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Sample records for filter-free 18-mv photon

  1. Dosimetric characterization of the 18-MV photon beam from the Siemens Mevatron 77 linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palta, J.R.; Meyer, J.A.; Hogstrom, K.R.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive set of dosimetric measurements has been made on the Mevatron 77.80.67 18-MV photon beam. Percentage depth dose, dose in the buildup region, field size dependence of output, transmission through lead, tray attenuation, and isodose curves for the open and wedged fields were measured using an ionization chamber in water and polystyrene phantoms. These dosimetric measurements sufficiently characterized the beam to permit clinical use. The depth dose at 10-cm depth for a 10 x 10 cm 2 field at 100-cm source-to-skin distance (SSD) is 80.9%, which meets design specifications. Central axis depth-dose data were fitted to within 0.5% by a set of polynomial equations utilizing a two-dimensional linear regression analysis. Tissue--maximum ratios calculated from depth-dose data agree with measured data to within 2%. Output differences as large as 2.5% were measured for rectangular fields depending on which collimator jaws defined the long dimension of the field. The field size dependence of output was fit to within +- 0.1% by a linear regression. The half-value thickness of the beam was measured to be 13 mm of lead

  2. Relative measurements of fast neutron contamination in 18-MV photon beams from two linear accelerators and a betatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gur, D.; Bukovitz, A.G.; Rosen, J.C.; Holmes, B.G.

    1979-01-01

    Fast neutron contamination in photon beams in the 20 MV range have been reported in recent years. In order to determine if the variations were due mainly to differences in measurement procedures, or inherent in the design of the accelerators, three different 18-MV (BJR) photon beams were compared using identical analytical techniques. The units studied were a Philips SL/75-20 and a Siemens Mevatron-20 linear accelerators and a Schimadzu betatron. Gamma spectroscopy of an activated aluminum foil was the method used. By comparing the relative amounts of neutron contamination, errors associated with absolute measurements such as detector efficiency and differences in activation foils were eliminated. Fast neutron contaminations per rad of x rays in a ratio of 6.7:3.7:1 were found for the Philips, Schimadzu and Siemens accelerators, respectively

  3. Fast and slow neutrons in an 18-MV photon beam from a Philips SL/75-20 linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gur, D.; Rosen, J.C.; Bukovitz, A.G.; Gill, A.W.

    1978-01-01

    Fast- and slow-neutron contamination in an 18-MV photon beam from a Philips SL/75-20 linear accelerator has been measured. Aluminum and indium foils were activated to determine fast- and slow-neutron fluence, which were largely independent of field sizes. Measured fast-neutron fluences were typically 13.9 x 10 4 and 4.4 x 10 4 neutrons/cm 2 /rad of x ray inside and 5 cm outside the field, respectively. Slow-neutron fluences, 1.3 x 10 4 neutrons/cm 2 /rad of x ray, remained relatively constant inside and outside the field. The reported results are about three times higher than neutron fluences recently reported with a betatron operated at the same energy

  4. Dosimetric evaluation of fattening filter free photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechner, W.

    2014-01-01

    Very recently, conventional treatment machines able to deliver flattening filter free photon have been introduced into clinical practice. An Elekta Pricise linear accelerator LINAC which was able to deliver 6MV and 10 MV flattened (FF) and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams was used throughout this work. The investigated modalities were 9-Field intensity modulated radiotherapy (Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)) and 360° - single arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)) with flattened and unflattened photon beams. For treatment plan evaluation the concept of Pareto optimal fronts was employed. Additionally, the efficiency of these modalities was assessed. The evaluation of the treatment plan quality showed no significant difference between FF- and FFF-beams. With respect to treatment plan efficiency, a significant decrease of delivery time of IMRT treatment plans without flattening filter compared to those with filter was found. On average, the delivery time decreased by 18% and 4% for prostate and head-and-neck cases, respectively. In contrast to that, the delivery time of VMAT treatment plans without flatting filter was significantly increased by 22% and 16% for prostate and head- and-neck cases, respectively. The applicability of 14 different detectors to small field dosimetry in FF- as well as in FFF-beams was investigated by measuring output factors of 6MV and 10 MV FF- and FFF- beams. An additional MLC was attached to the treatment machine in order to generate field sizes between 0.6x0.6 cm 2 and 10x10 cm 2 . Alanine pellets were used as reference detectors for the calculation of correction factors for small field dosimetry. Compared to alanine, the solid sate detectors and the liquid filled ionization chamber generally overestimated the output factors of small fields, whereas the air filled ionzation chambers underestimated the output factors. For the shielded diodes the correction factors ranged between 8

  5. Lepton contamination and photon scatter produced by open field 18 MV X-ray beams in the build-up region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, M.J.; Cheung Tsang; Yu, P.K.N.

    2002-01-01

    18 MV X-ray beams used in radiotherapy have skin sparing properties as they produce a dose build-up effect whereby a smaller dose is delivered to the skin compared to dose at depth. Experimental results have shown that variations in the build-up dose significantly contribute to lepton contamination produced outside of the patient or the phantom in question. Monte Carlo simulations of 18 MV X-ray beams show that the surface dose contribution from in-phantom scatter alone is approximately 6% of the maximum dose. The contribution to dose from lepton contamination is found by comparison of Monte Carlo phantom photon scatter dose only and experimental data. Results show that the percentage contributions to dose from lepton contamination are approximately, 65%, 90% of dose at 0.05 mm (basal cell layer), 52%, 79% at 1 mm depth (dermal layer) and 15%, 26% at 10 mm depth (subcutaneous tissue) for 10 cmx10 cm 2 and 40 cmx40 cm 2 fields, respectively

  6. Lepton contamination and photon scatter produced by open field 18 MV X-ray beams in the build-up region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butson, M.J. E-mail: mbutson@guessmail.com; Cheung Tsang; Yu, P.K.N

    2002-04-01

    18 MV X-ray beams used in radiotherapy have skin sparing properties as they produce a dose build-up effect whereby a smaller dose is delivered to the skin compared to dose at depth. Experimental results have shown that variations in the build-up dose significantly contribute to lepton contamination produced outside of the patient or the phantom in question. Monte Carlo simulations of 18 MV X-ray beams show that the surface dose contribution from in-phantom scatter alone is approximately 6% of the maximum dose. The contribution to dose from lepton contamination is found by comparison of Monte Carlo phantom photon scatter dose only and experimental data. Results show that the percentage contributions to dose from lepton contamination are approximately, 65%, 90% of dose at 0.05 mm (basal cell layer), 52%, 79% at 1 mm depth (dermal layer) and 15%, 26% at 10 mm depth (subcutaneous tissue) for 10 cmx10 cm{sup 2} and 40 cmx40 cm{sup 2} fields, respectively.

  7. Analysis of latent variance reduction methods in phase space Monte Carlo calculations for 6, 10 and 18 MV photons by using MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezzati, A.O.; Sohrabpour, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, azimuthal particle redistribution (APR), and azimuthal particle rotational splitting (APRS) methods are implemented in MCNPX2.4 source code. First of all, the efficiency of these methods was compared to two tallying methods. The APRS is more efficient than the APR method in track length estimator tallies. However in the energy deposition tally, both methods have nearly the same efficiency. Latent variance reduction factors were obtained for 6, 10 and 18 MV photons as well. The APRS relative efficiency contours were obtained. These obtained contours reveal that by increasing the photon energies, the contours depth and the surrounding areas were further increased. The relative efficiency contours indicated that the variance reduction factor is position and energy dependent. The out of field voxels relative efficiency contours showed that latent variance reduction methods increased the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation efficiency in the out of field voxels. The APR and APRS average variance reduction factors had differences less than 0.6% for splitting number of 1000. -- Highlights: ► The efficiency of APR and APRS methods was compared to two tallying methods. ► The APRS is more efficient than the APR method in track length estimator tallies. ► In the energy deposition tally, both methods have nearly the same efficiency. ► Variance reduction factors of these methods are position and energy dependent.

  8. Surface dose investigation of the flattening filter-free photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuenan; Khan, Mohammad K; Ting, Joseph Y; Easterling, Stephen B

    2012-06-01

    Flattening filter-free (FFF) x-rays can provide more efficient use of photons and a significant increase of dose rate compared with conventional flattened x-rays, features that are especially beneficial for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The available data on the entrance doses of the FFF photon beams remain limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the entrance dose of FFF photons in the buildup region and to compare it with that of conventional flattened photons. A Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator has been in full clinical operation with 6-MV and 10-MV FFF and flattened x-ray photons. Entrance dose at the surface was measured using a parallel plate ionization chamber in a solid water phantom with buildup depth = 0~15 mm for 6X and 0~25 mm for 10X. Different field size (FS) patterns were created in the Eclipse Treatment Planning System by multileaf collimator (MLC) rather than jaws (FS = 2 × 2, 3 × 3, 4 × 4, 6 × 6, and 10 × 10 cm(2) by MLC and jaw size = 2.2 × 2.2, 3.2 × 3.2, 4.2 × 4.2, 6 × 6, and 10 × 10 cm(2)). The smallest FS was about four times larger than the ion chamber dimension. All buildup dose measurements were normalized to FS = 10 × 10 cm(2) at the depth of dose maximum (dmax). Good repeatability was demonstrated and surface dose increased linearly with FS for both flattened and FFF photons. The entrance dose of the FFF photons was modestly larger than that of the corresponding flattened photons for both 6X and 10X for different FS ranging from 2 × 2 cm(2) to 10 × 10 cm(2). The FFF photons have a higher entrance dose than that of the corresponding flattened photons for FS smaller than 10 × 10 cm(2). However, the difference is not substantial and may be clinically insignificant. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Definition of parameters for quality assurance of flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogliata, A.; Garcia, R.; Knöös, T.; Nicolini, G.; Clivio, A.; Vanetti, E.; Khamphan, C.; Cozzi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Flattening filter free (FFF) beams generated by medical linear accelerators have recently started to be used in radiotherapy clinical practice. Such beams present fundamental differences with respect to the standard filter flattened (FF) beams, making the generally used dosimetric parameters and definitions not always viable. The present study will propose possible definitions and suggestions for some dosimetric parameters for use in quality assurance of FFF beams generated by medical linacs in radiotherapy. Methods: The main characteristics of the photon beams have been analyzed using specific data generated by a Varian TrueBeam linac having both FFF and FF beams of 6 and 10 MV energy, respectively. Results: Definitions for dose profile parameters are suggested starting from the renormalization of the FFF with respect to the corresponding FF beam. From this point the flatness concept has been translated into one of “unflatness” and other definitions have been proposed, maintaining a strict parallelism between FFF and FF parameter concepts. Conclusions: Ideas for quality controls used in establishing a quality assurance program when introducing FFF beams into the clinical environment are given here, keeping them similar to those used for standard FF beams. By following the suggestions in this report, the authors foresee that the introduction of FFF beams into a clinical radiotherapy environment will be as safe and well controlled as standard beam modalities using the existing guidelines.

  10. Poster — Thur Eve — 37: Respiratory gating with an Elekta flattening filter free photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Péloquin, S; Furstoss, C; Munger, P; Wierzbicki, W; Carrier, J-F

    2014-01-01

    In cases where surgery is not possible for lung cancer treatment, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) may be an option. One problem when treating this type of cancer is the motion of the lungs caused by the patient's respiration. It is possible to reduce the impact of this movement with the use of respiratory gating. By combining respiratory gating with a flattening filter free (FFF) photon beam linac, the increased treatment time caused by a reduced beam-on time of respiratory gating methods can be compensated by the inherent increased dose rate of FFF beams. This project's aim is to create hardware and software interfaces allowing free respiration gating on an Elekta Synergy-S linac specially modified to deliver 6 MV FFF photon beams. First, a printed circuit board was created for reading the signal from a Bellows Belt from Philips (a respiration monitor belt) and transmitting an On/Off signal to the accelerator. A software was also developed to visualize patient respiration. Secondly, a FFF model was created with the Pinnacle treatment planning system from Philips. Gamma (Γ) analysis (2%, 2 mm) was used to evaluate model. For fields going from 5.6 × 5.6 to 12 × 12 cm 2 , central axis depth dose model fitting shows an average gamma value of 0.2 and 100% of gamma values remain under the Γ = 1 limit. For smaller fields (0.8 × 0.8 and 1.6 × 1.6 cm 2 ), Pinnacle has more trouble trying to fit the measurements, overestimating dose in penumbra and buildup regions

  11. Equivalent (uniform) square field sizes of flattening filter free photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Wolfgang; Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Palmans, Hugo

    2017-10-01

    Various types of treatment units, such as CyberKnife, TomoTherapy and C-arm linear accelerators (LINACs) are operated using flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams. Their reference dosimetry, however, is currently based on codes of practice that provide data which were primarily developed and tested for high-energy photon beams with flattening filter (WFF). The aim of this work was to introduce equivalent uniform square field sizes of FFF beams to serve as a basis of a unified reference dosimetry procedure applicable to all aforementioned FFF machines. For this purpose, in-house determined experimental data together with published data of the ratio of doses at depths of 20 cm and 10 cm in water (D 20,10) were used to characterize the depth dose distribution of 6 and 10 MV WFF and FFF beams. These data were analyzed for field sizes ranging from 2  ×  2 cm2 to 40  ×  40 cm2. A scatter function that takes the lateral profiles of the individual beams into account was fitted to the experimental data. The lateral profiles of the WFF beams were assumed to be uniform, while those of the FFF beams were approximated using fourth or sixth order polynomials. The scatter functions of the FFF beams were recalculated using a uniform lateral profile (the same as the physical profile of the WFF beams), and are henceforth denoted as virtual uniform FFF beams (VUFFF). The field sizes of the VUFFF beams having the same scatter contribution as the corresponding FFF beams at a given field size were defined as the equivalent uniform square field (EQUSF) size. Data from four different LINACs with 18 different beams in total, as well as a CyberKnife beam, were analyzed. The average values of EQUSFs over all investigated LINACs of the conventional 10  ×  10 cm2 reference fields of 6 MV and 10 MV FFF beams for C-arm LINACs and machine-specific reference fields for CyberKnife and TomoTherapy were 9.5 cm, 9 cm, 5.0 cm and 6.5 cm respectively. The

  12. Technical Report: Evaluation of peripheral dose for flattening filter free photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covington, E. L.; Moran, J. M.; Owrangi, A. M.; Prisciandaro, J. I., E-mail: joannp@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Ritter, T. A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive peripheral dose (PD) dataset for the two unflattened beams of nominal energy 6 and 10 MV for use in clinical care. Methods: Measurements were made in a 40 × 120 × 20 cm{sup 3} (width × length × depth) stack of solid water using an ionization chamber at varying depths (dmax, 5, and 10 cm), field sizes (3 × 3 to 30 × 30 cm{sup 2}), and distances from the field edge (5–40 cm). The effects of the multileaf collimator (MLC) and collimator rotation were also evaluated for a 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} field. Using the same phantom geometry, the accuracy of the analytic anisotropic algorithm (AAA) and Acuros dose calculation algorithm was assessed and compared to the measured values. Results: The PDs for both the 6 flattening filter free (FFF) and 10 FFF photon beams were found to decrease with increasing distance from the radiation field edge and the decreasing field size. The measured PD was observed to be higher for the 6 FFF than for the 10 FFF for all field sizes and depths. The impact of collimator rotation was not found to be clinically significant when used in conjunction with MLCs. AAA and Acuros algorithms both underestimated the PD with average errors of −13.6% and −7.8%, respectively, for all field sizes and depths at distances of 5 and 10 cm from the field edge, but the average error was found to increase to nearly −69% at greater distances. Conclusions: Given the known inaccuracies of peripheral dose calculations, this comprehensive dataset can be used to estimate the out-of-field dose to regions of interest such as organs at risk, electronic implantable devices, and a fetus. While the impact of collimator rotation was not found to significantly decrease PD when used in conjunction with MLCs, results are expected to be machine model and beam energy dependent. It is not recommended to use a treatment planning system to estimate PD due to the underestimation of the out-of-field dose and the inability to calculate dose

  13. SU-F-T-511: Feasibility Study of Using Flattening-Filter-Free Photon Beams to Deliver Conventional Flat Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, N; Lebron, S; Yan, G; Li, J; Liu, C; Lu, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Various dosimetric benefits such as increased dose rate, and reduced leakage and out of field dose has led to the growth of FFF technology in the clinic. In this study, we concentrate on investigating the feasibility of using flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams to deliver conventional flat beams (CFB), since completely getting rid of the flattening-filter module from the gantry head can not only simplify the gantry design but also decrease the workload on machine maintain and quality assurance. Methods: The sliding window based IMRT technique was utilized to generate the CFB from the FFF beam for various beam configurations on the Elekta Versa HD. The flat beam reproducibility and MU efficiency were compared for each beam configuration among FFF planning, delivery and CFB planning. Results: Compared to the CFB plan, the 3%3mm passing rates of the FFF beams from both measurement and plan are 100% and 95%(or better) for 15×15 cm 2 or smaller field size and for any field size greater than 15×15 cm 2 at 10 cm depth, respectively. The largest discrepancy is about 5% and typically appears at the field shoulder area. The MU increase average was 80% for FFF compared to CFB, however has a minimal impact on treatment delivery time. Conclusion: The ability to deliver conventional flat treatments is not absent when operating in FFF mode. With proper TPS manipulation and beam modulation, FFF mode can achieve reasonable flat profiles and comparable dose coverage as CFB does for various conventional treatment techniques, such as four field box, or long spine treatment techniques. The ability to deliver most clinical treatments from the same treatment unit, will allow for less quality assurance as well as maintenance, and completely eliminate the need for the flattening filter on modern linacs.

  14. SU-F-T-511: Feasibility Study of Using Flattening-Filter-Free Photon Beams to Deliver Conventional Flat Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, N; Lebron, S; Yan, G; Li, J; Liu, C; Lu, B [University Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Various dosimetric benefits such as increased dose rate, and reduced leakage and out of field dose has led to the growth of FFF technology in the clinic. In this study, we concentrate on investigating the feasibility of using flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams to deliver conventional flat beams (CFB), since completely getting rid of the flattening-filter module from the gantry head can not only simplify the gantry design but also decrease the workload on machine maintain and quality assurance. Methods: The sliding window based IMRT technique was utilized to generate the CFB from the FFF beam for various beam configurations on the Elekta Versa HD. The flat beam reproducibility and MU efficiency were compared for each beam configuration among FFF planning, delivery and CFB planning. Results: Compared to the CFB plan, the 3%3mm passing rates of the FFF beams from both measurement and plan are 100% and 95%(or better) for 15×15 cm{sup 2} or smaller field size and for any field size greater than 15×15 cm{sup 2}at 10 cm depth, respectively. The largest discrepancy is about 5% and typically appears at the field shoulder area. The MU increase average was 80% for FFF compared to CFB, however has a minimal impact on treatment delivery time. Conclusion: The ability to deliver conventional flat treatments is not absent when operating in FFF mode. With proper TPS manipulation and beam modulation, FFF mode can achieve reasonable flat profiles and comparable dose coverage as CFB does for various conventional treatment techniques, such as four field box, or long spine treatment techniques. The ability to deliver most clinical treatments from the same treatment unit, will allow for less quality assurance as well as maintenance, and completely eliminate the need for the flattening filter on modern linacs.

  15. Comparison of k Q factors measured with a water calorimeter in flattening filter free (FFF) and conventional flattening filter (cFF) photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Prez, Leon; de Pooter, Jacco; Jansen, Bartel; Perik, Thijs; Wittkämper, Frits

    2018-02-01

    Recently flattening filter free (FFF) beams became available for application in modern radiotherapy. There are several advantages of FFF beams over conventional flattening filtered (cFF) beams, however differences in beam spectra at the point of interest in a phantom potentially affect the ion chamber response. Beams are also non-uniform over the length of a typical reference ion chamber and recombination is usually larger. Despite several studies describing FFF beam characteristics, only a limited number of studies investigated their effect on k Q factors. Some of those studies predicted significant discrepancies in k Q factors (0.4% up to 1.0%) if TPR20,10 based codes of practice (CoPs) were to be used. This study addresses the question to which extent k Q factors, based on a TPR20,10 CoP, can be applied in clinical reference dosimetry. It is the first study that compares k Q factors measured directly with an absorbed dose to water primary standard in FFF-cFF pairs of clinical photon beams. This was done with a transportable water calorimeter described elsewhere. The measurements corrected for recombination and beam radial non-uniformity were performed in FFF-cFF beam pairs at 6 MV and 10 MV of an Elekta Versa HD for a selection of three different Farmer-type ion chambers (eight serial numbers). The ratio of measured k Q factors of the FFF-cFF beam pairs were compared with the TPR20,10 CoPs of the NCS and IAEA and the %dd(10) x CoP of the AAPM. For the TPR20,10 based CoPs differences less than 0.23% were found in k Q factors between the corresponding FFF-cFF beams with standard uncertainties smaller than 0.35%, while for the %dd(10) x these differences were smaller than 0.46% and within the expanded uncertainty of the measurements. Based on the measurements made with the equipment described in this study the authors conclude that the k Q factors provided by the NCS-18 and IAEA TRS-398 codes of practice can be applied for flattening filter free beams without

  16. SU-E-T-493: Influence of Filtered and Flatting Filter Free Photon Beam of 10 Megavolts Energy On Rapid Arc Radiotherapy Planning for Cervix Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girigesh, Y; Kumar, L; Raman, K; Mishra, M [Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi, Delhi (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Aim of this study is to determine the dosimetric influence of Filtered and Flatting Filter Free Photon Beam of 10 MV energy on RA planning for Ca. Cervix. Methods: CT data sets of eleven patients reported with carcinoma cervix were used for RA planning for 10MV -FFB and 10MV-FFFB. RA plans were generated using two full arcs.All RA plans were generated to deliver a dose of 50.4Gy in 28 fractions for PTV and ALARA for OAR’s. All plans were analysed for PTV Coverage, conformity Index, homogeneity index, dose to OAR’s, integral dose to normal tissue and total monitor units were studied. Results: DVH was used to evaluate RA plans for both 10MV-FFB and 10MV-FFFB photon beam. Planning results show a comparable PTV coverage for both energies. Results shows volume of PTV receiving prescription dose were 95.10+ 0.09% and 95.09 +0.11%, and volume of PTV receiving a dose of 107% is 0.45+0.96% and 5.25+8.9%, homogeneity index (HI) were 1.051+0.007 and 1.066+0.008, Conformity Index(CI) were 1.003+0.019 and 1.012+0.013, Mean Integral dose were 2.65+0.34 and 2.60+0.33(*10−5Gy.cm3) for 10MV-FFB and 10MV-FFFB respectively. 10MV-FB shows statistically significant (p<0.05) improvement in mean doses to bladder, rectum, bowel and mean total number of MU’s and also shows remarkable decrease in mean total no. of MU’s by 43.7% in comparison to 10MV-FFFB. There is statistically significant (p<0.05) difference found in CI and HI for 10MV-FB in comparison to 10MV -FFF beam. 10MV-FFFB shows statistically significant (p<0.05) for mean NTID and delivers 1.65 % less NTID in comparison to 10 MV- FB. Conclusion: 10MV-FB is superior to 10MV-FFFB for rapid arc planning in case of Cervix carcinomas, it offers better target coverage and OAR’s sparing, comparable mean Integral dose to normal tissues and 10 MV- FB also produced highly conformal and homogeneous dose distribution in comparison to 10MV-FFFB.

  17. Comparison of Flattening Filter (FF) and Flattening-Filter-Free (FFF) 6 MV photon beam characteristics for small field dosimetry using EGSnrc Monte Carlo code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, S.; Sureka, C. S.

    2017-06-01

    The present study is focused to compare the characteristics of Varian Clinac 600 C/D flattened and unflattened 6 MV photon beams for small field dosimetry using EGSnrc Monte Carlo Simulation since the small field dosimetry is considered to be the most crucial and provoking task in the field of radiation dosimetry. A 6 MV photon beam of a Varian Clinac 600 C/D medical linear accelerator operates with Flattening Filter (FF) and Flattening-Filter-Free (FFF) mode for small field dosimetry were performed using EGSnrc Monte Carlo user codes (BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc) in order to calculate the beam characteristics using Educated-trial and error method. These includes: Percentage depth dose, lateral beam profile, dose rate delivery, photon energy spectra, photon beam uniformity, out-of-field dose, surface dose, penumbral dose and output factor for small field dosimetry (0.5×0.5 cm2 to 4×4 cm2) and are compared with magna-field sizes (5×5 cm2 to 40×40 cm2) at various depths. The results obtained showed that the optimized beam energy and Full-width-half maximum value for small field dosimetry and magna-field dosimetry was found to be 5.7 MeV and 0.13 cm for both FF and FFF beams. The depth of dose maxima for small field size deviates minimally for both FF and FFF beams similar to magna-fields. The depths greater than dmax depicts a steeper dose fall off in the exponential region for FFF beams comparing FF beams where its deviations gets increased with the increase in field size. The shape of the lateral beam profiles of FF and FFF beams varies remains similar for the small field sizes less than 4×4 cm2 whereas it varies in the case of magna-fields. Dose rate delivery for FFF beams shows an eminent increase with a two-fold factor for both small field dosimetry and magna-field sizes. The surface dose measurements of FFF beams for small field size were found to be higher whereas it gets lower for magna-fields than FF beam. The amount of out-of-field dose reduction gets

  18. Technical Note: On the impact of the incident electron beam energy on the primary dose component of flattening filter free photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Palmans, Hugo; Lechner, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    For commercially available linear accelerators (Linacs), the electron energies of flattening filter free (FFF) and flattened (FF) beams are either identical or the electron energy of the FFF beam is increased to match the percentage depth dose curve (PDD) of the FF beam (in reference geometry). This study focuses on the primary dose components of FFF beams for both kinds of settings, studied on the same Linac. The measurements were conducted on a VersaHD Linac (Elekta, Crawley, UK) for both FF and FFF beams with nominal energies of 6 and 10 MV. In the clinical setting of the VersaHD, the energy of FFFM (Matched) beams is set to match the PDDs of the FF beams. In contrast the incident electron beam of the FFFU beam was set to the same energy as for the FF beam. Half value layers (HVLs) and a dual parameter beam quality specifier (DPBQS) were determined. For the 6 MV FFFM beam, HVL and DPBQS values were very similar compared to those of the 6 MV FF beam, while for the 10 MV FFFM and FF beams, only %dd(10)x and HVL values were comparable (differences below 1.5%). This shows that matching the PDD at one depth does not guarantee other beam quality dependent parameters to be matched. For FFFU beams, all investigated beam quality specifiers were significantly different compared to those for FF beams of the same nominal accelerator potential. The DPBQS of the 6 MV FF and FFFM beams was equal within the measurement uncertainty and was comparable to published data of a machine with similar TPR20,10 and %dd(10)x. In contrast to that, the DPBQS's two parameters of the 10 MV FFFM beam were substantially higher compared to those for the 10 MV FF beam. PDD-matched FF and FFF beams of both nominal accelerator potentials were observed to have similar HVL values, indicating similarity of their primary dose components. Using the DPBQS revealed that the mean attenuation coefficient was found to be the same within the uncertainty of 0.8% for 6 MV FF and 6 MV FFFM beams, while for 10 MV

  19. Technical Note: On the impact of the incident electron beam energy on the primary dose component of flattening filter free photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Lechner, Wolfgang; Palmans, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: For commercially available linear accelerators (Linacs), the electron energies of flattening filter free (FFF) and flattened (FF) beams are either identical or the electron energy of the FFF beam is increased to match the percentage depth dose curve (PDD) of the FF beam (in reference geometry). This study focuses on the primary dose components of FFF beams for both kinds of settings, studied on the same Linac. Methods: The measurements were conducted on a VersaHD Linac (Elekta, Crawley, UK) for both FF and FFF beams with nominal energies of 6 and 10 MV. In the clinical setting of the VersaHD, the energy of FFF M (Matched) beams is set to match the PDDs of the FF beams. In contrast the incident electron beam of the FFF U beam was set to the same energy as for the FF beam. Half value layers (HVLs) and a dual parameter beam quality specifier (DPBQS) were determined. Results: For the 6 MV FFF M beam, HVL and DPBQS values were very similar compared to those of the 6 MV FF beam, while for the 10 MV FFF M and FF beams, only %dd(10) x and HVL values were comparable (differences below 1.5%). This shows that matching the PDD at one depth does not guarantee other beam quality dependent parameters to be matched. For FFF U beams, all investigated beam quality specifiers were significantly different compared to those for FF beams of the same nominal accelerator potential. The DPBQS of the 6 MV FF and FFF M beams was equal within the measurement uncertainty and was comparable to published data of a machine with similar TPR 20,10 and %dd(10) x . In contrast to that, the DPBQS’s two parameters of the 10 MV FFF M beam were substantially higher compared to those for the 10 MV FF beam. Conclusions: PDD-matched FF and FFF beams of both nominal accelerator potentials were observed to have similar HVL values, indicating similarity of their primary dose components. Using the DPBQS revealed that the mean attenuation coefficient was found to be the same within the uncertainty of

  20. Design of a treatment room for an 18 MV Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez A, L.; Contreras S, H.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Perez L, L. H., E-mail: dameluis@hotmail.co [Instituto Zacatecano del Tumor, Apdo. Postal 294, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    In this work it has been calculated the treatment room for an 18 MV Linac. The walls thickness, the door and the maze were designed according to the NCRP Report 151 recommendations. The results of this work are contrasted with the Monte Carlo calculations performed with the MCNP5 code where dose equivalent due to neutrons and neutron spectra are estimated at different points inside and outside of the radiotherapy room, verify the shielding thickness obtained are enough to reduce the dose level allowed by the Mexican regulation. (Author)

  1. Critical appraisal of RapidArc radiosurgery with flattening filter free photon beams for benign brain lesions in comparison to GammaKnife: a treatment planning study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abacioglu, Ufuk; Ozen, Zeynep; Yilmaz, Meltem; Arifoglu, Alptekin; Gunhan, Basri; Kayalilar, Namik; Peker, Selcuk; Sengoz, Meric; Gurdalli, Salih; Cozzi, Luca

    2014-05-21

    To evaluate the role of RapidArc (RA) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of benign brain lesions in comparison to GammaKnife (GK) based technique. Twelve patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS, n = 6) or cavernous sinus meningioma (CSM, n = 6) were planned for both SRS using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) by RA. 104 MV flattening filter free photon beams with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min were selected. Data were compared against plans optimised for GK. A single dose of 12.5 Gy was prescribed. The primary objective was to assess treatment plan quality. Secondary aim was to appraise treatment efficiency. For VS, comparing best GK vs. RA plans, homogeneity was 51.7 ± 3.5 vs. 6.4 ± 1.5%; Paddick conformity Index (PCI) resulted 0.81 ± 0.03 vs. 0.84 ± 0.04. Gradient index (PGI) was 2.7 ± 0.2 vs. 3.8 ± 0.6. Mean target dose was 17.1 ± 0.9 vs. 12.9 ± 0.1 Gy. For the brain stem, D(1cm3) was 5.1 ± 2.0 Gy vs 4.8 ± 1.6 Gy. For the ipsilateral cochlea, D(0.1cm3) was 1.7 ± 1.0 Gy vs. 1.8 ± 0.5 Gy. For CSM, homogeneity was 52.3 ± 2.4 vs. 12.4 ± 0.6; PCI: 0.86 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.05; PGI: 2.6 ± 0.1 vs. 3.8 ± 0.5; D(1cm3) to brain stem was 5.4 ± 2.8 Gy vs. 5.2 ± 2.8 Gy; D(0.1cm3) to ipsi-lateral optic nerve was 4.2 ± 2.1 vs. 2.1 ± 1.5 Gy; D(0.1cm3) to optic chiasm was 5.9 ± 3.1 vs. 4.5 ± 2.1 Gy. Treatment time was 53.7 ± 5.8 (64.9 ± 24.3) minutes for GK and 4.8 ± 1.3 (5.0 ± 0.7) minutes for RA for schwannomas (meningiomas). SRS with RA and FFF beams revealed to be adequate and comparable to GK in terms of target coverage, homogeneity, organs at risk sparing with some gain in terms of treatment efficiency.

  2. Neutron H*(10) estimation and measurements around 18MV linac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón Ramírez, Pablo Víctor; Díaz Góngora, José Antonio Irán; Paredes Gutiérrez, Lydia Concepción; Rivera Montalvo, Teodoro; Vega Carrillo, Héctor René

    2016-11-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry, analytical techniques and Monte Carlo calculations were used to estimate the dose of neutron radiation in a treatment room with a linear electron accelerator of 18MV. Measurements were carried out through neutron ambient dose monitors which include pairs of thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD 600 ( 6 LiF: Mg, Ti) and TLD 700 ( 7 LiF: Mg, Ti), which were placed inside a paraffin spheres. The measurements has allowed to use NCRP 151 equations, these expressions are useful to find relevant dosimetric quantities. In addition, photoneutrons produced by linac head were calculated through MCNPX code taking into account the geometry and composition of the linac head principal parts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Shielding provision in an old 6MV bunker for a new 18MV linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howlett, S.J.; Ebert, M.A.; Kenny, W.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In October 2003 the Newcastle Mater Hospital commenced clinical use of a new Varian 21EX which replaced it's 14 year old Varian Clinac l800. The 1800 had only been enabled for 6MV X-ray beam for most of its clinical use but was enabled for 18MV for a period in 2000. This was to make up for the loss of an 18MV beam from another Clinac 1800 which was being replaced in a bunker designed for that higher energy. The new 21EX would provide both 6MV and 18MV beams for routine clinical use. The original bunker had been designed for the lower energy and hence additional shielding was required to meet radiation dose limits recommended in ICRP 60 and adopted in ARPANSA RPS6. A general radiation survey was conducted around the bunker area when the 18MV beam was available on the older linear accelerator. This rather unique situation provided data which would normally be impossible to obtain. Photon activation in the neutron door was a source of increased dose levels in the control area. Commercial design was contracted for the additional barrier calculations and supply. Additional shielding was required on one primary barrier and the neutron door. Post installation surveys were conducted and the R and V system was used for usage figures. Using dose constraints for public and occupational exposure, various survey points were measured around the bunker. This data was assessed in terms of calculated requirements, actual requirements and the ALARA principle for radiation shielding design. Review of staff dose histories was also performed. The final survey calculations showed the additional shielding more than adequate for the usage of 18MV and 6MV photon beams. The availability of the R and V data gives supporting evidence for design of barriers to be adjusted on usage values as has been reported in an earlier work at this centre. The issue of occupancy arises in this work as dose histories indicate. Typically barrier design is always conservative and survey results on

  4. Integrating techniques for neutron dosimetry in Linac 18 MV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceron R, P. V.; Diaz G, J. A. I.; Rivera M, T.; Paredes G, L. C.; Vega C, H. R.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper thermoluminescent dosimetry, analytical techniques and Monte Carlo calculations were used to estimate the neutron dose equivalent in a radiotherapy room with a linear electron accelerator of 18 MV. The equivalent dose was measured at isocenter to 1.42 m of target and at the entrance of the labyrinth of the room of a Novalis Tx. The neutron detectors were constructed with pairs of thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD 600 ( 6 LiF: Mg, Ti) and TLD 700 ( 7 LiF: Mg, Ti) which are placed inside a paraffin sphere of 20 cm in diameter. These measurements enabled the calculation of equivalent dose in the gate and the source term, using the relationships contained in the NCRP-151. Through the models carried out with the code MCNPX the absorbed dose distribution with regard to depth in a paraffin phantom are included and the neutron spectrum produced by the head, taking into account the geometry and component materials. The results are in the order of neutron milli sievert by gray of X-rays (mSv/Gy x) which are in the same order as those found in other reports for different accelerators. (Author)

  5. Radiological safety around a Linac of 18 MV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceron R, P.; Rivera M, T.; Paredes G, L.; Azorin N, J.; Sanchez, A.; Vega C, H. R.

    2014-10-01

    There are now several neutron detection systems, such as proportional counters based on BF 3 , He 3 and Bonner sphere spectrometers. However, the cost and complexity of the implementation of such systems makes them inaccessible for dosimetry purposes in radiotherapy rooms (Rt) and other facilities with this type of radiation fields. For these reasons the use of a neutron detection system is proposed composed by a paraffin moderator media forming an array 4π (spheres) and several pairs of thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD 600/TLD 700 inside, in order to make useful measurements for radiation protection around high-energy lineal accelerators (Linacs). In the first part of this work the system response when irradiated with a source of Pu Be and their corresponding calibration factor is displayed. In the second part are presented the ambient dose equivalent (H(10)) due to neutrons at various points of a living of Rt with a Linac of 18 MV, which are in the order mSv/Gy by X-ray treatment. The measurements made are similar to those taken in the memories of the accelerator and in previous work for this type of facility. (Author)

  6. Radiological safety around a Linac of 18 MV; Seguridad radiologica alrededor de un LINAC de 18 MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceron R, P.; Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Calz. Legaria No. 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Paredes G, L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Azorin N, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Sanchez, A. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, Edif. 9, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: victceronr@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 09868 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    There are now several neutron detection systems, such as proportional counters based on BF{sub 3}, He{sub 3} and Bonner sphere spectrometers. However, the cost and complexity of the implementation of such systems makes them inaccessible for dosimetry purposes in radiotherapy rooms (Rt) and other facilities with this type of radiation fields. For these reasons the use of a neutron detection system is proposed composed by a paraffin moderator media forming an array 4π (spheres) and several pairs of thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD 600/TLD 700 inside, in order to make useful measurements for radiation protection around high-energy lineal accelerators (Linacs). In the first part of this work the system response when irradiated with a source of Pu Be and their corresponding calibration factor is displayed. In the second part are presented the ambient dose equivalent (H(10)) due to neutrons at various points of a living of Rt with a Linac of 18 MV, which are in the order mSv/Gy by X-ray treatment. The measurements made are similar to those taken in the memories of the accelerator and in previous work for this type of facility. (Author)

  7. SU-F-T-338: Flattening Filter Free Photon Beams Can Achieve the Same Plan Quality as Conventional Flattened Beams for Prostate Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolar, M; Szwedowski, R; Greskovich, J; Xia, P [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Some modern linear accelerators are equipped with one low energy flat beam and two flattening filter free (FFF) beams at high and low energies. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the high energy FFF beam can produce the same plan quality as the conventional low energy flat beam, using a volumetric modulated arc (VMAT) technique for prostate patients. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients were selected with a prescription of 78Gy. For each patient, three plans were created: (a) double arc flat 6MV plan used clinically; (b) double arc 10MV FFF plan; (c) single arc 10MV FFF plan. Each plan was prescribed so that at least 95% of the PTV received the prescription dose. The following dosimetric endpoints were evaluated: volume receiving 78Gy (V78) of the CTV and PTV, PTV conformality index (CI, ratio of prescription isodose volume to the PTV volume), bladder volume receiving 70Gy (V70) and 60Gy (V60), rectum volume receiving 70Gy (V70) and 50Gy (V50), dose to 10cc of the rectum, and volume of both femoral heads receiving 50Gy (V50). Total monitor units for each plan were recorded. Results: No significant difference was found for all dosimetric endpoints between all plans (p>0.05). Compared to the 6MV plans, monitor units were higher with the double arc 10MV FFF plans and lower with the single arc 10MV FFF plans, 29% and 4% respectively. Conclusion: Both single arc and double arc 10MV FFF VMAT can achieve equivalent plan quality as 6MV flat beam double arc treatment plans. With the gantry speed restriction, a high dose rate of 2400MU/min may allow the optimizer to use more MUs than actually needed. Single arc 10MV FFF VMAT plans are a reasonable alternative to double arc 6MV flat beam VMAT plans.

  8. SU-F-T-338: Flattening Filter Free Photon Beams Can Achieve the Same Plan Quality as Conventional Flattened Beams for Prostate Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolar, M; Szwedowski, R; Greskovich, J; Xia, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Some modern linear accelerators are equipped with one low energy flat beam and two flattening filter free (FFF) beams at high and low energies. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the high energy FFF beam can produce the same plan quality as the conventional low energy flat beam, using a volumetric modulated arc (VMAT) technique for prostate patients. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients were selected with a prescription of 78Gy. For each patient, three plans were created: (a) double arc flat 6MV plan used clinically; (b) double arc 10MV FFF plan; (c) single arc 10MV FFF plan. Each plan was prescribed so that at least 95% of the PTV received the prescription dose. The following dosimetric endpoints were evaluated: volume receiving 78Gy (V78) of the CTV and PTV, PTV conformality index (CI, ratio of prescription isodose volume to the PTV volume), bladder volume receiving 70Gy (V70) and 60Gy (V60), rectum volume receiving 70Gy (V70) and 50Gy (V50), dose to 10cc of the rectum, and volume of both femoral heads receiving 50Gy (V50). Total monitor units for each plan were recorded. Results: No significant difference was found for all dosimetric endpoints between all plans (p>0.05). Compared to the 6MV plans, monitor units were higher with the double arc 10MV FFF plans and lower with the single arc 10MV FFF plans, 29% and 4% respectively. Conclusion: Both single arc and double arc 10MV FFF VMAT can achieve equivalent plan quality as 6MV flat beam double arc treatment plans. With the gantry speed restriction, a high dose rate of 2400MU/min may allow the optimizer to use more MUs than actually needed. Single arc 10MV FFF VMAT plans are a reasonable alternative to double arc 6MV flat beam VMAT plans.

  9. Tunable microwave photonic filter free from baseband and carrier suppression effect not requiring single sideband modulation using a Mach-Zenhder configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, José; Ortigosa-Blanch, Arturo; Pastor, Daniel; Capmany, José

    2006-08-21

    We present a full theoretical and experimental analysis of a novel all-optical microwave photonic filter combining a mode-locked fiber laser and a Mach-Zenhder structure in cascade to a 2x1 electro-optic modulator. The filter is free from the carrier suppression effect and thus it does not require single sideband modulation. Positive and negative coefficients are obtained inherently in the system and the tunability is achieved by controlling the optical path difference of the Mach-Zenhder structure.

  10. Constituent Components of Out-of-Field Scatter Dose for 18-MV Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy: A Comparison With 6-MV and Implications for Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruben, Jeremy D.; Smith, Ryan; Lancaster, Craig M.; Haynes, Matthew; Jones, Phillip; Panettieri, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize and compare the components of out-of-field dose for 18-MV intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and their 6-MV counterparts and consider implications for second cancer induction. Methods and Materials: Comparable plans for each technique/energy were delivered to a water phantom with a sloping wall; under full scatter conditions; with field edge abutting but outside the bath to prevent internal/phantom scatter; and with shielding below the linear accelerator head to attenuate head leakage. Neutron measurements were obtained from published studies. Results: Eighteen-megavolt IMRT produces 1.7 times more out-of-field scatter than 18-MV 3D-CRT. In absolute terms, however, differences are just approximately 0.1% of central axis dose. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT reduces internal/patient scatter by 13%, but collimator scatter (C) is 2.6 times greater than 18-MV 3D-CRT. Head leakage (L) is minimal. Increased out-of-field photon scatter from 18-MV IMRT carries out-of-field second cancer risks of approximately 0.2% over and above the 0.4% from 18-MV 3D-CRT. Greater photoneutron dose from 18-MV IMRT may result in further maximal, absolute increased risk to peripheral tissue of approximately 1.2% over 18-MV 3D-CRT. Out-of-field photon scatter remains comparable for the same modality irrespective of beam energy. Machine scatter (C+L) from 18 versus 6 MV is 1.2 times higher for IMRT and 1.8 times for 3D-CRT. It is 4 times higher for 6-MV IMRT versus 3D-CRT. Reduction in internal scatter with 18 MV versus 6 MV is 27% for 3D-CRT and 29% for IMRT. Compared with 6-MV 3D-CRT, 18-MV IMRT increases out-of-field second cancer risk by 0.2% from photons and adds 0.28-2.2% from neutrons. Conclusions: Out-of-field photon dose seems to be independent of beam energy for both techniques. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT increases out-of-field scatter 1.7-fold over 3D-CRT because of greater collimator scatter despite

  11. Integrating techniques for neutron dosimetry in Linac 18 MV; Integrando tecnicas para dosimetria de neutrones en un Linac de 18 MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceron R, P. V.; Diaz G, J. A. I.; Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Paredes G, L. C. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper thermoluminescent dosimetry, analytical techniques and Monte Carlo calculations were used to estimate the neutron dose equivalent in a radiotherapy room with a linear electron accelerator of 18 MV. The equivalent dose was measured at isocenter to 1.42 m of target and at the entrance of the labyrinth of the room of a Novalis Tx. The neutron detectors were constructed with pairs of thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD 600 ({sup 6}LiF: Mg, Ti) and TLD 700 ({sup 7}LiF: Mg, Ti) which are placed inside a paraffin sphere of 20 cm in diameter. These measurements enabled the calculation of equivalent dose in the gate and the source term, using the relationships contained in the NCRP-151. Through the models carried out with the code MCNPX the absorbed dose distribution with regard to depth in a paraffin phantom are included and the neutron spectrum produced by the head, taking into account the geometry and component materials. The results are in the order of neutron milli sievert by gray of X-rays (mSv/Gy x) which are in the same order as those found in other reports for different accelerators. (Author)

  12. Dose-volume histogram comparison between static 5-field IMRT with 18-MV X-rays and helical tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Akihiro; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hattori, Yukiko; Tamura, Takeshi; Iwabuchi, Michio; Otsuka, Shinya; Sugie, Chikao; Yanagi, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    We treated prostate cancer patients with static 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using linac 18-MV X-rays or tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays. As X-ray energies differ, we hypothesized that 18-MV photon IMRT may be better for large patients and tomotherapy may be more suitable for small patients. Thus, we compared dose-volume parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) in 59 patients with T1-3 N0M0 prostate cancer who had been treated using 5-field IMRT. For these same patients, tomotherapy plans were also prepared for comparison. In addition, plans of 18 patients who were actually treated with tomotherapy were analyzed. The evaluated parameters were homogeneity indicies and a conformity index for the PTVs, and D2 (dose received by 2% of the PTV in Gy), D98, Dmean and V10-70 Gy (%) for OARs. To evaluate differences by body size, patients with a known body mass index were grouped by that index ( 25 kg/m(2)). For the PTV, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans compared with the 5-field IMRT plans. For the rectum, V10 Gy and V60 Gy were higher, whereas V20 Gy and V30 Gy were lower in the tomotherapy plans. For the bladder, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans. However, both plans were considered clinically acceptable. Similar trends were observed in 18 patients treated with tomotherapy. Obvious trends were not observed for body size. Tomotherapy provides equivalent dose distributions for PTVs and OARs compared with 18-MV 5-field IMRT. Tomotherapy could be used as a substitute for high-energy photon IMRT for prostate cancer regardless of body size. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  13. Ambient neutron dose equivalent outside concrete vault rooms for 15 and 18 MV radiotherapy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-ovalle, S. A.; Barquero, R.; Gomez-ros, J. M.; Lallena, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), due to neutrons outside three bunkers that house a 15- and a 18-MV Varian Clinac 2100C/D and a 15-MV Elekta Inor clinical linacs, has been calculated. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX (v. 2.5) has been used to simulate the neutron production and transport. The complete geometries including linacs and full installations have been built up according to the specifications of the manufacturers and the planes provided by the corresponding medical physical services of the hospitals where the three linacs operate. Two of these installations, those lodging the Varian linacs, have an entrance door to the bunker while the other one does not, although it has a maze with two bends. Various treatment orientations were simulated in order to establish plausible annual equivalent doses. Specifically anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral orientations and an additional one with the gantry rotated 30 deg. have been studied. Significant dose rates have been found only behind the walls and the door of the bunker, near the entrance and the console, with a maximum of 12 μSv h -1 . Dose rates per year have been calculated assuming a conservative workload for the three facilities. The higher dose rates in the corresponding control areas were 799 μSv y -1 , in the case of the facility which operates the 15-MV Clinac, 159 μSv y -1 , for that with the 15-MV Elekta, and 21 μSv y -1 for the facility housing the 18-MV Varian. A comparison with measurements performed in similar installations has been carried out and a reasonable agreement has been found. The results obtained indicate that the neutron contamination does not increase the doses above the legal limits and does not produce a significant enhancement of the dose equivalent calculated. When doses are below the detection limits provided by the measuring devices available today, MCNPX simulation provides an useful method to evaluate neutron dose equivalents

  14. Neutron spectra and H*(10) around and 18 MV Linac by Ann's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banuelos F, A.; Valero L, C.; Borja H, C. G.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: alanb535@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    Neutron spectra and ambient dose equivalent H*(10) were calculated for a radiotherapy room in 16 point-like detectors, 15 located inside the vault room and 1 located outside the bunker. The calculation was carried out using Monte Carlo Methods with the MCNP5 code for a generic radiotherapy room model operating with a 18 MV Linac, obtaining 16 neutron spectra with 47 energy bins, the H*(10) values were calculated from the neutron spectra by the use of the fluence-dose conversion factors. An artificial neural network were designed and trained to determine the neutron H*(10) in 15 different locations inside the vault room from the H*(10) dose calculated for the detector located outside the room, using the calculated dose values as training set, using the scaled conjugated gradient training algorithm. The mean squared error set for the network training was 1E(-14), adjusting the data in 99.992 %. In the treatment hall, as the distance respect to the isocenter is increased, the amount of neutrons and the H*(10) are reduced, neutrons in the high-energy region are shifted to lower region peaking around 0.1 MeV, however the epithermal and thermal neutrons remain constant due to the room-return effect. In the maze the spectra are dominated by epithermal and thermal neutrons that contributes to produce activation and the production of prompt gamma-rays. The results shows the using this artificial intelligence technic as a useful tool for the neutron spectrometry and dosimetry by the simplification on the neutronic fields characterization inside radiotherapy rooms avoiding the use of traditional spectrometric systems. And once the H*(10) doses have been calculated, to take the appropriated actions to reduce or prevent the patient and working staff exposure to this undesirable neutron radiation. (Author)

  15. Neutron spectra and H*(10) around and 18 MV Linac by Ann's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banuelos F, A.; Valero L, C.; Borja H, C. G.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R.

    2011-10-01

    Neutron spectra and ambient dose equivalent H*(10) were calculated for a radiotherapy room in 16 point-like detectors, 15 located inside the vault room and 1 located outside the bunker. The calculation was carried out using Monte Carlo Methods with the MCNP5 code for a generic radiotherapy room model operating with a 18 MV Linac, obtaining 16 neutron spectra with 47 energy bins, the H*(10) values were calculated from the neutron spectra by the use of the fluence-dose conversion factors. An artificial neural network were designed and trained to determine the neutron H*(10) in 15 different locations inside the vault room from the H*(10) dose calculated for the detector located outside the room, using the calculated dose values as training set, using the scaled conjugated gradient training algorithm. The mean squared error set for the network training was 1E(-14), adjusting the data in 99.992 %. In the treatment hall, as the distance respect to the isocenter is increased, the amount of neutrons and the H*(10) are reduced, neutrons in the high-energy region are shifted to lower region peaking around 0.1 MeV, however the epithermal and thermal neutrons remain constant due to the room-return effect. In the maze the spectra are dominated by epithermal and thermal neutrons that contributes to produce activation and the production of prompt gamma-rays. The results shows the using this artificial intelligence technic as a useful tool for the neutron spectrometry and dosimetry by the simplification on the neutronic fields characterization inside radiotherapy rooms avoiding the use of traditional spectrometric systems. And once the H*(10) doses have been calculated, to take the appropriated actions to reduce or prevent the patient and working staff exposure to this undesirable neutron radiation. (Author)

  16. Surface dose measurements in and out of field. Implications for breast radiotherapy with megavoltage photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lonski, Peta; Kron, Tomas [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); RMIT Univ., Melbourne (Australia); Ramachandran, Prabhakar; Franich, Rick [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2017-07-01

    This study examines the difference in surface dose between flat and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in the context of breast radiotherapy. The surface dose was measured for 6 MV, 6 MV FFF, 10 MV, 10 MV FFF and 18 MV photon beams using a thin window ionisation chamber for various field sizes. Profiles were acquired to ascertain the change in surface dose off-axis. Out-of-field measurements were included in a clinically representative half beam block tangential breast field. In the field centres of FFF beams the surface dose was found to be increased for small fields and decreased for large fields compared to flat beams. For FFF beams, surface dose was found to decrease off-axis and resulted in lower surface dose out-of-field compared to flat beams.

  17. Measurementof photo-neutron dose from an 18-MV medical linac using a foil activation method in view of radiation protection of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuecel, Haluk; Kolbasi, Asuman; Yueksel, Alptug Oezer; Cobanbas, Ibrahim; Kaya, Vildan

    2016-01-01

    High-energy linear accelerators are increasingly used in the medical field. However, the unwanted photo-neutrons can also be contributed to the dose delivered to the patients during their treatments. In this study, neutron fluxes were measured in a solid water phantom placed at the isocenter 1-m distance from the head of an 18-MV linac using the foil activation method. The produced activities were measured with a calibrated well-type Ge detector. From the measured fluxes, the total neutron fluence was found to be (1.17 ± 0.06) X 10 7 n/cm 2 per Gy at the phantom surface in a 20 X 20 cm 2 X-ray field size. The maximum photo-neutron dose was measured to be 0.67 ± 0.04 mSv/Gy at d max = 5 cm depth in the phantom at isocenter. The present results are compared with those obtained for different field sizes of 10 X 10cm 2 , 15 X 15cm 2 , and 20 X 20cm 2 from 10-, 15-, and 18-MV linacs. Additionally, ambient neutron dose equivalents were determined at different locations in the room and they were found to be negligibly low. The results indicate that the photo-neutron dose at the patient position is not a negligible fraction of the therapeutic photon dose. Thus, there is a need for reduction of the contaminated neutron dose by taking some additional measures, for instance, neutron absorbing-protective materials might be used as aprons during the treatment

  18. Spectra and neutron dose of an 18 MV Linac using two geometric models of the head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, M. T.; Pino, F.; Barros, H.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Davila, J.; Salcedo, E.; Vega C, H. R.; Benites R, J. L.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: Using the Monte Carlo method, by MCNP5 code, simulations were performed with different source terms and 2 geometric models of the head to obtain spectra in energy, flow and doses of photo-neutrons at different positions on the stretcher and in the radiotherapy room. The simplest model was a spherical shell of tungsten; the second was the complete model of a heterogeneous head of an accelerator Varian ix. In both models Tosi function was used as a source term. In addition, for the second model Sheikh-Bagheri distribution was used for photons and photo-neutrons were generated. Also in both models the radiotherapy room of Gurve group of the Teaching Medical Center La Trinidad was included, which is equipped with an accelerator Varian Clinic 2100. In this Center passive detectors PADC (Cr-39) were irradiated with neutron converters, with 18 MeV photons radiation. The measured neutron flow was compared with that obtained with Monte Carlo calculations. The Monte Carlo flows are similar to those measured at the isocenter. The simplest model underestimates the neutron flow compared with the calculated flows with the heterogeneous model of the head. (Author)

  19. Beam properties and stability of a flattening-filter free 7 MV beam--An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Licht, Norbert; Nuesken, Frank; Ruebe, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Several works have recently focused on flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams of linear accelerators of various companies (in particular, Varian and Elekta), but no overview as yet exists for the flattening-filter free 7XU beam (Siemens Artiste). Methods: Dosimetric properties of the 7XU beam were measured in May and September 2011. We present depth dose curves and beam profiles, output factors, and MLC transmission and assess the stability of the measurements. The 7XU beam was commissioned in the Pinnacle³ treatment planning system (TPS), and modeling results including the spectrum are presented. Results: The percent depth dose curve of the 7XU beam is similar to the flat 6X beam line, with a slightly smaller surface dose. The beam profiles show the characteristic shape of flattening-filter free beams, with deviations between measurements of generally less than 1%. The output factors of the 7XU beam decrease more slowly than for the 6X beam. The MLC transmission is comparable but slightly less for the 7XU beam. The 7XU beam can be adequately modeled by the Pinnacle³ TPS, with successful dosimetric verification. The spectrum of the 7XU beam has lower photon fluence up to approximately 2.5 MeV and higher fluence beyond, with a slightly higher mean energy. Conclusions: The 7XU beam has been commissioned for clinical use after successful modeling, stability checks, and dosimetric verification.

  20. Tenth value layers for 60Co gamma rays and for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV x rays in concrete for beams of cone angles between 0 degrees and 14 degrees calculated by Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradat, Adnan K; Biggs, Peter J

    2007-05-01

    The calculation of shielding barrier thicknesses for radiation therapy facilities according to the NCRP formalism is based on the use of broad beams (that is, the maximum possible field sizes). However, in practice, treatment fields used in radiation therapy are, on average, less than half the maximum size. Indeed, many contemporary treatment techniques call for reduced field sizes to reduce co-morbidity and the risk of second cancers. Therefore, published tenth value layers (TVLs) for shielding materials do not apply to these very small fields. There is, hence, a need to determine the TVLs for various beam modalities as a function of field size. The attenuation of (60)Co gamma rays and photons of 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV bremsstrahlung x ray beams by concrete has been studied using the Monte Carlo technique (MCNP version 4C2) for beams of half-opening angles of 0 degrees , 3 degrees , 6 degrees , 9 degrees , 12 degrees , and 14 degrees . The distance between the x-ray source and the distal surface of the shielding wall was fixed at 600 cm, a distance that is typical for modern radiation therapy rooms. The maximum concrete thickness varied between 76.5 cm and 151.5 cm for (60)Co and 18 MV x rays, respectively. Detectors were placed at 630 cm, 700 cm, and 800 cm from the source. TVLs have been determined down to the third TVL. Energy spectra for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV x rays for 10 x 10 cm(2) and 40 x 40 cm(2) field sizes were used to generate depth dose curves in water that were compared with experimentally measured values.

  1. Artificial neural network for the determination of neutron spectra in the bunker of a Linac of 18 MV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banuelos F, A.; Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C.; Guzman G, K. A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R.

    2011-11-01

    The neutron spectrum and equivalent of environmental dose H(10) were calculated for a radiotherapy room in 16 punctual detectors, 15 inside of and 1 outside of the same one. The calculations were carried out with the Monte Carlo method and with the code MCNP5 for a generic room model with a Linac of 18 MV, obtaining this way 16 spectra with 47 intervals of energy class, starting from these spectra the values of H(10) were calculated. On the other hand, an artificial neural network was designed and trained to determine the spectra by neutrons in 15 different locations inside the radiotherapy room starting from the value of H(10) in the detector 16 located in the exterior of the room, using as training data the spectra and calculated dose by neutrons, of which a medium quadratic error was obtained (m se) in the adjustment between the objective data and the exit data of m se=1E(-8). The results demonstrate that the use of the artificial intelligence as technique is an useful tool in the spectrometry and dosimetry of neutrons, since it simplifies the characterization process of neutron fields in radiotherapy rooms without the use of spectrometry systems, and that once the energy distribution of the neutrons produced by the Linac is known and the corresponding doses be calculated H(10), they can take the appropriate cautions for the security patient in treatment as well as for the personnel in the room. (Author)

  2. Simplified geometric model for the calculation of neutron yield in an accelerator of 18 MV for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes G, L.C.; Balcazar G, M.; Francois L, J.L.; Azorin N, J.

    2008-01-01

    The results of the neutrons yield in different components of the bolster of an accelerator Varian Clinac 2100C of 18 MV for radiotherapy are presented, which contribute to the radiation of flight of neutrons in the patient and bolster planes. For the calculation of the neutrons yield, a simplified geometric model of spherical cell for the armor-plating of the bolster with Pb and W was used. Its were considered different materials for the Bremsstrahlung production and of neutrons produced through the photonuclear reactions and of electro disintegration, in function of the initial energy of the electron. The theoretical result of the total yield of neutrons is of 1.17x10 -3 n/e, considering to the choke in position of closed, in the patient plane with a distance source-surface of 100 cm; of which 15.73% corresponds to the target, 58.72% to the primary collimator, 4.53% to the levelled filter of Fe, 4.87% to the levelled filter of Ta and 16.15% to the closed choke. For an initial energy of the electrons of 18 MeV, a half energy of the neutrons of 2 MeV was obtained. The calculated values for radiation of experimental neutrons flight are inferior to the maxima limit specified in the NCRP-102 and IEC-60601-201.Ed.2.0 reports. The absorbed dose of neutrons determined through the measurements with TLD dosemeters in the isocenter to 100 cm of the target when the choke is closed one, is approximately 3 times greater that the calculated for armor-plating of W and 1.9 times greater than an armor-plating of Pb. (Author)

  3. Irradiation with x-rays of the energy 18 MV induces radioactivity in transfusion blood: Proposal of a safe method using 6 MV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentzel, Katharina; Badakhshi, Harun

    2016-12-01

    To prevent a fatal transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, it is recommended to irradiate transfusion blood and blood components with ionizing radiation. Using x-rays from a linear accelerator of the radiotherapy department is an accepted alternative to gamma irradiation devices of the blood bank and to the orthovoltage units that are replacing the gamma irradiators today. However, the use of high energy x-rays may carry a potential risk of induced radioactivity. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of two different energy levels, 6 and 18 MV, which are executed in routine clinical settings. The research question was if induced radioactivity occurs at one of these standard energy levels. The authors aimed to give a proposal for a blood irradiation procedure that certainly avoids induced radioactivity. For this study, the authors developed a blood bag phantom, irradiated it with x-ray energies of 6 and 18 MV, and measured the induced radioactivity in a well counter. Thereafter, the same irradiation and measuring procedure was performed with a unit of packed red blood cells. A feasible clinical procedure was developed using 6 MV and an acrylic box. With the irradiation planning system XiO, the authors generated an irradiation protocol for the linear accelerator Siemens ONCOR Anvant-Garde. Both measurement setups showed that there was induced radioactivity for 18 MV but not for 6 MV. The induced radioactivity for 18 MV was up to 190 times the background. This is significant and of clinical relevance especially since there are newborn and fetal blood recipients for whom every radiation exposure has to be strictly avoided. The irradiation of blood with x-rays from a linear accelerator of the radiotherapy department is safe and feasible, but by the current state of scientific knowledge, the authors recommend to use an x-ray energy of 6 MV or less to avoid induced radioactivity in transfusion blood.

  4. Radiation transmission of heavyweight and normal-weight concretes containing colemanite for 6 MV and 18 MV X-rays using linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, F.; Budak, G.; Sahin, R.; Karabulut, A.; Oltulu, M.; Serifoglu, K.; Un, A.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate measurements have been made to determine radiation transmission of concretes produced with barite, colemanite and normal aggregate by using beam transmission method for 6 and 18 MV X-rays with a linear accelerator (LINAC). Linear attenuation coefficients of thirteen heavy- and four normal-weight concretes were calculated. It was determined that linear attenuation coefficient (μ, cm -1 ) decreased with colemanite concentration and increased with barite concentration in both types of the concretes.

  5. A Retina-Like Dual Band Organic Photosensor Array for Filter-Free Near-Infrared-to-Memory Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanlin; Liu, Hongtao; Zhao, Qiang; Ni, Zhenjie; Zou, Ye; Yang, Jie; Wang, Lifeng; Sun, Yanqiu; Guo, Yunlong; Hu, Wenping; Liu, Yunqi

    2017-08-01

    Human eyes use retina photoreceptor cells to absorb and distinguish photons from different wavelengths to construct an image. Mimicry of such a process and extension of its spectral response into the near-infrared (NIR) is indispensable for night surveillance, retinal prosthetics, and medical imaging applications. Currently, NIR organic photosensors demand optical filters to reduce visible interference, thus making filter-free and anti-visible NIR imaging a challenging task. To solve this limitation, a filter-free and conformal, retina-inspired NIR organic photosensor is presented. Featuring an integration of photosensing and floating-gate memory modules, the device possesses an acute color distinguishing capability. In general, the retina-like photosensor transduces NIR (850 nm) into nonvolatile memory and acts as a dynamic photoswitch under green light (550 nm). In doing this, a filter-free but color-distinguishing photosensor is demonstrated that selectively converts NIR optical signals into nonvolatile memory. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Spectra and neutron dose of an 18 MV Linac using two geometric models of the head; Espectros y dosis por neutrones de un Linac de 18 MV usando dos modelos geometricos del cabezal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, M. T.; Pino, F.; Barros, H.; Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Sartenejas, Baruta 1080-A, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Davila, J. [Fisica Medica C. A., Av. Francisco de Miranda s/n, Los Palos Grandes, 1060 Miranda (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Salcedo, E. [Centro Medico Docente La Trinidad, Av. de El Haltillo, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Benites R, J. L., E-mail: mariate9590@gmail.com [Centro de Cancerologia de Nayarit, Servicio de Seguridad Radiologica, Calz. de la Cruz 118 Sur, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Using the Monte Carlo method, by MCNP5 code, simulations were performed with different source terms and 2 geometric models of the head to obtain spectra in energy, flow and doses of photo-neutrons at different positions on the stretcher and in the radiotherapy room. The simplest model was a spherical shell of tungsten; the second was the complete model of a heterogeneous head of an accelerator Varian ix. In both models Tosi function was used as a source term. In addition, for the second model Sheikh-Bagheri distribution was used for photons and photo-neutrons were generated. Also in both models the radiotherapy room of Gurve group of the Teaching Medical Center La Trinidad was included, which is equipped with an accelerator Varian Clinic 2100. In this Center passive detectors PADC (Cr-39) were irradiated with neutron converters, with 18 MeV photons radiation. The measured neutron flow was compared with that obtained with Monte Carlo calculations. The Monte Carlo flows are similar to those measured at the isocenter. The simplest model underestimates the neutron flow compared with the calculated flows with the heterogeneous model of the head. (Author)

  7. Improvement of the penumbra for small radiosurgical fields using flattening filter free low megavoltage beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarahmadi, Mehran [Kurdistan Univ. of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Allahverdi, Mahmoud; Nedaie, Hassan A.; Asnaashari, Khadijeh; Vaezzadeh, Sayed A. [Tehran Univ. of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sauer, Otto A. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie

    2013-07-01

    Background: In stereotactic radiosurgery, sharp beam edges have clear advantages to spare normal tissues. In general, the dose gradient is a limiting factor in minimizing dose to nearby critical structures for clinical cases. Therefore the penumbral width should be diminished. Methods: A Varian Clinac 2100 linear accelerator equipped with in-house designed radiosurgical collimator was modeled using the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code and compared with the measurements. The 0.015 cm{sup 3} PinPoint chamber was used to measure the 6 MV photon beam characteristics and to validate Monte Carlo calculations. Additional to the standard (STD) linac, a flattening filter free (FFF) linac was simulated. Percent depth doses, beam profiles and output factors were calculated for small field sizes with diameter of 5, 10, 20 and 30 mm with DOSXYZnrc. The mean energy and photon fluence at the water surface were calculated with BEAMDP for both FFF linac and STD linacs. Results: The penumbra width (80%-20%) was decreased by 0.5, 0.3, 0.2 and 0.2 mm for field sizes of 5, 10, 20 and 30 mm respectively when removing the FF. The fluence of photons at the surface increased up to 3.6 times and the mean energy decreased by a factor of 0.69 when removing the FF. The penumbra width (80%-20%) decreased by 17% when a 2 MeV monoenergetic electron pencil beam incident on the target is used instead of 6.2 MeV. Conclusions: It was found that the penumbra of small field sizes is decreased by removing the FF. Likewise using low megavoltage photons reduced the beam penumbra maintaining adequate penetration and skin sparing. (orig.)

  8. Photoneutron Flux Measurement via Neutron Activation Analysis in a Radiotherapy Bunker with an 18 MV Linear Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çeçen, Yiğit; Gülümser, Tuğçe; Yazgan, Çağrı; Dapo, Haris; Üstün, Mahmut; Boztosun, Ismail

    2017-09-01

    In cancer treatment, high energy X-rays are used which are produced by linear accelerators (LINACs). If the energy of these beams is over 8 MeV, photonuclear reactions occur between the bremsstrahlung photons and the metallic parts of the LINAC. As a result of these interactions, neutrons are also produced as secondary radiation products (γ,n) which are called photoneutrons. The study aims to map the photoneutron flux distribution within the LINAC bunker via neutron activation analysis (NAA) using indium-cadmium foils. Irradiations made at different gantry angles (0°, 90°, 180° and 270°) with a total of 91 positions in the Philips SLI-25 linear accelerator treatment room and location-based distribution of thermal neutron flux was obtained. Gamma spectrum analysis was carried out with high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. Results of the analysis showed that the maximum neutron flux in the room occurred at just above of the LINAC head (1.2x105 neutrons/cm2.s) which is compatible with an americium-beryllium (Am-Be) neutron source. There was a 90% decrease of flux at the walls and at the start of the maze with respect to the maximum neutron flux. And, just in front of the LINAC door, inside the room, neutron flux was measured less than 1% of the maximum.

  9. Photoneutron Flux Measurement via Neutron Activation Analysis in a Radiotherapy Bunker with an 18 MV Linear Accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çeçen Yiğit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In cancer treatment, high energy X-rays are used which are produced by linear accelerators (LINACs. If the energy of these beams is over 8 MeV, photonuclear reactions occur between the bremsstrahlung photons and the metallic parts of the LINAC. As a result of these interactions, neutrons are also produced as secondary radiation products (γ,n which are called photoneutrons. The study aims to map the photoneutron flux distribution within the LINAC bunker via neutron activation analysis (NAA using indium-cadmium foils. Irradiations made at different gantry angles (0°, 90°, 180° and 270° with a total of 91 positions in the Philips SLI-25 linear accelerator treatment room and location-based distribution of thermal neutron flux was obtained. Gamma spectrum analysis was carried out with high purity germanium (HPGe detector. Results of the analysis showed that the maximum neutron flux in the room occurred at just above of the LINAC head (1.2x105 neutrons/cm2.s which is compatible with an americium-beryllium (Am-Be neutron source. There was a 90% decrease of flux at the walls and at the start of the maze with respect to the maximum neutron flux. And, just in front of the LINAC door, inside the room, neutron flux was measured less than 1% of the maximum.

  10. Impact of a flattening filter free linear accelerator on structural shielding design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jank, Julia; Kragl, Gabriele; Georg, Dietmar; Medical University of Vienna

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to assess the effects of a flattening filter free medical accelerator on structural shielding demands of a treatment vault of a medical linear accelerator. We tried to answer the question, to what extent the required thickness of the shielding barriers can be reduced if instead of the standard flattened photon beams unflattened ones are used. Material and Methods: We chose both an experimental as well as a theoretical approach. On the one hand we measured photon dose rates at protected places outside the treatment room and compared the obtained results for flattened and unflattened beams. On the other hand we complied with international guidelines for adequate treatment vault design and calculated the shielding barriers according to the therein given specifications. Measurements were performed with an Elekta Precise trademark linac providing nominal photon energies of 6 and 10 MV. This machine underwent already earlier some modifications in order to be able to operate both with and without a flattening filter. Photon dose rates were measured with a LB133-1 dose rate meter manufactured by Berthold. To calculate the thickness of shielding barriers we referred to the Austrian standard OeNORM S 5216 and to the US American NCRP Report No. 151. Results: We determined a substantial photon dose rate reduction for all measurement points and photon energies. For unflattened 6 MV beams a reduction factor ranging from 1.4 to 1.8 was identified. The corresponding values for unflattened 10 MV beams were 2.1 and 3.2. The performed shielding calculations indicated the same tendency: For all relevant radiation components we found a reduction in shielding thickness when unflattened beams were used. The required thickness of primary barriers was reduced up to 8.0%, the thickness of secondary barriers up to 11.4%, respectively. Conclusions: For an adequate dimensioning of treatment vault shielding barriers it is by no means irrelevant if the

  11. Impact of a flattening filter free linear accelerator on structural shielding design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jank, Julia; Kragl, Gabriele; Georg, Dietmar

    2014-03-01

    The present study aimed to assess the effects of a flattening filter free medical accelerator on structural shielding demands of a treatment vault of a medical linear accelerator. We tried to answer the question, to what extent the required thickness of the shielding barriers can be reduced if instead of the standard flattened photon beams unflattened ones are used. We chose both an experimental as well as a theoretical approach. On the one hand we measured photon dose rates at protected places outside the treatment room and compared the obtained results for flattened and unflattened beams. On the other hand we complied with international guidelines for adequate treatment vault design and calculated the shielding barriers according to the therein given specifications. Measurements were performed with an Elekta Precise™ linac providing nominal photon energies of 6 and 10 MV. This machine underwent already earlier some modifications in order to be able to operate both with and without a flattening filter. Photon dose rates were measured with a LB133-1 dose rate meter manufactured by Berthold. To calculate the thickness of shielding barriers we referred to the Austrian standard ÖNORM S 5216 and to the US American NCRP Report No. 151. We determined a substantial photon dose rate reduction for all measurement points and photon energies. For unflattened 6 MV beams a reduction factor ranging from 1.4 to 1.8 was identified. The corresponding values for unflattened 10 MV beams were 2.1 and 3.2. The performed shielding calculations indicated the same tendency: For all relevant radiation components we found a reduction in shielding thickness when unflattened beams were used. The required thickness of primary barriers was reduced up to 8.0%, the thickness of secondary barriers up to 11.4%, respectively. For an adequate dimensioning of treatment vault shielding barriers it is by no means irrelevant if the accommodated linac operates with or without a flattening filter. The

  12. Impact of a flattening filter free linear accelerator on structural shielding design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jank, Julia [Klinikum - Klagenfurt am Woerthersee (Austria). Inst. fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Kragl, Gabriele [Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna (Austria). Div. Medical Radiation Physics; Georg, Dietmar [Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna (Austria). Div. Medical Radiation Physics; Medical University of Vienna (Austria). Christian Doppler Lab. for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to assess the effects of a flattening filter free medical accelerator on structural shielding demands of a treatment vault of a medical linear accelerator. We tried to answer the question, to what extent the required thickness of the shielding barriers can be reduced if instead of the standard flattened photon beams unflattened ones are used. Material and Methods: We chose both an experimental as well as a theoretical approach. On the one hand we measured photon dose rates at protected places outside the treatment room and compared the obtained results for flattened and unflattened beams. On the other hand we complied with international guidelines for adequate treatment vault design and calculated the shielding barriers according to the therein given specifications. Measurements were performed with an Elekta Precise trademark linac providing nominal photon energies of 6 and 10 MV. This machine underwent already earlier some modifications in order to be able to operate both with and without a flattening filter. Photon dose rates were measured with a LB133-1 dose rate meter manufactured by Berthold. To calculate the thickness of shielding barriers we referred to the Austrian standard OeNORM S 5216 and to the US American NCRP Report No. 151. Results: We determined a substantial photon dose rate reduction for all measurement points and photon energies. For unflattened 6 MV beams a reduction factor ranging from 1.4 to 1.8 was identified. The corresponding values for unflattened 10 MV beams were 2.1 and 3.2. The performed shielding calculations indicated the same tendency: For all relevant radiation components we found a reduction in shielding thickness when unflattened beams were used. The required thickness of primary barriers was reduced up to 8.0%, the thickness of secondary barriers up to 11.4%, respectively. Conclusions: For an adequate dimensioning of treatment vault shielding barriers it is by no means irrelevant if the

  13. Effect of Gold Nanoparticles on Prostate Dose Distribution under Ir-192 Internal and 18 MV External Radiotherapy Procedures Using Gel Dosimetry and Monte Carlo Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosravi H.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gel polymers are considered as new dosimeters for determining radiotherapy dose distribution in three dimensions. Objective: The ability of a new formulation of MAGIC-f polymer gel was assessed by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo (MC method for studying the effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs in prostate dose distributions under the internal Ir-192 and external 18MV radiotherapy practices. Method: A Plexiglas phantom was made representing human pelvis. The GNP shaving 15 nm in diameter and 0.1 mM concentration were synthesized using chemical reduction method. Then, a new formulation of MAGIC-f gel was synthesized. The fabricated gel was poured in the tubes located at the prostate (with and without the GNPs and bladder locations of the phantom. The phantom was irradiated to an Ir-192 source and 18 MV beam of a Varian linac separately based on common radiotherapy procedures used for prostate cancer. After 24 hours, the irradiated gels were read using a Siemens 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. The absolute doses at the reference points and isodose curves resulted from the experimental measurement of the gels and MC simulations following the internal and external radiotherapy practices were compared. Results: The mean absorbed doses measured with the gel in the presence of the GNPs in prostate were 15% and 8 % higher than the corresponding values without the GNPs under the internal and external radiation therapies, respectively. MC simulations also indicated a dose increase of 14 % and 7 % due to presence of the GNPs, for the same experimental internal and external radiotherapy practices, respectively. Conclusion: There was a good agreement between the dose enhancement factors (DEFs estimated with MC simulations and experiment gel measurements due to the GNPs. The results indicated that the polymer gel dosimetry method as developed and used in this study, can be recommended as a reliable method for investigating the DEF of GNPs in internal

  14. Effect of Gold Nanoparticles on Prostate Dose Distribution under Ir-192 Internal and 18 MV External Radiotherapy Procedures Using Gel Dosimetry and Monte Carlo Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, H; Hashemi, B; Mahdavi, S R; Hejazi, P

    2015-03-01

    Gel polymers are considered as new dosimeters for determining radiotherapy dose distribution in three dimensions. The ability of a new formulation of MAGIC-f polymer gel was assessed by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo (MC) method for studying the effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in prostate dose distributions under the internal Ir-192 and external 18MV radiotherapy practices. A Plexiglas phantom was made representing human pelvis. The GNP shaving 15 nm in diameter and 0.1 mM concentration were synthesized using chemical reduction method. Then, a new formulation of MAGIC-f gel was synthesized. The fabricated gel was poured in the tubes located at the prostate (with and without the GNPs) and bladder locations of the phantom. The phantom was irradiated to an Ir-192 source and 18 MV beam of a Varian linac separately based on common radiotherapy procedures used for prostate cancer. After 24 hours, the irradiated gels were read using a Siemens 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. The absolute doses at the reference points and isodose curves resulted from the experimental measurement of the gels and MC simulations following the internal and external radiotherapy practices were compared. The mean absorbed doses measured with the gel in the presence of the GNPs in prostate were 15% and 8 % higher than the corresponding values without the GNPs under the internal and external radiation therapies, respectively. MC simulations also indicated a dose increase of 14 % and 7 % due to presence of the GNPs, for the same experimental internal and external radiotherapy practices, respectively. There was a good agreement between the dose enhancement factors (DEFs) estimated with MC simulations and experiment gel measurements due to the GNPs. The results indicated that the polymer gel dosimetry method as developed and used in this study, can be recommended as a reliable method for investigating the DEF of GNPs in internal and external radiotherapy practices.

  15. Fiber-coupled radioluminescence dosimetry with saturated Al2O3:C crystals: Characterization in 6 and 18 MV photon beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Erik; Damkjær, Sidsel Marie Skov; Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from carbon-doped aluminum oxide crystals can be used for medical dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy and remotely afterloaded brachytherapy. The RL/OSL signals are guided from the treatment room to the readout instrumentation...... using optical fiber cables, and in vivo dosimetry can be carried out in real time while the dosimeter probes are in the patient. The present study proposes a new improved readout protocol based solely on the RL signal from Al2O3:C. The key elements in the protocol are that Al2O3:C is pre-dosed with 20...... ((−0.21 ± 0.01)%/ °C), and dose-delivery rate ((−0.22 ± 0.01)% per 100 MU/min). A temporal gating technique was used for separation of RL and stem signals (i.e. Cerenkov light and fluorescence induced in the optical fiber cable during irradiation). The new readout protocol was a substantial improvement...

  16. Ambient dose equivalent and personal points due to photoneutrons outside a facility that houses a linear accelerator of 18 MV varian; Equivalente de dosis ambiental y personal debida a fotoneutrones en puntos externos a una instalacion que alberga un acelerador lineal varian de 18 MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, S. A.; Barquero, R.; Gomez-Ros, J. M.; Lallena, A. M.; Ponzano, P. E.

    2011-07-01

    The use of linear accelerators (linacs) with energies above 10 MV radiotherapy treatments RT and IMRT, can improve the distribution of the absorbed dose in the treated area, increasing the effectiveness of radiation treatments. However and as shown in the scientific literature, the production of photoneutrons for energies above 10 MeV can contribute to exposure of both patient and occupationally exposed workers and the public in the vicinity of the installation. It is therefore necessary to determine the value of ambient dose equivalent and staff both inside and outside the facilities that house these accelerators, especially for energies of 15 and 18 MV.

  17. The impact of flattening-filter-free beam technology on 3D conformal RT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The removal of the flattening filter (FF) leads to non-uniform fluence distribution with a considerable increase in dose rate. It is possible to adapt FFF beams (flattening-filter-free) in 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT) by using field in field techniques (FiF). The aim of this retrospective study is to clarify whether the quality of 3D CRT plans is influenced by the use of FFF beams. Method This study includes a total of 52 CT studies of RT locations that occur frequently in clinical practice. Dose volume targets were provided for the PTV of breast (n=13), neurocranium (n=11), lung (n=7), bone metastasis (n=10) and prostate (n=11) in line with ICRU report 50/62. 3D CRT planning was carried out using FiF methods. Two clinically utilized photon energies are used for a Siemens ARTISTE linear accelerator in FFF mode at 7MVFFF and 11MVFFF as well as in FF mode at 6MVFF and 10MVFF. The plan quality in relation to the PTV coverage, OAR (organs at risk) and low dose burden as well as the 2D dosimetric verification is compared with FF plans. Results No significant differences were found between FFF and FF plans in the mean dose for the PTV of breast, lung, spine metastasis and prostate. The low dose parameters V5Gy and V10Gy display significant differences for FFF and FF plans in some subgroups. The DVH analysis of the OAR revealed some significant differences. Significantly more fields (1.9 – 4.5) were necessary in the use of FFF beams for each location (p<0.0001) in order to achieve PTV coverage. All the tested groups displayed significant increases (1.3 – 2.2 times) in the average number of necessary MU with the use of FFF beams (p<0.001). Conclusions This study has shown that the exclusive use of a linear accelerator in FFF mode is feasible in 3D CRT. It was possible to realize RT plans in comparable quality in typical cases of clinical radiotherapy. The 2D dosimetric validation of the modulated fields verified the dose calculation and thus the

  18. Efficient and accurate stereotactic radiotherapy using flattening filter free beams and HexaPOD robotic tables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Hansen, C. R.; Brink, C.

    2016-01-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) high dose rate beam technique was introduced for brain stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT). Furthermore, a HexaPOD treatment table was introduced for the brain SRS to enable correction of rotational setup errors. 19 filter fl...

  19. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying Biomedical Photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy This volume discusses biomedical photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy, the basic physical principles underlying the technology and its applications. The topics discussed in this volume are: Biophotonics; Fluorescence and Phosphorescence; Medical Photonics; Microscopy; Nonlinear Optics; Ophthalmic Technology; Optical Tomography; Optofluidics; Photodynamic Therapy; Image Processing; Imaging Systems; Sensors; Single Molecule Detection; Futurology in Photonics. Comprehensive and accessible cov

  20. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying the technology instrumentation of photonics This volume discusses photonics technology and instrumentation. The topics discussed in this volume are: Communication Networks; Data Buffers; Defense and Security Applications; Detectors; Fiber Optics and Amplifiers; Green Photonics; Instrumentation and Metrology; Interferometers; Light-Harvesting Materials; Logic Devices; Optical Communications; Remote Sensing; Solar Energy; Solid-State Lighting; Wavelength Conversion Comprehensive and accessible coverage of the whole of modern photonics Emphas

  1. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying thescience and technology of nanophotonics, its materials andstructures This volume presents nanophotonic structures and Materials.Nanophotonics is photonic science and technology that utilizeslight/matter interactions on the nanoscale where researchers arediscovering new phenomena and developing techniques that go wellbeyond what is possible with conventional photonics andelectronics.The topics discussed in this volume are: CavityPhotonics; Cold Atoms and Bose-Einstein Condensates; Displays;E-paper; Graphene; Integrated Photonics; Liquid Cry

  2. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    This book covers modern photonics accessibly and discusses the basic physical principles underlying all the applications and technology of photonicsThis volume covers the basic physical principles underlying the technology and all applications of photonics from statistical optics to quantum optics. The topics discussed in this volume are: Photons in perspective; Coherence and Statistical Optics; Complex Light and Singular Optics; Electrodynamics of Dielectric Media; Fast and slow Light; Holography; Multiphoton Processes; Optical Angular Momentum; Optical Forces, Trapping and Manipulation; Pol

  3. A 4 MV flattening filter-free beam: commissioning and application to conformal therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, S W; Rosser, K E; Bedford, J L

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that radiotherapy treatments undertaken on a flattening filter-free (FFF) linear accelerator have a number of advantages over treatments undertaken on a conventional linear accelerator. In addition, 4 MV photon beams may give improved isodose coverage for some treatment volumes at air/tissue interfaces, compared to when utilizing the clinical standard of 6 MV photons. In order to investigate these benefits, FFF beams were established on an Elekta Beam Modulator linear accelerator for 4 MV photons. Commissioning beam data were obtained for open and wedged fields. The measured data were then imported into a treatment planning system and a beam model was commissioned. The beam model was optimized to improve dose calculations at shallow, clinically relevant depths. Following verification, the beam model was utilized in a treatment planning study, including volumetric modulated arc therapy, for a selection of lung, breast/chest wall and larynx patients. Increased dose rates of around 800 MU min -1 were recorded for open fields (relative to 320 MU min -1 for filtered open fields) and reduced head scatter was inferred from output factor measurements. Good agreement between planned and delivered dose was observed in verification of treatment plans. The planning study indicated that with a FFF beam, equivalent (and in some cases improved) isodose profiles could be achieved for small lung and larynx treatment volumes relative to 4 MV filtered treatments. Furthermore, FFF treatments with wedges could be replicated using open fields together with an 'effective wedge' technique and isocentre shift. Clinical feasibility of a FFF beam was therefore demonstrated, with beam modelling, treatment planning and verification being successfully accomplished.

  4. Structural Shielding Design of a 6 MV Flattening Filter Free Linear Accelerator: Indian Scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Bibekananda; Selvam, T. Palani; Sharma, P. K. Dash

    2017-01-01

    Detailed structural shielding of primary and secondary barriers for a 6 MV medical linear accelerator (LINAC) operated with flattening filter (FF) and flattening filter free (FFF) modes are calculated. The calculations have been carried out by two methods, one using the approach given in National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) Report No. 151 and the other based on the monitor units (MUs) delivered in clinical practice. Radiation survey of the installations was also carried out. NCRP a...

  5. Flattening filter free beams from TrueBeam and Versa HD units: Evaluation of the parameters for quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogliata, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.fogliata@humanitas.it; Reggiori, Giacomo; Stravato, Antonella; Scorsetti, Marta; Cozzi, Luca [Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Humanitas Research Hospital, Milan-Rozzano I-20098 (Italy); Fleckenstein, Jens; Schneider, Frank; Lohr, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim D-68167 (Germany); Pachoud, Marc; Ghandour, Sarah [Radiation Oncology Department, Hôpital Riviera Chablais, Vevey CH-1800 (Switzerland); Krauss, Harald [Radio-Oncology Department, Kaiser Franz Josef Spital, Vienna A-1100 (Austria)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Flattening filter free (FFF) beams generated by medical linear accelerators are today clinically used for stereotactical and non-stereotactical radiotherapy treatments. Such beams differ from the standard flattened beams (FF) in the high dose rate and the profile shape peaked on the beam central axis. Definition of new parameters as unflatness and slope for FFF beams has been proposed based on a renormalization factor for FFF profiles. The present study aims to assess the dosimetric differences between FFF beams generated by linear accelerators from different vendors, and to provide renormalization and parameter data of the two kinds of units. Methods: Dosimetric data from two Varian TrueBeam and two Elekta Versa HD linear accelerators, all with 6 and 10 MV nominal accelerating potentials, FF and FFF modes have been collected. Renormalization factors and related fit parameters according to Fogliata et al. [“Definition of parameters for quality assurance of flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in radiation therapy,” Med. Phys. 39, 6455–6464 (2012)] have been evaluated for FFF beams of both units and energies. Unflatness and slope parameters from profile curves were evaluated. Dosimetric differences in terms of beam penetration and near-the-surface dose were also assessed. Results: FFF profile parameters have been updated; renormalization factors and unflatness from the Varian units are consistent with the published data. Elekta FFF beam qualities, different from the Varian generated beams, tend to express similar behaviour as the FF beam of the corresponding nominal energy. TPR{sub 20,10} for 6 and 10 MV FF and FFF TrueBeam beams are 0.665, 0.629 (6 MV) and 0.738, 0.703 (10 MV). The same figures for Versa HD units are 0.684, 0.678 (6 MV) and 0.734, 0.721 (10 MV). Conclusions: Renormalization factor and unflatness parameters evaluated from Varian and Elekta FFF beams are provided, in particular renormalization factors table and fit parameters.

  6. Monte Carlo evaluation of the potential benefits of flattening filter free beams from the Oncor® clinical linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Amin; Razavi-Ratki, Seid Kazem; Jabbari, Keyvan; Najafzadeh, Milad; Nickfarjam, Abolfazl

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the potential privileges of flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beams from Oncor® linac for 6 MV and 18 MV energies. A Monte Carlo (MC) model of Oncor® linac was built using BEAMnrc MCCode and verified by the measured data using 6 MV and 18 MV energies. A comprehensive set of data was also characterized for MC model of Oncor® machine running with and without flattening filter (FF) for 6 MV and 18 MV beams in six field sizes. The investigated characteristics included mean energy, energy spectrum, photon spatial fluence, superficial dose, percent depth dose (PDD), dose output, and out-of-field dose with two indexes of lateral dose profile and isodose curve at three depths. Using FFF enhanced the energy uniformity 3.4±0.11% (6 MV) and 2.05±0.09% (18 MV) times and improved dose output by factor of 2.91 (6 MV) and 4.2 (18 MV) on the central axis, respectively. Using FFF also reduced the PDD dependencies by 9.1% (6 MV) and 5.57% (18 MV). In addition, using FFF had a lower out-of-field dose due to the reduced head scatter and softer spectra. The findings in this study suggested that using FFF, Oncor® machine could achieve better treatment results with lower dose toxicity and a shorter beam-on time.

  7. Treatment vault shielding for a flattening filter-free medical linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Polf, Jerimy; Mohan, Radhe; Vassiliev, Oleg N.

    2009-03-01

    The requirements for shielding a treatment vault with a Varian Clinac 2100 medical linear accelerator operated both with and without the flattening filter were assessed. Basic shielding parameters, such as primary beam tenth-value layers (TVLs), patient scatter fractions, and wall scatter fractions, were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of 6, 10 and 18 MV beams. Relative integral target current requirements were determined from treatment planning studies of several disease sites with, and without, the flattening filter. The flattened beam shielding data were compared to data published in NCRP Report No. 151, and the unflattened beam shielding data were presented relative to the NCRP data. Finally, the shielding requirements for a typical treatment vault were determined for a single-energy (6 MV) linac and a dual-energy (6 MV/18 MV) linac. With the exception of large-angle patient scatter fractions and wall scatter fractions, the vault shielding parameters were reduced when the flattening filter was removed. Much of this reduction was consistent with the reduced average energy of the FFF beams. Primary beam TVLs were reduced by 12%, on average, and small-angle scatter fractions were reduced by up to 30%. Head leakage was markedly reduced because less integral target current was required to deliver the target dose. For the treatment vault examined in the current study, removal of the flattening filter reduced the required thickness of the primary and secondary barriers by 10-20%, corresponding to 18 m3 less concrete to shield the single-energy linac and 36 m3 less concrete to shield the dual-energy linac. Thus, a shielding advantage was found when the linac was operated without the flattening filter. This translates into a reduction in occupational exposure and/or the cost and space of shielding.

  8. Treatment vault shielding for a flattening filter-free medical linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kry, Stephen F; Howell, Rebecca M; Polf, Jerimy; Mohan, Radhe; Vassiliev, Oleg N [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: sfkry@mdanderson.org

    2009-03-07

    The requirements for shielding a treatment vault with a Varian Clinac 2100 medical linear accelerator operated both with and without the flattening filter were assessed. Basic shielding parameters, such as primary beam tenth-value layers (TVLs), patient scatter fractions, and wall scatter fractions, were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of 6, 10 and 18 MV beams. Relative integral target current requirements were determined from treatment planning studies of several disease sites with, and without, the flattening filter. The flattened beam shielding data were compared to data published in NCRP Report No. 151, and the unflattened beam shielding data were presented relative to the NCRP data. Finally, the shielding requirements for a typical treatment vault were determined for a single-energy (6 MV) linac and a dual-energy (6 MV/18 MV) linac. With the exception of large-angle patient scatter fractions and wall scatter fractions, the vault shielding parameters were reduced when the flattening filter was removed. Much of this reduction was consistent with the reduced average energy of the FFF beams. Primary beam TVLs were reduced by 12%, on average, and small-angle scatter fractions were reduced by up to 30%. Head leakage was markedly reduced because less integral target current was required to deliver the target dose. For the treatment vault examined in the current study, removal of the flattening filter reduced the required thickness of the primary and secondary barriers by 10-20%, corresponding to 18 m{sup 3} less concrete to shield the single-energy linac and 36 m{sup 3} less concrete to shield the dual-energy linac. Thus, a shielding advantage was found when the linac was operated without the flattening filter. This translates into a reduction in occupational exposure and/or the cost and space of shielding.

  9. Treatment vault shielding for a flattening filter-free medical linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kry, Stephen F; Howell, Rebecca M; Polf, Jerimy; Mohan, Radhe; Vassiliev, Oleg N

    2009-01-01

    The requirements for shielding a treatment vault with a Varian Clinac 2100 medical linear accelerator operated both with and without the flattening filter were assessed. Basic shielding parameters, such as primary beam tenth-value layers (TVLs), patient scatter fractions, and wall scatter fractions, were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of 6, 10 and 18 MV beams. Relative integral target current requirements were determined from treatment planning studies of several disease sites with, and without, the flattening filter. The flattened beam shielding data were compared to data published in NCRP Report No. 151, and the unflattened beam shielding data were presented relative to the NCRP data. Finally, the shielding requirements for a typical treatment vault were determined for a single-energy (6 MV) linac and a dual-energy (6 MV/18 MV) linac. With the exception of large-angle patient scatter fractions and wall scatter fractions, the vault shielding parameters were reduced when the flattening filter was removed. Much of this reduction was consistent with the reduced average energy of the FFF beams. Primary beam TVLs were reduced by 12%, on average, and small-angle scatter fractions were reduced by up to 30%. Head leakage was markedly reduced because less integral target current was required to deliver the target dose. For the treatment vault examined in the current study, removal of the flattening filter reduced the required thickness of the primary and secondary barriers by 10-20%, corresponding to 18 m 3 less concrete to shield the single-energy linac and 36 m 3 less concrete to shield the dual-energy linac. Thus, a shielding advantage was found when the linac was operated without the flattening filter. This translates into a reduction in occupational exposure and/or the cost and space of shielding.

  10. Multicentre knowledge sharing and planning/dose audit on flattening filter free beams for SBRT lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C. R.; Sykes, J. R.; Barber, J.

    2015-01-01

    When implementing new technology into clinical practice, there will always be a need for large knowledge gain. The aim of this study was twofold, (I) audit the treatment planning and dose delivery of Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam technology for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) of lung...... tumours across a range of treatment planning systems compared to the conventional Flatting Filter (FF) beams, (II) investigate how sharing knowledge between centres of different experience can improve plan quality. All vendor/treatment planning system (TPS) combinations investigated were able to produce...

  11. Dosimetric study of RapidArc plans with flattened beam (FB and flattening filter-free (FFF beam for localized prostate cancer based on physical indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birendra Kumar Rout

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify the continual diversity between flattening photon beam (FB and Flattening Filter Free (FFF photon beams for localized prostate cancer; and to determine potential benefits and drawbacks of using unflattened beam for this type of treatment.Methods: Eight prostate cases including seminal vesicles selected for this study. The primary planning target volume (PTVP and boost planning target volume (PTVB were contoured. The total prescription dose was 78 Gy (56 Gy to PTVP and an additional 22 Gy to PTVB. For all cases, treatment plans using 6MV with FB and FFF beams with identical dose-volume constraints, arc angles and number of arcs were developed. The dose volume histograms for both techniques were compared for primary target volume and critical structures.Results: A low Sigma index (FFF: 1.65 + 0.361; FB: 1.725 + 0.39 indicating improved dose homogeneity in FFF beam. Conformity index (FFF: 0.994 + 0.01; FB: 0.993 + 0.01 is comparable for both techniques. Minimal difference of Organ at risk mean dose was observed. Normal tissue integral dose in FB plan resulted 1.5% lower than FFF plan. All the plans displayed significant increase (1.18 times for PTVP and 1.11 for PTBB in the average number of necessary MU with FFF beam.Conclusion: Diversity between FB and FFF beam plans were found. FFF beam accelerator has been utilized to develop clinically acceptable Rapid Arc treatment plans for prostate cancer with 6 MV.---------------------------------Cite this article as: Rout BK, Muralidhar KR, Ali M, Shekar MC, Kumar A. Dosimetric study of RapidArc plans with flattened beam (FB and flattening filter-free (FFF beam for localized prostate cancer based on physical indices. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(4:02046.  DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0204.6

  12. Treatment of breast cancer with simultaneous integrated boost in hybrid plan technique. Influence of flattening filter-free beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrainy, Marzieh; Kretschmer, Matthias; Joest, Vincent; Kasch, Astrid; Wuerschmidt, Florian; Dahle, Joerg; Lorenzen, Joern [Radiologische Allianz, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    The present study compares in silico treatment plans using hybrid plan technique during hypofractionated radiation of mammary carcinoma with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). The influence of 6 MV photon radiation in flattening filter free (FFF) mode against the clinical standard flattening filter (FF) mode is to be examined. RT planning took place with FF and FFF radiation plans for 10 left-sided breast cancer patients. Hybrid plans were realised with two tangential IMRT fields and one VMAT field. The dose prescription was in line with the guidelines in the ARO-2010-01 study. The dosimetric verification took place with a manufacturer-independent measurement system. Required dose prescriptions for the planning target volumes (PTV) were achieved for both groups. The average dose values of the ipsi- and contralateral lung and the heart did not differ significantly. The overall average incidental dose to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) of 8.24 ± 3.9 Gy in the FFF group and 9.05 ± 3.7 Gy in the FF group (p < 0.05) were found. The dosimetric verifications corresponded to the clinical requirements. FFF-based RT plans reduced the average treatment time by 17 s/fraction. In comparison to the FF-based hybrid plan technique the FFF mode allows further reduction of the average LAD dose for comparable target volume coverage without adverse low-dose exposure of contralateral structures. The combination of hybrid plan technique and 6 MV photon radiation in the FFF mode is suitable for use with hypofractionated dose schemes. The increased dose rate allows a substantial reduction of treatment time and thus beneficial application of the deep inspiration breath hold technique. (orig.) [German] Vergleich der ''In-silico''-Bestrahlungsplaene der klinisch etablierten Hybridplan-Technik bei hypofraktionierter Bestrahlung des Mammakarzinoms mit simultan integriertem Boost (SIB). Untersucht wird der Einfluss von 6MV-Photonenstrahlung im Flattening-Filter-Free

  13. SU-E-T-435: Flattening Filter Free Beams for Head and Neck IMRT and VMAT Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghahremani, S; Chavez, R; Li, Y; Crownover, R; Baacke, D; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate if there is benefits of using flattening filter free (FFF) versus flattening filter (FF) beams during plan optimization for head and neck targets. Methods: Five head and neck cancer patients previously treated were selected for this study. Each plan was optimized for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using 2 full arcs. Target volumes and the organs at risk (OAR) were outlined by the same physician. The prescription doses for each patient and the dose limits for each OAR were specified by the physician. For each patient four plans were created by varying the photon beam energy (6MV vs 10MV) and the use of FF or FFF. For each patient the prescription dose and OAR dose limits remained unchanged. Furthermore, the number of optimization iterations remained the same for each plan without user interference. The plans were compared using dose volume histograms, conformity and homogeneity indices. Results: Our results showed that the plans optimized with FF beams produced more homogeneous dose distributions in the PTV than the ones with FFF beams (0.92 vs. 0.86 and 0.92 vs.85 for 6MVFF, 6MVFFF, 10MVFF and 10MVFFF respectively). The conformity was better for FFF beams than for FF beams (1.26 vs. 1.20 and 1.27 vs. 1.21 for 6MVFF, 6MVFFF, 10MVFF and 10MVFFF respectively). The overall minimum, maximum and means doses were reduced for the FFF plans by approximately 4% to 6%. All FFF plans allowed more sparing of organs at risk by 7% to 9% on average. Only one 10MVFFF plan had a 1% higher dose than the respective 10MVFF for the spinal cord. Conclusion: The 6MVFFF and 10MVFFF beams illustrated the improvement of normal tissue sparing while achieving similar target dose distribution compared to 6MVFF and 10MVFF beams. Further investigation is required to determine the magnitude of improvement. case specific, fluence-based optimization improved both PTV and OAR dosimetry in 80% of cases.

  14. SU-F-T-521: Flattening-Filter-Free Beam Parameters Comparison From Different Linac Machine Types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, A [King Faisal Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Arkansas Cancer Institute, Pine Bluff, AR (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Novel linac machines, TrueBeam (TB) and Elekta Versa have updated head designing and software control system, include flattening-filter-free (FFF) photon and electron beams. Later on FFF beams were also introduced on C-Series machines. In this work FFF beams for same energy 6MV but from different machine versions were studied with reference to beam data parameters. Methods: The 6MV-FFF percent depth doses, profile symmetry and flatness, dose rate tables, and multi-leaf collimator (MLC) transmission factors were measured during commissioning process of both C-series and Truebeam machines. The scanning and dosimetric data for 6MV-FFF beam from Truebeam and C-Series linacs was compared. A correlation of 6MV-FFF beam from Elekta Versa with that of Varian linacs was also found. Results: The scanning files were plotted for both qualitative and quantitative analysis. The dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) for C-Series 6MV-FFF beam is 1.1 mm. Published values for Truebeam dosimetric leaf gap is 1.16 mm. 6MV MLC transmission factor varies between 1.3 % and 1.4 % in two separate measurements and measured DLG values vary between 1.32 mm and 1.33 mm on C-Series machine. MLC transmission factor from C-Series machine varies between 1.5 % and 1.6 %. Some of the measured data values from C-Series FFF beam are compared with Truebeam representative data. 6MV-FFF beam parameter values like dmax, OP factors, beam symmetry and flatness and additional parameters for C-Series and Truebeam liancs will be presented and compared in graphical form and tabular data form if selected. Conclusion: The 6MV flattening filter (FF) beam data from C-Series & Truebeam and 6MV-FFF beam data from Truebeam has already presented. This particular analysis to compare 6MV-FFF beam from C-Series and Truebeam provides opportunity to better elaborate FFF mode on novel machines. It was found that C-Series and Truebeam 6MV-FFF dosimetric and beam data was quite similar.

  15. Multicentre knowledge sharing and planning/dose audit on flattening filter free beams for SBRT lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. R.; Sykes, J. R.; Barber, J.; West, K.; Bromley, R.; Szymura, K.; Fisher, S.; Sim, J.; Bailey, M.; Chrystal, D.; Deshpande, S.; Franji, I.; Nielsen, T. B.; Brink, C.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2015-01-01

    When implementing new technology into clinical practice, there will always be a need for large knowledge gain. The aim of this study was twofold, (I) audit the treatment planning and dose delivery of Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam technology for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) of lung tumours across a range of treatment planning systems compared to the conventional Flatting Filter (FF) beams, (II) investigate how sharing knowledge between centres of different experience can improve plan quality. All vendor/treatment planning system (TPS) combinations investigated were able to produce acceptable treatment plans and the dose accuracy was clinically acceptable for all plans. By sharing knowledge between the different centres, the minor protocol violations (MPV) could be significantly reduced, from an average of 1.9 MPV per plan to 0.6 after such sharing of treatment planning knowledge. In particular, for the centres with less SBRT and/or volumetric- modulated arc therapy (VMAT) experience the MPV average per plan improved. All vendor/TPS combinations were also able to successfully deliver the FF and FFF SBRT VMAT plans. The plan quality and dose accuracy were found to be clinically acceptable.

  16. Multicentre knowledge sharing and planning/dose audit on flattening filter free beams for SBRT lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, C R; Nielsen, T B; Brink, C; Sykes, J R; Barber, J; West, K; Bromley, R; Szymura, K; Fisher, S; Sim, J; Bailey, M; Chrystal, D; Deshpande, S; Franji, I; Thwaites, D I

    2015-01-01

    When implementing new technology into clinical practice, there will always be a need for large knowledge gain. The aim of this study was twofold, (I) audit the treatment planning and dose delivery of Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam technology for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) of lung tumours across a range of treatment planning systems compared to the conventional Flatting Filter (FF) beams, (II) investigate how sharing knowledge between centres of different experience can improve plan quality. All vendor/treatment planning system (TPS) combinations investigated were able to produce acceptable treatment plans and the dose accuracy was clinically acceptable for all plans. By sharing knowledge between the different centres, the minor protocol violations (MPV) could be significantly reduced, from an average of 1.9 MPV per plan to 0.6 after such sharing of treatment planning knowledge. In particular, for the centres with less SBRT and/or volumetric- modulated arc therapy (VMAT) experience the MPV average per plan improved. All vendor/TPS combinations were also able to successfully deliver the FF and FFF SBRT VMAT plans. The plan quality and dose accuracy were found to be clinically acceptable

  17. Structural shielding design of a 6 MV flattening filter free linear accelerator: Indian scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibekananda Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Detailed structural shielding of primary and secondary barriers for a 6 MV medical linear accelerator (LINAC operated with flattening filter (FF and flattening filter free (FFF modes are calculated. The calculations have been carried out by two methods, one using the approach given in National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP Report No. 151 and the other based on the monitor units (MUs delivered in clinical practice. Radiation survey of the installations was also carried out. NCRP approach suggests that the primary and secondary barrier thicknesses are higher by 24% and 26%. respectively, for a LINAC operated in FF mode to that of a LINAC operated in both FF and FFF modes with an assumption that only 20% of the workload is shared in FFF mode. Primary and secondary barrier thicknesses calculated from MUs delivered on clinical practice method also show the same trend and are higher by 20% and 19%, respectively, for a LINAC operated in FF mode to that of a LINAC operated in both FF and FFF modes. Overall, the barrier thickness for a LINAC operated in FF mode is higher about 20% to that of a LINAC operated in both FF and FFF modes.

  18. Structural Shielding Design of a 6 MV Flattening Filter Free Linear Accelerator: Indian Scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Bibekananda; Selvam, T Palani; Sharma, P K Dash

    2017-01-01

    Detailed structural shielding of primary and secondary barriers for a 6 MV medical linear accelerator (LINAC) operated with flattening filter (FF) and flattening filter free (FFF) modes are calculated. The calculations have been carried out by two methods, one using the approach given in National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) Report No. 151 and the other based on the monitor units (MUs) delivered in clinical practice. Radiation survey of the installations was also carried out. NCRP approach suggests that the primary and secondary barrier thicknesses are higher by 24% and 26%. respectively, for a LINAC operated in FF mode to that of a LINAC operated in both FF and FFF modes with an assumption that only 20% of the workload is shared in FFF mode. Primary and secondary barrier thicknesses calculated from MUs delivered on clinical practice method also show the same trend and are higher by 20% and 19%, respectively, for a LINAC operated in FF mode to that of a LINAC operated in both FF and FFF modes. Overall, the barrier thickness for a LINAC operated in FF mode is higher about 20% to that of a LINAC operated in both FF and FFF modes.

  19. Acquiring beam data for a flattening-filter free linear accelerator using organic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beierholm, A.R.; Behrens, C.F.; Hoffmann, L.; Andersen, C.E.

    2013-01-01

    Fibre-coupled organic scintillators have been proven a credible alternative to clinically implemented methods for radiotherapy dosimetry, primarily due to their water equivalence and good spatial resolution. Furthermore, the fast response of the scintillators can be exploited to perform time-resolved dosimetry on a highly detailed level. In this study, we present beam data for a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator, which is capable of delivering flattening-filter free (FFF 1 ) clinical X-ray beams. The beam data have been acquired using an in-house developed dosimetry system based on fibre-coupled organic scintillators. The presented data exhibit high accuracy and precision when compared with data obtained using commercial dosimetry methods, and agree well with results published in the literature. -- Highlights: •A dosimetry system based on fibre-coupled organic scintillators is presented. •The system is used for radiotherapy beams with and without flattening filter. •Measurements show good agreement with various commercial dosimeters

  20. Technical Note: A fast online adaptive replanning method for VMAT using flattening filter free beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ates, Ozgur; Ahunbay, Ergun E.; Li, X. Allen, E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States); Moreau, Michel [Elekta, Inc., Maryland Heights, Missouri 63043 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a fast replanning algorithm based on segment aperture morphing (SAM) for online replanning of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with flattening filter free (FFF) beams. Methods: A software tool was developed to interface with a VMAT research planning system, which enables the input and output of beam and machine parameters of VMAT plans. The SAM algorithm was used to modify multileaf collimator positions for each segment aperture based on the changes of the target from the planning (CT/MR) to daily image [CT/CBCT/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)]. The leaf travel distance was controlled for large shifts to prevent the increase of VMAT delivery time. The SAM algorithm was tested for 11 patient cases including prostate, pancreatic, and lung cancers. For each daily image set, three types of VMAT plans, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) repositioning, SAM adaptive, and full-scope reoptimization plans, were generated and compared. Results: The SAM adaptive plans were found to have improved the plan quality in target and/or critical organs when compared to the IGRT repositioning plans and were comparable to the reoptimization plans based on the data of planning target volume (PTV)-V100 (volume covered by 100% of prescription dose). For the cases studied, the average PTV-V100 was 98.85% ± 1.13%, 97.61% ± 1.45%, and 92.84% ± 1.61% with FFF beams for the reoptimization, SAM adaptive, and repositioning plans, respectively. The execution of the SAM algorithm takes less than 10 s using 16-CPU (2.6 GHz dual core) hardware. Conclusions: The SAM algorithm can generate adaptive VMAT plans using FFF beams with comparable plan qualities as those from the full-scope reoptimization plans based on daily CT/CBCT/MRI and can be used for online replanning to address interfractional variations.

  1. Flattening filter-free accelerators: a report from the AAPM Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ying; Kry, Stephen F; Popple, Richard; Yorke, Ellen; Papanikolaou, Niko; Stathakis, Sotirios; Xia, Ping; Huq, Saiful; Bayouth, John; Galvin, James; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2015-05-08

    This report describes the current state of flattening filter-free (FFF) radiotherapy beams implemented on conventional linear accelerators, and is aimed primarily at practicing medical physicists. The Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) formed a writing group to assess FFF technology. The published literature on FFF technology was reviewed, along with technical specifications provided by vendors. Based on this information, supplemented by the clinical experience of the group members, consensus guidelines and recommendations for implementation of FFF technology were developed. Areas in need of further investigation were identified. Removing the flattening filter increases beam intensity, especially near the central axis. Increased intensity reduces treatment time, especially for high-dose stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery (SRT/SRS). Furthermore, removing the flattening filter reduces out-of-field dose and improves beam modeling accuracy. FFF beams are advantageous for small field (e.g., SRS) treatments and are appropriate for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For conventional 3D radiotherapy of large targets, FFF beams may be disadvantageous compared to flattened beams because of the heterogeneity of FFF beam across the target (unless modulation is employed). For any application, the nonflat beam characteristics and substantially higher dose rates require consideration during the commissioning and quality assurance processes relative to flattened beams, and the appropriate clinical use of the technology needs to be identified. Consideration also needs to be given to these unique characteristics when undertaking facility planning. Several areas still warrant further research and development. Recommendations pertinent to FFF technology, including acceptance testing, commissioning, quality assurance, radiation safety, and facility planning, are presented. Examples of clinical

  2. Photon and photoneutron spectra produced in radiotherapy Linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H. R.; Martinez O, S. A.; Benites R, J. L.; Lallena, A. M.

    2011-10-01

    A Monte Carlo calculation, using the MCNPX code, was carried out in order to estimate the photon and neutron spectra in two locations of two linacs operating at 15 and 18 MV. Detailed models of both linac heads were used in the calculations. Spectra were estimated below the flattening filter and at the isocenter. Neutron spectra show two components due to evaporation and knock-on neutrons. Lethargy spectra under the filter were compared to the spectra calculated from the function quoted by Tosi et al. that describes reasonably well neutron spectra beyond 1 MeV, though tends to underestimate the energy region between 10 -6 and 1 MeV. Neutron and Bremsstrahlung spectra show the same features regardless of the linac voltage. The amount of photons and neutrons produced by the 15 MV linac is smaller than that found for the 18 MV linac. As expected, Bremsstrahlung spectra ends according to the voltage used to accelerate the electrons. (Author)

  3. Photon and photoneutron spectra produced in radiotherapy Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Martinez O, S. A. [Universidad Pedagogica y Tecnologica de Colombia, Grupo de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada y Simulacion, Av. Central del Norte Km. 1, Via Paipa Tunja, Boyaca (Colombia); Benites R, J. L. [Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Postgrado CBAP, Carretera Tepic Compostela Km. 9, Xalisco, Nayarit (Mexico); Lallena, A. M., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universida de Granada, Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    A Monte Carlo calculation, using the MCNPX code, was carried out in order to estimate the photon and neutron spectra in two locations of two linacs operating at 15 and 18 MV. Detailed models of both linac heads were used in the calculations. Spectra were estimated below the flattening filter and at the isocenter. Neutron spectra show two components due to evaporation and knock-on neutrons. Lethargy spectra under the filter were compared to the spectra calculated from the function quoted by Tosi et al. that describes reasonably well neutron spectra beyond 1 MeV, though tends to underestimate the energy region between 10{sup -6} and 1 MeV. Neutron and Bremsstrahlung spectra show the same features regardless of the linac voltage. The amount of photons and neutrons produced by the 15 MV linac is smaller than that found for the 18 MV linac. As expected, Bremsstrahlung spectra ends according to the voltage used to accelerate the electrons. (Author)

  4. An in vitro study of the radiobiological effects of flattening filter free radiotherapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R B; Hyland, W B; McGarry, C K; Hounsell, A R; Cole, A J; Butterworth, K T; McMahon, S J; Redmond, K M; Trainer, C; Prise, K M

    2013-01-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerators allow for an increase in instantaneous dose-rate of the x-ray pulses by a factor of 2–6 over the conventional flattened output. As a result, radiobiological investigations are being carried out to determine the effect of these higher dose-rates on cell response. The studies reported thus far have presented conflicting results, highlighting the need for further investigation. To determine the radiobiological impact of the increased dose-rates from FFF exposures a Varian Truebeam medical linear accelerator was used to irradiate two human cancer cell lines in vitro, DU-145 prostate and H460 non-small cell lung, with both flattened and FFF 6 MV beams. The fluence profile of the FFF beam was modified using a custom-designed Nylon compensator to produce a similar dose profile to the flattened beam (6X) at the cell surface but at a higher instantaneous dose-rate. For both cell lines there appeared to be no significant change in cell survival. Curve fitting coefficients for DU145 cells irradiated with constant average dose-rates were 6X: α = 0.09 ± 0.03, β = 0.03 ± 0.01 and 6FFF: α = 0.14 ± 0.13, β = 0.03 ± 0.02 with a significance of p = 0.75. For H460 cells irradiated with the same instantaneous dose-rate but different average dose-rate the fit coefficients were 6FFF (low dose-rate): α = 0.21 ± 0.11, 0.07 ± 0.02 and 6FFF (high dose-rate): α = 0.21 ± 0.16, 0.07 ± 0.03, with p = 0.79. The results indicate that collective damage behaviour does not occur at the instantaneous dose-rates investigated here and that the use of either modality should result in the same clinical outcome, however this will require further validation in vivo. (note)

  5. Characteristics of flattening filter free beams at low monitor unit settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akino, Yuichi [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan and Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ota, Seiichi; Inoue, Shinichi; Mizuno, Hirokazu [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sumida, Iori; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Isohashi, Fumiaki [Oncology Center, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Newer linear accelerators (linacs) have been equipped to deliver flattening filter free (FFF) beams. When FFF beams are used for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the stability of delivery of small numbers of monitor units (MU) is important. The authors developed automatic measurement techniques to evaluate the stability of the dose profile, dose linearity, and consistency. Here, the authors report the performance of the Artiste™ accelerator (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) in delivering low-MU FFF beams.Methods: A 6 MV flattened beam (6X) with 300 MU/min dose rate and FFF beams of 7 (7XU) and 11 MV (11XU), each with a 500 MU/min dose rate, were measured at 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, and 20 MU settings. For the 2000 MU/min dose rate, the 7 (7XUH) and 11 MV (11XUH) beams were set at 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 MU because of the limits of the minimum MU settings. Beams with 20 × 20 and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} field sizes were alternately measured ten times in intensity modulated (IM) mode, with which Siemens linacs regulate beam delivery for step-and-shoot IMRT. The in- and crossplane beam profiles were measured using a Profiler™ Model 1170 (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) in multiframe mode. The frames of 20 × 20 cm{sup 2} beams were identified at the off-axis profile. The 6X beam profile was normalized at the central axis. The 7 and 11 MV FFF beam profiles were rescaled to set the dose at the central axis at 145% and 170%, respectively. Point doses were also measured using a Farmer-type ionization chamber and water-equivalent solid phantom to evaluate the linearity and consistency of low-MU beam delivery. The values displayed on the electrometer were recognized with a USB-type camera and read with open-source optical character recognition software.Results: The symmetry measurements of the 6X, 7XU, and 11XU beam profiles were better than 2% for beams ≥2 MU and improved with increasing MU. The variations in flatness of FFF beams ≥2 MU were

  6. Characteristics of flattening filter free beams at low monitor unit settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Yuichi; Ota, Seiichi; Inoue, Shinichi; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Sumida, Iori; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Isohashi, Fumiaki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Newer linear accelerators (linacs) have been equipped to deliver flattening filter free (FFF) beams. When FFF beams are used for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the stability of delivery of small numbers of monitor units (MU) is important. The authors developed automatic measurement techniques to evaluate the stability of the dose profile, dose linearity, and consistency. Here, the authors report the performance of the Artiste™ accelerator (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) in delivering low-MU FFF beams.Methods: A 6 MV flattened beam (6X) with 300 MU/min dose rate and FFF beams of 7 (7XU) and 11 MV (11XU), each with a 500 MU/min dose rate, were measured at 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, and 20 MU settings. For the 2000 MU/min dose rate, the 7 (7XUH) and 11 MV (11XUH) beams were set at 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 MU because of the limits of the minimum MU settings. Beams with 20 × 20 and 10 × 10 cm 2 field sizes were alternately measured ten times in intensity modulated (IM) mode, with which Siemens linacs regulate beam delivery for step-and-shoot IMRT. The in- and crossplane beam profiles were measured using a Profiler™ Model 1170 (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) in multiframe mode. The frames of 20 × 20 cm 2 beams were identified at the off-axis profile. The 6X beam profile was normalized at the central axis. The 7 and 11 MV FFF beam profiles were rescaled to set the dose at the central axis at 145% and 170%, respectively. Point doses were also measured using a Farmer-type ionization chamber and water-equivalent solid phantom to evaluate the linearity and consistency of low-MU beam delivery. The values displayed on the electrometer were recognized with a USB-type camera and read with open-source optical character recognition software.Results: The symmetry measurements of the 6X, 7XU, and 11XU beam profiles were better than 2% for beams ≥2 MU and improved with increasing MU. The variations in flatness of FFF beams ≥2 MU were ±5%. The

  7. Color-filter-free spatial visible light communication using RGB-LED and mobile-phone camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Chow, Chi-Wai

    2014-12-15

    A novel color-filter-free visible-light communication (VLC) system using red-green-blue (RGB) light emitting diode (LED) and mobile-phone camera is proposed and demonstrated for the first time. A feature matching method, which is based on the scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm for the received grayscale image is used instead of the chromatic information decoding method. The proposed method is simple and saves the computation complexity. The signal processing is based on the grayscale image computation; hence neither color-filter nor chromatic channel information is required. A proof-of-concept experiment is performed and high performance channel recognition is achieved.

  8. Impact of flattening-filter-free radiation on the clonogenic survival of astrocytic cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steenken, Caroline; Fleckenstein, Jens; Kegel, Stefan; Jahnke, Lennart; Simeonova, Anna; Hartmann, Linda; Kuebler, Jens; Veldwijk, Marlon R.; Wenz, Frederik; Herskind, Carsten; Giordano, Frank Anton [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim (UMM), Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams are increasingly used in radiotherapy as delivery times can be substantially reduced. However, the relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) of FFF may be increased relative to conventional flattened (FLAT) beams due to differences in energy spectra. Therefore, we investigated the effects of FFF and FLAT beams on the clonogenic survival of astrocytoma cells. Three cell lines (U251, U251-MGMT, and U87) were irradiated with 6-MV and 10-MV X-rays from a linear accelerator in FFF- or FLAT-beam modes at dose rates in the range of 0.5-24 Gy/min. The surviving fraction (SF) as function of dose (2-12 Gy) was determined by the colony formation assay and fitted by the linear-quadratic model. For both beams (FFF or FLAT), the cells were pelleted in conical 15-ml centrifuge tubes and irradiated at 2-cm depth in a 1 x 1-cm{sup 2} area on the central axis of a 30 x 30-cm{sup 2} field. Dosimetry was performed with a 0.3-cm{sup 3} rigid ionization chamber. RBE was determined for FFF versus FLAT irradiation. The RBE of FFF at 7.3-11.3 Gy was 1.027 ± 0.013 and 1.063 ± 0.018 relative to FLAT beams for 6- and 10-MV beams, respectively, and was only significantly higher than 1 for 10 MV. Significantly increased survival rates were seen for lower dose rates (0.5 Gy/min FLAT vs. 5 Gy/min FLAT) at higher doses (11.9 Gy), while no differences were seen at dose rates ≥ 1.4 Gy/min (1.4 Gy/min FFF vs. 14 Gy/min FFF and 2.4 Gy/min FFF vs. 24 Gy/min FFF). FFF beams showed only a slightly increased RBE relative to FLAT beams in this experimental set-up, which is unlikely to result in clinically relevant differences in outcome. (orig.) [German] Die Flattening-Filter-freie (FFF) Bestrahlungstechnik findet zunehmend Verwendung, da sich die Applikationsdauer der einzelnen Fraktionen deutlich verkuerzen laesst. Aufgrund der Unterschiede im Spektrum koennte die relative biologische Wirksamkeit (RBW) von FFF jedoch hoeher sein als bei konventioneller Technik (d.h. bei

  9. SU-F-T-545: Dosimetric and Radiobiological Evaluation of Dose Calculation Algorithms On Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Conventional Flattened and Flattening-Filter-Free Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S; Suh, T; Chung, J; Eom, K; Lee, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric and radiobiological impact of Acuros XB (AXB) and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA) dose calculation algorithms on prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy plans with both conventional flattened (FF) and flattening-filter free (FFF) modes. Methods: For thirteen patients with prostate cancer, SBRT planning was performed using 10-MV photon beam with FF and FFF modes. The total dose prescribed to the PTV was 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions. All plans were initially calculated using AAA algorithm in Eclipse treatment planning system (11.0.34), and then were re-calculated using AXB with the same MUs and MLC files. The four types of plans for different algorithms and beam energies were compared in terms of homogeneity and conformity. To evaluate the radiobiological impact, the tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) calculations were performed. Results: For PTV, both calculation algorithms and beam modes lead to comparable homogeneity and conformity. However, the averaged TCP values in AXB plans were always lower than in AAA plans with an average difference of 5.3% and 6.1% for 10-MV FFF and FF beam, respectively. In addition, the averaged NTCP values for organs at risk (OARs) were comparable. Conclusion: This study showed that prostate SBRT plan were comparable dosimetric results with different dose calculation algorithms as well as delivery beam modes. For biological results, even though NTCP values for both calculation algorithms and beam modes were similar, AXB plans produced slightly lower TCP compared to the AAA plans.

  10. SU-F-T-545: Dosimetric and Radiobiological Evaluation of Dose Calculation Algorithms On Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Conventional Flattened and Flattening-Filter-Free Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S; Suh, T [The catholic university of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, J; Eom, K [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J [Konkuk University Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric and radiobiological impact of Acuros XB (AXB) and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA) dose calculation algorithms on prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy plans with both conventional flattened (FF) and flattening-filter free (FFF) modes. Methods: For thirteen patients with prostate cancer, SBRT planning was performed using 10-MV photon beam with FF and FFF modes. The total dose prescribed to the PTV was 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions. All plans were initially calculated using AAA algorithm in Eclipse treatment planning system (11.0.34), and then were re-calculated using AXB with the same MUs and MLC files. The four types of plans for different algorithms and beam energies were compared in terms of homogeneity and conformity. To evaluate the radiobiological impact, the tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) calculations were performed. Results: For PTV, both calculation algorithms and beam modes lead to comparable homogeneity and conformity. However, the averaged TCP values in AXB plans were always lower than in AAA plans with an average difference of 5.3% and 6.1% for 10-MV FFF and FF beam, respectively. In addition, the averaged NTCP values for organs at risk (OARs) were comparable. Conclusion: This study showed that prostate SBRT plan were comparable dosimetric results with different dose calculation algorithms as well as delivery beam modes. For biological results, even though NTCP values for both calculation algorithms and beam modes were similar, AXB plans produced slightly lower TCP compared to the AAA plans.

  11. Validating dose rate calibration of radiotherapy photon beams through IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jangda, A.Q.; Hussein, S.

    2012-01-01

    In external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), the quality assurance (QA) of the radiation beam is crucial to the accurate delivery of the prescribed dose to the patient. One of the dosimetric parameters that require monitoring is the beam output, specified as the dose rate on the central axis under reference conditions. The aim of this project was to validate dose rate calibration of megavoltage photon beams using the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/World Health Organisation (WHO) postal audit dosimetry service. Three photon beams were audited: a 6 MV beam from the low-energy linac and 6 and 18 MV beams from a dual high-energy linac. The agreement between our stated doses and the IAEA results was within 1% for the two 6 MV beams and within 2% for the 18 MV beam. The IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service provides an independent verification of dose rate calibration protocol by an international facility. (author)

  12. Validating dose rate calibration of radiotherapy photon beams through IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangda, Abdul Qadir; Hussein, Sherali

    2012-05-01

    In external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), the quality assurance (QA) of the radiation beam is crucial to the accurate delivery of the prescribed dose to the patient. One of the dosimetric parameters that require monitoring is the beam output, specified as the dose rate on the central axis under reference conditions. The aim of this project was to validate dose rate calibration of megavoltage photon beams using the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/World Health Organisation (WHO) postal audit dosimetry service. Three photon beams were audited: a 6 MV beam from the low-energy linac and 6 and 18 MV beams from a dual high-energy linac. The agreement between our stated doses and the IAEA results was within 1% for the two 6 MV beams and within 2% for the 18 MV beam. The IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service provides an independent verification of dose rate calibration protocol by an international facility.

  13. Feasibility study of using PET to determine nitrogen concentration after high energy photon irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alghamdi, A.A.; Spyrou, N.M.; Al-Mokhlef, J.; Alhaj, A.

    2007-01-01

    The technique of photon activation analysis (PAA) is widely employed in many fields as an effective non-invasive tool for measuring elemental compositions and concentrations. In recent years there has been a revival and growing interest of PAA in general and for medical applications in particular. The feasibility of using a PET scanner (Ecat Exact 931) to determine nitrogen concentration in a dead rabbit is described. This method is based on the photon activation of 14 N(γ,n) 13 N (T 1/2 = 9.9 min) using an 18 MV photon beam Medical Linear Accelerator (Varian 2300EX). (author)

  14. Radiosurgery with flattening-filter-free techniques in the treatment of brain metastases. Plan comparison and early clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieber, J.; Tonndorf-Martini, E.; Schramm, O.; Rhein, B.; Stefanowicz, S.; Lindel, K.; Debus, J.; Rieken, S.; Kappes, J.; Hoffmann, H.

    2016-01-01

    Radiosurgical treatment of brain metastases is well established in daily clinical routine. Utilization of flattening-filter-free beams (FFF) may allow for more rapid delivery of treatment doses and improve clinical comfort. Hence, we compared plan quality and efficiency of radiosurgery in FFF mode to FF techniques. Between November 2014 and June 2015, 21 consecutive patients with 25 brain metastases were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in FFF mode. Brain metastases received dose-fractionation schedules of 1 x 20 Gy or 1 x 18 Gy, delivered to the conformally enclosing 80 % isodose. Three patients with critically localized or large (>3 cm) brain metastases were treated with 6 x 5 Gy. Plan quality and efficiency were evaluated by analyzing conformity, dose gradients, dose to healthy brain tissue, treatment delivery time, and number of monitor units. FFF plans were compared to those using the FF method, and early clinical outcome and toxicity were assessed. FFF mode resulted in significant reductions in beam-on time (p [de

  15. SU-E-J-127: Implementation of An Online Replanning Tool for VMAT Using Flattening Filter-Free Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ates, O; Ahunbay, E; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This is to report the implementation of an online replanning tool based on segment aperture morphing (SAM) for VMAT with flattening filter free (FFF) beams. Methods: Previously reported SAM algorithm modified to accommodate VMAT with FFF beams was implemented in a tool that was interfaced with a treatment planning system (Monaco, Elekta). The tool allows (1) to output the beam parameters of the original VMAT plan from Monaco, and (2) to input the apertures generated from the SAM algorithm into Monaco for the dose calculation on daily CT/CBCT/MRI in the following steps:(1) Quickly generating target contour based on the image of the day, using an auto-segmentation tool (ADMIRE, Elekta) with manual editing if necessary; (2) Morphing apertures based on the SAM in the original VMAT plan to account for the interfractional change of the target from the planning to the daily images; (3) Calculating dose distribution for new apertures with the same numbers of MU as in the original plan; (4) Transferring the new plan into a record & verify system (MOSAIQ, Elekta); (5) Performing a pre-delivery QA based on software; (6) Delivering the adaptive plan for the fraction.This workflow was implemented on a 16-CPU (2.6 GHz dual-core) hardware with GPU and was tested for sample cases of prostate, pancreas and lung tumors. Results: The online replanning process can be completed within 10 minutes. The adaptive plans generally have improved the plan quality when compared to the IGRT repositioning plans. The adaptive plans with FFF beams have better normal tissue sparing as compared with those of FF beams. Conclusion: The online replanning tool based on SAM can quickly generate adaptive VMAT plans using FFF beams with improved plan quality than those from the IGRT repositioning plans based on daily CT/CBCT/MRI and can be used clinically. This research was supported by Elekta Inc. (Crawley, UK)

  16. SU-E-J-127: Implementation of An Online Replanning Tool for VMAT Using Flattening Filter-Free Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ates, O; Ahunbay, E; Li, X

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This is to report the implementation of an online replanning tool based on segment aperture morphing (SAM) for VMAT with flattening filter free (FFF) beams. Methods: Previously reported SAM algorithm modified to accommodate VMAT with FFF beams was implemented in a tool that was interfaced with a treatment planning system (Monaco, Elekta). The tool allows (1) to output the beam parameters of the original VMAT plan from Monaco, and (2) to input the apertures generated from the SAM algorithm into Monaco for the dose calculation on daily CT/CBCT/MRI in the following steps:(1) Quickly generating target contour based on the image of the day, using an auto-segmentation tool (ADMIRE, Elekta) with manual editing if necessary; (2) Morphing apertures based on the SAM in the original VMAT plan to account for the interfractional change of the target from the planning to the daily images; (3) Calculating dose distribution for new apertures with the same numbers of MU as in the original plan; (4) Transferring the new plan into a record & verify system (MOSAIQ, Elekta); (5) Performing a pre-delivery QA based on software; (6) Delivering the adaptive plan for the fraction.This workflow was implemented on a 16-CPU (2.6 GHz dual-core) hardware with GPU and was tested for sample cases of prostate, pancreas and lung tumors. Results: The online replanning process can be completed within 10 minutes. The adaptive plans generally have improved the plan quality when compared to the IGRT repositioning plans. The adaptive plans with FFF beams have better normal tissue sparing as compared with those of FF beams. Conclusion: The online replanning tool based on SAM can quickly generate adaptive VMAT plans using FFF beams with improved plan quality than those from the IGRT repositioning plans based on daily CT/CBCT/MRI and can be used clinically. This research was supported by Elekta Inc. (Crawley, UK)

  17. An online replanning method using warm start optimization and aperture morphing for flattening-filter-free beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahunbay, Ergun E; Ates, O; Li, X A

    2016-08-01

    In a situation where a couch shift for patient positioning is not preferred or prohibited (e.g., MR-linac), segment aperture morphing (SAM) can address target dislocation and deformation. For IMRT/VMAT with flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams, however, SAM method would lead to an adverse translational dose effect due to the beam unflattening. Here the authors propose a new two-step process to address both the translational effect of FFF beams and the target deformation. The replanning method consists of an offline and an online step. The offline step is to create a series of preshifted-plans (PSPs) obtained by a so-called "warm start" optimization (starting optimization from the original plan, rather than from scratch) at a series of isocenter shifts. The PSPs all have the same number of segments with very similar shapes, since the warm start optimization only adjusts the MLC positions instead of regenerating them. In the online step, a new plan is obtained by picking the closest PSP or linearly interpolating the MLC positions and the monitor units of the closest PSPs for the shift determined from the image of the day. This two-step process is completely automated and almost instantaneous (no optimization or dose calculation needed). The previously developed SAM algorithm is then applied for daily deformation. The authors tested the method on sample prostate and pancreas cases. The two-step interpolation method can account for the adverse dose effects from FFF beams, while SAM corrects for the target deformation. Plan interpolation method is effective in diminishing the unflat beam effect and may allow reducing the required number of PSPs. The whole process takes the same time as the previously reported SAM process (5-10 min). The new two-step method plus SAM can address both the translation effects of FFF beams and target deformation, and can be executed in full automation except the delineation of target contour required by the SAM process.

  18. Measurement of changes in linear accelerator photon energy through flatness variation using an ion chamber array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Song; Balter, Peter A.; Rose, Mark; Simon, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for determining changes in photon beam energy for a megavoltage linear accelerator. Methods: Energy changes were accomplished by adjusting the bending magnet current by up to ±15% in 5% increments away from the value used clinically. Two metrics for flatness, relative flatness in the central 80% of the field (Flat) and average maximum dose along the diagonals normalized by central axis dose (F DN ), were measured using a commercially available planner ionization chamber array. PDD was measured in water at depths of 5 and 10 cm in 3 × 3 cm 2 and 10 × 10 cm 2 fields using a cylindrical chamber. Results: PDD was more sensitive to changes in energy when the beam energy was increased than when it was decreased. For the 18-MV beam in particular, PDD was not sensitive to energy reductions below the nominal energy. The value of Flat was found to be more sensitive to decreases in energy than to increases, with little sensitivity to energy increases above the nominal energy for 18-MV beams. F DN was the only metric that was found to be sensitive to both increases and reductions of energy for both the 6- and 18-MV beams. Conclusions: Flatness based metrics were found to be more sensitive to energy changes than PDD, In particular, F DN was found to be the most sensitive metric to energy changes for photon beams of 6 and 18 MV. The ionization chamber array allows this metric to be conveniently measured as part of routine accelerator quality assurance.

  19. SU-F-T-283: A Novel Device to Enable Portal Dosimetry for Flattening Filter Free Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faught, A; Wu, Q; Adamson, J [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Varian’s electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based portal dosimetry tool is a popular and effective means of performing IMRT QA. EPIDs for older models of the TrueBeam accelerator utilize a 40cmx30cm Image Detection Unit (IDU) that saturates at the center for standard source to imager distances with high dose rate flattening filter free (FFF) beams. This makes portal dosimetry not possible and an alternative means of IMRT QA necessary. We developed a filter that would attenuate the beam to a dose rate measureable by the IDU for portal dosimetry IMRT QA. Methods: Multipurpose 304 stainless steel plates were placed on an accessory tray to attenuate the beam. Profiles of an open field measured on the IDU were acquired with varying number of plates to assess the thickness needed to reduce the maximum dose rates of 6XFFF and 10XFFF beams to measurable levels. A new portal dose image prediction (PDIP) model was commissioned based on open field measurements with plates in position, and a modified beam profile was input to portal dosimetry calibration at the console to empirically correct for attenuation and scatter. The portal dosimetry tool was used to assess agreement between predicted and measured doses for open 25×25cm{sup 2} fields and intensity modulated fields using 6XFFF and 10XFFF beams. Results: Thicknesses of 2.5cm and 3.8cm of steel were required to reduce the highest dose rates to a measureable level for 6XFFF and 10XFFF, respectively. Gamma analysis using a 3%/3mm relative criterion with the filter in place and using the new PDIP model resulted in 98.2% and 93.6% of pixels passing while intensity modulated fields showed passing rates of 98.2% and 99.0%. Conclusion: Use of the filter allows for portal dosimetry to be used for IMRT QA of FFF plans in place of purchasing a second option for IMRT QA.

  20. An online replanning method using warm start optimization and aperture morphing for flattening-filter-free beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahunbay, Ergun E.; Ates, O.; Li, X. A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In a situation where a couch shift for patient positioning is not preferred or prohibited (e.g., MR-linac), segment aperture morphing (SAM) can address target dislocation and deformation. For IMRT/VMAT with flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams, however, SAM method would lead to an adverse translational dose effect due to the beam unflattening. Here the authors propose a new two-step process to address both the translational effect of FFF beams and the target deformation. Methods: The replanning method consists of an offline and an online step. The offline step is to create a series of preshifted-plans (PSPs) obtained by a so-called “warm start” optimization (starting optimization from the original plan, rather than from scratch) at a series of isocenter shifts. The PSPs all have the same number of segments with very similar shapes, since the warm start optimization only adjusts the MLC positions instead of regenerating them. In the online step, a new plan is obtained by picking the closest PSP or linearly interpolating the MLC positions and the monitor units of the closest PSPs for the shift determined from the image of the day. This two-step process is completely automated and almost instantaneous (no optimization or dose calculation needed). The previously developed SAM algorithm is then applied for daily deformation. The authors tested the method on sample prostate and pancreas cases. Results: The two-step interpolation method can account for the adverse dose effects from FFF beams, while SAM corrects for the target deformation. Plan interpolation method is effective in diminishing the unflat beam effect and may allow reducing the required number of PSPs. The whole process takes the same time as the previously reported SAM process (5–10 min). Conclusions: The new two-step method plus SAM can address both the translation effects of FFF beams and target deformation, and can be executed in full automation except the delineation of target contour

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of beam characteristics from small fields based on TrueBeam flattening-filter-free mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Zhongsu; Yue, Haizhen; Zhang, Yibao; Wu, Hao; Cheng, Jinsheng; Su, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Through the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of 6 and 10 MV flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams from Varian TrueBeam accelerator, this study aims to find the best incident electron distribution for further studying the small field characteristics of these beams. By incorporating the training materials of Varian on the geometry and material parameters of TrueBeam Linac head, the 6 and 10 MV FFF beams were modelled using the BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes, where the percentage depth doses (PDDs) and the off-axis ratios (OARs) curves of fields ranging from 4 × 4 to 40 × 40 cm 2 were simulated for both energies by adjusting the incident beam energy, radial intensity distribution and angular spread, respectively. The beam quality and relative output factor (ROF) were calculated. The simulations and measurements were compared using Gamma analysis method provided by Verisoft program (PTW, Freiburg, Germany), based on which the optimal MC model input parameters were selected and were further used to investigate the beam characteristics of small fields. The Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM), mono-energetic energy and angular spread of the resultant incident Gaussian radial intensity electron distribution were 0.75 mm, 6.1 MeV and 0.9° for the nominal 6 MV FFF beam, and 0.7 mm, 10.8 MeV and 0.3° for the nominal 10 MV FFF beam respectively. The simulation was mostly comparable to the measurement. Gamma criteria of 1 mm/1 % (local dose) can be met by all PDDs of fields larger than 1 × 1 cm 2 , and by all OARs of no larger than 20 × 20 cm 2 , otherwise criteria of 1 mm/2 % can be fulfilled. Our MC simulated ROFs agreed well with the measured ROFs of various field sizes (the discrepancies were less than 1 %), except for the 1 × 1 cm 2 field. The MC simulation agrees well with the measurement and the proposed model parameters can be clinically used for further dosimetric studies of 6 and 10 MV FFF beams

  2. SU-E-T-377: Inaccurate Positioning Might Introduce Significant MapCheck Calibration Error in Flatten Filter Free Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S; Chao, C; Chang, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the calibration error of detector sensitivity for MapCheck due to inaccurate positioning of the device, which is not taken into account by the current commercial iterative calibration algorithm. We hypothesize the calibration is more vulnerable to the positioning error for the flatten filter free (FFF) beams than the conventional flatten filter flattened beams. Methods: MapCheck2 was calibrated with 10MV conventional and FFF beams, with careful alignment and with 1cm positioning error during calibration, respectively. Open fields of 37cmx37cm were delivered to gauge the impact of resultant calibration errors. The local calibration error was modeled as a detector independent multiplication factor, with which propagation error was estimated with positioning error from 1mm to 1cm. The calibrated sensitivities, without positioning error, were compared between the conventional and FFF beams to evaluate the dependence on the beam type. Results: The 1cm positioning error leads to 0.39% and 5.24% local calibration error in the conventional and FFF beams respectively. After propagating to the edges of MapCheck, the calibration errors become 6.5% and 57.7%, respectively. The propagation error increases almost linearly with respect to the positioning error. The difference of sensitivities between the conventional and FFF beams was small (0.11 ± 0.49%). Conclusion: The results demonstrate that the positioning error is not handled by the current commercial calibration algorithm of MapCheck. Particularly, the calibration errors for the FFF beams are ~9 times greater than those for the conventional beams with identical positioning error, and a small 1mm positioning error might lead to up to 8% calibration error. Since the sensitivities are only slightly dependent of the beam type and the conventional beam is less affected by the positioning error, it is advisable to cross-check the sensitivities between the conventional and FFF beams to detect

  3. An online replanning method using warm start optimization and aperture morphing for flattening-filter-free beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahunbay, Ergun E., E-mail: eahunbay@mcw.edu; Ates, O.; Li, X. A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: In a situation where a couch shift for patient positioning is not preferred or prohibited (e.g., MR-linac), segment aperture morphing (SAM) can address target dislocation and deformation. For IMRT/VMAT with flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams, however, SAM method would lead to an adverse translational dose effect due to the beam unflattening. Here the authors propose a new two-step process to address both the translational effect of FFF beams and the target deformation. Methods: The replanning method consists of an offline and an online step. The offline step is to create a series of preshifted-plans (PSPs) obtained by a so-called “warm start” optimization (starting optimization from the original plan, rather than from scratch) at a series of isocenter shifts. The PSPs all have the same number of segments with very similar shapes, since the warm start optimization only adjusts the MLC positions instead of regenerating them. In the online step, a new plan is obtained by picking the closest PSP or linearly interpolating the MLC positions and the monitor units of the closest PSPs for the shift determined from the image of the day. This two-step process is completely automated and almost instantaneous (no optimization or dose calculation needed). The previously developed SAM algorithm is then applied for daily deformation. The authors tested the method on sample prostate and pancreas cases. Results: The two-step interpolation method can account for the adverse dose effects from FFF beams, while SAM corrects for the target deformation. Plan interpolation method is effective in diminishing the unflat beam effect and may allow reducing the required number of PSPs. The whole process takes the same time as the previously reported SAM process (5–10 min). Conclusions: The new two-step method plus SAM can address both the translation effects of FFF beams and target deformation, and can be executed in full automation except the delineation of target contour

  4. TH-A-9A-10: Prostate SBRT Delivery with Flattening-Filter-Free Mode: Benefit and Accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, T; Yuan, L; Sheng, Y; Wu, Q

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Flattening-filter-free (FFF) beam mode offered on TrueBeam™ linac enables delivering IMRT at 2400 MU/min dose rate. This study investigates the benefit and delivery accuracy of using high dose rate in the context of prostate SBRT. Methods: 8 prostate SBRT patients were retrospectively studied. In 5 cases treated with 600-MU/min dose rate, continuous prostate motion data acquired during radiation-beam-on was used to analyze motion range. In addition, the initial 1/3 of prostate motion trajectories during each radiation-beam-on was separated to simulate motion range if 2400-MU/min were used. To analyze delivery accuracy in FFF mode, MLC trajectory log files from an additional 3 cases treated at 2400-MU/min were acquired. These log files record MLC expected and actual positions every 20ms, and therefore can be used to reveal delivery accuracy. Results: (1) Benefit. On average treatment at 600-MU/min takes 30s per beam; whereas 2400-MU/min requires only 11s. When shortening delivery time to ~1/3, the prostate motion range was significantly smaller (p<0.001). Largest motion reduction occurred in Sup-Inf direction, from [−3.3mm, 2.1mm] to [−1.7mm, 1.7mm], followed by reduction from [−2.1mm, 2.4mm] to [−1.0mm, 2.4mm] in Ant-Pos direction. No change observed in LR direction [−0.8mm, 0.6mm]. The combined motion amplitude (vector norm) confirms that average motion and ranges are significantly smaller when beam-on was limited to the 1st 1/3 of actual delivery time. (2) Accuracy. Trajectory log file analysis showed excellent delivery accuracy with at 2400 MU/min. Most leaf deviations during beam-on were within 0.07mm (99-percentile). Maximum leaf-opening deviations during each beam-on were all under 0.1mm for all leaves. Dose-rate was maintained at 2400-MU/min during beam-on without dipping. Conclusion: Delivery prostate SBRT with 2400 MU/min is both beneficial and accurate. High dose rates significantly reduced both treatment time and intra-beam prostate

  5. Radiosurgery with flattening-filter-free techniques in the treatment of brain metastases. Plan comparison and early clinical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieber, J.; Tonndorf-Martini, E.; Schramm, O.; Rhein, B.; Stefanowicz, S.; Lindel, K.; Debus, J.; Rieken, S. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Kappes, J. [Heidelberg University, Translational Research Unit, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg University, Department of Pneumology, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg (Germany); Member of the German Centre for Lung Research (DZL), Translational Lung Research Centre Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Heidelberg (Germany); Hoffmann, H. [Heidelberg University, Translational Research Unit, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg University, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg (Germany); Member of the German Centre for Lung Research (DZL), Translational Lung Research Centre Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Radiosurgical treatment of brain metastases is well established in daily clinical routine. Utilization of flattening-filter-free beams (FFF) may allow for more rapid delivery of treatment doses and improve clinical comfort. Hence, we compared plan quality and efficiency of radiosurgery in FFF mode to FF techniques. Between November 2014 and June 2015, 21 consecutive patients with 25 brain metastases were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in FFF mode. Brain metastases received dose-fractionation schedules of 1 x 20 Gy or 1 x 18 Gy, delivered to the conformally enclosing 80 % isodose. Three patients with critically localized or large (>3 cm) brain metastases were treated with 6 x 5 Gy. Plan quality and efficiency were evaluated by analyzing conformity, dose gradients, dose to healthy brain tissue, treatment delivery time, and number of monitor units. FFF plans were compared to those using the FF method, and early clinical outcome and toxicity were assessed. FFF mode resulted in significant reductions in beam-on time (p < 0.001) and mean brain dose (p = 0.001) relative to FF-mode comparison plans. Furthermore, significant improvements in dose gradients and sharper dose falloffs were found for SRS in FFF mode (-1.1 %, -29.6 %; p ≤ 0.003), but conformity was slightly superior in SRS in FF mode (-1.3 %; p = 0.001). With a median follow-up time of 5.1 months, 6-month overall survival was 63.3 %. Local control was observed in 24 of 25 brain metastases (96 %). SRS in FFF mode is time efficient and provides similar plan quality with the opportunity of slightly reduced dose exposure to healthy brain tissue when compared to SRS in FF mode. Clinical outcomes appear promising and show only modest treatment-related toxicity. (orig.) [German] Die radiochirurgische Behandlung (SRS) von Hirnmetastasen wird vielfach in der klinischen Routine durchgefuehrt. Die zusaetzliche Anwendung von ausgleichsfilterfreien Bestrahlungstechniken (FFF) kann die Bestrahlungszeit

  6. Photon-photon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief summary of the present status of photon-photon interactions is presented. Stress is placed on the use of two-photon collisions to test present ideas on the quark constituents of hadrons and on the theory of strong interactions

  7. Testing of the analytical anisotropic algorithm for photon dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esch, Ann van; Tillikainen, Laura; Pyykkonen, Jukka; Tenhunen, Mikko; Helminen, Hannu; Siljamaeki, Sami; Alakuijala, Jyrki; Paiusco, Marta; Iori, Mauro; Huyskens, Dominique P.

    2006-01-01

    The analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) was implemented in the Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) treatment planning system to replace the single pencil beam (SPB) algorithm for the calculation of dose distributions for photon beams. AAA was developed to improve the dose calculation accuracy, especially in heterogeneous media. The total dose deposition is calculated as the superposition of the dose deposited by two photon sources (primary and secondary) and by an electron contamination source. The photon dose is calculated as a three-dimensional convolution of Monte-Carlo precalculated scatter kernels, scaled according to the electron density matrix. For the configuration of AAA, an optimization algorithm determines the parameters characterizing the multiple source model by optimizing the agreement between the calculated and measured depth dose curves and profiles for the basic beam data. We have combined the acceptance tests obtained in three different departments for 6, 15, and 18 MV photon beams. The accuracy of AAA was tested for different field sizes (symmetric and asymmetric) for open fields, wedged fields, and static and dynamic multileaf collimation fields. Depth dose behavior at different source-to-phantom distances was investigated. Measurements were performed on homogeneous, water equivalent phantoms, on simple phantoms containing cork inhomogeneities, and on the thorax of an anthropomorphic phantom. Comparisons were made among measurements, AAA, and SPB calculations. The optimization procedure for the configuration of the algorithm was successful in reproducing the basic beam data with an overall accuracy of 3%, 1 mm in the build-up region, and 1%, 1 mm elsewhere. Testing of the algorithm in more clinical setups showed comparable results for depth dose curves, profiles, and monitor units of symmetric open and wedged beams below d max . The electron contamination model was found to be suboptimal to model the dose around d max , especially for physical

  8. Peripheral dose in photon beams from a linear accelerator with a multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lope Lope, R.; Lozano Flores, F.; Gracia Sorrosal, J.; Font Gomez, J.A.; Hernandez Vitoria, A.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation doses outside the radiotherapy treatment field are of radiation protection interest when anatomical structures with very low dose tolerances might be involved. One of the major sources of peripheral dose, scatter from secondary collimators, depends on the configuration of the collimator. In this study, peripheral dose was measured at two depths for 6 and 18 MV photons from a linac Primus (Siemens) with a multileaf collimator (MLC). Comparative measurements were made both with leaves and with the upper jaw positioned at the field edge near to the detector. Configuring the MLC leaves at the field edge yielded a reduction in peripheral dose. (author)

  9. Evaluation of an aSi-EPID with flattening filter free beams: Applicability to the GLAaS algorithm for portal dosimetry and first experience for pretreatment QA of RapidArc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolini, G.; Clivio, A.; Vanetti, E.; Cozzi, L.; Fogliata, A.; Krauss, H.; Fenoglietto, P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of portal dosimetry with an amorphous silicon mega voltage imager for flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams by means of the GLAaS methodology and to validate it for pretreatment quality assurance of volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc).Methods: The GLAaS algorithm, developed for flattened beams, was applied to FFF beams of nominal energy of 6 and 10 MV generated by a Varian TrueBeam (TB). The amorphous silicon electronic portal imager [named mega voltage imager (MVI) on TB] was used to generate integrated images that were converted into matrices of absorbed dose to water. To enable GLAaS use under the increased dose-per-pulse and dose-rate conditions of the FFF beams, new operational source-detector-distance (SDD) was identified to solve detector saturation issues. Empirical corrections were defined to account for the shape of the profiles of the FFF beams to expand the original methodology of beam profile and arm backscattering correction. GLAaS for FFF beams was validated on pretreatment verification of RapidArc plans for three different TB linacs. In addition, the first pretreatment results from clinical experience on 74 arcs were reported in terms of γ analysis.Results: MVI saturates at 100 cm SDD for FFF beams but this can be avoided if images are acquired at 150 cm for all nominal dose rates of FFF beams. Rotational stability of the gantry-imager system was tested and resulted in a minimal apparent imager displacement during rotation of 0.2 ± 0.2 mm at SDD = 150 cm. The accuracy of this approach was tested with three different Varian TrueBeam linacs from different institutes. Data were stratified per energy and machine and showed no dependence with beam quality and MLC model. The results from clinical pretreatment quality assurance, provided a gamma agreement index (GAI) in the field area for six and ten FFF beams of (99.8 ± 0.3)% and (99.5 ± 0.6)% with distance to agreement and dose difference criteria

  10. Comparison of the dosimetric parameters in linear accelerators with flattening filter-free (FFF) and flattening filter (FF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Anderson S.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Moura, Eduardo S.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Daiane C.; Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Souza, Carla D.; Melo, Emerson R.; Camargo, Anderson R.; Batista, Talita Q.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the main features associated with the dosimetric parameters between FFF and FF Linacs. A set of Varian TrueBeam Linac and Varian 23EX dosimetric measurements was acquired to perform the experimental measurements. The dose measurements were carried out in a water Blue phantom, with a waterproof ionization chambers: farmer ionization chamber (0.6 cm 3 ) and Exradin A1SL(0.053 cm 3 ) , for fields 5 x 5, 8 x 8, 10 x 10, 15 x 15, 30 x 30 cm 2 . The 6 MV FFF and FF was the energy used in this work. Percent Depth Dose (PDD) was the dosimetric parameters evaluated using a fixed Source Surface Distance of 100 cm. One depth were applied for the measurements, 10 cm (central axis) from the water surface. The 6 MV FFF showed less penetrating than the 6 MV FF. This is due to the removal flattening filter causes more lower energy photons on the central axis. The field sizes were equivalent for both FFF and FF. The main advantage in operate linear accelerators without flattening filter is due to the high doses rates delivered during the treatment. High doses rates could reduce the patient treatment time and may be beneficial for some treatment techniques such as IMRT and SRT. (author)

  11. Efficacy of flattening-filter-free beam in stereotactic body radiation therapy planning and treatment: A systematic review with meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Thu M.; Peters, Mitchell J.; Hickey, Brigid; Semciw, Adam

    2017-01-01

    A linear accelerator with the flattening-filter removed generates a non-uniform dose profile beam. We aimed to analyse and compare plan quality and treatment time between flattened beam (FB) and flattening-filter-free (FFF) beam to assess the efficacy of FFF beam for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The search strategy was based around 3 concepts; radiation therapy, flattening-filter-free and treatment delivery. The years searched were restricted from 2010 to date of review (October 2015). All plan quality comparisons were between FFF and FB plans from the same data sets. We identified 210 potential studies based on the three searched concepts. All articles were screened by two authors for title and abstract and by three authors for full text. Ten studies met the eligibility criteria. Plan quality was evaluated using conformity index (CI), heterogeneity index (HI) and gradient index (GI). Dose to organs-at-risk (OAR) and healthy tissues were compared. Differences between beam-on-time (BOT) and treatment time (T × T) were also analysed. Normalized percentage ratios of CI and HI demonstrated no clinical differences among the studied articles. GI displayed small variations between the articles favouring FFF beam. The BOT with FFF is substantially reduced, and appears to impact the frequency of intra-fraction imaging which, in turn, affects total treatment time. Based on planning tumour volume (PTV) coverage, dose to OAR and healthy tissue sparing, FFF beam is clinically effective for the treatment of cancer patients using SBRT. We recommend the use of FFF beam for SBRT based on these factors and the reported overall treatment time reduction.

  12. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e#betta# scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by #betta##betta# collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F 2 /sup #betta#/(x,Q 2 ) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved

  13. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haissinski, J.

    1986-06-01

    The discussions presented in this paper deal with the following points: distinctive features of gamma-gamma collisions; related processes; photon-photon elastic scattering in the continuum and γγ →gg; total cross section; γγ → V 1 V 2 (V=vector meson); radiative width measurements and light meson spectroscopy; exclusive channels at large /t/; jets and inclusive particle distribution in γγ collisions; and, the photon structure function F γ 2

  14. Photon-photon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R ampersand D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy

  15. Neutron and photon spectra in LINACs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega-Carrillo, H.R.; Martínez-Ovalle, S.A.; Lallena, A.M.; Mercado, G.A.; Benites-Rengifo, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    A Monte Carlo calculation, using the MCNPX code, was carried out in order to estimate the photon and neutron spectra in two locations of two linacs operating at 15 and 18 MV. Detailed models of both linac heads were used in the calculations. Spectra were estimated below the flattening filter and at the isocenter. Neutron spectra show two components due to evaporation and knock-on neutrons. Lethargy spectra under the filter were compared to the spectra calculated from the function quoted by Tosi et al. that describes reasonably well neutron spectra beyond 1 MeV, though tends to underestimate the energy region between 10 –6 and 1 MeV. Neutron and the Bremsstrahlung spectra show the same features regardless of the linac voltage. - Highlights: ► With MCNPX code realistic models of two LINACs were built. ► Photon and neutron spectra below the flattening filter and at the isocenter were calculated. ► Neutron spectrum at the flattening filter was compared against the Tosi et al. source-term model. ► Tosi et al. model underestimates the neutron contribution below 1 MeV. ► Photon spectra look alike to those published in literature.

  16. SU-E-T-336: Dosimetric Properties of a New Solid Water High Equivalency Phantom for High-Energy Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, F; Ohno, T; Onitsuka, R; Shimohigashi, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric properties in high-energy photon beams for a Solid Water High Equivalency (SWHE, SW557) phantom (Gammex) which was newly developed as water mimicking material. Methods: The mass density of SWHE and SWHE/water electron density ratio are 1.032 g/cm 3 and 1.005 according to the manufacturer information, respectively. SWHE is more water equivalent material in physical characteristics and uniformity than conventional SW457. This study calculated the relative ionization ratio of water and SWHE as a function of depth from the cavity dose in PTW30013 and Exradin A19 Farmer-type ionization chambers using Monte Caro simulations. The simulation was performed with a 10 x 10 cm 2 field at SAD of 100 cm for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photons. The ionization ratio was also measured with the PTW30013 chamber for 6 and 15 MV photons. In addition, the overall perturbation factor of both chambers was calculated for both phantoms. Results: The relative ionization ratio curves for water and SWHE was in good agreement for all photon energies. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE for both chambers was 0.999–1.002, 0.999–1.002, 1.001–1.004, 1.004–1.007, and 1.006–1.010 at depths of over the buildup region for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photons, respectively. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE increased up to 1% with increasing the photon energy. The measured ionization ratio of water/SWHE for 6 and 15 MV photons agreed well with calculated values. The overall perturbation factor for both chambers was 0.983–0.988 and 0.978–0.983 for water and SWHE, respectively, in a range from 4 MV to 18 MV. Conclusion: The depth scaling factor of water/SWHE was equal to unity for all photon energies. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE at a reference depth was equal to unity for 4 and 6 MV and larger up to 0.7% than unity for 18 MV

  17. Peripheral photon and neutron doses from prostate cancer external beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezak, Eva; Takam, Rundgham; Marcu, Loredana G

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral photon and neutron doses from external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) are associated with increased risk of carcinogenesis in the out-of-field organs; thus, dose estimations of secondary radiation are imperative. Peripheral photon and neutron doses from EBRT of prostate carcinoma were measured in Rando phantom. (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P glass-rod thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) were inserted in slices of a Rando phantom followed by exposure to 80 Gy with 18-MV photon four-field 3D-CRT technique. The TLDs were calibrated using 6- and 18-MV X-ray beam. Neutron dose equivalents measured with CR-39 etch-track detectors were used to derive readout-to-neutron dose conversion factor for (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs. Average neutron dose equivalents per 1 Gy of isocentre dose were 3.8±0.9 mSv Gy(-1) for thyroid and 7.0±5.4 mSv Gy(-1) for colon. For photons, the average dose equivalents per 1 Gy of isocentre dose were 0.2±0.1 mSv Gy(-1) for thyroid and 8.1±9.7 mSv Gy(-1) for colon. Paired (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs can be used to measure photon and neutron doses simultaneously. Organs in close proximity to target received larger doses from photons than those from neutrons whereas distally located organs received higher neutron versus photon dose. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  19. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of α/sub s/ and Λ/sup ms/ from the γ*γ → π 0 form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from γγ → H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub γγ/ from exclusive channels at low W/sub γγ/, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z 0 and W +- beams from e → eZ 0 and e → nu W will become important. 44 references

  20. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The current status, both theoretical and experimental, of two photon collision physics is reviewed with special emphasis on recent experimental results from e + e - storage rings. After a complete presentation of the helicity amplitude formalism for the general process e + e - → Xe + e - , various approximations (transverse photon, Weisaecker Williams) are discussed. Beam polarisation effects and radiative corrections are also briefly considered. A number of specific processes, for which experimental results are now available, are then described. In each case existing theoretical prediction are confronted with experimental results. The processes described include single resonance production, lepton and hadron pair production, the structure functions of the photon, the production of high Psub(T) jets and the total photon photon cross section. In the last part of the review the current status of the subject is summarised and some comments are made on future prospects. These include both extrapolations of current research to higher energy machines (LEP, HERA) as well as a brief mention of both the technical realisation and the physics interest of the real γγ and eγ collisions which may be possible using linear electron colliders in the 1 TeV energy range

  1. Volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free beams for isolated abdominal/pelvic lymph nodes: report of dosimetric and early clinical results in oligometastatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alongi Filippo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SBRT is a safe and efficient strategy to locally control multiple metastatic sites. While research in the physics domain for Flattening Filter Free Beams (FFF beams is increasing, there are few clinical data of FFF beams in clinical practice. Here we reported dosimentric and early clinical data of SBRT and FFF delivery in isolated lymph node oligometastatic patients. Methods Between October 2010 and March 2012, 34 patients were treated with SBRT for oligometastatic lymph node metastasis on a Varian TrueBeamTM treatment machine using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (RapidArc. We retrospectively evaluated a total of 25 patients for isolated lymph node metastases in abdomen and/or pelvis treated with SBRT and FFF (28 treatments. Acute toxicity was recorded. Local control evaluation was scored by means of CT scan and/or PET scan. Results All dosimetric results are in line with what published for the same type of stereotactic abdominal lymph node metastases treatments and fractionation, using RapidArc. All 25 FFF SBRT patients completed the treatment. Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was minimal: one patient showed Grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity. Three other patients presented Grade 2 toxicity. No Grade 3 or higher was recorded. All toxicities were recovered within one week. The preliminary clinical results at the median follow up of 195 days are: complete response in 12 cases, partial response in 11, stable disease in 5, with an overall response rate of 82%; no local progression was recorded. Conclusions Data of dosimetrical findings and acute toxicity are excellent for patients treated with SBRT with VMAT using FFF beams. Preliminary clinical results showed a high rate of local control in irradiated lesion. Further data and longer follow up are needed to assess late toxicity and definitive clinical outcomes.

  2. SU-E-T-311: Dosimetric Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans for Preoperative Radiotherapy Rectal Cancer Using Flattening Filter-Free and Flattening Filter Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W; Zhang, J; Lu, J; Chen, C [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference of volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT) for preoperative radiotherapy rectal cancer using 6MV X-ray flattening filter free(FFF) and flattening filter(FF) modes. Methods: FF-VMAT and FFF-VMAT plans were designed to 15 rectal cancer patients with preoperative radiotherapy by planning treatment system(Eclipse 10.0),respectively. Dose prescription was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. All plans were normalized to 50 Gy to 95% of PTV. The Dose Volume Histogram (DVH), target and risk organ doses, conformity indexes (CI), homogeneity indexes (HI), low dose volume of normal tissue(BP), monitor units(MU) and treatment time (TT) were compared between the two kinds of plans. Results: FF-VMAT provided the lower Dmean, V105, HI, and higher CI as compared with FFF-VMAT. The small intestine of D5, Bladder of D5, Dmean, V40, V50, L-femoral head of V40, R-femoral head of Dmean were lower in FF-VMAT than in FFF-VMAT. FF-VMAT had higher BP of V5, but no significantly different of V10, V15, V20, V30 as compared with FFF-VMAT. FF-VMAT reduceed the monitor units(MU) by 21%(P<0.05), as well as the treatment time(TT) was no significantly different(P>0.05), as compared with FFF-VMAT. Conclusion: The plan qualities of FF and FFF VMAT plans were comparable and both clinically acceptable. FF-VMAT as compared with FFF-VMAT, showing better target coverage, some of OARs sparing, the MUs of FFF-VMAT were higher than FF-VMAT, yet were delivered within the same time. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  3. Can volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free beams play a role in stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver lesions? A volume-based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reggiori, Giacomo; Mancosu, Pietro; Castiglioni, Simona; Alongi, Filippo; Pellegrini, Chiara; Lobefalo, Francesca; Catalano, Maddalena; Fogliata, Antonella; Arcangeli, Stefano; Navarria, Piera; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free (FFF) and flattening filter (FF) beams in patients with hepatic metastases subject to hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT). Methods: A planning study on 13 virtual lesions of increasing volume was performed. Two single arc plans were optimized with the RapidArc technique using either FFF or FF beams. A second planning study was performed on ten patients treated for liver metastases to validate conclusions. In all cases, a dose of 75 Gy in 3 fractions was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) and plans were evaluated in terms of coverage, homogeneity, conformity, mean dose to healthy liver and to healthy tissue. For each parameter, results were expressed in relative terms as the percentage ratio between FFF and FF data. Results: In terms of PTV coverage, conformity index favored FFF for targets of intermediate size while FF resulted more suitable for small ( 3 ) and large (>300 cm 3 ) targets. Plans optimized with FFF beams resulted in increased sparing of healthy tissue in ≅85% of cases. Despite the qualitative results, no statistically significant differences were found between FFF and FF results. Plans optimized with un-flattened beams resulted in higher average MU/Gy than plans with FF beams. A remarkable and significant difference was observed in the beam-on time (BOT) needed to deliver plans. The BOT for FF plans was 8.2 ± 1.0 min; for FFF plans BOT was 2.2 ± 0.2 min. Conclusions: RapidArc plans optimized using FFF were dosimetrically equivalent to those optimized using FF beams, showing the feasibility of SBRT treatments with FFF beams. Some improvement in healthy tissue sparing was observed when using the FFF modality due to the different beam's profile. The main advantage was a considerable reduction of beam-on time, relevant for SBRT techniques.

  4. The evaluation of properties for radiation therapy techniques with flattening filter-free beam and usefulness of time and economy to a patient with the radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Jang Hyeon; Won, Hui Su; Hong, Joo Wan; Chang, Nam Jun; Park, Jin Hong

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to appraise properties for radiation therapy techniques and effectiveness of time and economy to a patient in the case of applying flattening filter-free (3F) and flattening filter (2F) beam to the radiation therapy. Alderson rando phantom was scanned for computed tomography image. Treatment plans for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with 3F and 2F beam were designed for prostate cancer. To evaluate the differences between the 3F and 2F beam, total monitor units (MUs), beam on time (BOT) and gantry rotation time (GRT) were used and measured with TrueBeam TM STx and Surveillance And Measurement (SAM) 940 detector was used for photoneutron emitted by using 3F and 2F. To assess temporal and economical aspect for a patient, total treatment periods and medical fees were estimated. In using 3F beam, total MUs in IMRT plan increased the highest up to 34.0% and in the test of BOT, GRT and photoneutron, the values in SBRT plan decreased the lowest 39.8, 38.6 and 48.1%, respectively. In the temporal and economical aspect, there were no differences between 3F and 2F beam in all of plans and the results showed that 10 days and 169,560 won was lowest in SBRT plan. According as the results, total MUs increased by using 3F beam than 2F beam but BOT, GRT and photoneutron decreased. From above the results, using 3F beam can decrease intra-fraction setup error and risk of radiation-induced secondary malignancy. But, using 3F beam did not make the benefits of temporal and economical aspect for a patient with the radiation therapy

  5. Development of a flattening filter free multiple source model for use as an independent, Monte Carlo, dose calculation, quality assurance tool for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faught, Austin M; Davidson, Scott E; Popple, Richard; Kry, Stephen F; Etzel, Carol; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Followill, David S

    2017-09-01

    The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core-Houston (IROC-H) Quality Assurance Center (formerly the Radiological Physics Center) has reported varying levels of compliance from their anthropomorphic phantom auditing program. IROC-H studies have suggested that one source of disagreement between institution submitted calculated doses and measurement is the accuracy of the institution's treatment planning system dose calculations and heterogeneity corrections used. In order to audit this step of the radiation therapy treatment process, an independent dose calculation tool is needed. Monte Carlo multiple source models for Varian flattening filter free (FFF) 6 MV and FFF 10 MV therapeutic x-ray beams were commissioned based on central axis depth dose data from a 10 × 10 cm 2 field size and dose profiles for a 40 × 40 cm 2 field size. The models were validated against open-field measurements in a water tank for field sizes ranging from 3 × 3 cm 2 to 40 × 40 cm 2 . The models were then benchmarked against IROC-H's anthropomorphic head and neck phantom and lung phantom measurements. Validation results, assessed with a ±2%/2 mm gamma criterion, showed average agreement of 99.9% and 99.0% for central axis depth dose data for FFF 6 MV and FFF 10 MV models, respectively. Dose profile agreement using the same evaluation technique averaged 97.8% and 97.9% for the respective models. Phantom benchmarking comparisons were evaluated with a ±3%/2 mm gamma criterion, and agreement averaged 90.1% and 90.8% for the respective models. Multiple source models for Varian FFF 6 MV and FFF 10 MV beams have been developed, validated, and benchmarked for inclusion in an independent dose calculation quality assurance tool for use in clinical trial audits. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. SU-E-T-670: Radiotherapy Vault Shielding Evaluation Method for a Flattening Filter-Free (FFF) Linac-Practical Considerations and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailidis, D [CAMC Cancer Center-Alliance Oncology and West Virginia University, Charleston, WV (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To date, there isn’t formal approach for flattening filter-free (FFF) linac vault shielding evaluation, thus, we propose an extension to NCRP#151 to accommodate the recent large number of FFF linac installations.Methods and Materials: We extended the approach in NCRP#151 to design two Truebeam vaults in our new cancer center for hypofractionated treatments. Monte Carlo calculations have characterized primary, scattered, leakage and neutron radiations from FFF-modes. These calculations have shown that: a) FFF primary beam is softer on the central-axis compared to flattening filtered (FF), b) the lateral dose profile is peaked on the central axis and less integral target current is required to generate the same tumor dose with the FF beam. Thus, the TVLs for FFF mode are smaller than those of the FF mode and the scatter functions of the FF mode (NCRP#151) may not be appropriate for FFF-mode, c) the neutron source strength and fluence for 18X-FFF is smaller than 18X-FF, but it is not of a concern here, no 18X-FFF-mode is available on the linac under investigation. Results: These barrier thickness are smaller (12% reduction on the average) than those computed for conventional FF mode with same realistic primary workload since, the primary TVLs used here are smaller and the WL is smaller than the conventional (almost half reduced), keeping the TADR in tolerance. Conclusions: A comprehensive method for shielding barrier calculations based on dedicated data for FFF-mode linacs is highly desired. Meanwhile, we provide an extension to NCRP#151 to accommodate the shielding design of such installations. It is also shown that if a vault is already designed for IMRT/VMAT and SABR hypofractionated treatments with FFF-mode linac, the vault can also be used for a FFF mode linac replacement, leaving some leeway for slightly higher workload on the FFF linac.

  7. SU-E-T-670: Radiotherapy Vault Shielding Evaluation Method for a Flattening Filter-Free (FFF) Linac-Practical Considerations and Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihailidis, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To date, there isn’t formal approach for flattening filter-free (FFF) linac vault shielding evaluation, thus, we propose an extension to NCRP#151 to accommodate the recent large number of FFF linac installations.Methods and Materials: We extended the approach in NCRP#151 to design two Truebeam vaults in our new cancer center for hypofractionated treatments. Monte Carlo calculations have characterized primary, scattered, leakage and neutron radiations from FFF-modes. These calculations have shown that: a) FFF primary beam is softer on the central-axis compared to flattening filtered (FF), b) the lateral dose profile is peaked on the central axis and less integral target current is required to generate the same tumor dose with the FF beam. Thus, the TVLs for FFF mode are smaller than those of the FF mode and the scatter functions of the FF mode (NCRP#151) may not be appropriate for FFF-mode, c) the neutron source strength and fluence for 18X-FFF is smaller than 18X-FF, but it is not of a concern here, no 18X-FFF-mode is available on the linac under investigation. Results: These barrier thickness are smaller (12% reduction on the average) than those computed for conventional FF mode with same realistic primary workload since, the primary TVLs used here are smaller and the WL is smaller than the conventional (almost half reduced), keeping the TADR in tolerance. Conclusions: A comprehensive method for shielding barrier calculations based on dedicated data for FFF-mode linacs is highly desired. Meanwhile, we provide an extension to NCRP#151 to accommodate the shielding design of such installations. It is also shown that if a vault is already designed for IMRT/VMAT and SABR hypofractionated treatments with FFF-mode linac, the vault can also be used for a FFF mode linac replacement, leaving some leeway for slightly higher workload on the FFF linac

  8. SU-E-T-339: Dosimetric Verification of Acuros XB Dose Calculation Algorithm On An Air Cavity for 6-MV Flattening Filter-Free Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S; Suh, T; Chung, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study was to verify the accuracy of Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm on an air cavity for a single radiation field using 6-MV flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. Methods: A rectangular slab phantom containing an air cavity was made for this study. The CT images of the phantom for dose calculation were scanned with and without film at measurement depths (4.5, 5.5, 6.5 and 7.5 cm). The central axis doses (CADs) and the off-axis doses (OADs) were measured by film and calculated with Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) and AXB for field sizes ranging from 2 Χ 2 to 5 Χ 5 cm 2 of 6-MV FFF beams. Both algorithms were divided into AXB-w and AAA -w when included the film in phantom for dose calculation, and AXB-w/o and AAA-w/o in calculation without film. The calculated OADs for both algorithms were compared with the measured OADs and difference values were determined using root means squares error (RMSE) and gamma evaluation. Results: The percentage differences (%Diffs) between the measured and calculated CAD for AXB-w was most agreement than others. Compared to the %Diff with and without film, the %Diffs with film were decreased than without within both algorithms. The %Diffs for both algorithms were reduced with increasing field size and increased relative to the depth increment. RMSEs of CAD for AXB-w were within 10.32% for both inner-profile and penumbra, while the corresponding values of AAA-w appeared to 96.50%. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the dose calculation with AXB within air cavity shows more accurate than with AAA compared to the measured dose. Furthermore, we found that the AXB-w was superior to AXB-w/o in this region when compared against the measurements

  9. SU-F-T-522: Dosimetric Study of Junction Dose in Double Isocenter Flatten and Flatten Filter Free IMRT and VMAT Plan Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuvel, K; Yadav, G; Bhushan, M; Tamilarasu, S; Kumar, L; Suhail, M [Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi, Delhi (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric accuracy of junction dose in double isocenter flattened and flatten filter free(FFF) intensity modulated radiation therapy(IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT) plan delivery using pelvis phantom. Methods: Five large field pelvis patients were selected for this study. Double isocenter IMRT and VMAT treatment plans were generated in Eclipse Treatment planning System (V.11.0) using 6MV FB and FFF beams. For all the plans same distance 17.0cm was kept between one isocenter to another isocenter. IMRT Plans were made with 7 coplanar fields and VMAT plans were made with full double arcs. Dose calculation was performed using AAA algorithms with dose grid size of 0.25 cm. Verification plans were calculated on Scanditronix Wellhofer pelvis slab phantom. Measurement point was selected and calculated, where two isocenter plan fields are overlapping, this measurement point was kept at distance 8.5cm from both isocenter. The plans were delivered using Varian TrueBeamTM machine on pelvis slab phantom. Point dose measurements was carried out using CC13 ion chamber volume of 0.13cm3. Results: The measured junction point dose are compared with TPS calculated dose. The mean difference observed was 4.5%, 6.0%, 4.0% and 7.0% for IMRT-FB,IMRT-FFF, VMAT-FB and VMAT-FFF respectively. The measured dose results shows closer agreement with calculated dose in Flatten beam planning in both IMRT and VMAT, whereas in FFF beam plan dose difference are more compared with flatten beam plan. Conclusion: Dosimetry accuracy of Large Field junction dose difference was found less in Flatten beam compared with FFF beam plan delivery. Even though more dosimetric studies are required to analyse junction dose for FFF beam planning using multiple point dose measurements and fluence map verification in field junction area.

  10. SU-E-T-153: Burst-Mode Modulated Arc Therapy with Flattening-Filter-Free Beams Versus Flattening-Filtered Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kainz, K; Lawton, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetry and delivery of burst-mode modulated arc radiotherapy using flattening-filter-free (FFF) and flattening-filtered (FF) beams. Methods: Burst-mode modulated arc therapy (mARC, Siemens) plans were generated for six prostate cases with FFF and FF beam models, using the Elekta Monaco v. 5.00 planning system. One 360-degree arc was used for five cases, and for one case two 360-degree coplanar arcs were used. The maximum number of optimization points (OPs) per arc was set to 91, and OPs with less than 4 MU were disregarded. All plans were delivered on the Siemens Artiste linear accelerator with 6MV FF (300 MU/min) and comparable-energy FFF (2000 MU/min, labeled as 7UF) beams. Results: For all cases studied, the plans with FFF beams exhibited DVHs for the PTV, rectum, and bladder that were nearly identical to those for the plans with FF beams. The FFF plan yielded reduced dose to the right femoral head for 5 cases, and lower mean dose to the left femoral head for 4 cases. For all but the two-arc case, the FFF and FF plans resulted in an identical number of segments. The total number of MUs was slightly lower for the FF plans for five cases. The total delivery time per fraction was substantially lower for the FFF plans, ranging from 25 to 50 percent among all cases, as compared to the FF plans. Conclusion: For mARC plans, FFF and FF beams provided comparable PTV coverage and rectum and bladder sparing. For the femoral heads, the mean dose was slightly lower in most cases when using the FFF beam. Although the flat beam plans typically required slightly fewer MUs, FFF beams required substantially less time to deliver a plan of similar quality. This work was supported by Siemens Medical Solutions and the MCW Cancer Center Fotsch Foundation.

  11. The evaluation of properties for radiation therapy techniques with flattening filter-free beam and usefulness of time and economy to a patient with the radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Jang Hyeon; Won, Hui Su; Hong, Joo Wan; Chang, Nam Jun; Park, Jin Hong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul national university Bundang hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to appraise properties for radiation therapy techniques and effectiveness of time and economy to a patient in the case of applying flattening filter-free (3F) and flattening filter (2F) beam to the radiation therapy. Alderson rando phantom was scanned for computed tomography image. Treatment plans for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with 3F and 2F beam were designed for prostate cancer. To evaluate the differences between the 3F and 2F beam, total monitor units (MUs), beam on time (BOT) and gantry rotation time (GRT) were used and measured with TrueBeam{sup TM} STx and Surveillance And Measurement (SAM) 940 detector was used for photoneutron emitted by using 3F and 2F. To assess temporal and economical aspect for a patient, total treatment periods and medical fees were estimated. In using 3F beam, total MUs in IMRT plan increased the highest up to 34.0% and in the test of BOT, GRT and photoneutron, the values in SBRT plan decreased the lowest 39.8, 38.6 and 48.1%, respectively. In the temporal and economical aspect, there were no differences between 3F and 2F beam in all of plans and the results showed that 10 days and 169,560 won was lowest in SBRT plan. According as the results, total MUs increased by using 3F beam than 2F beam but BOT, GRT and photoneutron decreased. From above the results, using 3F beam can decrease intra-fraction setup error and risk of radiation-induced secondary malignancy. But, using 3F beam did not make the benefits of temporal and economical aspect for a patient with the radiation therapy.

  12. SU-F-T-260: Using Portal Image Device for Pre-Treatment QA in Volumetric Modulated Arc Plans with Flattening Filter Free (FFF) Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, H; Qi, P; Yu, N; Xia, P [The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement and validate a method of using electronic portal image device (EPID) for pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans using flattering filter free (FFF) beams for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: On Varian Edge with 6MV FFF beam, open field (from 2×2 cm to 20×20 cm) EPID images were acquired with 200 monitor unit (MU) at the image device to radiation source distance of 150cm. With 10×10 open field and calibration unit (CU) provided by vendor to EPID image pixel, a dose conversion factor was determined by dividing the center dose calculated from the treatment planning system (TPS) to the corresponding CU readout on the image. Water phantom measured beam profile and the output factors for various field sizes were further correlated to those of EPID images. The dose conversion factor and correction factors were then used for converting the portal images to the planner dose distributions of clinical fields. A total of 28 VMAT fields of 14 SBRT plans (8 lung, 2 prostate, 2 liver and 2 spine) were measured. With 10% low threshold cutoff, the delivered dose distributions were compared to the reference doses calculated in water phantom from the TPS. A gamma index analysis was performed for the comparison in percentage dose difference/distance-to-agreement specifications. Results: The EPID device has a linear response to the open fields with increasing MU. For the clinical fields, the gamma indices between the converted EPID dose distributions and the TPS calculated 2D dose distributions were 98.7%±1.1%, 94.0%±3.4% and 70.3%±7.7% for the criteria of 3%/3mm, 2%/2mm and 1%/1mm, respectively. Conclusion: Using a portal image device, a high resolution and high accuracy portal dosimerty was achieved for pre-treatment QA verification for SBRT VMAT plans with FFF beams.

  13. Dosimetric comparison of deep inspiration breath hold and free breathing technique in stereotactic body radiotherapy for localized lung tumor using Flattening Filter Free beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Karthick Raj; Bhuiyan, Md. Anisuzzaman; Alam, Md. Mahbub; Ahmed, Sharif; Sumon, Mostafa Aziz; Sengupta, Ashim Kumar; Rahman, Md. Shakilur; Azharul Islam, Md. S. M.

    2018-03-01

    Aim: To compare the dosimetric advantage of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized lung tumor between deep inspiration breath hold technique and free breathing technique. Materials and methods: We retrospectively included ten previously treated lung tumor patients in this dosimetric study. All the ten patients underwent CT simulation using 4D-CT free breathing (FB) and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) techniques. Plans were created using three coplanar full modulated arc using 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) bream with a dose rate of 1400 MU/min. Same dose constraints for the target and the critical structures for a particular patient were used during the plan optimization process in DIBH and FB datasets. We intend to deliver 50 Gy in 5 fractions for all the patients. For standardization, all the plans were normalized at target mean of the planning target volume (PTV). Doses to the critical structures and targets were recorded from the dose volume histogram for evaluation. Results: The mean right and left lung volumes were inflated by 1.55 and 1.60 times in DIBH scans compared to the FB scans. The mean internal target volume (ITV) increased in the FB datasets by 1.45 times compared to the DIBH data sets. The mean dose followed by standard deviation (x¯ ± σx¯) of ipsilateral lung for DIBH-SBRT and FB-SBRT plans were 7.48 ± 3.57 (Gy) and 10.23 ± 4.58 (Gy) respectively, with a mean reduction of 36.84% in DIBH-SBRT plans. Ipsilateral lung were reduced to 36.84% in DIBH plans compared to FB plans. Conclusion: Significant dose reduction in ipsilateral lung due to the lung inflation and target motion restriction in DIBH-SBRT plans were observed compare to FB-SBRT. DIBH-SBRT plans demonstrate superior dose reduction to the normal tissues and other critical structures.

  14. CONFERENCE: Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Despite being difficult to observe, photon-photon collisions have opened up a range of physics difficult, or even impossible, to access by other methods. The progress which has been made in this field was evident at the fifth international workshop on photon-photon collisions, held in Aachen from 13-16 April and attended by some 120 physicists

  15. Calculation of effective dose in whole body in dependence of angle of collimator for photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuenzalida, M.; Varon, C.; Piriz, G.; Banguero, Y.; Lozano, E.; Mancilla, C.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to obtain quantifiable data of whole body effective dose for photons fields of 6 MV and 18 MV in function of the collimator angle of a Varian Clinac 21EX lineal accelerator. It has been made a variety of studies which investigate the form to reduce the dose in whole body with photons fields, specially over the potential risks and the influence of the collimator angle, as performed Stanthakis et al. [1] with the Monte Carlo method. As a result of this work, the values of whole body effective doses are higher with a 0 deg collimator than with a 90 deg collimator, and as the field size increases, the effective doses difference in whole body, between 0 deg and 90 deg collimator angle, for both energies, becomes smaller. (author)

  16. Calculation of effective dose in whole body in dependence of angle of collimator for photon fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuenzalida, M. [Universidad de la Frontera, Temuco (Chile). Programa de Magister en Fisica Medica; Varon, C.; Piriz, G.; Banguero, Y.; Lozano, E.; Mancilla, C., E-mail: fisicamedica@incancer.c [Instituto Nacional del Cancer, Santiago (Chile). Unidad de Fisica Medica

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to obtain quantifiable data of whole body effective dose for photons fields of 6 MV and 18 MV in function of the collimator angle of a Varian Clinac 21EX lineal accelerator. It has been made a variety of studies which investigate the form to reduce the dose in whole body with photons fields, specially over the potential risks and the influence of the collimator angle, as performed Stanthakis et al. [1] with the Monte Carlo method. As a result of this work, the values of whole body effective doses are higher with a 0 deg collimator than with a 90 deg collimator, and as the field size increases, the effective doses difference in whole body, between 0 deg and 90 deg collimator angle, for both energies, becomes smaller. (author)

  17. Photon technology. Hard photon technology; Photon technology. Hard photon gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Research results of hard photon technology have been summarized as a part of novel technology development highly utilizing the quantum nature of photon. Hard photon technology refers to photon beam technologies which use photon in the 0.1 to 200 nm wavelength region. Hard photon has not been used in industry due to the lack of suitable photon sources and optical devices. However, hard photon in this wavelength region is expected to bring about innovations in such areas as ultrafine processing and material synthesis due to its atom selective reaction, inner shell excitation reaction, and spatially high resolution. Then, technological themes and possibility have been surveyed. Although there are principle proposes and their verification of individual technologies for the technologies of hard photon generation, regulation and utilization, they are still far from the practical applications. For the photon source technology, the laser diode pumped driver laser technology, laser plasma photon source technology, synchrotron radiation photon source technology, and vacuum ultraviolet photon source technology are presented. For the optical device technology, the multi-layer film technology for beam mirrors and the non-spherical lens processing technology are introduced. Also are described the reduction lithography technology, hard photon excitation process, and methods of analysis and measurement. 430 refs., 165 figs., 23 tabs.

  18. A theoretical model for the production of Ac-225 for cancer therapy by photon-induced transmutation of Ra-226.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, G; Fan Liu, Sau; Allen, B J

    2006-09-01

    Radium needles that were once implanted into tumours as a cancer treatment are now obsolete and constitute a radioactive waste problem, as their half-life is 1600 years. We are investigating the reduction of radium by transmutation on a small scale by bombarding Ra-226 with high-energy photons from a medical linear accelerator (linac) to produce Ra-225, which subsequently decays to Ac-225, which can be used as a generator to produce Bi-213 for use in 'targeted alpha therapy' for cancer. This paper examines the possibility of producing Ac-225 with a linac using an accurate theoretical model in which the bremsstrahlung photon spectrum at 18 MV linac electron energy is convoluted with the corresponding photonuclear cross sections of Ra-226. The total integrated yield can then be obtained and is compared with a computer simulation. This study shows that at 18 MV, the photonuclear reaction on Ra-226 can produce low activities of Ac-225 with a linac. However, a high power linac with high current, pulse length and frequency is needed to produce practical amounts of Ac-225 and a useful reduction of Ra-226.

  19. Characterisation of flattening filter free (FFF) beam properties for initial beam set-up and routine QA, independent of flattened beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, D.; Weston, S. J.; Cosgrove, V. P.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2018-01-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) beams have reached widespread use for clinical treatment deliveries. The usual methods for FFF beam characterisation for their quality assurance (QA) require the use of associated conventional flattened beams (cFF). Methods for QA of FFF without the need to use associated cFF beams are presented and evaluated against current methods for both FFF and cFF beams. Inflection point normalisation is evaluated against conventional methods for the determination of field size and penumbra for field sizes from 3 cm  ×  3 cm to 40 cm  ×  40cm at depths from dmax to 20 cm in water for matched and unmatched FFF beams and for cFF beams. A method for measuring symmetry in the cross plane direction is suggested and evaluated as FFF beams are insensitive to symmetry changes in this direction. Methods for characterising beam energy are evaluated and the impact of beam energy on profile shape compared to that of cFF beams. In-plane symmetry can be measured, as can cFF beams, using observed changes in profile, whereas cross-plane symmetry can be measured by acquiring profiles at collimator angles 0 and 180. Beam energy and ‘unflatness’ can be measured as with cFF beams from observed shifts in profile with changing beam energy. Normalising the inflection points of FFF beams to 55% results in an equivalent penumbra and field size measurement within 0.5 mm of conventional methods with the exception of 40 cm  ×  40 cm fields at a depth of 20 cm. New proposed methods are presented that make it possible to independently carry out set up and QA measurements on beam energy, flatness, symmetry and field size of an FFF beam without the need to reference to an equivalent flattened beam of the same energy. The methods proposed can also be used to carry out this QA for flattened beams, resulting in universal definitions and methods for MV beams. This is presented for beams produced by an Elekta linear accelerator, but is

  20. SU-E-T-591: Optimizing the Flattening Filter Free Beam Selection in RapidArc-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, B-T; Lu, J-Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To optimize the flattening filter free (FFF) beam energy selection in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment for stage I lung cancer with different fraction schemes. Methods: Twelve patients suffering from stage I lung cancer were enrolled in this study. Plans were designed using 6XFFF and 10XFFF beams with the most widely used fraction schemes of 4*12 Gy, 3*18 Gy and 1*34 Gy, respectively. The plan quality was appraised in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage, conformity of the prescribed dose (CI100%), intermediate dose spillage (R50% and D2cm), organs at risk (OARs) sparing and beam-on time. Results: The 10XFFF beam predicted 1% higher maximum, mean dose to the PTV and 4–5% higher R50% compared with the 6XFFF beam in the three fraction schemes, whereas the CI100% and D2cm was similar. Most importantly, the 6XFFF beam exhibited 3–10% lower dose to all the OARs. However, the 10XFFF beam reduced the beam-on time by 31.9±7.2%, 38.7±2.8% and 43.6±4.0% compared with the 6XFFF beam in the 4*12 Gy, 3*18 Gy and 1*34 Gy schemes, respectively. Beam-on time was 2.2±0.2 vs 1.5±0.1, 3.3±0.9 vs 2.0±0.5 and 6.3±0.9 vs 3.5±0.4 minutes for the 6XFFF and 10XFFF one in the three fraction schemes. Conclusion: The 6XFFF beam obtains better OARs sparing in SBRT treatment for stage I lung cancer, but the 10XFFF one provides improved treatment efficiency. To balance the OARs sparing and intrafractional variation as a function of prolonged treatment time, the authors recommend to use the 6XFFF beam in the 4*12 Gy and 3*18 Gy schemes for better OARs sparing. However, for the 1*34 Gy scheme, the 10XFFF beam is recommended to achieve improved treatment efficiency

  1. Dosimetric Impact of the Interplay Effect During Stereotactic Lung Radiation Therapy Delivery Using Flattening Filter-Free Beams and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Chin Loon; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the dosimetric impact of the interplay effect during RapidArc stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung tumors using flattening filter-free (FFF) beams with different dose rates. Methods and Materials: Seven tumors with motion ≤20 mm, treated with 10-MV FFF RapidArc, were analyzed. A programmable phantom with sinusoidal longitudinal motion (30-mm diameter “tumor” insert; period = 5 s; individualized amplitude from planning 4-dimensional computed tomography) was used for dynamic dose measurements. Measurements were made with GafChromic EBT III films. Plans delivered the prescribed dose to 95% of the planning target volume, created by a 5-mm expansion of the internal target volume. They comprised 2 arcs and maximum dose rates of 400 and 2400 MU/min. For 2400 MU/min plans, measurements were repeated at 3 different initial breathing phases to model interplay over 2 to 3 fractions. For 3 cases, 2 extra plans were created using 1 full rotational arc (with contralateral lung avoidance sector) and 1 partial arc of 224° to 244°. Dynamic and convolved static measurements were compared by use of gamma analysis of 3% dose difference and 1 mm distance-to-agreement. Results: For 2-arc 2400 MU/min plans, maximum dose deviation of 9.4% was found in a single arc; 7.4% for 2 arcs (single fraction) and 99% of the area within the region of interest passed the gamma criteria when all 3 measurements with different initial phases were combined. Single-fraction single-arc plans showed higher dose deviations, which diminished when dose distributions were summed over 2 fractions. All 400 MU/min plans showed good agreement in a single fraction measurement. Conclusion: Under phantom conditions, single-arc and single-fraction 2400 MU/min FFF RapidArc lung stereotactic body radiation therapy is susceptible to interplay. Two arcs and ≥2 fractions reduced the effect to a level that appeared unlikely to be clinically significant

  2. A Study of volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy in case of multi-target liver cancer using flattening filter free beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Mi Sook; Yoon, In Ha; Hong, Dong Gi; Back, Geum Mun

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has proved its efficacy in several patient populations with primary and metastatic limited tumors. Because SBRT prescription is high dose level than Conventional radiation therapy. SBRT plan is necessary for effective Organ at risk (OAR) protection and sufficient Planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage. In particular, multi-target cases may result excessive doses to OAR and hot spot due to dose overlap. This study evaluate usefulness of Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in dosimetric and technical considerations using Flattening filter free (FFF) beam. The treatment plans for five patients, being treated on TrueBeam STx(Varian™, USA) with VMAT using 10MV FFF beam and Standard conformal radiotherapy (CRT) using 15MV Flattening filter (FF) beam. PTV, liver, duodenum, bowel, spinal cord, esophagus, stomach dose were evaluated using the dose volume histogram(DVH). Conformity index(CI), homogeneity index(HI), Paddick's index(PCI) for the PTV was assessed. Total Monitor unit (MU) and beam on time was assessed. Average value of CI, HI and PCI for PTV was 1.381±0.028, 1.096±0.016, 0.944±0.473 in VMAT and 1.381± 0.042, 1.136±0.042, 1.534±0.465 in CRT respectively. OAR dose in CRT plans evaluated 1.8 times higher than VMAT. Total MU in VMAT evaluated 1.3 times increase than CRT. Average beam on time was 6.8 minute in VMAT and 21.3 minute in CRT respectively. OAR dose in CRT plans evaluated 1.8 times higher than VMAT. Total MU in VMAT evaluated 1.3 times increase than CRT. Average beam on time was 6.8 minute in VMAT and 21.3 minute in CRT. VMAT for SBRT in multi-target liver cancer using FFF beam is effective treatment techniqe in dosimetric and technical considerations. VMAT decrease intra-fraction error due to treatment time shortening using high dose rate of FFF beam

  3. Establishing stereotactic body radiotherapy with flattening filter free techniques in the treatment of pulmonary lesions - initial experiences from a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieber, Juliane; Tonndorf-Martini, Eric; Schramm, Oliver; Rhein, Bernhard; König, Laila; Adeberg, Sebastian; Meyerhof, Eva; Mohr, Angela; Kappes, Jutta; Hoffmann, Hans; Debus, Jürgen; Rieken, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using flattening filter free (FFF)-techniques has been increasingly applied during the last years. However, clinical studies investigating this emerging technique are still rare. Hence, we analyzed toxicity and clinical outcome of pulmonary SBRT with FFF-techniques and performed dosimetric comparison to conventional techniques using flattening filters (FF). Between 05/2014 and 06/2015, 56 consecutive patients with 61 pulmonary lesions were treated with SBRT in FFF-mode. Central lesions received 8 × 7.5 Gy delivered to the conformally enclosing 80 %-isodose, while peripheral lesions were treated with 3 × 15 Gy, prescribed to the 65 %-isodose. Early and late toxicity (after 6 months) as well as initial clinical outcomes were evaluated. Furthermore, [deleted] plan quality and efficiency were evaluated by analyzing conformity, beam- on and total treatment delivery times in comparison to plans with FF-dose application. Median follow-up time was 9.3 months (range 1.5–18.0 months). Early toxicity was low with only 5 patients (8.9 %) reporting CTCAE 2° or higher side-effects. Only one patient (1.8 %) was diagnosed with radiation-induced pneumonitis CTCAE 3°, while 2 (3.6 %) patients suffered from pneumonitis CTCAE 2°. After 6 months, no toxicity greater than CTCAE 2° was reported. 1-year local progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival and overall survival were 92.8 %, 78.0 %, and 94.4 %, respectively. While plan quality was similar for FFF- and FF-plans in respect to conformity (p = 0.275), median beam-on time as well as total treatment time were significantly reduced for SBRT in FFF-mode compared to FF-mode (p ≤ 0.001, p ≤ 0.001). Patient treatment with SBRT using FFF-techniques is safe and provides promising clinical results with only modest toxicity at significantly increased dose delivery speed

  4. A Study of volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy in case of multi-target liver cancer using flattening filter free beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Mi Sook; Yoon, In Ha; Hong, Dong Gi; Back, Geum Mun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, ASAN Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has proved its efficacy in several patient populations with primary and metastatic limited tumors. Because SBRT prescription is high dose level than Conventional radiation therapy. SBRT plan is necessary for effective Organ at risk (OAR) protection and sufficient Planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage. In particular, multi-target cases may result excessive doses to OAR and hot spot due to dose overlap. This study evaluate usefulness of Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in dosimetric and technical considerations using Flattening filter free (FFF) beam. The treatment plans for five patients, being treated on TrueBeam STx(Varian™, USA) with VMAT using 10MV FFF beam and Standard conformal radiotherapy (CRT) using 15MV Flattening filter (FF) beam. PTV, liver, duodenum, bowel, spinal cord, esophagus, stomach dose were evaluated using the dose volume histogram(DVH). Conformity index(CI), homogeneity index(HI), Paddick's index(PCI) for the PTV was assessed. Total Monitor unit (MU) and beam on time was assessed. Average value of CI, HI and PCI for PTV was 1.381±0.028, 1.096±0.016, 0.944±0.473 in VMAT and 1.381± 0.042, 1.136±0.042, 1.534±0.465 in CRT respectively. OAR dose in CRT plans evaluated 1.8 times higher than VMAT. Total MU in VMAT evaluated 1.3 times increase than CRT. Average beam on time was 6.8 minute in VMAT and 21.3 minute in CRT respectively. OAR dose in CRT plans evaluated 1.8 times higher than VMAT. Total MU in VMAT evaluated 1.3 times increase than CRT. Average beam on time was 6.8 minute in VMAT and 21.3 minute in CRT. VMAT for SBRT in multi-target liver cancer using FFF beam is effective treatment techniqe in dosimetric and technical considerations. VMAT decrease intra-fraction error due to treatment time shortening using high dose rate of FFF beam.

  5. Polychromatic photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Ole

    2002-01-01

    train quantum electrodynamics. A brief description of particle (photon) position operators is given, and it is shown that photons usually are only algebraically confined in an emission process. Finally, it is demonstrated that the profile of the birth domain of a radio-frequency photon emitted...

  6. Direct megavoltage photon calibration service in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, D.J.; Ramanthan, G.; Oliver, C.; Cole, A.; Harty, P.D.; Wright, T.; Webb, D.V.; Lye, J.; Followill, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) maintains the Australian primary standard of absorbed dose. Until recently, the standard was used to calibrate ionisation chambers only in 60 Co gamma rays. These chambers are then used by radiotherapy clinics to determine linac output, using a correction factor (k Q ) to take into account the different spectra of 60 Co and the linac. Over the period 2010–2013, ARPANSA adapted the primary standard to work in megavoltage linac beams, and has developed a calibration service at three photon beams (6, 10 and 18 MV) from an Elekta Synergy linac. We describe the details of the new calibration service, the method validation and the use of the new calibration factors with the International Atomic Energy Agency’s TRS-398 dosimetry Code of Practice. The expected changes in absorbed dose measurements in the clinic when shifting from 60 Co to the direct calibration are determined. For a Farmer chamber (model 2571), the measured chamber calibration coefficient is expected to be reduced by 0.4, 1.0 and 1.1 % respectively for these three beams when compared to the factor derived from 60 Co. These results are in overall agreement with international absorbed dose standards and calculations by Muir and Rogers in 2010 of k Q factors using Monte Carlo techniques. The reasons for and against moving to the new service are discussed in the light of the requirements of clinical dosimetry.

  7. EGSNRC Monte Carlo study of the effect of photon energy and field margin in phantoms simulating small lung lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, E.K.; Darko, J.; Mosseri, A.; Jezioranski, J.

    2003-01-01

    The dose distribution in small lung tumors (coin lesions) is affected by the combined effects of reduced attenuation of photons and extended range of electrons in lung. The increased range of electrons in low-density tissues can lead to loss of field flatness and increased penumbra width, especially at high energies. The EGSNRC Monte Carlo code, together with DOSXYZNRC, a three-dimensional voxel dose calculation module has been used to study the characteristics of the penumbra in the region of the target-lung interfaces for various radiation beam energies, lung densities, target-field edge distances, target size, and depth. The Monte Carlo model was validated by film measurements made in acrylic (simulating a tumor) imbedded in cork (simulating the lung). Beam profiles that are deemed to be acceptable are defined as those in which no point within the planning target volume (target volume plus 1 cm margin) received less than 95% of the dose prescribed to the center of the target. For parallel opposed beams and 2 cm cube target size, 6 MV photons produce superior dose distribution with respect to penumbra at the lateral, anterior, and posterior surfaces and midplane of the simulated target, with a target-field edge distance of 2.5 cm. A lesser target-field edge distance of 2.0 cm is required for 4 MV photons to produce acceptable dose distribution. To achieve equivalent dose distribution with 10 and 18 MV photons, a target-field edge distance of 3.0 and 3.5 cm, respectively, is required. For a simulated target size of 4 cm cube, a target-field edge distance of 2, 2.5, and 3 cm is required for 6, 10, and 18 MV photons, respectively, to yield acceptable PTV coverage. The effect, which is predominant in determining the target dose, depends on the beam energy, target-field edge distance, lung density, and the depth and size of the target

  8. The response of a radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter in megavoltage photon and electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Fujio; Ohno, Takeshi

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the response of a radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter (RGD) in megavoltage photon and electron beams. The RGD response was compared with ion chamber measurements for 4-18 MV photons and 6-20 MeV electrons in plastic water phantoms. The response was also calculated via Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with EGSnrc/egs_chamber and Cavity user-codes, respectively. In addition, the response of the RGD cavity was analyzed as a function of field sizes and depths according to Burlin's general cavity theory. The perturbation correction factor, PQ, in the RGD cavity was also estimated from MC simulations for photon and electron beams. The calculated and measured RGD energy response at reference conditions with a 10 × 10 cm(2) field and 10 cm depth in photons was lower by up to 2.5% with increasing energy. The variation in RGD response in the field size range of 5 × 5 cm(2) to 20 × 20 cm(2) was 3.9% and 0.7%, at 10 cm depth for 4 and 18 MV, respectively. The depth dependence of the RGD response was constant within 1% for energies above 6 MV but it increased by 2.6% and 1.6% for a large (20 × 20 cm(2)) field at 4 and 6 MV, respectively. The dose contributions from photon interactions (1 - d) in the RGD cavity, according to Burlin's cavity theory, decreased with increasing energy and decreasing field size. The variation in (1 - d) between field sizes became larger with increasing depth for the lower energies of 4 and 6 MV. PQ for the RGD cavity was almost constant between 0.96 and 0.97 at 10 MV energies and above. Meanwhile, PQ depends strongly on field size and depth for 4 and 6 MV photons. In electron beams, the RGD response at a reference depth, dref, varied by less than 1% over the electron energy range but was on average 4% lower than the response for 6 MV photons. The RGD response for photon beams depends on both (1 - d) and perturbation effects in the RGD cavity. Therefore, it is difficult to predict the energy dependence of RGD response by

  9. Photonic Hypercrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenii E. Narimanov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new “universality class” of artificial optical media—photonic hypercrystals. These hyperbolic metamaterials, with periodic spatial variation of dielectric permittivity on subwavelength scale, combine the features of optical metamaterials and photonic crystals. In particular, surface waves supported by a hypercrystal possess the properties of both the optical Tamm states in photonic crystals and surface-plasmon polaritons at the metal-dielectric interface.

  10. Microwave photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chi H

    2006-01-01

    Wireless, optical, and electronic networks continue to converge, prompting heavy research into the interface between microwave electronics, ultrafast optics, and photonic technologies. New developments arrive nearly as fast as the photons under investigation, and their commercial impact depends on the ability to stay abreast of new findings, techniques, and technologies. Presenting a broad yet in-depth survey, Microwave Photonics examines the major advances that are affecting new applications in this rapidly expanding field.This book reviews important achievements made in microwave photonics o

  11. Modelling of electron contamination in clinical photon beams for Monte Carlo dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J; Li, J S; Qin, L; Xiong, W; Ma, C-M

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to model electron contamination in clinical photon beams and to commission the source model using measured data for Monte Carlo treatment planning. In this work, a planar source is used to represent the contaminant electrons at a plane above the upper jaws. The source size depends on the dimensions of the field size at the isocentre. The energy spectra of the contaminant electrons are predetermined using Monte Carlo simulations for photon beams from different clinical accelerators. A 'random creep' method is employed to derive the weight of the electron contamination source by matching Monte Carlo calculated monoenergetic photon and electron percent depth-dose (PDD) curves with measured PDD curves. We have integrated this electron contamination source into a previously developed multiple source model and validated the model for photon beams from Siemens PRIMUS accelerators. The EGS4 based Monte Carlo user code BEAM and MCSIM were used for linac head simulation and dose calculation. The Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions were compared with measured data. Our results showed good agreement (less than 2% or 2 mm) for 6, 10 and 18 MV photon beams

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of MOSFET detectors for high-energy photon beams using the PENELOPE code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panettieri, Vanessa; Amor Duch, Maria; Jornet, Núria; Ginjaume, Mercè; Carrasco, Pablo; Badal, Andreu; Ortega, Xavier; Ribas, Montserrat

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the response of commercially available dosimeters based on metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) for radiotherapeutic photon beams using the PENELOPE code. The studied Thomson&Nielsen TN-502-RD MOSFETs have a very small sensitive area of 0.04 mm2 and a thickness of 0.5 µm which is placed on a flat kapton base and covered by a rounded layer of black epoxy resin. The influence of different metallic and Plastic water™ build-up caps, together with the orientation of the detector have been investigated for the specific application of MOSFET detectors for entrance in vivo dosimetry. Additionally, the energy dependence of MOSFET detectors for different high-energy photon beams (with energy >1.25 MeV) has been calculated. Calculations were carried out for simulated 6 MV and 18 MV x-ray beams generated by a Varian Clinac 1800 linear accelerator, a Co-60 photon beam from a Theratron 780 unit, and monoenergetic photon beams ranging from 2 MeV to 10 MeV. The results of the validation of the simulated photon beams show that the average difference between MC results and reference data is negligible, within 0.3%. MC simulated results of the effect of the build-up caps on the MOSFET response are in good agreement with experimental measurements, within the uncertainties. In particular, for the 18 MV photon beam the response of the detectors under a tungsten cap is 48% higher than for a 2 cm Plastic water™ cap and approximately 26% higher when a brass cap is used. This effect is demonstrated to be caused by positron production in the build-up caps of higher atomic number. This work also shows that the MOSFET detectors produce a higher signal when their rounded side is facing the beam (up to 6%) and that there is a significant variation (up to 50%) in the response of the MOSFET for photon energies in the studied energy range. All the results have shown that the PENELOPE code system can

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of MOSFET detectors for high-energy photon beams using the PENELOPE code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panettieri, Vanessa; Duch, Maria Amor; Jornet, Núria; Ginjaume, Mercè; Carrasco, Pablo; Badal, Andreu; Ortega, Xavier; Ribas, Montserrat

    2007-01-07

    The aim of this work was the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the response of commercially available dosimeters based on metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) for radiotherapeutic photon beams using the PENELOPE code. The studied Thomson&Nielsen TN-502-RD MOSFETs have a very small sensitive area of 0.04 mm(2) and a thickness of 0.5 microm which is placed on a flat kapton base and covered by a rounded layer of black epoxy resin. The influence of different metallic and Plastic water build-up caps, together with the orientation of the detector have been investigated for the specific application of MOSFET detectors for entrance in vivo dosimetry. Additionally, the energy dependence of MOSFET detectors for different high-energy photon beams (with energy >1.25 MeV) has been calculated. Calculations were carried out for simulated 6 MV and 18 MV x-ray beams generated by a Varian Clinac 1800 linear accelerator, a Co-60 photon beam from a Theratron 780 unit, and monoenergetic photon beams ranging from 2 MeV to 10 MeV. The results of the validation of the simulated photon beams show that the average difference between MC results and reference data is negligible, within 0.3%. MC simulated results of the effect of the build-up caps on the MOSFET response are in good agreement with experimental measurements, within the uncertainties. In particular, for the 18 MV photon beam the response of the detectors under a tungsten cap is 48% higher than for a 2 cm Plastic water cap and approximately 26% higher when a brass cap is used. This effect is demonstrated to be caused by positron production in the build-up caps of higher atomic number. This work also shows that the MOSFET detectors produce a higher signal when their rounded side is facing the beam (up to 6%) and that there is a significant variation (up to 50%) in the response of the MOSFET for photon energies in the studied energy range. All the results have shown that the PENELOPE code system can successfully

  14. Production of Ac-225 for cancer therapy by photon-induced transmutation of Ra-226.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, G; Meriarty, H; Metcalfe, P; Knittel, T; Allen, B J

    2007-09-01

    The increasing application of Ac-225 for cancer therapy indicates the potential need for its increased production and availability. The production of Ac-225 has been achieved using bremsstrahlung photons from an 18 MV medical linear accelerator (linac) to bombard a Ra-226 target. A linac dose of 2800 Gy produced about 64 microCi of Ra-225, which decays to Ac-225. This result, while consistent with the theoretical calculations, is far too low to be of practical use. A more powerful linac is required that runs at a higher current, longer pulse length and higher frequency for practical production. This process could also lead to the reduction of the nuclear waste product Ra-226.

  15. SU-F-T-333: Deliverability Considerations in Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGeachy, P [Department of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Weppler, S; Villarreal-Barajas, J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Center, Calgary, AB (Canada); Zinchenko, Y [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Khan, R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT), which simultaneously optimizes photon beamlet energy (6 and 18 MV) and fluence, has shown dosimetric improvements for fluence map optimization (FMO) when compared to conventional single-energy intensity modulated radiotherapy. However, generating deliverable multi-leaf collimator (MLC) sequences for XMRT needs to be explored. Therefore, two problems were investigated: 1) The ability to generate MLC-sequenced fluence maps from FMO XMRT solutions for a prostate case 2) The impact of fluence smoothening constraints imposed in the FMO on the deliverability and dose distribution. Methods: XMRT FMO solutions for a clinical prostate case employing standard dosimetric constraints, prescriptions, and a seven coplanar beam arrangement were generated. Smoothening constraints in the FMO utilized a sum of positive gradients approach. Sequenced maps were generated using an in-house optimization algorithm (MLCSO). The maximum leaf speed, minimum leaf separation, and transmission through MLC leaves were set to 2.5 mm/s, 1 mm, and 1%, respectively. The resulting sequenced maps for each field were compared with the original FMO solutions through gamma analysis (0.5%/0.5 mm) and root mean square error (RMSE). This comparison was done for both the smoothed and unsmoothed XMRT solutions. Results: Average RMSE and gamma agreement of 0.44, 93%and 0.36, 95% were obtained for unsmoothed 6 and 18 MV contributions from XMRT sequenced maps. The sequenced maps with smoothening constraints had better agreement with their respective optimal fluences, with RMSEs of 0 and gamma pass rates of 100% for all comparisons. This improved smoothening led to increased dose to critical structures (rectum, bladder, and femoral heads); however solutions were still clinically acceptable. Conclusion: For a clinical prostate case, XMRT FMO fluence maps were suitable for conversion into deliverable MLC sequences. Imposing smoothening constraints during FMO resulted

  16. Photon technology. Hard photon technology; Photon technology. Hard photon gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For the application of photon to industrial technologies, in particular, a hard photon technology was surveyed which uses photon beams of 0.1-200nm in wavelength. Its features such as selective atom reaction, dense inner shell excitation and spacial high resolution by quantum energy are expected to provide innovative techniques for various field such as fine machining, material synthesis and advanced inspection technology. This wavelength region has been hardly utilized for industrial fields because of poor development of suitable photon sources and optical devices. The developmental meaning, usable time and issue of a hard photon reduction lithography were surveyed as lithography in ultra-fine region below 0.1{mu}m. On hard photon analysis/evaluation technology, the industrial use of analysis, measurement and evaluation technologies by micro-beam was viewed, and optimum photon sources and optical systems were surveyed. Prediction of surface and surface layer modification by inner shell excitation, the future trend of this process and development of a vacuum ultraviolet light source were also surveyed. 383 refs., 153 figs., 17 tabs.

  17. Inverse photon-photon processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carimalo, C.; Crozon, M.; Kesler, P.; Parisi, J.

    1981-12-01

    We here consider inverse photon-photon processes, i.e. AB → γγX (where A, B are hadrons, in particular protons or antiprotons), at high energies. As regards the production of a γγ continuum, we show that, under specific conditions the study of such processes might provide some information on the subprocess gg γγ, involving a quark box. It is also suggested to use those processes in order to systematically look for heavy C = + structures (quarkonium states, gluonia, etc.) showing up in the γγ channel. Inverse photon-photon processes might thus become a new and fertile area of investigation in high-energy physics, provided the difficult problem of discriminating between direct photons and indirect ones can be handled in a satisfactory way

  18. Photon generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  19. A feasibility study of Dynamic Phantom scanner for quality assurance of photon beam profiles at various gantry angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunkai; Hsi, Wen C; Chu, James C H; Bernard, Damian B; Abrams, Ross A

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gantry rotation on beam profiles of photon and electron beams is an important issue in quality assurance for radiotherapy. To address variations in the profiles of photon and electron beams at different gantry angles, a Dynamic Phantom scanner composed of a 20 x 12 x 6 cm3 scanning Lucite block was designed as a cross-beam-profile scanner. To our knowledge, differences between scanned profiles acquired at different gantry angles with a small size Lucite block and those acquired a full-size (60 x 60 x 50 cm3) water phantom have not been previously investigated. We therefore performed a feasibility study for a first prototype Dynamic Phantom scanner without a gantry attachment mount. Radiation beams from a Varian LINAC 21EX and 2100C were used. Photon beams (6 MV and 18 MV) were shaped by either collimator jaws or a Varian 120 Multileaf (MLC) collimator, and electron beams (6 MeV, 12 MeV, and 20 MeV) were shaped by a treatment cone. To investigate the effect on profiles by using a Lucite block, a quantitative comparison of scanned profiles with the Dynamic Phantom and a full-size water phantom was first performed at a 0 degrees gantry angle for both photon and electron beams. For photon beam profiles defined by jaws at 1.0 cm and 5.0 cm depths of Lucite (i.e., at 1.1 cm and 5.7 cm depth of water), a good agreement (less than 1% variation) inside the field edge was observed between profiles scanned with the Dynamic Phantom and with a water phantom. The use of Lucite in the Dynamic Phantom resulted in reduced penumbra width (about 0.5 mm out of 5 mm to 8mm) and reduced (1% to 2%) scatter dose beyond the field edges for both 6 MV and 18 MV beams, compared with the water phantom scanner. For profiles of the MLC-shaped 6 MV photon beam, a similar agreement was observed. For profiles of electron beams scanned at 2.9 cm depth of Lucite (i.e., at 3.3 cm depth of water), larger disagreements in profiles (3% to 4%) and penumbra width (3 mm to 4 mm out of 12 mm

  20. Quantum photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Pearsall, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    This textbook employs a pedagogical approach that facilitates access to the fundamentals of Quantum Photonics. It contains an introductory description of the quantum properties of photons through the second quantization of the electromagnetic field, introducing stimulated and spontaneous emission of photons at the quantum level. Schrödinger’s equation is used to describe the behavior of electrons in a one-dimensional potential. Tunneling through a barrier is used to introduce the concept of non­locality of an electron at the quantum level, which is closely-related to quantum confinement tunneling, resonant tunneling, and the origin of energy bands in both periodic (crystalline) and aperiodic (non-crystalline) materials. Introducing the concepts of reciprocal space, Brillouin zones, and Bloch’s theorem, the determination of electronic band structure using the pseudopotential method is presented, allowing direct computation of the band structures of most group IV, group III-V, and group II-VI semiconducto...

  1. WE-FG-BRA-05: Potential Clinical Benefit of LINAC Flattening-Filter-Free (FFF) Mode - Improvement of Treatment Therapeutic Ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S; Rivera, J; Tian, H; Price, A; Santos, C; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrahigh dose-rate radiation at >40Gy/s has demonstrated astonishing normal-tissue sparing and tumor control in recent preclinical naive and tumor-bearing rodent studies when compared to the same radiation dose at a conventional dose-rate. The working mechanism of this fascinating dose-rate effect is currently under investigation. The aims of this work include investigating 1) whether LINAC FFF mode radiation at approximately 1Gy/s also has an improved therapeutic ratio compared to the same radiation dose at the conventional dose-rate of 0.05Gy/s, and 2) the dose-rate effect’s potential working mechanism by studying the expression of the P53 gene, linked to tumor suppression and cell regulation after radiation damage. Methods: We used mouse model C57BL/6J, the same as that used in the ultrahigh dose-rate studies, and exposed them to total body irradiation (TBI) using the Elekta Versa accelerator 10MV photons. Mice (N=20) were given a total dose of 12Gy in both the high dose-rate group (n=10) using the FFF-mode and the conventional dose-rate group (n=10) using the conventional does rate mode. The FFF-mode treatment setup consisted of a 15cm×15cm field size setting at 53.2cm SSD while the conventional-mode set-up consisted of a 10cm×10cm field size at 100SSD. Post-radiation, animals were monitored daily for survival analysis and signs of moribundity requiring euthanasia. In addition, mouse spleens were harvested for P53 analysis at different time points. Results: For 12Gy TBI, the 1.3Gy/s FFF-mode high dose-rate produced a statistically significant (p=0.02) improvement in mouse survival compared to the 0.05Gy/s conventional dose-rate. An initial P53 study at the time of death time-point indicates that high dose-rate radiation induced a stronger expression of P53 than conventional dose-rate radiation. Conclusion: Our pilot study indicates that the FFF-mode high dose-rate radiation, which has been used largely to improve clinical throughput, may provide

  2. WE-FG-BRA-05: Potential Clinical Benefit of LINAC Flattening-Filter-Free (FFF) Mode - Improvement of Treatment Therapeutic Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S [Department of Radiation Oncology, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill/ North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Lineberger Clinical Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Rivera, J [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill/ North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Tian, H [Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu (China); Lineberger Clinical Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Price, A [Department of Radiation Oncology, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Santos, C [Lineberger Clinical Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Zhang, Y [Department of Radiation Oncology, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu (China); Lineberger Clinical Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Ultrahigh dose-rate radiation at >40Gy/s has demonstrated astonishing normal-tissue sparing and tumor control in recent preclinical naive and tumor-bearing rodent studies when compared to the same radiation dose at a conventional dose-rate. The working mechanism of this fascinating dose-rate effect is currently under investigation. The aims of this work include investigating 1) whether LINAC FFF mode radiation at approximately 1Gy/s also has an improved therapeutic ratio compared to the same radiation dose at the conventional dose-rate of 0.05Gy/s, and 2) the dose-rate effect’s potential working mechanism by studying the expression of the P53 gene, linked to tumor suppression and cell regulation after radiation damage. Methods: We used mouse model C57BL/6J, the same as that used in the ultrahigh dose-rate studies, and exposed them to total body irradiation (TBI) using the Elekta Versa accelerator 10MV photons. Mice (N=20) were given a total dose of 12Gy in both the high dose-rate group (n=10) using the FFF-mode and the conventional dose-rate group (n=10) using the conventional does rate mode. The FFF-mode treatment setup consisted of a 15cm×15cm field size setting at 53.2cm SSD while the conventional-mode set-up consisted of a 10cm×10cm field size at 100SSD. Post-radiation, animals were monitored daily for survival analysis and signs of moribundity requiring euthanasia. In addition, mouse spleens were harvested for P53 analysis at different time points. Results: For 12Gy TBI, the 1.3Gy/s FFF-mode high dose-rate produced a statistically significant (p=0.02) improvement in mouse survival compared to the 0.05Gy/s conventional dose-rate. An initial P53 study at the time of death time-point indicates that high dose-rate radiation induced a stronger expression of P53 than conventional dose-rate radiation. Conclusion: Our pilot study indicates that the FFF-mode high dose-rate radiation, which has been used largely to improve clinical throughput, may provide

  3. Green photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Photonics, the broad merger of electronics with the optical sciences, encompasses such a wide swath of technology that its impact is almost universal in our everyday lives. This is a broad overview of some aspects of the industry and their contribution to the ‘green’ or environmental movement. The rationale for energy conservation is briefly discussed and the impact of photonics on our everyday lives and certain industries is described. Some opinions from industry are presented along with market estimates. References are provided to some of the most recent research in these areas. (review article)

  4. Commissioning of a PTW 34070 large-area plane-parallel ionization chamber for small field megavoltage photon dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfer, Tom; Lehmann, Joerg; Butler, Duncan J; Ramanathan, Ganesan; Bailey, Tracy E; Franich, Rick D

    2017-11-01

    This study investigates a large-area plane-parallel ionization chamber (LAC) for measurements of dose-area product in water (DAP w ) in megavoltage (MV) photon fields. Uniformity of electrode separation of the LAC (PTW34070 Bragg Peak Chamber, sensitive volume diameter: 8.16 cm) was measured using high-resolution microCT. Signal dependence on angle α of beam incidence for square 6 MV fields of side length s = 20 cm and 1 cm was measured in air. Polarity and recombination effects were characterized in 6, 10, and 18 MV photons fields. To assess the lateral setup tolerance, scanned LAC profiles of a 1 × 1 cm 2 field were acquired. A 6 MV calibration coefficient, N D ,w, LAC , was determined in a field collimated by a 5 cm diameter stereotactic cone with known DAP w . Additional calibrations in 10 × 10 cm 2 fields at 6, 10, and 18 MV were performed. Electrode separation is uniform and agrees with specifications. Volume-averaging leads to a signal increase proportional to ~1/cos(α) in small fields. Correction factors for polarity and recombination range between 0.9986 to 0.9996 and 1.0007 to 1.0024, respectively. Off-axis displacement by up to 0.5 cm did not change the measured signal in a 1 × 1 cm 2 field. N D ,w, LAC was 163.7 mGy cm -2 nC -1 and differs by +3.0% from the coefficient derived in the 10 × 10 cm 2 6 MV field. Response in 10 and 18 MV fields increased by 1.0% and 2.7% compared to 6 MV. The LAC requires only small correction factors for DAP w measurements and shows little energy dependence. Lateral setup errors of 0.5 cm are tolerated in 1 × 1 cm 2 fields, but beam incidence must be kept as close to normal as possible. Calibration in 10 × 10 fields is not recommended because of the LAC's over-response. The accuracy of relative point-dose measurements in the field's periphery is an important limiting factor for the accuracy of DAP w measurements. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on

  5. Performance of EPI diodes as dosimeters for photon beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Thais C. dos; Bizetto, Cesar A., E-mail: ccbueno@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neves-Junior, Wellington F.P.; Haddad, Cecilia M.K. [Hospital Sirio Libanes (HSL), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Bueno, Carmen C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC-SP), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In this work we present the preliminary results about the performance of an epitaxial (EPI) diode as on-line dosimeter for photon beam radiotherapy. The diode used was processed at University of Hamburg on n-type 75 {mu}m thick epitaxial silicon layer grown on a highly doped n-type 300 {mu}m thick Czochralski (Cz) silicon substrate. The measurements were performed with a diode which not received any type of pre-dose. In order to use this device as a dosimeter, it was enclosed in a black polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) probe. The diode was connected to an electrometer Keithley 6517B in the photovoltaic mode. During all measurements, the diode was held between PMMA plates, placed at 10.0 cm depth and centered in a radiation field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, with the source-to-surface distance (SSD) kept at 100 cm. The short-term repeatability was measured with photon beams of 6 and 18 MV energy by registering five consecutive current signals for the same radiation dose. The current signals induced showed good instantaneous repeatability of the diode, characterized by a smallest coefficient of variation (CV) of 0.21%. Furthermore, the dose-response curves of the diode were quite linear with the highest charge sensitivity achieved of 5.0 {mu}C/Gy. It worth noting that still remains to be investigated the pre-dose influence on epitaxial silicon diode response in radiotherapy photon beam dosimetry, the long term stability and the radiation hardness of these diodes for absorbed doses higher than that investigated in this work. All these studies are under way. (author)

  6. Photon Differentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Erleben, Kenny

    2007-01-01

    illumination features. This is often not desirable as these may lose clarity or vanish altogether. We present an accurate method for reconstruction of indirect illumination with photon mapping. Instead of reconstructing illumination using classic density estimation on finite points, we use the correlation...

  7. Photon Rao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 69-72 Feature Article. Molecule of the Month Molecular–Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best! Photon Rao · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1303-1306. Molecule of the Month - Molecular-Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best!

  8. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-01-01

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e + e - collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two

  9. Photon absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkema, R.; Blokland, J.A.K.; Papapoulos, S.E.; Bijvoet, O.L.M.; Pauwels, E.K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a significant health problem in the western world, with important medical, social and economical consequences. Prevention and treatment require reliable methods for in vivo monitoring of the bone mineral content (BMC) and its change in time. This paper presents an overview of currently used radiological methods, based on photon absorptiometry, and their clinical applications. With recent methods based on dual energy X-ray absorptiometry accurate and precise measurements of axial BMC can be obtained. Whether this improvements allows reliable detection of small changes in BMC remains to be investigated. (Author). 95 refs.; 1 tab

  10. A method for photon beam Monte Carlo multileaf collimator particle transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Keall, Paul J.; Kim, Jong Oh; Mohan, Radhe

    2002-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms are recognized as the most accurate methodology for patient dose assessment. For intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivered with dynamic multileaf collimators (DMLCs), accurate dose calculation, even with MC, is challenging. Accurate IMRT MC dose calculations require inclusion of the moving MLC in the MC simulation. Due to its complex geometry, full transport through the MLC can be time consuming. The aim of this work was to develop an MLC model for photon beam MC IMRT dose computations. The basis of the MC MLC model is that the complex MLC geometry can be separated into simple geometric regions, each of which readily lends itself to simplified radiation transport. For photons, only attenuation and first Compton scatter interactions are considered. The amount of attenuation material an individual particle encounters while traversing the entire MLC is determined by adding the individual amounts from each of the simplified geometric regions. Compton scatter is sampled based upon the total thickness traversed. Pair production and electron interactions (scattering and bremsstrahlung) within the MLC are ignored. The MLC model was tested for 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams by comparing it with measurements and MC simulations that incorporate the full physics and geometry for fields blocked by the MLC and with measurements for fields with the maximum possible tongue-and-groove and tongue-or-groove effects, for static test cases and for sliding windows of various widths. The MLC model predicts the field size dependence of the MLC leakage radiation within 0.1% of the open-field dose. The entrance dose and beam hardening behind a closed MLC are predicted within +/-1% or 1 mm. Dose undulations due to differences in inter- and intra-leaf leakage are also correctly predicted. The MC MLC model predicts leaf-edge tongue-and-groove dose effect within +/-1% or 1 mm for 95% of the points compared at 6 MV and 88% of the points compared at 18 MV

  11. A method for photon beam Monte Carlo multileaf collimator particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebers, Jeffrey V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)]. E-mail: jsiebers@vcu.edu; Keall, Paul J.; Kim, Jong Oh; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2002-09-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms are recognized as the most accurate methodology for patient dose assessment. For intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivered with dynamic multileaf collimators (DMLCs), accurate dose calculation, even with MC, is challenging. Accurate IMRT MC dose calculations require inclusion of the moving MLC in the MC simulation. Due to its complex geometry, full transport through the MLC can be time consuming. The aim of this work was to develop an MLC model for photon beam MC IMRT dose computations. The basis of the MC MLC model is that the complex MLC geometry can be separated into simple geometric regions, each of which readily lends itself to simplified radiation transport. For photons, only attenuation and first Compton scatter interactions are considered. The amount of attenuation material an individual particle encounters while traversing the entire MLC is determined by adding the individual amounts from each of the simplified geometric regions. Compton scatter is sampled based upon the total thickness traversed. Pair production and electron interactions (scattering and bremsstrahlung) within the MLC are ignored. The MLC model was tested for 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams by comparing it with measurements and MC simulations that incorporate the full physics and geometry for fields blocked by the MLC and with measurements for fields with the maximum possible tongue-and-groove and tongue-or-groove effects, for static test cases and for sliding windows of various widths. The MLC model predicts the field size dependence of the MLC leakage radiation within 0.1% of the open-field dose. The entrance dose and beam hardening behind a closed MLC are predicted within {+-}1% or 1 mm. Dose undulations due to differences in inter- and intra-leaf leakage are also correctly predicted. The MC MLC model predicts leaf-edge tongue-and-groove dose effect within {+-}1% or 1 mm for 95% of the points compared at 6 MV and 88% of the points compared at 18 MV

  12. Influence of the Integral Quality Monitor transmission detector on high energy photon beams. A multi-centre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casar, Bozidar [Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Pasler, Marlies [Lake Constance Radiation Oncology Center, Singen and Friedrichshafen (Germany); Wegener, Sonja [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; and others

    2017-10-01

    The influence of the Integral Quality Monitor (IQM) transmission detector on photon beam properties was evaluated in a preclinical phase, using data from nine participating centres: (i) the change of beam quality (beam hardening), (ii) the influence on surface dose, and (iii) the attenuation of the IQM detector. For 6 different nominal photon energies (4 standard, 2 FFF) and square field sizes from 1 x 1 cm{sup 2} to 20 x 20 cm{sup 2}, the effect of IQM on beam quality was assessed from the PDD{sub 20,10} values obtained from the percentage dose depth (PDD) curves, measured with and without IQM in the beam path. The change in surface dose with/without IQM was assessed for all available energies and field sizes from 4 x 4 cm{sup 2} to 20 x 20 cm{sup 2}. The transmission factor was calculated by means of measured absorbed dose at 10 cm depth for all available energies and field sizes. (i) A small (0.11-0.53%) yet statistically significant beam hardening effect was observed, depending on photon beam energy. (ii) The increase in surface dose correlated with field size (p < 0.01) for all photon energies except for 18 MV. The change in surface dose was smaller than 3.3% in all cases except for the 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} field and 10 MV FFF beam, where it reached 8.1%. (iii) For standard beams, transmission of the IQM showed a weak dependence on the field size, and a pronounced dependence on the beam energy (0.9412 for 6 MV to 0.9578 for 18 MV and 0.9440 for 6 MV FFF; 0.9533 for 10 MV FFF). The effects of the IQM detector on photon beam properties were found to be small yet statistically significant. The magnitudes of changes which were found justify treating IQM either as tray factors within the treatment planning system (TPS) for a particular energy or alternatively as modified outputs for specific beam energy of linear accelerators, which eases the introduction of the IQM into clinical practice.

  13. Experimental verification of a commercial Monte Carlo-based dose calculation module for high-energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenzler, Thomas; Fotina, Irina; Stock, Markus; Georg, Dietmar

    2009-01-01

    The dosimetric performance of a Monte Carlo algorithm as implemented in a commercial treatment planning system (iPlan, BrainLAB) was investigated. After commissioning and basic beam data tests in homogenous phantoms, a variety of single regular beams and clinical field arrangements were tested in heterogeneous conditions (conformal therapy, arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy including simultaneous integrated boosts). More specifically, a cork phantom containing a concave-shaped target was designed to challenge the Monte Carlo algorithm in more complex treatment cases. All test irradiations were performed on an Elekta linac providing 6, 10 and 18 MV photon beams. Absolute and relative dose measurements were performed with ion chambers and near tissue equivalent radiochromic films which were placed within a transverse plane of the cork phantom. For simple fields, a 1D gamma (γ) procedure with a 2% dose difference and a 2 mm distance to agreement (DTA) was applied to depth dose curves, as well as to inplane and crossplane profiles. The average gamma value was 0.21 for all energies of simple test cases. For depth dose curves in asymmetric beams similar gamma results as for symmetric beams were obtained. Simple regular fields showed excellent absolute dosimetric agreement to measurement values with a dose difference of 0.1% ± 0.9% (1 standard deviation) at the dose prescription point. A more detailed analysis at tissue interfaces revealed dose discrepancies of 2.9% for an 18 MV energy 10 x 10 cm 2 field at the first density interface from tissue to lung equivalent material. Small fields (2 x 2 cm 2 ) have their largest discrepancy in the re-build-up at the second interface (from lung to tissue equivalent material), with a local dose difference of about 9% and a DTA of 1.1 mm for 18 MV. Conformal field arrangements, arc therapy, as well as IMRT beams and simultaneous integrated boosts were in good agreement with absolute dose measurements in the

  14. Poster - 52: Smoothing constraints in Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT) fluence map optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGeachy, Philip; Villarreal-Barajas, Jose Eduardo; Zinchenko, Yuriy; Khan, Rao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT), which simultaneously optimizes photon beamlet energy (6 and 18 MV) and fluence, has recently shown dosimetric improvement in comparison to conventional IMRT. That said, the degree of smoothness of resulting fluence maps (FMs) has yet to be investigated and could impact the deliverability of XMRT. This study looks at investigating FM smoothness and imposing smoothing constraint in the fluence map optimization. Methods: Smoothing constraints were modeled in the XMRT algorithm with the sum of positive gradient (SPG) technique. XMRT solutions, with and without SPG constraints, were generated for a clinical prostate scan using standard dosimetric prescriptions, constraints, and a seven coplanar beam arrangement. The smoothness, with and without SPG constraints, was assessed by looking at the absolute and relative maximum SPG scores for each fluence map. Dose volume histograms were utilized when evaluating impact on the dose distribution. Results: Imposing SPG constraints reduced the absolute and relative maximum SPG values by factors of up to 5 and 2, respectively, when compared with their non-SPG constrained counterparts. This leads to a more seamless conversion of FMS to their respective MLC sequences. This improved smoothness resulted in an increase to organ at risk (OAR) dose, however the increase is not clinically significant. Conclusions: For a clinical prostate case, there was a noticeable improvement in the smoothness of the XMRT FMs when SPG constraints were applied with a minor increase in dose to OARs. This increase in OAR dose is not clinically meaningful.

  15. Poster - 52: Smoothing constraints in Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT) fluence map optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGeachy, Philip; Villarreal-Barajas, Jose Eduardo; Zinchenko, Yuriy; Khan, Rao [Department of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, CAN, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CAN, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CAN, Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT), which simultaneously optimizes photon beamlet energy (6 and 18 MV) and fluence, has recently shown dosimetric improvement in comparison to conventional IMRT. That said, the degree of smoothness of resulting fluence maps (FMs) has yet to be investigated and could impact the deliverability of XMRT. This study looks at investigating FM smoothness and imposing smoothing constraint in the fluence map optimization. Methods: Smoothing constraints were modeled in the XMRT algorithm with the sum of positive gradient (SPG) technique. XMRT solutions, with and without SPG constraints, were generated for a clinical prostate scan using standard dosimetric prescriptions, constraints, and a seven coplanar beam arrangement. The smoothness, with and without SPG constraints, was assessed by looking at the absolute and relative maximum SPG scores for each fluence map. Dose volume histograms were utilized when evaluating impact on the dose distribution. Results: Imposing SPG constraints reduced the absolute and relative maximum SPG values by factors of up to 5 and 2, respectively, when compared with their non-SPG constrained counterparts. This leads to a more seamless conversion of FMS to their respective MLC sequences. This improved smoothness resulted in an increase to organ at risk (OAR) dose, however the increase is not clinically significant. Conclusions: For a clinical prostate case, there was a noticeable improvement in the smoothness of the XMRT FMs when SPG constraints were applied with a minor increase in dose to OARs. This increase in OAR dose is not clinically meaningful.

  16. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking

  17. Resonance formation in photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gidal, G.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental progress on resonance formation in photon-photon collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on the pseudoscalar and tensor nonents and on the γγ* production of spin-one resonances. 37 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs

  18. SU-E-T-800: Verification of Acurose XB Dose Calculation Algorithm at Air Cavity-Tissue Interface Using Film Measurement for Small Fields of 6-MV Flattening Filter-Free Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S; Suh, T; Chung, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To verify the dose accuracy of Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm at air-tissue interface using inhomogeneous phantom for 6-MV flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. Methods: An inhomogeneous phantom included air cavity was manufactured for verifying dose accuracy at the air-tissue interface. The phantom was composed with 1 and 3 cm thickness of air cavity. To evaluate the central axis doses (CAD) and dose profiles of the interface, the dose calculations were performed for 3 × 3 and 4 × 4 cm 2 fields of 6 MV FFF beams with AAA and AXB in Eclipse treatment plainning system. Measurements in this region were performed with Gafchromic film. The root mean square errors (RMSE) were analyzed with calculated and measured dose profile. Dose profiles were divided into inner-dose profile (>80%) and penumbra (20% to 80%) region for evaluating RMSE. To quantify the distribution difference, gamma evaluation was used and determined the agreement with 3%/3mm criteria. Results: The percentage differences (%Diffs) between measured and calculated CAD in the interface, AXB shows more agreement than AAA. The %Diffs were increased with increasing the thickness of air cavity size and it is similar for both algorithms. In RMSEs of inner-profile, AXB was more accurate than AAA. The difference was up to 6 times due to overestimation by AAA. RMSEs of penumbra appeared to high difference for increasing the measurement depth. Gamma agreement also presented that the passing rates decreased in penumbra. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the dose calculation with AXB shows more accurate than with AAA for the air-tissue interface. The 2D dose distributions with AXB for both inner-profile and penumbra showed better agreement than with AAA relative to variation of the measurement depths and air cavity sizes

  19. SU-E-T-131: Dosimetric Impact and Evaluation of Different Heterogenity Algorithm in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plan for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Lung Treatment with the Flattening Filter Free Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, J; Kim, J [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Kyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J [Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y [Choonhae College of Health Sciences, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the dosimetric impacts of the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and the Acuros XB (AXB) plan for lung stereotactic ablative radiation therapy using flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. The dosimetric parameters for the target and organs at risk (OARs) from the treatment plans calculated with these dose calculation algorithms were compared. The technical parameters, such as the computation times and the total monitor units (MUs), were also evaluated. Results: A comparison of DVHs from AXB and AAA showed that the AXB plan produced a high maximum PTV dose by average 4.40% with a statistical significance but slightly lower mean PTV dose by average 5.20% compared to the AAA plans. The maximum dose to the lung was slightly higher in the AXB compared to the AAA. For both algorithms, the values of V5, V10 and V20 for ipsilateral lung were higher in the AXB plan more than those of AAA. However, these parameters for contralateral lung were comparable. The differences of maximum dose for the spinal cord and heart were also small. The computation time of AXB was found fast with the relative difference of 13.7% than those of AAA. The average of monitor units (MUs) for all patients was higher in AXB plans than in the AAA plans. These results indicated that the difference between AXB and AAA are large in heterogeneous region with low density. Conclusion: The AXB provided the advantages such as the accuracy of calculations and the reduction of the computation time in lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with using FFF beam, especially for VMAT planning. In dose calculation with the media of different density, therefore, the careful attention should be taken regarding the impacts of different heterogeneity correction algorithms. The authors report no conflicts of interest.

  20. SU-E-T-131: Dosimetric Impact and Evaluation of Different Heterogenity Algorithm in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plan for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Lung Treatment with the Flattening Filter Free Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, J; Kim, J; Lee, J; Kim, Y

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the dosimetric impacts of the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and the Acuros XB (AXB) plan for lung stereotactic ablative radiation therapy using flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. The dosimetric parameters for the target and organs at risk (OARs) from the treatment plans calculated with these dose calculation algorithms were compared. The technical parameters, such as the computation times and the total monitor units (MUs), were also evaluated. Results: A comparison of DVHs from AXB and AAA showed that the AXB plan produced a high maximum PTV dose by average 4.40% with a statistical significance but slightly lower mean PTV dose by average 5.20% compared to the AAA plans. The maximum dose to the lung was slightly higher in the AXB compared to the AAA. For both algorithms, the values of V5, V10 and V20 for ipsilateral lung were higher in the AXB plan more than those of AAA. However, these parameters for contralateral lung were comparable. The differences of maximum dose for the spinal cord and heart were also small. The computation time of AXB was found fast with the relative difference of 13.7% than those of AAA. The average of monitor units (MUs) for all patients was higher in AXB plans than in the AAA plans. These results indicated that the difference between AXB and AAA are large in heterogeneous region with low density. Conclusion: The AXB provided the advantages such as the accuracy of calculations and the reduction of the computation time in lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with using FFF beam, especially for VMAT planning. In dose calculation with the media of different density, therefore, the careful attention should be taken regarding the impacts of different heterogeneity correction algorithms. The authors report no conflicts of interest

  1. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 08: Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestrovic, A; Fortin, D; Alexander, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten anonymized patient CT data sets were used in this planning study. For each patient CT data set, three sets of contours were generated: 1) low risk, 2) intermediate risk, and 3) high risk scenarios. For each scenario, a single-arc and a double-arc VMAT treatment plans were created. Plans were generated with the Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system for a Varian TrueBeam™ linac equipped with Millenium 120 MLC. Plans were created using a 10x-FFF beam with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min. Dose prescription was 36.25Gy/5 fractions with the planning objective of covering 99% of the Planning Target Volume with the 95% of the prescription dose. Normal tissue constraints were based on provincial prostate SABR planning guidelines, derived from national and international prostate SABR protocols. Plans were evaluated and compared in terms of: 1) dosimetric plan quality, and 2) treatment delivery efficiency. Results: Both single-arc and double-arc VMAT plans were able to meet the planning goals for low, intermediate and high risk scenarios. No significant dosimetric differences were observed between the plans. However, the treatment time was significantly lower for a single-arc VMAT plans. Conclusions: Prostate SABR treatments are feasible with 10x-FFF VMAT technique. A single-arc VMAT offers equivalent dosimetric plan quality and a superior treatment delivery efficiency, compared to a double-arc VMAT

  2. Hadron production in photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandita, P.N.; Singh, Y.

    1976-01-01

    We analyze deep-inelastic photon-photon collisions via the two-photon mechanism in electron-positron (-electron) colliding beams in a form especially suitable for experimental analysis. It is shown that by a helicity analysis similar to that used in electroproduction experiments, we can separate five of the eight structure functions describing the process γ* + γ* → hadrons. The helicity cross sections for this process and for the process with one real photon (inelastic electron-photon scattering) are related to structure functions, and are evaluated using quark light-cone algebra. There are anomalous contributions to the structure functions for the inelastic electron-photon scattering which arise both in parton as well as generalized vector-meson-dominance models. This suggests a connection between these two types of models for photon-photon scattering. Further, we use vector-meson dominance to construct a sum rule for sigma/sub gamma//sub gamma/ /sub arrow-right/ from which it is estimated that roughly 20% of the cross section should be built up from higher-mass vector states. Using a spectral representation for the total transverse cross section, and the ''aligned-jet'' vector-dominance model we achieve a connection, via a ''correspondence principle,'' with the parton model for the hadron multiplicities in photon-photon collisions. We also comment on inclusive pion multiplicities and the approach to scaling for photon-photon processes in the light-cone algebra

  3. Effect of Photon Beam Energy, Gold Nanoparticle Size and Concentration on the Dose Enhancement in Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahideh Gharehaghaji

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gold nanoparticles have been used as radiation dose enhancing materials in recent investigations. In the current study, dose enhancement effect of gold nanoparticles on tumor cells was evaluated using Monte Carlo (MC simulation. Methods: We used MCNPX code for MC modeling in the current study. A water phantom and a tumor region with a size of 1×1×1 cm3 loaded with gold nanoparticles were simulated. The macroscopic dose enhancement factor was calculated for gold nanoparticles with sizes of 30, 50, and 100 nm. Also, we simulated different photon beams including mono-energetic beams (50-120 keV, a Cobalt-60 beam, 6 & 18 MV photon beams of a conventional linear accelerator. Results: We found a dose enhancement factor (DEF of from 1.4 to 3.7 for monoenergetic kilovoltage beams, while the DEFs for megavoltage beams were negligible and less than 3% for all GNP sizes and concentrations. The optimum energy for higher DEF was found to be the 90 keV monoenergetic beam. The effect of GNP size was not considerable, but the GNP concentration had a substantial impact on achieved DEF in GNP-based radiation therapy. Conclusion: The results were in close agreement with some previous studies considering the effect of photon energy and GNP concentration on observed DEF. Application of GNP-based radiation therapy using kilovoltage beams is recommended.

  4. Influence of the Integral Quality Monitor transmission detector on high energy photon beams: A multi-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casar, Bozidar; Pasler, Marlies; Wegener, Sonja; Hoffman, David; Talamonti, Cinzia; Qian, Jianguo; Mendez, Ignasi; Brojan, Denis; Perrin, Bruce; Kusters, Martijn; Canters, Richard; Pallotta, Stefania; Peterlin, Primoz

    2017-09-01

    The influence of the Integral Quality Monitor (IQM) transmission detector on photon beam properties was evaluated in a preclinical phase, using data from nine participating centres: (i) the change of beam quality (beam hardening), (ii) the influence on surface dose, and (iii) the attenuation of the IQM detector. For 6 different nominal photon energies (4 standard, 2 FFF) and square field sizes from 1×1cm 2 to 20×20cm 2 , the effect of IQM on beam quality was assessed from the PDD 20,10 values obtained from the percentage dose depth (PDD) curves, measured with and without IQM in the beam path. The change in surface dose with/without IQM was assessed for all available energies and field sizes from 4×4cm 2 to 20×20cm 2 . The transmission factor was calculated by means of measured absorbed dose at 10cm depth for all available energies and field sizes. (i) A small (0.11-0.53%) yet statistically significant beam hardening effect was observed, depending on photon beam energy. (ii) The increase in surface dose correlated with field size (pphoton energies except for 18MV. The change in surface dose was smaller than 3.3% in all cases except for the 20×20cm 2 field and 10MV FFF beam, where it reached 8.1%. (iii) For standard beams, transmission of the IQM showed a weak dependence on the field size, and a pronounced dependence on the beam energy (0.9412 for 6MV to 0.9578 for 18MV and 0.9440 for 6MV FFF; 0.9533 for 10MV FFF). The effects of the IQM detector on photon beam properties were found to be small yet statistically significant. The magnitudes of changes which were found justify treating IQM either as tray factors within the treatment planning system (TPS) for a particular energy or alternatively as modified outputs for specific beam energy of linear accelerators, which eases the introduction of the IQM into clinical practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  5. Investigation of percentage depth dose and dose rate dependence of PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter for photon beams using MRI technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azadbakht, B.; Hadad, K.; Zahmatkesh, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the investigation of the normoxic Pagan polymer-gel dosimeter percentage depth dose and it's dose rate dependence has been made. Using MRI, the formulation to give the maximum change in the transverse relaxation rate R2 was determined to be 4.5% N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide(bis), 4.5% acrylamide, 5% gelatine, 5 m M tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride, 0.01 m M hydroquinone and 86% HPLC(Water). Irradiation of vials was performed using photon beams of Co-60 therapy unit and an Elec ta linear accelerator. Gel dosimeters were imaged in a Siemens Symphony 1.5 Tesla clinical MRI scanner using a head coil. Post-manufacture irradiation and post imaging times were both selected to be 1 day. For determining the percentage depth dose of the Pagan gel it was found that at the depth of 21 cm, the percentage depth dose for 1.25 MeV γ-ray photons of 60 Co and for 4,6 and 18 MV x-ray photons of Elec ta linear accelerator, are 48%, 52%, 57.3% and 59.73%, respectively. Thus, in the case of the higher energy photon beams, a higher dose can he delivered. to deep-seated tumors. The dose rate dependence of percentage depth dose was studied for 6 MV x-ray photons with the use of dose rates of 80, 160, 240, 320, 400 and 480 c Gy/min. No trend in polymer-gel dosimeter 1/T 2 dependence was found on the mean dose rate and energy for the photon beams.

  6. Photonic time crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lunwu; Xu, Jin; Wang, Chengen; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhao, Yuting; Zeng, Jing; Song, Runxia

    2017-12-07

    When space (time) translation symmetry is spontaneously broken, the space crystal (time crystal) forms; when permittivity and permeability periodically vary with space (time), the photonic crystal (photonic time crystal) forms. We proposed the concept of photonic time crystal and rewritten the Maxwell's equations. Utilizing Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, we simulated electromagnetic wave propagation in photonic time crystal and photonic space-time crystal, the simulation results show that more intensive scatter fields can obtained in photonic time crystal and photonic space-time crystal.

  7. Photon-Photon Collisions -- Past and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2005-01-01

    I give a brief review of the history of photon-photon physics and a survey of its potential at future electron-positron colliders. Exclusive hadron production processes in photon-photon and electron-photon collisions provide important tests of QCD at the amplitude level, particularly as measures of hadron distribution amplitudes. There are also important high energy γγ and eγ tests of quantum chromodynamics, including the production of jets in photon-photon collisions, deeply virtual Compton scattering on a photon target, and leading-twist single-spin asymmetries for a photon polarized normal to a production plane. Since photons couple directly to all fundamental fields carrying the electromagnetic current including leptons, quarks, W's and supersymmetric particles, high energy γγ collisions will provide a comprehensive laboratory for Higgs production and exploring virtually every aspect of the Standard Model and its extensions. High energy back-scattered laser beams will thus greatly extend the range of physics of the International Linear Collider

  8. Surface dose measurements and comparison of unflattened and flattened photon beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashokkumar Sigamani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the central axis dose in the build-up region and the surface dose of a 6 MV and 10 MV flattened photon beam (FB and flattening filter free (FFF therapeutic photon beam for different square field sizes (FSs for a Varian Truebeam linear accelerator using parallel-plate ionization chamber and Gafchromic film. Knowledge of dosimetric characteristics in the build-up region and surface dose of the FFF is essential for clinical care. The dose measurements were also obtained empirically using two different commonly used dosimeters: a p-type photon semiconductor dosimeter and a cylindrical ionization chamber. Surface dose increased linearly with FS for both FB and FFF photon beams. The surface dose values of FFF were higher than the FB FSs. The measured surface dose clearly increases with increasing FS. The FFF beams have a modestly higher surface dose in the build-up region than the FB. The dependence of source to skin distance (SSD is less significant in FFF beams when compared to the flattened beams at extended SSDs.

  9. Photon-photon collisions and photon structure functions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Patt, J

    2000-01-01

    The present knowledge of the structure of the photon based on measurements of photon structure functions is discussed. This review covers recent results on QED structure functions and on the hadronic structure function F/sub 2//sup gamma /. (13 refs).

  10. Photonic Crystals Towards Nanoscale Photonic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lourtioz, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vincent; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Maystre, Daniel; Tchelnokov, Alexei; Pagnoux, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Just like the periodical crystalline potential in solid state crystals determines their properties for the conduction of electrons, the periodical structuring of photonic crystals leads to envisioning the possibility of achieving a control of the photon flux in dielectric and metallic materials. The use of photonic crystals as cages for storing, filtering or guiding light at the wavelength scale paves the way to the realization of optical and optoelectronic devices with ultimate properties and dimensions. This will contribute towards meeting the demands for greater miniaturization imposed by the processing of an ever increasing number of data. Photonic Crystals will provide students and researchers from different fields with the theoretical background required for modelling photonic crystals and their optical properties, while at the same time presenting the large variety of devices, ranging from optics to microwaves, where photonic crystals have found application. As such, it aims at building bridges between...

  11. Photonic Crystals Towards Nanoscale Photonic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lourtioz, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vincent; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Maystre, Daniel; Tchelnokov, Alexis

    2005-01-01

    Just like the periodical crystalline potential in solid-state crystals determines their properties for the conduction of electrons, the periodical structuring of photonic crystals leads to envisioning the possibility of achieving a control of the photon flux in dielectric and metallic materials. The use of photonic crystals as a cage for storing, filtering or guiding light at the wavelength scale thus paves the way to the realisation of optical and optoelectronic devices with ultimate properties and dimensions. This should contribute toward meeting the demands for a greater miniaturisation that the processing of an ever increasing number of data requires. Photonic Crystals intends at providing students and researchers from different fields with the theoretical background needed for modelling photonic crystals and their optical properties, while at the same time presenting the large variety of devices, from optics to microwaves, where photonic crystals have found applications. As such, it aims at building brid...

  12. Photon and photon reactions: elementary theoretical introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diu, B.

    The electromagnetic field and associated quanta, the photons, are simply and briefly studied. The conventional electromagnetism laws are recalled. Fundamental concepts such as gauge invariance, the electromagnetic current conservation, and photon behavior against the internal symmetries of strong interactions are simply introduced. Results and notations are applied to analysis of reactions where photons intervene in initial or final states (photoproduction) within the limits of amplitude properties in the conventional space-time. The helicity and invariant amplitude formalisms are compared [fr

  13. Active Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Sara

    This thesis deals with the fabrication and characterization of active photonic crystal waveguides, realized in III-V semiconductor material with embedded active layers. The platform offering active photonic crystal waveguides has many potential applications. One of these is a compact photonic...... due to photonic crystal dispersion. The observations are explained by the enhancement of net gain by light slow down. Another application based on active photonic crystal waveguides is micro lasers. Measurements on quantum dot micro laser cavities with different mirror configurations and photonic...

  14. SU-F-I-70: Investigation of Gafchromic EBT3 Film Energy Dependence Using Proton, Photon, and Electron Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, C; Schnell, E; Ahmad, S; De La Fuente Herman, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the energy dependence of Gafchromic EBT3 film over a range of clinically used proton, photon and electron energies. Methods: Proton beam energies of 117 and 204 MeV, corresponding respectively to ranges in water of 10 cm and 27 cm from a Mevion S250 double scatter system unit were used. Electron energies of 6 and 20 MeV and photon energies of 6 and 18 MV from a Varian Clinac 21EX Linac were used. Two pieces of film (5×5 cm"2) were irradiated sequentially for doses of 100, 500, and 1000 cGy for all energies and modalities. Films were placed on the central beam axis for a 10×10 cm"2 field size in the middle of spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) for proton and in respective dmax for photon and electron energies. Films were scanned on a flatbed Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner on the central region of the scanning window using 48-bit, 300 dpi, and landscape orientation after 48 hours post-irradiation of film to account for optical density (OD) stabilization. Film analysis of the red channel was performed using ImageJ 1.48v (National Institutes of Health). Results: The energy dependency of EBT3 among all energies and modalities for all doses studied was small within measurement uncertainties (1σ = ± 4.1%). The mean net OD in red channel for films receiving the same dose in the same energy modality had standard deviations within 0.9% for photons, 4.9% for electrons and 1.8% for protons. It was observed that film pieces were activated during proton irradiation, e.g., 7 mR/hr at surface after 30 minutes of irradiation, lasting for 2 hours post irradiation. Conclusion: EBT3 energy dependency was evaluated for clinically used proton, photon, and electron energies. The film self-activation may have contributed to fog and negligible dose.

  15. Photonic crystals: towards nanoscale photonic devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lourtioz, J.-M

    2005-01-01

    .... From this point of view, the emergence of photonic bandgap materials and photonic crystals at the end of the 1980s can be seen as a revenge to the benefit this time of optics and electromagnetism. In the same way as the periodicity of solid state crystals determines the energy bands and the conduction properties of electrons, the periodical structur...

  16. Jet and hadron production in photon-photon collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Soldner-Rembold, Stefan

    1999-01-01

    Di-jet and inclusive charged hadron production cross-sections measured in photon-photon collisions by OPAL are compared to NLO pQCD calculations. Jet shapes measured in photon-photon scattering by OPAL, in deep-inelastic ep scattering by H1 and in photon-proton scattering by ZEUS are shown to be consistent in similar kinematic ranges. New results from TOPAZ on prompt photon production in photon-photon interactions are presented.

  17. Photonic crystal pioneer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anscombe, Nadya

    2011-08-01

    Over the past ten years, Crystal Fiber, now part of NKT Photonics, has been busy commercializing photonic crystal fibre. Nadya Anscombe finds out about the evolution of the technology and its applications.

  18. Photonic Design for Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosten, E.; Callahan, D.; Horowitz, K.; Pala, R.; Atwater, H.

    2014-08-28

    We describe photonic design approaches for silicon photovoltaics including i) trapezoidal broadband light trapping structures ii) broadband light trapping with photonic crystal superlattices iii) III-V/Si nanowire arrays designed for broadband light trapping.

  19. Photonic crystal light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James G [Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Shawn-Yu [Albuquerque, NM; Bur, James A [Corrales, NM

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  20. Photon structure function - theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1984-12-01

    The theoretical status of the photon structure function is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the hadronic mixing problem and the ability of perturbative QCD to make definitive predictions for the photon structure function. 11 references

  1. Photon wave function

    OpenAIRE

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo

    2005-01-01

    Photon wave function is a controversial concept. Controversies stem from the fact that photon wave functions can not have all the properties of the Schroedinger wave functions of nonrelativistic wave mechanics. Insistence on those properties that, owing to peculiarities of photon dynamics, cannot be rendered, led some physicists to the extreme opinion that the photon wave function does not exist. I reject such a fundamentalist point of view in favor of a more pragmatic approach. In my view, t...

  2. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Fogh Olsen, Ole; Sporring, Jon

    2007-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  3. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Olsen, Ole Fogh; Sporring, Jon

    2006-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  4. Photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Hansen, K P; Nielsen, M D

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers having a complex microstructure in the transverse plane constitute a new and promising class of optical fibers. Such fibers can either guide light through total internal reflection or the photonic bandgap effect, In this paper, we review the different types and applications...... of photonic crystal fibers with particular emphasis on recent advances in the field....

  5. Dosimetry study comparing NCS report-2 versus IAEA TRS-398 protocol for high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attalaa, E.M.; Khaled, N.E.; Abou Elenein, H.S.; Elsayed, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this work a dosimetry study is presented in which the results of absorbed dose determined at reference condition according to the IAEA TRS-398 protocol and the NCS report-2 are compared. The IAEA TRS-398 protocol for absorbed dose calibration is based on ionization chamber having absorbed dose to water calibration factor N d w, while the NCS-2 dosimetry report for absorbed dose calibration is based on an ionization chamber having air- kerma calibration factor N k . This study shows that the absorbed dose which is calculated with The IAEA TRS-398 formalisms is higher than that calculated with NCS report-2 formalisms within range from 0.4 to 0.9% in cobalt-60 beam as sensed by different ionization chambers, and from 0.2 to 1.1% for different higher energy photon beams of 6, 8 and 18 MV. The chambers used are PTW 30001, 30004, and NE-2571; which have calibration factors N k and N d w traceable to the BIPM (Bureau International des Poids et Mesures)

  6. Penumbra characteristics of square photon beams delimited by a GEMS multi-leaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briot, E; Julia, F [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    1995-12-01

    A multi-leaf collimator (MLC) has been designed to replace directly the standard collimator of a SATURNE IV Series linac. It consists of 2 x 32 tungsten leaves and one set of upper block jaws. Isodose curves and dose profiles were measured for symmetric fields at the depth of the maximum and the reference depths for 6 MV, 10 MV, 18 MV photon beams. The penumbra (80%-20%) corresponding to the face and the side of the leaves have been compared with the standard collimators. Along with the X direction, the field delimitation is performed primarily with the leaves which are continuously variable in position. Along the Y direction, the field is initially approximated by the closure of opposite leaf pairs; then the Y upper jaws produce the exact size of the required field. As the leaves move linearly the penumbra (80%-20%) corresponding to the leaf ends is minimized and held constant at all positions by curvature of their faces. Penumbra obtained with the superposition of leaves and Y jaws depend on their relative position. The penumbra is minimum when the leaf side and the Y jaw edge coincide and the comparison of the measurement values with the conventional collimator shows that the differences are within 1 mm. When the leaves delineating the field are not entirely covered by the Y block upper jaws, the penumbra increases, and the junction of the opposing leaves, a width increase up to 3.5 mm has been measured.

  7. Silicon Microspheres Photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serpenguzel, A.

    2008-01-01

    Electrophotonic integrated circuits (EPICs), or alternatively, optoelectronic integrated circuit (OEICs) are the natural evolution of the microelectronic integrated circuit (IC) with the addition of photonic capabilities. Traditionally, the IC industry has been based on group IV silicon, whereas the photonics industry on group III-V semiconductors. However, silicon based photonic microdevices have been making strands in siliconizing photonics. Silicon microspheres with their high quality factor whispering gallery modes (WGMs), are ideal candidates for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) applications in the standard near-infrared communication bands. In this work, we will discuss the possibility of using silicon microspheres for photonics applications in the near-infrared

  8. Photon correlation holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Dinesh N; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Ezawa, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Yoko; Takeda, Mitsuo

    2011-01-17

    Unconventional holography called photon correlation holography is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Using photon correlation, i.e. intensity correlation or fourth order correlation of optical field, a 3-D image of the object recorded in a hologram is reconstructed stochastically with illumination through a random phase screen. Two different schemes for realizing photon correlation holography are examined by numerical simulations, and the experiment was performed for one of the reconstruction schemes suitable for the experimental proof of the principle. The technique of photon correlation holography provides a new insight into how the information is embedded in the spatial as well as temporal correlation of photons in the stochastic pseudo thermal light.

  9. Electron and Photon ID

    CERN Document Server

    Hryn'ova, Tetiana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The identification of prompt photons and the rejection of background coming mostly from photons from hadron decays relies on the high granularity of the ATLAS calorimeter. The electron identification used in ATLAS for run 2 is based on a likelihood discrimination to separate isolated electron candidates from candidates originating from photon conversions, hadron misidentification and heavy flavor decays. In addition, isolation variables are used as further handles to separate signal and background. Several methods are used to measure with data the efficiency of the photon identification requirements, to cover a broad energy spectrum. At low energy, photons from radiative Z decays are used. In the medium energy range, similarities between electrons and photon showers are exploited using Z->ee decays. At high energy, inclusive photon samples are used. The measurement of the efficiencies of the electron identification and isolation cuts are performed with the data using tag and probe techniques with large statis...

  10. SU-F-T-491: Photon Beam Matching Analysis at Multiple Sites Up to Twelve Years Post Installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Able, C [Florida Cancer Specialists - New Port Richey, New Port Richey, FL (United States); Zakikhani, R [Florida Cancer Specialists - Largo, Largo, FL (United States); Yan, K [Florida Cancer Specialists- Tampa, Tampa, FL (United States); Sha, D [Florida Cancer Specialist - New Port Richey, New Port Richey, FL (United States); Chopra, A [Florida Cancer Specialist - Brooksville, Spring Hill, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine if the photon beams associated with several models of accelerators are matched with ‘Golden Beam’ data (VGBD) to assess treatment planning modeling and delivery. Methods: Six accelerators’ photon beams were evaluated to determine if they matched the manufacturer’s (Varian Medical Systems, Inc.) VGBD. Additional direct comparisons of the 6X and 18X beams using the manufacturer’s specification of Basic and Fine beam matching were also performed. The Cseries accelerator models were 21 EX (3), IX (2), and a IX Trilogy, ranging from three to twelve years post installation. Computerized beam scanning was performed (IBA Blue Phantom 2) with 2 CC13 ion chambers in water at 100 cm SSD. Dmax (10 cm2 field size), percentage depth dose (6 cm2, 10 cm2, 20 cm2, and 30 cm2 field sizes) and beam uniformity (10 cm2, 30 cm2 and 40 cm2 field sizes) were evaluated. Results: When comparing the beams with VGBD using the ‘Basic’ matching criteria, all beams were within the specifications ( 1.5mm at dmax, 1% PDD, and 2% Profiles). When considering the “Fine” matching criteria ( 1.5mm at dmax, 0.5% PDD, and 2% Profiles), only three of six 6MV beams and two of six high energy (five 18MV & one 15MV) beams passed. Direct comparisons between accelerators using the Clinac IX (installed 2012) as the reference beam datasets resulted in all 6 MV and 18MV beams meeting both the “Basic” and “Fine” criterion with the exception of two accelerators. Conclusion: Linear accelerators installed up to nine years apart are capable of meeting the manufacturers beam matching criteria for “Basic” matching. Without any adjustments most beams, when evaluated, may meet the “Fine” match criteria. The use of a single dataset (VGBD or designated accelerator reference data) for treatment planning commissioning is acceptable and can provide quality treatment delivery.

  11. Inclusive hard processes in photon-photon and photon-proton interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Glasman, Claudia

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of jet, prompt photon, high-pT hadron and heavy quark production in photon-induced processes provide tests of QCD and are sensitive to the photon parton densities. A review of the latest experimental results in photon-photon and photon-proton interactions is presented. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations for these measurements are discussed.

  12. Programmable Quantum Photonic Processor Using Silicon Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    8 Figure 6: (a) Proposed on-demand single photon source based on dynamic cavity storage . (b) Example of a gate implementation...electronic architectures tuned to implement artificial neural networks that improve upon both computational speed and energy efficiency. 3.6 All...states are in the dual- rail logic representation. Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited. 6 Figure 3: Schematic of two-photon

  13. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, M.; Castellan, C.; Signorini, S.; Trenti, A.; Pavesi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Silicon photonics is a technology based on fabricating integrated optical circuits by using the same paradigms as the dominant electronics industry. After twenty years of fervid development, silicon photonics is entering the market with low cost, high performance and mass-manufacturable optical devices. Until now, most silicon photonic devices have been based on linear optical effects, despite the many phenomenologies associated with nonlinear optics in both bulk materials and integrated waveguides. Silicon and silicon-based materials have strong optical nonlinearities which are enhanced in integrated devices by the small cross-section of the high-index contrast silicon waveguides or photonic crystals. Here the photons are made to strongly interact with the medium where they propagate. This is the central argument of nonlinear silicon photonics. It is the aim of this review to describe the state-of-the-art in the field. Starting from the basic nonlinearities in a silicon waveguide or in optical resonator geometries, many phenomena and applications are described—including frequency generation, frequency conversion, frequency-comb generation, supercontinuum generation, soliton formation, temporal imaging and time lensing, Raman lasing, and comb spectroscopy. Emerging quantum photonics applications, such as entangled photon sources, heralded single-photon sources and integrated quantum photonic circuits are also addressed at the end of this review.

  14. Single-photon sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lounis, Brahim; Orrit, Michel

    2005-01-01

    The concept of the photon, central to Einstein's explanation of the photoelectric effect, is exactly 100 years old. Yet, while photons have been detected individually for more than 50 years, devices producing individual photons on demand have only appeared in the last few years. New concepts for single-photon sources, or 'photon guns', have originated from recent progress in the optical detection, characterization and manipulation of single quantum objects. Single emitters usually deliver photons one at a time. This so-called antibunching of emitted photons can arise from various mechanisms, but ensures that the probability of obtaining two or more photons at the same time remains negligible. We briefly recall basic concepts in quantum optics and discuss potential applications of single-photon states to optical processing of quantum information: cryptography, computing and communication. A photon gun's properties are significantly improved by coupling it to a resonant cavity mode, either in the Purcell or strong-coupling regimes. We briefly recall early production of single photons with atomic beams, and the operation principles of macroscopic parametric sources, which are used in an overwhelming majority of quantum-optical experiments. We then review the photophysical and spectroscopic properties and compare the advantages and weaknesses of various single nanometre-scale objects used as single-photon sources: atoms or ions in the gas phase and, in condensed matter, organic molecules, defect centres, semiconductor nanocrystals and heterostructures. As new generations of sources are developed, coupling to cavities and nano-fabrication techniques lead to improved characteristics, delivery rates and spectral ranges. Judging from the brisk pace of recent progress, we expect single photons to soon proceed from demonstrations to applications and to bring with them the first practical uses of quantum information

  15. Single-photon imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Seitz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition and interpretation of images is a central capability in almost all scientific and technological domains. In particular, the acquisition of electromagnetic radiation, in the form of visible light, UV, infrared, X-ray, etc. is of enormous practical importance. The ultimate sensitivity in electronic imaging is the detection of individual photons. With this book, the first comprehensive review of all aspects of single-photon electronic imaging has been created. Topics include theoretical basics, semiconductor fabrication, single-photon detection principles, imager design and applications of different spectral domains. Today, the solid-state fabrication capabilities for several types of image sensors has advanced to a point, where uncoooled single-photon electronic imaging will soon become a consumer product. This book is giving a specialist´s view from different domains to the forthcoming “single-photon imaging” revolution. The various aspects of single-photon imaging are treated by internati...

  16. Heavy quark pair production in polarized photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jikia, G.; Tkabladze, A.

    2000-04-01

    We present the cross sections of the heavy quark-antiquark pair production in polarized photon photon collision for the general case of photon polarizations. The numerical results for top-antitop production cross sections together with production asymmetries are obtained for linearly polarized photon-photon collisions, including QCD radiative corrections. (orig.)

  17. Photonics in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bollig, C

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available : photonics, ultrafast and ultra- intense laser science (Heinrich Schwoerer, University of Stellenbosch); quantum information processing and communication (Francesco Petruccione, University of KwaZulu-Natal); medicinal chemistry and nanotechnology... of experience in diamond research, where scientists are now turning their attention to diamond for photonic devices. �ere is an active community in South Africa studying the potential of diamond as a single-photon source for applications in quantum...

  18. Integrated Microwave Photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Marpaung, David; Roeloffzen, Chris; Heideman, René; Leinse, Arne; Sales Maicas, Salvador; Capmany Francoy, José

    2013-01-01

    Microwave photonics (MWP) is an emerging field in which radio frequency (RF) signals are generated, distributed, processed and analyzed using the strength of photonic techniques. It is a technology that enables various functionalities which are not feasible to achieve only in the microwave domain. A particular aspect that recently gains significant interests is the use of photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technology in the MWP field for enhanced functionalities and robustness as well as the r...

  19. Two-photon physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1981-10-01

    A new experimental frontier has recently been opened to the study of two photon processes. The first results of many aspects of these reactions are being presented at this conference. In contrast, the theoretical development of research ito two photon processes has a much longer history. This talk reviews the many different theoretical ideas which provide a detailed framework for our understanding of two photon processes

  20. Review on Dark Photon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curciarello Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available e+e− collider experiments at the intensity frontier are naturally suited to probe the existence of a force beyond the Standard Model between WIMPs, the most viable dark matter candidates. The mediator of this new force, known as dark photon, should be a new vector gauge boson very weakly coupled to the Standard Model photon. No significant signal has been observed so far. I will report on current limits set on the coupling factor ε2 between the photon and the dark photon by e+e− collider experiments.

  1. Towards THz integrated photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Hübers, Heinz-Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The demonstration of an integrated terahertz transceiver featuring a quantum cascade laser and a Schottky diode mixer promises new applications for compact and convenient terahertz photonic instrumentation.

  2. Tale of two photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    A very profitable spinoff from electron- positron collisions is two-photon physics. Rather than the electron and positron interacting directly via an exchanged photon, two virtual (transient) photons, one from each particle, get tangled up. With new electron-positron colliders appearing on the scene, a topical meeting on two-photon physics - 'From DAPHNE to LEP 200 and beyond' - held from 2-4 February in Paris, in the premises of the Ministry of Higher Education and Research, was particularly timely. Some 60 physicists, both experimentalists and theorists, participated, with some thirty speakers

  3. Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratoryprovides this nation's (in fact, this hemisphere's) brightest storage...

  4. Photonic Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Integrated photonics generally is the integration of multiple lithographically defined photonic and electronic components and devices (e.g. lasers, detectors, waveguides passive structures, modulators, electronic control and optical interconnects) on a single platform with nanometer-scale feature sizes. The development of photonic integrated circuits permits size, weight, power and cost reductions for spacecraft microprocessors, optical communication, processor buses, advanced data processing, and integrated optic science instrument optical systems, subsystems and components. This is particularly critical for small spacecraft platforms. We will give an overview of some NASA applications for integrated photonics.

  5. Single photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buvat, Irene

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this lecture is to present the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging technique. Content: 1 - Introduction: anatomic, functional and molecular imaging; Principle and role of functional or molecular imaging; 2 - Radiotracers: chemical and physical constraints, main emitters, radioisotopes production, emitters type and imaging techniques; 3 - Single photon emission computed tomography: gamma cameras and their components, gamma camera specifications, planar single photon imaging characteristics, gamma camera and tomography; 4 - Quantification in single photon emission tomography: attenuation, scattering, un-stationary spatial resolution, partial volume effect, movements, others; 5 - Synthesis and conclusion

  6. Photon virtual bound state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, J.; Ohtaka, K.

    2004-01-01

    We study virtual bound states in photonics, which are a vectorial extension of electron virtual bound states. The condition for these states is derived. It is found that the Mie resonant state which satisfies the condition that the size parameter is less than the angular momentum should be interpreted as a photon virtual bound state. In order to confirm the validity of the concept, we compare the photonic density of states, the width of which represents the lifetime of the photon virtual bound states, with numerical results

  7. Biomedical photonics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2003-01-01

    1.Biomedical Photonics: A Revolution at the Interface of Science and Technology, T. Vo-DinhPHOTONICS AND TISSUE OPTICS2.Optical Properties of Tissues, J. Mobley and T. Vo-Dinh3.Light-Tissue Interactions, V.V. Tuchin 4.Theoretical Models and Algorithms in Optical Diffusion Tomography, S.J. Norton and T. Vo-DinhPHOTONIC DEVICES5.Laser Light in Biomedicine and the Life Sciences: From the Present to the Future, V.S. Letokhov6.Basic Instrumentation in Photonics, T. Vo-Dinh7.Optical Fibers and Waveguides for Medical Applications, I. Gannot and

  8. Overdose Problem Associated with Treatment Planning Software for High Energy Photons in Response of Panama's Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attalla, E.M.; Lotayef, M.M.; Khalil, E.M.; El-Hosiny, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify dose distribution errors by comparing actual dose measurements with the calculated values done by the software. To evaluate the outcome of radiation overexposure related to Panama's accident and in response to ensure that the treatment planning systems (T.P.S.) are being operated in accordance with the appropriate quality assurance programme, we studied the central axis and pripheral depth dose data using complex field shaped with blocks to quantify dose distribution errors. Material and Methods: Multi data T.P.S. software versions 2.35 and 2.40 and Helax T.P.S. software version 5.1 B were assesed. The calculated data of the software treatment planning systems were verified by comparing these data with the actual dose measurements for open and blocked high energy photon fields (Co-60, 6MV and 18MV photons). Results: Close calculated and measured results were obtained for the 2-D (Multi data) and 3-D treatment planning (TMS Helax). These results were correct within 1 to 2% for open fields and 0.5 to 2.5% for peripheral blocked fields. Discrepancies between calculated and measured data ranged between 13. to 36% along the central axis of complex blocked fields when normalisation point was selected at the Dmax, when the normalisation point was selected near or under the blocks, the variation between the calculated and the measured data was up to 500% difference. Conclusions: The present results emphasize the importance of the proper selection of the normalization point in the radiation field, as this facilitates detection of aberrant dose distribution (over exposure or under exposure)

  9. Overdose problem associated with treatment planning software for high energy photons in response of Panama's accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attalla, Ehab M; Lotayef, Mohamed M; Khalil, Ehab M; El-Hosiny, Hesham A; Nazmy, Mohamed S

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify dose distribution errors by comparing actual dose measurements with the calculated values done by the software. To evaluate the outcome of radiation overexposure related to Panama's accident and in response to ensure that the treatment planning systems (T.P.S.) are being operated in accordance with the appropriate quality assurance programme, we studied the central axis and pripheral depth dose data using complex field shaped with blocks to quantify dose distribution errors. Multidata T.P.S. software versions 2.35 and 2.40 and Helax T.P.S. software version 5.1 B were assesed. The calculated data of the software treatment planning systems were verified by comparing these data with the actual dose measurements for open and blocked high energy photon fields (Co-60, 6MV & 18MV photons). Close calculated and measured results were obtained for the 2-D (Multidata) and 3-D treatment planning (TMS Helax). These results were correct within 1 to 2% for open fields and 0.5 to 2.5% for peripheral blocked fields. Discrepancies between calculated and measured data ranged between 13. to 36% along the central axis of complex blocked fields when normalisation point was selected at the Dmax, when the normalisation point was selected near or under the blocks, the variation between the calculated and the measured data was up to 500% difference. The present results emphasize the importance of the proper selection of the normalization point in the radiation field, as this facilitates detection of aberrant dose distribution (over exposure or under exposure).

  10. Photon-phonon interaction in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueta, T

    2010-01-01

    Photon-phonon interaction on the analogy of electron-phonon interaction is considered in one-dimensional photonic crystal. When lattice vibration is artificially introduced to the photonic crystal, a governing equation of electromagnetic field is derived. A simple model is numerically analysed and the following novel phenomena are found out. The lattice vibration generates the light of frequency which added the integral multiple of the vibration frequency to that of the incident wave and also amplifies the incident wave resonantly. On a resonance, the amplification factor increases very rapidly with the number of layers increases. Resonance frequencies change with the phases of lattice vibration. The amplification phenomenon is analytically discussed for low frequency of the lattice vibration.

  11. ALICE Photon Multiplicity Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nayak, T

    2013-01-01

    Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) measures the multiplicity and spatial distribution of photons in the forward region of ALICE on a event-by-event basis. PMD is a pre-shower detector having fine granularity and full azimuthal coverage in the pseudo-rapidity region 2.3 < η < 3.9.

  12. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Sporring, Jon; Fogh Olsen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    . To address this problem, we introduce a photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way, we preserve important illumination features, while...

  13. Integrated microwave photonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marpaung, D.A.I.; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.; Heideman, Rene; Leinse, Arne; Sales, S.; Capmany, J.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave photonics (MWP) is an emerging field in which radio frequency (RF) signals are generated, distributed, processed and analyzed using the strength of photonic techniques. It is a technology that enables various functionalities which are not feasible to achieve only in the microwave domain. A

  14. Two Photon Distribution Amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Beiyad, M.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2008-01-01

    The factorization of the amplitude of the process γ*γ→γγ in the low energy and high photon virtuality region is demonstrated at the Born order and in the leading logarithmic approximation. The leading order two photon (generalized) distribution amplitudes exhibit a characteristic ln Q 2 behaviour and obey new inhomogeneous evolution equations

  15. Agile Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    75, pp. 3253-3256, Oct. 1995. [24] F. Benabid, J. C. Knight, and P. S. J. Russell, “Particle levitation and guidance in hollow-core photonic crystal...B. Mizaikoff, “Midinfrared sensors meet nanotechnology: Trace gas sensing with quantum cascade lasers inside photonic band-gap hollow waveguides

  16. Photon beam position monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.; Shu, Deming

    1995-01-01

    A photon beam position monitor for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade "shadowing". Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation.

  17. Superconducting Single Photon Detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorenbos, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is about the development of a detector for single photons, particles of light. New techniques are being developed that require high performance single photon detection, such as quantum cryptography, single molecule detection, optical radar, ballistic imaging, circuit testing and

  18. Photonics in wireless transceivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogani, A.; Ghelfi, P.

    2013-01-01

    During the last few years, the cross-fertilization between photonics and radio systems has been helping to overcome some major limitations of the classical radio technologies, setting new paradigms, and promising improved performance and new applications with strong benefits for public communications and safety. In particular, photonics-based wireless systems, albeit still at research level, are moving toward a new generation of multifunctional systems able to manage the wireless communication with several different frequencies and protocols, even simultaneously while also realizing surveillance operations. Photonics matches the new requirements of flexibility for software-defined architectures, thanks to its ultra-wide bandwidths and ease of tunability, and guarantees low footprint and weight, thanks to integrated photonic technologies. Moreover, photonics also allows increased resolution and sensitivity by means of the inherent low phase noise of lasers. (author)

  19. Nonlinear Photonics 2014: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmediev, N; Kartashov, Yaroslav

    2015-01-12

    International Conference "Nonlinear Photonics-2014" took place in Barcelona, Spain on July 27-31, 2014. It was a part of the "Advanced Photonics Congress" which is becoming a traditional notable event in the world of photonics. The current focus issue of Optics Express contains contributions from the participants of the Conference and the Congress. The articles in this focus issue by no means represent the total number of the congress contributions (around 400). However, it demonstrates wide range of topics covered at the event. The next conference of this series is to be held in 2016 in Australia, which is the home of many researchers working in the field of photonics in general and nonlinear photonics in particular.

  20. Almost real photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, H.

    1977-01-01

    High energy photon-proton scattering is expected to bring an important information on strong and electromagnetic interaction, and is discussed in this paper. When the ''mass'' of the photon is less than that of the lightest hadron, it is said ''the photon is almost real''. The photon energy is sufficiently high to check the energy dependence of the gamma-proton total cross section, even in the first stage of TRISTAN. The tagging system consists of four multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC) and a lead glass Cerenkov counter. The energy of scattered electrons is determined with the Cerenkov counter. The equivalent-photon approximation is a useful method to obtain the counting rates. The estimation of the counting rate was made under the expected value of the total cross section. The estimated counting rate is strong enough for the experiment of the gamma-proton total cross section measurement. (Kato, T.)

  1. Verification of the pure alanine in PMMA tube dosimeter applicability for dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Karmi, Anan M; Ayaz, Ali Asghar H; Al-Enezi, Mamdouh S; Abdel-Rahman, Wamied; Dwaikat, Nidal

    2015-09-01

    Alanine dosimeters in the form of pure alanine powder in PMMA plastic tubes were investigated for dosimetry in a clinical application. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure absorbed radiation doses by detection of signals from radicals generated in irradiated alanine. The measurements were performed for low-dose ranges typical for single-fraction doses often used in external photon beam radiotherapy. First, the dosimeters were irradiated in a solid water phantom to establish calibration curves in the dose range from 0.3 to 3 Gy for 6 and 18 MV X-ray beams from a clinical linear accelerator. Next, the dosimeters were placed at various locations in an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom to measure the dose delivery of a conventional four-field box technique treatment plan to the pelvis. Finally, the doses measured with alanine dosimeters were compared against the doses calculated with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). The results showed that the alanine dosimeters have a highly sensitive dose response with good linearity and no energy dependence in the dose range and photon beams used in this work. Also, a fairly good agreement was found between the in-phantom dose measurements with alanine dosimeters and the TPS dose calculations. The mean value of the ratios of measured to calculated dose values was found to be near unity. The measured points in the in-field region passed dose-difference acceptance criterion of 3% and those in the penumbral region passed distance-to-agreement acceptance criterion of 3 mm. These findings suggest that the pure alanine powder in PMMA tube dosimeter is a suitable option for dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams.

  2. Determination of the quality index (Q) for photon beams at arbitrary field sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Otto A

    2009-09-01

    A commonly used beam quality index (Q) for high-energy photon beams is the tissue phantom ratio (TPR20,10) for a square field of 10 x 10 cm2 and SDD of 100 cm. On some specialized radiotherapy treatment equipment such a reference collimator setting is not achievable. Likewise a flat beam profile, not explicitly required in dosimetry protocols, but certainly influences the measurement of Q, is not always produced. In this work, a method was developed in order to determine Q at any field size, especially for small and nonflattened beams. An analytical relationship was derived between TPR20,10 for arbitrary field sizes and Q [the TPR20,10 (10 x 10 cm2)] as quality index. The proposed model equation was fitted to the measured and published data in order to achieve three general fit parameters. The procedure was then tested with published data from TomoTherapy and CyperKnife treatment devices. For standard flattened photon fields, the uncertainty in Q measured at any field size using the parameters derived from this study is better than 1%. In flattening-filter free beams, the proposed procedure results in a reliable Q for any field size setting. A method is introduced and successfully tested in order to measure the beam quality under nonstandard conditions. It can be used, e.g., to get energy dependent correction factors as tabulated in dosimetry codes of practice even if standard conditions are not adjustable.

  3. Beam Characterization of 10-MV Photon Beam from Medical Linear Accelerator without Flattening Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimozato, Tomohiro; Aoyama, Yuichi; Matsunaga, Takuma; Tabushi, Katsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    This work investigated the dosimetric properties of a 10-MV photon beam emitted from a medical linear accelerator (linac) with no flattening filter (FF). The aim of this study is to analyze the radiation fluence and energy emitted from the flattening filter free (FFF) linac using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The FFF linac was created by removing the FF from a linac in clinical use. Measurements of the depth dose (DD) and the off-axis profile were performed using a three-dimensional water phantom with an ionization chamber. A MC simulation for a 10-MV photon beam from this FFF linac was performed using the BEAMnrc code. The off-axis profiles for the FFF linac exhibited a chevron-like distribution, and the dose outside the irradiation field was found to be lower for the FFF linac than for a linac with an FF (FF linac). The DD curves for the FFF linac included many contaminant electrons in the build-up region. Therefore, for clinical use, a metal filter is additionally required to reduce the effects of the electron contamination. The mean energy of the FFF linac was found to be lower than that of the FF linac owing to the absence of beam hardening caused by the FF.

  4. Progress in neuromorphic photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira de Lima, Thomas; Shastri, Bhavin J.; Tait, Alexander N.; Nahmias, Mitchell A.; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2017-03-01

    As society's appetite for information continues to grow, so does our need to process this information with increasing speed and versatility. Many believe that the one-size-fits-all solution of digital electronics is becoming a limiting factor in certain areas such as data links, cognitive radio, and ultrafast control. Analog photonic devices have found relatively simple signal processing niches where electronics can no longer provide sufficient speed and reconfigurability. Recently, the landscape for commercially manufacturable photonic chips has been changing rapidly and now promises to achieve economies of scale previously enjoyed solely by microelectronics. By bridging the mathematical prowess of artificial neural networks to the underlying physics of optoelectronic devices, neuromorphic photonics could breach new domains of information processing demanding significant complexity, low cost, and unmatched speed. In this article, we review the progress in neuromorphic photonics, focusing on photonic integrated devices. The challenges and design rules for optoelectronic instantiation of artificial neurons are presented. The proposed photonic architecture revolves around the processing network node composed of two parts: a nonlinear element and a network interface. We then survey excitable lasers in the recent literature as candidates for the nonlinear node and microring-resonator weight banks as the network interface. Finally, we compare metrics between neuromorphic electronics and neuromorphic photonics and discuss potential applications.

  5. Single photons on demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grangier, P.; Abram, I.

    2004-01-01

    Quantum cryptography and information processing are set to benefit from developments in novel light sources that can emit photons one by one. Quantum mechanics has gained a reputation for making counter-intuitive predictions. But we rarely get the chance to witness these effects directly because, being humans, we are simply too big. Take light, for example. The light sources that are familiar to us, such as those used in lighting and imaging or in CD and DVD players, are so huge that they emit billions and billions of photons. But what if there was a light source that emitted just one photon at a time? Over the past few years, new types of light source that are able to emit photons one by one have been emerging from laboratories around the world. Pulses of light composed of a single photon correspond to power flows in the femtowatt range - a million billion times less than that of a table lamp. The driving force behind the development of these single-photon sources is a range of novel applications that take advantage of the quantum nature of light. Quantum states of superposed and entangled photons could lead the way to guaranteed-secure communication, to information processing with unprecedented speed and efficiency, and to new schemes for quantum teleportation. (U.K.)

  6. Total photon absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos, P.

    1985-06-01

    The present discussion is limited to a presentation of the most recent total photonuclear absorption experiments performed with real photons at intermediate energy, and more precisely in the region of nucleon resonances. The main sources of real photons are briefly reviewed and the experimental procedures used for total photonuclear absorption cross section measurements. The main results obtained below 140 MeV photon energy as well as above 2 GeV are recalled. The experimental study of total photonuclear absorption in the nuclear resonance region (140 MeV< E<2 GeV) is still at its beginning and some results are presented

  7. Photonics: Technology project summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P.

    1991-01-01

    Photonics involves the use of light (photons) in conjunction with electronics for applications in communications, computing, control, and sensing. Components used in photonic systems include lasers, optical detectors, optical wave guide devices, fiber optics, and traditional electronic devices. The goal of this program is to develop hybrid optoelectronic devices and systems for sensing, information processing, communications, and control. It is hoped that these new devices will yield at least an order of magnitude improvement in performance over existing technology. The objective of the program is to conduct research and development in the following areas: (1) materials and devices; (2) networking and computing; (3) optical processing/advanced pattern recognition; and (4) sensing.

  8. Physics of photonic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang, Shun Lien

    2009-01-01

    The most up-to-date book available on the physics of photonic devices This new edition of Physics of Photonic Devices incorporates significant advancements in the field of photonics that have occurred since publication of the first edition (Physics of Optoelectronic Devices). New topics covered include a brief history of the invention of semiconductor lasers, the Lorentz dipole method and metal plasmas, matrix optics, surface plasma waveguides, optical ring resonators, integrated electroabsorption modulator-lasers, and solar cells. It also introduces exciting new fields of research such as:

  9. Single photon ECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Toshio; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Tada, Akira; Bunko, Hisashi; Koizumi, Kiyoshi

    1982-01-01

    The detectability of lesions located deep in a body or overlapped with a physiologically increased activity improve with the help of single photon ECT. In some cases, the ECT is superior to the conventional gamma camera images and X-ray CT scans in the evaluation of the location and size of lesion. The single photon ECT of the brain compares favorably with the contrast enhansed X-ray CT scans. The most important adaptation of the single photon ECT are the detection of recurrent brain tumors after craniotomy and the evaluation of ischemic heart diseases. (author)

  10. Strained Silicon Photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf B. Wehrspohn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A review of recent progress in the field of strained silicon photonics is presented. The application of strain to waveguide and photonic crystal structures can be used to alter the linear and nonlinear optical properties of these devices. Here, methods for the fabrication of strained devices are summarized and recent examples of linear and nonlinear optical devices are discussed. Furthermore, the relation between strain and the enhancement of the second order nonlinear susceptibility is investigated, which may enable the construction of optically active photonic devices made of silicon.

  11. Photonic Crystal Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Sanchez Bjarklev, Araceli

    Photonic crystal fibres represent one of the most active research areas today in the field of optics. The diversity of applications that may be addressed by these fibres and their fundamental appeal, by opening up the possibility of guiding light in a radically new way compared to conventional...... optical fibres, have spun an interest from almost all areas of optics and photonics. The aim of this book is to provide an understanding of the different types of photonic crystal fibres and to outline some of the many new and exciting applications that these fibres offer. The book is intended for both...

  12. Fundamentals of photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Bahaa E A

    2007-01-01

    Now in a new full-color edition, Fundamentals of Photonics, Second Edition is a self-contained and up-to-date introductory-level textbook that thoroughly surveys this rapidly expanding area of engineering and applied physics. Featuring a logical blend of theory and applications, coverage includes detailed accounts of the primary theories of light, including ray optics, wave optics, electromagnetic optics, and photon optics, as well as the interaction of photons and atoms, and semiconductor optics. Presented at increasing levels of complexity, preliminary sections build toward more advan

  13. Tomography of photon-added and photon-subtracted states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazrafkan, MR; Man'ko, [No Value

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce symplectic and optical tomograms of photon-added and photon-subtracted quantum states. Explicit relations for the tomograms of photon-added and photon-subtracted squeezed coherent states and squeezed number states are obtained. Generating functions for the

  14. Hadronic photon-photon interactions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, R.; Siegen Univ.; Ranft, J.

    1996-01-01

    Photon-photon collisions are investigated in the framework of the two-component Dual Parton Model. The model contains contributions from direct, resolved soft and resolved hard interactions. All free parameters of the model are determined in fits to hadron-hadron and photon-hadron cross section data. The model is shown to agree well to hadron production data from hadron-hadron and photon-hadron collisions. The multiparticle production in hadron-hadron, photon-hadron and photon-photon collisions as predicted by the model is compared. Strong differences are only found as function of the transverse momentum variable. (author)

  15. Microwave background constraints on mixing of photons with hidden photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Redondo, Javier; Sigl, Guenter

    2008-12-01

    Various extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of hidden photons kinetically mixing with the ordinary photon. This mixing leads to oscillations between photons and hidden photons, analogous to the observed oscillations between different neutrino flavors. In this context, we derive new bounds on the photon-hidden photon mixing parameters using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer instrument on board of the Cosmic Background Explorer. Requiring the distortions of the CMB induced by the photon-hidden photon mixing to be smaller than experimental upper limits, this leads to a bound on the mixing angle χ 0 -7 - 10 -5 for hidden photon masses between 10 -14 eV and 10 -7 eV. This low-mass and low-mixing region of the hidden photon parameter space was previously unconstrained. (orig.)

  16. Microwave background constraints on mixing of photons with hidden photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirizzi, Alessandro [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Redondo, Javier [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Sigl, Guenter [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2008-12-15

    Various extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of hidden photons kinetically mixing with the ordinary photon. This mixing leads to oscillations between photons and hidden photons, analogous to the observed oscillations between different neutrino flavors. In this context, we derive new bounds on the photon-hidden photon mixing parameters using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer instrument on board of the Cosmic Background Explorer. Requiring the distortions of the CMB induced by the photon-hidden photon mixing to be smaller than experimental upper limits, this leads to a bound on the mixing angle {chi}{sub 0}

  17. Comparative Investigation of Ce3+ Doped Scintillators in a Wide Range of Photon Energies Covering X-ray CT, Nuclear Medicine and Megavoltage Radiation Therapy Portal Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valais, Ioannis G.; Michail, Christos M.; David, Stratos L.; Liaparinos, Panagiotis F.; Fountos, George P.; Paschalis, Theodoros V.; Kandarakis, Ioannis S.; Panayiotakis, George S.

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the performance of scintillators currently used in PET and animal PET systems, under conditions met in radiation therapy and PET/CT imaging. The results of this study will be useful in applications where both CT and PET photons as well as megavoltage cone beam CT (MV CBCT) photons could be detected using a common detector unit. To this aim crystal samples of GSO, LSO, LYSO, LuYAP and YAP scintillators, doped with cerium (Ce+3) were examined under a wide energy range of photon energies. Evaluation was performed by determining the absolute luminescence efficiency (emitted light flux over incident X-ray exposure) in the energy range employed in X-ray CT, in Nuclear Medicine (70 keV up to 662 keV) and in radiotherapy 6 MV (approx. 2.0 MeV mean energy)-18 MV (approx. 4.5 MeV mean energy). Measurements were performed using an experimental set-up based on a photomultiplier coupled to a light integration sphere. The emission spectrum under X-ray excitation was measured, using an optical grating monochromator, to determine the spectral compatibility to optical photon detectors incorporated in medical imaging systems. Maximum absolute luminescence efficiency values were observed at 70 keV for YAP:Ce and LuYAP:Ce and at 140 keV for LSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce and GSO:Ce. Highest absolute efficiency between the scintillators examined was observed for LSO:Ce, followed by LYSO:Ce. The detector optical gain (DOG) exhibited a significant variation with the increase of energy between 70 keV to 2.0 MeV. All scintillators exhibited low compatibility when combined with GaAsP (G5645) photodetector.

  18. Microwave photonics shines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Rachel

    2011-12-01

    The combination of microwave photonics and optics has advanced many applications in defence, wireless communications, imaging and network infrastructure. Rachel Won talks to Jianping Yao from the University of Ottawa in Canada about the importance of this growing field.

  19. Photon induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecking, B.A.

    1982-04-01

    Various aspects of medium energy nuclear reactions induced by real photons are reviewed. Special emphasis is put on high accuracy experiments that will become possible with the next generation of electron accelerators. (orig.)

  20. Photons and magnetization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pile, P.; Němec, P.; Jungwirth, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 6 (2013), s. 500 ISSN 1749-4885 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : spintronics * photonics * magneto-optics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 29.958, year: 2013

  1. Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Altug, Hatice; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    We recently proposed two-dimensional coupled photonic crystal nanocavity arrays as a route to achieve a slow-group velocity of light in all crystal directions, thereby enabling numerous applications...

  2. Photonic Crystal Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kristiansen, Rene E

    2005-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking Crystal Fibre A/S as follows: Crystal Fibre will conduct research and development of large mode area, dual clad multi-core Yb-doped photonic crystal fiber...

  3. Principles of photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jia-Ming

    2016-01-01

    With this self-contained and comprehensive text, students will gain a detailed understanding of the fundamental concepts and major principles of photonics. Assuming only a basic background in optics, readers are guided through key topics such as the nature of optical fields, the properties of optical materials, and the principles of major photonic functions regarding the generation, propagation, coupling, interference, amplification, modulation, and detection of optical waves or signals. Numerous examples and problems are provided throughout to enhance understanding, and a solutions manual containing detailed solutions and explanations is available online for instructors. This is the ideal resource for electrical engineering and physics undergraduates taking introductory, single-semester or single-quarter courses in photonics, providing them with the knowledge and skills needed to progress to more advanced courses on photonic devices, systems and applications.

  4. Photonic Quantum Information Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walther, P.

    2012-01-01

    The advantage of the photon's mobility makes optical quantum system ideally suited for delegated quantum computation. I will present results for the realization for a measurement-based quantum network in a client-server environment, where quantum information is securely communicated and computed. Related to measurement-based quantum computing I will discuss a recent experiment showing that quantum discord can be used as resource for the remote state preparation, which might shine new light on the requirements for quantum-enhanced information processing. Finally, I will briefly review recent photonic quantum simulation experiments of four frustrated Heisenberg-interactions spins and present an outlook of feasible simulation experiments with more complex interactions or random walk structures. As outlook I will discuss the current status of new quantum technology for improving the scalability of photonic quantum systems by using superconducting single-photon detectors and tailored light-matter interactions. (author)

  5. Possible nonvanishing mass of photon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazato, Hiromichi; Namiki, Mikio; Yamanaka, Yoshiya; Yokoyama, Kan-ichi.

    1985-05-01

    From phenomenological and field-theoretical considerations on photon mass, we first show that photon is not limitted to being massless at the present stage. Next we illustrate a possibility of formulating a local field theory for massive photons coupled with nonconserved currents, while we cannot do for massless photons. (author)

  6. The photon collider at TESLA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Badelek, B.; Bloechinger, C.; Blümlein, J.; Boos, E.; Brinkman, R.; Burkhardt, H.; Bussey, P.; Carimalo, C.; Chýla, Jiří; Ciftci, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 30 (2004), s. 5097-5186 ISSN 0217-751X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010920 Keywords : photon collider * linear collider * gamma-gamma * photon-photon * photon electron * Compton scattering Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.054, year: 2004

  7. ALICE photon spectrometer crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Members of the mechanical assembly team insert the last few crystals into the first module of ALICE's photon spectrometer. These crystals are made from lead-tungstate, a crystal as clear as glass but with nearly four times the density. When a high-energy particle passes through one of these crystals it will scintillate, emitting a flash of light allowing the energy of photons, electrons and positrons to be measured.

  8. Photon structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1980-11-01

    Theoretical understanding of the photon structure function is reviewed. As an illustration of the pointlike component, the parton model is briefly discussed. However, the systematic study of the photon structure function is presented through the framework of the operator product expansion. Perturbative QCD is used as the theoretical basis for the calculation of leading contributions to the operator product expansion. The influence of higher order QCD effects on these results is discussed. Recent results for the polarized structure functions are discussed

  9. Hard processes in photon-photon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchovni, E.

    1985-03-01

    In this thesis, the existence of hard component in two-photon collisions is investigated. Due to the relative simplicity of the photon, such processes can be exactly calculated in QCD. Untagged (low Q 2 ) two-photon events are used. This leads to relatively high statistics, but to severe background problem due mainly to e + e - annihilation. The background contamination is reduced to a tolerable level using a special set of cuts. Moreover, the remaining contamination is shown to be calculable with a small systematic error. A large number of events of the hard ''γγ'' type is found. An attempt to explain these events using the simplest QCD diagram (the Born term) is done. This process is found to be capable of explaining only a 1/4 of the data. Other options like the constituent intercharge model, integer charged quarks, and higher order diagrams are therefore also discussed. The large cross-section for the production of ρ 0 ρ 0 pairs in ''γγ'' collisions has not been understood yet. Inorder to look at closely related processes, a search for φρ 0 and φφ was initiated. The cross-section for θπ + π - was found to be sizeable. Only upper limits for the production of φρ 0 and φφ are obtained

  10. Single-photon imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, Peter; Theuwissen, Albert J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition and interpretation of images is a central capability in almost all scientific and technological domains. In particular, the acquisition of electromagnetic radiation, in the form of visible light, UV, infrared, X-ray, etc. is of enormous practical importance. The ultimate sensitivity in electronic imaging is the detection of individual photons. With this book, the first comprehensive review of all aspects of single-photon electronic imaging has been created. Topics include theoretical basics, semiconductor fabrication, single-photon detection principles, imager design and applications of different spectral domains. Today, the solid-state fabrication capabilities for several types of image sensors has advanced to a point, where uncooled single-photon electronic imaging will soon become a consumer product. This book is giving a specialist's view from different domains to the forthcoming ''single-photon imaging'' revolution. The various aspects of single-photon imaging are treated by internationally renowned, leading scientists and technologists who have all pioneered their respective fields. (orig.)

  11. Multi-photon absorption limits to heralded single photon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husko, Chad A.; Clark, Alex S.; Collins, Matthew J.; De Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Xiong, Chunle; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Single photons are of paramount importance to future quantum technologies, including quantum communication and computation. Nonlinear photonic devices using parametric processes offer a straightforward route to generating photons, however additional nonlinear processes may come into play and interfere with these sources. Here we analyse spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) sources in the presence of multi-photon processes. We conduct experiments in silicon and gallium indium phosphide photonic crystal waveguides which display inherently different nonlinear absorption processes, namely two-photon (TPA) and three-photon absorption (ThPA), respectively. We develop a novel model capturing these diverse effects which is in excellent quantitative agreement with measurements of brightness, coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) and second-order correlation function g(2)(0), showing that TPA imposes an intrinsic limit on heralded single photon sources. We build on these observations to devise a new metric, the quantum utility (QMU), enabling further optimisation of single photon sources. PMID:24186400

  12. Non-Poissonian photon statistics from macroscopic photon cutting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Mathijs; Meijerink, Andries; Rabouw, Freddy T

    2017-05-24

    In optical materials energy is usually extracted only from the lowest excited state, resulting in fundamental energy-efficiency limits such as the Shockley-Queisser limit for single-junction solar cells. Photon-cutting materials provide a way around such limits by absorbing high-energy photons and 'cutting' them into multiple low-energy excitations that can subsequently be extracted. The occurrence of photon cutting or quantum cutting has been demonstrated in a variety of materials, including semiconductor quantum dots, lanthanides and organic dyes. Here we show that photon cutting results in bunched photon emission on the timescale of the excited-state lifetime, even when observing a macroscopic number of optical centres. Our theoretical derivation matches well with experimental data on NaLaF 4 :Pr 3+ , a material that can cut deep-ultraviolet photons into two visible photons. This signature of photon cutting can be used to identify and characterize new photon-cutting materials unambiguously.

  13. CMOS-compatible photonic devices for single-photon generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Chunle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sources of single photons are one of the key building blocks for quantum photonic technologies such as quantum secure communication and powerful quantum computing. To bring the proof-of-principle demonstration of these technologies from the laboratory to the real world, complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS-compatible photonic chips are highly desirable for photon generation, manipulation, processing and even detection because of their compactness, scalability, robustness, and the potential for integration with electronics. In this paper, we review the development of photonic devices made from materials (e.g., silicon and processes that are compatible with CMOS fabrication facilities for the generation of single photons.

  14. Axion mediated photon to dark photon mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejlli, Damian [Novosibirsk State University, Department of Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Theory Group, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2018-01-15

    The interaction between the dark/mirror sector and the ordinary sector is considered, where the two sectors interact with each other by sharing the same QCD axion field. This feature makes the mixing between ordinary and dark/mirror photons in ordinary and dark electromagnetic fields possible. Perturbative solutions of the equations of motion describing the evolution of fields in ordinary and dark external magnetic fields are found. User-friendly quantities such as transition probability rates and Stokes parameters are derived. Possible astrophysical and cosmological applications of this model are suggested. (orig.)

  15. The irreducible photon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, David L.

    2009-08-01

    In recent years it has become evident that the primary concept of the photon has multiple interpretations, with widely differing secondary connotations. Despite the all-pervasive nature of this concept in science, some of the ancillary properties with which the photon is attributed in certain areas of application sit uneasily alongside those invoked in other areas. Certainly the range of applications extends far beyond what was envisaged in the original conception, now entering subjects extending from elementary particle physics and cosmology through to spectroscopy, statistical mechanics and photochemistry. Addressing this diverse context invites the question: What is there, that it is possible to assert as incontrovertibly true about the photon? Which properties are non-controversial, if others are the subject of debate? This paper describes an attempt to answer these questions, establishing as far as possible an irreducible core of what can rightly be asserted about the photon, and setting aside some of what often is, but should never be so asserted. Some of the more bewildering difficulties and differences of interpretation owe their origin to careless descriptions, highlighting a need to guard semantic precision; although simplifications are frequently and naturally expedient for didactic purposes, they carry the risk of becoming indelible. Focusing on such issues, the aim is to identify how much or how little about the photon can be regarded as truly non-controversial.

  16. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsia, Kevin K.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-05-01

    An intriguing optical property of silicon is that it exhibits a large third-order optical nonlinearity, with orders-ofmagnitude larger than that of silica glass in the telecommunication band. This allows efficient nonlinear optical interaction at relatively low power levels in a small footprint. Indeed, we have witnessed a stunning progress in harnessing the Raman and Kerr effects in silicon as the mechanisms for enabling chip-scale optical amplification, lasing, and wavelength conversion - functions that until recently were perceived to be beyond the reach of silicon. With all the continuous efforts developing novel techniques, nonlinear silicon photonics is expected to be able to reach even beyond the prior achievements. Instead of providing a comprehensive overview of this field, this manuscript highlights a number of new branches of nonlinear silicon photonics, which have not been fully recognized in the past. In particular, they are two-photon photovoltaic effect, mid-wave infrared (MWIR) silicon photonics, broadband Raman effects, inverse Raman scattering, and periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). These novel effects and techniques could create a new paradigm for silicon photonics and extend its utility beyond the traditionally anticipated applications.

  17. Fuel Effective Photonic Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, N.; Srivarshini, S.

    2017-09-01

    With the entry of miniaturization in electronics and ultra-small light-weight materials, energy efficient propulsion techniques for space travel can soon be possible. We need to go for such high speeds so that the generation’s time long interstellar missions can be done in incredibly short time. Also renewable energy like sunlight, nuclear energy can be used for propulsion instead of fuel. These propulsion techniques are being worked on currently. The recently proposed photon propulsion concepts are reviewed, that utilize momentum of photons generated by sunlight or onboard photon generators, such as blackbody radiation or lasers, powered by nuclear or solar power. With the understanding of nuclear photonic propulsion, in this paper, a rough estimate of nuclear fuel required to achieve the escape velocity of Earth is done. An overview of the IKAROS space mission for interplanetary travel by JAXA, that was successful in demonstrating that photonic propulsion works and also generated additional solar power on board, is provided; which can be used as a case study. An extension of this idea for interstellar travel, termed as ‘Star Shot’, aims to send a nanocraft to an exoplanet in the nearest star system, which could be potentially habitable. A brief overview of the idea is presented.

  18. Photonics for life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Bassi, Andrea; Comelli, Daniela; Cova, Sergio; Farina, Andrea; Ghioni, Massimo; Rech, Ivan; Pifferi, Antonio; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Taroni, Paola; Torricelli, Alessandro; Tosi, Alberto; Valentini, Gianluca; Zappa, Franco

    2011-01-01

    Light is strictly connected with life, and its presence is fundamental for any living environment. Thus, many biological mechanisms are related to light interaction or can be evaluated through processes involving energy exchange with photons. Optics has always been a precious tool to evaluate molecular and cellular mechanisms, but the discovery of lasers opened new pathways of interactions of light with biological matter, pushing an impressive development for both therapeutic and diagnostic applications in biomedicine. The use of light in different fields has become so widespread that the word photonics has been utilized to identify all the applications related to processes where the light is involved. The photonics area covers a wide range of wavelengths spanning from soft X-rays to mid-infrared and includes all devices related to photons as light sources, optical fibers and light guides, detectors, and all the related electronic equipment. The recent use of photons in the field of telecommunications has pushed the technology toward low-cost, compact, and efficient devices, making them available for many other applications, including those related to biology and medicine where these requirements are of particular relevance. Moreover, basic sciences such as physics, chemistry, mathematics, and electronics have recognized the interdisciplinary need of biomedical science and are translating the most advanced researches into these fields. The Politecnico school has pioneered many of them,and this article reviews the state of the art of biomedical research at the Politecnico in the field internationally known as biophotonics.

  19. Antigravity Acts on Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brynjolfsson, Ari

    2002-04-01

    Einstein's general theory of relativity assumes that photons don't change frequency as they move from Sun to Earth. This assumption is correct in classical physics. All experiments proving the general relativity are in the domain of classical physics. This include the tests by Pound et al. of the gravitational redshift of 14.4 keV photons; the rocket experiments by Vessot et al.; the Galileo solar redshift experiments by Krisher et al.; the gravitational deflection of light experiments by Riveros and Vucetich; and delay of echoes of radar signals passing close to Sun as observed by Shapiro et al. Bohr's correspondence principle assures that quantum mechanical theory of general relativity agrees with Einstein's classical theory when frequency and gravitational field gradient approach zero, or when photons cannot interact with the gravitational field. When we treat photons as quantum mechanical particles; we find that gravitational force on photons is reversed (antigravity). This modified theory contradicts the equivalence principle, but is consistent with all experiments. Solar lines and distant stars are redshifted in accordance with author's plasma redshift theory. These changes result in a beautiful consistent cosmology.

  20. Multiple photon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, C.J.; Feldman, B.J.

    1979-02-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis is presented of the interaction of intense near-resonant monochromatic radiation with an N-level anharmonic oscillator. In particular, the phenomenon of multiple photon resonance, the process by which an N-level system resonantly absorbs two or more photons simultaneously, is investigated. Starting from the Schroedinger equation, diagrammatic techniques are developed that allow the resonant process to be analyzed quantitatively, in analogy with well-known two-level coherent phenomena. In addition, multiple photon Stark shifts of the resonances, shifts absent in two-level theory, are obtained from the diagrams. Insights into the nature of multiple photon resonances are gained by comparing the quantum mechanical system with classical coupled pendulums whose equations of motion possess identical eigenvalues and eigenvectors. In certain limiting cases, including that of the resonantly excited N-level harmonic oscillator and that of the equally spaced N-level system with equal matrix elements, analytic results are derived. The influence of population relaxation and phase-disrupting collisions on the multiple photon process are also analyzed, the latter by extension of the diagrammatic technique to the density matrix equations of motion. 11 figures

  1. Subwavelength silicon photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheben, P.; Bock, P.J.; Schmid, J.H.; Lapointe, J.; Janz, S.; Xu, D.-X.; Densmore, A.; Delage, A.; Lamontagne, B.; Florjanczyk, M.; Ma, R.

    2011-01-01

    With the goal of developing photonic components that are compatible with silicon microelectronic integrated circuits, silicon photonics has been the subject of intense research activity. Silicon is an excellent material for confining and manipulating light at the submicrometer scale. Silicon optoelectronic integrated devices have the potential to be miniaturized and mass-produced at affordable cost for many applications, including telecommunications, optical interconnects, medical screening, and biological and chemical sensing. We review recent advances in silicon photonics research at the National Research Council Canada. A new type of optical waveguide is presented, exploiting subwavelength grating (SWG) effect. We demonstrate subwavelength grating waveguides made of silicon, including practical components operating at telecom wavelengths: input couplers, waveguide crossings and spectrometer chips. SWG technique avoids loss and wavelength resonances due to diffraction effects and allows for single-mode operation with direct control of the mode confinement by changing the refractive index of a waveguide core over a range as broad as 1.6 - 3.5 simply by lithographic patterning. The light can be launched to these waveguides with a coupling loss as small as 0.5 dB and with minimal wavelength dependence, using coupling structures similar to that shown in Fig. 1. The subwavelength grating waveguides can cross each other with minimal loss and negligible crosstalk which allows massive photonic circuit connectivity to overcome the limits of electrical interconnects. These results suggest that the SWG waveguides could become key elements for future integrated photonic circuits. (authors)

  2. Reconfigurable topological photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaev, Mikhail I.; Desnavi, Sameerah; Walasik, Wiktor; Litchinitser, Natalia M.

    2018-02-01

    Topological insulators are materials that conduct on the surface and insulate in their interior due to non-trivial topology of the band structure. The edge states on the interface between topological (non-trivial) and conventional (trivial) insulators are topologically protected from scattering due to structural defects and disorders. Recently, it was shown that photonic crystals (PCs) can serve as a platform for realizing a scatter-free propagation of light waves. In conventional PCs, imperfections, structural disorders, and surface roughness lead to significant losses. The breakthrough in overcoming these problems is likely to come from the synergy of the topological PCs and silicon-based photonics technology that enables high integration density, lossless propagation, and immunity to fabrication imperfections. For many applications, reconfigurability and capability to control the propagation of these non-trivial photonic edge states is essential. One way to facilitate such dynamic control is to use liquid crystals (LCs), which allow to modify the refractive index with external electric field. Here, we demonstrate dynamic control of topological edge states by modifying the refractive index of a LC background medium. Background index is changed depending on the orientation of a LC, while preserving the topology of the system. This results in a change of the spectral position of the photonic bandgap and the topological edge states. The proposed concept might be implemented using conventional semiconductor technology, and can be used for robust energy transport in integrated photonic devices, all-optical circuity, and optical communication systems.

  3. SU-E-T-368: Evaluating Dosimetric Outcome of Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT) Optimization for Head and Neck Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGeachy, P; Villarreal-Barajas, JE; Khan, R [University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Zinchenko, Y [University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric outcome of optimized treatment plans obtained by modulating the photon beamlet energy and fluence on a small cohort of four Head and Neck (H and N) patients was investigated. This novel optimization technique is denoted XMRT for modulated photon radiotherapy. The dosimetric plans from XMRT for H and N treatment were compared to conventional, 6 MV intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) optimization plans. Methods: An arrangement of two non-coplanar and five coplanar beams was used for all four H and N patients. Both XMRT and IMRT were subject to the same optimization algorithm, with XMRT optimization allowing both 6 and 18 MV beamlets while IMRT was restricted to 6 MV only. The optimization algorithm was based on a linear programming approach with partial-volume constraints implemented via the conditional value-at-risk method. H and N constraints were based off of those mentioned in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 1016 protocol. XMRT and IMRT solutions were assessed using metrics suggested by International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements report 83. The Gurobi solver was used in conjunction with the CVX package to solve each optimization problem. Dose calculations and analysis were done in CERR using Monte Carlo dose calculation with VMC{sub ++}. Results: Both XMRT and IMRT solutions met all clinical criteria. Trade-offs were observed between improved dose uniformity to the primary target volume (PTV1) and increased dose to some of the surrounding healthy organs for XMRT compared to IMRT. On average, IMRT improved dose to the contralateral parotid gland and spinal cord while XMRT improved dose to the brainstem and mandible. Conclusion: Bi-energy XMRT optimization for H and N patients provides benefits in terms of improved dose uniformity to the primary target and reduced dose to some healthy structures, at the expense of increased dose to other healthy structures when compared with IMRT.

  4. TH-CD-201-06: Experimental Characterization of Acoustic Signals Generated in Water Following Clinical Photon and Electron Beam Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickling, S; El Naqa, I

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Previous work has demonstrated the detectability of acoustic waves induced following the irradiation of high density metals with radiotherapy linac photon beams. This work demonstrates the ability to experimentally detect such acoustic signals following both photon and electron irradiation in a more radiotherapy relevant material. The relationship between induced acoustic signal properties in water and the deposited dose distribution is explored, and the feasibility of exploiting such signals for radiotherapy dosimetry is demonstrated. Methods: Acoustic waves were experimentally induced in a water tank via the thermoacoustic effect following a single pulse of photon or electron irradiation produced by a clinical linac. An immersion ultrasound transducer was used to detect these acoustic waves in water and signals were read out on an oscilloscope. Results: Peaks and troughs in the detected acoustic signals were found to correspond to the location of gradients in the deposited dose distribution following both photon and electron irradiation. Signal amplitude was linearly related to the dose per pulse deposited by photon or electron beams at the depth of detection. Flattening filter free beams induced large acoustic signals, and signal amplitude decreased with depth after the depth of maximum dose. Varying the field size resulted in a temporal shift of the acoustic signal peaks and a change in the detected signal frequency. Conclusion: Acoustic waves can be detected in a water tank following irradiation by linac photon and electron beams with basic electronics, and have characteristics related to the deposited dose distribution. The physical location of dose gradients and the amount of dose deposited can be inferred from the location and magnitude of acoustic signal peaks. Thus, the detection of induced acoustic waves could be applied to photon and electron water tank and in vivo dosimetry. This work was supported in part by CIHR grants MOP-114910 and MOP

  5. SU-E-T-43: Analytical Model for Photon Peripheral Dose in Radiotherapy Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieto, B Sanchez; El far, R [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Santiago De Chile (Chile); Romero-Exposito, M [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Lagares, J [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Madrid (Spain); Mateo, JC [Hospital Duques del Infantado, Sevilla (Spain); Terron, JA [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain); Irazola, L; Sanchez-Doblado, F [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain); Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The higher survival rate of radiotherapy patients entails a growing concern on second cancers associated to peripheral doses. Currently, dosimetry of out-of field doses is still under development. Our group has developed a methodology to estimate neutron equivalent dose in organs (1,2). We aimed to propose a model to estimate out-of-field photon doses in isocentric treatments from basic clinical data. Methods: The proposed function models the dose as the sum of leakage and scatter terms. The latter is modeled as a virtual source at the collimator, which suffers from attenuation in air and tissue, corrected by the inverse-square-law. The model was parameterized using experimental measurements with TLD700 chips placed inside an anthropomorphic phantom (6–18MV) irradiated with conformal and modulated techniques in Elekta, Siemens and Varian linacs. This model provides photon dose at a point as a function of clinical parameters as prescription dose/UM, PTV volume, distance to the field edge, height of the MLC leaves and distance from the the MLC to the isocenter. Model was tested against independent measurements (TLD100) for a VMAT treatment on a Elekta. Dose to organs is modeled from dose to points along the head-to-feet axis of the organ of a “standard man” escalated by patient height. Results: Our semi-empirical model depends on 3 given parameters (leakage parameter can be individualized). A novelty of our model, over other models (e.g., PERIDOSE), arises from its applicability to any technique (independently of the number of MU needed to deliver a dose). Differences between predictions and measurements were < 0.005mSv/UM. Conclusion: We have proposed a unique model which successfully account for photon peripheral organ dose. This model can be applied in the day-to-day clinic as it only needs a few basic parameters which are readily accessible.1. Radiother. Oncol. 107:234–243, 2013. 2. Phys. Med. Biol. 57:6167–6191, 2012.

  6. Dosimetric properties characterization of silicon diodes used in photon beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizetto, Cesar Augusto

    2013-01-01

    In the current work it was studied the performance of epitaxial (EPI) and float zone (FZ) silicon diodes as on-line dosimeters for megavoltage (EPI diode) and orthovoltage (EPI and FZ diode) photon beam radiotherapy. In order to be used as dosimeters the diodes were enclosed in black polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) probes. The devices were then connected, on photovoltaic mode, to an electrometer Keithley® 6517B to allow measurements of the photocurrent. The irradiations were performed with 6 and 18 MV photon beams (Siemens Primus® linear accelerator), 6 and 15 MV (Novalis TX®) and 10, 25, 30 and 50 kV of a Pantak / Seifert X ray radiation device. During the measurements with the Siemens Primus the diodes were held between PMMA plates placed at 10.0 cm depth. When using Novalis TX® the devices were held between solid water plates placed at 50 cm depth. In both cases the diodes were centered in a radiation field of 10 x 10 cm 2 , with the source-to-surface distance (SSD) kept at 100 cm. In measurements with orthovoltage photon beams the diodes were placed 50.0 cm from the tube in a radiation field of 8 cm diameter. The dose-rate dependency was studied for 6 and 15 MV (varying the dose-rate from 100 to 600 monitor units per minute) and for the 50 kV beam by varying the current tube from 2 to 20 mA. All devices showed linear response with dose rate and, within uncertainties the charge collected is independent of dose rate. The current signals induced showed good instantaneous repeatability of the diodes, characterized by coefficients of variation of current (CV) smaller than 1.14% (megavoltage beams) and 0.15% for orthovoltage beams and coefficients of variation of charge (CV) smaller than 1.84% (megavoltage beams) and 1.67% (orthovoltage beams). The dose response curves were quite linear with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.9999 for all diodes. (author)

  7. SU-E-T-43: Analytical Model for Photon Peripheral Dose in Radiotherapy Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieto, B Sanchez; El far, R; Romero-Exposito, M; Lagares, J; Mateo, JC; Terron, JA; Irazola, L; Sanchez-Doblado, F

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The higher survival rate of radiotherapy patients entails a growing concern on second cancers associated to peripheral doses. Currently, dosimetry of out-of field doses is still under development. Our group has developed a methodology to estimate neutron equivalent dose in organs (1,2). We aimed to propose a model to estimate out-of-field photon doses in isocentric treatments from basic clinical data. Methods: The proposed function models the dose as the sum of leakage and scatter terms. The latter is modeled as a virtual source at the collimator, which suffers from attenuation in air and tissue, corrected by the inverse-square-law. The model was parameterized using experimental measurements with TLD700 chips placed inside an anthropomorphic phantom (6–18MV) irradiated with conformal and modulated techniques in Elekta, Siemens and Varian linacs. This model provides photon dose at a point as a function of clinical parameters as prescription dose/UM, PTV volume, distance to the field edge, height of the MLC leaves and distance from the the MLC to the isocenter. Model was tested against independent measurements (TLD100) for a VMAT treatment on a Elekta. Dose to organs is modeled from dose to points along the head-to-feet axis of the organ of a “standard man” escalated by patient height. Results: Our semi-empirical model depends on 3 given parameters (leakage parameter can be individualized). A novelty of our model, over other models (e.g., PERIDOSE), arises from its applicability to any technique (independently of the number of MU needed to deliver a dose). Differences between predictions and measurements were < 0.005mSv/UM. Conclusion: We have proposed a unique model which successfully account for photon peripheral organ dose. This model can be applied in the day-to-day clinic as it only needs a few basic parameters which are readily accessible.1. Radiother. Oncol. 107:234–243, 2013. 2. Phys. Med. Biol. 57:6167–6191, 2012

  8. SU-F-I-70: Investigation of Gafchromic EBT3 Film Energy Dependence Using Proton, Photon, and Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, C; Schnell, E; Ahmad, S; De La Fuente Herman, T [University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the energy dependence of Gafchromic EBT3 film over a range of clinically used proton, photon and electron energies. Methods: Proton beam energies of 117 and 204 MeV, corresponding respectively to ranges in water of 10 cm and 27 cm from a Mevion S250 double scatter system unit were used. Electron energies of 6 and 20 MeV and photon energies of 6 and 18 MV from a Varian Clinac 21EX Linac were used. Two pieces of film (5×5 cm{sup 2}) were irradiated sequentially for doses of 100, 500, and 1000 cGy for all energies and modalities. Films were placed on the central beam axis for a 10×10 cm{sup 2} field size in the middle of spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) for proton and in respective dmax for photon and electron energies. Films were scanned on a flatbed Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner on the central region of the scanning window using 48-bit, 300 dpi, and landscape orientation after 48 hours post-irradiation of film to account for optical density (OD) stabilization. Film analysis of the red channel was performed using ImageJ 1.48v (National Institutes of Health). Results: The energy dependency of EBT3 among all energies and modalities for all doses studied was small within measurement uncertainties (1σ = ± 4.1%). The mean net OD in red channel for films receiving the same dose in the same energy modality had standard deviations within 0.9% for photons, 4.9% for electrons and 1.8% for protons. It was observed that film pieces were activated during proton irradiation, e.g., 7 mR/hr at surface after 30 minutes of irradiation, lasting for 2 hours post irradiation. Conclusion: EBT3 energy dependency was evaluated for clinically used proton, photon, and electron energies. The film self-activation may have contributed to fog and negligible dose.

  9. Mesoscopic photon heat transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojanen, T.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir-Wingreen-Landauer-typ......We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir......-Wingreen-Landauer-type of conductance formula, which gives the photonic heat current through an arbitrary circuit element coupled to two dissipative reservoirs at finite temperatures. As an illustration we present an exact solution for the case when the intermediate circuit can be described as an electromagnetic resonator. We discuss...

  10. Generation of photon number states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waks, Edo; Diamanti, Eleni; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2006-01-01

    The visible light photon counter (VLPC) has the capability to discriminate photon number states, in contrast to conventional photon counters which can only detect the presence or absence of photons. We use this capability, along with the process of parametric down-conversion, to generate photon number states. We experimentally demonstrate generation of states containing 1, 2, 3 and 4 photons with high fidelity. We then explore the effect the detection efficiency of the VLPC has on the generation rate and fidelity of the created states

  11. Graphene-based photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Oleg L.; Boyko, Vladimir S.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Kolesnikov, Anton A.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2010-01-01

    A novel type of photonic crystal formed by embedding a periodic array of constituent stacks of alternating graphene and dielectric discs into a background dielectric medium is proposed. The photonic band structure and transmittance of such photonic crystal are calculated. The graphene-based photonic crystals can be used effectively as the frequency filters and waveguides for the far infrared region of electromagnetic spectrum. Due to substantial suppression of absorption of low-frequency radiation in doped graphene the damping and skin effect in the photonic crystal are also suppressed. The advantages of the graphene-based photonic crystal are discussed.

  12. Update on photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arteaga-Romero, N.; Cochard, G.; Ong, S.; Amiens Univ., 80; Carimalo, C.; Kessler, P.; Nicolaidis, A.; Parisi, J.; Courau, A.

    1980-03-01

    This report is the continuation of the 'Update' of last year (L.P.C. 79-03, March 1979, in French). In Part I, the structure functions of the photon in QCD are examined. It is shown that, while large psub(T) hadron production is similar to some extent in γγ collisions and in hadron-hadron collisions, the point-like nature of the photon introduces new terms which are entirely calculable, providing new means to test the dynamics of strong interactions. In Part II, problems of analysis in γγ experiments are discussed. The pros and cons of various options with regard to the measurement of outgoing electrons (non-tagging, finite-angle tagging, tagging at 0 0 ) are compared. It is shown that (a) non-tagging may be applied to the study of a limited number of processes only; (b) finite-angle tagging counters allow for various possibilities (double-tagging, single-tagging, double anti-tagging), but none of them is entirely satisfactory; (c) the ideal measurement is double tagging at 0 0 , provided the problem of bremsstrahlung saturation of the tagging counters can be solved

  13. Photon detector for MEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagliardi, C.A.; Tribble, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    During the past year, we have continued work on the photon detector for the MEGA experiment at Los Alamos, a search for the rare decay μ → eγ to a sensitivity of a few parts in 10 13 . The MEGA photon detector is designed to observe the 52.38 MeV photon produced in a μ → eγ decay with an energy resolution of 1.25 MeV, a position resolution of 2 x 5 mm 2 , a directional resolution of 10 degrees, a time resolution of 500 ps, and an efficiency of 7%. It will consists of four independent concentric cylindrical pair spectrometers mounted within a 1.5 T magnetic field produced by a superconducting solenoid magnet. Each pair spectrometer includes two thin Pb foils to convert photons into e + e - pairs, and thereby, determine both their locations and their vector momenta. The inner drift chamber layer includes a delay line cathode to determine the z coordinates needed for track reconstruction. An MWPC located between two Pb layers identifies the conversion layer so that energy loss corrections may be applied, while plastic scintillators provide timing information. Our, group together with a group from the University of Houston, is responsible for the design and construction of the photon detector, as well as developing the computer codes necessary for Monte Carlo simulations and data analysis. During the past year, our efforts have focused primarily on two tasks, delay line cathode read-out and software development. This report describes our recent work on delay lines and data analysis along with a discussion of the new plans for multiplexing in the photon arm

  14. Models for Photon-photon Total Cross-sections

    OpenAIRE

    Godbole, RM; Grau, A; Pancheri, G

    1999-01-01

    We present here a brief overview of recent models describing the photon-photon cross-section into hadrons. We shall show in detail results from the eikonal minijet model, with and without soft gluon summation.

  15. Photonic band gap engineering in 2D photonic crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Applied Physics, Delhi College of Engineering, Faculty of Technology. (University of ... Photonic crystal; photonic band gap; plane-wave expansion method. PACS Nos 71.20 .... Numerical analysis and results. To obtain the ...

  16. Workplace photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, P.H.; Bartlett, D.T.; Ambrosi, P.

    1999-01-01

    The knowledge of workplace radiation fields is essential for measures in radiation protection. Information about the energy and directional distribution of the incident photon radiation was obtained by several devices developed by the National Radiation Protection Board, United Kingdom, by the Statens Stralskyddsinstitut, Sweden, together with EURADOS and by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany. The devices are described and some results obtained at workplaces in nuclear industry, medicine and science in the photon energy range from 20 keV to 7 MeV are given. (author)

  17. Photon mass experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    A Coulomb null experiment is described that enables physics students to obtain rigorous upper bounds on photon mass. The experimenter searches for subnanovolt signals that would escape a closed shell were photon mass to be positive. The approach can be adapted for several college levels. At the simplest level, a ''miniature'' low-cost experiment allows a student to verify the exponent ''-2'' in Coulomb's law to eight or more decimal places. An advanced student given a full-size apparatus (at greater cost) can obtain mass bounds very close to the established laboratory limit

  18. Recent developments in the theory of photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1984-09-01

    Over the past few years the field of photon-photon collisions has emerged as one of the best testing grounds for QCD, particularly in the area of exclusive and inclusive hard scattering processes, exotic resonance production, and detailed tests of the coupling of real and virtual photons to the quark current. In this summary of contributed papers, I will briefly review recent theoretical progress in the analysis of two-photon reactions and possible directions for future work. 29 references

  19. QCD measurements in photon-photon collisions at LEP

    OpenAIRE

    Csilling, Akos

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the latest results of the LEP collaborations on QCD measurements in photon-photon collisions is presented, including measurements of the total hadronic cross-section, the production of heavy quarks and dijets and the structure functions of real and virtual photons.

  20. High brightness single photon sources based on photonic wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claudon, J.; Bleuse, J.; Bazin, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel single-photon-source based on the emission of a semiconductor quantum dot embedded in a single-mode photonic wire. This geometry ensures a very large coupling (> 95%) of the spontaneous emission to the guided mode. Numerical simulations show that a photon collection efficiency...

  1. Tests of perturbative quantum chromodynamics in photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1979-01-01

    The production of hadrons in the collision of two photons via the process e + e - → e + e - X can provide an ideal laboratory for testing many of the features of the photon's hadronic interactions, especially its short-distance aspects. That part of two-photon physics which is particularly relevant to tests of perturbative QCD is reviewed here. 6 figures

  2. Photon sources for absorptiometric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, R.M.; Sandrik, J.M.; Cameron, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    Photon absorptiometry is defined and the requirements of photon sources for these measurements are described. Both x-ray tubes and radionuclide sources are discussed, including the advantages of each in absorptiometric systems

  3. ALICE Photon Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    Kharlov, Y

    2013-01-01

    PHOS provides unique coverage of the following physics topics: - Study initial phase of the collision of heavy nuclei via direct photons, - Jet-quenching as a probe of deconfinement, studied via high Pτ ϒ and π0, - Signals of chiral-symmetry restoration, - QCD studies in pp collisions via identified neutral spectra.

  4. Photon strength functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, I.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for extracting photon strength functions are briefly discussed. We follow the Brink-Axel approach to relate the strength functions to the giant resonances observed in photonuclear work and summarize the available data on the E1, E2 and M1 resonances. Some experimental and theoretical problems are outlined. (author)

  5. Direct photon experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeggild, H.

    1986-11-01

    The author reviews the experiments on direct photon production in hadronic collisions. After a description of the experimental methods for the study of such processes he presents some results on differential cross sections and the γ/π 0 ratio in π - p, π + p, pp, and anti pp processes as well as in reactions of π - , π + , and p on carbon. (HSI)

  6. Total photon absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos, P.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental methods using real photon beams for measurements of total photonuclear absorption cross section σ(Tot : E/sub γ/) are recalled. Most recent σ(Tot : E/sub γ/)results for complex nuclei and in the nucleon resonance region are presented

  7. Magnetic photon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovesey, S.W.

    1987-05-01

    The report reviews, at an introductory level, the theory of photon scattering from condensed matter. Magnetic scattering, which arises from first-order relativistic corrections to the Thomson scattering amplitude, is treated in detail and related to the corresponding interaction in the magnetic neutron diffraction amplitude. (author)

  8. Photon collider at TESLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telnov, Valery

    2001-01-01

    High energy photon colliders (γγ, γe) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e + e - linear colliders. In this report, we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case, the γγ luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach about (1/3)L e + e - . Typical cross-sections of interesting processes in γγ collisions are higher than those in e + e - collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in γγ collisions will be more than that in e + e - collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is ''an optical storage ring (optical trap)'' with a diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based on the linear collider TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems

  9. What is a Photon?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    we say we `see' something, what we are talking about is that some photons ... Nobel Prize for his work in QED, and called it the strange theory of light and matter. Strange .... its form was assumed by him in order to get the correct expression for ...

  10. Jet production in photon-photon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.; Genzel, H.; Lackas, W.; Pielorz, J.; Raupach, F.; Wagner, W.; Buerger, J.; Criegee, L.; Deuter, A.; Franke, G.; Gerke, C.; Knies, G.; Lewendel, B.; Meyer, J.; Michelsen, U.; Pape, K.H.; Timm, U.; Winter, G.G.; Zimmermann, W.; Zachara, M.; Ferrarotto, F.; Gaspero, M.; Stella, B.; Bussey, P.J.; Cartwright, S.L.; Dainton, J.B.; Hendry, D.; King, B.T.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J.M.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Smith, K.M.; Thomson, J.C.; Achterberg, O.; Blobel, V.; Burkart, D.; Diehlmann, K.; Feindt, M.; Kapitza, H.; Koppitz, B.; Krueger, M.; Poppe, M.; Spitzer, H.; Staa, R. van; Almeida, F.; Baecker, A.; Barreiro, F.; Brandt, S.; Derikum, K.; Grupen, C.; Meyer, H.J.; Mueller, H.; Neumann, B.; Rost, M.; Stupperich, K.; Zech, G.; Alexander, G.; Bella, G.; Gnat, Y.; Grunhaus, J.; Junge, H.; Kraski, K.; Maxeiner, C.; Maxeiner, H.; Meyer, H.; Schmidt, D.

    1987-01-01

    We present results on jet production in γγ interactions where both photons are quasi-real. The invariant masses of the hadronic system are limited to the range 4≤W vis 12 GeV/c 2 . The data approach the Quark-Parton-Model (QPM) expectation at the highest p T jet values (≥4 GeV/c). Jet production at low p T (≤1 GeV/c) can be described by a Vector Dominance derived model. The data also have a component with no apparent jet structure in the range, 1.0≤p T jet ≤4.0 GeV/c which can be described by phase space or by models of the QCD hard scattering processes γγ→qanti qg and γγ→qanti qqanti q. (orig.)

  11. Limits on the photon mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasseur, G.

    1996-03-01

    Is the photon mass strictly null as it is told in quantum electrodynamics. In fact, a coherent theory can be build with a massive photon. Experiences have been regularly led to try to make obvious an eventual non null photon mass. Superior limits more and more strict have been found. Here is given a general survey of the consequences of a non null photon mass, different methods to measure it and the achieved limits. (author). 30 refs., 1 fig

  12. Biomedical photonics handbook biomedical diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2014-01-01

    Shaped by Quantum Theory, Technology, and the Genomics RevolutionThe integration of photonics, electronics, biomaterials, and nanotechnology holds great promise for the future of medicine. This topic has recently experienced an explosive growth due to the noninvasive or minimally invasive nature and the cost-effectiveness of photonic modalities in medical diagnostics and therapy. The second edition of the Biomedical Photonics Handbook presents fundamental developments as well as important applications of biomedical photonics of interest to scientists, engineers, manufacturers, teachers, studen

  13. Photons, photon jets, and dark photons at 750 GeV and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Kopp, Joachim; Schwaller, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    In new physics searches involving photons at the LHC, one challenge is to distinguish scenarios with isolated photons from models leading to "photon jets". For instance, in the context of the 750 GeV diphoton excess, it was pointed out that a true diphoton resonance [Formula: see text] can be mimicked by a process of the form [Formula: see text], where S is a new scalar with a mass of 750 GeV and a is a light pseudoscalar decaying to two collinear photons. Photon jets can be distinguished from isolated photons by exploiting the fact that a large fraction of photons convert to an [Formula: see text] pair inside the inner detector. In this note, we quantify this discrimination power, and we study how the sensitivity of future searches differs for photon jets compared to isolated photons. We also investigate how our results depend on the lifetime of the particle(s) decaying to the photon jet. Finally, we discuss the extension to [Formula: see text], where there are no photons at all but the dark photon [Formula: see text] decays to [Formula: see text] pairs. Our results will be useful in future studies of the putative 750 GeV signal, but also more generally in any new physics search involving hard photons.

  14. Photons, photon jets and dark photons at 750 GeV and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Kopp, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    In new physics searches involving photons at the LHC, one challenge is to distinguish scenarios with isolated photons from models leading to ''photon jets''. For instance, in the context of the 750 GeV diphoton excess, it was pointed out that a true diphoton resonance S → γγ can be mimicked by a process of the form pp → S → aa → 4γ, where S is a new scalar with a mass of 750 GeV and a is a light pseudoscalar decaying to two collinear photons. Photon jets can be distinguished from isolated photons by exploiting the fact that a large fraction of photons convert to an e + e - pair inside the inner detector. In this note, we quantify this discrimination power, and we study how the sensitivity of future searches differs for photon jets compared to isolated photons. We also investigate how our results depend on the lifetime of the particle(s) decaying to the photon jet. Finally, we discuss the extension to S → A'A' → e + e - e + e - , where there are no photons at all but the dark photon A' decays to e + e - pairs. Our results will be useful in future studies of the putative 750 GeV signal, but also more generally in any new physics search involving hard photons.

  15. Multi-photon entanglements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniell, M.L.

    2000-09-01

    The motivation of this thesis was to create higher-order entanglements. The first experimental observation of a four-photon entanglement was presented in the experiment of this thesis. And the visibility of this entanglement was 0.79+-0.06, which is sufficient to make claims of the nonlocality of quantum mechanics. This therefore lays a foundation for experiments showing the nonlocality of teleportation, and the purification of entanglement. The work of this thesis brings together a lot of earlier work done by the Zeilinger Group, and lays a foundation for future experiments. Earlier experiments such as teleportation together with entanglement swapping, which are 'complete teleportation' in as much as the state teleported is entirely undefined, can be combined and re-done with this four-photon entanglement. This result would be the first demonstration of complete, nonlocal teleportation. Also this experiment can be slightly modified and used to perform the first experimental quantum purification of entanglement, which is of vital importance to the fields of quantum information, and also is interesting for fundamental experiments on entanglement. Another direct application of this experiment is to perform the first 'event-ready' testing of Bell's Inequality. Here the four-photon entanglement can be used as a source of entangled photons, whereby the photons have no common source. This would enable an even more stringent testing of Bells theorem. Finally this experiment can be used for the demonstration and investigation of many practical, directly applicable quantum information schemes. For instance quantum cryptography, error correction, and computing. (author)

  16. Nonlinear photonic quasicrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, B.; Bartal, G.; Segev, M.; Lifshitz, R.; Christodoulides, D.; Fleischer, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text:Quasicrystals are structures with long-range order and no periodicity, whose unique structural and physical properties have intrigued scientists ever since their discovery and initial theoretical analysis more than two decades ago. The lack of periodicity excludes the use of well-established theoretical and experimental tools for the analysis of quasicrystals, including such notions as the Brillouin zone and Bloch theorem. Instead, the quasiperiodic atomic arrangement gives rise to unique properties such as a hierarchy of effective Brillouin (or Jones) zones, yielding a fractal-like band structure, and the existence of unique phason degrees of freedom. Generally, in atomic quasicrystals it is very difficult to directly observe the evolution of electronic wave-packets propagating through the structure, or the dynamics of the structure itself. Photonic quasicrystals, on the other hand, are macroscopic objects and hence their internal wave dynamics can be locally excited and directly imaged. Here, we employ optical induction to create 2D photonic quasicrystals, and explore wave transport phenomena in quasicrystals in ways that were impossible until now. We demonstrate linear tunneling-transport of light initiated at different crystal sites, and observe the formation of lattice solitons when the light is made sufficiently intense. We experiment with dynamical photonic quasicrystals, in which crystal sites interact with one another, and directly observe dislocation dynamics: creation, healing, and local structural rearrangement due to phason flips. Our experiments show that photonic quasicrystals are an excellent model system through which one can study the universal features of wave dynamics in quasiperiodic structures, that should apply not only to photonics, but also to other systems such as matter waves in quasiperiodic traps, generic pattern-forming systems as in parametrically-excited surface waves, liquid quasicrystals, as well as the more familiar

  17. The three-photon vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delbourgo, R.

    1976-01-01

    Owing to weak interactions, the three-photon vertex is non-zero. From gauge invariance and symmetry requirements, it is proved that the C = -1P = - 1 vertex amplitudes are at least of order q 7 in the limit of soft photon momentum q and that if any two photons are placed on mass shell the form factors vanish identically. (author)

  18. Optimization of photonic crystal cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fengwen; Sigmund, Ole

    2017-01-01

    We present optimization of photonic crystal cavities. The optimization problem is formulated to maximize the Purcell factor of a photonic crystal cavity. Both topology optimization and air-hole-based shape optimization are utilized for the design process. Numerical results demonstrate...... that the Purcell factor of the photonic crystal cavity can be significantly improved through optimization....

  19. Fetal dose from radiotherapy photon beams: Physical basis, techniques to estimate radiation dose outside of the treatment field, biological effects and professional considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stovell, Marilyn; Blackwell, C. Robert

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The presentation will review: 1. The physical basis of radiation dose outside of the treatment field. 2. Techniques to estimate and reduce fetal dose. 3. Clinical examples of fetal dose estimation and reduction. 4. Biological effects of fetal irradiation. 5. Professional considerations. Approximately 4000 women per year in the United States require radiotherapy during pregnancy. This report presents data and techniques that allow the medical physicist to estimate the radiation dose the fetus will receive and to reduce this dose with appropriate shielding. Out-of-beam data are presented for a variety of photon beams, including cobalt-60 gamma rays and x rays from 4 to 18 MV. Designs for simple and inexpensive to more complex and expensive types of shielding equipment are described. Clinical examples show that proper shielding can reduce the radiation dose to the fetus by 50%. In addition, a review of the biological aspects of irradiation enables estimates of the risks of lethality, growth retardation, mental retardation, malformation, sterility, cancer induction, and genetic defects to the fetus. A summary of professional considerations/recommendations is also provided as a guide for the radiation oncologist and medical physicist

  20. Neuromorphic photonic networks using silicon photonic weight banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Alexander N; de Lima, Thomas Ferreira; Zhou, Ellen; Wu, Allie X; Nahmias, Mitchell A; Shastri, Bhavin J; Prucnal, Paul R

    2017-08-07

    Photonic systems for high-performance information processing have attracted renewed interest. Neuromorphic silicon photonics has the potential to integrate processing functions that vastly exceed the capabilities of electronics. We report first observations of a recurrent silicon photonic neural network, in which connections are configured by microring weight banks. A mathematical isomorphism between the silicon photonic circuit and a continuous neural network model is demonstrated through dynamical bifurcation analysis. Exploiting this isomorphism, a simulated 24-node silicon photonic neural network is programmed using "neural compiler" to solve a differential system emulation task. A 294-fold acceleration against a conventional benchmark is predicted. We also propose and derive power consumption analysis for modulator-class neurons that, as opposed to laser-class neurons, are compatible with silicon photonic platforms. At increased scale, Neuromorphic silicon photonics could access new regimes of ultrafast information processing for radio, control, and scientific computing.

  1. Photorefractive Photonics 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Preface This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series represents a selection of the contributions presented in the Photorefractive Photonics 2017 (PR17) conference which was held in Qingdao, Shandong, China from July 17 through July 20, 2017. The conference is the successor of the traditional Photorefractive (PR) Conference Series: the International Conference on Photorefractive Effects, Materials and Devices. The first PR Conference was held in Los Angeles, California, USA in 1987. After that, the PR Conference was held every two years around the world: Aussois, France (1989), Beverly, Massachusetts, USA (1991), Kiev, Ukraine (1993), Aspen Lodge, Colorado, USA (1995), Chiba, Japan (1997), Elsinore, Denmark (1999), Delevan, Wisconsin, USA (2001), Nice, France (2003), Sanya, Hainan, China (2005), Olympic Valley, California, USA (2007), Bad Honnef, Germany (2009), Ensenada, Mexico (2011), Winchester, UK (2013) and Villars, Switzerland (2015). The Conference was renamed to be Photorefractive Photonics Conference in 2015. The PR17 conference was organized by Nankai University, Qingdao University and Qingdao Society of Physics. The scientific topics of the PR17 conference include, but not limited to, wave mixing and its applications (T1), nonlinear light-matter interaction and its applications (T2), material engineering and photonic micro-structures (T3), photorefractive lattice photonics (T4), digital photorefractive photonics (T5), and novel photorefractive effects, materials and applications (T6). Note that both traditional topics such as photorefractive wave mixing and new topics such as energy photonics and nano/micro-structures based on photorefractive effects and materials are included, especially, basic issues such as the influence of pyroelectric effect on the photorefractive wave-mixing are considered, and much attention was paid to the development of new applications of photorefractive effects and materials, which reflect the current state of the art

  2. Physics with Photons in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    The fine granularity ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter provides a precise measurement of the photon energy and direction, as well as efficient rejection of background from fake photons, while the high precision inner detector allows also the reconstruction of photons that convert into electron-positron pairs.Isolated photons are measured using well-defined infrared-safe isolation criteria corrected for underlying event and the effects of additional proton-proton collisions. Differential cross sections for inclusive photons and diphotons are presented, and the spectrum of diphoton production is used to search for the Higgs boson in this decay channel.

  3. Few-photon optical diode

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Dibyendu

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme of realizing an optical diode at the few-photon level. The system consists of a one-dimensional waveguide coupled asymmetrically to a two-level system. The two or multi-photon transport in this system is strongly correlated. We derive exactly the single and two-photon current and show that the two-photon current is asymmetric for the asymmetric coupling. Thus the system serves as an optical diode which allows transmission of photons in one direction much more efficie...

  4. Photon + jets at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnenschein, Lars; /RWTH Aachen U.

    2009-06-01

    Photon plus jet production has been studied by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at a centre of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Measurements of the inclusive photon, inclusive photon plus jet, photon plus heavy flavour jet cross sections and double parton interactions in photon plus three jet events are presented. They are based on integrated luminosities between 0.4 fb{sup -1} and 1.0 fb{sup -1}. The results are compared to perturbative QCD calculations in various approximations.

  5. Technical Report: Reference photon dosimetry data for Varian accelerators based on IROC-Houston site visit data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerns, James R.; Followill, David S.; Kry, Stephen F., E-mail: sfkry@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core-Houston, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center-Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Lowenstein, Jessica; Molineu, Andrea; Alvarez, Paola; Taylor, Paige A. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core-Houston, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Stingo, Francesco C. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Accurate data regarding linear accelerator (Linac) radiation characteristics are important for treatment planning system modeling as well as regular quality assurance of the machine. The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core-Houston (IROC-H) has measured the dosimetric characteristics of numerous machines through their on-site dosimetry review protocols. Photon data are presented and can be used as a secondary check of acquired values, as a means to verify commissioning a new machine, or in preparation for an IROC-H site visit. Methods: Photon data from IROC-H on-site reviews from 2000 to 2014 were compiled and analyzed. Specifically, data from approximately 500 Varian machines were analyzed. Each dataset consisted of point measurements of several dosimetric parameters at various locations in a water phantom to assess the percentage depth dose, jaw output factors, multileaf collimator small field output factors, off-axis factors, and wedge factors. The data were analyzed by energy and parameter, with similarly performing machine models being assimilated into classes. Common statistical metrics are presented for each machine class. Measurement data were compared against other reference data where applicable. Results: Distributions of the parameter data were shown to be robust and derive from a student’s t distribution. Based on statistical and clinical criteria, all machine models were able to be classified into two or three classes for each energy, except for 6 MV for which there were eight classes. Quantitative analysis of the measurements for 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photon beams is presented for each parameter; supplementary material has also been made available which contains further statistical information. Conclusions: IROC-H has collected numerous data on Varian Linacs and the results of photon measurements from the past 15 years are presented. The data can be used as a comparison check of a physicist’s acquired values. Acquired values that are well

  6. Technical Report: Reference photon dosimetry data for Varian accelerators based on IROC-Houston site visit data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, James R.; Followill, David S.; Kry, Stephen F.; Lowenstein, Jessica; Molineu, Andrea; Alvarez, Paola; Taylor, Paige A.; Stingo, Francesco C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate data regarding linear accelerator (Linac) radiation characteristics are important for treatment planning system modeling as well as regular quality assurance of the machine. The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core-Houston (IROC-H) has measured the dosimetric characteristics of numerous machines through their on-site dosimetry review protocols. Photon data are presented and can be used as a secondary check of acquired values, as a means to verify commissioning a new machine, or in preparation for an IROC-H site visit. Methods: Photon data from IROC-H on-site reviews from 2000 to 2014 were compiled and analyzed. Specifically, data from approximately 500 Varian machines were analyzed. Each dataset consisted of point measurements of several dosimetric parameters at various locations in a water phantom to assess the percentage depth dose, jaw output factors, multileaf collimator small field output factors, off-axis factors, and wedge factors. The data were analyzed by energy and parameter, with similarly performing machine models being assimilated into classes. Common statistical metrics are presented for each machine class. Measurement data were compared against other reference data where applicable. Results: Distributions of the parameter data were shown to be robust and derive from a student’s t distribution. Based on statistical and clinical criteria, all machine models were able to be classified into two or three classes for each energy, except for 6 MV for which there were eight classes. Quantitative analysis of the measurements for 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photon beams is presented for each parameter; supplementary material has also been made available which contains further statistical information. Conclusions: IROC-H has collected numerous data on Varian Linacs and the results of photon measurements from the past 15 years are presented. The data can be used as a comparison check of a physicist’s acquired values. Acquired values that are well

  7. Photonic-powered cable assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Stephen N.; Appel, Titus James; Wrye, IV, Walter C.

    2013-01-22

    A photonic-cable assembly includes a power source cable connector ("PSCC") coupled to a power receive cable connector ("PRCC") via a fiber cable. The PSCC electrically connects to a first electronic device and houses a photonic power source and an optical data transmitter. The fiber cable includes an optical transmit data path coupled to the optical data transmitter, an optical power path coupled to the photonic power source, and an optical feedback path coupled to provide feedback control to the photonic power source. The PRCC electrically connects to a second electronic device and houses an optical data receiver coupled to the optical transmit data path, a feedback controller coupled to the optical feedback path to control the photonic power source, and a photonic power converter coupled to the optical power path to convert photonic energy received over the optical power path to electrical energy to power components of the PRCC.

  8. Matching beams on photon/electron linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, L.; Vial, P.; Hunt, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: There are a number of obvious reasons to match megavoltage X-ray and electron beams for clinical purposes. If two dual-purpose X-ray/electron linear accelerators are of the same design and manufacturer, then this might be possible. The issue is however whether the beams can be matched sufficiently close to be considered the same for patient treatments and planning data for dose calculation purposes. If successfully achieved, there are significant advantages in reduced commissioning time, less work in planning and flexibility in the treatment of patients between the two treatment machines. We have investigated matching a new Varian Clinac 21EX with our 1993 Varian Clinac 2100 C/D. A Varian Clinac 1800 was the first linear accelerator installed at RNSH in 1987. When the Clinac 2100 C/D was installed in 1993, we attempted to match all the X-ray and electron beams with the original Clinac 1800 physical data. The X-ray beam characteristics were satisfactory but the electron beams were not sufficiently compatible for planning or patient treatment purposes. A different designed scattering foil and electron applicator were the cause of the different electron beam physical characteristics between the two models. In replacing the Clinac 1800 with the Clinac 21EX, we have used the original 1993 data of the Clinac 2100 C/D as the gold standard to aim for. Initial measurements during acceptance tests showed that all beams satisfied the manufacturer's specification. The energy was then matched to the existing clinical physics data by adjusting the bending magnet power supply and re-tuning the accelerator. This involved matching % depth dose and the corresponding ratio of 10 and 20 cm % depth dose ratio for 6MV and 18 MV X-ray beams. For 6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV electron beams the normal physical parameters of depth of maximum (R max ), the practical range (R p ), the depth of 50% (R 50 ), the slope (G), the average energy at the surface (E 0 ) and the % photon

  9. Essentials of photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Alan; Baets, Roel

    2008-01-01

    Photons and ElectronsHistorical SketchThe Wave Nature of LightPolarizationThe Electromagnetic SpectrumEmission and Absorption ProcessesPhoton Statistics The Behaviour of Electrons LasersSummaryWave Properties of LightThe Electromagnetic SpectrumWave RepresentationElectromagnetic WavesReflection and RefractionTotal Internal ReflectionInterference of LightLight WaveguidingInterferometersDiffractionGaussian Beams and Stable Optical ResonatorsPolarization OpticsThe Polarization EllipseCrystal OpticsRetarding WaveplatesA Variable Waveplate: The Soleil-Babinet Compensator Polarizing PrismsLinear BirefringenceCircular BirefringenceElliptical BirefringencePractical Polarization EffectsPolarization AnalysisThe Form of the Jones MatricesLight and Matter Emission, Propagation, and Absorption ProcessesClassical Theory of Light Propagation in Uniform Dielectric Media Optical Dispersion Emission and Absorption of LightOptical Coherence and CorrelationIntroductionMeasure of Coherence Wiener-Khinchin TheoremDual-Beam Interfe...

  10. Nonlocal structures: bilocal photon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapp, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    It is postulated that all particles and fields are built from a single primitive field, a massless fermion with a σ spin of one-half. Two helicities are embodied in a tau spin of one-half. The vacuum is an open Fermi sea whose height is a wave number kappa. Elementary particles are structures having the form of standing-wave systems floating on the vacuum sea. A bilocal photon starts with a function describing two primitive quanta with parallel σ spin and opposite tau spin. A centroid-time wave equation then couples-in and infinite set of orthogonal functions. The introduction of an operator Qlambda permits the reduction of the infinite secular determinant to finite six-by-six determinant. Solutions are obtained describing photons with right-handed and left-handed polarizations. Electric and magnetic field vectors satisfying the vacuum Maxwell equations, are obtained from a bilocal Hertz vector. (author)

  11. Quantum communication with photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tittel, W.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The discovery that transmission of information encoded into single quantum systems enables new forms of communication let to the emergence of the domain of quantum communication. During the last ten years, various key experiments based on photons as carrier of the quantum information have been realized. Today, quantum cryptography systems based on faint laser pulses can be purchased commercially, bi-partite entanglement has been distributed over long distances and has been used for quantum key distribution, and quantum purification, teleportation and entanglement swapping have been demonstrated. I will give a general introduction into this fascinating field and will review experimental achievements in the domain of quantum communication with discrete two-level quantum systems (qubits) encoded into photons. (author)

  12. Photonics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Reider, Georg A

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction into photonics, from the electrodynamic and quantum mechanic fundamentals to the level of photonic components and building blocks such as lasers, amplifiers, modulators, waveguides, and detectors. The book will serve both as textbook and as a reference work for the advanced student or scientist. Theoretical results are derived from basic principles with convenient, yet state-of-the-art mathematical tools, providing not only deeper understanding but also familiarization with formalisms used in the relevant technical literature and research articles. Among the subject matters treated are polarization optics, pulse and beam propagation, waveguides, light–matter interaction, stationary and transient behavior of lasers, semiconductor optics and lasers (including low-dimensional systems such as quantum wells), detector technology, photometry, and colorimetry. Nonlinear optics are elaborated comprehensively. The book is intended for both students of physics and elect...

  13. MCNP: Photon benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whalen, D.J.; Hollowell, D.E.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1991-09-01

    The recent widespread, markedly increased use of radiation transport codes has produced greater user and institutional demand for assurance that such codes give correct results. Responding to these pressing requirements for code validation, the general purpose Monte Carlo transport code MCNP has been tested on six different photon problem families. MCNP was used to simulate these six sets numerically. Results for each were compared to the set's analytical or experimental data. MCNP successfully predicted the analytical or experimental results of all six families within the statistical uncertainty inherent in the Monte Carlo method. From this we conclude that MCNP can accurately model a broad spectrum of photon transport problems. 8 refs., 30 figs., 5 tabs

  14. Nonlinear Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Per

    2004-01-01

    Despite the general recession in the global economy and the collapse of the optical telecommunication market, research within specialty fibers is thriving. This is, more than anything else, due to the technology transition from standard all-glass fibers to photonic crystal fibers, which, instead....... The freedom to design the dispersion profile of the fibers is much larger and it is possible to create fibers, which support only a single spatial mode, regardless of wavelength. In comparison, the standard dispersion-shifted fibers are limited by a much lower index-contrast between the core and the cladding...... in 1996, and are today on their way to become the dominating technology within the specialty fiber field. Whether they will replace the standard fiber in the more traditional areas like telecommunication transmission, is not yet clear, but the nonlinear photonic crystal fibers are here to stay....

  15. Natural photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigneron, Jean Pol, E-mail: jean-pol.vigneron@fundp.ac.be [Research Center in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Simonis, Priscilla [Research Center in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2012-10-15

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  16. PHOTON: A user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, D.

    1988-01-01

    PHOTON has proven very useful in the development of the X17 superconducting wiggler beamline. Its use has determined the shielding required from the wiggler device to the very end of the beamline in the hutches and angiography section. Doses calculated by this program have been compared with experimental results from conventional bending magnet beamline with great success. In each case the program consistently overestimated the dose by factors ranging from 2 to 10. The reason for this overestimation is understood and was not refined further in the program in order to maintain some level of safety in the shielding calculations. PHOTON should prove useful in the design of any beamline. Its ability to calculate power deposited and spectra transmitted through nearly arbitrary beamline configurations as well as the scattered radiation doses through shielding walls make it a very powerful tool

  17. Natural photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigneron, Jean Pol; Simonis, Priscilla

    2012-01-01

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  18. Illuminating WISPs with photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arias, Paola

    2011-10-01

    Physics beyond the Standard Model naturally gives rise to very light and weakly interacting particles, dubbed WISPs (Weakly Interacting Slim Particles). A prime example is the axion, that has eluded experimental detection for more than thirty years. In this talk we review some of the strongly motivated candidates for such particles, the observational hints for them and the present status of searches with photon regeneration experiments, as well as possible future improvements. (orig.)

  19. Manipulating atoms with photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen-Tannoudji, C.N.

    1998-01-01

    The article is a translation of the lecture delivered on the occasion of the 1997 Nobel Prize awarding ceremony. The physical mechanisms which allow manipulating of neutral atoms with laser photons are described. A remark is also made concerning several possible applications of ultra-cool atoms and streams of future research. The article is completed by Prof. Cohen-Tannoudji's autobiography. (Z.J.)

  20. Three-photon micromasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obada, A.S.F.; Abu Sitta, A.M.M.; Yasin, O.M.

    1993-01-01

    A non-degenerate 3-photon micromaser is analyzed. A 4-level atom is taken and 3 models of the field are considered. The model is solved for the case of resonance and the master equation for the density matrix is obtained. Semi-analytical solutions are obtained under specified approximations. Three modes can exist depending on the time of interaction. (author). 10 refs, 2 figs

  1. Mass of the photon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhaber, A.S.; Nieto, M.M.

    1976-01-01

    Several experiments are discussed for which results are equivalent to the catching and weighing of a photon. It is noted that none of the experiments has proved the rest mass to be zero and that such a proof may be impossible. It is shown by such experiments that the rest mass is less than the limit of accuracy of the experiment. These limits have approached ever closer to zero, and the most recent values are exceedingly small

  2. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  3. The photon structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.

    1984-01-01

    In principle we have to distinguish between three cases: In no-tag experiments, none of the outgoing leptons e + e - is detected. The photon flux is completely dominated by transversely polarized photons, which are practically on-mass-shell. In single-tag experiments, either the outgoing e - or e + is detected in a forward spectrometer. Sometimes the tagging information is only used for separating a multihadronic twophoton final state from e + e - annihilation states. On the other hand, the information from the forward detectors can be used to investigate the Q 2 behaviour of the cross-section. A combination of tagging on one side with antitagging on the other allows an easy interpretation of the results in terms of electron scattering off a real photon target. In double-tag experiments, both outgoing leptons are measured. In principle, the full kinematical structure of the process can be studied, but we are still a long way from starting to tackle this difficult task

  4. Slotted Photonic Crystal Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  5. Nonlinear photonic metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guixin; Zhang, Shuang; Zentgraf, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Compared with conventional optical elements, 2D photonic metasurfaces, consisting of arrays of antennas with subwavelength thickness (the 'meta-atoms'), enable the manipulation of light-matter interactions on more compact platforms. The use of metasurfaces with spatially varying arrangements of meta-atoms that have subwavelength lateral resolution allows control of the polarization, phase and amplitude of light. Many exotic phenomena have been successfully demonstrated in linear optics; however, to meet the growing demand for the integration of more functionalities into a single optoelectronic circuit, the tailorable nonlinear optical properties of metasurfaces will also need to be exploited. In this Review, we discuss the design of nonlinear photonic metasurfaces — in particular, the criteria for choosing the materials and symmetries of the meta-atoms — for the realization of nonlinear optical chirality, nonlinear geometric Berry phase and nonlinear wavefront engineering. Finally, we survey the application of nonlinear photonic metasurfaces in optical switching and modulation, and we conclude with an outlook on their use for terahertz nonlinear optics and quantum information processing.

  6. Slotted Photonic Crystal Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Di Falco

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study.

  7. Photon-activation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) is a technique in which radiation dose to tumor is enhanced via introduction of stable 127 I in the form of iodinated deoxyuridine (IdUrd). Stimulation of cytotoxic effects from IdUrd is accomplished by activation with external (or implanted) radiation sources. Thus, accumulations of this nucleoside in actively competing cellpools do not preclude therapy in so far as such tissues can be excluded from the radiation field. Calculations show that 5% replacement of thymidine (Tyd) in tumor DNA should enhance the biological effectiveness of a given photon radiotherapy dose by a factor of approx. 3. Proportionally higher gains would result from higher replacements of Tyd and IdUrd. In addition, biological response is enhanced by chemical sensitization with IdUrd. The data indicate that damage from photon activation as well as chemical sensitization does not repair. Thus, at low dose rates, a further increase in therapeutic gain should accrue as normal tissues are allowed to repair and regenerate. A samarium-145 source has been developed for PAT, with activating x-ray energies of from 38 to 45 keV. Favorable clinical results can be expected through the use of IdUrd and protracted irradiations with low energy x-rays. In particular, PAT may provide unique advantages at selected sites such as brain, or head and neck tumors

  8. SU-F-T-476: Performance of the AS1200 EPID for Periodic Photon Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMarco, J; Fraass, B; Yang, W; McKenzie Boehnke, E [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Moran, J [University Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Barnes, M [Calvary Mater Hospital Newcastle, Warratah, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); Kim, G [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric performance of a new amorphous silicon flat-panel electronic portal imaging device (EPID) suitable for high-intensity, flattening-filter-free delivery mode. Methods: An EPID-based QA suite was created with automation to periodically monitor photon central-axis output and two-dimensional beam profile constancy as a function of gantry angle and dose-rate. A Varian TrueBeamTM linear accelerator installed with Developer Mode was used to customize and deliver XML script routines for the QA suite using the dosimetry mode image acquisition for an aS1200 EPID. Automatic post-processing software was developed to analyze the resulting DICOM images. Results: The EPID was used to monitor photon beam output constancy (central-axis), flatness, and symmetry over a period of 10 months for four photon beam energies (6x, 15x, 6xFFF, and 10xFFF). EPID results were consistent to those measured with a standard daily QA check device. At the four cardinal gantry angles, the standard deviation of the EPID central-axis output was <0.5%. Likewise, EPID measurements were independent for the wide range of dose rates (including up to 2400 mu/min for 10xFFF) studied with a standard deviation of <0.8% relative to the nominal dose rate for each energy. Also, profile constancy and field size measurements showed good agreement with the reference acquisition of 0° gantry angle and nominal dose rate. XML script files were also tested for MU linearity and picket-fence delivery. Using Developer Mode, the test suite was delivered in <60 minutes for all 4 photon energies with 4 dose rates per energy and 5 picket-fence acquisitions. Conclusion: Dosimetry image acquisition using a new EPID was found to be accurate for standard and high-intensity photon beams over a broad range of dose rates over 10 months. Developer Mode provided an efficient platform to customize the EPID acquisitions by using custom script files which significantly reduced the time. This work was funded

  9. INDIA: Photon multiplicity detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: The team of Indian scientists from Calcutta's Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Bhubaneswar Institute of Physics, Panjab (Chandigarh), Rajasthan (Jaipur) and Jammu in collaboration with GSI Darmstadt have contributed a large and highly granular preshower photon multiplicity detector (PMD) for the WA98 experiment at the CERN SPS proton synchrotron. This experiment studies high energy collisions of lead ions and will measure both charged particle and photon multiplicity in a large overlap region. The motivation for measuring photon multiplicity in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions stems from theoretical predictions of changes in the relative production of photons and charged particles in the phase transition of hadronic matter to quarkgluon plasma and its subsequent hadronization. The photon multiplicity detector consists of a matrix of scintillator pads placed in light-tight boxes and mounted behind the lead converter plates. The light from the scintillator pads is transported to the readout system using wavelength shifting (WLS) fibres. Developing on the team's earlier experience with a smaller version for the WA93 experiment (September 1991, page 16), several modifications were incorporated to improve light collection and transport. Use of improved WLS fibres, short WLS pieces to minimize self-absorption, and thermal splicing with long clear fibres were some of the important changes incorporated. Tests showed signficantly improved light collection. The scintillator pads were fabricated at all the five collaborating centres in India and the complicated assembly in the detector box modules carried out at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta. More than 400 lead converter plates were machined in Calcutta to rigorous tolerances of 0.2 mm. The assembled detector box modules and lead plates were shipped to CERN in spring 1994 for tests and installation. The WA98 PMD consists of over 50,000 scintillator pads of sizes varying from 15 to

  10. INDIA: Photon multiplicity detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-01-15

    Full text: The team of Indian scientists from Calcutta's Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Bhubaneswar Institute of Physics, Panjab (Chandigarh), Rajasthan (Jaipur) and Jammu in collaboration with GSI Darmstadt have contributed a large and highly granular preshower photon multiplicity detector (PMD) for the WA98 experiment at the CERN SPS proton synchrotron. This experiment studies high energy collisions of lead ions and will measure both charged particle and photon multiplicity in a large overlap region. The motivation for measuring photon multiplicity in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions stems from theoretical predictions of changes in the relative production of photons and charged particles in the phase transition of hadronic matter to quarkgluon plasma and its subsequent hadronization. The photon multiplicity detector consists of a matrix of scintillator pads placed in light-tight boxes and mounted behind the lead converter plates. The light from the scintillator pads is transported to the readout system using wavelength shifting (WLS) fibres. Developing on the team's earlier experience with a smaller version for the WA93 experiment (September 1991, page 16), several modifications were incorporated to improve light collection and transport. Use of improved WLS fibres, short WLS pieces to minimize self-absorption, and thermal splicing with long clear fibres were some of the important changes incorporated. Tests showed signficantly improved light collection. The scintillator pads were fabricated at all the five collaborating centres in India and the complicated assembly in the detector box modules carried out at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta. More than 400 lead converter plates were machined in Calcutta to rigorous tolerances of 0.2 mm. The assembled detector box modules and lead plates were shipped to CERN in spring 1994 for tests and installation. The WA98 PMD consists of over 50,000 scintillator pads of sizes varying from 15 to 25 mm

  11. Photon-photon inclusive scattering and perturbative QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maor, U.

    1988-01-01

    Perturbative QCD expectations and problems associated with the study of the photon structure function data are reviewed. An assessment is given for the viability and sensitivity of photon-photon scattering as a decisive tool for the determination of the QCD scale. Particular attention is given to the theoretical problems of singularity cancellations at x = 0 and threshold-associated difficulties at x = 1 and their implications on the actual data analysis. It is concluded that the experimental results, while not providing a decisive verification of QCD at small distances, do add to other independent experiments which are all consistent with the theory and suggest a reasonably well defined QCD scale parameter. The importance of the small Q 2 limit to photon-photon analysis is discussed and the data are examined in an attempt to identify and isolate the contributions of the hadronic and point-like sectors of the target photon. 21 refs., 7 figs. (author)

  12. First Swiss bachelor in Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, Tobias; Studer, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    Swissmem, the Swiss association of mechanical and electrical engineering industries, founded a new photonics group in 2013. This reflects the importance of this key technology for Switzerland. Swissmem requested from the Swiss Universities of Applied Sciences to introduce a new bachelor program to fulfill the increasing demand of the Swiss industry of young academics in the field of photonics. Optech Consulting is investigating the Swiss photonics market since many years on behalf of Swissphotonics, the Swiss national thematic network for photonics. The study concluded that the total production volume of the Swiss photonics industry in the year 2013 was 3 billion Swiss francs and a slight growth is expected for 2014. The University of Applied Science HTW Chur is located in the Eastern part of Switzerland. This area of the Rhine valley is a technology cluster of innovative companies in the field of optics and electronics. The industry is growing and the R&D departments of the worldwide active companies are lacking well-educated photonics engineers. The HTW Chur is dedicated to establish the first Swiss bachelor in Photonics. Supported by strong industrial players and an excellent network, the HTW Chur developed different job descriptions and a complete curriculum, which reflect the needs of the Swiss photonics industry. Almost 60% of the ECTS of this national degree program are assigned to photonics specific courses and the practical projects are organized in close collaboration with the photonics industry. Curriculum, job descriptions and the industrial needs will be discussed in detail in this paper.

  13. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-01-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter ∼200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  14. Photon correlation in single-photon frequency upconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaorong; Huang, Kun; Pan, Haifeng; Wu, E; Zeng, Heping

    2012-01-30

    We experimentally investigated the intensity cross-correlation between the upconverted photons and the unconverted photons in the single-photon frequency upconversion process with multi-longitudinal mode pump and signal sources. In theoretical analysis, with this multi-longitudinal mode of both signal and pump sources system, the properties of the signal photons could also be maintained as in the single-mode frequency upconversion system. Experimentally, based on the conversion efficiency of 80.5%, the joint probability of simultaneously detecting at upconverted and unconverted photons showed an anti-correlation as a function of conversion efficiency which indicated the upconverted photons were one-to-one from the signal photons. While due to the coherent state of the signal photons, the intensity cross-correlation function g(2)(0) was shown to be equal to unity at any conversion efficiency, agreeing with the theoretical prediction. This study will benefit the high-speed wavelength-tunable quantum state translation or photonic quantum interface together with the mature frequency tuning or longitudinal mode selection techniques.

  15. Photon technology. Laser process technology; Photon technology. Laser process gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For developing laser process technology by interaction between substance and photon, the present state, system, R and D issues and proposal of such technology were summarized. Development of the photon technology aims at the modification of bonding conditions of substances by quantum energy of photon, and the new process technology for generating ultra- high temperature and pressure fields by concentrating photon on a minute region. Photon technology contributes to not only the conventional mechanical and thermal forming and removal machining but also function added machining (photon machining) in quantum level and new machining technology ranging from macro- to micro-machining, creating a new industrial field. This technology extends various fields from the basis of physics and chemistry to new bonding technology. Development of a compact high-quality high-power high-efficiency photon source, and advanced photon transmission technology are necessary. The basic explication of an unsolved physicochemical phenomenon related to photon and substance, and development of related application technologies are essential. 328 refs., 147 figs., 13 tabs.

  16. Resonant Photonic States in Coupled Heterostructure Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabarinathan J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors.

  17. Photon-splitting cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannessen, A.M.; Mork, K.J.; Overbo, I.

    1980-01-01

    The differential cross section for photon splitting (scattering of one photon into two photons) in a Coulomb field, obtained earlier by Shima, has been integrated numerically to yield various differential cross sections. Energy spectra differential with respect to the energy of one of the outgoing photons are presented for several values of the primary photon energy. Selected examples of recoil momentum distributions and some interesting doubly or multiply differential cross sections are also given. Values for the total cross section are obtained essentially for all energies. The screening effect caused by atomic electrons is also taken into account, and is found to be important for high energies, as in e + e - pair production. Comparisons with various approximate results obtained by previous authors mostly show fair agreement. We also discuss the possibilities for experimental detection and find the most promising candidate to be a measurement of both photons, and their energies, at a moderately high energy

  18. Very energetic photons at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bawa, A.C.; Krawczyk, M.

    1991-01-01

    We show that every energetic photons in the backward direction can be produced in deep inelastic Compton scattering at HERA. Assuming a fixed energy of 9 GeV for the initial photons and 820 GeV for the protons a high rate is found for the production of final photons with a transverse momentum equal to 5 GeV/c and energy between 40 GeV and 300 GeV. These energetic photons arise mainly from the scattering of the soft gluonic constituents of the initial photon with quarks from the proton. They are produced in the backward direction in coincidence with a photon beam jet of energy ∝ 9 GeV in the forward direction. (orig.)

  19. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  20. Higgs-photon resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kearney, John [Fermilab, Theoretical Physics Department, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-10-15

    We study models that produce a Higgs boson plus photon (h{sup 0}γ) resonance at the LHC. When the resonance is a Z{sup '} boson, decays to h{sup 0}γ occur at one loop. If the Z{sup '} boson couples at tree level to quarks, then the h{sup 0}γ branching fraction is typically of order 10{sup -5} or smaller. Nevertheless, there are models that would allow the observation of Z{sup '} → h{sup 0}γ at √(s) = 13 TeV with a cross section times branching fraction larger than 1 fb for a Z{sup '} mass in the 200-450 GeV range, and larger than 0.1 fb for a mass up to 800 GeV. The one-loop decay of the Z{sup '} into lepton pairs competes with h{sup 0}γ, even if the Z{sup '} couplings to leptons vanish at tree level. We also present a model in which a Z{sup '} boson decays into a Higgs boson and a pair of collimated photons, mimicking an h{sup 0}γ resonance. In this model, the h{sup 0}γ resonance search would be the discovery mode for a Z{sup '} as heavy as 2 TeV. When the resonance is a scalar, although decay to h{sup 0}γ is forbidden by angular momentum conservation, the h{sup 0} plus collimated photons channel is allowed. We comment on prospects of observing an h{sup 0}γ resonance through different Higgs decays, on constraints from related searches, and on models where h{sup 0} is replaced by a nonstandard Higgs boson. (orig.)

  1. Quantum Dot Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnischtzke, Laura A.

    We report on several experiments using single excitons confined to single semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). Electric and magnetic fields have previously been used as experimental knobs to understand and control individual excitons in single quantum dots. We realize new ways of electric field control by changing materials and device geometry in the first two experiments with strain-based InAs QDs. A standard Schottky diode heterostructure is demonstrated with graphene as the Schottky gate material, and its performance is bench-marked against a diode with a standard gate material, semi-transparent nickel-chromium (NiCr). This change of materials increases the photon collection rate by eliminating absorption in the metallic NiCr layer. A second set of experiments investigates the electric field response of QDs as a possible metrology source. A linear voltage potential drop in a plane near the QDs is used to describe how the spatially varying voltage profile is also imparted on the QDs. We demonstrate a procedure to map this voltage profile as a preliminary route towards a full quantum sensor array. Lastly, InAs QDs are explored as potential spin-photon interfaces. We describe how a magnetic field is used to realize a reversible exchange of information between light and matter, including a discussion of the polarization-dependence of the photoluminesence, and how that can be linked to the spin of a resident electron or hole. We present evidence of this in two wavelength regimes for InAs quantum dots, and discuss how an external magnetic field informs the spin physics of these 2-level systems. This thesis concludes with the discovery of a new class of quantum dots. As-yet unidentified defect states in single layer tungsten diselenide (WSe 2 ) are shown to host quantum light emission. We explore the spatial extent of electron confinement and tentatively identify a radiative lifetime of 1 ns for these single photon emitters.

  2. Nuclear studies with tagged photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axel, P.

    1979-01-01

    First, the photon tagging technique will be described schematically, and a brief history of photon tagging will be given, including the 20 year development of this technique at Illinois. In the second part some typical operating conditions will be indicated for our tagged photon facility. The final section of this paper will illustrate some types of experiments by showing data obtained recently. (KBE) 891 KBE/KBE 892 ARA

  3. Direct photons in WA98

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Angelis, Aris L S; Antonenko, V G; Arefev, V; Astakhov, V A; Avdeichikov, V; Awes, T C; Baba, P V K S; Badyal, S K; Barlag, C; Bathe, S; Batyunya, B; Bernier, T; Bhalla, K B; Bhatia, V S; Blume, C; Bock, R; Bohne, E M; Böröcz, Z K; Bucher, D; Buijs, A; Büsching, H; Carlén, L; Chalyshev, V; Chattopadhyay, S; Cherbachev, R; Chujo, T; Claussen, A; Das, A C; Decowski, M P; Delagrange, H; Dzhordzhadze, V; Dönni, P; Dubovik, I; Dutt, S; Dutta-Majumdar, M R; El-Chenawi, K F; Eliseev, S; Enosawa, K; Foka, P Y; Fokin, S L; Ganti, M S; Garpman, S; Gavrishchuk, O P; Geurts, F J M; Ghosh, T K; Glasow, R; Gupta, S K; Guskov, B; Gustafsson, Hans Åke; Gutbrod, H H; Higuchi, R; Hrivnacova, I; Ippolitov, M S; Kalechofsky, H; Kamermans, R; Kampert, K H; Karadzhev, K; Karpio, K; Kato, S; Kees, S; Klein-Bösing, C; Knoche, S; Kolb, B W; Kosarev, I G; Kucheryaev, I; Krümpel, T; Kugler, A; Kulinich, P A; Kurata, M; Kurita, K; Kuzmin, N A; Langbein, I; Lee, Y Y; Löhner, H; Luquin, Lionel; Mahapatra, D P; Man'ko, V I; Martin, M; Martínez, G; Maksimov, A; Mgebrishvili, G; Miake, Y; Mir, M F; Mishra, G C; Miyamoto, Y; Mohanty, B; Morrison, D; Mukhopadhyay, D S; Naef, H; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Neumaier, S; Nyanin, A; Nikitin, V A; Nikolaev, S; Nilsson, P O; Nishimura, S; Nomokonov, V P; Nystrand, J; Obenshain, F E; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Pachr, M; Pavlyuk, S; Peitzmann, Thomas; Petracek, V; Pinganaud, W; Plasil, F; Von Poblotzki, U; Purschke, M L; Rak, J; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ramamurthy, V S; Rao, N K; Retière, F; Reygers, K; Roland, G; Rosselet, L; Rufanov, I A; Roy, C; Rubio, J M; Sako, H; Sambyal, S S; Santo, R; Sato, S; Schlagheck, H; Schmidt, H R; Schutz, Y; Shabratova, G; Shah, T H; Sibiryak, Yu; Siemiarczuk, T; Silvermyr, D; Sinha, B C; Slavin, N V; Söderström, K; Solomey, Nickolas; Sood, G; Sørensen, S P; Stankus, P; Stefanek, G; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Stüken, D; Sumbera, M; Svensson, S; Trivedi, M D; Tsvetkov, A A; Tykarski, L; Urbahn, J; Van den Pijll, E C; van Eijndhoven, N; van Nieuwenhuizen, G J; Vinogradov, A; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopyanov, A S; Vörös, S; Wyslouch, B; Yagi, K; Yokota, Y; Young, G R

    2002-01-01

    A measurement of direct photon production in /sup 208/Pb+/sup 208/Pb collisions at 158 A GeV has been carried out in the CERN WA98 experiment. The invariant yield of direct photons was extracted as a function of transverse momentum in the interval 0.51.5 GeV/c. the result constitutes the first observation of direct photons in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. (19 refs).

  4. Silicon photonic integration in telecommunications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Richard Doerr

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Silicon photonics is the guiding of light in a planar arrangement of silicon-based materials to perform various functions. We focus here on the use of silicon photonics to create transmitters and receivers for fiber-optic telecommunications. As the need to squeeze more transmission into a given bandwidth, a given footprint, and a given cost increases, silicon photonics makes more and more economic sense.

  5. CERN manufactured hybrid photon detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    These hybrid photon detectors (HPDs) produce an electric signal from a single photon. An electron is liberated from a photocathode and accelerated to a silicon pixel array allowing the location of the photon on the cathode to be recorded. The electronics and optics for these devices have been developed in close collaboration with industry. HPDs have potential for further use in astrophysics and medical imaging.

  6. Nanodiamond Emitters of Single Photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasov I.I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Luminescence properties of single color centers were studied in nanodiamonds of different origin. It was found that single photon emitters could be realized even in molecularsized diamond (less than 2 nm capable of housing stable luminescent center “silicon-vacancy.” First results on incorporation of single-photon emitters based on luminescent nanodiamonds in plasmonic nanoantennas to enhance the photon count rate and directionality, diminish the fluorescence decay time, and provide polarization selectivity are presented.

  7. Spaceborne Photonics Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venable, D. D.; Farrukh, U. O.; Han, K. S.; Hwang, I. H.; Jalufka, N. W.; Lowe, C. W.; Tabibi, B. M.; Lee, C. J.; Lyons, D.; Maclin, A.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes in chronological detail the development of the Spaceborne Photonics Institute as a sustained research effort at Hampton University in the area of optical physics. This provided the research expertise to initiate a PhD program in Physics. Research was carried out in the areas of: (1) modelling of spaceborne solid state laser systems; (2) amplified spontaneous emission in solar pumped iodine lasers; (3) closely simulated AM0 CW solar pumped iodine laser and repeatedly short pulsed iodine laser oscillator; (4) a materials spectroscopy and growth program; and (5) laser induced fluorescence and atomic and molecular spectroscopy.

  8. Complex photonic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersma, D.S.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss in detail the optical properties of complex photonic structures, in particular those with a dominating disorder component. We will focus on their general transport properties, as well as on their use as light sources (random lasers). The basis for the theory of multiple light scattering in random systems will be explained as a tutorial introduction to the topic, including the explicit calculation of the effect of coherent backscattering. We will discuss various structures that go beyond regular disordered ones, in particular Levy glasses, liquid crystals, and quasicrystals, and show examples of their optical properties both from a conceptual and practical point of view.

  9. Photon mass and electrogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgov, Alexander; Pelliccia, Diego N.

    2007-01-01

    We show that if the photon possesses a tiny but non-vanishing mass, the universe cannot be electrically neutral. A cosmological electric asymmetry could be generated either at an early stage by the different evaporation rates of the primordial black holes with respect to positively and negatively charged particles or by a predominant capture of protons in comparison to electrons by the heavy galactic black holes in the contemporary universe. An impact of this phenomenon on the generation of large scale magnetic fields and on the acceleration of the universe is considered

  10. Fluctuations and Photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Sourendu

    2007-01-01

    In this talk I discuss measures of fluctuations, especially those leading to the proof that the quark gluon plasma indeed contains quarks. I discuss the quark mass dependence of the critical end point of QCD. Then I discuss probes of the QCD critical point. Non-gaussian behaviour of event-to-event fluctuations of conserved quantum numbers is one such probe. Another is due to the coupling of fluctuations in baryon number and electrical charge, giving rise to long range random fluctuations of local charge density which relax slowly. These fluctuations can scatter photons, giving rise to critical opalescence

  11. Fluctuations and Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sourendu

    2007-02-01

    In this talk I discuss measures of fluctuations, especially those leading to the proof that the quark gluon plasma indeed contains quarks. I discuss the quark mass dependence of the critical end point of QCD. Then I discuss probes of the QCD critical point. Non-gaussian behaviour of event-to-event fluctuations of conserved quantum numbers is one such probe. Another is due to the coupling of fluctuations in baryon number and electrical charge, giving rise to long range random fluctuations of local charge density which relax slowly. These fluctuations can scatter photons, giving rise to critical opalescence.

  12. Fluctuations and Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Sourendu [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2007-02-15

    In this talk I discuss measures of fluctuations, especially those leading to the proof that the quark gluon plasma indeed contains quarks. I discuss the quark mass dependence of the critical end point of QCD. Then I discuss probes of the QCD critical point. Non-gaussian behaviour of event-to-event fluctuations of conserved quantum numbers is one such probe. Another is due to the coupling of fluctuations in baryon number and electrical charge, giving rise to long range random fluctuations of local charge density which relax slowly. These fluctuations can scatter photons, giving rise to critical opalescence.

  13. Dirac tensor with heavy photon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bytev, V.V.; Kuraev, E.A. [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation). Bogoliubov Lab. of Theoretical Physics; Scherbakova, E.S. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 1. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2012-01-15

    For the large-angles hard photon emission by initial leptons in process of high energy annihilation of e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} to hadrons the Dirac tensor is obtained, taking into account the lowest order radiative corrections. The case of large-angles emission of two hard photons by initial leptons is considered. This result is being completed by the kinematics case of collinear hard photons emission as well as soft virtual and real photons and can be used for construction of Monte-Carlo generators. (orig.)

  14. Recent photon results from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Glasman, Claudia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The production of prompt isolated photons at hadron colliders provides a stringent test of perturbative QCD and can be used to probe the gluon density function of the proton. The ATLAS collaboration has performed precise measurements of the inclusive production o f isolated prompt photons at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, differential in both rap idity and the photon transverse momentum. In addition, the integrated and differential c ross sections for isolated photon pair production 8 TeV have been measured. The results are compared with state-of-the-art theory predictions at NLO in QCD and with predictions of several MC generators.

  15. Analytical approach for determining beam profiles in water phantom of symmetric and asymmetric fields of wedged, blocked, and open photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi Birgani, Mohamad Javad; Chegeni, Nahid; Arvandi, Shole; Razmjoo Ghalaee, Sasan; Zabihzadeh, Mansoor; Khezerloo, Davood

    2013-11-04

    Nowadays, in most radiotherapy departments, the commercial treatment planning systems (TPS) used to calculate dose distributions needs to be verified; therefore, quick, easy-to-use, and low-cost dose distribution algorithms are desirable to test and verify the performance of the TPS. In this paper, we put forth an analytical method to calculate the phantom scatter contribution and depth dose on the central axis based on the equivalent square concept. Then, this method was generalized to calculate the profiles at any depth and for several field shapes - regular or irregular fields - under symmetry and asymmetry photon beam conditions. Varian 2100 C/D and Siemens Primus Plus linacs with 6 and 18 MV photon beam were used for irradiations. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured for a large number of square fields for both energies and for 45° wedge, which were employed to obtain the profiles in any depth. To assess the accuracy of the calculated profiles, several profile measurements were carried out for some treatment fields. The calculated and measured profiles were compared by gamma-index calculation. All γ-index calculations were based on a 3% dose criterion and a 3 mm dose-to-agreement (DTA) acceptance criterion. The γ values were less than 1 at most points. However, the maximum γ observed was about 1.10 in the penumbra region in most fields and in the central area for the asymmetric fields. This analytical approach provides a generally quick and fairly accurate algorithm to calculate dose distribution for some treatment fields in conventional radiotherapy.

  16. Physics with Photons at the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Reale, V.

    2008-01-01

    The identification of photons in the ATLAS experiment is crucial for the study of a number of physics channels, including the search for a Higgs boson decaying to photon pairs, and measurements of direct production of single photons and photon pairs. The photon-photon and photon-jet channels are interesting in their own right, allowing the study of QCD at the new energy range of the LHC. The photon-identification strategy in ATLAS will be presented along with photon-jet cross section measurements and the potential ATLAS constrains on the gluon structure function

  17. Photon Differentials in Space and Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Erleben, Kenny

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel photon mapping algorithm for animations. We extend our previous work on photon differentials [12] with time differentials. The result is a first order model of photon cones in space an time that effectively reduces the number of required photons per frame as well as efficiently...... reduces temporal aliasing without any need for in-between-frame photon maps....

  18. Two-dimensional 'photon fluid': effective photon-photon interaction and physical realizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiao, R Y; Hansson, T H; Leinaas, J M; Viefers, S

    2004-01-01

    We describe a recently developed effective theory for atom-mediated photon-photon interactions in a two-dimensional 'photon fluid' confined to a Fabry-Perot resonator. The photons in the lowest longitudinal cavity mode will appear as massive bosons interacting via a renormalized delta-function potential with a strength determined by physical parameters such as the density of atoms and the detuning of the photons relative to the resonance frequency of the atoms. We discuss novel quantum phenomena for photons, such as Bose-Einstein condensation and bound state formation, as well as possible experimental scenarios based on Rydberg atoms in a microwave cavity, or alkali atoms in an optical cavity

  19. Deterministically swapping frequency-bin entanglement from photon-photon to atom-photon hybrid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Bao-Quan; Liu, Chang; Sun, Yuan; Chen, Ping-Xing

    2018-02-01

    Inspired by the recent developments of the research on the atom-photon quantum interface and energy-time entanglement between single-photon pulses, we are motivated to study the deterministic protocol for the frequency-bin entanglement of the atom-photon hybrid system, which is analogous to the frequency-bin entanglement between single-photon pulses. We show that such entanglement arises naturally in considering the interaction between a frequency-bin entangled single-photon pulse pair and a single atom coupled to an optical cavity, via straightforward atom-photon phase gate operations. Its anticipated properties and preliminary examples of its potential application in quantum networking are also demonstrated. Moreover, we construct a specific quantum entanglement witness tool to detect such extended frequency-bin entanglement from a reasonably general set of separable states, and prove its capability theoretically. We focus on the energy-time considerations throughout the analysis.

  20. Photonic band gap engineering in 2D photonic crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    -dimensional photonic crystals with square lattices composed of air holes in dielectric and vice versa i.e., dielectric rods in air, using the plane-wave expansion method are investigated. We then study, how the photonic band gap size is ...

  1. Waveguide superconducting single-photon autocorrelators for quantum photonic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahin, D.; Gaggero, A.; Frucci, G.; Jahanmirinejad, S.; Sprengers, J.P.; Mattioli, F.; Leoni, R.; Beetz, J.; Lermer, M.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.; Fiore, A.; Hasan, Z.U.; Hemmer, P.R.; Lee, H.; Santori, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel component for integrated quantum photonic applications, a waveguide single-photon autocorrelator. It is based on two superconducting nanowire detectors patterned onto the same GaAs ridge waveguide. Combining the electrical output of the two detectors in a correlation card enables

  2. Non-Poissonian photon statistics from macroscopic photon cutting materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Mathijs; Meijerink, A; Rabouw, Freddy T.

    2017-01-01

    In optical materials energy is usually extracted only from the lowest excited state, resulting in fundamental energy-efficiency limits such as the Shockley-Queisser limit for single-junction solar cells. Photon-cutting materials provide a way around such limits by absorbing high-energy photons and

  3. Exclusive Channels in Photon-Photon Collisions at LEP

    OpenAIRE

    Braccini, Saverio

    2002-01-01

    The study of exclusive channels in photon-photon collisions at e+e- colliders allows to investigate the structure and the properties of hadrons in a very clean experimental environment. A concise review of the most recent results obtained at LEP is presented.

  4. Quantum photonics with quantum dots in photonic wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munsch, Mathieu; Kuhlmann, Andreas; Cadeddu, Davide

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the spectroscopy of a single quantum dot in a photonic wire. The device presents a high photon extraction efficiency, and strong hybrid coupling to mechanical modes. We use resonance fluorescence to probe the emitter’s properties with the highest sensitivity. Weperform...

  5. Sidewall roughness measurement of photonic wires and photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Garnæs, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    The performance of nanophotonic building blocks such as photonic wires and photonic crystals are rapidly improving, with very low propagation loss and very high cavity Q-factors being reported. In order to facilitate further improvements in performance the ability to quantitatively measure...

  6. Polarized tagged photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximon, L.C.; Ganz, Eric; Aniel, Thierry; Miniac, Arlette de.

    1982-03-01

    We consider in detail the differential cross section for polarized bremsstrahlung for angles and energies in the range of interest for a tagging system and derive a high energy, small angle approximation for this cross section. We use these approximations to determine the maxima and minima of the cross sections for these two polarization states, dσperpendicular and dσparallel, and to evaluate these cross sections at the extrema. It is shown that both dσperpendicular and dσparallel have a very sharp dip in the region of small momentum transfers. However, their behavior in the region of the dip, as a function of the azimuthal angle phi, is quite different over most of the photon spectrum. The cross section dσperpendicular behaves similarly to the cross section for unpolarized photons in that as phi increases, the sharp dip vanishes, the minimum fuses with the second maximum, and the cross section then has only a single maximum. In contrast, the sharp dip in the cross section dσparallel remains as phi increases. Coulomb corrections to the Born approximation are considered, and do not fill in these dips

  7. Photon compression in cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensley, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    It has been shown theoretically that intense microwave radiation is absorbed non-classically by a newly enunciated mechanism when interacting with hydrogen plasma. Fields > 1 Mg, lambda > 1 mm are within this regime. The predicted absorption, approximately P/sub rf/v/sub theta/sup e/, has not yet been experimentally confirmed. The applications of such a coupling are many. If microwave bursts approximately > 5 x 10 14 watts, 5 ns can be generated, the net generation of power from pellet fusion as well as various military applications becomes feasible. The purpose, then, for considering gas-gun photon compression is to obtain the above experimental capability by converting the gas kinetic energy directly into microwave form. Energies of >10 5 joules cm -2 and powers of >10 13 watts cm -2 are potentially available for photon interaction experiments using presently available technology. The following topics are discussed: microwave modes in a finite cylinder, injection, compression, switchout operation, and system performance parameter scaling

  8. Robust Adaptive Photon Tracing using Photon Path Visibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hachisuka, Toshiya; Jensen, Henrik Wann

    2011-01-01

    We present a new adaptive photon tracing algorithm which can handle illumination settings that are considered difficult for photon tracing approaches such as outdoor scenes, close-ups of a small part of an illuminated region, and illumination coming through a small gap. The key contribution in our...... algorithm is the use of visibility of photon path as the importance function which ensures that our sampling algorithm focuses on paths that are visible from the given viewpoint. Our sampling algorithm builds on two recent developments in Markov chain Monte Carlo methods: adaptive Markov chain sampling...... and replica exchange. Using these techniques, each photon path is adaptively mutated and it explores the sampling space efficiently without being stuck at a local peak of the importance function. We have implemented this sampling approach in the progressive photon mapping algorithm which provides visibility...

  9. Modification of equivalent photon approximation (EPA) for resolved photon processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drees, M.; Godbole, R.M.

    1995-05-01

    The authors propose a modification of the equivalent photon approximation (EPA) for processes which involve the parton content of the photon, to take into account the suppression of the photonic parton fluxes due to the virtuality of the photon. They present simple, physically motivated ansaetze to model this suppression and show that even though the parton content of the electron no longer factorizes into an electron flux function and photon structure function, it is still possible to express it as a single integral. They also show that for the TRISTAN (transposable ring intersecting storage accelerators in Nippon) experiments its effects can be numerically of the same size as that of the NLO corrections. Further, it is discussed a possible measurements at HERA (hadron electron ring an large), which can be provide an experimental handle on the effect the authors model through their ansaetze

  10. Amplified Photon Upconversion by Photonic Shell of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2017-04-26

    As an effective platform to exploit triplet-triplet-annihilation-based photon upconversion (TTA-UC), microcapsules composed of a fluidic UC core and photonic shell are microfluidically prepared using a triple emulsion as the template. The photonic shell consists of cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) with a periodic helical structure, exhibiting a photonic band gap. Combined with planar anchoring at the boundaries, the shell serves as a resonance cavity for TTA-UC emission and enables spectral tuning of the UC under low-power-density excitation. The CLC shell can be stabilized by introducing a polymerizable mesogen in the LC host. Because of the microcapsule spherical symmetry, spontaneous emission of the delayed fluorescence is omnidirectionally amplified at the edge of the stop band. These results demonstrate the range of opportunities provided by TTA-UC systems for the future design of low-threshold photonic devices.

  11. Photonic integration and photonics-electronics convergence on silicon platform

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jifeng; Baba, Toshihiko; Vivien, Laurent; Xu, Dan-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Silicon photonics technology, which has the DNA of silicon electronics technology, promises to provide a compact photonic integration platform with high integration density, mass-producibility, and excellent cost performance. This technology has been used to develop and to integrate various photonic functions on silicon substrate. Moreover, photonics-electronics convergence based on silicon substrate is now being pursued. Thanks to these features, silicon photonics will have the potential to be a superior technology used in the construction of energy-efficient cost-effective apparatuses for various applications, such as communications, information processing, and sensing. Considering the material characteristics of silicon and difficulties in microfabrication technology, however, silicon by itself is not necessarily an ideal material. For example, silicon is not suitable for light emitting devices because it is an indirect transition material. The resolution and dynamic range of silicon-based interference de...

  12. Photon energy-modulated radiotherapy: Monte Carlo simulation and treatment planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Min; Kim, Jung-in; Heon Choi, Chang; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Il Han; Ye, Sung-Joon [Interdiciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110-744, Korea and Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Interdiciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Interdiciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Interdiciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Intelligent Convergence Systems, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of photon energy-modulated radiotherapy during beam-on time. Methods: A cylindrical device made of aluminum was conceptually proposed as an energy modulator. The frame of the device was connected with 20 tubes through which mercury could be injected or drained to adjust the thickness of mercury along the beam axis. In Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, a flattening filter of 6 or 10 MV linac was replaced with the device. The thickness of mercury inside the device varied from 0 to 40 mm at the field sizes of 5 x 5 cm{sup 2} (FS5), 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} (FS10), and 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} (FS20). At least 5 billion histories were followed for each simulation to create phase space files at 100 cm source to surface distance (SSD). In-water beam data were acquired by additional MC simulations using the above phase space files. A treatment planning system (TPS) was commissioned to generate a virtual machine using the MC-generated beam data. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for six clinical cases were generated using conventional 6 MV, 6 MV flattening filter free, and energy-modulated photon beams of the virtual machine. Results: As increasing the thickness of mercury, Percentage depth doses (PDD) of modulated 6 and 10 MV after the depth of dose maximum were continuously increased. The amount of PDD increase at the depth of 10 and 20 cm for modulated 6 MV was 4.8% and 5.2% at FS5, 3.9% and 5.0% at FS10 and 3.2%-4.9% at FS20 as increasing the thickness of mercury from 0 to 20 mm. The same for modulated 10 MV was 4.5% and 5.0% at FS5, 3.8% and 4.7% at FS10 and 4.1% and 4.8% at FS20 as increasing the thickness of mercury from 0 to 25 mm. The outputs of modulated 6 MV with 20 mm mercury and of modulated 10 MV with 25 mm mercury were reduced into 30%, and 56% of conventional linac, respectively. The energy-modulated IMRT plans had less integral doses than 6 MV IMRT or 6 MV flattening filter free plans for tumors located in the

  13. Topological Order in Silicon Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-07

    photonic edge states and quantum emitters [ S. Barik , H. Miyake, W. DeGottardi, E. Waks and M. Hafezi, New J. Phys., 18, 11301 (2016) ]. Entanglement... Barik , H. Miyake, W. DeGottardi, E. Waks, and M. Hafezi “Two-Dimensionally Confined Topological Edge States in Photonic Crystals”, New J. Phys., 18

  14. Photonic nanowires for quantum optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munsch, M.; Claudon, J.; Bleuse, J.

    Photonic nanowires (PWs) are simple dielectric structures for which a very efficient and broadband spontaneous emission (SE) control has been predicted [1]. Recently, a single photon source featuring a record high efficiency was demonstrated using this geometry [2]. Using time-resolved micro-phot...

  15. XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 8 XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database (Web, free access)   A web database is provided which can be used to calculate photon cross sections for scattering, photoelectric absorption and pair production, as well as total attenuation coefficients, for any element, compound or mixture (Z <= 100) at energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV.

  16. Photonic-crystal fibers gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Muse Haider

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we proposed to use of a photonic crystal fiber with an inner hollow defect. The use of such fibers is not affected by a material medium on the propagation of optical radiation. Photonic crystal fibers present special properties and capabilities that lead to an outstanding potential for sensing applications

  17. Experimental test of magnetic photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakes, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    A 'magnetic' photon hypothesis associated with magnetic monopoles is tested experimentally. These photons are predicted to easily penetrate metal. Experimentally the optical transmittance T of a metal foil was less than 2x10-17. The hypothesis is not supported since it predicts T=2x10-12

  18. Advances on integrated microwave photonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Jianji; Liao, Shasha; Yan, Siqi

    2017-01-01

    Integrated microwave photonics has attracted a lot of attentions and makes significant improvement in last 10 years. We have proposed and demonstrated several schemes about microwave photonics including waveform generation, signal processing and energy-efficient micro-heaters. Our schemes are all...

  19. The STAR Photon Multiplicity Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, M.M.; Badyal, S.K.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhatia, V.S.; Chattopadhyay, S. E-mail: sub@veccal.ernet.in; Das, S.; Datta, R.; Dubey, A.K.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Ganti, M.S.; Ghosh, P.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, I.; Kumar, A.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Mangotra, L.K.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Nayak, S.K.; Nayak, T.K.; Pal, S.K.; Phatak, S.C.; Potukuchi, B.V.K.S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Sahoo, R.; Sharma, A.; Singaraju, R.N.; Sood, G.; Trivedi, M.D.; Varma, R.; Viyogi, Y.P

    2003-03-01

    Details concerning the design, fabrication and performance of STAR Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) are presented. The PMD will cover the forward region, within the pseudorapidity range 2.3-3.5, behind the forward time projection chamber. It will measure the spatial distribution of photons in order to study collective flow, fluctuation and chiral symmetry restoration.

  20. Photonic Free-Electron Lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Denis, T.; Lee, J.H.H.; van Dijk, M.W.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2012-01-01

    A photonic free-electron laser (pFEL) produces coherent Cerenkov radiation from a set of parallel electron beams streaming through a photonic crystal. The function of the crystal is to slow down the phase velocity of a copropagating electromagnetic wave, such that also mildly relativistic electrons

  1. Nanodiamond particles forming photonic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grichko, Varvara; Tyler, Talmage; Grishko, Victor I; Shenderova, Olga

    2008-01-01

    Colloid suspensions of irregularly shaped, highly charged detonation nanodiamond particles are found to have unexpected optical properties, similar to those of photonic crystals. This finding is all the more surprising since the particles used in this work are far more polydisperse than those typically forming photonic crystals. Intensely iridescent structures have been fabricated using the centrifugation of aqueous suspensions of nanodiamonds

  2. Nanodiamond particles forming photonic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grichko, Varvara; Tyler, Talmage; Grishko, Victor I; Shenderova, Olga [International Technology Center, 8100 Brownleigh Drive, Suite 120, Raleigh, NC 27617 (United States)], E-mail: oshenderova@itc-inc.org

    2008-06-04

    Colloid suspensions of irregularly shaped, highly charged detonation nanodiamond particles are found to have unexpected optical properties, similar to those of photonic crystals. This finding is all the more surprising since the particles used in this work are far more polydisperse than those typically forming photonic crystals. Intensely iridescent structures have been fabricated using the centrifugation of aqueous suspensions of nanodiamonds.

  3. Silicon photonics fundamentals and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Deen, M Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The creation of affordable high speed optical communications using standard semiconductor manufacturing technology is a principal aim of silicon photonics research. This would involve replacing copper connections with optical fibres or waveguides, and electrons with photons. With applications such as telecommunications and information processing, light detection, spectroscopy, holography and robotics, silicon photonics has the potential to revolutionise electronic-only systems. Providing an overview of the physics, technology and device operation of photonic devices using exclusively silicon and related alloys, the book includes: * Basic Properties of Silicon * Quantum Wells, Wires, Dots and Superlattices * Absorption Processes in Semiconductors * Light Emitters in Silicon * Photodetectors , Photodiodes and Phototransistors * Raman Lasers including Raman Scattering * Guided Lightwaves * Planar Waveguide Devices * Fabrication Techniques and Material Systems Silicon Photonics: Fundamentals and Devices outlines ...

  4. Two-dimensional topological photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanikaev, Alexander B.; Shvets, Gennady

    2017-12-01

    Originating from the studies of two-dimensional condensed-matter states, the concept of topological order has recently been expanded to other fields of physics and engineering, particularly optics and photonics. Topological photonic structures have already overturned some of the traditional views on wave propagation and manipulation. The application of topological concepts to guided wave propagation has enabled novel photonic devices, such as reflection-free sharply bent waveguides, robust delay lines, spin-polarized switches and non-reciprocal devices. Discrete degrees of freedom, widely used in condensed-matter physics, such as spin and valley, are now entering the realm of photonics. In this Review, we summarize the latest advances in this highly dynamic field, with special emphasis on the experimental work on two-dimensional photonic topological structures.

  5. Photon Entanglement Through Brain Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lingyan; Galvez, Enrique J; Alfano, Robert R

    2016-12-20

    Photon entanglement, the cornerstone of quantum correlations, provides a level of coherence that is not present in classical correlations. Harnessing it by study of its passage through organic matter may offer new possibilities for medical diagnosis technique. In this work, we study the preservation of photon entanglement in polarization, created by spontaneous parametric down-conversion, after one entangled photon propagates through multiphoton-scattering brain tissue slices with different thickness. The Tangle-Entropy (TS) plots show the strong preservation of entanglement of photons propagating in brain tissue. By spatially filtering the ballistic scattering of an entangled photon, we find that its polarization entanglement is preserved and non-locally correlated with its twin in the TS plots. The degree of entanglement correlates better with structure and water content than with sample thickness.

  6. Photonics principles and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Azzawi, Abdul

    2006-01-01

    Light The Nature of Light Light and Shadows Thermal Radiation Light Production Light Intensity Light and Colour Laws of Light Optics Plane Mirrors Spherical Mirrors Lenses Prisms Beamsplitters Light Passing through Optical Components Optical Instruments for Viewing Applications Polarization of Light Optical Materials Waves and Diffraction Waves Interference and Diffraction The Diffraction Grating Interferometers Spectrometers and Spectroscopes Optical Fibres Fibre Optic Cables Advanced Fibre Optic Cables Light Attenuation in Optical Components Fibre-Optic Cable Types and Installations Fibre-Optic Connectors Passive Fibre Optic Devices Wavelength Division Multiplexer Optical Amplifiers Optical Receivers Lasers Optical Switches Optical Fibre Communications Fibre Optic Lighting Testing Fibre Optic Testing Safety Photonics Laboratory Safety Miscellaneous Appendix A: Details of the Devices, Components, Tools, and Parts Appendix B: Alignment Procedure of a Conventional Ar...

  7. Photonics a short course

    CERN Document Server

    Degiorgio, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    This extended and revised edition will serve as a concise, self-contained, up-to-date introduction to Photonics for undergraduate students. It can also be used as a primer by researchers and professionals who start working in the field. Blending theory with technical descriptions, the book covers a wide range of topics, including the general mechanism of laser action, continuous and pulsed laser operation, optical propagation in isotropic and anisotropic media, operating principles and structure of passive optical components, electro-optic and acousto-optic modulation, solid-state lasers, semiconductor lasers and LEDs, nonlinear optical phenomena, and optical fiber components and devices. The book concludes with an overview of applications, including optical communications, telemetry and sensing, industrial and biomedical applications, solid-state lighting, displays, and photovoltaics. This second edition includes a set of problems at the end of all but the last chapter. These problems deal with numerical c...

  8. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  9. Progress on photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P; Gundacker, S; Hillemanns, H; Jarron, P; Knapitsch, A; Leclercq, J L; Letartre, X; Meyer, T; Pauwels, K; Powolny, F; Seassal, C

    2010-01-01

    The renewal of interest for Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) has highlighted the need for increasing the light output of scintillating crystals and in particular for improving the light extraction from materials with a high index of refraction. One possible solution to overcome the problem of total internal reflection and light losses resulting from multiple bouncing within the crystal is to improve the light extraction efficiency at the crystal/photodetector interface by means of photonic crystals, i.e. media with a periodic modulation of the dielectric constant at the wavelength scale. After a short reminder of the underlying principles this contribution proposes to present the very encouraging results we have recently obtained on LYSO pixels and the perspectives on other crystals such as BGO, LuYAP and LuAG. These results confirm the impressive predictions from our previously published Monte Carlo simulations. A detailed description of the sample preparation procedure is given as well ...

  10. Photonics a short course

    CERN Document Server

    Degiorgio, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    This book will serve as a concise, self-contained, up-to-date introduction to Photonics, to be used as a textbook for undergraduate students or as a reference book for researchers and professionals. Blending theory with technical descriptions, the book covers a wide range of topics, including the general mechanism of laser action, continuous and pulsed laser operation, optical propagation in isotropic and anisotropic media, operating principles and structure of passive optical components, electro-optical and acousto-optical modulation, solid-state lasers, semiconductor lasers and LEDs, nonlinear optics, and optical fiber components and devices.. The book concludes with an overview of applications, including optical communications, telemetry and sensing, industrial and biomedical applications, solid-state lighting, displays, and photovoltaics.

  11. Ordered photonic microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kevin Ming

    2001-09-01

    This thesis examines novel photonic materials systems possessing order in the atomic, microscopic, and macroscopic dimensional regimes. In the atomic order regime, a structure-property investigation is done for Er2O3 in which the first report of room temperature photoluminescence (PL) is provided. Thin films of the rare earth oxide were deposited via reactive sputtering of Er metal in an Ar/O2 ambient, and subsequently annealed to promote grain growth. Heat treatment consisting of a 650°C followed by 1000°C anneal produces maximum crystallinity as measured by glancing angle x-ray diffraction. These films show characteristic PL at λ = 1.54 μm. In the microscopic order regime, omnidirectional reflectors and thin film microcavities are demonstrated using sol-gel and solid-state materials. A first demonstration of omnidirectional reflectivity in sol-gel structures was accomplished using a dielectric stack consisting of 12 spin-on SiO 2/TiO2 quarterwave sol-gel films. Similarly, solid-state dielectric stacks consisting of 6 Si/SiO2 sputtered films were used to demonstrate the same principle. Microcavities were formed using solgel structures, producing a low quality factor Q = 35 due to limitations in film thickness control and lossy interfaces from stress-induced cracks. The high index contrast Si/SiO2 microcavities enabled Q ~ 1000 using 17 total layers following hydrogenation of dangling bonds within the amorphous Si films. Combining fabrication processes for the solid-state microcavity and Er2O3 films, a device was fabricated to demonstrate photoluminescence enhancement of an Er2O3 film embedded in a microcavity. The structure consisted of 3-bilayer mirrors on either side of an SiO2/Er2O3/SiO2 cavity. The Q ~ 300 was near the theoretical value for such a structure. At room temperature, PL of Er2O3 was enhanced by a factor of 1000 in the microcavity compared to a single thin film. In the macroscopic order regime, self-assembly of micron- sized SiO 2 and

  12. The advanced photon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galayda, J.N.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a 7-GeV third-generation synchrotron radiation storage ring and full-energy positron injector. Construction project funding began in 1989, and ground breaking took place on 5 May 1990. Construction of all accelerator facilities was completed in January 1995 and storage ring commissioning is underway. First observation of x-rays from a bending magnet source took place on 26 March 1995. Nearly all performance specifications of the injector have been reached, and first observations indicate that the reliability, dynamic aperture, emittance, and orbit stability in the storage ring are satisfactory. Observation of radiation from the first of 20 insertion device beamlines is scheduled for October 1995. Start of regular operations is expected to take place well before the APS Project target date of December 1996

  13. Photonic quantum information: science and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological progress in the generation, manipulation and detection of individual single photons has opened a new scientific field of photonic quantum information. This progress includes the realization of single photon switches, photonic quantum circuits with specific functions, and the application of novel photonic states to novel optical metrology beyond the limits of standard optics. In this review article, the recent developments and current status of photonic quantum information technology are overviewed based on the author's past and recent works.

  14. Spatial photon correlations in multiple scattering media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan; Muskens, O.; Lagendijk, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first angle-resolved measurements of spatial photon correlations that are induced by multiple scattering of light. The correlation relates multiple scattered photons at different spatial positions and depends on incident photon fluctuations.......We present the first angle-resolved measurements of spatial photon correlations that are induced by multiple scattering of light. The correlation relates multiple scattered photons at different spatial positions and depends on incident photon fluctuations....

  15. Nonlocal hyperconcentration on entangled photons using photonic module system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Cong; Wang, Tie-Jun; Mi, Si-Chen [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); Zhang, Ru [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); School of Ethnic Minority Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); Wang, Chuan, E-mail: wangchuan@bupt.edu.cn [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Entanglement distribution will inevitably be affected by the channel and environment noise. Thus distillation of maximal entanglement nonlocally becomes a crucial goal in quantum information. Here we illustrate that maximal hyperentanglement on nonlocal photons could be distilled using the photonic module and cavity quantum electrodynamics, where the photons are simultaneously entangled in polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom. The construction of the photonic module in a photonic band-gap structure is presented, and the operation of the module is utilized to implement the photonic nondestructive parity checks on the two degrees of freedom. We first propose a hyperconcentration protocol using two identical partially hyperentangled initial states with unknown coefficients to distill a maximally hyperentangled state probabilistically, and further propose a protocol by the assistance of an ancillary single photon prepared according to the known coefficients of the initial state. In the two protocols, the total success probability can be improved greatly by introducing the iteration mechanism, and only one of the remote parties is required to perform the parity checks in each round of iteration. Estimates on the system requirements and recent experimental results indicate that our proposal is realizable with existing or near-further technologies.

  16. Photon technology. Laser processing technology; Photon technology. Laser process gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Survey has been conducted to develop laser processing technology utilizing the interaction between substance and photon. This is a part of the leading research on photon technology development. The photon technology development is aimed at novel technology development highly utilizing the quantum nature of photons. In the field of laser processing, high quality photons are used as tools, special functions of atoms and molecules will be discovered, and processing for functional fabrication (photon machining) will be established. A role of laser processing in industries has become significant, which is currently spreading not only into cutting and welding of materials and scalpels but also into such a special field as ultrafine processing of materials. The spreading is sometimes obstructed due to the difficulty of procurement of suitable machines and materials, and the increase of cost. The purpose of this study is to develop the optimal laser technology, to elucidate the interaction between substance and photon, and to develop the laser system and the transmission and regulation systems which realize the optimal conditions. 387 refs., 115 figs., 25 tabs.

  17. Nonlocal hyperconcentration on entangled photons using photonic module system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Cong; Wang, Tie-Jun; Mi, Si-Chen; Zhang, Ru; Wang, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Entanglement distribution will inevitably be affected by the channel and environment noise. Thus distillation of maximal entanglement nonlocally becomes a crucial goal in quantum information. Here we illustrate that maximal hyperentanglement on nonlocal photons could be distilled using the photonic module and cavity quantum electrodynamics, where the photons are simultaneously entangled in polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom. The construction of the photonic module in a photonic band-gap structure is presented, and the operation of the module is utilized to implement the photonic nondestructive parity checks on the two degrees of freedom. We first propose a hyperconcentration protocol using two identical partially hyperentangled initial states with unknown coefficients to distill a maximally hyperentangled state probabilistically, and further propose a protocol by the assistance of an ancillary single photon prepared according to the known coefficients of the initial state. In the two protocols, the total success probability can be improved greatly by introducing the iteration mechanism, and only one of the remote parties is required to perform the parity checks in each round of iteration. Estimates on the system requirements and recent experimental results indicate that our proposal is realizable with existing or near-further technologies.

  18. Multi-Photon Entanglement and Quantum Teleportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shih, Yanhua

    1999-01-01

    The project 'Multi-Photon Entanglement and Quantum Teleportation' concerns a series of experimental and theoretical investigations on multi-photon entangled states and the applications, for example...

  19. Holographic Two-Photon Induced Photopolymerization

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Holographic two-photon-induced photopolymerization (HTPIP) offers distinct advantages over conventional one-photon-induced photopolymerization and current techniques...

  20. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-06-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states.

  1. Analysis of photonic band gap in novel piezoelectric photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malar Kodi, A.; Doni Pon, V.; Joseph Wilson, K. S.

    2018-03-01

    The transmission properties of one-dimensional novel photonic crystal having silver-doped novel piezoelectric superlattice and air as the two constituent layers have been investigated by means of transfer matrix method. By changing the appropriate thickness of the layers and filling factor of nanocomposite system, the variation in the photonic band gap can be studied. It is found that the photonic band gap increases with the filling factor of the metal nanocomposite and with the thickness of the layer. These structures possess unique characteristics enabling one to operate as optical waveguides, selective filters, optical switches, integrated piezoelectric microactuators, etc.

  2. Photonic Paint Developed with Metallic Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Po; Williams, John D.

    2012-01-01

    This work details the design and simulation of an inconspicuous photonic paint that can be applied onto an object for anticounterfeit and tag, track, and locate (TTL) applications. The paint consists of three-dimensional metallic tilted woodpile photonic crystals embedded into a visible and infrared transparent polymer film, which can be applied to almost any surface. The tilted woodpile photonic crystals are designed with a specific pass band detectable at nearly all incident angles of light. When painted onto a surface, these crystals provide a unique reflective infra-red optical signature that can be easily observed and recorded to verify the location or contents of a package.

  3. Photon-photon and photon-hadron processes in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, N.C.

    1993-11-01

    Photon-photon and photon-hadron interactions in relativistic heavy ion collisions are studied in the framework of the impact parameter dependent equivalent photon approximation. Improvements of this method, like formfactor inclusion and geometrical modifications are developed. In disruptive relativistic heavy ion collisions where the heavy ions overlapp during the collision, electromagnetic processes are an important background to other mechanisms. In peripheral (non-disruptive) relativistic heavy ion collisions where the ions pass each other without strong interactions, the electromagnetic processes can be studied in their pure form. The lepton pair production is an important diagnostic tool in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The coherent γγ lepton pair production is therefore extensively studied in disruptive but also in non-disruptive collisions. The effects of strong interactions on the coherent γγ lepton pair production in disruptive collisions are discussed in terms of a simple stopping model. Coherent γγ dielectron production contributes to the dilepton production in high energy hadron-hadron collisions. As an example, the coherent dielectron production in π - p collisions is studied in terms of the equivalent photon approximation. Peripheral ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions open up new possibilities for γγ physics. Taking into account γA background reactions, typical γγ processes in the relevant invariant mass ranges are discussed. The extreme high energy part of the equivalent photon spectrum leads to hard photon-parton reactions. As a potential tool to investigate the gluon distribution function of nucleons, thee q anti q production via the γg fusion in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions is studied. It is the purpose of this work to investigate how photon-photon and photon-hadron reactions in relativistic heavy ion collisions may contribute to the understanding of QCD and the standard model. (orig.) [de

  4. ITMO Photonics: center of excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voznesenskaya, Anna; Bougrov, Vladislav; Kozlov, Sergey; Vasilev, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    ITMO University, the leading Russian center in photonics research and education, has the mission to train highlyqualified competitive professionals able to act in conditions of fast-changing world. This paradigm is implemented through creation of a strategic academic unit ITMO Photonics, the center of excellence concentrating organizational, scientific, educational, financial, laboratory and human resources. This Center has the following features: dissemination of breakthrough scientific results in photonics such as advanced photonic materials, ultrafast optical and quantum information, laser physics, engineering and technologies, into undergraduate and graduate educational programs through including special modules into the curricula and considerable student's research and internships; transformation of the educational process in accordance with the best international educational practices, presence in the global education market in the form of joint educational programs with leading universities, i.e. those being included in the network programs of international scientific cooperation, and international accreditation of educational programs; development of mechanisms for the commercialization of innovative products - results of scientific research; securing financial sustainability of research in the field of photonics of informationcommunication systems via funding increase and the diversification of funding sources. Along with focusing on the research promotion, the Center is involved in science popularization through such projects as career guidance for high school students; interaction between student's chapters of international optical societies; invited lectures of World-famous experts in photonics; short educational programs in optics, photonics and light engineering for international students; contests, Olympics and grants for talented young researchers; social events; interactive demonstrations.

  5. Quantum mechanics of a photon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Hassan; Mostafazadeh, Ali

    2017-08-01

    A first-quantized free photon is a complex massless vector field A =(Aμ ) whose field strength satisfies Maxwell's equations in vacuum. We construct the Hilbert space H of the photon by endowing the vector space of the fields A in the temporal-Coulomb gauge with a positive-definite and relativistically invariant inner product. We give an explicit expression for this inner product, identify the Hamiltonian for the photon with the generator of time translations in H , determine the operators representing the momentum and the helicity of the photon, and introduce a chirality operator whose eigenfunctions correspond to fields having a definite sign of energy. We also construct a position operator for the photon whose components commute with each other and with the chirality and helicity operators. This allows for the construction of the localized states of the photon with a definite sign of energy and helicity. We derive an explicit formula for the latter and compute the corresponding electric and magnetic fields. These turn out to diverge not just at the point where the photon is localized but on a plane containing this point. We identify the axis normal to this plane with an associated symmetry axis and show that each choice of this axis specifies a particular position operator, a corresponding position basis, and a position representation of the quantum mechanics of a photon. In particular, we examine the position wave functions determined by such a position basis, elucidate their relationship with the Riemann-Silberstein and Landau-Peierls wave functions, and give an explicit formula for the probability density of the spatial localization of the photon.

  6. Quantum imaging with undetected photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Gabriela Barreto; Borish, Victoria; Cole, Garrett D; Ramelow, Sven; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Zeilinger, Anton

    2014-08-28

    Information is central to quantum mechanics. In particular, quantum interference occurs only if there exists no information to distinguish between the superposed states. The mere possibility of obtaining information that could distinguish between overlapping states inhibits quantum interference. Here we introduce and experimentally demonstrate a quantum imaging concept based on induced coherence without induced emission. Our experiment uses two separate down-conversion nonlinear crystals (numbered NL1 and NL2), each illuminated by the same pump laser, creating one pair of photons (denoted idler and signal). If the photon pair is created in NL1, one photon (the idler) passes through the object to be imaged and is overlapped with the idler amplitude created in NL2, its source thus being undefined. Interference of the signal amplitudes coming from the two crystals then reveals the image of the object. The photons that pass through the imaged object (idler photons from NL1) are never detected, while we obtain images exclusively with the signal photons (from NL1 and NL2), which do not interact with the object. Our experiment is fundamentally different from previous quantum imaging techniques, such as interaction-free imaging or ghost imaging, because now the photons used to illuminate the object do not have to be detected at all and no coincidence detection is necessary. This enables the probe wavelength to be chosen in a range for which suitable detectors are not available. To illustrate this, we show images of objects that are either opaque or invisible to the detected photons. Our experiment is a prototype in quantum information--knowledge can be extracted by, and about, a photon that is never detected.

  7. SU-F-T-461: Dosimetric Evaluation of Indigenous Farmer Type Chamber FAR65- GB for Reference Dosimetry of FFF MV Photon Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patwe, P; Mhatre, V; Dandekar, P [Sir HN RF Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Indigenous Farmer type chamber FAR 65 GB is a reference class 0.6 cc ion chamber. It can be used for dosimetric evaluation of photon and high energy electron beams. We studied dosimetric characteristics of the chamber for 6MV and 10MV Flattening filter free FFF photon beams available on trueBEAM STx Linac. Methods: The study was carried out on trueBEAM STx Linac having 6 and 10 MV FFF photon beam with maximum dose rate 1400 and 2400 MU per min respectively. The dosimetric device to be evaluated is Rosalina Instruments FAR 65-GB Ion Chamber with active volume 0.65 cc, total active length 23.1cm, inner diameter of cylinder 6.2mm, wall thickness 0.4mm, inner electrode diameter 1mm. Inner and outer electrodes are made from Aluminium 2.7 gm per cc and graphite 1.82 gm per cc respectively. The ion chamber was placed along central axis of beam at 10cm depth and irradiated for 10cm × 10cm field size at SAD of 100 cm in plastic phantom. We studied Precision, Dose Linearity, Dose Rate dependence, directional dependence, Recombination effect. Recombination effect was determined using standard two-voltage method. Results: 1. Measurements were reproducible std deviation of 0.0105 and type A uncertainty 0.003265 under same set of reference conditions 2. Chamber exhibit dose linearity over a wider dose range. 3. Chamber shows dose rate independence for all available dose rate range. 4. Response of chamber with the angle of incidence of radiation is constant. 5. Recombination correction factors were 1.01848 and 1.02537 for dose rate 1400 and 2400 MU per min resp. Conclusion: Our study reveals that the chamber is prone to saturation effect at dose rate of 2400 MU per min. FAR 65-GB can be used for reference dosimetry of FFF MV photon beam with proper calculation of recombination effect.

  8. Photon energy tunability of advanced photon source undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viccaro, P.J.; Shenoy, G.K.

    1987-08-01

    At a fixed storage ring energy, the energy of the harmonics of an undulator can be shifted or ''tuned'' by changing the magnet gap of the device. The possible photon energy interval spanned in this way depends on the undulator period, minimum closed gap, minimum acceptable photon intensity and storage ring energy. The minimum magnet gap depends directly on the stay clear particle beam aperture required for storage ring operation. The tunability of undulators planned for the Advanced Photon Source with first harmonic photon energies in the range of 5 to 20 keV are discussed. The results of an analysis used to optimize the APS ring energy is presented and tunability contours and intensity parameters are presented for two typical classes of devices

  9. Photon-counting image sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Teranishi, Nobukazu; Theuwissen, Albert; Stoppa, David; Charbon, Edoardo

    2017-01-01

    The field of photon-counting image sensors is advancing rapidly with the development of various solid-state image sensor technologies including single photon avalanche detectors (SPADs) and deep-sub-electron read noise CMOS image sensor pixels. This foundational platform technology will enable opportunities for new imaging modalities and instrumentation for science and industry, as well as new consumer applications. Papers discussing various photon-counting image sensor technologies and selected new applications are presented in this all-invited Special Issue.

  10. Photonics activities at DTU Fotonik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle; Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Lodahl, Peter

    2010-01-01

    DTU Fotonik, Department of Photonics Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark has about 200 employees including 60 PhD students. The ambition is to be among the world’s leading University departments within photonics research, education and innovation. To fulfil this ambition, DTU Fotonik...... tries to attract excellent researchers and students from all over the world and to collaborate with world leading research institutes and companies. The activities span from quantum photonics, nanotechnology and metamaterials over nonlinear fiber optics, optical sensors and diode lasers & LED systems...

  11. Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-14

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0032 Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics Kuang-Hsiung Wu National Chiao Tung University Final Report 04/14/2017...DATES COVERED (From - To) 18 Apr 2013 to 17 Apr 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Final Report for AOARD Grant FA2386-13-1-4022 “Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics” Date May 23th, 2016

  12. Slow Images and Entangled Photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swordy, Simon

    2007-01-01

    I will discuss some recent experiments using slow light and entangled photons. We recently showed that it was possible to map a two dimensional image onto very low light level signals, slow them down in a hot atomic vapor while preserving the amplitude and phase of the images. If time remains, I will discuss some of our recent work with time-energy entangled photons for quantum cryptography. We were able to show that we could have a measurable state space of over 1000 states for a single pair of entangled photons in fiber.

  13. Photonic Microresonator Research and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chremmos, Ioannis; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos

    2010-01-01

    Photonic Microresonator Research and Applications explores advances in the fabrication process that enable nanometer waveguide separations. The technology surrounding the design and fabrication of optical microresonators has matured to a point where there is a need for commercialization. Consequently, there is a need for device research involving more advanced architectures and more esoteric operating princples. This volume discusses these issues, while also: Showing a reader how to design and fabricate microresonators Discussing microresonators in photonic crystals, microsphere circuits, and sensors, and provides application oriented examples Covering the latest in microresonator research with contributions from the leading researchers Photonic Microresonator Research and Applications would appeal to researchers and academics working in the optical sciences.

  14. Summary of Lepton Photon 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2012-03-14

    In this lecture, I summarize developments presented at the Lepton Photon 2011 conference and give my perspective on the current situation in high-energy physics. I am grateful to the organizers of Lepton Photon 2011 for providing us a very pleasant and simulating week in Mumbai. This year's Lepton Photon conference has covered the full range of subjects that fall within the scope of high-energy physics, including connections to cosmology, nuclear physics, and atomic physics. The experiments that were discussed detect particles ranging in energy from radio frequencies to EeV.

  15. Random photonic crystal optical memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth Lima Jr, A; Sombra, A S B

    2012-01-01

    Currently, optical cross-connects working on wavelength division multiplexing systems are based on optical fiber delay lines buffering. We designed and analyzed a novel photonic crystal optical memory, which replaces the fiber delay lines of the current optical cross-connect buffer. Optical buffering systems based on random photonic crystal optical memory have similar behavior to the electronic buffering systems based on electronic RAM memory. In this paper, we show that OXCs working with optical buffering based on random photonic crystal optical memories provides better performance than the current optical cross-connects. (paper)

  16. Photon-Photon Luminosities in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions at LHC Energies

    OpenAIRE

    Hencken, Kai; Trautmann, Dirk; Baur, Gerhard

    1994-01-01

    Effective photon-photon luminosities are calculated for various realistic hadron collider scenarios. The main characteristics of photon-photon processes at relativistic heavy-ion colliders are established and compared to the corresponding photon-photon luminosities at electron-positron and future Photon Linear Colliders (PLC). Higher order corrections as well as inelastic processes are discussed. It is concluded that feasible high luminosity Ca-Ca collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)...

  17. Tailoring single-photon and multiphoton probabilities of a single-photon on-demand source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdall, A.L.; Branning, D.; Castelletto, S.

    2002-01-01

    As typically implemented, single-photon sources cannot be made to produce single photons with high probability, while simultaneously suppressing the probability of yielding two or more photons. Because of this, single-photon sources cannot really produce single photons on demand. We describe a multiplexed system that allows the probabilities of producing one and more photons to be adjusted independently, enabling a much better approximation of a source of single photons on demand

  18. gPhoton: THE GALEX PHOTON DATA ARCHIVE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Million, Chase [Million Concepts LLC, P.O. Box 119, 141 Mary Street, Lemont, PA 16851 (United States); Fleming, Scott W.; Shiao, Bernie; Smith, Myron; Thompson, Randy; White, Richard L. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Seibert, Mark [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Loyd, Parke [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Boulder, Colorado, 80309 (United States); Tucker, Michael [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28608 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    gPhoton is a new database product and software package that enables analysis of GALEX ultraviolet data at the photon level. The project’s stand-alone, pure-Python calibration pipeline reproduces the functionality of the original mission pipeline to reduce raw spacecraft data to lists of time-tagged, sky-projected photons, which are then hosted in a publicly available database by the Mikulski Archive at Space Telescope. This database contains approximately 130 terabytes of data describing approximately 1.1 trillion sky-projected events with a timestamp resolution of five milliseconds. A handful of Python and command-line modules serve as a front end to interact with the database and to generate calibrated light curves and images from the photon-level data at user-defined temporal and spatial scales. The gPhoton software and source code are in active development and publicly available under a permissive license. We describe the motivation, design, and implementation of the calibration pipeline, database, and tools, with emphasis on divergence from prior work, as well as challenges created by the large data volume. We summarize the astrometric and photometric performance of gPhoton relative to the original mission pipeline. For a brief example of short time-domain science capabilities enabled by gPhoton, we show new flares from the known M-dwarf flare star CR Draconis. The gPhoton software has permanent object identifiers with the ASCL (ascl:1603.004) and DOI (doi:10.17909/T9CC7G). This paper describes the software as of version v1.27.2.

  19. Vector-vector production in photon-photon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronan, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of exclusive untagged /rho/ 0 /rho/ 0 , /rho//phi/, K/sup *//bar K//sup */, and /rho/ω production and tagged /rho/ 0 /rho/ 0 production in photon-photon interactions by the TPC/Two-Gamma experiment are reviewed. Comparisons to the results of other experiments and to models of vector-vector production are made. Fits to the data following a four quark model prescription for vector meson pair production are also presented. 10 refs., 9 figs

  20. The photonic nanowire: A highly efficient single-photon source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The photonic nanowire represents an attractive platform for a quantum light emitter. However, careful optical engineering using the modal method, which elegantly allows access to all relevant physical parameters, is crucial to ensure high efficiency.......The photonic nanowire represents an attractive platform for a quantum light emitter. However, careful optical engineering using the modal method, which elegantly allows access to all relevant physical parameters, is crucial to ensure high efficiency....

  1. Engineering Photon-Photon Interactions within Rubidium-Filled Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrella, C.; Light, P. S.; Vahid, S. Afshar; Benabid, F.; Luiten, A. N.

    2018-04-01

    Strong photon-photon interactions are a required ingredient for deterministic two-photon optical quantum logic gates. Multiphoton transitions in dense atomic vapors have been shown to be a promising avenue for producing such interactions. The strength of a multiphoton interaction can be enhanced by conducting the interaction in highly confined geometries such as small-cross-section optical waveguides. We demonstrate, both experimentally and theoretically, that the strength of such interactions scale only with the optical mode diameter, d , not d2 as might be initially expected. This weakening of the interaction arises from atomic motion inside the waveguides. We create an interaction between two optical signals, at 780 and 776 nm, using the 5 S1 /2→5 D5 /2 two-photon transition in rubidium vapor within a range of hollow-core fibers with different core sizes. The interaction strength is characterized by observing the absorption and phase shift induced on the 780-nm beam, which is in close agreement with theoretical modeling that accounts for the atomic motion inside the fibers. These observations demonstrate that transit-time effects upon multiphoton transitions are of key importance when engineering photon-photon interactions within small-cross-section waveguides that might otherwise be thought to lead to enhanced optical nonlinearity through increased intensities.

  2. EDITORIAL: Photonic terahertz technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisauskas, Alvydas; Löffler, Torsten; Roskos, Hartmut G.

    2005-07-01

    In recent years, when reading newspapers and journals or watching TV, one has been able to find feature presentations dealing with the prospects of terahertz (THz) technology and its potential impact on market applications. THz technology aims to fill the THz gap in the electro-magnetic spectrum in order to make the THz frequency regime, which spans the two orders of magnitude from 100 GHz to 10 THz, accessible for applications. From the lower-frequency side, electronics keeps pushing upwards, while photonic approaches gradually improve our technological options at higher frequencies. The popular interest reflects the considerable advances in research in the THz field, and it is mainly advances in the photonic branch, with the highlight being the development of the THz quantum cascade laser, which in recent years have caught the imagination of the public, and of potential users and investors. This special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology provides an overview of key scientific developments which currently represent the cutting edge of THz photonic technology. In order to be clear about the implications, we should define exactly what we mean by 'THz photonic technology', or synonymously 'THz photonics'. It is characterized by the way in which THz radiation (or a guided THz wave) is generated, namely by the use of lasers. This may be done in one of two fundamentally different schemes: (i) by laser action in the terahertz frequency range itself (THz lasers), or (ii) by down-conversion processes (photomixing) involving the radiation of lasers which operate in the visible, near-infrared or infrared spectral ranges, either in pulsed or continuous-wave mode. The field of THz photonics has grown so considerably that it is out of the question to cover all its aspects in a single special issue of a journal. We have elected, instead, to focus our attention on two types of development with a potentially strong impact on the THz field: first, on significant advances

  3. Photonics for aerospace sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, John; Adler, Eric D.; Filipov, Andree N.; Harrison, Lorna J.; van der Gracht, Joseph; Smith, Dale J.; Tayag, Tristan J.; Viveiros, Edward A.

    1992-11-01

    The maturation in the state-of-the-art of optical components is enabling increased applications for the technology. Most notable is the ever-expanding market for fiber optic data and communications links, familiar in both commercial and military markets. The inherent properties of optics and photonics, however, have suggested that components and processors may be designed that offer advantages over more commonly considered digital approaches for a variety of airborne sensor and signal processing applications. Various academic, industrial, and governmental research groups have been actively investigating and exploiting these properties of high bandwidth, large degree of parallelism in computation (e.g., processing in parallel over a two-dimensional field), and interconnectivity, and have succeeded in advancing the technology to the stage of systems demonstration. Such advantages as computational throughput and low operating power consumption are highly attractive for many computationally intensive problems. This review covers the key devices necessary for optical signal and image processors, some of the system application demonstration programs currently in progress, and active research directions for the implementation of next-generation architectures.

  4. Patterned Colloidal Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jue; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin

    2018-03-01

    Colloidal photonic crystals (PCs) have been well developed because they are easy to prepare, cost-effective, and versatile with regards to modification and functionalization. Patterned colloidal PCs contribute a novel approach to constructing high-performance PC devices with unique structures and specific functions. In this review, an overview of the strategies for fabricating patterned colloidal PCs, including patterned substrate-induced assembly, inkjet printing, and selective immobilization and modification, is presented. The advantages of patterned PC devices are also discussed in detail, for example, improved detection sensitivity and response speed of the sensors, control over the flow direction and wicking rate of microfluidic channels, recognition of cross-reactive molecules through an array-patterned microchip, fabrication of display devices with tunable patterns, well-arranged RGB units, and wide viewing-angles, and the ability to construct anti-counterfeiting devices with different security strategies. Finally, the perspective of future developments and challenges is presented. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. THE PHOTON UNDERPRODUCTION CRISIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollmeier, Juna A.; Weinberg, David H.; McEwen, Joseph; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Danforth, Charles; Haardt, Francesco; Katz, Neal; Fardal, Mark; Davé, Romeel; Madau, Piero; Ford, Amanda B.; Peeples, Molly S.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the statistics of the low-redshift Lyα forest from smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations in light of recent improvements in the estimated evolution of the cosmic ultraviolet background (UVB) and recent observations from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS). We find that the value of the metagalactic photoionization rate (Γ HI ) required by our simulations to match the observed properties of the low-redshift Lyα forest is a factor of five larger than the value predicted by state-of-the art models for the evolution of this quantity. This mismatch in Γ HI results in the mean flux decrement of the Lyα forest being overpredicted by at least a factor of two (a 10σ discrepancy with observations) and a column density distribution of Lyα forest absorbers systematically and significantly elevated compared to observations over nearly two decades in column density. We examine potential resolutions to this mismatch and find that either conventional sources of ionizing photons (galaxies and quasars) must contribute considerably more than current observational estimates or our theoretical understanding of the low-redshift universe is in need of substantial revision

  6. Photon interactions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, S.T.; Sealock, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    This document is a progress report for DOE Grant No. FG05-89ER40501, A000. The grant began March, 1989. Our primary research effort has been expended at the LEGS project at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report will summarize our present research effort at LEGS as well as data analysis and publications from previous experiments performed at SLAC. In addition the principal investigators are heavily involved in the CLAS collaboration in Hall B at CEBAF. We have submitted several letters of intent and proposals and have made commitments to construct experimental equipment for CEBAF. We expect our primary experimental effort to continue at LEGS until CEBAF becomes operational. This report will be divided into separate sections describing our progress at LEGS, SLAC, and CEBAF. We will also discuss our significant efforts in the education and training of both undergraduate and graduate students. Photon detectors are described as well as experiments on delta deformation in nuclei of quasielastic scattering and excitation of the delta by 4 He(e,e')

  7. Thermoelectric single-photon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzanyan, A A; Petrosyan, V A; Kuzanyan, A S

    2012-01-01

    The ability to detect a single photon is the ultimate level of sensitivity in the measurement of optical radiation. Sensors capable of detecting single photons and determining their energy have many scientific and technological applications. Kondo-enhanced Seebeck effect cryogenic detectors are based on thermoelectric heat-to-voltage conversion and voltage readout. We evaluate the prospects of CeB 6 and (La,Ce)B 6 hexaboride crystals for their application as a sensitive element in this type of detectors. We conclude that such detectors can register a single UV photon, have a fast count rate (up to 45 MHz) and a high spectral resolution of 0.1 eV. We calculate the electric potential generated along the thermoelectric sensor upon registering a UV single photon.

  8. Manipulating continuous variable photonic entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plenio, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    I will review our work on photonic entanglement in the continuous variable regime including both Gaussian and non-Gaussian states. The feasibility and efficiency of various entanglement purification protocols are discussed this context. (author)

  9. Femtosecond Photon-Counting Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Rambo, Timothy M.; Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Numata, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    An optical correlation receiver is described that provides ultra-precise distance and/or time/pulse-width measurements even for weak (single photons) and short (femtosecond) optical signals. A new type of optical correlation receiver uses a fourth-order (intensity) interferometer to provide micron distance measurements even for weak (single photons) and short (femtosecond) optical signals. The optical correlator uses a low-noise-integrating detector that can resolve photon number. The correlation (range as a function of path delay) is calculated from the variance of the photon number of the difference of the optical signals on the two detectors. Our preliminary proof-of principle data (using a short-pulse diode laser transmitter) demonstrates tens of microns precision.

  10. Photon management in solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Rau, Uwe; Gombert, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Written by renowned experts in the field of photon management in solar cells, this one-stop reference gives an introduction to the physics of light management in solar cells, and discusses the different concepts and methods of applying photon management. The authors cover the physics, principles, concepts, technologies, and methods used, explaining how to increase the efficiency of solar cells by splitting or modifying the solar spectrum before they absorb the sunlight. In so doing, they present novel concepts and materials allowing for the cheaper, more flexible manufacture of solar cells and systems. For educational purposes, the authors have split the reasons for photon management into spatial and spectral light management. Bridging the gap between the photonics and the photovoltaics communities, this is an invaluable reference for materials scientists, physicists in industry, experimental physicists, lecturers in physics, Ph.D. students in physics and material sciences, engineers in power technology, appl...

  11. Nano lasers in photonic VLSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hill, M.T.; Oei, Y.S.; Smit, M.K.

    2007-01-01

    We examine the use of micro and nano lasers to form digital photonic VLSI building blocks. Problems such as isolation and cascading of building blocks are addressed, and the potential of future nano lasers explored.

  12. Modelling of photonic crystal fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    , as well as a honeycomb bandgap fibre and the first analysis of semi-periodic layered air-hole fibres. Using the modelling framework established as a basis, we provide an analysis of microbend loss, by regarding displacement of a fibre core as a stationary stochastic process, inducing mismatch between......In the presenta ph.d. work a theoretical study of aspects of modelling photonic crystal fibres was carried out. Photonic crystal fibres form a class of optical waveguides where guidance is no longer provided by a difference in refractive index between core and cladding. Instead, guidance...... is provided by an arrangement of air-holes running along the length of the fibre. Depending on the geometry of the fibre, the guiding mechanism may be either arising from the formation of a photonic bandgap in the cladding structure (photonic bandgap fibre), or by an effect resembling total internal...

  13. Quantum photonic networks in diamond

    KAUST Repository

    Lončar, Marko; Faraon, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have enabled the opportunity to fabricate nanoscale optical devices and chip-scale systems in diamond that can generate, manipulate, and store optical signals at the single-photon level. In particular, nanophotonics has

  14. Parity-Time Symmetric Photonics

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Han

    2018-01-17

    The establishment of non-Hermitian quantum mechanics (such as parity-time (PT) symmetry) stimulates a paradigmatic shift for studying symmetries of complex potentials. Owing to the convenient manipulation of optical gain and loss in analogy to the complex quantum potentials, photonics provides an ideal platform for visualization of many conceptually striking predictions from the non-Hermitian quantum theory. A rapidly developing field has emerged, namely, PT symmetric photonics, demonstrating intriguing optical phenomena including eigenstate coalescence and spontaneous PT symmetry breaking. The advance of quantum physics, as the feedback, provides photonics with brand-new paradigms to explore the entire complex permittivity plane for novel optical functionalities. Here, we review recent exciting breakthroughs in PT symmetric photonics while systematically presenting their underlying principles guided by non-Hermitian symmetries. The potential device applications for optical communication and computing, bio-chemical sensing, and healthcare are also discussed.

  15. Coupling the photon kinetics of soft photons with high energy photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, L. O.; Bingham, R.

    2017-10-01

    The description of electromagnetic fields based on the generalized photon kinetic theory, which takes advantage of the Wigner-Moyal description for the corresponding classical field theory, is capable of capturing collective plasma dynamics in the relativistic regime driven by broadband incoherent or partially coherent sources. We explore the possibility to extend this description to include the dynamics of hard photons in the plasma, whose interaction is dominated by single scattering processes. Examples of the modification of classical plasma instabilities due to the presence of hard photons is discussed. Work supported by the European Research Council (ERC-AdG-2015 InPairs Grant No. 695088).

  16. National Photonics Skills Standard for Technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This document defines "photonics" as the generation, manipulation, transport, detection, and use of light information and energy whose quantum unit is the photon. The range of applications of photonics extends from energy generation to detection to communication and information processing. Photonics is at the heart of today's…

  17. Photon final states at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanelli, Mario; /University Coll. London

    2008-04-01

    The authors present here several recent measurements involving associate production of photons and jets at the Tevatron. In particular, inclusive photon + met from D0, and photon + b-jets and photon + b-jet + leptons + MET from CDF are described in some detail. These measurements offer a good test of QCD predictions in rather complex final states.

  18. Experimental search for muonic photons

    CERN Document Server

    Vilain, P; Beyer, R; Flegel, Wilfried; Mouthuy, T; Øverås, H; Panman, J; Rozanov, A N; Winter, Klaus; Zacek, G; Zacek, V; Büsser, F W; Foos, C; Gerland, L; Layda, T; Niebergall, F; Rädel, G; Stähelin, P; Voss, T; Favart, D; Grégoire, G; Knoops, E; Lemaître, V; Gorbunov, P; Grigoriev, E A; Ilyin, V A; Khovanskii, V D; Maslennikov, A M; Okun, Lev Borisovich; Lippich, W; Nathaniel, A; Staude, A; Vogt, J; Cocco, A G; Ereditato, A; Fiorillo, G; Marchetti-Stasi, F; Palladino, Vittorio; Strolin, P; Capone, A; De Pedis, D; Dore, U; Frenkel-Rambaldi, A; Loverre, P F; Macina, Daniela; Piredda, G; Santacesaria, R; Di Capua, E; Ricciardi, S; Saitta, B; Akkus, B; Arik, E; Serin-Zeyrek, M; Sever, R; Tolun, P; Hiller, K; Nahnhauer, R; Roloff, H

    1998-01-01

    We report new limits on the production of muonic photons in the CERN neutrino beam. The results are based on the analysis of neutrino production of dimuons in the CHARM II detector. A $90\\%$ CL limit on the coupling constant of muonic photons, $\\alpha_{\\mu} / \\alpha < (1.5 \\div 3.2) \\times10^{-6}$ is derived for a muon neutrino mass in the range $m_{\

  19. Photon factory activity report, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This issue is the annual report of the Photon Factory, National laboratory of High Energy Physics. First, the outline of the Photon Factory is presented. Injector linac, light source, beamlines and instrumentation, the Tristan synchrotron radiation facility at the accumulation ring, and the Tristan super light facility are described in detail. The facility is open to researchers. The user's reports are collected as well. (J.P.N.) (435 refs.)

  20. Modeling of photonic Crystal Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Barkou, Stig Eigil

    1999-01-01

    Diferent theoretical models for analysis of photonic crystal fibres are reviewed and compaired. The methods span from simple scalar approaches to full-vectorial models using different mode-field decompositions. The specific advantages of the methods are evaluated.......Diferent theoretical models for analysis of photonic crystal fibres are reviewed and compaired. The methods span from simple scalar approaches to full-vectorial models using different mode-field decompositions. The specific advantages of the methods are evaluated....

  1. Topology Optimized Photonic Wire Splitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Borel, Peter Ingo; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2006-01-01

    Photonic wire splitters have been designed using topology optimization. The splitters have been fabricated in silicon-on-insulator material and display broadband low-loss 3dB splitting in a bandwidth larger than 100 nm.......Photonic wire splitters have been designed using topology optimization. The splitters have been fabricated in silicon-on-insulator material and display broadband low-loss 3dB splitting in a bandwidth larger than 100 nm....

  2. Photon factory activity report, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This issue is the annual report of the Photon Factory, National Laboratory of High Energy Physics. First the outline of the Photon Factory is presented. Injector linac, light source, beamlines and instrumentation, synchrotron radiation facility at the Tristan accumulation ring, and the Tristan super light facility are described in detail. The facility is open to researchers. The user's reports are collected as well. (J.P.N.)

  3. Approaches to single photon detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thew, R.T.; Curtz, N.; Eraerds, P.; Walenta, N.; Gautier, J.-D.; Koller, E.; Zhang, J.; Gisin, N.; Zbinden, H.

    2009-01-01

    We present recent results on our development of single photon detectors, including: gated and free-running InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes (APDs); hybrid detection systems based on sum-frequency generation (SFG) and Si APDs-SFG-Si APDs; and SSPDs (superconducting single photon detectors), for telecom wavelengths; as well as SiPM (Silicon photomultiplier) detectors operating in the visible regime.

  4. Spin dependent photon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohar, A.V.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1989-01-01

    Spin dependent structure functions of the photon are studied using the operator product expansion. There are new twist-two photon and gluon operators which contribute. The structure functions g 1 and F 3 are calculable in QCD, but differ from their free quark values. The corrections to F 3 are suppressed by 1/log Q 2 . The calculation is an extension of the analysis of Witten for the spin averaged structure functions F 1 and F 2 . (orig.)

  5. Quasimetallic silicon micromachined photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temelkuran, B.; Bayindir, Mehmet; Ozbay, E.; Kavanaugh, J. P.; Sigalas, M. M.; Tuttle, G.

    2001-01-01

    We report on fabrication of a layer-by-layer photonic crystal using highly doped silicon wafers processed by semiconductor micromachining techniques. The crystals, built using (100) silicon wafers, resulted in an upper stop band edge at 100 GHz. The transmission and defect characteristics of these structures were found to be analogous to metallic photonic crystals. We also investigated the effect of doping concentration on the defect characteristics. The experimental results agree well with predictions of the transfer matrix method simulations

  6. Topological Photonics for Continuous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveirinha, Mario

    Photonic crystals have revolutionized light-based technologies during the last three decades. Notably, it was recently discovered that the light propagation in photonic crystals may depend on some topological characteristics determined by the manner how the light states are mutually entangled. The usual topological classification of photonic crystals explores the fact that these structures are periodic. The periodicity is essential to ensure that the underlying wave vector space is a closed surface with no boundary. In this talk, we prove that it is possible calculate Chern invariants for a wide class of continuous bianisotropic electromagnetic media with no intrinsic periodicity. The nontrivial topology of the relevant continuous materials is linked with the emergence of edge states. Moreover, we will demonstrate that continuous photonic media with the time-reversal symmetry can be topologically characterized by a Z2 integer. This novel classification extends for the first time the theory of electronic topological insulators to a wide range of photonic platforms, and is expected to have an impact in the design of novel photonic systems that enable a topologically protected transport of optical energy. This work is supported in part by Fundacao para a Ciencia e a Tecnologia Grant Number PTDC/EEI-TEL/4543/2014.

  7. Spatial filtering with photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maigyte, Lina [Departament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Rambla Sant Nebridi 22, Terrassa 08222 (Spain); Staliunas, Kestutis [Departament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Rambla Sant Nebridi 22, Terrassa 08222 (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Pg. Lluís Companys 23, Barcelona 08010 (Spain)

    2015-03-15

    Photonic crystals are well known for their celebrated photonic band-gaps—the forbidden frequency ranges, for which the light waves cannot propagate through the structure. The frequency (or chromatic) band-gaps of photonic crystals can be utilized for frequency filtering. In analogy to the chromatic band-gaps and the frequency filtering, the angular band-gaps and the angular (spatial) filtering are also possible in photonic crystals. In this article, we review the recent advances of the spatial filtering using the photonic crystals in different propagation regimes and for different geometries. We review the most evident configuration of filtering in Bragg regime (with the back-reflection—i.e., in the configuration with band-gaps) as well as in Laue regime (with forward deflection—i.e., in the configuration without band-gaps). We explore the spatial filtering in crystals with different symmetries, including axisymmetric crystals; we discuss the role of chirping, i.e., the dependence of the longitudinal period along the structure. We also review the experimental techniques to fabricate the photonic crystals and numerical techniques to explore the spatial filtering. Finally, we discuss several implementations of such filters for intracavity spatial filtering.

  8. Ultra-broadband photonic internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, there is presented a review of our today's understanding of the ultimately broadband photonic Internet. A simple calculation is presented showing the estimate of the throughput of the core photonic network branches. Optoelectronic components, circuits, systems and signals, together with analogous electronic entities and common software layers, are building blocks of the contemporary Internet. Participation of photonics in development of the physical layer in the future Internet will probably increase. The photonics leads now to a better usage of the available bandwidth (increase of the spectral efficiency measured in Bit/s/Hz), increase in the transmission rate (from Gbps, via Tbps up to probably Pbps), increase in the transmission distance without signal regeneration (in distortion compensated active optical cables), increase in energy/power efficiency measured in W/Gbps, etc. Photonics may lead, in the future, to fully transparent optical networks and, thus, to essential increase in bandwidth and network reliability. It is expected that photonics (with biochemistry, electronics and mechatronics) may build psychological and physiological interface for humans to the future global network. The following optical signal multiplexing methods were considered, which are possible without O/E/O conversion: TDM-OTDM, FDM-CO-OFDM, OCDM-OCDMA, WDM-DWDM.

  9. Tunable Multiband Microwave Photonic Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mable P. Fok

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for multifunctional devices, the use of cognitive wireless technology to solve the frequency resource shortage problem, as well as the capabilities and operational flexibility necessary to meet ever-changing environment result in an urgent need of multiband wireless communications. Spectral filter is an essential part of any communication systems, and in the case of multiband wireless communications, tunable multiband RF filters are required for channel selection, noise/interference removal, and RF signal processing. Unfortunately, it is difficult for RF electronics to achieve both tunable and multiband spectral filtering. Recent advancements of microwave photonics have proven itself to be a promising candidate to solve various challenges in RF electronics including spectral filtering, however, the development of multiband microwave photonic filtering still faces lots of difficulties, due to the limited scalability and tunability of existing microwave photonic schemes. In this review paper, we first discuss the challenges that were facing by multiband microwave photonic filter, then we review recent techniques that have been developed to tackle the challenge and lead to promising developments of tunable microwave photonic multiband filters. The successful design and implementation of tunable microwave photonic multiband filter facilitate the vision of dynamic multiband wireless communications and radio frequency signal processing for commercial, defense, and civilian applications.

  10. Computational Modeling of Photonic Crystal Microcavity Single-Photon Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulnier, Nicole A.

    Conventional cryptography is based on algorithms that are mathematically complex and difficult to solve, such as factoring large numbers. The advent of a quantum computer would render these schemes useless. As scientists work to develop a quantum computer, cryptographers are developing new schemes for unconditionally secure cryptography. Quantum key distribution has emerged as one of the potential replacements of classical cryptography. It relics on the fact that measurement of a quantum bit changes the state of the bit and undetected eavesdropping is impossible. Single polarized photons can be used as the quantum bits, such that a quantum system would in some ways mirror the classical communication scheme. The quantum key distribution system would include components that create, transmit and detect single polarized photons. The focus of this work is on the development of an efficient single-photon source. This source is comprised of a single quantum dot inside of a photonic crystal microcavity. To better understand the physics behind the device, a computational model is developed. The model uses Finite-Difference Time-Domain methods to analyze the electromagnetic field distribution in photonic crystal microcavities. It uses an 8-band k · p perturbation theory to compute the energy band structure of the epitaxially grown quantum dots. We discuss a method that combines the results of these two calculations for determining the spontaneous emission lifetime of a quantum dot in bulk material or in a microcavity. The computational models developed in this thesis are used to identify and characterize microcavities for potential use in a single-photon source. The computational tools developed are also used to investigate novel photonic crystal microcavities that incorporate 1D distributed Bragg reflectors for vertical confinement. It is found that the spontaneous emission enhancement in the quasi-3D cavities can be significantly greater than in traditional suspended slab

  11. Neutron-induced photon production in MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, R.C.; Seamon, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    An improved method of neutron-induced photon production has been incorporated into the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP. The new method makes use of all partial photon-production reaction data provided by ENDF/B evaluators including photon-production cross sections as well as energy and angular distributions of secondary photons. This faithful utilization of sophisticated ENDF/B evaluations allows more precise MCNP calculations for several classes of coupled neutron-photon problems

  12. SU-G-BRB-05: Automation of the Photon Dosimetric Quality Assurance Program of a Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebron, S; Lu, B; Yan, G; Li, J; Liu, C [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated method to calculate a linear accelerator (LINAC) photon radiation field size, flatness, symmetry, output and beam quality in a single delivery for flattened (FF) and flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams using an ionization chamber array. Methods: The proposed method consists of three control points that deliver 30×30, 10×10 and 5×5cm{sup 2} fields (FF or FFF) in a step-and-shoot sequence where the number of monitor units is weighted for each field size. The IC Profiler (Sun Nuclear Inc.) with 5mm detector spacing was used for this study. The corrected counts (CCs) were calculated and the locations of the maxima and minima values of the first-order gradient determined data of each sub field. Then, all CCs for each field size are summed in order to obtain the final profiles. For each profile, the radiation field size, symmetry, flatness, output factor and beam quality were calculated. For field size calculation, a parameterized gradient method was used. For method validation, profiles were collected in the detector array both, individually and as part of the step-and-shoot plan, with 9.9cm buildup for FF and FFF beams at 90cm source-to-surface distance. The same data were collected with the device (plus buildup) placed on a movable platform to achieve a 1mm resolution. Results: The differences between the dosimetric quantities calculated from both deliveries, individually and step-and-shoot, were within 0.31±0.20% and 0.04±0.02mm. The differences between the calculated field sizes with 5mm and 1mm resolution were ±0.1mm. Conclusion: The proposed single delivery method proved to be simple and efficient in automating the photon dosimetric monthly and annual quality assurance.

  13. Formation of η' mesons in photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uitert, B.K. van.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis describes an experiment performed at the positron electron storage ring PEP at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center on the formation of the η' resonance which is observed in its decay mode ρ 0 γ, where the ρ decays into a π + π - pair. Some general features of the relatively new subject of photon-photon physics are introduced. The η' and the coupling of photons to the η' are discussed in the context of the quark model. It is shown how the mixing angle in the nonet of pseudoscalar mesons can be derived from ratios of γγ widths. The kinematics of the two-photon exchange process, the formation of the η' resonance by the two virtual photons and its subsequent electromagnetic decay into ρ 0 γ are discussed. The selected sample of events is used to determine the γγ width of the η' under the conventional assignment J P = 0 - for the η' and J P = 1 - for the ρ. The result is combined with measurements by other experiments to a world average, which is used to determine the mixing angle for the pseudoscalar nonet under various assumptions. The decay angular and energy distributions are investigated in detail. (Auth.)

  14. Monte Carlo-based investigations on the impact of removing the flattening filter on beam quality specifiers for photon beam dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Damian; Poppe, Björn; Zink, Klemens

    2017-06-01

    , namely (L¯/ρ)airwater, mean photon and electron energy. Furthermore, the results show that a beam profile correction is important for dose measurements with large ionization chambers in flattening filter free beams. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. On the validity of the equivalent-photon approximation for virtual photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carimalo, C.; Kessler, P.; Parisi, J.

    1979-05-01

    For virtual photon-photon collisions in electron storage rings, one derive the equivalent-photon approximation from a helicity treatment, and present it in two forms, involving respectively (i) polarized transverse photons ('transverse-photon approximation') and (ii) unpolarized ones ('Williams-Weizsaecker approximation'). One first postulates the conditions of validity of the approximation on the basis of analytic considerations, and then check them numerically in the case of the process e e → e e μ + μ - . For this check, we consider the completely differentiated cross section as far as approximation (i) is concerned; and in the case of approximation (ii), the cross section differentiated with respect to all variables except the azimuthal angles. The results are given in the form of Tables showing the lower and higher limit of the error involved in the approximation for a large variety of kinematic configurations (i. e., energy losses and scattering angles of both electrons). Those Tables are discussed in detail, and conclusions are drawn as to the applicability of the equivalent-photon approximation to future experiments to be performed with high-energy electron storage rings

  16. PHOTON09. Proceedings of the international conference on the structure and interactions of the photon including the 18th international workshop on photon-photon collisions and the international workshop on high energy photon linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Olaf; Diehl, Markus; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Steinbrueck, Georg [eds.

    2010-01-15

    The following topics were dealt with: Electroweak and new physics, photon-collider technology, low-energy photon experiments, prompt photons, photon structure, jets and heavy flavours, vacuum polarization and light-by-light scattering, small-x processes, diffraction, total cross sections, exclusive channels and resonances, photons in astroparticle physics. (HSI)

  17. PHOTON09. Proceedings of the international conference on the structure and interactions of the photon including the 18th international workshop on photon-photon collisions and the international workshop on high energy photon linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnke, Olaf; Diehl, Markus; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Steinbrueck, Georg

    2010-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Electroweak and new physics, photon-collider technology, low-energy photon experiments, prompt photons, photon structure, jets and heavy flavours, vacuum polarization and light-by-light scattering, small-x processes, diffraction, total cross sections, exclusive channels and resonances, photons in astroparticle physics. (HSI)

  18. Silicon photonics: some remaining challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, G. T.; Topley, R.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thompson, D. J.; Stanković, S.; Reynolds, S.; Chen, X.; Soper, N.; Mitchell, C. J.; Hu, Y.; Shen, L.; Martinez-Jimenez, G.; Healy, N.; Mailis, S.; Peacock, A. C.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Gardes, F. Y.; Soler Penades, J.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Ortega-Monux, A.; Wanguemert-Perez, G.; Molina-Fernandez, I.; Cheben, P.; Mashanovich, G. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses some of the remaining challenges for silicon photonics, and how we at Southampton University have approached some of them. Despite phenomenal advances in the field of Silicon Photonics, there are a number of areas that still require development. For short to medium reach applications, there is a need to improve the power consumption of photonic circuits such that inter-chip, and perhaps intra-chip applications are viable. This means that yet smaller devices are required as well as thermally stable devices, and multiple wavelength channels. In turn this demands smaller, more efficient modulators, athermal circuits, and improved wavelength division multiplexers. The debate continues as to whether on-chip lasers are necessary for all applications, but an efficient low cost laser would benefit many applications. Multi-layer photonics offers the possibility of increasing the complexity and effectiveness of a given area of chip real estate, but it is a demanding challenge. Low cost packaging (in particular, passive alignment of fibre to waveguide), and effective wafer scale testing strategies, are also essential for mass market applications. Whilst solutions to these challenges would enhance most applications, a derivative technology is emerging, that of Mid Infra-Red (MIR) silicon photonics. This field will build on existing developments, but will require key enhancements to facilitate functionality at longer wavelengths. In common with mainstream silicon photonics, significant developments have been made, but there is still much left to do. Here we summarise some of our recent work towards wafer scale testing, passive alignment, multiplexing, and MIR silicon photonics technology.

  19. Photonics Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Elizabeth [UNLV Research Foundation, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2010-01-15

    During the period August 2005 through October 2009, the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF), a non-profit affiliate of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), in collaboration with UNLV's Colleges of Science and Engineering; Boston University (BU); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and Sunlight Direct, LLC, has managed and conducted a diverse and comprehensive research and development program focused on light-emitting diode (LED) technologies that provide significantly improved characteristics for lighting and display applications. This final technical report provides detailed information on the nature of the tasks, the results of the research, and the deliverables. It is estimated that about five percent of the energy used in the nation is for lighting homes, buildings and streets, accounting for some 25 percent of the average home's electric bill. However, the figure is significantly higher for the commercial sector. About 60 percent of the electricity for businesses is for lighting. Thus replacement of current lighting with solid-state lighting technology has the potential to significantly reduce this nation's energy consumption by some estimates, possibly as high as 20%. The primary objective of this multi-year R&D project has been to develop and advance lighting technologies to improve national energy conversion efficiencies; reduce heat load; and significantly lower the cost of conventional lighting technologies. The UNLVRF and its partners have specifically focused these talents on (1) improving LED technologies; (2) optimizing hybrid solar lighting, a technology which potentially offers the benefits of blending natural with artificial lighting systems, thus improving energy efficiency; and (3) building a comprehensive academic infrastructure within UNLV which concentrates on photonics R&D. Task researchers have reported impressive progress in (1) the development of quantum dot laser emitting diodes (QDLEDs) which will ultimately improve

  20. Enhanced axion-photon coupling in GUT with hidden photon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daido, Ryuji; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Yokozaki, Norimi

    2018-05-01

    We show that the axion coupling to photons can be enhanced in simple models with a single Peccei-Quinn field, if the gauge coupling unification is realized by a large kinetic mixing χ = O (0.1) between hypercharge and unbroken hidden U(1)H. The key observation is that the U(1)H gauge coupling should be rather strong to induce such large kinetic mixing, leading to enhanced contributions of hidden matter fields to the electromagnetic anomaly. We find that the axion-photon coupling is enhanced by about a factor of 10-100 with respect to the GUT-axion models with E / N = 8 / 3.

  1. Photon statistics characterization of a single-photon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleaume, R; Treussart, F; Courty, J-M; Roch, J-F

    2004-01-01

    In a recent experiment, we reported the time-domain intensity noise measurement of a single-photon source relying on single-molecule fluorescence control. In this paper, we present data processing starting from photocount timestamps. The theoretical analytical expression of the time-dependent Mandel parameter Q(T) of an intermittent single-photon source is derived from ON↔OFF dynamics. Finally, source intensity noise analysis, using the Mandel parameter, is quantitatively compared with the usual approach relying on the time autocorrelation function, both methods yielding the same molecular dynamical parameters

  2. Dosimetric properties characterization of silicon diodes used in photon beam radiotherapy; Caracterizacao das propriedades dosimetricas de diodos de silicio empregados em radioterapia com feixe de fotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizetto, Cesar Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In the current work it was studied the performance of epitaxial (EPI) and float zone (FZ) silicon diodes as on-line dosimeters for megavoltage (EPI diode) and orthovoltage (EPI and FZ diode) photon beam radiotherapy. In order to be used as dosimeters the diodes were enclosed in black polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) probes. The devices were then connected, on photovoltaic mode, to an electrometer Keithley Registered-Sign 6517B to allow measurements of the photocurrent. The irradiations were performed with 6 and 18 MV photon beams (Siemens Primus Registered-Sign linear accelerator), 6 and 15 MV (Novalis TX Registered-Sign ) and 10, 25, 30 and 50 kV of a Pantak / Seifert X ray radiation device. During the measurements with the Siemens Primus the diodes were held between PMMA plates placed at 10.0 cm depth. When using Novalis TX Registered-Sign the devices were held between solid water plates placed at 50 cm depth. In both cases the diodes were centered in a radiation field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, with the source-to-surface distance (SSD) kept at 100 cm. In measurements with orthovoltage photon beams the diodes were placed 50.0 cm from the tube in a radiation field of 8 cm diameter. The dose-rate dependency was studied for 6 and 15 MV (varying the dose-rate from 100 to 600 monitor units per minute) and for the 50 kV beam by varying the current tube from 2 to 20 mA. All devices showed linear response with dose rate and, within uncertainties the charge collected is independent of dose rate. The current signals induced showed good instantaneous repeatability of the diodes, characterized by coefficients of variation of current (CV) smaller than 1.14% (megavoltage beams) and 0.15% for orthovoltage beams and coefficients of variation of charge (CV) smaller than 1.84% (megavoltage beams) and 1.67% (orthovoltage beams). The dose response curves were quite linear with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.9999 for all diodes. (author)

  3. Dosimetric properties characterization of silicon diodes used in photon beam radiotherapy; Caracterizacao das propriedades dosimetricas de diodos de silicio empregados em radioterapia com fotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizetto, Cesar Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In the current work it was studied the performance of epitaxial (EPI) and float zone (FZ) silicon diodes as on-line dosimeters for megavoltage (EPI diode) and orthovoltage (EPI and FZ diode) photon beam radiotherapy. In order to be used as dosimeters the diodes were enclosed in black polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) probes. The devices were then connected, on photovoltaic mode, to an electrometer KeithleyÒ 6517B to allow measurements of the photocurrent. The irradiations were performed with 6 and 18 MV photon beams (Siemens PrimusÒ linear accelerator), 6 and 15 MV (Novalis TXÒ) and 10, 25, 30 and 50 kV of a Pantak / Seifert X ray radiation device. During the measurements with the Siemens PrimusÒ the diodes were held between PMMA plates placed at 10.0 cm depth. When using Novalis TXÒ the devices were held between solid water plates placed at 50 cm depth. In both cases the diodes were centered in a radiation field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, with the source-to-surface distance (SSD) kept at 100 cm. In measurements with orthovoltage photon beams the diodes were placed 50.0 cm from the tube in a radiation field of 8 cm diameter. The dose-rate dependency was studied for 6 and 15 MV (varying the dose-rate from 100 to 600 monitor units per minute) and for the 50 kV beam by varying the current tube from 2 to 20 mA. All devices showed linear response with dose rate and, within uncertainties the charge collected is independent of dose rate. The current signals induced showed good instantaneous repeatability of the diodes, characterized by coefficients of variation of current (CV) smaller than 1.14% (megavoltage beams) and 0.15% for orthovoltage beams and coefficients of variation of charge (CV) smaller than 1.84% (megavoltage beams) and 1.67% (orthovoltage beams). The dose response curves were quite linear with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.9999 for all diodes. (author)

  4. Entangled photons and quantum communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Zhensheng, E-mail: yuanzs@ustc.edu.c [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bao Xiaohui [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Lu Chaoyang; Zhang Jun; Peng Chengzhi [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Pan Jianwei, E-mail: pan@ustc.edu.c [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    This article reviews the progress of quantum communication that utilizes photonic entanglement. We start with a survey of various methods for generating entangled photons, followed by an introduction of the theoretical principles and the experimental implementations of quantum key distribution. We then move on to a discussion of more involved quantum communication protocols including quantum dense coding, teleportation and quantum communication complexity. After that, we review the progress in free-space quantum communication, decoherence-free subspace, and quantum repeater protocols which are essential ingredients for long-distance quantum communication. Practical realizations of quantum repeaters, which require an interface between photons and quantum memories, are discussed briefly. Finally, we draw concluding remarks considering the technical challenges, and put forward an outlook on further developments of this field.

  5. Photonic quantum technologies (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jeremy L.

    2015-09-01

    The impact of quantum technology will be profound and far-reaching: secure communication networks for consumers, corporations and government; precision sensors for biomedical technology and environmental monitoring; quantum simulators for the design of new materials, pharmaceuticals and clean energy devices; and ultra-powerful quantum computers for addressing otherwise impossibly large datasets for machine learning and artificial intelligence applications. However, engineering quantum systems and controlling them is an immense technological challenge: they are inherently fragile; and information extracted from a quantum system necessarily disturbs the system itself. Of the various approaches to quantum technologies, photons are particularly appealing for their low-noise properties and ease of manipulation at the single qubit level. We have developed an integrated waveguide approach to photonic quantum circuits for high performance, miniaturization and scalability. We will described our latest progress in generating, manipulating and interacting single photons in waveguide circuits on silicon chips.

  6. Photon Factory activity report, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Photon Factory is a national synchrotron radiation research facility affiliated with the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics located in Tsukuba Science City. The Photon Factory consists of a 2.5 GeV electron/positron linear accelerator, a 2.5 GeV electron/positron storage ring, beam lines and experimental stations. All the facilities for synchrotron radiation research are open to scientists. A part of the accumulation ring of the TRISTAN main ring has been used as a synchrotron radiation source in the energy range from 5.8 to 6.5 GeV. The Photon Factory is composed of three divisions of Injector Linac, Light Source and Instrumentation. The researches of each divisions are reviewed, and the users' short reports are collected. The list of published papers with author index is also included in the publication. (K.I.) 233 refs

  7. Quenching effects in photon production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, M.

    1989-01-01

    Contraints on the photon production calculated by kinetic approaches are studied by means of sum-rules a finite temperature for simple quantum system. For the square-well potential the exact production rate is compared with its semi-classical limit in order to introduce the principle problem. For the scattering of hard spheres the photon production cross section is derived exactly by partial wave expansion. This serves to study the more realistic example of a gas of hard spheres. The corresponding kinetic photon production rates are found to violate the sum-rules, due to a singular behaviour at small gamma energies. Thus the hypothesis of incoherent free scattering is not valid in that range because of destructive interferences which quench the production rates significantly. For the application to nuclear collisions at intermediate energies these quenching effects are found to be important for gamma energies even up to a few hundred MeV. (orig.)

  8. Quantum photonics hybrid integration platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, E.; Floether, F. F. [Cambridge Research Laboratory, Toshiba Research Europe Limited, 208 Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ellis, D. J. P.; Meany, T.; Bennett, A. J., E-mail: anthony.bennet@crl.toshiba.co.uk; Shields, A. J. [Cambridge Research Laboratory, Toshiba Research Europe Limited, 208 Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Lee, J. P. [Cambridge Research Laboratory, Toshiba Research Europe Limited, 208 Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, 9 J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Griffiths, J. P.; Jones, G. A. C.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-26

    Fundamental to integrated photonic quantum computing is an on-chip method for routing and modulating quantum light emission. We demonstrate a hybrid integration platform consisting of arbitrarily designed waveguide circuits and single-photon sources. InAs quantum dots (QD) embedded in GaAs are bonded to a SiON waveguide chip such that the QD emission is coupled to the waveguide mode. The waveguides are SiON core embedded in a SiO{sub 2} cladding. A tuneable Mach Zehnder interferometer (MZI) modulates the emission between two output ports and can act as a path-encoded qubit preparation device. The single-photon nature of the emission was verified using the on-chip MZI as a beamsplitter in a Hanbury Brown and Twiss measurement.

  9. Integrated Ultrasonic-Photonic Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barretto, Elaine Cristina Saraiva

    in channel waveguides and Mach-Zehnder interferometers. Numerical models are developed based on the finite element method, and applied to several scenarios, such as optimization of the geometrical parameters of waveguides, use of slow light in photonic crystal waveguides and use of Lamb waves in membranized......This thesis deals with the modeling, design, fabrication and characterization of integrated ultrasonic-photonic devices, with particular focus on the use of standard semiconductor materials such as GaAs and silicon. The devices are based on the use of guided acoustic waves to modulate the light...... investigated. Comparisons are made with the numerical and experimental results, and they validate the obtained response of the acoustic and photonic components of the device. Finally, a new design for an optical frequency shifter is proposed, posing several advantages over existing devices in terms of size...

  10. Single-photon decision maker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Makoto; Berthel, Martin; Drezet, Aurélien; Huant, Serge; Aono, Masashi; Hori, Hirokazu; Kim, Song-Ju

    2015-08-01

    Decision making is critical in our daily lives and for society in general and is finding evermore practical applications in information and communication technologies. Herein, we demonstrate experimentally that single photons can be used to make decisions in uncertain, dynamically changing environments. Using a nitrogen-vacancy in a nanodiamond as a single-photon source, we demonstrate the decision-making capability by solving the multi-armed bandit problem. This capability is directly and immediately associated with single-photon detection in the proposed architecture, leading to adequate and adaptive autonomous decision making. This study makes it possible to create systems that benefit from the quantum nature of light to perform practical and vital intelligent functions.

  11. Photon attenuation by intensifying screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holje, G.

    1983-01-01

    The photon attenuation by intensifying screens of different chemical composition has been determined. The attenuation of photons between 20 keV and 120 keV was measured by use of a multi-channel analyzer and a broad bremsstrahlung distribution. The attenuation by the intensifying screens was hereby determined simultaneously at many different monoenergetic photon energies. Experimentally determined attenuations were found to agree well with attenuation calculated from mass attenuation coefficients. The attenuation by the screens was also determined at various bremsstrahlung distributions, simulating those occurring behind the patient in various diagnostic X-ray examinations. The high attenuation in some of the intensifying screens form the basis for an analysis of the construction of asymmetric screen pairs. Single screen systems are suggested as a favourable alternative to thick screen pair systems. (Author)

  12. Optical properties of photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Sakoda, Kazuaki

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between the radiation field and matter is the most fundamen­ tal source of dynamics in nature. It brings about the absorption and emission of photons, elastic and inelastic light scattering, the radiative lifetime of elec­ tronic excited states, and so on. The huge amount of energy carried from the sun by photons is the source of all activities of creatures on the earth. The absorption of photons by chlorophylls and the successive electronic excita­ tion initiate a series of chemical reactions that are known as photosynthesis, which support all life on the earth. Radiative energy is also the main source of all meteorological phenomena. The fundamentals of the radiation field and its interaction with matter were clarified by classical electromagnetism and quantum electrodynamics. These theories, we believe, explain all electromagnetic phenomena. They not only provide a firm basis for contemporary physics but also generate a vast range of technological applications. These include television, ...

  13. Review of dark photon searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denig, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Dark Photons are hypothetical extra-U(1) gauge bosons, which are motivated by a number of astrophysical anomalies as well as the presently seen deviation between the Standard Model prediction and the direct measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, (g − 2)μ. The Dark Photon does not serve as the Dark Matter particle itself, but acts as a messenger particle of a hypothetical Dark Sector with residual interaction to the Standard Model. We review recent Dark Photon searches, which were carried out in a global effort at various hadron and particle physics facilities. We also comment on the perspectives for future invisble searches, which directly probe the existence of Light Dark Matter particles.

  14. Entangled photons and quantum communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zhensheng; Bao Xiaohui; Lu Chaoyang; Zhang Jun; Peng Chengzhi; Pan Jianwei

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the progress of quantum communication that utilizes photonic entanglement. We start with a survey of various methods for generating entangled photons, followed by an introduction of the theoretical principles and the experimental implementations of quantum key distribution. We then move on to a discussion of more involved quantum communication protocols including quantum dense coding, teleportation and quantum communication complexity. After that, we review the progress in free-space quantum communication, decoherence-free subspace, and quantum repeater protocols which are essential ingredients for long-distance quantum communication. Practical realizations of quantum repeaters, which require an interface between photons and quantum memories, are discussed briefly. Finally, we draw concluding remarks considering the technical challenges, and put forward an outlook on further developments of this field.

  15. Research summer camp in photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyanovskaya, Elizaveta; Melnik, Maksim; Egorov, Vladimir; Gleim, Artur; Lukishova, Svetlana; Kozlov, Sergei; Zhang, Xi-Cheng

    2017-08-01

    ITMO University and the University of Rochester became close partners several years ago. One of the first outcomes of this mutually beneficial partnership was the creation of International Institute of Photonics and Optical Information Technologies led by Prof. Sergei Kozlov and Prof. Xi-Cheng Zhang. Universities have created a double Masters-degree program in optics in 2014, and several ITMO students have been awarded degrees from Rochester. At the same time ITMO University organizes Summer Research camp in Photonics for University of Rochester students. Students spent two weeks in the Northern Capital of Russia learning about the emerging practical applications of femtosecond optics, terahertz biomedicine and quantum information technologies.

  16. Photon propagators at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, J.H.

    1982-07-01

    We have used the real time formalism to compute the one-loop finite temperature corrections to the photon self energies in spinor and scalar QED. We show that, for a real photon, only the transverse components develop the temperature-dependent masses, while, for an external static electromagnetic field applied to the finite temperature system, only the static electric field is screened by thermal fluctuations. After showing how to compute systematically the imaginary parts of the finite temperature Green functions, we have attempted to give a microscopic interpretation of the imaginary parts of the self energies. (author)

  17. Polymers for electronic & photonic application

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, C P

    2013-01-01

    The most recent advances in the use of polymeric materials by the electronic industry can be found in Polymers for Electronic and Photonic Applications. This bookprovides in-depth coverage of photoresis for micro-lithography, microelectronic encapsulants and packaging, insulators, dielectrics for multichip packaging,electronic and photonic applications of polymeric materials, among many other topics. Intended for engineers and scientists who design, process, and manufacturemicroelectronic components, this book will also prove useful for hybrid and systems packaging managers who want to be info

  18. Photonic wires and trumpets for ultrabright single photon sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gérard, Jean-Michel; Claudon, Julien; Bleuse, Joël

    2013-01-01

    as to tailor their radiation diagram in the far-field. We highlight the novel “photonic trumpet” geometry, which provides a clean Gaussian beam, and is much less sensitive to fabrication imperfections than the more common needle-like taper geometry. S4Ps based on a single QD in a PW with integrated bottom...

  19. Fast pulse discriminator for photon counting at high photon densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, R.; Pedrini, A.

    1977-03-01

    A fast tunnel diode discriminator for photon counting up to 200MHz count frequency is described. The tunnel diode is operated on its apparent I.V. characteristics displayed when the diode is driven into its oscillating region. The pulse shaper-discriminator is completely D.C. coupled in order to avoid base-line shift at high pulse rates

  20. REVIEW: Optics of globular photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, V. S.

    2007-05-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter ~200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported.