Defences: Technical report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lendering, K.T.

    2015-01-01

    Historically the Netherlands have always had to deal with the threat of flooding, both from the rivers and the sea as well as from heavy rainfall. The country consists of a large amount of polders, which are low lying areas of land protected from flooding by embankments. These polders require an ext

  5. Modeling on Flash Flood Disaster Induced by Bed Load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Shuyou; LIU Xingnian; HUANG Er; YANG Keiun

    2008-01-01

    Flash floods result from a complex interaction among hydro-meteorological, hydrologi-cal, and hydraulic processes across various spatial and temporal scales. Sichuan Province suffers flash floods frequently owing to mountain weather and topography. A flash flood and gravel bed load transport are two key relative problems in mountain river engineering. Bed materials are often encountered in alternate scouring and deposition in mountain fluvial processes during a flash flood.In this circumstance, CRS-1 bed load numerical model jointly with scale physical model is em-ployed to predict water level and gravel bed scour and deposition for design of flood control dykes and flash flood disaster mitigation. A case study on the mechanism of a flash flood disaster in-duced by bed load transport for a hydropower station in Sichuan Province is conducted. Finally,suggestions to protect the hydropower station are proposed.

  6. Crossing historical and sedimentary archives to reconstruct an extreme flood event calendar in high alpine areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, B.; Giguet-Covex, C.; Arnaud, F.; Allignol, F.; Legaz, A.; Melo, A.

    2010-09-01

    Torrential flood hazard is expected to increase in the context of global warming. However, long time-series of climate and gauge data at high-elevation sites are too sparse to assess reliably recurrence times of such events in high mountain areas. Historical documents are an alternative which provide valuable information. However, historic archives are by nature subjective and variable in quality owing to hazard perception and vulnerability according to the banks land-use throughout time. To overcome these limits, natural archives may be used as complementary records. Among the various natural archives lake sediments have the advantage to be continuous records in which particular events are preserved such as earthquakes and especially flood events. Furthermore an objective magnitude of these events can be assessed from the thickness of noteworthy event-triggered deposits. However if the recognition of major event-triggered deposits can be simple, a high-resolution dating of these events is more difficult over the historical period due to a lack of chronological markers. In this paper, we present a sediment record study of a French high alpine lake where an important effort was undertaken to date precisely 56 flood events over the last three centuries from the use of historical archives. The caesium and the lead were measured to detect the fallouts of the Chernobyl accident (1986), the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests (1955-1963) and the use of leaded gasoline which culminated in the 70's. In parallel local and regional historical archives were going through in order to correlate the thickest sediment deposits triggered by major floods and earthquakes with their potential triggering historic events. Thus we were able to associate 12 historic flood and 4 earthquake dates to particular sediment deposits. The resulting flood calendar is very well-constrained thanks to 19 chronological marks over the last 270 years, i.e. one mark by 14 years. This method permitted so

  7. Flood of April and May 2008 in Northern Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2010-01-01

    Severe flooding occurred in Aroostook and Penobscot Counties in northern Maine between April 28 and May 1, 2008, and was most extreme in the town of Fort Kent. Peak streamflows in northern Aroostook County were the result of a persistent heavy snowpack that caused high streamflows when it quickly melted during the third week of April 2008. Snowmelt was followed by from two to four inches of rainfall over a 2-day period in northern Maine. Peak water-surface elevations resulting from the flood were obtained from 13 continuous-record streamgages and 63 surveyed high-water marks in Aroostook and Penobscot Counties. Peak streamflows were obtained from 20 sites on 15 streams through stage/discharge rating curves or hydraulic flow models. Peak water-surface elevations and streamflows were the highest ever recorded at seven continuous-record streamgages, which had between 25 and 84 years of record in northern Aroostook County. The annual exceedance probability (the percent chance of exceeding the streamflow recorded during the April/May 2008 flood during any given year) at six streamgages in northern Maine was equal to or less than 1 percent. Data from flood-insurance studies published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency were available for five of the locations analyzed for the April/May 2008 flood and were compared to streamflows and observed peak water-surface elevations from the 2008 flood. Water-surface elevations that would be expected given the observed flow as applied to the effective flood insurance studies ranged from between 1 and 4 feet from the water-surface elevations observed during the 2008 flood. Differences were likely the result of up to 30 years of additional data for the calculation of recurrence intervals and the fact that hydraulic models used for the models had not previously been calibrated to a flood of this magnitude.

  8. Magnitude of flood flows for selected annual exceedance probabilities for streams in Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.

    2017-05-11

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, determined the magnitude of flood flows at selected annual exceedance prob­abilities (AEPs) at streamgages in Massachusetts and from these data developed equations for estimating flood flows at ungaged locations in the State. Flood magnitudes were deter­mined for the 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent AEPs at 220 streamgages, 125 of which are in Massachusetts and 95 are in the adjacent States of Connecticut, New Hamp­shire, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont. AEP flood flows were computed for streamgages using the expected moments algorithm weighted with a recently computed regional skew­ness coefficient for New England.Regional regression equations were developed to estimate the magnitude of floods for selected AEP flows at ungaged sites from 199 selected streamgages and for 60 potential explanatory basin characteristics. AEP flows for 21 of the 125 streamgages in Massachusetts were not used in the final regional regression analysis, primarily because of regulation or redundancy. The final regression equations used general­ized least squares methods to account for streamgage record length and correlation. Drainage area, mean basin elevation, and basin storage explained 86 to 93 percent of the variance in flood magnitude from the 50- to 0.2-percent AEPs, respec­tively. The estimates of AEP flows at streamgages can be improved by using a weighted estimate that is based on the magnitude of the flood and associated uncertainty from the at-site analysis and the regional regression equations. Weighting procedures for estimating AEP flows at an ungaged site on a gaged stream also are provided that improve estimates of flood flows at the ungaged site when hydrologic characteristics do not abruptly change.Urbanization expressed as the percentage of imperviousness provided some explanatory power in the regional regression; however, it was not statistically

  9. Two-dimensional Model of Ciliwung River Flood in DKI Jakarta for Development of the Regional Flood Index Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Formánek

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to present a sophisticated method of developing supporting material for flood control implementation in DKI Jakarta. High flow rates in the Ciliwung River flowing through Jakarta regularly causes extensive flooding in the rainy season. The affected area comprises highly densely populated villages. For developing an efficient early warning system in view of decreasing the vulnerability of the locations a flood index map has to be available. This study analyses the development of a flood risk map of the inundation area based on a two-dimensional modeling using FESWMS. The reference event used for the model was the most recent significant flood in 2007. The resulting solution represents flood characteristics such as inundation area, inundation depth and flow velocity. Model verification was performed by confrontation of the results with survey data. The model solution was overlaid with a street map of Jakarta. Finally, alternatives for flood mitigation measures are discussed.

  10. Developing flood-inundation maps for Johnson Creek, Portland, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonewall, Adam J.; Beal, Benjamin A.

    2017-04-14

    Digital flood-inundation maps were created for a 12.9‑mile reach of Johnson Creek by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The flood-inundation maps depict estimates of water depth and areal extent of flooding from the mouth of Johnson Creek to just upstream of Southeast 174th Avenue in Portland, Oregon. Each flood-inundation map is based on a specific water level and associated streamflow at the USGS streamgage, Johnson Creek at Sycamore, Oregon (14211500), which is located near the upstream boundary of the maps. The maps produced by the USGS, and the forecasted flood hydrographs produced by National Weather Service River Forecast Center can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapper Web site (http://wimcloud.usgs.gov/apps/FIM/FloodInundationMapper.html).Water-surface elevations were computed for Johnson Creek using a combined one-dimensional and two‑dimensional unsteady hydraulic flow model. The model was calibrated using data collected from the flood of December 2015 (including the calculated streamflows at two USGS streamgages on Johnson Creek) and validated with data from the flood of January 2009. Results were typically within 0.6 foot (ft) of recorded or measured water-surface elevations from the December 2015 flood, and within 0.8 ft from the January 2009 flood. Output from the hydraulic model was used to create eight flood inundation maps ranging in stage from 9 to 16 ft. Boundary condition hydrographs were identical in shape to those from the December 2015 flood event, but were scaled up or down to produce the amount of streamflow corresponding to a specific water-surface elevation at the Sycamore streamgage (14211500). Sensitivity analyses using other hydrograph shapes, and a version of the model in which the peak flow is maintained for an extended period of time, showed minimal variation, except for overbank areas near the Foster Floodplain Natural Area.Simulated water-surface profiles were combined with light detection and ranging (lidar

  11. Flood Impact Modelling and Natural Flood Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Gareth; Quinn, Paul; ODonnell, Greg

    2016-04-01

    Local implementation of Natural Flood Management methods are now being proposed in many flood schemes. In principal it offers a cost effective solution to a number of catchment based problem as NFM tackles both flood risk and WFD issues. However within larger catchments there is the issue of which subcatchments to target first and how much NFM to implement. If each catchment has its own configuration of subcatchment and rivers how can the issues of flood synchronisation and strategic investment be addressed? In this study we will show two key aspects to resolving these issues. Firstly, a multi-scale network water level recorder is placed throughout the system to capture the flow concentration and travel time operating in the catchment being studied. The second is a Flood Impact Model (FIM), which is a subcatchment based model that can generate runoff in any location using any hydrological model. The key aspect to the model is that it has a function to represent the impact of NFM in any subcatchment and the ability to route that flood wave to the outfall. This function allows a realistic representation of the synchronisation issues for that catchment. By running the model in interactive mode the user can define an appropriate scheme that minimises or removes the risk of synchornisation and gives confidence that the NFM investment is having a good level of impact downstream in large flood events.

  12. Urban pluvial flood prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk; Jensen, David Getreuer

    2016-01-01

    Flooding produced by high-intensive local rainfall and drainage system capacity exceedance can have severe impacts in cities. In order to prepare cities for these types of flood events – especially in the future climate – it is valuable to be able to simulate these events numerically both...... historically and in real-time. There is a rather untested potential in real-time prediction of urban floods. In this paper radar data observations with different spatial and temporal resolution, radar nowcasts of 0–2 h lead time, and numerical weather models with lead times up to 24 h are used as inputs...... to an integrated flood and drainage systems model in order to investigate the relative difference between different inputs in predicting future floods. The system is tested on a small town Lystrup in Denmark, which has been flooded in 2012 and 2014. Results show it is possible to generate detailed flood maps...

  13. Determination of design floods using storm data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Eugene A.

    1987-12-01

    A brief historical perspective of hydrologic analyses used in the determination of spillway sizing is presented. The paper describes the procedures for determining a reasonable upper limit of flood potential for a given drainage basin. A previous paper by the National Weather Service detailed the development of probable maximum precipitation estimates. These estimates form the basis for the determination of spillway design floods which are used to size spillways of major reservoirs for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Nationwide, the Corps has constructed hundreds of reservoirs which are operated for flood control, navigation, hydroelectric power and other purposes. These reservoirs are sized based on storm data and must withstand the most severe flood likely to occur. The paper also describes the design data including antecedent storms, infiltration, unit hydrographs and other hydrologic data used to convert probable maximum precipitation estimates into spillway design floods. Emphasis is given on designing safe reservoirs versus design flood selection based on economical considerations. Finally, a brief discussion of the similarities of design floods used by the other Federal construction agencies is presented.

  14. St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Indiana, flood-inundation HEC-RAS Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Zachary W.

    2017-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.6-mile reach of the St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Indiana were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 04101000, St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Ind. Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (NWS site EKMI3). Flood profiles were computed for the USGS streamgage 04101000, St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Ind., reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater hydraulic modeling software developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated using the current stage-discharge rating at the USGS streamgage 04101000, St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Ind. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 6 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum ranging from 23.0 ft (the NWS “action stage”) to 28.0 ft, which is the highest stage interval of the current USGS stage-discharge rating curve and 1 ft higher than the NWS “major flood stage.” The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging [lidar]) data having a 0.49-ft root mean squared error and 4.9-ft horizontal resolution) to delineate the area flooded at each stage. The availability of these maps, along with Internet information regarding current stage from the USGS streamgage

  15. Impacts of 21st century sea-level rise on a Danish major city - an assessment based on fine-resolution digital topography and a new flooding algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erenskjold Moeslund, Jesper; Klith Bøcher, Peder; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Mølhave, Thomas; Arge, Lars

    2009-11-01

    This study examines the potential impact of 21st century sea-level rise on Aarhus, the second largest city in Denmark, emphasizing the economic risk to the city's real estate. Furthermore, it assesses which possible adaptation measures that can be taken to prevent flooding in areas particularly at risk from flooding. We combine a new national Digital Elevation Model in very fine resolution (~2 meter), a new highly computationally efficient flooding algorithm that accurately models the influence of barriers, and geospatial data on real-estate values to assess the economic real-estate risk posed by future sea-level rise to Aarhus. Under the A2 and A1FI (IPCC) climate scenarios we show that relatively large residential areas in the northern part of the city as well as areas around the river running through the city are likely to become flooded in the event of extreme, but realistic weather events. In addition, most of the large Aarhus harbour would also risk flooding. As much of the area at risk represent high-value real estate, it seems clear that proactive measures other than simple abandonment should be taken in order to avoid heavy economic losses. Among the different possibilities for dealing with an increased sea level, the strategic placement of flood-gates at key potential water-inflow routes and the construction or elevation of existing dikes seems to be the most convenient, most socially acceptable, and maybe also the cheapest solution. Finally, we suggest that high-detail flooding models similar to those produced in this study will become an important tool for a climate-change-integrated planning of future city development as well as for the development of evacuation plans.

  16. Impacts of 21st century sea-level rise on a Danish major city - an assessment based on fine-resolution digital topography and a new flooding algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeslund, Jesper Erenskjold; Svenning, Jens-Christian [Ecoinformatics and Biodiversity Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Aarhus University (Denmark); Boecher, Peder Klith [Department of Agroecology and Environment, Aarhus University (Denmark); Moelhave, Thomas; Arge, Lars, E-mail: jesper.moeslund@biology.au.d [MADALGO - Center for Massive Data Algorithmics, Aarhus University (Denmark)

    2009-11-01

    This study examines the potential impact of 21st century sea-level rise on Aarhus, the second largest city in Denmark, emphasizing the economic risk to the city's real estate. Furthermore, it assesses which possible adaptation measures that can be taken to prevent flooding in areas particularly at risk from flooding. We combine a new national Digital Elevation Model in very fine resolution ({approx}2 meter), a new highly computationally efficient flooding algorithm that accurately models the influence of barriers, and geospatial data on real-estate values to assess the economic real-estate risk posed by future sea-level rise to Aarhus. Under the A2 and A1FI (IPCC) climate scenarios we show that relatively large residential areas in the northern part of the city as well as areas around the river running through the city are likely to become flooded in the event of extreme, but realistic weather events. In addition, most of the large Aarhus harbour would also risk flooding. As much of the area at risk represent high-value real estate, it seems clear that proactive measures other than simple abandonment should be taken in order to avoid heavy economic losses. Among the different possibilities for dealing with an increased sea level, the strategic placement of flood-gates at key potential water-inflow routes and the construction or elevation of existing dikes seems to be the most convenient, most socially acceptable, and maybe also the cheapest solution. Finally, we suggest that high-detail flooding models similar to those produced in this study will become an important tool for a climate-change-integrated planning of future city development as well as for the development of evacuation plans.

  17. Development of a flood-warning system and flood-inundation mapping in Licking County, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostheimer, Chad J.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for selected reaches of South Fork Licking River, Raccoon Creek, North Fork Licking River, and the Licking River in Licking County, Ohio, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Ohio Department of Transportation; U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration; Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District; U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service; and the City of Newark and Village of Granville, Ohio. The inundation maps depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to water levels (stages) at the following USGS streamgages: South Fork Licking River at Heath, Ohio (03145173); Raccoon Creek below Wilson Street at Newark, Ohio (03145534); North Fork Licking River at East Main Street at Newark, Ohio (03146402); and Licking River near Newark, Ohio (03146500). The maps were provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into a Web-based flood-warning system that can be used in conjunction with NWS flood-forecast data to show areas of predicted flood inundation associated with forecasted flood-peak stages. As part of the flood-warning streamflow network, the USGS re-installed one streamgage on North Fork Licking River, and added three new streamgages, one each on North Fork Licking River, South Fork Licking River, and Raccoon Creek. Additionally, the USGS upgraded a lake-level gage on Buckeye Lake. Data from the streamgages and lake-level gage can be used by emergency-management personnel, in conjunction with the flood-inundation maps, to help determine a course of action when flooding is imminent. Flood profiles for selected reaches were prepared by calibrating steady-state step-backwater models to selected, established streamgage rating curves. The step-backwater models then were used to determine water-surface-elevation profiles for up to 10 flood stages at a streamgage with corresponding streamflows ranging from approximately

  18. Flood-hazard study: 100-year flood stage for Lucerne Lake, San Bernadino County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Mark William

    1977-01-01

    A study of the flood hydrology of Lucerne Valley, Calif., was made to develop the 100-year stage for Lucerne Lake. Synthetic-hydrologic techniques were used; and the 100-year flood stage was estimated to be at an elevation of 2,849.3 feet above mean sea level. Channel dimensions were measured at 59 sites in Lucerne Valley. Dranage area-discharge relations developed from channel-geometry data for sites nearby were used to estimate the discharge at 12 additional sites where channel geometry could not be measured. In order to compute the total volume discharge into the playa, the peak discharges were converted to volumes. From the Apple Valley report (Busby, 1975) the equation formulated from the relation between peak discharge and flood volume for the deserts of California was used to compute the flood volumes for routing into Lucerne Lake. (Woodard-USGS)

  19. Water Tables, Flooding, and Water Use by Riparian Phreatophyte Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, J. R.; Cleverly, J. R.; Dahm, C.

    2010-12-01

    Phreatophytic riparian vegetation relies heavily on ground water transported from upstream sources. In the American southwest, the phenology of native phreatophytes, e.g., Rio Grande cottonwood, (Populus deltoides) is also dependent on seasonal flooding, which has been greatly diminished by hydrologic alterations and competing allocations. In this semi-arid, water-scarce region, a long history of agriculture and a rapidly expanding population impose limits on water available for ecological purposes, such as managed, restorative flooding. At native and non-native (e.g., saltcedar, (Tamarix spp.)) sites along the Rio Grande floodplain of central New Mexico, eddy covariance flux towers and monitoring wells are deployed to quantify evapotranspiration (ET) and investigate relationships between ET, water table (WT) depth, and flooding. Season-long measurements have been completed over several years in flooding and non-flooding sites under climatic conditions fluctuating from wet to extreme drought. Total growing season ET declines with deeper WTs across sites, with robust correlations where strong hydrologic connections exist between the river and ground water. As such, wet years with elevated WTs result in greater annual ET. However, ET responds less clearly to floods within the growing season. Longer duration floods lasting several weeks are more typical earlier in the growing season, associated with sufficient snowmelt runoff. Extensive spring flooding in two recent years coincided with significantly higher ET at a young, mixed stand, but had no effect on ET at a mature saltcedar forest. Summer monsoons and drier springs typically bring more transitory flood pulses with rapid WT ascent and decline measured in days. Elevated ET occurred during only one of several shorter flood pulses, at a saltcedar site during an otherwise dry spring. ET was not affected by monsoon flood pulses. Recruitment of native vegetation requires spring floods with favorable timing, magnitude

  20. Projected Flood Risks in China Based on CMIP5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ying; ZHANG Bing; ZHOU Bo-Tao; DONG Si-Yan; YU Li; LI Rou-Ke

    2014-01-01

    Based on the simulations of 22 CMIP5 models in combination with socio-economic data and terrain elevation data, the spatial distribution of risk levels of flood disaster and the vulnerability to flood hazards in China are projected under the RCP8.5 for the near term period (2016-2035), medium term period (2046-2065) and long term period (2080-2099), respectively. The results show that regions with high flood hazard levels are mainly located in Southeast China, while the vulnerability to flood hazards is high in eastern China. Under the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas emissions scenario, future high flood risk levels will mainly appear in the eastern part of Sichuan, in major part of East China, and in the provinces of Hebei, Beijing, and Tianjin. The major cities in Northeast China, some areas in Shaanxi and Shanxi, as well as the coastal areas in southeastern China will also encounter high flood risks. Compared with the baseline period, the regional flood risk levels will increase towards the end of the 21st century, although the occurrences of floods change little. Due to the coarse resolution of the climate models and the indistinct methodology for determining the weight coefficients, large uncertainty still exists in the projection of flood risks.

  1. Decision Support System for Flood Control with Applications to Jiangxi Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱来友

    2004-01-01

    Affected by the climatic fluctuation and human activities, significant changes of the flood control situation are taking place in China. In the new century, the flood control systems have to face a series of challenges. In this paper, we design fa decision support system (DSS) for flood control based on its requirements. The DSS has been applied to decision-making for flood control in Jiangxi province, and play an important role in the flood control in the recent two years. Finally, we plot the further improvement on the DSS so that it will make more contribution in the flood control.

  2. A Study on Regional Rainfall Frequency Analysis for Flood Simulation Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Younghun; Ahn, Hyunjun; Joo, Kyungwon; Heo, Jun-Haeng

    2014-05-01

    Recently, climate change has been observed in Korea as well as in the entire world. The rainstorm has been gradually increased and then the damage has been grown. It is very important to manage the flood control facilities because of increasing the frequency and magnitude of severe rain storm. For managing flood control facilities in risky regions, data sets such as elevation, gradient, channel, land use and soil data should be filed up. Using this information, the disaster situations can be simulated to secure evacuation routes for various rainfall scenarios. The aim of this study is to investigate and determine extreme rainfall quantile estimates in Uijeongbu City using index flood method with L-moments parameter estimation. Regional frequency analysis trades space for time by using annual maximum rainfall data from nearby or similar sites to derive estimates for any given site in a homogeneous region. Regional frequency analysis based on pooled data is recommended for estimation of rainfall quantiles at sites with record lengths less than 5T, where T is return period of interest. Many variables relevant to precipitation can be used for grouping a region in regional frequency analysis. For regionalization of Han River basin, the k-means method is applied for grouping regions by variables of meteorology and geomorphology. The results from the k-means method are compared for each region using various probability distributions. In the final step of the regionalization analysis, goodness-of-fit measure is used to evaluate the accuracy of a set of candidate distributions. And rainfall quantiles by index flood method are obtained based on the appropriate distribution. And then, rainfall quantiles based on various scenarios are used as input data for disaster simulations. Keywords: Regional Frequency Analysis; Scenarios of Rainfall Quantile Acknowledgements This research was supported by a grant 'Establishing Active Disaster Management System of Flood Control Structures

  3. NASA Global Flood Mapping System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Policelli, Fritz; Slayback, Dan; Brakenridge, Bob; Nigro, Joe; Hubbard, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    Product utility key factors: Near real time, automated production; Flood spatial extent Cloudiness Pixel resolution: 250m; Flood temporal extent; Flash floods short duration on ground?; Landcover--Water under vegetation cover vs open water

  4. A methodology for urban flood resilience assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhomme, Serge; Serre, Damien; Diab, Youssef; Laganier, Richard

    2010-05-01

    In Europe, river floods have been increasing in frequency and severity [Szöllösi-Nagy and Zevenbergen, 2005]. Moreover, climate change is expected to exacerbate the frequency and intensity of hydro meteorological disaster [IPCC, 2007]. Despite efforts made to maintain the flood defense assets, we often observe levee failures leading to finally increase flood risk in protected area. Furthermore, flood forecasting models, although benefiting continuous improvements, remain partly inaccurate due to uncertainties arising all along data calculation processes. In the same time, the year 2007 marks a turning point in history: half of the world population now lives in cities (UN-Habitat, 2007). Moreover, the total urban population is expected to double from two to four billion over the next 30 to 35 years (United Nations, 2006). This growing rate is equivalent to the creation of a new city of one million inhabitants every week, and this during the next four decades [Flood resilience Group]. So, this quick urban development coupled with technical failures and climate change have increased flood risk and corresponding challenges to urban flood risk management [Ashley et al., 2007], [Nie et al., 2009]. These circumstances oblige to manage flood risk by integrating new concepts like urban resilience. In recent years, resilience has become a central concept for risk management. This concept has emerged because a more resilient system is less vulnerable to risk and, therefore, more sustainable [Serre et al., 2010]. But urban flood resilience is a concept that has not yet been directly assessed. Therefore, when decision makers decide to use the resilience concept to manage urban flood, they have no tool to help them. That is why this paper proposes a methodology to assess urban flood resilience in order to make this concept operational. Networks affect the well-being of the people and the smooth functioning of services and, more generally, of economical activities. Yet

  5. Floods Risk Management in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Güiza Suárez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The last rainy season 2010-2011 resulted in Colombia in around 500 casualties and more than 3.6 million of victims. Although this rainfall term accounted for one of the strongest it was not an unprecedented event since for more than fifty years this phenomenon has been taking place in the same Colombian regions producing casualties and victims. This fact makes us to think about the public management by authorities regarding flooding prevention in our country. This article elaborates on this topic explaining the risk management system in case of flooding in Colombia. It shows some national figures of the main ravages brought about by the 2010 2011 rainy seasons. Finally the article analyzes two cases of study of how operational is this public policy in risk management: La Mojana and Canal del Dique regions. It was evident that the state failed in managing the risk management from flooding because despite the important investment, every year the victims, casualties and material damages are increasing steadily.

  6. Hydrological and hydraulic models for determination of flood-prone and flood inundation areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Hafzullah; Sadan Ozgur Kirca, Veysel; Burgan, Halil Ibrahim; Kellecioglu, Dorukhan

    2016-05-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are widely used in most studies on water resources. Especially, when the topography and geomorphology of study area are considered, GIS can ease the work load. Detailed data should be used in this kind of studies. Because of, either the complication of the models or the requirement of highly detailed data, model outputs can be obtained fast only with a good optimization. The aim in this study, firstly, is to determine flood-prone areas in a watershed by using a hydrological model considering two wetness indexes; the topographical wetness index, and the SAGA (System for Automated Geoscientific Analyses) wetness index. The wetness indexes were obtained in the Quantum GIS (QGIS) software by using the Digital Elevation Model of the study area. Flood-prone areas are determined by considering the wetness index maps of the watershed. As the second stage of this study, a hydraulic model, HEC-RAS, was executed to determine flood inundation areas under different return period-flood events. River network cross-sections required for this study were derived from highly detailed digital elevation models by QGIS. Also river hydraulic parameters were used in the hydraulic model. Modelling technology used in this study is made of freely available open source softwares. Based on case studies performed on watersheds in Turkey, it is concluded that results of such studies can be used for taking precaution measures against life and monetary losses due to floods in urban areas particularly.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF LANDSLIDE DAM-BREAK FLOOD OVER ERODIBLE BED IN OPEN CHANNELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jun; CAO Zhi-xian; LIU Huai-han; CHEN Li

    2009-01-01

    Large-scale landslide dams may block the river flow and cause inundation upstream,and subsequently fail and result in severe flooding and damage in the downstream.The need for enhanced understanding of the inundation and flooding is evident.This article presents an experimental study of the inundation and landslide dam-break flooding over erodible bed in open channels.A set of automatic water-level probes is deployed to record the highly transient stage,and the post-flooding channel bed elevation is measured.New experimental data resources are provided for understanding the processes of landslide-induced flooding and for testing mathematical rivers models.

  8. Flood Hazard Mapping by Using Geographic Information System and Hydraulic Model: Mert River, Samsun, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahdettin Demir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, flood hazard maps were prepared for the Mert River Basin, Samsun, Turkey, by using GIS and Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System (HEC-RAS. In this river basin, human life losses and a significant amount of property damages were experienced in 2012 flood. The preparation of flood risk maps employed in the study includes the following steps: (1 digitization of topographical data and preparation of digital elevation model using ArcGIS, (2 simulation of flood lows of different return periods using a hydraulic model (HEC-RAS, and (3 preparation of flood risk maps by integrating the results of (1 and (2.

  9. On Flood Alert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    lina braces fora particularly dangerous flood season in the wake of disastrous rainstorms Aseries of heavy storms since early May led to severe flooding and landslides in south and southwest China,causing heavy casualties and economic losses. Severe convective weather such as downpours,

  10. Discover Floods Educators Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project WET Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Now available as a Download! This valuable resource helps educators teach students about both the risks and benefits of flooding through a series of engaging, hands-on activities. Acknowledging the different roles that floods play in both natural and urban communities, the book helps young people gain a global understanding of this common--and…

  11. Improving remote sensing flood assessment using volunteered geographical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Schnebele

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A new methodology for the generation of flood hazard maps is presented fusing remote sensing and volunteered geographical data. Water pixels are identified utilizing a machine learning classification of two Landsat remote sensing scenes, acquired before and during the flooding event as well as a digital elevation model paired with river gage data. A statistical model computes the probability of flooded areas as a function of the number of adjacent pixels classified as water. Volunteered data obtained through Google news, videos and photos are added to modify the contour regions. It is shown that even a small amount of volunteered ground data can dramatically improve results.

  12. The Upper Mississippi River floodscape: spatial patterns of flood inundation and associated plant community distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJager, Nathan R.; Rohweder, Jason J.; Yin, Yao; Hoy, Erin E.

    2016-01-01

    Questions How is the distribution of different plant communities associated with patterns of flood inundation across a large floodplain landscape? Location Thirty-eight thousand nine hundred and seventy hectare of floodplain, spanning 320 km of the Upper Mississippi River (UMR). Methods High-resolution elevation data (Lidar) and 30 yr of daily river stage data were integrated to produce a ‘floodscape’ map of growing season flood inundation duration. The distributions of 16 different remotely sensed plant communities were quantified along the gradient of flood duration. Results Models fitted to the cumulative frequency of occurrence of different vegetation types as a function of flood duration showed that most types exist along a continuum of flood-related occurrence. The diversity of community types was greatest at high elevations (0–10 d of flooding), where both upland and lowland community types were found, as well as at very low elevations (70–180 d of flooding), where a variety of lowland herbaceous communities were found. Intermediate elevations (20–60 d of flooding) tended to be dominated by floodplain forest and had the lowest diversity of community types. Conclusions Although variation in flood inundation is often considered to be the main driver of spatial patterns in floodplain plant communities, few studies have quantified flood–vegetation relationships at broad scales. Our results can be used to identify targets for restoration of historical hydrological regimes or better anticipate hydro-ecological effects of climate change at broad scales.

  13. Simulation of Flood Profiles for Fivemile Creek at Tarrant, Alabama, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K.G.; Hedgecock, T.S.

    2007-01-01

    A one-dimensional step-backwater model was used to simulate flooding conditions for Fivemile Creek at Tarrant, Alabama. The 100-year flood stage published in the current flood insurance study for Tarrant by the Federal Emergency Management Agency was significantly exceeded by the March 2000 and May 2003 floods in this area. A peak flow of 14,100 cubic feet per second was computed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the May 2003 flood in the vicinity of Lawson Road. Using this estimated peak flow, flood-plain surveys with associated roughness coefficients, and the surveyed high-water profile for the May 2003 flood, a flow model was calibrated to closely match this known event. The calibrated model was then used to simulate flooding for the 10-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year recurrence interval floods. The results indicate that for the 100-year recurrence interval, the flood profile is about 2.5 feet higher, on average, than the profile published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The absolute maximum and minimum difference is 6.80 feet and 0.67 foot, respectively. All water-surface elevations computed for the 100-year flood are higher than those published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, except for cross section H. The results of this study provide the community with flood-profile information that can be used for existing flood-plain mitigation, future development, and safety plans for the city.

  14. Quantifying the importance of spatial resolution and other factors through global sensitivity analysis of a flood inundation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Steven Savage, James; Pianosi, Francesca; Bates, Paul; Freer, Jim; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-11-01

    Where high-resolution topographic data are available, modelers are faced with the decision of whether it is better to spend computational resource on resolving topography at finer resolutions or on running more simulations to account for various uncertain input factors (e.g., model parameters). In this paper we apply global sensitivity analysis to explore how influential the choice of spatial resolution is when compared to uncertainties in the Manning's friction coefficient parameters, the inflow hydrograph, and those stemming from the coarsening of topographic data used to produce Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). We apply the hydraulic model LISFLOOD-FP to produce several temporally and spatially variable model outputs that represent different aspects of flood inundation processes, including flood extent, water depth, and time of inundation. We find that the most influential input factor for flood extent predictions changes during the flood event, starting with the inflow hydrograph during the rising limb before switching to the channel friction parameter during peak flood inundation, and finally to the floodplain friction parameter during the drying phase of the flood event. Spatial resolution and uncertainty introduced by resampling topographic data to coarser resolutions are much more important for water depth predictions, which are also sensitive to different input factors spatially and temporally. Our findings indicate that the sensitivity of LISFLOOD-FP predictions is more complex than previously thought. Consequently, the input factors that modelers should prioritize will differ depending on the model output assessed, and the location and time of when and where this output is most relevant.

  15. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23

    The Flooding Predictor™ is a patented advanced control technology proven in research at the Separations Research Program, University of Texas at Austin, to increase distillation column throughput by over 6%, while also increasing energy efficiency by 10%. The research was conducted under a U. S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement awarded to George Dzyacky of 2ndpoint, LLC. The Flooding Predictor™ works by detecting the incipient flood point and controlling the column closer to its actual hydraulic limit than historical practices have allowed. Further, the technology uses existing column instrumentation, meaning no additional refining infrastructure is required. Refiners often push distillation columns to maximize throughput, improve separation, or simply to achieve day-to-day optimization. Attempting to achieve such operating objectives is a tricky undertaking that can result in flooding. Operators and advanced control strategies alike rely on the conventional use of delta-pressure instrumentation to approximate the column’s approach to flood. But column delta-pressure is more an inference of the column’s approach to flood than it is an actual measurement of it. As a consequence, delta pressure limits are established conservatively in order to operate in a regime where the column is never expected to flood. As a result, there is much “left on the table” when operating in such a regime, i.e. the capacity difference between controlling the column to an upper delta-pressure limit and controlling it to the actual hydraulic limit. The Flooding Predictor™, an innovative pattern recognition technology, controls columns at their actual hydraulic limit, which research shows leads to a throughput increase of over 6%. Controlling closer to the hydraulic limit also permits operation in a sweet spot of increased energy-efficiency. In this region of increased column loading, the Flooding Predictor is able to exploit the benefits of higher liquid

  16. Bucket elevator

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Cílem této bakalářské práce je návrh svislého korečkového elevátoru, který má sloužit k dopravě obilovin s dopravní výškou 19 m a dopravovaným množstvím 100 t/hod. Práce se skládá z popisu korečkového elevátoru a jeho hlavních částí, zmiňující se v úvodní rešerši. Tato práce je zaměřena na funkční a kapacitní výpočet, určení pohonu a napínacího zařízení. Další výpočet je kontrolní, skládající se z pevnostní kontroly hnacího hřídele, výpočtu pera, životnosti ložisek a výpočtu napínacího zaříze...

  17. Direct local building inundation depth determination in 3-D point clouds generated from user-generated flood images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbaum, Luisa; Marx, Sabrina; Höfle, Bernhard

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, the number of people affected by flooding caused by extreme weather events has increased considerably. In order to provide support in disaster recovery or to develop mitigation plans, accurate flood information is necessary. Particularly pluvial urban floods, characterized by high temporal and spatial variations, are not well documented. This study proposes a new, low-cost approach to determining local flood elevation and inundation depth of buildings based on user-generated flood images. It first applies close-range digital photogrammetry to generate a geo-referenced 3-D point cloud. Second, based on estimated camera orientation parameters, the flood level captured in a single flood image is mapped to the previously derived point cloud. The local flood elevation and the building inundation depth can then be derived automatically from the point cloud. The proposed method is carried out once for each of 66 different flood images showing the same building façade. An overall accuracy of 0.05 m with an uncertainty of ±0.13 m for the derived flood elevation within the area of interest as well as an accuracy of 0.13 m ± 0.10 m for the determined building inundation depth is achieved. Our results demonstrate that the proposed method can provide reliable flood information on a local scale using user-generated flood images as input. The approach can thus allow inundation depth maps to be derived even in complex urban environments with relatively high accuracies.

  18. Quantification of uncertainty in flood risk assessment for flood protection planning: a Bayesian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittes, Beatrice; Špačková, Olga; Ebrahimian, Negin; Kaiser, Maria; Rieger, Wolfgang; Disse, Markus; Straub, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Flood risk estimates are subject to significant uncertainties, e.g. due to limited records of historic flood events, uncertainty in flood modeling, uncertain impact of climate change or uncertainty in the exposure and loss estimates. In traditional design of flood protection systems, these uncertainties are typically just accounted for implicitly, based on engineering judgment. In the AdaptRisk project, we develop a fully quantitative framework for planning of flood protection systems under current and future uncertainties using quantitative pre-posterior Bayesian decision analysis. In this contribution, we focus on the quantification of the uncertainties and study their relative influence on the flood risk estimate and on the planning of flood protection systems. The following uncertainty components are included using a Bayesian approach: 1) inherent and statistical (i.e. limited record length) uncertainty; 2) climate uncertainty that can be learned from an ensemble of GCM-RCM models; 3) estimates of climate uncertainty components not covered in 2), such as bias correction, incomplete ensemble, local specifics not captured by the GCM-RCM models; 4) uncertainty in the inundation modelling; 5) uncertainty in damage estimation. We also investigate how these uncertainties are possibly reduced in the future when new evidence - such as new climate models, observed extreme events, and socio-economic data - becomes available. Finally, we look into how this new evidence influences the risk assessment and effectivity of flood protection systems. We demonstrate our methodology for a pre-alpine catchment in southern Germany: the Mangfall catchment in Bavaria that includes the city of Rosenheim, which suffered significant losses during the 2013 flood event.

  19. Flood insurance in Canada: implications for flood management and residential vulnerability to flood hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulahen, Greg

    2015-03-01

    Insurance coverage of damage caused by overland flooding is currently not available to Canadian homeowners. As flood disaster losses and water damage claims both trend upward, insurers in Canada are considering offering residential flood coverage in order to properly underwrite the risk and extend their business. If private flood insurance is introduced in Canada, it will have implications for the current regime of public flood management and for residential vulnerability to flood hazards. This paper engages many of the competing issues surrounding the privatization of flood risk by addressing questions about whether flood insurance can be an effective tool in limiting exposure to the hazard and how it would exacerbate already unequal vulnerability. A case study investigates willingness to pay for flood insurance among residents in Metro Vancouver and how attitudes about insurance relate to other factors that determine residential vulnerability to flood hazards. Findings indicate that demand for flood insurance is part of a complex, dialectical set of determinants of vulnerability.

  20. Flood Insurance in Canada: Implications for Flood Management and Residential Vulnerability to Flood Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulahen, Greg

    2015-03-01

    Insurance coverage of damage caused by overland flooding is currently not available to Canadian homeowners. As flood disaster losses and water damage claims both trend upward, insurers in Canada are considering offering residential flood coverage in order to properly underwrite the risk and extend their business. If private flood insurance is introduced in Canada, it will have implications for the current regime of public flood management and for residential vulnerability to flood hazards. This paper engages many of the competing issues surrounding the privatization of flood risk by addressing questions about whether flood insurance can be an effective tool in limiting exposure to the hazard and how it would exacerbate already unequal vulnerability. A case study investigates willingness to pay for flood insurance among residents in Metro Vancouver and how attitudes about insurance relate to other factors that determine residential vulnerability to flood hazards. Findings indicate that demand for flood insurance is part of a complex, dialectical set of determinants of vulnerability.

  1. Health impacts of floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Weiwei; FitzGerald, Gerard Joseph; Clark, Michele; Hou, Xiang-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Floods are the most common hazard to cause disasters and have led to extensive morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The impact of floods on the human community is related directly to the location and topography of the area, as well as human demographics and characteristics of the built environment. The aim of this study is to identify the health impacts of disasters and the underlying causes of health impacts associated with floods. A conceptual framework is developed that may assist with the development of a rational and comprehensive approach to prevention, mitigation, and management. This study involved an extensive literature review that located >500 references, which were analyzed to identify common themes, findings, and expert views. The findings then were distilled into common themes. The health impacts of floods are wide ranging, and depend on a number of factors. However, the health impacts of a particular flood are specific to the particular context. The immediate health impacts of floods include drowning, injuries, hypothermia, and animal bites. Health risks also are associated with the evacuation of patients, loss of health workers, and loss of health infrastructure including essential drugs and supplies. In the medium-term, infected wounds, complications of injury, poisoning, poor mental health, communicable diseases, and starvation are indirect effects of flooding. In the long-term, chronic disease, disability, poor mental health, and poverty-related diseases including malnutrition are the potential legacy. This article proposes a structured approach to the classification of the health impacts of floods and a conceptual framework that demonstrates the relationships between floods and the direct and indirect health consequences.

  2. Development of flood index by characterisation of flood hydrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Biswa; Suman, Asadusjjaman

    2015-04-01

    In recent years the world has experienced deaths, large-scale displacement of people, billions of Euros of economic damage, mental stress and ecosystem impacts due to flooding. Global changes (climate change, population and economic growth, and urbanisation) are exacerbating the severity of flooding. The 2010 floods in Pakistan and the 2011 floods in Australia and Thailand demonstrate the need for concerted action in the face of global societal and environmental changes to strengthen resilience against flooding. Due to climatological characteristics there are catchments where flood forecasting may have a relatively limited role and flood event management may have to be trusted upon. For example, in flash flood catchments, which often may be tiny and un-gauged, flood event management often depends on approximate prediction tools such as flash flood guidance (FFG). There are catchments fed largely by flood waters coming from upstream catchments, which are un-gauged or due to data sharing issues in transboundary catchments the flow of information from upstream catchment is limited. Hydrological and hydraulic modelling of these downstream catchments will never be sufficient to provide any required forecasting lead time and alternative tools to support flood event management will be required. In FFG, or similar approaches, the primary motif is to provide guidance by synthesising the historical data. We follow a similar approach to characterise past flood hydrographs to determine a flood index (FI), which varies in space and time with flood magnitude and its propagation. By studying the variation of the index the pockets of high flood risk, requiring attention, can be earmarked beforehand. This approach can be very useful in flood risk management of catchments where information about hydro-meteorological variables is inadequate for any forecasting system. This paper presents the development of FI and its application to several catchments including in Kentucky in the USA

  3. Nogales flood detention study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura M.; Levick, Lainie; Guertin, D. Phillip; Callegary, James; Guadarrama, Jesus Quintanar; Anaya, Claudia Zulema Gil; Prichard, Andrea; Gray, Floyd; Castellanos, Edgar; Tepezano, Edgar; Huth, Hans; Vandervoet, Prescott; Rodriguez, Saul; Nunez, Jose; Atwood, Donald; Granillo, Gilberto Patricio Olivero; Ceballos, Francisco Octavio Gastellum

    2010-01-01

    Flooding in Ambos Nogales often exceeds the capacity of the channel and adjacent land areas, endangering many people. The Nogales Wash is being studied to prevent future flood disasters and detention features are being installed in tributaries of the wash. This paper describes the application of the KINEROS2 model and efforts to understand the capacity of these detention features under various flood and urbanization scenarios. Results depict a reduction in peak flow for the 10-year, 1-hour event based on current land use in tributaries with detention features. However, model results also demonstrate that larger storm events and increasing urbanization will put a strain on the features and limit their effectiveness.

  4. Outburst Flood Simulation Model for Optimizing the Solo River Floods Emergency Response Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Priyana

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop flood inundation based on several flood level. The results of this study are: (a land use in the study area is divided into (1 urban area (the Business Area which includes regional administrative center, shopping area, and office area, (2 residential areas (single home region, the region multi- unit house (residence, settlement areas and apartments, (3 industrial estate (industrial estates are less dense and dense industrial area, (4 the surface area covered with vegetation (forest - thicket, meadow area, and the area of land productive rice fields and fields, (5 the area of open land and vacant land that is intended (the city park , cemetery and park area, and (6 transportation area and the pavement surface area (area train station and bus terminal region, (b the preparation of spatial database in this study in the form of data or data vector altitude of Digital Elevation Model (DEM. District of Jebres there are 56 points of elevation and District of Pasar Kliwon there are 48 points of elevation. Elevation of the study area ranged from 88,9 mpdal up to 127.65 mdpal and (c the higher the flood inundation scenarios impact on land use in the study area are also getting bigger. Most obvious impact under scenario 2 m area of 296 601 m , while the smallest impact under scenario 1 m with an area of 77 693 m 2 2 impact. Extensive simulation results based on the total impact amounts to 544 756 m.

  5. Dynamic Flood Vulnerability Mapping with Google Earth Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellman, B.; Kuhn, C.; Max, S. A.; Sullivan, J.

    2015-12-01

    Satellites capture the rate and character of environmental change from local to global levels, yet integrating these changes into flood exposure models can be cost or time prohibitive. We explore an approach to global flood modeling by leveraging satellite data with computing power in Google Earth Engine to dynamically map flood hazards. Our research harnesses satellite imagery in two main ways: first to generate a globally consistent flood inundation layer and second to dynamically model flood vulnerability. Accurate and relevant hazard maps rely on high quality observation data. Advances in publicly available spatial, spectral, and radar data together with cloud computing allow us to improve existing efforts to develop a comprehensive flood extent database to support model training and calibration. This talk will demonstrate the classification results of algorithms developed in Earth Engine designed to detect flood events by combining observations from MODIS, Landsat 8, and Sentinel-1. Our method to derive flood footprints increases the number, resolution, and precision of spatial observations for flood events both in the US, recorded in the NCDC (National Climatic Data Center) storm events database, and globally, as recorded events from the Colorado Flood Observatory database. This improved dataset can then be used to train machine learning models that relate spatial temporal flood observations to satellite derived spatial temporal predictor variables such as precipitation, antecedent soil moisture, and impervious surface. This modeling approach allows us to rapidly update models with each new flood observation, providing near real time vulnerability maps. We will share the water detection algorithms used with each satellite and discuss flood detection results with examples from Bihar, India and the state of New York. We will also demonstrate how these flood observations are used to train machine learning models and estimate flood exposure. The final stage of

  6. Doubling of coastal flooding frequency within decades due to sea-level rise

    OpenAIRE

    Sean Vitousek; Patrick L. Barnard; Fletcher, Charles H.; Neil Frazer; Li Erikson; Curt D. Storlazzi

    2017-01-01

    Global climate change drives sea-level rise, increasing the frequency of coastal flooding. In most coastal regions, the amount of sea-level rise occurring over years to decades is significantly smaller than normal ocean-level fluctuations caused by tides, waves, and storm surge. However, even gradual sea-level rise can rapidly increase the frequency and severity of coastal flooding. So far, global-scale estimates of increased coastal flooding due to sea-level rise have not considered elevated...

  7. Spatial Modeling of Flood Sea Tides (Case Study: East Coast Semarang)

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Aris Marfai

    2004-01-01

    The aims of this research are 1) to construct a spatial model of tidal flood hazard, 2) to do hazard analysis of tidal flood. Spatial modelling has been generated using Geographic Information System (GIS) software and ILWIS software was seleccted to do the model operation. Neighborhood function and digital elevation model (DEM) have been applied on the modelling calculation process. DEM data was correted and menipulated using map calculation on the digital form. Tidal flood hazard analysis ha...

  8. Simulations of cataclysmic outburst floods from Pleistocene Glacial Lake Missoula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, Roger P.; O'Connell, D. R. H.

    2009-01-01

    Using a flow domain that we constructed from 30 m digital-elevation model data of western United States and Canada and a two-dimensional numerical model for shallow-water flow over rugged terrain, we simulated outburst floods from Pleistocene Glacial Lake Missoula. We modeled a large, but not the largest, flood, using initial lake elevation at 1250 m instead of 1285 m. Rupture of the ice dam, centered on modern Lake Pend Oreille, catastrophically floods eastern Washington and rapidly fills the broad Pasco, Yakima, and Umatilla Basins. Maximum flood stage is reached in Pasco and Yakima Basins 38 h after the dam break, whereas maximum flood stage in Umatilla Basin occurs 17 h later. Drainage of these basins through narrow Columbia gorge takes an additional 445 h. For this modeled flood, peak discharges in eastern Washington range from 10 to 20 × 106 m3/s. However, constrictions in Columbia gorge limit peak discharges to 6 m3/s and greatly extend the duration of flooding. We compare these model results with field observations of scabland distribution and high-water indicators. Our model predictions of the locations of maximum scour (product of bed shear stress and average flow velocity) match the distribution of existing scablands. We compare model peak stages to high-water indicators from the Rathdrum-Spokane valley, Walulla Gap, and along Columbia gorge. Though peak stages from this less-than-maximal flood model attain or exceed peak-stage indicators along Rathdrum-Spokane valley and along Columbia gorge, simulated peak stages near Walulla Gap are 10–40 m below observed peak-stage indicators. Despite this discrepancy, our match to field observations in most of the region indicates that additional sources of water other than Glacial Lake Missoula are not required to explain the Missoula floods.

  9. FLOODPLAIN, FLOOD COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  10. Localized Flood Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    practitioners will cover a range of practices that can help communities build flood resilience, from small scale interventions such as rain gardens and permeable pavement to coordinated open space and floodplain preservation

  11. Floods and Mold Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold growth may be a problem after flooding. Excess moisture in the home is cause for concern about indoor air quality primarily because it provides breeding conditions for pests, molds and other microorganisms.

  12. How important are sediments in the flood peaks generated by a Mediterranean catchment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puertes, Cristina; Francés, Félix

    2016-04-01

    Currently, soil erosion and sediment yield have increased their importance because of their impact on the increase in flood peaks, in addition to the sedimentation in reservoirs, channels and flooded urban areas. Hence, this research wants to be a contribution in that sense. The aim was to evaluate the importance of the incorporation of sediment cycle to hydrological models in order to improve the reliability of the simulated floods. It was focused on the flood that took place in Valencia, Spain, in 1957. This flood produced two straight floods, of 2700 and 3700 m3/s peak flows, as a consequence of two heavy rainy days (above 100mm precipitations in 24h), preceded by two rainy days. As a result, it caused 81 dead, thousands homeless and high material damage. The amount of sediments deposited in the city was slightly lower than 2 hm3. Cleaning up tasks lasted more than a month and, although less than one seventh of the sediments volume were removed, public expenditures exceed 23.500.000€ (2015 currency value). In order to carry out this study, it was necessary to make a reconstruction of the event. The first step was to calibrate a distributed hydrological model in the Turia River basin. The total catchment area is 6350 km2, but only the catchment downstream the Benagéber Reservoir was active during the flood. The parameters needed for the calibration were obtained from a 100x100 m Digital Elevation Model, the land use map and the physical characteristics of the basin. The model was calibrated using a time step of one hour and the observed discharge in the outlet point from the period 1990-2013. Previously, a daily model was calibrated and used for the computation of the initial conditions of the hourly model. Once calibrated, a reconstruction of precipitation at hourly discretization for the 1957 event was made. Finally, the sedimentological sub-model was calibrated using only data from the amount of sediments deposited in the city during the overflowing. All

  13. Analysis and GIS Mapping of Flooding Hazards on 10 May 2016, Guangzhou, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Min Lyu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available On 10 May 2016, Guangdong Province, China, suffered a heavy rainstorm. This rainstorm flooded the whole city of Guangzhou. More than 100,000 people were affected by the flooding, in which eight people lost their lives. Subway stations, cars, and buses were submerged. In order to analyse the influential factors of this flooding, topographical characteristics were mapped using Digital Elevation Model (DEM by the Geographical Information System (GIS and meteorological conditions were statistically summarised at both the whole city level and the district level. To analyse the relationship between flood risk and urbanization, GIS was also adopted to map the effect of the subway system using the Multiple Buffer operator over the flooding distribution area. Based on the analyses, one of the significant influential factors of flooding was identified as the urbanization degree, e.g., construction of a subway system, which forms along flood-prone areas. The total economic loss due to flooding in city centers with high urbanization has become very serious. Based on the analyses, the traditional standard of severity of flooding hazards (rainfall intensity grade was modified. Rainfall intensity for severity flooding was decreased from 50 mm to 30 mm in urbanized city centers. In order to protect cities from flooding, a “Sponge City” planning approach is recommended to increase the temporary water storage capacity during heavy rainstorms. In addition, for future city management, the combined use of GIS and Building Information Modelling (BIM is recommended to evaluate flooding hazards.

  14. Flood hazard zoning in Yasooj region, Iran, using GIS and multi-criteria decision analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Rahmati

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Flood is considered to be the most common natural disaster worldwide during the last decades. Flood hazard potential mapping is required for management and mitigation of flood. The present research was aimed to assess the efficiency of analytical hierarchical process (AHP to identify potential flood hazard zones by comparing with the results of a hydraulic model. Initially, four parameters via distance to river, land use, elevation and land slope were used in some part of the Yasooj River, Iran. In order to determine the weight of each effective factor, questionnaires of comparison ratings on the Saaty's scale were prepared and distributed to eight experts. The normalized weights of criteria/parameters were determined based on Saaty's nine-point scale and its importance in specifying flood hazard potential zones using the AHP and eigenvector methods. The set of criteria were integrated by weighted linear combination method using ArcGIS 10.2 software to generate flood hazard prediction map. The inundation simulation (extent and depth of flood was conducted using hydrodynamic program HEC-RAS for 50- and 100-year interval floods. The validation of the flood hazard prediction map was conducted based on flood extent and depth maps. The results showed that the AHP technique is promising of making accurate and reliable prediction for flood extent. Therefore, the AHP and geographic information system (GIS techniques are suggested for assessment of the flood hazard potential, specifically in no-data regions.

  15. Spatial Modeling of Flood Sea Tides (Case Study: East Coast Semarang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aris Marfai

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research are 1 to construct a spatial model of tidal flood hazard, 2 to do hazard analysis of tidal flood. Spatial modelling has been generated using Geographic Information System (GIS software and ILWIS software was seleccted to do the model operation. Neighborhood function and digital elevation model (DEM have been applied on the modelling calculation process. DEM data was correted and menipulated using map calculation on the digital form. Tidal flood hazard analysis has been done by means of map calulation on the tidal flood hazard map and detail landuse map. Histogram and tabulation from the result of the map calculation have been analyzed to identify the impact of the tidal flood hazard on the landuse. The highest impact of the tidal flood hazard occurs on the 1 meter of tidal flood level, where in the inundation occurs mainly on the fishpond and yard/ open space area.

  16. The Terrible Flood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dorine; Houston

    1998-01-01

    Dear Xiao Lan. ’Several times a week, no matter which of the major television news networksI turn to, the screen is filled with tragic pictures of flooding along the YangtzeRiver, and I grieve for the suffering people whose lives are being so terriblydisrupted by this disaster. Even more to be grieved is the terrible number of peoplewho have been killed by the floods and their effects.

  17. Flood Bypass Capacity Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siclari, A.; Hui, R.; Lund, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Large river flows can damage adjacent flood-prone areas, by exceeding river channel and levee capacities. Particularly large floods are difficult to contain in leveed river banks alone. Flood bypasses often can efficiently reduce flood risks, where excess river flow is diverted over a weir to bypasses, that incur much less damage and cost. Additional benefits of bypasses include ecosystem protection, agriculture, groundwater recharge and recreation. Constructing or expanding an existing bypass costs in land purchase easements, and levee setbacks. Accounting for such benefits and costs, this study develops a simple mathematical model for optimizing flood bypass capacity using benefit-cost and risk analysis. Application to the Yolo Bypass, an existing bypass along the Sacramento River in California, estimates optimal capacity that economically reduces flood damage and increases various benefits, especially for agriculture. Land availability is likely to limit bypass expansion. Compensation for landowners could relax such limitations. Other economic values could affect the optimal results, which are shown by sensitivity analysis on major parameters. By including land geography into the model, location of promising capacity expansions can be identified.

  18. Explorers Presentation: Flooding and Coastal Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Institute, Marine

    2015-01-01

    : Explorers Flooding and Coastal Communities presentation provides an introduction to flooding. This can be used with the lesson plan on building flood defences. It covers: What is a flood? Why does it flood? Where does the water come from? The water cycle; Where is water stored? Examples of Pluvial vs. Coastal flooding; Impacts of flooding; Flood defences; What else influences flooding - Human impacts, Urbanisation, Deforestation, Sea level rise

  19. Geographic Information System and Remote Sensing Applications in Flood Hazards Management: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dano Umar Lawal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine and review the various applications of GIS and remote sensing tools in flood disaster management as opposed to the conventional means of recording the hydrological parameters, which in many cases failed to capture an extreme event. In the recent years, GIS along with remote sensing has become the key tools in flood disaster monitoring and management. Advancement particularly in the area of remote sensing application has developed gradually from optical remote sensing to microwave or radar remote sensing, which has proved a profound capability of penetrating a clouded sky and provided all weather capabilities compared to the later (optical remote sensing in flood monitoring, mapping, and management. The main concern here is delineation of flood prone areas and development of flood hazard maps indicating the risk areas likely to be inundated by significant flooding along with the damageable objects maps for the flood susceptible areas. Actually, flood depth is always considered to be the basic aspect in flood hazard mapping, and therefore in determining or estimating the flood depth, a Digital Elevation Model data (DEM is considered to be the most appropriate means of determining the flood depth from a remotely sensed data or hydrological data. Accuracy of flood depth estimation depends mainly on the resolution of the DEM data in a flat terrain and in the regions that experiences monsoon seasons such as the developing countries of Asia where there is a high dependence on agriculture, which made any effort for flood estimation or flood hazard mapping difficult due to poor availability of high resolution DEM. More so the idea of Web-based GIS is gradually becoming a reality, which plays an important role in the flood hazard management. Therefore, this paper provides a review of applications of GIS and remote sensing technology in flood disaster monitoring and management.

  20. Dynamic computing resource allocation in online flood monitoring and prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchar, S.; Podhoranyi, M.; Vavrik, R.; Portero, A.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents tools and methodologies for dynamic allocation of high performance computing resources during operation of the Floreon+ online flood monitoring and prediction system. The resource allocation is done throughout the execution of supported simulations to meet the required service quality levels for system operation. It also ensures flexible reactions to changing weather and flood situations, as it is not economically feasible to operate online flood monitoring systems in the full performance mode during non-flood seasons. Different service quality levels are therefore described for different flooding scenarios, and the runtime manager controls them by allocating only minimal resources currently expected to meet the deadlines. Finally, an experiment covering all presented aspects of computing resource allocation in rainfall-runoff and Monte Carlo uncertainty simulation is performed for the area of the Moravian-Silesian region in the Czech Republic.

  1. Estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods in urban basins in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southard, Rodney E.

    2010-01-01

    Streamgage flood-frequency analyses were done for 35 streamgages on urban streams in and adjacent to Missouri for estimation of the magnitude and frequency of floods in urban areas of Missouri. A log-Pearson Type-III distribution was fitted to the annual series of peak flow data retrieved from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System. For this report, the flood frequency estimates are expressed in terms of percent annual exceedance probabilities of 50, 20, 10, 4, 2, 1, and 0.2. Of the 35 streamgages, 30 are located in Missouri. The remaining five non-Missouri streamgages were added to the dataset to improve the range and applicability of the regression analyses from the streamgage frequency analyses. Ordinary least-squares was used to determine the best set of independent variables for the regression equations. Basin characteristics selected for independent variables into the ordinary least-squares regression analyses were based on theoretical relation to flood flows, literature review of possible basin characteristics, and the ability to measure the basin characteristics using digital datasets and geographic information system technology. Results of the ordinary least-squares were evaluated on the basis of Mallow's Cp statistic, the adjusted coefficient of determination, and the statistical significance of the independent variables. The independent variables of drainage area and percent impervious area were determined to be statistically significant and readily determined from existing digital datasets. The drainage area variable was computed using the best elevation data available, either from a statewide 10-meter grid or high-resolution elevation data from urban areas. The impervious area variable was computed from the National Land Cover Dataset 2001 impervious area dataset. The National Land Cover Dataset 2001 impervious area data for each basin was compared to historical imagery and 7.5-minute topographic maps to verify the national

  2. Flood Water Model Logan K. kuiper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, L. K.

    2013-05-01

    A mathematical model is developed to simulate flood water movement. Specifically, the model applies to situations where water depth is much smaller than the width or length of the water body, and resistance to flow from obstructions such as trees and structures is minimal. The model is applicable to many situations and in some cases may be able to suggest flood alleviation procedures. The derivation of the discretized form of the time dependant nonlinear equation governing the flow is based upon water conservation and the ability to approximate water flow rate (L2/T) as a function of the gradient of water surface elevation and water depth using the Manning equation. The flow equation is discretized using four sided finite elements. The resulting set of simultaneous nonlinear equations is solved iteratively using a conjugate gradient solver. To check for model programming error, a simple problem with constant water depth and constant water surface elevation gradient is checked against the Manning equation. An application of the model to a situation similar to the 2010 flood in northern Belize is ongoing.

  3. 75 FR 82272 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ...-0510P). 30, 2010; The Times Upper Merion Township Herald. Manager, 175 West Valley Forge Road, King of... Joe King, August 26, 2010 485458 of Brazoria County August 16, 2010; Brazoria County Judge, (10-06... 25, 2010; The Honorable Eric Hogue, December 30, 2010 480759 1838P). September 1, 2010; Mayor,...

  4. 77 FR 1887 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ... Rico Planning Board, Roberto Sanchez Vilella Governmental Center, North Building, 16th Floor, De Diego Avenue International Baldorioty de Castro Avenue San Juan, PR 00940. Texas: Bexar City of San Antonio... West Advocate. Juan Linn Street Victoria, TX 77901. ] Virginia: Henrico Unincorporated areas...

  5. 77 FR 12746 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ..., North Building, 16th Floor, De Diego Avenue International Baldorioty de Castro Avenue, San Juan, PR...). November 10, 2011; Armstrong, Mayor, City The Victoria of Victoria, 105 West Advocate. Juan Linn...

  6. 76 FR 2837 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... Business 8401 West Monroe Street, Gazette. Peoria, AZ 85345. ] Arizona: Maricopa Unincorporated areas...-8400P). Tallahassee Democrat. South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301. Florida: Okaloosa... Sarasota (10- November 5, 2010, The Honorable Kelly M. Oct. 28, 2010........ 125150 04-6569P). November...

  7. 76 FR 20554 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ...). 1908P). 28, 2010, The Barrett, Mayor, City of Arizona Business Peoria, 8401 West Monroe Gazette. Street..., Nov. The Honorable Kelly M. October 28, 2010 125150 1172). 04-6569P). 12, 2010, The Kirschner,...

  8. 76 FR 26941 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ... 1135). (10-04-0448P). April 23, 2010; The Mayor, Town of Chapel Chapel Hill Herald. Hill, 405 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Chapel Hill, NC 27514. ] (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance No. 97.022... 28348. Cumberland (FEMA Docket No.: Unincorporated areas July 26, 2010; Mr. James E. Martin, November...

  9. 75 FR 18076 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Docket No: B- City of Fort Worth March 3, 2009; March The Honorable Michael J. February 23, 2009 480596...). Waukesha Freeman. Waukesha County Board of Supervisors, 515 West Moreland Boulevard, Waukesha, WI...

  10. 77 FR 21516 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... Creek--West Tributary, Council Creek, Dairy Creek, Dawson Creek, Deer Creek, Erickson Creek, Fanno Creek... Creek, Deer Creek, Erickson Creek, Glencoe Swale, Golf Creek, Gordon Creek, Hall Center Creek, Hall... Avenue. Erickson Creek Approximately 211 feet +174 +175 City of Beaverton. upstream of Southwest 144th...

  11. 76 FR 21662 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order 13132, Federalism. This interim rule involves no policies..., 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376. Sec. 65.4 0 2. The tables... Honorable Vincent June 24, 2011 040129 (10-09-2786P). February 24, 2011; Francia, Mayor, Town of The...

  12. 76 FR 79093 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ..., 2011; May 8, Mr. Jon B. Roberts, City September 6, 2011 080159 1199). Springs (11-08- 2011; The... Docket No.: B- City of St. George May 31, 2011; June The Honorable Daniel D. May 24, 2011 490177 1211). (11-08-0214P). 7, 2011; The McArthur, Mayor, City of Spectrum. St. George, 175 East 200 North, St...

  13. 75 FR 7956 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... of News Journal. Smyrna, 315 South Lowry Street, Smyrna, TN 37167. Wilson Unincorporated areas July 8..., 2009 170194 of Douglas County 22, 2009; Tuscola Schable, Chair, Douglas (09-05-1421P). Journal. County... Journal. Tuscola, 214 North Main Street, Tuscola, IL 61953. Nevada: Clark Unincorporated areas July...

  14. 77 FR 44498 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ...- Unincorporated areas Nov. 25, 2011, Dec. The Honorable Wilson Nov. 17, 2011 120080 1240). of Escambia County 2, 2011, The Robertson, Chairman, (11-04-7674P). Pensacola News Escambia County Board of Journal..., 2011, The Indian Cadden, Mayor, Town of River Press Journal. Indian River Shores, 6001 North...

  15. 75 FR 29201 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... (09-05-1227P). Bulletin. County Administration, 151 4th Street Southeast, Rochester, MN 55904. Olmsted... 275246 1063). 05-1227P). 2, 2009; Post- Brede, Mayor, City of Bulletin. Rochester, 201 4th Street..., P.O. Box 413, Deadwood, SD 57732. Tennessee: Wilson (FEMA Docket No: City of Mt. Juliet June...

  16. 76 FR 20553 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ..., KS 66212. Missouri: Phelps City of Rolla (10-07- Sept. 27, 2010, The Honorable William S. February 2... News. Street, Rolla, MO 65401. Phelps Unincorporated areas Sept. 27, 2010, The Honorable Randy February 2, 2011 290284 of Phelps County (10- October 4, 2010, Verkamp, Presiding 07-0800P). The Rolla...

  17. 75 FR 18082 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ..., 9200 Tribune. Pigeon Roost Road, Olive Branch, MS 38654. Missouri: Phelps Unincorporated areas August 11, 2009; The Honorable Randy December 16, 2009 290824 of Phelps County (09- August 18, 2009; Verkamp, Presiding 07-0033P). Rolla Daily News. Commissioner, Phelps County Commission, 200 North Main Street,...

  18. 78 FR 49121 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    .... Raymond E. Sines, July 01, 2011 390771 of Lake County (10- 21, 2011; The News President, Lake County 05...: Lake (FEMA Docket No.: B-1219) Unincorporated areas August 11, 2011; Mr. Raymond E. Sines, December 16...

  19. 75 FR 29210 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order 13132, Federalism. This interim rule involves no policies..., 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376. Sec. 65.4 0 2. The tables...; The Gerlach, Mayor, City of Johnson County Sun. Overland Park, 8500 Santa Fe Drive, Overland Park,...

  20. 76 FR 77155 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... modified BFEs for new buildings and their contents. DATES: These modified BFEs are currently in effect on... within the scope of the Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 601- 612, a regulatory flexibility analysis.... Fishkill, 330 State Route 376, Hopewell Junction, NY 12533. Oklahoma: Oklahoma City of Oklahoma City...

  1. 75 FR 35674 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... 77803. Collin (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Allen November 12, 2009; The Honorable Stephen March 19, 2010... Ballard Street, Yorktown, VA 23690. Washington: King (FEMA Docket No.: B-1088) City of Redmond October...

  2. 75 FR 29199 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ...: Collier City of Marco Island, February 19, 2010; Mr. Stephen T. Thompson, February 9, 2010 120426 (09-04..., Suite 910, Ogden, UT 84401. Washington: King City of Snoqualmie, February 5, 2010; The Honorable Matt.... Snoqualmie, P.O. Box 987, Snoqualmie, WA 98065. King Unincorporated areas February 5, 2010; The Honorable...

  3. 77 FR 3391 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... King Street, Room 300, Honolulu, HI 96813. Mississippi: Lee City of Saltillo (10- November 4, 2011; The...; The Honorable Stephen F. February 27, 2012 560081 of Campbell County October 28, 2011;...

  4. 75 FR 82275 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... July 22, 2010; July Mr. Doug Gilpin, November 26, 2010 120296 of Sumter County (10- 29, 2010; Sumter... 28613. ] Catawba City of Newton (10-04- July 7, 2010; July The Honorable Robert A. July 30, 2010...

  5. 75 FR 18084 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... October 16, 2009; The Honorable James February 20, 2010 060296 (08-09-1888P). October 23, 2009; Desmond..., Lexington, KY 40507. North Carolina: Cumberland........ Unincorporated Areas October 7, 2009; Mr. James E... 510119 of Prince William November 4, 2009; Stewart, Chairman, County (09-03-1773P). News &...

  6. 76 FR 50913 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... notice was published of community No. Alabama: Baldwin City of Gulf Shores June 10, 2011; June The... Shores P.O. Box 299 Gulf Shores, AL 36547. Baldwin City of Orange Beach June 22, 2011; June The Honorable..., Columbia, SC 29201. Lexington Unincorporated areas May 5, 2011;May 12, The Honorable James E. June 13,...

  7. 77 FR 425 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ... notice was published of community No. Alabama: Baldwin City of Gulf Shores October 7, 2011; The Honorable.... Gulf Shores, 1905 West 1st Street, Gulf Shores, AL 36547. Baldwin City of Gulf Shores October 11, 2011..., Evans, GA 30809. ] Liberty City of Hinesville September 30, 2011; The Honorable James September 26,...

  8. 76 FR 68325 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... Effective date of modification Community notice was published of community No. Alabama: Baldwin (FEMA Docket...- Unincorporated areas April 7, 2011; April Mr. James Dinneen, August 12, 2011 125155 1199). of Volusia County 14.... Pennsylvania: Cumberland (FEMA Township of Upper November 15, 2010; The Honorable James G. March 22,...

  9. 77 FR 20994 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ... Effective date of modification Community No. No. notice was published of community Alabama: Baldwin (FEMA... Street, Gulf Shores, AL 36547. Baldwin (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Gulf Shores October 11, 2011; The... September 30, 2011; The Honorable James September 26, 2011 130125 1235). (11-04-0768P). October 7,...

  10. 75 FR 11744 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ..., 2009; April The Honorable James E. August 7, 2009 315275 1052). 07-1022P). 9, 2009; Papillion Blinn.... Wisconsin: St. Croix (FEMA Docket Village of Baldwin April 28, 2009; May The Honorable Donald April 16, 2009 550380 No: B-1055). (09-05-1751P). 5, 2009; The McGee, President, Baldwin Bulletin. Village of Baldwin,...

  11. 76 FR 18938 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... Daily Regalado, Mayor, City of Business Review. Miami, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133. Miami... August 24, 2010; The Honorable Peter December 29, 2010 130207 1172). (10-04-1925P). August 31, 2010...

  12. 75 FR 78613 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order 13132, Federalism. This interim rule involves no policies..., 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376. Sec. 65.4 0 2. The tables..., 2010, The Honorable Norma September 30, 2010... 060359 (10-09-1399P)........ October 20, 2010,...

  13. 75 FR 29205 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... Unincorporated areas March 14, 2010; The Honorable Ron C. July 19, 2010 130059 of Columbia County March 21, 2010.... Hill, 405 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Chapel Hill, NC 27514. Wake City of Raleigh (09- January...

  14. 75 FR 18088 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ..., 305 Century Parkway, Allen, TX 75013. Collin City of Plano (09-06- November 12, 2009; The Honorable Phil Dyer, March 19, 2010 480140 0276P). November 19, 2009; Mayor, City of Plano, Plano Star Courier. 1520 Avenue K, Plano, TX 75074. Dallas City of Garland (09- November 6, 2009; The Honorable Ronald...

  15. 76 FR 8905 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... City of Plano (10-06- December 9, 2010; The Honorable Phil Dyer, April 15, 2011 480140 1746P). December 16, 2010; Mayor, City of Plano, The Plano Star 1520 Avenue K, Plano, TX Courier. 75086. Utah:...

  16. 77 FR 20992 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ..., below the eight row, the table should appear as follows: Texas: Collin City of Plano (10-06- June 23, 2011; June The Honorable Phil August 31, 2010 480140 0997P). 30, 2011; The Plano Dyer, Mayor, City of Star Courier. Plano, 1520 Avenue K, Plano, TX 75074. BILLING CODE 1505-01-D...

  17. 76 FR 58409 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... 17112. Collin City of Plano (10-06- June 23, 2011; June The Honorable Phil Dyer, August 31, 2010 480140 0997P). 30, 2011; The Plano Mayor, City of Plano, Star Courier. 1520 Avenue K, Plano, TX 75074....

  18. 76 FR 39009 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... 17316. Texas: Collin, (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Plano (10-06- December 9, 2010; The Honorable Phil Dyer, April 15, 2011 480140 1177). 1746P). December 16, 2010; Mayor, City of Plano, The Plano Star- 1520 Avenue K, Plano, TX Courier. 75074. Utah: Salt Lake, (FEMA Docket No.: City of West...

  19. 77 FR 1884 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ... 37174. Texas: Collin (FEMA Docket No.: B-1215) City of Plano (10-06- June 23, 2011; June The Honorable Phil Dyer, August 31, 2010 480140 0997P). 30, 2011; The Plano Mayor, City of Plano, Star Courier. 1520 Avenue K, Plano, TX 75074. Comal (FEMA Docket No.: B-1215). City of New Braunfels May 31, 2011; June...

  20. 76 FR 50423 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... May 31, 2011; June The Honorable October 5, 2011 040073 of Pima County, (11- 7, 2011; The Daily Ram n... 370002 (10-04-4375P). 2011; The Times- Wall, Mayor, City of News. Burlington, P.O. Box 1358,...

  1. 75 FR 35672 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... August 19, 2010 060375 of Sonoma County (09- April 21, 2010; The Brown, Chair, Sonoma 09-2125P). Press..., Murfreesboro, TN 37130. Texas: Kerr Unincorporated areas April 20, 2010; The Honorable Pat Tinley, August 25.... Tarrant City of Keller (09-06- April 14, 2010; The Honorable Pat August 19, 2010 480602 2005P). April 21...

  2. 76 FR 68322 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ..., TX 75040. Denton and Tarrant City of Fort Worth June 28, 2011; July The Honorable Betsy November 2..., TX 75601. Tarrant City of Euless (10- March 4, 2011; March The Honorable Mary Lib July 11, 2011... Drive, Euless, TX 76039. Tarrant City of Keller (10- April 8, 2010, April The Honorable Pat April...

  3. 76 FR 60748 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... Rockwall County Rockwall, 385 South News. Goliad Street, Rockwall, TX 75087. Tarrant City of Arlington (11.... Tarrant City of Fort Worth May 6, 2011; May 13, The Honorable Michael September 12, 2011 480596 (10-06... Street, Fort Worth, TX 76102. Tarrant City of Saginaw (10- May 6, 2011; May 13, The Honorable...

  4. 75 FR 35670 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ...; The Oklahoman. Linley, Mayor, City of Del City, P.O. Box 15177, Del City, OK 73155. ] Texas: Tarrant..., 2010; Dittrich, Mayor, City of Star-Telegram. Benbrook, P.O. Box 26569, Benbrook, TX 76126. Tarrant..., 2010; Star- Manager, City of Telegram. Benbrook, 911 Winscott Road, Benbrook, TX 76126. Tarrant City...

  5. 77 FR 31216 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... 76201. Johnson and Tarrant (FEMA City of Burleson (11- October 12, 2011; The Honorable Ken February 16.... County Judge, 501 North Thompson Street, Suite 401, Conroe, TX 77301. ] Tarrant (FEMA Docket No.: B- City..., Arlington, TX 76010. Tarrant (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Crowley (11- November 3, 2011; The Honorable...

  6. 76 FR 50420 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ...- Town of Easton, (11- November 15, 2010, Mr. David Colton, Town of November 2, 2010 250053 1181). 01... Drive, Overland Park, KS 66212. Massachusetts: Bristol (FEMA Docket No. B- Town of Easton, (11- November 1, 2010, Mr. David Colton, Town of October 26, 2010 250053 1181). 01-0022P). November 8,...

  7. 76 FR 20551 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    .... Selectmen, Swansea Town Hall Annex, 68 Stevens Road, Swansea, MA 02777. Bristol Town of Easton (11-01- Nov. 1, 2010, Nov. Mr. David Colton, Town of October 26, 2010 250053 0022P). 8, 2010, The Easton..., Nov. Mr. David Colton, Town of November 2, 2010 250053 0021P). 22, 2010, The Easton...

  8. 75 FR 29208 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... Unincorporated areas December 3, 2009, The Honorable David April 9, 2010 080124 of Montrose County December 10.... Mississippi: Hinds City of Jackson (09- January 15, 2010, The Honorable Harvey December 31, 2009 280072...

  9. 76 FR 44276 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    ... Honorable Kathy August 5, 2011 100066 0744P). April 7, 2011; The Harvey, Mayor, Town of Middletown Odessa, P... Santa Fe (10- March 3, 2011; March The Honorable David Coss, February 24, 2011 350070 06-2026P)....

  10. 76 FR 26943 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ..., 1st Floor, Hollister, CA 95023. Ventura City of Simi Valley March 9, 2011; March The Honorable Bob Huber, July 14, 2011 060421 (10-09-3242P). 16, 2011; The Mayor, City of Simi Ventura County Star. Valley, 2929 Tapo Canyon Road, Simi Valley, CA 93063. Colorado: Arapahoe City of Littleton (11- March 18,...

  11. 76 FR 50915 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... Adams County, (10- February 24, 2011; ``Skip'' Fischer 08-0748P). The Northglenn- Chairman, Adams County... The Honorable Michael J. November 17, 2010 480596 1162). (10-06-1675P). 20, 2010; The Fort...

  12. 75 FR 7955 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ..., 2009 480234 06-1930P) 30, 2009; Fort Bend Thompson, Mayor, City Sun. of Sugar Land, P.O. Box 110, Sugar..., 210 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Madison, WI 53703. Dane Village of De Forest July 24, 2009; July...

  13. 76 FR 35753 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ..., Billings, MT 59107. Nevada: Douglas Unincorporated areas April 6, 2011; April The Honorable Michael A... and Review, 58 FR 51735. Executive Order 13132, Federalism. This interim rule involves no policies..., 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376. Sec. 65.4 0 2. The...

  14. 77 FR 20997 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ... 21, 2011 120040 1231). Beach (11-04-3579P). 5, 2011; The Sun- Mayor, Town of Hillsboro Sentinel..., 2011; The Fort McGrail, Mayor, City of Worth Star-Telegram. Keller, 1100 Bear Creek Parkway, Keller, TX... County Judge, 710 South Sun. Main Street, Suite 101, Georgetown, TX 78626. (Catalog of Federal...

  15. 76 FR 52879 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... Board of News-Press. Commissioners, 100 3rd Street, Castle Rock, CO 80104. Douglas (FEMA Docket No.: B.... Commissioners, 100 3rd Street, Castle Rock, CO 80104. * * * * * * * 0 2. On the same page, in the same table... Fort Mayor, City of Worth Star-Telegram. Mansfield, 1200 East Broad Street, Mansfield, TX...

  16. 76 FR 76052 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ..., Castle Rock, CO 80104. Larimer Unincorporated areas September 8, 2011; The Honorable Tom September 29.... Wyoming: Fremont City of Lander (11-08- September 11, 2011; The Honorable Mick Wolfe, January 16,...

  17. 76 FR 43194 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... Honorable Nelson W. November 5, 2010 480035 of Bexar County (09- November 19, 2010; Wolff, Bexar County 06.... Bexar Unincorporated areas September 28, 2010; The Honorable Nelson W. February 2, 2011 480035 of...

  18. 76 FR 17 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... Lincoln Gazette. Street, Lowell, AR 72745. Crawford (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Alma (09-06- February 10..., City Alma Journal. of Alma, 804 Fayetteville Avenue, Alma, AR 72921. St. Francis (FEMA Docket No.: City...- Sarasota, 1565 1st Tribune. Street, Room 101, Sarasota, FL 34236. Georgia: Cobb (FEMA Docket No.:...

  19. 76 FR 79090 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ..., 2011 230171 01-2103P). October 4, 2011; of Kittery Manager, 200 The Portsmouth Rogers Road Extension... Richard J. September 27, 2011 350002 (11-06-0465P). October 11, 2011; Berry, Mayor, City of The... Honorable Richard L. January 12, 2012 390173 (11-05-2052P). September 14, 2011; Stage, Mayor, City of...

  20. 75 FR 18086 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ..., 2009; The Hume, Mayor, City of Elk Sacramento Bee. Grove, 8401 Laguna Palms Way, Elk Grove, CA 95758...). Ventura County Board of Supervisors, 800 South Victoria Avenue, Ventura, CA 93009. Colorado: Grand (FEMA... Board of Commissioners, P.O. Box 264, Hot Sulphur Springs, CO 80451. Florida: Charlotte (FEMA...

  1. 75 FR 78607 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ...)........ Great Falls Tribune. Board of Commissioners, 325 2nd Avenue North, Great Falls, MT 59401. North Carolina... 57013. Texas: Wichita City of Wichita Falls August 20, 2010, The Honorable Glenn December 27, 2010.... 480662 (10-06-1225P)........ August 27, 2010, Barham, Mayor, City of Wichita Falls Times Wichita Falls,...

  2. 75 FR 29211 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... County 05-0486P). State Journal. Executive, City County Building, Room 118, 210 Martin Luther King, Jr... Docket City of Shasta Lake July 20, 2009; July Ms. Carol Martin, City of July 10, 2009 060758 No.:...

  3. 75 FR 18079 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Statesman Journal. Salem, 555 Liberty Street Southeast, Room 220, Salem, OR 97301. Pennsylvania: Adams City... 14, 2009; Coons, New Castle County County (09-03- The News Journal. Executive, 87 Reads Way 0870P... 135157 04-5599P). 2009; Atlanta Franklin, Mayor, City of Journal- Atlanta, 55 Trinity...

  4. 75 FR 78610 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... Frank V. April 28, 2010....... 125096 (10-04-4136P)........ 2010, St. Petersburg Hibbard, Mayor, City of... North Carson Street, Suite 2, Carson City, NV 89701. New Mexico: Dona Ana City of Las Cruces... May 7...

  5. 76 FR 8900 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... Frank V. April 28, 2010 125096 1135). (10-04-4136P). 2010; St. Hibbard, Mayor, City of Petersburg Times..., Suite 2, Carson City, NV 89701. New Mexico: ] Dona Ana (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Las Cruces May 7...

  6. 75 FR 81484 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ....: B- Unincorporated areas November 9, 2009; The Honorable Frank March 16, 2010 125155 1129). of..., Harrisonville, MO 64701. New Mexico: Dona Ana (FEMA Docket City of Las Cruces February 5, 2010; The Honorable...

  7. 75 FR 29195 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ..., Mayor, City Toledo Blade. of Toledo, 1 Government Center, 640 Jackson, Suite 2200, Toledo, OH 43604. Miami City of Troy (09-05- December 14, 2009; The Honorable Michael December 30, 2009 390402 3442P). December 21, 2009; Beamish, Mayor, City of Troy Daily News. Troy, 100 South Market Street, Troy, OH...

  8. Mitigating flood exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, James M; McLean, Andrew; Herberman Mash, Holly B; Rosen, Alexa; Kelly, Fiona; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Youngs Jr, Georgia A; Jensen, Jessica; Bernal, Oscar; Neria, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. In 2011, following heavy winter snowfall, two cities bordering two rivers in North Dakota, USA faced major flood threats. Flooding was foreseeable and predictable although the extent of risk was uncertain. One community, Fargo, situated in a shallow river basin, successfully mitigated and prevented flooding. For the other community, Minot, located in a deep river valley, prevention was not possible and downtown businesses and one-quarter of the homes were inundated, in the city’s worst flood on record. We aimed at contrasting the respective hazards, vulnerabilities, stressors, psychological risk factors, psychosocial consequences, and disaster risk reduction strategies under conditions where flood prevention was, and was not, possible. Methods. We applied the “trauma signature analysis” (TSIG) approach to compare the hazard profiles, identify salient disaster stressors, document the key components of disaster risk reduction response, and examine indicators of community resilience. Results. Two demographically-comparable communities, Fargo and Minot, faced challenging river flood threats and exhibited effective coordination across community sectors. We examined the implementation of disaster risk reduction strategies in situations where coordinated citizen action was able to prevent disaster impact (hazard avoidance) compared to the more common scenario when unpreventable disaster strikes, causing destruction, harm, and distress. Across a range of indicators, it is clear that successful mitigation diminishes both physical and psychological impact, thereby reducing the trauma signature of the event. Conclusion. In contrast to experience of historic flooding in Minot, the city of Fargo succeeded in reducing the trauma signature by way of reducing risk through mitigation. PMID:28228985

  9. Proper estimation of hydrological parameters from flood forecasting aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Tsuda, Morimasa; Yamakage, Yuzuru; Iwami, Yoichi; Yanami, Hitoshi; Anai, Hirokazu

    2016-04-01

    The hydrological parameters of a flood forecasting model are normally calibrated based on an entire hydrograph of past flood events by means of an error assessment function such as mean square error and relative error. However, the specific parts of a hydrograph, i.e., maximum discharge and rising parts, are particularly important for practical flood forecasting in the sense that underestimation may lead to a more dangerous situation due to delay in flood prevention and evacuation activities. We conducted numerical experiments to find the most proper parameter set for practical flood forecasting without underestimation in order to develop an error assessment method for calibration appropriate for flood forecasting. A distributed hydrological model developed in Public Works Research Institute (PWRI) in Japan was applied to fifteen past floods in the Gokase River basin of 1,820km2 in Japan. The model with gridded two-layer tanks for the entire target river basin included hydrological parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity, surface roughness and runoff coefficient, which were set according to land-use and soil-type distributions. Global data sets, e.g., Global Map and Digital Soil Map of the World (DSMW), were employed as input data for elevation, land use and soil type. The values of fourteen types of parameters were evenly sampled with 10,001 patterns of parameter sets determined by the Latin Hypercube Sampling within the search range of each parameter. Although the best reproduced case showed a high Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency of 0.9 for all flood events, the maximum discharge was underestimated in many flood cases. Therefore, two conditions, which were non-underestimation in the maximum discharge and rising parts of a hydrograph, were added in calibration as the flood forecasting aptitudes. The cases with non-underestimation in the maximum discharge and rising parts of the hydrograph also showed a high Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency of 0.9 except two flood cases

  10. Flood tracking chart for the Illinois River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Charles F.; Holmes, Jr., Robert R.; Sharpe, Jennifer B.

    1998-01-01

    This Flood Tracking Chart for the Illinois River Basin in Illinois can be used to record and compare the predicted or current flood-crest stage to past flood-crest information. This information can then be used by residents and emergency-response personnel to make informed decisions concerning the threat of flooding to life and property. The chart shows a map of the Illinois River Basin (see below), the location of real-time streamflow-gaging stations in the basin, graphs of selected historical recorded flood-crest stages at each of the stations, and sea-level conversion (SLC) factors that allow conversion of the current or predicted flood-crest stage to elevation above sea level. Each graph represents a streamflow-gaging station and has a space to record the most current river stage reported for that station by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The National Weather Service (NWS) predicts flood crests for many of the stations shown on this chart.

  11. Crowdsourcing detailed flood data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walliman, Nicholas; Ogden, Ray; Amouzad*, Shahrzhad

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade the average annual loss across the European Union due to flooding has been 4.5bn Euros, but increasingly intense rainfall, as well as population growth, urbanisation and the rising costs of asset replacements, may see this rise to 23bn Euros a year by 2050. Equally disturbing are the profound social costs to individuals, families and communities which in addition to loss of lives include: loss of livelihoods, decreased purchasing and production power, relocation and migration, adverse psychosocial effects, and hindrance of economic growth and development. Flood prediction, management and defence strategies rely on the availability of accurate information and flood modelling. Whilst automated data gathering (by measurement and satellite) of the extent of flooding is already advanced it is least reliable in urban and physically complex geographies where often the need for precise estimation is most acute. Crowdsourced data of actual flood events is a potentially critical component of this allowing improved accuracy in situations and identifying the effects of local landscape and topography where the height of a simple kerb, or discontinuity in a boundary wall can have profound importance. Mobile 'App' based data acquisition using crowdsourcing in critical areas can combine camera records with GPS positional data and time, as well as descriptive data relating to the event. This will automatically produce a dataset, managed in ArcView GIS, with the potential for follow up calls to get more information through structured scripts for each strand. Through this local residents can provide highly detailed information that can be reflected in sophisticated flood protection models and be core to framing urban resilience strategies and optimising the effectiveness of investment. This paper will describe this pioneering approach that will develop flood event data in support of systems that will advance existing approaches such as developed in the in the UK

  12. Assessing Flood Risk Using Reservoir Flood Control Rules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Fu; Yadong Mei; Zhihuai Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The application of conventional flood operation regulation is restricted due to insufficient description of flood control rules for the Pubugou Reservoir in southern China. Based on the require-ments of different flood control objects, this paper proposes to optimize flood control rules with punish-ment mechanism by defining different parameters of flood control rules in response to flood inflow fore-cast and reservoir water level. A genetic algorithm is adopted for solving parameter optimization problem. The failure risk and overflow volume of the downstream insufficient flood control capacity are assessed through the reservoir operation policies. The results show that an optimised regulation can provide better performance than the current flood control rules.

  13. Analysis of the SYN Flood DoS Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitko Bogdanoski

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes systems vulnerability targeted by TCP (Transmission Control Protocol segments when SYN flag is ON, which gives space for a DoS (Denial of Service attack called SYN flooding attack or more often referred as a SYN flood attack. The effects of this type of attack are analyzed and presented in OPNET simulation environment. Furthermore, the paper presents two anomaly detection algorithms as an effective mechanism against this type of attack. Finally, practical approaches against SYN flood attack for Linux and Windows environment which are followed by are shown.

  14. Flood Heterogeneity as a Tool for Exploring Flood Frequency-Climate Linkages from a Watershed Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora-Reyes, D.; Hirschboeck, K. K.; Valdes, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    .g. 1953-1965 and 1978-84/1992-95 (summer convective and winter synoptic flood dominance, respectively). These periods were used to guide the development of a series of future flooding scenarios by systematic resampling of the observed data to simulate plausible changes in the heterogeneous mix of flood types. Using upper and lower quartile events to represent extremes, several scenarios were constructed for watersheds in different hydroclimatic regions in the state. The scenarios included: increased/decreased convective activity due to enhanced/suppressed summer moisture-flux, and increased/decreased winter-synoptic activity caused by varying jet stream patterns. Finally, all heterogeneity information was compiled to create joint conditional probability equations which were used to calculate the 1% and 0.5% Annual Exceedence Probability discharge estimates. This experimental approach resamples from observed data to construct hydro-climatologically realistic scenarios for individual watersheds. It can be used as a complement to future climate change scenarios based on downscaled precipitation from global circulation models, which cannot easily resolve basin-specific flooding processes. Arizona is in clear need of studies that can coherently incorporate climate change into FFA since recent studies warn of the possibility of a considerable increase in future flood damage.

  15. Application of satellite products and hydrological modelling for flood early warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koriche, Sifan A.; Rientjes, Tom H. M.

    2016-06-01

    Floods have caused devastating impacts to the environment and society in Awash River Basin, Ethiopia. Since flooding events are frequent, this marks the need to develop tools for flood early warning. In this study, we propose a satellite based flood index to identify the runoff source areas that largely contribute to extreme runoff production and floods in the basin. Satellite based products used for development of the flood index are CMORPH (Climate Prediction Center MORPHing technique: 0.25° by 0.25°, daily) product for calculation of the Standard Precipitation Index (SPI) and a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM) for calculation of the Topographic Wetness Index (TWI). Other satellite products used in this study are for rainfall-runoff modelling to represent rainfall, potential evapotranspiration, vegetation cover and topography. Results of the study show that assessment of spatial and temporal rainfall variability by satellite products may well serve in flood early warning. Preliminary findings on effectiveness of the flood index developed in this study indicate that the index is well suited for flood early warning. The index combines SPI and TWI, and preliminary results illustrate the spatial distribution of likely runoff source areas that cause floods in flood prone areas.

  16. Composite Flood Risk for New Jersery

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Composite Flood Risk layer combines flood hazard datasets from Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) flood zones, NOAA's Shallow Coastal Flooding, and the...

  17. Composite Flood Risk for Virgin Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Composite Flood Risk layer combines flood hazard datasets from Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) flood zones, NOAA's Shallow Coastal Flooding, and the...

  18. Flood-inundation maps for the Yellow River at Plymouth, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Chad D.; Bunch, Aubrey R.; Kim, Moon H.

    2016-11-16

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 4.9-mile reach of the Yellow River at Plymouth, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 05516500, Yellow River at Plymouth, Ind. Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=05516500. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood-warning system (http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS AHPS forecasts flood hydrographs at many sites that are often collocated with USGS streamgages, including the Yellow River at Plymouth, Ind. NWS AHPS-forecast peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood and forecasts of flood hydrographs at this site.For this study, flood profiles were computed for the Yellow River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the current stage-discharge relations at the Yellow River streamgage, in combination with the flood-insurance study for Marshall County (issued in 2011). The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine eight water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The 1-percent annual exceedance probability flood profile elevation (flood elevation with recurrence intervals within 100 years) is within

  19. Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

    2010-12-01

    This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

  20. Flood Risk Management In Europe: European flood regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegger, D.L.T.; Bakker, M.H.; Green, C.; Driessen, Peter; Delvaux, B.; Rijswick, H.F.M.W. van; Suykens, C.; Beyers, J-C.; Deketelaere, K.; Doorn-Hoekveld, W. van; Dieperink, C.

    2013-01-01

    In Europe, water management is moving from flood defense to a risk management approach, which takes both the probability and the potential consequences of flooding into account. In this report, we will look at Directives and (non-)EU- initiatives in place to deal with flood risk in Europe indirectly

  1. Improving Global Flood Forecasting using Satellite Detected Flood Extent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revilla Romero, B.

    2016-01-01

    Flooding is a natural global phenomenon but in many cases is exacerbated by human activity. Although flooding generally affects humans in a negative way, bringing death, suffering, and economic impacts, it also has potentially beneficial effects. Early flood warning and forecasting systems, as well

  2. Improving Global Flood Forecasting using Satellite Detected Flood Extent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revilla Romero, B.

    2016-01-01

    Flooding is a natural global phenomenon but in many cases is exacerbated by human activity. Although flooding generally affects humans in a negative way, bringing death, suffering, and economic impacts, it also has potentially beneficial effects. Early flood warning and forecasting systems, as well

  3. Different Responses of Sexual and Asexual Reproduction of Arundinella hirta to Flooding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Bo; Fu Tianfei; Ulrich Schurr; Arnd J.Kuhn

    2006-01-01

    The sexual and asexual reproductive features of the graminoid species Arundinella hirta growing at riversides of the Jialing River were analyzed.It was found that the total seed mass,seed number per plant,and sexual reproductive allocation of A.hirta decreased with decreasing bank elevation,and plants growing at the lowest elevations of banks subjected to intense flooding did not show sexual reproduction.The total plant biomass and the number of ramifications per plant increased with flooding intensity,which implies that,contrary to sexual reproduction,asexual reproduction of A.hirta was enhanced by flooding.

  4. The Global Flood Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P.; Huddelston, M.; Michel, G.; Thompson, S.; Heynert, K.; Pickering, C.; Abbott Donnelly, I.; Fewtrell, T.; Galy, H.; Sperna Weiland, F.; Winsemius, H.; Weerts, A.; Nixon, S.; Davies, P.; Schiferli, D.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, a Global Flood Model (GFM) initiative has been proposed by Willis, UK Met Office, Esri, Deltares and IBM. The idea is to create a global community platform that enables better understanding of the complexities of flood risk assessment to better support the decisions, education and communication needed to mitigate flood risk. The GFM will provide tools for assessing the risk of floods, for devising mitigation strategies such as land-use changes and infrastructure improvements, and for enabling effective pre- and post-flood event response. The GFM combines humanitarian and commercial motives. It will benefit: - The public, seeking to preserve personal safety and property; - State and local governments, seeking to safeguard economic activity, and improve resilience; - NGOs, similarly seeking to respond proactively to flood events; - The insurance sector, seeking to understand and price flood risk; - Large corporations, seeking to protect global operations and supply chains. The GFM is an integrated and transparent set of modules, each composed of models and data. For each module, there are two core elements: a live "reference version" (a worked example) and a framework of specifications, which will allow development of alternative versions. In the future, users will be able to work with the reference version or substitute their own models and data. If these meet the specification for the relevant module, they will interoperate with the rest of the GFM. Some "crowd-sourced" modules could even be accredited and published to the wider GFM community. Our intent is to build on existing public, private and academic work, improve local adoption, and stimulate the development of multiple - but compatible - alternatives, so strengthening mankind's ability to manage flood impacts. The GFM is being developed and managed by a non-profit organization created for the purpose. The business model will be inspired from open source software (eg Linux): - for non-profit usage

  5. FEMA DFIRM Flood Hazard Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — FEMA flood hazard delineations are used by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to designate the Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) and for insurance rating...

  6. 2013 FEMA Flood Hazard Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  7. FLOOD CHARACTERISTICS AND MANAGEMENT ADAPTATIONS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    2011-10-26

    , bearing flood losses and land ... Engineering control of the major tributaries of the Imo River system is required to ..... on previous knowledge of physical nature of flood ... uptake; other factors include a lack of formal titles to.

  8. National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) is a compilation of GIS data that comprises a nationwide digital Flood Insurance Rate Map. The GIS data and services are...

  9. FEMA Q3 Flood Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Q3 Flood Data are derived from the Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMS) published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The file is georeferenced to...

  10. FEMA 100 year Flood Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Q3 Flood Data product is a digital representation of certain features of FEMA's Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) product, intended for use with desktop mapping...

  11. 2013 FEMA Flood Control Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  12. Multivariate pluvial flood damage models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ootegem, Luc [HIVA — University of Louvain (Belgium); SHERPPA — Ghent University (Belgium); Verhofstadt, Elsy [SHERPPA — Ghent University (Belgium); Van Herck, Kristine; Creten, Tom [HIVA — University of Louvain (Belgium)

    2015-09-15

    Depth–damage-functions, relating the monetary flood damage to the depth of the inundation, are commonly used in the case of fluvial floods (floods caused by a river overflowing). We construct four multivariate damage models for pluvial floods (caused by extreme rainfall) by differentiating on the one hand between ground floor floods and basement floods and on the other hand between damage to residential buildings and damage to housing contents. We do not only take into account the effect of flood-depth on damage, but also incorporate the effects of non-hazard indicators (building characteristics, behavioural indicators and socio-economic variables). By using a Tobit-estimation technique on identified victims of pluvial floods in Flanders (Belgium), we take into account the effect of cases of reported zero damage. Our results show that the flood depth is an important predictor of damage, but with a diverging impact between ground floor floods and basement floods. Also non-hazard indicators are important. For example being aware of the risk just before the water enters the building reduces content damage considerably, underlining the importance of warning systems and policy in this case of pluvial floods. - Highlights: • Prediction of damage of pluvial floods using also non-hazard information • We include ‘no damage cases’ using a Tobit model. • The damage of flood depth is stronger for ground floor than for basement floods. • Non-hazard indicators are especially important for content damage. • Potential gain of policies that increase awareness of flood risks.

  13. Projected Flood Risks in China based on CMIP5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Based on the simulations from 22 CMIP5 models and in combination with data on population, GDP, arable land, and terrain elevation, the spatial distributions of the flood risk levels are calculated and analyzed under RCP8.5 for the baseline period (1986-2005), the near term future period (2016-2035), the middle term future period (2046-2065), and the long term future period (2080-2099). (1) Areas with higher flood hazard risk levels in the future are concentrated in southeastern China, and the areas with the risk level III continue to expand. The major changes in flood hazard risks will occur in the middle and long term future. (2) In future, the areas of high vulnerability to flood hazards will be located in China's eastern region. In the middle and late 21st century, the extent of the high vulnerability area will expand eastward and its intensity will gradually increase. The highest vulnerability values are found in the provinces of Beijing, Tianjin, Hebei, Henan, Anhui, Shandong, Shanghai, Jiangsu, and in parts of the Pearl River Delta. Furthermore, the major cities in northeast China, as well as Wuhan, Changsha and Nanchang are highly vulnerable. (3) The regions with high flood risk levels will be located in eastern China, in the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River and stretching northward to Beijing and Tianjin. High-risk flood areas are also occurring in major cities in Northeast China, in some parts of Shaanxi and Shanxi, and in some coastal areas in Southeast China. (4) Compared to the baseline period, the high flood risks will increase on a regional level towards the end of the 21st century, although the areas of flood hazards show little variation. In this paper, the projected future flood risks for different periods were analyzed under the RCP8.5 emission scenarios. By comparing the results with the simulations under the RCP 2.6 and RCP 4.5 scenarios, both scenarios show no differences in the spatial distribution, but in the intensity of flood

  14. Flood-Inundation Maps for Sugar Creek at Crawfordsville, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Zachary W.

    2016-06-06

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.5-mile reach of Sugar Creek at Crawfordsville, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 03339500, Sugar Creek at Crawfordsville, Ind. Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (NWS site CRWI3).Flood profiles were computed for the USGS streamgage 03339500, Sugar Creek at Crawfordsville, Ind., reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater hydraulic modeling software developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated using the current stage-discharge rating at the USGS streamgage 03339500, Sugar Creek at Crawfordsville, Ind., and high-water marks from the flood of April 19, 2013, which reached a stage of 15.3 feet. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 13 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum ranging from 4.0 ft (the NWS “action stage”) to 16.0 ft, which is the highest stage interval of the current USGS stage-discharge rating curve and 2 ft higher than the NWS “major flood stage.” The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging [lidar]) data having a 0.49-ft root mean squared error and 4.9-ft horizontal resolution) to delineate the area flooded at each stage.The availability

  15. Risk reduction by combining nature values with flood protection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Loon-Steensma Jantsje M.

    2016-01-01

    foreland into the dike design does not automatically mean that nature values and flood protection are well integrated. Flood protection imposes rather different requirements on the extent and features of marshes than nature conservation and development. Wave damping is most effective with a high and stable marsh, while nature thrives with dynamic processes and differences in elevation. Therefore, only a design that allows natural marsh dynamics and includes different marsh zones could combine nature values with flood protection. In practice, this means a dike design with an uncertain foreland, that offers space for natural processes. The uncertainty in foreland development reduces the possible flood risk reduction. In our paper we describe the critical points of interest concerning risk reduction in this system.

  16. Floods of 2011 in New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumia, Richard; Firda, Gary D.; Smith, Travis L.

    2014-01-01

    Basins in northeastern New York, and several other stream basins throughout southeastern New York. Downstream reaches of the Mohawk River also had substantial flooding. Sixty-two USGS streamgages throughout eastern New York documented record high stream flows and elevations with AEPs of 25 peak discharges equaling or exceeding 1 percent. The USGS streamgage for the Schoharie Creek at Prattsville recorded its greatest peak discharge in 109 years of record at 120,000 cubic feet per second (greater than the 0.2-percent AEP discharge) on August 28. The peak water-surface elevation at the streamgage in Prattsville was 5 feet higher than its previous record in 1996. USGS personnel surveyed 184 high-water marks (HWMs) at 30 locations along an 84-mile reach of Schoharie Creek and compared the elevations to those published by FEMA for the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent AEP floods. Elevations in the lower reaches of the basin exceeded published elevations for the 0.2-percent AEP flood. Remnants of Tropical Storm Lee brought a third major storm to New York in September 2011. Moisture from Lee began moving into New York on September 7 and intensified over the already saturated Susquehanna River Basin. Most of the rain fell on September 8 with storm totals nearing 13 inches in some areas (12.73 inches at Apalachin in Tioga County). Major disaster declarations were issued for 15 counties in and around central New York, making them eligible for individual or public assistance. Ten USGS streamgages within the Susquehanna River Basin documented record-high stream discharges and elevations on September 8, and all were greater than the 1-percent AEP discharge. USGS personnel surveyed 20 HWMs at 18 locations along a 114- mile reach of the Susquehanna River and compared the elevations to those published by FEMA for the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent AEP floods. Several of the surveyed HWMs exceeded published elevations for the 0.2-percent AEP flood.

  17. Optimal strategies for flood prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijgenraam, Carel; Brekelmans, Ruud; den Hertog, Dick; Roos, C.

    2016-01-01

    Flood prevention policy is of major importance to the Netherlands since a large part of the country is below sea level and high water levels in rivers may also cause floods. In this paper we propose a dike height optimization model to determine economically efficient flood protection standards. We i

  18. Floods in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theresa K. Andersen; Marshall J. Shepherd

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric warming and associated hydrological changes have implications for regional flood intensity and frequency. Climate models and hydrological models have the ability to integrate various contributing factors and assess potential changes to hydrology at global to local scales through the century. This survey of floods in a changing climate reviews flood...

  19. Flood damage: a model for consistent, complete and multipurpose scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menoni, Scira; Molinari, Daniela; Ballio, Francesco; Minucci, Guido; Mejri, Ouejdane; Atun, Funda; Berni, Nicola; Pandolfo, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    Effective flood risk mitigation requires the impacts of flood events to be much better and more reliably known than is currently the case. Available post-flood damage assessments usually supply only a partial vision of the consequences of the floods as they typically respond to the specific needs of a particular stakeholder. Consequently, they generally focus (i) on particular items at risk, (ii) on a certain time window after the occurrence of the flood, (iii) on a specific scale of analysis or (iv) on the analysis of damage only, without an investigation of damage mechanisms and root causes. This paper responds to the necessity of a more integrated interpretation of flood events as the base to address the variety of needs arising after a disaster. In particular, a model is supplied to develop multipurpose complete event scenarios. The model organizes available information after the event according to five logical axes. This way post-flood damage assessments can be developed that (i) are multisectoral, (ii) consider physical as well as functional and systemic damage, (iii) address the spatial scales that are relevant for the event at stake depending on the type of damage that has to be analyzed, i.e., direct, functional and systemic, (iv) consider the temporal evolution of damage and finally (v) allow damage mechanisms and root causes to be understood. All the above features are key for the multi-usability of resulting flood scenarios. The model allows, on the one hand, the rationalization of efforts currently implemented in ex post damage assessments, also with the objective of better programming financial resources that will be needed for these types of events in the future. On the other hand, integrated interpretations of flood events are fundamental to adapting and optimizing flood mitigation strategies on the basis of thorough forensic investigation of each event, as corroborated by the implementation of the model in a case study.

  20. Can atmospheric reanalysis datasets be used to reproduce flood characteristics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreadis, K.; Schumann, G.; Stampoulis, D.

    2014-12-01

    Floods are one of the costliest natural disasters and the ability to understand their characteristics and their interactions with population, land cover and climate changes is of paramount importance. In order to accurately reproduce flood characteristics such as water inundation and heights both in the river channels and floodplains, hydrodynamic models are required. Most of these models operate at very high resolutions and are computationally very expensive, making their application over large areas very difficult. However, a need exists for such models to be applied at regional to global scales so that the effects of climate change with regards to flood risk can be examined. We use the LISFLOOD-FP hydrodynamic model to simulate a 40-year history of flood characteristics at the continental scale, particularly over Australia. LISFLOOD-FP is a 2-D hydrodynamic model that solves the approximate Saint-Venant equations at large scales (on the order of 1 km) using a sub-grid representation of the river channel. This implementation is part of an effort towards a global 1-km flood modeling framework that will allow the reconstruction of a long-term flood climatology. The components of this framework include a hydrologic model (the widely-used Variable Infiltration Capacity model) and a meteorological dataset that forces it. In order to extend the simulated flood climatology to 50-100 years in a consistent manner, reanalysis datasets have to be used. The objective of this study is the evaluation of multiple atmospheric reanalysis datasets (ERA, NCEP, MERRA, JRA) as inputs to the VIC/LISFLOOD-FP model. Comparisons of the simulated flood characteristics are made with both satellite observations of inundation and a benchmark simulation of LISFLOOD-FP being forced by observed flows. Finally, the implications of the availability of a global flood modeling framework for producing flood hazard maps and disseminating disaster information are discussed.

  1. A GIS based approach for the prediction of the dam break flood hazard – A case study of Zardezas reservoir “Skikda, Algeria”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derdous Oussama

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction of dams in rivers can offer many advantages, however the consequences resulting from their failure could result in major damage, including loss of life and property destruction. To mitigate the threats of dam break it is essential to appreciate the characteristics of the potential flood in realistic manner. In this study an approach based on the integration of hydraulic modelling and GIS has been used to assess the risks resulting from a potential failure of Zardezas dam, a concrete dam located in Skikda, in the North East of Algeria. HEC-GeoRAS within GIS was used to extract geometric information from a digital elevation model and then imported into HEC-RAS. Flow simulation of the dam break was performed using HEC-RAS and results were mapped using the GIS. Finally, a flood hazard map based on water depth and flow velocity maps was created in GIS environment. According to this map the potential failure of Zardezas dam will place a large number in people in danger. The present study has shown that Application of Geographical Information System (GIS techniques in integration with hydraulic modelling can significantly reduce the time and the resources required to forecast potential dam break flood hazard which can play a crucial role in improving both flood disaster management and land use planning downstream of dams.

  2. FLOOD SUSCEPTIBILITY ASSESSMENT IN THE NIRAJ BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANDA ROŞCA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Flood susceptibility assessment in the Niraj basin. In the context of global warming and the increasing frequency of extreme weather events, it becomes evident that we have to face natural hazards, such as floods. In the area of Niraj basin this phenomenon is specific both in the spring, because of the snow melting and of the precipitations which come along with the season, and then in the summer because of the torrential precipitations but rarely in autumn and winter. The aim of this paper is to determinate the susceptibility of the zone and obtain a map which will take into consideration the possibility of a flooding. Defining vulnerability can help us understand this type of natural disasters and find the best ways to reduce it. For this purpose we use thematic layers, morphological characteristics (slope and depth fragmentation, hydrological characteristics, geology, pedology (permeability and soil texture, landuse, precipitation data, and human interventions because in this way we have the possibility to use data mining for this purpose. Data mining will allow us to extract new information based on the existing sets of data.The final result will be a thematic map that highlights the areas which are exposed to the flood. Therefore, this map can be used as a support decision for local government or business purposes.

  3. Rethinking the relationship between flood risk perception and flood management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholz, S; Muro, M; Jeffrey, P; Smith, H M

    2014-04-15

    Although flood risk perceptions and their concomitant motivations for behaviour have long been recognised as significant features of community resilience in the face of flooding events, there has, for some time now, been a poorly appreciated fissure in the accompanying literature. Specifically, rationalist and constructivist paradigms in the broader domain of risk perception provide different (though not always conflicting) contexts for interpreting evidence and developing theory. This contribution reviews the major constructs that have been applied to understanding flood risk perceptions and contextualises these within broader conceptual developments around risk perception theory and contemporary thinking around flood risk management. We argue that there is a need to re-examine and re-invigorate flood risk perception research, in a manner that is comprehensively underpinned by more constructivist thinking around flood risk management as well as by developments in broader risk perception research. We draw attention to an historical over-emphasis on the cognitive perceptions of those at risk to the detriment of a richer understanding of a wider range of flood risk perceptions such as those of policy-makers or of tax-payers who live outside flood affected areas as well as the linkages between these perspectives and protective measures such as state-supported flood insurance schemes. Conclusions challenge existing understandings of the relationship between risk perception and flood management, particularly where the latter relates to communication strategies and the extent to which those at risk from flooding feel responsible for taking protective actions.

  4. Flooding on Elbe River

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Heavy rains in Central Europe over the past few weeks have led to some of the worst flooding the region has witnessed in more than a century. The floods have killed more than 100 people in Germany, Russia, Austria, Hungary, and the Czech Republic and have led to as much as $20 billion in damage. This false-color image of the Elbe River and its tributaries was taken on August 20, 2002, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The floodwaters that inundated Dresden, Germany, earlier this week have moved north. As can be seen, the river resembles a fairly large lake in the center of the image just south of the town of Wittenberg. Flooding was also bad further downriver in the towns of Maqgdeburge and Hitzacker. Roughly 20,000 people were evacuated from their homes in northern Germany. Fifty thousand troops, border police, and technical assistance workers were called in to combat the floods along with 100,000 volunteers. The floodwaters are not expected to badly affect Hamburg, which sits on the mouth of the river on the North Sea. Credit:Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  5. On Flood Alert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ Aseries of heavy storms since early May led to severe flooding and landslides in south and southwest China,causing heaw casualties and economic losses.Severe convective weather such as downpours,gusts,hail and thunderstorms attacked these areas over a week from May 5.

  6. Fast Flooding over Manhattan

    CERN Document Server

    Clementi, Andrea; Silvestri, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    We consider a Mobile Ad-hoc NETwork (MANET) formed by n agents that move at speed V according to the Manhattan Random-Way Point model over a square region of side length L. The resulting stationary (agent) spatial probability distribution is far to be uniform: the average density over the "central zone" is asymptotically higher than that over the "suburb". Agents exchange data iff they are at distance at most R within each other. We study the flooding time of this MANET: the number of time steps required to broadcast a message from one source agent to all agents of the network in the stationary phase. We prove the first asymptotical upper bound on the flooding time. This bound holds with high probability, it is a decreasing function of R and V, and it is tight for a wide and relevant range of the network parameters (i.e. L, R and V). A consequence of our result is that flooding over the sparse and highly-disconnected suburb can be as fast as flooding over the dense and connected central zone. Rather surprisin...

  7. Effective delineation of urban flooded areas based on aerial ortho-photo imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Guindon, Bert; Raymond, Don; Hong, Gang

    2016-10-01

    The combination of rapid global urban growth and climate change has resulted in increased occurrence of major urban flood events across the globe. The distribution of flooded area is one of the key information layers for applications of emergency planning and response management. While SAR systems and technologies have been widely used for flood area delineation, radar images suffer from range ambiguities arising from corner reflection effects and shadowing in dense urban settings. A new mapping framework is proposed for the extraction and quantification of flood extent based on aerial optical multi-spectral imagery and ancillary data. This involves first mapping of flood areas directly visible to the sensor. Subsequently, the complete area of submergence is estimated from this initial mapping and inference techniques based on baseline data such as land cover and GIS information such as available digital elevation models. The methodology has been tested and proven effective using aerial photography for the case of the 2013 flood in Calgary, Canada.

  8. Incorporating the effect of DEM resolution and accuracy for improved flood inundation mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksena, Siddharth; Merwade, Venkatesh

    2015-11-01

    Topography plays a major role in determining the accuracy of flood inundation areas. However, many areas in the United States and around the world do not have access to high quality topographic data in the form of Digital Elevation Models (DEM). For such areas, an improved understanding of the effects of DEM properties such as horizontal resolution and vertical accuracy on flood inundation maps may eventually lead to improved flood inundation modeling and mapping. This study attempts to relate the errors arising from DEM properties such as spatial resolution and vertical accuracy to flood inundation maps, and then use this relationship to create improved flood inundation maps from coarser resolution DEMs with low accuracy. The results from the five stream reaches used in this study show that water surface elevations (WSE) along the stream and the flood inundation area have a linear relationship with both DEM resolution and accuracy. This linear relationship is then used to extrapolate the water surface elevations from coarser resolution DEMs to get water surface elevations corresponding to a finer resolution DEM. Application of this approach show that improved results can be obtained from flood modeling by using coarser and less accurate DEMs, including public domain datasets such as the National Elevation Dataset and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) DEMs. The improvement in the WSE and its application to obtain better flood inundation maps is dependent on the study reach characteristics such as land use, valley shape, reach length and width. Application of the approach presented in this study on more reaches may lead to development of guidelines for flood inundation mapping using coarser resolution and less accurate topographic datasets.

  9. Reducing uncertainty in flood frequency analyses: A comparison of local and regional approaches involving information on extreme historical floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, K.; Nguyen, C. C.; Payrastre, O.; Gaume, E.

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a detailed comparison of local and regional approaches for flood frequency analyses, with a special emphasis on the effects of (a) the information on extreme floods used in the analysis (historical data or recent extreme floods observed at ungauged sites), and (b) the assumptions associated with regional approaches (statistical homogeneity of considered series, independence of observations). The results presented are based on two case studies: the Ard e ̀ che and Argens rivers regions in south-east of France. Four approaches are compared: 1 - local analysis based on continuous measured series, 2 - local analysis with historical information, 3 - regional index-flood analysis based on continuous series, 4 - regional analysis involving information on extremes (including both historical floods and recent floods observed at ungauged sites). The inference approach used is based on a GEV distribution and a Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain approach for parameters estimation. The comparison relies both on (1) available observed datasets and (2) Monte Carlo simulations in order to evaluate the effects of sampling variability and to analyze the possible influence of regional heterogeneities. The results indicate that a relatively limited level of regional heterogeneity, which may not be detected through homogeneity tests, may significantly affect the performances of regional approaches. These results also illustrate the added value of information on extreme floods, historical floods or recent floods observed at ungauged sites, in both local and regional approaches. As far as possible, gathering such information and incorporating it into flood frequency studies should be promoted. Finally, the presented Monte Carlo simulations appear as an interesting analysis tool for adapting the estimation strategy to the available data for each specific case study.

  10. Building a flood hazard map due to magma effusion into the caldera lake of the Baekdusan Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K.; Kim, S.; Yun, S.; Yu, S.; Kim, I.

    2013-12-01

    Many volcanic craters and calderas are filled with large amounts of water that can pose significant flood hazards to downstream communities due to their high elevation and the potential for catastrophic releases of water. Recent reports pointed out the Baekdusan volcano that is located between the border of China and North Korea as a potential active volcano. Since Millennium Eruption around 1000 AD, smaller eruptions have occurred at roughly 100-year intervals, with the last one in 1903. The volcano is showing signs of waking from a century-long slumber recently and the volcanic ash may spread up to the northeastern of Japan. The development of various forecasting techniques to prevent and minimize economic and social damage is in urgent need. Floods from lake-filled calderas may be particularly large and high. Volcanic flood may cause significant hydrologic hazards for this reason. This study focuses on constructing a flood hazard map triggered by the uplift of lake bottom due to magma effusion in the Baekdusan volcano. A physically-based uplift model was developed to compute the amount of water and time to peak flow. The ordinary differential equation was numerically solved using the finite difference method and Newton-Raphson iteration method was used to solve nonlinear equation. The magma effusion rate into the caldera lake is followed by the past record from other volcanic activities. As a result, the hydrograph serves as an upper boundary condition when hydrodynamic model (Flo-2D) runs to simulate channel routing downstream. The final goal of the study stresses the potential flood hazard represented by the huge volume of water in the caldera lake, the unique geography, and the limited control capability. he study will contribute to build a geohazard map for the decision-makers and practitioners. Keywords: Effusion rate, Volcanic flood, Caldera lake, Uplift, Flood hazard map Acknowledgement This research was supported by a grant [NEMA-BAEKDUSAN-2012-1-2] from

  11. Influence of dem in Watershed Management as Flood Zonation Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrajhi, Muhamad; Khan, Mudasir; Afroz Khan, Mohammad; Alobeid, Abdalla

    2016-06-01

    Despite of valuable efforts from working groups and research organizations towards flood hazard reduction through its program, still minimal diminution from these hazards has been realized. This is mainly due to the fact that with rapid increase in population and urbanization coupled with climate change, flood hazards are becoming increasingly catastrophic. Therefore there is a need to understand and access flood hazards and develop means to deal with it through proper preparations, and preventive measures. To achieve this aim, Geographical Information System (GIS), geospatial and hydrological models were used as tools to tackle with influence of flash floods in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia due to existence of large valleys (Wadis) which is a matter of great concern. In this research paper, Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of different resolution (30m, 20m,10m and 5m) have been used, which have proven to be valuable tool for the topographic parameterization of hydrological models which are the basis for any flood modelling process. The DEM was used as input for performing spatial analysis and obtaining derivative products and delineate watershed characteristics of the study area using ArcGIS desktop and its Arc Hydro extension tools to check comparability of different elevation models for flood Zonation mapping. The derived drainage patterns have been overlaid over aerial imagery of study area, to check influence of greater amount of precipitation which can turn into massive destructions. The flow accumulation maps derived provide zones of highest accumulation and possible flow directions. This approach provide simplified means of predicting extent of inundation during flood events for emergency action especially for large areas because of large coverage area of the remotely sensed data.

  12. GIS Support for Flood Rescue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Gengsheng; Mioc, Darka; Anton, François

    2007-01-01

    Under flood events, the ground traffic is blocked in and around the flooded area due to damages to roads and bridges. The traditional transportation network may not always help people to make a right decision for evacuation. In order to provide dynamic road information needed for flood rescue, we...... developed an adaptive web-based transportation network application using Oracle technology. Moreover, the geographic relationships between the road network and flood areas are taken into account. The overlay between the road network and flood polygons is computed on the fly. This application allows users...... to retrieve the shortest and safest route in Fredericton road network during flood event. It enables users to make a timely decision for flood rescue. We are using Oracle Spatial to deal with emergency situations that can be applied to other constrained network applications as well....

  13. Flooding Distributed Denial of Service Attacks-A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijah W.M. Ghazali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Flaws either in users’ implementation of a network or in the standard specification of protocols has resulted in gaps that allow various kinds of network attack to be launched. Of the kinds of network attacks, denial-of-service flood attacks have caused the most severe impact. Approach: This study reviews recent researches on flood attacks and their mitigation, classifying such attacks as either high-rate flood or low-rate flood. Finally, the attacks are compared against criteria related to their characteristics, methods and impacts. Results: Denial-of-service flood attacks vary in their rates, traffic, targets, goals and impacts. However, they have general similarities that are the methods used are flooding and the main purpose is to achieve denial of service to the target. Conclusion/Recommendations: Mitigation of the denial-of-service flood attacks must correspond to the attack rates, traffic, targets, goals and impacts in order to achieve effective solution.

  14. Flash flood hazard mapping: a pilot case study in Xiapu River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-wei Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Flash flood hazard mapping is a supporting component of non-structural measures for flash flood prevention. Pilot case studies are necessary to develop more practicable methods for the technical support systems of flash flood hazard mapping. In this study, the headwater catchment of the Xiapu River Basin in central China was selected as a pilot study area for flash flood hazard mapping. A conceptual distributed hydrological model was developed for flood calculation based on the framework of the Xinanjiang model, which is widely used in humid and semi-humid regions in China. The developed model employs the geomorphological unit hydrograph method, which is extremely valuable when simulating the overland flow process in ungauged catchments, as compared with the original Xinanjiang model. The model was tested in the pilot study area, and the results agree with the measured data on the whole. After calibration and validation, the model is shown to be a useful tool for flash flood calculation. A practicable method for flash flood hazard mapping using the calculated peak discharge and digital elevation model data was presented, and three levels of flood hazards were classified. The resulting flash flood hazard maps indicate that the method successfully predicts the spatial distribution of flash flood hazards, and it can meet the current requirements in China.

  15. Flood Risk Management in Remote and Impoverished Areas—A Case Study of Onaville, Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Heimhuber

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, geographic information system (GIS-based hydrologic and hydraulic modeling was used to perform a flood risk assessment for Onaville, which is a fairly new, rapidly growing informal settlement that is exposed to dangerous flash-flood events. Since records of historic floods did not exist for the study area, design storms with a variety of significant average return intervals (ARIs were derived from intensity-duration-frequency (IDF curves and transformed into design floods via rainfall-runoff modeling in hydrologic engineering center’s hydrologic modeling system (HEC-HMS. The hydraulic modeling software hydrologic engineering center’s river analysis system (HEC-RAS was used to perform one-dimensional, unsteady-flow simulations of the design floods in the Ravine Lan Couline, which is the major drainage channel of the area. Topographic data comprised a 12 m spatial resolution TanDEM-X digital elevation model (DEM and a 30 cm spatial resolution DEM created with mapping drones. The flow simulations revealed that large areas of the settlement are currently exposed to flood hazard. The results of the hydrologic and hydraulic modeling were incorporated into a flood hazard map which formed the basis for flood risk management. We present a grassroots approach for preventive flood risk management on a community level, which comprises the elaboration of a neighborhood contingency plan and a flood risk awareness campaign together with representatives of the local community of Onaville.

  16. A GIS-based method for flood risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogeropoulos, Kleomenis; Stathopoulos, Nikos; Psarogiannis, Athanasios; Penteris, Dimitris; Tsiakos, Chrisovalantis; Karagiannopoulou, Aikaterini; Krikigianni, Eleni; Karymbalis, Efthimios; Chalkias, Christos

    2016-04-01

    Floods are physical global hazards with negative environmental and socio-economic impacts on local and regional scale. The technological evolution during the last decades, especially in the field of geoinformatics, has offered new advantages in hydrological modelling. This study seeks to use this technology in order to quantify flood risk assessment. The study area which was used is an ungauged catchment and by using mostly GIS hydrological and geomorphological analysis together with a GIS-based distributed Unit Hydrograph model, a series of outcomes have risen. More specifically, this paper examined the behaviour of the Kladeos basin (Peloponnese, Greece) using real rainfall data, as well hypothetical storms. The hydrological analysis held using a Digital Elevation Model of 5x5m pixel size, while the quantitative drainage basin characteristics were calculated and were studied in terms of stream order and its contribution to the flood. Unit Hydrographs are, as it known, useful when there is lack of data and in this work, based on time-area method, a sequences of flood risk assessments have been made using the GIS technology. Essentially, the proposed methodology estimates parameters such as discharge, flow velocity equations etc. in order to quantify flood risk assessment. Keywords Flood Risk Assessment Quantification; GIS; hydrological analysis; geomorphological analysis.

  17. Flood marks of the 1813 flood in the Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklanek, Pavol; Pekárová, Pavla; Halmová, Dana; Pramuk, Branislav; Bačová Mitková, Veronika

    2014-05-01

    In August 2013, 200 years have passed since the greatest and most destructive floods known in the Slovak river basins. The flood affected almost the entire territory of Slovakia, northeastern Moravia, south of Poland. River basins of Váh (Orava, Kysuca), Poprad, Nitra, Hron, Torysa, Hornád, upper and middle Vistula, Odra have been most affected. The aim of this paper is to map the flood marks documenting this catastrophic flood in Slovakia. Flood marks and registrations on the 1813 flood in the Váh river basin are characterized by great diversity and are written in Bernolák modification of Slovak, in Latin, German and Hungarian. Their descriptions are stored in municipal chronicles and Slovak and Hungarian state archives. The flood in 1813 devastated the entire Váh valley, as well as its tributaries. Following flood marks were known in the Vah river basin: Dolná Lehota village in the Orava river basin, historical map from 1817 covering the Sučany village and showing three different cross-sections of the Váh river during the 1813 flood, flood mark in the city of Trenčín, Flood mark in the gate of the Brunovce mansion, cross preserved at the old linden tree at Drahovce, and some records in written documents, e.g. Cifer village. The second part of the study deals with flood marks mapping in the Hron, Hnilec and Poprad River basins, and Vistula River basin in Krakow. On the basis of literary documents and the actual measurement, we summarize the peak flow rates achieved during the floods in 1813 in the profile Hron: Banská Bystrica. According to recent situation the 1813 flood peak was approximately by 1.22 m higher, than the flood in 1974. Also in the Poprad basin is the August 1813 flood referred as the most devastating flood in last 400 years. The position of the flood mark is known, but the building was unfortunately removed later. The water level in 1813 was much higher than the water level during the recent flood in June 2010. In Cracow the water level

  18. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  19. National Elevation Dataset (NED)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a National Elevation Database (NED). The NED is a seamless mosaic of best-available elevation data. The 7.5-minute elevation...

  20. Numerical modeling techniques for flood analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anees, Mohd Talha; Abdullah, K.; Nawawi, M. N. M.; Ab Rahman, Nik Norulaini Nik; Piah, Abd. Rahni Mt.; Zakaria, Nor Azazi; Syakir, M. I.; Mohd. Omar, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    Topographic and climatic changes are the main causes of abrupt flooding in tropical areas. It is the need to find out exact causes and effects of these changes. Numerical modeling techniques plays a vital role for such studies due to their use of hydrological parameters which are strongly linked with topographic changes. In this review, some of the widely used models utilizing hydrological and river modeling parameters and their estimation in data sparse region are discussed. Shortcomings of 1D and 2D numerical models and the possible improvements over these models through 3D modeling are also discussed. It is found that the HEC-RAS and FLO 2D model are best in terms of economical and accurate flood analysis for river and floodplain modeling respectively. Limitations of FLO 2D in floodplain modeling mainly such as floodplain elevation differences and its vertical roughness in grids were found which can be improve through 3D model. Therefore, 3D model was found to be more suitable than 1D and 2D models in terms of vertical accuracy in grid cells. It was also found that 3D models for open channel flows already developed recently but not for floodplain. Hence, it was suggested that a 3D model for floodplain should be developed by considering all hydrological and high resolution topographic parameter's models, discussed in this review, to enhance the findings of causes and effects of flooding.