WorldWideScience

Sample records for film cooling effectiveness

  1. Research on Cooling Effectiveness in Stepped Slot Film Cooling Vane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yulong; WU Hong; ZHOU Feng; RONG Chengjun

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most important developments in air cooling technology for hot parts of the aero-engine,film cooling technology has been widely used.Film cooling hole structure exists mainly in areas that have high temperature,uneven cooling effectiveness issues when in actual use.The first stage turbine vanes of the aero-engine consume the largest portion of cooling air,thereby the research on reducing the amount of cooling air has the greatest potential.A new stepped slot film cooling vane with a high cooling effectiveness and a high cooling uniformity was researched initially.Through numerical methods,the affecting factors of the cooling effectiveness of a vane with the stepped slot film cooling structure were researched.This paper focuses on the cooling effectiveness and the pressure loss in different blowing ratio conditions,then the most reasonable and scientific structure parameter can be obtained by analyzing the results.The results show that 1.0 mm is the optimum slot width and 10.0 is the most reasonable blowing ratio.Under this condition,the vane achieved the best cooling result and the highest cooling effectiveness,and also retained a low pressure loss.

  2. Effect of free-stream turbulence on film cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, C. J.; Tacina, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    Film-cooling experiments were conducted at four levels of free-stream turbulence to test the hypothesis that the film-cooling effectiveness is inversely related to the free-stream turbulence level. The hot-gas operating conditions were held constant at a temperature of 590 K, a pressure of 1 atmosphere, and a velocity of 62 m/sec. The film-cooling air was at ambient inlet temperature, and the film-cooling flow rates were 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 percent of the total airflow. Blockage plates with blockage areas of 0, 52, 72, and 90 percent were placed upstream of the film-cooling slot and produced axial turbulence intensities of 7, 14, 23, and 35 percent, respectively. The film-cooling effectiveness decreased as much as 50 percent as the freestream turbulence intensity was increased from 7 to 35 percent. The value of the turbulent mixing coefficient used in previous work was compared with the axial turbulence intensity. The turbulent mixing coefficient was found to be 10 to 40 percent of the axial turbulence intensity.

  3. Numerical analysis of microholes film/effusion cooling effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochrymiuk, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    Numerical simulations were performed to predict the film cooling effectiveness on the fiat plate with a three-dimensional discrete hole film cooling RSM-AKN turbulent heat transfer models based on variable turbulent Prandtl number approaches were considered. Obtained numerical results were directly compared with the data that came from an experiment based on Transient Liquid Crystal methodology. All implemented models for turbulent heat transfer performed sufficiently well for the considered case. It was confirmed, however, that the two-equation closure can give a detailed look into film cooling problems without using any time-consuming and inherently unsteady models. The RSM-AKN turbulent model was used in micoholes case too. The main target of simulations was maintain the same level of cooling efficiency ratio in both cases and confirm that is possible significantly reduce mass flows of the coolant in microholes case.

  4. Dependence of Film Cooling Effectiveness on 3D Printed Cooling Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghasi, Paul

    To investigate the viability of using additive manufacturing technology for flat plate film cooling experiments a new experiential facility was constructed using gas analysis and oxygen sensitive paint as a method of measuring and characterizing film cooling effectiveness for various additive manufacturing technologies as well as aluminum. The ultimate objective of this work is to assess whether these technologies can be a replacement for traditional aluminum CNC machining. Film Cooling Effectiveness is closely dependent on the geometry of the hole emitting the cooling film. These holes are sometimes quite expensive to machine by traditional methods so 3D printed test pieces have the potential to greatly reduce the cost of film cooling tests. What is unknown is the degree to which parameters like layer resolution and the choice of 3D printing technologies influence the results of a film cooling test. A new flat-plate film cooling facility employing the mass transfer analogy (introduction of foreign gas as coolant, not to be confused with the sublimation method) and measurements both by gas sample analysis and oxygen-sensitive paint is first validated using gas analysis and oxygen sensitive paint cross correlation. The same facility is then used to characterize the film cooling effectiveness of a diffuser shaped film cooling hole geometry. These diffuser holes (film hole diameter, D of 0.1 inches) are then produced by a variety of different manufacturing technologies, including traditional machined aluminum, Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), Stereo Lithography Apparatus (SLA) and PolyJet with layer thicknesses from 0.001D (25 microm) to 0.12D (300 microm). Tests are carried out at mainstream flow Mach number of 0.30 and blowing ratios from 1.0 to 3.5. The coolant gas used is CO2 yielding a density ratio of 1.5. Surface quality is characterized by an Optical Microscope that calculates surface roughness. Test coupons with rougher surface topology generally showed

  5. Combined Effects of Wakes and Jet Pulsing on Film Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    water as a refer- ence. Constant current cold- wire and constant temperature hot - wire anemometry were used to measure flow temperature and velocity...Temperature measurements were made using an infrared camera, thermocouples, and constant current (cold wire ) anemometry . The local film cooling effectiveness...and heat transfer coefficient were de- termined from the measured temperatures. Phase locked flow temperature fields were determined from cold- wire

  6. Effect of injector configuration in rocket nozzle film cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A. Lakshya; Pisharady, J. C.; Shine, S. R.

    2016-04-01

    Experimental and numerical investigations are carried out to analyze the effect of coolant injector configuration on overall film cooling performance in a divergent section of a rocket nozzle. Two different injector orientations are investigated: (1) shaped slots with a divergence angle of 15° (semi-divergent injector) (2) fully divergent slot (fully divergent injector). A 2-dimensional, axis-symmetric, multispecies computational model using finite volume formulation has been developed and validated against the experimental data. The experiments provided a consistent set of measurements for cooling effectiveness for different blowing ratios ranging from 3.7 to 6. Results show that the semi divergent configuration leads to higher effectiveness compared to fully divergent slot at all blowing ratios. The spatially averaged effectiveness results show that the difference between the two configurations is significant at higher blowing ratios. The increase in effectiveness was around 2 % at BR = 3.7 whereas it was around 12 % in the case of BR = 6. Numerical results show the presence of secondary flow recirculation zones near the jet exit for both the injectors. An additional recirculation zone present in the case of fully divergent injector caused an increase in mixing of the coolant and mainstream, and a reduction in film cooling performance.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT AND NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR FLOW FIELD AND FILM COOLING EFFECTIVENESS IN FILM-COOLED TURBINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Numerical simulation of three-dimensional flow field and film cooling effectiveness in film-cooled turbine rotor and stationary turbine cascade were carried out by using the κ-ε turbulence model, and the predictions of the three-dimensional velocities were compared with the measured results by Laser-Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). Results reveal the secondary flow near the blade surface in the wake region behind the jet hole. Compared with the stationary cascade, there are the centrifugal force and Coriolis force existing in the flow field of the turbine rotor, and these forces make the three-dimensional flow field change in the turbine rotor, especially for the radial velocity. The effect of rotation on the flow field and the film cooling effectiveness on the pressure side is more apparent than that on the suction side as is shown in the computational and measured results, and the low film cooling effectiveness appears on the pressure surface of the turbine rotor blade compared with that of the stationary cascade.

  8. Leading edge film cooling effects on turbine blade heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1995-01-01

    An existing three dimensional Navier-Stokes code, modified to include film cooling considerations, has been used to study the effect of spanwise pitch of shower-head holes and coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio on the adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient on a film-cooled turbine vane. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature = 1900 K and stagnation pressure = 3 MPa. It is found that with the coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio fixed, reducing P, the spanwise pitch for shower-head holes, from 7.5 d to 3.0 d, where d is the hole diameter, increases the average effectiveness considerably over the blade surface. However, when P/d= 7.5, increasing the coolant mass flow increases the effectiveness on the pressure surface but reduces it on the suction surface due to coolant jet lift-off. For P/d = 4.5 or 3.0, such an anomaly does not occur within the range of coolant to mainstream mass flow ratios analyzed. In all cases, adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient are highly three-dimensional.

  9. Effects of geometry on slot-jet film cooling performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyams, D.G.; McGovern, K.T.; Leylek, J.H. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The physics of the film cooling process for shaped, inclined slot-jets with realistic slot-length-to-width ratios (L/s) is studied for a range of blowing ratio (M) and density ratio (DR) parameters typical of gas turbine operations. For the first time in the open literature, the effect of inlet and exit shaping of the slot-jet on both flow and thermal field characteristics is isolated, and the dominant mechanisms responsible for differences in these characteristics are documented. A previously documented computational methodology was applied for the study of four distinct configurations: (1) slot with straight edges and sharp corners (reference case); (2) slot with shaped inlet region; (3) slot with shaped exit region; and (4) slot with both shaped inlet and exit regions. Detailed field results as well as surface phenomena involving adiabatic film effectiveness ({eta}) and heat transfer coefficient (h) are presented. It is demonstrated that both {eta} and h results are vital in the proper assessment of film cooling performance. All simulations were carried out using a multi-block, unstructured/adaptive grid, fully explicit, time-marching solver with multi-grid, local time stepping, and residual smoothing type acceleration techniques. Special attention was paid to and full documentation provided for: (1) proper modeling of the physical phenomena; (2) exact geometry and high quality grid generation techniques; (3) discretization schemes; and (4) turbulence modeling issues. The key parameters M and DR were varied from 1.0 to 2.0 and 1.5 to 2.0, respectively, to show their influence. Simulations were repeated for slot length-to-width ratio (L/s) of 3.0 and 4.5 in order to explain the effects of this important parameter. Additionally, the performance of two popular turbulence models, standard k-F, and RNG k-E, were studied to establish their ability to handle highly elliptic jet/crossflow interaction type processes.

  10. Turbine endwall film cooling with combustor-turbine interface gap leakage flow: Effect of incidence angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Yuan, Xin

    2013-04-01

    This paper is focused on the film cooling performance of combustor-turbine leakage flow at off-design condition. The influence of incidence angle on film cooling effectiveness on first-stage vane endwall with combustor-turbine interface slot is studied. A baseline slot configuration is tested in a low speed four-blade cascade comprising a large-scale model of the GE-E3Nozzle Guide Vane (NGV). The slot has a forward expansion angle of 30 deg. to the endwall surface. The Reynolds number based on the axial chord and inlet velocity of the free-stream flow is 3.5 × 105 and the testing is done in a four-blade cascade with low Mach number condition (0.1 at the inlet). The blowing ratio of the coolant through the interface gap varies from M = 0.1 to M = 0.3, while the blowing ratio varies from M = 0.7 to M = 1.3 for the endwall film cooling holes. The film-cooling effectiveness distributions are obtained using the pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique. The results show that with an increasing blowing ratio the film-cooling effectiveness increases on the endwall. As the incidence angle varies from i = +10 deg. to i = -10 deg., at low blowing ratio, the averaged film-cooling effectiveness changes slightly near the leading edge suction side area. The case of i = +10 deg. has better film-cooling performance at the downstream part of this region where the axial chord is between 0.15 and 0.25. However, the disadvantage of positive incidence appears when the blowing ratio increases, especially at the upstream part of near suction side region where the axial chord is between 0 and 0.15. On the main passage endwall surface, as the incidence angle changes from i = +10 deg. to i = -10 deg., the averaged film-cooling effectiveness changes slightly and the negative incidence appears to be more effective for the downstream part film cooling of the endwall surface where the axial chord is between 0.6 and 0.8.

  11. Jet model for slot film cooling with effect of free-stream and coolant turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Frederick F.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis was performed utilizing the model of a wall jet for obtaining equations that will predict slot film-cooling efficiency under conditions of variable turbulence intensity, flow, and temperature. The analysis, in addition to assessing the effects of the above variables, makes a distinction between an initial region and a fully developed region. Such a distinction is important in determining the role that the turbulence intensity of the coolant plays in effecting film-cooling effectiveness in the area of the slot exit. The results of the analysis were used in the correlation of the results of a well-designed film-cooling experiment. The result of the analysis and experiment was equations that predicted film-cooling efficiency within + or - 4% average deviation for lateral free-stream turbulence intensities up to 24% and blowing rates up to 1.9. These equations should be useful in determining the optimum quantity of cooling air requried for protecting the wall of a combustor.

  12. Large Eddy Simulation of the Effects of Plasma Actuation Strength on Film Cooling Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guozhan; Chen, Fu; Li, Linxi; Song, Yanping

    2016-11-01

    In this article, numerical investigation of the effects of different plasma actuation strengths on the film cooling flow characteristics has been conducted using large eddy simulation (LES). For this numerical research, the plasma actuator is placed downstream of the trailing edge of the film cooling hole and a phenomenological model is employed to provide the electric field generated by it, resulting in the body forces. Our results show that as the plasma actuation strength grows larger, under the downward effect of the plasma actuation, the jet trajectory near the cooling hole stays closer to the wall and the recirculation region observably reduces in size. Meanwhile, the momentum injection effect of the plasma actuation also actively alters the distributions of the velocity components downstream of the cooling hole. Consequently, the influence of the plasma actuation strength on the Reynolds stress downstream of the cooling hole is remarkable. Furthermore, the plasma actuation weakens the strength of the kidney shaped vortex and prevents the jet from lifting off the wall. Therefore, with the increase of the strength of the plasma actuation, the coolant core stays closer to the wall and tends to split into two distinct regions. So the centerline film cooling efficiency is enhanced, and it is increased by 55% at most when the plasma actuation strength is 10.

  13. Experimental Investigation on the Effects of DBD Plasma on the Film Cooling Effectiveness of a 30-Degree Slot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Jee Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD plasma on the film cooling effectiveness of a 30-degree slot was experimentally investigated in a low-speed wind tunnel. The pressure sensitive paint (PSP technique was used to measure the film cooling effectiveness, and two blowing ratios (0.5 and 1.0 were tested. A sinusoidal waveform with a 1-kHz frequency was supplied to the exposed electrode. Two input voltages (6 and 7 kV and two exposed electrode locations were considered. The results showed that the film cooling effectiveness of the slot was higher for the blowing ratio of the 1.0 case than that for the blowing ratio of the 0.5 case regardless of plasma operation. The higher input voltage case (7 kV showed higher film cooling effectiveness than the lower input voltage case (6 kV. The improvement in film cooling effectiveness facilitated by the DBD plasma was more significant when the coolant had less momentum. The maximum improvement of the area averaged film cooling effectiveness was 2.3% for the case with the exposed electrode located at the slot exit and a blowing ratio of 0.5.

  14. Unsteady High Turbulence Effects on Turbine Blade Film Cooling Heat Transfer Performance Using a Transient Liquid Crystal Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J. C.; Ekkad, S. V.; Du, H.; Teng, S.

    2000-01-01

    Unsteady wake effect, with and without trailing edge ejection, on detailed heat transfer coefficient and film cooling effectiveness distributions is presented for a downstream film-cooled gas turbine blade. Tests were performed on a five-blade linear cascade at an exit Reynolds number of 5.3 x 10(exp 5). Upstream unsteady wakes were simulated using a spoke-wheel type wake generator. Coolant blowing ratio was varied from 0.4 to 1.2; air and CO2 were used as coolants to simulate different density ratios. Surface heat transfer and film effectiveness distributions were obtained using a transient liquid crystal technique; coolant temperature profiles were determined with a cold wire technique. Results show that Nusselt numbers for a film cooled blade are much higher compared to a blade without film injection. Unsteady wake slightly enhances Nusselt numbers but significantly reduces film effectiveness versus no wake cases. Nusselt numbers increase only slic,htly but film cooling, effectiveness increases significantly with increasing, blowing ratio. Higher density coolant (CO2) provides higher effectiveness at higher blowing ratios (M = 1.2) whereas lower density coolant (Air) provides higher 0 effectiveness at lower blowing ratios (M = 0.8). Trailing edge ejection generally has more effect on film effectiveness than on the heat transfer, typically reducing film effectiveness and enhancing heat transfer. Similar data is also presented for a film cooled cylindrical leading edge model.

  15. Effect of velocity and temperature distribution at the hole exit on film cooling of turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1995-01-01

    An existing three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code, modified to include film cooling considerations, has been used to study the effect of coolant velocity and temperature distribution at the hole exit on the heat transfer coefficient on three-film-cooled turbine blades, namely, the C3X vane, the VKI rotor, and the ACE rotor. Results are also compared with the experimental data for all the blades. Moreover, Mayle's transition criterion, Forest's model for augmentation of leading edge heat transfer due to freestream turbulence, and Crawford's model for augmentation of eddy viscosity due to film cooling are used. Use of Mayle's and Forest's models is relevant only for the ACE rotor due to the absence of showerhead cooling on this rotor. It is found that, in some cases, the effect of distribution of coolant velocity and temperature at the hole exit can be as much as 60% on the heat transfer coefficient at the blade suction surface, and 50% at the pressure surface. Also, different effects are observed on the pressure and suction surface depending upon the blade as well as upon the hole shape, conical or cylindrical.

  16. Enhancing the efectiveness of film cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tom I-P.Shih; Sangkwon Na

    2007-01-01

    Advanced gas turbine stages are designed to operate at increasingly higher inlet temperatures to increase thermal efficiency and specific power output.To maintain durability and reasonable life,film cooling is needed in addition to internal cooling,especially for the first stage.Film cooling lowers material temperature by forced convection inside film-cooling holes and by forming a layer of coolant about component surfaces to insulate them from the hot gases.Unfortunately,each cooling jet forms a pair of counter-rotating vortices that entrains hot gas and causes the film-cooling jet to lift off from the surface that it is intended to protect.This paper gives an overview of efforts to enhance the effectiveness of film-cooling.This paper also describes two new design concepts.One design concept seeks to minimize the entrainment of hot gases underneath of film-cooling jets by using flow-aligned blockers.The other design concept shifts the interaction between the approaching hot gas and the cooling jet to occur further above the surface by using an upstream ramp.For both design concepts,computational fluid dynamics results are presented to examine their usefulness in enhancing film-cooling effectiveness.

  17. Minimization of the Effects of Secondary Reactions on Turbine Film Cooling in a Fuel Rich Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-02

    cooling as [1] (2.2) where hf is the heat transfer coefficient with film cooling and Tf is the temperature of the film. 7...the rig. The Hastelloy-X block was cooled with water, nitrogen, or a Mokon oil temperature control system through welded cooling loops and channels...block. To hold the thermocouples in place, three groves were cut out and bands were welded on top of the thermocouples. To hold the lower

  18. Numerical prediction of film cooling effectiveness over flat plate using variable turbulent prandtl number closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochrymiuk, Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulations were performed to predict the film cooling effectiveness on the fiat plate with a three- dimensional discrete-hole film cooling arrangement. The effects of basic geometrical characteristics of the holes, i.e. diameter D, length L and pitch S/D were studied. Different turbulent heat transfer models based on constant and variable turbulent Prandtl number approaches were considered. The variability of the turbulent Prandtl number Pr t in the energy equation was assumed using an algebraic relation proposed by Kays and Crawford, or employing the Abe, Kondoh and Nagano eddy heat diffusivity closure with two differential transport equations for the temperature variance k θ and its destruction rate ɛ θ . The obtained numerical results were directly compared with the data that came from an experiment based on Transient Liquid Crystal methodology. All implemented models for turbulent heat transfer performed sufficiently well for the considered case. It was confirmed, however, that the two- equation closure can give a detailed look into film cooling problems without using any time-consuming and inherently unsteady models.

  19. Effect of external turbulence on the efficiency of film cooling with coolant injection into a transverse trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalatov, A. A.; Panchenko, N. A.; Severin, S. D.

    2017-09-01

    Film cooling is among the basic methods used for thermal protection of blades in modern high-temperature gas turbines. Results of computer simulation of film cooling with coolant injection via a row of conventional inclined holes or a row of holes in a trench are presented in this paper. The ANSYS CFX 14 commercial software package was used for CFD-modeling. The effect is studied of the mainstream turbulence on the film cooling efficiency for the blowing ratio range between 0.6 and 2.3 and three different turbulence intensities of 1, 5, and 10%. The mainstream velocity was 150 and 400 m/s, while the temperatures of the mainstream and the injected coolant were 1100 and 500°C, respectively. It is demonstrated that, for the coolant injection via one row of trenched holes, an increase in the mainstream turbulence intensity reduces the film cooling efficiency in the entire investigated range of blowing ratios. It was revealed that freestream turbulence had varied effects on the film cooling efficiency depending on the blowing ratio and mainstream velocity in a blade channel. Thus, an increase in the mainstream turbulence intensity from 1 to 10% decreases the surface-averaged film cooling efficiency by 3-10% at a high mainstream velocity (400 m/s) in the blade channel and by 12-23% at a moderate velocity (of 150 m/s). Here, lower film cooling efficiencies correspond to higher blowing ratios. The effect of mainstream turbulence intensity on the film cooling efficiency decreases with increasing the mainstream velocity in the modeled channel for both investigated configurations.

  20. Adiabatic Effectiveness and Heat Transfer Coefficient on a Film-Cooled Rotating Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    1997-01-01

    three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code has been used to compute the adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient on a rotating film-cooled turbine blade. The blade chosen is the United Technologies Research Center(UTRC) rotor with five film-cooling rows containing 83 holes, including three rows on the shower head with 49 holes, covering about 86% of the blade span. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature 1900 K and stagnation pressure 3 MPa. The blade speed is taken to be 5200 rpm. The adiabatic effectiveness is higher for a rotating blade as compared to that for a stationary blade. Also, the direction of coolant injection from the shower-head holes considerably affects the effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient values on both the pressure and suction surfaces. In all cases the heat transfer coefficient and adiabatic effectiveness are highly three-dimensional in the vicinity of holes but tend to become two-dimensional far downstream.

  1. Effect of Coolant Temperature and Mass Flow on Film Cooling of Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier Stokes code has been used to study the effect of coolant temperature, and coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio on the adiabatic effectiveness of a film-cooled turbine blade. The blade chosen is the VKI rotor with six rows of cooling holes including three rows on the shower head. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature = 1900 K and stagnation pressure = 3 MPa. Generally, the adiabatic effectiveness is lower for a higher coolant temperature due to nonlinear effects via the compressibility of air. However, over the suction side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness is higher for a higher coolant temperature than that for a lower coolant temperature when the coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio is 5% or more. For a fixed coolant temperature, the effectiveness passes through a minima on the suction side of shower-head holes as the coolant to mainstream mass flow, ratio increases, while on the pressure side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness decreases with increase in coolant mass flow due to coolant jet lift-off. In all cases, the adiabatic effectiveness is highly three-dimensional.

  2. Computational Film Cooling Effectiveness of Dual Trench Configuration on Flat Plate at Moderate Blowing Ratios

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antar M.M.Abdala; Qun Zheng; Fifi N.M.Elwekeel; Ping Dong

    2013-01-01

    In the present work,computational simulations was made using ANSYS CFX to predict the improvements in film cooling performance with dual trench.Dual-trench configuration consists of two trenches together,one wider trench and the other is narrow trench that extruded from the wider one.Several blowing ratios in the range (0.5∶5) were investigated.The pitch-to-diameter ratio of 2.775 is used.By using the dual trench configuration,the coolant jet impacted the trench wall two times allowing increasing the spreading of coolant laterally in the trench,reducing jet velocity and jet completely covered on the surface.The results indicate that this configuration increased adiabatic effectiveness as blowing ratio increased.The spatially averaged adiabatic effectiveness reached 57.6% for at M=2.No observed film blow-offat all blowing ratios.The adiabatic film effectiveness of dual trench case outperformed the narrow trench case,laidback fan-shaped hole,fan-shaped hole and cylinder hole at different blowing ratios.

  3. Film cooling enhancement with surface restructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuping

    Discrete-hole film cooling is used extensively in turbine components. In past decades, many research works concerning this technique have been published. Recently, efforts have been directed at seeking technologies that would increase film cooling effectiveness. Particularly, surface reshaping through protective coatings, such as a thermal barrier coating (TBC), is very attractive to turbine designers because extra machining work is not needed for its application. In the present work, film cooling enhancement with surface restructure is experimentally studied using an infrared (IR) imaging technique. The first surface structure studied is the surface with flow-aligned blockers. The studied configurations include single-hole and three-hole-row structures. The single-hole case is used for studying the effects of blocker design parameters, which include blocker height (0.2D, 0.4D, and 0.6D), distance between two neighboring blockers (0.8D, D, and 1.2D), blocker length (2", 4", and 6"), and blowing ratio M (0.43 and 0.93). The design with the best performance is chosen for the three-hole-row cases. The second surface shape studied, is the so-called upstream ramp, which is placed in front of a row of film cooling holes. Investigated geometrical parameters include upstream ramp angles (8.5°, 15°, and 24°) and blowing ratio M (0.29, 0.43, 0.57, 0.93, and 1.36). Detailed local film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient are measured using an IR imaging technique. The third film cooling concept is the so-called trenched film cooling holes, i.e., film cooling holes sitting in a transverse groove. The film cooling structure for this experimental test consists of a three-hole row embedded in a trench 0.5D in depth and 2D in width, where D is the diameter of the holes. Five blowing ratios (0.29, 0.43, 0.57, 0.93, and 1.36) are tested. Based on the tested results, the three film cooling schemes are also compared. To implement the experimental work, a test system

  4. Overall Effectiveness Measurement at Engine Temperatures with Reactive Film Cooling and Surface Curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    Da = Damkohler number ( ℎ ) DR = density ratio F = Fahrenheit FCR = film cooling rig H* = non-dimensional fuel enthalpy h...the objective of a film layer is to remain 2 attached to the blade surface, any flame produced by a reaction between the coolant and the...making reactions likely Figure 2-5 shows the predicted temperature profile on a portion of a hybrid vane. The combustion occurs in the cavity on the top

  5. Effect of internal coolant crossflow orientation on the discharge coefficient of shaped film-cooling holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritsch, M.; Saumweber, C.; Schulz, A.; Wittig, S.; Sharp, E.

    2000-01-01

    Discharge coefficients of three film-cooling hole geometries are presented over a wide range of engine like conditions. The hole geometries comprise a cylindrical hole and two holes with a diffuser-shaped exit portion (a fanshaped and a laidback fanshaped hole). For all three hole geometries the hole axis was inclined 30 deg with respect to the direction of the external (hot gas) flow. The flow conditions considered were the hot gas crossflow Mach number (up to 0.6), the coolant crossflow Mach number (up to 0.6) and the pressure ratio across the hole (up to 2). The effect of internal crossflow approach direction, perpendicular or parallel to the main flow direction, is particularly addressed in the present study. Comparison is made of the results for a parallel and perpendicular orientation, showing that the coolant crossflow orientation has a strong impact on the discharge behavior of the different hole geometries. The discharge coefficients were found to strongly depend on both hole geometry and crossflow conditions. Furthermore, the effects of internal and external crossflow on the discharge coefficients were described by means of correlations used to derive a predicting scheme for discharge coefficients. A comparison between predictions and measurements reveals the capability of the method proposed.

  6. Experimental and computational study of the effect of shocks on film cooling effectiveness in scramjet combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Pradeep S.; Holden, Michael S.; Mcclinton, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents results from a study conducted to investigate the effect of incident oblique shocks on the effectiveness of a coolant film at Mach numbers, typical of those expected in a scramjet combustor at Mach 15 to 20 flight. Computations with a parabolic code are in good agreement with the measured pressures and heat fluxes, after accounting for the influence of the shock upstream of its point of impingement on the plate, and the expansion from the trailing edge of the shock generator. The test data shows that, for the blowing rates tested, the film is rendered largely ineffective by the shock. Computations show that coolant blowing rates five to ten times those tested are required to protect against shock-induced heating. The implications of the results to scramjet combustor design are discussed.

  7. Effect of plenum crossflow on heat (mass) transfer near and within the entrance of film cooling holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, R.J. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Cho, H.H. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Jabbari, M.Y. [Saginaw Valley State Univ., University Center, MI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-10-01

    Convective heat/mass transfer near and within the entrance region of film cooling holes supplied with air from an internal duct (plenum) behind the cooling holes has been measured using a naphthalene sublimation technique. The experiments are conducted for duct Reynolds number, based on the duct inlet flow condition, of 1,800 to 13,500, which results in a range of hole Reynolds numbers of 8000 to 30,000, close to actual engine operating conditions. The flow entering the hole can be considered a combination of flow along a 90 deg tube bend and a sudden contraction duct flow. The flow separates at the inner corner and a secondary flow is induced by the centrifugal force associated with the streamline curvature. The mass transfer coefficient for the duct wall (surface of film-cooled plate) with a cooling hole is three to five times higher than for a fully developed duct flow. With a smaller duct, the overall transfer coefficient on the hole entrance surface increases due to the higher duct Reynolds numbers, but the flow has less secondary flow effects within the smaller space. Generally, transfer coefficients on the hole entrance surface are largely unaffected by the duct end presence, but the transfer coefficient is larger downstream for a short distance from the center of the last hole to the duct end. In tests with multiple film cooling holes, the flow at the first hole is more of a curved duct flow (strong secondary flow) and the flow at the last hole is more of a sink-like flow. At the middle hole, the flow is a combination of both flows. The mass transfer rates on the inner hole surfaces are found to be the same for holes with corresponding positions relative to the duct end, although the total number of open holes is different.

  8. Recent Development in Turbine Blade Film Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je-Chin Han

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas turbines are extensively used for aircraft propulsion, land-based power generation, and industrial applications. Thermal efficiency and power output of gas turbines increase with increasing turbine rotor inlet temperature (RIT. The current RIT level in advanced gas turbines is far above the .melting point of the blade material. Therefore, along with high temperature material development, a sophisticated cooling scheme must be developed for continuous safe operation of gas turbines with high performance. Gas turbine blades are cooled internally and externally. This paper focuses on external blade cooling or so-called film cooling. In film cooling, relatively cool air is injected from the inside of the blade to the outside surface which forms a protective layer between the blade surface and hot gas streams. Performance of film cooling primarily depends on the coolant to mainstream pressure ratio, temperature ratio, and film hole location and geometry under representative engine flow conditions. In the past number of years there has been considerable progress in turbine film cooling research and this paper is limited to review a few selected publications to reflect recent development in turbine blade film cooling.

  9. Computational investigation of film cooling from cylindrical and row trenched cooling holes near the combustor endwall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Kianpour

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the effects of cylindrical and row trenched cooling holes with alignment angles of 0° and 90° at blowing ratio of 3.18 on the film cooling performance adjacent to the endwall surface of a combustor simulator. In this research a three-dimensional representation of Pratt and Whitney gas turbine engine was simulated and analyzed with a commercial finite volume package FLUENT 6.2. The analysis has been carried out with Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes turbulence model (RANS on internal cooling passages. This combustor simulator was combined with the interaction of two rows of dilution jets, which were staggered in the streamwise direction and aligned in the spanwise direction. Film cooling was placed along the combustor liner walls. In comparison with the baseline case of cooling holes, the application of a row trenched hole near the endwall surface doubled the performance of film cooling effectiveness.

  10. Heat and mass transfer problems for film cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leontiev, A.I.

    1999-07-01

    An advance in many branches of engineering is connected with using of more and more high working temperatures, perfection of cooling systems of power installations and further development of the theory of heat transfer. One of the most promising methods of thermal protection of heating surfaces is using of the gas film cooling. Despite intensive development of numerical methods of calculation of film cooling problems, simple and reliable correlations, which are based on clear physical models, that make it possible to generalize experimental data for complex boundary conditions, are necessary for complex engineering calculations. It is well known, that an increase in an initial gas temperature of the gas at the turbine inlet is the basic method to advance technical and economical parameters of the gas turbine units and engines. Modern gas turbine engines are designed to operate at inlet temperatures of 1,800--2,000 K, which are far above the allowable temperatures of the metal. Under these conditions, the turbine blades should be cooled in order to ensure a reasonable lifetime. In the paper the review of calculation methods and of experimental results on heat transfer under film cooling is presented. The effect of an arrangement of film cooling, longitudinal gradient of pressure, nonisothermality and compressibility of gas, swirling of flow, and turbulent pulsations of the main gas flow on effectiveness of the gas film cooling is considered. A method of calculation of combined cooling (film, porous or transpiration and convective) is proposed.

  11. Heat Transfer on a Film-Cooled Blade - Effect of Hole Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Rigby, David L.

    1998-01-01

    A multi-block, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code has been used to study the within-hole and near-hole physics in relation to heat transfer on a film-cooled blade. The flow domain consists of the coolant flow through the plenum and hole-pipes for the three staggered rows of shower-head holes on the VK1 rotor, and the main flow over the blade. A multi-block grid is generated that is nearly orthogonal to the various surfaces. It may be noted that for the VK1 rotor the shower-head holes are inclined at 30 deg. to the spanwise direction, and are normal to the streamwise direction on the blade. Wilcox's k-omega turbulence model is used. The present study provides a much better comparison for the heat transfer coefficient at the blade mid-span with the experimental data than an earlier analysis wherein coolant velocity and temperature distributions were specified at the hole exits rather than extending the computational domain into the hole-pipe and plenum. Details of the distributions of coolant velocity, temperature, k and omega at the hole exits are also presented.

  12. Heat Transfer on a Film-Cooled Blade: Effect of Hole Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Rigby, David L.

    1999-01-01

    A multiblock, three-dimensional Navier Stokes code has been used to study the within-hole and near-hole physics in relation to heat transfer on a film-cooled blade. The flow domain consists of the coolant flow through the plenum and hole-pipes for the three staggered rows of shower-head holes on the VKI rotor, and the main flow over the blade. A multiblock grid is generated that is nearly orthogonal to the various surfaces. It may be noted that for the VKI rotor the shower-head holes are inclined at 30 deg to the spanwise direction, and are normal to the streamwise direction on the blade. Wilcox's k-omega turbulence model is used. The present study provides a much better comparison for the span-averaged heat transfer coefficient on the blade surface with the experimental data than an earlier analysis wherein coolant velocity and temperature distributions were specified at the hole exits rather than extending the computational domain into the hole-pipe and plenum. Details of the distributions of coolant velocity, temperature, k and omega at the hole exits are also presented.

  13. Correlation of liquid-film cooling mass transfer data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gater, R. A.; L'Ecuyer, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    An empirical correlation proposed by Gater and Ecuyer (1970) for liquid-film cooling mass transfer, accounting for film roughness and entrainment effects, is extended to include liquid films of arbitrary length. A favorable comparison between the predicted results and the experimental data of Kinney et al. (1952) and Emmons and Warner (1964) shows the utility of the mass transfer correlation for predictions over a wide range of experimental parameters.

  14. Effect of Turbulence Intensity on Cross-Injection Film Cooling at a Stepped or Smooth Endwall of a Gas Turbine Vane Passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pey-Shey Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with a film cooling technique applicable to the protection of the endwalls of a gas turbine vane. In the experiments, cross-injection coolant flow from two-row, paired, inclined holes with nonintersecting centerlines was utilized. The test model is a scaled two-half vane. The levels of turbulence intensity used in the experiments are T.I.=1.8%, 7%, and 12%. Other parameters considered in the film cooling experiments include three inlet Reynolds numbers (9.20×104 , 1.24×105, and  1.50×105, three blowing ratios (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0, and three endwall conditions (smooth endwall and stepped endwall with forward-facing or backward-facing step. Thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC technique with steady-state heat transfer experiments was used to obtain the whole-field film cooling effectiveness. Results show that, at low turbulence intensity, increasing Reynolds number decreases the effectiveness in most of the vane passage. There is no monotonic trend of influence by Reynolds number at high turbulence intensity. The effect of blowing ratio on the effectiveness has opposite trends at low and high turbulence levels. Increasing turbulent intensity decreases the effectiveness, especially near the inlet of the vane passage. With a stepped endwall, turbulence intensity has only mild effect on the film cooling effectiveness.

  15. Effect of turbulence intensity on cross-injection film cooling at a stepped or smooth endwall of a gas turbine vane passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pey-Shey; Tsai, Shen-Ta; Jhuo, Yue-Hua

    2014-01-01

    This study is concerned with a film cooling technique applicable to the protection of the endwalls of a gas turbine vane. In the experiments, cross-injection coolant flow from two-row, paired, inclined holes with nonintersecting centerlines was utilized. The test model is a scaled two-half vane. The levels of turbulence intensity used in the experiments are T.I. = 1.8%, 7%, and 12%. Other parameters considered in the film cooling experiments include three inlet Reynolds numbers (9.20 × 10(4), 1.24 × 10(5), and 1.50 × 10(5)), three blowing ratios (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0), and three endwall conditions (smooth endwall and stepped endwall with forward-facing or backward-facing step). Thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) technique with steady-state heat transfer experiments was used to obtain the whole-field film cooling effectiveness. Results show that, at low turbulence intensity, increasing Reynolds number decreases the effectiveness in most of the vane passage. There is no monotonic trend of influence by Reynolds number at high turbulence intensity. The effect of blowing ratio on the effectiveness has opposite trends at low and high turbulence levels. Increasing turbulent intensity decreases the effectiveness, especially near the inlet of the vane passage. With a stepped endwall, turbulence intensity has only mild effect on the film cooling effectiveness.

  16. Heat Transfer Coefficient and Film Cooling Effectiveness on a Full-Film Cooling Vane%全气膜冷却叶片表面换热系数和冷却效率研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宗卫; 朱惠人; 刘聪; 孟庆昆

    2012-01-01

    The high-resolution heat transfer coefficient and the film effectiveness measurements on a full-film cooling nozzle guide vane with compound and axial angle holes were obtained using a transient liquid crystal technique. The tests were performed in a scaled-up, two-passage cascade at an inlet Reynolds number of 1.0×105. There are eight rows of compound angle cylinder film holes around the leading edge, 21 rows of axial angle cylinder holes on the pressure side, and 24 rows of axial angle cylinder holes on the suction side. The holes are fed from two internal plenum with a mass flow ratio of 4. 56% in the first plenum and 4. 67% in the second plenum. The results show that the film cover region shrinks on the suction side and expands on the pressure side due to the influence of passage vortex. The heat transfer coefficient and the film cooling effectiveness are higher in the near hole region. The heat transfer coefficient is higher and the film cooling effectiveness is lower near the leading edge. The film cooling effectiveness is about 0. 4 on the suction side and about 0. 35 on the pressure side, respectively.%为了研究全气膜冷却涡轮导叶叶片的换热特性,采用瞬态液晶技术获得了叶片全表面的高分辨率换热系数和冷却效率.实验在三叶片两通道放大模型中完成,叶栅进口雷诺数是1.0×105. 叶片前缘有8排复合角孔,压力面有21排轴向角孔,吸力面有24排轴向角孔.气膜孔排由2个供气腔供气,前腔二次流与主流的质量流量比为4.56%,后腔为4.67%.结果表明:受叶栅通道涡作用,气膜出流在吸力面呈聚敛状,在压力面则呈发散状.气膜出流受气膜孔角度影响,气膜孔下游的换热系数和冷却效率都较高.叶片前缘受到冲击,换热强,冷却效率低;叶片吸力面冷却效率维持在0.4左右,压力面维持在0.35左右.该全气膜冷却叶片气膜覆盖效果较好,冷却效率和换热系数分布均匀,是一种较好的冷却结构.

  17. Effect of RANS-Type Turbulence Models on Adiabatic Film Cooling Effectiveness over a Scaled Up Gas Turbine Blade Leading Edge Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepuri, Giridhara Babu; Talanki Puttarangasetty, Ashok Babu; Kolke, Deepak Kumar; Jesuraj, Felix

    2016-06-01

    Increasing the gas turbine inlet temperature is one of the key technologies in raising gas turbine engine power output. Film cooling is one of the efficient cooling techniques to cool the hot section components of a gas turbine engines in turn the turbine inlet temperature can be increased. This study aims at investigating the effect of RANS-type turbulence models on adiabatic film cooling effectiveness over a scaled up gas turbine blade leading edge surfaces. For the evaluation, five different two equation RANS-type turbulent models have been taken in consideration, which are available in the ANSYS-Fluent. For this analysis, the gas turbine blade leading edge configuration is generated using Solid Works. The meshing is done using ANSYS-Workbench Mesh and ANSYS-Fluent is used as a solver to solve the flow field. The considered gas turbine blade leading edge model is having five rows of film cooling circular holes, one at stagnation line and the two each on either side of stagnation line at 30° and 60° respectively. Each row has the five holes with the hole diameter of 4 mm, pitch of 21 mm arranged in staggered manner and has the hole injection angle of 30° in span wise direction. The experiments are carried in a subsonic cascade tunnel facility at heat transfer lab of CSIR-National Aerospace Laboratory with a Reynolds number of 1,00,000 based on leading edge diameter. From the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) evaluation it is found that K-ɛ Realizable model gives more acceptable results with the experimental values, compared to the other considered turbulence models for this type of geometries. Further the CFD evaluated results, using K-ɛ Realizable model at different blowing ratios are compared with the experimental results.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION FOR THE EFFECT OF ROTATION ON THREE-DIMENSIONAL FLOW FIELD IN FILM-COOLED TURBINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Feng; ZHU Xiaocheng; DU Zhaohui

    2007-01-01

    An experimental investigation of three-dimensional flow field in a film-cooled turbine model is carried out by using particle image velocimeter (PIV) in a low-speed wind tunnel. The effects of different blowing ratios (M=1.5, 2) on the flow field are studied. The experimental results reveal the classical phenomena of the formation of kidney vortex pair and secondary flow in wake region behind the jet hole. And the changes of the kidney vortex pair and the wake at different locations away from the hole on the suction and pressure sides are also studied. Compared with the flow field in stationary cascade, there are centrifugal force and Coriolis force existing in the flow field of rotating turbine, and these forces bring the radial velocity in the jet flow. The effect of rotation on the flow field of the pressure side is more distinct than that on the suction side from the measured flow fields in Y-Z plane and radial velocity contours. The increase of blowing ratio makes the kidney vortex pair and the secondary flow in the wake region stronger and makes the range of the wake region enlarged.

  19. Effect of Vortex Circulation on Injectant from a Single Film-Cooling Hole and a Row of Film-Cooling Holes in a Turbulent Boundary Layer. Part 1. Injection Beneath the Vortex Downwash

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    distribution is unlimited ~ PERFORMING ORGAN IZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) 5 MONITORING ORGANIZ ATION REPORT NUMBER(S) )a NAM E OF PERF ORMING ORGANIZATION 6b...California, March, 1987. Ort1::, A., "The Thermal Behavoir of Film Cooled Turbulent Boundary Layers as Affected by Long1tudinal Vort1ces", M.E

  20. Analysis of Turbine Blade Relative Cooling Flow Factor Used in the Subroutine Coolit Based on Film Cooling Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Heat transfer correlations of data on flat plates are used to explore the parameters in the Coolit program used for calculating the quantity of cooling air for controlling turbine blade temperature. Correlations for both convection and film cooling are explored for their relevance to predicting blade temperature as a function of a total cooling flow which is split between external film and internal convection flows. Similar trends to those in Coolit are predicted as a function of the percent of the total cooling flow that is in the film. The exceptions are that no film or 100 percent convection is predicted to not be able to control blade temperature, while leaving less than 25 percent of the cooling flow in the convection path results in nearing a limit on convection cooling as predicted by a thermal effectiveness parameter not presently used in Coolit.

  1. Prediction of Film Cooling on Gas Turbine Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes analysis tool has been developed in order to study the effect of film cooling on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of actual turbine airfoils. An existing code (Arnone et al., 1991) has been modified for the purpose. The code is an explicit, multigrid, cell-centered, finite volume code with an algebraic turbulence model. Eigenvalue scaled artificial dissipation and variable-coefficient implicit residual smoothing are used with a full-multigrid technique. Moreover, Mayle's transition criterion (Mayle, 1991) is used. The effects of film cooling have been incorporated into the code in the form of appropriate boundary conditions at the hole locations on the airfoil surface. Each hole exit is represented by several control volumes, thus providing an ability to study the effect of hole shape on the film-cooling characteristics. Comparison is fair with near mid-span experimental data for four and nine rows of cooling holes, five on the shower head, and two rows each on the pressure and suction surfaces. The computations, however, show a strong spanwise variation of the heat transfer coefficient on the airfoil surface, specially with shower-head cooling.

  2. Numerical investigation of unsteady mixing mechanism in plate film cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A large-scale large eddy simulation in high performance personal computer clusters is carried out to present unsteady mixing mechanism of film cooling and the development of films. Simulation cases include a single-hole plate with the inclined angle of 30° and blowing ratio of 0.5, and a single-row plate with hole-spacing of 1.5D and 2D (diameters of the hole. According to the massive simulation results, some new unsteady phenomena of gas films are found. The vortex system is changed in different position with the development of film cooling with the time marching the process of a single-row plate film cooling. Due to the mutual interference effects including mutual exclusion, a certain periodic sloshing and mutual fusion, and the structures of a variety of vortices change between parallel gas films. Macroscopic flow structures and heat transfer behaviors are obtained based on 20 million grids and Reynolds number of 28600.

  3. Heat Transfer on a Film-Cooled Rotating Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    1999-01-01

    A multi-block, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code has been used to compute heat transfer coefficient on the blade, hub and shroud for a rotating high-pressure turbine blade with 172 film-cooling holes in eight rows. Film cooling effectiveness is also computed on the adiabatic blade. Wilcox's k-omega model is used for modeling the turbulence. Of the eight rows of holes, three are staggered on the shower-head with compound-angled holes. With so many holes on the blade it was somewhat of a challenge to get a good quality grid on and around the blade and in the tip clearance region. The final multi-block grid consists of 4784 elementary blocks which were merged into 276 super blocks. The viscous grid has over 2.2 million cells. Each hole exit, in its true oval shape, has 80 cells within it so that coolant velocity, temperature, k and omega distributions can be specified at these hole exits. It is found that for the given parameters, heat transfer coefficient on the cooled, isothermal blade is highest in the leading edge region and in the tip region. Also, the effectiveness over the cooled, adiabatic blade is the lowest in these regions. Results for an uncooled blade are also shown, providing a direct comparison with those for the cooled blade. Also, the heat transfer coefficient is much higher on the shroud as compared to that on the hub for both the cooled and the uncooled cases.

  4. Temperature Mapping of Air Film-Cooled Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces Using Phosphor Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC) thermal protection and air film cooling effectiveness for jet engine components are usually studied separately, their contributions to combined cooling effectiveness are interdependent and are not simply additive. Therefore, combined cooling effectiveness must be measured to achieve an optimum balance between TBC thermal protection and air film cooling. Phosphor thermometry offers several advantages for mapping temperatures of air film cooled surfaces. While infrared thermography has been typically applied to study air film cooling effectiveness, temperature accuracy depends on knowing surface emissivity (which may change) and correcting for effects of reflected radiation. Because decay time-based full-field phosphor thermometry is relatively immune to these effects, it can be applied advantageously to temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces. In this presentation, an overview will be given of efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center to perform temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces in a burner rig test environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and the strengths and limitations of this method for studying air film cooling effectiveness are discussed.

  5. Slot film cooling: A comprehensive experimental characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffan, Fernando

    When components of a propulsion system are exposed to elevated flow temperatures there is a risk for catastrophic failure if the components are not properly protected from the thermal loads. Among several strategies, slot film cooling is one of the most commonly used, yet poorly understood active cooling techniques. Tangential injection of a relatively cool fluid layer protects the surface(s) in question, but the turbulent mixing between the hot mainstream and cooler film along with the presence of the wall presents an inherently complex problem where kinematics, thermal transport and multimodal heat transfer are coupled. Furthermore, new propulsion designs rely heavily on CFD analysis to verify their viability. These CFD models require validation of their results, and the current literature does not provide a comprehensive data set for film cooling that meets all the demands for proper validation, namely a comprehensive (kinematic, thermal and boundary condition data) data set obtained over a wide range of conditions. This body of work aims at solving the fundamental issue of validation by providing high quality comprehensive film cooling data (kinematics, thermal mixing, heat transfer). 3 distinct velocity ratios (VR=u c/uinfinity) are examined corresponding to wall-wake (VR˜0.5), min-shear (VR ˜ 1.0), and wall-jet (VR˜2.0) type flows at injection, while the temperature ratio TR= Tinfinity/Tc is approximately 1.5 for all cases. Turbulence intensities at injection are 2-4% for the mainstream (urms/uinfinity, vrms/uinfinity,), and on the order of 8-10% for the coolant (urms/uc, vrms/uc,). A special emphasis is placed on inlet characterization, since inlet data in the literature is often incomplete or is of relatively low quality for CFD development. The data reveals that min-shear injection provides the best performance, followed by the wall-jet. The wall-wake case is comparably poor in performance. The comprehensive data suggests that this relative performance

  6. Hypersonic aerospace vehicle leading edge cooling using heat pipe, transpiration and film cooling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modlin, James Michael

    An investigation was conducted to study the feasibility of cooling hypersonic vehicle leading edge structures exposed to severe aerodynamic surface heat fluxes using a combination of liquid metal heat pipes and surface mass transfer cooling techniques. A generalized, transient, finite difference based hypersonic leading edge cooling model was developed that incorporated these effects and was demonstrated on an assumed aerospace plane-type wing leading edge section and a SCRAMJET engine inlet leading edge section. The hypersonic leading edge cooling model was developed using an existing, experimentally verified heat pipe model. Two applications of the hypersonic leading edge cooling model were examined. An assumed aerospace plane-type wing leading edge section exposed to a severe laminar, hypersonic aerodynamic surface heat flux was studied. A second application of the hypersonic leading edge cooling model was conducted on an assumed one-quarter inch nose diameter SCRAMJET engine inlet leading edge section exposed to both a transient laminar, hypersonic aerodynamic surface heat flux and a type 4 shock interference surface heat flux. The investigation led to the conclusion that cooling leading edge structures exposed to severe hypersonic flight environments using a combination of liquid metal heat pipe, surface transpiration, and film cooling methods appeared feasible.

  7. An experimental comparison between a novel and a conventional cooling system for the blown film process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janas, M.; Andretzky, M.; Neubert, B.; Kracht, F.; Wortberg, J.

    2016-03-01

    The blown film extrusion is a significant manufacturing process of plastic films. Compared to other extrusion processes, the productivity is limited by the cooling of the extrudate. A conventional cooling system for the blown film application provides the cooling air tangentially, homogeneous over the whole circumference of the bubble, using a single or dual lip cooling ring. In prior works, major effects could be identified that are responsible for a bad heat transfer. Besides the formation of a boundary sublayer on the film surface due to the fast flowing cooling air, there is the interaction between the cooling jet and the ambient air. In order to intensify the cooling of a tubular film, a new cooling approach was developed, called Multi-Jet. This system guides the air vertically on the film surface, using several slit nozzles over the whole tube formation zone. Hence, the jets penetrate the sublayer. To avoid the interaction with the ambient air, the bubble expansion zone is surrounded by a housing. By means of a numeric investigation, the novel cooling approach and the efficiency of the cooling system could be proved. Thereby, a four times higher local heat transfer coefficient is achieved compared to a conventional cooling device. In this paper, the Multi-Jet cooling system is experimentally tested for several different process conditions. To identify a worth considering cooling configuration of the novel cooling system for the experiment, a simulation tool presets the optimal process parameters. The comparison between the results of the new and a conventional system shows that the novel cooling method is able to gain the same frost line height using a 40% lower cooling air volume flow. Due to the housing of the tube formation zone, a heat recovery can be achieved.

  8. Film Cooling Optimization Using Numerical Computation of the Compressible Viscous Flow Equations and Simplex Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Elsayed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Film cooling is vital to gas turbine blades to protect them from high temperatures and hence high thermal stresses. In the current work, optimization of film cooling parameters on a flat plate is investigated numerically. The effect of film cooling parameters such as inlet velocity direction, lateral and forward diffusion angles, blowing ratio, and streamwise angle on the cooling effectiveness is studied, and optimum cooling parameters are selected. The numerical simulation of the coolant flow through flat plate hole system is carried out using the “CFDRC package” coupled with the optimization algorithm “simplex” to maximize overall film cooling effectiveness. Unstructured finite volume technique is used to solve the steady, three-dimensional and compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The results are compared with the published numerical and experimental data of a cylindrically round-simple hole, and the results show good agreement. In addition, the results indicate that the average overall film cooling effectiveness is enhanced by decreasing the streamwise angle for high blowing ratio and by increasing the lateral and forward diffusion angles. Optimum geometry of the cooling hole on a flat plate is determined. In addition, numerical simulations of film cooling on actual turbine blade are performed using the flat plate optimal hole geometry.

  9. Improving Durability of Turbine Components Through Trenched Film Cooling and Contoured Endwalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogard, David G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Thole, Karen A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The experimental and computational studies of the turbine endwall and vane models completed in this research program have provided a comprehensive understanding of turbine cooling with combined film cooling and TBC. To correctly simulate the cooling effects of TBC requires the use of matched Biot number models, a technique developed in our laboratories. This technique allows for the measurement of the overall cooling effectiveness which is a measure of the combined internal and external cooling for a turbine component. The overall cooling effectiveness provides an indication of the actual metal temperature that would occur at engine conditions, and is hence a more powerful performance indicator than the film effectiveness parameter that is commonly used for film cooling studies. Furthermore these studies include the effects of contaminant depositions which are expected to occur when gas turbines are operated with syngas fuels. Results from the endwall studies performed at Penn State University and the vane model studies performed at the University of Texas are the first direct measurements of the combined effects of film cooling and TBC. These results show that TBC has a dominating effect on the overall cooling effectiveness, which enhances the importance of the internal cooling mechanisms, and downplays the importance of the film cooling of the external surface. The TBC was found to increase overall cooling effectiveness by a factor of two to four. When combined with TBC, the primary cooling from film cooling holes was found to be due to the convective cooling within the holes, not from the film effectiveness on the surface of the TBC. Simulations of the deposition of contaminants on the endwall and vane surfaces showed that these depositions caused a large increase in surface roughness and significant degradation of film effectiveness. However, despite these negative factors, the depositions caused only a slight decrease in the overall cooling effectiveness on

  10. Experimental and computational studies of film cooling with compound angle injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, R.J.; Eckert, E.R.G.; Patankar, S.V.; Simon, T.W. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The thermal efficiency of gas turbine systems depends largely on the turbine inlet temperature. Recent decades have seen a steady rise in the inlet temperature and a resulting reduction in fuel consumption. At the same time, it has been necessary to employ intensive cooling of the hot components. Among various cooling methods, film cooling has become a standard method for cooling of the turbine airfoils and combustion chamber walls. The University of Minnesota program is a combined experimental and computational study of various film-cooling configurations. Whereas a large number of parameters influence film cooling processes, this research focuses on compound angle injection through a single row and through two rows of holes. Later work will investigate the values of contoured hole designs. An appreciation of the advantages of compound angle injection has risen recently with the demand for more effective cooling and with improved understanding of the flow; this project should continue to further this understanding. Approaches being applied include: (1) a new measurement system that extends the mass/heat transfer analogy to obtain both local film cooling and local mass (heat) transfer results in a single system, (2) direct measurement of three-dimensional turbulent transport in a highly-disturbed flow, (3) the use of compound angle and shaped holes to optimize film cooling performance, and (4) an exploration of anisotropy corrections to turbulence modeling of film cooling jets.

  11. Experimental and computational studies of film cooling with compound angle injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, R.J.; Eckert, E.R.G.; Patankar, S.V. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The thermal efficiency of gas turbine systems depends largely on the turbine inlet temperature. Recent decades have seen a steady rise in the inlet temperature and a resulting reduction in fuel consumption. At the same time, it has been necessary to employ intensive cooling of the hot components. Among various cooling methods, film cooling has become a standard method for cooling of the turbine airfoils and combustion chamber walls. The University of Minnesota program is a combined experimental and computational study of various film-cooling configurations. Whereas a large number of parameters influence film cooling processes, this research focuses on compound angle injection through a single row and through two rows of holes. Later work will investigate the values of contoured hole designs. An appreciation of the advantages of compound angle injection has risen recently with the demand for more effective cooling and with improved understanding of the flow; this project should continue to further this understanding. Approaches being applied include: (1) a new measurement system that extends the mass/heat transfer analogy to obtain both local film cooling and local mass (heat) transfer results in a single system, (2) direct measurement of three-dimensional turbulent transport in a highly-disturbed flow, (3) the use of compound angle and shaped holes to optimize film cooling performance, and (4) an exploration of anisotropy corrections to turbulence modeling of film cooling jets.

  12. Multidisciplinary design optimization of film-cooled gas turbine blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talya Shashishekara S.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Design optimization of a gas turbine blade geometry for effective film cooling toreduce the blade temperature has been done using a multiobjective optimization formulation. Three optimization formulations have been used. In the first, the average blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized. An upper bound constraint has been imposed on the maximum blade temperature. In the second, the maximum blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized with an upper bound constraint on the average blade temperature. In the third formulation, the blade average and maximum temperatures are chosen as objective functions. Shape optimization is performed using geometric parameters associated with film cooling and blade external shape. A quasi-three-dimensional Navier–Stokes solver for turbomachinery flows is used to solve for the flow field external to the blade with appropriate modifications to incorporate the effect of film cooling. The heat transfer analysis for temperature distribution within the blade is performed by solving the heat diffusion equation using the finite element method. The multiobjective Kreisselmeier–Steinhauser function approach has been used in conjunction with an approximate analysis technique for optimization. The results obtained using both formulations are compared with reference geometry. All three formulations yield significant reductions in blade temperature with the multiobjective formulation yielding largest reduction in blade temperature.

  13. Investigation of the cooling film distribution in liquid rocket engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Antonio Silva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results of the investigation of a cooling method widely used in the combustion chambers, which is called cooling film, and it is applied to a liquid rocket engine that uses as propellants liquid oxygen and kerosene. Starting from an engine cooling, whose film is formed through the fuel spray guns positioned on the periphery of the injection system, the film was experimentally examined, it is formed by liquid that seeped through the inner wall of the combustion chamber. The parameter used for validation and refinement of the theoretical penetration of the film was cooling, as this parameter is of paramount importance to obtain an efficient thermal protection inside the combustion chamber. Cold tests confirmed a penetrating cold enough cooling of the film for the length of the combustion chamber of the studied engine.

  14. Numerical Modeling and Analysis of Grooved Surface Applied to Film Cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. Guo; Z. C. Liu; Y.Y.Yan; Z.W.Han

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of film cooling,numerical investigation was carried out to study the effects of different film-cooled plates on surface heat transfer.Both grooved and non-grooved surfaces were concerned.The modeling was performed using Fluent software with the adoption of Shear-Stress Transport (SST) k-co model as the turbulence closure.The coolant was supplied by a single film cooling hole with an inclination angle of 30°.The Mach numbers for the coolant flow and the mainstream flow were fixed at 0 and 0.6,respectively.At three blowing ratios of 0.5,1.0 and 1.5,the aerodynamic behaviour of the mixing process as well as the heat transfer performance of the film cooling were presented.The numerical results were validated using experimental data extracted from a benchmark test.Good agreements between numerical results and the experimental data were observed.For the film cooling efficiency,it shows that both local and laterally averaged cooling effectiveness can be improved by the non-smooth surface at different blowing ratios.Using the grooved surface,the turbulence intensity upon the plate can be reduced notably,and the mixing between the two flows is weakened due to the reduced turbulence level.The results indicate that the cooling effectiveness of film cooling can be enhanced by applying the grooved surface.

  15. Turbine Airfoil Leading Edge Film Cooling Bibliography: 1972–1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Kercher

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Film cooling for turbine airfoil leading edges has been a common practice for at least 35 years as turbine inlet gas temperatures and pressures have continually increased along with cooling air temperatures for higher engine cycle efficiency. With substantial engine cycle performance improvements from higher gas temperatures, it has become increasingly necessary to film cool nozzle and rotor blade leading edges since external heat transfer coefficients and thus heat load are the highest in this airfoil region. Optimum cooling air requirements in this harsh environment has prompted a significant number of film cooling investigations and analytical studies reported over the past 25 years from academia, industry and government agencies. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the complex nature of leading edge film cooling from airfoil cascades, simulated airfoil leading edges and environment. This bibliography is a report of the open-literature references available which provide information on the complex aero–thermo interaction of leading edge gaseous film cooling with mainstream flow. From much of this investigative information has come successful operational leading edge film cooling design systems capable of sustaining airfoil leading edge durability in very hostile turbine environments.

  16. Influences of Hole Shape on Film Cooling Characteristics with CO2 Injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guangchao; Zhu Huiren; Fan Huiming

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the data about heat transfer coefficient ratios, film cooling effectiveness and heat loads for the injection through cylindrical holes, 3-in-1 holes and fanned holes in order to characterize the film cooling performance downstream of a row of holes with 45° inclination and 3 hole spacing apart. The trip wire is placed upstream at a distance of 10 times diameter of the cooling hole from the hole center to keep mainstream fully turbulent. Both inlet and outlet of 3-in-1 holes have a 15° lateral expansion. The outlet of faaned holes has a lateral expansion. CO2 is applied for secondary injection to obtain a density ratio of 1.5. Momentum flux ratio varies from 1 to 4. The results indicate that the increased momentum flux ratio significantly inoreases heat transfer coefficient and slightly improve film cooling effectiveness for the injection through cylindrical holes. A weak dependence of heat transfer coefficient and film cooling effectiveness, respectively, on momentum flux ratio has been identified for the injection through 3-in-1 holes. The increase of the momentum flux ratio decreases heat transfer coefficient and significantly increases film cooling effectiveness for the injection through fanned holes. In terms of the film cooling performance, the fanned holes are the best while the cylindrical holes are the worst among the three hole shapes under study.

  17. Experimental assessment of film cooling performance of short cylindrical holes on a flat surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kuldeep; Premachandran, B.; Ravi, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    The present study is an experimental investigation of film-cooling over a flat surface from the short cylindrical holes. The film cooling holes used in the combustion chamber and the afterburner liner of an aero engine has length-to-diameter (L/D) typically in the range 1-2, while the cooling holes used in turbine blades has L/D > 3. Based on the classification given in the literature, cooling holes with L/D ≤ 3 are named as short holes and cooling holes with L/D > 3 are named as long holes. Short film cooling holes cause jetting of the secondary fluid whereas the secondary fluid emerging from long holes has characteristics similar to fully developed turbulent flow in pipe. In order to understand the difference in the film cooling performance of long and short cooling holes, experimental study is carried out for five values of L/D in the range 1-5, five injection angles, α = 15°-90° and five mainstream Reynolds number 1.25 × 105-6.25 × 105 and two blowing ratios, M = 0.5-1.0. The surface temperature of the test plate is monitored using infrared thermography. The results obtained from the present study showed that the film-cooling effectiveness is higher for the longest holes (L/D = 5) investigated in the present work in comparison to that for the shorter holes. Short holes are found to give better effectiveness at the lowest investigated injection angle i.e. α = 15° in the near cooling hole region, whereas film cooling effectiveness obtained at injection angle, α = 45° is found to be better than other injection angles for longest investigated holes, i.e. L/D = 5.

  18. Experimental assessment of film cooling performance of short cylindrical holes on a flat surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kuldeep; Premachandran, B.; Ravi, M. R.

    2016-03-01

    The present study is an experimental investigation of film-cooling over a flat surface from the short cylindrical holes. The film cooling holes used in the combustion chamber and the afterburner liner of an aero engine has length-to-diameter (L/D) typically in the range 1-2, while the cooling holes used in turbine blades has L/D > 3. Based on the classification given in the literature, cooling holes with L/D ≤ 3 are named as short holes and cooling holes with L/D > 3 are named as long holes. Short film cooling holes cause jetting of the secondary fluid whereas the secondary fluid emerging from long holes has characteristics similar to fully developed turbulent flow in pipe. In order to understand the difference in the film cooling performance of long and short cooling holes, experimental study is carried out for five values of L/D in the range 1-5, five injection angles, α = 15°-90° and five mainstream Reynolds number 1.25 × 105-6.25 × 105 and two blowing ratios, M = 0.5-1.0. The surface temperature of the test plate is monitored using infrared thermography. The results obtained from the present study showed that the film-cooling effectiveness is higher for the longest holes (L/D = 5) investigated in the present work in comparison to that for the shorter holes. Short holes are found to give better effectiveness at the lowest investigated injection angle i.e. α = 15° in the near cooling hole region, whereas film cooling effectiveness obtained at injection angle, α = 45° is found to be better than other injection angles for longest investigated holes, i.e. L/D = 5.

  19. Numerical Analysis of Supersonic Film Cooling in Supersonic Flow in Hypersonic Inlet with Isolator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silong Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Supersonic film cooling is an efficient method to cool the engine with extremely high heat load. In order to study supersonic film cooling in a real advanced engine, a two-dimensional model of the hypersonic inlet in a scramjet engine with supersonic film cooling in the isolator is built and validated through experimental data. The simulation results show that the cooling effect under different coolant injection angles does not show clear differences; a small injection angle can ensure both the cooling effect and good aerodynamic performances (e.g., flow coefficient of the hypersonic inlet. Under selected coolant injection angle and inlet Mach number, the cooling efficiency increases along with the injection Mach number of the coolant flow, only causing a little total pressure loss in the isolator. Along with the increase of the inlet Mach number of the hypersonic inlet, the cooling efficiency does not present a monotonic change because of the complex shock waves. However, the wall temperature shows a monotonic increase when the inlet Mach number increases. The mass flow rate of coolant flow should be increased to cool the engine more efficiently according to the mass flow rate of the main stream when the inlet Mach number increases.

  20. Film cooling in a pulsating stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasel, H.; Ortega, A.; Wygnanski, I.J. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The mean flow and stability characteristics of a plane, laminar wall jet were investigated experimentally, theoretically, and numerically for a constant wall temperature boundary condition. The streamwise mean velocity and temperature profiles and the downstream development of the hydrodynamic and thermal boundary layer thicknesses were obtained through simultaneous hot and cold wire measurements. Even at relatively low temperature differences, heating or cooling of the surface sufficiently altered the mean velocity profile in the inner region to produce significant effects on the jet stability. Selective forcing of the flow at the most amplified frequencies produced profound effects on the velocity and temperature fields and hence the time-averaged shear stress and heat transfer. Large amplitude excitation of the flow at high frequencies resulted in a reduction in the maximum skin friction by as much as 65% with an increase in the maximum wall heat flux as high as 45%. The skin friction and wall heat flux were much less susceptible to low frequency excitation.

  1. Measurement of the heat transfer and the film cooling effectiveness at a film-cooled leading edge of a turbine blade and derivation of a local model. Pt. C: derivation of a local model. Final report; Messung von Waermeuebergang und Filmkuehleffektivitaet im Bereich der filmgekuehlten Vorderkante eines Turbinenschaufelprofils und Ableitung lokaler Modelle. T. C: Ableitung lokaler Modelle. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, H.P.; Biba, S.

    1998-03-31

    Today, the heat transfer on a film-cooled leading edge of a high pressure turbine blade is calculated either by simple but inaccurate correlations or highly complex 3-D-simulations of the entire blade flow. The aim of the project was to derive an improved local model of the heat transfer at the leading edge in order to develop new, more precise correlations. This was done in order to minimize the cooling mass flow requirements and therefore to improve the efficiency of gas turbines. A new simple model of the near wall flow at the film cooled leading edge was derived. The model is based on the modification of the well-known turbulent boundary layer flow at a flat plate. This leads to semi-empirical correlations for the prediction of the adiabatic film cooling effectiveness and the heat transfer coefficient. The parameters of these correlations are matched to measurements at a film cooled leading edge model. By applying the correlations, the heat transfer at the leading edge can be predicted sufficiently accurate in dependence on the downstream distance, the blowing ratio and the Reynolds-number. The correlations can be implemented in existing 2-D-methods for the design of a blade cooling configuration. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Waermeeintrag an einer filmgekuehlten Vorderkante einer Hochdruckturbinenschaufel wird derzeit mittels einfacher, nicht hinreichend genauer Korrelationen oder durch komplexe 3-D-Simulationen der Stroemung berechnet. Ziel des Vorhabens ist es, zur Minimierung des Kuehlungsmassenstroms und damit zur Wirkungsgradverbesserung der Gasturbine ein verbessertes lokales Modell des Waermeuebergangs und genauere Korrelationen herzuleiten. Im Vorhaben wurde ein Modell fuer die wandnahe Stroemung an einer filmgekuehlten Vorderkante entwickelt. Das Modell beruht auf der Modifikation der bekannten turbulenten Grenzschicht an einer ebenen Platte. Die Modellierung fuehrt zu halb-empirischen Korrelationen fuer die adiabate Filmkuehleffektivitaet und dem

  2. 质量流量比对全气膜冷却叶片冷却特性影响的实验研究%Experimental Study of Effects of Mass Flow Ratio on Film Cooling Effectiveness on Full Surface Cooling Vane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟庆昆; 朱惠人; 张宗卫; 刘聪

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution heat transfer coefficient and film effectiveness measurements on a full-film cooling nozzle guide vane with compound and axial angle holes are obtained using a transient liquid crystal technique. Tests were performed in a scaled-up, two-passage cascade at an inlet Reynolds number of 1. 0 X 10 . There are 8 rows of compound angle cylinder film holes around the leading edge, 21 rows of axial angle cylinder holes on the pressure side, and 24 rows of axial angle cylinder holes on the suction side. The holes are fed from one of two internal cavities with a mass flow ratio of 4. 56% in the first plenum and 4. 67% in the second plenum. Results show that the film cover region shrinks on the suction side and expands on the pressure side as the influence of passage vortex. As for the three mass flow ratios, the mean effectiveness of film cooling stay the same. The results show that MFR has a little influence film cooling effectiveness, and as MFR increases, the heat transfer coefficient and film cooling effectiveness increase at the same time. On the leading edge of the blade,film cooling effectiveness has a better improvement.%采用瞬态液晶技术获得了全气膜冷却涡轮导向叶片全表面的高分辨率气膜冷却效率分布云图.实验在放大模型中完成,叶栅构成为三叶片两通道,叶栅进口雷诺数是1.0 × 105.叶片前缘有8排扩张型孔,压力面有21排轴向角孔,吸力面有24排轴向角孔.气膜孔排由2个供气腔供气,前腔二次流与主流的质量流量比为4.56%,后腔为4.67%.结果表明:受叶栅通道涡作用,气膜出流在吸力面呈聚敛状,在压力面则呈发散状.在三种质量流量比情况下,叶片平均冷却效率分布大体一致.随质量流量比的提升,叶片平均冷却效率提高,叶片前缘区域,气膜冷却效率提升更加明显.

  3. Numerical optimization of a multi-jet cooling system for the blown film extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janas, M.; Wortberg, J.

    2015-05-01

    The limiting factor for every extrusion process is the cooling. For the blown film process, this task is usually done by means of a single or dual lip air ring. Prior work has shown that two major effects are responsible for a bad heat transfer. The first one is the interaction between the jet and the ambient air. It reduces the velocity of the jet and enlarges the straight flow. The other one is the formation of a laminar boundary layer on the film surface due to the fast flowing cooling air. In this case, the boundary layer isolates the film and prevents an efficient heat transfer. To improve the heat exchange, a novel cooling approach is developed, called Multi-Jet. The new cooling system uses several slit nozzles over the whole tube formation zone for cooling the film. In contrast to a conventional system, the cooling air is guided vertically on the film surface in different heights to penetrate the boundary sublayer. Simultaneously, a housing of the tube formation zone is practically obtained to reduce the interaction with the ambient air. For the numerical optimization of the Multi-Jet system, a new procedure is developed. First, a prediction model identifies a worth considering cooling configuration. Therefore, the prediction model computes a film curve using the formulation from Zatloukal-Vlcek and the energy balance for the film temperature. Thereafter, the optimized cooling geometry is investigated in detail using a process model for the blown film extrusion that is able to compute a realistic bubble behavior depending on the cooling situation. In this paper, the Multi-Jet cooling system is numerically optimized for several different process states, like mass throughputs and blow-up ratios using one slit nozzle setting. For each process condition, the best cooling result has to be achieved. Therefore, the height of any nozzle over the tube formation zone is adjustable. The other geometrical parameters of the cooling system like the nozzle diameter or the

  4. Microwave Cooled Microbolometers Based on Cermet Si-Cr Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovichev, S. N.; Vdovin, V. F.; Klimov, A. Yu.; Mukhin, A. S.; Nozdrin, Yu. N.; Rogov, V. V.; Udalov, O. G.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of creating a cooled microbolometer based on the cermet films of the silicon and chromium mixture. This material is used for manufacturing the freely hanging high-resistive microbolometers for the first time. The details of fabricating such microbolometers and the prospects for using cermet films to construct microbolometers are discussed. The first estimates of sensitivity of the fabricated microbolometers are given.

  5. Computational and experimental study on supersonic film cooling for liquid rocket nozzle applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakumar Vishnu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and computational investigation of supersonic film cooling (SFC was conducted on a subscale model of a rocket engine nozzle. A computational model of a convergent-divergent nozzle was generated, incorporating a secondary injection module for film cooling in the divergent section. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD simulations were run on the model and different injection configurations were analyzed. The CFD simulations also analyzed the parameters that influence film cooling effectiveness. Subsequent to the CFD analysis and literature survey an angled injection configuration was found to be more effective, therefore the hardware was fabricated for the same. The fabricated nozzle was later fixed to an Air-Kerosene combustor and numerous sets of experiments were conducted in order to ascertain the effect on film cooling on the nozzle wall. The film coolant employed was gaseous Nitrogen. The results showed substantial cooling along the walls and a considerable reduction in heat transfer from the combustion gas to the wall of the nozzle. Finally the computational model was validated using the experimental results. There was fairly good agreement between the predicted nozzle wall temperature and the value obtained through experiments.

  6. Film Cooling in Fuel Rich Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    12 2.3 Hydrocarbon Combustion Hydrocarbon combustion is a chemical reaction globally following equation 2.8 in air. The heat release from this reaction ...following reaction completion in the WSR at the measured ”stack” temperature, and second for an adiabatic flame temperature and enthalpy rise for the...schemes for hot section turbine blades involve injecting cool, oxygen-rich air adjacent to the surface, the potential arises for reaction with the

  7. Numerical and experimental investigation of turbine blade film cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkache, Amar; Dizene, Rabah

    2017-06-01

    The blades in a gas turbine engine are exposed to extreme temperature levels that exceed the melting temperature of the material. Therefore, efficient cooling is a requirement for high performance of the gas turbine engine. The present study investigates film cooling by means of 3D numerical simulations using a commercial code: Fluent. Three numerical models, namely k-ɛ, RSM and SST turbulence models; are applied and then prediction results are compared to experimental measurements conducted by PIV technique. The experimental model realized in the ENSEMA laboratory uses a flat plate with several rows of staggered holes. The performance of the injected flow into the mainstream is analyzed. The comparison shows that the RANS closure models improve the over-predictions of center-line film cooling velocities that is caused by the limitations of the RANS method due to its isotropy eddy diffusivity.

  8. NUMERICAL STUDIES ON HYDROGEN COMBUSTION IN A FILM COOLED CRYOGENIC ROCKET ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARSHAD A.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Liquid rocket engines have variety of propellant combinations which produces very high specific impulses. It is due to this fact; very high heat fluxes are incident on the combustion chamber and the nozzle walls. In order to deal with these heat fluxes, a wide range of cooling techniques have been employed, out of which a combination of film cooling and regenerative cooling promises to be the most effective one. The present study involves the numerical analysis of combustion in a typical film cooled cryogenic rocket engine thrust chamber considering the combustion of the fuel, heat transfer through the chamber walls and the fluid flow simultaneously. Analysis was done for a typical rocket engine thrust chamber with a single coaxial injector which uses gaseous hydrogen as the fuel and liquid oxygen as the oxidizer.

  9. Heat Transfer Measurements for a Film Cooled Turbine Vane Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinsatte, Philip E.; Heidmann, James D.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental heat transfer and pressure measurements were obtained on a large scale film cooled turbine vane cascade. The objective was to investigate heat transfer on a commercial high pressure first stage turbine vane at near engine Mach and Reynolds number conditions. Additionally blowing ratios and coolant density were also matched. Numerical computations were made with the Glenn-HT code of the same geometry and compared with the experimental results. A transient thermochromic liquid crystal technique was used to obtain steady state heat transfer data on the mid-span geometry of an instrumented vane with 12 rows of circular and shaped film cooling holes. A mixture of SF6 and Argon gases was used for film coolant to match the coolant-to-gas density ratio of a real engine. The exit Mach number and Reynolds number were 0.725 and 2.7 million respectively. Trends from the experimental heat transfer data matched well with the computational prediction, particularly for the film cooled case.

  10. Numerical study on film cooling and convective heat transfer characteristics in the cutback region of turbine blade trailing edge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Yong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas turbine blade trailing edge is easy to burn out under the exposure of high-temperature gas due to its thin shape. The cooling of this area is an important task in gas turbine blade design. The structure design and analysis of trailing edge is critical because of the complexity of geometry, arrangement of cooling channels, design requirement of strength, and the working condition of high heat flux. In the present paper, a 3-D model of the trailing edge cooling channel is constructed and both structures with and without land are numerically investigated at different blowing ratio. The distributions of film cooling effectiveness and convective heat transfer coefficient on cutback and land surface are analyzed, respectively. According to the results, it is obtained that the distributions of film cooling effectiveness and convective heat transfer coefficient both show the symmetrical characteristics as a result of the periodic structure of the trailing edge. The increase of blowing ratio significantly improves the film cooling effectiveness and convective heat transfer coefficient on the cutback surface, which is beneficial to the cooling of trailing edge. It is also found that the land structure is advantageous for enhancing the streamwise film cooling effectiveness of the trailing edge surface while the film cooling effectiveness on the land surface remains at a low level. Convective heat transfer coefficient exhibits a strong dependency with the blowing ratio, which suggests that film cooling effectiveness and convective heat transfer coefficient must be both considered and analyzed in the design of trailing edge cooling structure.

  11. A computer program for full-coverage film-cooled blading analysis including the effects of a thermal barrier coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The program input, coolant flow and heat transfer model, and the program output are discussed. As an example, sections of the suction and pressure sides of a high temperature, high pressure turbine vane are analyzed to show the effects of a thermal barrier coating. Compared to the uncoated design, the coating halves the required coolant flow, while simultaneously reducing metal outer temperatures by over 111 K.

  12. Analyzing the structure of the optical path difference of the supersonic film cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Haolin; Yi, Shihe; Fu, Jia; He, Lin

    2016-10-01

    While high-speed aircraft are flying in the atmosphere, its optical-hood is subjected to severe aerodynamic heating. Supersonic film cooling method can effectively isolate external heating, but the flow structures formed by the supersonic film cooling can cause the beam degradation and affect the imaging quality. To research the aero-optics of supersonic film cooling, an experimental model was adopted in this paper, its mainstream Mach number 3.4, designed jet Mach number 2.5, measured jet Mach number 2.45. High-resolution images of flow were acquired by the nano-based planar laser scattering (NPLS) technique, by reconstructing the density field of supersonic film cooling, and then, the optical path difference (OPD) were acquired by the ray-tracing method. Depending on the comparison between K-H vortex and OPD distribution, the valleys of OPD correspond to the vortex `rollers' and the peaks to the `braids'. However, the corresponding relationship becomes quite irregular for the flow field with developed vortices, and cannot be summarized in this manner. And then, the OPD were analyzed by correlation function and structure function, show that, there is a relationship between the shape of OPD correlation function and the vortex structure, the correlation function type changed with the development of the vortex. The correctness that the mixing layer makes a main contribution to the aero-optics of supersonic film cooling was verified, and the structure function of aero-optical distortion has a power relationship that is similar to that of atmospheric optics. At last, the power spectrum corresponding to the typical region of supersonic film cooling were acquired by improved periodgram.

  13. Measurements in Film Cooling Flows with Periodic Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    camera, thermocouples, and constant current (cold- wire ) anemometry . Hot - wire anemometry was used for velocity measurements. The local film cooling...and constant temperature hot - wire anemometry were used to measure flow temperature and velocity, respectively. Boundary layer probes with 1.27 m...jet velocity and temperature were documented by Coulthard et al. 26 by traversing the constant current and hot - wire probes over the hole exit plane

  14. Thin-Film Evaporative Cooling for Side-Pumped Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Brian K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method are provided for cooling a crystal rod of a side-pumped laser. A transparent housing receives the crystal rod therethrough so that an annular gap is defined between the housing and the radial surface of the crystal rod. A fluid coolant is injected into the annular gap such the annular gap is partially filled with the fluid coolant while the radial surface of the crystal rod is wetted as a thin film all along the axial length thereof.

  15. Peltier cooling and onsager reciprocity in ferromagnetic thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, A D; Zink, B L

    2013-09-20

    We present direct measurements of the Peltier effect as a function of temperature from 77 to 325 K in Ni, Ni(80)Fe(20), and Fe thin films made using a suspended Si-N membrane structure. Measurement of the Seebeck effect in the same films allows us to directly test predictions of Onsager reciprocity between the Peltier and Seebeck effects. The Peltier coefficient Π is negative for both Ni and Ni(80)Fe(20) films and positive for the Fe film. The Fe film also exhibits a peak associated with the magnon drag Peltier effect. The observation of magnon drag in the Fe film verifies that the coupling between the phonon, magnon, and electron systems in the film is the same whether driven by heat current or charge current. The excellent agreement between Π values predicted using the experimentally determined Seebeck coefficient for these films and measured values offers direct experimental confirmation of the Onsager reciprocity between these thermoelectric effects in ferromagnetic thin films near room temperature.

  16. Peltier Cooling and Onsager Reciprocity in Ferromagnetic Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, A. D.; Zink, B. L.

    2013-09-01

    We present direct measurements of the Peltier effect as a function of temperature from 77 to 325 K in Ni, Ni80Fe20, and Fe thin films made using a suspended Si-N membrane structure. Measurement of the Seebeck effect in the same films allows us to directly test predictions of Onsager reciprocity between the Peltier and Seebeck effects. The Peltier coefficient Π is negative for both Ni and Ni80Fe20 films and positive for the Fe film. The Fe film also exhibits a peak associated with the magnon drag Peltier effect. The observation of magnon drag in the Fe film verifies that the coupling between the phonon, magnon, and electron systems in the film is the same whether driven by heat current or charge current. The excellent agreement between Π values predicted using the experimentally determined Seebeck coefficient for these films and measured values offers direct experimental confirmation of the Onsager reciprocity between these thermoelectric effects in ferromagnetic thin films near room temperature.

  17. Film-cooled turbine endwall in a transonic flow field; Filmgekuehlte Turbinenplattform in transsonischem Stroemungsfeld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicklas, M.

    2000-11-01

    Aero and thermodynamic measurements at the endwall of a turbine nozzle guide vane were carried out. These investigations are the first where the complete blade passage at the endwall in a transonic flow field is analysed for heat transfer and adiabatic film-cooling effectiveness. The aerodynamic measurements identify an intensive interaction between the coolant air and the secondary flow field. Similarly strong variations in heat transfer and film-cooling effectiveness were found. Analysis of the heat transfer measurements indicates that the heat transfer represents an indispensable tool for the evaluation of platform film-cooling design. On the basis of infrared temperature measurements, a procedure for accurate analysis of heat transfer and film-cooling effectiveness in a complex transonic flow field was developed. This measurement technique combines high accuracy with flexibility of application. These investigations have led to design improvements for film-cooling systems at the platform. (orig.) [German] Aero- und thermodynamische Messungen an einer Plattform eines Turbinenleitrads werden beschrieben. Erstmals wird in einem transsonischen Stroemungsfeld die komplette Seitenwand bezueglich des Waermeuebergangs und der adiabaten Filmkuehleffektivitaet untersucht. Die aerodynamischen Messungen zeigen eine intensive Wechselwirkung der Kuehlluft mit dem Sekundaerstroemungsfeld. Daraus resultierend treten starke Aenderungen des Waermeuebergangs und der Filmkuehleffektivitaet auf. Die Resultate der Waermeuebergangsmessungen zeigen, dass der Waermeuebergang eine wichtige Groesse fuer die Bewertung eines Filmkuehldesigns an einer Plattform darstellt. Ein Messverfahren auf der Grundlage von Infrarot-Temperaturmessungen fuer eine genaue Analyse des Waermeuebergangs und der Filmkuehleffektivitaet in den komplexen Verhaeltnissen einer transsonischen Stroemung wurde entwickelt. Mit der verwendeten Messtechnik wird eine hohe Genauigkeit bei der Ermittlung der quantitativen

  18. Mathematical model and calculation of water-cooling efficiency in a film-filled cooling tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laptev, A. G.; Lapteva, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    Different approaches to simulation of momentum, mass, and energy transfer in packed beds are considered. The mathematical model of heat and mass transfer in a wetted packed bed for turbulent gas flow and laminar wave counter flow of the fluid film in sprinkler units of a water-cooling tower is presented. The packed bed is represented as the set of equivalent channels with correction to twisting. The idea put forward by P. Kapitsa on representation of waves on the interphase film surface as elements of the surface roughness in interaction with the gas flow is used. The temperature and moisture content profiles are found from the solution of differential equations of heat and mass transfer written for the equivalent channel with the volume heat and mass source. The equations for calculation of the average coefficients of heat emission and mass exchange in regular and irregular beds with different contact elements, as well as the expression for calculation of the average turbulent exchange coefficient are presented. The given formulas determine these coefficients for the known hydraulic resistance of the packed bed element. The results of solution of the system of equations are presented, and the water temperature profiles are shown for different sprinkler units in industrial water-cooling towers. The comparison with experimental data on thermal efficiency of the cooling tower is made; this allows one to determine the temperature of the cooled water at the output. The technical solutions on increasing the cooling tower performance by equalization of the air velocity profile at the input and creation of an additional phase contact region using irregular elements "Inzhekhim" are considered.

  19. Use of a laser-induced fluorescence thermal imaging system for film cooling heat transfer measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyu, M.K. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a novel approach based on fluorescence imaging of thermographic phosphor that enables the simultaneous determination of both local film effectiveness and local heat transfer on a film-cooled surface. The film cooling model demonstrated consists of a single row of three discrete holes on a flat plate. The transient temperature measurement relies on the temperature-sensitive fluorescent properties of europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:EU{sup 3+}) thermographic phosphor. A series of full-field surface temperatures, mainstream temperatures, and coolant film temperatures were acquired during the heating of a test surface. These temperatures are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients and the film effectiveness simultaneously. Because of the superior spatial resolution capability for the heat transfer data reduced from these temperature frames, the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system, the present study observes the detailed heat transfer characteristics over a film-protected surface. The trend of the results agrees with those obtained using other conventional thermal methods, as well as the liquid crystal imaging technique. One major advantage of this technique is the capability to record a large number of temperature frames over a given testing period. This offers multiple-sample consistency.

  20. Confirmation of shutdown cooling effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Kotaro, E-mail: ksato@nelted.co.jp; Tabuchi, Masato; Sugimura, Naoki; Tatsumi, Masahiro [Nuclear Engineering, Limited, 1-3-7 Tosabori Nishi-ku, Osaka-shi, Osaka 550-0001 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    After the Fukushima accidents, all nuclear power plants in Japan have gradually stopped their operations and have long periods of shutdown. During those periods, reactivity of fuels continues to change significantly especially for high-burnup UO{sub 2} fuels and MOX fuels due to radioactive decays. It is necessary to consider these isotopic changes precisely, to predict neutronics characteristics accurately. In this paper, shutdown cooling (SDC) effects of UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels that have unusual operation histories are confirmed by the advanced lattice code, AEGIS. The calculation results show that the effects need to be considered even after nuclear power plants come back to normal operation.

  1. 基于BP神经网络的多参数气膜冷却效率研究%Prediction of the Adiabatic Film Cooling Effectiveness Influnenced by Multi Parameters Based on BP Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦晏旻; 李雪英; 任静; 蒋洪德

    2011-01-01

    Film cooling is necessary for modern gas turbine.Its cooling effectiveness is sophisticated influenced by multi parameters.The BP neural network is applied to predict the adiabatic film cooling effectiveness of the cooling system with multi geometry and flow parameters.The input parameters of neural network are chosen as blowing ratio,density ratio,free stream turbulence intensity,area ratio and length ratio.A database covering the real operation range is build up.Prediction from the neural network trained by Bayesian Regulation backpropagation is compared to an existing correlation.The result shows a good accuracy and wide application range of the neural network model.It implicates that the developed model is promising to be applied on the film cooling system.%气膜冷却作为当代燃机高温透平中必需的冷却手段,其冷却性能在多种参数的影响下表现复杂。采用BP神经网络模型对多种几何、流动参数变化下的气膜冷却系统的绝热气膜冷却效率进行预测。选择气膜冷却系统的吹风比、密度比、主流湍流度、面积比和长径比作为神经网络的输入参数,以燃气轮机透平叶片气膜冷却的实际运行工况为范围建立数据库。计算结果表明,采用贝叶斯归一化法训练后建立的气膜冷却神经网络模型在预测精度上要优于经验公式法,而且参数适用范围更广,具有良好的发展应用前景。

  2. Validation of Heat Transfer and Film Cooling Capabilities of the 3-D RANS Code TURBO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Vikram; Ameri, Ali; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The capabilities of the 3-D unsteady RANS code TURBO have been extended to include heat transfer and film cooling applications. The results of simulations performed with the modified code are compared to experiment and to theory, where applicable. Wilcox s k-turbulence model has been implemented to close the RANS equations. Two simulations are conducted: (1) flow over a flat plate and (2) flow over an adiabatic flat plate cooled by one hole inclined at 35 to the free stream. For (1) agreement with theory is found to be excellent for heat transfer, represented by local Nusselt number, and quite good for momentum, as represented by the local skin friction coefficient. This report compares the local skin friction coefficients and Nusselt numbers on a flat plate obtained using Wilcox's k-model with the theory of Blasius. The study looks at laminar and turbulent flows over an adiabatic flat plate and over an isothermal flat plate for two different wall temperatures. It is shown that TURBO is able to accurately predict heat transfer on a flat plate. For (2) TURBO shows good qualitative agreement with film cooling experiments performed on a flat plate with one cooling hole. Quantitatively, film effectiveness is under predicted downstream of the hole.

  3. LES of film cooling for different jet fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.Renze; W.Schr(o)der; M.Meinke

    2007-01-01

    The present paper investigates the impact of the velocity and density ratio on the turbulent mixing process in gas turbine blade film cooling.A cooling fluid is injected from an inclined pipe at α=30° into a turbulent boundary layer profile at a freestream Reynolds number of Re∞=400000.This jet-in-a-crossflow(JICF) problem is investigated using large-eddy simulations(LES).The governing equations comprise the Navier-Stokes equations plus additional transport equations for several species to simulate a non-reacting gas mixture.A variation of the density ratio is simulated by the heat-mass transfer analogy,i.e.,gases of different density are effused into an an air crossflow at a constant temperature.An efficient large-eddy simulation method for low subsonic flows based on an implicit dual time-stepping scheme combined with low Mach number preconditioning is applied.The numerical results and experimental velocity data measured using two-component particle-image velocimetry (PIV) are in excellent agreement.The results show the dynamics of the flow field in the vicinity of the jet hole,i.e.,the recirculation region and the inclination of the shear layers,to be mainly determined by the velocity ratio.However,evaluating the cooling efficiency downstream of the jet hole the mass flux ratio proves to be the dominant similarity parameter,i.e.,the density ratio between the fluids and the velocity ratio have to be considered.

  4. Turbine Endwall Film Cooling With Combustor-Turbine Interface Gap Leakage Flow: Effect of Incidence Angle%攻角对端壁缝隙泄漏流气膜冷却的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张扬; 袁新

    2012-01-01

    The influence of incidence angle on film cooling effectiveness is studied on first-stage vane endwall with combustor-turbine interface slot. A baseline slot configuration is tested in a low speed four-blade cascade consisting of large scale model of the GE-E3 Nozzle Guide Vane (NGV). The slot has a forward expansion angle of 30° to the endwall surface. The Reynolds number based on the axial chord and inlet velocity of the free-stream flow is 3.5×10^5, and the testing is done in a four-blade cascade with low Mach number condition (0.1 at the inlet) while the mass flow ratio of the coolant through the interface gap varies from 0.5% to 2.0%. The film-cooling effectiveness distributions are obtained using the PSP (pressure sensitive paint) technique. The results show that with blowing ratio increasing, the film cooling effectiveness increases on the endwall. As the incidence angle varies from i=+10°to i=-10°, at low blowing ratio the film cooling effectiveness decreases near the leading edge suction side. As for the main passage endwall, with the incidence angle changing form i = +10° to i = -10° the averaged film cooling effectiveness changes slightly, while this trend will be eliminated by increasing the blowing ratio.%本文中的实验在高压涡轮进口导叶平面叶栅中完成,叶栅端壁前缘开有模拟燃烧室涡轮连接处的缝隙。实验中采用GE-E^3高压涡轮进口导叶作为研究对象,缝隙与端壁表面夹角为30°。进口雷诺数(基于叶片轴向弦长和进口气流速度)为3.5×10^5,进口马赫数为0.1,泄漏流流量比为0.5%和2,0%。气膜有效度通过压力敏感漆(Pressure Sensitive Paint,PSP)进行测量。实验结果表明随泄漏流流量比的增加,端壁表面的平均气膜有效度有所增加;当来流攻角从i=+10。变化至i=-10°时,叶片前缘吸力面附近的端壁气膜有效度降低,但在整个端壁表面气膜有效度对攻角变化并不敏感。

  5. Increased output of blown film extrusion lines by using a cooling sleeve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmann, Christian; Windeck, Christian; Hennigs, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Production efficiency is one of the most important demands in blown film production. In many cases, the cooling power is the limiting factor for an increased output. A possible solution for a better cooling is the use of a cooling sleeve right after the outlet of the die in addition to the conventional air rings and internal bubble cooling (IBC). At the Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV), first tests were conducted to investigate the advantages of the use of a cooling sleeve. Therefore, the influence of several geometries of the cooling sleeve surface and different cooling sleeve temperatures on the process stability and the mechanical and optical film properties is investigated. The cooling sleeve surfaces differ in the tapping between inlet and outlet diameter from 0 % (cylindric) to 10 % (conical). The tests show that a high amount of tapping as well as too high resp. low cooling sleeve temperatures cause process instabilities and an uneven thickness profile of the film. While the mechanical film properties (E-modulus, elongation at break, tensile strength) of the films produced by the use of a cooling sleeve (cs-films) do not significantly differ from the values of the reference films, the haze of the cs-films was higher and therefore worse. A measurement of the bubble temperatures above the air ring shows that the use of a cooling sleeve can significant lower the bubble temperature at this point. Because of this and because of the results of the mechanical tests, the principle of a contact cooling is generally applicable. Further research and development on the geometry of the cooling sleeve surface has to be done to improve the process stability and the haze for a possible industrial application.

  6. Full Coverage Shaped Hole Film Cooling in an Accelerating Boundary Layer with High Free-Stream Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, Forrest E. [University of North Dakota; Kingery, Joseph E. [University of North Dakota

    2015-06-17

    Full coverage shaped-hole film cooling and downstream heat transfer measurements have been acquired in the accelerating flows over a large cylindrical leading edge test surface. The shaped holes had an 8° lateral expansion angled at 30° to the surface with spanwise and streamwise spacings of 3 diameters. Measurements were conducted at four blowing ratios, two Reynolds numbers and six well documented turbulence conditions. Film cooling measurements were acquired over a four to one range in blowing ratio at the lower Reynolds number and at the two lower blowing ratios for the higher Reynolds number. The film cooling measurements were acquired at a coolant to free-stream density ratio of approximately 1.04. The flows were subjected to a low turbulence condition (Tu = 0.7%), two levels of turbulence for a smaller sized grid (Tu = 3.5%, and 7.9%), one turbulence level for a larger grid (8.1%), and two levels of turbulence generated using a mock aero-combustor (Tu = 9.3% and 13.7%). Turbulence level is shown to have a significant influence in mixing away film cooling coverage progressively as the flow develops in the streamwise direction. Effectiveness levels for the aero-combustor turbulence condition are reduced to as low as 20% of low turbulence values by the furthest downstream region. The film cooling discharge is located close to the leading edge with very thin and accelerating upstream boundary layers. Film cooling data at the lower Reynolds number, show that transitional flows have significantly improved effectiveness levels compared with turbulent flows. Downstream effectiveness levels are very similar to slot film cooling data taken at the same coolant flow rates over the same cylindrical test surface. However, slots perform significantly better in the near discharge region. These data are expected to be very useful in grounding computational predictions of full coverage shaped hole film cooling with elevated turbulence levels and acceleration. IR

  7. Heat Transfer on a Film-Cooled Rotating Blade Using a Two Equation Turbulence Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    1998-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code has been used to compare the heat transfer coefficient on a film-cooled, rotating turbine blade. The blade chosen is the ACE rotor with five rows containing 93 film cooling holes covering the entire span. This is the only film-cooled rotating blade over which experimental data is available for comparison. Over 2.278 million grid points are used to compute the flow over the blade including the tip clearance region, using Coakley's q-omega turbulence model. Results are also compared with those obtained by Garg and Abhari (1997) using the zero-equation Baldwin-Lomax (B-L) model. A reasonably good comparison with the experimental data is obtained on the suction surface for both the turbulence models. At the leading edge, the B-L model yields a better comparison than the q-omega model. On the pressure surface, however, the comparison between the experimental data and the prediction from either turbulence model is poor. A potential reason for the discrepancy on the pressure surface could be the presence of unsteady effects due to stator-rotor interaction in the experiments which are not modeled in the present computations. Prediction using the two-equation model is in general poorer than that using the zero-equation model, while the former requires at least 40% more computational resources.

  8. Stagnation region gas film cooling: Spanwise angled injection from multiple rows of holes. [gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckey, D. W.; Lecuyer, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    The stagnation region of a cylinder in a cross flow was used in experiments conducted with both a single row and multiple rows of spanwise angled (25 deg) coolant holes for a range of the coolant blowing ratio with a freestream to wall temperature ratio approximately equal to 1.7 and R(eD) = 90,000. Data from local heat flux measurements are presented for injection from a single row located at 5 deg, 22.9 deg, 40.8 deg, 58.7 deg from stagnation using a hole spacing ratio of S/d(o) = 5 and 10. Three multiple row configurations were also investigated. Data are presented for a uniform blowing distribution and for a nonuniform blowing distribution simulating a plenum supply. The data for local Stanton Number reduction demonstrated a lack of lateral spreading by the coolant jets. Heat flux levels larger than those without film cooling were observed directly behind the coolant holes as the blowing ratio exceeded a particular value. The data were spanwise averaged to illustrate the influence of injection location, blowing ratio and hole spacing. The large values of blowing ratio for the blowing distribution simulating a plenum supply resulted in heat flux levels behind the holes in excess of the values without film cooling. An increase in freestream turbulence intensity from 4.4 to 9.5 percent had a negligible effect on the film cooling performance.

  9. Large eddy simulations of turbulent flows on graphics processing units: Application to film-cooling flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Aaron F.

    this problem as well as techniques to improve it is important. Fundamentally, a film-cooling configuration is an inclined cooling jet in a hot cross-flow. A known problem in the film-cooling method is jet lift-off, where the jet of coolant moves away from the surface to be cooled due to mutual vortex induction by the counter-rotating vortex pair embedded in the jet, resulting in decreased cooling at the surface. To counteract this, a micro-ramp vortex generator was added downstream of the film-cooling jet, which generated near-wall counter-rotating vortices of opposite sense to the vortex pair in the jet. It was found that the micro-ramp vortices created a downwash effect toward the wall, which helped entrain coolant from the jet and transport it to the wall, resulting in better cooling. Results are reported using two film-cooling configurations, where the primary difference is the way the jet exit boundary conditions are prescribed. In the first configuration, the jet is prescribed using a precursor simulation and in the second the jet is modeled using a plenum/pipe configuration. The latter configuration was designed based on previous wind tunnel experiments at NASA Glenn Research Center, and the present results were meant to supplement those experiments.

  10. A saw-tooth plasma actuator for film cooling efficiency enhancement of a shaped hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guozhan; Yu, Jianyang; Liu, Huaping; Chen, Fu; Song, Yanping

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports the large eddy simulations of the effects of a saw-tooth plasma actuator and the laidback fan-shaped hole on the film cooling flow characteristics, and the numerical results are compared with a corresponding standard configuration (cylindrical hole without the saw-tooth plasma actuator). For this numerical research, the saw-tooth plasma actuator is installed just downstream of the cooling hole and a phenomenological plasma model is employed to provide the 3D plasma force vectors. The results show that thanks to the downward force and the momentum injection effect of the saw-tooth plasma actuator, the cold jet comes closer to the wall surface and extends further downstream. The saw-tooth plasma actuator also induces a new pair of vortex which weakens the strength of the counter-rotating vortex pair (CRVP) and entrains the coolant towards the wall, and thus the diffusion of the cold jet in the crossflow is suppressed. Furthermore, the laidback fan-shaped hole reduces the vertical jet velocity causing the disappearance of downstream spiral separation node vortices, this compensates for the deficiency of the saw-tooth plasma actuator. Both effects of the laidback fan-shaped hole and the saw-tooth plasma actuator effectively control the development of the CRVP whose size and strength are smaller than those of the anti-counter rotating vortex pair in the far field, thus the centerline and the spanwise-averaged film cooling efficiency are enhanced. The average film cooling efficiency is the biggest in the Fan-Dc = 1 case, which is 80% bigger than that in the Fan-Dc = 0 case and 288% bigger than that in the Cyl-Dc = 0 case.

  11. Conjugate Heat Transfer Study of Combined Impingement and Showerhead Film Cooling Near NGV Leading Edge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dileep Chandran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational and experimental study is carried out on the leading edge region of a typical gas turbine NGV, cooled by a combination of impingement and showerhead film cooling. A detailed flow and conjugate heat transfer study has revealed the complex flow structure owing to the coolant-mainstream interaction and the influence of vane material thermal conductivity. The local effectiveness values obtained by the computations agreed well with the experimental data from IR thermography. The effect of blowing ratio on the overall effectiveness is found to be strongly dependent on the vane material conductivity. The effect of blowing ratio is also found to be different towards the pressure and suction sides of the stagnation region. However, the overall effectiveness is found to decrease by about 12% and 6% for low and high conducting materials, respectively, with an increase in mainstream Reynolds number from Re=4.8×105 to 14.4×105.

  12. 2D and 3D Modeling Efforts in Fuel Film Cooling of Liquid Rocket Engines (Conference Paper with Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-12

    to determine what parameters drive unsteadiness in fuel films, and how these parameters affect wall temperature profiles. Parametric studies performed...temperature profiles. Parametric studies performed in 2D suggest that a Helmholtz resonator exists for simple slot geometries. Frequencies in 3D were...effect on film cooling effectiveness. In general, the heat flux exhibits complex trends and did not scale well with chamber pressure. ∗Aerospace

  13. Floor cooling and air-cooling, the effects on thermal comfort or different cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sijpheer, N.C.; Bakker, E.J.; Ligthart, F.A.T.M.; Opstelten, I.J. [ECN Energie in de Gebouwde Omgeving en Netten, Petten (Netherlands)

    2007-09-15

    One of the research areas of the Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) concerns the built environment. Several facilities to conduct research activities are at ECN's disposal. One of these facilities, are five research dwellings located on the premises of ECN. Measured data from these facilities together with weather data and computer models are used to evaluate innovative energy concepts and components in energy systems. Experiments with different cooling systems in ECN's research dwellings are executed to evaluate their effective influence on both energy use and thermal comfort. Influence of inhabitants' behaviour is taken into account in these experiments. The thermal comfort is indicated by the Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) as defined by P.O. Fanger. For this paper, the results of measurements with a floor cooling and air cooling system are assessed. Effects on the PMV measured during experiments with the two different cooling systems will be presented.

  14. Modeling of Fuel Film Cooling Using Steady State RANS and Unsteady DES Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 21 July 2016 – 31 August 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Modeling of Fuel Film Cooling Using Steady State RANS...Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 1 Distribution A: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited. PA# 16391. Modeling of  Fuel  Film Cooling Using...Distribution Unlimited. PA# 16391. 3 Introduction • Fuel  film cooling is critical for high performing boost engines  using the Oxygen Rich Staged

  15. Passive radiative cooling design with broadband optical thin-film filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecebas, Muhammed Ali; Menguc, M. Pinar; Kosar, Ali; Sendur, Kursat

    2017-09-01

    The operation of most electronic semiconductor devices suffers from the self-generated heat. In the case of photovoltaic or thermos-photovoltaic cells, their exposure to sun or high temperature sources make them get warm beyond the desired operating conditions. In both incidences, the solution strategy requires effective radiative cooling process, i.e., by selective absorption and emission in predetermined spectral windows. In this study, we outline two approaches for alternative 2D thin film coatings, which can enhance the passive thermal management for application to electronic equipment. Most traditional techniques use a metallic (silver) layer because of their high reflectivity, although they display strong absorption in the visible and near-infrared spectrums. We show that strong absorption in the visible and near-infrared spectrums due to a metallic layer can be avoided by repetitive high index-low index periodic layers and broadband reflection in visible and near-infrared spectrums can still be achieved. These modifications increase the average reflectance in the visible and near-infrared spectrums by 3-4%, which increases the cooling power by at least 35 W/m2. We also show that the performance of radiative cooling can be enhanced by inserting an Al2O3 film (which has strong absorption in the 8-13 μm spectrum, and does not absorb in the visible and near-infrared) within conventional coating structures. These two approaches enhance the cooling power of passive radiative cooling systems from the typical reported values of 40 W/m2-100 W/m2 and 65 W/m2 levels respectively.

  16. 叶栅前缘单排冷却孔气膜冷却效果的数值研究%Numerical Study on Single Row of Cooling Holes in the Leading Edge of Blade Cascade Film Cooling Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁野; 万剑峰

    2014-01-01

    To improve turbine inlet temperature is an effective measure to improve the thermal efficiency and the output power of the gas-turbine.A 3D numerical simulation,which is based on Cooling/Bleed (air-jet model) model and S-A ( Spalart-Allmaras) turbulent model,was carried out to reduce the temperature of the gas turbine blade leading edge and improve temperature uniformity.The results show that apart from the downstream hole center,reducing tilt angles will help to reduce the temperature at leading edge and improve temperature uniformity,especially in the case of high blow ratio.%提高燃气轮机入口温度是提高其热效率和输出功率的有效措施,但目前燃气轮机进口的燃气温度已远超叶片材料的承受极限。为了降低燃气轮机叶片前缘的温度和提高温度的均匀性,对气膜冷却孔采用Cooling/Bleed (冷气喷射模型)模型,采用S-A( Spalart-Allmaras)模型,对叶栅进行了三维数值模拟。模拟结果表明:除孔中心下游以外,降低倾斜角有助于降低前缘温度和提高温度的均匀性,另外吹风比越大效果越明显。

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Dual Bell Nozzle Film Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braman, Kalen; Garcia, Christian; Ruf, Joseph; Bui, Trong

    2015-01-01

    nozzle pressure ratios and film coolant flow rates are investigated to determine the effect of the film injection on the nozzle flow transition behavior. The results of this CFD study of a dual bell with film injection are presented in this paper.

  18. Cooling Curve's Effect on Hardening Behavior of Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuto Fukuhara; Shigeru Asada; Yoshihiro Tomita; Syusaku Maeda

    2004-01-01

    Quenching Oils are comprised mostly of mineral oil as major component, but mineral oil alone result in lower cooling performance. Therefore, various additives are formulated as required for each particular case. Cooling curves of mineral oil as determined by JIS method can be divided into three stages, vapor film stage, boiling stage and convection stage. And there are many types of additives used for quenching oil, one effective to shorten vapor film stage and another to shift boiling stage toward lower temperature side. As rapid quenching required temperature range for particular steel varies pending on its shape of CCT curve(1), it is possible to provide higher quench hardening performance using quenching oil formulated of adequate additives.

  19. Influence of cooling rate on optical properties and electrical properties of nanorod ZnO films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Meizhen, E-mail: gaomz@lzu.edu.c [Key Lab for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of MOE, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Liu, Jing; Sun, Huina; Wu, Xiaonan; Xue, Desheng [Key Lab for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of MOE, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2010-06-25

    ZnO films are prepared on Ag-coated glass substrates by wet chemical method at low temperature using Zn(NO{sub 3}).6H{sub 2}O and dimethylamine borane complex (DMAB). The structural, electrical and optical properties of ZnO films are investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, four-point probe method and photoluminescence, respectively. The ZnO film deposited at 90 {sup o}C is the most compact films with a c-axis preferred orientation. The cooling rate affects the optical and electrical properties of ZnO films dramatically. The ZnO films cooled at -15 {sup o}C exhibit the lowest electrical resistivity of 0.525 {Omega} cm and the strongest photoluminescence in visible light. The increase of the conductivity and the enhancement of the photoluminescence are attributed to the increase of oxygen vacancies in the films.

  20. Flame-Sprayed Y2O3 Films with Metal-EDTA Complex Using Various Cooling Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Keiji; Toyama, Ayumu; Sekiya, Tetsuo; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Atsushi; Toda, Ikumi; Ohshio, Shigeo; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, yttrium oxide (Y2O3) films were synthesized from a metal-ethylenediaminetetraacetic (metal-EDTA) complex by employing a H2-O2 combustion flame. A rotation apparatus and various cooling agents (compressed air, liquid nitrogen, and atomized purified water) were used during the synthesis to control the thermal history during film deposition. An EDTA·Y·H complex was prepared and used as the staring material for the synthesis of Y2O3 films with a flame-spraying apparatus. Although thermally extreme environments were employed during the synthesis, all of the obtained Y2O3 films showed only a few cracks and minor peeling in their microstructures. For instance, the Y2O3 film synthesized using the rotation apparatus with water atomization units exhibited a porosity of 22.8%. The maximum film's temperature after deposition was 453 °C owing to the high heat of evaporation of water. Cooling effects of substrate by various cooling units for solidification was dominated to heat of vaporization, not to unit's temperatures.

  1. [Effectiveness of scalp cooling in chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Thomas G; He, Jie; Lemieux, Renald

    2011-10-01

    The main objectives of this literature review are to determine if scalp cooling is efficient and safe, if there are side effects and if the patients' quality of life improves. In terms of effectiveness, scalp cooling seems to get good performance in its aim to prevent hair loss in patients receiving chemotherapy. The weighted average results of all identified studies indicate that this technology allows for 63.5% of patients to have a good preservation of their hair. In studies with a group of control, the weighted rates of good preservation of the hair are 50.6% with scalp cooling and 16.3% without. From the standpoint of safety technology, the main risk is that of scalp metastases. However, no study has successfully demonstrated a statistically significant difference between groups of patients receiving chemotherapy with or without scalp cooling.

  2. Method for analysis of showerhead film cooling experiments on highly curved surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, G.; Schneider, E.; Ott, P. [Laboratoire de Thermique Appliquee et de Turbomachines (LTT), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); von Wolfersdorf, J.; Weigand, B. [Institute of Aerospace Thermodynamics (ITLR), University of Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    The transient liquid crystal technique has been extensively used for measuring the heat transfer characteristics in gas turbine applications. Thereby, the time evolution of the surface temperature is usually evaluated using the model of a semi-infinite flat plate. For experiments on cylinders, Wagner et al. [G. Wagner, M. Kotulla, P. Ott, B. Weigand, J. von Wolfersdorf, The transient liquid crystal technique: influence of surface curvature and finite wall thickness, ASME Paper GT2004-53553, 2004] showed, that curvature and finite thickness effects can have an influence on the obtained heat transfer coefficients. The aim of this study is to develop a time effective data reduction method that accounts for curvature and that is applicable to film cooling experiments with time varying adiabatic wall temperatures. To verify this method, transient liquid crystal experiments have been carried out on a blunt body model with showerhead film cooling. The experimental data was evaluated with the traditional semi-infinite flat plate approach and with the curvature correction using regression analysis. (author)

  3. Effectiveness-weighted control method for a cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Levi A.; Chu, Richard C.; David, Milnes P.; Ellsworth Jr., Michael J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Simons, Robert E.

    2015-12-15

    Energy efficient control of cooling system cooling of an electronic system is provided based, in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components. The control includes automatically determining speed control settings for multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components of the cooling system, and the determining operates to limit power consumption of at least the cooling system, while ensuring that a target temperature associated with at least one of the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range by provisioning, based on the weighted cooling effectiveness, a desired target temperature change among the multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The provisioning includes provisioning applied power to the multiple adjustable cooling components via, at least in part, the determined control settings.

  4. Effectiveness-weighted control of cooling system components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Levi A.; Chu, Richard C.; David, Milnes P.; Ellsworth Jr., Michael J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Simmons, Robert E.

    2015-12-22

    Energy efficient control of cooling system cooling of an electronic system is provided based, in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components. The control includes automatically determining speed control settings for multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components of the cooling system, and the determining operates to limit power consumption of at least the cooling system, while ensuring that a target temperature associated with at least one of the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range by provisioning, based on the weighted cooling effectiveness, a desired target temperature change among the multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The provisioning includes provisioning applied power to the multiple adjustable cooling components via, at least in part, the determined control settings.

  5. Film Cooling from Two Staggered Rows of Compound Angle Holes at High Blowing Ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip M. Ligrani

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results are presented which describe the development and structure of flow downstream of two staggered rows of film-cooling holes with compound angle orientations at high blowing ratios. These film cooling configurations are important because they are frequently employed on the first stage of rotating blades of operating gas turbine engines. With this configuration, holes are spaced 3d apart in the spanwise direction, with inclination angles of 24 degrees, and angles of orientation of 50.5 degrees. Blowing ratios range from 0.5 to 4.0 and the ratio of injectant to freestream density is near 1.0. Results show that spanwise averaged adiabatic effectiveness, spanwise-averaged iso-energetic Stanton number ratios, surveys of streamwise mean velocity, and surveys of injectant distributions change by important amounts as the blowing ratio increases. This is due to injectant lift-off from the test surface just downstream of the holes which becomes more pronounced as blowing ratio increases.

  6. Film cooling on a convex wall: Heat transfer and hydrodynamic measurements for full and partial coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhama, K.; Moffat, R. J.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.

    1985-08-01

    Turbine-blade cooling is an important issue for high-efficiency turbine engines, and discrete-hole injection is widely used as a cooling method. In the present study, detailed measurements were made of the heat transfer and hydrodynamics of a film-cooled flow on a convex wall, both for full and partial coverage. Two important parameters were altered: the blowing ratio, m, and the number of rows of injection holes. Three values of m were tested: m = 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6. In the blown region, m = 0.4 results in the lowest Stanton numbers of the three blowing ratios tested. This indicates that the value of m = 0.4 is near optimum on the convex wall from the point of view of cooling effect by injection. In the recovery region, Stanton numbers gradually approach the no injection values. Although the heat-transfer behavior during recovery from injection looks relatively complicated, the behavior of Stanton number can be explained in terms of two mechanisms: recovery from the thermal effect of injection and recovery from the turbulence augmentation. This interpretation of the data is supported by the hydrodynamic and temperture-profile measurements. For partial blowing cases, the data follow the full-coverage values inside the blown region. In the unblown region, both in the curved and in the flat plate, the effect of the number of blown rows is clearly seen. Hydrodynamic boundary-layer profiles were measured with the aid of a triple hot-water probe. Three mean-velocity components and six turbulence quantities were simultaneously measured, and inside the blown region strong three-dimensionality was observed.

  7. Long Hole Film Cooling Dataset for CFD Development . Part 1; Infrared Thermography and Thermocouple Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Vikram; Thurman, Douglas; Poinsatte, Phillip; Ameri, Ali; Eichele, Peter; Knight, James

    2013-01-01

    An experiment investigating flow and heat transfer of long (length to diameter ratio of 18) cylindrical film cooling holes has been completed. In this paper, the thermal field in the flow and on the surface of the film cooled flat plate is presented for nominal freestream turbulence intensities of 1.5 and 8 percent. The holes are inclined at 30deg above the downstream direction, injecting chilled air of density ratio 1.0 onto the surface of a flat plate. The diameter of the hole is 0.75 in. (0.01905 m) with center to center spacing (pitch) of 3 hole diameters. Coolant was injected into the mainstream flow at nominal blowing ratios of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0. The Reynolds number of the freestream was approximately 11,000 based on hole diameter. Thermocouple surveys were used to characterize the thermal field. Infrared thermography was used to determine the adiabatic film effectiveness on the plate. Hotwire anemometry was used to provide flowfield physics and turbulence measurements. The results are compared to existing data in the literature. The aim of this work is to produce a benchmark dataset for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) development to eliminate the effects of hole length to diameter ratio and to improve resolution in the near-hole region. In this report, a Time-Filtered Navier Stokes (TFNS), also known as Partially Resolved Navier Stokes (PRNS), method that was implemented in the Glenn-HT code is used to model coolant-mainstream interaction. This method is a high fidelity unsteady method that aims to represent large scale flow features and mixing more accurately.

  8. Film cooling research on the endwall of a turbine nozzle guide vane in a short duration annular cascade. II - Analysis and correlation of results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasgama, S. P.; Burton, C. D.

    1991-06-01

    Measurements of the heat transfer characteristics of the film cooled endwall (platform) of a turbine nozzle guide vane in an annular cascade at engine representative conditions are analyzed. The experimental results are well represented by the superposition theory of film cooling. It is shown that high cooling effectiveness can be achieved when the data are corrected for axial pressure gradients. The data are correlated against both the slot-wall jet parameter and the discrete hole injection function for flat-plate, zero pressure gradient cases. The pressure gradient correction brings the data to within +/- 11 percent of the discrete hole correlation.

  9. The development of evaporative liquid film model for analysis of passive containment cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hong June; Hwang, Young Dong; Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Young In; Chang, Moon Hee

    2000-07-01

    An analytical model was developed to simulate behavior of the liquid film formed on the outside surface of the steel containment vessel of PCCS including the ellipsoidal dome and the vertical wall. The model was coupled with CFX code using the user subroutines provided by the code, and a series of numerical calculations were performed to evaluate the evaporative heat transfer coefficient at the interface. Numerical results for Sherwood number and evaporative heat transfer coefficient were compared with the experimental data. The results were in good agreement with the experimental data. The calculated liquid film thickness showed good agreement with that of Sun except an upper portion of the channel. The model was applied to the full scale of PCCS to investigate the effects of dome and chimney on the evaporation rate. The results showed that the heat transfer coefficient in the dome region, where the flow cross-sectional area decreases and the swirling occurs, was lower than that of the vertical annulus region. The calculated evaporative heat transfer coefficient was about 20 times larger than that of the dry cooling. Sensitivity studies on the gap size and the wall temperature were also performed to figure out their effects on the heat transfer coefficient and inlet air average velocity. Through the analysis of the dryout point, the minimum liquid film flow rate to cover the entire surface of the vessel was estimated.

  10. Heat transfer and film-cooling for the endwall of a first stage turbine vane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thole, Karen A.; Knost, Daniel G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Secondary flows that result in turbomachines from inherent pressure gradients in airfoil passages, are the main contributors to aerodynamic losses and high heat transfer to the airfoil endwalls. The endwalls present a challenge to durability engineers in maintaining the integrity of the airfoils. One means of preventing degradation in the turbine is to film-cool components whereby coolant is extracted from the compressor and injected through small cooling holes in the airfoil surfaces. In addition to film-cooling, leakage flows from component interfaces, such as the combustor and turbine, can provide cooling in localized areas but also provide a change to the inlet boundary condition to the passage. This paper presents measurements relevant to the endwall region of a vane, which indicate the importance of considering the inlet flow condition. (author)

  11. Experimental investigation of gas turbine airfoil aerodynamic performance without and with film cooling in an annular sector cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiers, S.H.

    2002-02-01

    The steady growing of industrialization, the densification of the anthroposphere, the increasing concern over the effects of gas turbine cruise emissions on the atmosphere threaten the growth of air transportation, and the perception about the possible climatic impact of CO{sub 2} emissions causes a public distinctive sense of responsibility. The conventional energy production techniques, which are based on fossil fuel, will keep its central importance within the global energy production. Forecasts about the increasing air transportation give duplication in the next 10-15 years. The optimization of the specific fuel consumption is necessary to decrease the running costs and the pollution emissions in the atmosphere, which makes an increased process efficiency of stationary turbines as well as of jet engines essential. This leads to the necessity of an increased thermodynamic efficiency of the overall process and the optimization of the aerodynamic components. Due to the necessity of more detailed three-dimensional data on the behavior of film cooled blades an annular sector cascade turbine test facility has gone into service. The annular sector cascade facility is a relative cost efficient solution compared to a full annular facility to investigate three-dimensional effects on a non cooled and cooled turbine blade. The aerodynamic investigations on the annular sector cascade facility are part of a broad perspective where experimental data from a hot annular sector cascade facility and the cold annular sector facility are used to verify, calibrate and understand the physics for both internal and external calculation methods for flow and heat transfer prediction. The objective of the present study is the design and validation of a cold flow annular sector cascade facility, which meets the flow conditions in a modem turbine as close as possible, with emphasis on achieving periodic flow conditions. The first part of this study gives the necessary background on this

  12. Heat Transfer on a Film-Cooled Rotating Blade Using a Two-Equation Turbulence Model

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay K Garg

    1998-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier–Stokes code has been used to compare the heat transfer coefficient on a film-cooled, rotating turbine blade. The blade chosen is the ACE rotor with five rows containing 93 film cooling holes covering the entire span. This is the only filmcooled rotating blade over which experimental data is available for comparison. Over 2.278 million grid points are used to compute the flow over the blade including the tip clearance region, using Coakley's q-ω turbulence model. Res...

  13. Numerical and experimental investigation of the methane film cooling in subscale combustion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimon, Y.; Negishi, H.; Koshi, M.; Suslov, D.

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of film cooling in a CH4/O2 subscale chamber with multiinjector elements and two kinds of film cooling slot dimensions are investigated using a calorimeter chamber in experiments and simulations, in which the finite rate chemistry with a reduced CH4/O2 reaction mechanism is taken into account. The computed wall heat flux and pressure distributions are compared to the experimental results, which overall show good agreement. A large slot dimension is shown to induce mixing with core flow. This mixing causes a low heat-flux distribution near face plate along with high combustion efficiency.

  14. Taguchi Based Regression Analysis of End-Wall Film Cooling in a Gas Turbine Cascade with Single Row of Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, D.; Parammasivam, K. M.

    2016-09-01

    Numerical investigations were conducted on a turbine cascade, with end-wall cooling by a single row of cylindrical holes, inclined at 30°. The mainstream fluid was hot air and the coolant was CO2 gas. Based on the Reynolds number, the flow was turbulent at the inlet. The film hole row position, its pitch and blowing ratio was varied with five different values. Taguchi approach was used in designing a L25 orthogonal array (OA) for these parameters. The end-wall averaged film cooling effectiveness (bar η) was chosen as the quality characteristic. CFD analyses were carried out using Ansys Fluent on computational domains designed with inputs from OA. Experiments were conducted for one chosen OA configuration and the computational results were found to correlate well with experimental measurements. The responses from the CFD analyses were fed to the statistical tool to develop a correlation for bar η using regression analysis.

  15. Transient Three-Dimensional Side Load Analysis of Out-of-Round Film Cooled Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ten-See; Lin, Jeff; Ruf, Joe; Guidos, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of nozzle out-of-roundness on the transient startup side loads at a high altitude, with an anchored computational methodology. The out-of-roundness could be the result of asymmetric loads induced by hardware attached to the nozzle, asymmetric internal stresses induced by previous tests, and deformation, such as creep, from previous tests. The rocket engine studied encompasses a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber and a film cooled nozzle extension with film coolant distributed from a turbine exhaust manifold. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, and a transient inlet history based on an engine system simulation. Transient startup computations were performed with the out-of-roundness achieved by four different degrees of ovalization: one perfectly round, one slightly out-of-round, one more out-of-round, and one significantly out-of-round. The results show that the separation-line-jump is the peak side load physics for the round, slightly our-of-round, and more out-of-round cases, and the peak side load increases as the degree of out-of-roundness increases. For the significantly out-of-round nozzle, however, the peak side load reduces to comparable to that of the round nozzle and the separation line jump is not the peak side load physics. The counter-intuitive result of the significantly out-of-round case is found to be related to a side force reduction mechanism that splits the effect of the separation-line-jump into two parts, not only in the circumferential direction and most importantly in time.

  16. The Impact of Heat Release in Turbine Film Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Film Gauge ITB = Inter-Turbine Burner PFR = Plug Flow Reactor PSR = Perfectly Stirred Reactor SLPM = Standard Liters Per Minute TFG = Thin Film...Plug Flow Reactors ( PFRs ), a mixer, and a final PFR . The gas inlets of the PSR were the mass flow rates of air and propane to model the = 0.6, 0.8...0.95, 1.5, and 1.7 conditions. The exhaust flow then moved through a PFR representing the ceramic chimney of the actual rig. The heat loss in this

  17. Numerical Study of the Effects of Thermal Barrier Coating and Turbulence Intensity on Cooling Performances of a Nozzle Guide Vane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasert Prapamonthon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a numerical investigation of the combined effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC with mainstream turbulence intensity (Tu on a modified vane of the real film-cooled nozzle guide vane (NGV reported by Timko (NASA CR-168289. Using a 3D conjugate heat transfer (CHT analysis, the NGVs with and without TBC are simulated at three Tus (Tu = 3.3%, 10% and 20%. The overall cooling effectiveness, TBC effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient are analyzed and discussed. The results indicate the following three interesting phenomena: (1 TBC on the pressure side (PS is more effective than that on the suction side (SS due to a fewer number of film holes on the SS; (2 for all three Tus, the variation trends of the overall cooling effectiveness are similar, and TBC plays the positive and negative roles in heat flux at the same time, and significantly increases the overall cooling effectiveness in regions cooled ineffectively by cooling air; (3 when Tu increases, the TBC effect is more significant, for example, at the highest Tu (Tu = 20% the overall cooling effectiveness can increase as much as 24% in the film cooling ineffective regions, but near the trailing edge (TE and the exits and downstream of film holes on the SS, this phenomenon is slight.

  18. Genetic Algorithm Optimization of a Film Cooling Array on a Modern Turbine Inlet Vane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Taw, does not escape some level of empiricism . Heat transfer coefficient is found from turbulent boundary layer Nu relations, originally from flat...of empiricism in heat transfer design practice and to develop truly predictive capabilities for film cooling [34]. The goals of this work are not to

  19. Computational Analysis of Droplet Mass and Size Effect on Mist/Air Impingement Cooling Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenglei Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Impingement cooling has been widely employed to cool gas turbine hot components such as combustor liners, combustor transition pieces, turbine vanes, and blades. A promising technology is proposed to enhance impingement cooling with water droplets injection. However, previous studies were conducted on blade shower head film cooling, and less attention was given to the transition piece cooling. As a continuous effort to develop a realistic mist impingement cooling scheme, this paper focuses on simulating mist impingement cooling under typical gas turbine operating conditions of high temperature and pressure in a double chamber model. Furthermore, the paper presents the effect of cooling effectiveness by changing the mass and size of the droplets. Based on the heat-mass transfer analogy, the results of these experiments prove that the mass of 3E – 3 kg/s droplets with diameters of 5–35 μm could enhance 90% cooling effectiveness and reduce 122 K of wall temperature. The results of this paper can provide guidance for corresponding experiments and serve as the qualification reference for future more complicated studies with convex surface cooling.

  20. Modeling the methane hydrate formation in an aqueous film submitted to steady cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avendano-Gomez, J.R. [ESIQIE, Laboratorio de Ingenieria Quimica Ambiental, Mexico (Mexico). Inst. Politecnico Nacional; Garcia-Sanchez, F. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, Mexico (Mexico). Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo; Gurrola, D.V. [UPIBI, Laboratorio de Diseno de Plantas, Mexico (Mexico). Inst. Politecnico Nacional

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates, or clathrate hydrates, are ice-like compounds that results from the kinetic process of crystallization of an aqueous solution supersaturated with a dissolved gas. This paper presented a model that took into account two factors involved in the hydrate crystallization, notably the stochastic nature of crystallization that causes sub-cooling and the heat resulting from the exothermic enthalpy of hydrate formation. The purpose of this study was to model the thermal evolution inside a hydrate forming system which was submitted to an imposed steady cooling. The study system was a cylindrical thin film of aqueous solution at 19 Mpa. The study involved using methane as the hydrate forming molecule. It was assumed that methane was homogeneously dissolved in the aqueous phase. Ethane hydrate was formed through a kinetic process of nucleation and crystallization. In order to predict the onset time of nucleation, the induction time needed to be considered. This paper discussed the probability of nucleation as well as the estimation of the rate of nucleation. It also presented the mathematical model and boundary conditions. These included assumptions and derivation of the model; boundary conditions; initial conditions; and numerical solution of the model equation. It was concluded that the heat source must be considered when investigating crystallization effects. 34 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  1. Thermoelastic stress analysis of multilayered films in a micro-thermoelectric cooling device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Mei Yang; Xing-Zhe Wang; Wen-Jie Zhang

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical solution for the thermoelastic stress in a typical in-plane's thin-film microthermoelectric cooling device under different operating conditions.The distributions of the permissible temperature fields in multilayered thin-films are analytically obtained,and the characteristics,including maximum temperature difference and maximum refrigerating output of the thermoelectric device,are discussed for two operating conditions.Analytical expressions of the thermoelastic stresses in the layered thermoelectric thin-films induced by the temperature difference are formulated based on the theory of multilayer system.The results demonstrate that,the geometric dimension is a significant factor which remarkably affects the thermoelastic stresses.The stress distributions in layers of semiconductor thermoelements,insulating and supporting membrane show distinctly different features.The present work may profitably guide the optimization design of highefficiency micro-thermoelectric cooling devices.

  2. A Computational Study for the Utilization of Jet Pulsations in Gas Turbine Film Cooling and Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartuzova, Olga V.

    2012-01-01

    This report is the second part of a three-part final report of research performed under an NRA cooperative Agreement contract. The first part is NASA/CR-2012-217415. The third part is NASA/CR-2012-217417. Jets have been utilized in various turbomachinery applications in order to improve gas turbines performance. Jet pulsation is a promising technique because of the reduction in the amount of air removed from compressor. In this work two areas of pulsed jets applications were computationally investigated using the commercial code Fluent (ANSYS, Inc.); the first one is film cooling of High Pressure Turbine (HPT) blades and second one is flow separation control over Low Pressure Turbine (LPT) airfoil using Vortex Generator Jets (VGJ). Using pulsed jets for film cooling purposes can help to improve the effectiveness and thus allow higher turbine inlet temperature. Effects of the film hole geometry, blowing ratio and density ratio of the jet, pulsation frequency and duty cycle of blowing on the film cooling effectiveness were investigated. As for the low-pressure turbine (LPT) stages, the boundary layer separation on the suction side of airfoils can occur due to strong adverse pressure gradients. The problem is exacerbated as airfoil loading is increased. Active flow control could provide a means for minimizing separation under conditions where it is most severe (low Reynolds number), without causing additional losses under other conditions (high Reynolds number). The effects of the jet geometry, blowing ratio, density ratio, pulsation frequency and duty cycle on the size of the separated region were examined in this work. The results from Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes and Large Eddy Simulation computational approaches were compared with the experimental data.

  3. Investigation of film cooling on the leading edge of turbine blade based on detached eddy simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG JunYu; KANG Shun

    2012-01-01

    In order to assess the influences of curved hole passage on cooling effectiveness and flow structure of turbine blade leading edge,the detached eddy simulation is applied to numerically investigate the AGTB turbine cascade under the condition of global blowing ratio M=0.7.The straight or curved cooling holes are located at either the pressure or suction side near the leading edge.The analysis and discussion focus on the local turbulence structure; influence of pressure gradient on the structure,and distribution of cooling effectiveness on the blade surface.The numerical results show that cooling hole with curved passage could bring positive impact on the increase of the local cooling effectiveness.On the suction side,the increased cooling effectiveness could be about 82% and about 77% on the pressure side,compared to the conventional straight hole.

  4. Transient Side Load Analysis of Out-of-Round Film-Cooled Nozzle Extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ten-See; Lin, Jeff; Ruf, Joe; Guidos, Mike

    2012-01-01

    There was interest in understanding the impact of out-of-round nozzle extension on the nozzle side load during transient startup operations. The out-of-round nozzle extension could be the result of asymmetric internal stresses, deformation induced by previous tests, and asymmetric loads induced by hardware attached to the nozzle. The objective of this study was therefore to computationally investigate the effect of out-of-round nozzle extension on the nozzle side loads during an engine startup transient. The rocket engine studied encompasses a regeneratively cooled chamber and nozzle, along with a film cooled nozzle extension. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, and transient inlet boundary flow properties derived from an engine system simulation. Six three-dimensional cases were performed with the out-of-roundness achieved by three different degrees of ovalization, elongated on lateral y and z axes: one slightly out-of-round, one more out-of-round, and one significantly out-of-round. The results show that the separation line jump was the primary source of the peak side loads. Comparing to the peak side load of the perfectly round nozzle, the peak side loads increased for the slightly and more ovalized nozzle extensions, and either increased or decreased for the two significantly ovalized nozzle extensions. A theory based on the counteraction of the flow destabilizing effect of an exacerbated asymmetrical flow caused by a lower degree of ovalization, and the flow stabilizing effect of a more symmetrical flow, created also by ovalization, is presented to explain the observations obtained in this effort.

  5. An Experimental Investigation Studying the Influence of Dimples on a Film Cooled Turbine Blade Leading Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Room Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV) silicone sealant was used to attach the heat flux plate to the surface of the model while carefully aligning...was negligible. 4.2 RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH This scientific investigation was able to demonstrate that dimples placed upstream of a film...Education Limited. Harlow, England, 2001. 3. Han, J.-C. “Turbine Blade Cooling Studies at Texas A&M University: 1980-2004,” Journal of

  6. EFFECT OF COOLED BOUNDARY ON THE TURBULENT STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guo-xiang; Mao Hua-yong; Li Na

    2003-01-01

    The flow field in the cooled channel of a heat exchanger was measured using the X-type film probes of Hot Wire/Firm Anemotheter, and the turbulent mechanism was discussed. It is concluded that the airflow is cooled in the flow process, the distribution of the turbulent intensity is relatively convergent near the centerline and the boundary, the constriction action produced due to heat release at the foot of the fins causes u to decrease and w to increase near the root downstream. It is concluded that the turbulent flow with cooled boundary results from the balance of production, dissipation and intermittency caused by constriction action.

  7. Fracture behaviour of bread crust: Effect of bread cooling conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Primo-Martín, C.; Beukelaer, H. de; Hamer, R.J.; Vliet, T. van

    2008-01-01

    The effect of air and vacuum cooling on the fracture behaviour and accompanying sound emission, moisture content and crispness of bread crust were investigated. Vacuum cooling resulted in rapid evaporative cooling of products that contained high moisture content. Fracture experiments showed a clear

  8. Fracture behaviour of bread crust: Effect of bread cooling conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Primo Martin, C.; Beukelaer, de H.J.; Hamer, R.J.; Vliet, van T.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of air and vacuum cooling on the fracture behaviour and accompanying sound emission, moisture content and crispness of bread crust were investigated. Vacuum cooling resulted in rapid evaporative cooling of products that contained high moisture content. Fracture experiments showed a clear

  9. Heat Transfer on a Film-Cooled Rotating Blade Using Different Turbulence Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    1999-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier Stokes code has been used to compute the heat transfer coefficient on a film-cooled, rotating turbine blade. The blade chosen is the ACE rotor with five rows containing 93 film cooling holes covering the entire span. This is the only film-cooled rotating blade over which experimental data is available for comparison. Over 2.278 million grid points are used to compute the flow over the blade including the tip clearance region. using Wilcox's k-omega model, Coakley's q-omega model, and the zero-equation Baldwin-Lomax (B-L) model. A reasonably good comparison with the experimental data is obtained on the suction surface for all the turbulence models. At the leading edge, the B-L model yields a better comparison than tile two-equation models. On the pressure surface however the comparison between the experimental data and the prediction from the k-omega model is much better than from the other two models. Overall, the k-omega model provides the best comparison with the experimental data. However, the two-equation models require at least 40% more computational resources than the B-L model.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Reactive Flows in Overexpanded Supersonic Nozzle with Film Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sellam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reignition phenomena occurring in a supersonic nozzle flow may present a crucial safety issue for rocket propulsion systems. These phenomena concern mainly rocket engines which use H2 gas (GH2 in the film cooling device, particularly when the nozzle operates under over expanded flow conditions at sea level or at low altitudes. Consequently, the induced wall thermal loads can lead to the nozzle geometry alteration, which in turn, leads to the appearance of strong side loads that may be detrimental to the rocket engine structural integrity. It is therefore necessary to understand both aerodynamic and chemical mechanisms that are at the origin of these processes. This paper is a numerical contribution which reports results from CFD analysis carried out for supersonic reactive flows in a planar nozzle cooled with GH2 film. Like the experimental observations, CFD simulations showed their ability to highlight these phenomena for the same nozzle flow conditions. Induced thermal load are also analyzed in terms of cooling efficiency and the results already give an idea on their magnitude. It was also shown that slightly increasing the film injection pressure can avoid the reignition phenomena by moving the separation shock towards the nozzle exit section.

  11. A Modification of the Newton's Cooling Law and Mpemba Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Pankovic, Vladan

    2010-01-01

    In this work we suggest a simple modification of the Newton's cooling law that can model Mpemba effect. We introduce, in the usual Newton's law, i.e. linear differential equation, an additional term proportional to the quadrate of the geometrical average value of the initial and latter difference between liquid and cooling thermostat (environment) temperature. It, after simple transformations, yields usual Newton's linear differential equation but with modified cooling parameter. This modified cooling parameter represents sum of the usual cooling parameter and an additional term directly proportional to the difference between initial temperature of the liquid and cooling thermostat temperature. Corresponding solution of the modified Newton's cooling equation, i.e. temperature decrease during time, has an additional exponential term with negative argument proportional to mentioned difference between initial temperature of the liquid and temperature of the cooling thermostat. (It can be observed that appearance...

  12. Effect of Triangular Fins on Critical Heat Flux in Ethanol-cooled Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takegoshi, Masao; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Saito, Toshihito; Ono, Fumiei; Hiraiwa, Tetsuo; Tomioka, Sadatake

    A pressure-fed engine with a regeneratively-cooled combustion chamber is studied in JAXA. Operation chamber pressure is approximately 1 MPa. A proposed propellant combination is liquid oxygen and ethanol. However, it is necessary to understand the critical heat flux when ethanol is used as a coolant for regeneratively-cooled combustion chamber because the saturation pressure of it is 6.3 MPa. In general, it is known that the cooling wall with fins improves the cooling performance. In this study, the effect of triangular fins on critical heat flux of ethanol in ethanol-cooled combustion chamber was investigated. As the result, it was found that the critical heat flux of cooling wall with triangular fins was 23 % higher than that of that without fin in the same velocity condition of the coolant. The critical heat flux increases by the triangular fins on the cooling surface due to the effect of the combination cooling with film boiling and nucleate boiling.

  13. Pulsed Film Cooling on a Turbine Blade Leading Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    2.9) The solution for the temperature response was described by Incropera and DeWitt (1996) among other heat transfer texts. At the surface...ReD = 71000 has a maximum heat transfer coefficient of approximately 77 W/(m2 K) ( Incropera and DeWitt (1996)), which is fairly uniform in the region...transition is expected at approximately 80° from the leading edge ( Incropera and DeWitt (1996)) and roughness is known to have little effect on the

  14. Temperature Mapping of Air Film-Cooled Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces Using Cr-Doped GdAlO3 Phosphor Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Shyam, Vikram; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently shown that the high luminescence intensity from a Cr-doped GdAlO3 (Cr:GdAlO3) thermographic phosphor enables non-rastered full-field temperature mapping of thermal barrier coating (TBC) surfaces to temperatures above 1000C. In this presentation, temperature mapping by Cr:GdAlO3 based phosphor thermometry of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces is demonstrated for both scaled-up cooling hole geometries as well as for actual components in a burner rig test environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and advantages of this method over infrared thermography as well as the limitations of this method for studying air film cooling are discussed.

  15. Microtextured Surfaces for Turbine Blade Impingement Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Gas turbine engine technology is constantly challenged to operate at higher combustor outlet temperatures. In a modern gas turbine engine, these temperatures can exceed the blade and disk material limits by 600 F or more, necessitating both internal and film cooling schemes in addition to the use of thermal barrier coatings. Internal convective cooling is inadequate in many blade locations, and both internal and film cooling approaches can lead to significant performance penalties in the engine. Micro Cooling Concepts, Inc., has developed a turbine blade cooling concept that provides enhanced internal impingement cooling effectiveness via the use of microstructured impingement surfaces. These surfaces significantly increase the cooling capability of the impinging flow, as compared to a conventional untextured surface. This approach can be combined with microchannel cooling and external film cooling to tailor the cooling capability per the external heating profile. The cooling system then can be optimized to minimize impact on engine performance.

  16. Cooling of gas turbines IX : cooling effects from use of ceramic coatings on water-cooled turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W Byron; Livingood, John N B

    1948-01-01

    The hottest part of a turbine blade is likely to be the trailing portion. When the blades are cooled and when water is used as the coolant, the cooling passages are placed as close as possible to the trailing edge in order to cool this portion. In some cases, however, the trailing portion of the blade is so narrow, for aerodynamic reasons, that water passages cannot be located very near the trailing edge. Because ceramic coatings offer the possibility of protection for the trailing part of such narrow blades, a theoretical study has been made of the cooling effect of a ceramic coating on: (1) the blade-metal temperature when the gas temperature is unchanged, and (2) the gas temperature when the metal temperature is unchanged. Comparison is also made between the changes in the blade or gas temperatures produced by ceramic coatings and the changes produced by moving the cooling passages nearer the trailing edge. This comparison was made to provide a standard for evaluating the gains obtainable with ceramic coatings as compared to those obtainable by constructing the turbine blade in such a manner that water passages could be located very near the trailing edge.

  17. Flow visualisation of the external flow from a converging slot-hole film-cooling geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargison, J. E.; Oldfield, M. L. G.; Guo, S. M.; Lock, G. D.; Rawlinson, A. J.

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents flow visualisation experiments for a novel film-cooling hole, the converging slot-hole or console for short. Previously published experimental results have demonstrated that the console improved both the heat transfer and the aerodynamic performance of turbine vane and rotor blade cooling systems. Flow visualisation data for a row of consoles were compared with that of cylindrical and fan-shaped holes and a slot at the same inclination angle of 35° to the surface, on a large-scale, flat-plate model at engine-representative Reynolds numbers in a low speed tunnel with ambient temperature mainstream flow. In the first set of experiments, the flow was visualised by using a fine nylon mesh covered with thermochromic liquid crystals, allowing the measurement of gas temperature contours in planes perpendicular to the flow. This data demonstrated that the console film was similar to a slot film, and remained thin and attached to the surface for the coolant-to-mainstream momentum flux ratios of 1.1 to 40 and for a case with no crossflow (infinite momentum flux ratio). A second set of flow visualisation experiments using water/dry-ice fog have confirmed these results and have shown that the flow through all coolant geometries is unsteady.

  18. Effect of Cooling Methods on Methane Conversion via Dielectric-Barrier Discharges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Baowei; YANG Kuanhui; XU Genhui

    2008-01-01

    Effects of cooling methods on stability and methane conversion rate using dielectricbarrier discharges (DBD) were systematically investigated in this article.The results showed that the methane conversion rate was as high as 44.43% in a pure methane system at a flow rate of 100 mL.min-1 and an input power of 234.2 W with air cooling.A dark greenish and soft film-like carbon was deposited on the outer surface of quartz tube when the outer electrode was watercooled,which decreased the methane conversion.With air cooling of inner electrode the selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons was higher than that with other cooling methods,while the C3 hydrocarbons had higher selectivity with flowing water cooling.Cooling the inner electrode could restrain the carbon deposition,but would decrease the methane conversion rate.The stability of both reaction and plasma operation can be improved through cooling the reactor.From thermodynamic analysis,it was found that the effective collisions frequency among the reactant molecules and free electrons (e-) increased with temperature,which in turn led to a higher methane conversion rate and a change in the distribution of products.

  19. Size effects in thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Tellier, CR; Siddall, G

    1982-01-01

    A complete and comprehensive study of transport phenomena in thin continuous metal films, this book reviews work carried out on external-surface and grain-boundary electron scattering and proposes new theoretical equations for transport properties of these films. It presents a complete theoretical view of the field, and considers imperfection and impurity effects.

  20. Rotational effects on turbine blade cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govatzidakis, G.J.; Guenette, G.R.; Kerrebrock, J.L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    An experimental investigation of the influence of rotation on the heat transfer in a smooth, rectangular passage rotating in the orthogonal mode is presented. The passage simulates one of the cooling channels found in gas turbine blades. A constant heat flux is imposed on the model with either inward or outward flow. The effects of rotation and buoyancy on the Nusselt number were quantified by systematically varying the Rotation number, Density Ratio, Reynolds number, and Buoyancy parameter. The experiment utilizes a high resolution infrared temperature measurement technique in order to measure the wall temperature distribution. The experimental results show that the rotational effects on the Nusselt number are significant and proper turbine blade design must take into account the effects of rotation, buoyancy, and flow direction. The behavior of the Nusselt number distribution depends strongly on the particular side, axial position, flow direction, and the specific range of the scaling parameters. The results show a strong coupling between buoyancy and Corollas effects throughout the passage. For outward flow, the trailing side Nusselt numbers increase with Rotation number relative to stationary values. On the leading side, the Nusselt numbers tended to decrease with rotation near the inlet and subsequently increased farther downstream in the passage. The Nusselt numbers on the side walls generally increased with rotation. For inward flow, the Nusselt numbers generally improved relative to stationary results, but increases in the Nusselt number were relatively smaller than in the case of outward flow. For outward and inward flows, increasing the density ratio generally tended to decrease Nusselt numbers on the leading and trailing sides, but the exact behavior and magnitude depended on the local axial position and specific range of Buoyancy parameters.

  1. Effect of Precipitable Water Vapor Amount on Radiative Cooling Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mingke; Zhao, Bin; Ao, Xianze; Pei, Gang

    2017-05-01

    A radiative cooler based on aluminum-evaporated polyvinyl-fluoride surface was employed to investigate the effect of precipitable water vapor amount on its radiative cooling performance. A mathematic model of steady heat transfer that considers the spectral radiant distribution of the sky, the transparent cover and the collecting surface was established. The results indicate that the amount of precipitable water vapor shows a remarkable and negative effect on radiative cooling performance of the radiative cooler. Both the temperature difference between the cooler and surroundings and the net radiative cooling power decrease as the precipitable water vapor amount increases. The net radiative cooling power drops by about 41.0% as the the precipitable water vapor amount changes from 1.0 cm to 7.0 cm. Besides, the radiative cooler shows better cooling performance in winter than in summer. The net radiative cooling power in summer of Hefei is about 82.2% of that in winter.

  2. Simulation of Cold Flow in a Truncated Ideal Nozzle with Film Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braman, K. E.; Ruf, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Flow transients during rocket start-up and shut-down can lead to significant side loads on rocket nozzles. The capability to estimate these side loads computationally can streamline the nozzle design process. Towards this goal, the flow in a truncated ideal contour (TIC) nozzle has been simulated using RANS and URANS for a range of nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) aimed to match a series of cold flow experiments performed at the NASA MSFC Nozzle Test Facility. These simulations were performed with varying turbulence model choices and for four approximations of the supersonic film injection geometry, each of which was created with a different simplification of the test article geometry. The results show that although a reasonable match to experiment can be obtained with varying levels of geometric fidelity, the modeling choices made do not fully represent the physics of flow separation in a TIC nozzle with film cooling.

  3. Film Cooled Recession of SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Test Development, CFD Modeling and Experimental Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Sakowski, Barbara A.; Fisher, Caleb

    2014-01-01

    SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. However, the environmental stability of Si-based ceramics in high pressure, high velocity turbine engine combustion environment is of major concern. The water vapor containing combustion gas leads to accelerated oxidation and corrosion of the SiC based ceramics due to the water vapor reactions with silica (SiO2) scales forming non-protective volatile hydroxide species, resulting in recession of the ceramic components. Although environmental barrier coatings are being developed to help protect the CMC components, there is a need to better understand the fundamental recession behavior of in more realistic cooled engine component environments.In this paper, we describe a comprehensive film cooled high pressure burner rig based testing approach, by using standardized film cooled SiCSiC disc test specimen configurations. The SiCSiC specimens were designed for implementing the burner rig testing in turbine engine relevant combustion environments, obtaining generic film cooled recession rate data under the combustion water vapor conditions, and helping developing the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) film cooled models and performing model validation. Factors affecting the film cooled recession such as temperature, water vapor concentration, combustion gas velocity, and pressure are particularly investigated and modeled, and compared with impingement cooling only recession data in similar combustion flow environments. The experimental and modeling work will help predict the SiCSiC CMC recession behavior, and developing durable CMC systems in complex turbine engine operating conditions.

  4. Hydrogen film cooling with incident and swept-shock interactions in a Mach 6.4 nitrogen free stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, George C.; Nowak, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    The effectiveness of slot film cooling of a flat plate in a Mach 6.4 flow with and without incident and swept oblique shock interactions was experimentally investigated. Hydrogen was the primary coolant gas, although some tests were conducted using helium as the coolant. Tests were conducted in the Calspan 48-Inch Shock Tunnel with a nitrogen flow field to preclude combustion of the hydrogen coolant gas. A two-dimensional highly instrumented model developed in a previous test series was used. Parameters investigated included coolant mass flow rate, coolant gas, local free-stream Reynolds number, incident oblique shock strength, and a swept oblique shock. Both gases were highly effective coolants in undisturbed flow; however, both incident and swept shocks degraded that effectiveness.

  5. Fabrication and Characterization of Brush-Printed p-Type Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 Thick Films for Thermoelectric Cooling Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Han; Liu, Xing; Wei, Ping; Zhou, Hong-Yu; Mu, Xin; He, Dan-Qi; Zhu, Wan-Ting; Nie, Xiao-Lei; Zhao, Wen-Yu; Zhang, Qing-Jie

    2016-11-01

    Bismuth telluride alloys are promising thermoelectric materials used for portable and wearable cooling devices due to their excellent thermoelectric properties near the ambient temperature. Here, a simple and cost-effective brush-printing technique, together with a subsequent annealing treatment, has been used to prepare Bi2Te3-based thick films and prototype devices. The composition, microstructure, and electrical properties of the brush-printed p-type Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 thick films at different annealing temperatures are investigated. It is found that annealing temperature plays an important role in promoting densification and preventing the film from cracking, hence improving the electrical transport properties. The maximum power factor of the brush-printed thick films is 0.15 mW K-2 m-1 when annealed at 673 K for 4 h. A prototype thermoelectric device is manufactured by connecting the brush-printed p-type Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 and n-type Bi2Te2.7Se0.3 thick films with Cu thick-film electrodes on an Al2O3 substrate. The cooling performance of the thermoelectric device is evaluated by measuring the temperature difference produced under applied currents.

  6. Fabrication of Thermoelectric Sensor and Cooling Devices Based on Elaborated Bismuth-Telluride Alloy Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellah Boulouz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The principal motivation of this work is the development and realization of smart cooling and sensors devices based on the elaborated and characterized semiconducting thermoelectric thin film materials. For the first time, the details design of our sensor and the principal results are published. Fabrication and characterization of Bi/Sb/Te (BST semiconducting thin films have been successfully investigated. The best values of Seebeck coefficient (α(T at room temperature for Bi2Te3, and (Bi1−xSbx2Te3 with x = 0.77 are found to be −220 µV/K and +240 µV/K, respectively. Fabrication and evaluation of performance devices are reported. 2.60°C of cooling of only one Peltier module device for an optimal current of Iopt=2.50 mA is obtained. The values of temperature measured by infrared camera, by simulation, and those measured by the integrated and external thermocouple are reported. A sensitivity of the sensors of 5 mV Torr−1 mW−1 for the pressure sensor has been found with a response time of about 600 ms.

  7. Effect of cooling rate on crystallization in an aluminophosphosilicate melt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S. J.; Zhang, Yanfei; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The effect of cooling rate on spontaneous crystallization behavior of an alumino-phospho-silicate melt is studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and viscometry. The cooling rates of 160, 2100 and 12000 K/s are attained by subjecting...

  8. Effect of cooling rate on crystallization in an aluminophosphosilicate melt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S. J.; Zhang, Yanfei; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The effect of cooling rate on spontaneous crystallization behavior of an alumino-phospho-silicate melt is studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and viscometry. The cooling rates of 160, 2100 and 12000 K/s are attained by subjecting...

  9. Effect of Annealing Conditions on Properties of Sol-Gel Derived Al-Doped ZnO Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Mei-Zhen; ZHANG Feng; LIU Jing; SUN Hui-Na

    2009-01-01

    Transparent conductive Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films are prepared on normal glass substrates by the sol-gel spin coating method.The effects of drying conditions,annealing temperature and cooling rate on the structural,electrical and optical properties of AZO films are investigated by x-ray diffraction,scanning electron microscopy,the four-point probe method and UV- VIS spectrophotometry,respectively.The deposited films show a hexagonal wurtzite structure and high preferential c-axis orientation.As the drying temperature increases from 100℃ to 300℃ the resistivity of AZO films decreases dramatically.In contrast to the annealed films cooled in a furnace and in air,the resistivity of the annealed film which is cooled at -15℃ is greatly reduced.Increasing the cooling rate dramatically increases the electrical conductivity of AZO films.

  10. Experimental investigations on showerhead cooling on a blunt body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcoz, C.; Ott, P. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratoire de Thermique Appliquee et de Turbomachines (LTT), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Weigand, B. [Institut fuer Thermodynamik der Luft- und Raumfahrt (ITLR), Stuttgart University, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    In modern gas turbines, the turbine airfoil leading edge is currently protected from the hot gases by specific film cooling schemes, so-called showerhead cooling. The present paper shows an experimental study of different showerhead cooling geometries on a blunt body. For these tests, TLC (thermochromatic liquid crystals) have been used for measuring the film cooling performance and the heat transfer. Detailed experimental results for the aerodynamics, the film cooling effectiveness and the heat transfer enhancement are presented for different film cooling geometries. (author)

  11. Effects of heat treatment on morphological, optical and electrical properties of ITO films by sol-gel technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-hua; KE Yu-peng; REN Dong-yan

    2008-01-01

    Indium-tin-oxide(ITO) films were prepared on the quarts glass by sol-gel technique. Effects of different heat treatment temperatures and cooling methods on the morphological, optical and electrical properties of ITO films were measured by TG/DTA, IR, XRD, SEM, UV-VIS spectrometer and four-probe apparatus. It is found that the crystallized ITO films exhibit a polycrystalline cubic bixbyite structure. The heat treatment process has significant effects on the morphological, optical and electrical properties of ITO films. Elevating the heat treatment temperature can perfect the crystallization process of ITO films, therefore the optical and electrical properties of ITO films are improved. But the further increasing of heat treatment temperature results in the increment of ITO films' resistivity. Compared with ITO films elaborated by furnace cooling, those prepared through air cooling have following characteristics as obviously decreased crystalline size, deeply declined porosity, more compact micro-morphology, improved electrical property and slightly decreased optical transmission.

  12. An Experimental Investigation on Transpiration Cooling Part II: Comparison of Cooling Methods and Media

    OpenAIRE

    Wang J; Messner J.; Stetter H.

    2004-01-01

    This article attempts to provide a cooling performance comparison of various mass transfer cooling methods and different cooling media through two experiments. In the first experiment, pressurized air was used as a cooling medium and two different circular tubes were used as specimens. One is made of impermeable solid material with four rows of discrete holes to simulate film cooling, and the other consists of sintered porous material to create a porous transpiration cooling effect. The...

  13. Anomalous Effects in Air While Cooling Water

    CERN Document Server

    Sardo, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    Water is a unique compound with many anomalies and properties not fully understood. Designing an experiment in the laboratory to study such anomalies, we set up a series of experiments where a tube was placed inside a sealed container with thermocouples attached to the outer surface of the tube and in the air adjacent to the tube. Alternately, deionized water and other compounds were added to the tube and cooled to freezing. Several of the thermocouples suspended in the air and adjacent to the tube showed thermal oscillations as the overall temperature of the container was decreasing. The temperature of the thermocouples increased and decreased in a sinusoidal way during part of the cool down to freezing. Thermal oscillations as large as 3 degrees Celsius were recorded with typical frequencies of about 5 oscillations per minute.

  14. Effect of pressure on the vacuum cooling of iceberg lettuce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozturk, Hande Mutlu [Pamukkale University, Food Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Denizli (Turkey); Ozturk, Harun Kemal [Pamukkale University, Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, 20070 Kinikli, Denizli (Turkey)

    2009-05-15

    Vacuum cooling is known as a rapid evaporative cooling technique for any porous product which has free water. The aim of this paper is to apply vacuum cooling technique to the cooling of the iceberg lettuce and show the pressure effect on the cooling time and temperature decrease. The results of vacuum cooling are also compared with conventional cooling (cooling in refrigerator) for different temperatures. Vacuum cooling of iceberg lettuce at 0.7 kPa is about 13 times faster than conventional cooling of iceberg lettuce at 6 C. It has been also found that it is not possible to decrease the iceberg lettuce temperature below 10 C if vacuum cooling method is used and vacuum pressure is set to 1.5 kPa. (author) [French] Le refroidissement sous vide est connu comme une technique evaporative rapide refroidissant pour n'importe quel produit poreux qui a de l'eau libre. Le but de ce papier est d'appliquer le refroidissement sous vide pour le refroidissement de la laitue et examiner l'effet de la pression sur le temps de refroidissement et la diminution de temperature. Les resultats de refroidissement sous vide sont aussi compares avec le refroidissement conventionnel (refroidissement dans le refrigerateur) pour les differentes temperatures. Le refroidissement a vide de laitue a 0.7 kPa est environ 13 fois plus vite que le refroidissement conventionnel de laitue croquante a 6 C. Il a ete aussi constate qu'il n'est pas possible de diminuer la temperature de laitue ci-dessous 10 C si le refroidissement sous vide est utilise comme methode et la pression a vide est montree a 1.5 kPa. (orig.)

  15. Properties of Accretion Shocks in Viscous Flows with Cooling Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Das, S; Das, Santabrata; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2004-01-01

    Low angular momentum accretion flows can have standing and oscillating shock waves. We study the region of the parameter space in which multiple sonic points occur in viscous flows in presence of various cooling effects such as bremsstrahlung and Comptonization. We also quantify the parameter space in which shocks are steady or oscillating. We find that cooling induces effects opposite to heating by viscosity even in modifying the topology of the solutions, though one can never be exactly balanced by the other due to their dissimilar dependence on dynamic and thermodynamic parameters. We show that beyond a critical value of cooling, the flow ceases to contain a shock wave.

  16. Improved thermoelectric cooling based on the Thomson effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Khanna, Raghav; Toberer, Eric S.; Heinz, Nicholas A.; Seifert, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Traditional thermoelectric cooling relies on the Peltier effect which produces a temperature drop limited by the figure of merit, zT. This cooling limit is not required from classical thermodynamics but can be traced to problems of thermoelectric compatibility. Alternatively, if a thermoelectric cooler can be designed to achieve full thermoelectric compatibility, lower temperature can be achieved even if the zT is low. In such a device the Thomson effect plays an important role. We present the theoretical concept of a "Thomson cooler," for cryogenic cooling which is designed to maintain thermoelectric compatibility and we derive the requirements for the Seebeck coefficient.

  17. AGN effect on cooling flow dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bibi, F Alouani; Blundell, K; Omma, H

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the feedback of AGN jets on cooling flow clusters using three-dimensional AMR hydrodynamic simulations. We studied the interaction of the jet with the intracluster medium and creation of low X-ray emission cavities (Bubbles) in cluster plasma. The distribution of energy input by the jet into the system was quantified in its different forms, i.e. internal, kinetic and potential. We find that the energy associated with the bubbles, (pV + gamma pV/(gamma-1)), accounts for less than 10 percent of the jet energy.

  18. Investigation of Minimum Film boiling Phenomena on Fuel Rods Under Blowdown Cooling Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen M. Bajorek; Michael Gawron; Timothy Etzel; Lucas Peterson

    2003-06-30

    Blowdon cooling heat transfer is an important process that occurs early in a hypothetical large break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor. During blowdown, the flow through the hot assembly is a post-critical heat flux dispersed droplet flow. The heat transfer mechanisms that occur in blowdown cooling are complex and depend on droplet and heated surface interaction. In a safety analysis, it is of considerable importance to determine the thermal-hydraulic conditions leading to the minimum film boiling temperature, Tmin. A flow boiling rig for measurement of blowdown cooling heat transfer and quench phenomena on a nuclear fuel rod simulator was designed and constructed for operation at up to 12.4 MPa. The test section consisted of a concentric annulus, with a 9.5 mm OD nuclear fuel rod simulator at the center. The rod was contained within a 0.85 mm thick, 19 mm OD 316 stainless steel tube, forming the flow channel. Two types of rods were tested; one type was sheathed with Inconel 600 while the other was clad with Zircaloy-2. Water was injected into the test section at the top of the heated length through an injection header. This header was an annular sign that fit around the fuel rod simulator and within the stainless steel tube. Small spacers aligned the injection header and prevented contract with either the heater rod or the tube. A series of small diameter holes at the bottom of the header caused the formation of droplets that became entrained with the steam flow. The test section design was such that quench would take place on the rod, and not along the channel outer annulus.

  19. Effect of radiative cooling on collapsing charged grains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B P Pandey; Vinod Krishan; M Roy

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the radiative cooling of electrons on the gravitational collapse of cold dust grains with fluctuating electric charge is investigated. We find that the radiative cooling as well as the charge fluctuations, both, enhance the growth rate of the Jeans instability. However, the Jeans length, which is zero for cold grains and nonradiative plasma, becomes finite in the presence of radiative cooling of electrons and is further enhanced due to charge fluctuations of grains resulting in an increased threshold of the spatial scale for the Jeans instability.

  20. The effect of pre-cooling intensity on cooling efficiency and exercise performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, N.; Perret, C.; Bogerd, C.P.; Rossi, R.M.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although pre-cooling is known to enhance exercise performance, the optimal cooling intensity is unknown. We hypothesized that mild cooling opposed to strong cooling circumvents skin vasoconstriction and thermogenesis, and thus improves cooling efficiency reflected in improved time to exhaustion. Eig

  1. Air cooling : an experimental method of evaluating the cooling effect of air streams on air-cooled cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcock, J F

    1927-01-01

    In this report is described an experimental method which the writer has evolved for dealing with air-cooled engines, and some of the data obtained by its means. Methods of temperature measurement and cooling are provided.

  2. Numerical study of reservoir cooling by means of peltier effect

    OpenAIRE

    Farias, Rodrigo Martins; Santos, Elizaldo Domingues dos; Isoldi, Liércio André; Rocha, Luiz Alberto Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    The present work studies numerically and experimentally the water cooling process by means of natural convection inside a closed reservoir. The cooling process is performed by Peltier or Thermoelectric effect. The purpose here is to obtain the thermal gradient inside the reservoir and to search for the best point where the coldest water can be extracted from the reservoir, which can be considered a geometric optimization of the device thermal design. The analyzed flow is incompressible, lamin...

  3. Environmental Effects on TPB Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Christie

    2012-03-01

    The future neutrino detector MicroBooNE at Fermilab will rely on liquid argon scintillation of wavelength 128 nm for the trigger, as well as for determining the time and location of neutrino events. To better detect this light, we use Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) embedded in polystyrene which shifts the light to a peak wavelength of 425 nm. Although we would like to store TPB films for several weeks at a time, we observed that they degraded significantly after only one day. We examined environmental effects on TPB degradation by tracking the performance of several plates placed in different conditions with varying light exposure and humidity levels. We also looked at the ability of desiccation to restore TPB films. This talk presents the study of the degradation between plates kept in each condition and discusses the effectiveness of desiccation to restore the films.

  4. Effects of 'Cooled' Cooling Air on Pre-Swirl Nozzle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scricca, J. A.; Moore, K. D.

    2006-01-01

    It is common practice to use Pre-Swirl Nozzles to facilitate getting the turbine blade cooling air onboard the rotating disk with minimum pressure loss and reduced temperature. Higher engine OPR's and expanded aircraft operating envelopes have pushed cooling air temperatures to the limits of current disk materials and are stressing the capability to cool the blade with practical levels of cooling air flow. Providing 'Cooled' Cooling Air is one approach being considered to overcome these limitations. This presentation looks at how the introduction of 'Cooled' Cooling Air impacts the design of the Pre-Swirl Nozzles, specifically in relation to the radial location of the nozzles.

  5. Numerical investigation of the influence of elevated turbulence levels on the cooling effectiveness of an anti-vortex hole geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repko, Timothy William

    A novel film cooling hole geometry for use in gas turbine engines has been investigated numerically by solving the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations in a commercial CFD code (STAR-CCM+) with varying turbulence intensity and length scale using the k-o SST turbulence model. Both steady and unsteady results were considered in order to investigate the effects of freestream turbulence intensity and length scale on this novel anti-vortex hole (AVH) concept. The AVH geometry utilizes two side holes, one on each side of the main hole, to attempt to mitigate the vorticity from the jet from the main hole. The AVH concept has been shown by past research to provide a substantial improvement over conventional film cooling hole designs. Past research has been limited to low turbulence intensity and small length scales that are not representative of the turbulent flow exiting the combustor. Three turbulence intensities (Tu = 5, 10 and 20%) and three length scales normalized by the main cooling hole diameter (Λ x/dm = 1, 3, 6) were considered in this study for a total of nine turbulence conditions. The highest intensity, largest length scale turbulence case (Tu = 20, Λx/dm = 6) is considered most representative of engine conditions and was shown to have the best cooling performance. Results show that the turbulence in the hot gases exiting the combustor can aid in the film cooling for the AVH geometry at high blowing ratios (BR = 2.0), where the blowing ratio is essentially the ratio of the jet-to-mainstream mass flux ratios. Length scale was shown to have an insignificant effect on the cooling performance at low turbulence intensity and a moderate effect at higher turbulence intensities. The adiabatic film cooling effectiveness was shown to increase as the turbulence intensity was elevated. The convective heat transfer coefficient was also shown to increase at the turbulence intensity was elevated. An increase in the heat transfer coefficient is a deleterious effect and

  6. Air cooling effect of fins on a Honda shine bike

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padhiyar Abhesinh J

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The main of aim of this work is to study various researches done in past to improve heat transfer rate of cooling fins by changing cylinder block fin geometry. Low rate of heat transfer through cooling fins is the main problem in this type of cooling. So efficiency of the engine is increase by increase the heat transfer. Examples of direct air cooling in modern automobiles are rare. The most common example is the commercials Automobile bike like a Honda Shine, Bajaj bike, Honda splendor etc. It is conclude about shape try to this fins is more effectively heat transfer in Honda shine bike compare to existing fins. After FEA Analysis it checking on fin whether efficiency of heat transfer increases or not. This work validation with Experimental and Mathematical.

  7. Effect of Transverse Coupling on Asymmetric Cooling in Compton Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bulyak, E; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    Fast cooling of bunches circulating in a Compton ring is achieved by placing the collision point between electron bunches and laser pulses in a dispersive section and by, in addition, introducing a transverse offset between the laser pulse and the electron-beam closed orbit. Growth of the emittance in the dispersive transversal direction due to the additional excitation of betatron oscillations limits this type of cooling. Here we present the results of further studies on the fast cooling process, looking at the effect of the coupling of the transverse (betatron) oscillations. We first show theoretically that the transverse betatron coupling shortens the cooling time and hence reduces the steady-state energy spread of the electron beam, as well as the quantum losses. The theoretical estimates are then validated by simulations. Finally, a proof-of-principle experiment at the KEK ATF Damping Ring is proposed.

  8. Development of the Glenn-Heat-Transfer (Glenn-HT) Computer Code to Enable Time-Filtered Navier Stokes (TFNS) Simulations and Application to Film Cooling on a Flat Plate Through Long Cooling Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Ali A.; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David; Poinsatte, Phillip; Thurman, Douglas; Steinthorsson, Erlendur

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation for turbomachinery-related flows has enabled improved engine component designs. RANS methodology has limitations that are related to its inability to accurately describe the spectrum of flow phenomena encountered in engines. Examples of flows that are difficult to compute accurately with RANS include phenomena such as laminar/turbulent transition, turbulent mixing due to mixing of streams, and separated flows. Large eddy simulation (LES) can improve accuracy but at a considerably higher cost. In recent years, hybrid schemes that take advantage of both unsteady RANS and LES have been proposed. This study investigated an alternative scheme, the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) method applied to compressible flows. The method developed by Shih and Liu was implemented in the Glenn-Heat-Transfer (Glenn-HT) code and applied to film-cooling flows. In this report the method and its implementation is briefly described. The film effectiveness results obtained for film cooling from a row of 30deg holes with a pitch of 3.0 diameters emitting air at a nominal density ratio of unity and two blowing ratios of 0.5 and 1.0 are shown. Flow features under those conditions are also described.

  9. Development of the Glenn Heat-Transfer (Glenn-HT) Computer Code to Enable Time-Filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) Simulations and Application to Film Cooling on a Flat Plate Through Long Cooling Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Ali; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David; Poinsatte, Phillip; Thurman, Douglas; Steinthorsson, Erlendur

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation for turbomachinery-related flows has enabled improved engine component designs. RANS methodology has limitations that are related to its inability to accurately describe the spectrum of flow phenomena encountered in engines. Examples of flows that are difficult to compute accurately with RANS include phenomena such as laminar/turbulent transition, turbulent mixing due to mixing of streams, and separated flows. Large eddy simulation (LES) can improve accuracy but at a considerably higher cost. In recent years, hybrid schemes that take advantage of both unsteady RANS and LES have been proposed. This study investigated an alternative scheme, the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) method applied to compressible flows. The method developed by Shih and Liu was implemented in the Glenn-Heat-Transfer (Glenn-HT) code and applied to film-cooling flows. In this report the method and its implementation is briefly described. The film effectiveness results obtained for film cooling from a row of 30deg holes with a pitch of 3.0 diameters emitting air at a nominal density ratio of unity and two blowing ratios of 0.5 and 1.0 are shown. Flow features under those conditions are also described.

  10. Development of the Glenn-HT Computer Code to Enable Time-Filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) Simulations and Application to Film Cooling on a Flat Plate Through Long Cooling Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Ali; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David; Poinsatte, Philip; Thurman, Douglas; Steinthorsson, Erlendur

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation for turbomachinery-related flows has enabled improved engine component designs. RANS methodology has limitations which are related to its inability to accurately describe the spectrum of flow phenomena encountered in engines. Examples of flows that are difficult to compute accurately with RANS include phenomena such as laminarturbulent transition, turbulent mixing due to mixing of streams, and separated flows. Large eddy simulation (LES) can improve accuracy but at a considerably higher cost. In recent years, hybrid schemes which take advantage of both unsteady RANS and LES have been proposed. This study investigated an alternative scheme, the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) method applied to compressible flows. The method developed by Shih and Liu was implemented in the Glenn-HT code and applied to film cooling flows. In this report the method and its implementation is briefly described. The film effectiveness results obtained for film cooling from a row of 30 holes with a pitch of 3.0 diameters emitting air at a nominal density ratio of unity and four blowing ratios of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 are shown. Flow features under those conditions are also described.

  11. Stellar cooling bounds on new light particles: including plasma effects

    CERN Document Server

    Hardy, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Strong constraints on the coupling of new light particles to the Standard Model (SM) arise from their production in the hot cores of stars, and the effects of this on stellar cooling. The large electron density in stellar cores significantly modifies the in-medium propagation of SM states. For new light particles which have an effective in-medium mixing with the photon, such plasma effects can result in parametrically different production rates to those obtained from a naive calculation. Taking these previously-neglected contributions into account, we make updated estimates for the stellar cooling bounds on a number of light new particle candidates. In particular, we improve the bounds on light (m < keV) scalars coupling to electrons or nucleons by up to 3 orders of magnitude in the coupling squared, significantly revise the supernova cooling bounds on dark photon couplings, and qualitatively change the mass dependence of stellar bounds on new vectors.

  12. Cooling Effect of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Mohseni, F; Succi, S; Herrmann, H J

    2015-01-01

    We provide numerical evidence that the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability contributes to the cooling of a relativistic fluid. Due to the presence of jet particles traveling throughout the medium, shock waves are generated in the form of Mach cones. The interaction of multiple shock waves can trigger the RM instability, and we have found that this process leads to a down-cooling of the relativistic fluid. To confirm the cooling effect of the instability, shock tube Richtmyer-Meshkov instability simulations are performed. Additionally, in order to provide an experimental observable of the RM instability resulting from the Mach cone interaction, we measure the two particle correlation function and highlight the effects of the interaction. The simulations have been performed with an improved version of the relativistic lattice Boltzmann model, including general equations of state and external forces.

  13. Effect of input power on cooling property of a thermoacoustic cooling system with diameter-expanded prime movers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, So; Sakamoto, Shin-ichi; Orino, Yuichiro; Wada, Takahiro; Inui, Yoshitaka; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2016-07-01

    We studied a thermoacoustic cooling system driven at low temperatures to make practical use of the system. Aiming to reduce the driving temperature of the thermoacoustic system, we developed a loop-tube-type thermoacoustic system with diameter-expanded two-stage prime movers, i.e., a heat-to-sound transducer. The system drove at 67 °C. Additionally, we developed a prototype for a thermoacoustic cooling system with a diameter-expanded two-stage prime mover. In the experiment, the cooling point temperature was decreased by 4.4 °C from room temperature, i.e., 20 °C. To improve the cooling performance of the prototype thermoacoustic cooling system, we experimentally investigated the effect of increasing the input power on the cooling performance.

  14. Laboratory study on the cooling effect of flash water evaporative cooling technology for ventilation and air-conditioning of buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Yuan, Shu; Yang, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a simple cooling technology using flash water evaporation. The technology combines a water atomizer with a plate heat exchanger used for heat recovery of a ventilation system. It is mainly used to cool the ventilation airflow from outdoors and is particularly suitable to be used...... in warm/hot and dry environment where dehumidification of outdoor air is not needed. A laboratory experiment was designed and conducted to evaluate the cooling effectiveness of this technology. The experiment was conducted in a twin-climate chamber. One chamber simulated warm/hot and dry outdoor...... environments and the other simulated an air-conditioned indoor environment. The flash water evaporation cooling device was installed in the chamber that simulated indoor environment. The air from the chamber simulating outdoor environment was introduced into the cooling device and cooled by the flash water...

  15. Can Coolness Predict Technology Adoption? Effects of Perceived Coolness on User Acceptance of Smartphones with Curved Screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Joon; Shin, Dong-Hee; Park, Eunil

    2015-09-01

    This study proposes an acceptance model for curved-screen smartphones, and explores how the sense of coolness induced by attractiveness, originality, subcultural appeal, and the utility of the curved screen promotes smartphone adoption. The results of structural equation modeling analyses (N = 246) show that these components of coolness (except utility) increase the acceptance of the technology by enhancing the smartphones' affectively driven qualities rather than their utilitarian ones. The proposed coolness model is then compared with the original technology acceptance model to validate that the coolness factors are indeed equally effective determinants of usage intention, as are the extensively studied usability factors such as perceived ease of use and usefulness.

  16. HOT WIRE MEASUREMENT OF TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER ON A FILM COOLING PLATE WITH DIFFUSION HOLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This study experimentally investigated the film cooling flowfield of a single row of diffusion holes, from which the secondary air flow was injected into a turbulent boundary layer with zero pressure gradient on a flat plate. Circular-shaped holes were also tested as a basis for comparison. All the holes were inclined downstream at 35° with respect to the surface and the lateral spacing between the holes was 3 diameters of the hole. The mainstream velocity was maintained at 17 m/s and the Reynolds number based on the injection hole diameter was almost 11000. The density ratio of the jet to mainstream was 1.0, and the jet-to-mainstream velocity ratios M were 0.5 and 1.5. Normal-type and X-type hot wire anemometries were used to measure the streamwise mean velocity and its components, the normal and shear turbulent Reynolds stress components at the locations from the backward edge of the injection hole to 25 diameters downstream.

  17. Cooling Strategies for Vane Leading Edges in a Syngas Environment Including Effects of Deposition and Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, Forrest [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Bons, Jeffrey [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The Department of Energy has goals to move land based gas turbine systems to alternate fuels including coal derived synthetic gas and hydrogen. Coal is the most abundant energy resource in the US and in the world and it is economically advantageous to develop power systems which can use coal. Integrated gasification combined cycles are (IGCC) expected to allow the clean use of coal derived fuels while improving the ability to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. These cycles will need to maintain or increase turbine entry temperatures to develop competitive efficiencies. The use of coal derived syngas introduces a range of potential contaminants into the hot section of the gas turbine including sulfur, iron, calcium, and various alkali metals. Depending on the effectiveness of the gas clean up processes, there exists significant likelihood that the remaining materials will become molten in the combustion process and potentially deposit on downstream turbine surfaces. Past evidence suggests that deposition will be a strong function of increasing temperature. Currently, even with the best gas cleanup processes a small level of particulate matter in the syngas is expected. Consequently, particulate deposition is expected to be an important consideration in the design of turbine components. The leading edge region of first stage vanes most often have higher deposition rates than other areas due to strong fluid acceleration and streamline curvature in the vicinity of the surface. This region remains one of the most difficult areas in a turbine nozzle to cool due to high inlet temperatures and only a small pressure ratio for cooling. The leading edge of a vane often has relatively high heat transfer coefficients and is often cooled using showerhead film cooling arrays. The throat of the first stage nozzle is another area where deposition potentially has a strongly adverse effect on turbine performance as this region meters the turbine inlet flow. Based on roughness

  18. Radiation therapy of prostate cancer applied with cooling effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuhata, Akihiko; Ogawa, Katsuaki; Miyazaki, Machiko; Iwai, Hiroshi [Yokosuka National Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Takeda, Takashi

    1995-05-01

    The radio-sensitivity of prostate carcinoma is a resistant one. Also a prostate locates close to rectum, urethra and bladder of which mucus membranes are intermediate sensitive for irradiation, and causes side effects frequently. In this study, we applied with hyperfraction and local membrane cooling to the radiation therapy of the prostate cancer. This brought favorable clinical results with decreased morbidities. (author).

  19. Effects of cooling media on the Mechanical properties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2008-04-01

    Apr 1, 2008 ... Defects in castings can affect the ... effects of cooling media on Aluminium alloy cast. ... bined with other materials such as binder, addi- .... Ca. Sr. Wt %. 98.49 0.5106 0.4743 0.3490 0.3210 0.0586 0.0564 0.0157 0.0117 ...

  20. Cooling load calculation by the radiant time series method - effect of solar radiation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Alexandre M.S. [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil)], E-mail: amscosta@uem.br

    2010-07-01

    In this work was analyzed numerically the effect of three different models for solar radiation on the cooling load calculated by the radiant time series' method. The solar radiation models implemented were clear sky, isotropic sky and anisotropic sky. The radiant time series' method (RTS) was proposed by ASHRAE (2001) for replacing the classical methods of cooling load calculation, such as TETD/TA. The method is based on computing the effect of space thermal energy storage on the instantaneous cooling load. The computing is carried out by splitting the heat gain components in convective and radiant parts. Following the radiant part is transformed using time series, which coefficients are a function of the construction type and heat gain (solar or non-solar). The transformed result is added to the convective part, giving the instantaneous cooling load. The method was applied for investigate the influence for an example room. The location used was - 23 degree S and 51 degree W and the day was 21 of January, a typical summer day in the southern hemisphere. The room was composed of two vertical walls with windows exposed to outdoors with azimuth angles equals to west and east directions. The output of the different models of solar radiation for the two walls in terms of direct and diffuse components as well heat gains were investigated. It was verified that the clear sky exhibited the less conservative (higher values) for the direct component of solar radiation, with the opposite trend for the diffuse component. For the heat gain, the clear sky gives the higher values, three times higher for the peek hours than the other models. Both isotropic and anisotropic models predicted similar magnitude for the heat gain. The same behavior was also verified for the cooling load. The effect of room thermal inertia was decreasing the cooling load during the peak hours. On the other hand the higher thermal inertia values are the greater for the non peak hours. The effect

  1. Effects of Thermal Barrier Coatings on Approaches to Turbine Blade Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Reliance on Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) to reduce the amount of air used for turbine vane cooling is beneficial both from the standpoint of reduced NOx production, and as a means of improving cycle efficiency through improved component efficiency. It is shown that reducing vane cooling from 10 to 5 percent of mainstream air can lead to NOx reductions of nearly 25 percent while maintaining the same rotor inlet temperature. An analysis is given which shows that, when a TBC is relied upon in the vane thermal design process, significantly less coolant is required using internal cooling alone compared to film cooling. This is especially true for small turbines where internal cooling without film cooling permits the surface boundary layer to remain laminar over a significant fraction of the vane surface.

  2. Enhancement of Natural Convection by Carbon Nanotube Films Covered Microchannel-Surface for Passive Electronic Cooling Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang; Jiang, Shaohui; Yao, Wei; Liu, Changhong

    2016-11-16

    Owing to the outstanding properties of thermal conduction, lightweight, and chemical durability, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have revealed promising applications in thermal management materials. Meanwhile, the increasingly popular portable electronics and the rapid development of space technology need lighter weight, smaller size, and more effective thermal management devices. Here, a novel kind of heat dissipation devices based on the superaligned CNT films and underlying microchannels is proposed, and the heat dissipation properties are measured at the natural condition. Distinctive from previous studies, by combining the advantages of microchannels and CNTs, such a novel heat dissipation device enables superior natural convection heat transfer properties. Our findings prove that the novel CNT-based devices could show an 86.6% larger total natural heat dissipation properties than bare copper plate. Further calculations of the radiation and natural convection heat transfer properties demonstrate that the excellent passive cooling properties of these CNT-based devices are primarily caused by the reinforcement of the natural convection heat transfer properties. Furthermore, the heat dissipation mechanisms are briefly discussed, and we propose that the very high heat transfer coefficients and the porous structures of superaligned CNT films play critical roles in reinforcing the natural convection. The novel CNT-based heat dissipation devices also have advantages of energy-saving, free-noise, and without additional accessories. So we believe that the CNT-based heat dissipation devices would replace the traditional metal-finned heat dissipation devices and have promising applications in electronic devices, such as photovoltaic devices, portable electronic devices, and electronic displays.

  3. Cooling of Gas Turbines. 2; Effectiveness of Rim Cooling of Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenstein, Lincoln; Meyer, Gene L.; McCarthy, John S.

    1945-01-01

    An analysis of rim cooling, which cools the blade by condition alone, was conducted. Gas temperatures ranged from 1300 degrees to 1900 degrees F and rim temperatures from 0 degrees to 1000 degrees F below gas temperatures. Results show that gas temperature increases up to 200 degrees F are permissible provided that the blades are cooled by 400 degrees to 500 degrees F below the gas temperature. Relatively small amounts of blade cooling, at constant gas temperature, give large increases in blade life. Dependence of rim cooling on heat-transfer coefficient, blade dimensions, and thermal conductivity is determined by a single parameter.

  4. Latent cooling and microphysics effects in deep convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-González, S.; Wang, P. K.; Gascón, E.; Valero, F.; Sánchez, J. L.

    2016-11-01

    Water phase changes within a storm are responsible for the enhancement of convection and therefore the elongation of its lifespan. Specifically, latent cooling absorbed during evaporation, melting and sublimation is considered the main cause of the intensification of downdrafts. In order to know more accurately the consequences of latent cooling caused by each of these processes (together with microphysical effects that they induce), four simulations were developed with the Wisconsin Dynamical and Microphysical Model (WISCDYMM): one with all the microphysical processes; other without sublimation; melting was suppressed in the third simulation; and evaporation was disabled in the fourth. The results show that sublimation cooling is not essential to maintain the vertical currents of the storm. This is demonstrated by the fact that in the simulation without sublimation, maximum updrafts are in the same range as in the control simulation, and the storm lifespan is similar or even longer. However, melting was of vital importance. The storm in the simulation without melting dissipated prematurely, demonstrating that melting is indispensable to the enhancement of downdrafts below the freezing level and for avoiding the collapse of low level updrafts. Perhaps the most important finding is the crucial influence of evaporative cooling above the freezing level that maintains and enhances mid-level downdrafts in the storm. It is believed that this latent cooling comes from the evaporation of supercooled liquid water connected with the Bergeron-Findeisen process. Therefore, besides its influence at low levels (which was already well known), this evaporative cooling is essential to strengthen mid-level downdrafts and ultimately achieve a quasi-steady state.

  5. Highly c-axis-oriented monocrystalline Pb(Zr, Ti)O₃ thin films on si wafer prepared by fast cooling immediately after sputter deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shinya; Hanzawa, Hiroaki; Wasa, Kiyotaka; Esashi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Shuji

    2014-09-01

    We successfully developed sputter deposition technology to obtain a highly c-axis-oriented monocrystalline Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 (PZT) thin film on a Si wafer by fast cooling (~-180°C/min) of the substrate after deposition. The c-axis orientation ratio of a fast-cooled film was about 90%, whereas that of a slow-cooled (~-40°C/min) film was only 10%. The c-axis-oriented monocrystalline Pb(Zr0.5, Ti0.5)O3 films showed reasonably large piezoelectric coefficients, e(31,f) = ~-11 C/m(2), with remarkably small dielectric constants, ϵ(r) = ~220. As a result, an excellent figure of merit (FOM) was obtained for piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) such as a piezoelectric gyroscope. This c-axis orientation technology on Si will extend industrial applications of PZT-based thin films and contribute further to the development of piezoelectric MEMS.

  6. Effect of geometry on hydrodynamic film thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewe, D. E.; Hamrock, B. J.; Taylor, C. M.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of geometry on the isothermal hydrodynamic film separating two rigid solids was investigated. Pressure-viscosity effects were not considered. The minimum film thickness is derived for fully flooded conjunctions by using the Reynolds boundary conditions. It was found that the minimum film thickness had the same speed, viscosity, and load dependence as Kapitza's classical solution. However, the incorporation of Reynolds boundary conditions resulted in an additional geometry effect. Solutions using the parabolic film approximation are compared with those using the exact expression for the film in the analysis. Contour plots are shown that indicate in detail the pressure developed between the solids.

  7. How to measure thermal effects of personal cooling systems : Human, thermal manikin and human simulator study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, N.; Psikuta, A.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Rossi, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal effects, such as cooling power and thermophysiological responses initiated upon application of a personal cooling system, can be assessed with (i) humans, (ii) a thermal manikin and (iii) a thermophysiological human simulator. In order to compare these methods, a cooling shirt (mild cooling)

  8. Effect of cooling procedure on final denture base adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzarolli, S M; Rached, R N; Garcia, R C M R; Del Bel Cury, A A

    2002-08-01

    Well-fitted dentures prevent hyperplasic lesions, provide chewing efficiency and promote patient's comfort. Several factors may affect final adaptation of dentures, as the type of the acrylic resin, the flask cooling procedure and the water uptake. This investigation evaluated the effect of water storage and two different cooling procedures [bench cooling (BC) for 2 h; running water (RW) at 20 degrees C for 45 min] on the final adaptation of denture bases. A heat-cured acrylic resin (CL, Clássico, Clássico Artigos Odontológicos) and two microwave-cured acrylic resins [Acron MC, (AC) GC Dent. Ind. Corp.; Onda Cryl (OC), Clássico Artigos Odontológicos] were used to make the bases. Adaptation was assessed by measuring the weight of an intervening layer of silicone impression material between the base and the master die. Data was submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (0.05). The following means were found: (BC) CL=0.72 +/- 0.03 a; AC=0.70 +/- 0.03 b; OC=0.76 +/- 0.04 c//(RW) CL= 1.00 +/- 0.11 a; AC=1.00 +/- 0.12 a; OC=0.95 +/- 0.10 a. Different labels join groups that are not statistically different (P > 0.05). Comparisons are made among groups submitted to the same cooling procedure (BC or RW). The conclusions are: interaction of type of material and cooling procedure had a statistically significant effect on the final adaptation of the denture bases (P 0.05) on the final adaptation.

  9. Effect of Temperature and Ionic Concentration on Self-Assembled Films of Chicago Sky Blue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. Dey; M.N. Islam; S.A. Hussain; D. Bhattacharjee

    2008-01-01

    We employ a layer-by-layer adsorption technique for deposition on solid substrates of polyionic films of Chicago Sky Blue. Film growth was significant with the increasing number of layers. Photochemical properties of these films are investigated for different ionic concentrations. A significant blue shift is observed with the increasing ionic strength of the solution, suggesting the formation of aggregation. Temperature effect studies show some preferable reorientation of molecules in the film during cooling process. Most remarkable observation is that the absorption intensity is the highest for a particular degree of inclination. Deposition time is fixed at 15 min because adsorption kinetics results show saturation after 15 min.

  10. Effect of cooling water on stability of NLC linac components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Le Pimpec et al.

    2003-02-11

    Vertical vibration of linac components (accelerating structures, girders and quadrupoles) in the NLC has been studied experimentally and analytically. Effects such as structural resonances and vibration caused by cooling water both in accelerating structures and quadrupoles have been considered. Experimental data has been compared with analytical predictions and simulations using ANSYS. A design, incorporating the proper decoupling of structure vibrations from the linac quadrupoles, is being pursued.

  11. Fabrication and Optimization of Brush-Printed n-type Bi2Te3 Thick Films for Thermoelectric Cooling Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Zhao, Wen-yu; Zhou, Hong-yu; Mu, Xin; He, Dan-qi; Zhu, Wan-ting; Wei, Ping; Wu, Han; Zhang, Qing-jie

    2016-03-01

    A simple, efficient and rapid brush-printing method has been developed for preparation of n-type Bi2Te2.7Se0.3 films approximately 100-150 μm thick. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and four-point probe measurements were used to characterize the crystal structure, composition, microstructure, and electrical properties of the films. The results showed that all the n-type Bi2Te2.7Se0.3 thick films were composed of single-phase Bi2Te2.7Se0.3; the grains in the films were randomly distributed in the low-temperature-annealed samples and predominantly oriented along the (00 l) plane in samples annealed at temperatures >673 K. σ and the absolute value of α first increased substantially with increasing the annealing temperature in the range 573-673 K then decreased when the annealing temperature was increased further. The dependence of σ and α on annealing temperature may be reasonably explained on the basis of the change in the microstructure induced by annealing. The performance of a prototype cooling device containing n-type Bi2Te2.7Se0.3 thick films was evaluated for temperature differences produced by use of different DC currents.

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis of axisymmetric plume and base flow of film/dump cooled rocket nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, P. K.; Warsi, S. A.

    1993-07-01

    Film/dump cooling a rocket nozzle with fuel rich gas, as in the National Launch System (NLS) Space Transportation Main Engine (STME), adds potential complexities for integrating the engine with the vehicle. The chief concern is that once the film coolant is exhausted from the nozzle, conditions may exist during flight for the fuel-rich film gases to be recirculated to the vehicle base region. The result could be significantly higher base temperatures than would be expected from a regeneratively cooled nozzle. CFD analyses were conduced to augment classical scaling techniques for vehicle base environments. The FDNS code with finite rate chemistry was used to simulate a single, axisymmetric STME plume and the NLS base area. Parallel calculations were made of the Saturn V S-1 C/F1 plume base area flows. The objective was to characterize the plume/freestream shear layer for both vehicles as inputs for scaling the S-C/F1 flight data to NLS/STME conditions. The code was validated on high speed flows with relevant physics. This paper contains the calculations for the NLS/STME plume for the baseline nozzle and a modified nozzle. The modified nozzle was intended to reduce the fuel available for recirculation to the vehicle base region. Plumes for both nozzles were calculated at 10kFT and 50kFT.

  13. Numerical investigation of impact of relative humidity on droplet accumulation and film cooling on compressor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugarin, Luz Irene

    During the summer, high inlet temperatures affect the power output of gas turbine systems. Evaporative coolers have gained popularity as an inlet cooling method for these systems. Wet compression has been one of the common evaporative cooling methods implemented to increase power output of gas turbine systems due to its simple installation and low cost. This process involves injection of water droplets into the continuous phase of compressor to reduce the temperature of the flow entering the compressor and in turn increase the power output of the whole gas turbine system. This study focused on a single stage rotor-stator compressor model with varying inlet temperature between 300K and 320K, as well as relative humidity between 0% and 100%. The simulations are carried out using the commercial CFD tool ANSYS: FLUENT. The study modeled the interaction between the two phases including mass and heat transfer, given different inlet relative humidity (RH) and temperature conditions. The Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with k-epsilon turbulence model were applied as well as the droplet coalescence and droplet breakup model considered in the simulation. Sliding mesh theory was implemented to simulate the compressor movement in 2-D. The interaction between the blade and droplets were modeled to address all possible interactions; which include: stick spread, splash, or rebound and compared to an interaction of only reflect. The goal of this study is to quantify the relation between RH, inlet temperature, overall heat transfer coefficient, and the heat transferred from the droplets to the blades surface. The result of this study lead to further proof that wet compression yields higher pressure ratios and lower temperatures in the domain under all of the cases. Additionally, droplet-wall interaction has an interesting effect on the heat transfer coefficient at the compressor blades.

  14. Impact of cooling condition on the crystal structure and surface quality of preferred c-axis-oriented AIN films for SAW devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Geng-yu; YANG Bao-he; ZHAO Jian; LI Cui-ping; LI Ming-ji

    2011-01-01

    AIN films with preferred c-axis orientation are deposited on Si substrates using the radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method. The post-processing is carried out under the cooling conditions including high vacuum, low vacuum under deposition gas ambient and low vacuum under dynamic N2 ambient. Structures and morphologies of the films are analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The hardness and Young's modulus are investigated by the nanoindenter. The experimental results indicate that the (100) and (110) peak intensities decrease in the XRD spectra and the root-mean-square of roughness (Rrms) of the film decreases gradually with the increase of the cooling rate. The maximum values of the hardness and Young's modulus are obtained by cooling in low vacuum under deposition gas ambient. The reason for orientation variation of the films is explained from the perspective of the Al-N bond formation.

  15. Landauer's blowtorch effect as a thermodynamic cross process: Brownian cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Moupriya; Das, Debojyoti; Barik, Debashis; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2015-11-01

    The local heating of a selected region in a double-well potential alters the relative stability of the two wells and gives rise to an enhancement of population transfer to the cold well. We show that this Landauer's blowtorch effect may be considered in the spirit of a thermodynamic cross process linearly connecting the flux of particles and the thermodynamic force associated with the temperature difference and consequently ensuring the existence of a reverse cross effect. This reverse effect is realized by directing the thermalized particles in a double-well potential by application of an external bias from one well to the other, which suffers cooling.

  16. The Formation of Counter-Rotating Vortex Pair and the Nature of Liftoff-Reattachment in Film-Cooling Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Ming Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the formation of the Counter-Rotating Vortex Pair (CRVP has been attributed to three main sources: the jet-mainstream shear layer where the jet meets with the mainstream flow right outside the pipe, the in-tube boundary layer developing along the pipe wall, and the in-tube vortices associated with the tube inlet vorticity; whereas the liftoff-reattachment phenomenon occurring in the main flow along the plate right downstream of the jet has been associated with the jet flow trajectory. The jet-mainstream shear layer has also been demonstrated to be the dominant source of CRVP formation, whereby the shear layer disintegrates into vortex rings that deform as the jet convects downstream, becoming a pair of CRVPs flowing within the jet and eventually turning into the main flow direction. These traditional findings are assessed qualitatively and quantitatively for film-cooling flow in gas turbines by simulating numerically the flow and evaluating the extent to which the traditional flow phenomena are taking place particularly for CRVP and for flow liftoff-reattachment. To this end, three flow simulation cases are used; they are referred to as 1—the baseline case; 2—the free-slip in-tube wall case (FSIT; and 3—the unsteady flow case. The baseline case is a typical film-cooling case. The FSIT case is used to assess the in-tube boundary layer. Cases 1 and 2 are simulated using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS, whereas Case 3 solves a Detached Eddy Simulation (DES model. It is concluded that decreasing the strength of the CRVP, which is the case for e.g., shaped holes, provides high cooling performance, and the liftoff-reattachment phenomenon was thus found to be strongly influenced by the entrainment caused by the CRVP, rather than the jet flow trajectory. These interpretations of the flow physics that are more relevant to gas turbine cooling flow are new and provide a physics-based guideline for designing new film-cooling

  17. Piezoresistive effect in carbon nanotube films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The piezoresistive effect of the pristine carbon nanotube (CNT) films has been studied. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The piezoresistive effect in the pristine CNT films was studied by a three-point bending test. The gauge factor for the pristine CNT films under 500 microstrains was found to be at least 65 at room temperature, and increased with temperature, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃. The origin of the piezoresistivity in CNT films may be ascribed to a pressure-induced change in the band gap and the defects.

  18. Effect of temperature, chloride ions and sulfide ions on the electrochemical properties of 316L stainless steel in simulated cooling water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The influence of temperature, chloride ions and sulfide ions on the anticorrosion behavior of 316L stainless steel in simulated cooling water was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and anodic polarization curves. The results show that the film resistance increases with the solution temperature but decreases after 8 days' immersion, which indicates that the film formed at higher temperature has inferior anticorrosion behavior; Chloride ions and sulfide ions have remarkable effects on the elect...

  19. 液体火箭发动机液膜冷却研究综述%Review of Research on Liquid Film Cooling for Liquid-propellant Rocket Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周红玲; 杨成虎; 刘犇

    2012-01-01

    液膜冷却对降低燃烧室和喷注器头部温度有显著作用,而且通道结构比较简单,因此在载人航天液体推进系统用姿轨控发动机中得到了广泛应用。液膜冷却的传热过程主要包括对流传热和沸腾传热两种形式,传质过程主要包括液膜的蒸发和中心主气流对液膜的携带。对液膜冷却过程的研究工作进行了综述,讨论了液膜冷却的异常升温现象和发生机理。%Liquid film cooling is widely used in attitude and ahitude liquid rocket engine for manned spaceflight propulsion sys- tem. With a comparatively simple channel structure, it is an effective method to protect the combustor and injector from high temperature. The two main heat transfer patterns in liquid film cooling are convection transfer and boiling heat transfer, while the process of mass transfer mainly includes liquid film evaporating and the carrying of the film by main flow. Research on the heat and mass transfer during liquid film cooling is reviewed, and the phenomenon and mecha- nism of abnormal temperature rise of liquid film cooling are discussed.

  20. Numerical simulation of heat transfer physics of film cooling under rotating conditions%旋转状态气膜换热机理的数值研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宁; 孙纪宁

    2011-01-01

    Large eddy simulation was used to investigate the effect of rotation on film cooling over flat plate with single hole. The Reynolds number at the jet exit was 2 600, and the blowing ratio was 0. 5. The flow and heat transfer without rotation and with rotating number of 0. 02 were calculated, and the heat transfer mechanics under rotating condition was analyzed through the evolvement of turbulence structure. It was found that hairpin structure determined the heat transfer of film cooling, and the shape and trajectory of hairpin structure was mainly affected by Coriolis force under rotating condition. The film was driven towards high radius side by spanwise Coriolis force, resulting in less mixing between main flow and jet and maintaining low temperature of the film. The Coriolis force normal to the wall reinforced the film attachment and reduced the strength of counter rotating vortex pair, leading to less entrainment of mainflow and better coverage of film.%大涡模拟研究了旋转对单孔平板气膜冷却的影响,气膜出流的雷诺数为2600,吹风比为0.5,计算了静止和旋转数为0.02两种状态的流动和换热,从湍流结构演化的角度讨论了旋转状态气膜换热的机理.结果表明:①发卡涡是决定气膜换热的主要湍流结构,旋转状态发卡涡的形状和运动规律主要受哥氏力的影响;②气膜在哥氏力作用下向高半径方向偏移,弱化了射流前缘与主流的剪切和掺混,使气膜保持较低温度;③气膜的侧向速度诱发垂直向下的哥氏力,压制射流贴附壁面,并降低对转涡对的强度,减少了对主流的卷吸,增强了气膜的保护效果.

  1. Heat transfer and turbulence measurements of a film-cooled flow over a convexly curved surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhama, K.; Moffat, R. J.; Frota, M. N.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer and hydrodynamic boundary layer measurements were made in a turbulent boundary layer on a convex surface with 13 rows of injection. Both full- and partial-coverage cases were tested for three blowing ratios: 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6. Heat transfer results are discussed in terms of Stanton number with injection air temperature equal to wall temperature. In the blown region, for both m (blowing ratio) = 0.2 and 0.4, the local response of the boundary layer is dominated by curvature, and m = 0.4 shows higher cooling effects than m = 0.2 or 0.6, as expected, based on flat-plate results. Hydrodynamic measurements with a triple-hot-wire suggest the existence of two streamwise lanes. Lanes containing injection holes are highly affected by injection and show a definite streamwise evolution. Lanes which do not contain holes are not affected much by injection and show little change in the streamwise direction.

  2. Effect of Half Time Cooling on Thermoregulatory Responses and Soccer-Specific Performance Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined two active coolings (forearm and hand cooling, and neck cooling during a simulated half-time recovery on thermoregulatory responses and subsequent soccer-specific exercise performance. Following a 45-min treadmill run in the heat, participants (N=7 undertook 15-min recovery with either passive cooling, forearm and hand cooling, or neck cooling in a simulated cooled locker room environment. After the recovery, participants performed a 6×15-m sprint test and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 test (YYIR1 in a temperate environment. During the 15-min recovery, rectal temperature fell significantly (p<0.05. Neither active coolings induced further reduction in rectal temperature compared to passive cooling. No effect of active coolings was found in repeated sprint test. However, neck cooling reduced (p<0.05 the thermal sensation (TS compared to passive cooling during the 15-min recovery. Active coolings attenuated (p<0.05 the sweat rate compared to passive cooling: 1.2±0.3 l•h-1 vs. 0.8±0.1 l•h-1 vs. 0.8±0.3 l•h-1, for passive cooling, forearm and hand cooling, and neck cooling, respectively. For passive cooling, elevated sweat rate resulted in higher (p<0.05 dehydration (2.1±0.3% compared to neck cooling (1.5±0.3% and forearm and hand cooling (1.4±0.3%. YYIR1 was improved (p<0.05 following forearm and hand cooling (869±320 m and neck cooling (814±328 m compared to passive cooling (654±311 m. Neck cooling (4.6±0.6 reduced (p=0.03 the session TS compared to passive cooling (5.3±0.5. These results suggest that active coolings effectively improved comfort and sweating response, which delayed exercise-heat induced performance diminish during a second bout of exercise.

  3. Unveiling the irreversible performance degradation of organo-inorganic halide perovskite films and solar cells during heating and cooling processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamun, Abdullah Al; Ava, Tanzila Tasnim; Byun, Hye Ryung; Jeong, Hyeon Jun; Jeong, Mun Seok; Nguyen, Loi; Gausin, Christine; Namkoong, Gon

    2017-07-26

    While organo-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells show great potential to meet future energy needs, their thermal instability raises serious questions about their commercialization viability. At present, the stability of perovskite solar cells has been studied under various environmental conditions including humidity and temperature. Nonetheless, understanding of the performance of CH3NH3PbI3-xClx perovskite solar cells is limited. This study reports the irreversible performance degradation of CH3NH3PbI3-xClx perovskite solar cells during the heating and cooling processes under AM 1.5 and unveils what triggers the irreversible performance degradation of solar cells. Particularly, the primary cause of the irreversible performance degradation of CH3NH3PbI3-xClx is quantitatively analyzed by monitoring in real time the development of deteriorated crystallinity, charge trapping/detrapping, trap depth, and the PbI2 phase, namely a critical signal of perovskite degradation while varying the temperature of the perovskite films and solar cells. Most surprisingly, it is revealed that the degradation of both perovskite films and solar cells was triggered at ∼70 °C. Remarkably, even after the device temperature cooled down to room temperature, the degraded performance of the solar cells persisted with increasing charge trapping and further development of the PbI2 phase. Identification of the irreversible performance degradation of perovskite solar cells provides guidance for future development of more stable perovskite solar cells.

  4. Influence of Postdeposition Cooling Atmosphere on Thermoelectric Properties of 2% Al-Doped ZnO Thin Films Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, S.; Mele, P.; Honda, H.; Matsumoto, K.; Miyazaki, K.; Luna, L. Molina; Hopkins, P. E.

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated the thermoelectric properties of 2% Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films depending on the postdeposition cooling atmosphere [in oxygen pressure (AZO-O) or vacuum (AZO-V)]. Thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition on sapphire () substrates at various deposition temperatures ( to ). All films were c-axis oriented. The electrical conductivity of AZO-V thin films was higher than that of AZO-O thin films across the whole temperature range from 300 K to 600 K, due to the optimal carrier concentration () of AZO-V samples. Furthermore, the thermoelectric performance of AZO-V films increased with the deposition temperature; for instance, the highest power factor of and dimensionless figure of merit of 0.07 at 600 K were found for AZO-V thin film deposited at.

  5. Effects of cooling rate on the fracture properties of TA15 ELI alloy plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shikai; XIONG Baiqing; HUI Songxiao

    2007-01-01

    The effects of cooling rate on the mechanical properties and the fatigue crack growth behavior of TA15 ELI alloy plates with different microstructures were investigated at room temperature. The results indicate that the cooling rate (water quench, air cooling, and furnace cooling) has a pronounced influence on the mechanical properties and on the fatigue crack growth,especially for air cooling and furnace cooling.Optical microstructure observation and scanning electron microscopy of tensile fracture surfaces were performed to gain an insight into the mechanism of properties.The dependence of mechanical properties and fatigue crack growth behavior on the cooling rate can be attributed to the α lamellae width and the α colony size,which induce the change in slip length. The microstructure produced by air cooling shows the best damage tolerance behavior when compared with water quench and furnace cooling.

  6. A comparative study on showerhead cooling performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcoz, C.; Ott, P. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratoire de Thermique Appliquee et de Turbomachines (LTT), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Weigand, B. [Institut fuer Thermodynamik der Luft- und Raumfahrt (ITLR), Stuttgart University, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    In modern gas turbines, the turbine airfoil leading edge is currently protected from the hot gas by specific film cooling schemes, so called showerhead cooling. The present paper shows a numerical study of different showerhead cooling geometries. The 3D finite element program ABAQUS as well as a 2D finite element program have been employed to predict the showerhead cooling performance. In the numerical calculations, the different cooling effects and their contribution to the total showerhead cooling performance have been investigated separately. From the numerical calculations a simple method has been derived which enables the prediction of the performance of a 3D showerhead cooling scheme by simple 2D computations. Experimental investigations on showerhead cooling have been presented in a companion paper [C. Falcoz, B. Weigand, P. Ott, Experimental investigations on showerhead cooling on a blunt body. Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, in press. r publication]. (author)

  7. Comparison of Two-Equation Turbulence Models for Prediction of Heat Transfer on Film-Cooled Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Ameri, Ali A.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code has been used to compute the heat transfer coefficient on two film-cooled turbine blades, namely, the VKI rotor with six rows of cooling holes, including three rows on the shower head and the C3X vane with nine rows of holes, including five rows on the shower head. Predictions of heat transfer coefficient at the blade surface using three two-equation turbulence model specifically, Coakley's q-omega model, Chien's k-epsilon model and Wilcox's k-omega model with Menter's modifications, have been compared with the experimental data of Camci and Arts for the VKI rotor, and of Hylton et al. for the C3X vane along with predictions using the Baldwin-Lomar (B-L) model taken from Garg and Gaugler. It is found that for the cases considered here the two equation models predict the blade heat transfer somewhat better than the B-L model except immediately downstream of the film-cooled holes on the suction surface of the VKI rotor, and over most of the suction surface of the C3X vane. However, all two-equation models require 40% more computer core than the B-L model for solution, and while the q-omega and k-epsilon models need 40% more computer time than the B-L model the k-omega model requires at least 65% more time because of the slower rate of convergence. It is found that the heat transfer coefficient exhibit a strong spanwise as well as streamwise variation for both blades and all turbulence models.

  8. Electrically heated tube investigation of cooling channel geometry effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation on the combined effects of cooling channel aspect ratio and curvature for rocket engines are presented. Symmetrically heated tubes with average heat fluxes up to 1.7 MW/m(exp 2) were used. The coolant was gaseous nitrogen at an inlet temperature of 280 K (500 R) and inlet pressures up to 1.0 x 10(exp 7) N/m(exp 2) (1500 psia). Two different tube geometries were tested: a straight, circular cross-section tube, and an aspect-ratio 10 cross-section tube with a 45 deg bend. The circular tube results are compared to classical models from the literature as validation of the system. The curvature effect data from the curved aspect-ratio 10 tube compare favorably to the empirical equations available in the literature for low aspect ratio tubes. This latter results suggest that thermal stratification of the coolant due to diminished curvature effect mixing may not be an issue for high aspect-ratio cooling channels.

  9. Effects of ankle joint cooling on peroneal short latency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, J Ty; Hunter, Iain; McLoda, Todd

    2006-01-01

    While cryotherapy has direct physiological effects on contractile tissues, the extent to which joint cooling affects the neuromuscular system is not well understood. The purpose of the study was to detect changes in ankle dynamic restraint (peroneal short latency response and muscle activity amplitude) during inversion perturbation following ankle joint cryotherapy. A 2x3 factorial design was used to compare reaction time and EMG amplitude data of treatment conditions (cryotherapy and control) across time (pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 30 min post-treatment). Thirteen healthy volunteers (age 23 ± 4 yrs, ht 1.76 ± 0.09 m, mass 78.8 ± 16.6 kg), with no history of lower extremity joint injury participated in this study. Surface EMG was collected from the peroneus longus (PL) of the dominant leg during an ankle inversion perturbation triggered while walking. Subjects walked the length of a 6.1 m runway 30 times. A trap door mechanism, inducing inversion perturbation, was released at heel contact during six randomly selected trials for each leg. Following baseline measurements, a 1.5 L bag of crushed ice was applied to the lateral ankle of subjects in the treatment group with an elastic wrap. A bag similar in weight and consistency was applied to the lateral ankle of subjects in the control group. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare treatment conditions across time (p 0.05) for PL reaction time. Average RMS EMG, normalized to an isometric reference position, increased in the cryotherapy group at the 30 min post-treatment interval relative to the control group (p movement is unknown.Short latency response should be measured during functional movement instead of during stance to take into consideration alterations in motor drive.Joint cooling has no effect on peroneal short latency response, and joint cooling may result in increased short term peroneal activation.Joint cooling has no effect on the peroneus longus as a dynamic stabilizer during walking.

  10. The effect of cooling water on magnet vibrations

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S; Coosemans, Williame; Schnell, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    The quadrupole magnets in the CLIC Test Facility II (CTF2) incorporate a water cooling circuit. In the frame-work of the CLIC stability study, the mechanical vibrations of the magnets were measured for different flows of cool-ing water. We present the results and compare them with simple theoretical estimates. It is shown that the vibra-tion requirements of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) quadrupoles with cooling water can basically be met.

  11. What makes gambling cool? Images of agency and self-control in fiction films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerer, Michael; Rantala, Varpu

    2015-03-01

    The study is a qualitative film analysis. It seeks to determine the semiotic and cinematic structures that make gambling appealing in films based on analysis of 72 film scenes from 28 narrative fiction films made from 1922 to 2003 about gambling in North American and West European mainstream cinema. The main game types include card games, casino games, and slot machines. The theme of self-control and competence was identified as being central to gambling's appeal. These images are strongly defined by gender. The study was funded by ELOMEDIA, financed by the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture as well as the Finnish Foundation for Alcohol Studies. The limitations of the study are noted.

  12. Study the effect of cryogenic cooling on orthogonal machining Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Kaushal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In present scenario , all the manufacturing organization aims to maximize the productivity of organization in respect of all the aspect of manufacturing process, in case of machining process, it associated with various factors which affect the productivity directly in sense of tool life . Temperature, cutting forces, shear angle, work-piece surface finishing & accuracy, amount of power consumed in machining process and other thing also. All the factors might be optimized by applying effective and efficient amount of coolant throughout the process, to get desired efficiency of process. A coolant play a vital role in machining operation but which must have specific properties which have been reviewed in previous article of various student , research scholars , scientist and industrial candidates .in this research paper , we were focusing on the effect of cryogenic cooling on cutting temperature , cutting forces , chip behavior , shear angle , when alloy steel EN-8 and aluminum alloy 6061-T89 was machined by carbide cutting tool (coated & uncoated & applying liquid nitrogen as a coolant and observed that temperature was decreased during the machining process about 16% to 27% and cutting forces improved to 13%when the machining was performed , the same without cooling of EN-8 alloy, similarly on the other hand in case of aluminum alloy 6061-T89 , temperature was decreased to 25% to 37% and cutting force improved to 9% .

  13. Cooling Performance of an Impingement Cooling Device Combined with Pins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongliang QUAN; Songling LIU; Jianghai LI; Gaowen LIU

    2005-01-01

    Experimental study and one dimensional model analysis were conducted to investigate cooling performance of an integrated impingement and pin fin cooling device. A typical configuration specimen was made and tested in a large scale low speed closed-looped wind tunnel. Detailed two-dimensional contour maps of the temperature and cooling effectiveness were obtained for different pressure ratios and therefore different coolant flow-rates through the tested specimen. The experimental results showed that very high cooling effectiveness can be achieved by this cooling device with relatively small amount of coolant flow. Based on the theory of transpiration cooling in porous material, a one dimensional heat transfer model was established to analyze the effect of various parameters on cooling effectiveness. It was found from this model that the variation of heat transfer on the gas side, including heat transfer coefficient and film cooling effectiveness, of the specimen created much more effect on its cooling effectiveness than that of the coolant side. The predictions of the one-dimensional mode were compared and agreed well with the experimental data.

  14. Behavior of cooling jet in the lateral injection in film cooling. 1st Report. ; Time-averaged velocity and temperature field. Span hoko ni fukidasu makureikyaku ni okeru reikyaku kuki no kyodo. 1. ; Jikan heikin sokudoba to ondoba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchiyama, A. (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Yamamoto, M. (Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan)); Shizawa, T.; Honami, S. (Science University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1994-02-25

    In order to improve the gas turbine blade film cooling technology, this paper elucidates flow field and temperature field of secondary air blown out into a span direction; derives the temperature distribution on the wall face; and describes cooling air behavior in film cooling. The wall face temperature distribution measured with a temperature measuring system using liquid crystal has shown relatively good correspondence with the temperature distribution in the vicinity of the wall face as measured by a two-wire probe. Film cooling by blowing air into the span direction has shown good attachment of the secondary air onto the wall face in the secondary air blowing direction. However, in the opposite direction to the air blowing direction, air has attached to the wall face only poorly because of vortex movements of the primary air due to being dragged in. The secondary air has departed from the wall face as the blow-out ratio has been increased, resulting in drop in the cooling efficiency. A 'Z' direction position that the temperature of the secondary air shows a maximum value differs from a 'Z' direction position having a peak in the wall face cooling efficiency, the difference having become more noticeable with increasing blow-out ratio. A region with lower cooling efficiency due to rolling-in of the primary air exists near the blow-out hole, where rolling-in of the primary air is recognized prominently as the blow-out ratio has been increased. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Effects of polyethylene film wrap on cooler shrink and the microbial status of beef carcasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Guilherme S L; Pflanzer-Júnior, Sérgio B; Roça, Roberto de O; Casagrande, Leandro; Bedeschi, Elaine A; Padovani, Carlos R; Miguel, Giulianna Z; Santos, Carolina T; Girão, Lucio V C; Miranda, Zander B; Franco, Robson M

    2015-02-01

    The present study evaluated the use of polyethylene film wrapping of beef half carcasses and its effects on cooler shrink, cooling characteristics and microbial status of the half carcasses. Film wrapping reduced cooler shrink by 55.2%, 43.1%, 36.0% and 30% after 24, 48, 72 and 96 h of cooling, respectively, compared to the unwrapped half carcasses, whereas the surface water activity showed no significant differences among the time periods. The wrapped half carcasses had a lower cooling rate and higher surface and internal temperatures. The highest values of the aerobic mesophiles, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacteriaceae were found in the half carcasses wrapped in film. No significant differences were found in the values of Escherichia coli. The polyethylene film was effective in reducing cooler shrink; however, it caused a delay in cooling, thereby enabling greater microbial occurrences and counts and impairing the hygienic and sanitary conditions of the carcasses, which may be an impediment to the practical application of this technology.

  16. Polarization Gradient Cooling by Zeeman-Effect-Assisted Saturated Absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Shun-Li; CHENG Bing; ZHANG Jiag-Fang; XU Yun-Fei; WANG Zhao-Ying; LIN Qiang

    2009-01-01

    A novel and simple method to realize polarization gradient cooling(PGC)is reported.The stabilizing,shifting and rapid tuning of the frequency of the external cavity diode laser is realized by using the Zeeman-effect-assisted Doppler-free saturated absorption technique.Based on this convenient technique,~(87)Rb cold atoms are captured from room-temperature background vapor in the magneto-optical trap(MOT).Meanwhile,the steady-state number,the density and the lifetime of atoms in the MOT are measured.Subsequently,a frequency-fast-varying circuit is designed to realize PGC,which is demonstrated effectively and reliably in experiments.The temperature of the cold atom cloud is measured by two different methods,which coincide with each other.

  17. Black carbon reduction will weaken the aerosol net cooling effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. L. Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC, a distinct type of carbonaceous material formed from the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass based fuels under certain conditions, can interact with solar radiation and clouds through its strong light-absorption ability, thereby warming the Earth's climate system. Some studies have even suggested that global warming could be slowed down in a short term by eliminating BC emission due to its short lifetime. In this study, we estimate the influence of removing some sources of BC and other co-emitted species on the aerosol radiative effect by using an aerosol-climate coupled model BCC_AGCM2.0.1_CUACE/Aero, in combination with the aerosol emissions from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs scenarios. We find that the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA will be enhanced by 0.12 W m−2 compared with present-day conditions if the BC emission is reduced exclusively to the level projected for 2100 based on the RCP2.6 scenario. This will be beneficial for the mitigation of global warming. However, the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the TOA will be weakened by 1.7–2.0 W m−2 relative to present-day conditions if emissions of BC and co-emitted sulfur dioxide and organic carbon are simultaneously reduced as the most close conditions to the actual situation to the level projected for 2100 in different ways based on the RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5 scenarios. Because there are no effective ways to remove the BC exclusively without influencing the other co-emitted components, our results therefore indicate that a reduction in BC emission can lead to an unexpected warming on the Earth's climate system in the future.

  18. Experimental Study of the Cooling of Electrical Components Using Water Film Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Harmand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat and mass transfer, which occur in the evaporation of a falling film of water, are studied experimentally. This evaporation allows the dissipation of the heat flux produced by twelve resistors, which simulate electrical components on the back side of an aluminium plate. On the front side of the plate, a falling film of water flows by the action of gravity. An inverse heat conduction model, associated with a spatial regularisation, was developed and produces the local heat fluxes on the plate using the measured temperatures. The efficiency of this evaporative process has been studied with respect to several parameters: imposed heat flux, inlet mass flow rate, and geometry. A comparison of the latent and sensible fluxes used to dissipate the imposed heat flux was studied in the case of a plexiglass sheet in front of the falling film at different distances from the aluminium plate.

  19. Convective Heat Transfer with and without Film Cooling in High Temperature, Fuel Rich and Lean Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    the test section, a metal sleeve was placed around the entire ceramic transition as seen at the bottom left of Fig. 3.4. Despite the structural...Wade, W. R. Measurements of Total Hemispherical Emissivity of Several Stably Oxidized Metals and Some Refractory Oxide Coatings. Technical report...materials. Ceramics are capable of withstanding the high Taw condition but crack after repeated heating and cooling cycles. Thus, ceramics not viable in

  20. The Effects of δ Meson on the Neutron Star Cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许妍; 刘广洲; 吴姚睿; 朱明枫; 喻孜; 王红岩; 赵恩广

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the relativistic mean field theory, the isovector scalar interaction is considered by exchanging δ meson to study the influence of δ meson on the cooling properties of neutron star matter. The calculation results show that with the inclusion of δ meson, the neutrino emissivity of the direct Urca processes increases, and thus enhances the cooling of neutron star matter. When strong proton superfluidity is considered, the theoretical cooling curves agree with the observed thermal radiation for isolated neutron stars.

  1. Effect of Mixed Corrosion Inhibitors in Cooling Water System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Raheem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of mixed corrosion inhibitors in cooling system was evaluated by using carbon steel specimens and weight loss analysis. The carbon steel specimens immersed in mixture of sodium phosphate (Na2 HPO4 used as corrosion inhibitor and sodium glocunate (C6 H11 NaO7 as a scale dispersant at different concentrations (20,40, 60, 80 ppm and at different temperature (25,50,75 and 100ºC for (1-5 days. The corrosion inhibitors efficiency was calculated by using uninhibited and inhibited water to give 98.1%. The result of these investigations indicate that the corrosion rate decreases with the increase the corrosion inhibitors concentration at 80 ppm and at 100ºC for 5 days, (i.e, corrosion rate= 0.014gmd.

  2. Anomalous Hall effect in polycrystalline Ni films

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing

    2012-02-01

    We systematically studied the anomalous Hall effect in a series of polycrystalline Ni films with thickness ranging from 4 to 200 nm. It is found that both the longitudinal and anomalous Hall resistivity increased greatly as film thickness decreased. This enhancement should be related to the surface scattering. In the ultrathin films (46 nm thick), weak localization corrections to anomalous Hall conductivity were studied. The granular model, taking into account the dominated intergranular tunneling, has been employed to explain this phenomenon, which can explain the weak dependence of anomalous Hall resistivity on longitudinal resistivity as well. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of segmental, localized lower limb cooling on dynamic balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Roger E; Hartley, Geoffrey L; Tyler, Christopher J; Cheung, Stephen S

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of cooling progressively greater portions of the lower extremities on dynamic balance and neuromuscular activation. Ten healthy males (22.8 ± 3.4 yr, 76.5 ± 9.1 kg) performed one room air temperature control (22.4°C ± 0.8°C) and three trials of cold water immersion at 12°C (lateral malleolus, ankle; lateral femoral epicondyle, knee; anterior superior iliac spine, hip) for 10 min before performing a unipedal balance test (Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT)) with their dominant limb. Muscle activation of the vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and lateral gastrocnemius was measured with surface EMG during the SEBT. Core temperature remained euthermic throughout all trials. Gastrocnemius temperature decreased from control (30.4°C ± 0.5°C) with knee (23.7°C ± 1.7°C) and hip immersion (22.4°C ± 1.0°C), whereas vastus lateralis temperature decreased from control (33.7°C ± 1.7°C) with hip immersion (27.3°C ± 2.0°C) (P Cold water immersion influenced mean anterior and posterior reach distance on the SEBT in a dose-dependent fashion. Compared with those in control, mean anterior and posterior SEBT reach distances were not decreased with ankle (-1.38% and -0.74%, respectively) and knee immersion (-2.48% and -2.74%), whereas hip immersion significantly reduced SEBT by 4.73% and 4.05% (P Muscle activation was largely unaffected as the lower extremities were cooled, with only the lateral gastrocnemius during the anterior SEBT approaching a decrease (P = 0.059). Cooling larger portions of the lower extremities progressively affect dynamic balance, and thermal protection strategies should focus on maintaining temperature in the large muscle mass of the thigh.

  4. Alginate-magnesium aluminum silicate composite films: effect of film thickness on physical characteristics and permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2008-01-04

    The different film thicknesses of the sodium alginate-magnesium aluminum silicate (SA-MAS) microcomposite films were prepared by varying volumes of the composite dispersion for casting. Effect of film thickness on thermal behavior, solid-state crystallinity, mechanical properties, water uptake and erosion, and water vapor and drug permeability of the microcomposite films were investigated. The film thickness caused a small change in thermal behavior of the films when tested using DSC and TGA. The crystallinity of the thin films seemed to increase when compared with the thick films. The thin films gave higher tensile strength than the thick films, whereas % elongation of the films was on the contrary resulted in the lower Young's modulus of the films when the film thickness was increased. This was due to the weaker of the film bulk, suggesting that the microscopic matrix structure of the thick films was looser than that of the thin films. Consequently, water uptake and erosion, water vapor permeation and drug diffusion coefficient of the thick films were higher than those of the thin films. The different types of drug on permeability of the films also showed that a positive charge and large molecule of drug, propranolol HCl, had higher lag time and lower diffusion coefficient that acetaminophen, a non-electrolyte and small molecule. This was because of a higher affinity of positive charge drug on MAS in the films. The findings suggest that the evaporation rate of solvent in different volumes of the composite dispersion used in the preparation method could affect crystallinity and strength of the film surface and film bulk of the microcomposite films. This led to a change in water vapor and drug permeability of the films.

  5. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  6. Secondary pyroelectric and electrocaloric effects in thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Trong

    The pyroelectric and electrocaloric effect play an important role in many applications such as energy harvesting and solid-state cooling. This dissertation focuses on the characterization of the pyroelectric and electric coefficient in thin film using novel laser-based technique. The implementation of the systems is described in detail, and heat transport models are developed to interpret the experimental data. The temperature oscillation caused by the modulated laser power or the entropy change are calculated over a wide range of the modulation frequency. These techniques are applied to characterize Pb(ZrTi)O3 and Ba(SrTi)O3 films growth by Pulse Laser Deposition (PLD) and sol-gel method. The secondary pyroelectric and electrocaloric contributions caused by clamping substrate effect are discussed. A wide range frequency analysis is applied to extract the secondary pyroelectric coefficient. The secondary pyroelectric effect is found to have the same dependence on applied field as the pyroelectric coefficient and is approximately 15% and 20% of the total response for PbZr 0.2Ti0.8O3 and Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO 3 grown by PLD, respectively. By comparing the pyroelectric and electrocaloric coefficient measured on the same devices, our result shows the secondary contribution to the electrocaloric coefficient has the opposite sign as the primary effect and therefore reduces the overall entropy change of Pb(ZrTi)O3 in an electric field. Finally, the sol-gel method is used to produce Pb(ZrTi)O 3 thin films. The sample fabrication is described in detail along with physical characterization and the pyroelectric measurement. Sol-gel PZT films are perovskite phase with (100) orientation. The pyroelectric coefficient is measured to be 135 microC m-2 K-1.

  7. Degradation of thermal barrier coatings on an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) simulated film-cooled turbine vane pressure surface due to particulate fly ash deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kevin

    Coal synthesis gas (syngas) can introduce contaminants into the flow of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) industrial gas turbine which can form molten deposits onto components of the first stage of a turbine. Research is being conducted at West Virginia University (WVU) to study the effects of particulate deposition on thermal barrier coatings (TBC) employed on the airfoils of an IGCC turbine hot section. WVU had been working with U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to simulate deposition on the pressure side of an IGCC turbine first stage vane to study the effects on film cooling. To simulate the particulate deposition, TBC coated, angled film-cooled test articles were subjected to accelerated deposition injected into the flow of a combustor facility with a pressure of approximately 4 atm and a gas temperature of 1560 K. The particle characteristics between engine conditions and laboratory are matched using the Stokes number and particulate loading. To investigate the degradation on the TBC from the particulate deposition, non-destructive evaluations were performed using a load-based multiple-partial unloading micro-indentation technique and were followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluation and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) examinations. The micro-indentation technique used in the study was developed by Kang et al. and can quantitatively evaluate the mechanical properties of materials. The indentation results found that the Young's Modulus of the ceramic top coat is higher in areas with deposition formation due to the penetration of the fly ash. The increase in the modulus of elasticity has been shown to result in a reduction of strain tolerance of the 7% yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) TBC coatings. The increase in the Young's modulus of the ceramic top coat is due to the stiffening of the YSZ columnar microstructure from the cooled particulate fly ash. SEM evaluation was used to

  8. Numerical modelling of lawsonite thin film as radiative cooling minerals for dew harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlattar, M.; Laatioui, S.; Oualim, E. M.; Mazroui, M.; Mouhsen, A.; Harmouchi, M.

    Harvesting dew can be used as a renewable complementary source of water both for drinking and agriculture in specific arid or semi-arid water-stressed areas. Condensation of water vapor by nighttime radiative cooling is the phenomenon that can be explained the dew formation on plants or surfaces. In this paper, we propose the lawsonite mineral, as a potential radiative cooling material, for exploiting this natural phenomenon. Furthermore, a computer model that includes meteorological parameters, obtained from the coastal region of Southern Morrocco (Mirleft-South of Agadir), is used to determine the thermal balance and fit to dew mass evolution. In order to form global estimates of dew formation potential via our dew formation model, we combined different meteorological data with radiative properties of natural lawsonite condenser (CaAl2Si2O7(OH)2·H2O) to enhance the modelled dew yield. The daily modelled yields show that significant amounts of dew water can be calculated as a function of the condenser temperature, the thickness condenser as well as the wind speed.

  9. Internal target effects in ion storage rings with beam cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gostishchev, Vitaly

    2008-06-15

    The accurate description of internal target effects is important for the prediction of operation conditions which are required for experiments in the planned storage rings of the FAIR facility. The BETACOOL code developed by the Dubna group has been used to evaluate beam dynamics in ion storage rings, where electron cooling in combination with an internal target is applied. Systematic benchmarking experiments of this code were carried out at the ESR storage ring at GSI. A mode with vanishing dispersion in the target position was applied to evaluate the influence of the dispersion function on the parameters when the target is heating the beam. The influence of the internal target on the beam parameters is demonstrated in the present work. A comparison of experimental results with simple models describing the energy loss of the beam particles in the target as well as with more sophisticated simulations with the BETACOOL code is given. In order to study the conditions which can be achieved in the proposed experiments the simulation results were quantitatively compared with experimental results and simulations for the ESR. The results of this comparison are discussed in the present thesis. BETACOOL simulations of target effects were performed for the NESR and the HESR of the future FAIR facility in order to predict the beam parameters for the planned experiments. (orig.)

  10. Local cooling and warming effects of forests based on satellite observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhao, Maosheng; Motesharrei, Safa; Mu, Qiaozhen; Kalnay, Eugenia; Li, Shuangcheng

    2015-03-31

    The biophysical effects of forests on climate have been extensively studied with climate models. However, models cannot accurately reproduce local climate effects due to their coarse spatial resolution and uncertainties, and field observations are valuable but often insufficient due to their limited coverage. Here we present new evidence acquired from global satellite data to analyse the biophysical effects of forests on local climate. Results show that tropical forests have a strong cooling effect throughout the year; temperate forests show moderate cooling in summer and moderate warming in winter with net cooling annually; and boreal forests have strong warming in winter and moderate cooling in summer with net warming annually. The spatiotemporal cooling or warming effects are mainly driven by the two competing biophysical effects, evapotranspiration and albedo, which in turn are strongly influenced by rainfall and snow. Implications of our satellite-based study could be useful for informing local forestry policies.

  11. Cost-effectiveness analysis of scalp cooling to reduce chemotherapy-induced alopecia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hurk, C.J.; van den Akker-van Marle, E.M.; Breed, W.P.M.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; Nortier, J.; Coebergh, J.W.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Alopecia is a frequently occurring side effect of chemotherapy that often can be prevented by cooling the scalp during the infusion. This study compared effects and costs of scalp cooling with usual general oncological care, i.e. purchasing a wig or head cover. Material and methods.

  12. Effects of Deep Cooling and Re-Warming on Ionotropic Glutamatergic Receptors In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrushin, A A

    2016-05-01

    We studied the effects of cooling to -10°C and re-warming to 37°C on slices of rat olfactory cortex. The amplitudes of action potential in the lateral olfactory tract and excitatory postsynaptic potential activated by AMPA recovered during slow cooling/re-warming (0.1°C/min), while during rapid cooling/re-warming (9°C/min), they surpassed the control values. NMDA receptor-dependent mechanism was blocked in both cooling/re-warming modes. Swelling of the brain slices was observed during re-warming, especially during rapid cooling/re-warming. Nerve fibers of the lateral olfactory tract and AMPA-related processes survived deep cooling/re-warming, while NMDA-related processes were irreversibly blocked.

  13. Effect of cooling rate on the microstructure and properties of FeCrVC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleckmann, M., E-mail: MatthiasBleckmann@bundeswehr.org [WIWeB, Institutsweg 1, D-85435 Erding (Germany); Gleinig, J.; Hufenbach, J.; Wendrock, H. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 27 01 16, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Giebeler, L. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 27 01 16, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institute of Materials Science, Helmholtzstraße 7, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Zeisig, J. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 27 01 16, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Diekmann, U. [Metatech GmbH, Lünener Straße 211/212, D-59174 Kamen (Germany); Eckert, J. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 27 01 16, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institute of Materials Science, Helmholtzstraße 7, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Kühn, U. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 27 01 16, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Effect of cooling rate on microstructure and microhardness of newly developed steel. • Intensive study of DSC measurements was done including different cooling rates. • Examinations by XRD, EDS and EBSD as well as microhardness on the DSC samples. • Matrix phase changes with cooling rates from ferrit to martensite. • Thermodynamic calculations of solidification process shows good agreement. - Abstract: In this work a systematic investigation of the influence of the cooling rate on the microstructure and properties of a newly developed Fe92.7Cr4.2V2.1C1 (FeCrVC) tool steel is presented. By applying a tailored casting process and sufficiently high cooling rates excellent mechanical properties are obtained for the presented alloy already in the as-cast state. Since no subsequent heat treatment is required, the cooling parameters applied during the casting process play a key role with respect to the evolving microstructure and resulting properties. In the present publication the effect of the cooling rate on the microstructure and properties of as-solidified FeCrVC was investigated. By using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), several samples were heated up and cooled with continuous rates of 3–50 K/min. The received DSC data was used to investigate the alloy’s solidification and phase transformation behavior. Subsequently, these samples were studied regarding their properties and microstructure by different analysis methods (EDX/WDX, EBSD, XRD). With increasing cooling rates the liquidus and solidus temperature are lowered, whereas the solidification interval is enlarged. A higher cooling rate is accompanied by a lower solidification time which results in a refinement of the dendritic microstructure. Furthermore, with rising cooling rates the microhardness increased. This provides the opportunity to make predictions from the applied cooling parameters upon the hardness and vice versa and enables one to draw first conclusions on the

  14. Desiccant aging and its effect on desiccant cooling system performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belding, W.A. [Innovative Research Enterprises, Danville, CA (United States); Delmas, M.P.F.; Holeman, W.D. [LaRoche Industries Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Desiccants used for the purpose of space conditioning or enthalpy transfer can be subjected to hundreds of thousands of adsorption/regeneration cycles over their useful life. Studying the loss of a desiccant`s equilibrium water adsorption capacity after exposure to thermal cycling is a common method for quantifying desiccant aging. Since isotherm shape and desiccant capacity can be related to overall cooling-system performance, system cooling capacity and coefficients of performance over time can be predicted. Adsorption isotherms for several different desiccants have been determined after subjecting the materials to varying numbers of thermal cycles in a specially designed test unit capable of adsorption/desorption cycling every 10 min. Aging curves for a new Type 1M desiccant developed specifically for desiccant cooling applications by LaRoche Industries Inc. are compared to other commonly used desiccants. (author)

  15. Fabrication processing effects on the microstructure and morphology of erbium film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Hua-Hai; Peng Shu-Ming; Long Xing-Gui; Zhou Xiao-Song; Yang Li; Liu Jin-Hua; Sun Qing-Qiang; Zu Xiao-Tao

    2012-01-01

    The effect of substrate temperature on the microstructure and the morphology of erbium film are systematically investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).All the erbium films are grown by electron-beam vapor deposition (EBVD).A novel preparation method for observing the cross-section morphology of the erbium film is developed.The films deposited at 200 ℃ have (002) preferred orientation,and the films deposited at 450 ℃ have a mixed (100) and (101) texture,due to the different growth mechanisms of surface energy minimization and recrystallization,respectively.The peak positions and the full widths at half maximum (FWHMs) of erbium diffraction lines (100),(002),and (101) shift towards higher angles and decrease with the increasing substrate temperature in a largely uniform manner,respectively.Also,the lattice constants decrease with increasing temperature.The transition in the film stresses can be used to interpret the changes in peak positions,FWHMs,and lattice constants.The stress is compressive for the as-growth films,and is counteracted by the tensile strees formed during the process of temperature cooling to room temperature.The tensile stress mainly originates from the difference in the coefficients of thermal expansion of the substrate-film couple.

  16. Bauschinger effect in unpassivated freestanding thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shishvan, S.S.; Nicola, L.; Van der Giessen, E.

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) discrete dislocation plasticity simulations are carried out to investigate the Bauschinger effect (BE) in freestanding thin films. The BE in plastic flow of polycrystalline materials is generally understood to be caused by inhomogeneous deformation during loading, leading to res

  17. Application of computational fluid dynamics to the design of the film cooled STME subscale nozzle for the National Launch System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    The status of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations for the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) film/dump cooled nozzle design is presented, with an emphasis on the timely impact of CFD on the design of the sub-scale nozzle coolant system. The following aspects of the sub-scale coolant delivery system were analyzed with CFD: 1) a design trade study of a mechanical flow splitting device for uniform distribution of the subsonic cavity flow, 2) a design trade study of the subsonic cavity lip to achieve film integrity, and 3) an analysis of the primary flow interaction with the core/secondary coolant streams. All design calculations were performed with the Generalized Aerodynamic Simulation Program (GASP), a 3-D, multi-block, generalized Navier-Stokes code capable of solving with frozen, finite-rate or equilibrium chemical kinetics. The initial design of the subsonic cavity flow used square posts to distribute the sonic orifice jets into a uniform flow. Calculations for this design indicated that an unacceptable mal-distribution of film occurred. Design modifications involving curved and slotted posts were computed in an effort to uniformly distribute the secondary coolant flow. Analysis of these configurations showed that although the flowfield improved in uniformity, it was still unacceptable, especially at higher feed pressures. Results from these studies were then incorporated into a design that resulted in the insertion of a porous metal ring into the subsonic cavity. Subsequent water flow model studies showed that this concept was successful in uniformly distributing flow exiting the cavity. In addition to the design of the subsonic cavity, CFD was also used to analyze the secondary coolant lip and the primary flow interaction with the core/secondary coolant streams. A series of calculations were first performed to modify the subsonic cavity lip contour. The flow over the modified lip was then computed simultaneously with the primary injectors to

  18. The effectiveness of cooling conditions on temperature of canine EDTA whole blood samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M. Tobias

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Preanalytic factors such as time and temperature can have significant effects on laboratory test results. For example, ammonium concentration will increase 31% in blood samples stored at room temperature for 30 min before centrifugation. To reduce preanalytic error, blood samples may be placed in precooled tubes and chilled on ice or in ice water baths; however, the effectiveness of these modalities in cooling blood samples has not been formally evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of various cooling modalities on reducing temperature of EDTA whole blood samples. Methods Pooled samples of canine EDTA whole blood were divided into two aliquots. Saline was added to one aliquot to produce a packed cell volume (PCV of 40% and to the second aliquot to produce a PCV of 20% (simulated anemia. Thirty samples from each aliquot were warmed to 37.7 °C and cooled in 2 ml allotments under one of three conditions: in ice, in ice after transfer to a precooled tube, or in an ice water bath. Temperature of each sample was recorded at one minute intervals for 15 min. Results Within treatment conditions, sample PCV had no significant effect on cooling. Cooling in ice water was significantly faster than cooling in ice only or transferring the sample to a precooled tube and cooling it on ice. Mean temperature of samples cooled in ice water was significantly lower at 15 min than mean temperatures of those cooled in ice, whether or not the tube was precooled. By 4 min, samples cooled in an ice water bath had reached mean temperatures less than 4 °C (refrigeration temperature, while samples cooled in other conditions remained above 4.0 °C for at least 11 min. For samples with a PCV of 40%, precooling the tube had no significant effect on rate of cooling on ice. For samples with a PCV of 20%, transfer to a precooled tube resulted in a significantly faster rate of cooling than direct placement of the warmed tube onto ice

  19. The effectiveness of cooling conditions on temperature of canine EDTA whole blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Karen M; Serrano, Leslie; Sun, Xiaocun; Flatland, Bente

    2016-01-01

    Preanalytic factors such as time and temperature can have significant effects on laboratory test results. For example, ammonium concentration will increase 31% in blood samples stored at room temperature for 30 min before centrifugation. To reduce preanalytic error, blood samples may be placed in precooled tubes and chilled on ice or in ice water baths; however, the effectiveness of these modalities in cooling blood samples has not been formally evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of various cooling modalities on reducing temperature of EDTA whole blood samples. Pooled samples of canine EDTA whole blood were divided into two aliquots. Saline was added to one aliquot to produce a packed cell volume (PCV) of 40% and to the second aliquot to produce a PCV of 20% (simulated anemia). Thirty samples from each aliquot were warmed to 37.7 °C and cooled in 2 ml allotments under one of three conditions: in ice, in ice after transfer to a precooled tube, or in an ice water bath. Temperature of each sample was recorded at one minute intervals for 15 min. Within treatment conditions, sample PCV had no significant effect on cooling. Cooling in ice water was significantly faster than cooling in ice only or transferring the sample to a precooled tube and cooling it on ice. Mean temperature of samples cooled in ice water was significantly lower at 15 min than mean temperatures of those cooled in ice, whether or not the tube was precooled. By 4 min, samples cooled in an ice water bath had reached mean temperatures less than 4 °C (refrigeration temperature), while samples cooled in other conditions remained above 4.0 °C for at least 11 min. For samples with a PCV of 40%, precooling the tube had no significant effect on rate of cooling on ice. For samples with a PCV of 20%, transfer to a precooled tube resulted in a significantly faster rate of cooling than direct placement of the warmed tube onto ice. Canine EDTA whole blood samples cool most

  20. Investigation the positive moments on the M-T curve of YBCO films measured by using zero-field cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭树权; 王凤林; 周岳亮; 赵柏儒; 高炬

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting transition of a YBCO film was measured by a MPMS-5 superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer, using a zero-field cooling process. The experimental results have shown that there are positive magnetic moment and positive peak on the M-T curve. We have proven that these anomalous behaviours are due to measurement error, but not phase transition. We have proposed a simple formula to explain and to calculate quantitatively these anomalous behaviours. It was found that, provided dH > 0.59Hp (dH is the inhomogeneous field of the remnant field, Hp is the fully penetrated field of the measured sample), the experimental results will be positive,not negative.If dH ≥ 2Hp, the experimental results will be symmetrical to their real negative values. From the M-T curve, which h as positive moment and positive peak below Tc (superconducting transition temperature), we found a new possible method to obtain Hp of the measured sample.

  1. Summer and Winter Effect of Innovative Cool Roof Tiles on the Dynamic Thermal Behavior of Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Laura Pisello

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cool roofs represent an acknowledged passive cooling technique to reduce building energy consumption for cooling and to mitigate urban heat island effects. This paper concerns the evaluation of the dynamic effect of new cool roof clay tiles on building thermal performance in summer and winter conditions. To this end, these properties have been analyzed on traditional roof brick tiles through an indoor and outdoor two-year long continuous monitoring campaign set up in a residential building located in central Italy. The analysis and the cooperation with industrial companies producing brick tiles and reflective coatings allowed the production of a new tile with notable “cool roof” properties through the traditional industrial manufacturing path of such tiles. Notable results show that during summer the high reflection tiles are able to decrease the average external roof surface temperature by more than 10 °C and the indoor operative temperature by more than 3 °C. During winter the average external surface temperature is lower with high reflection tiles by about 1 °C. Singular optic-thermal phenomena are registered while evaluating the dynamics of the cool roof effect. Interesting findings show how the sloped cool roof application could suggest further considerations about the dynamic effect of cool roofs.

  2. Effect of floor cooling on farrowing sow and litter performance: Field experiment under Dutch conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenberg, van A.V.; Peet-Schwering, van der C.M.C.; Binnendijk, G.P.; Claessen, P.J.P.W.

    2006-01-01

    Lactating sows generally have problems dissipating their body heat to the environment. Cooling the floor under the sow¿s shoulder, called the cool-sow system, is a method to increase body heat removal by conduction, thereby contributing to the thermal comfort of the sow. In this study, the effect of

  3. Effect of temperature, chloride ions and sulfide ions on the electrochemical properties of 316L stainless steel in simulated cooling water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jinbo; Zhai Wen; Zheng Maosheng; Zhu Jiewu

    2008-01-01

    The influence of temperature, chloride ions and sulfide ions on the anticorrosion behavior of 316L stainless steel in simulated cooling water was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and anodic polarization curves. The results show that the film resistance increases with the solution temperature but decreases after 8 days' immersion, which indicates that the film formed at higher temperature has inferior anticorrosion behavior; Chloride ions and sulfide ions have remarkable effects on the electrochemical property of 316L stainless steel in simulated cooling water and the pitting potential declines with the concentration of chloride ions; the passivation current has no obvious effect; the rise of the concentration of sulfide ions obviously increases the passivation current, but the pitting potential changes little, which indicates that the two types of ions may have different effects on destructing passive film of stainless steel. The critical concentration of chloride ions causing anodic potential curve's change in simulated cooling water is 250 mg/L for 316 L stainless. The effect of sulfide ions on the corrosion resistance behavior of stainless steel is increasing the passivation current density Ip. The addition of 6mg/L sulfide ions to the solution makes Ip of 316 L increase by 0.5 times.

  4. Effect of cooling on Clostridium perfringens in pea soup

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.E.I.; Rombouts, F.M.; Beumer, R.R.

    2004-01-01

    Foods associated with Clostridium perfringens outbreaks are usually abused after cooking. Because of their short generation times, C. perfringens spores and cells can grow out to high levels during improper cooling. Therefore, the potential of C. perfringens to multiply in Dutch pea soup during diff

  5. Analytical model of transient thermal effect on convectional cooled end-pumped laser rod

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Khalid S Shibib; Mohammad A Munshid; Kadim A Hubiter

    2013-10-01

    The transient analytical solutions of temperature distribution, stress, strain and optical path difference in convectional cooled end-pumped laser rod are derived. The results are compared with other works and good agreements are found. The effects of increasing the edge cooling and face cooling are studied. It is found that an increase in the edge cooling has significant effect on reducing the maximum temperature that can be reached in the laser rod but it has no effect on the value of optical path difference. It is also found that increasing this type of cooling significantly reduces the time required to reach the thermal equilibrium with a slight increase in the max. tensile hoop stress that can be reached as the cooling increases. On the other hand, increase in face cooling reduces the response time, optical path difference and the maximum temperature that can be reached in the laser rod but a significant increase in the max. tensile hoop stress is observed. A matching between the advantages of these two type of cooling may be useful for a designer.

  6. Shark skin effect in creeping films

    CERN Document Server

    Scholle, M

    2006-01-01

    If a body in a stream is provided with small ridges aligned in the local flow direction, a remarkable drag reduction can be reached under turbulent flow conditions. This surprising phenomenon is called the 'shark skin effect'. We demonstrate, that a reduction of resistance can also be reached in creeping flows if the ridges are aligned perpendicular to the flow direction. We especially consider in gravity-driven film flows the effect of the bottom topography on the mean transport velocity.

  7. Cooling flow bulk motion corrections to the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, P M; Puy, D; Jetzer, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    We study the influence of converging cooling flow bulk motions on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. To that purpose we derive a modified Kompaneets equation which takes into account the contribution of the accelerated electron media of the cooling flow inside the cluster frame. The additional term is different from the usual kinematic SZ-effect, which depends linearly on the velocity, whereas the contribution described here is quadratic in the macroscopic electron fluid velocity, as measured in the cluster frame. For clusters with a large cooling flow mass deposition rate and/or a small central electron density, it turns out that this effect becomes relevant.

  8. THE INFLUENCE OF WAVE PATTERNS AND FREQUENCY ON THERMO-ACOUSTIC COOLING EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN BAIMAN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing environmental challenges, the search for an environmentally benign cooling technology that has simple and robust architecture continues. Thermo-acoustic refrigeration seems to be a promising candidate to fulfil these requirements. In this study, a simple thermo-acoustic refrigeration system was fabricated and tested. The thermo-acoustic refrigerator consists of acoustic driver (loudspeaker, resonator, stack, vacuum system and testing system. The effect of wave patterns and frequency on thermo-acoustic cooling effect was studied. It was found that a square wave pattern would yield superior cooling effects compared to other wave patterns tested.

  9. Effect of controlling parameters on heat transfer during spray impingement cooling of steel plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purna C. Mishra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of stationary steel plate was experimentally investigated. Experiments were conducted on an electrically heated flat stationary steel plate of dimension 120 mm x 120 mm x 4 mm. The controlling parameters taken during the experiments were airwater pressures, water flow rate, nozzle tip to target distance and mass impingement density. The effects of the controlling parameters on the cooling rates were critically examined during spray impingement cooling. Air assisted DM water was used as the quenchant media in the work. The cooling rates were calculated from the time dependent temperature profiles were recorded by NI-cRIO DAS at the desired locations of the bottom surface of the plate embedded with K-type thermocouples. By using MS-EXCEL the effects of these cooling rate parameters were analysed The results obtained in the study confirmed the higher efficiency of the spray cooling system and the cooling strategy was found advantageous over the conventional cooling methods in the present steel industries

  10. Numerical simulation of secondary vortex chamber effect on the cooling capacity enhancement of vortex tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmahmoud, Nader; Azar, Farid Sepehrian; Hassanzadeh, Amir

    2014-09-01

    A vortex tube with additional chamber is investigated by computational fluid mechanics techniques to realize the effects of additional chamber in Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube and to understand optimal length for placing the second chamber in order to have maximum cooling effect. Results show that by increasing the distance between two chambers, both minimum cold and maximum hot temperatures increase and maximum cooling effect occurs at Z/ L = 0.047 (dimensionless distance).

  11. Improved Thermoelectric Cooling Based on the Thomson Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Khanna, Raghav; Toberer, Eric S.; Heinz, Nicholas A.; Seifert, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Traditional thermoelectric Peltier coolers exhibit a cooling limit which is primarily determined by the figure of merit, zT. Rather than a fundamental thermodynamic limit, this bound can be traced to the difficulty of maintaining thermoelectric compatibility. Self-compatibility locally maximizes the cooler's coefficient of performance for a given zT and can be achieved by adjusting the relative ratio of the thermoelectric transport properties that make up zT. In this study, we investigate the...

  12. Improved thermoelectric cooling based on the Thomson effect

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Toberer, Eric S.; Khanna, Raghav; Seifert, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Traditional thermoelectric Peltier coolers exhibit a cooling limit which is primarily determined by the figure of merit, zT. Rather than a fundamental thermodynamic limit, this bound can be traced to the difficulty of maintaining thermoelectric compatibility. Self-compatibility locally maximizes the cooler's coefficient of performance for a given zT and can be achieved by adjusting the relative ratio of the thermoelectric transport properties that make up zT. In this study, we investigate the...

  13. Enhanced Transverse Magnetoresistive Effect in Semiconducting Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wan-Lu; LIAO Ke-Jun; WANG Bi-Ben

    2000-01-01

    A very large magnetoresistive effect in both homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial semiconducting diamond films by chemical vapor deposition has been observed. The changes in the resistance of the films strongly depend on both magnetic field intensity and geometric form of the samples. The effect of disk structure is greater than that of stripe type samples, also variation in the resistance of homoepitaxial diamond films is greater than that of eteroepitaxial diamond films. The resistance of homoepitaxial diamond films with the disk structure is increased y a factor of 2.1 at room temperature under magnetic field intensity of 5 T, but only 0.80 for heteroepitaxial diamond films.

  14. Effect of cryogenic cooling on corrosion of friction stir welded AA7010-T7651

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jariyaboon, Manthana; Davenport, A. J.; Ambat, Rajan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to study how cryogenic CO2 cooling during the welding process affects corrosion behaviour of friction stir welding (FSW) AA7010-T7651. Design/methodology/approach - Friction stir welded AA7010-17651 was produced with a rotation speed of 288 rpm and a travel...... a gel visualisation test and potentiodynamic polarisation measurements using a micro-electrochemical technique. Findings - The main corrosion region for both FSWs AA7010-T7651 produced with and without cryogenic CO2 cooling is in the HAZ region, which exhibited intergranular attack. Cryogenic cooling...... the nugget region of uncooled welds. Originality/value - There has been no previous work to investigate the effect of cryogenic CO2 cooling on the corrosion behaviour of FSW AA7010-T7651. The paper relates the microstructures of both uncooled and cooled welds to their anodic and cathodic reactivities using...

  15. Thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic: Effects of finite cooling rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihe Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a semi-analytical model to explore the effects of cooling rate on the thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic (FGC plate with a periodic array of edge cracks. The FGC is assumed to be a thermally heterogeneous material with constant elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio. The cooling rate applied at the FGC surface is modeled using a linear ramp function. An integral equation method and a closed form asymptotic temperature solution are employed to compute the thermal stress intensity factor (TSIF. The thermal shock residual strength and critical thermal shock of the FGC plate are obtained using the SIF criterion. Thermal shock simulations for an Al2O3/Si3N4 FGC indicate that a finite cooling rate leads to a significantly higher critical thermal shock than that under the sudden cooling condition. The residual strength, however, is relatively insensitive to the cooling rate.

  16. Effects of biocidal treatments to inhibit the growth of legionellae and other microorganisms in cooling towers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H; Ezaki, T; Ikedo, M; Yabuuchi, E

    1991-01-01

    The effects of biocidal treatments for cooling towers were examined through the use of chemicals and ultraviolet irradiation to inhibit the growth of legionellae and other microorganisms. In the water of cooling towers without continuous biocidal treatments, heterotrophic bacteria and bacterivorous protozoan first appeared, and then legionellae increased up to 10(4) CFU/100 ml. When a UV sterilizer was connected to the cooling tower, the legionellae count was 1/10 or 1/100 of that in the nontreated tower water. In the water of towers supplemented continuously with the biocidal chemicals, legionellae were not found during a 4-month period. The biocidal treatments tested were proved to suppress the increase of legionellae in cooling-tower water, and thus are useful in preventing the outbreak of legionellosis due to inhalation of contaminated aerosol from the cooling tower system.

  17. 多种气膜冷却形式下轴对称矢量喷管壁温计算研究%Numerical Study on Film Cooling and Wall Temperature of Vectored Axial-symmetric Nozzle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛航; 陈徐屹; 张小英

    2014-01-01

    The study on the cooling structure of vectoring nozzle is very essential for developing the vectoring propulsion technology in aero-engine .To study the cooling technology of the heat shield on the axial-symmetric vectoring nozzle with 20° deflection ,the heat balance equation based on heat transfer of nozzle has been devel-oped and solved with Newton-Rafael method to give wall temperature .Heat transfer of film cooling is computed with empirical formula of cooling effectiveness .And radiative heating from the gas is computed with net radia-tion analysis method in an enclosure .To verify the computation method ,wall temperature of a certain axial-symmetric nozzle in after burning condition is computed and compared with the results of reference .Study shows that the heat shield plays a good cooling part for convergent part of nozzle with film cooling reducing its temperature remarkably .Compared with convergent part of nozzle which is protected by the heat shield ,tem-perature of the divergent section of nozzle is much higher and needs further cooling .%航空发动机矢量喷管的冷却结构设计是研究矢量推进技术应用的关键问题之一。针对某偏转20°轴对称矢量喷管隔热屏采用的十种气膜冷却结构,建立基于壁面传热的热平衡方程,采用牛顿-拉斐尔森迭代法得出十种冷却结构下壁面及隔热屏的温度。其中气膜冷却采用有效温比经验公式计算,燃气辐射采用封闭腔净辐射分析法计算,并把本文计算的壁温与文献结果进行对比分析。结果表明:隔热屏对喷管收敛段有很好的冷却作用,采用气膜冷却可显著降低其温度;相对于受隔热屏保护的收敛段而言,喷管扩张段的受热形势较为严峻,温度更高,其冷却有待加强。

  18. Pulse-Width Dependence of the Cooling Effect on Sub-Micrometer ZnO Spherical Particle Formation by Pulsed-Laser Melting in a Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaki, Shota; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Yoshie; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2017-05-05

    Sub-micrometer spherical particles can be synthesized by irradiating particles in a liquid with a pulsed laser (pulse width: 10 ns). In this method, all of the laser energy is supposed to be spent on particle heating because nanosecond heating is far faster than particle cooling. To study the cooling effect, sub-micrometer spherical particles are fabricated by using a pulsed laser with longer pulse widths (50 and 70 ns). From the increase in the laser-fluence threshold for sub-micrometer spherical particle formation with increasing pulse width, it is concluded that the particles dissipate heat to the surrounding liquid, even during several tens of nanoseconds of heating. A particle heating-cooling model considering the cooling effect is developed to estimate the particle temperature during laser irradiation. This model suggests that the liquid surrounding the particles evaporates, and the generated vapor films suppress heat dissipation from the particles, resulting in efficient heating and melting of the particles in the liquid. In the case of small particle sizes and large pulse widths, the particles dissipate heat to the liquid without forming such vapor films. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Effect of film thickness on the phase behaviors of diblock copolymer thin film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jueun; Park, Hae-Woong; Lee, Sekyung; Lee, Hyojoon; Chang, Taihyun; Matsunaga, Kazuyuki; Jinnai, Hiroshi

    2010-06-22

    A phase diagram was constructed for a polystyrene-block-polyisoprene (PS-b-PI, M(W) = 32 700, f(PI) = 0.670) in thin films on Si wafer as a function of film thickness over the range of 150-2410 nm (7-107L(0) (L(0): domain spacing)). The PS-b-PI exhibits a variety of ordered phases from hexagonally perforated lamellar (HPL) via double gyroid (DG) to hexagonally packed cylinder (HEX) before going to the disordered (DIS) phase upon heating. The morphology of the PS-b-PI in thin film was investigated by grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and transmission electron microtomography. In thin film, the phase transition temperature is difficult to be determined unequivocally with in situ heating processes since the phase transition is slow and two phases coexist over a wide temperature range. Therefore, in an effort to find an "equilibrium" phase, we determined the long-term stable phase formed after cooling the film from the DIS phase to a target temperature and annealing for 24 h at the temperature. The temperature windows of stable ordered phases are strongly influenced by the film thickness. As the film thickness decreases, the temperature window of layer-like structures such as HPL and HEX becomes wider, whereas that of the DG stable region decreases. For the films thinner than 160 nm (8L(0)), only the HPL phase was found. In the films exhibiting DG phase, a perforated layer structure at the free surface was found, which gradually converts to the internal DG structure. The relief of interfacial tension by preferential wetting appears to play an important role in controlling the morphology in very thin films.

  20. Water mist effect on cooling range and efficiency of casting die

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Władysiak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This project is showing investigation results of cooling process of casting die in the temperature range 570÷100 °C with 0.40 MPa compressed air and water mist streamed under pressure 0.25÷0.45 MPa in air jet 0.25÷0.50 MPa using open cooling system.The character and the speed of changes of temperature, forming of the temperture’s gradient along parallel layer to cooled surface of die is shawing with thermal and derivative curves. The effect of kind of cooling factor on the temperature and time and distance from cooling nozzle is presented in the paper. A designed device for generating the water mist cooling the die and the view of sprying water stream is shown here. It’s proved that using of the water mist together with the change of heat transfer interface increases intensity of cooling in the zone and makes less the range cooling zone and reduces the porosity of cast microstructure.

  1. Piezoelectric properties and ferroelectric hysteresis effects in uniaxially stretched nylon-11 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, S. C.; Scheinbeim, J. I.; Newman, B. A.

    1984-11-01

    Oriented nylon-11 films initially quenched (delta-prime form) or slow cooled (alpha-prime form) from the melt and then subjected to a series of static positive and negative poling fields were found to show a hysteresislike behavior of the piezoelectric strain constant d31 and the piezoelectric stress constant e31. This behavior was very similar to that observed in poly(vinylidene fluoride) and attributed to ferroelectric dipole switching by Scheinbeim et al. (1980). No change in the X-ray diffraction patterns of the delta-prime films was observed after poling. Changes in the X-ray diffraction patterns of the alpha-prime films after poling were consistent with dipole reorientation in the crystalline regions. In both cases the magnitude of the piezoelectric response of the oriented films was considerably higher than that of the unoriented films. The melting points of the poled films increased significantly relative to those of the unpoled films with the same thermal history, which may suggest field-induced annealing effects.

  2. Numerical and experimental analysis of a thin liquid film on a rotating disk related to development of a spacecraft absorption cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghri, Amir; Swanson, Theodore D.

    1989-01-01

    The numerical and experimental analysis of a thin liquid film on a rotating and a stationary disk related to the development of an absorber unit for a high capacity spacecraft absorption cooling system, is described. The creation of artificial gravity by the use of a centrifugal field was focused upon in this report. Areas covered include: (1) One-dimensional computation of thin liquid film flows; (2) Experimental measurement of film height and visualization of flow; (3) Two-dimensional computation of the free surface flow of a thin liquid film using a pressure optimization method; (4) Computation of heat transfer in two-dimensional thin film flow; (5) Development of a new computational methodology for the free surface flows using a permeable wall; (6) Analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a thin film in the presence and absence of gravity; and (7) Comparison of theoretical prediction and experimental data. The basic phenomena related to fluid flow and heat transfer on rotating systems reported here can also be applied to other areas of space systems.

  3. Effects of a Novel Cooling Shirt on Various Physical Performance Parameters in Elite Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-03

    Dynamic warmup; total body lift, functional circuit on indoor turf Physiological variables including exercise HR, acceleration, HR variability, and...269-277. 9. Gordon NF, Bogdanffy GM, Wilkinson J. Effect of a practical neck cooling device on core temperature during exercise . Med Sci Sports ...operations and sport matches. The primary purpose of this short-term field observation was to determine the effects of a technical cooling shirt and

  4. Grain size and film thickness effect on the thermal expansion coefficient of FCC metallic thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seulgi; Kim, Youngman

    2011-08-01

    Thin films are used in wide range of applications in industry, such as solar cells and LEDs. When thin films are deposited on substrates, various stresses are generated due to the mechanical difference between the film and substrate. These stresses can cause defects, such as cracking and buckling. Therefore, knowledge of the mechanical properties is important for improving their reliability and stability. In this study, the thermal expansion coefficient of FCC metallic thin films, such as Ag and Cu, which have different grain sizes and thicknesses, were calculated using the thermal cycling method. As a result, thermal expansion coefficient increased with increasing grain size. However, the film thickness had no remarkable effect.

  5. The effectiveness of cool and green roofs as urban heat island mitigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Bou-Zeid, Elie; Oppenheimer, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Mitigation of the urban heat island (UHI) effect at the city-scale is investigated using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in conjunction with the Princeton Urban Canopy Model (PUCM). Specifically, the cooling impacts of green roof and cool (white/high-albedo) roof strategies over the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area during a heat wave period (7 June-10 June 2008) are assessed using the optimal set-up of WRF-PUCM described in the companion paper by Li and Bou-Zeid (2014). Results indicate that the surface UHI effect (defined based on the urban-rural surface temperature difference) is reduced significantly more than the near-surface UHI effect (defined based on urban-rural 2 m air temperature difference) when these mitigation strategies are adopted. In addition, as the green and cool roof fractions increase, the surface and near-surface UHIs are reduced almost linearly. Green roofs with relatively abundant soil moisture have comparable effect in reducing the surface and near-surface UHIs to cool roofs with an albedo value of 0.7. Significant indirect effects are also observed for both green and cool roof strategies; mainly, the low-level advection of atmospheric moisture from rural areas into urban terrain is enhanced when the fraction of these roofs increases, thus increasing the humidity in urban areas. The additional benefits or penalties associated with modifications of the main physical determinants of green or cool roof performance are also investigated. For green roofs, when the soil moisture is increased by irrigation, additional cooling effect is obtained, especially when the ‘unmanaged’ soil moisture is low. The effects of changing the albedo of cool roofs are also substantial. These results also underline the capabilities of the WRF-PUCM framework to support detailed analysis and diagnosis of the UHI phenomenon, and of its different mitigation strategies.

  6. X-rays from Magnetically Confined Wind Shocks: Effect of Cooling-Regulated Shock Retreat

    CERN Document Server

    ud-Doula, Asif; Townsend, Richard; Petit, Veronique; Cohen, David

    2014-01-01

    We use 2D MHD simulations to examine the effects of radiative cooling and inverse Compton (IC) cooling on X-ray emission from magnetically confined wind shocks (MCWS) in magnetic massive stars with radiatively driven stellar winds. For the standard dependence of mass loss rate on luminosity $\\Mdot \\sim L^{1.7} $, the scaling of IC cooling with $L$ and radiative cooling with $\\Mdot$ means that IC cooling become formally more important for lower luminosity stars. However, because the sense of the trends is similar, we find the overall effect of including IC cooling is quite modest. More significantly, for stars with high enough mass loss to keep the shocks radiative, the MHD simulations indicate a linear scaling of X-ray luminosity with mass loss rate; but for lower luminosity stars with weak winds, X-ray emission is reduced and softened by a {\\em shock retreat} resulting from the larger post-shock cooling length, which within the fixed length of a closed magnetic loop forces the shock back to lower pre-shock w...

  7. Effects of Hot Streak and Phantom Cooling on Heat Transfer in a Cooled Turbine Stage Including Particulate Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bons, Jeffrey [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Ameri, Ali [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-01-08

    The objective of this research effort was to develop a validated computational modeling capability for the characterization of the effects of hot streaks and particulate deposition on the heat load of modern gas turbines. This was accomplished with a multi-faceted approach including analytical, experimental, and computational components. A 1-year no cost extension request was approved for this effort, so the total duration was 4 years. The research effort succeeded in its ultimate objective by leveraging extensive experimental deposition studies complemented by computational modeling. Experiments were conducted with hot streaks, vane cooling, and combinations of hot streaks with vane cooling. These studies contributed to a significant body of corporate knowledge of deposition, in combination with particle rebound and deposition studies funded by other agencies, to provide suitable conditions for the development of a new model. The model includes the following physical phenomena: elastic deformation, plastic deformation, adhesion, and shear removal. It also incorporates material property sensitivity to temperature and tangential-normal velocity rebound cross-dependencies observed in experiments. The model is well-suited for incorporation in CFD simulations of complex gas turbine flows due to its algebraic (explicit) formulation. This report contains model predictions compared to coefficient of restitution data available in the open literature as well as deposition results from two different high temperature turbine deposition facilities. While the model comparisons with experiments are in many cases promising, several key aspects of particle deposition remain elusive. The simple phenomenological nature of the model allows for parametric dependencies to be evaluated in a straightforward manner. This effort also included the first-ever full turbine stage deposition model published in the open literature. The simulations included hot streaks and simulated vane cooling

  8. Electrostatic Discharge Effects on Thin Film Resistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Michael J.; Hull, Scott M.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, open circuit failures of individual elements in thin film resistor networks have been attributed to electrostatic discharge (ESD) effects. This paper will discuss the investigation that came to this conclusion and subsequent experimentation intended to characterize design factors that affect the sensitivity of resistor elements to ESD. The ESD testing was performed using the standard human body model simulation. Some of the design elements to be evaluated were: trace width, trace length (and thus width to length ratio), specific resistivity of the trace (ohms per square) and resistance value. However, once the experiments were in progress, it was realized that the ESD sensitivity of most of the complex patterns under evaluation was determined by other design and process factors such as trace shape and termination pad spacing. This paper includes pictorial examples of representative ESD failure sites, and provides some options for designing thin film resistors that are ESD resistant. The risks of ESD damage are assessed and handling precautions suggested.

  9. The cooling effect by adsorption-desorption cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolak Eliza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption appliances may turn out to be an alternative to compression-type refrigerators. The adsorption refrigeration machine may be driven by a low-grade heat source, especially solar energy. Solar adsorption cooling systems are environment-friendly and have zero ozone depletion potential. Therefore, the adsorption refrigeration is one kind of energy saving refrigeration methods. The merits of the adsorption refrigeration systems will be more significant especially when it is used in vehicles (automobiles, ships and locomotives, to preserve food and medicines and in air-conditioning. The paper presents the advantages and disadvantages as well as the evolution of the technology of adsorptive refrigeration systems. The methods of improving of adsorption refrigeration systems through improvements in adsorbents properties, use of advanced cycles and hybrid systems is also presented. Possible applications and perspectives for development of adsorption cooling systems are also analyzed. The paper describes a test stand of the adsorption-desorption refrigeration. The present investigations have been carried out utilizing the activated carbon granules as an adsorbent and methanol as an adsorbate. The paper demonstrates the measurement of temperature changes in the adsorbent bed and condenser during adsorption-desorption cycles.

  10. Study on Effects of Diesel Engine Cooling System Parameters on Water Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆清国; 冯建涛; 刘国夫; 桂勇

    2011-01-01

    A simulation model for a certain diesel engine cooling system is set up by using GT-COOL. The backwater tem- perature response in different operating conditions is simulated numerically. The effects of single or multiple system parameters on the water temperature are analyzed. The results show that, changing different single parameters, the time taken for the steady backwater temperature is different, but relatively short; and if multiple parameters are changed, the time will be longer. Referred to the thermal balance test, the simulation results are validated and provide a basis for the intelligent con- trol of the cooling system.

  11. Effect of Austenite Deformation on Continuous Cooling Transformation Microstructures for 22CrSH Gear Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bing-xin; JIANG Ying-tian; XU Xu-dong; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong

    2007-01-01

    The effect of compressive deformation of austenite on continuous cooling transformation microstructures for 22CrSH gear steel has been investigated using a Gleeble 1500 thermal simulator. The experimental results show that the deformation of austenite promotes the formation of proeutectoid ferrite and pearlite, and leads to the increase of critical cooling rate of proeutectoid ferrite plus pearlite microstructure. The grain boundary allotriomorphic ferrite occupies the austenite grain surfaces when the prior deformation takes place or the cooling rate is decreased, which causes a transition from bainite to acicular ferrite. The deformation enhances the stability of transformation from austenite to acicular ferrite, which results in an increase of M/A constituent.

  12. Effect of floor cooling on farrowing sow and litter performance: Field experiment under Dutch conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Wagenberg, van, A.V.; Peet-Schwering, van der, C.M.C.; Binnendijk, G.P.; Claessen, P.J.P.W.

    2006-01-01

    Lactating sows generally have problems dissipating their body heat to the environment. Cooling the floor under the sow¿s shoulder, called the cool-sow system, is a method to increase body heat removal by conduction, thereby contributing to the thermal comfort of the sow. In this study, the effect of the cool-sow system on the performance of the sow and her piglets in the farrowing room and on the position of the sow in the farrowing crate was determined. In total, 60 sows (parity between 2 an...

  13. Nano Peltier cooling device from geometric effects using a single graphene nanoribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wan-Ju; Yao, Dao-Xin; Carlson, Erica

    2012-02-01

    Based on the phenomenon of curvature-induced doping in graphene we propose a class of Peltier cooling devices, produced by geometrical effects, without gating. We show how a graphene nanoribbon laid on an array of curved nano cylinders can be used to create a targeted cooling device. Using theoretical calculations and experimental inputs, we predict that the cooling power of such a device can approach 1kW/cm^2, on par with the best known techniques using standard lithography methods. The structure proposed here helps pave the way toward designing graphene electronics which use geometry rather than gating to control devices.

  14. Post-deposition cooling in oxygen is critical for YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - sub d films deposited by eclipse pulsed laser deposition method

    CERN Document Server

    Ohmukai, M; Ohno, T

    2001-01-01

    YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - sub d thin films were deposited on MgO single crystals by means of an eclipse pulsed laser deposition method. Deposited films are cooled down in situ under an oxygen atmosphere at a given oxygen pressure. The relationship between critical temperature and oxygen deficiency was investigated by means of electrical resistance R(T) and X-ray diffraction measurements. Post- deposition cooling is critical and the high pressure of oxygen during cooling is favorable.

  15. Dewetting of microliquid film via vapor-mediated Marangoni effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungho; Kim, Ho-Young

    2015-11-01

    It is generally conceived that water film residing on a hydrophilic layer is much more stable than one on a hydrophobic layer. Here we show that the film on a hydrophilic layer can be punctured just by placing an alcohol drop near the film. It is because the concentration gradients of alcohol vapor deposited on water give rise to the Marangoni effect, which pulls the water film away from the alcohol drop. We term this behavior the vapor-mediated Marangoni dewetting. Two different film flow types are observed depending on the thickness of film. For a thin water film, a bulk film recedes from the center where the alcohol vapor concentration is the highest but leaves a thin fringe film. The nanoscale fringe film is then dried, leading to continuous growth of the hole. For a thick water film, no nanoscale fringe films are observed, but the hole growth is limited to a certain radius. The maximum hole radius in the thick film regime is determined by the balance between the hydrostatic pressure and the Marangoni stress. We visualize such novel film dewetting dynamics with a high-speed camera and characterize their salient features by combining experimental and scaling analysis.

  16. Investigating the Effects of "Cool" Solar Reflective Pavements on California Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohegh, M.; Ban-Weiss, G. A.; Levinson, R.; Rosado, P.

    2015-12-01

    Implementing "Cool pavement" is a local mitigation strategy that can reduce urban heat islands. We investigated the climate impacts of widespread deployment of cool pavements by increasing the albedo of the pavements from 0.1 to 0.5 to understand the efficiency of cool pavements in reducing the temperature in California's urban areas. A validated parameterization of WRF model coupled with Single Layer Urban Canopy Model (SLUCM) is employed to simulate the effects of pavements at the bottom of canopy on urban heat islands. The results show local surface air temperature reductions, peaking at late morning and late evening which coincides with the lowest boundary layer height in the day time. Summer time temperature reductions up to 0.62 K in the evening (20:00 local) and 0.32 K in afternoon (14:00) in California are predicted. The cooling effects of 15 cities in California are sampled and analyzed. The average temperature reductions for the cities in California show 0.32 K temperature reduction per 0.1 total albedo reduction in the afternoon (14:00) which is consistent with the previous works. The linear relation between temperature reductions and the albedo increase is used to estimate the effect of cool pavements in "No Canopy" state, which can be used as an upper bound of the effects of cool pavements.

  17. Nutrient solution cooling and its effect on temperature of leaf lettuce in hydroponic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, S W; Kim, M K; Son, J E

    1996-12-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a hydroponic system were experimentally verified after theoretical establishment and the effect of nutrient solution cooling on the plant temperature was investigated. About 96 percent of the total heat flow transferred from culture bed to nutrient solution was the conductive heat through planting board and partitioning materials. The average and maximum temperatures of the leaf lettuce decreased 0.6 and 1.5 degrees C., respectively, with cooling of nutrient solution by 6 degrees C. A numerical model for prediction of cooling load of nutrient solution in a hydroponic greenhouse was developed, and the results from the simulation model showed a good agreement with those from experiments. A mechanical cooling system using the counter flow type with double pipes was developed for cooling the nutrient solution. Also the heat transfer characteristics of the system were analyzed experimentally and theoretically, and compared with the other existing cooling systems of nutrient solution. The cooling capacities of three different systems, which used polyethylene tube in solution tank, stainless tube in solution tank, and the counter flow type with double pipes, were comparatively evaluated.

  18. Magnetic after-effect in manganite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirena, M. E-mail: sirenam@ib.cnea.gov.ar; Steren, L.B.; Guimpel, J

    2001-05-01

    The time dependence of the magnetic and transport properties on La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3} films and bulk samples has been studied through magnetization and resistivity measurements. A magnetic after-effect has been observed in all samples. At low temperatures, the low-field magnetization, can be described by the function M(t)=M{sub c}+M{sub d} exp(-t/{tau})+S(H,T)ln(t). The resistivity increases logarithmically in the same temperature range, indicating the evolution of the sample to a more disordered state. Above a characteristic temperature, this behaviour is reversed and an increase of the magnetization with time is observed. The relaxation parameters depend on the bulk or films character of the samples. In the latter case, a dependence on the film thickness was found. A direct correlation between the time dependence of the resistivity and magnetization curves in manganite compounds was found.

  19. Percolation effect in thick film superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sali, R.; Harsanyi, G. [Technical Univ. of Budapest (Hungary)

    1994-12-31

    A thick film superconductor paste has been developed to study the properties of granulated superconductor materials, to observe the percolation effect and to confirm the theory of the conducting mechanism in the superconducting thick films. This paste was also applied to make a superconducting planar transformer. Due to high T{sub c} and advantageous current density properties the base of the paste was chosen to be of Bi(Pb)SrCaCuO system. For contacts a conventional Ag/Pt paste was used. The critical temperature of the samples were between 110 K and 115 K depending on the printed layer thickness. The critical current density at the boiling temperature of the liquid He- was between 200-300 A/cm{sup 2}. The R(T) and V(I) functions were measured with different parameters. The results of the measurements have confirmed the theory of conducting mechanism in the material. The percolation structure model has been built and described. As an application, a superconducting planar thick film transformer was planned and produced. Ten windings of the transformer were printed on one side of the alumina substrate and one winding was printed on the other side. The coupling between the two sides was possible through the substrate. The samples did not need special drying and firing parameters. After the preparation, the properties of the transformer were measured. The efficiency and the losses were determined. Finally, some fundamental advantages and problems of the process were discussed.

  20. Effect of sludge ice cooling on renal function and renal histology in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbaeys, A; Oosterlinck, W; Lameire, N; Cuvelier, C; De Sy, W A

    1981-01-01

    The effect of sludge ice surface cooling on the compensatory hypertrophied dog kidney was investigated. Renal function was measured prior to and on days 1, 3 and 7 after the cooling procedure by means of inulin clearance, PAH clearance and sodium excretion capacity during normal hydration and after volume expansion. No alteration in renal function was shown. No freezing lesions or thromboses were seen on histological examination.

  1. Application of thermoelectric cooling theory to the characterization of Peltier effect thermal elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, N.

    1980-04-01

    A synthesis of the theory of thermoelectric cooling is applied to the practical as well as numerical characterization of cooling systems that work by the Peltier effect. A computerized calculation procedure for determining the coefficient of performance of a Peltier module, given its Seebeck coefficient, its conductivity, its resistance, and its J coefficient of merit, is outlined. An example of application is drawn from the design analysis of a SPACELAB experiment package. Calculation results are in good agreement with test results.

  2. Monitoring the Energy-Use Effects of Cool Roofs on California Commercial Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Konopaki, Steve; Rainer, Leo

    2004-07-01

    Solar-reflective roofs stay cooler in the sun than solar-absorptive roofs. Such ''cool'' roofs achieve lower surface temperatures that reduce heat conduction into the building and the building's cooling load. The California Energy Commission has funded research in which Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has measured the electricity use and peak demand in commercial buildings to document savings from implementing the Commission's Cool Roofs program. The study seeks to determine the savings achieved by cool roofs by monitoring the energy use of a carefully selected assortment of buildings participating in the Cool Roofs program. Measurements were needed because the peak savings resulting from the application of cool roofs on different types of buildings in the diverse California climate zones have not been well characterized to date. Only a few occupancy categories (e.g., office and retail buildings) have been monitored before this, and those were done under a limited number of climatic conditions. To help rectify this situation, LBNL was tasked to select the buildings to be monitored, measure roof performance before and after replacing a hot roof by a cool roof, and document both energy and peak demand savings resulting from installation of cool roofs. We monitored the effects of cool roofs on energy use and environmental parameters in six California buildings at three different sites: a retail store in Sacramento; an elementary school in San Marcos (near San Diego); and a 4-building cold storage facility in Reedley (near Fresno). The latter included a cold storage building, a conditioning and fruit-palletizing area, a conditioned packing area, and two unconditioned packing areas (counted as one building).

  3. Giant electrocaloric effect in PZT bilayer thin films by utilizing the electric field engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiandong; Li, Weili; Cao, Wenping; Hou, Yafei; Yu, Yang; Fei, Weidong

    2016-04-01

    The enhancement of the electrocaloric effect (ECE) was achieved by the amplifying effect of applied electric field through devising the thin films' structure. The PbZr0.95Ti0.05O3/PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 bilayer structured thin films were fabricated on a Pt(111)/Ti/SiO2/Si substrate using sol-gel method. The ΔS = 20.5 J K-1 kg-1 and ΔT = 24.8 K for bilayer thin films is achieved around 125 °C much below Tc, which is caused by the amplifying electric field induced phase transition of OAFE/RFE in PZr0.95Ti0.05O3 layer. It is also worth mentioning that the films exhibit outstanding ECE at room temperature; ΔS = 11.9 J K-1 kg-1 and ΔT = 10.7 K are observed, which are attributed to the effect of amplifying electric field in PbZr0.95Ti0.05O3 layer and RFE/TFE at morphotropic phase boundaries (MPB) in PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 layer. This result indicates that to amplify the local electric field engineering and to maximize the number of coexisting phases in heterostructures or multilayer thin films may be an effective way for cooling applications.

  4. Cooling curve analysis in binary Al-Cu alloys: Part I- Effect of cooling rate and copper content on the eutectic formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dehnavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many techniques available for investigating the solidification of metals and alloys. In recent years computer-aided cooling curve analysis (CA-CCA has been used to determine thermo-physical properties of alloys, latent heat and solid fraction. In this study, the effect of cooling rate and copper addition was taken into consideration in non- equilibrium eutectic transformation of binary Al- Cu melt via cooling curve analysis. For this purpose, melts with different copper weight percent of 2.2, 3.7 and 4.8 were prepared and cooled in controlled rates of 0.04 and 0.42 °C/s. Results show that, latent heat of alloy highly depends upon the post- solidification cooling rate and composition. As copper content of alloy and cooling rate increase, achieved nonequilibrium eutectic phase increases that leads to release of high amount of latent heat and appearing of second deviation in cooling curve. This deviation can be seen in first time derivative curve in the form of a definite peak.

  5. Questioning the Mpemba effect: hot water does not cool more quickly than cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, Henry C.; Linden, Paul F.

    2016-11-01

    The Mpemba effect is the name given to the assertion that it is quicker to cool water to a given temperature when the initial temperature is higher. This assertion seems counter-intuitive and yet references to the effect go back at least to the writings of Aristotle. Indeed, at first thought one might consider the effect to breach fundamental thermodynamic laws, but we show that this is not the case. We go on to examine the available evidence for the Mpemba effect and carry out our own experiments by cooling water in carefully controlled conditions. We conclude, somewhat sadly, that there is no evidence to support meaningful observations of the Mpemba effect.

  6. Fossil fuel and biomass burning effect on climate - Heating or cooling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Fraser, Robert S.; Mahoney, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The basic theory of the effect of pollution on cloud microphysics and its global implications is applied to compare the relative effect of a small increase in the consumption rate of oil, coal, or biomass burning on cooling and heating of the atmosphere. The characteristics of and evidence for the SO2 induced cooling effect are reviewed. This perturbation analysis approach permits linearization, therefore simplifying the analysis and reducing the number of uncertain parameters. For biomass burning the analysis is restricted to burning associated with deforestation. Predictions of the effect of an increase in oil or coal burning show that within the present conditions the cooling effect from oil and coal burning may range from 0.4 to 8 times the heating effect.

  7. Fossil fuel and biomass burning effect on climate - Heating or cooling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Fraser, Robert S.; Mahoney, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The basic theory of the effect of pollution on cloud microphysics and its global implications is applied to compare the relative effect of a small increase in the consumption rate of oil, coal, or biomass burning on cooling and heating of the atmosphere. The characteristics of and evidence for the SO2 induced cooling effect are reviewed. This perturbation analysis approach permits linearization, therefore simplifying the analysis and reducing the number of uncertain parameters. For biomass burning the analysis is restricted to burning associated with deforestation. Predictions of the effect of an increase in oil or coal burning show that within the present conditions the cooling effect from oil and coal burning may range from 0.4 to 8 times the heating effect.

  8. Effect of transverse electron velocities on the longitudinal cooling force in the Fermilab electron cooler

    CERN Document Server

    Khilkevich, Andrei; Shemyakin, Alexander V

    2012-01-01

    In Fermilab's electron cooler, a 0.1A, 4.3MeV DC electron beam propagates through the 20 m cooling section, which is immersed in a weak longitudinal magnetic field. A proper adjustment of 200 dipole coils, installed in the cooling section for correction of the magnetic field imperfections, can create a helix-like trajectory with the wavelength of 1-10 m. The longitudinal cooling force is measured in the presence of such helixes at different wavelengths and amplitudes. The results are compared with a model calculating the cooling force as a sum of collisions with small impact parameters, where the helical nature of the coherent angle is ignored, and far collisions, where the effect of the coherent motion is neglected. A qualitative agreement is found.

  9. Effect of the cooling rate on the phase composition and structure of copper matte converting slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selivanov, E. N.; Gulyaeva, R. I.; Udoeva, L. Yu.; Belyaev, V. V.; Pankratov, A. A.

    2009-08-01

    The effect of the cooling rate on the phase composition and microstructure of copper matte converting slags is studied by X-ray diffraction, combined thermogravimetry and calorimetry, mineragraphy, and electron-probe microanalysis. The compositions of oxide and sulfide phases are determined, and the forms of nonferrous metals in slags cooled at a rate of 0.3 and 900°C/s are revealed. At high cooling rates of the slags, iron silicate glass is shown to form apart from sulfide phases. Repeated heating of the slags leads to the development of devitrification, “cold” crystallization, and melting. A decrease in the cooling rate favors an increase in the grain sizes in oxides (magnetite, iron silicates) and sulfides (bornite-, sphalerite, and galena-based solid solutions).

  10. A review of the risks of sudden global cooling and its effects on agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, K.C.

    2003-01-01

    /asteroid impact have been suggested as cause. Nuclear winter after large-scale nuclear war is a well-known scenario, but climate instabilities may also be caused by changes in the sun, Milankovitch cycles, changes in ocean currents, volcanoes, asteroid impacts, dusting from comets passing close, methane released...... was 1816, the year without a summer, probably caused by the cooling effect of the eruption of the volcano Tambora, Indonesia. The last decade-long cooling event was A.D. 536-545 where dust veil, cold, famine, and plague was recorded in Byzantium and China. Very large volcanic eruptions or a comet...... from its hydrate, and pollution, The risks associated with sudden global cooling are rather smaller than the risks of global warming, but they are real. A dangerous sudden cooling event will happen sooner or later. Ability to change to cold-resistant crops rapidly in large parts of the world may...

  11. Effect of Controlled Cooling After Hot Rolling on Mechanical Properties of Hot Rolled TRIP Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Di; LI Zhuang; L(U) Hui-sheng

    2008-01-01

    A three-step cooling pattern on the runout table (ROT) was conducted for the hot rolled TRIP steel. Microstructural evolution during thermomechanical controlled processing (TMCP) was investigated. Proeessing condition of controlled cooling on a ROT in the laboratory rolling mill was discussed. The results indicated that the microstructure containing polygonal ferrite, granular bainite and a significant amount of the stable retained austenite can be obtained through three-step cooling on the ROT after hot rolling. TMCP led to ferrite grain refinement. Controlled cooling after hot rolling resulted in the stability of the remaining austenite and a satisfactory TRIP effect. Excellent mechanical properties were obtained through TMCP for the hot rolled TRIP steel.

  12. Effects of cooling rates on the mechanical properties of a Ti-based bulk metallic glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical properties of the glassy specimens fabricated at different cooling rates with a composition of Ti40Zr25Cu12Ni3Be20 were systematically investigated. It was confirmed that faster cooling rates caused not only a larger amount of frozen-in free volume but also a higher glass transition temperature in the bulk glassy alloy. Increase in the free volume was found to favor plastic deformation and then to give rise to larger compressive plasticity, whilst the rise in the glass transition temperature seemed to be closely related to the higher yield strength. Moreover, the increase of yield strength and plasticity induced by fast cooling rates may also be associated with the residual stress generated during the fabrication process. Our results suggest that the deformation behavior of bulk metallic glasses is sensitive to various factors and influences from the other factors should be excluded as far as cooling-rate effects on bulk metallic glasses are considered.

  13. THE EFFECT OF THE COOLING RATE ON THE YIELD BEHAVIOUR IN Ti-V-Al INTERSTITIAL FREE STEELS

    OpenAIRE

    Süleyman GÜNDÜZ; Kaçar,Ramazan; GÜLENÇ, Behçet

    2001-01-01

    In this work, steel chemistry and the effects of the cooling rate on the yield behaviour in Ti-V-Al interstitial free steel were investigated experimentally for six grades of steel plate. The steels were austenitised at 950 ± 10 °C for 15 minutes and then cooled at different cooling rates in order to see the effect of different cooling rates on yield behaviour of interstitial free steels. Reducing the cooling rate reduces the yield point elongation and is conducive to continuous yielding. G...

  14. Effect of repeated forearm muscle cooling on the adaptation of skeletal muscle metabolism in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Nishimura, Takayuki; Wijayanto, Titis; Watanuki, Shigeki; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of repeated cooling of forearm muscle on adaptation in skeletal muscle metabolism. It is hypothesized that repeated decreases of muscle temperature would increase the oxygen consumption in hypothermic skeletal muscle. Sixteen healthy males participated in this study. Their right forearm muscles were locally cooled to 25 °C by cooling pads attached to the skin. This local cooling was repeated eight times on separate days for eight participants (experimental group), whereas eight controls received no cold exposure. To evaluate adaptation in skeletal muscle metabolism, a local cooling test was conducted before and after the repeated cooling period. Change in oxy-hemoglobin content in the flexor digitorum at rest and during a 25-s isometric handgrip (10% maximal voluntary construction) was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy at every 2 °C reduction in forearm muscle temperature. The arterial blood flow was occluded for 15 s by upper arm cuff inflation at rest and during the isometric handgrip. The oxygen consumption in the flexor digitorum muscle was evaluated by a slope of the oxy-hemoglobin change during the arterial occlusion. In the experimental group, resting oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle did not show any difference between pre- and post-intervention, whereas muscle oxygen consumption during the isometric handgrip was significantly higher in post-intervention than in pre-test from thermoneutral baseline to 31 °C muscle temperature (P < 0.05). This result indicated that repeated local muscle cooling might facilitate oxidative metabolism in the skeletal muscle. In summary, skeletal muscle metabolism during submaximal isometric handgrip was facilitated after repeated local muscle cooling.

  15. Effect of repeated forearm muscle cooling on the adaptation of skeletal muscle metabolism in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Nishimura, Takayuki; Wijayanto, Titis; Watanuki, Shigeki; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of repeated cooling of forearm muscle on adaptation in skeletal muscle metabolism. It is hypothesized that repeated decreases of muscle temperature would increase the oxygen consumption in hypothermic skeletal muscle. Sixteen healthy males participated in this study. Their right forearm muscles were locally cooled to 25 °C by cooling pads attached to the skin. This local cooling was repeated eight times on separate days for eight participants (experimental group), whereas eight controls received no cold exposure. To evaluate adaptation in skeletal muscle metabolism, a local cooling test was conducted before and after the repeated cooling period. Change in oxy-hemoglobin content in the flexor digitorum at rest and during a 25-s isometric handgrip (10% maximal voluntary construction) was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy at every 2 °C reduction in forearm muscle temperature. The arterial blood flow was occluded for 15 s by upper arm cuff inflation at rest and during the isometric handgrip. The oxygen consumption in the flexor digitorum muscle was evaluated by a slope of the oxy-hemoglobin change during the arterial occlusion. In the experimental group, resting oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle did not show any difference between pre- and post-intervention, whereas muscle oxygen consumption during the isometric handgrip was significantly higher in post-intervention than in pre-test from thermoneutral baseline to 31 °C muscle temperature ( P muscle cooling might facilitate oxidative metabolism in the skeletal muscle. In summary, skeletal muscle metabolism during submaximal isometric handgrip was facilitated after repeated local muscle cooling.

  16. Effect of limb cooling on peripheral and global oxygen consumption in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, I A-A; Wickramasinghe, Y A; Spencer, S A

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate peripheral oxygen consumption (VO(2)) measurements using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with arterial occlusion in healthy term neonates by studying the effect of limb cooling on peripheral and global VO(2). Twenty two healthy term neonates were studied. Peripheral VO(2) was measured by NIRS using arterial occlusion and measurement of the oxyhaemoglobin (HbO(2)) decrement slope. Global VO(2) was measured by open circuit calorimetry. Global and peripheral VO(2) was measured in each neonate before and after limb cooling. In 10 neonates, a fall in forearm temperature of 2.2 degrees C (mild cooling) decreased forearm VO(2) by 19.6% (p Global VO(2) did not change. In 12 neonates, a fall in forearm temperature of 4 degrees C (moderate cooling) decreased forearm VO(2) by 34.7% (p Global VO(2) increased by 17.6% (p cooling. The changes are more pronounced with moderate limb cooling when a concomitant rise in global VO(2) is observed. Change in peripheral temperature must be taken into consideration in the interpretation of peripheral VO(2) measurements in neonates.

  17. Effect of cooling of cooked white rice on resistant starch content and glycemic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonia, Steffi; Witjaksono, Fiastuti; Ridwan, Rahmawati

    2015-01-01

    Cooling of cooked starch is known to cause starch retrogradation which increases resistant starch content. This study aimed to determine the effect of cooling of cooked white rice on resistant starch content and glycemic response in healthy subjects. Resistant starch contents were analyzed on freshly cooked white rice (control rice), cooked white rice cooled for 10 hours at room temperature (test rice I), and cooked white rice cooled for 24 hours at 4°C then reheated (test rice II). The results showed that resistant starch contents in control rice, test rice I, and test rice II were 0.64 g/100 g, 1.30 g/100 g, and 1.65 g/100 g, respectively. Test rice II had higher resistant starch content than test rice I, hence used in the clinical study along with control rice to characterize glycemic response in 15 healthy adults. The clinical study was a randomized, single-blind crossover study. In the clinical study, test rice II significantly lowered glycemic response compared with control rice (125±50.1 vs 152±48.3 mmol.min/L, respectively; p=0.047). In conclusion, cooling of cooked white rice increased resistant starch content. Cooked white rice cooled for 24 hours at 4°C then reheated lowered glycemic response compared with freshly cooked white rice.

  18. Cooling rate effects in thermoluminescence dosimetry grade lithium flouride. Implications for practical dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, E W; McKinlay, A F; Clark, I

    1976-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the effects of cooling rates in the range of 10(-1) to 2 X 10(5) degrees C min-1 applied to TLD-700, LiF thermoluminescence dosemeters has shown that the 'transfer sensitivity' effect observed by Booth, Johnson and Attix (1972) is only of importance for cooling rates greater than 10(3) degrees C min-1. Although it is concluded that for practical dosimetry purposes the effect may be ignored it is not clear why Booth et al. observed such large changes and until this discrepancy is explained it is recommended that a low temperature pre-irradiation anneal should be used.

  19. Water-lithium bromide double-effect absorption cooling analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vliet, G.C.; Lawson, M.B.; Lithgow, R.A.

    1980-12-01

    This investigation involved the development of a numerical model for the transient simulation of the double-effect, water-lithium bromide absorption cooling machine, and the use of the model to determine the effect of the various design and input variables on the absorption unit performance. The performance parameters considered were coefficient of performance and cooling capacity. The sensitivity analysis was performed by selecting a nominal condition and determining performance sensitivity for each variable with others held constant. The variables considered in the study include source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water temperatures; source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water flow rates; solution circulation rate; heat exchanger areas; pressure drop between evaporator and absorber; solution pump characteristics; and refrigerant flow control methods. The performance sensitivity study indicated in particular that the distribution of heat exchanger area among the various (seven) heat exchange components is a very important design consideration. Moreover, it indicated that the method of flow control of the first effect refrigerant vapor through the second effect is a critical design feature when absorption units operate over a significant range of cooling capacity. The model was used to predict the performance of the Trane absorption unit with fairly good accuracy. The dynamic model should be valuable as a design tool for developing new absorption machines or modifying current machines to make them optimal based on current and future energy costs.

  20. Effectiveness of non-volatile falling film absorbers with solution and coolant in counter-flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.S. [Austrian Institute of Technology, Dept. Energy, Giefinggasse 2, 1210 Vienna (Austria); Infante Ferreira, C.A. [Delft University of Technology, Engineering Thermodynamics, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands)

    2010-01-15

    Effectiveness equations are developed for non-volatile falling film absorbers with solution and coolant in counter-flow. It is shown how mixture thermodynamics and film theory can be used to simplify the problem to give eigenvalue solutions for temperature and concentration profiles and how heat and mass transfer effectiveness equations can be derived from such solutions. The results indicate that the transfer process in an absorber is driven by two driving forces, i.e. the difference between bulk solution and cooling water temperatures and the initial deviation of bulk solution from its equilibrium state. Asymptotic effectiveness equations are derived for a few limiting cases to show that they approach their counterparts in single-phase heat transfer and isothermal absorption processes. (author)

  1. Effect of quenching on the magnetic properties of Mg-ferrite thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himadri Roy Dakua

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the microstructural and magnetic properties of the post annealed slow cooled and quenched Mg-ferrite thin films. The microstructural properties of these films were studied through XRD, TEM and SEM. The magnetic properties were studied using VSM at 300K and 10K. The quenched film showed ∼1.66 times higher magnetization at room temperature (RT compared to the bulk and the slow cooled film (4πMS of bulk∼1880 Gauss at RT though the crystal phase, grain size and thickness of both the films were similar. The change in the cation distribution is the plausible origin of large magnetization observed in the quenched (rapid cooled film.

  2. Passive Method to Reduce Solar Energy Effect on the Cooling Load in Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orfi J.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Energy needed for cooling residential and industrial buildings in hot weather countries is the major issue. The period needed for cooling or comfort conditions in those countries exceeds five months and outdoor temperature reaches more than 40 °C. Also, the solar intensity usually high and can reach about one kW per m2. Hence, any attempt to reduce the effect of solar energy on the cooling load is worthy to investigate. The present work analyzes using artificial, naturally ventilated, shading covers to reduce the effect of solar energy. Analytical and numerical analyzes were performed on the effect of adding a ventilated cover to walls and roof exposed to the solar energy.

  3. Cooling Effect Improvement by Dimensional Modification of Annular Fins in Two Stage Reciprocating Compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Ashish D. Vasiyar,

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Reciprocating Compressor fins are made from Aluminum alloy and it is provided for increase in contact area in convective heat transfer. Air cooling is a method of dissipating heat It works by making the object to be cooled have a larger surface area or have an increased flow of air over its surface. a fin is a surface that extends from an object to increase the rate of heat transfer to or from the environment by increasing convection. The aim of present work study is to prepare a finite element model of fin. The result of finite element model will be verified with experimental work with thermocouple. After comparing results of FEA model we can modify boundary condition, material shape & size for improvement in efficiency & cooling rate. It is possible to find optimum solution with FEA package ANSYS 14 used for modeling and analysis. Effectiveness of fin can be improved by changing geometry of fin. So after increase effectiveness it can increase cooling rate and minimize the time for cooling process of Reciprocating compressor. Aim of this work is increase effectiveness of the fin for best performance.

  4. Simultaneous effects of water spray and crosswind on performance of natural draft dry cooling tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadikia Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of water spray and crosswind on the effectiveness of the natural draft dry cooling tower (NDDCT, a three-dimensional model has been developed. Efficiency of NDDCT is improved by water spray system at the cooling tower entrance for high ambient temperature condition with and without crosswind. The natural and forced heat convection flow inside and around the NDDCT is simulated numerically by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations in both air and water droplet phases. Comparison of the numerical results with one-dimensional analytical model and the experimental data illustrates a well-predicted heat transfer rate in the cooling tower. Applying water spray system on the cooling tower radiators enhances the cooling tower efficiency at both no wind and windy conditions. For all values of water spraying rate, NDDCTs operate most effectively at the crosswind velocity of 3m/s and as the wind speed continues to rise to more than 3 m/s up to 12 m/s, the tower efficiency will decrease by approximately 18%, based on no-wind condition. The heat transfer rate of radiator at wind velocity 10 m/s is 11.5% lower than that of the no wind condition. This value is 7.5% for water spray rate of 50kg/s.

  5. THE EFFECT OF THE COOLING RATE ON THE YIELD BEHAVIOUR IN Ti-V-Al INTERSTITIAL FREE STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman GÜNDÜZ

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, steel chemistry and the effects of the cooling rate on the yield behaviour in Ti-V-Al interstitial free steel were investigated experimentally for six grades of steel plate. The steels were austenitised at 950 ± 10 °C for 15 minutes and then cooled at different cooling rates in order to see the effect of different cooling rates on yield behaviour of interstitial free steels. Reducing the cooling rate reduces the yield point elongation and is conducive to continuous yielding. Grains are coarsening during slow cooling, this decrease yield strength of the steels. Vanadium additions allow discontinuous yielding over a wide range of cooling rates compared to Ti steels.

  6. Effects of mass flow rate and droplet velocity on surface heat flux during cryogen spray cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karapetian, Emil [Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Aguilar, Guillermo [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Kimel, Sol [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Lavernia, Enrique J [Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Nelson, J Stuart [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2003-01-07

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is used to protect the epidermis during dermatologic laser surgery. To date, the relative influence of the fundamental spray parameters on surface cooling remains incompletely understood. This study explores the effects of mass flow rate and average droplet velocity on the surface heat flux during CSC. It is shown that the effect of mass flow rate on the surface heat flux is much more important compared to that of droplet velocity. However, for fully atomized sprays with small flow rates, droplet velocity can make a substantial difference in the surface heat flux. (note)

  7. Numerical Investigation of the Flow Dynamics and Evaporative Cooling of Water Droplets Impinging onto Heated Surfaces: An Effective Approach To Identify Spray Cooling Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Nan; Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Rui-Na; Ouyang, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Pei-Xue

    2016-09-13

    Numerical investigations of the dynamics and evaporative cooling of water droplets impinging onto heated surfaces can be used to identify spray cooling mechanisms. Droplet impingement dynamics and evaporation are simulated using the presented numerical model. Volume-of-fluid method is used in the model to track the free surface. The contact line dynamics was predicted from a dynamic contact angle model with the evaporation rate predicted by a kinetic theory model. A species transport equation was solved in the gas phase to describe the vapor convection and diffusion. The numerical model was validated by experimental data. The physical effects including the contact angle hysteresis and the thermocapillary effect are analyzed to offer guidance for future numerical models of droplet impingement cooling. The effects of various parameters including surface wettability, surface temperature, droplet velocity, droplet size, and droplet temperature were numerically studied from the standpoint of spray cooling. The numerical simulations offer profound analysis and deep insight into the spray cooling heat transfer mechanisms.

  8. Effects of Cooling on Ankle Muscle Strength, Electromyography, and Gait Ground Reaction Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitava Halder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of cooling on neuromuscular function and performance during gait are not fully examined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of local cooling for 20 min in cold water at 10°C in a climate chamber also at 10°C on maximal isometric force and electromyographic (EMG activity of the lower leg muscles. Gait ground reaction forces (GRFs were also assessed. Sixteen healthy university students participated in the within subject design experimental study. Isometric forces of the tibialis anterior (TA and the gastrocnemius medialis (GM were measured using a handheld dynamometer and the EMG was recorded using surface electrodes. Ground reaction forces during gait and the required coefficient of friction (RCOF were recorded using a force plate. There was a significantly reduced isometric maximum force in the TA muscle (P<0.001 after cooling. The mean EMG amplitude of GM muscle was increased after cooling (P<0.003, indicating that fatigue was induced. We found no significant changes in the gait GRFs and RCOF on dry and level surface. These findings may indicate that local moderate cooling 20 min of 10°C cold water, may influence maximal muscle performance without affecting activities at sub-maximal effort.

  9. The evaluation of pressure effects on the ex-vessel cooling for KNGR with MELCOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Hwa; Park, Soo Yong; Kim, Dong Ha

    2001-03-01

    In this report, the effect of external vessel cooling on debris coolability and vessel integrity for the KNGR were examined from the two typical pressure range of high(170 bar) and low(5 bar)case using the lower plenum model in MELCOR1.8.4. As the conditions of these calculations, 80 ton of debris was relocated simultaneously into the lower vessel head and the debris relocation temperature from the core region was 2700 K. The decay heat has been assumed to be that of one hour after reactor shutdown. The creep failure of the vessel wall was simulated with 1-D model, which can consider the rapid temperature gradient over the wall thickness during the ex-vessel cooling. From the calculation results, both the coolant temperature and the total amount of coolant mass injected into the cavity are known to be the important factors in determining the time period to keep the external vessel cool. Therefore, a long-term strategy to keep the coolant temperature subcooled throughout the transient is suggested to sustain or prolong the effect of external vessel cooling. Also, it is expected that to keep the primary side at low pressure and to perform the ex-vessel flooding be the essential conditions to sustain the vessel integrity. From MELCOR, the penetration failure always occurs after relocation regardless of the RCS pressure or availability of the external vessel cooling. Therefore, It is expected that the improvement of the model for the penetration tube failure will be necessary.

  10. Geometry effects on cooling in a standing wave cylindrical thermoacousic resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Ghazali, Normah; Ghazali, Ahmad Dairobi; Ali, Irwan Shah; Rahman, Muhammad Aminullah A.

    2012-06-01

    Numerous reports have established the refrigeration applications of thermoacoustic cooling without compressors and refrigerants. Significant cooling effects can be obtained in a thermoacoustic resonator fitted with a heat exchanging stack and operated at resonance frequency. Past studies, however, have hardly referred to the fundamental relationship between resonant frequency and the resonator geometry. This paper reports the thermoacoustic cooling effects at resonance obtained by changing the diameter of the resonator while holding the length constant and vice versa. Experiments were completed at atmospheric pressure with air as the working fluid using a number of pvc tubes having parallel plate stack from Mylar. The temperature difference measured across the stack showed that a volume increase in the working fluid in general increases the temperature gradient for the quarter-and half-wavelength resonators. Doubling the diameter from 30 mm to 60 mm produced the highest temperature difference due to the greater number of stack plates resulting in a higher overall thermoacaoustic cooling. Increasing the resonator length only produced a small increase in temperature gradient since the resonant frequency at operation is only slightly changed. Investigation on the aspect ratio exhibits no influence on the temperature difference across the stack. This study have shown that the resonator length and diameter do affect the temperature difference across the thermoacoustic stack, and further research should be done to consider the contribution of the stack mass on the overall desired thermoacoustic cooling.

  11. Effect of modification and cooling rate on the microstructure of IN-713C alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kościelna

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of the effect of modification and cooling rate on the microstructure of castings made from IN-713C nickel superalloy were described. As an inoculant, cobalt aluminate CoAl2O4 in composition with aluminium powder and colloidal silica was used. Changes in the cooling rate were obtained by the use of cast stepped test piece with steps of 6, 11 and 17 mm thickness. The phase and chemical composition of microstructural constituents, i.e. of γ phase, γ’ phase and eutectic carbide precipitates, was evaluated. A significant effect of the cooling rate and modification treatment on the stereological parameters of carbide precipitates was confirmed. Problems in evaluation of the chemical composition of these precipitates in the case of a high degree of the structure refinement were indicated.

  12. Simulation of the Effects of Cooling Techniques on Turbine Blade Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Vince; Fatuzzo, Marco

    Increases in the performance demands of turbo machinery has stimulated the development many new technologies over the last half century. With applications that spread beyond marine, aviation, and power generation, improvements in gas turbine technologies provide a vast impact. High temperatures within the combustion chamber of the gas turbine engine are known to cause an increase in thermal efficiency and power produced by the engine. However, since operating temperatures of these engines reach above 1000 K within the turbine section, the need for advances in material science and cooling techniques to produce functioning engines under these high thermal and dynamic stresses is crucial. As with all research and development, costs related to the production of prototypes can be reduced through the use of computational simulations. By making use of Ansys Simulation Software, the effects of turbine cooling techniques were analyzed. Simulation of the Effects of Cooling Techniques on Turbine Blade Heat Transfer.

  13. Cooling Effect of Crushed Rock-Based Embankment along the Chaidaer-Muli Railway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study of the cooling effect of crushed rock-based embankment on slope wetlands along the Chaidaer-Muli Railway. The result shows that only the embankment shady side can be effectively cooled down in a warm permafrost region and the crushed rock-based embankment can cool the entire embankment in a cold permafrost region. The crushed rock-based embankment cannot eliminate the problems from the south-north slope. Slope wetland can influence the temperature field of the crushed rock-based embankment. On the uphill side, it will lead to degradation in some cases and development of permafrost in other cases, which depends on the topsoil water content and ground surface runoff. On the downhill side, it always leads to the warming of permafrost. For crushed rock-based embankment constructed on slope wetlands, it is necessary to adopt other stronger measures to eliminate the sunny-shady slope problems.

  14. The effect of cooling on particle trajectories and acceleration in relativistic magnetic reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Daniel; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-01-01

    The maximum synchrotron burnoff limit of 160 MeV represents a fundamental limit to radiation resulting from electromagnetic particle acceleration in one-zone ideal plasmas. In magnetic reconnection, however, particle acceleration and radiation are decoupled because the electric field is larger than the magnetic field in the diffusion region. We carry out two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to determine the extent to which magnetic reconnection can produce synchrotron radiation above the burnoff limit. We use the test particle comparison (TPC) method to isolate the effects of cooling by comparing the trajectories and acceleration efficiencies of test particles incident on such a reconnection region with and without cooling them. We find that the cooled and uncooled particle trajectories are typically similar during acceleration in the reconnection region, and derive an effective limit on particle acceleration that is inversely proportional to the average magnetic field experienced by the particle duri...

  15. Effect of wall thickness and helium cooling channels on duct magnetohydrodynamic flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Qingyun; Feng, Jingchao; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • MHD flows in ducts of different wall thickness compared with wall uniform. • Study of velocity, pressure distribution in ducts MHD flows with single pass of helium cooling channels. • Comparison of three types of dual helium cooling channels and acquisition of an option for minimum pressure drop. • A single short duct MHD flow in blanket without FCI has been simulated for pressure gradient analysis. - Abstract: The concept of dual coolant liquid metal (LM) blanket has been proposed in different countries to demonstrate the technical feasibility of DEMO reactor. In the system, helium gas and PbLi eutectic, separated by structure grid, are used to cool main structure materials and to be self-cooled, respectively. The non-uniform wall thickness of structure materials gives rise to wall non-homogeneous conductance ratio. It will lead to electric current distribution changes, resulting in significant changes in the velocity distribution and pressure drop of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows. In order to investigate the effect of helium channels on MHD flows, different methods of numerical simulations cases are carried out including the cases of different wall thicknesses, single pass of helium cooling channels, and three types of dual helium cooling channels. The results showed that helium tubes are able to affect the velocity distribution in the boundary layer by forming wave sharp which transfers from Hartmann boundary layer to the core area. In addition, the potential profile and pressure drop in the cases have been compared to these in the case of walls without cooling channel, and the pressure gradient of a simplified single short duct MHD flow in blanket shows small waver along the central axis in the helium channel position.

  16. Numerical investigation into thermal effects of pre-cooling zone in vitrification-based cryopreservation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsun-Heng; Tsai, Chien-Hsiung; Wu, Wei-Te; Chen, Fu-Zen; Chiang, Pei-Ju

    2015-02-01

    Most studies on ultra-fast cryopreservation assume an immediate placement of the cryopreservation tube in the liquid nitrogen tank. However, in practice, before the tube is placed into the liquid nitrogen, it passes through a space containing gaseous nitrogen (pre-cooling zone) formed via the evaporation of the bulk liquid nitrogen. Comparing with ultra-fast cryopreservation, the cooling rate is insufficiently high during the falling transition to vitrify the liquid. As the tube passes through this region, its temperature may fall to the temperature required for the formation of ice crystals, and thus cell damage may occur. Consequently, in optimizing the cryopreservation process, the effects of this transition region should be properly understood. Accordingly, the present study utilizes a thermal model to investigate the temperature variation in the tube as it falls through the pre-cooling region. The simulation results show that the cooling rate within the tube increases with an increasing tube velocity. Furthermore, the results reveal that the cooling rate at the front end of the tube is higher than that at any other position of the tube. Thus, to prevent the formation of ice crystals, the material used to seal the front end of the tube should have a low thermal conductivity. In addition, a streamlined design of the front end of the tube is advised. Finally, the cooling rate within the tube depends on the tube material as well as the falling speed. The height of the pre-cooling zone needs to be carefully designed based on the tube material and falling speed, thus the ice crystal formation can be prevented.

  17. A model for asymmetric magnetoimpedance effect in multilayered bimagnetic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buznikov, N. A.; Antonov, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    The magnetoimpedance in three-layered bimagnetic film structure is studied theoretically. The structure consists of the soft and hard magnetic films separated by highly conductive non-magnetic layer. A model to describe the magnetoimpedance effect in the film structure based on a simultaneous solution of linearized Maxwell equations and Landau-Lifshitz equation is proposed. It is shown that magnetostatic coupling between the magnetic layers results in the asymmetry in the field dependence of the film impedance. The magnetostatic coupling is described in terms of an effective bias field appearing in the soft magnetic layer. The calculated field and frequency dependences of the film impedance are shown to be in a qualitative agreement with previous results of experimental studies of the asymmetric magnetoimpedance in NiFe/Cu/Co film structures. The results obtained may be useful for development of weak magnetic-field sensors.

  18. Interfacial Effects on Pentablock Ionomer Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etampawala, Thusitha; Ratnaweera, Dilru; Osti, Naresh; Shrestha, Umesh; Perahia, Dvora; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2011-03-01

    The interfacial behavior of multi block copolymer thin films results from a delicate balance between inherent phase segregation due to incompatibility of the blocks and the interactions of the individual blocks with the interfaces. Here in we report a study of thin films of ABCBA penta block copolymers, anionically synthesized, comprising of centered randomly sulfonated polystyrene block to which rubbery poly-ethylenebutalene is connected, terminated by blocks of poly-t-butylstyrene, kindly provided by Kraton. AFM and neutron reflectometry studies have shown that the surface structure of pristine films depends on film thickness and ranges from trapped micelles to thin layered films. Annealing above Tg for the styrene block results in rearrangements into relatively featureless air interface. Neutron reflectivity studies have shown that annealed films forms layers whose plane are parallel to the solid substrate with the bulky block at the air interface and the ionic block at the solid interface.

  19. Expressions for the evaporation of sessile liquid droplets incorporating the evaporative cooling effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yilin; Ma, Liran; Xu, Xuefeng; Luo, Jianbin

    2016-12-15

    The evaporation along the surface of pinned, sessile droplets is investigated numerically by using the combined field approach. In the present model, the evaporative cooling at the droplet surface which leads to a reduction in the evaporation is taken into account. Simple, yet accurate analytical expressions for the local evaporation flux and for the total evaporation rate of sessile droplets are obtained. The theoretical analyses indicate that the reduction in the evaporation becomes more pronounced as the evaporative cooling number Ec increases. The results also reveal that the variation of total evaporation rate with contact angle will change its trend as the intensity of the evaporative cooling changes. For small values of Ec, the total evaporation rate increases with the contact angle, the same as predicted by Deegan et al. and by Hu and Larson in their isothermal models in which the evaporative cooling is neglected. Contrarily, when the evaporative cooling effect is strong enough, the total evaporation rate will decrease as the contact angle increases. The present theory is corroborated experimentally, and found in good agreement with the expressions proposed by Hu and Larson in the limiting isothermal case.

  20. Effects of ambient room temperature on cold air cooling during laser hair removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Ramin; Rosenbach, Alan

    2007-09-01

    Forced air cooling is a well-established technique that protects the epidermis during laser heating of deeper structures, thereby allowing for increased laser fluences. The goal of this prospective study was to identify whether an elevation in ambient room temperature influences the efficacy of forced air cooling. Skin surface temperatures were measured on 24 sites (12 subjects) during cold air exposure in examination rooms with ambient temperatures of 72 degrees F (22.2 degrees C) and 82 degrees F (27.8 degrees C), respectively. Before cooling, mean skin surface temperature was 9 degrees F (5 degrees C) higher in the warmer room (P cooling (within 1 s), the skin surface temperature remained considerably higher (10.75 degrees F, or 5.8 degrees C, P cooling in a room with an ambient temperature of 82 degrees F (27.8 degrees C) is not as effective as in a room that is at 72 degrees F (22.2 degrees C).

  1. Pressure Effects on Solid State Phase Transformation of Aluminium Bronze in Cooling Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai-Yan; CHEN Yan; LIU Yu-Wen; LI Fei; LIU Jian-Hua; PENG Gui-Rong; WANG Wen-Kui

    2009-01-01

    Effects of high pressure (6 GPa) on the solid state phase transformation kinetic parameters of aluminum bronze during the cooling process are investigated, based on the measurement and calculation of its solid state phase transformation temperature, duration and activation energy and the observation of its microstructures. The results show that high pressure treatment can reduce the solid phase transformation temperature and activation energy in the cooling process and can shorten the phase transformation duration, which is favorable when forming fine-grained aluminum bronze.

  2. Effect of dislocation configuration on non-equilibrium boron segregation during cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Different densities and configurations of crystal defects were obtained in an austenitic Fe-30%Ni alloy and an ultra low carbon bainitic (ULCB) alloy by undergoing different deformations and annealing treatments at high temperatures. Boron segregation on grain boundaries and subgrain boundaries during air-cooling were revealed by means of the particle tracking autoradiography technique. It is found that non-equilibrium segregation is resisted in deformed grains after recovery and polygonization, boron-depleted zones seem to be quite clear in recrystallized grains than those in deformed original grains during cooling. Subgrain boundaries and polygonized dislocation cells have a significant effect on non-equilibrium boron segregation during the air-cooling. The results implicates that dislocation configuration is a more important factor affecting boron segregation at grain boundaries rather than the density of defects itself in the grain.

  3. Effect of modification and cooling rate on the macrostructure of IN-713C alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Binczyk

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of the effect of modification and cooling rate on the macrostructure of castings made from IN-713C nickel superalloy were described. As a modifier, cobalt aluminate CoAl2O4 in composition with aluminium powder and colloidal silica was used. Changes in the cooling rate were obtained by the use of a stepped test piece with the steps of 6, 11, 17 and 23 mm thickness. As a criterion for the evaluation of casting macrostructure, the stereological parameters, like grain count, relative surface area, shape factor, and indeces of the grain size and shape homogeneity, were applied. The modification treatment was observed to change the grain type from columnar to equiaxial. The stereological parameters of the equiaxial grains depended to a great extent on the cooling rate of the individual elements of a cast stepped test piece.

  4. The cooling and moistening effect on the formation of sea fog in the Huanghai Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jian; ZHOU Faxiu

    2006-01-01

    With the sea surface observations from ICOADS for the years 1960~2002, the conditions of cooling, evaporation and water vapor transportation are analyzed and compared for the formation of seasonal sea fog in April-July in the Huanghai Sea. It is found that sea surface cooling is always existent during the fog seasons while sea surface evaporation only appears in April-June in the Huanghai Sea. Local evaporation alone is not sufficient to form fogs though it may lead to light ones. Water vapor transported from the low-latitudes accomplished by specific synoptic systems is the most important condition for sea fog formation. In general, the moistening effect is more important than the cooling one.

  5. Tunable nano Peltier cooling device from geometric effects using a single graphene nanoribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wan-Ju; Yao, Dao-Xin; Carlson, E. W.

    2014-08-01

    Based on the phenomenon of curvature-induced doping in graphene we propose a class of Peltier cooling devices, produced by geometrical effects, without gating. We show how a graphene nanoribbon laid on an array of curved nano cylinders can be used to create a targeted and tunable cooling device. Using two different approaches, the Nonequilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) method and experimental inputs, we predict that the cooling power of such a device can approach the order of kW/cm2, on par with the best known techniques using standard superlattice structures. The structure proposed here helps pave the way toward designing graphene electronics which use geometry rather than gating to control devices.

  6. Effect of film thickness on the columnar packing structures of discotic supramolecules in thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo-Sik; Choi, Sung-Min; Pate, Brian D; Park, Po Gyu

    2009-10-19

    The effects of film thickness on the columnar packing structure of discotic supramolecules in a thin supported film have been investigated by grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering technique using magnetically aligned cobalt octa(n-decylthio)porphyrazine (CoS10) films on octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-functionalized substrates as model systems. Magnetically aligned CoS10 films with a range of film thicknesses (49-845 nm) form uniaxially oriented 'edge-on' columnar superstructures with their columnar directors perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. However, the orientational ordering of the columnar packing in the plane perpendicular to the applied magnetic field is strongly dependent on the film thickness. While being damped by the elasticity of the side chains of CoS10, the strong interfacial interaction at the film-substrate interface propagates up to 50-100 nm from the substrate, maintaining the orientation of columnar packing in the plane perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. When the distance from the film-substrate interface becomes larger than about 100 nm, symmetric tilting of columnar layer orientation, which saturates at 11.5 degrees , occurs due to longitudinal edge dislocations induced by accumulated elastic deformation.

  7. Effects of tropical climate and water cooling methods on growing pigs' responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huynh, T.T.T.; Aarnink, A.J.A.; Truong, C.T.; Kemp, B.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2006-01-01

    We report a study on crossbred growing pig ((Duroc x Pietrain) x Large White) that measured the effect of tropical conditions on respiration rate (RR), skin temperature (ST), rectal temperature (RT) and productivity and determined the efficacy of two simple cooling methods. The experiment was a rand

  8. The lumping of heat transfer parameters in cooled packed beds: effect of the bed entry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, E.J.; Gerner, J.W.; Gerner, J.W.; Westerterp, K.R.; van der Wal, S.

    1993-01-01

    The lumping of the heat transfer parameters of the one- and the two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous model of a cooled fixed bed were compared. It appeared that the lumping of the two-dimensional parameters, being the effective radial conductivity h-eff and the heat transfer coefficient at the wall (a

  9. Determination of effective heat transport coefficients for wall-cooled packed beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borkink, J.G.H.; Borkink, J.G.H.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    The influence is studied of several assumptions, often made in literature, on the values for the effective radial heat conductivity, wall heat transfer coefficient and overall heat transfer coefficient, as obtained from experiments in wall-cooled packed beds without a chemical reaction. Especially t

  10. Elastocaloric effect of Ni-Ti wire for application in a cooling device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tusek, Jaka; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2015-01-01

    We report on the elastocaloric effect of a superelastic Ni-Ti wire to be used in a cooling device. Initially, each evaluated wire was subjected to 400 loading/unloading training cycles in order to stabilize its superelastic behavior. The wires were trained at different temperatures, which lead to...

  11. Thermal field of the Joule-Thomson effect under conditions of bed cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharafutdinov, R.F.; Filippov, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    Features are examined of the thermal field for the Joule-Thomson effect under bed conditions when there is cooling by injected water. It is indicated that the time for establishing the temperature significantly depends on the thermophysical properties of the bed and underlying rocks. Results of calculations of the temperature relationship for different conditions of well operation are presented.

  12. Analysis of Regen Cooling in Rocket Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Brent (Technical Monitor); Merkle, C. L.; Li, D.; Sankaran, V.

    2004-01-01

    The use of detailed CFD modeling for the description of cooling in rocket chambers is discussed. The overall analysis includes a complete three-dimensional analysis of the flow in the regenerative cooling passages, conjugate heat transfer in the combustor walls, and the effects of film cooling on the inside chamber. The results in the present paper omit the effects of film cooling and include only regen cooling and the companion conjugate heat transfer. The hot combustion gases are replaced by a constant temperature wall boundary condition. Load balancing for parallel cluster computations is ensured by using single-block unstructured grids for both fluids and solids, and by using a 'multiple physical zones' to account for differences in the number of equations. Validation of the method is achieved by comparing simple two-dimensional solutions with analytical results. Representative results for cooling passages are presents showing the effects of heat conduction in the copper walls with tube aspect ratios of 1.5:l.

  13. Temperature effects in supercritical fluid chromatography: a trade-off between viscous heating and decompression cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pauw, Ruben; Choikhet, Konstantin; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2014-10-24

    The study of radial and axial temperature profiles always has been an area interest both in liquid chromatography (LC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). Whereas in LC always an increase in temperature is observed due to the dominance of viscous heating, in SFC, especially for low modifier content, a decrease in temperature is found due to the much larger decompression cooling. However, for higher modifier content and higher operating pressure, the temperature effects become a trade-off between viscous heating and decompression cooling, since in SFC the latter is a strong function of operating pressure and mobile phase composition. At a temperature of 40°C and for neat CO2, the effect of decompression cooling and viscous heating cancel each other out at a pressure 450bar. This pressure decreases almost linearly with volume fraction of methanol to 150bar at 25vol%. As a result, both cooling and heating effects can be observed when operating at high back pressure, large column pressure drops or high modifier content. For example at a back pressure of 150bar and a column pressure drop of 270bar decompression cooling is observed throughout the column. However at 300bar back pressure and the same pressure drop, the mobile phase heats up in the first part of the column due to viscous heating and then cools in the second part due to decompression cooling. When coupling columns (2.1mm×150mm, 1.8μm fully porous particles) at very high operating pressure (e.g. 750bar for 8vol%), the situation is even more complex. E.g. at a back pressure of 150bar and using 8vol% methanol, viscous heating is only observed in the first column whereas only decompression cooling in the second. Further increasing the inlet pressure up to 1050bar resulted in no excessive temperature differences along the column. This implies that the inlet pressure of SFC instrumentation could be expanded above 600bar without additional band broadening caused by excessive radial temperature

  14. Making the Tg-Confinement Effect Disappear in Thin Polystyrene Films: Good Physics vs. Inappropriate Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkelson, John; Chen, Lawrence

    2013-03-01

    The Tg-confinement effect in polymers was first characterized in supported polystyrene (PS) films by Keddie et al. in 1994. Since then, many researchers have shown that (pseudo-)thermodynamic Tg measurements of supported PS films taken on cooling consistently yield the same qualitative results, with a decrease from bulk Tg beginning at 40-60 nm thickness and becoming very strong below 20 nm thickness. Some quantitative differences have been noted between studies, which may be ascribed to measurement method or the analysis employed. In 2004, we showed that the Tg-confinement effect in PS may be suppressed by adding several wt% of small-molecule diluents such as dioctyl phthalate. Recently, Kremer and co-workers (Macromolecules 2010, 43, 9937) reported that there was no Tg-confinement in supported PS films based on an analysis of the second derivative of ellipsometry data and use of a ninth order polynomial fit. Here, we demonstrate a new method for suppressing the Tg-confinement effect. In particular, PS made by emulsion polymerization yields no Tg-confinement effect as measured by ellipsometry or fluorescence, while PS made by anionic or conventional free radical polymerization yield strong Tg-confinement effects. The difference is hypothesized to result from surfactant in the emulsion polymerized PS. We also show that the absence of the Tg-confinement effect reported by Kremer is due to inappropriate analysis of ellipsometry data and that correct analysis yields Tg-confinement effects.

  15. Effect of solar radiation on the performance of cross flow wet cooling tower in hot climate of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banooni, Salem; Chitsazan, Ali

    2016-11-01

    In some cities such as Ahvaz-Iran, the solar radiation is very high and the annual-mean-daily of the global solar radiation is about 17.33 MJ m2 d-1. Solar radiation as an external heat source seems to affect the thermal performance of the cooling towers. Usually, in modeling cooling tower, the effects of solar radiation are ignored. To investigate the effect of sunshade on the performance and modeling of the cooling tower, the experiments were conducted in two different states, cooling towers with and without sunshade. In this study, the Merkel's approach and finite difference technique are used to predict the thermal behavior of cross flow wet cooling tower without sunshade and the results are compared with the data obtained from the cooling towers with and without sunshade. Results showed that the sunshade is very efficient and it reduced the outlet water temperature, the approach and the water exergy of the cooling tower up to 1.2 °C, 15 and 1.1 %, respectively and increased the range and the efficiency of the cooling tower up to 29 and 37 %, respectively. Also, the sunshade decreased the error between the experimental data of the cooling tower with sunshade and the modeling results of the cooling tower without sunshade 1.85 % in average.

  16. Questionable effects of antireflective coatings on inefficiently cooled solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akhmatov, Vladislav; Galster, Georg; Larsen, Esben

    1998-01-01

    of the output power and efficiency curves throughout the day the coherence between technical parameters of the solar cells and the climate in the operation region is observed and examined. It is shown how the drop in output power around noon can be avoided by fitting technical parameters of the solar cells......A model for temperature effects in p-n junction solar cells is introduced. The temperature of solar cells and the losses in the solar cell junction region caused by elevating temperature are discussed. The model developed is examined for low-cost silicon solar cells. In order to improve the shape...

  17. Cooling Effect of Rivers on Metropolitan Taipei Using Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study applied remote sensing technology to analyze how rivers in the urban environment affect the surface temperature of their ambient areas. While surface meteorological stations can supply accurate data points in the city, remote sensing can provide such data in a two-dimensional (2-D manner. The goal of this paper is to apply the remote sensing technique to further our understanding of the relationship between the surface temperature and rivers in urban areas. The 2-D surface temperature data was retrieved from Landsat-7 thermal infrared images, while data collected by Formosat-2 was used to categorize the land uses in the urban area. The land surface temperature distribution is simulated by a sigmoid function with nonlinear regression analysis. Combining the aforementioned data, the range of effect on the surface temperature from rivers can be derived. With the remote sensing data collected for the Taipei Metropolitan area, factors affecting the surface temperature were explored. It indicated that the effect on the developed area was less significant than on the ambient nature zone; moreover, the size of the buffer zone between the river and city, such as the wetlands or flood plain, was found to correlate with the affected distance of the river surface temperature.

  18. Cooling effect of rivers on metropolitan Taipei using remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Chang; Tan, Chih-Hung; Wei, Chiang; Su, Zi-Wen

    2014-01-23

    This study applied remote sensing technology to analyze how rivers in the urban environment affect the surface temperature of their ambient areas. While surface meteorological stations can supply accurate data points in the city, remote sensing can provide such data in a two-dimensional (2-D) manner. The goal of this paper is to apply the remote sensing technique to further our understanding of the relationship between the surface temperature and rivers in urban areas. The 2-D surface temperature data was retrieved from Landsat-7 thermal infrared images, while data collected by Formosat-2 was used to categorize the land uses in the urban area. The land surface temperature distribution is simulated by a sigmoid function with nonlinear regression analysis. Combining the aforementioned data, the range of effect on the surface temperature from rivers can be derived. With the remote sensing data collected for the Taipei Metropolitan area, factors affecting the surface temperature were explored. It indicated that the effect on the developed area was less significant than on the ambient nature zone; moreover, the size of the buffer zone between the river and city, such as the wetlands or flood plain, was found to correlate with the affected distance of the river surface temperature.

  19. Cross-linkage effect of cellulose/laponite hybrids in aqueous dispersions and solid films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zaiwu; Fan, Qingrui; Dai, Xiaonan; Zhao, Chao; Lv, Aijie; Zhang, Jingjing; Xu, Guiying; Qin, Menghua

    2014-02-15

    Homogenous cellulose/laponite aqueous dispersions and composite films were respectively prepared from the pre-cooling NaOH/urea aqueous systems. Rheological measurements of aqueous dispersions demonstrated a sol-to-gel transition triggered by loading of laponite, reflecting a cross-linkage effect of cellulose/laponite hybrids. Similarly, based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterizations, as well as mechanical and thermal measurements, the cross-linkage effect of cellulose/laponite hybrids was also found in solid films, which played an important role in improving the tensile strength (σb) of composite films. For instance, the σb exhibited a largest enhancement up to 75.7% at a critical laponite content of 0.100 wt%, indicating that the property of composite film was closely related with the dispersion and interaction state of laponite, i.e. its content in cellulose matrix. These results were expected to provide significant information for fabrication and utility of cellulose-based materials.

  20. Supercollision cooling effects on the hot photoluminescence emission of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencar, Thonimar V; Malard, Leandro M; Paula, Ana M de

    2016-09-30

    We report on hot photoluminescence measurements that show the effects of acoustic phonon supercollision processes in the intensity of graphene light emission. We use a simple optical method to induce defects on single layer graphene in a controlled manner to study in detail the light emission dependence on the sample defect density. It is now well accepted that the graphene photoluminescence is due to black-body thermal emission from the quasi-equilibrium electrons at a temperature well above the lattice temperature. Our results show that as the sample defect density is increased the electrons relax energy more efficiently via acoustic phonon supercollision processes leading to lower electron temperatures and thus lower emission intensities. The calculated intensity decrease due to supercollision energy relaxation agrees well with the experimental data.

  1. Determining the effects of thermal conductivity on epoxy molds using profiled cooling channels with metal inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altaf, Khurram; Rani, Abdul Ahmad Majdi; Ahmad, Faiz; Baharom, Masri [Mechanical Engineering Dept., Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia); Raghavan, Vijay R. [OYL Manufacturing, Sungai Buloh (Malaysia)

    2016-11-15

    Polymer injection molds are generally manufactured with metallic materials, such as tool steel, which provide reliable working of molds and extended service life. The manufacture of injection molds with steel is a prolonged process because of the strength of steel. For a short prototype production run, one of the suitable choices could be the use of aluminum-filled epoxy material, which can produce a functional mold in a short time as compared with a conventionally machined tool. Aluminum-filled epoxy tooling is a good choice for short production runs for engineering applications, yet works best for relatively simple shapes. The advantages in relation to the fabrication of injection molds with epoxy-based materials include time saving in producing the mold, epoxy curing at ambient temperature, and ease of machining and post processing. Nevertheless, one major drawback of epoxy material is its poor thermal conductivity, which results in a relatively longer cooling time for epoxy injection molds. This study investigates some of the innovative ideas for enhancing the thermal conductivity for epoxy molds. The basic concept behind these ideas was to embed a highly thermally conductive metal insert within the mold between cavities with an innovative design of cooling channels called profiled cooling channels. This technique will increase the effective thermal conductivity of the epoxy mold, leading to the reduction in cooling time for the injection molded polymer part. Experimental analysis conducted in the current study also verified that the mold with profiled cooling channels and embedded metal insert has significantly reduced the cooling time.

  2. Effects of different dentin thicknesses and air cooling on pulpal temperature rise during laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secilmis, Asli; Bulbul, Mehmet; Sari, Tugrul; Usumez, Aslihan

    2013-01-01

    The neodymium/yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd/YAG) laser has been suggested to repair broken prostheses in the mouth. This study investigated the effects of different dentin thicknesses and air cooling on pulpal temperature rise during laser welding. Three intact human maxillary molars were prepared for full-veneer crown. For each tooth, dentin thicknesses in mesiobuccal cusp was 2, 3, or 4 mm. Twenty dies were duplicated from each of the prepared teeth. For metal copings with 0.5-mm thickness, wax patterns were prepared with dip wax technique directly onto each of dies. All patterns were sprued and invested. The castings were made using a nickel-chromium alloy (Nicromed Premium, Neodontics). A hole with 0.5-mm diameter was prepared on the mesiobuccal cusp of each crown. The Nd/YAG laser (9.85 W; 1 Hz repetition rate; fluence, 1.230 J/cm(2); Fidelis Plus 3, Fotona) was used for welding with or without air cooling (n = 10). The temperature rise was measured in pulpal chamber with a J-type thermocouple wire that was connected to a data logger. Differences between start and highest temperature reading were taken, and temperature rise values were compared using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's honestly significant difference tests (α = .05). Pulpal temperature rise varied significantly depending on the dentin thickness and air cooling (p cooling group induced significantly the highest temperature increases. There were no significant differences between 2- and 3-mm dentin thicknesses groups (p > 0.05); however, pulpal temperature rise was the lowest for 4-mm dentin thickness group (p cooling was used in 2-mm dentin thickness group. Laser welding on base metal castings with Nd/YAG laser can be applied with air cooling to avoid temperature rises known to adversely affect pulpal health when dentin thickness is 2 or 3 mm.

  3. Boiling effect in liquid nitrogen directly cooled Yb³⁺:YAG laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Toshimitsu; Chosrowjan, Haik; Furuse, Hiroaki; Taniguchi, Seiji; Kitamura, Toshiyuki; Fujita, Masayuki; Ishii, Shinya; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2016-02-20

    Liquid nitrogen (LN2) behavior on the surface of excited Yb(3+):YAG is investigated using fluorometry. From the time-resolved temperature variations and integrated fluorescence spectra intensity on this directly cooled Yb(3+):YAG surface, we observe a phase transition of LN2 from nucleate boiling to film boiling. As a result of this pool boiling, good beam quality should occur when the temperature and heat flux at an excited surface of Yb(3+):YAG are below 95 K and 15.8  W/cm2, respectively. That is, the LN2 should remain in a steady state of nucleate boiling to produce good beam quality using pool boiling.

  4. Effect of Film Thickness on Properties of a-Si∶H Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The a-Si∶H films with different thickness smaller than 1μm were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) under the optimum deposition conditions. The effect of different thickness on film properties is analyzed.The results show that,with the increase of the film thickness,the dark conductivity, photoconductivity and threshold voltage increase, the optical gap and peak ratio of TA to TO in the Raman spectra decrease, the refractive index keeps almost constant, and the optical absorption coefficient and current ratio of on/off state first maximize and then reduce.

  5. Experimental test of the heating and cooling rate effect on blocking temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Thomas; Paterson, Greig A.; Cao, Changqian; Muxworthy, Adrian R.

    2017-07-01

    The cooling rates at which rocks acquire thermoremanent magnetizations (TRMs), affect their unblocking temperatures in thermal demagnetization experiments; similarly the heating rates at which the thermal demagnetization experiments are done also affect the unblocking temperature. We have tested the effects of variable cooling and heating rates on the unblocking temperatures of two natural non-interacting, magnetically uniform (single-domain, SD) (titano)magnetite samples and a synthetic SD magnetoferritin sample. While previous studies have only considered unblocking temperatures for stepwise thermal demagnetization data (i.e. the room-temperature magnetization after incremental heating), in this work we derive an expression for continuous thermal demagnetization of both TRMs and viscous remanent magnetizations (VRMs) and relate the heating rate to an effective equivalent hold time of a stepwise thermal demagnetization experiment. Through our analysis we reach four main conclusions: First, the theoretical expressions for the heating/cooling rate effect do not accurately predict experimentally observed blocking temperatures. Empirically, the relation can be modified incorporating a factor that amplifies both the temperature and the heating rate dependence of the heating/cooling rate effect. Using these correction factors, Pullaiah nomograms can accurately predict blocking temperatures of both TRMs and VRMs for continuous heating/cooling. Second, demagnetization temperatures are approximately predicted by published 'Pullaiah nomograms', but blocking occurs gradually over temperature intervals of 5-40 K. Third, the theoretically predicted temperatures correspond to ∼54-82 per cent blocking, depending on the sample. Fourth, the blocking temperatures can be used to obtain estimates of the atomic attempt time τ0, which were found to be 3 × 10-10 s for large grained (titano)magnetite, 1 × 10-13 s for small grained (titano)magnetite below the Verwey transition and 9

  6. Effect of pressure on closure temperature of a trace element in cooling petrological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yan

    2017-03-01

    Closure temperature is important to many diffusion-related problems involving cooling. The classic model of Dodson and its modifications for cooling petrological systems are formulated at constant pressure. Many petrologic processes involve changes in both temperature and pressure. The effect of changing pressure on diffusional loss in cooling petrological systems has not been considered in Dodson's model. During upwelling, the decompression rate is related to the cooling rate through the slope of the upwelling path. Simple analytical expressions for the average or mean closure temperature and closure pressure in cooling-upwelling mono-mineralic and bi-mineralic systems are obtained by noting that both temperature and pressure decrease as a function of time along the upwelling path. These pressure-adjusted equations are nearly identical to closure temperature equations for isobaric cases if one replaces the activation energy and pre-exponential factor for diffusion in the isobaric formulations by the path-dependent activation energy and pre-exponential factor. The latter also depend on the slope of the upwelling path. The competing effects between pressure and temperature on diffusion during upwelling result in reductions in the effective activation enthalpy for diffusion and exchange enthalpy for partitioning, which in turn leads to systematic deviations in closure temperatures from cases of constant pressure. For systems with large activation volume for diffusion, it may be possible to deduce upwelling path and upwelling rate from closure temperatures and closure pressures of selected elements. Examples of closure temperature and closure pressure for REE diffusion in garnet and clinopyroxene and in garnet-clinopyroxene aggregates are presented and discussed in the context of the minor's rule and the REE-in-garnet-clinopyroxene thermobarometer. Closure temperatures for middle-to-heavy REE in garnet-clinopyroxene aggregates are controlled primarily by diffusion in

  7. Effect of oxygen on the hydrogenation properties of magnesium films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld, Christopher Worsøe; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2006-01-01

    The effect of magnesium oxide on the magnesium and hydrogen desorption properties of magnesium films have been investigated. We find that by capping metallic magnesium films with oxide overlayers the apparent desorption energy of magnesium is increased from 146 kJ/mol to 314 kJ/mol. The results...

  8. Thermal effects and component cooling in Magnum-PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruijt, O.G., E-mail: kruijt@rijnhuizen.nl [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster (Netherlands); Scholten, J.; Smeets, P.H.M.; Brons, S.; Eck, H.J.N. van; Al, R.S.; Berg, M.A. van den; Meiden, H.J. van der; Rooij, G.J. van; Zelijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    Magnum-PSI is a linear plasma generator, built at the FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen. Subject of study will be the interaction of plasma with a diversity of surface materials. The machine is designed to provide an environment with a steady state high-flux plasma (up to 10{sup 24} H{sup +} ions/m{sup 2} s) in a 3 T magnetic field with an exposed surface of 80 cm{sup 2} up to 10 MW/m{sup 2}. Magnum-PSI will provide new insights in the complex physics and chemistry that will occur in the divertor region of the future experimental fusion reactor ITER and reactors beyond ITER. The conditions at the surface of the sample can be varied over a wide range, such as plasma temperature, beam diameter, particle flux, inclination angle of the target, background pressure and magnetic field. An important subject of attention in the design of the machine was thermal effects originating in the excess heat and gas flow from the plasma source and radiation from the target.

  9. The microscale cooling effects of water sensitive urban design and irrigation in a suburban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Ashley M.; Coutts, Andrew M.; Tapper, Nigel J.; Demuzere, Matthias; Beringer, Jason

    2017-09-01

    Prolonged drought has threatened traditional potable urban water supplies in Australian cities, reducing capability to adapt to climate change and mitigate against extreme. Integrated urban water management (IUWM) approaches, such as water sensitive urban design (WSUD), reduce the reliance on centralised potable water supply systems and provide a means for retaining water in the urban environment through stormwater harvesting and reuse. This study examines the potential for WSUD to provide cooling benefits and reduce human exposure and heat stress and thermal discomfort. A high-resolution observational field campaign, measuring surface level microclimate variables and remotely sensed land surface characteristics, was conducted in a mixed residential suburb containing WSUD in Adelaide, South Australia. Clear evidence was found that WSUD features and irrigation can reduce surface temperature (T s) and air temperature (T a) and improve human thermal comfort (HTC) in urban environments. The average 3 pm T a near water bodies was found to be up to 1.8 °C cooler than the domain maximum. Cooling was broadly observed in the area 50 m downwind of lakes and wetlands. Design and placement of water bodies were found to affect their cooling effectiveness. HTC was improved by proximity to WSUD features, but shading and ventilation were also effective at improving thermal comfort. This study demonstrates that WSUD can be used to cool urban microclimates, while simultaneously achieving other environmental benefits, such as improved stream ecology and flood mitigation.

  10. Numerical Simulation for Effect of Inlet Cooling Rate on Fluid Flow and Temperature Distribution in Tundish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Tian-peng; LIU Cheng-jun; JIANG Mao-fa

    2012-01-01

    The fluid flow in tundish is a non-isothermal process and the temperature variation of stream from teeming ladle dominates the fluid flow and thermal distribution in tundish. A numerical model was established to investigate the effect of inlet cooling rate on fluid flow and temperature distribution in tundish based on a FTSC (Flexible Thin Slab Casting) tundish. The inlet cooling rate varies from 0. 5 to 0. 25 ~C/rain. Under the present calculation conditions, the following conclusions were made. When the stream temperature from teeming ladle drops seriously (for inlet cooling rate of 0.5℃/min), there is a "backward flow" at the coming end of casting. The horizontal flow along the free surface turns to flow along the bottom of tundish. The bottom flow shortens the fluid flow route in tundish and deteriorates the removal effect of nonmetallic inclusions from molten steel. Nevertheless, when the inlet cooling rate decreases to 0.25℃/min, the horizontal flow is sustained during the whole casting period. The present research provides theoretical directions for temperature control in teeming ladle and continuous casting tundish during production of advanced steels.

  11. Effect of cooling rate on microstructure and compressive performance of AZ91 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lin; FENG Hui; QIU Ke-qiang; CHEN Li-jia; LIU Zheng

    2006-01-01

    Effect of cooling rate on both microstructure and room temperature compressive performance of the AZ91 magnesium alloy was investigated. The experimental results show that with increasing cooling rate, the quantity of the solid solution phase increases and the fraction of secondary phase Mg17Al12 decreases. The almost single solid solution phase can be obtained with using liquid nitrogen as a coolant. The compressive strengths of the rapid solidified AZ91 magnesium alloys are higher than those of normal cast alloy, and decrease with increasing cooling rate. After artificial aging treatment for 14 h at 168 ℃, the compressive strength of the rapidly solidified AZ91 magnesium alloy cooled in liquid nitrogen increases from 253.5 to 335.3 MPa, while the compressive yield strength increases from 138.1 to 225.91 MPa. The improvement in the compressive strength of the rapidly solidified AZ91magnesium alloys can be attributed to the hardening effect from fine secondary phase.

  12. Diagnosis and effects of urine contamination in cooled-extended stallion semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerbrock, R; Canisso, I; Feijo, L; Lima, F; Shipley, C; Kline, K

    2016-04-15

    Urospermia is known to affect semen quality in many mammals, including stallions. Determinations of semen pH and creatinine and urea concentrations have been used to diagnose urine contamination in raw stallion semen. Unfortunately, practitioners suspecting urine contamination in cooled-shipped samples have no proven means to confirm the presence of urine. Therefore, the objectives of this study were (1) to assess the effects of urine contamination on sperm motility of extended fresh and cooled-stored stallion semen, (2) to evaluate the usefulness of semen color, odor, pH, and creatinine and urea concentrations for urospermia diagnosis, and (3) to evaluate the accuracy of a commercial blood urea nitrogen test strip in diagnosing urine contamination in extended-cooled stallion semen. Thirty-seven ejaculates were obtained from 11 stallions with no history of urospermia before division into 5 mL aliquots, and contamination with stallion urine. Each resulting sample was assessed for sperm motility, color, odor, pH, creatinine, and urea nitrogen concentration using both a semiquantitative test strip (Azostix), and a quantitative automated analyzer before and after cooling for 24 hour. Sperm motility parameters, pH, and creatinine and urea concentrations were analyzed using mixed models. Urine contamination decreased total and progressive motility in all samples before and after cooling (P contaminated samples ranged from 30% to 71% at 0 hour and 27% to 61% at 24 hours. Control mean urea (29 mg/dL) and creatinine (0.6 mg/dL) concentrations were significantly different (P contaminated samples (158 mg/dL and 11.6 mg/dL, respectively) at 0 hour. Similarly, control mean urea (8 mg/dL) and creatinine (0.9 mg/dL) concentrations were significantly different than all urine-contaminated samples at 24 hours. Odor assessment presented moderate sensitivity (65%) and high specificity (100%), while color assessment presented low sensitivity (47%) and moderate specificity (79

  13. Effects of heat acclimation on hand cooling efficacy following exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Elizabeth L; Vandermark, Lesley W; Pryor, J Luke; Pryor, Riana R; VanScoy, Rachel M; Denegar, Craig R; Huggins, Robert A; Casa, Douglas J

    2017-05-01

    This study examined the separate and combined effects of heat acclimation and hand cooling on post-exercise cooling rates following bouts of exercise in the heat. Seventeen non-heat acclimated (NHA) males (mean ± SE; age, 23 ± 1 y; mass, 75.30 ± 2.27 kg; maximal oxygen consumption [VO2 max], 54.1 ± 1.3 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) completed 2 heat stress tests (HST) when NHA, then 10 days of heat acclimation, then 2 HST once heat acclimated (HA) in an environmental chamber (40°C; 40%RH). HSTs were 2 60-min bouts of treadmill exercise (45% VO2 max; 2% grade) each followed by 10 min of hand cooling (C) or no cooling (NC). Heat acclimation sessions were 90-240 min of treadmill or stationary bike exercise (60-80% VO2 max). Repeated measures ANOVA with Fishers LSD post hoc (α < 0.05) identified differences. When NHA, C (0.020 ± 0.003°C·min(-1)) had a greater cooling rate than NC (0.013 ± 0.003°C·min(-1)) (mean difference [95%CI]; 0.007°C [0.001,0.013], P = 0.035). Once HA, C (0.021 ± 0.002°C·min(-1)) was similar to NC (0.025 ± 0.002°C·min(-1)) (0.004°C [-0.003,0.011], P = 0.216). Hand cooling when HA (0.021 ± 0.002°C·min(-1)) was similar to when NHA (0.020 ± 0.003°C·min(-1)) (P = 0.77). In conclusion, when NHA, C provided greater cooling rates than NC. Once HA, C and NC provided similar cooling rates.

  14. Ultrathin organic semiconductor films--soft matter effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong; Yan, Donghang

    2014-05-01

    The growth of organic semiconductor thin films has been a crucial issue in organic electronics, especially the growth at the early stages. The thin-film phase has been found to be a common phenomenon in many organic semiconductor thin films, which is closely related with the weak van der Waals interaction between organic molecules, the long-range interaction between organic molecules and the substrate, as well as the soft matter characteristics of ultrathin films. The growth behavior and soft matter characteristics of the thin-film phase have great effects on thin film morphology and structure, for example, the formation and coalescence of grain boundaries, which further influences the performance of organic electronic devices. The understanding of thin-film phase and its intrinsic quality is necessary for fabricating large-size, highly ordered, continuous and defect-free ultrathin films. This review will focus on the growth behavior of organic ultrathin films, i.e., the level of the first several molecular layers, and provide an overview of the soft matter characteristics.

  15. Large Eddy Simulation of a Film Cooling Flow Injected from an Inclined Discrete Cylindrical Hole into a Crossflow with Zero-Pressure Gradient Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Shyam, Vikram

    2012-01-01

    A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is performed of a high blowing ratio (M = 1.7) film cooling flow with density ratio of unity. Mean results are compared with experimental data to show the degree of fidelity achieved in the simulation. While the trends in the LES prediction are a noticeable improvement over Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) predictions, there is still a lack a spreading on the underside of the lifted jet. This is likely due to the inability of the LES to capture the full range of influential eddies on the underside of the jet due to their smaller structure. The unsteady structures in the turbulent coolant jet are also explored and related to turbulent mixing characteristics

  16. Effects of Nuclear Energy on Sustainable Development and Energy Security: Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Case

    OpenAIRE

    Sungjoo Lee; Byungun Yoon; Juneseuk Shin

    2016-01-01

    We propose a stepwise method of selecting appropriate indicators to measure effects of a specific nuclear energy option on sustainable development and energy security, and also to compare an energy option with another. Focusing on the sodium-cooled fast reactor, one of the highlighted Generation IV reactors, we measure and compare its effects with the standard pressurized water reactor-based nuclear power, and then with coal power. Collecting 36 indicators, five experts select seven key indic...

  17. Effect of counter current gas phase on liquid film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shujuan LUO; Huaizhi LI; Weiyang FEI; Yundong WANG

    2009-01-01

    Liquid film flow is very important in many industrial applications. However, there are few reports about its characteristics on structured packings. Therefore, in this paper, liquid film phenomena were investigated experimentally to exploit new approaches for intensifying the performance of the structured packings. All experiments were performed at room temperature. Water and air were the working fluids. The effect of counter current gas phase on the liquid film was taken into consideration. A high speed camera, a non-intrusive measurement technique, was used. It is shown that both liquid and gas phases have strong effects on film characteristics. In the present work, liquid film width increased by 57% because of increasing liquid flow rate, while it decreased by 25% resulting from the counter current gas phase.

  18. Effect of field cooling process and ion-beam bombardment on the exchange bias of NiCo/(Ni, Co)O bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Lin, K.-W., E-mail: kwlin@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Liu, H.-Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Wei, D.-H. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Li, G.J. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Pong, P.W.T., E-mail: ppong@eee.hku.hk [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2014-11-03

    The research on exchange coupled ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (FM/AF) bilayers has been the foundation of spintronic applications such as hard disk reading heads and spin torque oscillators. In order to further explore the exchange bias behavior of NiCo/(Ni, Co)O bilayers, effect of field cooling process, magnetic angular dependence, and ion-beam bombardment was investigated. The difference in film composition resulted in remarkable distinction in crystalline structures and domain patterns. The exchange bias field (H{sub ex}) in the bilayer systems exhibited a strong angular dependence. The negative H{sub ex} after a field cooling process indicated that the polarity of H{sub ex} can be defined by aligning the magnetization orientation of the FM NiCo layer with the applied field. Moreover, enhanced exchange bias effect was observed in the NiCo/(Ni, Co)O bilayers that resulted from the surface of the (Ni, Co)O layers bombarded with different Ar{sup +} ion-beam energies using End-Hall voltages from 0 V to 150 V. The interface spin structures as well as the surface domain patterns were altered by the ion-beam bombardment process. These results indicated that the exchange bias field of NiCo/(Ni, Co)O bilayer systems could be tailored by field cooling process, angular dependence of magnetic properties, and post ion-beam bombardment. - Highlights: • Strong angular dependence was observed in the exchange bias of NiCo/(Ni, Co)O bilayers. • The field cooling process resulted in negative exchange bias. • Moderate ion-beam bombardment on (NiCo)O layers enhanced exchange bias at 298 K. • High-energy ion bombardment strengthened the exchange coupling in field cooled bilayer. • The structural deformation was responsible for the change in magnetic properties.

  19. The effect of interfacial evaporation on heat and mass transfer of falling liquid film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Buxuan; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Wasden, F.K., Dukler, A.E., Insight into the hydrodynamics of free falling wavy films, AIChE J., 1989, 35(2): 187.[2]Jayanti, S., Hewitt, G.F., Hydrodynamics and heat transfer of wavy thin film flow, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 1997, 40(10): 179.[3]Seban, R.A., Faghri, A., Evaporation and heating with turbulent falling liquid films, ASME J. Heat Transfer, 1976, 98C: 315.[4]Yang, W.M., Evaporation cooling of liquid film in turbulent mixed convection channel flows, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 1998, 41(23): 3719.[5]Wang, B.X., Zhang, J.T., Peng, X.F., Experimental study on the dryout heat flux of falling liquid film, accepted by Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer as HMT# 2507.[6]Udell, K.S., Heat transfer in porous media heated from above with evaporation, condensation, and capillary effects, ASME J. Heat Transfer, 1983, 105: 485.[7]Carey, V.P., Liquid-Vapor Phase-Change Phenomena——An Introduction to the Thermophysics of Vaporization and Conduction Processes in Heat Transfer Equipment, Washington: Hemisphere Publishing Corporation, 1992, 112.[8]Eames, I.W., Marr, N.J., Sabir, H., The evaporation coefficient of water: a review, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 1997, 40(12): 2963.[9]Israelachvili, J.N., Intermolecular and Surface Forces, San Diego: Academic Press, 1990, 16-30.[10]Holman, J.P., Heat Transfer, 5th ed., Tokyo: McGraw-Hill, Inc, 1981.[11]Zhang, J.T., Wang, B.X., Peng, X.F., Falling liquid film thickness measurement by optical-electronic method, Rev. Scientific Instruments, 2000, 71(4): [12]Zhang, J.T., Wang, B.X., Peng, X.F., Investigation on the interfacial evaporation of falling liquid film with wall heating, accepted by J. Tsinghua University.[13]Fujita, T., Ueda, T., Heat transfer to falling liquid films and film breakdown, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 1978, 21: 97.[14]Bohn, M.S., Davis, S.H., Thermocapillary breakdown of falling liquid films at high Reynolds numbers, Int. J. Heat Masss Transfer, 1993, 36

  20. Gamma irradiation effects in W films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claro, Luiz H. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados - IEAv, Rod. dos Tamoios, km 5,5, CEP: 12228-840, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil) and Faculdade de Tecnologia Sao Francisco - FATESF, Av. Siqueira Campos, 1174, CEP: 12207-000, Jacarei (Brazil); Santos, Ingrid A. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados - IEAv, Rod. dos Tamoios, km 5,5, CEP: 12228-840, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Silva, Cassia F. [Faculdade de Tecnologia Sao Francisco - FATESF, Av. Siqueira Campos, 1174, CEP: 12207-000, Jacarei, SP (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    Using the van Der Pauw methodology, the surface resistivity of irradiated tungsten films deposited on Silicon substrate was measured. The films were exposed to {gamma} radiation using a isotopic {sup 60}Co source in three irradiation stages attaining 40.35 kGy in total dose. The obtained results for superficial resistivity display a time annealing features and their values are proportional to the total dose.

  1. Effects of pre-cooling procedures on intermittent-sprint exercise performance in warm conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Rob; Marino, Frank E

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pre-cooling procedures improve both maximal sprint and sub-maximal work during intermittent-sprint exercise. Nine male rugby players performed a familiarisation session and three testing sessions of a 2 x 30-min intermittent sprint protocol, which consisted of a 15-m sprint every min separated by free-paced hard-running, jogging and walking in 32 degrees C and 30% humidity. The three sessions included a control condition, Ice-vest condition and Ice-bath/Ice-vest condition, with respective cooling interventions imposed for 15-min pre-exercise and 10-min at half-time. Performance measures of sprint time and % decline and distance covered during sub-maximal exercise were recorded, while physiological measures of core temperature (T (core)), mean skin temperature (T (skin)), heart rate, heat storage, nude mass, rate of perceived exertion, rate of thermal comfort and capillary blood measures of lactate [La(-)], pH, Sodium (Na(+)) and Potassium (K(+)) were recorded. Results for exercise performance indicated no significant differences between conditions for the time or % decline in 15-m sprint efforts or the distance covered during sub-maximal work bouts; however, large effect size data indicated a greater distance covered during hard running following Ice-bath cooling. Further, lowered T (core), T (skin), heart rate, sweat loss and thermal comfort following Ice-bath cooling than Ice-vest or Control conditions were present, with no differences present in capillary blood measures of [La(-)], pH, K(+) or Na(+). As such, the ergogenic benefits of effective pre-cooling procedures in warm conditions for team-sports may be predominantly evident during sub-maximal bouts of exercise.

  2. A Multi-Center Controlled Study of the Acute and Chronic Effects of Cooling Therapy for MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Bernadette; Schwid, Steven W.; Cutter, Gary; Murray, Ronald; Bowen, James; Pellegrino, Richard; Guisado, Raul; Webbon, Bruce W.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To determine the acute and chronic effects of cooling therapy on patients with MS using objective functional performance measures and self-assessed measures of fatigue. Cooling demyelinated nerves can reduce conduction block, potentially improving symptoms of MS. Significant acute and chronic effects of cooling have not been demonstrated in a multi-center, controlled, blinded study using objective measures of neurologic function. Patients (N=84) with definite MS, mild to moderate disability (EDSS less than 6.0), and self-reported heat sensitivity were enrolled at 5 study sites. Acute effects of cooling were assessed by randomly assigning subjects to high-dose or low-dose cooling for one hour using an active cooling vest and cap (Life Enhancement Technologies, Santa Clara, CA). Settings were individualized to maintain the cooling garments at 55 F for the high-dose treatment and 70 F for the low-dose treatment. Both patients and examining investigators were blinded to treatment assignments. The MSFC and visual acuity/contrast sensitivity were assessed before and 30 minutes after treatment. The following week, subjects had an identical visit with the alternate cooling treatment. Chronic effects of cooling were assessed by randomly assigning the same subjects to unblinded daily home cooling or observation for 4 weeks. All subjects completed the Rochester Fatigue Diary (RFD) twice weekly and subjective measures of strength, cognition, and energy level daily. At the end of the period, subjects completed the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) and underwent another high-dose cooling session with assessment of the MSFC and vision. After a one-week washout period, subjects crossed over to the alternate 4-week treatment. Oral temperatures were reduced with both acute treatments (0.8 +/- .06 F, high and 0.5 +/- .06 F, low). While mean MSFC did not change significantly during individual cooling sessions, post hoc analysis pooling the 3 high-dose cooling sessions revealed an

  3. The effect of laser beam size in a zig-zag collimator on transverse cooling of a krypton atomic beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vivek Singh; V B Tiwari; S Singh; S R Mishra; H S Rawat

    2014-07-01

    The effect of size of a cooling laser beam in a zig-zag atomic beam collimator on transverse cooling of a krypton atomic beam is investigated. The simulation results show that discreteness in the interaction between the cooling laser beam and atomic beam, arising due to finite size and incidence angle of the cooling laser beam, significantly reduces the value of transverse velocity capture range of the collimator. The experimental observations show the trend similar to that obtained from simulations. Our study can be particularly useful where a small zig-zag collimator is required.

  4. Effect of the cooling rate on microstructure and hardness of MAR-M247 Ni-based superalloy

    OpenAIRE

    Milenkovic, Srdjan; Sabirov, Ilchat; Llorca Martinez, Francisco Javier

    2012-01-01

    The effect of cooling rate on the microstructure of MAR-M247 Ni-based superalloy was investigated via physical simulation of the casting process. Solidification experiments with cooling rates in the range of 0.25–10 K/s showed smooth temperature profiles with measured cooling rates matching the set values. The MAR-M247 showed cellular (0.25 K/s) and dendritic (1, 5 and 10 K/s) microstructures. Microconstituents also varied with cooling rates: γ/γ′ matrix with carbides and γ/γ′ eutectic at 0.2...

  5. Strong Glacial Cooling In The Middle Tropical Troposphere Due To Non-linear Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, S. J.; Lohmann, G.

    Numerical experiments with an atmospheric general circulation model for glacial and interglacial climates have been performed. Our model experiments reveal that slightly cooler tropical sea surface temperatures (SST) relative to the ones previously recon- structed by the CLIMAP project (1981) are sufficient to exhibit a strong glacial cool- ing reconstructed by tropical snow lines. The increased cooling in our experiments can be attributed to two non-linear effects: Firstly, there is an increased environmental lapse rate in the free atmosphere. Slightly cooler glacial SSTs provide for less abso- lute moisture content and the Clausius-Clapeyron equation of moisture is accountable for an increased lapse rate. In our LGM simulation we find an additional two degrees cooling in the tropical middle troposphere. Secondly, the surface air temperature near tropical glaciers is further cooled by a longer duration of snow cover. Our model result provides a consistent view of the last glacial maximum climate with much colder tem- peratures than today in the tropical mountains in concordance with moderate lowering of tropical SSTs. We propose that these non-linearities in the climate system are also important when detecting global warming from tropical snow lines.

  6. Design and experimental study of a micro-groove grinding wheel with spray cooling effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Chaofeng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of grinding fluid supply has a crucial impact on grinding quality and efficiency in high speed grinding. In order to improve the cooling and lubrication, through in-depth research of self-inhaling internal cooling method and intermittent grinding mechanism, a new spray cooling method used in high speed grinding is proposed. By referring to the structure of bowl-shaped dispersion disk, the grinding wheel matrix with atomization ability is designed; through studying heat transfer of droplet collision and the influence of micro-groove on the boiling heat transfer, grinding segment with micro-groove is designed to enhance the heat flux of coolant and achieve maximum heat transfer between droplets and grinding contact zone. High-speed grinding experiments on GH4169 with the developed grinding wheel are carried out. The results show that with the micro-groove grinding wheel just 5.4% of pump outlet flow rate and 0.5% of spindle energy is needed to reduce the grinding temperature to 200 °C, which means the developed grinding wheel makes cooling high efficient and low energy consuming.

  7. The Effect of Intermittent Arm and Shoulder Cooling on Baseball Pitching Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Stacy H; Herron, Robert L; Ryan, Gregory A; Katica, Charles P; Bishop, Phillip A

    2016-04-01

    The throwing arm of a baseball pitcher is subjected to high stress as a result of the repetitive activity of pitching. Intermittent cryotherapy may facilitate recovery from this repeated high stress, but few researchers have investigated cryotherapy's efficacy in an ecologically valid setting. This study investigated the effects of intermittent cryotherapy on pitching velocity and subjective measures of recovery and exertion in a simulated baseball game. Trained college-aged male baseball pitchers (n = 8) threw 12 pitches (1 pitch every 20 seconds) per inning for 5 total innings during a simulated pitching start. Between each inning, pitchers received shoulder and arm cooling (AC) or, on a separate occasion, no cooling (NC). All sessions took place in a temperate environment (18.3 ± 2.8° C; 49 ± 4% relative humidity). Pitch speeds were averaged for each participant each inning and overall for 5 innings. Perceived exertion (rating of perceived exertion [RPE]) was recorded at the end of each simulated inning. Perceived recovery (perceived recovery scale [PRS]) was recorded after treatment between each inning. Mean pitching velocity for all-innings combined was higher (p = 0.04) for shoulder and elbow cooling (AC) (31.2 ± 2.1 m·s) than for no cooling (NC) (30.6 ± 2.1 m·s). Average pitch speed was significantly higher in the fourth (p = baseball pitching, decreased RPE, and facilitated subjective recovery during a 5-inning simulated game.

  8. 气膜冷却布置对前缘流动传热的影响%The Influence of Film Cooling Arrangement on Leading Edge Flow and Heat Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雪英; 李明飞; 任静; 蒋洪德

    2014-01-01

    透平一级静叶前缘是高温燃气滞止的区域,承受着整个叶片最高的热负荷,是极为重要的冷却部位.本文首先通过压力敏感漆实验得到了前缘在不同布置、吹风比、密度比情况下的绝热气膜冷却有效度分布,结合数值所给出的详细流场和传热信息,深入剖析了前缘气膜冷却的流动传热机制.%The leading edge of the gas turbine first stage nozzle bearing the highest thermal load due to the stagnation of hot gas is believed to be a very important position for cooling.This article measured the distribution of adiabatic film cooling effectiveness at different blowing ratios and density ratios of several leading edge arrangements with pressure sensitive paint technique.With the aid of detailed flow field and heat transfer information provided by CFD,the flow and heat transfer mechanism of leading edge is deeply analyzed.

  9. Effect of ion radiative cooling on Jeans instability of partially ionized dusty plasma with dust charge fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prerana; Patidar, Archana

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of ion radiative cooling on the gravitational instability of dusty plasma is studied, incorporating dust charge fluctuation with dust-neutral, neutral-ion, and ion-neutral collisions. The basic equations are linearized using normal mode analysis to obtain a general dispersion relation. The general dispersion relation is analytically and numerically discussed to explain the role of ion radiative cooling in the structure formation through gravitational instability. The Jeans collapse criteria are found to be modified due to ion and electron radiative cooling, dust charge fluctuations, and collisions effects. It is determined from the analytical and numerical calculations that the support of radiative cooling of ions drives thermal fluctuations and gives instability to the system. The electron cooling effect remains dominating over ion cooling effect, and thus, it enhances the collapse more efficiently than ion cooling effect. Although the radiative cooling is slow, it may precede the collapse in molecular cloud, which further leads to the structure formation. The present work is relevance for the structure formation in the molecular cloud.

  10. The effect of grain size and film thickness on the thermal expansion coefficient of copper thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seulgi; Kim, Youngman

    2011-02-01

    Cu thin films underwent thermal cycling to determine their coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). The thermal stress of the Cu thin films with various microstructures (different grain size and film thickness) was measured using a curvature measurement system. The thermal expansion coefficients of the films were obtained from the slope of the stress-temperature curve with the knowledge of the Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. The change in thermal stress with temperature of the Cu thin films tended to decrease with increasing grain size, resulting in an increase in the CTE. The thickness of Cu thin film had little effect on the thermal stress or the CTE.

  11. Strong quantum confinement effects in thin zinc selenide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskoutas, S.; Poulopoulos, P.; Karoutsos, V.; Angelakeris, M.; Flevaris, N. K.

    2006-01-01

    Thin Zinc Selenide films in the thickness range 3-50 nm have been prepared on high quality glass substrates by e-beam evaporation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Optical absorption spectroscopy experiments reveal a systematically increasing blue shift of the effective bandgap energy as the film thickness decreases, reaching a maximum value of 0.32 eV for the thinner film. The experimental results, which indicate the presence of strong quantum confinement effects, are fairly well described by theoretical calculations based on the potential morphing method, using as a confining potential the finite square well potential with height of the barriers equal to 5 eV.

  12. Effectiveness of a night radiative cooling system in different geographical latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoy, A. P.; Granovskiy, A. S.; Baranenko, A. V.; Tsoy, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    Growth of world energy consumption and depletion of energy resources make humanity to constantly work on the creation of the energy efficient technologies and increase usage of the alternative and renewable sources of energy. One of such alternative sources of energy is the night radiative cooling (NRC). NRC is an alternative and renewable source of energy, derived from the effective radiation of the Earth into the Space. If the given surface is located so that it looks to the night sky, then under the particular condition more energy can be generated under the effect of radiative cooling, than received from the atmosphere. As a result the temperature of the surface can be kept lower than the temperature of the ambient air. This effect can be used for creation of the refrigeration systems with the low energy consumption and as a result lower negative influence on the environment. During the research it has been identified that the possibility of the NRC usage is mostly predetermined by the specifics of the climate of the each region. In particular climate conditions the refrigeration systems working on night radiative cooling will be more effective that in others.

  13. The effects of age on nuclear power plant containment cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lofaro, R.; Subudhi, M.; Travis, R.; DiBiasio, A.; Azarm, A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Davis, J. [Science Applications International Corp., New York, NY (United States)

    1994-04-01

    A study was performed to assess the effects of aging on the performance and availability of containment cooling systems in US commercial nuclear power plants. This study is part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The objectives of this program are to provide an understanding of the aging process and how it affects plant safety so that it can be properly managed. This is one of a number of studies performed under the NPAR program which provide a technical basis for the identification and evaluation of degradation caused by age. The effects of age were characterized for the containment cooling system by reviewing and analyzing failure data from national databases, as well as plant-specific data. The predominant failure causes and aging mechanisms were identified, along with the components that failed most frequently. Current inspection, surveillance, and monitoring practices were also examined. A containment cooling system unavailability analysis was performed to examine the potential effects of aging by increasing failure rates for selected components. A commonly found containment spray system design and a commonly found fan cooler system design were modeled. Parametric failure rates for those components in each system that could be subject to aging were accounted for in the model to simulate the time-dependent effects of aging degradation, assuming no provisions are made to properly manage it. System unavailability as a function of increasing component failure rates was then calculated.

  14. Effect of Chromium on CCT Diagrams of Novel Air-Cooled Bainite Steels Analyzed by Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Wei; XU Wei-hong; LIU Ya-xiu; BAI Bing-zhe; FANG Hong-sheng

    2007-01-01

    The quantitative effects of chromium content on continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams of novel air-cooled bainite steels were analyzed using artificial neural network models. The results showed that the chromium may retard the high and medium-temperature martensite transformation.

  15. Use of local convective and radiant cooling at warm environment: effect on thermal comfort and perceived air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Duszyk, Marcin; Krejcirikova, Barbora

    2012-01-01

    The effect of four local cooling devices (convective, radiant and combined) on thermal comfort and perceived air quality reported by 24 subjects at 28 ˚C and 50% RH was studied. The devices studied were: (1) desk cooling fan, (2) personalized ventilation providing clean air, (3) two radiant panels...

  16. The Effect of Polar Lipids on Tear Film Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Aydemir, E.

    2010-06-17

    In this paper, we present a mathematical model describing the effect of polar lipids, excreted by glands in the eyelid and present on the surface of the tear film, on the evolution of a pre-corneal tear film. We aim to explain the interesting experimentally observed phenomenon that the tear film continues to move upward even after the upper eyelid has become stationary. The polar lipid is an insoluble surface species that locally alters the surface tension of the tear film. In the lubrication limit, the model reduces to two coupled non-linear partial differential equations for the film thickness and the concentration of lipid. We solve the system numerically and observe that increasing the concentration of the lipid increases the flow of liquid up the eye. We further exploit the size of the parameters in the problem to explain the initial evolution of the system. © 2010 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  17. Disinfection Effect of Film Cassettes by Ultraviolet Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Park, Peom [Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    A bacteria infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department. Studies have demonstrated a bactericidal effect of ultraviolet irradiation, and to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient prevent from nosocomial infection. The study showed that the laboratory result was identified non-pathologic and pathologic bacterial in the five different cassette size of the contact surface. Film cassettes were exposed to ultraviolet light for 1, 2 and 3 minutes. Ultraviolet light disinfection practices suitable for bacteria. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. In conclusion, ultraviolet irradiate on film cassette over the surface more than 2 minutes. Ultraviolet dose of 1565 {mu}W {center_dot} s/cm{sup 2}Win in 30 second relative to ultraviolet dose in time.

  18. The Chemistry behind Special Effects in Film and Television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Daniel B.; Badger, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    The chemistry behind practical special effects in the film and television industry is discussed, along with examples of commonly used chemical demonstrations that simulate them in the laboratory. (Contains 3 figures.)

  19. Effects of Nuclear Energy on Sustainable Development and Energy Security: Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungjoo Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a stepwise method of selecting appropriate indicators to measure effects of a specific nuclear energy option on sustainable development and energy security, and also to compare an energy option with another. Focusing on the sodium-cooled fast reactor, one of the highlighted Generation IV reactors, we measure and compare its effects with the standard pressurized water reactor-based nuclear power, and then with coal power. Collecting 36 indicators, five experts select seven key indicators to meet data availability, nuclear energy relevancy, comparability among energy options, and fit with Korean energy policy objectives. The results show that sodium-cooled fast reactors is a better alternative than existing nuclear power as well as coal electricity generation across social, economic and environmental dimensions. Our method makes comparison between energy alternatives easier, thereby clarifying consequences of different energy policy decisions.

  20. EFFECTS OF COOLED EXTERNAL EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION ON DIESEL HOMOGENEOUS CHARGE COMPRESSION IGNITION ENGINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Lei; CUI Yi; DENG Kangyao

    2007-01-01

    The effects of cooled external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on the combustion and emission performance of diesel fuel homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) are studied. Homogeneous mixture is formed by injecting fuel in-cylinder in the negative valve overlap (NVO) period. So, the HCCI combustion which has low NOx and smoke emission is achieved. Cooled external EGR can delay the start of combustion effectively, which is very useful for high cetane fuel (diesel) HCCI, because these fuels can easily self-ignition, which makes the start of combustion more early. External EGR can avoid the knock combustion of HCCI at high load which means that the EGR can expand the high load limit. HCCI maintains low smoke emission at various EGR rate and various load compared with conventional diesel engine because there is no fuel-rich area in cylinder.

  1. Impacts of planet migration models on planetary populations. Effects of saturation, cooling and stellar irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Dittkrist, K -M; Klahr, H; Alibert, Y; Henning, T

    2014-01-01

    Context: Several recent studies have found that planet migration in adiabatic discs differs significantly from migration in isothermal discs. Depending on the thermodynamic conditions, i.e., the effectiveness of radiative cooling, and the radial surface density profile, planets migrate inward or outward. Clearly, this will influence the semimajor axis - mass distribution of planets as predicted by population synthesis simulations. Aims: Our goal is to study the global effects of radiative cooling, viscous torque desaturation and gap opening as well as stellar irradiation on the tidal migration of a synthetic planet population. Methods: We combine results from several analytical studies and 3D hydrodynamic simulations in a new semi-analytical migration model for the application in our planet population synthesis calculations. Results: We find a good agreement of our model with torques obtained in a 3D radiative hydrodynamic simulations. We find three convergence zones in a typical disc, towards which planets m...

  2. Decoupling electrocaloric effect from Joule heating in a solid state cooling device

    OpenAIRE

    Quintero, M.; Gomez-Marlasca, F.; Ghivelder, L.; Parisi, F.

    2011-01-01

    We report a heat dynamics analysis of the electrocaloric effect (ECE) in commercial multilayer capacitors based on BaTiO3 dielectric, a promising candidate for applications as a solid state cooling device. Direct measurements of the time evolution of the sample's temperature changes under different applied voltages allow us to decouple the contributions from Joule heating and from the ECE. Heat balance equations were used to model the thermal coupling between different parts of the system. Fi...

  3. Heat engineering characteristics of the radiator for effective electronic equipment cooling systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudenko A. I.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of heat transfer charac-teristics research of the radiator on basis of a heat pipe for cooling of personal computer elements. It is determined that using acetone and ethanol as heat carriers under heat flow density q4·104 W/m2 is preferable. It is shown that the introduced radiators are considerably more effective than the radiators of conventional design with flat heat exchange surface with a rectangle plate fin.

  4. The Bigger, the Better? The Influence of Urban Green Space Design on Cooling Effects for Residential Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganmohan, Madhumitha; Knapp, Sonja; Buchmann, Carsten M; Schwarz, Nina

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the cooling effect of an urban green space extends into its surroundings, cooling the immediate environment and mitigating urban heat problems. However, the effects of size, shape, and type of an urban green space on cooling remain uncertain. The objectives of our study were to quantify and compare the strength of the cooling effects of urban parks and forests, to determine how far the cooling effects extend into the surrounding residential environment, and to better understand how temperature gradients are driven by physical characteristics of the green space and the surroundings. Mobile air temperature measurements were performed in 62 urban parks and forests in the city of Leipzig, Germany, in the summer of 2013. Three indicators of cooling were calculated: the change in temperature (ΔT) at the park-width distance, the maximum ΔT, and the cooling distance. The relationships of these variables to the physical characteristics of the green spaces and their surroundings were examined in multiple regression models. Analyzing all three indicators revealed that cooling effects were greater in urban forests than in parks. Cooling increased with increasing size but in a different manner for forests and parks, whereas the influence of shape was the same for forests and parks. Generally, the characteristics of the green spaces were more important than the characteristics of the residential surroundings. These findings have the potential to assist in better planning and designing of urban green spaces to increase their cooling effects. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  5. AZO thin film-based UV sensors: effects of RF power on the films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Nihan; Ceren Baskose, U.; Kinaci, Baris; Cakmak, Mehmet; Ozcelik, Suleyman

    2015-06-01

    Al-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films of thickness 150 nm were deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method under various RF powers in the range of 25-100 W. Structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of the films were investigated by X-ray diffractometer, atomic force microscope, UV-Vis spectrometer and Hall effect measurement system. All the obtained films had a highly preferred orientation along [002] direction of the c-axis perpendicular to the flexible PET substrate and had a high-quality surface. The energy band gap ( E g) values of the films varied in the range of 3.30-3.43 eV. The minimum resistivity of 1.84 × 10-4 Ω cm was obtained at a 50 W RF power. The small changes in the RF power had a critical important role on the structural, optical and electrical properties of the sputtered AZO thin films on flexible PET substrate. In addition, UV sensing of the fabricated AZO thin film-based sensors was explored by using current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. The sensors were sensitive in the UV region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  6. Nitrogen dioxide sensing properties of sprayed tungsten oxide thin film sensor: Effect of film thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganbavle, V V; Mohite, S V; Agawane, G L; Kim, J H; Rajpure, K Y

    2015-08-01

    We report a study on effect of film thickness on NO2 sensing properties of sprayed WO3 thin films. WO3 thin films varying in thicknesses are deposited onto the glass substrates by simple spray pyrolysis technique by varying the volume of spray solution.Thin film gas sensors are characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and photoluminescence (PL) techniques to study their physical properties. Film having thickness 745nm has shown highest gas response of 97% with 12 and 412s response and recovery times, respectively towards 100ppm NO2 concentration. Gas response of 20% is observed towards 10ppm NO2 at 200°C operating temperature. Sensitivity of the optimal sensor is 0.83%/ppm when operating at 200°C with 10ppm lower detection limit. The response of the sensor is reproducible and WO3 films are highly selective towards NO2 in presence of mist of various interfering gases viz. H2S, NH3, LPG, CO and SO2.

  7. The effect of H3+ cooling on jovian thermospheric energy and momentum balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, L. C.; Achilleos, N. A.; Miller, S.

    2014-12-01

    When the Galileo probe entered Jupiter's equatorial atmosphere, it measured thermospheric exobase temperatures of ~900 K, 700 K higher than what was expected from solar EUV heating. Therefore, there is an 'energy crisis' at Jupiter, in which a large source of equatorial heating is unaccounted for. A prime candidate to explain the high temperatures is the transport of auroral energy equatorwards from high latitudes. However, the combination of strong Coriolis forces from the rapid planetary rotation rate, coupled with ion drag from magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, results in an 'ion drag fridge' effect (Smith et al., 2007), which acts to transport auroral energy poleward, rather than equatorward. We modify the UCL JASMIN model (Jovian Axisymmetric Simulator with Magnetosphere, Ionosphere, and Neutrals) to include the effects of auroral heating and H3+ cooling. Thus far, auroral heating and H3+ cooling were neglected in dynamical models of the coupled thermosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere system, in order to focus on the effects of joule heating and ion drag on the jovian thermosphere. We explore how including these heating and cooling terms alters the energy and momentum balance, and subsequently meridional transport through Jupiter's thermosphere.

  8. Effect of cooling methods on hole quality in drilling of aluminium 6061-6T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. N.; Boswell, B.

    2016-02-01

    The influence of cooling method and drilling parameters on hole production has been investigated experimentally and analytically by measuring the hole quality. A three-level, three-parameter experiment was conducted using design-of-experiment methodology. The three levels of independent input parameters were: for cooling method—flood drilling, minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) drilling and cryogenic drilling; for feed rate—0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 mm/rev; and for cutting speed—60, 75 and 100 m/min. The selected work and tool materials were aluminium 6061-6T and high speed steel (HSS), respectively. The measured output parameters were the three most widely used quality characteristics of drilled holes - diameter error, circularity and surface roughness. The results were analysed applying three methods: Pareto ANOVA, Taguchi method and traditional analysis. The findings revealed that the cooling method has a significant effect on diameter error (contribution ratio 88.27%), moderate effect on surface roughness (contribution ratio 41.74%) and relatively small effect on circularity (contribution ratio 23.64%). The best results for the dimensional accuracy and surface roughness were achieved by MQL drilling. Cryogenic drilling produced the best circularity results; however, in terms of dimensional accuracy and surface roughness it was the worst.

  9. Effective micro-spray cooling for light emitting diode with graphene nanoporous layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Kok Keong; Cheong, Brian Mun Yew; Tong, Wei Li; Tan, Ming Kwang; Hung, Yew Mun

    2017-02-28

    Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) coating is utilized as a functionalized surface in enhancing the evaporation rate of micro-spray cooling for light-emitting diodes (LEDs). In micro-spray cooling, water is atomized into micro-sized droplets to reduce the surface energy and to increase the surface area for evaporation. The GNPs coating facilitates the effective filmwise evaporation through the attribute of the fast water permeation property. The oxygenated functional groups of GNPs provide the driving force that initiates the intercalation of water molecules through the carbon nanostructure. The water molecules slip in the frictionless passages between the hydrophobic carbon walls resulting an effective filmwise evaporation. The enhancement of evaporation leads to an enormous temperature reduction of 61.3ºC. The performance of LED is greatly enhanced where a maximum increase in illuminance of 25% and an extension of power rating from 9 W to 12 W can be achieved. With the application of GNPs coating, the high-temperature region is eliminated while maintaining the LED surface temperature for optimal operation. This study paves the way for employing the effective hybrid spray-evaporation-nanostructure technique in the development of a compact, low-power-consumption cooling system.

  10. Effective micro-spray cooling for light-emitting diode with graphene nanoporous layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keong Lay, Kok; Yew Cheong, Brian Mun; Li Tong, Wei; Tan, Ming Kwang; Hung, Yew Mun

    2017-04-01

    A graphene nanoplatelet (GNP) coating is utilized as a functionalized surface in enhancing the evaporation rate of micro-spray cooling for light-emitting diodes (LEDs). In micro-spray cooling, water is atomized into micro-sized droplets to reduce the surface energy and to increase the surface area for evaporation. The GNP coating facilitates the effective filmwise evaporation through the attribute of fast water permeation. The oxygenated functional groups of GNPs provide the driving force that initiates the intercalation of water molecules through the carbon nanostructure. The water molecules slip through the frictionless passages between the hydrophobic carbon walls, resulting an effective filmwise evaporation. The enhancement of evaporation leads to an enormous temperature reduction of 61.3 °C. The performance of the LED is greatly enhanced: a maximum increase in illuminance of 25% and an extension of power rating from 9 W to 12 W can be achieved. With the application of GNP coating, the high-temperature region is eliminated while maintaining the LED surface temperature for optimal operation. This study paves the way for employing the effective hybrid spray–evaporation–nanostructure technique in the development of a compact, low-power-consumption cooling system.

  11. The effect of passive heating and face cooling on perceived exertion during exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armada-da-Silva, P A S; Woods, J; Jones, D A

    2004-05-01

    Increased body temperature is thought to be an important component of the higher perception of exertion that is a feature of fatigue during exercise in the heat but a causal relationship has yet to be demonstrated. We have investigated the effect of passive heating on the perception of exertion during a standard bout of exercise and also assessed the effect of cooling the head on compensating for the increased body temperature on the feelings of exertion. Ten male subjects performed a 14-min cycling exercise [average power approximately 63% of maximum power output ( W(max))] at an ambient temperature of 35 degrees C at resting rectal temperature [mean (SD): 37.49 (0.27) degrees C; control (CON) trial] on one occasion, and after sitting in a sauna to raise rectal temperature [mean (SD): 38.95(0.13) degrees C; sauna (SAU) trial]. During the exercise, subjects reported their ratings of overall perceived exertion (RPE), perceived exertion of the legs (RPE(legs)) and thermal comfort (TC). A blood sample was collected by the end of the exercise for determination of plasma glucose, lactate and prolactin and haematocrit. RPE values were significantly elevated after passive heating [mean (SE): 14.5 (0.7) units in CON and 17.2 (0.5) units in SAU, at the end of exercise; PFAN) and SAU(FAN)) that was achieved by combining face fanning and spraying the face with a mist of cooled water. Face cooling decreased RPE values after sauna to a point that no differences between the two conditions existed. RPE(legs) scores and heart rate, however, remained higher in SAU(FAN) compared with CON(FAN) ( P<0.05). We conclude that hyperthermia is a causative element of the increased perception of exertion during submaximal exercise in the heat and that the effect of increased core temperature on the feelings of exertion is modulated by face cooling.

  12. Dick Effect in a Microwave Frequency Standard Based on Laser-Cooled 113Cd+ Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Wei; Miao, Kai; Wang, Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The Dick effect is one of the main limits to the frequency stability of a passive frequency standard, especially for the fountain clock and ion clock operated in pulsed mode which require unavoidable dead time during interrogation. Here we measure the phase noise of the interrogation oscillator applied in the microwave frequency standard based on laser-cooled 113Cd+ ions, and analyze the Allan deviation limited by the Dick effect. The results indicate that the Dick effect is one of the key issues for the cadmium ion clock to reach expected frequency stability. This problem can be resolved by interrogating the local oscillator continuously with two ion traps.

  13. Cooling Effect of Water Injection on a High-Temperature Supersonic Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature and high pressure supersonic jet is one of the key problems in the design of solid rocket motors. To reduce the jet temperature and noise, cooling water is typically injected into the exhaust plume. Numerical simulations for the gas-liquid multiphase flow field with mixture multiphase model were developed and a series of experiments were carried out. By introducing the energy source terms caused by the vaporization of liquid water into the energy equation, a coupling solution was developed to calculate the multiphase flow field. The temperature data predictions agreed well with the experimental results. When water was injected into the plume, the high temperature core region area was reduced, and the temperature on the head face was much lower than that without water. The relationship between the reduction of temperature on the bottom plate and the momentum ratio is developed, which can be used to predict the cooling effect of water injection in many cases.

  14. Effects of Syngas Cooling and Biomass Filter Medium on Tar Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Thapa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Biomass gasification is a proven technology; however, one of the major obstacles in using product syngas for electric power generation and biofuels is the removal of tar. The purpose of this research was to develop and evaluate effectiveness of tar removal methods by cooling the syngas and using wood shavings as filtering media. The performance of the wood shavings filter equipped with an oil bubbler and heat exchanger as cooling systems was tested using tar-laden syngas generated from a 20-kW downdraft gasifier. The tar reduction efficiencies of wood shavings filter, wood shavings filter with heat exchanger, and wood shavings filter with oil bubbler were 10%, 61%, and 97%, respectively.

  15. Effect of local application of superoxide dismutase on dielectric parameters of cooled skin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramonov, B A; Turkovski, I I; Doroshkevich, O S; Taranova, V N; Pomorski, K P

    2008-11-01

    The effect of on Changes in dielectric parameters of the skin (modulus of complex dielectric permittivity |e| and dielectric loss tangent tgd) were studied on rats with local surface contact cooling followed by treatment with various cream formulations. Addition of antioxidant superoxide dismutase (SOD) to the cream significantly prevented the shifts in these parameters, which attested to less pronounced changes in the water balance in SOD-treated skin. Application of SOD during the early terms after cooling accelerated wound healing. Histological examination performed on posttraumatic day 60 revealed better integrity of the skin structures (hair follicle, sweat and sebaceous gland), which indicates ability of SOD to prevent and ameliorate the degree of cold-induced damage in the skin.

  16. Cooling Rate Effect on Microhardness for SAW Welded Mild Steel Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Singh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available During fusion welding process it is possible to determine temperature at any point by using thermocouples and from such data it is possible to draw temperature distribution for any point of interest, such temperature distribution can be utilized to determine average cooling rate and distortion. These studies are utilized to investigate the microstructure and microhardness of the heat affected zone (HAZ and weldment. In present work, the influence of heat input and temperature distribution on microstructure and mechanical properties of weldment have been investigated. Fractional factorial design technique is used to conduct the experiment with four factors and two levels. Eight combinations and two set of heat input are designed with different combinations of SAW welding parameters. Temperature distribution curves and cooling rate, distortion, and microhardness curve have been drawn. The effects of selected welding parameters on the microhardness and microstructure have been investigated.

  17. Effects of Solution Hydrodynamics on Corrosion Inhibition of Steel by Citric Acid in Cooling Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Asghari, E.; Mohammadi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Corrosion is a major problem in cooling water systems, which is often controlled using corrosion inhibitors. Solution hydrodynamics is one of the factors affecting corrosion inhibition of metals in these systems. The present work focuses on the study of the combined effects of citric acid concentration (as a green corrosion inhibitor) and fluid flow on corrosion of steel in simulated cooling water. Electrochemical techniques including Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used for corrosion studies. Laminar flow was simulated using a rotating disk electrode. The effects of solution hydrodynamics on inhibition performance of citric acid were discussed. The citric acid showed low inhibition performance in quiescent solution; however, when the electrode rotated at 200 rpm, inhibition efficiency increased remarkably. It was attributed mainly to the acceleration of inhibitor mass transport toward metal surface. The efficiencies were then decreased at higher rotation speeds due to enhanced wall shear stresses on metal surface and separation of adsorbed inhibitor molecules. This article is first part of authors' attempts in designing green inhibitor formulations for industrial cooling water. Citric acid showed acceptable corrosion inhibition in low rotation rates; thus, it can be used as a green additive to the corrosion inhibitor formulations.

  18. Effects of cooling and star formation on the baryon fractions in clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kravtsov, A V; Vikhlinin, A A; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Nagai, Daisuke; Vikhlinin, Alexey A.

    2005-01-01

    We study the effects of dissipation on the baryon fractions in clusters using high-resolution cosmological simulations of nine clusters that resolve formation of cluster galaxies. The simulations of each cluster are performed with the shock-capturing eulerian adaptive mesh refinement N-body+gasdynamics ART code with and without radiative cooling. We show that dissipation and associated galaxy formation increase the total baryon fractions within radii as large as the virial radius. The effect is the strongest within cluster cores, where the simulations with cooling have baryon fractions larger than the universal value, while the fraction of baryons in adiabatic simulations are smaller than universal. At larger radii (r >~ r_500) the cumulative baryon fractions in simulations with cooling are close to, while those in the adiabatic runs remain below than, the universal value. The gas fractions in simulations with dissipation are reduced by ~20-40% at r0.2, but differ systematically by up to 10% at small radii.

  19. Acceleration sensing based on piezoresistive effect of carbon nanotube films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Feng-yan; SHEN Hui-juan; CAO Chun-lan; LIAO Ke-jun; HU Chen-guo

    2006-01-01

    Based on piezoresistive effect,the acceleration sensitivity of multi-walled canbon nanotube (MWNT) films was investigated.A three-point bending technique was presented to measure the piezoresistivity,which used a bending stress applied to the samples while making MWNT films wheeling with a rotational machine.The experimental results showed that the fractional increase in resistance increases linearly versus the increase of centripetal acceleration,and there is a linear relationship between the acceleration and the strain.These shed light on using carbon nanotube films as acceleration sensors for many potential applications.

  20. Effects of humidity during photoprocessing on thin film metallization adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norwood, D.P.

    1980-03-01

    Humidity effects during photoprocessing on tantalum/chromium/gold thin film networks (TFNs) were investigated. Humidity conditions at various process steps were controlled by placing either desiccant or water in handling containers for the TFNs. The TFNs photoprocessed in humid conditions had a much higher occurrence of metallization failures compared to TFNs processed in dry conditions. Ceramic surface defects were shown to cause pores in the thin films, and these pores enhanced corrosion susceptibility for the films. This study resulted in a desiccated storage process for production of TFNs.

  1. Effects of dispersion forces in the instability of polymer films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao He-Ping; Ophelia K.C.Tsui; Liu Zheng-You

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of some polymer films upon heating is commonplace. The very criterion for this instability is the system free energy possessing a negative curvature. Within the framework of full frequency-dependent theory of dispersion forces, we have derived the excess free energy of a typical system-polystyrene film deposited on the silicon substrate. The excess free energy, wavelengths and growth rates are calculate and a comparison is made between the accurate results and the approximate results. It is found that the stability of the film can be tuned by the variation of the thickness of the coating and the retardation effects can be significant sometimes.

  2. Effect of Cooling Method on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hot-Rolled C-Si-Mn TRIP Steel%Effect of Cooling Method on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hot-Rolled C-Si-Mn TRIP Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ji-yuan; ZHANG Zi-cheng; ZHU Fu-xian; LI Yan-mei; Manabe Ken-ichi

    2012-01-01

    The controlled cooling technology following hot rolling process is a vital factor that affects the final micro- structure and mechanical properties of the hot-rolled transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels. In the present study, low alloy C-Si-Mn TRIP steel was successfully fabricated by hot rolling process with a 4450 hot roiling mill. To maximize the volume fraction and stability of retained austenite of the steel, two different cooling methods (aircooling and ultra-fast cooling "AC-UFC" and ultrmfast cooling, air cooling and ultra-fast cooling "UFC-AC-UFC") were conducted. The effects of the cooling method on the microstructure of hot-rolled TRIP steel were investigated via optical microscope, transmission electron microscope and conversion electron Mossbauer spectroscope. The mechanical properties of the steel were also evaluated by conventional tensile test. The results indicated that ferrite and bainite in the microstructure were refined with the cooling method of UFC-AC-UFC. The morphology of retained austenite was also changed from small islands distributing in bainite district (obtained with AC-UFC) to granular shape locating at the triple junction of the ferrite grain boundaries (obtained with UFC-AC-UFC). As a result, the TRIP steel with a content of retained austenite of 11. 52%, total elongation of 32% and product of tensile strength and total elongation of 27 552 MPa·% was obtained.

  3. Electrostatic Discharge Effects in Thin Film Transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golo, Natasa

    2002-01-01

    Although amorphous silicon thin film transistors (α-Si:H TFT’s) have a very low electron mobility and pronounced instabilities of their electrical characteristics, they are still very useful and they have found their place in the semiconductors industry, as they possess some very good properties: th

  4. Temperature effect on elastic modulus of thin films and nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lihong; Li, Meizhi; Qin, Fuqi; Wei, Yueguang

    2013-02-01

    The stability of nanoscale devices is directly related to elasticity and the effect of temperature on the elasticity of thin films and nanocrystals. The elastic instability induced by rising temperature will cause the failure of integrated circuits and other microelectronic devices in service. The temperature effect on the elastic modulus of thin films and nanocrystals is unclear although the temperature dependence of the modulus of bulk materials has been studied for over half a century. In this paper, a theoretical model of the temperature-dependent elastic modulus of thin films and nanocrystals is developed based on the physical definition of the modulus by considering the size effect of the related cohesive energy and the thermal expansion coefficient. Moreover, the temperature effect on the modulus of Cu thin films is simulated by the molecular dynamics method. The results indicate that the elastic modulus decreases with increasing temperature and the rate of the modulus decrease increases with reducing thickness of thin films. The theoretical predictions based on the model are consistent with the results of computational simulations, semi-continuum calculations and the experimental measurements for Cu, Si thin films and Pd nanocrystals.

  5. Size Effect of Electromagnetic Constitutive Characteristics of Ultrathin Al Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The ultrathin aluminum films with thickness in the range of 2~60 nm have been deposited by dc magnetron sputtering apparatus. Reflectance and transmittance of the obtained samples were measured with a WFZ-900-D4 UV/VIS spectrophotometer. The optical constant (n, k) and permittivity (ε', e") were determined by applying Newton-Simpson recurrent substitution method. The results indicate that the electromagnetic constitutive characteristic of ultrathin aluminum films is a function of thickness and has obvious size effect.

  6. The effect of magnetic impurity scattering in Au films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic impurity scattering plays an important role in the phase coherence behavior of thin films.By using the thickness and disorder dependences of the low temperature logarithmic anomaly in resistivity we are able to determine the concentration of magnetic impurities in Au films and demonstrate that the low temperature saturation or plateau in phase decoherence time is closely related with the Kondo effect.

  7. Effects of Films and Television Dramas on Destination Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pars Şahbaz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is bring up the effects of films and television dramas on destination image. Image is a picture and a imagery which ia about destination and also image affects the purchase decision making. The population of the study contains domestic tourists who visited Mardin. The result of the study suggests that there is a substantive relationship between destination images and films and television dramas.

  8. Extraordinary Hall-effect in colloidal magnetic nanoparticle films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Gur, Leah; Tirosh, Einat; Segal, Amir; Markovich, Gil; Gerber, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Colloidal nickel nanoparticles (NPs) coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were synthesized. The nanoparticle dispersions were deposited on substrates and dried under mild heating to form conductive films. The films exhibited very small coercivity, nearly metallic conductivity, and a significant extraordinary Hall effect signal. This method could be useful for preparing simple, printed magnetic field sensors with the advantage of relatively high sensitivity around zero magnetic field, in contrast to magnetoresistive sensors, which have maximal field sensitivity away from zero magnetic field.

  9. Weak nonlinear surface-charging effects in electrolytic films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, D S; Horgan, R R

    2003-11-01

    A simple model of soap films with nonionic surfactants stabilized by added electrolyte is studied. The model exhibits charge regularization due to the incorporation of a physical mechanism responsible for the formation of a surface charge. We use a Gaussian field theory in the film but the full nonlinear surface terms which are then treated at a one-loop level by calculating the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann solution and then the fluctuations about this solution. We carefully analyze the renormalization of the theory and apply it to a triple-layer model for a thin film with Stern layer of thickness h. For this model we give expressions for the surface charge sigma(L) and the disjoining pressure P(d)(L) and show their dependence on the parameters. The influence of image charges naturally arises in the formalism, and we show that predictions depend strongly on h because of their effects. In particular, we show that the surface charge vanishes as the film thickness L-->0. The fluctuation terms in this class of theories contribute a Casimir-like attraction across the film. Although this attraction is well known to be negligible compared with the mean-field component for model electrolytic films with no surface-charge regulation, in the model studied here these fluctuations also affect the surface-charge regulation leading to a fluctuation component in the disjoining pressure which has the same behavior as the mean-field component even for large film thickness.

  10. The effects of exercise, heat, cooling and rehydration strategies on cognitive function in football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandelow, S; Maughan, R; Shirreffs, S; Ozgünen, K; Kurdak, S; Ersöz, G; Binnet, M; Dvorak, J

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the cognitive effects of exercising in the heat on the field players of two football teams in a series of three matches. Different rehydration and cooling strategies were used for one of the teams during the last two games. Cognitive functions were measured before, during and immediately after each football match, as well as core temperature, body mass, plasma osmolality and glucose levels, allowing an estimate of their differential impacts on cognition. The pattern of results suggests that mild-moderate dehydration during exercise in the heat (up to 2.5%) has no clear effect on cognitive function. Instead, plasma glucose and core temperature changes appear to be the main determinants: higher glucose was related to faster and less accurate performance, whereas core temperature rises had the opposite effect. The 50% correlation between plasma glucose and core temperatures observed during exercise in the heat may help to stabilize cognitive performance via their opposing effects. The glucose-like effects of sports drinks appear to be mediated by increased plasma glucose levels, because drinks effects became non-significant when plasma glucose levels were added to the models. The cooling intervention had only a beneficial effect on complex visuo-motor speed.

  11. Effect of makeup water properties on the condenser fouling in power planr cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, I.; Walker, M.; Abbasian, J.; Arastoopour, H.; Hsieh, M-K.; Dzombak, D.; Miller, D.

    2011-01-01

    The thermoelectric power industry in the U.S. uses a large amount of fresh water. As available freshwater for use in thermoelectric power production becomes increasingly limited, use of nontraditional water sources is of growing interest. Utilization of nontraditional water, in cooling systems increases the potential for mineral precipitation on heat exchanger surfaces. In that regard, predicting the accelerated rate of scaling and fouling in condenser is crucial to evaluate the condenser performance. To achieve this goal, water chemistry should be incorporated in cooling system modeling and simulation. This paper addresses the effects of various makeup water properties on the cooling system, namely pH and aqueous speciation, both of which are important factors affecting the fouling rate in the main condenser. Detailed modeling of the volatile species desorption (i.e. CO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}), the formation of scale in the recirculating system, and the relationship between water quality and the corresponding fouling rates is presented.

  12. Effects of focal cooling of the ventral medullary surface on breathing pattern and blood pressure in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonan, T; Hida, W; Okabe, S; Izumiyama, T; Sakurai, M; Takishima, T

    1991-01-01

    We assessed the effect of focal graded cooling of the ventral medullary surface (VMS) on breathing pattern and blood pressure in 15 anesthetized, vagotomized and artificially ventilated dogs. Diaphragmatic electromyogram or phrenic neurogram, referred to as Ec, and blood pressure (BP) were obtained during localized (2 x 2 mm2) cooling of the VMS. Greatest depression of both Ec and BP was obtained by cooling in the areas located 4-9 mm caudal to the foramen cecum (Fc) and lateral to the pyramids. Mild cooling in these intermediate areas decreased both inspiratory duration (Ti) and the rate of rise of Ec (Ec/Ti), but respiratory rate was unchanged. Cooling of the rostral areas (0-3 mm from Fc) induced mild depression of Ec amplitude due to reduction in Ec/Ti without changing Ti, and prolonged expiratory duration (Te) significantly. Cooling of the caudal areas (12-18 mm from Fc) reduced Ec amplitude mildly due to reduction in Ti without affecting Ec/Ti, and shortened Te greatly. Cooling of the rostral areas produced mild fall in BP, but cooling of the caudal areas did not affect BP significantly. It is suggested that rostral and intermediate parts of the VMS participate in the shaping of inspiratory drive, whereas wide areas of the VMS including caudal part are involved in the determination of respiratory timing. It is also suggested that the rostral and intermediate parts, and not the caudal part, of the VMS are important in the regulation of vasomotor tone.

  13. Effect of solution cooling rate on the γ' precipitation behaviors of a Ni-base P/M superalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The effect of cooling rate on the cooling "/' precipitation behaviors was investigated in a Ni-base powder/metallurgy (P/M)superalioy (FGH4096).The empirical equations were established between the cooling rate and the average sizes of secondary and tertiary γ' precipitates within grains and tertiary γ' precipitates at grain boundaries,as well as the apparent width of grain boundaries.The results show that the average sizes of secondary or tertiary γ' precipitates are inversely correlated with the cooling rate.The shape of secondary γ' precipitates within grains changes from butterfly-like to spherical with the increase of cooling rate,but all the tertiary γ' precipitates formed are spherical in shape.It is also found that tertiary γ' may be precipitated in the latter part of the cooling cycle only if the cooling rate is not faster than 4.3℃/s,and the apparent width of grain boundaries decreases linearly with the increase of cooling rate.

  14. The Effect of Duct Level on the Performance of Reactor Vault Cooling System in the PGSFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Sujin; Ryu, Seung Ho; Kim, Dehee; Lee, Tae-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Development of the prototype gen-Ⅵ sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) has been ongoing in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). A reactor vault cooling system (RVCS), one of passive decay heat removal systems (PDHRS), passively removes core decay heat by chimney effect when severe accidents occur. The air cooling path is located around containment vessel (CV). An air separator which divides the downstream air and the upstream air is installed between CV and the concrete wall. To design the RVCS, key design parameters such as stack height, gap size between the concrete wall and the air separator, gap size between the air separator and the CV, thickness and layer composition of the air separator have to be determined. A duct level is one of these design parameters. It denotes the height of the upstream air path and related to the heat transfer length from CV to air. The duct level should be optimized with considering structural reliability and heat removal performance. Thus, in this paper, the heat removal performance of RVCS is evaluated depends on the duct level using 1D system design code, that is developed by KAERI autonomously, and commercial CFD program for optimum design of RVCS In this paper, the heat removal performance of RVCS is evaluated depends on the duct level using PARS2- LMR code and commercial CFD program for optimum design of RVCS to satisfy both conflicting needs, structural reliability and cooling performance. As a result of PARS2-LMR code analysis, it was observed that the heat removal rate increases as increase of duct level and the geometrical conditions, that satisfy the design limitations, were obtained. To qualitatively observe the trends of local temperature distribution, CFD simulations were conducted and hotspots were observed at the upper region of ducts for the low duct level case.

  15. Nucleation behavior of melted Bi films at cooling rates from 10{sup 1} to 10{sup 4} K/s studied by combining scanning AC and DC nano-calorimetry techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Kechao; Vlassak, Joost J., E-mail: vlassak@esag.harvard.edu

    2015-03-10

    Highlights: • We proposed a general data reduction scheme that combines scanning AC and DC calorimetry results for the study of reaction kinetics. • Calorimetry measurements at cooling rates ranging from 30 K/s to 20,000 K/s were achieved. • Upon initial melting, the Bi thin-film sample breaks up into thousands of isolated islands, and highly repeatable nucleation behavior is observed. • The nucleation rate of melted Bi is calculated, which can be well described by classical nucleation theory over a wide range of cooling rates. - Abstract: We study the nucleation behavior of undercooled liquid Bi at cooling rates ranging from 10{sup 1} to 10{sup 4} K/s using a combination of scanning DC and AC nano-calorimetry techniques. Upon initial melting, the Bi thin-film sample breaks up into silicon nitride-coated isolated islands. The number of islands in a typical sample is sufficiently large that highly repeatable nucleation behavior is observed, despite the stochastic nature of the nucleation process. We establish a data reduction technique to evaluate the nucleation rate from DC and AC calorimetry results. The results show that the driving force for the nucleation of melted Bi is well described by classical nucleation theory over a wide range of cooling rates. The proposed technique provides a unique and efficient way to examine nucleation kinetics with cooling rates over several orders of magnitude. The technique is quite general and can be used to evaluate reaction kinetics in other materials.

  16. Modelling the Effect of Variable Viscosity on Unsteady Couette Flow of Nanofluids with Convective Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmada Omar Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates numerically the effects of variable viscosity on unsteady generalized Couette flow of a water base nanofluid with convective cooling at the moving surface. The Buongiorno model utilized for the nanofluid incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. The nonlinear governing equations of continuity, momentum, energy and nanoparticles concentration are tackled numerically using a semi discretization finite difference method together with Runge-Kutta Fehlberg integration scheme. Numerical results for velocity, temperature, and nanoparticles concentration profiles together with skin friction and Nusselt number are obtained graphically and discussed quantitatively.

  17. Pyroelectric response of lead zirconate titanate thin films on silicon: Effect of thermal stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesim, M. T.; Zhang, J.; Alpay, S. P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Trolier-McKinstry, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Mantese, J. V. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, Connecticut 06118 (United States); Whatmore, R. W. [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Dyke Parade, Cork City, County Cork (Ireland)

    2013-11-28

    Ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate [Pb(Zr{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x}O){sub 3}, (PZT x:1-x)] has received considerable interest for applications related to uncooled infrared devices due to its large pyroelectric figures of merit near room temperature, and the fact that such devices are inherently ac coupled, allowing for simplified image post processing. For ferroelectric films made by industry-standard deposition techniques, stresses develop in the PZT layer upon cooling from the processing/growth temperature due to thermal mismatch between the film and the substrate. In this study, we use a non-linear thermodynamic model to investigate the pyroelectric properties of polycrystalline PZT thin films for five different compositions (PZT 40:60, PZT 30:70, PZT 20:80, PZT 10:90, PZT 0:100) on silicon as a function of processing temperature (25–800 °C). It is shown that the in-plane thermal stresses in PZT thin films alter the out-of-plane polarization and the ferroelectric phase transformation temperature, with profound effect on the pyroelectric properties. PZT 30:70 is found to have the largest pyroelectric coefficient (0.042 μC cm{sup −2} °C{sup −1}, comparable to bulk values) at a growth temperature of 550 °C; typical to what is currently used for many deposition processes. Our results indicate that it is possible to optimize the pyroelectric response of PZT thin films by adjusting the Ti composition and the processing temperature, thereby, enabling the tailoring of material properties for optimization relative to a specific deposition process.

  18. Smaller desert dust cooling effect estimated from analysis of dust size and abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Jasper F.; Ridley, David A.; Zhou, Qing; Miller, Ron L.; Zhao, Chun; Heald, Colette L.; Ward, Daniel S.; Albani, Samuel; Haustein, Karsten

    2017-03-01

    Desert dust aerosols affect Earth's global energy balance through direct interactions with radiation, and through indirect interactions with clouds and ecosystems. But the magnitudes of these effects are so uncertain that it remains unclear whether atmospheric dust has a net warming or cooling effect on global climate. Consequently, it is still uncertain whether large changes in atmospheric dust loading over the past century have slowed or accelerated anthropogenic climate change, or what the effects of potential future changes in dust loading will be. Here we present an analysis of the size and abundance of dust aerosols to constrain the direct radiative effect of dust. Using observational data on dust abundance, in situ measurements of dust optical properties and size distribution, and climate and atmospheric chemical transport model simulations of dust lifetime, we find that the dust found in the atmosphere is substantially coarser than represented in current global climate models. As coarse dust warms the climate, the global dust direct radiative effect is likely to be less cooling than the ~-0.4 W m-2 estimated by models in a current global aerosol model ensemble. Instead, we constrain the dust direct radiative effect to a range between -0.48 and +0.20 W m-2, which includes the possibility that dust causes a net warming of the planet.

  19. Remote Sensing: Environmental Effects of Surface Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-15

    constitution of natural film-forming material. " Protein: heptone from soybeans, C/N approx. 6 " Carbohydrates: alginic acid, MW-240,00 (polymannuronic...acid) " Lipid: triolein, MW=885.4 Mlix peptone (25% as carbon), alginic acid (50% as carbon), and triolein (25% as carbon). It should be restated that...and the rheology Initial experiments were performed in the laboratory and )f the air-sea interface. It will be shown in ensuing sections on the

  20. MODELING THE AMBIENT CONDITION EFFECTS OF AN AIR-COOLED NATURAL CIRCULATION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Rui; Lisowski, Darius D.; Bucknor, Matthew; Kraus, Adam R.; Lv, Qiuping

    2017-07-02

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) is a passive safety concept under consideration for the overall safety strategy of advanced reactors such as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). One such variant, air-cooled RCCS, uses natural convection to drive the flow of air from outside the reactor building to remove decay heat during normal operation and accident scenarios. The Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (“Argonne”) is a half-scale model of the primary features of one conceptual air-cooled RCCS design. The facility was constructed to carry out highly instrumented experiments to study the performance of the RCCS concept for reactor decay heat removal that relies on natural convection cooling. Parallel modeling and simulation efforts were performed to support the design, operation, and analysis of the natural convection system. Throughout the testing program, strong influences of ambient conditions were observed in the experimental data when baseline tests were repeated under the same test procedures. Thus, significant analysis efforts were devoted to gaining a better understanding of these influences and the subsequent response of the NSTF to ambient conditions. It was determined that air humidity had negligible impacts on NSTF system performance and therefore did not warrant consideration in the models. However, temperature differences between the building exterior and interior air, along with the outside wind speed, were shown to be dominant factors. Combining the stack and wind effects together, an empirical model was developed based on theoretical considerations and using experimental data to correlate zero-power system flow rates with ambient meteorological conditions. Some coefficients in the model were obtained based on best fitting the experimental data. The predictive capability of the empirical model was demonstrated by applying it to the new set of experimental data. The

  1. Evaluation of the magnitude of EBT Gafchromic film polarization effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butson, M J; Cheung, T; Yu, P K N

    2009-03-01

    Gafchromic EBT film, has become a main dosimetric tools for quantitative evaluation of radiation doses in radiation therapy application. One aspect of variability using EBT Gafchromic film is the magnitude of the orientation effect when analysing the film in landscape or portrait mode. This work has utilized a > 99% plane polarized light source and a non-polarized diffuse light source to investigate the absolute magnitude of EBT Gafchromic films polarization or orientation effects. Results have shown that using a non-polarized light source produces a negligible orientation effect for EBT Gafchromic film and thus the angle of orientation is not important. However, the film exhibits a significant variation in transmitted optical density with angle of orientation to polarized light producing more than 100% increase, or over a doubling of measured OD for films irradiated with x-rays up to dose levels of 5 Gy. The maximum optical density was found to be in a plane at an angle of 14 degrees +/- 7 degrees (2 SD) when the polarizing sheet is turned clockwise with respect to the film. As the magnitude of the orientation effect follows a sinusoidal shape it becomes more critical for alignment accuracy of the film with respect to the polarizing direction in the anticlockwise direction as this will place the alignment of the polarizing axes on the steeper gradient section of the sinusoidal pattern. An average change of 4.5% per 5 degrees is seen for an anticlockwise polarizer rotation where as the effect is 1.2% per 5 degrees for an clockwise polarizer rotation. This may have consequences to the positional accuracy of placement of the EBT Gafchromic film on a scanner as even a 1 degree alignment error can cause an approximate 1% error in analysis. The magnitude of the orientation effect is therefore dependant on the degree of polarization of the scanning light source and can range from negligible (diffuse LED light source) through to more than 100% or doubling of OD variation

  2. A review of film boiling at cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Y. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Film boiling occurs in the quenching of metals, the chilling of biological species, the regenerative cooling of rockets, and the cooling down of a cryogenic fuel tank. Occasionally film boiling is also found in a nuclear reactor or in a cryomagnet. Aspects of film boiling involving an unconstrained liquid mass are considered, giving attention to the evaporation time, the Leidenfrost temperature, solid-liquid contacts, the thermal properties of the solid, effects of coating or scale, wettability, the metastable condition, and the velocity effect on drops. Developments discussed with regard to pool boiling are related to vertical surfaces, film boiling from horizontal surfaces, film boiling from a horizontal cylinder, film boiling from a sphere, and film boiling of helium. Processes of film boiling in a channel are also analyzed.

  3. Piezoresistive Effect of Doped carbon Nanotube/Cellulose Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王万录; 廖克俊; 李勇; 王永田

    2003-01-01

    The strain-induced resistance changes in iodine-doped and undoped carbon nanotube films were investigated by a three-point bending test. Carbon nanotubes were fabricated by hot filament chemical vapour deposition. The experimental results showed that there has a striking piezoresistive effect in carbon nanotube films. The gauge factor for I-doped and undoped carbon nanotube films under 500 microstrain was about 125 and 65 respectively at room temperature, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃. The origin of the piezoresistivity in the films may be ascribed to a strain-induced change in the band gap for the doped tubes and to the intertube contact resistance for the undoped tubes.

  4. Cutting film violence: effects on perceptions, enjoyment, and arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M; Gray, T; Donnerstein, E

    1999-10-01

    The authors investigated the effects of cutting specific graphic scenes of film violence on self-reports of arousal, enjoyability, and perceptions of violence among a sample of U.S. students. In 3 studies, they varied film exposure from 1 1/2 min in the 1st study to a complete motion picture (American vs. British version of same film) in the 3rd. In all 3 studies, the participants rated the cut versions as less violent than the uncut versions. The participants distinguished quite subtle differences in levels of violence, even when the cuts were minor and contextualized within an entire movie. Cutting the movie significantly increased its enjoyability for the women; for the men, there was no significant difference. Cutting violent films made no difference in arousal for the men but substantially lowered self-report levels of arousal for the women.

  5. Gas turbine heat transfer and cooling technology

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Je-Chin; Ekkad, Srinath

    2012-01-01

    FundamentalsNeed for Turbine Blade CoolingTurbine-Cooling TechnologyTurbine Heat Transfer and Cooling IssuesStructure of the BookReview Articles and Book Chapters on Turbine Cooling and Heat TransferNew Information from 2000 to 2010ReferencesTurbine Heat TransferIntroductionTurbine-Stage Heat TransferCascade Vane Heat-Transfer ExperimentsCascade Blade Heat TransferAirfoil Endwall Heat TransferTurbine Rotor Blade Tip Heat TransferLeading-Edge Region Heat TransferFlat-Surface Heat TransferNew Information from 2000 to 20102.10 ClosureReferencesTurbine Film CoolingIntroductionFilm Cooling on Rotat

  6. Thermoelectric Devices Cool, Power Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc., based in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, licensed thermoelectric technology from NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This has allowed the company to develop cutting edge, thin-film thermoelectric coolers that effective remove heat generated by increasingly powerful and tightly packed microchip components. These solid-state coolers are ideal solutions for applications like microprocessors, laser diodes, LEDs, and even potentially for cooling the human body. Nextreme s NASA technology has also enabled the invention of thermoelectric generators capable of powering technologies like medical implants and wireless sensor networks.

  7. Thermodynamic Casimir effect in films: the exchange cluster algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenbusch, Martin

    2015-02-01

    We study the thermodynamic Casimir force for films with various types of boundary conditions and the bulk universality class of the three-dimensional Ising model. To this end, we perform Monte Carlo simulations of the improved Blume-Capel model on the simple cubic lattice. In particular, we employ the exchange or geometric cluster cluster algorithm [Heringa and Blöte, Phys. Rev. E 57, 4976 (1998)]. In a previous work, we demonstrated that this algorithm allows us to compute the thermodynamic Casimir force for the plate-sphere geometry efficiently. It turns out that also for the film geometry a substantial reduction of the statistical error can achieved. Concerning physics, we focus on (O,O) boundary conditions, where O denotes the ordinary surface transition. These are implemented by free boundary conditions on both sides of the film. Films with such boundary conditions undergo a phase transition in the universality class of the two-dimensional Ising model. We determine the inverse transition temperature for a large range of thicknesses L(0) of the film and study the scaling of this temperature with L(0). In the neighborhood of the transition, the thermodynamic Casimir force is affected by finite size effects, where finite size refers to a finite transversal extension L of the film. We demonstrate that these finite size effects can be computed by using the universal finite size scaling function of the free energy of the two-dimensional Ising model.

  8. Nonlocal effect in surface plasmon polariton of ultrathin metal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Hong-jie; Yu, Yabin, E-mail: apybyu@hnu.edu.cn; Wu, Reng-lai; Yu, Yan-qin; Wang, Ya-xin

    2015-09-01

    Using the nonlocal conductivity based on quantum response theory, we study the optical properties of p-polarized wave in quartz–metal–film–air structures, especially the influence of nonlocal effect on the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) resonance. In absorption spectrum, the resonant peak of SPP is found, and the dependence of the resonant peak on film thickness shows that nonlocal effect in the SPP resonance is enhanced significantly with the decrease of film-thickness, especially in the less than 20 nm metal film. We calculate the surface charge density as a function of frequency, and find that the frequencies at the charge and absorption peaks are the same. This clearly confirms that the absorption peak stems from SPP resonance excitation, and SPPs absorb the energy of the electromagnetic wave via charge oscillations. In the case of SPP resonance, the charge and electric field on the down-surface of thin film are always greater than that on the up-surface; however, the situation is just opposite in the case of no SPP resonance. This implies that the SPP resonance occurs near the down-surface of the film. Moreover, due to the nonlocal response of electric current to the electric field, the energy flow and electric current show anomalous oscillations, and with the increase of film thickness the anomalous oscillations exhibit obvious attenuation.

  9. Giant room-temperature elastocaloric effect in ferroelectric ultrathin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Infante, Ingrid C; Lou, Xiaojie; Bellaiche, Laurent; Scott, James F; Dkhil, Brahim

    2014-09-17

    Environmentally friendly ultrathin BaTiO3 capacitors can exhibit a giant stress-induced elastocaloric effect without hysteresis loss or Joule heating. By combining this novel elastocaloric effect with the intrinsic electrocaloric effect, an ideal refrigeration cycle with high performance (temperature change over 10 K with a wide working-temperature window of 60 K) at room temperature is proposed for future cooling applications.

  10. Repulsive effects of hydrophobic diamond thin films on biomolecule detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruslinda, A. Rahim, E-mail: ruslindarahim@gmail.com [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Jln Kgr-Alor Setar, Seriab, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan); Ishiyama, Y. [Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan); Penmatsa, V. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Ibori, S.; Kawarada, H. [Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We report the effect of fluorine plasma treatment on diamond thin film to resist the nonspecific adsorption of biomolecules. • The diamond thin film were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m. • The repulsive effect shows excellent binding efficiency for both DNA and HIV-1 Tat protein. - Abstract: The repulsive effect of hydrophobic diamond thin film on biomolecule detection, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 trans-activator of transcription peptide protein detection, was investigated using a mixture of a fluorine-, amine-, and hydrogen-terminated diamond surfaces. These chemical modifications lead to the formation of a surface that effectively resists the nonspecific adsorption of proteins and other biomolecules. The effect of fluorine plasma treatment on elemental composition was also investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results revealed a fluorocarbon layer on the diamond thin films. The contact angle measurement results indicated that the fluorine-treated diamond thin films were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m.

  11. MHD Effect of Liquid Metal Film Flows as Plasma-Facing Components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiujie; XU Zengyu; PAN Chuanjie

    2008-01-01

    Stability of liquid metal film flow under gradient magnetic field is investigated. Three dimensional numerical simulations on magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) effect of free surface film flow were carried out, with emphasis on the film thickness variation and its surface stability. Three different MHD phenomena of film flow were observed in the experiment, namely, retardant, rivulet and flat film flow. From our experiment and numerical simulation it can be concluded that flat film flow is a good choice for plasma-facing components (PFCs)

  12. The theoretical studies of piezoresistive effect in diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the Fuchs and Sondheimer thin film theory (F-S film theory) and a revised valence band split-off model, considering a mixed scattering by lattice vibrations, ionized impurities and surfaces, a theoretical description of the piezoresistive effect (PR effect) in p-type heteroepitaxial diamond films was presented by solving the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation and using the parallel connection resistance model. A calculating expression of the PR effect was given. The main characteristics that were identical with the experiment were obtained by theoretical calculation. Giving out a model to show that the energy level interval between the split-off band and the heavy-hole band was changed by strain, a reasonable explanation was presented for the error between experimental results and theoretical values of saturated PR effect under big strain.

  13. The effect of cooling rate on undercooling of pure Sn single drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bin; Zhuravlev, Evgeny; Schmelzer, Juern; Schick, Christoph [Institute of Physics, University of Rostock (Germany); Gao, Yulai [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and MaterialsProcessing, Shanghai University (China); Abyzov, Alexander S. [National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (Ukraine)

    2011-07-01

    The cooling rate dependence of undercooling of pure Sn single drop is studied by the non-adiabatic fast scanning calorimetry in a large range of cooling rate spanning four orders of magnitude. The experimental results and theoretical analysis show that the undercooling can be obviously increased first with increasing cooling rate going over to a stage of slow increase for high cooling rates, which indicates a shelf-like dependence of undercooling on cooling rate before and after a ''crossover'' at higher cooling rate where two different heterogeneous mechanisms act simultaneously.

  14. Effect of wall cooling on the stability of compressible subsonic flows over smooth humps and backward-facing steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maaitah, Ayman A.; Nayfeh, Ali H.; Ragab, Saad A.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of wall cooling on the two-dimensional linear stability of subsonic flows over two-dimensional surface imperfections is investigated. Results are presented for flows over smooth humps and backward-facing steps with Mach numbers up to 0.8. The results show that, whereas cooling decreases the viscous instability, it increases the shear-layer instability and hence it increases the growth rates in the separation region. The coexistence of more than one instability mechanism makes a certain degree of wall cooling most effective. For the Mach numbers 0.5 and 0.8, the optimum wall temperatures are about 80 pct and 60 pct of the adiabatic wall temperature, respectively. Increasing the Mach number decreases the effectiveness of cooling slightly and reduces the optimum wall temperature.

  15. Electron cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkov, I.; Sidorin, A.

    2004-10-01

    The brief review of the most significant and interesting achievements in electron cooling method, which took place during last two years, is presented. The description of the electron cooling facilities-storage rings and traps being in operation or under development-is given. The applications of the electron cooling method are considered. The following modern fields of the method development are discussed: crystalline beam formation, expansion into middle and high energy electron cooling (the Fermilab Recycler Electron Cooler, the BNL cooler-recuperator, cooling with circulating electron beam, the GSI project), electron cooling in traps, antihydrogen generation, electron cooling of positrons (the LEPTA project).

  16. Effect of Austenite Deformation on the Microstructure Evolution and Grain Refinement Under Accelerated Cooling Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H.; Palmiere, E. J.

    2017-07-01

    Although there has been much research regarding the effect of austenite deformation on accelerated cooled microstructures in microalloyed steels, there is still a lack of accurate data on boundary densities and effective grain sizes. Previous results observed from optical micrographs are not accurate enough, because, for displacive transformation products, a substantial part of the boundaries have disorientation angles below 15 deg. Therefore, in this research, a niobium microalloyed steel was used and electron backscattering diffraction mappings were performed on all of the transformed microstructures to obtain accurate results on boundary densities and grain refinement. It was found that with strain rising from 0 to 0.5, a transition from bainitic ferrite to acicular ferrite occurs and the effective grain size reduces from 5.7 to 3.1 μm. When further increasing strain from 0.5 to 0.7, dynamic recrystallization was triggered and postdynamic softening occurred during the accelerated cooling, leading to an inhomogeneous and coarse transformed microstructure. In the entire strain range, the density changes of boundaries with different disorientation angles are distinct, due to different boundary formation mechanisms. Finally, the controversial influence of austenite deformation on effective grain size of low-temperature transformation products was argued to be related to the differences in transformation conditions and final microstructures.

  17. Stochastic Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  18. Dynamic process of trace boron non-equilibrium grain boundary segregation and the effect of cooling rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Wu; Xinlai He; Bing Cao; Sen Chen

    2003-01-01

    The dynamic process of non-equilibrium grain boundary segregation of trace boron in Fe-40%Ni alloy during cooling andthe effect of cooling rate were investigated by boron tracking autoradiography technique. The results indicate that during coolingprocess, the amount of segregated boron on grain boundary firstly increases fast, then enters a comparatively even increasing stageand increases rapidly again at the third stage. The details of each stage varied with cooling rate are explained. When thc segregationdevelops to a certain degree, the segregated boron atoms transform fiom solute status to precipitate status.

  19. The Effect of Using a Modified A/C System on the Cooling System Temperature of an Internal Combustion Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhtar M.A. Morad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of using A/C refrigerant to reduce the temperature of the coolant in a vehicle cooling system. An increase in coolant temperature due to harsh working conditions increases fuel consumption and leads to a reduction in engine power. Modifying vehicle air-conditioning by passing the suction line of the A/C system through the heat exchanger located in the lower part of the radiator (down flow type can significantly improve the performance of the engine cooling system. The results show a reduction in the temperature of coolant within the cooling system, thus maintaining a controlled working temperature within the allowable limits

  20. Cost-effective control systems for solar heating and cooling applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejsa, J. H.; Bassett, W. W.; Wenzler, S. A.; Nguyen, K. H.; Olson, T. J.

    1978-09-01

    A methodology has been defined to arrive at control recommendations for a variety of climate control system designs, applications and regions, and the results are presented in two parts. Part I consists of a literature and market-place survey, involving control strategies, functions, sensors, actuators, and the controllers themselves. Part II represents the bulk of the study effort - an attempt to simulate and evaluate system performance for several representative residential and commercial heating and cooling designs and thus to derive improved performance techniques within cost-effective control systems. (MHR)

  1. Magnetocaloric effect and refrigeration cooling power in amorphous Gd7Ru3 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pramod; Kumar, Rachana

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we report the magnetic, heat capacity and magneto-caloric effect (MCE) of amorphous Gd7Ru3 compound. Both, temperature dependent magnetization and heat capacity data reveals that two transitions at 58 K and 34 K. MCE has been calculated in terms of isothermal entropy change (ΔSM) and adiabatic temperature change (ΔTad) using the heat capacity data in different fields. The maximum values of ΔSM and ΔTad are 21 Jmol-1K-1 and 5 K respectively, for field change of 50 kOe whereas relative cooling power (RCP) is ˜735 J/kg for the same field change.

  2. The Effect of Pallet Component Geometry on Temperature Gradient During Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajwoluk A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the impact of the geometry of foundry pallet components on the value of temperature gradient on the wall crosssection during heat treatment. The gradient is one of the most important factors determining the distribution of thermal stresses in these items. Analysis of quantitative simulation was carried out to detect possible effect of the type of connection between pallet walls and thickness of these walls (ribs on the interior temperature distribution during rapid cooling. The analysis was performed for five basic designs of wall connections used in pallets. Basing on the results obtained, the conclusions were drawn on the best connection between the ribs in foundry pallets.

  3. Effect of evaporative surface cooling on thermographic assessment of burn depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Zawacki, B. E.

    1977-01-01

    Differences in surface temperature between evaporating and nonevaporating, partial- and full-thickness burn injuries were studied in 20 male, white guinea pigs. Evaporative cooling can disguise the temperature differential of the partial-thickness injury and lead to a false full-thickness diagnosis. A full-thickness burn with blister intact may retain enough heat to result in a false partial-thickness diagnosis. By the fourth postburn day, formation of a dry eschar may allow a surface temperature measurement without the complication of differential evaporation. For earlier use of thermographic information, evaporation effects must be accounted for or eliminated.

  4. Experimental facility for studying MHD effects in liquid metal cooled blankets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, C. B.; Picologlou, B. F.; Dauzvardis, P. V.

    The capabilities of a facility, brought into service to collect data on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects, pertinent to liquid metal cooled fusion reactor blankets, are presented. The facility, design to extend significantly the existing data base on liquid metal MHD, employs eutectic NaK as the working fluid in a room temperature closed loop. The instrumentation system is capable of collecting detailed data on pressure, voltage, and velocity distributions at any axial position within the base of a 2 Tesla conventional magnet. The axial magnetic field distribution can be uniform or varying with either rapid or slow spatial variations.

  5. Investigation of wind speed cooling effect on PV panels in windy locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gökmen, Nuri; Hu, Weihao; Hou, Peng

    2016-01-01

    by taking into account generally underestimated wind speed cooling effect. Firstly, optimum tilt angle variations have been investigated and secondly yearly energy comparisons are made for cases with and without considering wind speed. A more accurate mathematical model is given to estimate yearly energy...... gain especially in the planning stage. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is used to find optimum tilt angles for several time intervals. Results are given in detail through a case study in a windy northern European city, Aalborg, Denmark. The presented methodology can also easily be applied...

  6. Effects of acoustic ceiling units on the cooling performance of thermally activated building systems (TABS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacarte, Luis Marcos Domínguez; Rage, Niels; Kazanci, Ongun Berk

    2017-01-01

    the effects of two types of free hanging ceiling absorbers (horizontal and vertical) on the cooling performance of the TABS and the implications this has on the occupant thermal comfort. The measurements were carried out in a full-scale TABS test facility. The results show a reduction of 11% of the heat...... absorbers for equivalent levels of sound absorption. A reduction of 12% of the heat removed by the TABS has been measured for vertical sound absorbers (equivalent sound absorption levels to 60% coverage ratio with horizontal sound absorbers). This reduction was of 13% for vertical sound absorbers...

  7. [The effect of postoperative cold therapy in joint surgery using a new cooling device].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münst, P; Bonnaire, F; Kuner, E H

    1988-08-01

    The effect of continuous cold therapy with a new cooling device in post-operative treatment after knee surgery has been proved. Ten patients with different operations of the knee joint participated in this study. Eight out of ten patients reported no or poor pain, whereas in the control group especially after arthrotomy considerable or violent pain was reported. After arthroscopic operations we found more an decrease of swelling and effusion, after arthrotomy more pain reduction. The subjective feeling of all patients was very good and they were generally very receptive to it.

  8. Effectiveness of short-term cooling and vitamin E for alleviation of infertility induced by heat stress in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ealy, A D; Aréchiga, C F; Bray, D R; Risco, C A; Hansen, P J

    1994-12-01

    Four experiments were performed to determine whether cooling cows during final maturation of oocytes and early embryonic development or injection of vitamin E at AI prevented adverse effects of heat stress on pregnancy rates in lactating Holstein dairy cows. In Experiment 1, cows were placed in a cooling facility containing sprinklers and forced ventilation or received shade only from 2 to 3 d before until 5 to 6 d after breeding. Although cooling had no effect on detection of estrus, pregnancy rates were increased slightly for cooled cows (8 of 50 cows; 16.0%) compared with those for cows exposed to shade only (2 of 32 cows; 6.2%). In Experiments 2 through 4, cows were administered 3000 IU of vitamin E or placebo i.m. at AI during two consecutive summers and one winter in Florida. Administration of vitamin E had no consistent beneficial effect on pregnancy rates during summer or winter. Short-term cooling improved pregnancy rates slightly in heat-stressed cows, but administration of vitamin E had no beneficial effects on pregnancy rates during heat stress. Further improvements in cooling schemes during early pregnancy and delineation of antioxidant effects are necessary before such systems become practical for improvement of fertility in heat-stressed dairy cows.

  9. Numerical Simulation of 3—D Temperature Distribution of the Flame Tube of the Combustion Chamber with Air Film COoling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChangHaiping; HuangTaiping; 等

    1996-01-01

    The wall temperature distribution of the flame tube of the combustion chamber is strongly affected by the combustion,radiation and flow.The interaction of these influential factors froms a coupling system.In this paper,a new method,which is different from the previous methods,has been developed for calcuating the temperature distribution of the flame tube wall together with the flow field inside and outside the flame tube,In the calculation.the combustion,heat radiation,cooling air film and injection stream mixing inside the flame tube as well as the secondary air flowing outside the flame tube have been simulated.The calculation,in this paper,uses the SIMPLE algorithm,the κ-εturbulence model and the auto-adjustable damping method .By using this method ,the 3-D temperature distribution of the floame tube wall of the combustion chamber of an aeroengine has been simulated successfully.The calculation results are compared to the experimetal data.The error of wall temperature is less than 10%.

  10. The effective flux through a thin-film composite membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, M.; Chapman, S. J.; Ramon, G. Z.

    2015-05-01

    Composite membrane structures, used extensively in separation processes, comprise an ultra-thin selective polymer film cast over a porous support, whose pores partially obstruct transport out of the top film. Here, we model the composite as a finite thickness slab with a periodic array of circular absorbing patches in an otherwise reflective surface and study the effective transport properties of the composite. We obtain an analytical approximation for the effective diffusive flux as a function of the geometrical parameters, namely the film thickness, the support porosity and the pore size. We find a good agreement with full numerical solutions, and that a good effective rate is achievable with a relatively small number of pores.

  11. Effect of micro-patterned fluorine-doped tin oxide films on electrochromic properties of Prussian blue films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyuha [Center for Energy Convergence Research, Green City Technology Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, A-Young [Center for Energy Convergence Research, Green City Technology Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Material Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Hun; Jung, Hun-Gi; Choi, Wonchang; Lee, Hwa Young [Center for Energy Convergence Research, Green City Technology Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joong Kee, E-mail: leejk@kist.re.kr [Center for Energy Convergence Research, Green City Technology Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PB-based ECD employed micro-patterned FTO electrode was fabricated. • Effect of interface morphology on electrochromic characteristics was examined. • Electrochromic properties were enhanced by employing a patterned interface. - Abstract: The effect of interface morphology on electrochromic characteristics was examined for an electrochromic device (ECD). Micro-patterned fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) films were fabricated using a photolithography process. Prussian blue (PB) films were then deposited on the patterned FTO films. The surface areas of both PB films and FTO films were increased by patterning. ECDs were assembled using patterned PB/FTO films as the electrochromic electrode, bare FTO films as the counter electrode, and an electrolyte containing LiClO{sub 4} salt. The increased effective surface area of the patterned PB/FTO electrode boosted the mobility of ions at the interphase between the electrolyte and PB electrode, and the electron transfer between PB films and FTO films. As a result, electrochromic properties such as transmittance and response time were significantly improved by employing the patterned FTO films as the transparent conductive oxide layer of the electrochromic electrode.

  12. Effect of a Radiation Cooling and Heating Function on Standing Longitudinal Oscillations in Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Moon, Y.-J.

    2016-06-01

    Standing long-period (with periods longer than several minutes) oscillations in large, hot (with a temperature higher than 3 MK) coronal loops have been observed as the quasi-periodic modulation of the EUV and microwave intensity emission and the Doppler shift of coronal emission lines, and they have been interpreted as standing slow magnetoacoustic (longitudinal) oscillations. Quasi-periodic pulsations of shorter periods, detected in thermal and non-thermal emissions in solar flares could be produced by a similar mechanism. We present theoretical modeling of the standing slow magnetoacoustic mode, showing that this mode of oscillation is highly sensitive to peculiarities of the radiative cooling and heating function. We generalized the theoretical model of standing slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in a hot plasma, including the effects of the radiative losses and accounting for plasma heating. The heating mechanism is not specified and taken empirically to compensate the cooling by radiation and thermal conduction. It is shown that the evolution of the oscillations is described by a generalized Burgers equation. The numerical solution of an initial value problem for the evolutionary equation demonstrates that different dependences of the radiative cooling and plasma heating on the temperature lead to different regimes of the oscillations, including growing, quasi-stationary, and rapidly decaying. Our findings provide a theoretical foundation for probing the coronal heating function and may explain the observations of decayless long-period, quasi-periodic pulsations in flares. The hydrodynamic approach employed in this study should be considered with caution in the modeling of non-thermal emission associated with flares, because it misses potentially important non-hydrodynamic effects.

  13. Effect of cooling rate on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a C–Mn–Cr–B steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Smriti Ojha; N S Mishra; B K Jha

    2015-04-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of a low carbon steel containing 30 ppm boron have been investigated. The steel was subjected to various cooling conditions in a thermo-mechanical simulator to generate continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram. Similar cooling conditions were also applied to tensile samples in order to evaluate their mechanical properties. The results indicate profuse banding in the hot strip of thickness 2.5 mm. This effect is attributed to the presence of manganese. In addition, variation in cooling rate led to increase in strength but severely affected percentage elongation albeit in an acceptable limit of 6%. This effect is discussed in the light of degree of banding of strips and microstructural constituents generated during heat treatment of steel strips of different thicknesses.

  14. Intrinsic Josephson effects on superconducting films

    CERN Document Server

    Chana, O S

    2002-01-01

    Films of the high-T sub c superconductor Tl sub 2 Ba sub 2 CaCu sub 2 O sub 8 with the crystal c-axis misaligned from the substrate normal have been used to make intrinsic Josephson junctions. The copper-oxide layers in the cuprate superconductor are weakly coupled in the c-direction. This weak interplanar coupling is analogous to superconductor- insulator-superconductor stacks parallel to the c-direction in the film and this maps out to a series array of intrinsic Josephson junctions. A novel device geometry has been used to exploit this and series arrays of intrinsic Josephson junctions have been fabricated. The junctions are optimised in quality and have a high and critical-current- independent value for the product of the critical current and normal state resistance. The temperature dependence of the critical current fits the Ambegaokar-Baratoff theory for SIS tunnelling. X-band emission at around 12 GHz has been detected from the intrinsic Josephson bridge at 103 K. This confirms that the junctions are s...

  15. Effect of ischemia and cooling on the response to high frequency stimulation in rat tail nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning; Feldbæk Nielsen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Bodil

    2000-01-01

    In normal rat tail nerves the effect of temperature and ischemia on the response to long-term high frequency stimulation (HFS) (143 Hz) was studied. The effect of temperature was studied in two consecutive tests at 14 degrees C and 35 degrees C. Prior to the HFS the peak-to-peak amplitude (PP-amp...... ischemia to the rat tail, an additional fall of the PP-amp was seen after 15-20 min of HFS at both low (20 Hz) and high (143 Hz) stimulation frequencies. In conclusion, ischemia and cooling result in an impaired ability to transmit high frequency impulses.......In normal rat tail nerves the effect of temperature and ischemia on the response to long-term high frequency stimulation (HFS) (143 Hz) was studied. The effect of temperature was studied in two consecutive tests at 14 degrees C and 35 degrees C. Prior to the HFS the peak-to-peak amplitude (PP...

  16. Effect of cooling rate on the crystallization behavior of perovskite in high titanium-bearing blast furnace slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Liu; Mei-long Hu; Chen-guang Bai; Xue-weiLü; Yu-zhou Xu; Qing-yu Deng

    2014-01-01

    The effect of cooling rate on the crystallization of perovskite in high Ti-bearing blast furnace (BF) slag was studied using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). Results showed that perovskite was the primary phase formed during the cooling of slag. On the slag surface, the growth of perovskite proceeded via the successive production of quasi-particles along straight lines, which further extended in certain directions. The morphology and structure of perovskite was found to vary as a function of cooling rate. At cooling rates of 10 and 30 K/min, the dendritic arms of perovskite crossed obliquely, while they were orthogonal at a cooling rate of 20 K/min and hexagonal at cooling rates of 40 and 50 K/min. These three crystal morphologies thus obtained at different cooling rates respectively corresponded to the ortho-rhombic, cubic and hexagonal crystal structures of perovskite. The observed change in the structure of perovskite could probably be attrib-uted to the deficiency of O2-,when Ti2O3 was involved in the formation of perovskite.

  17. Cooling with a 4.5kW air-cooled single effect LiBr/H{sub 2}O absorption unit (Rotartica 045v)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo, M. [Inst. C.C Eduardo Torroja (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Lizarte, R.; Burguete, A. [Univ. Carlos III de Madrid, Leganes (Spain); Marcos, J.D. [Escuela Tecnica Superior Ingenieria Industrial, UNED, Madrid (Spain); Palacios, E. [Univ. Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    One experience, during an August hot day, was conducted to determine the performance of a commercial (Rotartica 045v) 4.5-kW air-cooled, single effect LiBr/H{sub 2}O absorption chiller for residential use. The experiments were run at La Poveda, Arganda del Rey, Madrid, in 4 August 2005. When outdoor temperature was 35.6 C and supplied water temperature to generator was 105.4 C, the chilled water temperature was 17.5 C. The average COP, when auxiliary equipment was factored into the calculations, was 0.42. (orig.)

  18. Effect of coil cooling conditions on microstructural and mechanical properties uniformity of flat hot rolled AHSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaputkina, L. M.; Marmulev, A. V.; Poliak, E. I.; Herman, G.

    2013-03-01

    Experimental and computational results of measurement of the temperature field due to cooling of coils of hot-rolled strip from low-carbon high-strength steel are presented. It is shown that in a conventional production process the coils cool nonuniformly. The nonuniformity of the cooling causes inhomogeneity of the properties both over the length of the strip and over its width.

  19. Influencing factors on the cooling effect of coarse blocky top-layers on relict rock glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauritsch, Marcus; Wagner, Thomas; Mayaud, Cyril; Thalheim, Felix; Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas; Winkler, Gerfried

    2017-04-01

    Coarse blocky material widely occurs in alpine landscapes particularly at the surface of bouldery rock glaciers. Such blocky layers are known to have a cooling effect on the subjacent material because of the enhanced non-conductive heat exchange with the atmosphere. This effect is used for instance by the construction of blocky embankments in the building of railways and roads in permafrost regions to prevent thawing processes. In alpine regions, this cooling effect may have a strong influence on the distribution and conservation of permafrost related to climate warming. The thermal regimes of the blocky surface layers of two comparable - in terms of size, elevation and geology - relict rock glaciers with opposing slope aspects are investigated. Therefore, the influence of the slope aspect-related climatic conditions (mainly the incident solar radiation, wind conditions and snow cover) on the cooling effect of the blocky layers is investigated. Air temperature, ground surface temperature and ground temperature at one meter depth were continuously measured over a period of four years at several locations at the NE-oriented Schöneben Rock Glacier and the adjacent SW-oriented Dürrtal Rock Glacier. At the former, additional data about wind speed and wind direction as well as precipitation are available, which are used to take wind-forced convection and snow cover into consideration. Statistical analyses of the data reveal that the blocky top layer of the Dürrtal Rock Glacier generally exhibits lower temperatures compared to the Schöneben Rock Glacier despite the more radiation-exposed aspect and the related higher solar radiation. However, the data show that the thermal regimes of the surface layers are highly heterogeneous and that data from the individual measurement sites have to be interpreted with caution. High Rayleigh numbers at both rock glaciers show that free convection occurs particularly during winter. Furthermore, wind-forced convection has a high

  20. An effect of heat insulation parameters on thermal losses of water-cooled roofs for secondary steelmaking electric arc furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mihailov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is research in the insulation parameters effect on the thermal losses of watercooled roofs for secondary steelmaking electric arc furnaces. An analytical method has been used for the investigation in heat transfer conditions in the working area. The results of the research can be used to choose optimal cooling parameters and select a suitable kind of insulation for water-cooled surfaces.

  1. Optical thin-film interference effects in microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, A.; Passian, A.; Arakawa, E.; Ferrell, T. L.; Thundat, T.

    2004-02-01

    We report direct observation of thin-film interference effects in microcantilevers, an effect that can impact the optical monitoring of the microcantilever motion. When microcantilevers are illuminated with different wavelengths of light the amount of absorption and the wavelengths of maxima in the absorption depend upon the thickness of the layers, the materials used in the layers, and the direction of illumination. Wavelengths of maximum absorption are observed as microcantilever deflections due to heat-induced bending of the bimaterial structure of the microcantilever. Results are presented for different multilayer configurations and illumination directions. These results are then compared with theoretical calculations based on multilayer thin-film analysis.

  2. Convective cooling of photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, E.; Gibbons, C. [Energy Engineering Group, Mechanical Engineering Department, Cork Institute of Technology, Bishopstown, Cork (Ireland)

    2004-07-01

    Most solar cells presently on the market are based on silicon wafers, the so-called first generation technology. As this technology has matured costs have become increasingly dominated by material costs. In the last ten years, continuous work has brought the efficiency of standard cells to the 25% region. A switch to second generation or thin film technology cells now seems imminent. Thin film technology eliminates the silicon wafer and offer the prospect of reducing material and manufacturing costs, but they exhibit lower efficiencies of around 10% for a commercial device. Third generation or tandem cells are currently at a 'proof of concept' research level, with a theoretical conversion rate of 86.8% being asserted Whatever the material construction and manufacturing method of cells, the thermal effect of overheating will prevail in the semiconductor and it is accepted that a lowered temperature will bring about an increase in conversion efficiency. The aim of this project is to improve the efficiency of PV electrical output, by convectively cooling the cells through perforations in them. As the cells heat up they lose efficiency. As the panel heats up a loss in efficiency of 0.5% per C increase in temperature has been recorded. (orig.)

  3. Effects of cooling rate and B content on microstructure of near-eutectic Al-13wt%Si Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Xiao; Zhou Jianyuan; Lü Jianhua

    2008-01-01

    Under cooling rates of 2℃/s and 10℃/s.the Influences of B content on the microstructure of near eutectic Al-13.0wt%Si alloy have been investigated.Results showed that the addition of boron resulted in refinement of eutectic grains,and to some extent,had an inhibiting effect on precipitation of the primary phases,and the refining and inhibiting effects are much more obvious at higher cooling rate.When B was not added,higher cooling rate promoted the α-Al dendrites formation.At Iower cooling rate,the addition of B did not cause the so called"columnar to equiaxed transition(CET)",however,at higher cooling rate,this transition was obvious.After the addition of B,the nucleation temperature TN ascended and nucleation mode changed from nucleation mode of from wall towards centre(without B addition)to a nucleation mode that the eutectic nucleated evenly throughout whole sample (with B added).It can be concluded that the addition of B offers a Iarge amount of nuclei for eutectic solidification,as a result,the eutectic grains was refined.Higher cooling rate will lead to more nuclei,so the effects on the refinement of eutectic grains and on suppression of primary phases are increased.

  4. Effect of Calcium Chloride and Cooling on Post-Harvest Brussels Cabbage (Brassica Oleracea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Rincón Pérez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the demand of crucifers has increased and particularly of Brussels sprouts (Brassica genus, species Brassica oleracea L.; mainly due to their functional properties; however, this vegetable is perishable and with inadequate techniques in postharvest handling, considerable losses are generated. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of calcium chloride and cooling on postharvest behavior of Brussels sprouts. A completely randomized design was performed, treatments corresponded to three storage temperatures (4°C, 8°C and temperature (18°C and three concentrations of calcium chloride (0%, 2% and 4% were used. Sprouts were harvested at commercial maturity on a farm irrigation district in Usochicamocha, Boyacá Department; of uniform size, excellent plant health and free from mechanical damage conditions. For 19 days of storage, weight loss, respiratory rate and total chlorophyll were measured. Sprouts stored at room temperature lasted 11days postharvest, while cooled lasted for 19 days. A significant effect in reducing weight loss between those sprouts which were stored at 4°C and 8°C and treated with calcium chloride solution at 4% was observed. For the respiratory rate was observed a significant reduction insprouts stored at 4°C. Therefore the most favorable temperature for the storage of Brussels sprouts is 4°C and calcium chloride solution 4%,useful information for producers and marketers.

  5. Effect of ambient humidity on light transmittance through skin phantoms during cryogen spray cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-San-Juan C, Julio [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Department of Optics, INAOE, AP 51 and 216, CP 72000 Puebla, Pue (Mexico); Choi, Bernard [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Franco, Walfre [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Nelson, J Stuart [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Aguilar, Guillermo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2006-01-07

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is a technique employed to reduce the risk of epidermal damage during dermatologic laser surgery. However, while CSC protects the epidermis from non-specific thermal damage, it might reduce the effective fluence reaching the target chromophore due to scattering of light by the spray droplets and subsequent water condensation/freezing on the skin surface. The objective of this work was to study the effect of ambient humidity ({omega}) on light transmittance during CSC. An integrating sphere was employed to measure the dynamics of light transmittance through a deformable agar phantom during CSC. The study included two representative CSC spurt patterns studied using four {omega}: 57, 40, 20 and 12%. Results show that during CSC, as {omega} increased, light transmittance decreased. For the highest humidity level (57%) studied, light transmittance reached a minimum of 55% approximately 30 ms after spurt termination. In a controlled environment with {omega} = 12%, light transmittance reached a minimum of 87% approximately 30 ms after spurt termination. The reduced light transmittance immediately after spurt termination was most likely because of scattering of light caused by condensation of water vapour due to aggressive cooling of ambient air in the wake of the cryogen spurt.

  6. The cooling effect of crushed rock structures on permafrost under an embankment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the analysis and comparison of soil temperature, thermal regime and permafrost table under the experimental embankment of crushed rock structures in Beiluhe, results show that crushed rock structures provide an extensive cooling effect, which produces a rising permafrost table and decreasing soil temperatures. The rise of the permafrost table under the embankment ranges from an increase of 1.08 m to 1.67 m, with an average of 1.27 m from 2004 to 2007. Mean annual soil temperatures under the crushed rock layer embankment decreased significantly from 2005 to 2007, with average decreases of ?1.03 °C at the depth of 0.5 m, ?1.14 °C at the depth of 1.5 m, and ?0.5 °C at the depth of 5 m. During this period, mean annual soil temperatures under the crushed rock cover embankment showed a slight decrease at shallow depths, with an average decrease of ?0.2 °C at the depth of 0.5 m and 1.5 m, but a slight rise at the depth of 5 m. After the crushed rock structures were closed or crammed with sand, the cooling effect of the crushed rock layer embankment was greatly reduced and that of the crushed rock cover embankment was just slightly reduced.

  7. Induced magnetism in exfoliated graphene via proximity effect with yttrium iron garnet thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, Mario; Li, Yang; di Bernardo, Angelo; Lombardo, Antonio; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Robinson, Jason

    The recent discovery of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in magnetically doped topological insulators cooled below in the milikelvin regime represents breakthrough in the field of spintronics. Theoretically, the QAHE should occur in graphene proximity coupled to a ferromagnetic insulato but with the promise of much higher operating temperatures for practical applications. Hints of proximity-induced magnetism in graphene coupled to yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films have been reported although the QAHE remains unobserved; the lack of a fully developed plateau in graphene/YIG devices can be attributed to poor interfacial coupling and therefore a dramatically reduced magnetic proximity effect. Here we report the deposition and characterisation of epitaxial thin-films of YIG on lattice-matched gadolinium gallium garnet substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Pristine exfoliated graphene flakes transferred mechanically onto the YIG are reported alongside results that correlate the effects of YIG morphology on the electronic and crystal properties of graphene by electrical (low temperature magnetoresistance measurements in Hall-bar-like configuration) and optical (Raman) means.

  8. Effect of Air Cooling and Vacuum Cooling Storage on the β-Carotene Content and Proximate Analysis (Water Content, pH, Total Protein and Content of Sugar) in Carrot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumaningsih, T.; Martini, T.; Rini, K. S.; Okstafiyanti, L.

    2017-04-01

    The study of air cooling and vacuum cooling storage effect on the β-carotene content and proximate analysis in carrot has been studied. The aim of the research to determine the effective storage in carrot to improve the quality and the shelf life. Parameters measured during the 12 weeks of storage process were β-carotene, pH, water, sugar and protein content. Validation analysis for β-carotene method showed a good linearity (r 2 = 0.997) in a range of 0-8 mg/L and (r 2 = 0.999) in a range of 0-1 mg/L. The precision was exemplified by %RSD of 0.88%-7.48%. Mean recovery was 100.66% during accuracy studied. UV analysis revealed the LOD values were 0.009 mg/L and LOQ values were 0.032 mg/L. The decreased content of β-carotene, water, protein, and pH from carrot during vacuum cooling storage were higher than in the air cooling storage period. The sugar content for air cooling storage increased up to eight weeks and decreased at the end of storage while the vacuum cooling storage decreased from the beginning of the storage period. All the data indicates that the air cooling storage was more effective storage techniques for extending the shelf life of carrot compared to the vacuum cooling storage.

  9. Effect of sub-zero cooling on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low alloyed austempered ductile iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Yazdani; M. Ardestani

    2007-01-01

    The effect of sub-zero cooling on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low alloyed austempered ductile iron has been investigated. Austempering of samples was performed at 325 ℃ and 400 ℃after austenitizing at 875 ℃ and 950 ℃. The sub-zero treatments were carried out by cooling down the samples to -30 ℃, -70 ℃ and -196 ℃. The changes in volume fraction of austenite and mechanical properties were determined after cooling to each temperature. The austenite volume fraction of samples which were austenitized at 875 ℃ and austempered at 325 ℃ remained unchanged, whilst it reduced in samples austenitized at 950 ℃ and 875 ℃ for austempering temperature of 400 ℃. In these specimens, some austenite transformed to martensite after subzero cooling. Mechanical property measurements showed a slight increase in strength and hardness and decrease in elongation and toughness due to this transformation behavior.

  10. Effect of sub-zero cooling on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low alloyed austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ardestani

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sub-zero cooling on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low alloyed austempered ductile iron has been investigated. Austempering of samples was performed at 325! and 400℃ after austenitizing at 875℃ and 950℃. The sub-zero treatments were carried out by cooling down the samples to -30℃, -70℃ and -196℃. The changes in volume fraction of austenite and mechanical properties were determined after cooling to each temperature. The austenite volume fraction of samples which were austenitized at 875℃ and austempered at 325℃ remained unchanged, whilst it reduced in samples austenitized at 950℃ and 875℃ for austempering temperature of 400℃. In these specimens, some austenite transformed to martensite after subzero cooling. Mechanical property measurements showed a slight increase in strength and hardness and decrease in elongation and toughness due to this transformation behavior.

  11. Effect of cooling rate on MC carbide in directionally solidified nickel-based superalloy under high thermal gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Weiguo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of directional solidification experiments have been performed to study the effect of cooling rate on the precipitation behavior of MC carbide in nickel-based superalloy under the temperature gradient of 500 K·s-1. Results reveal that the morphology of MC carbide changes from coarse block to fine strip, then to Chinese-script, and their sizes reduce gradually with the increasing of cooling rate from 2.53 K·s-1 to 36.4 K·s-1. At low cooling rates, most of these carbides are found to be located at the grain boundary and interdendritic regions, while the coupled growth of some carbides and γ matrix in the center of γ grains is occurred at high cooling rate. The main elements forming MC carbide are Ta, W, and Hf.

  12. Effect of Relative Humidity on the Tribological Properties of Self-Lubricating H3BO3 Films Formed on the Surface of Steel Suitable for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hernández-Sanchez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of environmental humidity on the self-lubricating properties of a thin film of boric acid (H3BO3 was evaluated. H3BO4 films were successfully formed on the surface of AISI 316L steel. The study was conducted on AISI 316L steel because of its use in biomedical applications. First, the samples were exposed to boriding to generate a continuous surface layer of iron borides. The samples were then exposed to a short annealing process (SAP at 1023 K for 5 min and cooled to room temperature while controlling the relative humidity (RH. Five different RH conditions were tested. The purpose of SAP was to promote the formation of a surface film of boric acid from the boron atoms present in the iron boride layers. The presence of the boric acid at the surface of the borided layer was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The self-lubricating capability of the films was demonstrated using the pin-on-disk technique. The influence of RH was reflected by the friction coefficient (FC, as the samples cooled with 20% of RH exhibited FC values of 0.16, whereas the samples cooled at 60% RH showed FC values of 0.02.

  13. Effects of the cooling rate on the shear behavior of continuous glass fiber/impact polypropylene composites (GF-IPP)

    KAUST Repository

    Wafai, Husam

    2016-09-20

    Fiber-reinforced composites with improved dissipation of energy during impact loading have recently been developed based on a polypropylene copolymer commonly called impact polypropylene (IPP). Composites made of IPP reinforced with glass fibers (GF) are particularly attractive to the automotive industry due to their low cost and good impact resistance. In such composites, the cooling rate varies depending on processing techniques and manufacturing choices. Here, we study the effects of the cooling rate of GF-IPP composites on shear behavior, which is critical in impact applications, using [±45]s monotonic and cyclic (load/unload) tensile specimens. The specimens were manufactured under a wide range of cooling rates (3 °C/min, 22 °C/min, 500–1000 °C/min). Mainly dominated by the properties of the matrix, the global shear behavior of GF-IPP composites differed considerably with respect to the cooling rate. However, the performance of the fiber-matrix interface (chemically modified) appeared to be unaffected by the range of cooling rates used in this study. We found that the cooling rate has a minor effect on the rate of damage accumulation, while it strongly modifies the shear-activated rate-dependant viscoelastic behavior. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  14. Characterization of rice starch-ι-carrageenan biodegradable edible film. Effect of stearic acid on the film properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Rahul; Saberi, Bahareh; Pristijono, Penta; Golding, John; Stathopoulos, Costas; Scarlett, Christopher; Bowyer, Michael; Vuong, Quan

    2016-12-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop rice starch (RS), ι-carrageenan (ι-car) based film. Different formulations of RS (1-4%, w/w), ι-car (0.5-2%, w/w) was blended with stearic acid (SA; 0.3-0.9%, w/w) and glycerol (1%, w/w) as a plasticizer. The effect of film ingredients on the thickness, water vapour permeability (WVP), film solubility (FS), moisture content (MC), colour, film opacity (FO), tensile strength (TS), elongation-at-break (EAB) of film was examined. Interactions and miscibility of partaking components was studied by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Hydrocolloid suspension solution of mix polysaccharides imparted a significant impact (p<0.05) on the important attributes of resulting edible film. TS and EAB of film were improved significantly (p<0.05) when ι-car was increased in the film matrix. Formulation F1 comprising 2% ι-car, 2% RS, 0.3% SA, Gly 30% w/w and 0.2% surfactant (tween(®)20) provided film with good physical, mechanical and barrier properties. FT-IR and XRD results reveal that molecular interactions between RS-ι-car have a great impact on the film properties confining the compatibility and miscibility of mixed polysaccharide. Results of the study offers new biodegradable formulation for application on fruit and vegetables. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Edible arabinoxylan-based films. 1. Effects of lipid type on water vapor permeability, film structure, and other physical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péroval, Claudine; Debeaufort, Frédéric; Despré, Denis; Voilley, Andrée

    2002-07-01

    Arabinoxylans (AX) are natural fibers extracted from maize bran, an industrial byproduct. To promote this polymer as a food ingredient, development of edible coatings and films had been proposed. Indeed, composite arabinoxylan-based films were prepared by emulsifying a fat: palmitic acid, oleic acid, triolein, or a hydrogenated palm oil (OK35). Lipid effects on water vapor permeability (WVP), surface hydrophobicity (contact angles), lipid particle size, and mechanical properties were investigated. Results showed that OK35-AX emulsion films had the lowest WVP. Emulsified films presented a bimodal particle size distribution; however, the smallest particle mean diameter (0.54 microm) was observed in OK35-AX emulsion films. Contact angles of water comparable to those observed for LDPE films (>90 degrees ) are measured on the OK35-AX film surface. Finally, only triolein-AX emulsion films had elongation higher than films without lipid. These results suggest that OK35 enhances functional properties of AX-based films and should be retained for further research.

  16. Postexercise cooling interventions and the effects on exercise-induced heat stress in a temperate environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausswirth, Christophe; Duffield, Rob; Pournot, Hervé; Bieuzen, François; Louis, Julien; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Castagna, Olivier

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of cool water immersion (20 °C; CWI) while wearing a cooling jacket (Cryovest;V) and a passive control (PAS) as recovery methods on physiological and thermoregulatory responses between 2 exercise bouts in temperate conditions. Nine well-trained male cyclists performed 2 successive bouts of 45 min of endurance cycling exercise in a temperate environment (20 °C) separated by 25 min of the respective recovery interventions. Capillary blood samples were obtained to measure lactate (La⁻), sodium (Na⁺), bicarbonate (HCO₃⁻) concentrations and pH, whilst body mass loss (BML), core temperature (T(core)), skin temperature (T(skin)), heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake , and minute ventilation were measured before (Pre), immediately after the first exercise bout (Ex1), the recovery (R), and after the second exercise bout (Ex2). V and CWI both resulted in a reduction of T(skin) at R (-2.1 ± 0.01 °C and -11.6 ± 0.01 °C, respectively, p 0.05), V attenuated the rise in HR, minute ventilation, and oxygen uptake from Ex1 to Ex2, while T(core) and T(skin) were significantly lower following the second session (p core), T(skin), and BML, while a rise in Na⁺ was observed following Ex2 (p exercise in a temperate environment provide a reduction in thermal strain during ensuing exercise bouts.

  17. Effect of organic on chemical oxidation for biofouling control in pilot-scale seawater cooling towers

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Bloushi, Mohammed

    2017-09-14

    Due to the scarcity of potable water in many regions of the world, the demand for seawater as an alternative evaporative cooling medium in cooling towers (CTs) has increased significantly in recent years. Seawater make-up in CTs is deemed the most feasible because of its unlimited supply in the coastal areas of Gulf and Red Sea. However, the seawater CTs have higher challenges greatly mitigating their performances because it is an open system where biofouling and bio-corrosion occurring within the fillers and piping of recirculation systems. Their pilot-scale CTs were constructed to assess the performance of three types of oxidizing biocides or oxidants, namely chlorine, chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and ozone, for biofouling control. The test results showed that the addition of organic (5mg/L of methanol (MeOH)) increased the bacterial growth in CT basin. All oxidants were effective in keeping the microbial growth to the minimum. Oxidation increased the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level from 270 to 600mV. Total residual oxidant (TRO) was increased with oxidation but it was slightly increased with organic addition. Other parameters including pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), conductivity levels were not changed. However, higher formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) was detected with chlorination and ozonation. This indicates the organic level should be limited in the oxidation for biofouling control in seawater CTs.

  18. Effect of Egg Yolk and Cooling on Storage of Ram Coated Spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mohammadi-Nohdehy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of egg yolk and cooling on ram coated spermatozoa. Semen was collected from three ram by artificial vagina contacted with a tube containing Tris- fructose-egg yolk 15%. Samples were pooled, centrifuged by 700 g for 10 min and removed supernatant. Then, samples were diluted by Tris-glucose and centrifuged again to remove seminal plasma and egg yolk. Aliquots split into two fractions and each one was split into 5 parts and added egg yolk 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20%. The half of the treatments were gradually cold and other ones were encountered with cold shock then samples were incubated at 5C for 72 h. Progressive sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity, viability (by Hoechst 33258 fluorescent staining and acrosome reaction (by PNA-Alexa flur-488 were investigated at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h. The results showed that there was no difference between 15% and 20% egg yolk in the progressive sperm motility but they were higher than 0% and 5% egg yolk. There was highest difference between 0% and 20 % egg yolk in the progressive sperm motility. There was no difference among the treatments containing egg yolk in plasma membrane integrity and acrosome reaction. In both cooling rate, there was no difference among the treatments containing egg yolk in the sperm viability. It was suggested that 20% egg yolk was superior to keep the function of ram coated spermatozoa for storage at 5C.

  19. Simulation of Cooling and Pressure Effects on Inflated Pahoehoe Lava Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Pahoehoe lobes are often emplaced by the advance of discrete toes accompanied by inflation of the lobe surface. Many random effects complicate modeling lobe emplacement, such as the location and orientation of toe breakouts, their dimensions, mechanical strength of the crust, micro-topography and a host of other factors. Models that treat the movement of lava parcels as a random walk have explained some of the overall features of emplacement. However, cooling of the surface and internal pressurization of the fluid interior has not been modeled. This work reports lobe simulations that explicitly incorporate 1) cooling of surface lava parcels, 2) the propensity of breakouts to occur at warmer margins that are mechanically weaker than cooler ones, and 3) the influence of internal pressurization associated with inflation. The surface temperature is interpreted as a surrogate for the mechanic strength of the crust at each location and is used to determine the probability of a lava parcel transfer from that location. When only surface temperature is considered, the morphology and dimensions of simulated lobes are indistinguishable from equiprobable simulations. However, inflation within a lobe transmits pressure to all connected fluid locations with the warmer margins being most susceptible to breakouts and expansion. Simulations accounting for internal pressurization feature morphologies and dimensions that are dramatically different from the equiprobable and temperature-dependent models. Even on flat subsurfaces the pressure-dependent model produces elongate lobes with distinct directionality. Observables such as topographic profiles, aspect ratios, and maximum extents should be readily distinguishable in the field.

  20. The comparative analysis of single and multi-effect absorption cooling machines

    OpenAIRE

    Ruciski, A.; Rusowicz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Описані результати розрахунку коефіцієнта корисної дії абсорбувальних охоло- джувальних утановок, а також представлено охолоджувальні установки багатокатної дії з сукупністю характеристичних робочих параметрів. This paper reports on the results of calculation of cooling machine absorption coefficients of performance as well as presentation of multi effect cooling machines with set of characteristic working parameters....

  1. The lock-in effect and the greening of automotive cooling systems in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnåvold, Amalie; Van Passel, Steven

    2017-06-23

    As of 2017, the sale and use of the refrigerants most commonly used in automotive cooling systems - hydrofluorocarbons - are entirely banned in all new vehicles placed on the market in the European Union. These refrigerants have been recognised as potent greenhouse gases and, therefore, direct contributors to climate change. It is within this regulation-driven market that the technologies for a sustainable solution have been developed. However, this paper argues that the market for automotive cooling systems has been 'locked-in', which means that competing technologies, operating under dynamic increasing returns, will allow for one - potentially inferior technology - to dominate the market. Whilst such a situation is not uncommon, this paper discusses the way that regulation has reinforced a patented monopoly in 'picking winners': to the advantage of a synthetic chemical, R-1234yf, as opposed to the natural solution, which is CO2. By developing a generic conceptual framework of path dependence and lock-in, the presented evidence seeks to show how a snowballing effect has led to the intensification of differences in market share. We also argue that the automotive industry is potentially promoting short-term fixes, rather than long-term, sustainable and economically viable solutions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Magneto-thermoelectric effects in NiFe thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Maximilian

    2015-11-01

    In this thesis magneto-thermoelectric effects are investigated in a systematic way to separate the transverse spin Seebeck effect from other parasitic effects like the anomalous Nernst effect. In contrast to the first studies found in the literature, in NiFe thin films a contribution of the transverse spin Seebeck effect can be excluded. This surprising outcome was crosschecked in a variety of different sample layouts and collaborations with other universities to ensure the validity of these results. In general, this thesis solves a long time discussion about the existence of the transverse spin Seebeck effect in NiFe films and supports the importance of control measurements for the scientific community. Even if such ''negative'' results may not be the award winning ones, new discoveries should be treated with constructive criticism and be checked carefully by the scientific community.

  3. Quantum size effects in InP inner film fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ting-yun; WANG Ke-xin; LU Jun

    2005-01-01

    Based on the semiconductor amplifiing properties and the structure of optical fiber wave guide an InP inner fiber is developed.The InP inner film fiber can be employed as a small size,broadband,and ultra-short fiber amplifier.The quantum size effects of the fiber are emphatically investigated in the work.Using the experimental data,we compare the effective mass approximation (EMA) with effective parameterization within the tight binding (EPTB) models for the accurate description of the quantum size effects in InP.The results show that the EPTB model provides an excellent description of band gap variation over a wide range of sizes.The Bohr diameter and the effective Rydberg energy of InP are calculated.Finally,the amplifiing properties of the InP inner film fiber are discussed due to the quantum size effects.

  4. Preferred Air Velocity and Local Cooling Effect of desk fans in warm environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2013-01-01

    Common experiences, standards, and laboratory studies show that increased air velocity helps to offset warm sensation due to high environmental temperatures. In warm climate regions the opening of windows and the use of desk or ceiling fans are the most common systems to generate increased airflows...... to compensate for higher environmental temperatures at the expense of no or relatively low energy consumption. When using desk fans, local air movement is generated around the occupant and a certain cooling effect is perceived. The impact of the local air movement generated by different air flow patterns....../kg. By a thermal manikin the effect of direct air movement generated by a personal desk fan at 26 °C, 28 °C, or 30 °C room temperatures and the achievable thermal comfort was also analyzed. Results show that it is possible to offset warm sensation within a range of indoor conditions using increased air velocity...

  5. Effects of surface finish and mechanical training on Ni-Ti sheets for elastocaloric cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Engelbrecht

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Elastocaloric cooling has emerged as a promising alternative to vapor compression in recent years. Although the technology has the potential to be more efficient than current technologies, there are many technical challenges that must be overcome to realize devices with high performance and acceptable durability. We study the effects of surface finish and training techniques on dog bone shaped polycrystalline samples of NiTi. The fatigue life of several samples with four different surface finishes was measured and it was shown that a smooth surface, especially at the edges, greatly improved fatigue life. The effects of training both on the structure of the materials and the thermal response to an applied strain was studied. The load profile for the first few cycles was shown to change the thermal response to strain, the structure of the material at failure while the final structure of the material was weakly influenced by the surface finish.

  6. Effects of socioeconomic factors on household appliance, lighting, and space cooling electricity consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydinalp, M. [Itron Inc., Boston, MA (United States); Ismet Ugursal, V.; Fung, A.S. [Dalhousie University, Halifax (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Two methods are currently used to model residential energy consumption at the national or regional level: the engineering method and the conditional demand analysis (CDA) method. One of the major difficulties associated with the use of engineering models is the inclusion of consumer behaviour and socioeconomic factors that have significant effects on the residential energy consumption. The CDA method can handle socioeconomic factors if they are included in the model formulation. However, the multicollinearity problem and the need for a very large amount of data make the use of CDA models very difficult. It is shown in this paper that the neural network (NN) method can be used to model the residential energy consumption with the inclusion of socioeconomic factors. The appliances, lighting, and cooling component of the NN based energy consumption model developed for the Canadian residential sector is presented here and the effects of some socioeconomic factors on the residential energy consumption are examined using the model. (author)

  7. Entanglement effects in capillary waves on liquid polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhang; Mukhopadhyay, Mrinmay K; Song, Sanghoon; Narayanan, Suresh; Lurio, L B; Kim, Hyunjung; Sinha, Sunil K

    2008-12-12

    Overdamped surface capillary wave relaxations on molten polymer films were measured using x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. We found a transition from a single through a stretched to another single exponential regime as the temperature is decreased from well above to near the bulk glass transition temperature. A universal scaling of the dynamics was discovered over a wide range of film thicknesses, temperatures, and molecular weights (except in the multiple relaxation regime). These observations are justified by hydrodynamic theory and the time-temperature superposition principle by considering an effective viscosity instead of the bulk zero shear viscosity.

  8. Pentacene Organic-Thin-Film Field-Effect Transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张素梅; 石家纬; 刘明大; 李靖; 郭树旭; 王伟

    2004-01-01

    We have fabricated organic thin-film transistors using the small-molecule polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon pentacene as an active material. Devices were fabricated on glass substrates by using rf-magnetron sputtered amorphous aluminium as the gate electrode, and gelatinized polyimide as the gate dielectric with physical vapour grown pentacene thin films pasted on it as the active layer, then using rf-magnetron sputtered amorphous aluminium as the source and drain contacts. Field effect mobility and threshold voltage is 0.092 cm2 /Vs and 14.5 V,respectively. On-off current ratio is nearly 103.

  9. Electric-field effect in partially deoxygenated YBCO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kula, W. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Lab. for Laser Energetics, Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States) Inst. of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa (Poland)); Sobolewski, R. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Lab. for Laser Energetics, Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States) Inst. of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa (Poland))

    1994-02-01

    We report our studies on the electric-field effect in partially oxygen-depleted YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub y] (YBCO) thin-film test structures fabricated by a laser-writing patterning technique. Our preliminary results indicate substantial, field-induced changes of the sample critical current. (orig.)

  10. Bauschinger effect in thin metal films: Discrete dislocation dynamics study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davoudi, K.M.; Nicola, L.; Vlassak, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of dislocation climb on plastic deformation during loading and unloading are studied using a two-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics model. Simulations are performed for polycrystalline thin films passivated on both surfaces. Dislocation climb lowers the overall level of the stress

  11. Annealing effect and irradiation properties of HFCVD diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Ling; WANG Lin-jun; SU Qing-feng; LIU Jian-min; XU Run; PENG Hong-yan; SHI Wei-min; XIA Yi-ben

    2006-01-01

    The post-growth treatment of a [100]-oriented diamond film was performed to improve the film quality. The characteristic of post-growth film was investigated by using the RAMAN spectrum and the capacitance-frequency curve. The results show that the resistivities and frequency response enhance after the post-treatments in solution of H2SO4 and H2O2 and an annealing under N2 atmosphere at 500 ℃ for 60 min. Under a bias voltage of 100 V,the net photocurrent is obtained under 55Fe(5.9 keV) X-rays and 241Am (5.5 MeV) α particles radiation,respectively. The photocurrent increases rapidly at first and becomes stable for the "pumping" effect with the radiation time.

  12. Effect of film slicks on near-surface wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnotskii, Mikhail; Ermakov, Stanislav; Ostrovsky, Lev; Shomina, Olga

    2016-09-01

    The transient effects of horizontal variation of sea-surface wave roughness due to surfactant films on near-surface turbulent wind are studied theoretically and experimentally. Here we suggest two practical schemes for calculating variations of wind velocity profiles near the water surface, the average short-wave roughness of which is varying in space and time when a film slick is present. The schemes are based on a generalized two-layer model of turbulent air flow over a rough surface and on the solution of the continuous model involving the equation for turbulent kinetic energy of the air flow. Wave tank studies of wind flow over wind waves in the presence of film slicks are described and compared with theory.

  13. Cheating the Locals: Invasive Mussels Steal and Benefit from the Cooling Effect of Indigenous Mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathlean, Justin A.; Seuront, Laurent; McQuaid, Christopher D.; Ng, Terence P. T.; Zardi, Gerardo I.; Nicastro, Katy R.

    2016-01-01

    The indigenous South African mussel Perna perna gapes during periods of aerial exposure to maintain aerobic respiration. This behaviour has no effect on the body temperatures of isolated individuals, but when surrounded by conspecifics, beneficial cooling effects of gaping emerge. It is uncertain, however, whether the presence of the invasive mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis limits the ability of P. perna for collective thermoregulation. We investigated whether varying densities of P. perna and M. galloprovincialis influences the thermal properties of both natural and artificial mussel beds during periods of emersion. Using infrared thermography, body temperatures of P. perna within mixed artificial beds were shown to increase faster and reach higher temperatures than individuals in conspecific beds, indicating that the presence of M. galloprovincialis limits the group cooling effects of gaping. In contrast, body temperatures of M. galloprovincialis within mixed artificial mussel beds increased slower and exhibited lower temperatures than for individuals in beds comprised entirely of M. galloprovincialis. Interestingly, differences in bed temperatures and heating rates were largely dependent on the size of mussels, with beds comprised of larger individuals experiencing less thermal stress irrespective of species composition. The small-scale patterns of thermal stress detected within manipulated beds were not observed within naturally occurring mixed mussel beds. We propose that small-scale differences in topography, size-structure, mussel bed size and the presence of organisms encrusting the mussel shells mask the effects of gaping behaviour within natural mussel beds. Nevertheless, the results from our manipulative experiment indicate that the invasive species M. galloprovincialis steals thermal properties as well as resources from the indigenous mussel P. perna. This may have significant implications for predicting how the co-existence of these two species may

  14. Cheating the Locals: Invasive Mussels Steal and Benefit from the Cooling Effect of Indigenous Mussels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin A Lathlean

    Full Text Available The indigenous South African mussel Perna perna gapes during periods of aerial exposure to maintain aerobic respiration. This behaviour has no effect on the body temperatures of isolated individuals, but when surrounded by conspecifics, beneficial cooling effects of gaping emerge. It is uncertain, however, whether the presence of the invasive mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis limits the ability of P. perna for collective thermoregulation. We investigated whether varying densities of P. perna and M. galloprovincialis influences the thermal properties of both natural and artificial mussel beds during periods of emersion. Using infrared thermography, body temperatures of P. perna within mixed artificial beds were shown to increase faster and reach higher temperatures than individuals in conspecific beds, indicating that the presence of M. galloprovincialis limits the group cooling effects of gaping. In contrast, body temperatures of M. galloprovincialis within mixed artificial mussel beds increased slower and exhibited lower temperatures than for individuals in beds comprised entirely of M. galloprovincialis. Interestingly, differences in bed temperatures and heating rates were largely dependent on the size of mussels, with beds comprised of larger individuals experiencing less thermal stress irrespective of species composition. The small-scale patterns of thermal stress detected within manipulated beds were not observed within naturally occurring mixed mussel beds. We propose that small-scale differences in topography, size-structure, mussel bed size and the presence of organisms encrusting the mussel shells mask the effects of gaping behaviour within natural mussel beds. Nevertheless, the results from our manipulative experiment indicate that the invasive species M. galloprovincialis steals thermal properties as well as resources from the indigenous mussel P. perna. This may have significant implications for predicting how the co-existence of

  15. Evaporative cooling: effective latent heat of evaporation in relation to evaporation distance from the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenith, George; Bröde, Peter; den Hartog, Emiel; Kuklane, Kalev; Holmer, Ingvar; Rossi, Rene M; Richards, Mark; Farnworth, Brian; Wang, Xiaoxin

    2013-03-15

    Calculation of evaporative heat loss is essential to heat balance calculations. Despite recognition that the value for latent heat of evaporation, used in these calculations, may not always reflect the real cooling benefit to the body, only limited quantitative data on this is available, which has found little use in recent literature. In this experiment a thermal manikin, (MTNW, Seattle, WA) was used to determine the effective cooling power of moisture evaporation. The manikin measures both heat loss and mass loss independently, allowing a direct calculation of an effective latent heat of evaporation (λeff). The location of the evaporation was varied: from the skin or from the underwear or from the outerwear. Outerwear of different permeabilities was used, and different numbers of layers were used. Tests took place in 20°C, 0.5 m/s at different humidities and were performed both dry and with a wet layer, allowing the breakdown of heat loss in dry and evaporative components. For evaporation from the skin, λeff is close to the theoretical value (2,430 J/g) but starts to drop when more clothing is worn, e.g., by 11% for underwear and permeable coverall. When evaporation is from the underwear, λeff reduction is 28% wearing a permeable outer. When evaporation is from the outermost layer only, the reduction exceeds 62% (no base layer), increasing toward 80% with more layers between skin and wet outerwear. In semi- and impermeable outerwear, the added effect of condensation in the clothing opposes this effect. A general formula for the calculation of λeff was developed.

  16. Effect of Nanoscale Ag Film Thickness on the Electrical and Optical Properties of Transparent IZTO/Ag/IZTO Multilayer Films Deposited on Glass Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dohyun; Lee, Nam Hyun; Cho, Woon-Jo; Kim, Tae Whan

    2015-07-01

    The effect of nanoscale Ag film thickness on the electrical and optical properties in transparent conducting oxide films consisting of an IZTO/Ag/IZTO multilayer were investigated. The homoge- neous morphologies of the Ag films sandwiched between the IZTO films affected the optical and electrical properties of the IZTO/Ag/IZTO multilayer films. The transmittance and resistivity of the IZTO/Ag/IZTO multilayer films decreased with increasing Ag film thickness. The resistivities of the IZTO/Ag/IZTO multilayer films grown on glass substrates were decreased by using an Ag thin inter- layer in comparison with that of the IZTO single layer.

  17. Cooling Effect of Evapotranspiration (ET) and ET Measurement by Thermal Remote Sensing in Urban

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, G. Y.; Yang, B.; Li, X.; Guo, Q.; Tan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Affected by global warming and rapid urbanization, urban thermal environment and livability are getting worse over the world. Global terrestrial evapotranspiration (ET) can annually consume 1.483 × 1023 joules of solar energy, which is about 300 times of the annual human energy use on the earth (4.935×1020 joules). This huge amount of energy use by ET indicates that there is great potential to cool the urban by regulating ET. However, accurately measurement of urban ET is quiet difficult because of the great spatial heterogeneity in urban. This study focuses on to quantify the cooling effects ET by mobile traverse method and improve a methodology to measure the urban ET by thermal remote sensing. The verifying experiment was carried out in Shenzhen, a sub-tropical mega city in China. Results showed that ET of vegetation could obviously reduce the urban temperature in hot season. Daily transpiration rate of a small-sized Ficus tree (Ficus microcarpa, 5 m in height and 20 cm of trunk diameter, measured by sap-flow method) was 36-55 kg and its cooling effect was equivalent to a 1.6-2.4 kWh air conditioner working for 24 hours. A 10% increase in the vegetated area could decrease urban temperature by 0.60°C at hot night. Moreover, it was found that a region with a vegetated area ratio over 55% had obvious effect on temperature decreasing. In addition, a methodology by using "thermal remote sensing + three-temperature model" was improved to measure the urban ET. Results showed that the urban ET could be reasonably measured by the proposed method. The daily ET of an urban lawn was 0.01-2.86 mm and monthly ET was 21-60 mm. This result agreed well with the verification study (Bowen ratio method, r=0.953). These results are very useful for urban planning, urban lower impact development, and improving of urban thermal environment.

  18. Effect of the primary cooling rate on the motility and fertility of frozen-thawed rabbit spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiro Maeda

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we examined the effect of primary cooling rates on the motility and fertility of frozen-thawed rabbit spermatozoa. Rabbit semen diluted with an egg-yolk acetamide extender was cooled from room temperature to 5°C at four different rates (-0.1, -0.2, -0.4, -0.8°C/min as a primary cooling step, then semen was frozen in liquid nitrogen vapour. After thawing, sperm cooled at -0.1°C/min showed the highest motility (40.7 ± 7.3%; there were no significant differences between the motilities of the -0.1, -0.2, and -0.4°C/min groups. The motility of frozen-thawed sperm cooled at -0.8°C/min (29.2 ± 6.8% was significantly lower than that of sperm cooled at -0.1 and -0.2°C/min. The viability (-0.1°C/min, 38.1 ± 4.0%; -0.8°C/min, 24.3 ± 7.3% of frozen-thawed sperm was closely related to its motility (-0.1°C/min, 36.7 ± 7.2%; -0.8°C/min, 22.3 ± 4.7%. Quality of post-thaw motile sperm cooled at different rates was estimated by comparing the fertilisation ability of the -0.1 and -0.8°C/min groups following artificial insemination. There were no significant differences in pregnancy rates and mean litter sizes. These data suggest that cooling rabbit semen at rates ranging from -0.1 to -0.8°C/min affects the viability but not the fertilisation capacity of motile spermatozoa after thawing.

  19. Effect of Water Vapor During Secondary Cooling on Hot Shortness in Fe-Cu-Ni-Sn-Si Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Erica; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2014-10-01

    Residual Cu in recycled steel scrap can cause hot shortness when the iron matrix is oxidized. Hot shortness can occur directly after the solid steel is formed from continuous casting as the steel undergoes a cooling process known as secondary cooling where water is first sprayed on the surface to promote cooling. This is followed by a radiant cooling stage where the steel is cooled in air to room temperature. This investigation examines the roles of water vapor, Si content, temperature, and the presence of Sn in a Fe-0.2 wt pct Cu-0.05 wt pct Ni alloy on oxidation, separated Cu and Cu induced-hot shortness during simulations of the secondary cooling process. The secondary cooling from 1473 K (1200 °C) resulted in a slight increase in liquid quantity and grain boundary penetration as compared to the isothermal heating cycles at 1423 K (1150 °C) due to the higher temperatures experienced in the non-isothermal cycle. The addition of water vapor increased the sample oxidation as compared to samples processed in dry atmospheres due to increased scale adherence, scale plasticity, and inward transport of oxygen. The increase in weight gain of the wet atmosphere increased the liquid formation at the interface in the non-Si containing alloys. The secondary cooling cycle with water vapor and the effect of Sn lead to the formation of many small pools of Cu-rich liquid embedded within the surface of the metal due to the Sn allowing for increased grain boundary decohesion and the water vapor allowing for oxidation within liquid-penetrated grain boundaries. The presence of Si increased the amount of occlusion of Cu and Fe, significantly decreasing the quantity of liquid at the interface and the amount of grain boundary penetration.

  20. Effect of Cooling Rate on Morphology of TiAl3 Particles in Al–4Ti Master Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Al–4Ti master alloy was fabricated by aluminum (Al and sponge titanium particle in a resistance furnace at different cooling rates. This work aims to investigate the relationship between the cooling rate and morphology of TiAl3. The microstructure and composition of master alloys at different cooling rates were characterized and analyzed by optical microscopy (OM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and SEM with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. The results showed that various morphologies of TiAl3 particles in the Al–4Ti master alloy could be acquired at different cooling rates. Petal-like, blocky, and flake-like TiAl3 particles in the Al–4Ti master alloy were respectively acquired at the cooling rates of 3.36 K/s, 2.57 K/s, and 0.31 K/s. It was also found that the morphology of TiAl3 particles in the prepared master alloy changed from petal-like to blocky, then finally to flake-like, with the decrease of cooling rate. In addition, the morphology of the TiAl3 particles has no effect on the phase inversion temperature of Al–4Ti master alloy.